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Sample records for galapagos petrel pterodroma

  1. Elevated mercury concentrations in the feathers of grey-faced petrels (Pterodroma gouldi) in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Lyver, P O' B; Aldridge, S P; Gormley, A M; Gaw, S; Webb, S; Buxton, R T; Jones, C J

    2017-04-01

    Our objective was to measure the concentrations of Hg, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Pb, Sb, V and Zn in the body feathers of grey-faced petrel (Pterodroma gouldi), fluttering shearwater (Puffinus gavia), little shearwater (Puffinus assimilis) and common diving petrel (Pelecanoides urinatrix) from breeding colonies in New Zealand between 2006 and 2013. The mean Hg concentration (36.48ppm; SD=9.59) in grey-faced petrel feathers was approximately 8.5 to 14 times that detected in the other three species sampled. We detected no trend or differences in Hg concentrations in grey-faced petrels over the 8years of this study, but Hg concentrations varied between breeding colonies although there was no strong relationship with latitude. The elevated Hg concentrations detected in grey-faced petrels could pose a risk to the breeding performance of grey-faced petrels and the customary harvest of chicks by Māori (New Zealand's indigenous peoples).

  2. 75 FR 235 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Final Rule To List the Galapagos Petrel and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... fisheries are albatrosses and other species of petrels (not Pterodroma species). The characteristics of a... killed in long-line fisheries are predominantly albatrosses and other species of petrels (not Pterodroma...

  3. Range expansion and hybridization in Round Island petrels (Pterodroma spp.): evidence from microsatellite genotypes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ruth M; Nichols, Richard A; Faulkes, Chris G; Jones, Carl G; Bugoni, Leandro; Tatayah, Vikash; Gottelli, Dada; Jordan, William C

    2010-08-01

    Historical records suggest that the petrels of Round Island (near Mauritius, Indian Ocean) represent a recent, long-distance colonization by species originating from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The majority of petrels on Round Island appear most similar to Pterodroma arminjoniana, a species whose only other breeding locality is Trindade Island in the South Atlantic. Using nine microsatellite loci, patterns of genetic differentiation in petrels from Round and Trindade Islands were analysed. The two populations exhibit low but significant levels of differentiation in allele frequencies and estimates of migration rate between islands using genetic data are also low, supporting the hypothesis that these populations have recently separated but are now isolated from one another. A second population of petrels, most similar in appearance to the Pacific species P. neglecta, is also present on Round Island and observations suggest that the two petrel species are hybridizing. Vocalizations recorded on the island also suggest that hybrid birds may be present within the population. Data from microsatellite genotypes support this hypothesis and indicate that there may have been many generations of hybridization and back-crossing between P. arminjoniana and P. neglecta on Round Island. Our results provide an insight into the processes of dispersal and the consequences of secondary contact in Procellariiformes.

  4. Using PCR-RFLP for sexing of the endangered Galápagos petrel (Pterodroma phaeopygia).

    PubMed

    Patiño, L; Cruz, M; Martínez, P; Cedeño-Escobar, V

    2013-10-18

    Pterodroma phaeopygia is a critically endangered avian species of the Galápagos Islands. This bird is sexually monomorphic, making it difficult to identify the sex. This information, however, is relevant to studies of behavior, ecology, and management of wild or captive populations. Here, we aimed to implement a molecular approach for determining sex in this petrel. DNA was extracted from the blood and the feathers of 24 adult P. phaeopygia, with samples from a female and a male Gallus gallus for comparison. We amplified the cromo-helicase DNA binding protein 1 (CHD-1) gene by PCR, using primers P2 and P8. Allele CHD-1W is unique to females and CHD-1Z occurs in both sexes. We then digested these PCR products using the restriction enzyme HaeIII. The PCR amplified a 400-bp product for both alleles. The digestion of the G. gallus, amplicons split the CHD-1Z allele into two fragments (of 320 and 80 bp), while CHD-1W remained intact. Thus, the male exhibited two bands (digested CHD- 1Z) and the female three bands (undigested CHD-1W and digested CHD-1Z). Applying this RFLP method on DNA derived from blood, 9 of the 24 petrels were found to be male, while 15 were females. The same results were obtained using feathers as the source of DNA. To our knowledge, this is the first report of molecular method for sexing this species. The potential of sexing this petrel from feathers is remarkable as it minimizes blood sampling induced stress. This method could be used to reinforce the conservation efforts for this bird, to investigate population sex ratios and to develop new conservation strategies.

  5. Feeding Habits of Introduced Black Rats, Rattus rattus, in Nesting Colonies of Galapagos Petrel on San Cristóbal Island, Galapagos.

    PubMed

    Riofrío-Lazo, Marjorie; Páez-Rosas, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Introduced rodents are responsible for ecosystem changes in islands around the world. In the Galapagos archipelago, their effects on the native flora and fauna are adverse, including the extinction of endemic rodents in some islands and the reduction in the reproductive success of the Galapagos petrel (Pterodroma phaeopygia) in its nesting zones. Understanding the feeding behavior of introduced rodents and their trophic interactions with native and non-native species on islands, can assist in the design of management strategies and conservation plans of invasive and endemic species respectively. Four petrel nesting colonies were monitored during June 2013 on San Cristóbal Island (El Plátano, El Junco, San Joaquín, and La Comuna). The feeding habits of black rats were evaluated by analyzing stomach contents and stable isotopes in hair. Three species of introduced rodents were captured. R. rattus was the most abundant at all sites (n=43, capture success (CS) = 55.8%), followed by the house mouse, Mus musculus (n = 17, CS = 37.8%), and the Norwegian rat, R. norvegicus (n = 4, CS = 4.5%), captured only at La Comuna. The omnivorous black rat ate mostly plants (98%) and arthropods (2%). Intact seeds of Miconia robinsoniana were the main food at all sites (relative abundance=72.1%, present in 95% of the analyzed stomachs), showing the black rats' possible role in the archipelago as endemic seed dispersers. There was no evidence of petrel's intake; however, its possible consumption is not discarded at all. The δ15N and δ13C analysis corroborated the primarily herbivorous diet of black rats. The isotopic signatures of the three rodent species reflect the inter- and intra-specific differential use of food resources. Black rat showed a wider diet in La Comuna, which was related to a lower availability of its primary prey and its ability to adapt to the available resources in its habitat.

  6. Feeding Habits of Introduced Black Rats, Rattus rattus, in Nesting Colonies of Galapagos Petrel on San Cristóbal Island, Galapagos

    PubMed Central

    Riofrío-Lazo, Marjorie; Páez-Rosas, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Introduced rodents are responsible for ecosystem changes in islands around the world. In the Galapagos archipelago, their effects on the native flora and fauna are adverse, including the extinction of endemic rodents in some islands and the reduction in the reproductive success of the Galapagos petrel (Pterodroma phaeopygia) in its nesting zones. Understanding the feeding behavior of introduced rodents and their trophic interactions with native and non-native species on islands, can assist in the design of management strategies and conservation plans of invasive and endemic species respectively. Four petrel nesting colonies were monitored during June 2013 on San Cristóbal Island (El Plátano, El Junco, San Joaquín, and La Comuna). The feeding habits of black rats were evaluated by analyzing stomach contents and stable isotopes in hair. Three species of introduced rodents were captured. R. rattus was the most abundant at all sites (n=43, capture success (CS) = 55.8%), followed by the house mouse, Mus musculus (n = 17, CS = 37.8%), and the Norwegian rat, R. norvegicus (n = 4, CS = 4.5%), captured only at La Comuna. The omnivorous black rat ate mostly plants (98%) and arthropods (2%). Intact seeds of Miconia robinsoniana were the main food at all sites (relative abundance=72.1%, present in 95% of the analyzed stomachs), showing the black rats’ possible role in the archipelago as endemic seed dispersers. There was no evidence of petrel’s intake; however, its possible consumption is not discarded at all. The δ15N and δ13C analysis corroborated the primarily herbivorous diet of black rats. The isotopic signatures of the three rodent species reflect the inter- and intra-specific differential use of food resources. Black rat showed a wider diet in La Comuna, which was related to a lower availability of its primary prey and its ability to adapt to the available resources in its habitat. PMID:25984724

  7. Population size, breeding biology and on-land threats of Cape Verde petrel (Pterodroma feae) in Fogo Island, Cape Verde

    PubMed Central

    Zango, Laura; Calabuig, Pascual; Stefan, Laura M.; González-Solís, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Cape Verde petrel (Pterodroma feae) is currently considered near threatened, but little is known about its population size, breeding biology and on land threats, jeopardizing its management and conservation. To improve this situation, we captured, marked and recaptured (CMR) birds using mist-nets over 10 years; measured and sexed them; monitored up to 14 burrows, deployed GPS devices on breeders and analyzed activity data of geolocators retrieved from breeders in Fogo (Cape Verde). We set cat traps over the colony and investigated their domestic/feral origin by marking domestic cats from a nearby village with transponders, by deploying GPS devices on domestic cats and by performing stable isotope analyses of fur of the trapped and domestic cats. The population of Fogo was estimated to be 293 birds, including immatures (95% CI: 233–254, CMR modelling). Based on geolocator activity data and nest monitoring we determined the breeding phenology of this species and we found biometric differences between sexes. While monitoring breeding performance, we verified a still ongoing cat predation and human harvesting. Overall, data gathered from trapped cats without transponder, cats GPS trips and the distinct isotopic values between domestic and trapped cats suggest cats visiting the colony are of feral origin. GPS tracks from breeders showed birds left and returned to the colony using the sector NE of the islands, where high level of public lights should be avoided specially during the fledging period. Main threats for the Cape Verde petrel in the remaining breeding islands are currently unknown but likely to be similar to Fogo, calling for an urgent assessment of population trends and the control of main threats in all Cape Verde Islands and uplisting its conservation status. PMID:28369105

  8. Population size, breeding biology and on-land threats of Cape Verde petrel (Pterodroma feae) in Fogo Island, Cape Verde.

    PubMed

    Militão, Teresa; Dinis, Herculano Andrade; Zango, Laura; Calabuig, Pascual; Stefan, Laura M; González-Solís, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Cape Verde petrel (Pterodroma feae) is currently considered near threatened, but little is known about its population size, breeding biology and on land threats, jeopardizing its management and conservation. To improve this situation, we captured, marked and recaptured (CMR) birds using mist-nets over 10 years; measured and sexed them; monitored up to 14 burrows, deployed GPS devices on breeders and analyzed activity data of geolocators retrieved from breeders in Fogo (Cape Verde). We set cat traps over the colony and investigated their domestic/feral origin by marking domestic cats from a nearby village with transponders, by deploying GPS devices on domestic cats and by performing stable isotope analyses of fur of the trapped and domestic cats. The population of Fogo was estimated to be 293 birds, including immatures (95% CI: 233-254, CMR modelling). Based on geolocator activity data and nest monitoring we determined the breeding phenology of this species and we found biometric differences between sexes. While monitoring breeding performance, we verified a still ongoing cat predation and human harvesting. Overall, data gathered from trapped cats without transponder, cats GPS trips and the distinct isotopic values between domestic and trapped cats suggest cats visiting the colony are of feral origin. GPS tracks from breeders showed birds left and returned to the colony using the sector NE of the islands, where high level of public lights should be avoided specially during the fledging period. Main threats for the Cape Verde petrel in the remaining breeding islands are currently unknown but likely to be similar to Fogo, calling for an urgent assessment of population trends and the control of main threats in all Cape Verde Islands and uplisting its conservation status.

  9. At-sea distribution of satellite-tracked grey-faced petrels, Pterodroma macroptera gouldi, captured on the Ruamaahua (Aldermen) Islands, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacLeod, Catriona; Adams, Josh; Lyver, Phil

    2008-01-01

    We used satellite telemetry to determine the at-sea distribution of 32 adult (non-breeders and failed breeders) Grey-faced Petrels, Pterodroma macroptera gouldi, during July-October in 2006 and 2007. Adults captured at breeding colonies on the Ruamaahua (Aldermen) Islands ranged across the southwestern Pacific Ocean and Tasman Sea between 20-49°S and 142°E and 1300 W Petrels were located almost exclusively over offshore waters> 1000 m depth. The extent oftheir distributions was similar across years, but petrels ranged farther south and west in 2006. Individuals displayed a high degree ofspatial overlap (48-620/0 among individuals) and area use revealed three general "hotspots" within their overall range: waters near the Ruamaahua Islands; the central Tasman Sea; and the area surrounding the Chatham Rise. In July-August 2006, most petrels congregated over the Tasman Sea, but for the same period in 2007 were predominantly associated with Chatham Rise. The home ranges of petrels tended to overlap disproportionately more than expected with the Australian Exclusive Economic Zone and less than expected with High Seas, relative to the area available in each zone, in July-August 2006. Accordingly, multiple nations are responsible for determining potential impacts resulting from fisheries bycatch and potential resource competition with Grey-faced Petrels.

  10. Non-precocial grey-faced petrel chicks (Pterodroma macroptera gouldi) show no age-related variation in corticosterone responses to capture and handling.

    PubMed

    Adams, N J; Cockrem, J F; Candy, E J; Taylor, G A

    2008-05-15

    Development patterns in birds range from precocial species, which hatch chicks largely capable of independent existence, to altricial species, chicks of which are highly dependent on their parents for extended periods. Previous work indicates precocial chicks have a robust corticosterone response from hatching whereas non-precocial and altricial chicks have a small response that increases through development. Grey-faced petrels are characteristic of most burrowing procellariiform seabirds with non-precocial chicks that are unable to locomote and are dependent on adults for food, although chicks have well developed downy plumage and can thermoregulate at or soon after hatching. Initial plasma corticosterone concentrations and corticosterone responses to handling were measured during development in semi-precocial grey-faced petrel (Pterodroma macroptera gouldi) chicks to determine whether they showed a precocial or altricial corticosterone response pattern. Chicks were sampled at six intervals through development from shortly after hatching until close to fledging. Mean corticosterone responses to handling after 30 min were high (115.9+/-10.7 ng/ml) from 2 to 4d after hatching and remained high throughout development (70-110 ng/ml). Contrary to expectations for non-precocial chicks, this pattern of corticosterone responses to handling indicates that grey-faced petrel chicks are able to perceive and respond to potential stressors from hatching, a response previously only demonstrated for precocial birds.

  11. Ingested plastic as a route for trace metals in Laysan Albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) and Bonin Petrel (Pterodroma hypoleuca) from Midway Atoll.

    PubMed

    Lavers, Jennifer L; Bond, Alexander L

    2016-09-15

    Seabirds are declining faster than any other group of birds, with plastic ingestion and associated contaminants linked to negative impacts on marine wildlife, including >170 seabird species. To provide quantitative data on the effects of plastic pollution, we sampled feathers and stomach contents from Laysan Albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) and Bonin Petrel (Pterodroma hypoleuca) on Midway Atoll, North Pacific Ocean, and assessed our ability to detect change over time by synthesizing previous studies. Between 25 and 100% of fledglings exceed international targets for plastic ingestion by seabirds. High levels of ingested plastic were correlated with increased concentrations of chlorine, iron, lead, manganese, and rubidium in feathers. The frequency of plastic ingestion by Laysan Albatross and concentration of some elements in both species is increasing, suggesting deterioration in the health of the marine environment. Variability in the frequency of plastic ingestion by Laysan Albatross may limit their utility as an indicator species.

  12. Differentiation of sympatric populations of the band-rumped storm-petrel in the Galapagos Islands: an examination of genetics, morphology, and vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Smith, A L; Friesen, V L

    2007-04-01

    In each of at least two locations within the Galapagos Islands, breeding band-rumped storm-petrels (Oceanodroma castro) form two distinct populations that use the same colony site at separate times of the year for reproduction. Temporal segregation of these populations raises the possibility that they are reproductively isolated and represent cryptic species. We examined variation in mitochondrial DNA, morphology, and vocalizations of storm-petrel populations nesting 6 months apart on the islet of Plaza Norte in the Galapagos. Seasonal populations displayed low but significant levels of differentiation in the mitochondrial control region, five morphological variables, and one feature of male vocalizations. Breeding populations appear to have been separated for approximately 1700 years. Given the recent divergence date and relatively high effective population sizes (4000-5600 females each), seasonal populations are unlikely to be in genetic equilibrium. As a result, the low divergence estimate probably reflects historical association and not contemporary genetic exchange. These populations are not sufficiently differentiated to be considered cryptic species. However, they are probably in the early stages of divergence. Consequently, we recommend that cool- and hot season populations on Plaza Norte be recognized as separate management units.

  13. 75 FR 310 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Withdrawal of Proposed Rule to List Cook's Petrel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... seabirds. The main species of seabirds killed in long-line fisheries are albatrosses and other species of... killed in long-line fisheries are albatrosses and other species of petrels (not Pterodroma species). The...

  14. Molecular evidence for the identity of the Magenta petrel.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Hayley A; Millar, Craig D; Imber, Michael J; Crockett, David E; Robins, Judith H; Scofield, R Paul; Taylor, Graeme A; Lambert, David M

    2009-03-01

    A lone petrel was shot from the decks of an Italian warship (the 'Magenta') while it was sailing the South Pacific Ocean in 1867, far from land. The species, unknown to science, was named the 'Magenta petrel' (Procellariiformes, Procellariidae, Pterodroma magentae). No other specimens of this bird were collected and the species it represented remained a complete enigma for over 100 years. We compared DNA sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene from the Magenta petrel to that of other petrels using phylogenetic methods and ancient DNA techniques. Our results strongly suggest that the Magenta petrel specimen is a Chatham Island taiko. Furthermore, given the collection location of the Magenta petrel, our finding indicates that the Chatham Island taiko forages far into the Pacific Ocean (near South America). This has implications for the conservation of the taiko, one of the world's rarest seabirds. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences reveal recent divergence in morphologically indistinguishable petrels.

    PubMed

    Welch, Andreanna J; Yoshida, Allison A; Fleischer, Robert C

    2011-04-01

    Often during the process of divergence, genetic markers will only gradually obtain the signal of isolation. Studies of recently diverged taxa utilizing both mitochondrial and nuclear data sets may therefore yield gene trees with differing levels of phylogenetic signal as a result of differences in coalescence times. However, several factors can lead to this same pattern, and it is important to distinguish between them to gain a better understanding of the process of divergence and the factors driving it. Here, we employ three nuclear intron loci in addition to the mitochondrial Cytochrome b gene to investigate the magnitude and timing of divergence between two endangered and nearly indistinguishable petrel taxa: the Galapagos (GAPE) and Hawaiian (HAPE) petrels (Pterodroma phaeopygia and P. sandwichensis). Phylogenetic analyses indicated reciprocal monophyly between these two taxa for the mitochondrial data set, but trees derived from the nuclear introns were unresolved. Coalescent analyses revealed effectively no migration between GAPE and HAPE over the last 100,000 generations and that they diverged relatively recently, approximately 550,000 years ago, coincident with a time of intense ecological change in both the Galapagos and Hawaiian archipelagoes. This indicates that recent divergence and incomplete lineage sorting are causing the difference in the strength of the phylogenetic signal of each data set, instead of insufficient variability or ongoing male-biased dispersal. Further coalescent analyses show that gene flow is low even between islands within each archipelago suggesting that divergence may be continuing at a local scale. Accurately identifying recently isolated taxa is becoming increasingly important as many clearly recognizable species are already threatened by extinction. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Global spatial ecology of three closely-related gadfly petrels

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Raül; Ramírez, Iván; Paiva, Vitor H.; Militão, Teresa; Biscoito, Manuel; Menezes, Dília; Phillips, Richard A.; Zino, Francis; González-Solís, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The conservation status and taxonomy of the three gadfly petrels that breed in Macaronesia is still discussed partly due to the scarce information on their spatial ecology. Using geolocator and capture-mark-recapture data, we examined phenology, natal philopatry and breeding-site fidelity, year-round distribution, habitat usage and at-sea activity of the three closely-related gadfly petrels that breed in Macaronesia: Zino’s petrel Pterodroma madeira, Desertas petrel P. deserta and Cape Verde petrel P. feae. All P. feae remained around the breeding area during their non-breeding season, whereas P. madeira and P. deserta dispersed far from their colony, migrating either to the Cape Verde region, further south to equatorial waters in the central Atlantic, or to the Brazil Current. The three taxa displayed a clear allochrony in timing of breeding. Habitat modelling and at-sea activity patterns highlighted similar environmental preferences and foraging behaviours of the three taxa. Finally, no chick or adult was recaptured away from its natal site and survival estimates were relatively high at all study sites, indicating strong philopatry and breeding-site fidelity for the three taxa. The combination of high philopatry, marked breeding asynchrony and substantial spatio-temporal segregation of their year-round distribution suggest very limited gene flow among the three taxa. PMID:27001141

  17. Global spatial ecology of three closely-related gadfly petrels.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Raül; Ramírez, Iván; Paiva, Vitor H; Militão, Teresa; Biscoito, Manuel; Menezes, Dília; Phillips, Richard A; Zino, Francis; González-Solís, Jacob

    2016-03-22

    The conservation status and taxonomy of the three gadfly petrels that breed in Macaronesia is still discussed partly due to the scarce information on their spatial ecology. Using geolocator and capture-mark-recapture data, we examined phenology, natal philopatry and breeding-site fidelity, year-round distribution, habitat usage and at-sea activity of the three closely-related gadfly petrels that breed in Macaronesia: Zino's petrel Pterodroma madeira, Desertas petrel P. deserta and Cape Verde petrel P. feae. All P. feae remained around the breeding area during their non-breeding season, whereas P. madeira and P. deserta dispersed far from their colony, migrating either to the Cape Verde region, further south to equatorial waters in the central Atlantic, or to the Brazil Current. The three taxa displayed a clear allochrony in timing of breeding. Habitat modelling and at-sea activity patterns highlighted similar environmental preferences and foraging behaviours of the three taxa. Finally, no chick or adult was recaptured away from its natal site and survival estimates were relatively high at all study sites, indicating strong philopatry and breeding-site fidelity for the three taxa. The combination of high philopatry, marked breeding asynchrony and substantial spatio-temporal segregation of their year-round distribution suggest very limited gene flow among the three taxa.

  18. Global spatial ecology of three closely-related gadfly petrels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Raül; Ramírez, Iván; Paiva, Vitor H.; Militão, Teresa; Biscoito, Manuel; Menezes, Dília; Phillips, Richard A.; Zino, Francis; González-Solís, Jacob

    2016-03-01

    The conservation status and taxonomy of the three gadfly petrels that breed in Macaronesia is still discussed partly due to the scarce information on their spatial ecology. Using geolocator and capture-mark-recapture data, we examined phenology, natal philopatry and breeding-site fidelity, year-round distribution, habitat usage and at-sea activity of the three closely-related gadfly petrels that breed in Macaronesia: Zino’s petrel Pterodroma madeira, Desertas petrel P. deserta and Cape Verde petrel P. feae. All P. feae remained around the breeding area during their non-breeding season, whereas P. madeira and P. deserta dispersed far from their colony, migrating either to the Cape Verde region, further south to equatorial waters in the central Atlantic, or to the Brazil Current. The three taxa displayed a clear allochrony in timing of breeding. Habitat modelling and at-sea activity patterns highlighted similar environmental preferences and foraging behaviours of the three taxa. Finally, no chick or adult was recaptured away from its natal site and survival estimates were relatively high at all study sites, indicating strong philopatry and breeding-site fidelity for the three taxa. The combination of high philopatry, marked breeding asynchrony and substantial spatio-temporal segregation of their year-round distribution suggest very limited gene flow among the three taxa.

  19. The Galapagos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, Nancy A.; Herreid, Clyde F.

    2000-01-01

    Uses a problem-based teaching approach to teach about the geological origins of the Galapagos Islands, colonization, species formation, and threats to biodiversity. Discusses finches, tortoises, and sea cucumbers and provides instructions for student discussions. (YDS)

  20. The Galapagos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, Nancy A.; Herreid, Clyde F.

    2000-01-01

    Uses a problem-based teaching approach to teach about the geological origins of the Galapagos Islands, colonization, species formation, and threats to biodiversity. Discusses finches, tortoises, and sea cucumbers and provides instructions for student discussions. (YDS)

  1. The evolution of north-east Atlantic gadfly petrels using statistical phylogeography.

    PubMed

    Gangloff, B; Zino, F; Shirihai, H; González-Solís, J; Couloux, A; Pasquet, E; Bretagnolle, V

    2013-01-01

    Macaronesia (north-east Atlantic archipelagos) has been host to complex patterns of colonization and differentiation in many groups of organisms including seabirds such as gadfly petrels (genus Pterodroma). Considering the subspecies of widely distributed soft-plumaged petrel for many years, the taxonomic status of the three gadfly petrel taxa breeding in Macaronesia is not yet settled, some authors advocating the presence of three, two or one species. These birds have already been the subject of genetic studies with only one mtDNA gene and relatively modest sample sizes. In this study, using a total of five genes (two mitochondrial genes and three nuclear introns), we investigated the population and phylogeographical histories of petrel populations breeding on Madeira and Cape Verde archipelagos. Despite confirming complete lineage sorting with mtDNA, analyses with nucDNA failed to reveal any population structuring and Isolation with Migration analysis revealed the absence of gene flow during the differentiation process of these populations. It appears that the three populations diverged in the late Pleistocene in the last 150 000 years, that is 10 times more recently than previous estimates based solely on one mtDNA gene. Finally, our results suggest that the Madeira petrel population is ancestral rather than that from Cape Verde. This study strongly advocates the use of nuclear loci in addition to mtDNA in demographical and phylogeographical history studies. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. First satellite tracks of the Endangered black-capped petrel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jodice, Patrick G.; Ronconi, Robert A.; Rupp, Ernst; Wallace, George E.; Satgé, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    The black-capped petrel Pterodroma hasitata is an endangered seabird with fewer than 2000 breeding pairs restricted to a few breeding sites in Haiti and the Dominican Republic. To date, use areas at sea have been determined entirely from vessel-based surveys and opportunistic sightings and, as such, spatial and temporal gaps in our understanding of the species’ marine range are likely. To enhance our understanding of marine use areas, we deployed satellite tags on 3 black-capped petrels breeding on Hispaniola, representing the first tracking study for this species and one of the first published tracking studies for any breeding seabird in the Caribbean. During chick rearing, petrels primarily used marine habitats in the southern Caribbean Sea (ca. 18.0° to 11.5°N, 70.0° to 75.5°W) between the breeding site and the coasts of Venezuela and Colombia. Maximum distance from the breeding sites ranged from ca. 500 to 1500 km during the chick-rearing period. During the post-breeding period, each bird dispersed north and used waters west of the Gulf Stream offshore of the mid- and southern Atlantic coasts of the USA as well as Gulf Stream waters and deeper pelagic waters east of the Gulf Stream. Maximum distance from the breeding sites ranged from ca. 2000 to 2200 km among birds during the nonbreeding period. Petrels used waters located within 14 different exclusive economic zones, suggesting that international collaboration will benefit the development of management strategies for this species.

  3. Galapagos Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of the Galapagos Islands was acquired on March 12, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The Galapagos Islands, which are part of Ecuador, sit in the Pacific Ocean about 1000 km (620 miles) west of South America. As the three craters on the largest island (Isabela Island) suggest, the archipelago was created by volcanic eruptions, which took place millions of years ago. Unlike most remote islands in the Pacific, the Galapagos have gone relatively untouched by humans over the past few millennia. As a result, many unique species have continued to thrive on the islands. Over 95 percent of the islands' reptile species and nearly three quarters of its land bird species cannot be found anywhere else in the world. Two of the more well known are the Galapagos giant tortoise and marine iguanas. The unhindered evolutionary development of the islands' species inspired Charles Darwin to begin The Origin of Species eight years after his visit there. To preserve the unique wildlife on the islands, the Ecuadorian government made the entire archipelago a national park in 1959. Each year roughly 60,000 tourists visit these islands to experience what Darwin did over a century and a half ago. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  4. Galapagos Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of the Galapagos Islands was acquired on March 12, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The Galapagos Islands, which are part of Ecuador, sit in the Pacific Ocean about 1000 km (620 miles) west of South America. As the three craters on the largest island (Isabela Island) suggest, the archipelago was created by volcanic eruptions, which took place millions of years ago. Unlike most remote islands in the Pacific, the Galapagos have gone relatively untouched by humans over the past few millennia. As a result, many unique species have continued to thrive on the islands. Over 95 percent of the islands' reptile species and nearly three quarters of its land bird species cannot be found anywhere else in the world. Two of the more well known are the Galapagos giant tortoise and marine iguanas. The unhindered evolutionary development of the islands' species inspired Charles Darwin to begin The Origin of Species eight years after his visit there. To preserve the unique wildlife on the islands, the Ecuadorian government made the entire archipelago a national park in 1959. Each year roughly 60,000 tourists visit these islands to experience what Darwin did over a century and a half ago. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  5. Diablotin Pterodroma hasitata: a biography of the endangered Black-capped Petrel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simons, Theodore R.; Lee, David S.; Haney, J. Chris

    2013-01-01

    Our findings are in accord with the recent decision by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to evaluate the need for additional protection of the species and the primary foraging habitat off the southeastern United States under the Endangered Species Act (USFWS 2012). Additional conservation measures and research strategies that warrant further consideration include (1) protection, monitoring, and management of known breeding populations and nesting habitat in the Dominican Republic and Haiti through controlling predators, installing artificial nest burrows in appropriate sites and hiring local wardens at breeding sites during the nesting season; (2) local and regional training, education and public awareness (e.g. Blanchard & Nettleship 1992); (3) restoration of the original common name Diablotin to common usage to promote the historical and cultural importance of this species; (4) studies to determine the distribution and genetic variability in the remaining populations; and (5) studies of satellite-tagged birds to assess their seasonal and geographic use of pelagic habitats.

  6. It is the time for oceanic seabirds: Tracking year-round distribution of gadfly petrels across the Atlantic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramos, Raul; Carlile, Nicholas; Madeiros, Jeremy; Ramirez, Ivan; Paiva, Vitor H.; Dinis, Herculano A.; Zino, Francis; Biscoito, Manuel; Leal, Gustavo R.; Bugoni, Leandro; Jodice, Patrick G.; Ryan, Peter G.; Gonzalez-Solis, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    AimAnthropogenic activities alter and constrain the structure of marine ecosystems with implications for wide-ranging marine vertebrates. In spite of the environmental importance of vast oceanic ecosystems, most conservation efforts mainly focus on neritic areas. To identify relevant oceanic areas for conservation, we assessed the year-round spatial distribution and spatio-temporal overlap of eight truly oceanic seabird species of gadfly petrels (Pterodroma spp.) inhabiting the Atlantic Ocean.LocationAtlantic Ocean.MethodsUsing tracking data (mostly from geolocators), we examined year-round distributions, the timing of life-cycle events, and marine habitat overlap of eight gadfly petrel species that breed in the Atlantic Ocean.ResultsWe compiled 125 year-round tracks. Movement strategies ranged from non-migratory to long-distance migrant species and from species sharing a common non-breeding area to species dispersing among multiple non-breeding sites. Gadfly petrels occurred throughout the Atlantic Ocean but tended to concentrate in subtropical regions. During the boreal summer, up to three species overlapped spatio-temporally over a large area around the Azores archipelago. During the austral summer, up to four species coincided in a core area in subtropical waters around Cape Verde, and three species shared habitat over two distinct areas off Brazil. The petrels used many national Exclusive Economic Zones, although they also exploited offshore international waters.Main conclusionsTracking movements of highly mobile vertebrates such as gadfly petrels can provide a powerful tool to evaluate and assess the potential need for and location of protected oceanic areas. As more multispecies, year-round data sets are collected from wide-ranging vertebrates, researchers and managers will have greater insight into the location of biodiversity hotspots. These can subsequently inform and guide marine spatial planning efforts that account for both conservation and

  7. Speciation and phylogeography of giant petrels Macronectes.

    PubMed

    Techow, N M S M; O'Ryan, C; Phillips, R A; Gales, R; Marin, M; Patterson-Fraser, D; Quintana, F; Ritz, M S; Thompson, D R; Wanless, R M; Weimerskirch, H; Ryan, P G

    2010-02-01

    We examine global phylogeography of the two forms of giant petrel Macronectes spp. Although previously considered to be a single taxon, and despite debate over the status of some populations and the existence of minimal genetic data (one mitochondrial cytochrome b sequence per form), the current consensus based on morphology is that there are two species, Northern Giant Petrel M. halli and Southern Giant Petrel M. giganteus. This study examined genetic variation at cytochrome b as well as six microsatellite loci in giant petrels from 22 islands, representing most island groups at which the two species breed. Both markers support separate species status, although sequence divergence in cytochrome b was only 0.42% (corrected). Divergence was estimated to have occurred approximately 0.2mya, but with some colonies apparently separated for longer (up to 0.5 my). Three clades were found within giant petrels, which separated approximately 0.7mya, with the Southern Giant Petrel paraphyletic to a monophyletic Northern Giant Petrel. There was evidence of past fragmentation during the Pleistocene, with subsequent secondary contact within Southern Giant Petrels. The analysis also suggested a period of past population expansion that corresponded roughly to the timing of speciation and the separation of an ancestral giant petrel population from the fulmar Fulmarus clade. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Stable Isotopic Insights into the Foraging Ecology of an Endangered Marine Predator, the Hawaiian Petrel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, A. E.; Ostrom, P. H.; James, H. F.

    2010-12-01

    Seabirds play vital roles in their ecosystems, both as predators in their oceanic foraging grounds and conduits of marine nutrients to island nesting sites. Despite growing evidence that food availability limits seabird populations, characterization of the diet and even foraging locations of some seabird species remains elusive. Here, we use stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes to study the foraging ecology of an endangered and poorly known seabird, the Hawaiian petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis). This species nests solely on the main Hawaiian Islands but forages widely across the NE Pacific, sometimes traveling over 10,000km on single foraging trips. δ13C and δ15N values vary with trophic level and at the base of food webs throughout the marine range of the Hawaiian petrel. Thus, we are able to use isotope signatures in modern and ancient petrel tissues to track spatial and temporal variation in foraging location and diet. We find strong evidence of foraging segregation between populations, with hatch-year birds from the island of Hawaii exhibiting feather δ15N and δ13C values over 3‰ and 1 ‰ higher, respectively, than those found in Maui and Kauai hatch-year birds. There is also significant variation in δ15N values between feathers from Kauai, Hawaii, and Maui adults, indicating additional foraging segregation during the winter molt. To distinguish between the effects of trophic level and foraging location, we relate our data to those from seabirds with known diet and foraging location, as well as to previous characterizations of isoscapes in the NE Pacific and at-sea observations of our study species. Finally, we track Hawaiian petrel foraging ecology back in time through examination of stable isotope values in historical feathers and ancient bone collagen. We find that, despite a species-wide decline in δ15N values (consistent with trophic level decline), populations have maintained divergent isotopic niches through at least the past 1

  9. Global phylogeography of the band-rumped storm-petrel (Oceanodroma castro; Procellariiformes: Hydrobatidae).

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrea L; Monteiro, Luis; Hasegawa, Osamu; Friesen, Vicki L

    2007-06-01

    Factors shaping population differentiation in low latitude seabirds are not well-understood. In this study, we examined global patterns of DNA sequence variation in the mitochondrial control region of the band-rumped storm-petrel (Oceanodroma castro), a highly pelagic seabird distributed across the sub-tropical and tropical Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Despite previous classification as a single, monotypic species, fixed haplotype differences occurred between Atlantic and Pacific populations, and among all Pacific populations. In addition, Cape Verde and Galapagos birds formed distinct clades, estimated to have diverged from all other populations at least 150,000years ago. Azores hot season populations were also genetically distinct, lending support to previous phenotypic evidence that they be recognized as a separate species. Seasonal populations in Madeira probably represent separate genetic management units. The phylogeography of the band-rumped storm-petrel appears to have been shaped by both nonphysical barriers to gene flow and Pleistocene oceanographic conditions. Ancestral populations likely expanded through contiguous range expansion and infrequent long-distance colonization into their current breeding range. These findings suggest several possible revisions to the taxonomy of the band-rumped storm-petrel.

  10. Isabela Island, Galapagos Islands

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-20

    STS072-732-072 (11-20 Jan. 1996) --- Three of the nineteen Galapagos Islands are visible in this image, photographed from the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour. The Galapagos Islands are located 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) to the west of Ecuador. The largest of the islands, Isabela, is at center (north is toward the upper right corner). The numerous circular features on the island, highlighted by clouds, are volcanoes. The Galapagos Islands owe their existence to a hot spot, or persistent heat source in the mantle, which also is located over a rift, or place where plates are separating and new crust is being created. The rift is located between the Cocos and Nazca Plates. The dark linear features on the islands are lava flows from past eruptions. The island to the left of Isabela is Fernandina, while the island to the right is San Salvador. The Galapagos Islands were visited by the English naturalist Charles Darwin in 1835.

  11. The Galapagos Jason Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Teachers Association, Arlington, VA.

    The JASON Curriculum Project materials are designed to prepare teachers and students for an exploration around the Galapagos Islands via satellite transmission of live images and sound. This curriculum package contains five units, 25 lesson plans, and over 50 activities, along with teacher background material, student worksheets and readings, a…

  12. The Galapagos Jason Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Teachers Association, Arlington, VA.

    The JASON Curriculum Project materials are designed to prepare teachers and students for an exploration around the Galapagos Islands via satellite transmission of live images and sound. This curriculum package contains five units, 25 lesson plans, and over 50 activities, along with teacher background material, student worksheets and readings, a…

  13. Genetic divergence among extant and extirpated colonies of an endangered pelagic seabird, the Hawaiian petrel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, A. J.; Fleischer, R. C.; James, H. F.

    2010-12-01

    It is important to consider both the temporal and spatial dimensions of variability in ecology and evolution. Given the potentially great dispersal capabilities and long generation times of pelagic seabirds, genetic diversity in these species seems likely to be homogeneously distributed and relatively static over time. Investigating temporal and spatial processes involved in the ecology and evolution of seabird populations is important to island ecosystem sustainability, as they play a significant role in transferring marine derived nutrients to terrestrial oceanic ecosystems. Additionally, many seabird species are threatened by extinction due to increasing mortality both at land and at sea. Here we investigate population divergence of the endemic and endangered Hawaiian petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis). We examined four extant colonies on the islands of Hawaii, Maui, Lanai and Kauai, and employed ancient DNA techniques to study a prehistorically extirpated colony on Oahu, and a historically large, but likely extirpated, colony on the island of Molokai. Analyses of sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene as well as nuclear microsatellite markers indicate substantial differentiation (global Φst of 0.38, p < 0.0001). Significant divergence was found among each pair of the six islands except between Oahu and Molokai (Φst = 0.10, p = 0.07). However, this could result from low power due to the limited availability of amplifiable samples, especially for the hot, low elevation colony formerly present on Oahu. The largest differentiation occurred between the islands of Lanai and Kauai (Φst = 0.58, p < 0.0001). These results suggest that despite their great dispersal capabilities, spatially proximate colonies of the Hawaiian petrel are not genetically homogenous. Additionally, the extirpation of large colonies, such as those on Oahu and Molokai, could result in loss of a substantial amount of genetic diversity. Future work should further investigate temporal

  14. Ancient DNA reveals genetic stability despite demographic decline: 3,000 years of population history in the endemic Hawaiian petrel.

    PubMed

    Welch, Andreanna J; Wiley, Anne E; James, Helen F; Ostrom, Peggy H; Stafford, Thomas W; Fleischer, Robert C

    2012-12-01

    In the Hawaiian Islands, human colonization, which began approximately 1,200 to 800 years ago, marks the beginning of a period in which nearly 75% of the endemic avifauna became extinct and the population size and range of many additional species declined. It remains unclear why some species persisted whereas others did not. The endemic Hawaiian petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis) has escaped extinction, but colonies on two islands have been extirpated and populations on remaining islands have contracted. We obtained mitochondrial DNA sequences from 100 subfossil bones, 28 museum specimens, and 289 modern samples to investigate patterns of gene flow and temporal changes in the genetic diversity of this endangered species over the last 3,000 years, as Polynesians and then Europeans colonized the Hawaiian Islands. Genetic differentiation was found to be high between both modern and ancient petrel populations. However, gene flow was substantial between the extirpated colonies on Oahu and Molokai and modern birds from the island of Lanai. No significant reductions in genetic diversity occurred over this period, despite fears in the mid-1900s that this species may have been extinct. Simulations show that even a decline to a stable effective population size of 100 individuals would result in the loss of only 5% of the expected heterozygosity. Simulations also show that high levels of genetic diversity may be retained due to the long generation time of this species. Such decoupling between population size and genetic diversity in long-lived species can have important conservation implications. It appears that a pattern of dispersal from declining colonies, in addition to long generation time, may have allowed the Hawaiian petrel to escape a severe genetic bottleneck, and the associated extinction vortex, and persist despite a large population decline after human colonization.

  15. GALAPAGOS: from pixels to parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Marco; Häußler, Boris; Peng, Chien Y.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Guo, Yicheng

    2012-05-01

    To automate source detection, two-dimensional light profile Sérsic modelling and catalogue compilation in large survey applications, we introduce a new code Galaxy Analysis over Large Areas: Parameter Assessment by GALFITting Objects from SEXTRACTOR (GALAPAGOS). Based on a single set-up, GALAPAGOS can process a complete set of survey images. It detects sources in the data, estimates a local sky background, cuts postage stamp images for all sources, prepares object masks, performs Sérsic fitting including neighbours and compiles all objects in a final output catalogue. For the initial source detection, GALAPAGOS applies SEXTRACTOR, while GALFIT is incorporated for modelling Sérsic profiles. It measures the background sky involved in the Sérsic fitting by means of a flux growth curve. GALAPAGOS determines postage stamp sizes based on SEXTRACTOR shape parameters. In order to obtain precise model parameters, GALAPAGOS incorporates a complex sorting mechanism and makes use of modern CPU's multiplexing capabilities. It combines SEXTRACTOR and GALFIT data in a single output table. When incorporating information from overlapping tiles, GALAPAGOS automatically removes multiple entries from identical sources. GALAPAGOS is programmed in the Interactive Data Language (IDL). We test the stability and the ability to properly recover structural parameters extensively with artificial image simulations. Moreover, we apply GALAPAGOS successfully to the STAGES data set. For one-orbit Hubble Space Telescope data, a single 2.2-GHz CPU processes about 1000 primary sources per 24 h. Note that GALAPAGOS results depend critically on the user-defined parameter set-up. This paper provides useful guidelines to help the user make sensible choices.

  16. Mechanisms of global diversification in the marine species Madeiran Storm-petrel Oceanodroma castro and Monteiro's Storm-petrel O. monteiroi: Insights from a multi-locus approach.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mauro F; Smith, Andrea L; Friesen, Vicki L; Bried, Joël; Hasegawa, Osamu; Coelho, M Manuela; Silva, Mónica C

    2016-05-01

    The evolutionary mechanisms underlying the geographic distribution of gene lineages in the marine environment are not as well understood as those affecting terrestrial groups. The continuous nature of the pelagic marine environment may limit opportunities for divergence to occur and lineages to spatially segregate, particularly in highly mobile species. Here, we studied the phylogeography and historical demography of two tropically distributed, pelagic seabirds, the Madeiran Storm-petrel Oceanodroma castro, sampled in the Azores, Madeira, Galapagos and Japan, and its sister species Monteiro's Storm-petrel O. monteiroi (endemic to the Azores), using a multi-locus dataset consisting of 12 anonymous nuclear loci and the mitochondrial locus control region. Both marker types support the existence of four significantly differentiated genetic clusters, including the sampled O. monteiroi population and three populations within O. castro, although only the mitochondrial locus suggests complete lineage sorting. Multi-locus coalescent analyses suggest that most divergence events occurred within the last 200,000years. The proximity in divergence times precluded robust inferences of the species tree, in particular of the evolutionary relationships of the Pacific populations. Despite the great potential for dispersal, divergence among populations apparently proceeded in the absence of gene flow, emphasizing the effect of non-physical barriers, such as those driven by the paleo-oceanographical environments, philopatry and local adaptation, as important mechanisms of population divergence and speciation in highly mobile marine species. In view of the predicted climate change impacts, future changes in the demography and evolutionary dynamics of marine populations might be expected.

  17. Phylogeography and taxonomy of White-chinned and Spectacled Petrels.

    PubMed

    Mareile Techow, N M S; Ryan, Peter G; O'Ryan, Colleen

    2009-07-01

    The genus Procellaria traditionally consists of four species, two restricted to New Zealand and two widespread in the Southern Ocean. All four are threatened because of incidental mortality on longlines and other fishing gear. The White-chinned Petrel P. aequinoctialis is the seabird killed in largest numbers by fisheries in the Southern Ocean. A spectacled form recently has been elevated to species status, Spectacled Petrel P. conspicillata, based on differences in morphometrics, vocalisations and breeding phenology. Cytochrome b sequences support species status for the Spectacled Petrel and show that the White-chinned Petrel has two regional populations, one around New Zealand and one throughout the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans. White-chinned and Spectacled Petrels segregated approximately 0.90 million years ago by allopatric fragmentation, and the two populations within White-chinned Petrels diverged approximately 0.35 million years ago. Climate changes and corresponding changes in ocean currents are most likely responsible for these patterns.

  18. Interaction between the Hawaiian dark-rumped petrel and the Argentine ant in Haleakala National Park, Maui, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krushelnycky, Paul D.; Hodges, Cathleen S.N.; Medeiros, Arthur C.; Loope, Lloyd L.

    2001-01-01

    The endemic biota of the Hawaiian islands is believed to have evolved in the absence of ant predation. However, it was suspected that this endemic biota is highly vulnerable to the effect of immigrant ants especially with regard to an aggressive predator known as the Argentine ant (Linepithema humile). First recorded in the Haleakala National Park on the island of Maui in 1967, this ant was believed to have reduced populations of native arthropods in high-elevation subalpine shrublands. In addition, concerns were raised that this immigrant ant may have also reduced the breeding success of the endangered Hawaiian Dark-rumped Petrel (Pterodroma phaeopygia sandwichensis), a native seabird. If so, then it was believe that this ant could become another major threat to the survival of this endangered seabird in addition to the threat that was caused by the introduction of introduced mammals, the advent of hunting by the Polynesians, and a loss of breeding habitat. As a result, the purpose of this study was to determine if the Argentine ant affects the nesting success of this native Hawaiian seabird.

  19. Radar Image of Galapagos Island

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-10-23

    This is an image showing part of Isla Isabella in the western Galapagos Islands. It was taken by the L-band radar in HH polarization from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar on the 40th orbit of NASA’s space shuttle Endeavour.

  20. Galapagos Tectonics and Evolution (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, R. N.

    2010-12-01

    Galapagos is now considered one of the type-examples of hotspot-ridge interaction, although in the early years of plate tectonics it was generally thought that this interpretation was demonstrably wrong, with two influential groups insisting that non-hotspot models were required for this area. The key to understanding Galapagos tectonic evolution was the recognition that small ridge axis jumps toward the hotspot had occurred, producing complicated magnetic anomalies and asymmetric lithospheric accretion. My dissertation work, guided by Jason Morgan, showed that this simple modification to plate tectonic theory could resolve the seemingly compelling geometric arguments against the Cocos and Carnegie aseismic ridges being Galapagos hotspot tracks, and further that if Galapagos were a hotspot near Fernandina, fixed with respect to the Hawaii hotspot, there should be aseismic ridges on the Cocos and Nazca plates with the observed Cocos and Carnegie ridge geometry, both aseismic ridges forming when the hotspot was ridge-centered, but only the Carnegie ridge since the plate boundary migrated north of the hotspot. A great deal of subsequent research has shown that some areas are considerably more complicated than originally thought, but the following basic model still appears to hold. The Farallon plate split apart along the Grijalva scarp, possibly a preexisting Pacific-Farallon FZ that intersected the hotspot at this time (although alternative interpretations exist), probably in response to tensional stress caused by slab pull in different directions at the Mid-America and Peru-Chile trenches. This break-up allowed more orthogonal subduction of independent Cocos and Nazca plates beginning shortly after 25 Ma. The original Cocos-Nazca ridge trended E-NE, but soon reorganized into N-S spreading segments. The subsequent evolution involved substantial northward ridge migration and ridge jumps, mostly toward the Galapagos hotspot. Recent ridge jumps have occurred in

  1. Tsunami Forecast for Galapagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renteria, W.

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study is to present a model for the short-term and long-term tsunami forecast for Galapagos Islands. For both cases the ComMIT/MOST(Titov,et al 2011) numerical model and methodology have been used. The results for the short-term model has been compared with the data from Lynett et al, 2011 surveyed from the impacts of the March/11 in the Galapagos Islands. For the case of long-term forecast, several scenarios have run along the Pacific, an extreme flooding map is obtained, the method is considered suitable for places with poor or without tsunami impact information, but under tsunami risk geographic location.

  2. Health evaluation of Galapagos Hawks (Buteo galapagoensis) on Santiago Island, Galapagos.

    PubMed

    Deem, Sharon L; Rivera-Parra, Jose Luis; Parker, Patricia G

    2012-01-01

    Galapagos Hawks (Buteo galapagoensis), the only endemic, diurnal raptor species in Galapagos, are currently distributed on eight Galapagos Islands having been extirpated from three of the human-inhabited islands. In January 2009, we performed health assessments of 89 Galapagos Hawks on Santiago Island, Galapagos. Four of the 89 Galapagos Hawks (4%) evaluated had physical abnormalities. Blood parameters did not differ between males and females, except for aspartate transaminase values, which were significantly higher in females than males. No Galapagos Hawks tested positive for antibodies to avian encephalitis virus, Marek virus, and paramyxovirus-1 or to haemosporidian antigen. Chlamydophila psittaci antigen was detected in 2 of 86 Galapagos Hawks (2%), with 24 of 43 Galapagos Hawks (56%) antibody-positive for avian adenovirus-1 and 1 of 48 Galapagos Hawks (2%) antibody positive for Toxoplasma gondii. There were no significant differences in infectious disease results based on sex. This study contributes to the understanding of the health status of the Galapagos Hawk and to the establishment of baseline information for the species.

  3. Galapagos Islands Flyby [HD Video

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Completed: 07-16-2009 Straddling the equator approximately 1000 kilometers to the west of the South American mainland, the Galapagos Islands lie within the heart of the equatorial current system. Rising from the sea floor, the volcanic islands of the Galapagos are set on top of a large submarine platform. The main portion of the Galapagos platform is relatively flat and less than 1000 meters in depth. The steepest slopes are found along the western and southern flanks of the platform with a gradual slope towards the east. The interactions of the Galapagos and the oceanic currents create vastly different environmental regimes which not only isolates one part of the Archipelago from the other but allows penguins to live along the equator on the western part of the Archipelago and tropical corals around the islands to the north. The islands are relatively new in geologic terms with the youngest islands in the west still exhibiting periodic eruptions from their massive volcanic craters. Please give credit for this item to: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, The SeaWiFS Project and GeoEye, Scientific Visualization Studio. NOTE: All SeaWiFS images and data presented on this web site are for research and educational use only. All commercial use of SeaWiFS data must be coordinated with GeoEye (http://www.geoeye.com). To download this video go to: svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?3628 NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation's largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe.

  4. The impact of the 1982-1983 El Niño-Southern Oscillation on seabirds in the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, Carlos A.; Cruz, Felipe; Cruz, Justine B.; Merlen, Godfrey; Coulter, Malcolm C.

    1987-12-01

    October 1982 through July 1983, the Galapagos Islands experienced the strongest El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event yet recorded, with heavy rains and a warm, unproductive ocean. During this period most seabirds did not breed, and many left the archipelago altogether. Dark-rumped petrels which did breed during the event demonstrated low growth rate of chicks. Censuses and observations demonstrated substantial population decreases of other seabirds during the ENSO. Magnificent frigate birds suffered decreased nesting success, while blue-footed boobies abandoned all nesting attempts. Total censuses of Galapagos penguins and flightless cormorants taken before and after the ENSO demonstrated declines of 77% and 49%, respectively. We discuss the seabird population declines during ENSO and their subsequent recovery.

  5. Radar Image of Galapagos Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image showing part of Isla Isabella in the western Galapagos Islands. It was taken by the L-band radar in HH polarization from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar on the 40th orbit of the space shuttle Endeavour. The image is centered at about 0.5 degree south latitude and 91 degrees west longitude and covers an area of 75 by 60 kilometers (47 by 37 miles). The radar incidence angle at the center of the image is about 20 degrees.

    The western Galapagos Islands, which lie about 1,200 kilometers (750 miles) west of Ecuador in the eastern Pacific, have six active volcanoes similar to the volcanoes found in Hawaii. Since the time of Charles Darwin's visit to the area in 1835, there have been over 60 recorded eruptions of these volcanoes. This SIR-C/X-SAR image of Alcedo and Sierra Negra volcanoes shows the rougher lava flows as bright features, while ash deposits and smooth pahoehoe lava flows appear dark. A small portion of Isla Fernandina is visible in the extreme upper left corner of the image.

    The Galapagos Islands are one of the SIR-C/X-SAR supersites and data of this area will be taken several times during the flight to allow scientists to conduct topographic change studies and to search for different lava flow types, ash deposits and fault lines.

    Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes

  6. Galapagos: Darwin, evolution, and ENT.

    PubMed

    Bluestone, Charles D

    2009-10-01

    This year is especially important in the history of the theory of evolution; 2009 is the bicentennial anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin and the sesquicentennial anniversary of his publication, The Origin of Species. Darwin visited the Galapagos Islands as a young man, which greatly influenced his thinking. My son Jim and I had the good fortune to visit these islands in January 2009 and see firsthand what led Darwin to arrive at his monumental insights into the origins of life on this planet. I have described my observations and related some of this experience to the ear, nose, and throat, albeit with whimsy in several instances. Nonetheless, some of the adaptations in the animals on these unique islands may have bearing on my hypotheses related to the incidence and pathogenesis of otitis media in humans. It is hoped the reader will share my enthusiasm for the experience we had on these fantastic islands and tour them in the future.

  7. Avian cholera in Southern Great Petrel (Macronectes giganteus) from Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leotta, G.A.; Rivas, M.; Chinen, I.; Vigo, G.B.; Moredo, F.A.; Coria, N.; Wolcott, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    A southern giant petrel (Macronectes giganteus) was found dead at Potter Peninsula, King George Island, South Shetland, Antarctica. The adult male was discovered approximately 48 hr after death. Macroscopic and microscopic lesions were compatible with avian cholera and the bacterium Pasteurella multocida subsp. gallicida, serotype A1 was isolated from lung, heart, liver, pericardial sac, and air sacs. In addition, Escherichia coli was isolated from pericardial sac and air sacs. This is the first known report of avian cholera in a southern giant petrel in Antarctica.

  8. DDT residues and declining reproduction in the Bermuda petrel.

    PubMed

    Wurster, C F; Wingate, D B

    1968-03-01

    Residues of DDT [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane] averaging 6.44 parts per million in eggs and chicks of the carnivorous Bermuda petrel indicate widespread contamination of an oceanic food chain that is remote from applications of DDT. Reproduction by the petrel has declined during the last 10 years at the annual rate of 3.25 percent; if the decline continues, reproduction will fail completely by 1978. Concentrations of residues are similar to those in certain terrestrial carnivorous birds whose productivity is also declining. Various considerations implicate contamination by insecticides as a probable major cause of the decline.

  9. Galapagos

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... human settlements on this island. Several plant species are endangered due to decimation by goats and competition with non-native ... and the cottony cushion scale insect are contributing to the endangered status of native plant species such as the endemic daisy tree and ...

  10. The origin and diversification of Galapagos mockingbirds.

    PubMed

    Arbogast, Brian S; Drovetski, Sergei V; Curry, Robert L; Boag, Peter T; Seutin, Gilles; Grant, Peter R; Grant, B Rosemary; Anderson, David J

    2006-02-01

    Evolutionary radiations of colonists on archipelagos provide valuable insight into mechanisms and modes of speciation. The apparent diversification of Galapagos mockingbirds (Nesomimus) provoked Darwin's initial conception of adaptive radiation, but the monophyly of this historically important exemplar has not been evaluated with molecular data. Additionally, as with most Galapagos organisms, we have a poor understanding of the temporal pattern of diversification of the mockingbirds following colonization(s) from source populations. Here we present a molecular phylogeny of Galapagos and other mockingbird populations based on mitochondrial sequence data. Monophyly of Galapagos mockingbirds was supported, suggesting a single colonization of the archipelago followed by diversification. Our analyses also indicate that Nesomimus is nested within the traditional genus Mimus, making the latter paraphyletic, and that the closest living relatives of Galapagos mockingbirds appear to be those currently found in North America, northern South America, and the Caribbean, rather than the geographically nearest species in continental Ecuador. Thus, propensity for over-water dispersal may have played a more important role than geographic proximity in the colonization of Galapagos by mockingbirds. Within Galapagos, four distinct mitochondrial DNA clades were identified. These four clades differ from current taxonomy in several important respects. In particular, mockingbirds in the eastern islands of the archipelago (Española, San Cristóbal, and Genovesa) have very similar mitochondrial DNA sequences, despite belonging to three different nominal species, and mockingbirds from Isabela, in the west of the archipelago, are more phylogenetically divergent than previously recognized. Consistent with current taxonomy is the phylogenetic distinctiveness of the Floreana mockingbird (N. trifasciatus) and close relationships among most mockingbirds from the central and northern region of the

  11. Hydrogeology of the Galapagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ozouville, N.; Pryet, A.; Violette, S.; de Marsily, G.; Deffontaines, B.; Auken, E.

    2010-12-01

    Due to the heterogeneity of geological formations, volcanic islands present complex and contrasting hydrogeological settings. A young discipline in the Galapagos, hydrogeology requires an understanding of geology, geomorphology, climate and hydrology. Throughout history, navigators, scientists and inhabitants noted the lack of surface freshwater; and water availability limited settlement of the islands. Today, this limitation is overcome through groundwater exploitation and expensive desalination, fed by economic growth. This shift has freed the field of hydrogeology from the existing premise of water being the principal drive for human development. Within this context, our approach is to lead a pluri-disciplinary research to characterize Galapagos hydrogeology. It involves a long-term commitment with international, national and local partners. Field investigations conducted on the inhabited islands of Santa Cruz, San Cristobal, Isabela and Floreana reveal three types of aquifers. A low-lying basal aquifer outcrops on Santa Cruz and Isabela. Due to the high permeability of fractured shield series forming coastal aprons, intruding sea water mixes with discharging freshwater, and confers a high salt content to groundwater. In order to characterize the hydraulic properties of this aquifer, the propagation of the tidal signal into the basal aquifer has been investigated through piezometric monitoring in three open coastal fractures and the deep well on Santa Cruz. Springs are scarce in the Archipelago, but have been identified historically on Santa Cruz and Floreana, located on the flanks of volcanic cones, and fed by small perched aquifers. On San Cristobal, high-level aquifers feed springs on the southern mountainside that contribute to a network of permanent rivers that reach the sea, a unique feature in the whole archipelago. They are independent from El Junco, a unique summital freshwater, and semi-endoreic lake. Internal resistivity structure of Santa Cruz and

  12. Rotavirus infections in Galapagos sea lions.

    PubMed

    Coria-Galindo, Elsa; Rangel-Huerta, Emma; Verdugo-Rodríguez, Antonio; Brousset, Dulce; Salazar, Sandie; Padilla-Noriega, Luis

    2009-07-01

    Group A rotaviruses infect and cause diarrhea in the young of a broad range of terrestrial mammals, but it is unknown, to our knowledge, whether they infect marine mammals. During February and March of 2002 and 2003, we collected 125 serum samples and 18 rectal swab samples from Galapagos sea lion pups (GSL, Zalophus wollebaeki), and 22 serum samples from Galapagos fur seal pups (GFS, Arctocephalus galapagoensis) from nine islands of the Galapagos archipelago, Ecuador. Sera were tested for antibodies (immunoglobulin G [IgG]) to rotavirus by an enzyme immunoassay using rhesus rotavirus as the capture antigen. In addition, rectal swabs were analyzed for the presence of rotavirus genomic double-stranded RNA by silver-stained polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Antibodies to rotavirus were detected in 27 GSL pups (22%) and five GFS pups (23%), and rotavirus RNA was detected in the fecal sample from one GSL pup (6%). These results provide the first evidence that rotavirus infections are prevalent at an early age in Galapagos sea lions and Galapagos fur seals.

  13. Promise seen in Petrel sub-basin off northwestern Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Maung, T.U.; Passmore, V. )

    1995-01-30

    The Australian government during the past 11 years has been regularly releasing vacant areas on the Australian continental shelf for exploration. Although Australia's offshore basins cover an area of 12 million sq km, only about 1,100 exploration and development wells have been drilled, and most of the basins are underexplored by world standards. One of these areas is the Petrel sub-basin of the Bonaparte basin in water shallower than 100 m off Northwest Australia. The government recently released six areas in the southern offshore Petrel subbasin for petroleum exploration. The results of a study by the Petroleum Resources Branch of the bureau of Resource Sciences have been synthesized into a Petrel Sub-basin Bulletin, some selections of which are discussed in this article. Although there are over 44,000 km of seismic data recorded in the sub-basin, the quality of pre-1979 data is very poor to poor, and only 15,800 km of data recorded between 1980--94 (including 1,000 km of 3D seismic data over the Barnett structure) are of fair to good quality. The paper describes the regional geology, reservoir and seals, source rocks, and types of geologic traps. The study identified over 30 structures and leads in the offshore southern Petrel sub-basin. Significant opportunities exist for delineation and definition of drillable prospects in this promising Australian petroleum province.

  14. The Incredible Shrinking Iguana: Impact of Galapagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtugudde, R.; Karnauskas, K.

    2007-05-01

    Galapagos Islands are well known for Darwin's epiphany about evolution after his 'discovery' of the islands. The incredible transformation that the key species on this island undergo on ENSO time-scales is recorded extensively. The impact of Galapagos on SSTs and ocean primary production has been conjectured but some recent work demonstrates that their influence extdends thousands of kilometers via stronger TIWs and modulations of the termination of EUC and related air-sea interactions. Tropical Pacific is not only the theater of action for ENSO dynamics but the ecosystem is the most studied iron limited region due to its HNLC characteristics. This study addresses the physical and biogeochemical impacts of the Galapagos islands with a OGCM-biogeochemical model coupled to a simple wind-anomaliy model. The impact of Galapagos is to warm the cold-tongue by upto 1C with a major impact on the termination of the EUC that results in large-scale circulation changes that extend to the South American coast as far south as 20S. If the islands are not included, then the equatorial Kelvin waves extend their impact on thermocline variability all the way to the eastern boundary and lead to a quasi-biennial ENSO whereas the impact of Galapagos islands shifts the frequency to a quasi- quadrennial time-scale. The impacts on the ecosystem are commensurate with the seasonal and interannual variability changes with the addition of dissolved iron supply related to EUC changes. Bio-physical feedbacks in the deep tropical Pacific also tend to warm SSTs and the impact of Galapagos is thus to flatten the east-west SST gradient resulting in less-frequent and weaker ENSO events. The relevance of these results to longer time-scale variability and any potential analogs to global warming and sea level change are discussed in detail.

  15. "Galapagos" and a Community of Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Susan R.

    A study examined the effectiveness of a community college district-wide reading program designed to foster reading by faculty, students, administrators, and staff. The Reading/Writing across the Curriculum Committee of the Metropolitan Community Colleges selected Kurt Vonnegut's novel "Galapagos," a novel which met criteria as to length,…

  16. Comparative immunology of Galapagos iguana hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Higgins, P J; Rand, C S

    1975-09-01

    The antigenic properties of the major hemoglobin component of the Galapgaos iguanas were studied using second-approximation qualitative and quantitative immunochemical techniques. Phylogenetic distances, relative to the Galapagos marine iguana. Amblyrhynchus cristatus, were established on the basis of immunological cross-reactions.

  17. Working with JASON in the Galapagos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigurdsson, Haraldur

    1992-01-01

    Describes the background and implementation of the JASON Project, which was designed to motivate young students to pursue careers in science and technology by involving them in direct exploration of the Galapagos Islands through more than 60 live, 1-hour television broadcasts. (JJK)

  18. Structure of some intact lipids of petrel stomach oils.

    PubMed

    Watts, R; Warham, J

    1976-06-01

    The stomach or proventricular oils from 16 species of petrel have been analyzed and the carbon number distributions of the wax esters, triglycerides, and diacylglyceryl ethers are reported. The wax esters have been fractionated further into less and more polar species. To determine whether any intermolecular specificity existed, carbon number distributions for each lipid class were calculated, assuming random esterifications. The tirglyceride and diacylglyceryl ether compositions observed were all found to aggree closely with those calculated. The wax esters from three petrel species were found to have greater proportions of the middle range species with carbon numbers 34-38 than calculated. However, most of the lipids examined had random structures which have been found to be characteristic of marine sources. The results in general support the belief that the oils are derived directly from dietary sources rather than synthesis by the proventricular glands.

  19. Analysis of Inter- and Intra-individual Variation in Foraging Habits of the Endangered Hawaiian Petrel Using Stables Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morra, K. E.; Ostrom, P. H.; Wiley, A. E.; James, H. F.; Stricker, C. A.; Gandhi, H.

    2014-12-01

    Stable isotope analysis of the endangered Hawaiian petrel's (Pterodroma sandwichensis, HAPE) feathers provides otherwise intractable information regarding non-breeding season foraging habits. Adult HAPE spend 3.5-6 months at sea during the non-breeding season, at which time they sequentially molt their flight feathers. Because feathers are metabolically inert once synthesized, they capture isotopic signals while they are grown, providing an opportunity to study foraging habits over time. Here we use stable hydrogen (δD), carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes to assess variation in foraging habits within and between individuals, and among four breeding colonies. δD is an indicator of prevalence of fish vs. invertebrates in the diet. In one analysis, we observed large variation in feather δD (125‰), with adults from Maui and Kauai having significantly higher δD values than corresponding hatch-year birds, indicating significant dietary differences between age groups. In a second analysis, we utilized δ13C and δ15N of Hawaii, Maui and Lanai adults, values which vary with trophic level and also at the base of the food web across HAPE's foraging range, potentially revealing information about feeding location, as well as diet. Furthermore, because the sequence of molt is known, we are able to determine whether individual foraging specialization (continued use of the same foraging behavior over time) exists in this species. To do this, we analyzed two primary feathers, P1 and P6, which reflect the beginning and the middle of the non-breeding season, respectively. We did not find significant differences in δ13C or δ15N between P1 and P6, suggesting consistent foraging habits within individuals over time. This provides evidence that individual foraging specialization exists within these populations. Analysis of a secondary feather grown late in the molt sequence would further illuminate the extent of foraging specialization. Finally, δ15N differs

  20. How quickly do albatrosses and petrels digest plastic particles?

    PubMed

    Ryan, Peter G

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how rapidly seabirds excrete or regurgitate ingested plastic items is important for their use as monitors of marine debris. van Franeker and Law (2015) inferred that fulmarine petrels excrete ∼75% of plastic particles within a month of ingestion based on decreases in the amounts of plastic in the stomachs of adult petrels moving to relatively clean environments to breed. However, similar decreases occur among resident species due to adults passing plastic loads to their chicks. The few direct measures of wear rates and retention times of persistent stomach contents suggest longer plastic residence times in most albatrosses and petrels. Residence time presumably varies with item size, type of plastic, the amount and composition of other persistent stomach contents, and the size at which items are excreted, which may vary among taxa. Accurate measures of ingested plastic retention times are needed to better understand temporal and spatial patterns in ingested plastic loads within marine organisms, especially if they are to be used as indicators of plastic pollution trends. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Galapagos Spreading Center. Galapagos Rifts Expedition--Grades 9-12. Mid-Ocean Ridges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

    This activity introduces students to the basic concept of seafloor spreading, the processes involved in creating new seafloor at a mid- ocean ridge, the Galapagos Spreading Center system, and the different types of plate motion associated with ridge segments and transform faults. The activity provides learning objectives, a list of needed…

  2. Exploitation of inland-breeding Antarctic petrels by south polar skuas.

    PubMed

    Brooke, M L; Keith, D; Røv, N

    1999-10-01

    During the austral summer of 1996/1997 we studied south polar skuas at Svarthamaren, Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, where the world's largest known colony of Antarctic petrels is found. Our censuses suggested approximately 250 full-grown skuas and 140,000 breeding pairs of petrels were present. During their breeding season, skuas did not visit the open sea at least 200 km from the site; they relied entirely on prey caught and scavenged from the petrel colony. Because the site is so isolated, we asked whether the prey (petrels) had swamped the predators (skuas), or whether there was evidence that predator numbers were limited by the size of the prey population. Particularly at the end of the petrel incubation period, we found a close correspondence between the energy required by adult skuas and their chicks, ascertained from time budget studies, and the rate at which petrel eggs disappeared from the colony. This suggests that, in this closed system, the predator population was limited by the prey population, and that predator swamping was not an advantage that petrels gained by nesting in this remote location.

  3. Evidence for nest-odour recognition in two species of diving petrel.

    PubMed

    Bonadonna, Francesco; Cunningham, Gregory B; Jouventin, Pierre; Hesters, Florence; Nevitt, Gabrielle A

    2003-10-01

    In nearly every procellariiform species, the sense of smell appears to be highly adapted for foraging at sea, but the sense of smell among the diving petrels is enigmatic. These birds forage at considerable depth and are not attracted to odour cues at sea. However, several procellariiform species have recently been shown to relocate their nesting burrows by scent, suggesting that these birds use an olfactory signature to identify the home burrow. We wanted to know whether diving petrels use smell in this way. We tested the common diving petrel Pelecanoides urinatrix and the South-Georgian diving petrel Pelecanoides georgicus to determine whether diving petrels were able to recognise their burrow by scent alone. To verify the efficacy of the method, we also tested a bird that is known to use olfaction for foraging and nest recognition, the thin-billed prion Pachyptila belcheri. In two-choice T-maze trials, we found that, for all species, individuals significantly preferred the odour of their own nest material to that of a conspecific. Our findings strongly suggest that an individual-specific odour provides an olfactory signature that allows burrowing petrels to recognize their own burrow. Since this ability seems to be well developed in diving petrels, our data further implicate a novel adaptation for olfaction in these two species that have been presumed to lack a well-developed sense of smell.

  4. Assesing Geographic Isolation of the Galapagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, D.; Smith, F.

    2016-06-01

    The Galapagos Archipelago is one of the most important ecological spots in the planet due its unique biodiversity, active geology, and relatively well-preserved ecosystems. These characteristics are strongly based on the geographical isolation of the islands. On the one hand this isolation allowed the evolution processes that gave the islands their international fame and on the other hand it kept them from major human impacts that affected the vast majority of the Earth's surface. Galapagos' geographical isolation is therefore of mayor value, but it is rapidly diminishing due to the increase of marine and air transportation among islands and with the rest of the world. This increased accessibility implies enhanced risks for the ecological dynamics on the archipelago (e.g. increased risk of biological invasions, uncontrolled tourism growth, more water and energy consumption). Here, we introduce a general accessibility model to assess geographical isolation of the Galapagos Islands. The model aims to characterize accessibility in terms of human mobility by evaluating travel time to each point of the archipelago using all available transportation modalities. Using a multi criteria cost surface for marine and land areas, we estimated travel time for each surface unit using the fastest route and mode of transportation available while considering several friction factors such as surface type, slope, infrastructure, transfer points, legal restrictions, and physical barriers. We created maps to evaluate the isolation of different islands and places, highlighting the potential risks for several habitats and ecosystems. The model can be used for research and decision-making regarding island conservation, such as estimating spreading paths for invasive species, informing decisions on tourism management, and monitoring isolation changes of sensitive ecosystems.

  5. Metabolic cost of incubation in the Laysan albatross and Bonin petrel.

    PubMed

    Grant, G S; Whittow, G C

    1983-01-01

    1. Oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production were measured in resting and incubating Laysan albatrosses and Bonin petrels on Midway Atoll in the north central Pacific Ocean. 2. Incubation metabolism within the thermal neutral zone is less than or equal to resting metabolism in the albatross and petrel. 3. The respiratory quotients (0.64-0.72) during the long fasts indicate fat metabolism. 4. The estimated fractional water content of the albatross and petrel do not change during incubation fasts because water loss is balanced by metabolic water production.

  6. Unusual foraging by a fork-tailed storm-petrel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gill, Robert E.

    1977-01-01

    While conducting an offshore bird census from the sea beach at Nelson Lagoon, Alaska Peninsula (56°00'N, 161°10'W) at 1700 on 17 September 1976 1 saw a Fork-tailed Storm Petrel (Oceanodroma f. furcata) feeding on the beached remains of an adult gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) that had been trapped by ice and died the previous April. I watched it for about 15 min. The sky was overcast with a 25-knot offshore wind, gusting to 35 knots. Seas were running from 3 to 4 m, and the tide was high. This observation is of note because it provides direct evidence of a terrestrial (i.e. nonpelagic) foraging capability by O. furcata. It also furthers the scant knowledge on the use of beached marine mammals for food by pelagic and inshore avifauna, especially during adverse weather when normal foraging habits might be inhibited.

  7. Exploring conservation discourses in the Galapagos Islands: A case study of the Galapagos giant tortoises.

    PubMed

    Benitez-Capistros, Francisco; Hugé, Jean; Dahdouh-Guebas, Farid; Koedam, Nico

    2016-10-01

    Conservation discourses change rapidly both at global and local scales. To be able to capture these shifts and the relationships between humans and nature, we focused on a local and iconic conservation case: the Galapagos giant tortoises (Chelonoidis spp.). We used the Q methodology to contextualize conservation for science and decision making and to explore the multidimensionality of the conservation concept in Galapagos. The results indicate four prevailing discourses: (1) Multi-actor governance; (2) giant tortoise and ecosystems conservation; (3) community governance; and (4) market and tourism centred. These findings allow us to identify foreseeable points of disagreement, as well as areas of consensus, and to discuss the implication of the findings to address socio-ecological conservation and sustainability challenges. This can help the different involved stakeholders (managers, scientists and local communities) to the design and apply contextualized conservation actions and policies to contribute to a better sustainable management of the archipelago.

  8. Pyroxenite in the Galapagos plume source at 65 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, W. T.; Gazel, E.; Vidito, C. A.; Herzberg, C. T.; Class, C.; Bizimis, M.; Alvarado-Induni, G.

    2013-12-01

    Mantle plumes originate from boundary layers below the upper mantle. Their surface expressions as hotspot tracks have been linked to voluminous outpourings of lava in the form of large igneous provinces. The Galapagos hotspot has been active since ~90 Ma and the oldest lavas of its associated submarine ridge have been dated to ~14 Ma, subducting at the Middle America Trench, off Costa Rica. The Galapagos plume head magmatic production is preserved as the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP). A series of 15-65 Ma accreted Galapagos paleo-ridges and islands/seamounts are accreted in the Pacific coast of Costa Rica and Panama. One of these accreted terranes, the Quepos block on the west coast of Costa Rica is an ancient, ~65 Ma Galapagos island. Olivine phenocrysts from Quepos picrites have elevated Ni and low Ca and Mn and Fe/Mn indicative of a dominant pyroxenite source component while CLIP samples are dominated by a peridotite source. The mantle potential temperature (max) of the plume changed from ~1650 to ~1550 C at 65 Ma. This change correlates with the first appearance of the pyroxenite component and an EMII signature (Northern Galapagos Domain) in the Galapagos plume. A relatively dense pyroxenite component may provide a mechanism for the change in Tp due to its effect on the plume's bouyancy. Alternatively, the pyroxenite component was diluted by high peridotite melt fraction during the massive production of the CLIP.

  9. Isla Isabela in the western Galapagos Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image showing part of Isla Isabela in the western Galapagos Islands. It was taken by the L-band radar in HH polarization from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperature Radar on the 40th orbit of the Shuttle Endeavour. The image is centered at about .5 degrees south latitude and 91 degrees West longitude and covers an area of 75 km by 60 km. The radar incidence angle at the center of the image is about 20 degrees. This SIR-C/X-SAR image of Alcedo and Sierra Negra volcanoes shows the rougher lava flows as bright features, while ash deposits and smooth Pahoehoe lava flows appear dark. A small portion of Isla Fernandina is visible in the extreme upper left corner of the image. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory alternative photo number is P-43899.

  10. Paleomagnetism of San Cristobal Island, Galapagos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, A.

    1971-01-01

    Isla San Cristobal, the most easterly of the Galapagos Islands, consists of two parts: a large volcano constitutes the southwest half of the island and an irregular apron of small cones and flows makes up the northeast half. As some of the younger flows on the flanks of the large volcano are reversely magnetized, the minimum age of the volcano is 0.7 my, which is the age of the Brunhes-Matuyama reversal boundary. The true age is probably several times greater. The cones and flows to the northeast are all normally magnetized. The between-site angular dispersion of virtual poles is 11.3?? - a value consistent with mathematical models for the latitude dependence of geomagnetic secular variation. ?? 1971.

  11. At-Sea Distribution and Prey Selection of Antarctic Petrels and Commercial Krill Fisheries.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Sébastien; Tarroux, Arnaud; Cherel, Yves; Delord, Karine; Godø, Olaf Rune; Kato, Akiko; Krafft, Bjørn A; Lorentsen, Svein-Håkon; Ropert-Coudert, Yan; Skaret, Georg; Varpe, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Commercial fisheries may impact marine ecosystems and affect populations of predators like seabirds. In the Southern Ocean, there is an extensive fishery for Antarctic krill Euphausia superba that is projected to increase further. Comparing distribution and prey selection of fishing operations versus predators is needed to predict fishery-related impacts on krill-dependent predators. In this context, it is important to consider not only predators breeding near the fishing grounds but also the ones breeding far away and that disperse during the non-breeding season where they may interact with fisheries. In this study, we first quantified the overlap between the distribution of the Antarctic krill fisheries and the distribution of a krill dependent seabird, the Antarctic petrel Thalassoica antarctica, during both the breeding and non-breeding season. We tracked birds from the world biggest Antarctic petrel colony (Svarthamaren, Dronning Maud Land), located >1000 km from the main fishing areas, during three consecutive seasons. The overall spatial overlap between krill fisheries and Antarctic petrels was limited but varied greatly among and within years, and was high in some periods during the non-breeding season. In a second step, we described the length frequency distribution of Antarctic krill consumed by Antarctic petrels, and compared this with results from fisheries, as well as from diet studies in other krill predators. Krill taken by Antarctic petrels did not differ in size from that taken by trawls or from krill taken by most Antarctic krill predators. Selectivity for specific Antarctic krill stages seems generally low in Antarctic predators. Overall, our results show that competition between Antarctic petrels and krill fisheries is currently likely negligible. However, if krill fisheries are to increase in the future, competition with the Antarctic petrel may occur, even with birds breeding thousands of kilometers away.

  12. At-Sea Distribution and Prey Selection of Antarctic Petrels and Commercial Krill Fisheries

    PubMed Central

    Descamps, Sébastien; Tarroux, Arnaud; Cherel, Yves; Delord, Karine; Godø, Olaf Rune; Kato, Akiko; Krafft, Bjørn A.; Lorentsen, Svein-Håkon; Ropert-Coudert, Yan; Skaret, Georg; Varpe, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Commercial fisheries may impact marine ecosystems and affect populations of predators like seabirds. In the Southern Ocean, there is an extensive fishery for Antarctic krill Euphausia superba that is projected to increase further. Comparing distribution and prey selection of fishing operations versus predators is needed to predict fishery-related impacts on krill-dependent predators. In this context, it is important to consider not only predators breeding near the fishing grounds but also the ones breeding far away and that disperse during the non-breeding season where they may interact with fisheries. In this study, we first quantified the overlap between the distribution of the Antarctic krill fisheries and the distribution of a krill dependent seabird, the Antarctic petrel Thalassoica antarctica, during both the breeding and non-breeding season. We tracked birds from the world biggest Antarctic petrel colony (Svarthamaren, Dronning Maud Land), located >1000 km from the main fishing areas, during three consecutive seasons. The overall spatial overlap between krill fisheries and Antarctic petrels was limited but varied greatly among and within years, and was high in some periods during the non-breeding season. In a second step, we described the length frequency distribution of Antarctic krill consumed by Antarctic petrels, and compared this with results from fisheries, as well as from diet studies in other krill predators. Krill taken by Antarctic petrels did not differ in size from that taken by trawls or from krill taken by most Antarctic krill predators. Selectivity for specific Antarctic krill stages seems generally low in Antarctic predators. Overall, our results show that competition between Antarctic petrels and krill fisheries is currently likely negligible. However, if krill fisheries are to increase in the future, competition with the Antarctic petrel may occur, even with birds breeding thousands of kilometers away. PMID:27533327

  13. From LIP to OIB: A view from the Galapagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Vidito, C. A.; Herzberg, C. T.; Class, C.

    2013-12-01

    Current models suggest that the massive basaltic production responsible for the emplacement of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPS) during the Permian-Paleocene may represent the initial phases of some of the mantle plumes that feed the current ocean island basalts (OIB). In some cases this magmatism was so voluminous that it produced global environmental impacts. Recent petrological, geochemical and geophysical studies of some of these localities like Samoa, Hawaii, Galapagos provide evidence that melting is related to a true mantle plume that originates from a boundary layer beneath the upper mantle. Thus, plume-related magmas produced in OIB and LIPS and their connecting plume tracks provide evidence on mantle temperature, size and composition of heterogeneities, and deep geochemical cycles. Although a lot of work has been done on LIPS and OIB, no complete record of the evolution of a mantle plume is available to this point. Galapagos-related lavas provide a complete record of the evolution of a mantle plume since the plume's initial stages in the Cretaceous. In the case of the Galapagos, our work suggests a decrease from TP(max) of 1650 °C in the Cretaceous to 1500 °C in the present day. Our recent work on the Galapagos Islands and the preliminary work on older Galapagos-related terranes suggest that together with secular cooling it is also evident the increase of recycled crust in the plume. Detailed olivine chemistry suggests that although peridotite is the dominant source lithology of the Galapagos Plume, a recycled pyroxenite component is also significant in both isotopically enriched and depleted domains of the archipelago. We suggest that this possibly represents two separate bodies of recycled crust within the Galapagos mantle plume.

  14. Contrasting movement strategies among juvenile albatrosses and petrels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grissac, Sophie; Börger, Luca; Guitteaud, Audrey; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2016-05-01

    Animal movement is a fundamental eco-evolutionary process yet the behaviour of juvenile animals is largely unknown for many species, especially for soaring seabirds which can range widely over the oceans at low cost. We present an unprecedented dataset of 98 juvenile albatrosses and petrels (nine species), tracked for the first three months after independence. There was a startling diversity within and among species in the type and scale of post-natal movement strategies, ranging from area-restricted to nomadic patterns. Spatial scales were clustered in three groups that ranged from <3000 km to >6000 km from the natal nest. In seven of the nine species, the orientation of flight paths and other movement statistics showed strong similarities between juveniles and adults, providing evidence for innate orientation abilities. Our results have implications for understanding the development of foraging behaviour in naïve individuals and the evolution of life history traits such as survival, lifespan and breeding strategy.

  15. Contrasting movement strategies among juvenile albatrosses and petrels

    PubMed Central

    de Grissac, Sophie; Börger, Luca; Guitteaud, Audrey; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Animal movement is a fundamental eco-evolutionary process yet the behaviour of juvenile animals is largely unknown for many species, especially for soaring seabirds which can range widely over the oceans at low cost. We present an unprecedented dataset of 98 juvenile albatrosses and petrels (nine species), tracked for the first three months after independence. There was a startling diversity within and among species in the type and scale of post-natal movement strategies, ranging from area-restricted to nomadic patterns. Spatial scales were clustered in three groups that ranged from <3000 km to >6000 km from the natal nest. In seven of the nine species, the orientation of flight paths and other movement statistics showed strong similarities between juveniles and adults, providing evidence for innate orientation abilities. Our results have implications for understanding the development of foraging behaviour in naïve individuals and the evolution of life history traits such as survival, lifespan and breeding strategy. PMID:27189182

  16. Contrasting movement strategies among juvenile albatrosses and petrels.

    PubMed

    de Grissac, Sophie; Börger, Luca; Guitteaud, Audrey; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2016-05-18

    Animal movement is a fundamental eco-evolutionary process yet the behaviour of juvenile animals is largely unknown for many species, especially for soaring seabirds which can range widely over the oceans at low cost. We present an unprecedented dataset of 98 juvenile albatrosses and petrels (nine species), tracked for the first three months after independence. There was a startling diversity within and among species in the type and scale of post-natal movement strategies, ranging from area-restricted to nomadic patterns. Spatial scales were clustered in three groups that ranged from <3000 km to >6000 km from the natal nest. In seven of the nine species, the orientation of flight paths and other movement statistics showed strong similarities between juveniles and adults, providing evidence for innate orientation abilities. Our results have implications for understanding the development of foraging behaviour in naïve individuals and the evolution of life history traits such as survival, lifespan and breeding strategy.

  17. An examination of US consumer pet-related and veterinary service expenditures, 1980--2005.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Christopher A; Lloyd, James W; Black, J Roy

    2008-08-01

    To evaluate US consumer expenditures for veterinary services, pets-pet supplies, and pet-related services. Retrospective economic analysis. US consumers from 1980 through 2005. Descriptive statistics and probit regressions were calculated. From 1980 to 2005, total inflation-adjusted expenditures on pet-related and veterinary services increased, as did the percentage of households with a pet-related expenditure. The percentage of households with veterinary service expenditures was fairly constant. Among households with a pet-related expenditure, the percentage purchasing veterinary services decreased. The probability for pet-related and veterinary service expenditures increased with income, education, and family size and was higher for household heads who were white, were married, owned their residence, and lived in a rural area. Overall spending on veterinary services increased substantially, providing no indication that successful practices should change strategy. Households that spent money on veterinary services increased their spending sufficiently to exceed the loss of income for veterinarians associated with the increasing proportion of pet-owning households that did not spend anything on veterinary services. Because the probability of veterinary service expenditures was strongly related to household income, caution is suggested in planning provision of veterinary services when incomes are constrained. Among households with pet-related expenditures, the decreasing percentage of households with veterinary service expenditures suggests a growing proportion of pet owners who are not having their veterinary service needs met. Because non-white households were less likely to purchase veterinary services, the veterinary profession cannot afford to delay efforts to enhance diversity and cultural competence.

  18. Avian cholera in a southern giant petrel (Macronectes giganteus) from Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Leotta, G A; Rivas, M; Chinen, I; Vigo, G B; Moredo, F A; Coria, N; Wolcott, M J

    2003-07-01

    A southern giant petrel (Macronectes giganteus) was found dead at Potter Peninsula, King George Island, South Shetland, Antarctica. The adult male was discovered approximately 48 hr after death. Macroscopic and microscopic lesions were compatible with avian cholera and the bacterium Pasteurella multocida subsp. gallicida, serotype A1 was isolated from lung, heart, liver, pericardial sac, and air sacs. In addition, Escherichia coli was isolated from pericardial sac and air sacs. This is the first known report of avian cholera in a southern giant petrel in Antarctica.

  19. Exposure to Toxoplasma gondii in Galapagos Penguins (Spheniscus mendiculus) and flightless cormorants (Phalacrocorax harrisi) in the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Deem, Sharon L; Merkel, Jane; Ballweber, Lora; Vargas, F Hernan; Cruz, Marilyn B; Parker, Patricia G

    2010-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is one of the most common protozoan parasites of humans and warm-blooded animals. Members of the family Felidae are the only definitive hosts of this parasite and, thus, important in the epidemiology of the disease. Previous studies on Pacific islands have found T. gondii infections in a number of avian species where domestic cats (Felis catus) have been introduced. Little is known about T. gondii in the Galapagos Islands, although introduced domestic cats in the archipelago are known to be T. gondii antibody-positive. In this study, we quantified prevalence of antibody to T. gondii in two threatened avian marine species, Galapagos Penguins (Spheniscus mendiculus) and Flightless Cormorants (Phalacrocorax harrisi), and tested the hypothesis that this parasite is more prevalent on Isabela Island (with cats) than on Fernandina Island (without cats). Overall, antibody prevalence was 2.3% in both Galapagos Penguins and Flightless Cormorants from samples collected during 2003-2005, and in 2008. In Galapagos Penguins (n=298), a significantly higher antibody prevalence was found in penguins on Fernandina Island (free of cats) than on Isabela Island (with cats; Fisher's exact test; P=0.02). In Flightless Cormorants (n=258), there was a higher antibody prevalence in cormorants living on Isabela than on Fernandina, although this difference was not statistically significant (Fisher's; P=0.19). This study is the first to show exposure to T. gondii in endemic avian species in the Galapagos Islands, providing evidence for disease-related risks associated with the feral cat population in the archipelago. We provide possible explanations for these findings and recommendations for future studies towards a better understanding of the epidemiology of T. gondii in the Galapagos Islands.

  20. Hippocampal volume is related to complexity of nesting habitat in Leach's storm-petrel, a nocturnal procellariiform seabird.

    PubMed

    Abbott, M L; Walsh, C J; Storey, A E; Stenhouse, I J; Harley, C W

    1999-01-01

    The hippocampal and telencephalon volumes of the nocturnal Leach's storm-petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa, n = 15) were compared with published data for food-storing and non-storing Passerines. The hippocampus to telencephalon ratio of Leach's storm-petrels is intermediate between food-storing and non-storing birds. Leach's storm-petrels taken from nesting burrows in wooded habitat had a larger relative hippocampal volume than those taken from burrows in an open meadow. Relative olfactory volume did not differ between woods and open-nesting storm-petrels. The larger relative hippocampal volume of storm-petrels may be associated with increased spatial demands of returning to their nests at night in the darker, more navigationally complex woods. It is not known whether the larger hippocampus in storm-petrels from the woods is due to selection on different subpopulations or whether experience in a more complex environment results in greater hippocampal volume. Hippocampal volume from the brain of one diurnal Procellariiforme, the northern fulmar (Fulmaris glacialis), fell within the range of non-storing species, which supports the view that hippocampal enlargement in the storm-petrel is related to the spatial demand of returning to the nest at night.

  1. Specimens and probable breeding activity of the band-rumped storm-petrel on Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banko, W.E.; Banko, P.C.; David, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Specimens (a downy fledgling and a hatch-year juvenile) and nocturnal calling of the Band-rumped Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma custro) are evidence that this rare seabird breeds on the island of Hawaii. Nocturnal calling over land and sightings near the coast indicate that populations nest on the southwest rift and possibly the upper western slope of Mauna Loa.

  2. Phylogenetic affinities of the Fregetta storm-petrels are not black and white.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Bruce C; Stephenson, Brent M; Ronconi, Robert A; Goldstien, Sharyn J; Shepherd, Lara; Tennyson, Alan; Carlile, Nicholas; Ryan, Peter G

    2016-04-01

    The Fregetta storm-petrels generally are regarded to comprise two species: black-bellied storm-petrels F. tropica (monotypic) breed at Antarctic and sub-Antarctic islands (46-63°S), and white-bellied storm-petrels F. grallaria breed at south temperate islands (28-37°S), with four recognized subspecies. Confusion surrounds the status of birds at Gough Island (40°S), central South Atlantic, which have been attributed usually to a white-bellied form of black-bellied storm-petrel F. t. melanoleuca. We use cytochrome b and nuclear β-fibrinogen gene sequences to show that F. t. melanoleuca are present during the breeding season at Gough and islands in the nearby Tristan da Cunha archipelago (37°S), exhibiting limited divergence from F. t. tropica. We also show that there is greater diversity among F. grallaria populations, with eastern South Pacific F. g. segethi and F. g. titan differing by c. 0.011, and both differing from western South Pacific nominate F. g. grallaria by c. 0.059. The Tristan archipelago supports a population of F. grallaria closely allied to the nominate form, as well as a distinct form identified as F. g. leucogaster. Further research is needed to assess how F. grallaria and F. tropica segregate in sympatry at Tristan and Gough, and why this is the only location where both species have white-bellies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Population Abundance of the Endangered Galapagos Sea Lion Zalophus wollebaeki in the Southeastern Galapagos Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Riofrío-Lazo, Marjorie; Arreguín-Sánchez, Francisco; Páez-Rosas, Diego

    2017-01-01

    There is great concern regarding the population status of the endangered Galapagos sea lion (GSL) because it has drastically decreased over the last 30 years. We determined the population size and growth trend of the GSL in the Galapagos southeastern region (SER) at three population levels based on the available census data: 1) SER (2011–2015), including 13 rookeries on the four islands San Cristóbal (SC), Española, Floreana, and Santa Fe, comprising 58% of the archipelago’s population; 2) SC (2011–2015), including five rookeries, comprising 52% of the SER population; and 3) El Malecón (2005–2015), the largest rookery on SC and in the SER (43% of the population on SC and 22% in the SER). We also analyzed the influence of environmental variability on pup abundance in these rookeries. The current GSL population size in the SER, after applying correction factors to the counts, is estimated at approximately 2300–4100 individuals and has declined at an average annual rate (ʎ) of 8.7% over the last five years. A similar trend was determined for SC but at ʎ = 1.4% during the same period. For El Malecón, a count-based population viability analysis using a diffusion approximation approach showed that the population increased from 2005 to 2015 at ʎ = 2%. The interannual variability in pup abundance was associated with anomalies in sea surface temperature linked to oceanographic-atmospheric events, which impact the abundance and availability of prey, and ultimately may determine the population’s reproductive success. Since rookeries in the SER had different population trends, management actions should be implemented based on their specific conditions, giving priority to rookeries such as El Malecón, which, despite showing a slightly increasing population trend, still faces a high risk of extinction due to anthropogenic disturbances and environmental variability that may affect its growth and survival. PMID:28052081

  4. Population Abundance of the Endangered Galapagos Sea Lion Zalophus wollebaeki in the Southeastern Galapagos Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Riofrío-Lazo, Marjorie; Arreguín-Sánchez, Francisco; Páez-Rosas, Diego

    2017-01-01

    There is great concern regarding the population status of the endangered Galapagos sea lion (GSL) because it has drastically decreased over the last 30 years. We determined the population size and growth trend of the GSL in the Galapagos southeastern region (SER) at three population levels based on the available census data: 1) SER (2011-2015), including 13 rookeries on the four islands San Cristóbal (SC), Española, Floreana, and Santa Fe, comprising 58% of the archipelago's population; 2) SC (2011-2015), including five rookeries, comprising 52% of the SER population; and 3) El Malecón (2005-2015), the largest rookery on SC and in the SER (43% of the population on SC and 22% in the SER). We also analyzed the influence of environmental variability on pup abundance in these rookeries. The current GSL population size in the SER, after applying correction factors to the counts, is estimated at approximately 2300-4100 individuals and has declined at an average annual rate (ʎ) of 8.7% over the last five years. A similar trend was determined for SC but at ʎ = 1.4% during the same period. For El Malecón, a count-based population viability analysis using a diffusion approximation approach showed that the population increased from 2005 to 2015 at ʎ = 2%. The interannual variability in pup abundance was associated with anomalies in sea surface temperature linked to oceanographic-atmospheric events, which impact the abundance and availability of prey, and ultimately may determine the population's reproductive success. Since rookeries in the SER had different population trends, management actions should be implemented based on their specific conditions, giving priority to rookeries such as El Malecón, which, despite showing a slightly increasing population trend, still faces a high risk of extinction due to anthropogenic disturbances and environmental variability that may affect its growth and survival.

  5. The Galapagos Islands: Darwin and Modern Conservation Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burr, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The author visited the Galapagos Islands in 2009 and here looks at their biodiversity through pictures taken then. The diverse habitats of the Islands are reflected in the great diversity of flora and fauna found on them, with many species endemic to the Islands. The stories of the land iguanas, control of introduced species and the giant…

  6. Deep-sea primary production at the Galapagos hydrothermal vents

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, D.M.; Wirsen, C.O.; Jannasch, H.W.

    1980-03-21

    Dense animal populations surrounding recently discovered hydrothermal vents at the Galapagos Rift sea-floor spreading center, 2550 meters deep, are probably sustained by microbial primary production. Energy in the form of geothermically reduced sulfur compounds emitted from the vents is liberated during oxidation and used for the reduction of carbon dioxide to organic matter by chemosynthetic bacteria.

  7. The Galapagos Islands: Darwin and Modern Conservation Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burr, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The author visited the Galapagos Islands in 2009 and here looks at their biodiversity through pictures taken then. The diverse habitats of the Islands are reflected in the great diversity of flora and fauna found on them, with many species endemic to the Islands. The stories of the land iguanas, control of introduced species and the giant…

  8. Seroprevalence of malarial antibodies in Galapagos penguins (Spheniscus mendiculus).

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jamie L; McCutchan, Thomas F; Vargas, F Hernan; Deem, Sharon L; Cruz, Marilyn; Hartman, Daniel A; Parker, Patricia G

    2013-10-01

    A parasite species of the genus Plasmodium has recently been documented in the endangered Galapagos penguin (Spheniscus mendiculus). Avian malaria causes high mortality in several species after initial exposure and there is great concern for the conservation of the endemic Galapagos penguin. Using a Plasmodium spp. circumsporozoite protein antigen, we standardized an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to test the level of exposure in this small population, as indicated by seroprevalence. Sera from adult and juvenile Galapagos penguins collected between 2004 and 2009 on the Galapagos archipelago were tested for the presence of anti- Plasmodium spp. antibodies. Penguins were also tested for the prevalence of avian malaria parasite DNA using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) screening. Total seroprevalence of malarial antibodies in this sample group was 97.2%, which suggests high exposure to the parasite and low Plasmodium-induced mortality. However, total prevalence of Plasmodium parasite DNA by PCR screening was 9.2%, and this suggests that parasite prevalence may be under-detected through PCR screening. Multiple detection methods may be necessary to measure the real extent of Plasmodium exposure on the archipelago.

  9. UAV Monitoring for Enviromental Management in Galapagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballari, D.; Orellana, D.; Acosta, E.; Espinoza, A.; Morocho, V.

    2016-06-01

    In the Galapagos Islands, where 97% of the territory is protected and ecosystem dynamics are highly vulnerable, timely and accurate information is key for decision making. An appropriate monitoring system must meet two key features: on one hand, being able to capture information in a systematic and regular basis, and on the other hand, to quickly gather information on demand for specific purposes. The lack of such a system for geographic information limits the ability of Galapagos Islands' institutions to evaluate and act upon environmental threats such as invasive species spread and vegetation degradation. In this context, the use of UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) for capturing georeferenced images is a promising technology for environmental monitoring and management. This paper explores the potential of UAV images for monitoring degradation of littoral vegetation in Puerto Villamil (Isabela Island, Galapagos, Ecuador). Imagery was captured using two camera types: Red Green Blue (RGB) and Infrarred Red Green (NIR). First, vegetation presence was identified through NDVI. Second, object-based classification was carried out for characterization of vegetation vigor. Results demonstrates the feasibility of UAV technology for base-line studies and monitoring on the amount and vigorousness of littoral vegetation in the Galapagos Islands. It is also showed that UAV images are not only useful for visual interpretation and object delineation, but also to timely produce useful thematic information for environmental management.

  10. Galapagos III World Evolution Summit: why evolution matters.

    PubMed

    Paz-Y-Miño-C, Guillermo; Espinosa, Avelina

    There is no place on Earth like the Galapagos Islands and no better destination to discuss the reality of evolution. Under the theme 'Why Does Evolution Matter', the University San Francisco of Quito (USFQ), Ecuador, and its Galapagos Institute for the Arts and Sciences (GAIAS), organized the III World Evolution Summit in San Cristóbal Island. The 200-attendee meeting took place on 1 to 5 June 2013; it included 12 keynote speakers, 20 oral presentations by international scholars, and 31 posters by faculty, postdocs, and graduate and undergraduate students. The Summit encompassed five sessions: evolution and society, pre-cellular evolution and the RNA world, behavior and environment, genome, and microbes and diseases. USFQ and GAIAS launched officially the Lynn Margulis Center for Evolutionary Biology and showcased the Galapagos Science Center, in San Cristóbal, an impressive research facility conceptualized in partnership with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA. USFQ and GAIAS excelled at managing the conference with exceptional vision and at highlighting the relevance of Galapagos in the history of modern evolutionary thinking; Charles Darwin's visit to this volcanic archipelago in 1835 unfolded unprecedented scientific interest in what today is a matchless World Heritage.

  11. Galapagos III World Evolution Summit: why evolution matters

    PubMed Central

    Paz-y-Miño-C, Guillermo; Espinosa, Avelina

    2016-01-01

    There is no place on Earth like the Galapagos Islands and no better destination to discuss the reality of evolution. Under the theme ‘Why Does Evolution Matter’, the University San Francisco of Quito (USFQ), Ecuador, and its Galapagos Institute for the Arts and Sciences (GAIAS), organized the III World Evolution Summit in San Cristóbal Island. The 200-attendee meeting took place on 1 to 5 June 2013; it included 12 keynote speakers, 20 oral presentations by international scholars, and 31 posters by faculty, postdocs, and graduate and undergraduate students. The Summit encompassed five sessions: evolution and society, pre-cellular evolution and the RNA world, behavior and environment, genome, and microbes and diseases. USFQ and GAIAS launched officially the Lynn Margulis Center for Evolutionary Biology and showcased the Galapagos Science Center, in San Cristóbal, an impressive research facility conceptualized in partnership with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA. USFQ and GAIAS excelled at managing the conference with exceptional vision and at highlighting the relevance of Galapagos in the history of modern evolutionary thinking; Charles Darwin’s visit to this volcanic archipelago in 1835 unfolded unprecedented scientific interest in what today is a matchless World Heritage. PMID:26925190

  12. Pup Mortality and Evidence for Pathogen Exposure in Galapagos Sea Lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) on San Cristobal Island, Galapagos, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Denkinger, Judith; Guevara, Nataly; Ayala, Sofia; Murillo, Juan Carlos; Hirschfeld, Maximilian; Montero-Serra, Ignasi; Fietz, Katharina; Goldstein, Tracey; Ackermann, Mark; Barragán, Veronica; Cabrera, Francisco; Chavez, Cristina; Dubovi, Edward J; Martinez, Jael; Trueba, Gabriel

    2017-03-20

    The Galapagos sea lion ( Zalophus wollebaeki ), an endangered species, experiences high pup mortality (up to 100%) in years when El Niño events reduce food supply in the Galapagos Islands. Mortality of pups in non-El Niño years is estimated to be 5% in undisturbed colonies. From 2009 to 2012 we observed high pup mortality (up to 66%) in colonies close to the Galapagos capital, Puerto Baquerizo Moreno, where contact with humans, domestic animals, and rats is frequent. Gross postmortem findings from 54 pups included hemorrhagic lesions in liver and congestion in lungs; histopathology suggested a possible association with infectious diseases. Evidence of Leptospira infection was found in five out of seven samples collected in 2010. Canine distemper viral (CDV) RNA was detected in tissues from six sea lions (in 2011-2012), four of which were confirmed by nucleotide sequencing. The absence of CDV antibodies in 109 juvenile animals tested in 2014 at urban and remote colonies could indicate that the CDV infection observed in 2011 was likely confined to a few animals. Our results indicated that Galapagos sea lions have been exposed at least to two pathogens, Leptospira and CDV; however, the impact of these infections on the sea lions is unclear.

  13. Imaging Enhancement on Deep Seismic Reflection with Petrel and Ocean Working Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, P.; Huang, D.; Feng, X.; Li, L.; Liu, W.; Wang, Y.; Zhao, Q.

    2011-12-01

    SinoProbe has been initiated to enhance understanding of earth deep structure, resources and geological disasters forecasting throughout Chinese continent. Besides traditional deep exploration methods, various state-of-the-art technologies have been carried out in order to acquire data and jointly utilize all possible information reflecting deep crust and mantle structures and evolution.Petrel, a powerful software application developed by Schlumberger, has been successfully applied to the O&G industry. It is now a complete seismic-to-simulation application for 3D and 2D seismic interpretation. However, it has a great potential to allow the user to extend utilization with multiple types of data sets to deal with much deeper geophysical information. Petrel all-in-one concept, that functionally comprises of massive data integration, multiple domains experts participation and 3D geological object-oriented etc., will come benefit to the deep earth study. Currently, there is no special tool designed for this purpose so that Petrel is required to extend its potential to cope with not only O&G area but also a larger area with unique requests of deeper objects.Ocean, a software framework for Petrel, provides an open development environment offering seamless integration of developer intellectual contribution to the Petrel mainstream workflow. It is able to accelerate the development and deployment of user's Petrel-like workflows to resolve complex problems. It can be implemented by means of plug-ins utilities although there is additional challenge to write a robust code with Ocean framework. Deep seismic reflection profiling is a well recognized technique to reveal the fine structure of lithosphere. Moreover, it can perform a significant role for prospective evaluation of O&G and mineral resources, and geological disasters. Its near-vertical deep seismic reflection method can enhance broad band seismic observations for imaging of the deep crust and continental geodynamics

  14. Galapagos Islands taken by the STS-109 crew

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-03-10

    STS109-718-102 (1-12 March 2002) --- The astronauts on board the Space Shuttle Columbia took this 70mm picture featuring the Galapagos Islands. For orientation purposes, north is towards the bottom of the view. Most of the largest island in the Galapagos group, Isla Isabela, stretches across the middle of the frame. The circular feature on this island at bottom is Volcano Wolf (1707 meters in altitude). Volcano Darwin (1280 meters in sea level) is the next volcano above and to the left, partly ringed with cloud. The single island top right is Isla Fernandina, the top of another volcano (1547 meters). Recent lava flows appear as darker surfaces and the older surfaces appear green, as a result of unusual rains and vegetational greening in this normally arid part of the world. The Equator passes exactly through Volcano Wolf, roughly left to right.

  15. Widespread Synchronous Volcanism Reveals a Broad Galapagos Hotspot Melting Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. M.; Stoffers, P.; Wijbrans, J. R.; Worthington, T. J.

    2004-12-01

    The massive aseismic ridges and associated seamounts dominating the morphology of the Panama Basin, eastern Central Pacific, have long been attributed to a Galapagos hotspot melting anomaly linked to a deep-seated mantle plume. Although these structures can provide information about the origin of hotspots and existence, or otherwise, of mantle plumes very little is known about their volcanic histories due to a lack of direct age and geochemical information. We report here 74 whole rock and 2 plagioclase 40Ar/39Ar ages for rocks dredged from 53 locations during the first systematic sampling of the Cocos, Carnegie, Coiba and Malpelo aseismic ridges and associated seamounts (F.S. SONNE PAGANINI expedition). In addition we also report ages for DSDP drill sites on Cocos, Carnegie and Coiba ridges and 7 Cocos Island subaerial samples. The distribution of new, and published ages for the Galapagos Archipelago-platform and NE end of the Cocos Ridge, show a general trend of increasing age with distance from the Galapagos Archipelago. A more dominant trend however is one of aseismic ridge-seamount formation in a progression of broad zones of synchronous, often overlapping volcanism created at discrete intervals. Broad zones of coeval Cocos and Carnegie volcanism once formed much larger regions of synchronous volcanism that have been split apart by the complex history of seafloor spreading associated with the Cocos-Nazca spreading center. We link these broad regions of synchronous volcanism to a correspondingly large hotspot melting anomaly. The present day, as yet unfragmented, zone of synchronous volcanism associated with this proposed broad hotspot is marked by the extensive region of recent volcanism extending across the Nazca and Cocos plates encompassing the Galapagos Archipelago-Platform and the Cocos Ridge as far north as Cocos Island. The complex tectonic history of the Cocos-Nazca spreading-center has controlled how the broad zones of synchronous, often overlapping

  16. Effects of human disturbance on cave-nesting seabirds: the case of the storm petrel

    PubMed Central

    Soldatini, Cecilia; Albores-Barajas, Yuri V.; Tagliavia, Marcello; Massa, Bruno; Fusani, Leonida; Canoine, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    Human disturbance is an important stress factor with potentially strong impact on breeding activity in animals. The consequences can be extinction of the breeding population, because disturbed animals might desert their breeding area and find no suitable substitute area. In this study, we investigated the effects of anthropogenic disturbance on a breeding population of Mediterranean storm petrels. Seabirds are increasingly used as bio-indicators for sea environmental parameters, because they are very sensitive to changing conditions. Burrowing or cave-nesting species may be particularly susceptible to human disturbance because their direct contact with humans is usually minimal or absent. First, we compared two different populations (exposed or not exposed to human disturbance) for their individual stress response to a standardized stressor (handling and keeping in a cloth bag). Second, we compared the two sub-colonies for their population-level stress response. Third, we tested experimentally whether sub-colonies of storm petrels exposed to tourism have physiological adaptations to anthropogenic disturbances. Our results indicate that storm petrels may be habituated to moderate disturbance associated with boat traffic close to the colony. PMID:27293726

  17. Effects of human disturbance on cave-nesting seabirds: the case of the storm petrel.

    PubMed

    Soldatini, Cecilia; Albores-Barajas, Yuri V; Tagliavia, Marcello; Massa, Bruno; Fusani, Leonida; Canoine, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    Human disturbance is an important stress factor with potentially strong impact on breeding activity in animals. The consequences can be extinction of the breeding population, because disturbed animals might desert their breeding area and find no suitable substitute area. In this study, we investigated the effects of anthropogenic disturbance on a breeding population of Mediterranean storm petrels. Seabirds are increasingly used as bio-indicators for sea environmental parameters, because they are very sensitive to changing conditions. Burrowing or cave-nesting species may be particularly susceptible to human disturbance because their direct contact with humans is usually minimal or absent. First, we compared two different populations (exposed or not exposed to human disturbance) for their individual stress response to a standardized stressor (handling and keeping in a cloth bag). Second, we compared the two sub-colonies for their population-level stress response. Third, we tested experimentally whether sub-colonies of storm petrels exposed to tourism have physiological adaptations to anthropogenic disturbances. Our results indicate that storm petrels may be habituated to moderate disturbance associated with boat traffic close to the colony.

  18. Southern giant Petrel Macronectes giganteus nest attendance patterns under extreme weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Uwe Horst; Krüger, Lucas; Petry, Maria Virginia

    2014-08-01

    Differences in nest attendance between genders in seabirds may be related to morphological differences. Southern giant petrel is a dimorphic species with gender-specific foraging behavior. The objective of this study was to investigate sex-related differences in nest attendance during the breeding period of southern giant petrels by presence/absence patterns of both sexes during incubation and compare use of the colony after nest failure. Fourteen birds were tagged with digitally coded radio-transmitters in a colony at Elephant Island, Antarctica, in the beginning of 2009/2010 breeding season. Females were present during 18 periods (min. 3 days, max. 9 days) and males only in five periods (min. 2 days, max. 13 days). The difference in mean number of radio signals per day between females (4330; s.e. 313.5) and males (2691; s.e. 248.6) was highly significant (t = 4.3; d.f. = 199; P < 0.001; Fig. 4 ). As consequence of the severe weather conditions that year, all tagged birds failed to reproduce. After abandonment of the nests, the presence of both genders decreased drastically, although the tagged individuals stayed in the area. Under severe weather conditions female Southern Giant Petrels continue breeding while males abandon the nest earlier.

  19. Ecological segregation in space, time and trophic niche of sympatric planktivorous petrels.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Joan; Votier, Stephen C; Aguzzi, Jacopo; Chiesa, Juan J; Forero, Manuela G; Phillips, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    The principle of competitive exclusion postulates that ecologically-similar species are expected to partition their use of resources, leading to niche divergence. The most likely mechanisms allowing such coexistence are considered to be segregation in a horizontal, vertical or temporal dimension, or, where these overlap, a difference in trophic niche. Here, by combining information obtained from tracking devices (geolocator-immersion and time depth recorders), stable isotope analyses of blood, and conventional morphometry, we provide a detailed investigation of the ecological mechanisms that explain the coexistence of four species of abundant, zooplanktivorous seabirds in Southern Ocean ecosystems (blue petrel Halobaena caerulea, Antarctic prion Pachyptila desolata, common diving petrel Pelecanoides urinatrix and South Georgian diving petrel P. georgicus). The results revealed a combination of horizontal, vertical and temporal foraging segregation during the breeding season. The stable isotope and morphological analyses reinforced this conclusion, indicating that each species occupied a distinct trophic space, and that this appears to reflect adaptations in terms of flight performance. In conclusion, the present study indicated that although there was a degree of overlap in some measures of foraging behaviour, overall the four taxa operated in very different ecological space despite breeding in close proximity. We therefore provide important insight into the mechanisms allowing these very large populations of ecologically-similar predators to coexist.

  20. Ecological Segregation in Space, Time and Trophic Niche of Sympatric Planktivorous Petrels

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Joan; Votier, Stephen C.; Aguzzi, Jacopo; Chiesa, Juan J.; Forero, Manuela G.; Phillips, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    The principle of competitive exclusion postulates that ecologically-similar species are expected to partition their use of resources, leading to niche divergence. The most likely mechanisms allowing such coexistence are considered to be segregation in a horizontal, vertical or temporal dimension, or, where these overlap, a difference in trophic niche. Here, by combining information obtained from tracking devices (geolocator-immersion and time depth recorders), stable isotope analyses of blood, and conventional morphometry, we provide a detailed investigation of the ecological mechanisms that explain the coexistence of four species of abundant, zooplanktivorous seabirds in Southern Ocean ecosystems (blue petrel Halobaena caerulea, Antarctic prion Pachyptila desolata, common diving petrel Pelecanoides urinatrix and South Georgian diving petrel P. georgicus). The results revealed a combination of horizontal, vertical and temporal foraging segregation during the breeding season. The stable isotope and morphological analyses reinforced this conclusion, indicating that each species occupied a distinct trophic space, and that this appears to reflect adaptations in terms of flight performance. In conclusion, the present study indicated that although there was a degree of overlap in some measures of foraging behaviour, overall the four taxa operated in very different ecological space despite breeding in close proximity. We therefore provide important insight into the mechanisms allowing these very large populations of ecologically-similar predators to coexist. PMID:23646155

  1. Motion analysis and trials of the deep sea hybrid underwater glider Petrel-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; Wang, Yan-hui; Wu, Zhi-liang; Wang, Shu-xin

    2017-03-01

    A hybrid underwater glider Petrel-II has been developed and field tested. It is equipped with an active buoyancy unit and a compact propeller unit. Its working modes have been expanded to buoyancy driven gliding and propeller driven level-flight, which can make the glider work in strong currents, as well as many other complicated ocean environments. Its maximal gliding speed reaches 1 knot and the propelling speed is up to 3 knots. In this paper, a 3D dynamic model of Petrel-II is derived using linear momentum and angular momentum equations. According to the dynamic model, the spiral motion in the underwater space is simulated for the gliding mode. Similarly the cycle motion on water surface and the depth-keeping motion underwater are simulated for the level-flight mode. These simulations are important to the performance analysis and parameter optimization for the Petrel-II underwater glider. The simulation results show a good agreement with field trials.

  2. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in fat samples from White-chinned Petrels (Procellaria aequinoctialis) and Spectacled Petrels (P. conspicillata) off southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cipro, Caio V Z; Colabuono, Fernanda I; Taniguchi, Satie; Montone, Rosalinda C

    2013-12-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been gaining much visibility in environmental chemical studies due to their similarity to PCBs and growing reports of harmful effects. The fact that these contaminants have not yet undergone bans or restrictions on the global level underscores the need for data on their occurrence. In the present study, fat samples from 26 White-chinned Petrels (Procellaria aequinoctialis) and 3 Spectacled Petrels (P. conspicillata) collected dead ashore or as bycatch of longline fisheries in southern Brazil were analyzed to determine concentrations of seven congeners (IUPAC #28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154 and 183). Concentrations of ΣPBDEs ranged from not detectable to 72.70 ng g(-1) (wet weight), comparatively lower than concentrations reported for seabird samples in northern hemisphere. The most detected congeners were 153, 154 and 183. This pattern is close to that previously reported for birds of the same group, but not those from the same region. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Lithospheric structure and compensation mechanisms of the Galapagos Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feighner, Mark A.; Richards, Mark A.

    1994-04-01

    Volcanic islands of the Galapagos Archipelago are the most recent subaerial expression of the Galapagos hotspot. These islands and numerous seamounts are constructed mainly upon a broad volcanic platform that overlies very young (less than 10 m.y.) oceanic lithosphere just south of the active Galapagos Spreading Center. The 91 deg W fracture zone crosses the platform and creates an estimated 5-m.y. age discontinuity in the lithosphere. Major tectonic features of the Galapagos include an unusually broad distribution of volcanic centers, pronounced structural trends such as the NW-SE Wolf-Darwin Lineament (WDL), and a steep escarpment along the western and southern margins of the archipelago. We use shipboard gravity and bathymetry data along with Geosat geoid data to explain the tectonic and structural evolution of the Galapagos region. We model the gravity anomalies using a variety of compensation models, including Airy isostasy, continuous elastic flexure of the lithosphere, and an elastic plate with embedded weaknesses, and we infer significant lithospheric strength variations across the archipelago. The outboard parts of the southern and western escarpment are flexurally supported with an effective elastic thickness of approximately 12 km. This area includes the large shield volcanoes of Fernandina and Isabela Islands, where the lithosphere regionally supports these volcanic loads. The central platform is weaker, with an elastic thickness of 6 km or less, and close to Airy isostasy. The greatest depths to the Moho are located beneath eastern Isabela Island and the central platform. Thinner lithosphere in this region may account for the broad distribution of volcanoes, the extended period of eruption of the central volcanoes, and their reduced size. The transition from strong to weak lithosphere along the southern escarpment appears to be abrupt, within the resolution of our models, and can be best represented by a free end or faultlike discontinuity. Also

  4. The Galapagos-OIB signature of the central Costa Rican volcanic front: arc-hotspot interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Carr, M. J.; Hoernle, K.; Feigenson, M. D.; Hauff, F.; Szymanski, D.; van den Bogaard, P.

    2008-12-01

    Although most Central American magmas have a typical arc geochemical signature, magmas in southern Central America have isotopic and trace element compositions with an OIB affinity, similar to the Galapagos hotspot lavas. Our new data for Costa Rica suggest that this signature, unusual for a convergent margin, has a relatively recent origin (Late Miocene-Pliocene ca. 6 Ma). We also show that there was a transition from typical arc magmas (analogous to the modern Nicaraguan volcanic front) to OIB-like magmas. The geographic distribution of the Galapagos signature in recent lavas from southern Central America is present landward from the subduction of the Galapagos hotspot tracks (the Seamount Province and the Cocos/Coiba Ridges) at the Middle American Trench. The higher Pb isotopic ratios, relatively low Nd isotopic ratios and enriched geochemical signature of central Costa Rican magmas can be explained by arc-hotspot interaction. The isotopic ratios of central Costa Rican lavas require the subducting Seamount Province (Northern Galapagos Domain) component, whereas the isotopic ratios of the adakites and alkaline basalts from southern Costa Rica and Panama are in the geochemical range of the subducting Cocos/Coiba Ridges (Central Galapagos Domain). Geological, geochemical, and isotopic evidence collectively indicate that the relatively recent Galapagos-OIB signature in southern Central America represents a geochemical signal from subducting Galapagos hotspot tracks, which started to collide with the margin ~8 Ma ago. The Galapagos hotspot contribution decreases systematically along the volcanic front from central Costa Rica to NW Nicaragua.

  5. GALAPAGOS: Galaxy Analysis over Large Areas: Parameter Assessment by GALFITting Objects from SExtractor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Marco; Häußler, Boris; Peng, Chien Y.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Guo, Yicheng

    2012-03-01

    GALAPAGOS, Galaxy Analysis over Large Areas: Parameter Assessment by GALFITting Objects from SExtractor (ascl:1010.064), automates source detection, two-dimensional light-profile Sersic modelling and catalogue compilation in large survey applications. Based on a single setup, GALAPAGOS can process a complete set of survey images. It detects sources in the data, estimates a local sky background, cuts postage stamp images for all sources, prepares object masks, performs Sersic fitting including neighbours and compiles all objects in a final output catalogue. For the initial source detection GALAPAGOS applies SExtractor, while GALFIT (ascl:1104.010) is incorporated for modelling Sersic profiles. It measures the background sky involved in the Sersic fitting by means of a flux growth curve. GALAPAGOS determines postage stamp sizes based on SExtractor shape parameters. In order to obtain precise model parameters GALAPAGOS incorporates a complex sorting mechanism and makes use of multiplexing capabilities. It combines SExtractor and GALFIT data in a single output table. When incorporating information from overlapping tiles, GALAPAGOS automatically removes multiple entries from identical sources. GALAPAGOS is programmed in the Interactive Data Language, IDL. A C implementation of the software, GALAPAGOS-C (ascl:1408.011), is available.

  6. Environmental Education in the Galapagos: 2007 Report to the Charles Darwin Foundation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepath, Carl M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: "Environmental education in the Galapagos: 2007 report to the Charles Darwin Foundation" is a report to the Charles Darwin Foundation (CDF) about the researchers observations about the status of environmental education in the Galapagos in 2006 and 2007. Purpose: This paper reports on environmental education in the Galapagos…

  7. Latitudinal exposure to DDTs, HCB, PCBs, PBDEs and DP in giant petrels (Macronectes spp.) across the Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Roscales, Jose L; González-Solís, Jacob; Zango, Laura; Ryan, Peter G; Jiménez, Begoña

    2016-07-01

    Studies on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) in Antarctic wildlife are scarce, and usually limited to a single locality. As a result, wildlife exposure to POPs across the Southern Ocean is poorly understood. In this study, we report the differential exposure of the major southern ocean scavengers, the giant petrels, to POPs across a wide latitudinal gradient. Selected POPs (PCBs, HCB, DDTs, PBDEs) and related compounds, such as Dechlorane Plus (DP), were analyzed in plasma of southern giant petrels (Macronectes giganteus) breeding on Livingston (62°S 61°W, Antarctica), Marion (46°S 37°E, sub-Antarctic), and Gough (40°S 10°W, cool temperate) islands. Northern giant petrels (Macronectes halli) from Marion Island were also studied. Stable isotope ratios of C and N (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) were used as dietary tracers of the marine habitat and trophic level, respectively. Breeding locality was a major factor explaining petrel exposure to POPs compared with species and sex. Significant relationships between δ(13)C values and POP burdens, at both inter- and intra-population levels, support latitudinal variations in feeding grounds as a key factor in explaining petrel pollutant burdens. Overall, pollutant levels in giant petrels decreased significantly with latitude, but the relative abundance (%) of the more volatile POPs increased towards Antarctica. DP was found at negligible levels compared with legacy POPs in Antarctic seabirds. Spatial POP patterns found in giant petrels match those predicted by global distribution models, and reinforce the hypothesis of atmospheric long-range transport as the main source of POPs in Antarctica. Our results confirm that wildlife movements out of the polar region markedly increase their exposure to POPs. Therefore, strategies for Antarctic wildlife conservation should consider spatial heterogeneity in exposure to marine pollution. Of particular relevance is the need to clarify the exposure of Antarctic predators to emerging

  8. Galapagos and Easter: A Tale of Two Hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpp, K.; Hall, P. S.; Jackson, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    Spatial asymmetry in the isotopic composition of volcanic rocks has been identified at several Pacific hotspots, including Hawaii, the Marquesas, and Samoa (Weis, 2011; Huang et al., 2011); the volcanoes are arranged in two chains that define distinct, sub-parallel fields in isotopic space. For these hotspots, lavas from the northern chains have a more depleted signature (higher ɛNd, lower 87Sr/86Sr, lower 208Pb*/206Pb*) than the corresponding southern chains. All 3 hotspots are located near the northern margin of the Large Low Shear Velocity Province (LLSVP) beneath the Pacific. Previous workers have proposed that the asymmetry may reflect bilateral compositional zonation in the plume created by an azimuthal distribution of heterogeneities about the base of the plume conduit, related to material in the LLSVP. This distribution is preserved in filaments from the lower mantle (e.g., Farnetani and Hofmann, 2009). Recently, Payne et al. (in press) showed that rocks from the Societies have an isotopic asymmetry that is the mirror image of Hawaii, with the northern lavas enriched relative to the southern chain. This is consistent with the Societies hotspot's location near the southern, rather than the northern margin of the LLSVP. We present data from two additional hotspots that exhibit spatial asymmetry in the isotopic characteristics of their lavas: the Galapagos and Easter hotspots, both on the Nazca Plate. Despite lacking two distinct volcanic chains, Galapagos lavas define a pattern similar to Hawaii, with enriched isotopic signatures in the southern and western archipelago and more depleted material in the north and east; the boundary dividing the compositional fields defines a NW-SE line parallel to the edge of the LLSVP. In contrast, the Easter Island chain resembles the Societies, in that the enriched lavas are erupted from the northern volcanoes, a mirror image of the Galapagos and coincident with the southern boundary of the LLSVP. Several important

  9. Survey for Haemoproteus spp., Trichomonas gallinae, Chlamydophila psittaci, and Salmonella spp. in Galapagos Islands columbiformes.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Luis R; Santiago-Alarcon, Diego; Merkel, Jane; Miller, R Eric; Parker, Patricia G

    2004-03-01

    Endemic free-ranging Galapagos doves (Zenaida galapagoensis) and introduced rock doves (Columba livia) were surveyed in several islands of the Galapagos archipelago to establish sample prevalence of hemoparasites, Trichomonas gallinae, Chlamydophila psittaci, and Salmonella species. A Haemoproteus sp., the only hemoparasite identified, was found in 89% of the Galapagos doves sampled but not in the rock doves. Trichomonas gallinae was detected by polymerase chain reaction in 44% of rock doves from San Cristobal but in none of the Galapagos doves. Chlamydophila psittaci was detected from cloacal swabs in 6% of the Galapagos doves but in none of the rock doves sampled. All positive cases of C. psittaci occurred on Española, where the crude sample prevalence was 24%. A polymerase chain reaction-based Salmonella test failed to show evidence of this organism from any birds sampled.

  10. At-sea distribution of radio-marked Ashy Storm-Petrels Oceanodroma homochroa captured on the California Channel Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, J.; Takekawa, John Y.

    2008-01-01

    Small, rare and wide-ranging pelagic birds are difficult to locate and observe at sea; little is therefore known regarding individual movements and habitat affinities among many of the world's storm-petrels (Family Hydrobatidae). We re-located 57 of 70 radio-marked Ashy Storm-Petrels Oceanodroma homochroa captured at three colonies in the California Channel Islands: Scorpion Rocks (2004, 2005), Santa Barbara Island (2004) and Prince Island (2005). Between 23 July and 22 September 2004, and 5 July and 4 August 2005, we flew 29 telemetry surveys, covered more than 65 000 km2 (2004) and 43 000 km2 (2005) of open ocean from San Nicolas Island north to the Farallon Islands and obtained 215 locations from 57 storm-petrels at sea. In both years, radio-marked storm-petrels were aggregated over the continental slope from Point Conception to Point Buchon, within the western Santa Barbara Channel, and over the Santa Cruz Basin between Santa Cruz, San Nicolas and Santa Barbara islands. Individuals captured in the Channel Islands ranged more than 600 km and were located as far north as Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. This is the first study to use radiotelemetry to determine the at-sea distribution and movements for any storm-petrel species.

  11. 110 Years of Avipoxvirus in the Galapagos Islands

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Patricia G.; Buckles, Elizabeth L.; Farrington, Heather; Petren, Kenneth; Whiteman, Noah K.; Ricklefs, Robert E.; Bollmer, Jennifer L.; Jiménez-Uzcátegui, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The role of disease in regulating populations is controversial, partly owing to the absence of good disease records in historic wildlife populations. We examined birds collected in the Galapagos Islands between 1891 and 1906 that are currently held at the California Academy of Sciences and the Zoologisches Staatssammlung Muenchen, including 3973 specimens representing species from two well-studied families of endemic passerine birds: finches and mockingbirds. Beginning with samples collected in 1899, we observed cutaneous lesions consistent with Avipoxvirus on 226 (6.3%) specimens. Histopathology and viral genotyping of 59 candidate tissue samples from six islands showed that 21 (35.6%) were positive for Avipoxvirus, while alternative diagnoses for some of those testing negative by both methods were feather follicle cysts, non-specific dermatitis, or post mortem fungal colonization. Positive specimens were significantly nonrandomly distributed among islands both for mockingbirds (San Cristobal vs. Espanola, Santa Fe and Santa Cruz) and for finches (San Cristobal and Isabela vs. Santa Cruz and Floreana), and overall highly significantly distributed toward islands that were inhabited by humans (San Cristobal, Isabela, Floreana) vs. uninhabited at the time of collection (Santa Cruz, Santa Fe, Espanola), with only one positive individual on an uninhabited island. Eleven of the positive specimens sequenced successfully were identical at four diagnostic sites to the two canarypox variants previously described in contemporary Galapagos passerines. We conclude that this virus was introduced late in 1890′s and was dispersed among islands by a variety of mechanisms, including regular human movements among colonized islands. At present, this disease represents an ongoing threat to the birds on the Galapagos Islands. PMID:21249151

  12. Allometric and temporal scaling of movement characteristics in Galapagos tortoises

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bastille-Rousseau, Guillaume; Yackulic, Charles B.; Frair, Jacqueline L.; Cabrera, Freddy; Blake, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how individual movement scales with body size is of fundamental importance in predicting ecological relationships for diverse species. One-dimensional movement metrics scale consistently with body size yet vary over different temporal scales. Knowing how temporal scale influences the relationship between animal body size and movement would better inform hypotheses about the efficiency of foraging behaviour, the ontogeny of energy budgets, and numerous life-history trade-offs.We investigated how the temporal scaling of allometric patterns in movement varies over the course of a year, specifically during periods of motivated (directional and fast movement) and unmotivated (stationary and tortuous movement) behaviour. We focused on a recently diverged group of species that displays wide variation in movement behaviour – giant Galapagos tortoises (Chelonoidis spp.) – to test how movement metrics estimated on a monthly basis scaled with body size.We used state-space modelling to estimate seven different movement metrics of Galapagos tortoises. We used log-log regression of the power law to evaluate allometric scaling for these movement metrics and contrasted relationships by species and sex.Allometric scaling of movement was more apparent during motivated periods of movement. During this period, allometry was revealed at multiple temporal intervals (hourly, daily and monthly), with values observed at daily and monthly intervals corresponding most closely to the expected one-fourth scaling coefficient, albeit with wide credible intervals. We further detected differences in the magnitude of scaling among taxa uncoupled from observed differences in the temporal structuring of their movement rates.Our results indicate that the definition of temporal scales is fundamental to the detection of allometry of movement and should be given more attention in movement studies. Our approach not only provides new conceptual insights into temporal attributes in one

  13. Paleochemistry of manganese in corals from the Galapagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Glen T.; Campbell, Todd M.; Dunbar, Robert B.; Wellington, Gerard M.; Colgan, Mitchell W.; Glynn, Peter W.

    1991-06-01

    Approximately 550 measurements of Mn/Ca ratios in three corals from the western Galapagos Islands have been performed to reconstruct a 380-year history of surface ocean variability with respect to this trace element. The time period studied encompasses 1600 A.D. to 1978. Manganese is inferred to be lattice-bound in coralline aragonite at 10 50% of its seawater proportion to calcium; uncertainty about the distribution coefficient stems from inherent variability of oceanic Mn in nearshore settings. Interannual variations at Urvina Bay, Isabela Island are generally small, with the exception of a few decades during the nineteenth century. A large positive Mn/Ca anomaly found between 1821 1830 is hypothesized to have resulted from a major volcanic eruption on nearby Fernandina Island in 1825. On intrannual timescales a pronounced cycle occurs in response to seasonal upwelling. Quarterly changes in Mn/Ca are six months out-of-phase with Cd/Ca variations-a reflection of the opposite distributions of these metals in the upper waters of the eastern Pacific. High frequency reconstructions over brief time intervals from the 17th, 18th, and 20th century reveal that the seasonal onset of warm and cool phases near Galapagos has persisted for at least 340 years. A quantitative assessment of historical changes in upwelling intensity is complicated by offsets in background Mn levels recorded by different corals. One apparent longterm feature is an overall decline in skeletal Mn concentrations from 1600 1978 which results in a net decrease of 20 30%. Several possible explanations exist for this trend, ranging from accumulation of a persistent diagenetic Mn phase in fossil aragonite to a temporal shift in oceanic/atmospheric Mn fluxes reaching the surface waters of the Galapagos Islands.

  14. The Chemistry of Hydrothermal Plumes Along the Galapagos Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resing, J.; Baker, E.; Lebon, G.; Walker, S.; Haymon, R.; Nakamura, K.; Lupton, J.

    2006-12-01

    During the 2005-06 GalAPAGoS expedition, we conducted nested sonar, plume, and camera surveys along a 300 n.m.-long portion of the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) where the ridge intersects the Galapagos hotspot between 94.5° and 89.5°W. Hydrothermal plumes were located by placing a variety of sensors on the clump weight of the DSL-120, which was towed approximately 100 m above the seafloor. These sensors included the vents in situ analyzer (nee SUAVE), which measured Fe, Mn, and pH; a redox potential (Eh) sensor; an optical backscatter sensor; a METs methane analyzer; and a CTD. These sensors were uploaded in real time allowing us to monitor for plumes during the tow. In addition, the tow line of the DSL-120 carried a vertical array of optical backscatter sensors (MAPRs). Almost all of the plumes found were identified solely from the data uploaded to the ship in real time and were confirmed from the vertical MAPR array. The MAPR array provided information on the rise height and vertical extent of the plumes. Many plumes were then also located and sampled by vertical and towed CTD hydrocasts. The CTD hydrocast samples were sampled for Fe, Mn, pH, helium isotopes, methane, and total suspended matter composition. Many of the plumes were characterized by fairly low amounts of total dissolved metals and variable Fe:Mn ratios. Plumes over the discovered black smoker vents carried elevated total dissolved metals and Fe:Mn ratios typical of other midocean ridge plumes. Data will be presented on the chemical makeup of the plumes from the sensors on the DSL-120 clump weight and from the CTD hydrocast samples.

  15. 110 years of Avipoxvirus in the Galapagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Parker, Patricia G; Buckles, Elizabeth L; Farrington, Heather; Petren, Kenneth; Whiteman, Noah K; Ricklefs, Robert E; Bollmer, Jennifer L; Jiménez-Uzcátegui, Gustavo

    2011-01-13

    The role of disease in regulating populations is controversial, partly owing to the absence of good disease records in historic wildlife populations. We examined birds collected in the Galapagos Islands between 1891 and 1906 that are currently held at the California Academy of Sciences and the Zoologisches Staatssammlung Muenchen, including 3973 specimens representing species from two well-studied families of endemic passerine birds: finches and mockingbirds. Beginning with samples collected in 1899, we observed cutaneous lesions consistent with Avipoxvirus on 226 (6.3%) specimens. Histopathology and viral genotyping of 59 candidate tissue samples from six islands showed that 21 (35.6%) were positive for Avipoxvirus, while alternative diagnoses for some of those testing negative by both methods were feather follicle cysts, non-specific dermatitis, or post mortem fungal colonization. Positive specimens were significantly nonrandomly distributed among islands both for mockingbirds (San Cristobal vs. Espanola, Santa Fe and Santa Cruz) and for finches (San Cristobal and Isabela vs. Santa Cruz and Floreana), and overall highly significantly distributed toward islands that were inhabited by humans (San Cristobal, Isabela, Floreana) vs. uninhabited at the time of collection (Santa Cruz, Santa Fe, Espanola), with only one positive individual on an uninhabited island. Eleven of the positive specimens sequenced successfully were identical at four diagnostic sites to the two canarypox variants previously described in contemporary Galapagos passerines. We conclude that this virus was introduced late in 1890's and was dispersed among islands by a variety of mechanisms, including regular human movements among colonized islands. At present, this disease represents an ongoing threat to the birds on the Galapagos Islands.

  16. Intestinal parasites of dogs on the Galapagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Gingrich, E N; Scorza, A V; Clifford, E L; Olea-Popelka, F J; Lappin, M R

    2010-05-11

    Dogs on the Galapagos Islands are a unique population created by isolation from the mainland and regulations prohibiting further importation. The effect of infectious agents of these domestic dogs on the indigenous fauna is largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites in dogs on the Galapagos Islands. Fecal samples were collected from 97 dogs presented during neutering campaigns on Santa Cruz (n=51), San Cristobal (n=17), and Isabela (n=29) islands. Feces were evaluated for parasites by microscopic examination after zinc sulfate centrifugation flotation as well as by a commercially available IFA for Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. Polymerase chain reaction for Cryptosporidium spp. DNA and Giardia spp. DNA was performed on all positive samples to provide the infecting genotypes. Ancylostoma caninum (57.7%) and Toxocara canis (16.5%) were most commonly detected, followed by Giardia spp. (5.2%), Isospora canis (4.1%), Sarcocystis canis (3.1%), and Cryptosporidium spp. (1%). Adequate DNA for sequencing was available for one Giardia spp. which was shown to be assemblage D. Despite being isolated, the dogs on the Galapagos have many of the same enteric parasites detected on the mainland of South America. These dogs are not routinely administered anthelmintics or other drugs, but are often allowed to roam the streets and live in close proximity to humans. Parasite prophylaxis is necessary to decrease the parasite burden within the population and to lessen the risk of spread to humans or other animals also inhabiting the islands.

  17. Allometric and temporal scaling of movement characteristics in Galapagos tortoises.

    PubMed

    Bastille-Rousseau, Guillaume; Yackulic, Charles B; Frair, Jacqueline L; Cabrera, Freddy; Blake, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Understanding how individual movement scales with body size is of fundamental importance in predicting ecological relationships for diverse species. One-dimensional movement metrics scale consistently with body size yet vary over different temporal scales. Knowing how temporal scale influences the relationship between animal body size and movement would better inform hypotheses about the efficiency of foraging behaviour, the ontogeny of energy budgets, and numerous life-history trade-offs. We investigated how the temporal scaling of allometric patterns in movement varies over the course of a year, specifically during periods of motivated (directional and fast movement) and unmotivated (stationary and tortuous movement) behaviour. We focused on a recently diverged group of species that displays wide variation in movement behaviour - giant Galapagos tortoises (Chelonoidis spp.) - to test how movement metrics estimated on a monthly basis scaled with body size. We used state-space modelling to estimate seven different movement metrics of Galapagos tortoises. We used log-log regression of the power law to evaluate allometric scaling for these movement metrics and contrasted relationships by species and sex. Allometric scaling of movement was more apparent during motivated periods of movement. During this period, allometry was revealed at multiple temporal intervals (hourly, daily and monthly), with values observed at daily and monthly intervals corresponding most closely to the expected one-fourth scaling coefficient, albeit with wide credible intervals. We further detected differences in the magnitude of scaling among taxa uncoupled from observed differences in the temporal structuring of their movement rates. Our results indicate that the definition of temporal scales is fundamental to the detection of allometry of movement and should be given more attention in movement studies. Our approach not only provides new conceptual insights into temporal attributes in one

  18. Prevalence of Diabetes on Santa Cruz Island in Galapagos Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Tahseen

    2015-01-01

    This was an observational study offering a screening program for diabetes in a health clinic in Puerto Ayora town on Santa Cruz Island to determine the prevalence of this disorder and identify those at risk. A 1-month screening program was undertaken. Of 141 patients screened, 85% of men and 83% of women were overweight or obese; 16 (11%) had suspected undiagnosed diabetes and 22 (16%) were at high risk of developing diabetes. This is the first reported study of glucose intolerance prevalence in Galapagos. Urgent education and prevention programs are required to address this public health problem. PMID:26086607

  19. Evidence for melt channelization in Galapagos plume-ridge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, T.; Richards, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Many present-day hot spots are located within ~ 1000 km of a mid-ocean ridge, either currently or in the geologic past, leading to frequent interaction between these two magmatic regimes. The consequent plume-ridge interactions provide a unique opportunity to test models for asthenosphere-lithosphere dynamics, with the plume acting as a tracer fluid in the problem, and excess magmatism reflecting otherwise unsampled sub-surface phenomena. Galapagos is an off-ridge hotspot with the mantle plume located ~150-250 km south of the plate boundary. Plume-ridge interaction in Galapagos is expressed by the formation of volcanic lineaments of islands and seamounts - e.g., the Wolf-Darwin lineament (WDL) - providing a direct probe of the plume-ridge interaction process, especially in regards to geochemical data. Although several models have been proposed to explain plume-ridge interaction in Galapagos, none adequately explain the observed characteristics, especially the WDL. In particular, predicted lithospheric fault orientations and melt density considerations appear at odds with observations, suggesting that lithospheric extension is not the primary process for formation of these islands. Other off-ridge hotspots interacting with nearby spreading ridges, such as Reunion and Louisville, also exhibit volcanic lineaments linking the plume and the ridge. Thus these lineament-type features are a common outcome of plume-ridge interaction that are indicative of the underlying physics. We propose that the lineaments are surface expressions of narrow sub-lithospheric melt channels focused towards the spreading ridge. These channels should form naturally due to the reactive infiltration instability in a two-phase flow of magma and solid mantle as demonstrated in two-phase flow simulations (e.g., Katz & Weatherley 2012). For Galapagos, we show that melt channels can persist thermodynamically over sufficient length-scales to link the plume and nearby ridge segments. We also show that

  20. Polychlorinated biphenyls and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki).

    PubMed

    Alava, Juan J; Ikonomou, Michael G; Ross, Peter S; Costa, Daniel; Salazar, Sandie; Aurioles-gamboa, David; Gobas, Frank A P C

    2009-11-01

    Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) were measured in muscle-blubber biopsy samples from 21 Galapagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki) pups that were live captured in the Galapagos Islands (Ecuador) using gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry. Only traces of PBDEs were detected in one male pup, whereas PCDDs and PCDFs were not detected in any sample. The total concentration of PCBs (ΣPCB) in the pups averaged 104 μg/kg lipid (range, 49-384 μg/kg). No statistically significant differences in ΣPCB were observed among the four study sites in the Galapagos Islands. Concentrations of PCB congeners in Galapagos sea lion pups were dominated by low-molecular-weight congeners. These results suggest that global transport is the main source for PCBs in Galapagos sea lions. The ΣPCB levels were below immunotoxic and endocrine-disruption thresholds in pinnipeds, suggesting a limited risk of adverse health effects. The present study indicates that Galapagos sea lions can serve as a useful sentinel of pollutants with a long-range transport capacity and that Galapagos Islands are not exempt from the threats of global pollutants despite its remote locale.

  1. Aggregation of European storm-petrel (Hydrobates pelagicus ssp. melitensis) around cage fish farms. Do they benefit from the farmś resources?

    PubMed

    Aguado-Giménez, F; Sallent-Sánchez, A; Eguía-Martínez, S; Martínez-Ródenas, J; Hernández-Llorente, M D; Palanca-Maresca, C; Molina-Pardo, J L; López-Pastor, B; García-Castellanos, F A; Ballester-Moltó, M; Ballesteros-Pelegrín, G; García-García, B; Barberá, G G

    2016-12-01

    Cage aquaculture aggregates wild fauna due to food provision. Several seabirds frequent fish farms, including the European storm-petrel (Hydrobates pelagicus melitensis). This work investigates the presence of storm-petrels around two aquaculture areas interspersed between breeding colonies in western Mediterranean Sea. Contribution of aquaculture-derived resources to their diet was assessed. Storm-petrels were mist-netted at the colonies and marked by bleaching feathers. Density around aquaculture areas was estimated through visual counts. Marks recognition was conducted visually and by photo-capture. Storm-petrel regurgitates were used as target tissue to estimate diet sources contribution. Contribution of surface zooplankton, ichthyoplankton and aquaculture wastes was estimated through Bayesian mixing modelling combining carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes and fatty acids as biomarkers. Storm-petrel density was high in open-sea aquaculture area, but not observed around near shore farms. Temporal variability of storm-petrels density during the breeding season was linked to their reproductive phenology. Within the open-sea aquaculture area, bluefin tuna farm was more attractive for storm-petrels than seabream/seabass farms. Visual identification of bleaching marks was not useful. Photo-capture showed that 8.3% of the storm-petrels watched around farms were firstly trapped in some of the nearby colonies, and 91.7% were unmarked. Qualitative evidence of aquaculture-derived wastes utilization was obtained. However, its estimated contribution was low (4.3%) when compared to ichthyoplankton (61.1%) or zooplankton (34.6%). The studied open-sea farms significantly aggregated storm-petrels along their entire breeding season. Storm-petrels got a slight profit from aquaculture resources. Nevertheless, some concerns arise regarding the cost/benefit balance of the interaction.

  2. Galapagos-OIB signature in southern Central America: Mantle refertilization by arc-hot spot interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, Esteban; Carr, Michael J.; Hoernle, Kaj; Feigenson, Mark D.; Szymanski, David; Hauff, Folkmar; van den Bogaard, Paul

    2009-02-01

    Although most Central American magmas have a typical arc geochemical signature, magmas in southern Central America (central Costa Rica and Panama) have isotopic and trace element compositions with an ocean island basalt (OIB) affinity, similar to the Galapagos-OIB lavas (e.g., Ba/La < 40, La/Yb > 10, 206Pb/204Pb > 18.8). Our new data for Costa Rica suggest that this signature, unusual for a convergent margin, has a relatively recent origin (Late Miocene ˜6 Ma). We also show that there was a transition from typical arc magmas (analogous to the modern Nicaraguan volcanic front) to OIB-like magmas similar to the Galapagos hot spot. The geographic distribution of the Galapagos signature in recent lavas from southern Central America is present landward from the subduction of the Galapagos hot spot tracks (the Seamount Province and the Cocos/Coiba Ridge) at the Middle American Trench. The higher Pb isotopic ratios, relatively lower Sr and Nd isotopic ratios, and enriched incompatible-element signature of central Costa Rican magmas can be explained by arc-hot spot interaction. The isotopic ratios of central Costa Rican lavas require the subducting Seamount Province (Northern Galapagos Domain) component, whereas the isotopic ratios of the adakites and alkaline basalts from southern Costa Rica and Panama are in the geochemical range of the subducting Cocos/Coiba Ridge (Central Galapagos Domain). Geological and geochemical evidence collectively indicate that the relatively recent Galapagos-OIB signature in southern Central America represents a geochemical signal from subducting Galapagos hot spot tracks, which started to collide with the margin ˜8 Ma ago. The Galapagos hot spot contribution decreases systematically along the volcanic front from central Costa Rica to NW Nicaragua.

  3. Same size--same niche? Foraging niche separation between sympatric juvenile Galapagos sea lions and adult Galapagos fur seals.

    PubMed

    Jeglinski, Jana W E; Goetz, Kimberley T; Werner, Christiane; Costa, Daniel P; Trillmich, Fritz

    2013-05-01

    1. In vertebrates, patterns of resource utilization change throughout development according to age- and or size-specific abilities and requirements. Thus, interspecific competition affects different age classes differently. 2. Adults of sympatric species often show distinct foraging niche segregation, but juvenile resource use might overlap with adult competitors of similar body size. Resultant negative effects on juveniles can have important consequences for population dynamics, yet such interactions have received little attention in studies of mammalian communities. 3. Using GPS tracking devices, time-depth recorders and stable isotope data, we compared diving depth, activity time, trophic position and foraging habitat characteristics to investigate foraging niche overlap between similar-sized sympatric juvenile Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) and adult Galapagos fur seals (Arctocephalus galapagoensis) and compared each group with much larger-bodied adult Galapagos sea lions. 4. We found little indication for direct competition but a complex pattern of foraging niche segregation: juvenile sea lions and adult fur seals dived to shallow depths at night, but foraged in different habitats with limited spatial overlap. Conversely, juvenile and adult sea lions employed different foraging patterns, but their foraging areas overlapped almost completely. 5. Consistency of foraging habitat characteristics between juvenile and adult sea lions suggests that avoidance of competition may be important in shaping foraging habitat utilization. Resultant specialization on a limited habitat could contribute to low sea lion numbers that contrast with high fur seal abundance. Our data suggest that exploitation by multiple predators within spatially restricted foraging ranges of juveniles might negatively impact juvenile foraging success and ultimately influence population dynamics.

  4. Lithospheric Evolution of Magmas from the Northern Galapagos Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M.; Geist, D.; Harpp, K. S.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Volcanoes of the Northern Galapagos Providence (NGP) are crucial to understanding the interaction between the Galapagos Plume and the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC). The NGP consists of five islands and nine volcanic lineaments, all located south of the GSC. Major and trace element compositions of seamounts within the NGP provide insight into the lithospheric evolution of magma within the province. The FLAMINGO cruise (June, 2010) dredged forty-seven localities in the NGP. Major element compositions were determined by XRF and microprobe analysis of submarine rocks and glasses. Crystallization as a function of pressure and temperature is modeled with MELTS and projections into ternary phase diagrams. The Wolf-Darwin Lineament (WDL) is divided into three groups for evaluation of the lavas’ petrology: Northern Wolf-Darwin lineament (that closest to the GSC including Darwin Island), Middle Wolf-Darwin lineament (MWDL, which includes Wolf Island), and Southern Wolf-Darwin lineament (that closest to the Galapagos Platform). Lavas from two other lineaments to the east of the WDL and around Pinta Island are assessed as well. Two parental compositions are modeled, one enriched and one depleted (K2O/TiO2 >0.23 as enriched and K2O/TiO2 =0.04 as depleted). CaO/Al2O3 and Al2O3 variations with Mg# vary considerably as a function of pressure. Magmas from most of the subregions of the NGP evolved by crystallization of olivine and plagioclase, with little CPX crystallization. This indicates that crystallization beneath these volcanoes is limited to pressures < 1 kb. In contrast, some MWDL magmas evolve by extensive crystallization of clinopyroxene-bearing assemblages, and our best pressure estimate is 3 kb. CPX crystallization is most likely due to polybaric crystal fractionation at the MWDL. Some of the NGP glasses are very rich in Al2O3, especially those of the MWDL, which peak at Al2O3 17.0 wt.% at Mg# of 59. The maximum Al2O3 of the other WDL subprovinces is 16.7 wt.%, at

  5. Cutaneous and diphtheritic avian poxvirus infection in a nestling Southern Giant Petrel (Macronectes giganteus) from Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie; Green, David Earl; Converse, K.A.; Docherty, D.E.; Thiel, T.; Geisz, H.N.; Fraser, William R.; Patterson-Fraser, Donna L.

    2008-01-01

    The Southern giant petrel (Macronectes giganteus) is declining over much of its range and currently is listed as vulnerable to extinction by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Island-specific breeding colonies near Palmer Station, Antarctica, have been monitored for over 30 years, and because this population continues to increase, it is critically important to conservation. In austral summer 2004, six diseased giant petrel chicks were observed in four of these colonies. Diseased chicks were 6a??9 weeks old and had multiple proliferative nodules on their bills and skin. One severely affected chick was found dead on the nest and was salvaged for necropsy. Histopathological examination of nodules from the dead chick revealed epithelial cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy with numerous eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusions (B??llinger bodies). A poxvirus was isolated from multiple nodules. Poxviral infection has not been reported in this species, and the reason for its emergence and its potential impact on the population are not yet known.

  6. Is basal metabolic rate influenced by age in a long-lived seabird, the snow petrel?

    PubMed

    Moe, Børge; Angelier, Frédéric; Bech, Claus; Chastel, Olivier

    2007-10-01

    Ageing is associated with a decline in basal metabolic rate (BMR) in many species, including humans. The evolutionary and physiological causes underlying the relationship between age and BMR are poorly understood. Studies of procellariiform seabirds may provide valuable insight because they have a longer maximum lifespan than expected from their body size and rates of energy metabolism. Such studies are rare, however, because there are few populations with a high proportion of individuals of known age. We performed a cross-sectional study of energy metabolism in relation to age in a long-lived seabird, the snow petrel Pagodroma nivea. In an Antarctic population that has been subject to a long-term research program, including annual banding of chicks since 1963, we measured BMR of individuals aged between 8 and 39 years. We show that the BMR of the snow petrel does not decrease with increasing age. BMR seems to be sustained at a fixed level throughout the investigated age-span. We review this result in light of the disposable soma theory of ageing, and we discuss whether species-specific relationships between age and basal metabolic rate can be related to differences in maximum lifespan.

  7. Bile is essential for lipid assimilation in Leach's storm petrel, Oceanodroma leucorhoa.

    PubMed

    Place, A R

    1992-08-01

    A tritium-labeled glycerol triether was tested as a non-absorbable lipid marker for studies of neutral lipid absorption in normal and cholestryamine-induced steatorrhic chicks of Leach's storm petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa). Absorption of triacylglycerol and wax ester (96 +/- 4.2 and 94 +/- 2.1%, respectively) in normal chicks was indistinguishable. Absorption of neutral lipids decreased with increasing quantities of resin, and with the highest dosage (14% wt/wt) less than 30% of dietary lipids were assimilated. The concentration of bile salts (greater than 500 mM) in the gallbladder of Leach's storm petrel is among the highest recorded. The bile salts are predominantly taurine conjugates of chenodeoxycholate and cholate. Biliary cholesterol levels are within the range observed in humans although biliary phospholipid levels are lower and triglyceride levels are higher. Extensive retrograde movement of duodenal contents and biliary secretions to the gizzard and proventriculus were found. Although similarities in fat and bile salt assimilation exist between seabirds and mammals, there do exist differences that make non-polar lipid assimilation (i.e., wax esters) more efficient in seabirds.

  8. The diet of a nocturnal pelagic predator, the Bulwer's petrel, across the lunar cycle.

    PubMed

    Waap, S; Symondson, W O C; Granadeiro, J P; Alonso, H; Serra-Gonçalves, C; Dias, M P; Catry, P

    2017-05-03

    The lunar cycle is believed to strongly influence the vertical distribution of many oceanic taxa, with implications for the foraging behaviour of nocturnal marine predators. Most studies to date testing lunar effects on foraging have focused on predator activity at-sea, with some birds and marine mammals demonstrating contrasting behavioural patterns, depending on the lunar-phase. However, to date no study has focused on how the lunar cycle might actually affect predator-prey interactions in the upper layers of the ocean. Here, we tested whether the diet of the predominantly nocturnal pelagic predator, the Bulwer's petrel (Bulweria bulwerii) would change throughout the lunar cycle, using molecular analysis to augment detection and taxonomic resolution of prey collected from stomach-contents. We found no evidence of dietary shifts in species composition or diversity, with Bulwer's petrel always consuming a wide range of mesopelagic species. Other co-variables potentially affecting light availability at-sea, such as percentage of cloud cover, did not confound our results. Moreover, many of the species found are thought not to reach the sea-surface. Our findings reveal that nocturnal predators are probably more specialized than previously assumed, irrespective of ambient-light, but also reveal deficiencies in our current understanding of species vertical distribution and predation-dynamics at-sea.

  9. Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen in the study of organochlorine contaminants in albatrosses and petrels.

    PubMed

    Colabuono, Fernanda I; Barquete, Viviane; Taniguchi, Satie; Ryan, Peter G; Montone, Rosalinda C

    2014-06-15

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in albatrosses and petrels collected off southern Brazil were compared with concentrations of organochlorine contaminants (OCs). δ(13)C and δ(15)N values, as well as OCs concentrations, exhibited a high degree of variability among individuals and overlap among species. δ(13)C values reflected latitudinal differences among species, with lower values found in Wandering and Tristan Albatrosses and higher values found in Black-browed and Atlantic Yellow-nosed Albatrosses and White-chinned Petrels. Some relationships were found between OCs and stable isotopes, but in general a partial 'uncoupling' was observed between OCs concentrations and stable isotopes ratios (especially for δ(15)N). δ(13)C and δ(15)N values in Procellariiformes tissues during the non-breeding season appear to be a better indicator of foraging habitats than of trophic relationships, which may partially explain the high degree of variability between concentrations of OCs and stable isotopes ratios in birds with a diversified diet and wide foraging range. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Monitoring of a Southern Giant Petrel Macronectes giganteus population on the Frazier Islands, Wilkes Land, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Creuwels, J.C.S.; Stark, J.S.; Woehler, Eric J.; Van Franeker, J. A.; Ribic, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    Since 1956, Southern Giant Petrels on the Frazier Islands, East Antarctica, have been counted with different census techniques, sometimes varying within seasons and among islands, which hindered analysis of the data. Protective measures for the islands from 1986 onwards have increased the need for reliable long-term census data, but reduced the ways to collect these data. Published and unpublished data were re-examined, and population trends were reconstructed based on two relatively standardised techniques: the number of active chicks (AC) and the number of apparently occupied nests (AON) around hatching. AC-values from Nelly Island from 1959 to 1998 indicate substantial periodic fluctuations, but no consistent long-term change. Since the late 1970s, AC-values on the other two islands and AON-values suggest that the breeding population may have grown by 35%. This recent growth, however, is within the extent of periodic fluctuations observed in Southern Giant Petrel population that is stable over the long term. ?? Springer-Verlag 2004.

  11. Galapagos Penguins in a Warming World: An Exemplar of Biological Loopholes in the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnauskas, K. B.; Jenouvrier, S.; Brown, C.; Murtugudde, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    The Galapagos is a flourishing yet fragile ecosystem whose health is particularly sensitive to regional and global climate variations. The distribution of several species, including the Galapagos Penguin, is intimately tied to upwelling of cold, nutrient-rich water along the western shores of the archipelago. Here we show, using reliable, high-resolution sea surface temperature observations, that the Galapagos cold pool has been intensifying and expanding northward since 1982. The linear cooling trend of 0.8°C per 33 years is likely the result of long-term changes in equatorial ocean circulation previously identified. Moreover, the northward expansion of the cold pool is dynamically consistent with a slackening of the cross-equatorial component of the regional trade winds—leading to an equatorward shift of the mean position of the Equatorial Undercurrent. The implied change in strength and distribution of upwelling has important implications for ongoing and future conservation measures in the Galapagos.

  12. NASA Spacecraft Peers Into the Mouth of the Galapagos Wolf Volcano

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-06-12

    On May 26, 2015, Wolf Volcano on Isabela Island in the Galapagos Islands erupted for the first time in 33 years. This image was acquired by NASA Terra spacecraft on June 11, 2015, after the eruption had quieted.

  13. Three new species of the feather mite subfamily Ingrassiinae (Acariformes: Xolalgidae) from shearwaters and petrels (Procellariiformes: Procellariidae).

    PubMed

    Stefan, Laura M; Gómez-Díaz, Elena; Mironov, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    Three new species of the feather mite subfamily Ingrassiinae (Acariformes: Astigmata: Xolalgidae) are described from shearwaters and petrels (Procellariiformes: Procellariidae) in the North-East of Atlantic Ocean: Ingrassia calonectris sp. n. from Calonectris borealis (Cory) (type host) and Calonectris edwardsii (Oustalet), Ingrassia micronota sp. n. and Opetiopoda bulweriae sp. n. from Bulweria bulwerii (Jardine and Selby).

  14. Cool, cold or colder? Spatial segregation of prions and blue petrels is explained by differences in preferred sea surface temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Quillfeldt, Petra; Cherel, Yves; Delord, Karine; Weimerkirch, Henri

    2015-01-01

    The Southern Ocean provides one of the largest environmental gradients on Earth that lacks geographical barriers, and small but highly mobile petrels living there may offer fine models of evolution of diversity along environmental gradients. Using geolocation devices, we investigated the winter distribution of closely related petrel species breeding sympatrically in the southern Indian Ocean, and applied ecological niche models to compare environmental conditions in the habitat used. We show that thin-billed prions (Pachyptila belcheri), Antarctic prions (Pachyptila desolata) and blue petrels (Halobaena caerulea) from the Kerguelen archipelago in the southern Indian Ocean segregate latitudinally, sea surface temperature being the most important variable separating the distribution of the species. Antarctic prions spent the winter north of the Polar Front in temperate waters, whereas blue petrels were found south of the Polar Front in Antarctic waters. Thin-billed prions preferred intermediate latitudes and temperatures. Stable isotope values of feathers reflected this near complete niche separation across an ecological gradient that spans large scales, and suggest evolutionary isolation by environment. In pelagic seabirds that exploit large areas of ocean, spatial niche partitioning may not only facilitate coexistence among ecologically similar species, but may also have driven their evolution in the absence of geographical barriers. PMID:25878044

  15. Examining the development of individual recognition in a burrow-nesting procellariiform, the Leach's storm-petrel.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Terence W; Ackerman, A L; Nevitt, Gabrielle A

    2008-02-01

    Burrow-nesting petrels use their well-developed sense of smell for foraging, homing to their nest, and mate recognition. The chicks of burrow-nesting petrels can apparently learn odours associated with prey while still in the nest, but the development of individual-specific odour recognition is less well understood. We used a simple two-choice test to determine whether 4- to 6-week-old chicks of a small, burrow-nesting species, the Leach's storm-petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa), prefer the scent of their own nest material to (1) the scent of similar organic material collected from the colony or (2) the scent of a conspecific's nest material. Results suggest that chicks clearly preferred the scent of their own nest material to that of similar organic material collected from the colony (96%; N=24; binomial test, P<0.001). Results further suggested that birds preferred the scent of their own nest material to that of a conspecific, though the preference was statistically less robust (67%; N=39; binomial test, P=0.05). Because Leach's storm-petrel chicks do not normally leave their burrow prior to fledging, an ability to recognise individual or nest-specific odours is not likely to be used for homing but instead may be linked to the development of individual recognition in different contexts.

  16. Cool, cold or colder? Spatial segregation of prions and blue petrels is explained by differences in preferred sea surface temperatures.

    PubMed

    Quillfeldt, Petra; Cherel, Yves; Delord, Karine; Weimerkirch, Henri

    2015-04-01

    The Southern Ocean provides one of the largest environmental gradients on Earth that lacks geographical barriers, and small but highly mobile petrels living there may offer fine models of evolution of diversity along environmental gradients. Using geolocation devices, we investigated the winter distribution of closely related petrel species breeding sympatrically in the southern Indian Ocean, and applied ecological niche models to compare environmental conditions in the habitat used. We show that thin-billed prions (Pachyptila belcheri), Antarctic prions (Pachyptila desolata) and blue petrels (Halobaena caerulea) from the Kerguelen archipelago in the southern Indian Ocean segregate latitudinally, sea surface temperature being the most important variable separating the distribution of the species. Antarctic prions spent the winter north of the Polar Front in temperate waters, whereas blue petrels were found south of the Polar Front in Antarctic waters. Thin-billed prions preferred intermediate latitudes and temperatures. Stable isotope values of feathers reflected this near complete niche separation across an ecological gradient that spans large scales, and suggest evolutionary isolation by environment. In pelagic seabirds that exploit large areas of ocean, spatial niche partitioning may not only facilitate coexistence among ecologically similar species, but may also have driven their evolution in the absence of geographical barriers.

  17. Distribution and at-sea activity of a nocturnal seabird, the Bulwer's petrel Bulweria bulwerii, during the incubation period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Maria P.; Romero, Joana; Granadeiro, José Pedro; Catry, Teresa; Pollet, Ingrid L.; Catry, Paulo

    2016-07-01

    Bulwer's petrels are nocturnal seabirds that mostly prey on mesopelagic fauna. As aerial foragers and shallow divers, their feeding opportunities are limited by near-surface availability of their prey, which is highly variable both temporally (reflecting diurnal and lunar cycles) and spatially. Here we studied how Bulwer's petrels cope with these constraints by analysing their at-sea distribution and activity during the incubation period. We tracked the movements of 20 birds from Selvagem Grande (NE Atlantic) during a complete lunar cycle, and recorded 30 foraging trips that lasted 11 days on average. Birds were both distributed around the colony and in waters close to the Azorean archipelago (mid-Atlantic) located 1700 km away, and were significantly more active at night (especially just after sunset and before sunrise), when mesopelagic fauna is also closer to the sea surface due to their diel vertical migrations. Bulwer's petrels spent significantly more time flying during moonlight, although the effect of the moon was relatively weak (ca. 10-15% difference between moonlit and dark periods of the night), and not obvious when birds were foraging in mid-Atlantic waters, which were also targeted more often during full-moon. These results reveal key adaptations of the Bulwer's petrel to the highly dynamic ecology of its mesopelagic prey.

  18. Three dimensional perspective view of portion of western Galapagos Islands

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-04-18

    STS059-S-085 (18 April 1994) --- This is a three-dimensional perspective view of part of Isla Isabela in the western Galapagos Islands. It was taken by the L-Band radar in HH polarization from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on the 40th orbit of the Space Shuttle Endeavour. This view was constructed by overlaying a SIR-C radar image on a U.S. Geological Survey digital elevation map. The image is centered at about .5 degrees south latitude and 91 degrees west longitude, and covers an area of 75 by 60 kilometers. The radar incidence angle at the center of the image is about 20 degrees. The western Galapagos Islands, which lie about 1200 kilometers west of Ecuador in the eastern Pacific, have six active volcanoes similar to the volcanoes found in Hawaii. Since the time of Charles Darwin's visit to the area in 1835, there have been over 60 recorded eruptions on these volcanoes. This SIR-C/X-SAR image of Alcedo and Sierra Negra volcanoes shows the rougher lava flows as bright features, while ash deposits and smooth pahoehoe lava flows appear dark. The Galapagos Islands are one of the SIR-C/X-SAR supersites and data of this area will be taken several times during the flight to allow scientists to conduct topographic change studies and to search for different lava flow types, ash deposits and fault lines. SIR-C/X-SAR is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE). SIR-C/X-SAR radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-Band (24 cm), C-Band (6 cm), and X-Band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes

  19. Characterization of MHC class I and II genes in a subantarctic seabird, the blue petrel, Halobaena caerulea (Procellariiformes).

    PubMed

    Strandh, Maria; Lannefors, Mimi; Bonadonna, Francesco; Westerdahl, Helena

    2011-10-01

    The great polymorphism observed in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes is thought to be maintained by pathogen-mediated selection possibly combined with MHC-disassortative mating, guided by MHC-determined olfactory cues. Here, we partly characterize the MHC class I and II B of the blue petrel, Halobaena caerulea (Procellariiformes), a bird with significant olfactory abilities that lives under presumably low pathogen burdens in Subantarctica. Blue petrels are long-lived, monogamous birds which suggest the necessity of an accurate mate choice process. The species is ancestral to songbirds (Passeriformes; many MHC loci), although not to gamefowls (Galliformes; few MHC loci). Considering the phylogenetic relationships and the low subantarctic pathogen burden, we expected few rather than many MHC loci in the blue petrel. However, when we analysed partial MHC class I and class II B cDNA and gDNA sequences we found evidence for as many as at least eight MHC class I loci and at least two class II B loci. These class I and II B sequences showed classical MHC characteristics, e.g. high nucleotide diversity, especially in putative peptide-binding regions where signatures of positive selection was detected. Trans-species polymorphism was found between MHC class II B sequences of the blue petrel and those of thin-billed prion, Pachyptila belcheri, two species that diverged ∼25 MYA. The observed MHC allele richness in the blue petrel may well serve as a basis for mate choice, especially since olfactory discrimination of MHC types may be possible in this species.

  20. Investigation of deaths in marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) on Galapagos.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J E; Laurie, W A

    1987-03-01

    Large numbers of marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus Bell) died on the Galapagos between December 1982 and August 1983. Gross and histopathological examination of five of these animals and comparison with three 1984 individuals indicated that the former had died of starvation. This was attributed to an inability to digest new species of algae which had flourished in the sea because of a rise in temperature associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation event in 1982 to 83. In 1984 to 85, after El Niño, conditions on the islands returned to normal; the original algal flora began to predominate and the iguana population showed a marked recovery, with increased rates of growth, survival and reproduction.

  1. Three dimensional perspective view of portion of western Galapagos Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a three dimensional perspective view of Isla Isabela in the western Galapagos Islands. It was taken by the L-band radar in HH polarization from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperature Radar on the 40th orbit of the Shuttle Endeavour. This view was constructed by overlaying a SIR-C radar image on a U.S. Geological Survey digital elevation map. The image is centered at about .5 degrees south latitude and 91 degrees West longitude and covers an area of 75 km by 60 km. This SIR-C/X-SAR image of Alcedo and Sierra Negra volcanoes shows the rougher lava flows as bright features, while ash deposits and smooth Pahoehoe lava flows dark. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory alternative photo number is P-43938.

  2. Dynamics of the Galapagos hotspot from helium isotope geochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kurz, M.D.; Geist, D.

    1999-12-01

    The authors have measured the isotopes of He, Sr, Nd and Pb in a number of lava flows from the Galapagos Archipelago; the main goal is to use magmatic helium as a tracer of plume influence in the western volcanoes. Because the Galapagos lava flows are so well preserved, it is also possible to measure surface exposure ages using in situ cosmic-ray-produced {sup 3}He. The exposure ages range from {lt}0.1 to 580 Ka, are consistent with other chronological constrains, and provide the first direct dating of these lava flows. The new age data demonstrate the utility of the technique in this important age range and show that the western Galapagos volcanoes have been erupting distance compositions simultaneously for the last {approximately}10 Ka. The magmatic {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios range from 6.0 to 27 times atmospheric (R{sub a}), with the highest values found on the islands of Isabella (16.8 R{sub a} for Vulcan Sierra Negra) and Fernandina (23 to 27 R{sub a}). Values from Santa Cruz are close to typical mid-ocean ridge basalt values (MORB, of {approximately}9 R{sub 2}) and Pinta has a {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratio lower than MORB (6.9 R{sub a}). These data confirm that the plume is centered beneath Fernandina which is the most active volcano in the archipelago and is at the leading edge of plate motion. The data are consistent with previous isotopic studies, confirming extensive contributions from depleted asthenospheric or lithospheric mantle sources, especially to the central islands. The most striking aspect of the helium isotopic data is that the {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios decrease systematically in all directions from Fernandina. This spatial variability is assumed to reflect the contribution of the purest plume component to Fernandina magmatism, and shows that helium is a sensitive indicator of plume influence. The highest {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios are found in volcanoes with lowest Na{sub 2}O(8) and FeO(8), which may relate to source composition as well as degree

  3. Effects of warm sea-surface temperature anomalies on the blue petrel at the Kerguelen Islands

    PubMed Central

    Guinet, C.; Chastel, O.; Koudil, M.; Durbec, J. P.; Jouventin, P.

    1998-01-01

    Several long-term studies on Southern Ocean seabirds and seals have suggested a possible link between major declines in breeding performance and El Niño Southern Oscillation events. We report that the breeding performances and body condition of the blue petrel (Halobaena carulea) on the Kerguelen Islands is depressed by episodic, warm sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) in the winter before breeding. Lagged cross correlations between SSTs in the Kerguelen sector and the Southern Oscillation Index indicate that warm SSTs were found south of Kerguelen Islands within a year of, and between 4.2 and 5.4 years after, an El Niño event took place. These results can be discussed with respect to the recently described Antarctic Circumpolar Wave that drives climatic anomalies eastward around the Southern Ocean.

  4. Climate driven life histories: the case of the Mediterranean storm petrel.

    PubMed

    Soldatini, Cecilia; Albores-Barajas, Yuri Vladimir; Massa, Bruno; Gimenez, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Seabirds are affected by changes in the marine ecosystem. The influence of climatic factors on marine food webs can be reflected in long-term seabird population changes. We modelled the survival and recruitment of the Mediterranean storm petrel (Hydrobates pelagicus melitensis) using a 21-year mark-recapture dataset involving almost 5000 birds. We demonstrated a strong influence of prebreeding climatic conditions on recruitment age and of rainfall and breeding period conditions on juvenile survival. The results suggest that the juvenile survival rate of the Mediterranean subspecies may not be negatively affected by the predicted features of climate change, i.e., warmer summers and lower rainfall. Based on considerations of winter conditions in different parts of the Mediterranean, we were able to draw inferences about the wintering areas of the species for the first time.

  5. Climate Driven Life Histories: The Case of the Mediterranean Storm Petrel

    PubMed Central

    Soldatini, Cecilia; Albores-Barajas, Yuri Vladimir; Massa, Bruno; Gimenez, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Seabirds are affected by changes in the marine ecosystem. The influence of climatic factors on marine food webs can be reflected in long-term seabird population changes. We modelled the survival and recruitment of the Mediterranean storm petrel (Hydrobates pelagicus melitensis) using a 21-year mark-recapture dataset involving almost 5000 birds. We demonstrated a strong influence of prebreeding climatic conditions on recruitment age and of rainfall and breeding period conditions on juvenile survival. The results suggest that the juvenile survival rate of the Mediterranean subspecies may not be negatively affected by the predicted features of climate change, i.e., warmer summers and lower rainfall. Based on considerations of winter conditions in different parts of the Mediterranean, we were able to draw inferences about the wintering areas of the species for the first time. PMID:24728099

  6. Spatial distribution and ecological niches of non-breeding planktivorous petrels.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Joan; Cardador, Laura; Brown, Ruth; Phillips, Richard A

    2015-07-13

    According to niche theory, mechanisms exist that allow co-existence of organisms that would otherwise compete for the same prey and other resources. How seabirds cope with potential competition during the non-breeding period is poorly documented, particularly for small species. Here we investigate for the first time the potential role of spatial, environmental (habitat) and trophic (isotopic) segregation as niche-partitioning mechanisms during the non-breeding season for four species of highly abundant, zooplanktivorous seabird that breed sympatrically in the Southern Ocean. Spatial segregation was found to be the main partitioning mechanism; even for the two sibling species of diving petrel, which spent the non-breeding period in overlapping areas, there was evidence from distribution and stable isotope ratios for differences in habitat use and diving depth.

  7. Spatial distribution and ecological niches of non-breeding planktivorous petrels

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Joan; Cardador, Laura; Brown, Ruth; Phillips, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    According to niche theory, mechanisms exist that allow co-existence of organisms that would otherwise compete for the same prey and other resources. How seabirds cope with potential competition during the non-breeding period is poorly documented, particularly for small species. Here we investigate for the first time the potential role of spatial, environmental (habitat) and trophic (isotopic) segregation as niche-partitioning mechanisms during the non-breeding season for four species of highly abundant, zooplanktivorous seabird that breed sympatrically in the Southern Ocean. Spatial segregation was found to be the main partitioning mechanism; even for the two sibling species of diving petrel, which spent the non-breeding period in overlapping areas, there was evidence from distribution and stable isotope ratios for differences in habitat use and diving depth. PMID:26165162

  8. The LIP-OIB transitional phase in the Galapagos mantle plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trela, J.; Gazel, E.; Vidito, C. A.; Class, C.; Jicha, B. R.; Bizimis, M.; Herzberg, C. T.; Alvarado-Induni, G.

    2014-12-01

    Although significant work has been done on LIPS and OIB, no complete record of the evolution of a mantle plume is available at this point. Galapagos-related lavas provide a complete record of the evolution of a mantle plume since the plume's initial stages in the Cretaceous. Our petrological models (PRIMELT2) suggest that the Galapagos plume head that formed the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP) at ~95 Ma melted at hotter temperatures than the ocean island basalt (OIB) equivalents of the modern archipelago. While this work suggests a significant decrease in mantle potential temperatures (Tp) over time, the exact mechanism responsible for secular cooling of the Galapagos plume remains unclear. One viable explanation is that plumes entraining recycled oceanic crust (pyroxenite) will be cooler than purely peridotite plumes, due to the effect of dense pyroxenite on the plume's buoyancy. High-precision electron microprobe analyses on olivine cores from the ~70 Ma Galapagos-related Quepos terrane in Costa Rica indicate a mixed peridotite-pyroxenite source lithology, not evident during the LIP stage. The appearance of this pyroxenitic component correlates with the first record of an EMII isotopic signature (Northern Galapagos Domain), and significant high-field strength enrichments in the Galapagos plume related lavas. This dense pyroxenite component may explain the marked decrease in Tp observed at ~70 Ma due to its effect on the plume's buoyancy. Otherwise, the pyroxenite component may have been diluted during voluminous basalt production of the CLIP by high peridotite melt fractions. Future research will incorporate further petrological modeling, olivine chemistry, and radiogenic isotope work of accreted Galapagos terranes in Central America to test whether or not a decrease in Tp correlates with increasing pyroxenite content in source melts.

  9. Evidence that blue petrel, Halobaena caerulea, fledglings can detect and orient to dimethyl sulfide.

    PubMed

    Bonadonna, F; Caro, S; Jouventin, P; Nevitt, G A

    2006-06-01

    Procellariiform seabirds (the petrels, albatrosses and shearwaters) are recognized for their acute sense of smell. These pelagic seabirds forage over thousands of miles of ocean to find patchily distributed prey resources. Over the past decade, much headway has been made in unravelling the variety of olfactory foraging strategies that Antarctic species employ, and it is becoming clearer that olfaction plays a key role in foraging, particularly for burrow nesting species. Now we are beginning to explore how these behaviours develop in chicks. Procellariiform chicks fledge and survive the open seas without aid or instruction from a parent, but how they are able to accomplish this task is unknown. Here we explore whether chicks leave the nest pre-tuned to olfactory cues necessary for foraging. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that blue petrel chicks (Halobaena caerulea) are able to detect and orient to a foraging cue (dimethyl sulphide, DMS) used by adults without ever having experienced this odour at sea. We first established that chicks could detect DMS at a biologically relevant concentration that they will later naturally encounter at sea (<10 pmol l-1). We then performed preference tests in a Y-maze on a group of birds 1-6 days before they fledged. Sixteen out of 20 fledglings preferred DMS (e.g. DMS+propylene glycol) to a ;control' odour (propylene glycol alone). Our results suggest that chicks can detect and may already recognize DMS as an orientation cue even before they leave the nest to forage for the first time.

  10. Geochemistry of Isla Santa Cruz, Galapagos Archipelago, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, E. L.; Schwartz, D. M.; Van Kirk, R.; Harpp, K.

    2012-12-01

    The geochemistry of Galapagos volcanoes extends to more depleted signatures than most hotspots, and do not appear to follow a classical tholeiitic to alkalic evolutionary sequence (i.e., Hawaiian Islands). Thus far, no such predictable sequence has been identified for Galapagos volcanoes. Isla Santa Cruz is one of the oldest volcanoes in the archipelago. Bow (1979) identified 3 volcanic stages: the Platform Series, the Shield Series, and the Shield-Modifying stage. The Platform Series defines a liquid line of descent that differs from the one shared by the Shield and Shield-Modifying units, which are genetically related to each other. Within the Shield and Shield-Modifying lavas, K2O/TiO2 ratios reveal three distinct compositional sub-groups: 1) a MORB-like, low-K suite (<0.10); 2) a tholeiitic suite (0.10-0.25); and 3) an alkaline suite (>0.25). These 3 sub-groups are geographically distributed across the island; the low-K suite is only in the north, whereas the alkaline suite constitutes the center highlands and the tholeiitic suite is on the eastern and northern flanks. Variations in La/Sm and Sm/Yb indicate that the magmas supplying the Shield and Shield-Modifying units were generated over a wide range of melting conditions: the alkaline suite melts were generated at the greatest depths and from the smallest melt fraction of the three suites, whereas the low-K suite originates from shallower, greater extents of melting; the tholeiitic lavas were generated at depths intermediate between the other 2 sub-groups. None of the lavas from Santa Cruz resemble material erupted at Fernandina volcano, the presumed center of the plume; radiogenic isotope ratios from previous research indicate that all Santa Cruz lavas are significantly more depleted than western Galapagos lavas. The ~1.2 Ma Platform Series is the most enriched of the Santa Cruz units. The Shield and Shield-Modifying lavas are all shifted towards more depleted signatures, approaching those of MORB, in terms

  11. Effects of the exxon valdez oil spill on fork-tailed storm-petrels breeding in the Barren Islands, Alaska. Bird study number 7. Exxon Valdez oil spill state/federal natural resource damage assessment final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimoto, M.; Byrd, G.V.

    1993-04-01

    We evaluated fork-tailed storm-petrels (Oceanodroma furcata) at East Amatuli Island, Barren Islands, the largest storm-petrel breeding colony within the trajectory of the oil slick, to determine whether there was evidence of adverse effects, following the 1989 Exxon Valdex oil spill. Although we were unable to measure all possible indicators, we found insufficient evidence to conclude that there were significant adverse impacts to breeding storm-petrels in 1989.

  12. Plant species dispersed by Galapagos tortoises surf the wave of habitat suitability under anthropogenic climate change

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Stephen; Soultan, Alaaeldin; Guézou, Anne; Cabrera, Fredy; Lötters, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Native biodiversity on the Galapagos Archipelago is severely threatened by invasive alien species. On Santa Cruz Island, the abundance of introduced plant species is low in the arid lowlands of the Galapagos National Park, but increases with elevation into unprotected humid highlands. Two common alien plant species, guava (Psidium guajava) and passion fruit (Passiflora edulis) occur at higher elevations yet their seeds are dispersed into the lowlands by migrating Galapagos tortoises (Chelonoidis spp.). Tortoises transport large quantities of seeds over long distances into environments in which they have little or no chance of germination and survival under current climate conditions. However, climate change is projected to modify environmental conditions on Galapagos with unknown consequences for the distribution of native and introduced biodiversity. We quantified seed dispersal of guava and passion fruit in tortoise dung piles and the distribution of adult plants along two elevation gradients on Santa Cruz to assess current levels of ‘wasted’ seed dispersal. We computed species distribution models for both taxa under current and predicted future climate conditions. Assuming that tortoise migratory behaviour continues, current levels of “wasted” seed dispersal in lowlands were projected to decline dramatically in the future for guava but not for passion fruit. Tortoises will facilitate rapid range expansion for guava into lowland areas within the Galapagos National Park where this species is currently absent. Coupled with putative reduction in arid habitat for native species caused by climate change, tortoise driven guava invasion will pose a serious threat to local plant communities. PMID:28727747

  13. Plant species dispersed by Galapagos tortoises surf the wave of habitat suitability under anthropogenic climate change.

    PubMed

    Ellis-Soto, Diego; Blake, Stephen; Soultan, Alaaeldin; Guézou, Anne; Cabrera, Fredy; Lötters, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Native biodiversity on the Galapagos Archipelago is severely threatened by invasive alien species. On Santa Cruz Island, the abundance of introduced plant species is low in the arid lowlands of the Galapagos National Park, but increases with elevation into unprotected humid highlands. Two common alien plant species, guava (Psidium guajava) and passion fruit (Passiflora edulis) occur at higher elevations yet their seeds are dispersed into the lowlands by migrating Galapagos tortoises (Chelonoidis spp.). Tortoises transport large quantities of seeds over long distances into environments in which they have little or no chance of germination and survival under current climate conditions. However, climate change is projected to modify environmental conditions on Galapagos with unknown consequences for the distribution of native and introduced biodiversity. We quantified seed dispersal of guava and passion fruit in tortoise dung piles and the distribution of adult plants along two elevation gradients on Santa Cruz to assess current levels of 'wasted' seed dispersal. We computed species distribution models for both taxa under current and predicted future climate conditions. Assuming that tortoise migratory behaviour continues, current levels of "wasted" seed dispersal in lowlands were projected to decline dramatically in the future for guava but not for passion fruit. Tortoises will facilitate rapid range expansion for guava into lowland areas within the Galapagos National Park where this species is currently absent. Coupled with putative reduction in arid habitat for native species caused by climate change, tortoise driven guava invasion will pose a serious threat to local plant communities.

  14. Three-dimensional Q for Sierra Negra volcano, Galapagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, B. E.; Lees, J. M.; Ebinger, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    Galapagos Islands volcanoes are some of the most rapidly deforming volcanoes on Earth, yet the magma storage chambers and migration pathways are poorly imaged. Three-dimensional tomographic inversion for seismic attenuation, 1/Q, is used to image variations in subsurface structure and heterogeneity associated with magma storage and volcanic construction at Sierra Negra volcano, Galapagos Islands. P-wave power spectra were used to estimate t* (attenuation weighted, integrated slowness) in the frequency domain for local earthquakes recorded on the 15 station, broadband SIGNET array. The SIGNET network was deployed around Sierra Negra caldera and the southern part of Isabela Island between August 2009 and January 2011. A subset of 451 earthquakes was selected for attenuation analysis based on event location within the array and station coverage. The modelled spectra were used to calculate path attenuation and earthquake source parameters. The earthquake source parameters corresponding to amplitude at zero frequency (Ω0) and corner frequency (fc) relate to earthquake size and are therefore set constant across stations. Accordingly, we derive a single Ω0 and fc for each event and fix them while allowing only t* to vary. Values of t* range between 8.89 x 10-15 and 0.0525. Preliminary results show an increase in attenuation beneath the caldera starting at 1 km depth. The zone of high attenuation is more pronounced at 2 km depth and extends laterally to the east and southeast beyond the extent of the 10 km-wide caldera. Gravity anomaly and InSAR data has been used previously to model the magma chamber at Sierra Negra. Deformation modelling requires a flat-topped sill at 2 km depth (Geist et. al., 2007; Jonsson, S., 2009; Yun et. al., 2006). Our shallow, high attenuation zone matches these results, but also indicates that the attenuating bodies extend beyond the limits of the caldera beneath the SE flank of Sierra Negra. Elongate zones of higher attenuation correlate with

  15. Definition of basin phases in the Petrel Sub-basin (Australia): Implications for the development of Palaeozoic petroleum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Blevin, J.E.; Colwell, J.B.; Kennard, J.M. , Canberra )

    1996-01-01

    An study of the Petrel Sub-basin (Bonaparte Basin) on Australia's northwest margin has identified seven main phases of basin development spanning the Early Cambrian to Tertiary. Each phase was initiated and terminated by distinct, primarily tectonic events that have controlled the structural and stratigraphic evolution of the basin and the development of petroleum systems. These phases include periods of major extension (Early Cambrian, Middle Devonian to early Carboniferous) and compression (Early Devonian, mid-Triassic), as well as rapid and slow subsidence phases in the Early to Late Carboniferous and Late Carboniferous to Triassic, respectively. Basin inversion in the mid-Triassic has been critical in controlling the development of broad anticlinal features that presently reservoir the large, but as yet undeveloped gas/condensate fields Petrel and Tern. An earlier period of minor compression during the late Carboniferous initiated limited movement of Paleozoic salt within the deeper basin, forming salt-cored, low amplitude anticlines in the predominantly carbonate Tanmurra Formation, a play which remains untested. In the southern Petrel Sub-basin, early phases of hydrocarbon generation and fluid migration associated with salt movement are poorly understood. Preliminary results of geochemical studies indicate that there are at least two oil families in Devonian and Carboniferous reservoirs. This suggests multiple source intervals within the deeper flanks of the basin, thus the understanding of sedimentation during early basin phases may be critical in evaluating petroleum systems.

  16. Definition of basin phases in the Petrel Sub-basin (Australia): Implications for the development of Palaeozoic petroleum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Blevin, J.E.; Colwell, J.B.; Kennard, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    An study of the Petrel Sub-basin (Bonaparte Basin) on Australia`s northwest margin has identified seven main phases of basin development spanning the Early Cambrian to Tertiary. Each phase was initiated and terminated by distinct, primarily tectonic events that have controlled the structural and stratigraphic evolution of the basin and the development of petroleum systems. These phases include periods of major extension (Early Cambrian, Middle Devonian to early Carboniferous) and compression (Early Devonian, mid-Triassic), as well as rapid and slow subsidence phases in the Early to Late Carboniferous and Late Carboniferous to Triassic, respectively. Basin inversion in the mid-Triassic has been critical in controlling the development of broad anticlinal features that presently reservoir the large, but as yet undeveloped gas/condensate fields Petrel and Tern. An earlier period of minor compression during the late Carboniferous initiated limited movement of Paleozoic salt within the deeper basin, forming salt-cored, low amplitude anticlines in the predominantly carbonate Tanmurra Formation, a play which remains untested. In the southern Petrel Sub-basin, early phases of hydrocarbon generation and fluid migration associated with salt movement are poorly understood. Preliminary results of geochemical studies indicate that there are at least two oil families in Devonian and Carboniferous reservoirs. This suggests multiple source intervals within the deeper flanks of the basin, thus the understanding of sedimentation during early basin phases may be critical in evaluating petroleum systems.

  17. Nature of differentiation trends in some volcanic rocks from the Galapagos spreading center

    SciTech Connect

    Byerly, G.

    1980-07-10

    The Galapagos spreading center has produced a suite of volcanic rocks which include (1) typical ocean floor tholeiites, (2) iron- and tianium-enriched tholeiites, (3) andesites, and (4) rhyodacites. Interpretation of major element compositions determined for these rocks, associated glassy selvedges, and mineral phases suggests that the entire suite can be produced by fractional crystallization of the observed low-pressure phenocrysts.The unusual extent of fractionation for this region may be related to the size, morphology, and eruption and resupply rates of the magma chambers associated with the Galapagos spreading center. This and the regional distribution of these highly fractionated rocks suggest and important, though indirect, influence of the Galapagos hot spot.

  18. Slopes of Western Galapagos volcanoes from airborne interferometric radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Rowland, Scott K.; Garbeil, Harold

    The distribution of slopes on the six basaltic shield volcanoes in the Western Galapagos Islands is investigated using a digital elevation model derived from airborne interferometric radar (TOPSAR) data. These measurements have a spatial sampling of 10 m/pixel, a vertical accuracy of 3 to 5 m, and constitute the highest resolution, most complete, topographic data set available for the islands. Volcano heights are determined to range from 1,124 m (Sierra Negra) to 1,710 m (Wolf). Over extensive areas of each volcano, slopes exceed 25°, with the highest slopes being ˜37° on Wolf and ˜36° on Fernandina. We confirm that two morphologic subgroups exist: Cerro Azul, Fernandina, and Wolf, with deep calderas (depth between 40-60% of the subaerial height of the volcano) and steep (>20°) maximum slopes at elevations between ˜60 and 80% of the volcano height; and Alcedo, Darwin, and Sierra Negra, with shallow calderas (depth <25% of subaerial height) and slopes that remain <15° until ˜90% of the total height is reached. Our data show that steep slopes are not uniquely correlated with the occurrence of arcuate fissures at the summit, leaving the origin of the steep slopes unresolved.

  19. Long Period Tremor At Sierra Negra Caldera, Galapagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. M.; Ebinger, C. J.; Ruiz, M. C.

    2011-12-01

    Galapagos caldera have exhibited extremely high amplitude, short time-scale surface deformations as observed in high spatial resolution InSAR along the 7 active volcanoes archipelago, and high temporal resolution GPS on Sierra Negra. A temporary array of 16 seismic stations was installed to monitor the seismic behavior on a regional scale. Several stations were deployed in and around the caldera to understand the seismic response of the modeled sill below the current lava surface. Occasional bursts of low frequency (5s) tremor have been recorded on several stations in the caldera and rim zone. The tremor clearly rises above background microseismic noise with an ovate, or Gaussian, envelope. Frequency analysis shows that the tremor exhibits frequency gliding, from slightly below 5s to slightly above, over a time span of several minutes. We presume these transient tremor episodes have a fluid dynamic origin, either hydrothermal or magmatic. The oscillatory bursts differ significantly from tremor observed at other, more silicic, volcanoes where explosions and degassing prevail. We place these events within the volcanological context afforded by seismic, geodetic, and gas emission studies.

  20. Diving behaviour and decompression sickness among Galapagos underwater harvesters.

    PubMed

    Westin, A A; Asvall, J; Idrovo, G; Denoble, P; Brubakk, A O

    2005-01-01

    Diving conditions, dive profiles, vascular bubbles, and symptoms of decompression sickness (DCS) in a group of Galapagos commercial divers are described. They harvest sea cucumbers from small boats with surface supplied air (hookah). Dive profiles for 12 divers were recorded using dive loggers, and bubble formation was measured in the pulmonary artery. DCS symptoms were assessed by interview. A total of 380 immersions were recorded over a nine day period. The divers did on average 6.3 immersions per day, in a yo-yo pattern. Mean overall depth was 34.5 FSW. Maximum recorded depth was 107 FSW. Average bottom time per day per diver was 175 minutes. 82 % of all ascents exceeded the recommended maximum ascent rate of 30 FSW/ min. High bubble grades were observed on six occasions, but the test was unreliable. Muscle and joint pain was reported on five occasions, in three different divers. Symptoms were typically managed by analgesics, in-water recompression or not at all. The divers were extremely reluctant to seek professional help for DCS symptoms, mostly due to the high costs of treatment. We conclude that the fishermen dive beyond standard no-decompression limits, and that DCS symptoms are common.

  1. Geology, petrography, and petrology of Pinzon Island, galapagos archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baitis, Hartmut W.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.

    1980-06-01

    Three stratigraphic units based on geologic relationships and paleomagnetic observations may be distinguished on Pinzon Island. The oldest unit is a broad shield which forms the main body of the island and was erupted during a period of reversed magnetic polarity from an area now occupied by a caldera. Subsequent activity was centered about 1.5 km to the north-northwest from vents later engulfed by the collapse of a younger caldera. The lower portion of this sequence was erupted during a period of transitional pole positions and is overlain by flows of normal polarity. Pinzon has the most diverse suite of differentiated tholeiitic rocks found in the Galapagos Archipelago. Products of eruptive cycles are preserved as sequences of tuffs and flows that have decreasing degrees of differentiation and increasing phenocryst abundance upsection. The sequences may be a consequence of tapping successively deeper levels of compositionally zoned magma chambers. Such a model is consistent with computer calculations utilizing major and trace element data for Pinzon rocks, which suggest that lavas of the island may be related by shallow-level crystal fractionation of observed phenocryst minerals.

  2. Earth observations of the Galapagos Islands taken from OV-105 during STS-99.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-28

    STS099-753-032 (11-22 February 2000) ---This 70mm photograph, photographed from the Space Shuttle Endeavour, centers on the two westernmost Galapagos Islands--seahorse-shaped Isla Isabela and the smaller round Isla Fernandina to its west. All of the 19 islands in the chain are volcanic in origin, and the craters of several of the shield volcanoes are visible as circular features on each of the islands. The two islands shown in this picture contain the most active volcanoes of the Galapagos. Fernandina last erupted in January-February 1995, with red-hot lava pouring into the sea. After 20 years of inactivity, Cerro Azul on Isla Isabela, last erupted in September-October 1998. Cerro Azul is the southwesternmost volcano on Isla Isabela. At 82 miles long, Isla Isabela is the largest of the islands, and comprises half of the land area of the archipelago. The islands are famous for their unique flora and fauna. Charles Darwin's observations of these species in 1835 contributed to the formation of his ideas on natural selection. Some of the most unique species include flightless cormorants, Galapagos penguins, giant land tortoises, and Galapagos finches. The range of Galapagos penguins is restricted to these western islands where upwelling enriches the ocean productivity, and the adaptation of a typically Antarctic bird family to the equator is an ecological marvel. Giant land tortoises are thought to have the oldest lifespans of any animal on Earth, but, scientists say, they have been driven near to extinction. During the most recent eruption of Cerro Azul, one tortoise was killed and many had to be relocated. The 13 species of Galapagos finches on the islands, although varied in form and lifestyle, are the descendants of an ancestor that happened to colonize this isolated archipelago. The human population of the entire archipelago is about 10,000.

  3. Hybridization and back-crossing in giant petrels (Macronectes giganteus and M. halli) at Bird Island, South Georgia, and a summary of hybridization in seabirds.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ruth M; Techow, N M S Mareile; Wood, Andrew G; Phillips, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization in natural populations provides an opportunity to study the evolutionary processes that shape divergence and genetic isolation of species. The emergence of pre-mating barriers is often the precursor to complete reproductive isolation. However, in recently diverged species, pre-mating barriers may be incomplete, leading to hybridization between seemingly distinct taxa. Here we report results of a long-term study at Bird Island, South Georgia, of the extent of hybridization, mate fidelity, timing of breeding and breeding success in mixed and conspecific pairs of the sibling species, Macronectes halli (northern giant petrel) and M. giganteus (southern giant petrel). The proportion of mixed-species pairs varied annually from 0.4-2.4% (mean of 1.5%), and showed no linear trend with time. Mean laying date in mixed-species pairs tended to be later than in northern giant petrel, and always earlier than in southern giant petrel pairs, and their breeding success (15.6%) was lower than that of conspecific pairs. By comparison, mixed-species pairs at both Marion and Macquarie islands always failed before hatching. Histories of birds in mixed-species pairs at Bird Island were variable; some bred previously or subsequently with a conspecific partner, others subsequently with a different allospecific partner, and some mixed-species pairs remained together for multiple seasons. We also report the first verified back-crossing of a hybrid giant petrel with a female northern giant petrel. We discuss the potential causes and evolutionary consequences of hybridization and back-crossing in giant petrels and summarize the incidence of back-crossing in other seabird species.

  4. Hybridization and Back-Crossing in Giant Petrels (Macronectes giganteus and M. halli) at Bird Island, South Georgia, and a Summary of Hybridization in Seabirds

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ruth M.; Techow, N. M. S. Mareile; Wood, Andrew G.; Phillips, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization in natural populations provides an opportunity to study the evolutionary processes that shape divergence and genetic isolation of species. The emergence of pre-mating barriers is often the precursor to complete reproductive isolation. However, in recently diverged species, pre-mating barriers may be incomplete, leading to hybridization between seemingly distinct taxa. Here we report results of a long-term study at Bird Island, South Georgia, of the extent of hybridization, mate fidelity, timing of breeding and breeding success in mixed and conspecific pairs of the sibling species, Macronectes halli (northern giant petrel) and M. giganteus (southern giant petrel). The proportion of mixed-species pairs varied annually from 0.4–2.4% (mean of 1.5%), and showed no linear trend with time. Mean laying date in mixed-species pairs tended to be later than in northern giant petrel, and always earlier than in southern giant petrel pairs, and their breeding success (15.6%) was lower than that of conspecific pairs. By comparison, mixed-species pairs at both Marion and Macquarie islands always failed before hatching. Histories of birds in mixed-species pairs at Bird Island were variable; some bred previously or subsequently with a conspecific partner, others subsequently with a different allospecific partner, and some mixed-species pairs remained together for multiple seasons. We also report the first verified back-crossing of a hybrid giant petrel with a female northern giant petrel. We discuss the potential causes and evolutionary consequences of hybridization and back-crossing in giant petrels and summarize the incidence of back-crossing in other seabird species. PMID:25815478

  5. The Cocos and Carnegie Ridges: A Record of Long-term Galapagos Plume-Ridge Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpp, K. S.; Wanless, V.; Hoernle, K.

    2001-12-01

    The present-day Galapagos Archipelago exhibits an astonishingly wide variety of geochemical compositions, from enriched, hotspot-like signatures in the west and south to MORB-like lavas in the central and northern regions. The distinctive spatial zonation has been attributed to a heterogeneous plume and its extensive interaction with the asthenosphere. One of the controversial questions about the Galapagos system is whether the geochemical zonation in the present-day archipelago is a long-term phenomenon due to inherent plume heterogeneity or only the recent result of short-lived mantle contamination. The aseismic Cocos and Carnegie Ridges record the last 20 Ma of plume activity as the Cocos and Nazca plates, respectively, have moved over the hotspot. During the 1999 PAGANINI expedition, we collected over 80 dredge samples from the ridges to explore the temporal variations of the Galapagos plume. Preliminary results suggested that lavas dredged off the west coast of Central America preserve the geochemical zonation observed in the Galapagos Archipelago today. Trace element determinations from dredge sites along the Cocos and Carnegie Ridges indicate, however, that the situation is (not surprisingly) more complex. Instead, the geochemical variations observed along the ridges may be controlled predominantly by the relative positions of the Galapagos plume and the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC). The GSC has been migrating to the NE relative to the hotspot. For the oldest portions of the Cocos Ridge, the plume was located beneath the Nazca plate and did not interact with the GSC. Lavas produced during this time therefore represent pristine plume, with compositions more enriched than those of the present-day Galapagos; these are observed NE of Cocos Island. As the ridge migrates closer to the hotspot, plume-mid-ocean ridge interaction intensifies, resulting in the dilution of hotspot lavas by entrained, depleted asthenosphere. Consistently, younger lavas along the

  6. Hormonal profiles of captive Galapagos tortoises (Chelonoidis nigra).

    PubMed

    Branson, Maile A; Atkinson, Shannon; Ramos, Meg Ferrell

    2016-05-01

    Monthly blood samples, daily mating observations from Galapagos tortoises (Chelonoidis nigra), and local rainfall and temperature were collected at the Honolulu Zoo as part of a fertility evaluation. Testosterone concentrations were measured for males (n = 6), two of which were seen copulating and were considered sexually active. Estrone sulfate and progesterone concentrations were measured for female tortoises (n = 9), two of which nested and only one had laid eggs. Testosterone profiles were similar for both sexually active and sexually inactive males, both of which were positively correlated with temperature but not rainfall. Peak testosterone concentrations (12.0 ± 1.4 ng/ml sexually active animals vs. 14.4 ± 2.4 ng/ml sexually inactive animals) occurred at the end of the nesting season, from April to July. Estrone sulfate concentrations were similar for nesting (n = 2) and non-nesting (n = 7) female tortoises, rising from non-detectable concentrations (September), and increasing to peak concentrations during the nesting season. Progesterone concentrations remained low and spiked (9.44 ng/ml) only for the female that nested and laid eggs. Testosterone was negatively correlated with mating behavior, and the male tortoises were likely capable of spermatogenesis even though only two of them engaged in mating behavior. The female tortoises were not senescent, as the estrone sulfate concentrations likely reflected waves of ovarian follicular activity. Endocrine parameters were not in synchrony with rainfall, and a disconnect between the timing of reproductive events and the environmental milieu may help to explain the poor fertility of these tortoises. Zoo Biol. 35:237-245, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Evolution of body size in Galapagos marine iguanas.

    PubMed

    Wikelski, Martin

    2005-10-07

    Body size is one of the most important traits of organisms and allows predictions of an individual's morphology, physiology, behaviour and life history. However, explaining the evolution of complex traits such as body size is difficult because a plethora of other traits influence body size. Here I review what we know about the evolution of body size in a group of island reptiles and try to generalize about the mechanisms that shape body size. Galapagos marine iguanas occupy all 13 larger islands in this Pacific archipelago and have maximum island body weights between 900 and 12 000g. The distribution of body sizes does not match mitochondrial clades, indicating that body size evolves independently of genetic relatedness. Marine iguanas lack intra- and inter-specific food competition and predators are not size-specific, discounting these factors as selective agents influencing body size. Instead I hypothesize that body size reflects the trade-offs between sexual and natural selection. We found that sexual selection continuously favours larger body sizes. Large males establish display territories and some gain over-proportional reproductive success in the iguanas' mating aggregations. Females select males based on size and activity and are thus responsible for the observed mating skew. However, large individuals are strongly selected against during El Niño-related famines when dietary algae disappear from the intertidal foraging areas. We showed that differences in algae sward ('pasture') heights and thermal constraints on large size are causally responsible for differences in maximum body size among populations. I hypothesize that body size in many animal species reflects a trade-off between foraging constraints and sexual selection and suggest that future research could focus on physiological and genetic mechanisms determining body size in wild animals. Furthermore, evolutionary stable body size distributions within populations should be analysed to better

  8. Individual foraging strategies reveal niche overlap between endangered galapagos pinnipeds.

    PubMed

    Villegas-Amtmann, Stella; Jeglinski, Jana W E; Costa, Daniel P; Robinson, Patrick W; Trillmich, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    Most competition studies between species are conducted from a population-level approach. Few studies have examined inter-specific competition in conjunction with intra-specific competition, with an individual-based approach. To our knowledge, none has been conducted on marine top predators. Sympatric Galapagos fur seals (Arctocephalus galapagoensis) and sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) share similar geographic habitats and potentially compete. We studied their foraging niche overlap at Cabo Douglas, Fernandina Island from simultaneously collected dive and movement data to examine spatial and temporal inter- and intra-specific competition. Sea lions exhibited 3 foraging strategies (shallow, intermediate and deep) indicating intra-specific competition. Fur seals exhibited one foraging strategy, diving predominantly at night, between 0-80 m depth and mostly at 19-22 h. Most sea lion dives also occurred at night (63%), between 0-40 m, within fur seals' diving depth range. 34% of sea lions night dives occurred at 19-22 h, when fur seals dived the most, but most of them occurred at dawn and dusk, when fur seals exhibited the least amount of dives. Fur seals and sea lions foraging behavior overlapped at 19 and 21 h between 0-30 m depths. Sea lions from the deep diving strategy exhibited the greatest foraging overlap with fur seals, in time (19 h), depth during overlapping time (21-24 m), and foraging range (37.7%). Fur seals foraging range was larger. Cabo Douglas northwest coastal area, region of highest diving density, is a foraging "hot spot" for both species. Fur seals and sea lions foraging niche overlap occurred, but segregation also occurred; fur seals primarily dived at night, while sea lions exhibited night and day diving. Both species exploited depths and areas exclusive to their species. Niche breadth generally increases with environmental uncertainty and decreased productivity. Potential competition between these species could be greater during warmer periods

  9. Evolution of body size in Galapagos marine iguanas

    PubMed Central

    Wikelski, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Body size is one of the most important traits of organisms and allows predictions of an individual's morphology, physiology, behaviour and life history. However, explaining the evolution of complex traits such as body size is difficult because a plethora of other traits influence body size. Here I review what we know about the evolution of body size in a group of island reptiles and try to generalize about the mechanisms that shape body size. Galapagos marine iguanas occupy all 13 larger islands in this Pacific archipelago and have maximum island body weights between 900 and 12 000 g. The distribution of body sizes does not match mitochondrial clades, indicating that body size evolves independently of genetic relatedness. Marine iguanas lack intra- and inter-specific food competition and predators are not size-specific, discounting these factors as selective agents influencing body size. Instead I hypothesize that body size reflects the trade-offs between sexual and natural selection. We found that sexual selection continuously favours larger body sizes. Large males establish display territories and some gain over-proportional reproductive success in the iguanas' mating aggregations. Females select males based on size and activity and are thus responsible for the observed mating skew. However, large individuals are strongly selected against during El Niño-related famines when dietary algae disappear from the intertidal foraging areas. We showed that differences in algae sward (‘pasture’) heights and thermal constraints on large size are causally responsible for differences in maximum body size among populations. I hypothesize that body size in many animal species reflects a trade-off between foraging constraints and sexual selection and suggest that future research could focus on physiological and genetic mechanisms determining body size in wild animals. Furthermore, evolutionary stable body size distributions within populations should be analysed to

  10. Individual Foraging Strategies Reveal Niche Overlap between Endangered Galapagos Pinnipeds

    PubMed Central

    Villegas-Amtmann, Stella; Jeglinski, Jana W. E.; Costa, Daniel P.; Robinson, Patrick W.; Trillmich, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    Most competition studies between species are conducted from a population-level approach. Few studies have examined inter-specific competition in conjunction with intra-specific competition, with an individual-based approach. To our knowledge, none has been conducted on marine top predators. Sympatric Galapagos fur seals (Arctocephalus galapagoensis) and sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) share similar geographic habitats and potentially compete. We studied their foraging niche overlap at Cabo Douglas, Fernandina Island from simultaneously collected dive and movement data to examine spatial and temporal inter- and intra-specific competition. Sea lions exhibited 3 foraging strategies (shallow, intermediate and deep) indicating intra-specific competition. Fur seals exhibited one foraging strategy, diving predominantly at night, between 0–80 m depth and mostly at 19–22 h. Most sea lion dives also occurred at night (63%), between 0–40 m, within fur seals' diving depth range. 34% of sea lions night dives occurred at 19–22 h, when fur seals dived the most, but most of them occurred at dawn and dusk, when fur seals exhibited the least amount of dives. Fur seals and sea lions foraging behavior overlapped at 19 and 21 h between 0–30 m depths. Sea lions from the deep diving strategy exhibited the greatest foraging overlap with fur seals, in time (19 h), depth during overlapping time (21–24 m), and foraging range (37.7%). Fur seals foraging range was larger. Cabo Douglas northwest coastal area, region of highest diving density, is a foraging “hot spot” for both species. Fur seals and sea lions foraging niche overlap occurred, but segregation also occurred; fur seals primarily dived at night, while sea lions exhibited night and day diving. Both species exploited depths and areas exclusive to their species. Niche breadth generally increases with environmental uncertainty and decreased productivity. Potential competition between these species could be greater during

  11. Organochlorine contaminants in albatrosses and petrels during migration in South Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Colabuono, Fernanda Imperatrice; Taniguchi, Satie; Montone, Rosalinda Carmela

    2012-02-01

    Albatrosses and petrels (Procellariiformes) are migratory oceanic birds of considerable conservational interest. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were assessed in the subcutaneous fat, liver and muscle of 100 birds belonging to eight species of Procellariiformes collected during their migration period in southern Brazil, one of the most important feeding areas for these species. Although the profiles of PCBs and OCPs were similar among the individuals, with predominance of penta, hexa and heptachlorobiphenyls and p'p-DDE, organochlorine concentrations exhibited a high degree of intra-species variability. The influence of body condition during the migration period in the distribution of organochlorine contaminants was also evaluated, showing that it is a significant factor in the variation and redistribution of these compounds in the tissues of these birds. The intense use of lipid reserves associated to the contamination from organochlorine compounds could be a troubling factor for seabirds with extended breeding periods and that spend most of their lives at sea migrating long distances, such as most of Procellariiformes. Studies on contamination are necessary to improve the knowledge of the threats to these birds and their populations as well as to contribute with information about persistent organic pollutants in the South Atlantic marine environment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Phylogenetic relationships of haemosporidian parasites in New World Columbiformes, with emphasis on the endemic Galapagos dove.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Alarcon, Diego; Outlaw, Diana C; Ricklefs, Robert E; Parker, Patricia G

    2010-03-15

    DNA-sequence analyses of avian haemosporidian parasites, primarily of passerine birds, have described the phylogenetic relationships of major groups of these parasites, which are in general agreement with morphological taxonomy. However, less attention has been paid to haemosporidian parasites of non-passerine birds despite morphological and DNA-sequence evidence for unique clades of parasites in these birds. Detection of haemosporidian parasites in the Galapagos archipelago has raised conservation concerns and prompted us to characterise the origins and diversity of these parasites in the Galapagos dove (Zenaida galapagoensis). We used partial mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) and apicoplast caseinolytic protease C (ClpC) genes to develop a phylogenetic hypothesis of relationships of haemosporidian parasites infecting New World Columbiformes, paying special attention to those parasites infecting the endemic Galapagos dove. We identified a well-supported and diverse monophyletic clade of haemosporidian parasites unique to Columbiformes, which belong to the sub-genus Haemoproteus (Haemoproteus). This is a sister clade to all the Haemoproteus (Parahaemoproteus) and Plasmodium parasites so far identified from birds as well as the Plasmodium parasites of mammals and reptiles. Our data suggest that the diverse Haemoproteus parasites observed in Galapagos doves are not endemic to the archipelago and likely represent multiple recent introductions.

  13. Radiometric ages of brachyuran crabs from the Galapagos spreading-center hydrothermal ventfield

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.T.; Turekian, K.K.

    1984-09-01

    The ages of four crab carapaces from the Galapagos spreading-center hydrothermal ventfield were determined radiometrically using members of the U and Th decay chains. One animal had an age of 0.1 years and therefore had undergone molting just before collection; the other three had last molted 3-4 years before collection.

  14. Long-term isolation of a highly mobile seabird on the Galapagos.

    PubMed

    Hailer, Frank; Schreiber, E A; Miller, Joshua M; Levin, Iris I; Parker, Patricia G; Chesser, R Terry; Fleischer, Robert C

    2011-03-22

    The Galapagos Islands are renowned for their high degree of endemism. Marine taxa inhabiting the archipelago might be expected to be an exception, because of their utilization of pelagic habitats-the dispersal barrier for terrestrial taxa-as foraging grounds. Magnificent frigatebirds (Fregata magnificens) have a highly vagile lifestyle and wide geographical distribution around the South and Central American coasts. Given the potentially high levels of gene flow among populations, the species provides a good test of the effectiveness of the Galapagos ecosystem in isolating populations of highly dispersive marine species. We studied patterns of genetic (mitochondrial DNA, microsatellites and nuclear introns) and morphological variation across the distribution of magnificent frigatebirds. Concordant with predictions from life-history traits, we found signatures of extensive gene flow over most of the range, even across the Isthmus of Panama, which is a major barrier to gene flow in other tropical seabirds. In contrast, individuals from the Galapagos were strongly differentiated from all conspecifics, and have probably been isolated for several hundred thousand years. Our finding is a powerful testimony to the evolutionary uniqueness of the taxa inhabiting the Galapagos archipelago and its associated marine ecosystems.

  15. Long-term isolation of a highly mobile seabird on the Galapagos

    PubMed Central

    Hailer, Frank; Schreiber, E. A.; Miller, Joshua M.; Levin, Iris I.; Parker, Patricia G.; Chesser, R. Terry; Fleischer, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    The Galapagos Islands are renowned for their high degree of endemism. Marine taxa inhabiting the archipelago might be expected to be an exception, because of their utilization of pelagic habitats—the dispersal barrier for terrestrial taxa—as foraging grounds. Magnificent frigatebirds (Fregata magnificens) have a highly vagile lifestyle and wide geographical distribution around the South and Central American coasts. Given the potentially high levels of gene flow among populations, the species provides a good test of the effectiveness of the Galapagos ecosystem in isolating populations of highly dispersive marine species. We studied patterns of genetic (mitochondrial DNA, microsatellites and nuclear introns) and morphological variation across the distribution of magnificent frigatebirds. Concordant with predictions from life-history traits, we found signatures of extensive gene flow over most of the range, even across the Isthmus of Panama, which is a major barrier to gene flow in other tropical seabirds. In contrast, individuals from the Galapagos were strongly differentiated from all conspecifics, and have probably been isolated for several hundred thousand years. Our finding is a powerful testimony to the evolutionary uniqueness of the taxa inhabiting the Galapagos archipelago and its associated marine ecosystems. PMID:20861041

  16. Megachile timberlakei Cockerell (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae): Yet another adventive bee species to the Galapagos Archipelago

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Galapagos Archipelago has been thought to be extremely depauperate in bees, with only one species known, Xylocopa darwini. Recently a second species, Anthidium vigintiduopunctatum, was detected. Here we document a third species, Megachile timberlakei. We provide floral records as well as a dia...

  17. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Two Tomato Species from the Galapagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Pailles, Yveline; Ho, Shwen; Pires, Inês S; Tester, Mark; Negrão, Sónia; Schmöckel, Sandra M

    2017-01-01

    Endemic flora of the Galapagos Islands has adapted to thrive in harsh environmental conditions. The wild tomato species from the Galapagos Islands, Solanum cheesmaniae and S. galapagense, are tolerant to various stresses, and can be crossed with cultivated tomato. However, information about genetic diversity and relationships within and between populations is necessary to use these resources efficiently in plant breeding. In this study, we analyzed 3,974 polymorphic SNP markers, obtained through the genotyping-by-sequencing technique, DArTseq, to elucidate the genetic diversity and population structure of 67 accessions of Galapagos tomatoes (compared to two S. lycopersicum varieties and one S. pimpinellifolium accession). Two clustering methods, Principal Component Analysis and STRUCTURE, showed clear distinction between the two species and a subdivision in the S. cheesmaniae group corresponding to geographical origin and age of the islands. High genetic variation among the accessions within each species was suggested by the AMOVA. High diversity in the S. cheesmaniae group and its correlation with the islands of origin were also suggested. This indicates a possible influence of the movement of the islands, from west to east, on the gene flow. Additionally, the absence of S. galapagense populations in the eastern islands points to the species divergence occurring after the eastern islands became isolated. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the population structure of the Galapagos tomatoes collection partially explains the evolutionary history of both species, knowledge that facilitates exploitation of their genetic potential for the identification of novel alleles contributing to stress tolerance.

  18. Investigating Island Evolution: A Galapagos-Based Lesson Using the 5E Instructional Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFina, Anthony V.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces an inquiry-based lesson plan on evolution and the Galapagos Islands. Uses the 5E instructional model which includes phases of engagement, exploration, explanation, elaboration, and evaluation. Includes information on species for exploration and elaboration purposes, and a general rubric for student evaluation. (YDS)

  19. Long-term isolation of a highly mobile seabird on the Galapagos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hailer, Frank; Schreiber, E.A.; Miller, Joshua M.; Levin, Iris I.; Parker, Patricia G.; Chesser, R. Terry; Fleischer, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    The Galapagos Islands are renowned for their high degree of endemism. Marine taxa inhabiting the archipelago might be expected to be an exception, because of their utilization of pelagic habitats--the dispersal barrier for terrestrial taxa--as foraging grounds. Magnificent frigatebirds (Fregata magnificens) have a highly vagile lifestyle and wide geographical distribution around the South and Central American coasts. Given the potentially high levels of gene flow among populations, the species provides a good test of the effectiveness of the Galapagos ecosystem in isolating populations of highly dispersive marine species. We studied patterns of genetic (mitochondrial DNA, microsatellites and nuclear introns) and morphological variation across the distribution of magnificent frigatebirds. Concordant with predictions from life-history traits, we found signatures of extensive gene flow over most of the range, even across the Isthmus of Panama, which is a major barrier to gene flow in other tropical seabirds. In contrast, individuals from the Galapagos were strongly differentiated from all conspecifics, and have probably been isolated for several hundred thousand years. Our finding is a powerful testimony to the evolutionary uniqueness of the taxa inhabiting the Galapagos archipelago and its associated marine ecosystems.

  20. Perceptions of Body Size in Mothers and Their Young Children in the Galapagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Waldrop, Julee B; Page, Rachel A; Bentley, Margaret E

    2016-10-01

    Introduction Little specific information has been published about the health of people who live in the Galapagos Islands. As part of determining the status of the nutrition transition that may be occurring in the islands mothers of young children in the Galapagos perceptions of their child's body size and therefore health status was evaluated along with actual body size. Methods This paper presents data collected as part of a pilot study that used a mixed methods approach to identify and describe health and nutrition issues for mother-child pairs on Isla Isabela in Galapagos, Ecuador. It includes participant anthropometric assessment and self-perception of body size using silhouettes for themselves and one of their children along with open-ended questions to elicit further understanding of body size perceptions. Twenty mothers of children greater than 6 months of age but less than 6 years of age were interviewed. Results The women preferred a smaller body size for themselves but a larger body size for their children. Findings of different body size combinations between mothers and children in the same household demonstrated that the island is undergoing or may be post the nutrition transition. Discussion This dual burden of body weights (especially overweight or obese mothers) in the same household with underweight, normal and overweight or obese children and the potential nutrition related chronic disease burden in the future will require more educational resources and innovative health services than are currently available for the people of the Galapagos.

  1. Anthidium vigintiduopunctatum Friese (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae): The elusive "dwarf bee" of the Galapagos Archipelago

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The endemic large carpenter bee, Xylocopa darwini Cockerell, was the only known bee pollinator to the Galapagos Archipelago but as early as 1964 locals also spoke of the "dwarf bee of Floreana". We report the presence of the wool carder bee, Anthidium vigintiduopunctatum Friese, on the island of Fl...

  2. A Capstone Course in Ecuador: The Andes/Galapagos Volcanology Field Camp Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Daniel F.; Uzunlar, Nuri; Lisenbee, Alvis; Beate, Bernardo; Turner, Hope E.

    We developed and implemented the Galapagos Volcanology Field Camp, a 3 week, 3 credit hour course for upper-level university students with a major course of study in geology. The course is offered by the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, is open to any student, and is usually populated by students from many universities across the U.S.…

  3. Petrology and geochemistry of the Galapagos Islands: Portrait of a pathological mantle plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, William M.; McBirney, Alexander R.; Duncan, Robert A.

    1993-11-01

    We report new major element, trace element, isotope ratio, and geochronological data on the Galapagos Archipelago. Magmas erupted from the large western volcanos are generally moderately fractionated tholeiites of uniform composition; those erupted on other islands are compositionally diverse, ranging from tholeiites to picritic basanitoids. While these volcanos do not form a strickly linear age progressive chain, the ages of the oldest dated flows on any given volcano do form a resonable progression from youngest in the west to oldest in the east, consistent with motion of the Nazca plate with respect to the fixed hotspot reference frame. Isotope ratios in the Galapagos display a considerable range, from values typical of mid-ocean ridge basalt on Genovesa Sr-87/Sr-86: 0.70259, epsilon(sub Nd): +9.4 Pb-206/Pb-204: 18.44), to typical oceanic island values on Floreana Sr-87/Sr-86: 0.70366, epsilon(Sub Nd): +5.3, Pb-206/Pb-204: 20.0). La/m(sub N) ranges from 0.45 to 6.7; other incompatible element abundances and ratios show comparable ranges. Isotope and incompatible element ratios define a horseshoe pattern with the most depleted signatures in the center of the Galapagos Archipelago and the more enriched signatures on the eastern, northern, and southern periphery. These isoptope and incompatible element patterns appear to reflect thermal entrainment of asthenosphere by the Galapagos plume as it experiences velocity shear in the uppermost asthenosphere. Both north-south heterogeneity within the plume itself and regional variations in degree and depth of melting also affect magma compositions. Rare earth systematics indicate that melting beneath the Galapagos begins in the garnet peridotite stability field, except beneath the southern islands, where melting may occur entirely in the spinel peridotite stability field. The greatest degree of melting occurs beneath the central western volcanos and decreases both to the east and to the north and south. Si(8.0), Fe(8

  4. The effect of recycled oceanic crust in the thermal evolution of the Galapagos Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Herzberg, C. T.; Vidito, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    Current models suggest that the massive basaltic production responsible for the emplacement of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPS) during the Permian-Paleocene may represent the initial phases (plume heads) of some of the mantle plumes that feed the current ocean island basalts (OIB). In many cases, magmatism associated with the initiation of mantle plumes was so voluminous that produced global environmental impacts. The origin of these intra-plate magmatism is still debated but recent petrological, geochemical and geophysical studies of some of these localities like Samoa, Hawaii, Galapagos, provide evidence that melting is related to a true mantle plume, representing a geochemically heterogeneous, hot-buoyant domain that originates from a boundary layer beneath the upper mantle. Thus, plume-related magmas produced in OIB and LIPS and their connecting plume tracks are windows into the Earth's mantle, providing evidence on mantle temperature, size and composition of heterogeneities, and the deep earth geochemical cycles. Our preliminary petrological modeling suggests that mantle plumes for LIPS with Permian-Paleocene ages were generally hotter and melted more extensively than plumes of more modern oceanic islands. Although a lot of work has been done on LIPS and OIB, no complete record of the evolution of a mantle plume is available to this point, mostly due to the inaccessibility of the submerged sections of almost all plume tracks. Galapagos-related lavas provide a complete record of the evolution of a mantle plume since the plume's initial stages in the Cretaceous. In the case of the Galapagos, our work suggests a decrease from TP(max) of1650 C in the Cretaceous to 1500 C in the present day. Our recent work on the Galapagos Islands and the preliminary work on older Galapagos-related terranes suggest that this secular cooling is directly related with increasing amounts of recycled crust in the plume.

  5. An Extensive Alien Plant Inventory from the Inhabited Areas of Galapagos

    PubMed Central

    Guézou, Anne; Trueman, Mandy; Buddenhagen, Christopher Evan; Chamorro, Susana; Guerrero, Ana Mireya; Pozo, Paola; Atkinson, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Background Plant invasions are causing habitat degradation in Galapagos. Problems are concentrated on the four inhabited islands. Plants introduced to rural areas in the humid highlands and urban areas on the arid coast act as foci for invasion of the surrounding Galapagos National Park. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we present results of the most comprehensive inventory to date of alien vascular plants in the inhabited areas of Galapagos. The survey was conducted between 2002 and 2007, in 6031 properties (97% of the total) on Floreana, Isabela, San Cristobal and Santa Cruz Islands. In total 754 alien vascular plant taxa were recorded, representing 468 genera in 123 families. Dicotyledons represented 554 taxa, monocotyledons 183, there were 7 gymnosperms and 10 pteridophytes. Almost half (363) of the taxa were herbaceous. The most represented families were Fabaceae (sensu lato), Asteraceae and Poaceae. The three most recorded species in the humid rural areas were Psidium guajava, Passiflora edulis and Bryophyllum pinnatum, and in the dry urban areas, Aloe vera, Portulaca oleracea and Carica papaya. In total, 264 (35%) taxa were recorded as naturalized. The most common use for taxa was ornamental (52%). Conclusions/Significance This extensive survey has increased the known alien vascular flora of Galapagos by 257 species, giving a ratio of alien to native taxa of 1.57∶1. It provides a crucial baseline for plant invasion management in the archipelago and contributes data for meta analyses of invasion processes worldwide. A repeat of the survey in the future would act as an effective early detection tool to help avoid further invasion of the Galapagos National Park. PMID:20421999

  6. Coastal Impacts of the March 11th Tsunami in the Galapagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynett, P. J.; Weiss, R.; Renteria, W.

    2011-12-01

    On March 11, 2011 at 5:46:23 UTC (March 10 11:46:23 PM Local Time, Galapagos), the magnitude 9.0 Mw Great East Japan Earthquake occurred near the Tohoku region off the east coast of Japan. The purpose of this presentation is to provide the results of a tsunami field survey in the Galapagos Islands performed by an International Tsunami Survey Team (ITST) with great assistance from INOCAR, the oceanographic service of the Ecuadorian Navy, and the Galapagos National Park. The Galapagos Islands are a volcanic chain composed of many islands of various sizes. The four largest islands are the focus of this survey, and are, from west to east, Isabela, Santiagio, Santa Cruz, and San Cristobal. Aside from approximately 10 sandy beaches that are open to tourists, all other shoreline locations are strictly off limits to anyone without a research permit. All access to the shoreline is coordinated through the Galapagos National Park, and any landing requires a chaperone, a Park Ranger. While a few of the visited areas in this survey were tourist sites, the vast majority were not. Due to time constraints and a generally inaccessibility of the coastline, the survey locations were strongly guided by numerical computations performed previous to the surveys. This numerical guidance accurately predicted the regions of highest impact, as well as regions of relatively low impact. Tide-corrected maximum flow elevations were generally in the range of 3-4 meters, while Isabela experienced the largest flow elevation of 6 m in a small pocket beach. The largest harbor in the Islands, Puerto Ayora, experienced moderate damage, with significant flooding and some structural damage. Currents in the Baltra Channel, a small waterway between Santa Cruz and Baltra, were strong enough to transport navigation buoys distances greater than 800 m. Extreme dune erosion, and the associated destruction of sea turtle nesting habit, was widespread and noted on all of the islands visited.

  7. Persistent organic pollutants in blood samples of Southern Giant Petrels (Macronectes giganteus) from the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Colabuono, Fernanda I; Vander Pol, Stacy S; Huncik, Kevin M; Taniguchi, Satie; Petry, Maria V; Kucklick, John R; Montone, Rosalinda C

    2016-09-01

    Seabirds play an important role as top consumers in the food web and can be used as biomonitors of exposure to pollutants. Contamination studies involving non-destructive sampling methods are of considerable importance, allowing better evaluation of the levels of pollutants and their toxic effects. In the present study, organohalogen contaminants were analyzed in 113 blood samples from Southern Giant Petrel (Macronectes giganteus) adults and chicks collected in the austral summer of 2011/2012 and 2012/2013 from colonies on Elephant and Livingston Islands, South Shetland, Antarctica. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), pentachlorobenzene (PeCB), mirex, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroetane and derivatives (DDTs) and chlordanes were detected in all birds, whereas polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were not detected in any blood samples. No significant differences were found in organochlorine levels between sampling events. Adults exhibited significantly higher levels than chicks, except for PeCB. PCBs, HCB, mirex and DDTs were statistically similar in males and females from Elephant Island. Females on Livingston Island exhibited higher HCB values than males, but no sex differences were found regarding other organochlorines. The similarity in organochlorine levels between sexes in birds with very marked sexual segregation in feeding habits during the breeding season may indicate that significant amounts of contaminants are acquired during migration to lower latitudes, when the diets of males and females are similar. Birds sampled on Livingston Island exhibited significantly lower levels of PCBs, HCB, DDTs, mirex and chlordanes in comparison to those on Elephant Island, which could be the result of distinct foraging patterns between the two colonies. Organochlorine levels were similar between years in birds captured in two consecutive breeding seasons. Blood samples from Southern Giant Petrels adults and chicks proved to be useful for the comparison

  8. Exploring individual quality: Basal metabolic rate and reproductive performance in storm-petrels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blackmer, A.L.; Mauck, R.A.; Ackerman, J.T.; Huntington, C.E.; Nevitt, G.A.; Williams, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Despite evidence that some individuals achieve both superior reproductive performance and high survivorship, the factors underlying variation in individual quality are not well understood. The compensation and increased-intake hypotheses predict that basal metabolic rate (BMR) influences reproductive performance; if so, variation in BMR may be related to differences in individual quality. We evaluated whether BMR measured during the incubation period provides a proximate explanation for variation in individual quality by measuring the BMRs and reproductive performance of Leach's storm-petrels (Oceanodroma leucorhoa) breeding on Kent Island, New Brunswick, Canada, during 2000 and 2001. We statistically controlled for internal (body mass, breeding age, sex) and external (year, date, time of day) effects on BMR. We found that males with relatively low BMRs hatched their eggs earlier in the season and that their chicks' wing growth rates were faster compared to males with relatively high BMRs. Conversely, BMR was not related to egg volume, hatching date, or chick growth rate for females or to lifetime (???23 years) hatching success for either sex. Thus, for males but not for females, our results support the compensation hypothesis. This hypothesis predicts that animals with low BMRs will achieve better reproductive performance than animals with high BMRs because they have lower self-maintenance costs and therefore can apportion more energy to reproduction. These results provide evidence that intraspecific variation in reproductive performance is related to BMR and suggest that BMR may influence individual quality in males. ?? The Author 2005. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Society for Behavioral Ecology. All rights reserved.

  9. Lack of porphyroblast rotation in noncoaxially deformed schists from Petrel Cove, South Australia, and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Chris

    1989-02-01

    Inclusion trails representing an S 1 cleavage demonstrate the lack of porphyroblast rotation during subsequent highly non-coaxial deformations. The pelitic schists of the Kanmantoo Group at Petrel Cove, South Australia contain two generations of porphyroblasts. The first one consists of cordierite porphyroblasts that formed early in D 2 and contain straight to slightly sigmoidal inclusion trails of S 1. The second generation consists of andalusite porphyroblasts that overgrew crenulated S 2 late during D 3. Several hundred inclusion trail traces from cordierites measured from oriented specimens taken throughout a strongly folded area show a horizontal great circle distribution when plotted and contoured on a stereographic projection. Hence, S 1 was planar and horizontal prior to D 2. S 1 measurements on limbs and hinges of a mesoscale D 2 foldpair show that folding had little effect on porphyroblast orientation as the S 1 orientation remained constant and subhorizontal around the fold. Hence, porphyroblasts have not rotated during any of the non-coaxial deformations accompanying and following their growth. This is interpreted as a result of the partitioning of the deformation around them. S 1 in the matrix has been totally destroyed by the formation of S 2 as a fully differentiated crenulation cleavage. What has previously been regarded as inconsistent senses of shear recorded by porphyroblasts around folds is resolved by the fact that the matrix foliation rotated rather than the porphyroblasts due to the effects of deformation partitioning. The presence of a subhorizontal S 1 foliation suggests horizontal movements (e.g. thrusting or detachment faulting) during the earliest phase of the Adelaidian orogeny.

  10. Local parasite lineage sharing in temperate grassland birds provides clues about potential origins of Galapagos avian Plasmodium.

    PubMed

    Levin, Iris I; Colborn, Rachel E; Kim, Daniel; Perlut, Noah G; Renfrew, Rosalind B; Parker, Patricia G

    2016-02-01

    Oceanic archipelagos are vulnerable to natural introduction of parasites via migratory birds. Our aim was to characterize the geographic origins of two Plasmodium parasite lineages detected in the Galapagos Islands and in North American breeding bobolinks (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) that regularly stop in Galapagos during migration to their South American overwintering sites. We used samples from a grassland breeding bird assemblage in Nebraska, United States, and parasite DNA sequences from the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador, to compare to global data in a DNA sequence registry. Homologous DNA sequences from parasites detected in bobolinks and more sedentary birds (e.g., brown-headed cowbirds Molothrus ater, and other co-occurring bird species resident on the North American breeding grounds) were compared to those recovered in previous studies from global sites. One parasite lineage that matched between Galapagos birds and the migratory bobolink, Plasmodium lineage B, was the most common lineage detected in the global MalAvi database, matching 49 sequences from unique host/site combinations, 41 of which were of South American origin. We did not detect lineage B in brown-headed cowbirds. The other Galapagos-bobolink match, Plasmodium lineage C, was identical to two other sequences from birds sampled in California. We detected a close variant of lineage C in brown-headed cowbirds. Taken together, this pattern suggests that bobolinks became infected with lineage B on the South American end of their migratory range, and with lineage C on the North American breeding grounds. Overall, we detected more parasite lineages in bobolinks than in cowbirds. Galapagos Plasmodium had similar host breadth compared to the non-Galapagos haemosporidian lineages detected in bobolinks, brown-headed cowbirds, and other grassland species. This study highlights the utility of global haemosporidian data in the context of migratory bird-parasite connectivity. It is possible that migratory bobolinks

  11. Life Cycle of Mantle Plumes: A perspective from the Galapagos Plume (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Herzberg, C. T.

    2009-12-01

    Hotspots are localized sources of heat and magmatism considered as modern-day evidence of mantle plumes. Some hotspots are related to massive magmatic production that generated Large Igneous Provinces (LIPS), an initial-peak phase of plume activity with a mantle source hotter and more magmatically productive than present-day hotspots. Geological mapping and geochronological studies have shown much lower eruption rates for OIB compared to lavas from Large Igneous Provinces LIPS such as oceanic plateaus and continental flood provinces. Our study is the first quantitative petrological comparison of mantle source temperatures and extent of melting for OIB and LIP sources. The wide range of primary magma compositions and inferred mantle potential temperatures for each LIP and OIB occurrence suggest that this rocks originated form a hotspot, a spatially localized source of heat and magmatism restricted in time. Extensive outcrops of basalt, picrite, and sometimes komatiite with circa 65-95 Ma ages occupy portions of the pacific shore of Central and South America included in the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP). There is general consensus of a Pacific-origin of CLIP and most studies suggest that it was produced by melting in the Galapagos mantle plume. The Galapagos connection is consistent with isotopic and geochemical similarities with lavas from the present-day Galapagos hotspot. A Galapagos link for rocks in South American oceanic complexes (eg. the island of Gorgona) is more controversial and requires future work. The MgO and FeO contents of lavas from the Galapagos related lavas and their primary magmas have decreased since the Cretaceous. From petrological modeling we infer that these changes reflect a cooling of the Galapagos mantle plume from a potential temperature of 1560-1620 C in the Cretaceous to 1500 C at the present time. These temperatures are higher than 1350 C for ambient mantle associated with oceanic ridges, and provide support for the mantle

  12. The Thermal Evolution of the Galapagos Mantle Plume: Insights from Al-in-Olivine Thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trela, J.; Gazel, E.; Sobolev, A. V.; Class, C.; Bizimis, M.; Jicha, B. R.; Batanova, V. G.; Denyer, P.

    2016-12-01

    The mantle plume hypothesis is widely accepted for the formation of large igneous provinces (LIP) and many ocean island basalts (OIB). Petrologic models support a mantle plume origin by indicating high mantle temperatures (>1500 °C) for some plume-melts relative to melts generated at ambient mid ocean ridge conditions (1350 °C). Mantle plumes forming LIPs and OIBs provide our primary source of information on the geochemical and lithological heterogeneity of the lower mantle. The Galapagos hotspot represents one of the most thermally and geochemically heterogeneous plumes on the planet, sustaining long-lived isotopic and lithological heterogeneity over its 90 Ma evolution. Previous petrologic studies showed that the Galapagos plume secularly cooled over time and that the decrease in the plume's temperature correlates with an increase in a recycled (pyroxenite) component. We used Al-in-olivine thermometry to show that maximum olivine crystallization temperatures confirm secular cooling of the Galapagos plume. Olivines from the early melting stages of the plume at 90 Ma (Caribbean LIP) record the highest crystallization temperatures (1600 °C). Olivines from the current archipelago record the lowest temperatures of only 1300 °C. The largest decrease in temperature occurred between 90 and 70 Ma ( 200 °C decrease) and coincides with the plume head-tail transition. Olivines from the 60-90 Ma-old accreted Galapagos-tracks in Costa Rica and Panama record higher Ni, Fe/Mn, and lower Ca contents than those from the present-day archipelago, indicating a higher abundance of pyroxenite (recycled oceanic crust) entrained in parts of the plume head that melted to form the Caribbean LIP. However, the Galapagos plume was pyroxenite-rich for 40 Ma thus pyroxenite-entrainment goes beyond the plume-tail transition. Our results suggest that hotter regions of the Galapagos plume entrained larger amounts of dense, recycled components due to their greater buoyancy; however, this

  13. Multstage Melting and Mantle Flow in the Galapagos Plume-Ridge Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geist, D.

    2010-12-01

    New geophysical and geochemical studies are yielding insights into the complexity of plume-ridge interaction in the Galapagos region. A multistage melting model of a heterogeneous plume is consistent with some of the paradoxical findings. The most difficult geochemical observations to explain are: 1) Although the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) is regionally affected by the Galapagos plume, as measured by Sr, Nd, Pb, and Hf isotopes and trace element ratios like Nb/La and La/Sm, the GSC shows no trace of plume helium. In fact, almost no measurable plume helium has been measured in the archipelago north of Darwin volcano, which overlies the deep root of the plume. 2) Many of the volcanoes between the Galapagos Platform and the GSC (including Wolf Volcano on Isabela Island) have more depleted isotopic and trace-element compositions than GSC lavas anywhere within 300 km of 92W; the only exception, so far as we know, are depleted lavas erupted from the oblique transform at 90.5W. Thus, if the well-documented regional geochemical anomaly along the GSC is caused by flow of the plume toward the ridge, the plume must have its helium removed, and enriched (in terms of Sr, Nd, Pb, Hf, Nb, etc.) components of the plume have to make it to the ridge without contributing to the seamounts between. Combined surface and body wave tomography by the Oregon group shows two low velocity anomalies beneath the western Galapagos Platform. The base of the deeper anomaly, which extends from 100 to 300 km depth, might be attributable to the carbonate-bearing solidus in the plume. The top of this anomaly is where a CO2-H2O-rich melt is extracted, along with helium, leaving a more viscous residue. The bottom of the second low velocity anomaly is at 60 km and represents the solidus of the enriched (as measured by Sr, Nd, Pb, and Hf isotopes) part of the plume. High 3He magmas at Fernandina are a hybrid of melts from the two melting zones. Plume material flowing toward the GSC is zoned, with

  14. Effect of sea-ice extent on adult survival of an Antarctic top predator: the snow petrel Pagodroma nivea.

    PubMed

    Barbraud, Christophe; Weimerskirch, Henri; Guinet, Christophe; Jouventin, Pierre

    2000-12-01

    The snow petrel Pagodroma nivea is an obligate associate of sea-ice and one of the most abundant seabird species of the Southern Ocean. Time- and sex-specific annual variation in adult survival was estimated using capture-mark-recapture of petrels nesting at Pétrels Island, Terre Adélie, 1981-1997. On the basis of a regression analysis, 44% of the variation was linked inversely to the latitudinal extent of sea-ice during winter (June) in the region offshore of the study colony, where this population is likely to spend the non-breeding season. Monthly sea-surface temperature anomalies tended to influence adult survival but the relationship was not statistically significant. Why sea-ice extent should have such a critical effect on this species is yet to be explained, but the relationship, in the context of environmental warming and the consequent potential loss of Antarctic sea-ice, is an important one for this species.

  15. A case study of human migration and the sea cucumber crisis in the Galapagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Bremner, Jason; Perez, Jaime

    2002-06-01

    The sea cucumber fishing crisis in Galapagos is an example of the potential consequences of rapid migration, growing economic competition, and weak regulatory mechanisms. In a short period of time sea cucumber fishing has become the most inflammatory issue in the Galapagos. The key factors that allowed for the efficient exploitation of the new resource were not the fishermen themselves but rather the new fishing techniques and access to credit and markets. This suggests that the annual sea cucumber crisis is due to factors more complex than simply more fishermen generating greater sea cucumber catches. This paper examines census data and fisher registries to analyze population growth in the islands. A public opinion survey is used to determine the population's attitudes toward sea cucumber fishing and regulations. Qualitative interviews explore the history of the sea cucumber boom. Information from the sea cucumber monitoring program provides estimates for the annual sea cucumber catches.

  16. Characterization of the seascape used by juvenile and wintering adult Southern Giant Petrels from Patagonia Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Gabriela S.; Pisoni, Juan P.; Quintana, Flavio

    2015-02-01

    The characterization of the seascape used by marine top predators provides a wide perspective of pelagic habitat use and it is necessary to understand the functioning of marine systems. The goal of this study was to characterize the oceanographic and biological features of marine areas used by adult and first year juvenile southern giant petrels (SGP, Macronectes giganteus) from northern Patagonian colonies (Isla Arce and Gran Robredo) during the austral fall and winter (2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008). The marine environment exploited by the SGP was characterized using sea surface temperature (SST), SST gradients, chlorophyll-a concentration, water depth, oceanographic regimes, and ocean surface winds. In addition, the biological seascape was defined by considering the distribution of squid during the months of study. Juveniles SGP exploited a wide range of environments focusing mainly on productive neritic waters using a variety of oceanographic regimes. Juveniles were exposed to eutrophic and enriched waters, probably because of the frequent presence of thermal fronts in their utilization areas. Adults' environments lacked of thermal fronts remaining the majority of their time within the oceanographic regime "Continental Shelf", in water depths of 100-200 m, exploiting mesotrophic and eutrophic environments, and remaining in areas of known food resources related to the presence of squid. For the most part, juveniles were exposed to westerly winds, which may have helped them in their initial flight to the shelf break, east of the colony. Wintering adults SGP also explored areas characterized by westerly winds but this did not play a primary role in the selection of their residence areas. Juveniles during their first year at sea have to search for food exploring a variety of unknown environments. During their search, they remained in productive environments associated to fronts and probably also associated to fisheries operating in their foraging areas. The

  17. Mast cell tumour in a giant Galapagos tortoise (Geochelone nigra vicina).

    PubMed

    Santoro, M; Stacy, B A; Morales, J A; Gastezzi-Arias, P; Landazuli, S; Jacobson, E R

    2008-01-01

    A well-differentiated cutaneous mast cell tumour was diagnosed in a subadult female giant Galapagos tortoise. The tumour was a pedunculated, verrucose mass located near the base of the neck. The histological features, which were diagnostic for a mast cell tumour, included abundant intracytoplasmic granules that were stained metachromatically with Giemsa and toluidine blue stains. Mast cell tumours are rare in reptiles, and this is the first description of a mast cell tumour in a chelonian.

  18. Immunochemical identity of the high and low molecular weight forms of Galapagos marine iguana hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Higgins, P J

    1978-01-01

    1. Two forms of Galapagos marine iguana methemoglobin, with molecular weights of 140,000 and 70,000 daltons, were identified in iguana RBC lysates by Sephadex G-200 molecular sieve fractionation. 2. The 140,000 dalton ferric hemoglobin was isolated by DEAE-Sephadex A-50 ion-exchange chromatography and found to be pure by electrophoretic and immunological criteria. 3. Immunochemical analyses revealed the high and low molecular weight hemoglobins to be antigenically identical.

  19. Seasonal cycles of manganese and cadmium in coral from the Galapagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, M. L.; Linn, L. J.; Druffel, E. R. M.

    1993-01-01

    Manganese-to-calcium ratios in corals from the eastern and western Galapagos demonstrate regional differences in seasonal trace metal cycling. The variability of trace metal-to-calcium ratios within the Galapagos Islands points to their unique geographic setting as a major factor. This region is influenced by several major oceanic currents (e.g., the South Equatorial Current, the Equatorial Undercurrent, and the Panama, or El Niño, Current) and by extremely intense upwelling. Manganese-to-calcium ratios in a banded coral Pavona clavus from Isabela Island, the westernmost island in the Galapagos, have distinct seasonal cycles for the non-El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) years 1946-1950, with lower ratios following intensified seasonal upwelling. Cadmium/calcium ratios show less distinct seasonal cycles. The near-moderate ENSO event in 1951 is marked by the disruption of seasonal cycles in Mn/Ca and Cd/Ca ratios. In contrast, corals from islands further east in the Galapagos (Hood Island, 1964-1973, LINN et al., 1990; San Cristobal, 1965-1979, SHEN and SANFORD, 1990), have stronger seasonal Cd/Ca signals, with higher ratios following seasonal upwelling, and less distinct seasonal cycles in Mn/Ca ratios one-half year out of phase with Cd/Ca variations. Average Mn/Ca ratios are lower for these corals from locations further east, indicating that Urvina Bay appears to have an additional localized source of Mn ( SHEN and SANFORD, 1990). In general, these regional variations in seasonal trace metal cycling are consistent with coral stable isotope signals and with their geographic locations. These variations are important to consider in using coral records to reconstruct and interpret oceanographic events occurring prior to historical records.

  20. The Origin of Widespread Long-lived Volcanism Across the Galapagos Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. M.; Stoffers, P.; Wijbrans, J. R.; Worthington, T. J.

    2005-12-01

    40Ar/39Ar ages for rocks dredged (SO144 PAGANINI expedition) and drilled (DSDP) from the Galapagos Volcanic Province (Cocos, Carnegie, Coiba and Malpelo aseismic ridges and associated seamounts) show evidence of 1) increasing age with distance from the Galapagos Archipelago, 2) long-lived episodic volcanism at many locations, and 3) broad overlapping regions of coeval volcanism. The widespread nature of synchronous volcanism across the Galapagos Volcanic Province (GVP) suggests a correspondingly large Galapagos hotspot melting anomaly (O'Connor et al., 2004). Development of the GVP via Cocos and Nazca plate migration and divergence over this broad melting anomaly would explain continued multiple phases of volcanism over millions of years following the initial onset of hotspot volcanism. The question arising from these observations is whether long-lived GVP episodic volcanism is equivalent to `rejuvenescent' or a `post-erosional' phase of volcanism that occurs hundreds of thousands or million years after the main shield-building phase documented on many mid-plate seamount chains, most notably along the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Chain? Thus, investigating the process responsible for long-lived episodic GVP volcanism provides the opportunity to evaluate this little understood process of rejuvenation in a physical setting very different to the Hawaiian-Emperor Chain (i.e. on/near spreading axis versus mid-plate). We consider here timing and geochemical information to test the various geodynamic models proposed to explain the origin of GVP hotspot volcanism, especially the possibility of rejuvenated phases that erupt long after initial shield-building.

  1. Mantle viscosity beneath the Galapagos 95.5 deg W propagating rift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Hey, R. N.

    1986-01-01

    Detailed geophysical surveys in the vicinity of the Galapagos 95.5 deg W propagating rift tip establish the opening history of the rift and its velocity of propagation. These data together with a theory for mantle upwelling into slowly widening lithospheric cracks constrain the viscosity of the asthenosphere beneath the propagating rift to be less than about 10 to the 17th to 10 to the 18th Pa s.

  2. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Two Tomato Species from the Galapagos Islands

    PubMed Central

    Pailles, Yveline; Ho, Shwen; Pires, Inês S.; Tester, Mark; Negrão, Sónia; Schmöckel, Sandra M.

    2017-01-01

    Endemic flora of the Galapagos Islands has adapted to thrive in harsh environmental conditions. The wild tomato species from the Galapagos Islands, Solanum cheesmaniae and S. galapagense, are tolerant to various stresses, and can be crossed with cultivated tomato. However, information about genetic diversity and relationships within and between populations is necessary to use these resources efficiently in plant breeding. In this study, we analyzed 3,974 polymorphic SNP markers, obtained through the genotyping-by-sequencing technique, DArTseq, to elucidate the genetic diversity and population structure of 67 accessions of Galapagos tomatoes (compared to two S. lycopersicum varieties and one S. pimpinellifolium accession). Two clustering methods, Principal Component Analysis and STRUCTURE, showed clear distinction between the two species and a subdivision in the S. cheesmaniae group corresponding to geographical origin and age of the islands. High genetic variation among the accessions within each species was suggested by the AMOVA. High diversity in the S. cheesmaniae group and its correlation with the islands of origin were also suggested. This indicates a possible influence of the movement of the islands, from west to east, on the gene flow. Additionally, the absence of S. galapagense populations in the eastern islands points to the species divergence occurring after the eastern islands became isolated. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the population structure of the Galapagos tomatoes collection partially explains the evolutionary history of both species, knowledge that facilitates exploitation of their genetic potential for the identification of novel alleles contributing to stress tolerance. PMID:28261227

  3. Hydrological characterization of volcanic island by DEM generation using ASAR (ENVISAT): Galapagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ozouville, N.; Violette, S.; Benveniste, J.; Wegmuller, U.; Deffontaines, B.; de Marsily, G.

    2007-12-01

    Low topographic oceanic islands often suffer from scarcity of freshwater resources and are poorly characterized due to their complex internal structure and challenging access. Remote sensing has proved to be an effective tool to generate valuable data for hydrological analysis. However, these are usually tested over areas with existing validation databases and not always where the need is greatest. Here we address the need for topographical data for hydrological understanding of Santa Cruz Island (Galapagos Archipelago) where no high resolution, no high accuracy topographical data exists. 97 percent of Galapagos territory consists of inaccessible National Park land which makes the use of indirect methods indispensable. We used new ASAR data (ENVISAT) for Digital Elevation Model generation, in order to extract drainage network, watersheds, and flow characteristics from a morpho-structural analysis. Results show the high potential of this data for both interferometric and radargrammetric generation methods. If interferometry suffered from low coherence over highly vegetated areas, it showed high precision over the rest of the island. Radargrammetry gave consistent results over the entire island, and detail was enhanced by integrating the SRTM as an external DEM. Validation of the extracted river networks and watersheds was carried out using ground-based field observations, comparison to drainage network extracted from aerial photographs and to high resolution (1 m) satellite imagery. For the first time watershed characteristics and flow paths are made available for an island of the Galapagos archipelago. Drainage networks and underground percolation are strongly influenced by fractures.

  4. Interactions of social, terrestrial, and marine sub-systems in the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Stephen J.; Mena, Carlos F.

    2016-01-01

    Galapagos is often cited as an example of the conflicts that are emerging between resource conservation and economic development in island ecosystems, as the pressures associated with tourism threaten nature, including the iconic and emblematic species, unique terrestrial landscapes, and special marine environments. In this paper, two projects are described that rely upon dynamic systems models and agent-based models to examine human–environment interactions. We use a theoretical context rooted in complexity theory to guide the development of our models that are linked to social–ecological dynamics. The goal of this paper is to describe key elements, relationships, and processes to inform and enhance our understanding of human–environment interactions in the Galapagos Islands of Ecuador. By formalizing our knowledge of how systems operate and the manner in which key elements are linked in coupled human–natural systems, we specify rules, relationships, and rates of exchange between social and ecological features derived through statistical functions and/or functions specified in theory or practice. The processes described in our models also have practical applications in that they emphasize how political policies generate different human responses and model outcomes, many detrimental to the social–ecological sustainability of the Galapagos Islands. PMID:27791072

  5. Interactions of social, terrestrial, and marine sub-systems in the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Stephen J; Mena, Carlos F

    2016-12-20

    Galapagos is often cited as an example of the conflicts that are emerging between resource conservation and economic development in island ecosystems, as the pressures associated with tourism threaten nature, including the iconic and emblematic species, unique terrestrial landscapes, and special marine environments. In this paper, two projects are described that rely upon dynamic systems models and agent-based models to examine human-environment interactions. We use a theoretical context rooted in complexity theory to guide the development of our models that are linked to social-ecological dynamics. The goal of this paper is to describe key elements, relationships, and processes to inform and enhance our understanding of human-environment interactions in the Galapagos Islands of Ecuador. By formalizing our knowledge of how systems operate and the manner in which key elements are linked in coupled human-natural systems, we specify rules, relationships, and rates of exchange between social and ecological features derived through statistical functions and/or functions specified in theory or practice. The processes described in our models also have practical applications in that they emphasize how political policies generate different human responses and model outcomes, many detrimental to the social-ecological sustainability of the Galapagos Islands.

  6. An Earthquake Swarm on the Galapagos Transform Fault: Implications for Earthquake Triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, E.; Boettcher, M. S.; McGuire, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    Transform faults on the East Pacific Rise spreading system often have large amounts of seismicity in short periods of time. The magnitude vs. time distribution of these sequences ranges from what would be classified as similar to a typical continental earthquake but with an elevated foreshock to aftershock ratio to sequences that would traditionally be classified as an "earthquake swarm" closer to those seen in volcanic regions (e.g. Forsyth et al., 2003). Analysis of declustered earthquake catalogs (i.e. ignoring the swarms) suggest that the anomalous foreshock to aftershock ratio on EPR transforms requires different triggering processes in the oceanic regime from those that explain continental seismicity. Here we investigate the best recorded earthquake swarm on an EPR transform to evaluate whether it has similar implications. Due to the lack of oceanic earthquake catalogs with low detection thresholds and reliable magnitude estimates, the unique characteristics of transform sequences have been difficult to quantify. This study uses the earthquake catalog derived from NOAA's hydroacoustic array in the equatorial Pacific Ocean and data from a land-based seismometer array on the Galapagos Islands (from Toomey et al.) to examine the temporal and size distribution of an earthquake swarm which occurred on the Galapagos Transform in 2000. Seismic moment estimates are determined with a high degree of accuracy using an Empirical Green's Function based, cross-correlation method. Characteristics of the Galapagos swarm can be compared to that normally observed in continental strike-slip faults by applying the Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) Model [e.g. Helmstetter and Sorenette, 2002], which is a common earthquake triggering model used to explain continental seismicity. This model assumes aftershocks are triggered from all large earthquakes with a triggering rate that decays in time following the Omori Law and increases with triggering event magnitude. The utility

  7. PET2OGS: Algorithms to link the static model of Petrel with the dynamic model of OpenGeoSys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C.-H.; Shinn, Y. J.; Park, Y.-C.; Huh, D.-G.; Lee, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    A set of three algorithms named PET2OGS is developed to integrate the static model (Petrel) with the dynamic model (OpenGeoSys). PET2OGS consists of three sub-algorithms that convert finite difference methods (FDMs) grids to finite element methods (FEMs) grids. The algorithms and the workflow of the integration procedures are described in detail. After the proposed algorithms are tested on a variety of grids both in homogeneous and heterogeneous media, the integrated platform of the static and dynamic models is applied to model CO2 storage in a saline aquifer. A successful demonstration of the proposed algorithms proved a robust integration of the platform. With some minor modifications of the algorithms in the part of input and output, the proposed algorithms can be extended to integrate different combinations of FDM-based static models and FEM-based dynamic models beyond the example combination in the paper.

  8. Ingestion of marine debris by the White-chinned Petrel (Procellaria aequinoctialis): Is it increasing over time off southern Brazil?

    PubMed

    Petry, Maria V; Benemann, Victória R F

    2017-04-15

    Seabirds are amongst the most affected organisms by plastic pollution worldwide. Ingestion of marine debris has been reported in at least 122 species, and owing to the increasing global production and persistence of these anthropogenic materials within the marine environment, it is expected to be a growing problem to the marine fauna. Here we report evidence of an increasing frequency in marine debris ingestion and a decrease in the amount of plastic pellets ingested by White-chinned Petrels attending south Brazilian waters during the last three decades. Future studies comprising large temporal scales and large sample sizes are needed to better understand the trends of marine debris ingestion by seabirds. We expect our findings to highlight the need for prevention policies and mitigation measures to reduce the amount of solid litter in the oceans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Poor Transferability of Species Distribution Models for a Pelagic Predator, the Grey Petrel, Indicates Contrasting Habitat Preferences across Ocean Basins

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Leigh G.; Sutton, Philip J. H.; Thompson, David R.; Delord, Karine; Weimerskirch, Henri; Sagar, Paul M.; Sommer, Erica; Dilley, Ben J.; Ryan, Peter G.; Phillips, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) are increasingly applied in conservation management to predict suitable habitat for poorly known populations. High predictive performance of SDMs is evident in validations performed within the model calibration area (interpolation), but few studies have assessed SDM transferability to novel areas (extrapolation), particularly across large spatial scales or pelagic ecosystems. We performed rigorous SDM validation tests on distribution data from three populations of a long-ranging marine predator, the grey petrel Procellaria cinerea, to assess model transferability across the Southern Hemisphere (25-65°S). Oceanographic data were combined with tracks of grey petrels from two remote sub-Antarctic islands (Antipodes and Kerguelen) using boosted regression trees to generate three SDMs: one for each island population, and a combined model. The predictive performance of these models was assessed using withheld tracking data from within the model calibration areas (interpolation), and from a third population, Marion Island (extrapolation). Predictive performance was assessed using k-fold cross validation and point biserial correlation. The two population-specific SDMs included the same predictor variables and suggested birds responded to the same broad-scale oceanographic influences. However, all model validation tests, including of the combined model, determined strong interpolation but weak extrapolation capabilities. These results indicate that habitat use reflects both its availability and bird preferences, such that the realized distribution patterns differ for each population. The spatial predictions by the three SDMs were compared with tracking data and fishing effort to demonstrate the conservation pitfalls of extrapolating SDMs outside calibration regions. This exercise revealed that SDM predictions would have led to an underestimate of overlap with fishing effort and potentially misinformed bycatch mitigation efforts. Although

  10. Status and trends of the ashy storm-petrel on Southeast Farallon Island, California, based upon capture-recapture analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sydeman, W.J.; Nur, N.; Mclaren, E.B.; McChesney, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    We conducted a capture-recapture study on the population size and trends of the Ashy Storm-petrel (Oceanodroma homochroa) on Southeast Farallon Island (SEFI), California, based upon data collected in 1971, 1972, and 1992. From March through August, birds were lured to fixed-site sampling locations using taped vocalization playback. Using program JOLLY, we estimated population size and evaluated statistical models using goodness-of-fit and Likelihood Ratio tests. On the southwestern slope of Lighthouse Hill, amidst prime breeding habitat, numbers of breeding birds decreased from 1,271 ?? 140 (?? ?? SE) in 1972 to 710 ?? 117 in 1992, a decline of 44% (approximate 95% CI = 22-66% decline; ?? = -2.8% per annum); for a variety of reasons, we consider this to be the most reliable indicator of population change. In 1971, on a portion of SEFI relatively disjunct from the sampling area in 1972, 2,131 ?? 322 breeding birds were estimated. To produce an overall early 1970s estimate with which to compare to 1992, we summed population estimates from 1971 and 1972. An overall value of 6,461 birds, of which 3,402 (53%) were breeders, was obtained for the early period. In 1992, the overall population in roughly the same area was estimated at 4,284 ?? 409 birds, of which 1,990 ?? 408 (46%) were presumed breeders. These results, encompassing peripheral as well as more centrally located storm-petrel habitat, indicate an overall population decline of 34% and a comparable decline in breeding birds of 42% over the past two decades. However, oceanographic conditions varied between 1971-1972 and 1992, and reduced food availability in 1992 may have influenced colony attendance and breeding effort. Nonetheless, the apparent population decline over the past 20 years suggests that the species warrants management and/or additional protective status.

  11. Poor transferability of species distribution models for a pelagic predator, the grey petrel, indicates contrasting habitat preferences across ocean basins.

    PubMed

    Torres, Leigh G; Sutton, Philip J H; Thompson, David R; Delord, Karine; Weimerskirch, Henri; Sagar, Paul M; Sommer, Erica; Dilley, Ben J; Ryan, Peter G; Phillips, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) are increasingly applied in conservation management to predict suitable habitat for poorly known populations. High predictive performance of SDMs is evident in validations performed within the model calibration area (interpolation), but few studies have assessed SDM transferability to novel areas (extrapolation), particularly across large spatial scales or pelagic ecosystems. We performed rigorous SDM validation tests on distribution data from three populations of a long-ranging marine predator, the grey petrel Procellaria cinerea, to assess model transferability across the Southern Hemisphere (25-65°S). Oceanographic data were combined with tracks of grey petrels from two remote sub-Antarctic islands (Antipodes and Kerguelen) using boosted regression trees to generate three SDMs: one for each island population, and a combined model. The predictive performance of these models was assessed using withheld tracking data from within the model calibration areas (interpolation), and from a third population, Marion Island (extrapolation). Predictive performance was assessed using k-fold cross validation and point biserial correlation. The two population-specific SDMs included the same predictor variables and suggested birds responded to the same broad-scale oceanographic influences. However, all model validation tests, including of the combined model, determined strong interpolation but weak extrapolation capabilities. These results indicate that habitat use reflects both its availability and bird preferences, such that the realized distribution patterns differ for each population. The spatial predictions by the three SDMs were compared with tracking data and fishing effort to demonstrate the conservation pitfalls of extrapolating SDMs outside calibration regions. This exercise revealed that SDM predictions would have led to an underestimate of overlap with fishing effort and potentially misinformed bycatch mitigation efforts. Although

  12. The pattern of circumferential and radial eruptive fissures on the volcanoes of Fernandina and Isabela islands, Galapagos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, W.W.; Howard, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Maps of the eruptive vents on the active shield volcanoes of Fernandina and Isabela islands, Galapagos, made from aerial photographs, display a distinctive pattern that consists of circumferential eruptive fissures around the summit calderas and radial fissures lower on the flanks. On some volcano flanks either circumferential or radial eruptions have been dominant in recent time. The location of circumferential vents outside the calderas is independent of caldera-related normal faults. The eruptive fissures are the surface expression of dike emplacement, and the dike orientations are interpreted to be controlled by the state of stress in the volcano. Very few subaerial volcanoes display a pattern of fissures similar to that of the Galapagos volcanoes. Some seamounts and shield volcanoes on Mars morphologically resemble the Galapagos volcanoes, but more specific evidence is needed to determine if they also share common structure and eruptive style. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag.

  13. Molecular Evidence for an Old World Origin of Galapagos and Caribbean Band-Winged Grasshoppers (Acrididae: Oedipodinae: Sphingonotus)

    PubMed Central

    Husemann, Martin; Habel, Jan Christian; Namkung, Suk; Hochkirch, Axel; Otte, Daniel; Danley, Patrick D.

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of colonization and diversification on islands provide valuable insights into evolutionary processes. Due to their unique geographic position and well known history, the Galapagos Islands are an important model system for evolutionary studies. Here we investigate the evolutionary history of a winged grasshopper genus to infer its origin and pattern of colonization in the Galapagos archipelago. The grasshopper genus Sphingonotus has radiated extensively in the Palaearctic and many species are endemic to islands. In the New World, the genus is largely replaced by the genus Trimerotropis. Oddly, in the Caribbean and on the Galapagos archipelago, two species of Sphingonotus are found, which has led to the suggestion that these might be the result of anthropogenic translocations from Europe. Here, we test this hypothesis using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences from a broad sample of Sphingonotini and Trimerotropini species from the Old World and New World. The genetic data show two distinct genetic clusters representing the New World Trimerotropini and the Old World Sphingonotini. However, the Sphingonotus species from Galapagos and the Caribbean split basally within the Old World Sphingonotini lineage. The Galapagos and Caribbean species appear to be related to Old World taxa, but are not the result of recent anthropogenic translocations as revealed by divergence time estimates. Distinct genetic lineages occur on the four investigated Galapagos Islands, with deep splits among them compared to their relatives from the Palaearctic. A scenario of a past wider distribution of Sphingonotus in the New World with subsequent extinction on the mainland and replacement by Trimerotropis might explain the disjunct distribution. PMID:25692768

  14. Molecular evidence for an old world origin of Galapagos and Caribbean band-winged grasshoppers (Acrididae: Oedipodinae: Sphingonotus).

    PubMed

    Husemann, Martin; Habel, Jan Christian; Namkung, Suk; Hochkirch, Axel; Otte, Daniel; Danley, Patrick D

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of colonization and diversification on islands provide valuable insights into evolutionary processes. Due to their unique geographic position and well known history, the Galapagos Islands are an important model system for evolutionary studies. Here we investigate the evolutionary history of a winged grasshopper genus to infer its origin and pattern of colonization in the Galapagos archipelago. The grasshopper genus Sphingonotus has radiated extensively in the Palaearctic and many species are endemic to islands. In the New World, the genus is largely replaced by the genus Trimerotropis. Oddly, in the Caribbean and on the Galapagos archipelago, two species of Sphingonotus are found, which has led to the suggestion that these might be the result of anthropogenic translocations from Europe. Here, we test this hypothesis using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences from a broad sample of Sphingonotini and Trimerotropini species from the Old World and New World. The genetic data show two distinct genetic clusters representing the New World Trimerotropini and the Old World Sphingonotini. However, the Sphingonotus species from Galapagos and the Caribbean split basally within the Old World Sphingonotini lineage. The Galapagos and Caribbean species appear to be related to Old World taxa, but are not the result of recent anthropogenic translocations as revealed by divergence time estimates. Distinct genetic lineages occur on the four investigated Galapagos Islands, with deep splits among them compared to their relatives from the Palaearctic. A scenario of a past wider distribution of Sphingonotus in the New World with subsequent extinction on the mainland and replacement by Trimerotropis might explain the disjunct distribution.

  15. Multiple lineages of Avian malaria parasites (Plasmodium) in the Galapagos Islands and evidence for arrival via migratory birds.

    PubMed

    Levin, I I; Zwiers, P; Deem, S L; Geest, E A; Higashiguchi, J M; Iezhova, T A; Jiménez-Uzcátegui, G; Kim, D H; Morton, J P; Perlut, N G; Renfrew, R B; Sari, E H R; Valkiunas, G; Parker, P G

    2013-12-01

    Haemosporidian parasites in the genus Plasmodium were recently detected through molecular screening in the Galapagos Penguin (Spheniscus mendiculus). We summarized results of an archipelago-wide screen of 3726 endemic birds representing 22 species for Plasmodium spp. through a combination of molecular and microscopy techniques. Three additional Plasmodium lineages were present in Galapagos. Lineage A-infected penguins, Yellow Warblers (Setophaga petechia aureola), and one Medium Ground Finch (Geospiza fortis) and was detected at multiple sites in multiple years [corrected]. The other 3 lineages were each detected at one site and at one time; apparently, they were transient infections of parasites not established on the archipelago. No gametocytes were found in blood smears of infected individuals; thus, endemic Galapagos birds may be dead-end hosts for these Plasmodium lineages. Determining when and how parasites and pathogens arrive in Galapagos is key to developing conservation strategies to prevent and mitigate the effects of introduced diseases. To assess the potential for Plasmodium parasites to arrive via migratory birds, we analyzed blood samples from 438 North American breeding Bobolinks (Dolichonyx oryzivorus), the only songbird that regularly migrates through Galapagos. Two of the ephemeral Plasmodium lineages (B and C) found in Galapagos birds matched parasite sequences from Bobolinks. Although this is not confirmation that Bobolinks are responsible for introducing these lineages, evidence points to higher potential arrival rates of avian pathogens than previously thought. Linajes Múltiples de Parásitos de Malaria Aviar (Plasmodium) en las Islas Galápagos y Evidencia de su Arribo por Medio de Aves Migratorias.

  16. COMPARISON OF TOTAL LEUKOCYTE QUANTIFICATION METHODS IN FREE-LIVING GALAPAGOS TORTOISES (CHELONOIDIS SPP.).

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Julie D; Stacy, Nicole I; Blake, Stephen; Cabrera, Fredy; Deem, Sharon L

    2016-03-01

    Reptile hematologic data provide important health information for conservation efforts of vulnerable wildlife species such as the Galapagos tortoise (Chelonoidis spp.). Given the reported discrepancies between manual leukocyte counts for nonmammalian species, two manual leukocyte quantification methods, the Natt and Herrick's (NH) and the Eopette (EO), were compared to white blood cell (WBC) estimates from blood films of 42 free-living, clinically healthy, adult female Galapagos tortoises. To investigate the effects of delay in sample processing, estimated WBC counts and leukocyte differentials were compared for blood films prepared at time of collection under field conditions (T0) to blood films prepared from samples that were stored for 18-23 hr at 4°C in the laboratory (T1). Passing-Bablok regression analysis revealed no constant or proportional error between the NH and WBC estimates (T0 and T1) with slopes of 1.1 and 0.9, respectively. However both constant and proportional errors were present between EO and WBC estimates (T0 and T1) with slopes of 3.1 and 2.7, respectively. Bland Altman plots also showed agreement between the NH and WBC estimates where the points fell within the confidence-interval limit lines and were evenly distributed about the mean. In contrast, the EO and WBC estimate comparisons showed numerous points above the upper limit line, especially at higher concentrations. WBC estimates obtained from T0 and T1 films were in agreement, whereas heterophil and monocyte percentages based on differentials were not. Cell morphology and preservation were superior in T0 blood films because thrombocytes exhibited swelling after storage, becoming difficult to differentiate from lymphocytes. In this study, the highest quality and most reliable hematologic data in Galapagos tortoises were obtained by combining immediate blood film preparation with the NH leukocyte quantification method and a confirmatory WBC estimate from the blood film.

  17. Differences in insect resistance between tomato species endemic to the Galapagos Islands

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Galapagos Islands constitute a highly diverse ecosystem and a unique source of variation in the form of endemic species. There are two endemic tomato species, Solanum galapagense and S. cheesmaniae and two introduced tomato species, S. pimpinellifolium and S. lycopersicum. Morphologically the two endemic tomato species of the Galapagos Islands are clearly distinct, but molecular marker analysis showed no clear separation. Tomatoes on the Galapagos are affected by both native and exotic herbivores. Bemisia tabaci is an important introduced insect species that feeds on a wide range of plants. In this article, we address the question whether the differentiation between S. galapagense and S. cheesmaniae may be related to differences in susceptibility towards phloem-feeders and used B. tabaci as a model to evaluate this. Results We have characterized 12 accessions of S. galapagense, 22 of S. cheesmaniae, and one of S. lycopersicum as reference for whitefly resistance using no-choice experiments. Whitefly resistance was found in S. galapagense only and was associated with the presence of relatively high levels of acyl sugars and the presence of glandular trichomes of type I and IV. Genetic fingerprinting using 3316 SNP markers did not show a clear differentiation between the two endemic species. Acyl sugar accumulation as well as the climatic and geographical conditions at the collection sites of the accessions did not follow the morphological species boundaries. Conclusion Our results suggest that S. galapagense and S. cheesmaniae might be morphotypes rather than two species and that their co-existence is likely the result of selective pressure. PMID:23972016

  18. Catch, bycatch and discards of the Galapagos Marine Reserve small-scale handline fishery.

    PubMed

    Zimmerhackel, Johanna S; Schuhbauer, Anna C; Usseglio, Paolo; Heel, Lena C; Salinas-de-León, Pelayo

    2015-01-01

    Fisheries bycatch is a significant marine conservation issue as valuable fish are wasted and protected species harmed with potential negative ecological and socio-economic consequences. Even though there are indications that the small-scale handline fishery of the Galapagos Marine Reserve has a low selectivity, information on its bycatch has never been published. We used onboard monitoring and interview data to assess the bycatch of the Galapagos handline fishery by estimating the bycatch ratio, determining species compositions of landings and bycatch, identifying fishers' reasons for discarding certain individuals, and revealing historical trends in the bycatch ratio. The estimated bycatch ratio as a function of biomass of 0.40 and a diverse species composition of target catch and bycatch confirmed the low selectivity of this fishery. Most individuals were not landed for economic motivations, either because species (77.4%) or sizes (17.7%) are unmarketable or for regulatory reasons (5.9%). We found that bycatch contributes to growth overfishing of some target species because they are discarded or used as bait before reaching their first maturity. Moreover, over half of interviewees perceived a historical decrease in bycatch ratios that was explained by a diversification of the target catch due to the reduction in abundance of the traditionally most important target species. As some target species show signs of overfishing and to date there are no specific regulations for the finfish fishery species in place, we recommend the implementation of a series of management measures to protect critical life stages of overexploited species and to improve the selectivity of the Galapagos handline fishery.

  19. The recent history of the Galapagos triple junction preserved on the Pacific plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Deborah K.; Schouten, Hans; Montési, Laurent; Zhu, Wenlu

    2013-06-01

    At the Galapagos triple junction, the Cocos and Nazca plates are broken by a succession of transient rifts north and south of the Cocos-Nazca (C-N) Rift. Modeling has suggested that each rift initiated at the East Pacific Rise (EPR), its location controlled by the distance of the C-N Rift tip from the EPR. Evidence on the Pacific plate confirms that each transient rift formed a true RRR triple junction with the EPR and clarifies the history of the region. At ˜1.5 Ma the triple junctions began jumping rapidly toward the C-N Rift suggesting that the C-N Rift tip moved closer to the EPR. Pacific abyssal hills became broad and shallow indicating enhanced magma supply to the region. At ˜1.4 Ma, the Galapagos microplate developed when extension became fixed on the southern transient rift to form the South scarp of the future Dietz rift basin. Lavas flooded the area and a Galapagos-Nazca magmatic spreading center initiated at the EPR. We suggest that a hotspot was approaching the southern triple junction from the west. The hotspot crossed to the Nazca plate ˜1.25 Ma. Dietz seamount formed within the young spreading center, dikes intruded Dietz rift basin, and eruptions built volcanic ridges. Since ˜0.8 Ma magmatic spreading has jumped northward twice, most recently to Dietz volcanic ridge. Amagmatic extension to the east has formed the large North scarp of Dietz rift basin. Northward jumping of the southern triple junction has maintained the microplate boundary close to the proposed hotspot.

  20. Zoanthid diversity (Anthozoa: Hexacorallia) in the Galapagos Islands: a molecular examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, J. D.; Sinniger, F.; Hickman, C. P.

    2008-09-01

    Although the Galapagos are famous for their unique biodiversity, many groups of marine invertebrates from this isolated archipelago remain understudied or not investigated. One such group is the zoanthids (Order Zoantharia, =Zoanthidea, =Zoanthiniaria), anthozoans (Cnidaria) found in marine ecosystems worldwide. Zoanthid taxonomy has been in a state of disorganization and neglect due in large part to the morphological plasticity within species and questions about the accuracy of traditionally used morphological and ecological characteristics. However, recent studies utilizing molecular methodology combined with morphology have proven to be very useful in understanding zoanthid diversity. The results of a survey of zoanthids from the Galapagos and the east Pacific are reported in this study. Shallow water (<35 m) zoanthid specimens were identified using the molecular markers mitochondrial 16S ribosomal DNA (mt 16S rDNA), cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene, and the internal transcribed spacer of ribosomal DNA (ITS-rDNA). From the collected specimens seven putative zoanthid species-level clades from three known genera ( Zoanthus, Palythoa, Parazoanthus) were identified at the molecular level. These identifications were further supported by morphological and ecological data. While almost all specimens belonged to known zoanthid genera, based on unique molecular and ecological data one group of specimens (designated unknown zoanthid sp. “03-103”) is potentially a novel undescribed genus. Additionally, the remaining three azooxanthellate Parazoanthus clades may also be undescribed new species, but due to the overall lack of zoanthid research and descriptions from neighboring areas (East Pacific, west coast of South America) further research is needed to clearly ascertain this. Additionally, notes on the four observed nominal azooxanthellate zoanthid species and a key to all eight nominal (seven from known genera, one from a potentially new genus) shallow water

  1. The Temporal Scale of Holocene Climatic Variability: From the Galapagos to Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, M. B.; Restrepo, A.; Correa, A.; Ford, R.; Valencia, B.; Gosling, W.; Silman, M.; Conroy, J.; Overpeck, J. T.

    2006-12-01

    High-resolution lake cores from the Andes and Amazonian lowlands of W. South America and the Galapagos Islands provide new insights into the Holocene climate history of this region and its interactions with Pacific climate drivers. Our data reveal that a major drought event reported broadly from the Andes and Amazonia in the early to mid-Holocene is actually a complex series of droughts with wet interludes. These results suggest strong climatic instability prior to c. 5600 cal. yr BP. Establishment of wetter conditions at our Andean study site at c. 5600 cal. yr BP correspond to the start of Quinoa cultivation. A similar pattern of higher lake levels coinciding with the local spread of agriculture is also evident in the lowlands. Within an overall pattern of progressively wetter conditions over the last 4000 years there are periods of pronounced climatic instability (drought and flood). Fossil pollen, charcoal, sediment color, and carbon content identify periods of peak erosion between c. 900 and 1100 cal. yr BP. On the Galapagos Islands, a subdecadally resolved analysis of fossil pollen provides a striking pattern of climatic change and human-induced alteration of the landscape. Prior to the period of transforming human activity, the fossil pollen record contains a multidecadal oscillation, with wavlet analysis evealing a quasi- periodicty of c. 60 years. Andean pollen are readily identifible in the Galapagos record and transport of mainland pollen to the islands has varied markedly within the past millennium. These multiproxy records reveal the dynamic nature of Holocene climates in the tropics and the impact those changes have had on people and landscapes.

  2. Lead isotope composition of Central American volcanoes: Influence of the Galapagos plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigenson, Mark D.; Carr, Michael J.; Maharaj, Susan V.; Juliano, Scott; Bolge, Louise L.

    2004-06-01

    Lead isotopic analyses of lavas from Central America, both along and behind the volcanic arc, help to clarify source components in the mantle wedge. Analysis of previous Pb isotopic data had implied that little or no marine sediment lead was added to the Central American source region, as all samples fell within the MORB field, in contrast to other information (e.g., Ba/La, 10Be, 87Sr/86Sr) that indicated a high subduction component. The data presented here include several analyses of local marine sediment, showing it to be exceptionally unradiogenic in Pb and thus permitting high sediment contributions to the mantle source region without significant changes in Pb isotopes. Combined Pb-Nd and Pb-Sr isotopic diagrams clearly illustrate the influence of crustal contamination for samples from Guatemala and Honduras, and of subducted sediment for all lavas of the volcanic front. Samples collected behind the volcanic front are derived from mixing between enriched and depleted mantle sources, and in central Costa Rica (extending to the back arc) overlap Pb, Sr and Nd isotope values for both Cocos Island and some components of the Galapagos hot spot. The restricted geographical occurrence of the enriched mantle signature in Central America, coupled with the persistence of the signal well into the back arc region, imply that these lavas are sampling Galapagos plume-influenced mantle. The presence of this plume component beneath southern Central America and extending to the northeast beneath the Caribbean confirms a Galapagos hot spot origin for this part of Caribbean Plate.

  3. Volcanic Evolution in the Galapagos: The Geochemistry and Petrology of Espanola Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, M.; Varga, K. C.; Harpp, K. S.; Geist, D.; Hall, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Galapagos Archipelago consists of a series of volcanic islands located ~1,000 km west of South America that are thought to be the result of a mantle plume. The southeasternmost island, Espanola, is one of the smallest of the major islands, measuring only 7 by 14 km and reaching an elevation of 200 m. Espanola is also the oldest island in the chain, with K-Ar dates from 3.01 ± 0.11 to 3.31 ± 0.36 million years (Hall et al. 1983; White et al., 1993). The southern coast is defined by cliffs that exceed 100 m in height, made up of nearly flat-lying lavas that are each several meters thick. The northern coastline consists of lavas that dip gently toward the ocean from the highlands, as well as remnants of eroded cinder cones. Paleomagnetic measurements made in the field indicate that the western half of the island is reversely polarized, whereas most lavas measured across the eastern half are normally polarized. Major element analyses of samples from across the island indicate that fractional crystallization is the dominant process controlling chemical variations in Espanola lavas, suggesting a relatively long-lived magmatic plumbing system. Stratigraphically constrained chemical variations suggest the magma chamber may have experienced periodic replenishment by compositionally homogeneous primitive melts. Variable fluid-mobile trace element concentrations provide some evidence for contributions from ancient, recycled oceanic crust to the parental melts. Espanola lavas have more depleted Sr and Pb radiogenic isotope ratios than either Floreana or Fernandina, and lie on a mixing curve between the composition of the plume and that of the depleted upper mantle. Between ~3 and 8 Ma, the Galapagos Spreading Center was closer to the Galapagos plume than it is today. Given that Espanola was constructed during the same period, the depleted isotopic signatures suggest that plume-ridge interaction may have been a strong influence on the island's geochemical composition.

  4. New Insights into the Morphology of the Galapagos Platform from Lower Crustal Flow Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana Rovirosa, F.; Richards, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The volcanically-active Galapagos Islands are constructed upon a broad platform, with the westernmost islands being the most active, marking the present-day position of the Galapagos hotspot (mantle plume). This volcanic platform overlies relatively young oceanic lithosphere (<15 Myr) and exhibits unique morphologic features along its boundaries. The most spectacular of these features is a system of stepped terraces on the southwestern escarpment, with very large vertical relief (>3 km), and contrasting with relatively gentle slopes off the eastern platform edge toward the Carnegie ridge. Considering the horizontal lithostatic pressure differences associated with this bathymetric relief, along with the high temperatures within this young, hotspot-affected oceanic lithosphere and crust; it is likely that lower crustal flow contributes significantly, perhaps even dominantly, to lithospheric and crustal deformation within the Galapagos Platform. Using 2D numerical models that invoke a thin-sheet approximation for the Stokes' equation for a Newtonian fluid with space- and time-dependent viscosity, and assuming isostatic conditions, we show that: (1) the pronounced bathymetric rim along the Eastern platform region (where gravimetric studies indicate Airy isostasy) near Española Island may be the expression of a mature stage of a lower crustal flow front evolving asymptotically during the last ~3 Myr; (2) the spectacular system of stepped terraces along the southwestern edge of the platform may be explained by lower crustal flow-associated backward tilting of the bathymetric surface that, even with small amounts of angular change (~0.1 deg) and potentially occurring in non-isostatic regimes, effectively hinders the horizontal flow of lava. This process of backward-tilting may have been largely restricted to the last ~1 Myr of platform growth, and hence may be a unique event that may involve horizontal extrusion of large lava sheets from within the southwestward

  5. Catch, bycatch and discards of the Galapagos Marine Reserve small-scale handline fishery

    PubMed Central

    Schuhbauer, Anna C.; Usseglio, Paolo; Heel, Lena C.; Salinas-de-León, Pelayo

    2015-01-01

    Fisheries bycatch is a significant marine conservation issue as valuable fish are wasted and protected species harmed with potential negative ecological and socio-economic consequences. Even though there are indications that the small-scale handline fishery of the Galapagos Marine Reserve has a low selectivity, information on its bycatch has never been published. We used onboard monitoring and interview data to assess the bycatch of the Galapagos handline fishery by estimating the bycatch ratio, determining species compositions of landings and bycatch, identifying fishers’ reasons for discarding certain individuals, and revealing historical trends in the bycatch ratio. The estimated bycatch ratio as a function of biomass of 0.40 and a diverse species composition of target catch and bycatch confirmed the low selectivity of this fishery. Most individuals were not landed for economic motivations, either because species (77.4%) or sizes (17.7%) are unmarketable or for regulatory reasons (5.9%). We found that bycatch contributes to growth overfishing of some target species because they are discarded or used as bait before reaching their first maturity. Moreover, over half of interviewees perceived a historical decrease in bycatch ratios that was explained by a diversification of the target catch due to the reduction in abundance of the traditionally most important target species. As some target species show signs of overfishing and to date there are no specific regulations for the finfish fishery species in place, we recommend the implementation of a series of management measures to protect critical life stages of overexploited species and to improve the selectivity of the Galapagos handline fishery. PMID:26082874

  6. First molecular characterization of a Hepatozoon species (Apicomplexa: Hepatozoidae) infecting birds and description of a new species infecting storm petrels (Aves: Hydrobatidae).

    PubMed

    Merino, Santiago; Martínez, Javier; Masello, Juan F; Bedolla, Yuliana; Quillfeldt, Petra

    2014-06-01

    During a survey of blood parasites in a population of Leach's and black storm petrels ( Oceanodroma leucorhoa and Oceanodroma melania) in Mexico, infection by a Hepatozoon species in erythrocytes of several birds was noted. Here we describe the species as Hepatozoon peircei sp. nov. Some species of Hepatozoon described from birds have been identified as lankesterellids when DNA molecular analyses were conducted. However, a sequence of 1,774 bp of the parasite found infecting storm petrels in this study clearly show the parasite is a species of the genus Hepatozoon. This is the first Hepatozoon species infecting birds to be characterized at the molecular level and the first found infecting erythrocytes and not leucocytes.

  7. Environmental Impact Analysis Process. Preliminary Environmental Constraints Survey U.S. Air Force, Space Division Advanced Launch System (ALS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    Conservation of the Endangered Hawaiian Dark-rumped Petrel (Pterodroma Phaeopygia sandwichensis). Prepared for the National Park Service, Cooperative...U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 1983. Hawaiian Dark-Rumped Petrel and Newell’s Manx Shearwater Recovery Plan. Portland, Oregon. . 1983. Nene Recovery...Leeward forest of Kona area. Hawaiian crow H Windward and leeward forests of Ma.na Loa, Mauna Kea, and Kohala Mountains. Hawaiian dark-rumped petrel H

  8. Giant Galapagos tortoises walk without inverted pendulum mechanical-energy exchange.

    PubMed

    Zani, Peter A; Gottschall, Jinger S; Kram, Rodger

    2005-04-01

    Animals must perform mechanical work during walking, but most conserve substantial mechanical energy via an inverted-pendulum-like mechanism of energy recovery in which fluctuations of kinetic energy (KE) and gravitational potential energy (GPE) are of similar magnitude and 180 degrees out of phase. The greatest energy recovery typically occurs at intermediate speeds. Tortoises are known for their slow speeds, which we anticipated would lead to small fluctuations in KE. To have an effective exchange of mechanical energy using the inverted-pendulum mechanism, tortoises would need to walk with only small changes in GPE corresponding to vertical center-of-mass (COM) fluctuations of < 0.5 mm. Thus, we hypothesized that giant Galapagos tortoises would not conserve substantial mechanical energy using the inverted-pendulum mechanism. We studied five adult giant Galapagos tortoises Geochelone elephantopus (mean mass=142 kg; range= 103-196 kg). Walking speed was extremely slow (0.16+/-0.052 m s(-1); mean +/- 1 s.d.). The fluctuations in kinetic energy (8.1+/-3.98 J stride(-1)) were only one-third as large as the fluctuations in gravitational potential energy (22.7+/-8.04 J stride(-1)). In addition, these energies fluctuated nearly randomly and were only sporadically out of phase. Because of the dissimilar amplitudes and inconsistent phase relationships of these energies, tortoises conserved little mechanical energy during steady walking, recovering only 29.8+/-3.77% of the mechanical energy (range=13-52%). Thus, giant Galapagos tortoises do not utilize effectively an inverted-pendulum mechanism of energy conservation. Nonetheless, the mass-specific external mechanical work required per distance (0.41+/-0.092 J kg(-1) m(-1)) was not different from most other legged animals. Other turtle species use less than half as much metabolic energy to walk as other terrestrial animals of similar mass. It is not yet known if Galapagos tortoises are economical walkers. Nevertheless

  9. Intra-annual variability of the radiocarbon content of corals from the Galapagos Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.A. Geophysics Program AK-50, Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA ); Farwell, G.W.; Schmidt, F.H. ); Grootes, P.M. Quatenary Isotope Lab. AK-60, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA ); Stuiver, M. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors report AMS [sup 14]C measurements on sub annual samples of coral from the Galapagos Islands that span the period, 1970-1973. Both the major 1972 El Nino/Southern Oscillation event and intra-annual changes in regional upwelling of [sup 14]C-depleted waters associated with alternation of surface-ocean current patterns are evident in the record. These data show that the corals preserve a detailed record of past intra-annual variations of the [sup 14]C content of surface ocean water.

  10. The Role of Plume-Ridge Interaction in Magma Genesis I: The Northern Galapagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpp, K. S.; Geist, D. J.

    2002-12-01

    A group of enigmatic volcanoes populates the ocean floor between the hotspot and the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC), including many seamounts, a few isolated islands (Pinta, Marchena, and Genovesa), and the Wolf-Darwin Lineament (WDL). The WDL is a NW trending bathymetric high between the Galapagos platform and the GSC. Many of the northern Galapagos volcanoes are unusually elongate edifices that trend parallel to the strike of their local lineament. The seafloor between Pinta and Marchena is cut by fractures and fissures parallel to the WDL, and a major submarine ridge extends NE from fissures that cross-cut Genovesa Island. Elongate volcanic structures are unusual in off-axis seamount provinces and indicate strong deviatoric stresses on a regional scale. Individual volcanoes in the northern Galapagos generally exhibit homogeneous geochemical signatures, although this may be an artifact of sparse sampling (see Blair et al. abstract). Regionally, however, lavas range from plume-like enrichment (Pinta) to MORB-like depletion (Genovesa, S. WDL), with many volcanoes of intermediate composition (Darwin, Marchena). The WDL volcanoes define two distinct chemical groups; lavas erupted south of Wolf Island are similar to those from the GSC west of 93°W, while the northern WDL resembles lavas from the GSC segment directly to their north. This distribution implies that the WDL is supplied by the same type of plume-affected mantle as the GSC segment that produced the lithosphere underlying the volcanoes. We propose that the WDL and perhaps other northern volcanoes are primarily the result of tensional stresses emanating from the inside corner of the GSC transform fault at 91°W. The oblique orientation of the fault with respect to the Nazca plate spreading direction may further enhance regional tensional forces. The area is magmatic owing to the overlapping effects of the ridge and the plume. The volcanoes simply tap hybrid products of mixing at the margins of the sub

  11. The role of small-scale extensional faulting in the evolution of basin geometries. An example from the late Palaeozoic Petrel Sub-basin, northwest Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, K.

    1998-03-01

    During continental extension, the kinematic collapse of the hangingwall of major normal faults and the subsequent isostatic response imposes a strong control on the evolving basin geometry. The interaction of the flexural wavelength. and the magnitude and location of faults may allow the development of basin geometries which deviate from a classic half-graben style, particularly if some of this deformation is below the scale of observation (commonly seismic reflection data). In particular the development of a lateral partitioning between large- and small-scale faults within a basin may exert a significant control on the resulting basin geometry. Using the Petrel Sub-basin in northwest Australia as an example, it is demonstrated that an extensional basin geometry consisting of a classic half-graben can be overprinted by a significant 'sag' geometry which can be related to the lateral offset of sub-resolution faulting. This lateral partitioning and resulting basin geometry may also have an application to other extensional basins, particularly if a mechanism is present to allow this partitioning of fault styles to develop. In the Petrel Sub-basin this has been related to the presence of older basement features of the Halls Creek Mobile Zone beneath the axis of the basin. However, a comparison with physical models also suggests that this may be applicable to basins formed by oblique rifting (a component of which may also be present within the Petrel Sub-basin), particularly if this is imposed upon a weak zone or suture within the upper mantle.

  12. Numerical models for the hydrothermal field at the Galapagos Spreading Center

    SciTech Connect

    Fehn, U.; Green, K.E.; Von Herzen, R.P.; Cathles, L.M.

    1983-02-10

    The heat flow distribution at the Galapagos Spreading Center is compared to results of two-dimensional numerical models for the hydrothermal convection through oceanic crust. The model calculations are based on the equations for fluid flow through porous media adapted for the situation at spreading oceanic ridges. The temperature- and pressure-dependent thermodynamic characteristics of water were used in the fluid flow equations. Models with average permeabilities of approximately 5 x 10/sup -15/ m/sup 2/ and penetration depths between 2 and 5 km produce heat flow distributions compatible with the observations at the Galapagos Spreading Center. Because of the convective heat loss, temperatures within the hydrothermal layer are significantly lower than for conductively cooling crust. Two different types of convection cells develop. The one or two cells closest to the ridge axis are fixed in location with respect to the ridge axis. Convection there is characterized by high temperatures (>300 /sup 0/C), rapid flow rates, and low water to rock ratios (approx.1). These cells remove most of the heat associated with the intrusion process at the ridge axis. Cells farther away from the ridge axis move with the moving plate and serve to prevent the oceanic crust from reheating. Temperatures there typically are moderate to low (<200 /sup 0/C), and flow velocities are lower than those in the axial cell, but water to rock ratios can be very high in these cells.

  13. Comparative host-parasite population genetic structures: obligate fly ectoparasites on Galapagos seabirds.

    PubMed

    Levin, Iris I; Parker, Patricia G

    2013-08-01

    Parasites often have shorter generation times and, in some cases, faster mutation rates than their hosts, which can lead to greater population differentiation in the parasite relative to the host. Here we present a population genetic study of two ectoparasitic flies, Olfersia spinifera and Olfersia aenescens compared with their respective bird hosts, great frigatebirds (Fregata minor) and Nazca boobies (Sula granti). Olfersia spinifera is the vector of a haemosporidian parasite, Haemoproteus iwa, which infects frigatebirds throughout their range. Interestingly, there is no genetic differentiation in the haemosporidian parasite across this range despite strong genetic differentiation between Galapagos frigatebirds and their non-Galapagos conspecifics. It is possible that the broad distribution of this one H. iwa lineage could be facilitated by movement of infected O. spinifera. Therefore, we predicted more gene flow in both fly species compared with the bird hosts. Mitochondrial DNA sequence data from three genes per species indicated that despite marked differences in the genetic structure of the bird hosts, gene flow was very high in both fly species. A likely explanation involves non-breeding movements of hosts, including movement of juveniles, and movement by adult birds whose breeding attempt has failed, although we cannot rule out the possibility that closely related host species may be involved.

  14. Preventing Establishment: An Inventory of Introduced Plants in Puerto Villamil, Isabela Island, Galapagos

    PubMed Central

    Guézou, Anne; Pozo, Paola; Buddenhagen, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    As part of an island-wide project to identify and eradicate potentially invasive plant species before they become established, a program of inventories is being carried out in the urban and agricultural zones of the four inhabited islands in Galapagos. This study reports the results of the inventory from Puerto Villamil, a coastal village representing the urban zone of Isabela Island. We visited all 1193 village properties to record the presence of the introduced plants. In addition, information was collected from half of the properties to determine evidence for potential invasiveness of the plant species. We recorded 261 vascular taxa, 13 of which were new records for Galapagos. Most of the species were intentionally grown (cultivated) (73.3%) and used principally as ornamentals. The most frequent taxa we encountered were Cocos nucifera (coconut tree) (22.1%) as a cultivated plant and Paspalum vaginatum (salt water couch) (13.2%) as a non cultivated plant. In addition 39 taxa were naturalized. On the basis of the invasiveness study, we recommend five species for eradication (Abutilon dianthum, Datura inoxia, Datura metel, Senna alata and Solanum capsicoides), one species for hybridization studies (Opuntia ficus-indica) and three species for control (Furcraea hexapetala, Leucaena leucocephala and Paspalum vaginatum). PMID:17940606

  15. Preventing establishment: an inventory of introduced plants in Puerto Villamil, Isabela Island, Galapagos.

    PubMed

    Guézou, Anne; Pozo, Paola; Buddenhagen, Christopher

    2007-10-17

    As part of an island-wide project to identify and eradicate potentially invasive plant species before they become established, a program of inventories is being carried out in the urban and agricultural zones of the four inhabited islands in Galapagos. This study reports the results of the inventory from Puerto Villamil, a coastal village representing the urban zone of Isabela Island. We visited all 1193 village properties to record the presence of the introduced plants. In addition, information was collected from half of the properties to determine evidence for potential invasiveness of the plant species. We recorded 261 vascular taxa, 13 of which were new records for Galapagos. Most of the species were intentionally grown (cultivated) (73.3%) and used principally as ornamentals. The most frequent taxa we encountered were Cocos nucifera (coconut tree) (22.1%) as a cultivated plant and Paspalum vaginatum (salt water couch) (13.2%) as a non cultivated plant. In addition 39 taxa were naturalized. On the basis of the invasiveness study, we recommend five species for eradication (Abutilon dianthum, Datura inoxia, Datura metel, Senna alata and Solanum capsicoides), one species for hybridization studies (Opuntia ficus-indica) and three species for control (Furcraea hexapetala, Leucaena leucocephala and Paspalum vaginatum).

  16. Seasonal radiocarbon and oxygen isotopes in a Galapagos coral: Calibration with climate indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druffel, Ellen R. M.; Griffin, Sheila; Glynn, Danielle S.; Dunbar, Robert B.; Mucciarone, David A.; Toggweiler, J. Robert

    2014-07-01

    We present seasonal ∆14C and δ18O measurements from a Galapagos coral sequence that grew during the early 20th century. Our results show that both ∆14C and δ18O values are correlated with sea surface temperature in the Niño 3.4 region and are indicators of El Niño-Southern Oscillation. There is a significant inverse correlation between ∆14C and δ18O values when ∆14C is lagged by ~2 months, indicating that sea surface temperature changes precede upwelling changes at this eastern equatorial location. We find that cold season low-∆14C values were higher after the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) changed from a positive to a negative phase. Cold season high-δ18O values were significantly higher after the PDO shift as well. These findings suggest that there are two sources of low-∆14C waters that upwell at the Galapagos, Subantarctic Mode Water and shallow overturning water from the subpolar North Pacific.

  17. Anonymous nuclear loci in the white-faced storm-petrel Pelagodroma marina and their applicability to other Procellariiform seabirds.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mónica C; Duarte, Margarida A; Coelho, M Manuela

    2011-01-01

    Procellariiform seabirds are among the avian species with the fastest rates of extinction due to interactions with fisheries and introduction of alien predators to the breeding colonies. Conservation and management policies targeting populations of these species must include information on colony demographics and levels of isolation and genetic markers go a long way toward providing reliable estimates of these parameters. To this end, we report isolation and characterization of 14 anonymous nuclear loci, with average length of 657 bp, in the pelagic seabird White-faced Storm-petrel Pelagodroma marina, a species for which there is virtually no genetic information available. These loci, initially isolated from a genomic library built from P. marina, were further tested, for a range of conditions, in 7 other species representing all Procellariiform families. We found high levels of cross-species amplification success, varying between 79% and 86% in representatives of Diomedeidae, Procellariidae, Pelecanoididae, and other Hydrobatidae. We also sequenced 11 loci for 22 P. marina individuals and report higher levels of anonymous genetic variation (π = 0.002), with an average of 1 single nucleotide polymorphism every 100 bp surveyed, relative to the levels found on a typically variable intron in avian species. These markers will be a valuable tool in future population genetics and phylogenetic studies, particularly of nonmodel seabird species.

  18. Differential use of the Argentine shelf by wintering adults and juveniles southern giant petrels, Macronectes giganteus, from Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Gabriela S.; Quintana, Flavio

    2014-08-01

    To study habitat use and at-sea movements of southern giant petrels (SGP) during non-breeding period, we deployed 15 satellite transmitters (six adults, nine juveniles) at Isla Arce and Isla Gran Robredo colonies in Patagonia, Argentina. Birds were instrumented during 81.4 ± 37 days. Adult birds used 74% of the Argentine shelf concentrating mainly at the shelf break, middle shelf waters, and the surroundings of the colony. After fledging, juveniles spread to the Argentine, Uruguayan and Brazilian shelves within the South Atlantic. Adults alternated at-sea excursions (12 ± 5 days) with periods at the colony of 3 ± 0.3 days. Contrarily, juveniles moved first to the shelf break and then traveled northwards reaching the south of Brazil. There was some spatial overlap between age classes, but only during the first 30 days after juveniles had fledged; thereafter there was not overlap between the areas used by both age classes. The Argentine shelf is widely used by different species offering a suitable environment for foraging; this may be why adults SGP from Patagonian colonies spend all year-round within the Argentine shelf. The identification of used areas of non-breeding SGP fills a gap in the species knowledge contributing not only to the preservation the species, but also to the management of marine areas globally recognized as important for many other Procellariiformes.

  19. Black Petrels (Procellaria parkinsoni) Patrol the Ocean Shelf-Break: GPS Tracking of a Vulnerable Procellariiform Seabird

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Robin; Dennis, Todd; Landers, Todd; Thompson, David; Bell, Elizabeth; Walker, Mike; Guilford, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Background Determining the foraging movements of pelagic seabirds is fundamental for their conservation. However, the vulnerability and elusive lifestyles of these animals have made them notoriously difficult to study. Recent developments in satellite telemetry have enabled tracking of smaller seabirds during foraging excursions. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we report the first successful precision tracking of a c. 700 g seabird, the vulnerable Black Petrel, Procellaria parkinsoni, foraging at sea during the breeding season, using miniature GPS-logging technology. Employing a combination of high-resolution fixes and low-power duty-cycles, we present data from nine individual foraging excursions tracked during the chick-rearing period in February 2006. Conclusions/Significance We provide a snapshot of the species' foraging range and behaviour in relation to detailed underlying bathymetry off the coast of New Zealand, finding a significant relationship between foraging movements and regions of the shelf-break. We also highlight the potential of more sophisticated analyses to identify behavioural phenomena from position data alone. PMID:20174652

  20. AN INVESTIGATION OF POISONOUS AND VENOMOUS FISHES AT COCOS, GALAPAGOS AND LA PLATA ISLANDS DURING 4 DECEMBER 1952 TO 28 JANUARY 1953

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Collections of fish were made at Cocos , Galapagos, and La Plata Islands to determine if species known to be poisonous in the Indo-Pacific and West...tropical water currents and the respective fish fauna. Large numbers of puffers were present at Chatham Bay, Cocos and at Tagus Cove, Isabela...Galapagos. Moray eels and red snappers were numerous at La Plata, and sharks were exceedingly abundant at Cocos . Representative collections of fish were taken

  1. Plagioclase-Ultraphyric Basalts of the Northern Galapagos and Plume-Ridge Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, J. A.; Harpp, K. S.; Geist, D. L.

    2004-05-01

    The northern islands of the Galapagos Archipelago (Wolf, Darwin, Pinta, Marchena, and Genovesa) are located between 50-100 km south of the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) and constitute a distinct geologic province from the main island chain. One of the most notable petrologic characteristics shared by the northern islands is the predominance of basaltic flows containing up to 60% high-An plagioclase feldspar megacrysts (An 80-95; up to 3 cm long), a feature not observed in the rest of the archipelago. Lavas from Wolf, Darwin, and Genovesa Islands were examined using XRF, ICP-MS, and electron microprobe to characterize the basalts and determine the magmatic history recorded by the large plagioclase crystals. Megacrysts of high-An plagioclase, accompanied by minor clinopyroxene (<5%) and/or olivine and orthopyroxene phenocrysts, dominate 30-60% of the volume of the plagioclase ultraphyric lavas, with clinopyroxene, plagioclase, and Fe-Ti oxides comprising the groundmass. The plagioclase crystals exhibit complex oscillatory zoning, glomerocrystic textures, quench rims of lower An content than the cores, abundant melt inclusions, and inclusions of Cr-Spinel (absent on Genovesa). Thermodynamic calculations (by MELTS) suggest that the megacrysts are not in equilibrium with the groundmass, which corroborates textural evidence for a xenocrystic origin for the megacrysts. According to statistical analyses, the plagioclase megacryst compositions from each island are not significantly different from each other. Nevertheless, preliminary electron microprobe analyses of rehomogenized plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions indicate that island-specific evolutionary trends are preserved in the crystals from each volcano. Our results suggest that a common feature of the northern islands is that they all formed from high temperature Al2O3 rich basalts, conducive to the formation of significant volumes of An-rich plagioclase. The composition of the mantle source, however, differs

  2. Petrology and Geochemistry of the Northeast Seamounts of the Galapagos Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinton, C. W.; Harpp, K. S.; Christie, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    One of the best locations to study hotspot-ridge interactions is the Northern Galápagos Province (NGP), the region that lies between the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) and the central portion of the Galapagos Archipelago. The Galapagos hotspot is currently located off-axis from the GSC but still has a profound influence on the ridge in terms of axial lava composition and ridge bathymetry. The NGP is characterized by an array of volcanic lineaments that are composed of seamounts and five small islands. The eastern edge of the NGP is defined by a group of at least five seamounts (the Northeast Seamounts), three of which were mapped and dredged in 1990 during Leg 2 of the PLUME expedition of the R/V Thomas Washington. We report petrological and geochemical data from the basalts recovered at six dredge sites. All basalts are tholeiitic with a general MORB-like composition, but with considerable variation within some individual dredge hauls and between seamounts. Previously published isotopic data are limited but 3He/4He ratios (Graham et al. 1993) and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data (Harpp and White 2000) are consistent with a depleted mantle source for all three seamounts. Based on geochemistry and petrological observations, the basalts can be divided into at least thirteen distinct groups. The bulk of the analyzed glass samples have compositions more than MORB with MgO content of 8-10% wt., although two of the groups are in the 6-7% range. In addition, the primitive lavas have high CaO and Al2O3 . The mineralogy ranges from aphyric for the more evolved lavas to olivine + plagioclase-phyric or plagioclase ultraphyric for the more primitive basalts. The plagioclase appear to be very calcic (up to An91) xenocrysts that are often hosting aluminous spinel (Al2O3 46-48% wt.) and primitive melt inclusions (Sinton et al., 1993). Initial trace element data show light rare earth (LREE)-depleted signatures, although several samples are slightly enriched in the LREE. Taken together

  3. Vegetation dynamics drive segregation by body size in Galapagos tortoises migrating across altitudinal gradients.

    PubMed

    Blake, Stephen; Yackulic, Charles B; Cabrera, Fredy; Tapia, Washington; Gibbs, James P; Kümmeth, Franz; Wikelski, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Seasonal migration has evolved in many taxa as a response to predictable spatial and temporal variation in the environment. Individual traits, physiology and social state interact with environmental factors to increase the complexity of migratory systems. Despite a huge body of research, the ultimate causes of migration remain unclear. A relatively simple, tractable system - giant tortoises on Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos, was studied to elucidate the roles of environmental variation and individual traits in a partial migratory system. Specifically, we asked: (i) do Galapagos tortoises undergo long-distance seasonal migrations? (ii) is tortoise migration ultimately driven by gradients in forage quality or temperature; and (iii) how do sex and body size influence migration patterns? We recorded the daily locations of 17 GPS-tagged tortoises and walked a monthly survey along the altitudinal gradient to characterize the movements and distribution of tortoises of different sizes and sexes. Monthly temperature and rainfall data were obtained from weather stations deployed at various altitudes, and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index was used as a proxy for forage quality. Analyses using net displacement or daily movement characteristics did not agree on assigning individuals as either migratory or non-migratory; however, both methods suggested that some individuals were migratory. Adult tortoises of both sexes move up and down an altitudinal gradient in response to changes in vegetation dynamics, not temperature. The largest tagged individuals all moved, whereas only some mid-sized individuals moved, and the smallest individuals never left lowland areas. The timing of movements varied with body size: large individuals moved upward (as lowland forage quality declined) earlier in the year than did mid-sized individuals, while the timing of downward movements was unrelated to body size and occurred as lowland vegetation productivity peaked. Giant tortoises are

  4. Comparative ectoparasite loads of five seabird species in the Galapagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Parra, Jose L; Levin, Iris I; Parker, Patricia G

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we describe the ectoparasitic lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera) found on 5 species of seabirds (magnificent frigatebird Fregata magnificens; great frigatebird Fregata minor ; Nazca booby Sula granti ; blue-footed booby Sula nebouxii ; and red-footed booby Sula sula ) on the Galapagos Archipelago. We found 9 species of ectoparasitic lice: 5 species of Pectinopygus ischnocerans, 1 infesting each host; 2 species of Colpocephalum amblyceran lice, 1 on each frigatebird species; and 2 shared amblycerans, Eidmanniella albescens (Piaget, 1880) found on Nazca and blue-footed boobies and Fregatiella aurifasciata (Kellogg, 1899) found on the 2 frigatebirds. We tested the relative importance and interactions of host sex, body size, host, island, host family, and breeding status and found that inter-island differences were the main predictors of prevalence and infestation intensity. These differences could be related to host density or weather, but further evidence is needed.

  5. Blood gases, biochemistry, and hematology of Galapagos green turtles (Chelonia mydas).

    PubMed

    Lewbart, Gregory A; Hirschfeld, Maximilian; Denkinger, Judith; Vasco, Karla; Guevara, Nataly; García, Juan; Muñoz, Juanpablo; Lohmann, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    The green turtle, Chelonia mydas, is an endangered marine chelonian with a circum-global distribution. Reference blood parameter intervals have been published for some chelonian species, but baseline hematology, biochemical, and blood gas values are lacking from the Galapagos sea turtles. Analyses were done on blood samples drawn from 28 green turtles captured in two foraging locations on San Cristóbal Island (14 from each site). Of these turtles, 20 were immature and of unknown sex; the other eight were males (five mature, three immature). A portable blood analyzer (iSTAT) was used to obtain near immediate field results for pH, lactate, pO2, pCO2, HCO3-, Hct, Hb, Na, K, iCa, and Glu. Parameter values affected by temperature were corrected in two ways: (1) with standard formulas; and (2) with auto-corrections made by the iSTAT. The two methods yielded clinically equivalent results. Standard laboratory hematology techniques were employed for the red and white blood cell counts and the hematocrit determination, which was also compared to the hematocrit values generated by the iSTAT. Of all blood analytes, only lactate concentrations were positively correlated with body size. All other values showed no significant difference between the two sample locations nor were they correlated with body size or internal temperature. For hematocrit count, the iSTAT blood analyzer yielded results indistinguishable from those obtained with high-speed centrifugation. The values reported in this study provide baseline data that may be useful in comparisons among populations and in detecting changes in health status among Galapagos sea turtles. The findings might also be helpful in future efforts to demonstrate associations between specific biochemical parameters and disease.

  6. Blood Gases, Biochemistry, and Hematology of Galapagos Green Turtles (Chelonia Mydas)

    PubMed Central

    Lewbart, Gregory A.; Hirschfeld, Maximilian; Denkinger, Judith; Vasco, Karla; Guevara, Nataly; García, Juan; Muñoz, Juanpablo; Lohmann, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    The green turtle, Chelonia mydas, is an endangered marine chelonian with a circum-global distribution. Reference blood parameter intervals have been published for some chelonian species, but baseline hematology, biochemical, and blood gas values are lacking from the Galapagos sea turtles. Analyses were done on blood samples drawn from 28 green turtles captured in two foraging locations on San Cristóbal Island (14 from each site). Of these turtles, 20 were immature and of unknown sex; the other eight were males (five mature, three immature). A portable blood analyzer (iSTAT) was used to obtain near immediate field results for pH, lactate, pO2, pCO2, HCO3−, Hct, Hb, Na, K, iCa, and Glu. Parameter values affected by temperature were corrected in two ways: (1) with standard formulas; and (2) with auto-corrections made by the iSTAT. The two methods yielded clinically equivalent results. Standard laboratory hematology techniques were employed for the red and white blood cell counts and the hematocrit determination, which was also compared to the hematocrit values generated by the iSTAT. Of all blood analytes, only lactate concentrations were positively correlated with body size. All other values showed no significant difference between the two sample locations nor were they correlated with body size or internal temperature. For hematocrit count, the iSTAT blood analyzer yielded results indistinguishable from those obtained with high-speed centrifugation. The values reported in this study provide baseline data that may be useful in comparisons among populations and in detecting changes in health status among Galapagos sea turtles. The findings might also be helpful in future efforts to demonstrate associations between specific biochemical parameters and disease. PMID:24824065

  7. Hydrothermal alteration in oceanic ridge volcanics: A detailed study at the Galapagos Fossil Hydrothermal Field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridley, W.I.; Perfit, M.R.; Josnasson, I.R.; Smith, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    The Galapagos Fossil Hydrothermal Field is composed of altered oceanic crust and extinct hydrothermal vents within the eastern Galapagos Rift between 85??49???W and 85??55???W. The discharge zone of the hydrothermal system is revealed along scarps, thus providing an opportunity to examine the uppermost mineralized, and highly altered interior parts of the crust. Altered rocks collected in situ by the submersible ALVIN show complex concentric alteration zones. Microsamples of individual zones have been analysed for major/minor, trace elements, and strontium isotopes in order to describe the complex compositional details of the hydrothermal alteration. Interlayered chlorite-smectite and chlorite with disequilibrium compositions dominate the secondary mineralogy as replacement phases of primary glass and acicular pyroxene. Phenocrysts and matrix grains of plagioclase are unaffected during alteration. Using a modification of the Gresens' equation we demonstrate that the trivalent rare earth elements (REEs) are relatively immobile, and calculate degrees of enrichment and depletion in other elements. Strontium isotopic ratios increase as Sr concentrations decrease from least-altered cores to most-altered rims and cross-cutting veins in individual samples, and can be modeled by open system behaviour under low fluid-rock ratio (< 10) conditions following a period of lower-temperature weathering of volcanics within the rift zone. The complex patterns of element enrichment and depletion and strontium isotope variations indicate mixing between pristine seawater and ascending hot fluids to produce a compositional spectrum of fluids. The precipitation of base-metal sulfides beneath the seafloor is probably a result of fluid mixing and cooling. If, as suggested here, the discharge zone alteration occurred under relatively low fluid-rock ratios, then this shallow region must play an important role in determining the exit composition of vent fluids in marine hydrothermal systems

  8. Trace metals in contemporary and seventeenth-century Galapagos coral: Records of seasonal and annual variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linn, L. J.; Delaney, M. L.; Druffel, E. R. M.

    1990-02-01

    We report trace element/calcium ratios for modern ( Cu/Ca, Mn/Ca, Cd/Ca, and Pb/Ca) and seventeenth-century ( Cu/Ca, Mn/Ca, and Pb/Ca) specimens of Pavona clavus collected in the Galapagos Islands. These data include the first reliable measurements of Cu/Ca ratios in coralline aragonite. We estimate that the ratio of Cu/Ca in the lattice to that in seawater (i.e., the effective distribution coefficient) is ~0.3, lower than the value of 1 observed for several other divalent elements; we estimate the effective distribution coefficient for Mn is ~ 1. Distribution coefficients in coral aragonite for 8 divalent metals are near unity despite different ionic radii and chemical speciation in seawater. Investigation of where these substituents are incorporated in the aragonite lattice is clearly warranted. In a modern Hood Island coral, quarter-annually sampled from 1964-73, Cu/Ca ratios decrease twofold from the late 1960s to early 1970s. Mn/Ca and Cd/Ca ratios vary seasonally with upwelling and the generic El Niño. The El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events of 1965, 1969, and 1972 are marked by suppression of Cd/Ca ratios by about 2.5 nmol/mol, while the Mn/Ca ratio is highest during the strong 1972 ENSO. Pb/Ca ratios were relatively constant throughout this period. From the Cu/Ca record of a seventeenth-century Urvina Bay coral annually sampled from 1600-1725 and the estimated Cu distribution coefficient, surface seawater Cu concentrations at Galapagos during the seventeenth century were similar to present day at 0.7-1.4 nmol/kg. Estimated Pb concentrations were lower at 5-20 pmol/kg, and Mn concentrations were slightly higher at 1.6-2.8 nmol/kg.

  9. Wide-angle Seismic Constraints On The Evolution of Galapagos Hotspot - Cocos Nazca Spreading Center Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallares, V.; Charvis, Ph.; Flueh, E. R.; Bialas, J.; Walther, C.

    The Nazca and Cocos plates include several blocks of thickened oceanci crust thought to have originated from the interaction between the Galapagos hotspot and the Cocos- Nazca spreading center during the last 20 Ma. The most prominent are the Cocos, Malpelo, and Carnegie Ridges. In this work we compare the crustal seismic structure of these ridges along five wide-angle profiles acquired during the PAGANINI-1999 and SALIERI-2001 experiments. Two of these profiles are located on the Cocos Ridge and another one in Malpelo. The last two profiles (Carnegie Ridge) are in the conjugate positions with Malpelo (at~20 Ma) and southern Cocos (at~12 Ma). The results show that maximum crustal thickness along these profiles is highly vari- able, ranging from 19-20 km in northern Cocos, Malpelo, and its conjugate position, to 16.5 km in southern Cocos and only 13 km in its conjugate position. Oceanic Layer 2 thickness is quite uniform regardless of total crustal thickness variations, and thus crustal thickening is mainly accomodated in Layer 3. The mean seismic velocities of Layer 3 are similar in all profiles, and generally lower where the crust is the thick- est. This leads to an overall anticorrelation between crustal thickness and bulk lower crustal velocities. These observations suggest, on one hand, the existence of important variations on the Galapagos hotspot activity and on its relative location with respect to the spreading center. At 20 Ma, the hotspot-ridge system would be dominated by a vig- orous on-ridge magmatic activity, while at 12 Ma it would show a significantly lower, off-ridge centered activity. On the other hand, the obtained velocity-thickness rela- tionship differs from that expected for a crust generated by decompression melting of an abnormally hot mantle. We suggest that other parameters such as active upwelling, or variations in water content and/or composition of the mantle source must be taken into account.

  10. Hydrothermal alteration in oceanic ridge volcanics: A detailed study at the Galapagos Fossil Hydrothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Ridley, W.I.; Perfit, M.R.; Smith, M.F.; Jonasson, I.R.

    1994-06-01

    The Galapagos Fossil Hydrothermal Field is composed of altered oceanic crust and extinct hydrothermal vents within the eastern Galapagos Rift between 85{degree}49 feet W and 85{degree} 55 feet W. The discharge zone of the hydrothermal system is revealed along scarps, thus providing an opportunity to examine the uppermost mineralized, and highly altered interior parts of the crust. Altered rocks collected in situ by the submersible ALVIN show complex concentric alteration zones. Microsamples of individual zones have been analysed for major/minor, trace elements, and strontium isotopes in order to describe the complex compositional details of the hydrothermal alteration. Interlayered chlorite-smectite and chlorite with disequilibrium compositions dominate the secondary mineralogy as replacement phases of primary glass and acicular pyroxene. Phenocrysts and matrix grains of plagioclase are unaffected during alteration. Using a modification of the Gresens` equation we demonstrate that the trivalent rare earth elements (REEs) are relatively immobile, and calculate degrees of enrichment and depletion in other elements. Strontium isotopic ratios increase as Sr concentrations decrease from least-altered cores to most-altered rims and cross-cutting veins in individual samples, and can be modeled by open system behaviour under low fluid-rock ratio (<10) conditions following a period of lower-temperature weathering of volcanics within the rift zone. The complex patterns of element enrichment and depletion and strontium isotope variations indicate mixing between pristine seawater and ascending hot fluids to produce a compositional spectrum of fluids. If, as suggested here, the discharge zone alteration occurred under relatively low fluid-rock ratios, then this shallow region must play an important role in determining the exit composition of vent fluids in marine hydrothermal systems. 50 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Variation with land use of immune function and prevalence of avian pox in Galapagos finches.

    PubMed

    Zylberberg, Maxine; Lee, Kelly A; Klasing, Kirk C; Wikelski, Martin

    2013-02-01

    Introduced disease has been implicated in recent wildlife extinctions and population declines worldwide. Both anthropogenic-induced change and natural environmental features can affect pathogen spread. Furthermore, environmental disturbance can result in changes in stress physiology, nutrition, and social structure, which in turn can suppress immune system function. However, it remains unknown whether landscape variation results in heterogeneity in host resistance to pathogens. Avian pox virus, a pathogen implicated in avian declines and extinctions in Hawaii, was introduced to the Galapagos in the 1890 s, and prevalence (total number of current infections) has increased recently in finches. We tested whether prevalence and recovery trends in 7 species of Galapagos finches varied by elevation or human land use. To do so, we used infection data obtained from 545 wild-caught birds. In addition, we determined whether annual changes in 4 aspects of innate immune function (complement protein activity, natural antibody activity, concentration of PIT54 protein, and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio) varied by elevation or land use. Prevalence and recovery rates did not vary by elevation from 2008 to 2009. Avian pox prevalence and proportion of recovered individuals in undeveloped and urban areas did not change from 2008 to 2009. In agricultural areas, avian pox prevalence increased 8-fold (from 2% to 17% of 234 individuals sampled) and proportion of recovered individuals increased (11% to 19%) from 2008 to 2009. These results suggest high disease-related mortality. Variation in immune function across human land-use types correlated with variation in both increased prevalence and susceptibility, which indicates changes in innate immune function may underlie changes in disease susceptibility. Our results suggest anthropogenic disturbance, in particular agricultural practices, may underlie immunological changes in host species that themselves contribute to pathogen emergence.

  12. Identification and Optimization of Microbial Attractants for Philornis downsi, an Invasive Fly Parasitic on Galapagos Birds.

    PubMed

    Cha, Dong H; Mieles, Alejandro E; Lahuatte, Paola F; Cahuana, Andrea; Lincango, Marie Piedad; Causton, Charlotte E; Tebbich, Sabine; Cimadom, Arno; Teale, Stephen A

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the role of olfactory cues from actively fermenting yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in attraction of adult Philornis downsi and identified two synergistically attractive yeast volatiles. Larvae of this invasive fly parasitize the hatchlings of passerines and threaten the Galapagos avifauna. Gas chromatography coupled with electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD), coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and field trapping experiments were used to identify volatile compounds from a yeast-sugar solution. EAD responses were consistently elicited by 14 yeast volatiles. In a series of field trapping experiments, a mixture of the 14 EAD-active compounds was similarly attractive to P. downsi when compared to the yeast-sugar solution, and we found that acetic acid and ethanol were essential for attraction. A mixture of 0.03 % acetic acid and 3 % ethanol was as attractive as the 14-component blend, but was not as attractive as the yeast-sugar solution. Philornis downsi showed positive and negative dose-responses to acetic acid in the ranges of 0.01 ~ 0.3 % and 0.3 ~ 9 %, respectively. Further optimization showed that the mixture of 1 % acetic acid and 3 % ethanol was as attractive as the yeast-sugar solution. Both mixtures of acetic acid and ethanol were more selective than the yeast-sugar solution in terms of non-target moths and Polistes versicolor wasps captured. These results indicate that acetic acid and ethanol produced by yeasts are crucial for P. downsi attraction to fermented materials on which they feed as adults and can be used to manage this invasive fly in Galapagos.

  13. Trace metals in contemporary and seventeenth-century Galapagos coral: Records of seasonal and annual variations

    SciTech Connect

    Linn, L.J.; Delaney, M.L.; Druffel, E.R.M. )

    1990-02-01

    The authors report trace element/calcium ratios for modern (Cu/Ca, Mn/Ca, Cd/Ca and Pb/Ca) and seventeenth-century (Cu/Ca, Mn/Ca, and Pb/Ca) specimens of Pavona clavus collected in the Galapagos Islands. These data include the first reliable measurements of Cu/Ca ratios in coralline aragonite. They estimate that the ratio of Cu/Ca in the lattice to that in seawater (i.e., the effective distribution coefficient) is {approx} 0.3, lower than the value of 1 observed for several other divalent elements; they estimate the effective distribution coefficient for Mn is {approx} 1. Distribution coefficients in coral aragonite for 8 divalent metals are near unity despite different ionic radii and chemical speciation in seawater. In a modern Hood Island coral, quarter-annually sampled from 1964-73, Cu/Ca ratios decrease twofold from the late 1960s to early 1970s. Mn/Ca and Cd/Ca ratios vary seasonally with upwelling and the generic El Nino. The El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events of 1965, 1969, and 1972 are marked by suppression of Cd/Ca ratios by about 2.5 nmol/mol, while the Mn/Ca ratio is highest during the strong 1972 ENSO. Pb/Ca ratios were relatively constant throughout this period. From the Cu/Ca record of a seventeenth-century Urvina Bay coral annually sampled from 1600-1725 and the estimated Cu distribution coefficient, surface seawater Cu concentrations at Galapagos during the seventeenth century were similar to present day at 0.7-1.4 nmol/kg. Estimated Pb concentrations were lower at 5-20 pmol/kg, and Mn concentrations were slightly higher at 1.6-2.8 nmol/kg.

  14. Non-neutral evolution and reciprocal monophyly of two expressed Mhc class II B genes in Leach's storm-petrel.

    PubMed

    Dearborn, Donald C; Gager, Andrea B; Gilmour, Morgan E; McArthur, Andrew G; Hinerfeld, Douglas A; Mauck, Robert A

    2015-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) is subject to pathogen-mediated balancing selection and can link natural selection with mate choice. We characterized two Mhc class II B loci in Leach's storm-petrel, Oceanodroma leucorhoa, focusing on exon 2 which encodes the portion of the protein that binds pathogen peptides. We amplified and sequenced exon 2 with locus-specific nested PCR and Illumina MiSeq using individually barcoded primers. Repeat genotyping of 78 single-locus genotypes produced identical results in 77 cases (98.7%). Sequencing of messenger RNA (mRNA) from three birds confirmed expression of both loci, consistent with the observed absence of stop codons or frameshifts in all alleles. In 48 birds, we found 9 and 12 alleles at the two loci, respectively, and all 21 alleles translated to unique amino acid sequences. Unlike many studies of duplicated Mhc genes, alleles of the two loci clustered into monophyletic groups. Consistent with this phylogenetic result, interlocus gene conversion appears to have affected only two short fragments of the exon. As predicted under a paradigm of pathogen-mediated selection, comparison of synonymous and non-synonymous substitution rates found evidence of a history of positive selection at putative peptide binding sites. Overall, the results suggest that the gene duplication event leading to these two loci is not recent and that point mutations and positive selection on the peptide binding sites may be the predominant forces acting on these genes. Characterization of these loci sets the stage for population-level work on the evolutionary ecology of Mhc in this species.

  15. Description of a New Galapagos Giant Tortoise Species (Chelonoidis; Testudines: Testudinidae) from Cerro Fatal on Santa Cruz Island

    PubMed Central

    Chiari, Ylenia; Garrick, Ryan C.; Russello, Michael A.; Benavides, Edgar; Watkins-Colwell, Gregory J.; Glaberman, Scott; Tapia, Washington; Gibbs, James P.; Cayot, Linda J.; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2015-01-01

    The taxonomy of giant Galapagos tortoises (Chelonoidis spp.) is currently based primarily on morphological characters and island of origin. Over the last decade, compelling genetic evidence has accumulated for multiple independent evolutionary lineages, spurring the need for taxonomic revision. On the island of Santa Cruz there is currently a single named species, C. porteri. Recent genetic and morphological studies have shown that, within this taxon, there are two evolutionarily and spatially distinct lineages on the western and eastern sectors of the island, known as the Reserva and Cerro Fatal populations, respectively. Analyses of DNA from natural populations and museum specimens, including the type specimen for C. porteri, confirm the genetic distinctiveness of these two lineages and support elevation of the Cerro Fatal tortoises to the rank of species. In this paper, we identify DNA characters that define this new species, and infer evolutionary relationships relative to other species of Galapagos tortoises. PMID:26488886

  16. Sterilisation of hybrid Galapagos tortoises (Geochelone nigra) for island restoration. Part 2: phallectomy of males under intrathecal anaesthesia with lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Rivera, S; Divers, S J; Knafo, S E; Martinez, P; Cayot, L J; Tapia-Aguilera, W; Flanagan, J

    2011-01-22

    Lidocaine intrathecal anaesthesia was used to perform phallectomies in 15 hybrid Galapagos tortoises (Geochelone nigra) in a field setting as part of a conservation and ecosystem restoration project in the Galapagos Islands. The intrathecal injection was performed in the dorsal intercoccygeal region of the tail. Once the tail and hindlimbs were relaxed and the phallus was easily exteriorised, phallectomy was performed in a routine manner. All the animals recovered well from the procedure and were walking 30 to 60 minutes after surgery. No adverse effects were noted as a result of lidocaine intrathecal anaesthesia. One of the larger animals had evidence of haemorrhage from the surgical site 48 hours postoperatively. All tortoises continued to make full recoveries and were released on to the island of Pinta in May 2010.

  17. Interactions between the Avian Parasite, Philornis downsi (Diptera: Muscidae) and the Galapagos Flycatcher, Myiarchus magnirostris Gould (Passeriformes: Tyrannidae).

    PubMed

    Lincango, Piedad; Causton, Charlotte; Cedeño, Daniel; Castañeda, Johanna; Hillstrom, Alexandra; Freund, Deborah

    2015-10-01

    An incidental observation of the fly Philornis downsi parasitizing a Galapagos Flycatcher (Myiarchus magnirostris) nest has revealed new insights into the searching behavior and biology of this invasive fly parasite and its interactions with endemic landbirds in the Galapagos Islands. Observations suggest that P. downsi relies on olfactory cues, or olfactory cues combined with the activity of adult birds, to locate nests and that flies continue to visit nests when chicks are >3 d old. At least 200 eggs were laid by P. downsi in different parts of the nest and >40 early-instar larvae were found inside the head of one chick, with additional larvae found in the base of the nest. Parasitism was the likely cause of mortality of both chicks found in or near the nest. This description of P. downsi parasitizing chicks of M. magnirostris highlights the vulnerability of this endemic bird species to this invasive fly.

  18. Description of a New Galapagos Giant Tortoise Species (Chelonoidis; Testudines: Testudinidae) from Cerro Fatal on Santa Cruz Island.

    PubMed

    Poulakakis, Nikos; Edwards, Danielle L; Chiari, Ylenia; Garrick, Ryan C; Russello, Michael A; Benavides, Edgar; Watkins-Colwell, Gregory J; Glaberman, Scott; Tapia, Washington; Gibbs, James P; Cayot, Linda J; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2015-01-01

    The taxonomy of giant Galapagos tortoises (Chelonoidis spp.) is currently based primarily on morphological characters and island of origin. Over the last decade, compelling genetic evidence has accumulated for multiple independent evolutionary lineages, spurring the need for taxonomic revision. On the island of Santa Cruz there is currently a single named species, C. porteri. Recent genetic and morphological studies have shown that, within this taxon, there are two evolutionarily and spatially distinct lineages on the western and eastern sectors of the island, known as the Reserva and Cerro Fatal populations, respectively. Analyses of DNA from natural populations and museum specimens, including the type specimen for C. porteri, confirm the genetic distinctiveness of these two lineages and support elevation of the Cerro Fatal tortoises to the rank of species. In this paper, we identify DNA characters that define this new species, and infer evolutionary relationships relative to other species of Galapagos tortoises.

  19. Possible impacts of the invasive plant Rubus niveus on the native vegetation of the Scalesia forest in the Galapagos islands.

    PubMed

    Rentería, Jorge Luis; Gardener, Mark R; Panetta, F Dane; Atkinson, Rachel; Crawley, Mick J

    2012-01-01

    Originally from Asia, Rubus niveus has become one of the most widespread invasive plant species in the Galapagos Islands. It has invaded open vegetation, shrubland and forest alike. It forms dense thickets up to 4 m high, appearing to displace native vegetation, and threaten the integrity of several native communities. This study used correlation analysis between a R. niveus cover gradient and a number of biotic (vascular plant species richness, cover and vegetation structure) and abiotic (light and soil properties) parameters to help understand possible impacts in one of the last remaining fragments of the Scalesia forest in Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos. Higher cover of R. niveus was associated with significantly lower native species richness and cover, and a different forest structure. Results illustrated that 60% R. niveus cover could be considered a threshold for these impacts. We suggest that a maximum of 40% R. niveus cover could be a suitable management target.

  20. Possible Impacts of the Invasive Plant Rubus niveus on the Native Vegetation of the Scalesia Forest in the Galapagos Islands

    PubMed Central

    Rentería, Jorge Luis; Gardener, Mark R.; Panetta, F. Dane; Atkinson, Rachel; Crawley, Mick J.

    2012-01-01

    Originally from Asia, Rubus niveus has become one of the most widespread invasive plant species in the Galapagos Islands. It has invaded open vegetation, shrubland and forest alike. It forms dense thickets up to 4 m high, appearing to displace native vegetation, and threaten the integrity of several native communities. This study used correlation analysis between a R. niveus cover gradient and a number of biotic (vascular plant species richness, cover and vegetation structure) and abiotic (light and soil properties) parameters to help understand possible impacts in one of the last remaining fragments of the Scalesia forest in Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos. Higher cover of R. niveus was associated with significantly lower native species richness and cover, and a different forest structure. Results illustrated that 60% R. niveus cover could be considered a threshold for these impacts. We suggest that a maximum of 40% R. niveus cover could be a suitable management target. PMID:23118934

  1. Spatial and Temporal Population Genetics at Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents Along the East Pacific Rise and Galapagos Rift

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Science and Engineering 1930 DOCTORAL DISSERTATION Spatial and Temporal Population Genetics at Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents Along the East...2008-10 2. 3. Recipient’s Accession No. 4. Title and Subtitle Spatial and Temporal Population Genetics at Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents Along the East...2008. Spatial and Temporal Population Genetics at Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents Along the East Pacific Rise and Galapagos Rift. Ph.D. Thesis. MITAVHOI

  2. Geochemistry of Alvarado and Sarmiento Ridges Suggests Widespread Galapagos Plume-Upper Mantle Interaction in the Miocene Eastern Pacific?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, P. R.; Lonsdale, P. F.

    2004-12-01

    Alvarado and Sarmiento are 1-2 km high, ~400 km-long, NE striking volcanic ridges in the Peru Basin that lie 150 km and 250 km, respectively, southeast of the Grijalva Scarp. The latter marks the southern boundary between the younger Cocos-Nazca and older EPR-Farallon crusts. The two ridges were originally proposed as transform fault trails on the Farallon plate, but new evidence suggest that they were the result of fissure eruption during an initially (pre-24Ma) broad zone of Farallon plate rupture. The rupture later became focussed along the Grijalva fracture, splitting the Farallon plate at 23Ma to create the Cocos and Nazca plates and initiating the Cocos-Nazca spreading center. Lava samples from the ridges were dredged during the DANA 02 expedition aboard R/V Revelle in Fall 2003. The lavas are invariably basalts ranging from tholeiitic to alkalic in composition. The basalts have flat to highly incompatible element-enriched trace element patterns and although their isotopic ratios are not as radiogenic as those of some of the Galapagos hotspot lavas, they are neither as depleted as those of normal-MORB (87Sr/86Sr[25Ma] >0.7027; 143Nd/144Nd[25Ma] <0.5130; 206Pb/204Pb[25Ma] >18.66). Some of the ridge lavas are compositionally similar to enriched-MORB erupted along the GSC section close to the Galapagos hotspot, but the majority are more akin to the relatively depleted hotspot lavas erupted at the center of the Galapagos Archipelago. The new geochemical data suggest that the volcanic ridge lavas came from a fairly large, anomalous region of the upper mantle that may have been created by the interaction between a Galapagos plume and the depleted source of MORB.

  3. Urban life of Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) on San Cristobal Island, Ecuador: colony trends and threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denkinger, Judith; Gordillo, Luis; Montero-Serra, Ignasi; Murillo, Juan Carlos; Guevara, Nataly; Hirschfeld, Maximilian; Fietz, Katharina; Rubianes, Francisco; Dan, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Worldwide, pristine environments are influenced by human societies. In the Galapagos Islands, the endangered, endemic Galapagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki) has formed one of the biggest colonies within the town center of Puerto Baquerizo Moreno. About 8,000 people live there and human wildlife interactions occur daily. With colony counts and direct observations from 2008 to 2012, we analyze cause of death, injuries and disease of urban sea lion colonies at Wreck Bay. Population increase since 2008 can be attributed to an immigration of adult sea lions in 2010, resulting in an increase in the pup and juvenile production in 2011 and 2012. Pup mortality increased drastically to 2009 and again in 2011 and 2012. Besides pup mortality, most of the deaths are caused by increased disease incidences and human activity. Our observations suggest that overall 65% of the injuries observed are produced by human interaction. The increase in threats leading to death, injuries or disease can have long-term effects on the population. Although threats that cause physical injuries can be managed locally, sea lions range movements contributes to the spread of infectious pathogens, which may affect neighbor colonies and potentially have an impact on the survival of the species. Our study reveals the need of stronger efforts towards a more complete understanding of threats and especially disease spread among Galapagos Sea lions in urban environments and the establishment of more effective management measures.

  4. Adapted to change: Low energy requirements in a low and unpredictable productivity environment, the case of the Galapagos sea lion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas-Amtmann, Stella; McDonald, Birgitte I.; Páez-Rosas, Diego; Aurioles-Gamboa, David; Costa, Daniel P.

    2017-06-01

    The rate of energy expenditure and acquisition are fundamental components of an animals' life history. Within mammals, the otariids (sea lions and fur seals) exhibit energetically expensive life styles, which can be challenging in equatorial regions where resources are particularly limited and unpredictable. To better understand how this energetically expensive life history pattern functions in an energetically challenging equatorial system, we concurrently measured the field metabolic rate (FMR) and foraging behavior of lactating Galapagos sea lions (GSL) rearing pups and yearlings. Females with pups tended to forage to the north, diving deeper, epi and mesopelagically compared to females with yearlings, which foraged to the west and performed dives to the sea bed that were shallower. FMR did not differ between females with pups or yearlings but, increased significantly with % time spent at-sea. Females with yearlings had higher water influx, suggesting greater food intake, but had lower body condition. The FMR (4.08±0.6 W/kg) of GSL is the lowest measured for any otariid, but is consistent with Galapagos fur seals which also exhibit low FMR. The observation that these two otariids have reduced energy requirements is consistent with an adaptation to the reduced prey availability of the Galapagos marine environment compared to other more productive marine systems.

  5. Kauai endangered seabird study. Volume 1: Interactions of Dark-Rumped Petrels and Newell`s Shearwaters with utility structures on Kauai, Hawaii. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, B.A.; Day, R.H.

    1995-12-01

    Declining populations of two endangered species of seabirds on Kauai, Hawaii--the Dark-Rumped Petrel and Newell`s Shearwater--have been the emphasis of a three-year research program to determine the causes of bird mortality and fallout and to recommend preventive measures. This study refined scientific understanding of the timing of bird movements, enabling future biologists to sample rates of avian traffic more efficiently and perhaps better identify the times when it would be most beneficial to reduce outdoor lighting, which has been linked to fallout. The study also identified three specific areas where collisions would be most beneficial. A sampling site was established in the highlands along a transmission line that runs from the south shore to the north shore through the interior and in proximity to several shearwater colonies. This site has provided a much clearer picture of Procellariiform behavior and collision mortality rates in the coastal areas. Volume 2 of this report describes the ecology of the Dark-Rumped Petrel and Newell`s Shearwater on the island of Kauai.

  6. Microanalysis of metals in barbs of a snow petrel (Pagodroma Nivea) from the Antarctica using synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhouqing; Zhang, Pengfei; Sun, Liguang; Xu, Siqi; Huang, Yuying; He, Wei

    2008-03-01

    For the first time synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) microanalysis was performed throughout the total length of 4 single barbs from the primaries and secondaries of a snow petrel (Pagodroma Nivea) collected in the Antarctica. Thirteen elements (S, Mg, K, Ca, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Sr, Ba, Hg and Pb) were detected somewhere in the barbs. Variations in levels of these elements within and among the barbs were obvious, indicating nonuniform microscale distributions. Factors influencing the fluctuations of the levels of the elements were investigated using a multivariate statistical analysis method. Five factors (F1 being associated with high loadings of Ca, Sr, and Ni, F2 with high loadings of Fe and Ba, F3 with high loadings of Se and Hg, F4 with high loadings of Ca and K, and F5 with high loadings of Zn and Pb) were found to explain about 80% of the total variance. Results from the factor analysis suggested external contamination of Fe, Ba, Pb, Zn and Hg on the feathers of the snow petrel.

  7. Dog overpopulation and burden of exposure to canine distemper virus and other pathogens on Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Nicole M; Mendez, Gabriella S; Grijalva, C Jaime; Walden, Heather S; Cruz, Marilyn; Aragon, Eduardo; Hernandez, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    Dog overpopulation and diseases are hazards to native island species and humans on the Galapagos. Vaccination and importation of dogs are prohibited on the Galapagos. Risk management of these hazards requires the use of science-based risk assessment and risk communication. The objectives of the study reported here were (i) to estimate the human:dog ratio and (ii) the prevalence of and identify exposure factors associated with positive antibody titers to canine distemper virus (CDV) and other pathogens, as well as infection with intestinal parasites in owned dogs on Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos in September 2014. The observed human:dog ratio was 6.148:1 which extrapolates to 2503 dogs (two times more than a recent dog count conducted by Galapagos Biosecurity Agency in March 2014). The proportion of spayed female dogs (50%) was higher, compared to neutered male dogs (30%) (p=0.04). Prevalence of dogs with positive antibody titers to CDV was 36% (95% CI=26, 46%), to canine parvovirus was 89% (95% CI=82, 95%), and to canine adenovirus was 40% (95% CI=30, 51%). The frequency of seropositive dogs to CDV was lower in urban dogs (26%), compared to rural dogs (53%) (p<0.05). A positive interaction effect between rural residence and spay/neuter status on seropositivity to CDV was observed, which we discuss in this report. Because vaccination is prohibited, the dog population on Santa Cruz is susceptible to an outbreak of CDV (particularly among urban dogs) with potential spill over to marine mammals. Dog's age (1-2 or 3-14 years old, compared to younger dogs), and residence (rural, urban) were associated with positive antibody titers to parvovirus, adenovirus, Ehrlichia spp., or Anaplasma spp., as well as infection with Ancylostoma spp., an intestinal parasite in dogs that can be transmitted to humans, particularly children. These results provide the most comprehensive assessment of dog overpopulation and exposure to CDV and other pathogens on the Galapagos to date

  8. A genetic signature of the evolution of loss of flight in the Galapagos cormorant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burga, Alejandro; Wang, Weiguang; Ben-David, Eyal; Wolf, Paul C.; Ramey, Andy M.; Verdugo, Claudio; Lyons, Karen; Parker, Patricia G.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONChanges in the size and proportion of limbs and other structures have played a key role in the evolution of species. One common class of limb modification is recurrent wing reduction and loss of flight in birds. Indeed, Darwin used the occurrence of flightless birds as an argument in favor of his theory of natural selection. Loss of flight has evolved repeatedly and is found among 26 families of birds in 17 different orders. Despite the frequency of these modifications, we have a limited understanding of their underpinnings at the genetic and molecular levels.RATIONALETo better understand the evolution of changes in limb size, we studied a classic case of recent loss of flight in the Galapagos cormorant (Phalacrocorax harrisi). Cormorants are large water birds that live in coastal areas or near lakes, and P. harrisi is the only flightless cormorant among approximately 40 extant species. The entire population is distributed along the coastlines of Isabela and Fernandina islands in the Galapagos archipelago. P. harrisi has a pair of short wings, which are smaller than those of any other cormorant. The extreme reduction of the wings and pectoral skeleton observed in P. harrisi is an attractive model for studying the evolution of loss of flight because it occurred very recently; phylogenetic evidence suggests that P. harrisi diverged from its flighted relatives within the past 2 million years. We developed a comparative and predictive genomics approach that uses the genome sequences of P. harrisi and its flighted relatives to find candidate genetic variants that likely contributed to the evolution of loss of flight.RESULTSWe sequenced and de novo assembled the whole genomes of P. harrisi and three closely related flighted cormorant species. We identified thousands of coding variants exclusive to P. harrisi and classified them according to their probability of altering protein function based on conservation. Variants most likely to alter

  9. Adaptation, isolation by distance and human-mediated transport determine patterns of gene flow among populations of the disease vector Aedes taeniorhynchus in the Galapagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Bataille, Arnaud; Cunningham, Andrew A; Cruz, Marilyn; Cedeño, Virna; Goodman, Simon J

    2011-12-01

    The black salt-marsh mosquito (Aedes taeniorhynchus) is the only native mosquito in the Galapagos Islands and potentially a major disease vector for Galapagos wildlife. Little is known about its population structure, or how its dynamics may be influenced by human presence in the archipelago. We used microsatellite data to assess the structure and patterns of A. taeniorhynchus gene flow among and within islands, to identify potential barriers to mosquito dispersal, and to investigate human-aided transport of mosquitoes across the archipelago. Our results show that inter-island migration of A. taeniorhynchus occurs frequently on an isolation by distance basis. High levels of inter-island migration were detected amongst the major ports of the archipelago, strongly suggesting the occurrence of human-aided transport of mosquitoes among islands, underlining the need for strict control measures to avoid the transport of disease vectors between islands. The prevalence of filarial nematode infection in Galapagos flightless cormorants is correlated with the population structure and migration patterns of A. taeniorhynchus, suggesting that A. taeniorhynchus is an important vector of this arthropod-borne parasite in the Galapagos Islands. Therefore mosquito population structure in Galapagos may have the potential to influence mosquito-borne parasite population dynamics, and the subsequent impacts of such pathogens on their host species in the islands.

  10. Geomagnetic paleointensity constraints on eruption timing at the Galapagos Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, J. A.; Ab Fatah, A.; Colman, A.; McClinton, J. T.; Sinton, J. M.; White, S. M.; Rubin, K. H.

    2011-12-01

    The intermediate-spreading-rate Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) experiences decreasing magma supply along axis with increasing distance from the nearby Galapagos hotspot. This allows us to explore the effects of variable magma supply on eruptive frequency, size, and style. Two contrasting sites on the GSC were mapped using high-resolution swath bathymetry, submersible observations, and camera tow photography. Individual eruptive units have been identified on the basis of these data and observations, as well sample geochemistry. In order to construct an eruptive history and to make broader interpretations regarding eruptive processes, it is necessary to place relative and absolute age constraints on these units. We present age determinations derived from geomagnetic paleointensity experiments at one of the study sites, centered at ~91°55'W, where increased magma supply from the hotspot results in an axial high. Due to the near monotonic decrease in geomagnetic paleointensity over the past ~500+ years, it is possible to infer relative age and to place approximate age constraints on eruptive units on the basis of their experimentally-determined paleointensity. Four of the largest identified units have been selected as a test case. Results suggest that the youngest flow is approximately 40 ± 30 years old. This flow unit is ~5 km long by 1 km wide, centered on the rise axis. An older flow (~180 ± 30 years old), also centered along the rise axis, lies to the west and its ~7 km along-axis exposure is interrupted by a large, flat-topped seamount. A number of active hydrothermal chimneys sit atop this flow unit, the heat source for which we infer to be related to the younger flow to the east or to a more recent shallow intrusion. The oldest documented flow is roughly 400 years old and is exposed slightly off-axis to the north of the two younger flows. The paleointensity-derived flow ages are consistent with available geological constraints on relative age. Based on

  11. Seismic Analysis of Magmatism in the Galapagos Archipelago and East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepp, Gabrielle

    Magmatism and deformation are consequences of fundamental processes shaping Earth's ˜150 km-thick continental and <125 km-thick oceanic plates. Earthquake seismology encompasses many methods to detect compositional and thermal boundaries from Earth's surface to the dynamic mantle driving plate tectonics. This work uses three different seismic methods to probe magma migration and storage and tectonism in two intraplate hotspot provinces: the Galapagos and East Africa. First, seismic body-wave tomography is used to image magma within oceanic crust of the largest Galapagos volcano, Sierra Negra. A laterally large, low-velocity region with many smaller, high-magnitude velocity anomalies is imaged at 8--15.5 km depths. No sharp seismic velocity increase is imaged within the resolvable depths, indicating that the thickened crust is at least 16 km deep. The second study involves a spectral analysis of earthquakes induced by the intrusion of thin sheets of magma rising beneath the Afar rift, East Africa. Earthquakes have varying spectral content, some with unusually large amplitude low-frequency content and enhanced surface waves. The analysis showed no clear boundaries between spectral types, suggesting that they are all primarily the result of brittle failure. Deep dike segments (tops > 3 km) induce only high-frequency volcano-tectonic earthquakes, while shallower dike segments induce the full range of spectral types. This suggests that low-frequency content is a result of shallow hypocenters, with path and site effects, surface ruptures, and dike fluid interactions all possible secondary causes. In the final study, shear-wave splitting analysis of teleseismic body-wave phases is conducted to evaluate strain and crack fabrics at the base of the continental plate as a consequence of magmatism, mantle flow, and plate stretching in the Western rift, East Africa. On average, fast directions are northeast, consistent with geodynamic models of mantle flow from the African

  12. Hydrodynamic properties of the basal aquifer of Santa Cruz Island using seismic refraction, Galapagos - Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loaiza, S.; Fortin, J.; Adelinet, M.; Guéguen, Y.; Violette, S.

    2012-04-01

    Santa Cruz Island is the most inhabited of the Galapagos archipelago, Ecuador. It faces important water resource problems which might lead to a major impact on their unique and pristine ecosystem, Endangered World Heritage list (2007). The scarcity of geological and hydrological data combined with the difficulty of access for field measurements lead to a poor understanding of the island hydrogeology. The Island is formed by series of thick fractured basaltic lava flows dissected by faults. The low-lying, extensive "basal" aquifer is the unique groundwater body identified on the island. This basal aquifer is subjected to sea-water intrusion, which has been mapped from electrical resistivity imaging with an airborne electromagnetic SkyTEM survey (D'Ozouville et al. 2008). In order to better understand the hydrodynamic properties of the basal aquifer, we acquired, in summer 2011, geophysical data based on seismic refraction. The experiment was conducted on three study sites located at different altitudes above the see level (Beagle site altitude +7m , Mirador +20m, and Villacis +393m). The P-wave refraction data were obtained using 24 geophones (1 component) and an acquisition system Daklink III. A hammer was used as an energy source. This source was the most environmentally friendly source that could be obtained and used in the Galapagos Island. Geophone spacing for the spreads was 1.2 or 5 m depending on the site. From our geophysical data, we could identify the different geological layers that constitute this basal aquifer and to estimate the thickness of these layers. We could as well clearly see the water level in the aquifer. More interesting, we found a P-wave velocity of ~1600 m/s in the dry fractured basalt lava flow, and a P-wave velocity of ~2700 m/s in the water saturated fractured basalt lava flow. The same velocity values were obtained in the different sites. This tends to show that the elastic properties of the aquifer are homogeneous and isotropic (at

  13. Surface ocean variability at Galapagos from 1936-1982: Calibration of geochemical tracers in corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Glen T.; Cole, Julia E.; Lea, David W.; Linn, Laura J.; McConnaughey, Ted A.; Fairbanks, Richard G.

    1992-10-01

    A variety of geochemical tracers has been developed in reef corals as a means of reconstructing the natural variability of the tropical surface ocean over wide ranging time frames. The purpose of this paper is to calibrate the performance of five of these tracers in a modern coral colony, over an extended period. A 47-year growth interval (1936-1982) in a colony of Pavona clavus taken from San Cristobal Island, Galapagos Islands, was sectioned into 187 quarterly intervals and analyzed for δ18O, δ13O, Ba/Ca, Cd/Ca, and Mn/Ca. The resulting time series are compared with eastern Pacific sea surface temperatures—one of few instrumental data bases available for calibration over this time period. Linear least squares regressions of four of the tracers (δ18O, δ13O, Ba/Ca, Cd/Ca) against Peruvian SST show highly significant correlations (p<0.0001). Over the annual, biennial, and ENSO (3.8 years) frequency bands, cross-spectral comparisons show even stronger coherency, with SST frequently accounting for 70-80% of the variance in these tracers. These results as well as the phase relationships determined from the spectral analyses suggest that the coupling between SST and δ18O and the nutrientlike tracers Ba and Cd is controlled principally by seasonal upwelling cycles and interannual interruptions of these cycles brought about by El Niño and anti-El Niño phenomena. An inverse relationship between SST and δ13C has its primary origins in the co-occurrence of the warm SST phase with high light levels during the first half of the calendar year. The association with sunlight derives from the photosynthetic response of algal symbionts which results in fractionation of light and heavy carbon isotopes between soft tissues and CaCO3 skeleton. The fifth tracer, the transition metal Mn, exhibits poorer correlations against both SST and the other tracers. Slight shifts in phasing of the historical Mn/Ca annual cycle suggest that the general water column distribution of this

  14. What factors drive prolactin and corticosterone responses to stress in a long-lived bird species (snow petrel Pagodroma nivea)?

    PubMed

    Angelier, Frédéric; Moe, Børge; Blanc, Samuel; Chastel, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Life-history theory predicts that individuals should adapt their parental investment to the costs and benefits of the current reproductive effort. This could be achieved by modulating the hormonal stress response, which may shift energy investment away from reproduction and redirect it toward survival. In birds, this stress response consists of a release of corticosterone that may be accompanied by a decrease in circulating prolactin, a hormone involved in the regulation of parental care. We lack data on the modulation of the prolactin stress response. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that individuals should modulate their prolactin stress response according to the fitness value of the current reproductive effort relative to the fitness value of future reproduction. Specifically, we examined the influence of breeding status (failed breeders vs. incubating birds) and body condition on prolactin and corticosterone stress responses in a long-lived species, the snow petrel Pagodroma nivea. When facing stressors, incubating birds had higher prolactin levels than failed breeders. However, we found no effect of body condition on the prolactin stress response. The corticosterone stress response was modulated according to body condition but was not affected by breeding status. We also performed an experiment using injections of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and found that the modulation of the corticosterone stress response was probably associated with a reduction in ACTH release by the pituitary and a decrease in adrenal sensitivity to ACTH. In addition, we examined whether prolactin and corticosterone secretion were functionally linked. We found that these two hormonal stress responses were not correlated. Moreover, injection of ACTH did not affect prolactin levels, demonstrating that short-term variations in prolactin levels are not governed directly or indirectly by ACTH release. Thus, we suggest that the corticosterone and prolactin responses to short

  15. Generating, Comparing and Exploiting DEMs for Hydrological Applications over the Galapagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ozouville, N.; Benveniste, J.; Deffontaines, B.; Violette, S.; de Marsily, G.; Wegmuller, U.

    Understanding the hydrological cycle of the Galapagos Islands will contribute to more efficient water management in insular basaltic environments with growing anthropogenic pressure and ecosystems to preserve. Lack of essential existing in-situ data such as topography led to retrieving this information from other sources. We present the generation from satellite data of digital elevation model (DEM) and its exploitation for the Santa Cruz island. An interferometric DEM was generated from ASAR (ENVISAT) data with Atlantis EarthView and a radargrammetric DEM using multiple incidence angle capacity of ASAR was generated by Gamma Remote Sensing. SRTM 90 m resolution data (NASA) and a digitalised topographic contour DEM (M. Souris, IRD) were used to aid the phase unwrapping and for comparison and validation. Combining the radargrammetric DEM (overall accurate, few detail) and the interferometric DEM (unresolved in uncoherent areas but high definition in coherent areas), it is hoped to achieve a resolution better than the 90 m SRTM data and which can be compared to the 30 m resolution SRTM data which has been requested from NASA. Drainage networks were extracted and identified on Santa Cruz and zones of interest for the setting up of hydrological instruments are defined. Radargrammetric versus interferometric method of DEM generation in volcanic insular environment is reviewed in this work. Resolution of the DEM will be a limiting factor to the accuracy of transposition from image to fieldwork. Background hydrological information from the DEM can be used in the hydrological modelling.

  16. Cascading effects of fishing on Galapagos rocky reef communities: reanalysis using corrected data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonnenholzner, Jorge I.; Ladah, Lydia B.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2009-01-01

    This article replaces Sonnenholzner et al. (2007; Mar Ecol Prog Ser 343:77–85), which was retracted on September 19, 2007, due to errors in entry of data on sea urchins. We sampled 10 highly fished and 10 (putatively) lightly fished shallow rocky reefs in the southeastern area of the Galapagos Marine Reserve, Ecuador. After the correction, these are the new results: there was a negative association between slate-pencil urchins Eucidaris galapagensis and non-coralline algae. In addition, pencil urchins were less abundant where there were many predators. An indirect positive association between predators and non-coralline algae occurred. Fishing appeared to affect this trophic cascade. The spiny lobster Panulirus penicillatus, the slipper lobster Scyllarides astori, and the Mexican hogfish Bodianus diplotaenia were significantly less abundant at highly fished sites. Urchin density was higher at highly fished sites. Non-coralline algae were nearly absent from highly fished sites, where a continuous carpet of the anemone Aiptasia sp. was recorded, and the algal assemblage was mainly structured by encrusting coralline and articulated calcareous algae.

  17. Galapagos Spreading Center at 86/sup 0/W: A detailed geothermal field study

    SciTech Connect

    Green, K.E.; Von Herzen, R.P.; Williams, D.L.

    1981-02-10

    We report here measurements of the heat flow field of the Galapagos Spreading Center on crust of age less than 1.0 m.y. The 443 measurements in an area of about 570 km/sup 2/ reveal the general planform of the geothermal flux and permit the first truly areal estimate of the near-axis conductive heat flux. The intrusion process and associated hydrothermal circulation dominate the surface heat flow pattern, with circulation apparently continuing beyond the limits of our survey. The areal average of the conductive heat flux is 7.1 +- 0.8 HFU (295 +- 33 mW/m/sup 2/), about one-third the heat flux predicted by plate models. The remaining heat is apparently removed by venting of hydrothermal waters at the spreading axis and through basalt outcrops and hydrothermal mounds off axis. The pattern of surface heat flux is lineated parallel to the axis and the strongly lineated topography. Sharp lateral gradients in the heat flow, greater than 10 HFU/km near escarpments and commonly expressed as high heat flow at the tops of the scarps and lower heat flow in the valleys, may indicate a local concentration of the circulation by surface fault systems and/or variable sediment thickness.

  18. The Galapagos Spreading Centre at 86o W: a detailed geothermal field study.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, K.E.; Von Herzen, R. P.; Williams, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    We report here measurements of the heat flow field of the Galapagos Spreading Center on crust of age less than 1.0 m.y. The 443 measurements in an area of about 570 km2 reveal the general planform of the geothermal flux and permit the first truly areal estimate of the near-axis conductive heat flux. The intrusion process and associated hydrothermal circulation dominate the surface heat flow pattern, with circulation apparently continuing beyong the limits of our survey. The areal average of the conductive heat flux is 7.1+-0.8 HFU (295+-33 m W/m2), about one-third the heat flux predicted by plate models. The remaining heat is apparently removed by venting of hydrothermal waters at the spreading axis and through basalt outcrops and hydrothermal mounds off axis. The pattern of surface heat flux is lineated parallel to the axis and the strongly lineated topography. Sharp lateral gradients in the heat flow, greater than 10 HFU/km near escarpments and commonly expressed as high heat flow at the tops of the scarps and lower heat flow in the valleys, may indicate a local concentration of the circulation by surface fault systems and/or variable sediment thickness. -Authors

  19. Oxygen and carbon isotope disequilibria in Galapagos corals: isotopic thermometry and calcification physiology

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Biological carbonate skeletons are built largely from carbon dioxide, which reacts to form carbonate ion within thin extracellular solutions. The light isotopes of carbon and oxygen react faster than the heavy isotopes, depleting the resulting carbonate ions in /sup 13/C and /sup 18/O. Calcium carbonate precipitation occurs sufficiently fast that the skeleton remains out of isotopic equilibrium with surrounding fluids. This explanation for isotopic disequilibrium in biological carbonates was partially simulated in vitro, producing results similar to those seen in non-photosynthetic corals. Photosynthetic corals have higher /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratios due to the preferential removal of /sup 12/C (as organic carbon) from the reservoir of dissolved inorganic carbon. The oxygen isotopic variations in corals can be used to reconstruct past sea surface temperatures to an accuracy of about 0.5/sup 0/C. The carbon isotopic content of photosynthetic corals provides an indication of cloudiness. Using isotopic data from Galapagos corals, it was possible to construct proxy histories of the El Nino phenomenon. The physiology of skeletogenesis appears to be surprisingly similar in calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, and silica precipitating systems.

  20. Ecosystem implications of conserving endemic versus eradicating introduced large herbivores in the Galapagos Archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bastille-Rousseau, Guillaume; Gibbs, James P.; Campbell, Karl; Yackulic, Charles B.; Blake, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Restoration of damaged ecosystems through invasive species removal and native species conservation is an increasingly common practice in biodiversity conservation. Estimating the degree of ecosystem response attributable specifically to eradication of exotic herbivores versus restoration of native herbivores is often difficult and is complicated by concurrent temporal changes in other factors, especially climate. We investigated the interactive impacts of native mega-herbivores (giant tortoises) and the eradication of large alien herbivores (goats) on vegetation productivity across the Galapagos Archipelago. We examined archipelago-wide patterns of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) as a proxy for vegetation productivity between 2001 and 2015 and evaluated how goat and historical and current tortoise occurrence influenced productivity. We used a breakpoint analysis to detect change in trends in productivity from five targeted areas following goat eradication. We found a positive association between tortoise occurrence and vegetation productivity and a negative association with goat occurrence. We also documented an increase in plant productivity following goat removal with recovery higher in moister regions than in arid region, potentially indicating an alternate stable state has been created in the latter. Climate variation also contributed to the detected improvement in productivity following goat eradication, sometimes obscuring the effect of eradication but more usually magnifying it by up to 300%. Our work offers perspectives regarding the effectiveness and outcomes of eradicating introduced herbivores and re-introducing native herbivores, and the merits of staging them simultaneously in order to restore critical ecosystem processes such as vegetation productivity.

  1. Physiological and ecological consequences of sleeping-site selection by the Galapagos land iguana (Conolophus pallidus)

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, K.A.; Tracy, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    Field observations and biophysical models were combined to analyze sleeping-site selection by Galapagos land iguanas (Conolophus pallidus). Iguanas slept in different kinds of sleeping sites during different seasons. In the coolest season (garua), adult land iguanas were found in sleeping sites that were warmer than the coolest sites available. This may be because the garua season (cool, overcast, and foggy) is a time when environmental conditions mitigate against rapid warm-up in the mornings, so lizards may regulate nighttime body temperatures so that it is easier to warm up to preferred daytime body temperatures. In the warmest season, adult iguanas were found in the coolest sleeping sites available. This observation is consistent with hypotheses of voluntary hypothermia, which can be advantageous in energy conservation and in avoiding detrimental effects associated with maintenance of constant body temperatures throughout the day and night. Juvenile iguanas were found sleeping in rock crevices regardless of the ambient thermal environments. Such sites are likely to be important as refugia for this life stage, which, unlike the adult stage, is vulnerable to predation. It was concluded that selection of sleeping sites is a process that may help in avoidance of predation, optimization of body temperature at the end of the sleeping period, and reduction of metabolic costs during sleeping. The importance of some of these factors may change with the thermal milieu (e.g., season).

  2. Three dimensional image of Isla Isabela in the western Galapagos Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a three-dimensional image of Isla Isabela in the western Galapagos Islands off the western coast of Ecuador, South America. The view was constructed by overlaying a Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar image on a TOPSAR digital elevation map. The vertical scale in this image is exaggerated by a factor of 1.87. The SIR-C/X-SAR image was taken on the 40th orbit of the shuttle Endeavour. The image is centered at about .5 degrees south latitude and 91 degrees West longitude and covers an area of 75 km by 60 km. The radar incidence angle at the center of the image is about 20 degrees. This SIR-C/X-SAR image of Alcedo and Sierra Negra volcanoes shows the rougher lava flowas as bright features, while ash deposits and smooth Pahoehoe lava flows appear dark. A small portion of Isla Fernandina is visible in the extreme upper left corner of the image. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory alternative photo number is P-43913.

  3. An outbreak of Brainerd diarrhea among travelers to the Galapagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Mintz, E D; Weber, J T; Guris, D; Puhr, N; Wells, J G; Yashuk, J C; Curtis, M; Tauxe, R V

    1998-04-01

    In 1992, an outbreak of chronic diarrhea occurred among passengers on a cruise ship visiting the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador. Passengers (548) were surveyed, and stool and biopsy specimens from a sample who reported chronic diarrhea were examined. On completed questionnaires, returned by 394 passengers (72%), 58 (15%) reported having chronic diarrhea associated with urgency (84%), weight loss (77%), fatigue (71%), and fecal incontinence (62%). Illness began 11 days (median) after boarding the ship and lasted 7 to >42 months. Macroscopic and histologic abnormalities of the colon were common, but extensive laboratory examination revealed no etiologic agent. No one responded to antimicrobial therapy. Patients were more likely than well passengers to have drunk the ship's unbottled water or ice before onset of illness and to have eaten raw sliced fruits and vegetables washed in unbottled water. Water handling and chlorination on the ship were deficient. Outbreaks of a similar illness, Brainerd diarrhea, have been reported in the United States. Although its etiology remains unknown, Brainerd diarrhea may also occur among travelers.

  4. Chemical and biological interactions in the Rose Garden hydrothermal vent field, Galapagos spreading center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kenneth S.; Childress, James J.; Hessler, Robert R.; Sakamoto-Arnold, Carole M.; Beehler, Carl L.

    1988-10-01

    The concentrations of a suite of redox reactive chemicals were measured in the Rose Garden hydrothermal vent field of the Galapagos spreading center. Sulfide, silicate, oxygen and temperature distributions were measured in situ with a submersible chemical analyser. In addition, 15 chemical species were measured in discrete samples. Variability in the slope of the temperature-silicate plots indicates that heat is lost from these relatively low temperatures (<15°C) solutions by conduction to the solid phase. Consumption of oxygen, sulfide and nitrate from the hydrothermal solution as it flows past the vent animals is apparent from the distributions measured in situ and in the discrete samples. The fraction of sulfide and nitrate removed from the solution by consumption appears to have increased between 1979-1985. Sulfide and oxygen appear to be consumed under different conditions: sulfide is removed primarily from the warmest solutions, and oxygen is consumed only from the cold seawater. This separation may be driven primarily by the increased gradients of each chemical under these conditions. There is no evidence for the consumption of significant amounts of manganese(II) by the vent organisms. The analysis of other data sets from this vent field indicate no significant consumption of methane by the vent organisms, as well.

  5. Water quality at points-of-use in the Galapagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Gerhard, William A; Choi, Wan Suk; Houck, Kelly M; Stewart, Jill R

    2017-04-01

    Piped drinking water is often considered a gold standard for protecting public health but research is needed to explicitly evaluate the effect of centralized treatment systems on water quality in developing world settings. This study examined the effect of a new drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) on microbial drinking water quality at the point-of-use on San Cristobal Island, Galapagos using fecal indicator bacteria total coliforms and Escherichia coli. Samples were collected during six collection periods before and after operation of the DWTP began from the freshwater sources (n=4), the finished water (n=6), and 50 sites throughout the distribution system (n=287). This study found that there was a significant decrease in contamination by total coliforms (two orders of magnitude) and E. coli (one order of magnitude) after DWTP operation began (p<0.001). However, during at least one post-construction collection cycle, total coliforms and E. coli were still found at 66% and 28% of points-of-use (n=50), respectively. During the final collection period, conventional methods were augmented with human-specific Bacteroides assays - validated herein - with the goal of elucidating possible microbial contamination sources. Results show that E. coli contamination was not predictive of contamination by human wastes and suggests that observed indicator bacteria contamination may have environmental origins. Together these findings highlight the necessity of a holistic approach to drinking water infrastructure improvements in order to deliver high quality water through to the point-of-use.

  6. Hotspots within hotspots? Hammerhead shark movements around Wolf Island, Galapagos Marine Reserve.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Alex; Ketchum, James; Klimley, A Peter; Espinoza, Eduardo; Peñaherrera, Cesar

    2010-01-01

    Are pelagic species such as sharks and tuna distributed homogenously or heterogeneously in the oceans? Large assemblages of these species have been observed at seamounts and offshore islands in the eastern tropical Pacific, which are considered hotspots of pelagic biodiversity. Is the species distribution uniform at these hotspots or do species aggregate at a finer spatial scale at these sites? We employed three techniques to demonstrate that the aggregations of scalloped hammerhead sharks, Sphyrna lewini, and other pelagic species were confined to the southeastern corner of Wolf Island in the Galapagos Marine Reserve. Coded ultrasonic transmitters were placed on individuals at this site and at another aggregation site at Darwin Island, separated from Wolf by 40 km, and they were detected by monitors moored at the southeastern corner of Wolf Island and rarely by monitors deployed at other sites around the island. Hammerhead sharks, carrying depth-sensing continual transmitters, were tracked for two-day periods in a vessel and shown to reside a disproportionately large fraction of their time at the southeastern corner. Visual censuses were carried out seasonally at the eight monitor sites at Wolf Island, recording the abundance of one species of tuna, four species of jacks, and a number of other species. The highest diversity and abundance of these species occurred in the southeastern corner of the island. Our results support the use of hammerhead sharks as indicator and umbrella species for pelagic hotspots on a fine scale.

  7. Fine scale bio-physical oceanographic characteristics predict the foraging occurrence of contrasting seabird species; Gannet (Morus bassanus) and storm petrel (Hydrobates pelagicus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, B. E.; Webb, A.; Palmer, M. R.; Embling, C. B.; Sharples, J.

    2013-10-01

    As we begin to manage our oceans in much more spatial detail we must understand a great deal more about oceanographic habitat preferences of marine mobile top predators. In this unique field study we test a hypothesis on the mechanisms defining mobile predator foraging habitat characteristics by comparing temporally and spatially detailed bio-physical oceanographic data from contrasting topographical locations. We contrast the foraging locations of two very different seabird species, gannets and storm petrels, by repeatedly sampling a bank and a nearby flat area over daily tidal cycles during spring and neap tides. The results suggest that storm petrels are linked to foraging in specific locations where internal waves are produced, which is mainly on banks. These locations can also include the presence of high biomass of chlorophyll. In contrast, the location where more gannets are foraging is significantly influenced by temporal variables with higher densities of foraging birds much more likely during the neap tide than times of spring tide. The foraging times of both species was influenced by differences between the vertical layers of the water column above and below the thermocline; via either vertical shear of horizontal currents or absolute differences in speed between layers. Higher densities of foraging gannets were significantly more likely to be found at ebb tides in both bank and flat regions however over the bank, the density of foraging gannets was higher when the differences in speed between the layers were at a maximum. Both gannets and storm petrels appear to be more likely to forage when wind direction is opposed to tidal direction. This detailed understanding links foraging behaviour to predictable spatial and temporal bio-physical vertical characteristics and thus can be immediately used to explain variance and increase certainty in past abundance and distributional surveys. These results also illuminate the types of variables that should be

  8. High annual variability in reproductive success and survival of an Antarctic seabird, the snow petrel Pagodroma nivea : A 27-year study.

    PubMed

    Chastel, O; Weimerskirch, H; Jouventin, P

    1993-05-01

    Demographic parameters were estimated for snow petrels Pagodroma nivea nesting at Pointe Géologie Archipelago, Adélie Land, Antarctica between 1963 and 1990; 21 years of data on adult survival and 27 years of data on breeding success are available. The average age of first return and first breeding were 8.1 and 9.9 years respectively and there was no signifcant difference between the sexes. The overall breeding success averaged 51.3% and was very variable between years (21-80%). Breeding failure was mostly due to incubation failure and annual breeding success was negatively correlated with average snow falls in October-November and October-March. Breeding frequency was very low, averaging 52% of seasons during a reproductive lifetime. Good quality sites, with high occupancy rate and high breeding success were few in the study plots. Poor years in 1966-1967, 1976-1977 and 1983-1984, with low breeding success, very low proportions of nets with breeding attempts and high numbers of non-breeders, occurred 1 year after large-scale El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events. Snow petrels exhibited very low philopatry. Only 45 birds have been recovered in the study plots from a total of 1115 banded fledglings giving an estimated rate of return of 12.9% between fledging and 3 years old. Annual survival between 3 and 10 years was 91.4%. Annual adult survival (93.4%), though variable, was low during poor years of 1977-1978 and 1983-1984. Adult survival of males (94.7%) was not significantly different from that of females (93.9%). Over the study period, the population of Pointe Géologie was stable. Using the estimated parameters, a Leslie model gave a growth rate of 0.948%, which was probably compensated by immigration (5.7% per year). Restricted numbers of good-quality sites at the place of birth could have led young birds to prospect other colonies and could have selected low philopatry. High adult survival, strong site tenacity and capacity to spread breeding over a

  9. Formation of curved seafloor fabric by changes in rift propagation velocity and spreading rate - Application to the 95.5 deg W Galapagos propagator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, Gary; Stein, Seth; Engeln, Joseph F.

    1988-01-01

    Possible rigid plate models and shear models for the formation of curved seafloor lineaments by rift propagation are investigated and are applied to the Galapagos propagation rift system at 95 deg W. It is shown that the geometry noted at the Galapagos can result from either rift propagation acceleration or a spreading rate decrease during the last few hundred thousand years. It is postulated that the reverse curvature could result from either deceleration of rift propagation or an increase in spreading rate. The data interpreted as requiring a shear zone are found to be equally consistent with two distinct models based on rigid plate tectonics.

  10. C-O-H ratios of silicate melt inclusions in basalts from the Galapagos Spreading Center near 95 deg W - A laser decrepitation mass spectrometry study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yonover, Robert N.; Sinton, John M.; Gibson, Everett K.; Sommer, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    Ratios of C, O, and H dissolved in silicate glass inclusions and pillow rind glasses in samples from the Galapagos Spreading Center near 95 deg W were analyzed (using laser volatilization and mass spectrometry), and the data were assessed in terms of mantle source compositions, oxygen fugacity, kinetic fractionation, and magmatic degassing. It was found that glass inclusions in the Galapagos failing rift lavas are higher and more variable in CO2/H2O (about 0.641) relative to inclusions in propagating rift lavas (about 0.245). This difference is considered to reflect different degrees of degassing during contrasting magmatic histories of the two regions.

  11. Formation of curved seafloor fabric by changes in rift propagation velocity and spreading rate - Application to the 95.5 deg W Galapagos propagator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, Gary; Stein, Seth; Engeln, Joseph F.

    1988-01-01

    Possible rigid plate models and shear models for the formation of curved seafloor lineaments by rift propagation are investigated and are applied to the Galapagos propagation rift system at 95 deg W. It is shown that the geometry noted at the Galapagos can result from either rift propagation acceleration or a spreading rate decrease during the last few hundred thousand years. It is postulated that the reverse curvature could result from either deceleration of rift propagation or an increase in spreading rate. The data interpreted as requiring a shear zone are found to be equally consistent with two distinct models based on rigid plate tectonics.

  12. Improved estimates of age, growth and reproduction for the regionally endemic Galapagos sailfin grouper Mycteroperca olfax (Jenyns, 1840)

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Alan M.; DeMartini, Edward E.; Schuhbauer, Anna; Schemmel, Eva; Salinas de Léon, Pelayo

    2015-01-01

    The Galapagos Sailfin grouper, Mycteroperca olfax, locally known as bacalao and listed as vulnerable by the IUCN, is culturally, economically, and ecologically important to the Galapagos archipelago and its people. It is regionally endemic to the Eastern Tropical Pacific, and, while an important fishery resource that has shown substantial declines in recent years, to date no effective management regulations are in place to ensure the sustainability of the Galapagos fishery for this species. Previous estimates of longevity and size at maturity for bacalao are inconsistent with estimates for congeners, which brings into question the accuracy of prior estimates. We set out to assess the age, growth, and reproductive biology of bacalao in order to provide more accurate life history information to inform more effective fisheries management for this species. The oldest fish in our sample was 21 years old, which is 2–3 times greater than previously reported estimates of longevity. Parameter estimates for the von Bertalanffy growth function (k = 0.11, L∞ = 110 cm TL, and to = − 1.7 years) show bacalao to grow much slower and attain substantially larger asymptotic maximum length than previous studies. Mean size at maturity (as female) was estimated at 65.3 cm TL, corresponding to a mean age of 6.5 years. We found that sex ratios were extremely female biased (0.009 M:1F), with a large majority of the individuals in our experimental catch being immature (79%). Our results show that bacalao grow slower, live longer, and mature at a much larger size and greater age than previously thought, with very few mature males in the population. These findings have important implications for the fishery of this valuable species and provide the impetus for a long-overdue species management plan to ensure its long-term sustainability. PMID:26401463

  13. Stable Isotopes Reveal Long-Term Fidelity to Foraging Grounds in the Galapagos Sea Lion (Zalophus wollebaeki).

    PubMed

    Drago, Massimiliano; Franco-Trecu, Valentina; Cardona, Luis; Inchausti, Pablo; Tapia, Washington; Páez-Rosas, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Most otariids have colony-specific foraging areas during the breeding season, when they behave as central place foragers. However, they may disperse over broad areas after the breeding season and individuals from different colonies may share foraging grounds at that time. Here, stable isotope ratios in the skull bone of adult Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) were used to assess the long-term fidelity of both sexes to foraging grounds across the different regions of the Galapagos archipelago. Results indicated that the stable isotope ratios (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) of sea lion bone significantly differed among regions of the archipelago, without any significant difference between sexes and with a non significant interaction between sex and region. Moreover, standard ellipses, estimated by Bayesian inference and used as a measure of the isotopic resource use area at the population level, overlapped widely for the sea lions from the southern and central regions, whereas the overlap of the ellipses for sea lions from the central and western regions was small and non-existing for those from the western and southern regions. These results suggest that males and females from the same region within the archipelago use similar foraging grounds and have similar diets. Furthermore, they indicate that the exchange of adults between regions is limited, thus revealing a certain degree of foraging philopatry at a regional scale within the archipelago. The constraints imposed on males by an expanded reproductive season (~ 6 months), resulting from the weak reproductive synchrony among females, and those imposed on females by a very long lactation period (at least one year but up to three years), may explain the limited mobility of adult Galapagos sea lions of both sexes across the archipelago.

  14. Stable Isotopes Reveal Long-Term Fidelity to Foraging Grounds in the Galapagos Sea Lion (Zalophus wollebaeki)

    PubMed Central

    Drago, Massimiliano; Franco-Trecu, Valentina; Cardona, Luis; Inchausti, Pablo; Tapia, Washington; Páez-Rosas, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Most otariids have colony-specific foraging areas during the breeding season, when they behave as central place foragers. However, they may disperse over broad areas after the breeding season and individuals from different colonies may share foraging grounds at that time. Here, stable isotope ratios in the skull bone of adult Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) were used to assess the long-term fidelity of both sexes to foraging grounds across the different regions of the Galapagos archipelago. Results indicated that the stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) of sea lion bone significantly differed among regions of the archipelago, without any significant difference between sexes and with a non significant interaction between sex and region. Moreover, standard ellipses, estimated by Bayesian inference and used as a measure of the isotopic resource use area at the population level, overlapped widely for the sea lions from the southern and central regions, whereas the overlap of the ellipses for sea lions from the central and western regions was small and non-existing for those from the western and southern regions. These results suggest that males and females from the same region within the archipelago use similar foraging grounds and have similar diets. Furthermore, they indicate that the exchange of adults between regions is limited, thus revealing a certain degree of foraging philopatry at a regional scale within the archipelago. The constraints imposed on males by an expanded reproductive season (~ 6 months), resulting from the weak reproductive synchrony among females, and those imposed on females by a very long lactation period (at least one year but up to three years), may explain the limited mobility of adult Galapagos sea lions of both sexes across the archipelago. PMID:26808381

  15. Improved estimates of age, growth and reproduction for the regionally endemic Galapagos sailfin grouper Mycteroperca olfax (Jenyns, 1840).

    PubMed

    Usseglio, Paolo; Friedlander, Alan M; DeMartini, Edward E; Schuhbauer, Anna; Schemmel, Eva; Salinas de Léon, Pelayo

    2015-01-01

    The Galapagos Sailfin grouper, Mycteroperca olfax, locally known as bacalao and listed as vulnerable by the IUCN, is culturally, economically, and ecologically important to the Galapagos archipelago and its people. It is regionally endemic to the Eastern Tropical Pacific, and, while an important fishery resource that has shown substantial declines in recent years, to date no effective management regulations are in place to ensure the sustainability of the Galapagos fishery for this species. Previous estimates of longevity and size at maturity for bacalao are inconsistent with estimates for congeners, which brings into question the accuracy of prior estimates. We set out to assess the age, growth, and reproductive biology of bacalao in order to provide more accurate life history information to inform more effective fisheries management for this species. The oldest fish in our sample was 21 years old, which is 2-3 times greater than previously reported estimates of longevity. Parameter estimates for the von Bertalanffy growth function (k = 0.11, L ∞ = 110 cm TL, and to = - 1.7 years) show bacalao to grow much slower and attain substantially larger asymptotic maximum length than previous studies. Mean size at maturity (as female) was estimated at 65.3 cm TL, corresponding to a mean age of 6.5 years. We found that sex ratios were extremely female biased (0.009 M:1F), with a large majority of the individuals in our experimental catch being immature (79%). Our results show that bacalao grow slower, live longer, and mature at a much larger size and greater age than previously thought, with very few mature males in the population. These findings have important implications for the fishery of this valuable species and provide the impetus for a long-overdue species management plan to ensure its long-term sustainability.

  16. Fowl play and the price of petrel: long-living Procellariiformes have peroxidation-resistant membrane composition compared with short-living Galliformes.

    PubMed

    Buttemer, William A; Battam, Harry; Hulbert, A J

    2008-08-23

    The membrane pacemaker hypothesis predicts that long-living species will have more peroxidation-resistant membrane lipids than shorter living species. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the fatty acid composition of heart phospholipids from long-living Procellariiformes (petrels and albatrosses) to those of shorter living Galliformes (fowl). The seabirds were obtained from by-catch of commercial fishing operations and the fowl values from published data. The 3.8-fold greater predicted longevity of the seabirds was associated with elevated content of peroxidation-resistant monounsaturates and reduced content of peroxidation-prone polyunsaturates and, consequently, a significantly reduced peroxidation index in heart membrane lipids, compared with fowl. Peroxidation-resistant membrane composition may be an important physiological trait for longevous species.

  17. Isolation and characterization of 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the endangered Galapagos-endemic whitespotted sandbass (Paralabrax albomaculatus).

    PubMed

    Bertolotti, Alicia C; Griffiths, Sarah M; Truelove, Nathan K; Box, Stephen J; Preziosi, Richard F; Salinas de Leon, Pelayo

    2015-01-01

    The white-spotted sandbass (Paralabrax albomaculatus) is a commercially important species in the Galapagos Marine Reserve, but is classified as endangered in the IUCN Red List. For this study, 10 microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized using Illumina paired-end sequencing. These loci can be used for genetic studies of population structure and connectivity to aid in the management of the white-spotted sandbass and other closely-related species. The 10 characterized loci were polymorphic, with 11-49 alleles per locus, and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.575 to 0.964. This set of markers is the first to be developed for this species.

  18. Groundmass Crystallization of A'a and Pahoehoe flows of Cerro Azul, Galapagos and Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teasdale, R.; Geist, D.; Wanless, D.; Cashman, K.

    2001-12-01

    Crystallinities of 1998 lavas from Cerro Azul, Galapagos are distinguished from 1843 Mauna Loa, Hawaii lavas by higher modal proportions of groundmass plagioclase crystals. In both cases, a'a lava was erupted first, followed by emplacement of pahoehoe flows. The 1843 Mauna Loa eruption lasted 90 days and produced both a'a and inflated pahoehoe flows (1). The 1998 Galapagos flows were emplaced over the course of 37 days, and the transition from a'a to pahoehoe flow morphology corresponds with decreased eruption rate during the last week of the eruption. Samples were collected along the length of flows from both volcanoes. Modal groundmass plagioclase increases down-flow for each flow type from each volcano. A'a and pahoehoe flows of Cerro Azul consistently have higher crystallinities (41% and 14%) than equivalent flow types at Mauna Loa (29% and 7%). Whereas Cerro Azul groundmass crystals are exclusively plagioclase, the groundmass of Mauna Loa lavas consists of plagioclase and pyroxene crystals, similar to Kilauea lavas. Proportions of plagioclase crystals and flow morphologies are consistent with predictions that groundmass crystal morphology plays a significant role in the development of crystal networks and yield strength, which instigates the development of a'a flow morphology (2, 3). Galapagos volcanoes tend to have more a'a than their Hawaiian counterparts Mauna Loa and Kilauea. Volcano slopes do not appear to control the proportion of each flow type (4); rather, abundance of groundmass plagioclase appears to be the distinguishing factor. An important distinction between the two systems is that Galapagos lavas have consistently higher Al2O3 content than Hawaiian volcanoes. High Al203 results in a comparatively high abundance of groundmass plagioclase, and may partly explain the prevalence of a'a. We note that while the relative abundance of a'a and pahoehoe flow morphologies on other volcanoes is rarely quantified, Mount Etna is also distinguished by abundant

  19. First record of a spawning aggregation for the tropical eastern Pacific endemic grouper Mycteroperca olfax in the Galapagos Marine Reserve.

    PubMed

    Salinas-de-León, P; Rastoin, E; Acuña-Marrero, D

    2015-07-01

    This study provides direct and indirect evidence of temporally and spatially consistent spawning aggregations for the grouper Mycteroperca olfax. Recently reported declines in population numbers, probably related to the direct targeting of aggregations by artisanal fishermen, highlight the urgent need for species-specific management actions in the Galapagos Marine Reserve, such as minimum and maximum landing sizes, and the importance of protecting key aggregation sites with the declaration of no-take areas and the establishment of total fishing bans during the reproductive season.

  20. Pockmark development in the Petrel Sub-basin, Timor Sea, Northern Australia: Seabed habitat mapping in support of CO2 storage assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, W. A.; Nichol, S. L.; Howard, F. J. F.; Picard, K.; Dulfer, H.; Radke, L. C.; Carroll, A. G.; Tran, M.; Siwabessy, P. J. W.

    2014-07-01

    The extent to which fluids may leak from sedimentary basins to the seabed is a critical issue for assessing the potential of a basin for carbon capture and storage. The Petrel Sub-basin, located beneath central and eastern Joseph Bonaparte Gulf in tropical northern Australia, was identified as potentially suitable for the geological storage of CO2 because of its geological characteristics and proximity to offshore gas and petroleum resources. In May 2012, a multidisciplinary marine survey (SOL5463) was undertaken to collect data in two targeted areas of the Petrel Sub-basin to facilitate an assessment of its CO2 storage potential. This paper focuses on Area 1 of that survey, a 471 km2 area of sediment-starved shelf (water depths of 78 to 102 m), characterised by low-gradient plains, low-lying ridges, palaeo-channels and shallow pockmarks. Three pockmark types are recognised: small shallow unit pockmarks 10-20 m in diameter (generally <1 m, rarely to 2 m deep), composite pockmarks of 150-300 m diameter formed from the co-location of several cross-cutting pockmarks forming a broad shallow depression (<1 m deep), and pockmark clusters comprised of shallow unit pockmarks co-located side by side (150-300 m width overall, <1 m deep). Pockmark distribution is non-random, focused within and adjacent to palaeo-channels, with pockmark clusters also located adjacent to ridges. Pockmark formation is constrained by AMS 14C dating of in situ mangrove deposits and shells to have begun after 15.5 cal ka BP when a rapid marine transgression of Bonaparte Shelf associated with meltwater pulse 1A drowned coastal mangrove environments. Pockmark development is likely an ongoing process driven by fluid seepage at the seabed, and sourced from CO2 produced in the shallow sub-surface (<2 m) sediment. No evidence for direct connection to deeper features was observed.

  1. Pet-Related Infections.

    PubMed

    Day, Michael J

    2016-11-15

    Physicians and veterinarians have many opportunities to partner in promoting the well-being of people and their pets, especially by addressing zoonotic diseases that may be transmitted between a pet and a human family member. Common cutaneous pet-acquired zoonoses are dermatophytosis (ringworm) and sarcoptic mange (scabies), which are both readily treated. Toxoplasmosis can be acquired from exposure to cat feces, but appropriate hygienic measures can minimize the risk to pregnant women. Persons who work with animals are at increased risk of acquiring bartonellosis (e.g., cat-scratch disease); control of cat fleas is essential to minimize the risk of these infections. People and their pets share a range of tick-borne diseases, and exposure risk can be minimized with use of tick repellent, prompt tick removal, and appropriate tick control measures for pets. Pets such as reptiles, amphibians, and backyard poultry pose a risk of transmitting Salmonella species and are becoming more popular. Personal hygiene after interacting with these pets is crucial to prevent Salmonella infections. Leptospirosis is more often acquired from wildlife than infected dogs, but at-risk dogs can be protected with vaccination. The clinical history in the primary care office should routinely include questions about pets and occupational or other exposure to pet animals. Control and prevention of zoonoses are best achieved by enhancing communication between physicians and veterinarians to ensure patients know the risks of and how to prevent zoonoses in themselves, their pets, and other people.

  2. ALVIN investigation of an active propagating rift system, Galapagos 95.5° W

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hey, R.N.; Sinton, J.M.; Kleinrock, M.C.; Yonover, R.N.; MacDonald, K.C.; Miller, S.P.; Searle, R.C.; Christie, D.M.; Atwater, T.M.; Sleep, Norman H.; Johnson, H. Paul; Neal, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    ALVIN investigations have defined the fine-scale structural and volcanic patterns produced by active rift and spreading center propagation and failure near 95.5° W on the Galapagos spreading center. Behind the initial lithospheric rifting, which is propagating nearly due west at about 50 km m.y.−1, a triangular block of preexisting lithosphere is being stretched and fractured, with some recent volcanism along curving fissures. A well-organized seafloor spreading center, an extensively faulted and fissured volcanic ridge, develops ~ 10 km (~ 200,000 years) behind the tectonic rift tip. Regional variations in the chemical compositions of the youngest lavas collected during this program contrast with those encompassing the entire 3 m.y. of propagation history for this region. A maximum in degree of magmatic differentiation occurs about 9 km behind the propagating rift tip, in a region of diffuse rifting. The propagating spreading center shows a gentle gradient in magmatic differentiation culminating at the SW-curving spreading center tip. Except for the doomed rift, which is in a constructional phase, tectonic activity also dominates over volcanic activity along the failing spreading system. In contrast to the propagating rift, failing rift lavas show a highly restricted range of compositions consistent with derivation from a declining upwelling zone accompanying rift failure. The lithosphere transferred from the Cocos to the Nazca plate by this propagator is extensively faulted and characterized by ubiquitous talus in one of the most tectonically disrupted areas of seafloor known. The pseudofault scarps, where the preexisting lithosphere was rifted apart, appear to include both normal and propagator lavas and are thus more lithologically complex than previously thought. Biological communities, probably vestimentiferan tubeworms, occur near the top of the outer pseudofault scarp, although no hydrothermal venting was observed.

  3. Seasonal shifts in body temperature and use of microhabitats by Galapagos land iguanas (Conolophus pallidus)

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, K.; Tracy, C.R.; Porter, W.P.

    1983-06-01

    Seasonal differences in the body temperatures (T/sub b/) of free-ranging Galapagos land iguanas (Conolophus pallidus) were detected by temperature sensitive telemetry transmitters. Midday T/sub b/'s of iguanas average 4.4/sup 0/C lower in the Garua (cool) season than in the Hot season. Measured T/sub b/'s and those predicted from biophysical models permitted the following conclusions: (1) lower T/sub b/'s during the Garua season represent an active shift in thermoregulation by the iguanas rather than a passive result of a cooler season; (2) the average midday T/sub b/ selected by the iguanas in either season is the T/sub b/ that allows maintenance of a constant T/sub b/ for the longest possible portion of the day; (3) by exploiting the warmer microclimate created by a cliff face, the iguanas are able to maintain a constant T/sub b/ for a full hour longer than they could elsewhere in their home range. Census data demonstrated that the iguanas exploited the warmer microclimate created by the cliff extensively during the Garua season, and the cliff face was visited by the iguanas relatively infrequently during the Hot season. Thus, the exploitation of the microclimate created by the cliff results in seasonal differences in the pattern of space utilization within the home ranges of the iguanas. Within the Garua season the iguanas moved away from the cliff more often on sunny days than during cloudy days. It is concluded that the physical environment is an important determinant of patterns of space utilization both within and between seasons.

  4. Is preference a predictor of enrichment efficacy in Galapagos tortoises (Chelonoidis nigra)?

    PubMed

    Mehrkam, Lindsay R; Dorey, Nicole R

    2014-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that environmental enrichment plays an important role in promoting the welfare of captive animals. However, a topic of debate is whether an animal's preference for an enrichment strategy is any indicator of its efficacy. In addition, relatively few studies have evaluated environmental enrichment strategies for non-mammalian species. In the present study, we compared the results of an observational evaluation of enrichment efficacy with the results of a paired-stimulus preference assessment for three Galapagos tortoises. In the observational study, object enrichment (boomer balls and a free-flowing sprinkler) and keeper interactions (shell scrubbing and neck rubbing) were evaluated systematically for their effects on locomotion, species-typical behavior, aggressive and non-aggressive conspecific interactions, and enclosure. Preference assessments were subsequently conducted in which subjects could choose the enrichment strategy to be implemented. All subjects preferred keeper interactions consistently over object enrichment. Our results suggest that enrichment preference was a variable predictor of efficacy across enrichment species-typical behavior, activity levels, enclosure use, and aggressive and non-aggressive conspecific interactions strategies. Preference predicted efficacy for promoting species-typical behavior (1/3 subjects), activity levels (2/3 subjects), and enclosure use (2/3 subjects), but not conspecific interactions (0/3 subjects). The results suggest that preference may be an efficient predictor of enrichment efficacy when daily observational evaluations are not practical; however, the predictive utility of preference assessments may depend on the behavioral goal of the enrichment strategy. We discuss the need for future research examining the relationship between preference and enrichment efficacy-as well as other potential indicators of enrichment effectiveness-in captive animals.

  5. Residency and movement patterns of an apex predatory shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) at the Galapagos Marine Reserve.

    PubMed

    Acuña-Marrero, David; Smith, Adam N H; Hammerschlag, Neil; Hearn, Alex; Anderson, Marti J; Calich, Hannah; Pawley, Matthew D M; Fischer, Chris; Salinas-de-León, Pelayo

    2017-01-01

    The potential effectiveness of marine protected areas (MPAs) as a conservation tool for large sharks has been questioned due to the limited spatial extent of most MPAs in contrast to the complex life history and high mobility of many sharks. Here we evaluated the movement dynamics of a highly migratory apex predatory shark (tiger shark Galeocerdo cuvier) at the Galapagos Marine Reserve (GMR). Using data from satellite tracking passive acoustic telemetry, and stereo baited remote underwater video, we estimated residency, activity spaces, site fidelity, distributional abundances and migration patterns from the GMR and in relation to nesting beaches of green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas), a seasonally abundant and predictable prey source for large tiger sharks. Tiger sharks exhibited a high degree of philopatry, with 93% of the total satellite-tracked time across all individuals occurring within the GMR. Large sharks (> 200 cm TL) concentrated their movements in front of the two most important green sea turtle-nesting beaches in the GMR, visiting them on a daily basis during nocturnal hours. In contrast, small sharks (< 200 cm TL) rarely visited turtle-nesting areas and displayed diurnal presence at a third location where only immature sharks were found. Small and some large individuals remained in the three study areas even outside of the turtle-nesting season. Only two sharks were satellite-tracked outside of the GMR, and following long-distance migrations, both individuals returned to turtle-nesting beaches at the subsequent turtle-nesting season. The spatial patterns of residency and site fidelity of tiger sharks suggest that the presence of a predictable source of prey and suitable habitats might reduce the spatial extent of this large shark that is highly migratory in other parts of its range. This highly philopatric behaviour enhances the potential effectiveness of the GMR for their protection.

  6. Demographic Outcomes and Ecosystem Implications of Giant Tortoise Reintroduction to Española Island, Galapagos

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, James P.; Hunter, Elizabeth A.; Shoemaker, Kevin T.; Tapia, Washington H.; Cayot, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of extirpated species via captive breeding has typically relied on population viability as the primary criterion for evaluating success. This criterion is inadequate when species reintroduction is undertaken to restore ecological functions and interactions. Herein we report on the demographic and ecological outcomes of a five-decade-long population restoration program for a critically endangered species of “ecosystem engineer”: the endemic Española giant Galapagos tortoise (Chelonoidis hoodensis). Our analysis of complementary datasets on tortoise demography and movement, tortoise-plant interactions and Española Island’s vegetation history indicated that the repatriated tortoise population is secure from a strictly demographic perspective: about half of tortoises released on the island since 1975 were still alive in 2007, in situ reproduction is now significant, and future extinction risk is low with or without continued repatriation. Declining survival rates, somatic growth rates, and body condition of repatriates suggests, however, that resources for continued population growth are increasingly limited. Soil stable carbon isotope analyses indicated a pronounced shift toward woody plants in the recent history of the island’s plant community, likely a legacy of changes in competitive relations between woody and herbaceous plants induced by now-eradicated feral goats and prolonged absence of tortoises. Woody plants are of concern because they block tortoise movement and hinder recruitment of cactus–a critical resource for tortoises. Tortoises restrict themselves to remnant cactus patches and areas of low woody plant density in the center of the island despite an apparent capacity to colonize a far greater range, likely because of a lack of cactus elsewhere on the island. We conclude that ecosystem-level criteria for success of species reintroduction efforts take much longer to achieve than population-level criteria; moreover, reinstatement of

  7. An overlapping propagating spreading center at 87 deg 30 min W on the Galapagos Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perram, Laura Jean; MacDonald, Ken C.

    1994-01-01

    In September of 1987 nwe completed a SeaMARC II (SMII) survey of the propagating spreading center located at 87 deg 30 min W on the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC). The spreading rate in the area is intermediate with a full rate of approximately 70 mm/yr and the spreading axis is marked by an axial high. Analysis of bathymetry, sidescan sonar and surface magnetic data indicates 90 - 100 mm/yr eastward propagation of the 26 km offset. The morphology of the feature is that of an overlapping spreading center pair (OSC). It fits a kinematic model of overlapping ridges with cyclic failure of the dying rift. There are marked differences in the morphology and kinematics of the propagator compared to the propagator at 95 deg 30 min W where the spreading rate and offset are comparable. The 87 deg 30 min W propagator is marked by an axial high and greater than 40 km of overlap in contrast to the axial rift valley and small amount of overlap associated with the 95 deg 30 min W propagator. Near-field stresses associated with variable axial topography contribute to decrease crack propagation forces at the 95 deg 30 min W propagator and increase those at the 87 deg 30 min W propagator. Differences in crack propagation forces and morphology may be due to a fundamental difference in the amount of available magma. This difference is evident in dominance of volcanism near 87 deg 30 min W as opposed to the dominance of tectonism near 95 deg 30 min W.

  8. Distribution and environmental synchronization of the marine insect, Halobates robustus, in the Galapagos islands.

    PubMed

    Birch, M C; Cheng, L; Treherne, J E

    1979-11-30

    The following three aspects of the biology of the marine insect Halobates robustus were studied, during a two week observation period, at several sites in the Galapagos Islands: distribution, aggregation behaviour and rhythmicity of locomotory activity. H. robustus occurred in highest numbers on the water surface at shores fringed with mangroves. The aggregations of H. robustus varied according to their location and density. Copulating adults formed dense, floating aggregations, which tended to be close to rocks or mangroves. Late instar nymphs were less aggregated and, in lagoons (where there was some shelter from direct tidal forces), were furthest from the shore. In two types of habitat (mangrove-fringed, sandy shores and rocky shores) the aggregations of H. robustus showed a pronounced ability to maintain a floating station in relation to the surrounding environment, irrespective of tidal movements (in one case at 34 m from the nearest fixed objects). Evidence of the ability of the aggregations to maintain station on the water surface was also obtained by comparing the movements of H. robustus with those of floating polystyrene particles, which move passively with wind and tide. Laboratory observations and experiments indicated no clear periodicity in locomotory movements throughout a 24 h period. However, the frequency of encounters between individuals showed two daily peaks, post-dawn and pre-dusk, with fewer encounters during the day and only occasional encounters during the night. By shifting the light-dark cycle it was demonstrated that the daily bimodal rhythm of encounters is triggered by dawn and, since it is not maintained in constant light or dark, an 'hour-glass' mechanism is suggested. The contributions of single adults, of copulating pairs and of immature stages to the overall pattern of activity were also determined. Immature stages did not affect the overall rate of encounters significantly and the interactions between single and copulating pairs

  9. Residency and movement patterns of an apex predatory shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) at the Galapagos Marine Reserve

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Adam N. H.; Hammerschlag, Neil; Hearn, Alex; Anderson, Marti J.; Calich, Hannah; Pawley, Matthew D. M.; Fischer, Chris; Salinas-de-León, Pelayo

    2017-01-01

    The potential effectiveness of marine protected areas (MPAs) as a conservation tool for large sharks has been questioned due to the limited spatial extent of most MPAs in contrast to the complex life history and high mobility of many sharks. Here we evaluated the movement dynamics of a highly migratory apex predatory shark (tiger shark Galeocerdo cuvier) at the Galapagos Marine Reserve (GMR). Using data from satellite tracking passive acoustic telemetry, and stereo baited remote underwater video, we estimated residency, activity spaces, site fidelity, distributional abundances and migration patterns from the GMR and in relation to nesting beaches of green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas), a seasonally abundant and predictable prey source for large tiger sharks. Tiger sharks exhibited a high degree of philopatry, with 93% of the total satellite-tracked time across all individuals occurring within the GMR. Large sharks (> 200 cm TL) concentrated their movements in front of the two most important green sea turtle-nesting beaches in the GMR, visiting them on a daily basis during nocturnal hours. In contrast, small sharks (< 200 cm TL) rarely visited turtle-nesting areas and displayed diurnal presence at a third location where only immature sharks were found. Small and some large individuals remained in the three study areas even outside of the turtle-nesting season. Only two sharks were satellite-tracked outside of the GMR, and following long-distance migrations, both individuals returned to turtle-nesting beaches at the subsequent turtle-nesting season. The spatial patterns of residency and site fidelity of tiger sharks suggest that the presence of a predictable source of prey and suitable habitats might reduce the spatial extent of this large shark that is highly migratory in other parts of its range. This highly philopatric behaviour enhances the potential effectiveness of the GMR for their protection. PMID:28829820

  10. The September 1988 intracaldera avalanche and eruption at Fernandina volcano, Galapagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, William W.; de Roy, Tui; Carrasco, Alfredo

    1991-05-01

    During 14 16 September 1988, a large intracaldera avalanche and an eruption of basaltic tephra and lava at Fernandina volcano, Galapagos, produced the most profound changes within the caldera since its collapse in 1968. A swarm of eight earthquakes ( m b 4.7 5.5) occurred in a 14 h period on 24 February 1988 at Fernandina, and two more earthquakes of this size followed on 15 April and 20 May, respectively. On 14 September 1988, another earthquake ( m b 4.6) preceded a complex series of events. A debris avalanche was generated by the failure of a fault-bounded segment of the east caldera wall, approximately 2 km long and 300 m wide. The avalanche deposit is up to 250 m thick and has an approximate volume of 0.9 km3. The avalanche rapidly displaced a preexisting lake from the southeast end of the caldera floor to the northwest end, where the water washed up against the lower part of the caldera wall, then gradually seeped into the avalanche deposit and was completely gone by mid-January 1989. An eruption began in the caldera within about 1 2 h of the earthquake, producing a vigorous tephra plume for about 12 h, then lava flows during the next two days. The eruption ended late on 16 September. Most of the eruptive activity was from vents on the caldera floor near the base of the new avalanche scar. Unequivocal relative timing of events is difficult to determine, but seismic records suggest that the avalanche may have occurred 1.6 h after the earthquake, and field relations show that lava was clearly erupted after the avalanche was emplaced. The most likely sequence of events seems to be that the 1988 feeder dike intruded upward into the east caldera wall, dislocated the unstable wall block, and triggered the avalanche. The avalanche immediately exposed the newly emplaced dike and initiated the eruption. The exact cause of the earthquakes is unknown.

  11. Demographic outcomes and ecosystem implications of giant tortoise reintroduction to Española Island, Galapagos.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, James P; Hunter, Elizabeth A; Shoemaker, Kevin T; Tapia, Washington H; Cayot, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of extirpated species via captive breeding has typically relied on population viability as the primary criterion for evaluating success. This criterion is inadequate when species reintroduction is undertaken to restore ecological functions and interactions. Herein we report on the demographic and ecological outcomes of a five-decade-long population restoration program for a critically endangered species of "ecosystem engineer": the endemic Española giant Galapagos tortoise (Chelonoidis hoodensis). Our analysis of complementary datasets on tortoise demography and movement, tortoise-plant interactions and Española Island's vegetation history indicated that the repatriated tortoise population is secure from a strictly demographic perspective: about half of tortoises released on the island since 1975 were still alive in 2007, in situ reproduction is now significant, and future extinction risk is low with or without continued repatriation. Declining survival rates, somatic growth rates, and body condition of repatriates suggests, however, that resources for continued population growth are increasingly limited. Soil stable carbon isotope analyses indicated a pronounced shift toward woody plants in the recent history of the island's plant community, likely a legacy of changes in competitive relations between woody and herbaceous plants induced by now-eradicated feral goats and prolonged absence of tortoises. Woody plants are of concern because they block tortoise movement and hinder recruitment of cactus--a critical resource for tortoises. Tortoises restrict themselves to remnant cactus patches and areas of low woody plant density in the center of the island despite an apparent capacity to colonize a far greater range, likely because of a lack of cactus elsewhere on the island. We conclude that ecosystem-level criteria for success of species reintroduction efforts take much longer to achieve than population-level criteria; moreover, reinstatement of

  12. Sedimentologic succession of uplifted coral community, Urvina Bay, Isabela Island, Galapagos Archipelago, Ecuador

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, M.W.; Hollander, D.

    1987-05-01

    In March 1954, along the west-central coast of Isabela Island, an upward movement of magma suddenly raised Urvina Bay over 6 m and exposed several square kilometers of carbonate deposits covering a young aa lava flow (around 1000 years old). Results from 6 transect lines across the uplift, 30 cores, and 10 trenches describe the sedimentologic and ecologic transition from barren basalt to diverse carbonate sediments with small coral reefs. Along horizontal transects spanning from 0 to 7 m paleowater depth, there is a seaward progression from beaches, mangroves, and basalt to thick deposits (> 1.6 m) of carbonate sands and small coral reefs. Variation in water depth, degree of wave exposure, and irregularity of the aa lava topography provided many microhabitats where coral, calcareous algae, and mollusks settled and grew. Eight hermatypic coral species are found throughout the shelf, and three species (i.e., Pavona clavus, Pocillopora damicornis, and Porites lobata) produced five small, isolated, monospecific, coral-reef frameworks. The vertical section seen in cores and trenches shows that calcium carbonate increased upward, whereas volcanic sediments decreased; however, episodic layers occur with high concentrations of basaltic sands. In vertical samples from the central portion of the shelf, the coral population changed from small, isolated colonies of Psammocora (Plesioseris) superficalis near the basalt basement to large reef-forming colonies of Pocillopora damicornis farther upsection. Reefs of the Galapagos Islands are small and less diverse than most Pacific reefs. Nonetheless, understanding their temporal successional development should throw light on the origin and history of larger oceanic reefs in the Pacific.

  13. Galapagos rift at 86 /sup 0/W: 4. Structure and morphology of hydrothermal fields and their relationship to the volcanic and tectonic processes of the rift valley

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, K.; Ballard, R.D.

    1980-03-10

    The Angus camera system is used to investigate the detailed structure and morphology of the active hydrothermal vent fields of the Galapagos Rift. Precision navigational data are combined with microtopographic information and detailed geological and biological observations obtained from an analysis of the color bottom pictures to create a series of three-dimensional models for each vent field.

  14. Phytoplankton Biomass Distribution and Identification of Productive Habitats Within the Galapagos Marine Reserve by MODIS, a Surface Acquisition System, and In-Situ Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Galapagos Marine Reserve (GMR) is one of the most diverse ecosystems in the world. Phytoplankton are the base of the ecosystem food chain for many higher trophic organisms, so identifying phytoplankton biomass distribution is the first step in understanding the dynamic envir...

  15. Phytoplankton Biomass Distribution and Identification of Productive Habitats Within the Galapagos Marine Reserve by MODIS, a Surface Acquisition System, and In-Situ Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Galapagos Marine Reserve (GMR) is one of the most diverse ecosystems in the world. Phytoplankton are the base of the ecosystem food chain for many higher trophic organisms, so identifying phytoplankton biomass distribution is the first step in understanding the dynamic envir...

  16. A revised strategy for the monitoring and management of the galapagos sea cucumber Isostichopus fuscus (Aspidochirotida: Stichopodidae).

    PubMed

    Wolff, Matthias; Schuhbauer, Anna; Castrejón, Mauricio

    2012-06-01

    The brown sea cucumber fishery is active in the Galapagos Islands since the year 1991 after its collapse in mainland Ecuador. This paper analyzes the Galapagos Sea cucumber fishery over the past decade and the reasons for its management pitfalls and chronic over fishing, and proposes an improved strategy for estimating stock size and harvest potential. Based on the historical distribution of the fishing fleet and past fishery surveys, 15 macrozones were defined; their areas were estimated from the coastline to the 30m isobaths and the numbers of sample replicates per macrozone were calculated for a density estimate precision of +/-25%. Overall stock size was calculated by summing over all macrozones and was multiplied by 0.122 to obtain the annual quota. This multiplier was derived by inserting an exploitation rate of E=0.3 and a published natural mortality value of M=0.17 into Cadimas formula, thereby obtaining a more conservative precautionary quota estimate. Pre-fishery stock densities in 2009 were below the legal threshold value and the fishery remained closed. Mean densities were significantly lower in the deeper (>15m) than in the shallower (<15m) stratum, contrary to fishermen expectations. Through an empirical regression of (log) pre-fishery density versus subsequent annual catch for the period 1998-2008 we found that catches of most years greatly exceeded the here proposed quota explaining the collapsed nature of the stock.

  17. Elucidating Native and Non-Native Plant-Fog Interactions Across Microclimatic Zones in San Cristobal Island, Galapagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, S.; Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Hu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in land use, such as the clear cutting of forests and the abandonment of land once used for agriculture, pose an incredible threat to the fragile ecosystems in the tropics. One such consequence of land use change in the tropics is the propagation of invasive plant species. The Galapagos Islands, an ecosystem subject to significant anthropogenic pressure by both increasing tourism and a growing native population, are especially threatened by invasive plant species. More than 800 plant species have been introduced in Galapagos, comprising over 60% of the total flora. San Cristobal Island in particular has been impacted by the introduction of non-native species; the combined pressures of invasive species and land use change have fundamentally altered 70% of the landscape of the island. We performed stable isotope analysis of fog water, surface water and plant xylem water to examine water use by both native and invasive plant species across different microclimatic zones. We conducted these measurements starting at the end of the rainy season and through the middle of the dry season. Our results represent an initial effort to characterize the effects of a changing vegetative cover on the water cycling of tropical islands and provide insight into the interactions between plants, surface water and groundwater at various spatial and temporal scales.

  18. Identifying the provenance of Leach's storm petrels in the North Atlantic using polychlorinated biphenyl signatures derived from comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Megson, David; Brown, Thomas A; Johnson, Glenn W; O'Sullivan, Gwen; Bicknell, Anthony W J; Votier, Stephen C; Lohan, Maeve C; Comber, Sean; Kalin, Robert; Worsfold, Paul J

    2014-11-01

    PCB signatures can be used for source identification, exposure studies, age dating and bio-monitoring. This study uses comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-ToFMS) to produce a PCB signature comprised of over 80 PCBs for individual Leach's storm petrels (Oceanodroma leucorhoa). The Leach's storm petrel is a relatively small, elusive, understudied pelagic bird, which only returns to remote islands under darkness during the breeding season. Samples were obtained from 25 Leach's storm petrels found dead in Canada and the UK following storm events in 2006 and 2009. Tissue samples were extracted and analysed by GCxGC-ToFMS and results showed that 83 PCB congeners were present in >60% of samples. An assessment of the PCB signature in four different tissue types showed that it did not vary greatly in samples obtained from the gut, heart, liver and stomach. Multivariate statistical analysis identified a distinctive PCB signature in birds from Canada and Europe which was used to identify the regional provenance and transatlantic movement of individual birds. The findings showcase the ability of GCxGC-ToFMS to provide the high quality congener specific analysis that is necessary for PCB fingerprinting, as well as highlighting the potential of PCB signatures for use in ecological studies of movement, foraging and behaviour.

  19. Magnetic Gradiometer and Vector Magnetometer Survey of the Galapagos Triple Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, J.; Cande, S. C.; Parker, R. L.; Lonsdale, P. F.; Bowles, J.

    2004-05-01

    Several fundamental tectonic problems of the equatorial Pacific remain unsolved due to the lack of magnetic anomaly data. A basic limitation encountered with the use of the standard proton precession magnetometer (or any total field instrument) is that total field anomalies over approximately N/S striking bodies are very small at low magnetic latitudes. Another problem encountered with magnetic surveys near the magnetic equator are the diurnal variations associated with the external field. Measurements of the vector anomalous field and total field gradient offer ways to overcome these limitations. Total field gradiometer data allow recognition and removal of time dependent external field variations. Vector magnetic anomalies provide two distinct advantages over total field measurements. Although the total field anomalies are small (typically 50 nT) over most of the equatorial Pacific, the vertical and horizontal components of the anomalous field are 2-5 times larger. In addition, vector anomaly data can be used to evaluate the two dimensionality of the magnetic source since the along track and vertical anomalies are related by a 90o phase shift for a perfectly two dimensional source. To evaluate the advantages of these systems, we conducted a survey of the trails of the Galapagos triple junction using both a high resolution total field gradiometer and a vector magnetometer. The longitudinal gradiometer system consists of two Overhauser sensors (0.01 nT sensitivity) towed 350 and 450m behind the survey vessel. The towed vector magnetometer utilizes a commercial motion reference sensor (0.02o orientation accuracy with three fluxgate sensors) suitable for measuring horizontal and vertical anomalies as small as 30-50 nT. Vector anomalies across Cocos-Nazca crust corroborate the high degree of linearity of these E/W lineations; horizontal and vertical anomalies exhibit high coherence (>0.9) and the expected 90o phase relationship at wavelengths longer than ~8km. Vector

  20. Seismometry in the Oceans: First Observations from an Array of Mermaids near Galapagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolet, G.; Hello, Y.; Bonnieux, S.; Chen, J.; Pazmino, A.; Deschamps, A.; Regnier, M. M.; Font, Y.; Van der Lee, S.; Simons, F.

    2016-12-01

    The last major frontier to conquer in seismology is the oceanic domain. But this is about to happen, using floating seismometers called "Mermaids".Since May 2014, nine Mermaids have been in operation around the Galapagos islands. These robots are equipped with a hydrophone, capable of detecting P and PKP wave arrivals while floating at 1500 m depth in the ocean and of transmitting short seismograms in quasi-real time when surfacing after a detection. By the end of June 2016, 1003 seismograms had been transmitted, of which 589 have been associated with known earthquakes observed with fixed networks. The figure shows the path coverage at the time of writing of this abstract. We shall show examples of the data, present their statistics, and give an overview of their quality. We discuss the various strategies developed to pick onset times reliably. The signal-to-noise ratio is not much different from that on island stations, but the predictable occurrence of a surface ghost after almost exactly 2 seconds often makes it easier to identify the true onset of the P wave. Onset identification is also helped by software that predicts the P wave polarity, and by software that models the P wave and its reflections and reverberations. For the noisiest records we developed a time-domain filter that removes the microseismic noise band without introducing artefacts in the filter output. For many onset times, a standard error of 0.2 seconds or better is within reach. We model the drift of the Mermaid during its ascent, because the GPS position at the surface is slightly different from that at the time of recording, and care should be taken that the equivalent time error is well below the value of 0.2 seconds.We discuss what we have learned with this first generation of Mermaids and how our experience has led to important improvements for the second generation which will be used to launch the first stage of a global network, EarthScope-Oceans, in 2017.

  1. Effects of Magma Supply on Volcanic Morphology along the Hotspot-Influenced Galapagos Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. M.; Meyer, J. D.; Haymon, R. M.; Anderson, P.; MacDonald, K. C.

    2006-12-01

    The relationship between lava morphology and spreading rate, with a predominance of pillows at slow- spreading ridges and sheets at fast-spreading ridges, is well known although not well understood. New EM300 and DSL-120A sonar data collected along the GSC from {94.5°}-{89.5°} W in 2006 reveals that increasing magma supply decreases the tendency for eruptions to focus to point-source volcanic vents, and ultimately produces fissure-fed sheet flow eruptions. The change in spreading rate is insignificant over this area, thus the additional magma supply provided by the Galapagos hotspot is the main variable. The high- resolution sonar data images volcanic vents clearly so that their morphology may be analyzed. Approaching the focus of hotspot influence on the GSC at {91.5°}W from {95°}W, volcanic vents become progressively lower in relief and more elongate. Volcanic vent morphology consists primarily of individual cones from {95°}-{92.5°}W presumably produced by eruptions that focus quickly to point-source vents, although the average size of the cones decreases toward the east, as magma supply increases. Where the ridge topography changes from an axial valley to axial rise, the volcanic morphology also becomes dominated by axial volcanic ridges rather than cones. Finally, along the ridge segment farthest east we find that the volcanic vents are simply expressed as fissures. Although the volcanic vent morphology progressively changes, it is only along this last, easternmost segment at {91.5°}W that we find a significant abundance of sheet lava flows based on extensive visual coverage with Medea. Elsewhere, the ridge is composed almost exclusively of pillow lava flows. These results suggest that magma supply, rather than other variables, is responsible for the relationship between lava morphology and spreading rate. Unlike true fast-spreading ridges, each ridge segment on the GSC from {93°}- {91°}W contains a single large volcanic cone centered at the segment

  2. A magnetic investigation of a tectonic problem: The propagating rift, Galapagos 95°30'W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephen P.; Hey, R. N.

    1986-02-01

    The propagation of an oceanic rift is an important tectonic problem, with a bearing on the reorganization of plate motion and on the early opening of oceanic basins. At the propagating rift at 95°30'W near the Galapagos Islands, we can use magnetic methods to determine the tectonic origin of a set of important sea floor features. The observed 27 km offset between the axes of the propagating rift and the dying rift presents us with an ideal situation, in which the oceanic crust created by the opposing systems has been magnetized in opposite directions. The normally magnetized crust of the propagating rift tip penetrates into older crust, which created when the earth's main field was reversed. A combined Deep Tow and Sea Beam investigation at 95°30'W on the Cocos-Nazca spreading center has revealed the crustal contact between the propagating rift and the dying rift systems. The inherent magnetic labelling of the crust has been recovered by performing inversions on the gridded representations of the observed magnetic field and bathymetry, working in the Fourier domain. The result is a gridded rock magnetization distribution. The inversion of the surface data covers a large area, 6000 km 2, and demonstrates close agreement with magnetization amplitudes of rock samples at existing dredge sites. In general, the propagating rift process appears to be much more orderly than the dying rift process. The magnetic polarity transition widths are narrower, and the boundaries have fewer undulations than the dying rift, which appears to be quite episodic in behavior. The average propagation rate is 52 mm/yr, compared to the average spreading half-rate of 29 mm/yr. The locations of the boundaries suggest that the acceleration to the normal spreading rate on the propagation rift requires about 250, 00 years. The inversion of the Deep Tow data, near the sea floor, provides a high resolution definition of the tip of the propagation rift, at 2°38.1t'N, 95°30.0'W.

  3. Seafloor Hydrothermal Activity at the Galapagos Triple Junction, East Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Yu, Z.; Zhang, G.; Tao, C.; Chen, S.

    2014-12-01

    Since the first discovery of black smokers on the Gaplapgaos spreading center, over 500 hydrothermal sites have been confirmed on the mid-ocean ridge, arc and back-arc settings (Beaulieu et al., 2013). However, the hydrothermal activity at triple-junction has not received much attention. Consequently, there are outstanding questions regarding the features of the hydrothermal system, and the effect of the hydrothermal circulation on the tectonic activity of the triple-junction. In 2009, the Chinese Dayang Cruise 21 discovered the Precious Stone field (PSF) on the Dietz Semount at the southern flank of the Galapagos triple junction (GTJ). Most studies of the GTJ focus on the topographictectonic and stresssimulation, which suggest that the GTJ had complex evoluation(Smith et al., 2011, 2013; Mitchell et al., 2011,Schouten et al., 2012). Water anomay were clear detected and samples of hydrothermal deposit and rocks were collected by TV-Grab (Figure.1). This study aims to understand the geological features of the PSF related hydrothermal activity. Hydrothermal mineralization Three types of sedimentary hydrothermal deposits representing three different hydrothermal activity stages (Figure 1)are confirmed in the PSF: 1) sediments with native sulfur and pyrite clasts(Type I), 2) Fe—Mn oxides (Type II), and 3) clay minerals mainlynontronite(Type III). Type II sedimentsprecipitate early and the source comprises of clasts of distal hydrothermal plume. The nontronite-rich sediments propably derive from the low-temperature alteration of Fe—Mn oxides. Type 1 sediments are found on the active hydrothermal venting field. Hydrothermal plume Water anomaly were detected at the southewestern PSF. We observed widespreadsedimentary hydrothermal depositsin the western PSF, but no water anomaly. According to the results of five water anomaly dectection lines, we predicted the existence of three hydrothermal vents in the PSF. Seafloor type inversion Multi-beam backscatter data were

  4. 30,000-Year Record of Climate From the Galapagos Islands and Links With High Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutavas, A.; Lynch-Stieglitz, J.; Sachs, J. P.; Marchitto, T. M.

    2001-12-01

    The eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) upwelling system influences climate on a global scale as manifested by the far-reaching teleconnections of El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). It is postulated that this system has played a primary role in orbital and millennial scale climate variability of the late Quaternary, but a test of this hypothesis has been hampered by a lack of high-resolution regional climate records. New tools for sea-surface temperature (SST) reconstruction, including Mg/Ca ratios in foraminifera and alkenone unsaturation ratios in bulk sediment, offer the potential for deconvolving the sea-surface temperature signal from oxygen-isotope records dominated by the isotopic composition of seawater. Application of these methods in the EEP upwelling region is beginning to place important constraints on past SST variability, nevertheless a detailed history of regional SST evolution during the last deglaciation has been lacking due to a virtual absence of high-resolution records from the core of the EEP upwelling tongue. We present a radiocarbon-dated, millennial resolution climate record of the last 30,000 years from a sediment core near the Galapagos Islands. This site is unique in its combination of (a) a high sedimentation rate (13 cm/ky), (b) a shallow depth (617 m), and (c) a southern equatorial position (1.2° S). Collectively these characteristics help circumvent bioturbation and dissolution problems in a site proximal to the core of the upwelling tongue that develops primarily south of the equator. Despite a modest glacial-interglacial SST amplitude of \\sim1.5oC based on alkenones and δ 18O, millennial-scale oscillations in SST as well as in foraminiferal δ 18O and δ 13C suggest links with Northern Hemisphere climate involving EEP upwelling variability. However, SST is decoupled from upwelling during parts of the record, which calls for the opposing influence of some other mechanism(s). A key candidate for this role may be advection of climate

  5. The September 1988 intracaldera avalanche and eruption at Fernandina volcano, Galapagos Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, W.W.; De Roy, T.; Carrasco, A.

    1991-01-01

    During 14-16 September 1988, a large intracaldera avalanche and an eruption of basaltic tephra and lava at Fernandina volcano, Galapagos, produced the most profound changes within the caldera since its collapse in 1968. A swarm of eight earthquakes (mb 4.7-5.5) occurred in a 14 h period on 24 February 1988 at Fernandina, and two more earthquakes of this size followed on 15 April and 20 May, respectively. On 14 September 1988, another earthquake (mb 4.6) preceded a complex series of events. A debris avalanche was generated by the failure of a fault-bounded segment of the east caldera wall, approximately 2 km long and 300 m wide. The avalanche deposit is up to 250 m thick and has an approximate volume of 0.9 km3. The avalanche rapidly displaced a preexisting lake from the southeast end of the caldera floor to the northwest end, where the water washed up against the lower part of the caldera wall, then gradually seeped into the avalanche deposit and was completely gone by mid-January 1989. An eruption began in the caldera within about 1-2 h of the earthquake, producing a vigorous tephra plume for about 12 h, then lava flows during the next two days. The eruption ended late on 16 September. Most of the eruptive activity was from vents on the caldera floor near the base of the new avalanche scar. Unequivocal relative timing of events is difficult to determine, but seismic records suggest that the avalanche may have occurred 1.6 h after the earthquake, and field relations show that lava was clearly erupted after the avalanche was emplaced. The most likely sequence of events seems to be that the 1988 feeder dike intruded upward into the east caldera wall, dislocated the unstable wall block, and triggered the avalanche. The avalanche immediately exposed the newly emplaced dike and initiated the eruption. The exact cause of the earthquakes is unknown. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Near-primary melt inclusions in anorthite phenocrysts from the Galapagos platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinton, Chris W.; Christie, David M.; Coombs, Valarie L.; Nielsen, Roger L.; Fisk, Martin R.

    1993-10-01

    Partially crystalline melt inclusions in anorthite phenocrysts from a Galapagos seamount have been rehomogenized in a series of heating experiments in order to accurately determine their initial compositions. They are primitive tholeiites, high in CaO and Al2O3 and low in TiO2 and alkies. We infer that they were entrapped at a temperature close to 1270 C. At this temprature, the trapped melt composition is multiply saturated with olivine, plagioclase and spinel at 1 atmosphere pressure, but it is also near-primary requiring addition of less than 5% olivine plus or minus plagioclase and spinel in order to be in equilibrium with mantle olivine. The inclusions occur in association with, and are potentially parental to, a suite of Mid oceanic ridge basalt (MORE) like pillow lavas which range in MGO content from 10 to 8 wt% and which could have been derived by up to 40% fractionation of olivine plus plagioclase from the inclusion composition. Although the host anorthites are remarkably homogeneous and unzoned and the inclusions themselves are uniform in major element composition, minor element contents vary by a factor of two or more. Unlike many other plagioclase megacrysts, these anorthites must have crystallized under conditions in which the major element compositions were buffered but minor (and presumably trace) elements were free to vary. Such conditions could be achieved by liquid-solid interactions either in the melting regime or, perhaps more likely, in a liquid-crystal mush within the oceanic crust. These melt inclusions are not unique. They appear to belong to a class of primative, high CaO and Al2O3 MORB that occur in association with high-An plagioclase in a variety of oceanic settings, usually where magma supply is low. We propose that such magmas are derived from the shallowest, most depleted part of a mantle melt column, and that they consitute one end member of a spectrum of primary magmas which givves rise to the global array of MORB compositions.

  7. Dynamics of magma supply, storage and migration at basaltic volcanoes: Geophysical studies of the Galapagos and Hawaiian volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnardi, Marco

    Basaltic shields forming ocean island volcanoes, in particular those of Hawai'i and of the Galapagos Islands, constitute some of the largest volcanic features on Earth. Understanding subsurface processes such as those controlling magma supply, storage and migration at these volcanoes, is essential to any attempt to anticipate their future behavior. This dissertation presents a series of studies carried out at Hawaiian and Galapagos volcanoes. InSAR measurements acquired between 2003 and 2010 at Fernandina Volcano, Galapagos, are used to study the structure and the dynamics of the shallow magmatic system of the volcano (Chapter 3). Spatial and temporal variations in the measured displacements reveal the presence of two hydraulically connected areas of magma storage, and the modeling of the deformation data provides an estimate of their location and geometry. The same dataset also provides the first geodetic evidence for two subvolcanic sill intrusions (in 2006 and 2007) deep beneath the volcano's flank. The lateral migration of magma from the reservoirs during these intrusions could provide an explanation for enigmatic volcanic events at Fernandina such as the 1968 caldera collapse without significant eruption. Space-geodetic measurements of the surface deformation produced by the most recent eruptions at Fernandina, reveal that all have initiated with the intrusion of subhorizontal sills from the shallow magma reservoir (Chapter 4). A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image acquired 1-2 h before the start of a radial fissure eruption in 2009 captures one of these sills in the midst of its propagation toward the surface. Galapagos eruptive fissures of all orientations have previously been presumed to be fed by vertical dikes, but these new findings allow a reinterpretation of the internal structure and evolution of Galapagos volcanoes and of similar basaltic shields elsewhere on Earth and on other planets. A joint analysis of InSAR and groud-based microgravity data

  8. The Oxidation State of Fe in Glasses from the Galapagos Archipelago: Variable Oxygen Fugacity as a Function of Mantle Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, M. E.; Kelley, K. A.; Cottrell, E.; Saal, A. E.; Kurz, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The oxidation state of the mantle plays an intrinsic role in the magmatic evolution of the Earth. Here we present new μ-XANES measurements of Fe3+/ΣFe ratios (a proxy for ƒO2) in a suite of submarine glasses from the Galapagos Archipelago. Using previously presented major, trace, and volatile elements and isotopic data for 4 groups of glass that come from distinct mantle sources (depleted upper mantle, 2 recycled, and a primitive mantle source) we show that Fe3+/ΣFe ratios vary both with the influence of shallow level processes and with variations in mantle source. Fe3+/ΣFe ratios increase with differentiation (i.e. decreasing MgO), but show a large variation at a given MgO. Progressive degassing of sulfur accompanies decreasing Fe3+/ΣFe ratios, while assimilation of hydrothermally altered crust (as indicated by increasing Sr/Sr*) is shown to increase Fe3+/ΣFe ratios. After taking these processes into account, there is still variability in the Fe3+/ΣFe ratios of the isotopically distinct sample suites studied, yielding a magmatic ƒO2 that ranges from ΔQFM = +0.16 to +0.74 (error < 0.5 log units) and showing that oxidation state varies as a function of mantle source composition in the Galapagos hotspot system. After correcting back to a common MgO content = 8.0 wt%, the trace element depleted group similar to MORB (ITD), and the group similar to Pinta (WD = high Th/La, Δ7/4, Δ8/4 ratios) show Fe3+/ΣFe ratios within the range of MORB (average ITD = 0.162 ± 0.003 and WD = 0.164 ± 0.006). Another trace element enriched group similar to Sierra Negra and Cerro Azul (ITE = enriched Sr and Pb isotopes) shows evidence of mixing between oxidized and reduced sources (ITE oxidized end-member = 0.177). This suggests that mantle sources in the Galapagos that are thought to contain recycled components (i.e., WD and ITE groups) have distinct oxidation states. The high 3He/4He Fernandina samples (HHe group) are shown to be the most oxidized (ave. 0.175 ± 0

  9. The Bolivar Channel Ecosystem of the Galapagos Marine Reserve: Energy flow structure and role of keystone groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Diego J.; Wolff, Matthias

    2011-08-01

    The Bolivar Channel Ecosystem (BCE) is among the most productive zones in the Galapagos Marine Reserve (GMR). It is exposed to relatively cool, nutrient-rich waters of the Cromwell current, which are brought to the photic zone through topographic upwelling. The BCE is characterized by a heterogeneous rocky reef habitat covered by dense algae beds and inhabited by numerous invertebrate and fish species, which represent the food for higher predators including seals and sharks and exploited fish species. In addition, plankton and detritus based food chains channel large amounts of energy through the complex food web. Important emblematic species of the Galapagos archipelagos reside in this area such as the flightless cormorant, the Galapagos penguin and the marine iguanas. A trophic model of BCE was constructed for the habitats < 30 m depth that fringe the west coast of Isabela and east coast of Fernandina islands covering 14% of the total BCE area (44 km 2). The model integrates data sets from sub tidal ecological monitoring and marine vertebrate population monitoring (2004 to 2008) programs of the Charles Darwin Foundation and consists of 30 compartments, which are trophically linked through a diet matrix. Results reveal that the BCE is a large system in terms of flows (38 695 t km - 2 yr - 1 ) comparable to Peruvian Bay Systems of the Humboldt upwelling system. A very large proportion of energy flows from the primary producers (phytoplankton and macro-algae) to the second level and to the detritus pool. Catches are high (54.3 t km - 2 yr - 1 ) and are mainly derived from the second and third trophic levels (mean TL of catch = 2.45) making the fisheries gross efficiency high (0.3%). The system's degree of development seems rather low as indicated by a P/R ratio of 4.19, a low ascendency (37.4%) and a very low Finn's cycling index (1.29%). This is explained by the system's exposure to irregular changes in oceanographic conditions as related to the EL Niño Southern

  10. Microbial Populations in Extreme Environments: Investigations and Characterizations of the Microbiology and Geochemistry of Galapagos Island Fumaroles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayhew, L. E.; Childers, S. E.; Geist, D.

    2005-12-01

    The extreme physiochemical conditions, insularity, and wide range in ages of fumaroles of the Galapagos Islands provide an excellent opportunity to explore for novel microorganisms and to study life in extreme environments. This is the first study that measures microbial diversity of Galapagos fumaroles. Forty-seven samples were collected from six distinct fumarole fields on Sierra Negra and Alcedo volcanoes. Vulcan Chico, on Sierra Negra, was activated during the last eruption in 1979. Two of the other fumarole fields on Sierra Negra are associated with a long-lived fault system on the caldera floor and are therefore likely to be significantly older. The fault-associated fumaroles have widespread alteration haloes (up to 100 m in diameter) and thick deposits of native sulfur. The most vigorous of the fumarole fields on Alcedo activated in late 1993 to early 1994. The second fumarole field on Alcedo is associated with a recently extinct geyser and the third is located on a rhyolite vent. A diversity of colors was observed in the substrates at all of the fumarole fields and some may be the result of microbial activity. Collection sites were chosen on the basis of temperature and the variations in the substrate in order to obtain samples from a variety of environments. Temperatures at sample sites range from 25.0 to 178.5° C, and pH from 0 to 6. The material collected varies between sites and includes crystalline sulfur deposits, clay, sandy and rocky soils, and microbial mats. Substrate material is characterized by powder x-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy and gases collected from five of the fumarole fields are being analyzed to test for chemical controls on the microbial populations. Genomic DNA is being extracted from all of the samples. Primers for Bacteria and Archaea are used for PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene. To date, 22 of 37 processed samples have amplifiable DNA. Microbial diversity of samples possessing amplifiable DNA is

  11. Hematology, plasma chemistry, serology, and Chlamydophila status of the waved albatross (Phoebastria irrorata) on the Galapagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Luis R; Huyvaert, Kathryn P; Merkel, Jane; Miller, R Eric; Parker, Patricia G

    2003-09-01

    Venipuncture was performed on 50 adult, free-ranging waved albatrosses (Phoebastria irrorata) on Española, Galapagos Islands, Ecuador, to establish hematologic and plasma biochemistry reference ranges and to determine the prevalence of exposure to important domestic avian pathogens. Weights and plasma creatine phosphokinase activities differed significantly between males and females. Serum was tested for evidence of exposure to avian influenza, avian paramyxoviruses 1, 2, and 3, avian cholera, adenovirus groups 1 and 2, avian encephalomyelitis, Marek's disease, infectious bursal disease, and infectious bronchitis virus (Connecticut and Massachusetts strains). Of 44 birds, 29 (66%) seroreacted to adenovirus group 1, and four seroreacted to avian encephalomyelitis. Cloacal swabs were negative for Chlamydophila psittaci DNA.

  12. So Long and Thanks for All the Fish: Overexploitation of the Regionally Endemic Galapagos Grouper Mycteroperca olfax (Jenyns, 1840)

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Alan M.; Koike, Haruko; Zimmerhackel, Johanna; Schuhbauer, Anna; Eddy, Tyler; Salinas-de-León, Pelayo

    2016-01-01

    The regionally endemic Galapagos Grouper, locally known as bacalao, is one of the most highly prized finfish species within the Galapagos Marine Reserve (GMR). Concerns of overfishing, coupled with a lack of fishing regulations aimed at this species raises concerns about the current population health. We assessed changes in population health over a 30-year period using three simple indicators: (1) percentage of fish below reproductive size (Lm); (2) percentage of fish within the optimum length interval (Lopt); and (3) percentage of mega-spawners in the catch. Over the assessed period, none of the indicators reached values associated with healthy populations, with all indicators declining over time. Furthermore, the most recent landings data show that the vast majority of the bacalao caught (95.7%,) were below Lm, the number of fish within the Lopt interval was extremely low (4.7%), and there were virtually no mega-spawners (0.2%). Bacalao fully recruit to the fishery 15 cm below the size at which 50% of the population matures. The Spawning Potential Ratio is currently 5% of potential unfished fecundity, strongly suggesting severe overfishing. Our results suggest the need for bacalao-specific management regulations that should include minimum (65 cm TL) and maximum (78 cm TL) landing sizes, slot limits (64–78 cm TL), as well as a closed season during spawning from October to January. It is recognized that these regulations are harsh and will certainly have negative impacts on the livelihoods of fishers in the short term, however, continued inaction will likely result in a collapse of this economically and culturally valuable species. Alternative sources of income should be developed in parallel with the establishment of fishing regulations to limit the socio-economic disruption to the fishing community during the transition to a more sustainable management regime. PMID:27780213

  13. Galapagos hotspot-spreading center system: 1. Spatial petrological and geochemical variations (83/sup 0/W-101/sup 0/W)

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, J.; Kingsley, R.H.; Devine, J.D.

    1982-07-10

    We report on the petrology and geochemistry of basalts dredged at 40--50 km intervals along the Galapagos Spreading Center, between 83/sup 0/W and 101/sup 0/W (40 stations). Emphasis is on spatial variations of 'whole rock' major elements, rare earths, trace metals of the first transition series, and the nature of phenocryst assemblages and their abundances. These results provide new constraints on the nature and scale of mantle source heterogeneities, melting conditions, thermal field, and dynamics of crustal formation of the region. We suggest that ridge segments outside the high magnetic amplitude zone are at a steady state as a result of passive seafloor spreading. Basalts from these segments are apparently derived from an asthenosphere relatively uniformally depleted in incompatible elements, which appears of worldwide extent. We reject Vogt and DeBoer's (1976) model invoking damming at fracture zones of subaxial asthenosphere flow of crystal slushes and increasing fractional crystallization down the flow line, because this model would not explain the gradients in REE observed about the Galapagos Platform. Our preferred model combines the mantle-plume binary mixing model of Schilling (1973) with the concept of recurring rift propagation proposed by Hey (1977a). We further propose that pulsating mantle plume flux, perhaps in the form of a chain of blobs, may initiate the development of new rifts and their propagation. The present position of the tips of such new propagating rifts locate the wave fronts of such pulsating mantle plume flow. A two million year period is suggested for the last 4 m.y. from Wilson and Hey's (1979) information Rigorous testing of our preferred model is possible.

  14. So Long and Thanks for All the Fish: Overexploitation of the Regionally Endemic Galapagos Grouper Mycteroperca olfax (Jenyns, 1840).

    PubMed

    Usseglio, Paolo; Friedlander, Alan M; Koike, Haruko; Zimmerhackel, Johanna; Schuhbauer, Anna; Eddy, Tyler; Salinas-de-León, Pelayo

    2016-01-01

    The regionally endemic Galapagos Grouper, locally known as bacalao, is one of the most highly prized finfish species within the Galapagos Marine Reserve (GMR). Concerns of overfishing, coupled with a lack of fishing regulations aimed at this species raises concerns about the current population health. We assessed changes in population health over a 30-year period using three simple indicators: (1) percentage of fish below reproductive size (Lm); (2) percentage of fish within the optimum length interval (Lopt); and (3) percentage of mega-spawners in the catch. Over the assessed period, none of the indicators reached values associated with healthy populations, with all indicators declining over time. Furthermore, the most recent landings data show that the vast majority of the bacalao caught (95.7%,) were below Lm, the number of fish within the Lopt interval was extremely low (4.7%), and there were virtually no mega-spawners (0.2%). Bacalao fully recruit to the fishery 15 cm below the size at which 50% of the population matures. The Spawning Potential Ratio is currently 5% of potential unfished fecundity, strongly suggesting severe overfishing. Our results suggest the need for bacalao-specific management regulations that should include minimum (65 cm TL) and maximum (78 cm TL) landing sizes, slot limits (64-78 cm TL), as well as a closed season during spawning from October to January. It is recognized that these regulations are harsh and will certainly have negative impacts on the livelihoods of fishers in the short term, however, continued inaction will likely result in a collapse of this economically and culturally valuable species. Alternative sources of income should be developed in parallel with the establishment of fishing regulations to limit the socio-economic disruption to the fishing community during the transition to a more sustainable management regime.

  15. White-faced storm-petrels Pelagodroma marina predated by gulls as biological monitors of plastic pollution in the pelagic subtropical Northeast Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Ricardo; Menezes, Dilia; Santos, Carolina Jardim; Catry, Paulo

    2016-11-15

    Marine plastic pollution is rapidly growing and is a source of major concern. Seabirds often ingest plastic debris and are increasingly used as biological monitors of plastic pollution. However, virtually no studies have assessed plastics in seabirds in the deep subtropical North Atlantic. We investigated whether remains of white-faced storm-petrels (WFSP) present in gull pellets could be used for biomonitoring. We analysed 263 pellets and 79.0% of these contained plastic debris originating in the digestive tract of WFSP. Pellets with no bird prey did not contain plastics. Most debris were fragments (83.6%) with fewer plastic pellets (8.2%). Light-coloured plastics predominated (71.0%) and the most frequent polymer was HDPE (73.0%). Stable isotopes in toe-nails of WFSP containing many versus no plastics did not differ, indicating no individual specialisation leading to differential plastic ingestion. We suggest WFSP in pellets are highly suitable to monitor the little known pelagic subtropical Northeast Atlantic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Young segment-scale eruption discovered on the eastern Galapagos rift during the GALREX 2011 Expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, R. W.; White, S. M.; Hammond, S. R.; McClinton, J. T.; Rex, C.

    2011-12-01

    New high resolution mapping with an EM302 multibeam system and seafloor observations made with the Little Hercules remotely operated vehicle (ROV) during the July 2011 GALREX expedition have discovered a very recent eruption along Segment III (Christie et al., 2005) centered at 88 deg 19.5'W on the eastern Galapagos spreading center (GSC). The site was chosen for detailed study after a water column survey using a towed CTD package identified intense particle plumes rising up to 250m above seafloor along the entire segment (see abstracts by Baker et al. and Holden et al., this meeting). The segment is characterized by ridge-and-valley terrain with the most recent neovolcanic ridge extending, respectively, 25 km west and 20 km east of a central low-relief area that is quasi-circular, ~2 km radius, less than 30 m high. The neovolcanic ridge, revealed by the EM302 bathymetry to be a generally hummocky edifice less than 1 km wide and under ~40 m high, is cut by a very small axial graben barely resolved in the EM302 bathymetry. Two areas were surveyed during five ROV dives, four on the central area near 88 deg 18.5'W and one dive at 14 km east at 88 deg 10.8'W. A third high intensity plume target near the western extremity of the segment at 88 deg 27.2'W was not investigated using the ROV. The recent lobate and pillow lava flows were emplaced in narrow grabens along and adjacent to the neovolcanic ridge. In several places, the flow was observed to fill the axial graben. It is likely that the flow thickness ranges from meters to 10's of meters, depending upon the pre-eruption graben size and local effusion variations. However, no long, channel-fed lava flows were found. Flow boundaries based on preliminary ROV navigation average less than 100 meters across-axis. The lobate lavas all had a very similar glassy appearance and negligible sediment cover, making them easy to recognize amid the surrounding, older flows. The age of these lavas appeared visually younger than the

  17. Eruption rates at Fernandina volcano, Galapagos archipelago, from cosmogenic helium in surficial lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, M. D.; Rowland, S.; Curtice, J.; Saal, A.; Naumann, T.

    2005-12-01

    Fernandina volcano is considered the center of the Galapagos hotspot because it lies at the leading (western) edge of the archipelago with respect to plate motion, has been the most active in historical times, and is characterized by extremely high 3He/4He. In an effort to determine the growth rate of the volcano, we have measured exposure ages using cosmogenic 3He measurements in olivine phenocrysts from surficially exposed lavas. Using satellite data, Rowland (1996) subdivided these flows into young, intermediate, and old, and calculated their respective surface areas, but had no method for determining ages, except for the few witnessed historical flows. The lava flows studied here span the entire exposed age range, based on both the Rowland (1996) map and field observations of weathering characteristics, vegetation, and stratigraphy. The surface exposure dates are all close to the limit of the method due to their young ages, low olivine contents in the lavas, low equatorial 3He production rates, and exposures near sea level. The oldest surfaces, found as small outcrops on the northern coast of Fernandina are therefore the most reliably dated using cosmogenic 3He, and demonstrate that the subaerial part of the volcano has been entirely resurfaced within the last 5 Ka. These data alone confirm that Fernandina has had relatively high eruption rates during that interval. The ages of the youngest flows cannot be accurately determined because cosmogenic 3He levels are below detection limits (by melting of olivine in vacuo), but they do yield useful age limits, of less than 0.8 Ka. The young flows have a surface area of 358 km2 and an approximate volume of 3.3 km3; using this volume, the minimum eruption rate of Fernandina over the last ~1 Ka has been ~0.005 km3 yr-1. This is a lower limit because the ages are upper limits, and many young flows entered the ocean. There are few eruption rates to compare for ocean island volcanoes, but this lower limit eruption rate is

  18. Sterilisation of hybrid Galapagos tortoises (Geochelone nigra) for island restoration. Part 1: endoscopic oophorectomy of females under ketamine-medetomidine anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Knafo, S E; Divers, S J; Rivera, S; Cayot, L J; Tapia-Aguilera, W; Flanagan, J

    2011-01-15

    An endoscopic sterilisation technique for use in Galapagos tortoises (Geochelone nigra) was developed as part of a conservation and ecosystem restoration project. Fifteen female giant Galapagos tortoises were anaesthetised, intubated and positioned in dorsal recumbency. A bilateral prefemoral approach was made and the ovaries were identified using a 5 mm × 33 cm rigid telescope. In the case of endoscope-assisted oophorectomy, the ovaries were exteriorised through the same incision, the vasculature was ligated and the mesovarium was transected. Two tortoises had immature ovaries that could not be exteriorised. In these animals, endoscopic oophorectomy was performed using radiosurgery. Closure of the incisions was routine. All tortoises except one recovered well from surgery. There were no reported complications six weeks and six months postoperatively, and all were successfully released on to Pinta Island in May 2010.

  19. Philopatry drives genetic differentiation in an island archipelago: comparative population genetics of Galapagos Nazca boobies (Sula granti) and great frigatebirds (Fregata minor).

    PubMed

    Levin, Iris I; Parker, Patricia G

    2012-11-01

    Seabirds are considered highly mobile, able to fly great distances with few apparent barriers to dispersal. However, it is often the case that seabird populations exhibit strong population genetic structure despite their potential vagility. Here we show that Galapagos Nazca booby (Sula granti) populations are substantially differentiated, even within the small geographic scale of this archipelago. On the other hand, Galapagos great frigatebird (Fregata minor) populations do not show any genetic structure. We characterized the genetic differentiation by sampling five colonies of both species in the Galapagos archipelago and analyzing eight microsatellite loci and three mitochondrial genes. Using an F-statistic approach on the multilocus data, we found significant differentiation between nearly all island pairs of Nazca booby populations and a Bayesian clustering analysis provided support for three distinct genetic clusters. Mitochondrial DNA showed less differentiation of Nazca booby colonies; only Nazca boobies from the island of Darwin were significantly differentiated from individuals throughout the rest of the archipelago. Great frigatebird populations showed little to no evidence for genetic differentiation at the same scale. Only two island pairs (Darwin - Wolf, N. Seymour - Wolf) were significantly differentiated using the multilocus data, and only two island pairs had statistically significant φ(ST) values (N. Seymour - Darwin, N. Seymour - Wolf) according to the mitochondrial data. There was no significant pattern of isolation by distance for either species calculated using both markers. Seven of the ten Nazca booby migration rates calculated between island pairs were in the south or southeast to north or northwest direction. The population differentiation found among Galapagos Nazca booby colonies, but not great frigatebird colonies, is most likely due to differences in natal and breeding philopatry.

  20. Philopatry drives genetic differentiation in an island archipelago: comparative population genetics of Galapagos Nazca boobies (Sula granti) and great frigatebirds (Fregata minor)

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Iris I; Parker, Patricia G

    2012-01-01

    Seabirds are considered highly mobile, able to fly great distances with few apparent barriers to dispersal. However, it is often the case that seabird populations exhibit strong population genetic structure despite their potential vagility. Here we show that Galapagos Nazca booby (Sula granti) populations are substantially differentiated, even within the small geographic scale of this archipelago. On the other hand, Galapagos great frigatebird (Fregata minor) populations do not show any genetic structure. We characterized the genetic differentiation by sampling five colonies of both species in the Galapagos archipelago and analyzing eight microsatellite loci and three mitochondrial genes. Using an F-statistic approach on the multilocus data, we found significant differentiation between nearly all island pairs of Nazca booby populations and a Bayesian clustering analysis provided support for three distinct genetic clusters. Mitochondrial DNA showed less differentiation of Nazca booby colonies; only Nazca boobies from the island of Darwin were significantly differentiated from individuals throughout the rest of the archipelago. Great frigatebird populations showed little to no evidence for genetic differentiation at the same scale. Only two island pairs (Darwin – Wolf, N. Seymour – Wolf) were significantly differentiated using the multilocus data, and only two island pairs had statistically significant φST values (N. Seymour – Darwin, N. Seymour – Wolf) according to the mitochondrial data. There was no significant pattern of isolation by distance for either species calculated using both markers. Seven of the ten Nazca booby migration rates calculated between island pairs were in the south or southeast to north or northwest direction. The population differentiation found among Galapagos Nazca booby colonies, but not great frigatebird colonies, is most likely due to differences in natal and breeding philopatry. PMID:23170212

  1. Chemical and isotopic diversity in basalts dredged from the East Pacific Rise at 10°S, the fossil Galapagos Rise and the Nazca plate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batiza, Rodey; Oestrike, Richard; Futa, Kiyoto

    1982-01-01

    The dredges from the East Pacific Rise at about 10°S recovered unusual transitional, light rare-earth element (LREE) enriched basalts which show a range of fractionation. On the basis of their chemical and isotopic abundances, it is unlikely that the lavas are related by a single simple process of magmatic differentiation. We suggest that the mantle source region of these basalts was chemically and isotopically heterogeneous. The chemistry of LREE-depleted tholeiitic basalt dredged from near the axis of the extinct Galapagos Rise indicates complex petrogenesis and differentiation. The presence of tholeiitic basalts here indicates that unlike the Guadalupe and Mathematician fossil ridges, the Galapagos Rise has not been the site of voluminous post-abandonment alkalic volcanism. Alkalic basalts of picritic bulk composition dredged from an elongate seamount near the Galapagos Rise do not represent liquid compositions. Instead, we suggest that these alkalic liquids contain added olivine and plagioclase xenocrysts. Although most of the samples analyzed are very fresh, a few have been altered. The latter exhibit characteristic chemical and isotopic effects of seawater alteration.

  2. The dominance of introduced plant species in the diets of migratory Galapagos tortoises increases with elevation on a human-occupied island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blake, Stephen; Guézou, Anne; Deem, Sharon L.; Yackulic, Charles B.; Cabrera, Fredy

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of resources and food selection are fundamental to the ecology, life history, physiology, population dynamics, and conservation of animals. Introduced plants are changing foraging dynamics of herbivores in many ecosystems often with unknown consequences. Galapagos tortoises, like many herbivores, undertake migrations along elevation gradients driven by variability in vegetation productivity which take them into upland areas dominated by introduced plants. We sought to characterize diet composition of two species of Galapagos tortoises, focussing on how the role of introduced forage species changes over space and the implications for tortoise conservation. We quantified the distribution of tortoises with elevation using GPS telemetry. Along the elevation gradient, we quantified the abundance of introduced and native plant species, estimated diet composition by recording foods consumed by tortoises, and assessed tortoise physical condition from body weights and blood parameter values. Tortoises ranged between 0 and 429 m in elevation over which they consumed at least 64 plant species from 26 families, 44 percent of which were introduced species. Cover of introduced species and the proportion of introduced species in tortoise diets increased with elevation. Introduced species were positively selected for by tortoises at all elevations. Tortoise physical condition was either consistent or increased with elevation at the least biologically productive season on Galapagos. Santa Cruz tortoises are generalist herbivores that have adapted their feeding behavior to consume many introduced plant species that has likely made a positive contribution to tortoise nutrition. Some transformed habitats that contain an abundance of introduced forage species are compatible with tortoise conservation.

  3. Feather mercury concentrations in Southern Ocean seabirds: Variation by species, site and time.

    PubMed

    Becker, Peter H; Goutner, Vassilis; Ryan, Peter G; González-Solís, Jacob

    2016-09-01

    We studied mercury contamination in 25 seabird species breeding along a latitudinal gradient across the Southern Ocean, from Gough Island (40°S) through Marion Island (47°S) to Byers Peninsula (63°S). Total mercury concentrations in body feather samples of adults caught at breeding colonies from 2008 to 2011 were determined. Krill (Euphausia spp.) and other zooplankton consumers had low mercury concentrations (gentoo penguin Pygoscelis papua, chinstrap penguin Pseudomonas Antarctica, common diving petrel Pelecanoides urinatrix, broad-billed prion Pachyptila vittata; mean levels 308-753 ng g(-1)), whereas seabirds consuming squid or carrion had high mercury concentrations (ascending order: Kerguelen petrel Aphrodroma brevirostris, southern giant petrel Macronectes giganteus, soft-plumaged petrel Pterodroma mollis, sooty albatross Phoebetria fusca, Atlantic petrel Pterodroma incerta, northern giant petrel Macronectes halli, great-winged petrel Pterodroma macroptera; 10,720-28038 ng g(-1)). The two species with the highest mercury concentrations, northern giant petrels and great-winged petrels, bred at Marion Island. Among species investigated at multiple sites, southern giant petrels had higher mercury levels at Marion than at Gough Island and Byers Peninsula. Mercury levels among Byers Peninsula seabirds were low, in two species even lower than levels measured 10 years before at Bird Island, South Georgia. Replicate measurements after about 25 years at Gough Island showed much higher mercury levels in feathers of sooty albatrosses (by 187%), soft-plumaged petrels (53%) and Atlantic petrels (49%). Concentrations similar to the past were detected in southern giant petrels at Gough and Marion islands, and in northern giant petrels at Marion. There were no clear indications that timing of moult or migratory behavior affected mercury contamination patterns among species. Causes of inter-site or temporal differences in mercury contamination could not be verified

  4. Understanding the mechanisms of antitropical divergence in the seabird White-faced Storm-petrel (Procellariiformes: Pelagodroma marina) using a multilocus approach.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mónica C; Matias, Rafael; Wanless, Ross M; Ryan, Peter G; Stephenson, Brent M; Bolton, Mark; Ferrand, Nuno; Coelho, M Manuela

    2015-06-01

    Analytical methods that apply coalescent theory to multilocus data have improved inferences of demographic parameters that are critical to understanding population divergence and speciation. In particular, at the early stages of speciation, it is important to implement models that accommodate conflicting gene trees, and benefit from the presence of shared polymorphisms. Here, we employ eleven nuclear loci and the mitochondrial control region to investigate the phylogeography and historical demography of the pelagic seabird White-faced Storm-petrel (Pelagodroma marina) by sampling subspecies across its antitropical distribution. Groups are all highly differentiated: global mitochondrial ΦST = 0.89 (P < 0.01) and global nuclear ΦST varies between 0.22 and 0.83 (all P < 0.01). The complete lineage sorting of the mitochondrial locus between hemispheres is corroborated by approximately half of the nuclear genealogies, suggesting a long-term antitropical divergence in isolation. Coalescent-based estimates of demographic parameters suggest that hemispheric divergence of P. marina occurred approximately 840 000 ya (95% HPD 582 000-1 170 000), in the absence of gene flow, and divergence within the Southern Hemisphere occurred 190 000 ya (95% HPD 96 000-600 000), both probably associated with the profound palaeo-oceanographic changes of the Pleistocene. A fledgling sampled in St Helena (tropical South Atlantic) suggests recent colonization from the Northern Hemisphere. Despite the great potential for long-distance dispersal, P. marina antitropical groups have been evolving as independent, allopatric lineages, and divergence is probably maintained by philopatry coupled with asynchronous reproductive phenology and local adaptation.

  5. Modulation of the prolactin and the corticosterone stress responses: do they tell the same story in a long-lived bird, the Cape petrel?

    PubMed

    Angelier, Frédéric; Wingfield, John C; Trouvé, Colette; de Grissac, Sophie; Chastel, Olivier

    2013-02-01

    Over the last decades, the corticosterone stress response has been suggested as a major physiological tool to understand what strategy an individual might adopt in response to environmental perturbations. More recently, another hormone related to parental care--prolactin--has been suggested as a complementary tool to investigate this question. Indeed, both of these hormones are affected by stressors and are involved in parental decisions, such as deserting the nest. Because of these similarities, it remains unclear what the functional distinction between the prolactin and corticosterone stress responses is. Here, we investigated whether natural variations of the corticosterone and prolactin stress responses are functionally linked in free-living Cape petrel (Daption capense) parents. If prolactin and corticosterone mediate the same functional response to a stressor and are the proxies of the same response, we predict that corticosterone and prolactin stress responses (1) will be modulated according to the same factors; (2) will affect reproductive performances in the same way; and, (3) of course, will be correlated. Contrary to these predictions, we found that the corticosterone and prolactin stress responses were respectively modulated according to body condition and breeding status. Moreover, prolactin levels, but not corticosterone levels, were related to hatching success in this species. Finally, we did not find any significant correlation between these two stress responses under any circumstances (failed breeders, incubating or chick rearing birds) and this result was overall supported by a review of the existing literature. Therefore, these two stress responses do not seem to be tightly linked and we believe that they may provide complementary pieces of information on parental investment in birds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of pet-related management factors and the risk of Salmonella spp. carriage in pet dogs from volunteer households in Ontario (2005-2006).

    PubMed

    Leonard, E K; Pearl, D L; Finley, R L; Janecko, N; Peregrine, A S; Reid-Smith, R J; Weese, J S

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine pet-related management factors that may be associated with the presence of Salmonella spp. in feces of pet dogs from volunteer households. From October 2005 until May 2006, 138 dogs from 84 households in Ontario were recruited to participate in a cross-sectional study. Five consecutive daily fecal samples were collected from each dog and enrichment culture for Salmonella spp. was performed. A higher than expected number of the dogs (23.2%; 32/138) had at least one fecal sample positive for Salmonella, and 25% (21/84) of the households had at least one dog shedding Salmonella. Twelve serotypes of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica were identified, with the predominant serotypes being Typhimurium (33.3%; 13/39), Kentucky (15.4%; 6/39), Brandenburg (15.4%; 6/39) and Heidelberg (12.8%; 5/39). Univariable logistic regression models were created with a random effect for household to account for clustering. Statistically significant risk factors for a dog testing positive included having contact with livestock, receiving a probiotic in the previous 30 days, feeding a commercial or homemade raw food diet, feeding raw meat and eggs, feeding a homemade cooked diet, and having more than one dog in the household. In two-variable models that controlled for feeding raw food, the non-dietary variables were no longer statistically significant. These results highlight the potential public health risk of including raw animal products in canine diets. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Sedimentology, geochemistry and rock magnetic properties of beach sands in Galapagos Islands - implications for nesting marine turtles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Cruz, L.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Vazquez-Gutierrez, F.; Carranza-Edwards, A.

    2007-12-01

    Marine turtles are well known for their navigation ability in the open ocean and fidelity to nesting beaches. Green turtle adult females migrate from foraging areas to island nesting beaches, traveling hundreds or thousands of kilometers each way. The marine turtle breeding in the Galapagos Islands is the Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas agassisi); fairly common throughout the islands but with nesting sites located at Las Bachas (Santa Cruz), Barahona and Quinta Playa (Isabela), Salinas (Baltra), Gardner Bay (Española) and Bartolomé Islet. In order to characterize and to identify the geochemical signature of nesting marine turtle beaches in Galapagos Islands, sedimentological, geochemical and rock magnetic parameters are used. A total of one hundred and twenty sand samples were collected in four beaches to relate compositional characteristics between equivalent areas, these are: Las Bachas, Salinas, Barahona and Quinta Playa. Grain size is evaluated using laser particle analysis (Model Coulter LS 230). Bulk ICP-MS geochemical analysis is performed, following trace elements are analyzed: Al, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Ba, Pb, Fe, Mn, K, Na, Mg, Sr, Ca and Hg; and low-field magnetic susceptibility is measured in all samples at low and high frequencies. Granulometric analysis showed that Barahona and Quinta Playa are characterized for fine grained sands. In contrast, Salinas and Las Bachas exhibit medium to coarse sands. Trace metals concentrations and magnetic susceptibility show different distribution patterns in the beach sands. Calcium is the most abundant element in the samples. In particular, Co, K, and Na show similar concentrations in the four beaches. Las Bachas beach shows highest concentrations of Pb and Hg (maximum values 101.1 and 118.5 mg/kg, respectively), we suggest that the enrichment corresponds to an anthropogenic signal. Salinas beach samples show high concentrations of Fe, V, Cr, Zn, Mn and the highest values of magnetic susceptibility (maximum

  8. Searching for Seismic Signatures of a Plume Source at the Base of the Mantle Below the Galapagos Island Hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanacore, E.; Niu, F.

    2007-12-01

    This study analyzes SKS and SKKS waveforms recorded on the BOLIVAR array in Venezuela and the BANJO array in South America from earthquake sources located in Tonga and Alaska regions to characterize the lower mantle beneath the Galapagos Islands. The data analysis applies two independent methods, residual differential SKKS-SKS travel times and anisotropy measurements, to examine the historically unsampled region. The residual differential travel time observations were performed using 21 earthquakes from the Tonga trench with magnitudes greater than 5.5 Mw that were recorded on the Bolivar array. Only data that was deemed to have a high SNR for both the SKS and SKKS phases were retained for analysis. Significant positive values of differential travel time that indicate low velocity along the SKKS raypaths are detected east of ~\\m270° longitude. The anisotropy data set consists of 31 intermediate and deep focus earthquakes from the Tonga and Aleutian trenches recorded on the BOLIVAR and BANJO arrays respectively. The anisotropy fast axis angle and time lag of the two phases are calculated using the 1-layer cross-convolution method of Menke and Levin (2003) with a maximum time lag window of 3 seconds. We retain results with an amplitude normalized squared L2 norm value of 0.6 or less for analysis. Because the raypaths of the SKS and SKKS phases are similar in the upper mantle and sample different regions of the lower mantle, we attribute inconsistencies between the two anisotropy to difference of the mantle structure near the CMB. We define significant difference in the azimuth of the fast axis as any difference between the SKSac and SKKSac measurements greater than 15 degrees. The dataset is dominated by inconsistent fast axis azimuth measurements between the SKSac and SKKSac phases, but does not isolate a single geographic region. Comparison of the splitting time measurements yields that inconsistency between the two phases is more significant, greater than 0.5 s

  9. Time-averaged paleomagnetic field at the equator: Complete data and results from the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromme, Sherman; Mankinen, Edward A.; PréVot, Michel

    2010-11-01

    We present here the complete paleomagnetic laboratory results from a collection of approximately 1500 oriented cores from all 16 of the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador, collected by Allan Cox in 1964-1965 but nearly all previously unpublished. The islands are located in the eastern Pacific Ocean within 1.4° of latitude from the equator and range in age from historically erupted to 3 Ma, mostly determined by published K-Ar and 3He isotopic dating. The number of sites collected on each island ranges from 1 to 28, for a total of 186. After combining duplicate site mean directions, 149 are used for an overall mean direction and 8 represent excursions and one reversal path. Divided by geomagnetic polarity chron, 110 site means are Brunhes or Jaramillo (normal polarity), 27 are Matuyama (reversed polarity), and 12 are Gauss (both polarities). We have completed the magnetic cleaning that was commenced in the late 1960s. Secondary (mostly viscous) magnetizations were nearly all removed by alternating field demagnetization at 10 mT. We have used the so-called blanket cleaning method, generally at 10 mT. All sites were in basalt flows and gave good paleomagnetic results; none was rejected in toto, and only a few core specimens were magnetically unsatisfactory. Nearly all sites had eight independently oriented cores, and within-site angular standard deviations of directions range from 1° to 8°. We used both Fisher and Bingham statistics to analyze the data and found that many of the direction populations are strongly elongate along the paleomagnetic meridian, while the corresponding virtual pole (VGP) populations are essentially circularly distributed. The paleomagnetic poles, calculated as the means of VGPs, are as follows: Brunhes and Jaramillo, north latitude = 86.9°, east longitude = 245.1°, and 95% confidence radius A95 = 1.9°; Matuyama, latitude = 87.2°, longitude = 158.2°, and A95 = 3.8°; Gauss, latitude = 83.0°, longitude = 204.7°, and A95 = 7.0°. These

  10. Time-averaged paleomagnetic field at the equator: Complete data and results from the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gromme, Sherman; Mankinen, Edward A.; Prévot, Michel

    2010-01-01

    We present here the complete paleomagnetic laboratory results from a collection of approximately 1500 oriented cores from all 16 of the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador, collected by Allan Cox in 1964–1965 but nearly all previously unpublished. The islands are located in the eastern Pacific Ocean within 1.4° of latitude from the equator and range in age from historically erupted to 3 Ma, mostly determined by published K-Ar and 3He isotopic dating. The number of sites collected on each island ranges from 1 to 28, for a total of 186. After combining duplicate site mean directions, 149 are used for an overall mean direction and 8 represent excursions and one reversal path. Divided by geomagnetic polarity chron, 110 site means are Brunhes or Jaramillo (normal polarity), 27 are Matuyama (reversed polarity), and 12 are Gauss (both polarities). We have completed the magnetic cleaning that was commenced in the late 1960s. Secondary (mostly viscous) magnetizations were nearly all removed by alternating field demagnetization at 10 mT. We have used the so-called blanket cleaning method, generally at 10 mT. All sites were in basalt flows and gave good paleomagnetic results; none was rejected in toto, and only a few core specimens were magnetically unsatisfactory. Nearly all sites had eight independently oriented cores, and within-site angular standard deviations of directions range from 1° to 8°. We used both Fisher and Bingham statistics to analyze the data and found that many of the direction populations are strongly elongate along the paleomagnetic meridian, while the corresponding virtual pole (VGP) populations are essentially circularly distributed. The paleomagnetic poles, calculated as the means of VGPs, are as follows: Brunhes and Jaramillo, north latitude = 86.9°, east longitude = 245.1°, and 95% confidence radius A95 = 1.9°; Matuyama, latitude = 87.2°, longitude = 158.2°, and A95 = 3.8°; Gauss, latitude = 83.0°, longitude = 204.7°, and A95 = 7.0°. These

  11. Imaging spatial and temporal seismic source variations at Sierra Negra Volcano, Galapagos Islands using back-projection methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, C. L.; Lawrence, J. F.; Ebinger, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Imaging spatial and temporal seismic source variations at Sierra Negra Volcano, Galapagos Islands using back-projection methods Cyndi Kelly1, Jesse F. Lawrence1, Cindy Ebinger2 1Stanford University, Department of Geophysics, 397 Panama Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA 2University of Rochester, Department of Earth and Environmental Science, 227 Hutchison Hall, Rochester, NY 14627, USA Low-magnitude seismic signals generated by processes that characterize volcanic and hydrothermal systems and their plumbing networks are difficult to observe remotely. Seismic records from these systems tend to be extremely 'noisy', making it difficult to resolve 3D subsurface structures using traditional seismic methods. Easily identifiable high-amplitude bursts within the noise that might be suitable for use with traditional seismic methods (i.e. eruptions) tend to occur relatively infrequently compared to the length of an entire eruptive cycle. Furthermore, while these impulsive events might help constrain the dynamics of a particular eruption, they shed little insight into the mechanisms that occur throughout an entire eruption sequence. It has been shown, however, that the much more abundant low-amplitude seismic 'noise' in these records (i.e. volcanic or geyser 'tremor') actually represents a series of overlapping low-magnitude displacements that can be directly linked to magma, fluid, and volatile movement at depth. This 'noisy' data therefore likely contains valuable information about the processes occurring in the volcanic or hydrothermal system before, during and after eruption events. In this study, we present a new method to comprehensively study how the seismic source distribution of all events - including micro-events - evolves during different phases of the eruption sequence of Sierra Negra Volcano in the Galapagos Islands. We apply a back-projection search algorithm to image sources of seismic 'noise' at Sierra Negra Volcano during a proposed intrusion event. By analyzing

  12. /sup 238/U, /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb in some vent waters of the Galapagos spreading center

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnaswami, S.; Turekian, K.K.

    1982-08-01

    The concentrations of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 238/U and /sup 210/Pb have been measured in waters from the Mussel Bed and the Rose Garden thermal fields at the Galapagos spreading center over a temperature range of approx.2.5--16 /sup 0/C. The /sup 226/Ra-T plots yield slopes of 0.112 and 0.036 dpm/kg /sup 0/C for the Mussel Bed and the Rose Garden respectively yielding a global hydrothermal /sup 226/Ra flux less than 5% of that required to sustain the oceanic inventory. /sup 238/U concentration in waters <9 /sup 0/C is the same as that in ambient sea water whereas water hotter than approx.9 /sup 0/C shows a decreasing trend with temperature to zero /sup 238/U at approx.29 /sup 0/C. /sup 210/Pb concentration in Mussel Bed increases with temperature, and extrapolated to approx.350 /sup 0/C yields a /sup 210/Pb concentration considerably less than that expected from /sup 222/Rn decay and basalt alteration.

  13. Variation in the hydrothermal vent clam, Calyptogen magnifica, at the Rose Garden vent on the Galapagos spreading center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, C. R.; Childress, J. J.; Arp, A. J.; Brooks, J. M.; Distel, D. L.; Dugan, J. A.; Felbeck, H.; Fritz, L. W.; Hessler, R. R.; Johnson, K. S.; Kennicutt, M. C.; Lutz, R. A.; Macko, S. A.; Newton, A.; Powell, M. A.; Somero, G. N.; Soto, T.

    1988-10-01

    Calyptogena magnifica occupy a relatively restricted habitat at the Rose Garden hydrothermal vent site on the Galapagos Rift. These clams are found in areas with very low flow of vent water and gain exposure to hydrogen sulfide by inserting their well-vascularized foot into cracks that contain this flow. Vent water is undetectable around the siphons of many of the individuals, and they therefore probably take up sulfide through their foot, and oxygen and inorganic carbon through their gills. Age estimates indicate that the bulk of the recruitment of C. magnifica occured between 1971 and 1976. Isotopic evidence indicates that symbionts are the main source of both nutritional carbon and nitrogen for the clams, and that the symbionts assimilate both of these substrates from inorganic sources. Carbohydrate and protein in the clam soft tissues, as well as the elemental sulfur content of their gills, decrease with increasing clam size. There is only slight variation in most of the parameters measured, and none of the parameters show nearly the variation seen in the other hydrothermal vent bivalve, Bathymodiolus thermophilus. However, several parameters, such as δ13C, condition index, and some bacterial enzyme activities, vary significantly with habitat.

  14. Feather mites and internal parasites in small ground finches (Geospiza fuliginosa, Emberizidae) from the Galapagos Islands (Equador).

    PubMed

    Lindström, Karin M; Dolnik, Olga; Yabsley, Michael; Hellgren, Olof; O'Connor, Barry; Pärn, Henrik; Foufopoulos, Johannes

    2009-02-01

    During a parasite survey, we collected data on the presence and distribution of feather mites, intestinal parasites, and blood parasites of small ground finches (Geospiza fuliginosa) from 4 islands in the Galapagos. We recorded 4 species of feather mites, with the most common species, Trouessartia geospiza, present on the majority (77% [308/400]) of individuals. Birds with high loads of T. geospiza came from larger islands and had higher body masses. We identified 3 species of intestinal Isospora (Isospora fragmenta, Isospora temeraria, and Isospora exigua) in fecal samples that showed a diurnal pattern of oocyst release. Among samples collected in the afternoon, infection prevalence was 61% (11/18), while only 0.5% (1/192) contained oocysts in the morning. We screened 40 individuals from one island (Isabela) for blood parasites using molecular markers. Although no parasites of Haemoproteus, Leucocytozoon, or Plasmodium were detected, a high proportion of birds (80% [32/40]) had systemic Isospora spp. infections. A high infection prevalence (74% [20/27]), but low infection intensity, was confirmed using optical microscopy. This result could either be due to the detection of a previously unidentified systemic Isospora sp. parasite, or a result of the previously described Isospora spp. parasites causing systemic infections.

  15. Weaker axially dipolar time-averaged paleomagnetic field based on multidomain-corrected paleointensities from Galapagos lavas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huapei; Kent, Dennis V.; Rochette, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The geomagnetic field is predominantly dipolar today, and high-fidelity paleomagnetic mean directions from all over the globe strongly support the geocentric axial dipole (GAD) hypothesis for the past few million years. However, the bulk of paleointensity data fails to coincide with the axial dipole prediction of a factor-of-2 equator-to-pole increase in mean field strength, leaving the core dynamo process an enigma. Here, we obtain a multidomain-corrected Pliocene–Pleistocene average paleointensity of 21.6 ± 11.0 µT recorded by 27 lava flows from the Galapagos Archipelago near the Equator. Our new result in conjunction with a published comprehensive study of single-domain–behaved paleointensities from Antarctica (33.4 ± 13.9 µT) that also correspond to GAD directions suggests that the overall average paleomagnetic field over the past few million years has indeed been dominantly dipolar in intensity yet only ∼60% of the present-day field strength, with a long-term average virtual axial dipole magnetic moment of the Earth of only 4.9 ± 2.4 × 1022 A⋅m2. PMID:26598664

  16. Weaker axially dipolar time-averaged paleomagnetic field based on multidomain-corrected paleointensities from Galapagos lavas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huapei; Kent, Dennis V; Rochette, Pierre

    2015-12-08

    The geomagnetic field is predominantly dipolar today, and high-fidelity paleomagnetic mean directions from all over the globe strongly support the geocentric axial dipole (GAD) hypothesis for the past few million years. However, the bulk of paleointensity data fails to coincide with the axial dipole prediction of a factor-of-2 equator-to-pole increase in mean field strength, leaving the core dynamo process an enigma. Here, we obtain a multidomain-corrected Pliocene-Pleistocene average paleointensity of 21.6 ± 11.0 µT recorded by 27 lava flows from the Galapagos Archipelago near the Equator. Our new result in conjunction with a published comprehensive study of single-domain-behaved paleointensities from Antarctica (33.4 ± 13.9 µT) that also correspond to GAD directions suggests that the overall average paleomagnetic field over the past few million years has indeed been dominantly dipolar in intensity yet only ∼ 60% of the present-day field strength, with a long-term average virtual axial dipole magnetic moment of the Earth of only 4.9 ± 2.4 × 10(22) A ⋅ m(2).

  17. Testing the linkage between the Galapagos hotspot and the Caribbean large igneous province (CLIP) based on a globally consistent plate kinematic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerlich, Rainer; Clark, Stuart R.; Bunge, Hans-Peter

    2013-04-01

    The Caribbean Sea is known for its complicated plate tectonic history. In this regard, a key element is the origin of the Caribbean large igneous province (CLIP) as it covers large parts of the Caribbean plate. It is characterized by thickened crust of up to ~20 km and ocean drilling samples yield predominantly ages of 88-94 Ma. Most authors agree that the CLIP is underlain by former Farallon lithosphere that was trapped in between the diverging North and South American plates. Alternatively, so-called "in-situ" models suggest an autochthonous genesis of the entire Caribbean Sea. The suggestions for the origin of the igneous rocks that compose the CLIP are equally diverse: According to a widely believed theory, the plume head of the "paleo-Galapagos hotspot" could have been such a source and abundant geochemical evidence lends support for this idea. However, so far plate reconstruction models were unsuccessful to match the presumed location of the "paleo-Galapagos hotspot" with the area of the Farallon plate that now (presumably) underlies the CLIP at the appropriate time (88-94 Ma). This has led some authors to suggest asthenosphere inflow through slab windows as a potential mechanism for the creation of the CLIP. In even stronger contradiction, "in-situ" models view the CLIP as in parts stretched continental North and South American crust covered by volcanic extrusions that resulted from the divergence of these two major plates. Here, we resume this ongoing discussion and test the linkage between the "paleo-Galapagos hotspot" and the CLIP on the basis of a globally consistent plate tectonic model. We also suggest an age distribution of the presumed former Farallon lithosphere underneath the CLIP.

  18. Visual Observations and Geologic Settings of the Newly-Discovered Black Smoker Vent Sites Across the Galapagos Ridge-Hotspot Intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P.; Haymon, R.; MacDonald, K.; White, S.

    2006-12-01

    Nearly one-fifth of the global mid-ocean ridge is hotspot-affected, yet very little is known about how hotspots affect quantity and distribution of high-temperature hydrothermal vents along the ridge. During the 2005-06 GalAPAGoS expedition, acoustic and plume sensor surveys were conducted across the Galapagos ridge- hotspot intersection, lon. 94.5ºW- lon. 89.5ºW, to map fine scale geologic features and locate hydrothermal plumes emanating from the ridge crest. Where significant plumes were detected, the Medea fiber-optic camera sled was used successfully to find and image high-temperature vents on the seafloor. With Medea we discovered and imaged the first active and recently extinct black smokers known along the entire Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC), and documented the geologic setting of these vents. The Medea survey imaged numerous inactive vents as well as 3 active high-temperature vent fields along the ridge at 94º 04.5'W (Navidad Site), 91º56.2'W (Iguanas Site) and 91º54.3'W (Pinguinos Site). Two recently extinct vent fields also were identified at 91º23.4'-23.7'W and 91º13.8'W. All of the high-temperature vent sites that we identified along the GSC are found above relatively shallow AMC reflectors and are located in the middle 20% of ridge segments. Without exception the vent sites are located along fissures atop constructional axial volcanic ridges (AVR's) composed of relatively young pillow basalts. In some cases, the vents were associated with collapses adjacent to the fissures. The fissures appear to be eruptive sources of the pillow lavas comprising the AVR's. Video images of the chimneys show mature, cylindrical structures, up to 14m high; little diffuse flow; few animals; and some worm casts and dead clam shells, suggesting prior habitation. We conclude that distribution of the vents is controlled by magmatic processes, (i.e., by locations of shallow AMC magma reservoirs and eruptive fissures above dike intrusions), and that there is

  19. The relationship between heart rate and rate of oxygen consumption in Galapagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) at two different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Butler, Patrick J; Frappell, Peter B; Wang, Tobias; Wikelski, Martin

    2002-07-01

    To enable the use of heart rate (fH) for estimating field metabolic rate (FMR) in free-ranging Galapagos marine iguanas Amblyrhynchus cristatus, we determined the relationships between fH and mass-specific rate of oxygen consumption (sVO2) in seven iguanas before and during exercise on a treadmill and during the post-exercise period. The experiments were conducted at 27 and 35 degrees C, which are the temperatures that represent the lowest and highest average body temperatures of these animals in the field during summer. There were linear and significant relationships between fH and sVO2 at both temperatures (r(2)=0.86 and 0.91 at 27 degrees C and 36 degrees C, respectively). The slopes of the two regression lines did not differ, but there were significant differences in their intercepts. Thus, while heart rate can be used to predict FMR, the effects of temperature on the intercept of the regression must be taken into account when converting fH to sVO2. On the basis of our data, this can be achieved by applying the following formula: sVO2=0.0113fH-0.2983Q(10)((T(b)-27)/10). The increase in sVO2 with elevated body temperature results from an increase in fH, with no significant change in mass-specific oxygen pulse (sO(2) pulse; cardiac stroke volume times the difference in oxygen content between arterial and mixed venous blood). However, during exercise at both temperatures, increases in fH are insufficient to provide all of the additional O(2) required and there are also significant increases in the sO(2) pulses. This creates the situation whereby the same fH at the two temperatures can represent different values of sVO2.

  20. Gravity Variations at a Dynamic Basaltic Caldera: Before and After the 2005 Eruption of Sierra Negra Volcano, Galapagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geist, D.; Vigouroux, N.; Williams-Jones, G.; Chadwick, W.; Johnson, D.

    2007-12-01

    Sierra Negra volcano, an active basaltic volcano in the western Galapagos, last erupted in October 2005 following a period of accelerated uplift of the central caldera floor that started in April 2003. Deformation data indicate that a shallow (~ 2 km) sill underlies the caldera floor, and an intrusion rate of 64 x 106 m3/y for the 6 months prior to eruption was calculated from a continuous GPS network installed in 2002. Micro-gravity measurements were conducted in 2005, 2006, and 2007 at three stations in the center of the caldera and one station on the outer flank of the volcano and referenced to a base station on the NE rim of the caldera. From June 2005 to June 2006, residual gravity measured in the caldera increased by 1500 microgals at the center of the caldera to 184 microgals halfway to the northern edge of the caldera. This increase in residual gravity (height corrected) was accompanied by an uplift rate of ~ 212 cm/y until February 2006 after which the uplift rate decreased to 73 cm/y in 2006 and 44 cm/y in 2007. Similarly, from June 2006 to June 2007 gravity increased less dramaticaly than in 2005-2006 with an average increase of 11 microgals at the center of the caldera and 132 microgals at the more northern part of the caldera. Interestingly, the center of maximum gravity change shifted from the center of the caldera to the northern part sometime between June 2006 and June 2007. Gravity measurements on the outer rim of the caldera showed a 300 and a 200 microgal decrease from June 2005 to June 2006 and June 2006 to June 2007, respectively accompanied by low rates of inflation (1.8 cm/y). The coupling of gravity and deformation change supports the hypothesis of significant mass increase in the central-northern part of the caldera.

  1. Whale shark (Rhincodon typus) seasonal presence, residence time and habitat use at darwin island, galapagos marine reserve.

    PubMed

    Acuña-Marrero, David; Jiménez, Jesús; Smith, Franz; Doherty, Paul F; Hearn, Alex; Green, Jonathan R; Paredes-Jarrín, Jules; Salinas-de-León, Pelayo

    2014-01-01

    The life history of the whale shark (Rhincodon typus), including its reproductive ecology, still remains largely unknown. Here, we present results from the first whale shark population study around Darwin Island, Galapagos Marine Reserve. Following a diversified approach we characterized seasonal occurrence, population structure and size, and described habitat use of whale sharks based on fine scale movements around the island. Whale shark presence at Darwin Island was negatively correlated with Sea Surface Temperature (SST), with highest abundance corresponding to a cool season between July and December over six years of monitoring. From 2011 to 2013 we photo-identified 82 whale sharks ranging from 4 to 13.1 m Total Length (TL). Size distribution was bimodal, with a great majority (91.5%) of adult female individuals averaging 11.35 m±0.12 m (TL±SE), all but one showing signs of a potential pregnancy. Population dynamics models for apparently pregnant sharks estimated the presence of 3.76±0.90 (mean ± SE) sharks in the study area per day with an individual residence time of 2.09±0.51 (mean ± SE) days. Movement patterns analysis of four apparently pregnant individuals tracked with acoustic tags at Darwin Island revealed an intense use of Darwin's Arch, where no feeding or specific behavior has been recorded, together with periodic excursions around the island's vicinity. Sharks showed a preference for intermediate depths (20-30 m) with occasional dives mostly to mid-water, remaining the majority of their time at water temperatures between 24-25°C. All of our results point to Darwin Island as an important stopover in a migration, possibly with reproductive purposes, rather than an aggregation site. Current studies carried out in this area to investigate regional scale movement patterns may provide essential information about possible pupping grounds for this enigmatic species.

  2. Seasonal effects and fine-scale population dynamics of Aedes taeniorhynchus, a major disease vector in the Galapagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Bataille, Arnaud; Cunningham, Andrew A; Cruz, Marilyn; Cedeno, Virna; Goodman, Simon J

    2010-10-01

    Characterization of the fine-scale population dynamics of the mosquito Aedes taeniorhynchus is needed to improve our understanding of its role as a disease vector in the Galapagos Islands. We used microsatellite data to assess the genetic structure of coastal and highland mosquito populations and patterns of gene flow between the two habitats through time on Santa Cruz Island. In addition, we assessed possible associations of mosquito abundance and genetic diversity with environmental variables. The coastal and highland mosquito populations were highly differentiated from each other all year round, with some gene flow detected only during periods of increased precipitation. The results support the hypothesis that selection arising from ecological differences between habitats is driving adaptation and divergence in A. taeniorhynchus, and maintaining long-term genetic differentiation of the populations against gene flow. The highland and lowland populations may constitute an example of incipient speciation in progress. Highland populations were characterized by lower observed heterozygosity and allelic richness, suggesting a founder effect and/or lower breeding site availability in the highlands. A lack of reduction in genetic diversity over time in highland populations suggests that they survive dry periods as dormant eggs. Association between mosquito abundance and precipitation was strong in the highlands, whereas tide height was the main factor affecting mosquito abundance on the coast. Our findings suggests differences in the infection dynamics of mosquito-borne parasites in the highlands compared to the coast, and a higher risk of mosquito-driven disease spread across these habitats during periods of increased precipitation.

  3. Applicability of single-camera photogrammetry to determine body dimensions of pinnipeds: Galapagos sea lions as an example.

    PubMed

    Meise, Kristine; Mueller, Birte; Zein, Beate; Trillmich, Fritz

    2014-01-01

    Morphological features correlate with many life history traits and are therefore of high interest to behavioral and evolutionary biologists. Photogrammetry provides a useful tool to collect morphological data from species for which measurements are otherwise difficult to obtain. This method reduces disturbance and avoids capture stress. Using the Galapagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki) as a model system, we tested the applicability of single-camera photogrammetry in combination with laser distance measurement to estimate morphological traits which may vary with an animal's body position. We assessed whether linear morphological traits estimated by photogrammetry can be used to estimate body length and mass. We show that accurate estimates of body length (males: ±2.0%, females: ±2.6%) and reliable estimates of body mass are possible (males: ±6.8%, females: 14.5%). Furthermore, we developed correction factors that allow the use of animal photos that diverge somewhat from a flat-out position. The product of estimated body length and girth produced sufficiently reliable estimates of mass to categorize individuals into 10 kg-classes of body mass. Data of individuals repeatedly photographed within one season suggested relatively low measurement errors (body length: 2.9%, body mass: 8.1%). In order to develop accurate sex- and age-specific correction factors, a sufficient number of individuals from both sexes and from all desired age classes have to be captured for baseline measurements. Given proper validation, this method provides an excellent opportunity to collect morphological data for large numbers of individuals with minimal disturbance.

  4. Whale Shark (Rhincodon typus) Seasonal Presence, Residence Time and Habitat Use at Darwin Island, Galapagos Marine Reserve

    PubMed Central

    Acuña-Marrero, David; Jiménez, Jesús; Smith, Franz; Doherty, Paul F.; Hearn, Alex; Green, Jonathan R.; Paredes-Jarrín, Jules; Salinas-de-León, Pelayo

    2014-01-01

    The life history of the whale shark (Rhincodon typus), including its reproductive ecology, still remains largely unknown. Here, we present results from the first whale shark population study around Darwin Island, Galapagos Marine Reserve. Following a diversified approach we characterized seasonal occurrence, population structure and size, and described habitat use of whale sharks based on fine scale movements around the island. Whale shark presence at Darwin Island was negatively correlated with Sea Surface Temperature (SST), with highest abundance corresponding to a cool season between July and December over six years of monitoring. From 2011 to 2013 we photo-identified 82 whale sharks ranging from 4 to 13.1 m Total Length (TL). Size distribution was bimodal, with a great majority (91.5%) of adult female individuals averaging 11.35 m±0.12 m (TL±SE), all but one showing signs of a potential pregnancy. Population dynamics models for apparently pregnant sharks estimated the presence of 3.76±0.90 (mean ± SE) sharks in the study area per day with an individual residence time of 2.09±0.51 (mean ± SE) days. Movement patterns analysis of four apparently pregnant individuals tracked with acoustic tags at Darwin Island revealed an intense use of Darwin's Arch, where no feeding or specific behavior has been recorded, together with periodic excursions around the island's vicinity. Sharks showed a preference for intermediate depths (20–30 m) with occasional dives mostly to mid-water, remaining the majority of their time at water temperatures between 24–25°C. All of our results point to Darwin Island as an important stopover in a migration, possibly with reproductive purposes, rather than an aggregation site. Current studies carried out in this area to investigate regional scale movement patterns may provide essential information about possible pupping grounds for this enigmatic species. PMID:25551553

  5. Recruitment of marine invertebrates to hard substrates at deep-sea hydrothermal vents on the East Pacific Rise and Galapagos spreading center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dover, Cindy Lee; Berg, Carl J.; Turner, Ruth D.

    1988-10-01

    Recruitment panels were placed at and near hydrothermal vent communities at three sites on the Galapagos spreading center and one site on the East Pacific Rise at 21°N. Deployment periods ranged from 26 days (Clam Acres, 21°N) to 260-320 days (Rose Garden, Garden of Eden, Mussel Bed, GSC) to 1216 days (Clam Acres). Recruitment of gastropod post-larvae and juveniles was observed on arrays deployed at Clam Acres for 26 days. Regardless of length of deployment, populations of polychaetes, mollusks, and barnacles colonizing the panels were predominantly post-larval, juvenile, or sub-adult stages. We suggest that some combination of competition, migration, and predation maintains these populations in immature stages. Size distributions of individuals within a taxon on panels deployed for 1216 days are broad, suggesting intermittent or continuous recruitment in many of the vent-associated species rather than a single episodic recruitment event. Folliculinid and foraminiferan protozoans were the most abundant eucaryotic organisms colonizing long-term deployments at Clam Acres. On the Galapagos spreading center, level of recruitment differed among the vent sites, with Rose Garden > Garden of Eden ≫ Mussel Bed. Recruitment of vent-associated species was greater on panels placed within vent communities compared to panels placed adjacent to these communities. This observation is consistent with the maintenance of vent communities in discrete regions of hydrothermal flux.

  6. Discovery and Distribution of Black Smokers on the Western Galapagos Spreading Center: Implications for Spatial and Temporal Controls on High Temperature Venting at Ridge/Hotspot Intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haymon, R. M.; Anderson, P. G.; Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; White, S. M.; MacDonald, K. C.

    2006-12-01

    Though nearly one-fifth of the mid-ocean ridge (MOR) lies on or near hotspots, it has been debated whether hotspots increase or decrease MOR hydrothermal flux, or affect vent biota. Despite hotspot enhancement of melt supply, high-temperature vent plumes are enigmatically sparse along two previously-surveyed ridge- hotspot intersections [Reykjanes Ridge (RR), Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR)]. This has been attributed to crustal thickening by excess volcanism. During the 2005-06 GalAPAGoS expedition, we conducted nested sonar, plume, and camera surveys along a 540 km-long portion of the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) where the ridge intersects the Galapagos hotspot at lon. 94.5 -89.5 deg. W. Although MOR hydrothermal springs were first found along the eastern GSC crest in 1977 near lon. 86 deg. W, the GalAPAGoS smokers are the first active high-temperature vents to be found anywhere along the Cocos-Nazca plate boundary. Active and/or recently-inactive smokers were located beneath plumes at 5 sites on the seafloor between lon. 91 deg. W and 94.5 deg. W (see Anderson et al., this session) during near-bottom, real-time fiber-optic Medea camera surveys. Smokers occur along eruptive seafloor fissures atop axial volcanic ridges near the middles of ridge segments, mainly in areas underlain by relatively shallow, continuous axial magma chamber (AMC) seismic reflectors. These findings (1) support magmatic, rather than tectonic, control of GSC smoker distribution; (2) demonstrate that thick crust at MOR-hotspot intersections does not prevent high-temperature hydrothermal vents from forming; and, (3) appear to be inconsistent with models suggesting that enhanced hydrothermal cooling causes abrupt deepening of the AMC and transition from non-rifted to rifted GSC morphology near lon. 92.7 deg. W. The widely-spaced smoker sites located on different GSC segments exhibit remarkably similar characteristics and seafloor settings. Most sites are mature or extinct, and are on lava

  7. Development of algorithms to link the static model of Petrel with the dynamic model of OpenGeoSys and application to CO2 storage in a saline aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C.; Shinn, Y.

    2013-12-01

    A set of three algorithms named PET2OGS is developed to integrate the static model (Petrel) with the dynamic model (OpenGeoSys). PET2OGS consists of three sub-algorithms that convert finite difference methods (FDMs) grids to finite element methods (FEMs) grids. The algorithms and the workflow of the integration procedures are described in detail. After the proposed algorithms are tested on a variety of grids both in homogeneous and heterogeneous media, the integrated platform of the static and dynamic models is applied to model CO2 storage in a saline aquifer. A successful demonstration of the proposed algorithms proved a robust integration of the platform. With some minor modifications of the algorithms in the part of input and output, the proposed algorithms can be extended to integrate different combinations of FDM-based static models and FEM-based dynamic models beyond the example combination.

  8. Heat transfer through the sediments of the mounds hydrothermal area, Galapagos Spreading Center at 86 /sup 0/W

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, K.; Von Herzen, R.P.

    1983-02-10

    Heat transfer processes at the mounds area of the Galapagos Spreading Center at 86 /sup 0/W are revealed by temperatures measured at roughly-equal10-m intervals in the 30 +- 10 m sediment at each of 12 holes at DSDP Leg 70 Sites 506--509 and by temperatures of up to five thermistors on eleven 8--12 m long piston cores. The 325 needle-probe values show a significant linear increase of thermal conductivity with depth in each core. About half of the temperature-thermal resistance profiles are nonlinear and are fit to a steady state, vertical pore water advection model. Results indicate high and variable total heat flow and localized hydrothermal discharge at roughly-equal10/sup -8/ m/s, associated with individual mounds. Recharge is indicated at similar rates in the low heat flow belt roughly-equal5 km south of the mounds and is suggested at slower rates in the intermediate heat flow (0.17--0.42 W/m/sup 2/) belt surrounding the mounds heat flow high. Possible slow entrained recharge within roughly-equal100 m of discharging mounds is suggested. Also suggested is strong local discharge along the major fault bounding the mounds crustal block to the north. About 95 km north of the spreading axis, at DSDP Site 510, temperatures in the 114-m sediment cover on 2.7-m.y. crust are linear, consistent with the suggestion that the hydraulic resistance of this layer is sufficient to seal off free hydrothermal exchange between basement and bottom water. The combination of heat flow data and the physical properties data of Karato and Becker (this issue) suggests that roughly-equal50 m of sediment may be a threshold thickness for sealing of hydrothermal circulation within basement, where the topography is smooth. We suggest that the formation of mounds may be associated with the forced localization of hydrothermal discharge through the sediment, as its thickness approaches this threshold value.

  9. Microhabitat variation in the hydrothermal vent mussel, Bathymodiolus thermophilus, at the Rose Garden vent on the Galapagos Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, C. R.; Childress, J. J.; Arp, A. J.; Brooks, J. M.; Distel, D.; Favuzzi, J. A.; Felbeck, H.; Hessler, R.; Johnson, K. S.; Kennicutt, M. C.; Macko, S. A.; Newton, A.; Powell, M. A.; Somero, G. N.; Soto, T.

    1988-10-01

    Clumps of Bathymodiolus thermophilus were collected from three discrete areas at the 'Rose Garden' site on the Galapagos Rift using the deep submersible Alvin. Two mussel collections were made from the central Riftia mass, an area associated with very active venting, and three other collections were of two different peripheral mussel clumps. Before collection the clumps were extensively photographed and the water at two of the 'microhabitats' was analysed in situ for oxygen silica, sulfide and temperature. Sulfide levels of up to 300 μM were recorded at the central collection site, while the highest sulfide level recorded at the peripheral site assayed was 35 μM. Levels of RuBP carboxylase activity in the gills were significantly higher in mussels collected from the central ' Riftia site' than in either peripheral site. ATP sulfurylase was significantly higher in the gills of mussels from the central clump than in one of the peripheral clump collections. The chemical composition (% water, protein, carbohydrate, lipid and ash) and stable carbon isotope ratios ( δ13C) of the mussels showed the same trends, with highest lipid and carbohydrate and the lowest water content and δ13C in the central site mussels. Similarly, the mussels from the central site were significantly depleted in stable nitrogen ( δ15N) when compared with the peripheral site mussels. Variations between sites and tissues of the same animal may be indicative of differential utilization of inorganic or dissolved molecular nitrogen sources. The condition index (CI = soft tissue dry mass / internal shell volume) was similar for all animals collected at Rose Garden. The presence of a commensal polychaete, Branchipolynoe symmytilida, in the mantle cavity of the mussels was also correlated with the collection site, with the highest incidence of occurrence in the central clump. Levels of the enzyme RuBP carboxylase are quite variable in B. thermophilus and are on the average much lower (0

  10. Variation in melting conditions beneath a hotspot influenced mid-ocean ridge revealed by rare earth elements in melt inclusions from the western Galapagos Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, C. J.; Graham, D. W.; Kent, A.; Sinton, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    The western Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) provides a unique region to investigate how mantle melting varies along a mid-ocean ridge at constant spreading rate, due to the magma supply gradient produced by a nearby mantle hotspot. We have analyzed rare earth element (REE) concentrations by laser ablation ICP-MS in 74 individual melt inclusions, trapped in olivine and plagioclase phenocrysts, from 8 dredged basalts recovered along the western GSC between 91.8-97.2°W. Concentrations of the REEs closely mimic measured values in host and associated basalt glasses, but show a significantly wider compositional range. Melt inclusions from the eastern section of the study area, closest to the Galapagos archipelago, are dominantly E-MORB, while melt inclusions from the western portion are dominantly N-MORB. The most diverse melt inclusions occur in the central region, where previous work has shown that the chemistry of the lavas and axial morphology are transitional between hotspot-influenced, inflated ridge segments in the east and depleted-mantle influenced, magmatically less robust ridge segments in the west. Geochemical modeling of the REE concentrations and ratios support an increased contribution of deep, smaller degree melts beneath the eastern area closer to the hotspot, as suggested previously from basalt glass analyses (Cushman et al., 2004; Ingle et al. 2010). N-MORBs along the GSC are derived from a depleted, upper mantle source by moderate degrees of melting of spinel lherzolite (average F ~9%, maximum F ~20%), assuming constant melt productivity of 0.3-0.4%/km during mantle upwelling. In contrast, E-MORBs along the GSC are generated by mixing of small degree melts of spinel lherzolite (F~1-4%) with small degree melts of garnet lherzolite (F≤ 2.5%); these latter melts may contribute up to ~50% to the mixture. If melt productivity is significantly lower during melting in the garnet stability field, e.g., due to enhanced H20 content in the mantle closer to

  11. Characterizing human-environment interactions in the Galapagos Islands: A case study of land use/land cover dynamics in Isabela Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleary, Amy L.

    This dissertation examines contemporary land use and land cover (LULC) change in the communities and protected areas of Isabela Island to provide insights into human-environment interactions in the Galapagos Islands of Ecuador. The growing human presence in Galapagos over the last four decades has been accompanied by significant changes in LULC on inhabited islands in the archipelago. Local stakeholders and decision-makers have recently called for a more integrative approach to understanding interactions between people and the environment in the archipelago. This study is guided by two complementary bodies of work situated within the human-environment tradition of Geography---land change science and landscape ecology. First, support Vector Machine (SVM) and Object Based Image Analysis (OBIA) classifiers are evaluated for mapping LULC from high spatial resolution satellite images. The results show that thematic LULC classifications produced by OBIA are more accurate overall than those generated by SVM. However, important tradeoffs exist between improvements in classification accuracy and processing requirements. The composition and spatial configuration of LULC change are then mapped and quantified from a time series of QuickBird and WorldView-2 satellite images from 2003 to 2010. The pattern metric and change detection analyses reveal that land use change is extensive within the communities due to the expansion and consolidation of built-up areas, and fragmentation of and declines in agriculture. The Galapagos National Park is primarily transformed by exotic plant invasion, forests expansion, and shrinking coastal lagoons. Patterns of agricultural land abandonment, plant invasion, and forest expansion over the same period are described from pattern metric and overlay analyses. Potential drivers of these LULC transitions are identified from logistic regression models, descriptive statistics of agricultural surveys and population censuses, and interviews with

  12. Light attraction in endangered procellariiform birds: Reduction by shielding upward radiation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, J.R.; Sincock, J.L.; Hailman, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Autumnal attraction to man-made lighting causes heavy mortality in fledgling Hawaiian seabirds: Newell's shearwater (Puffinus auricularis newelli), dark-rumped petrel (Pterodroma phaeopygia sandwichensis), and band-rumpted storm-petrel (Oceanodroma castro). These threatened, endangered and rare species (respectively) approach and circle lights on their first flight from mountain nesting colonies on the island of Kauai to the sea. Lights of the largest resort were shielded to prevent upward radiation on alternate nights during 2 fledgling seasons. Shielding decreased attraction by nearly 40%. Most attraction occurred 1-4 h after sunset. Full moon dramatically decreased attraction, a phenomenon that has both theoretical and management implications.

  13. Light attraction in endangered procellariiform birds: Reduction by shielding upward radiation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, J.R.; Sincock, J.L.; Hailman, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Autumnal attraction to man-made lighting causes heavy mortality in fledgling Hawaiian seabirds: Newell's Shearwater (Puffinus auricularis newelli), Dark-rumped Petrel (Pterodroma phaeopygia sandwichensis), and Band-rumped Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma castro). These threatened, endangered, and rare species (respectively) approach and circle lights on their first flight from mountain nesting colonies on the island of Kauai to the sea. We shielded lights of the largest resort to prevent upward radiation on alternate nights during two fledgling seasons. Shielding decreased attraction by nearly 40%. Most attraction occurred 1-4 h after sunset. Full moon dramatically decreased attraction, a phenomenon that has both theoretical and management implications.

  14. Minor and trace element geochemistry of volcanic rocks dredged from the Galapagos spreading center: role of crystal fractionation and mantle heterogeneity.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Frey, F.A.; Thompson, G.; Rindge, S.

    1981-01-01

    A wide range of rock types (abyssal tholeiite, Fe-Ti-rich basalt, andesite, and rhyodacite) were dredged from near 95oW and 85oW on the Galapagos spreading center. Computer modeling of major element compositions has shown that these rocks could be derived from common parental magmas by successive degrees of fractional crystallization. However, the P2O5/K2O ratio implies distinct mantle source compositions for the two areas. These source regions also have different rare earth element (REE) abundance patterns. The sequence of fractionated lavas differs for the two areas and indicates earlier fractionation of apatite and titanomagnetite in the lavas from 95oW. The mantle source regions for these two areas are interpreted to be depleted in incompatible (and volatile?) elements, although the source region beneath 95oW is less severely depleted in La and K. -Authors

  15. Isolation and characterization of a new fungal genus and species, Aphanoascella galapagosensis, from carapace keratitis of a Galapagos tortoise (Chelonoidis nigra microphyes).

    PubMed

    Sutton, D A; Marín, Y; Thompson, E H; Wickes, B L; Fu, J; García, D; Swinford, A; de Maar, T; Guarro, J

    2013-02-01

    A new fungal genus and species, Aphanoascella galapagosensis, recovered from carapace keratitis in a Galapagos tortoise residing in a south Texas zoological collection, is characterized and described. The presence of a pale peridium composed of textura epidermoidea surrounded by scarce Hülle cell-like chlamydospores, and the characteristic reticulate ascospores with an equatorial rim separates it from other genera within the Onygenales. The phylogenetic tree inferred from the analysis of D1/D2 sequences demonstrates that this fungus represents a new lineage within that order. As D1/D2 and ITS sequence data also shows a further separation of Aphanoascus spp. into two monophyletic groups, we propose to retain the generic name Keratinophyton for species whose ascospores are pitted and display a conspicuous equatorial rim, and thereby propose new combinations in this genus for four Aphanoascus species.

  16. Seamounts South of the Galapagos Spreading Center Provide New Constraints on Plume-Ridge Interaction and Evidence for a Depleted Plume Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoernle, K.; Hauff, S. F.; Hanan, B. B.; Werner, R.; Christie, D.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C.

    2010-12-01

    Here we present new geochemical data on the seamounts up to 1° south of the Cocos/Nazca (Galapagos) Spreading Center (GSC) between 88-92°W and compare them to data from the ridge axis between 86.0-92.5°W. Both were sampled during the R/V SONNE 158 Expedition. Four distinct components are needed to explain the variation in the chemistry of the on-axis samples: 1) enriched Wolf-Darwin or Northern Domain (as defined by Hoernle et al., 2000; Geology 28) type of component (92.5-91.5°W), 2) not previously recognized enriched west of transform component (91.5-91.0°W), 3) enriched Fernandina or Central Domain type of component (~91.0-87.5°W) with 206Pb/204Pb >18.7, and 4) depleted component 206Pb/204Pb < 18.7 at the incipient overlapping spreading center (OSC) at 89.2°W and east of the 87.5°W OSC. The seamounts and islands south of the GSC to the west of the 91° transform fault generally have similar chemistry to what is observed at the ridge axis at the same longitude, consistent with N to NW flow of the two previously mentioned enriched components to the ridge axis in this area. The west of the transform enriched component, found in a small sub-domain (0.5° E-W by 1° N-S), has not been identified elsewhere in the Galapagos and may be older material being flushed out of the system by the presently more dominant and encroaching Wolf-Darwin/Northern component. East of the 91° transform fault, most of the seamounts and islands (e.g. Genovesa and Marchena) south of the GSC have depleted compositions. This is in stark contrast to what is present on the GSC in this area. Considerable debate exists whether this Eastern Domain (ie. area in the inside of the horse-shoe-shaped area of enriched material) represents depleted upper mantle entrained in the plume (e.g. White et al., 1993; JGR 98) or an intrinsic depleted plume component (e.g. Hoernle et al., 2000). High-quality isotope data from the seamounts and ridge, with replicated isotope data from IFM-GEOMAR and San

  17. An investigation of the distribution of eruptive products on the shield volcanoes of the western Galapagos Islands using remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munro, Duncan C.; Rowland, Scott K.; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Wilson, Lionel; Oviedo-Perez, Victor-Hugo

    1991-01-01

    Recent volcanic activity in the Galapagos Islands is concentrated on the two westernmost islands, Isla Isabela and Isla Fernandina. Difficult access has thus far prevented comprehensive geological field studies, so we examine the potential of remotely sensed data as a means of studying volcanic processes in the region. Volcan Wolf is used as an example of the analysis of SPOT HRV-1 data undertaken for each volcano. Landsat TM data are analyzed in an attempt to construct a relative age sequence for the recent eruptive activity on Isla Fernandina. No systematic variation in the surface reflectance of lava flows as a function of age could be detected with these data. Thus it was not possible to complete a study of the temporal distribution of volcanic activity.

  18. Galapagos Hot Spot-Spreading Center System: 1. Spatial petrological and geochemical variations (83°W-101°W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, J.-G.; Kingsley, R. H.; Devine, J. D.

    1982-07-01

    We report on the petrology and geochemistry of basalts dredged at 40-50 km intervals along the Galapagos Spreading Center, between 83°W and 101°W (40 stations). Emphasis is on spatial variations of `whole rock' major elements, rare earths, trace metals of the first transition series, and the nature of phenocryst assemblages and their abundances. These results provide new constraints on the nature and scale of mantle source heterogeneities, melting conditions, thermal field, and dynamics of crustal formation of the region. We suggest that ridge segments outside the high magnetic amplitude zone are at a steady state as a result of passive seafloor spreading. Basalts from these segments are apparently derived from an asthenosphere relatively uniformally depleted in incompatible elements, which appears of worldwide extent. We reject Vogt and DeBoer's [1976] model invoking damming at fracture zones of subaxial astenosphere flow of crystal slushes and increasing fractional crystallization down the flow line, because this model would not explain the gradients in REE observed about the Galapagos Platform. Our preferred model combines the mantle-plume binary mixing model of Schilling [1973] with the concept of recurring rift propagation proposed by Hey [1977a]. We further propose that pulsating mantle plume flux, perhaps in the form of a chain of blobs, may initiate the development of new rifts and their propagation. The present position of the tips of such new propagating rifts locate the wave fronts of such pulsating mantle plume flow. A two million year period is suggested for the last 4 m.y. from Wilson and Hey's [1979] information. Rigorous testing of our preferred model is possible.

  19. Widespread gene flow between oceans in a pelagic seabird species complex.

    PubMed

    Booth Jones, Katherine A; Nicoll, Malcolm A C; Raisin, Claire; Dawson, Deborah A; Hipperson, Helen; Horsburgh, Gavin J; Groombridge, Jim J; Ismar, Stefanie M H; Sweet, Paul; Jones, Carl G; Tatayah, Vikash; Ruhomaun, Kevin; Norris, Ken

    2017-08-21

    Global-scale gene flow is an important concern in conservation biology as it has the potential to either increase or decrease genetic diversity in species and populations. Although many studies focus on the gene flow between different populations of a single species, the potential for gene flow and introgression between species is understudied, particularly in seabirds. The only well-studied example of a mixed-species, hybridizing population of petrels exists on Round Island, in the Indian Ocean. Previous research assumed that Round Island represents a point of secondary contact between Atlantic (Pterodroma arminjoniana) and Pacific species (Pterodroma neglecta and Pterodroma heraldica). This study uses microsatellite genotyping and tracking data to address the possibility of between-species hybridization occurring outside the Indian Ocean. Dispersal and gene flow spanning three oceans were demonstrated between the species in this complex. Analysis of migration rates estimated using bayesass revealed unidirectional movement of petrels from the Atlantic and Pacific into the Indian Ocean. Conversely, structure analysis revealed gene flow between species of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, with potential three-way hybrids occurring outside the Indian Ocean. Additionally, geolocation tracking of Round Island petrels revealed two individuals travelling to the Atlantic and Pacific. These results suggest that interspecific hybrids in Pterodroma petrels are more common than was previously assumed. This study is the first of its kind to investigate gene flow between populations of closely related Procellariiform species on a global scale, demonstrating the need for consideration of widespread migration and hybridization in the conservation of threatened seabirds. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Biomineralization and biosignatures of coralloid-type speleothems from lava tubes of Galapagos Islands: evidences on the fossil record of prokaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ana Z.; Garcia-Sanchez, Angela M.; Pereira, Manuel F. C.; Gazquez, Fernando; Calaforra, José M.; Forti, Paolo; Toulkeridis, Theofilos; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2016-04-01

    Lava tubes have traditionally been considered of little interest from a mineralogical point of view. Recently, this type of volcanic caves has received particular attention because lava tubes have been described on Mars. Speleothems, or secondary mineral deposits in lava tubes are mainly composed of siliceous minerals. Coralloid-type speleothems are found either on basaltic cave walls or on the surface of other speleothems. Several authors attribute a microbially mediated origin to their formation. This type of speleothems was recorded within Royal Palm Cave of Santa Cruz Island in Galapagos Archipelago (Ecuador), a lava tube 600 m long, 5 to 15 m height and 2 to 10 m width. The Galapagos Islands are an archipelago of 19 volcanic islands located some 1500 km west of Ecuador, in the Pacific Ocean. These islands host one of the most biodiverse settings on Earth, studied by Charles Darwin. Beige and greyish small coralloids were collected in Royal Palm Cave and analysed by field emission scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (FESEM-EDS), X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and mineralogical analyses for morphological, 3D microstructural and compositional characterization, as well as for assessing microbe-mineral interactions and biogenicity. In addition, 16S rRNA gene analyses were performed to identify microbial communities associated with the coralloid-type speleothems. The coralloids showed internal compositional zonation along the growth direction of the speleothems, according to micro-CT data. Internal layering was clearly discernable by the differences in opacity of the distinct mineralogical phases to X-rays, being dominated by alteration products of siliceous composition, whereas more opaque phases, usually Ca-rich minerals, were dominant in the outermost part of the speleothems. X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy reinforced that the first stage of deposition is mainly composed of opal A and clay minerals

  1. Plume locations and thermal anomalies determined by S-to-P receiver function imaging of the onset of melting: Afar, Hawaii, Galapagos, and Iceland (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychert, C.; Harmon, N.; Ebinger, C. J.; Hammond, J. O.; Kendall, J. M.; Laske, G.; Shearer, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    In classical plume theory, thermal anomalies rise vertically to the surface of the Earth. However, seismically imaging plume locations has proven challenging, and several observations and results from geodynamics suggest that plume trajectories may be more complicated than simple vertical upwellings. Here we use S-to-P receiver functions to image upper mantle discontinuity structure beneath volcanically active regions. We image a strong, sharp velocity increase in depth that is likely the base of a melt-rich layer beneath Hawaii, Iceland, Galapagos, and Afar. The discontinuity is likely related to the onset of melting, and is therefore expected deeper in locations of thermal plume anomalies. We use depth variations to constrain plume locations and the magnitude of thermal plume anomalies at asthenospheric depths in these regions. Beneath Hawaii we find a discontinuity at 110 to 155 km depth, deepest 100 km west of Hawaii in the location of slowest shear velocities as constrained by surface waves. Beneath Galapagos the discontinuity is imaged at ~125 to 145 km, deeper in 3 sectors that are coincident with the slowest shear velocity anomalies in the upper 100 km, as constrained by surface waves. One is located in the southwest in a hypothesized plume location. The other two are to the northwest and northeast, possibly illuminating multiple plume diversions related to complex plume-ridge interactions. Beneath Iceland the discontinuity is imaged at 110 - 160 km, deeper in the northeast in the location of hypothesized plume impingement. Beneath the Afar rift the discontinuity is imaged at ~75 km depth, suggesting that the plume is located outside our study region. Overall the maximum discontinuity depths correspond to ~100°C local thermal anomalies, or ~200°C from ambient mantle. In addition, the deepest realizations of the discontinuities are not necessarily located directly beneath surface hotspots. This suggests that either plumes approach the surface at an angle

  2. Porosity and hydraulic properties of sediments from the Galapagos spreading center and their relation to hydrothermal circulation in the oceanic crust

    SciTech Connect

    Karato, S.; Becker, K.

    1983-02-10

    Density and porosity of sediments were measured on DSDP legs 69 and 70 samples from the Galapagos spreading center. Permeability and the hydraulic impedance of each sediment layer were estimated from measured values of porosity. The gradients of porosity and density with depth where sediment layers are thin (< or approx. =50 m thick) are anomalously high compared with those of other areas and with the upper part of thicker sediment layers in this area. A good correlation was found between the anomalous porosity and density gradients and the present-day heat flow. We interpret these observations to suggest that these high gradients may be due to active hydrothermal circulation through a thin sediment cover, which is inhibited by a thicker sediment layer, and that the pattern of hydrothermal circulation may be essentially fixed with the moving plate. Hydraulic impedance of the sediment layer was estimated from the observed depth variation of porosity and was shown to increase rapidly with its thickness. Our interpretation that a threshold thickness of about 50 m would inhibit direct diffuse discharge or recharge of hydrothermal flow through the undisturbed sediment layer yields an average permeability of the underlying basement layer of about 3-6 x 10/sup -14/ m/sup 2/ (30-60 mdarcies).

  3. A three-dimensional gravity study of the 95.5°W propagating rift in the Galapagos spreading center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps Morgan, Jason; Parmentier, E. M.

    1987-01-01

    Seafloor at the Galapagos 95.5°W propagating rift (PR) has a varied morphological expression that can be spatially correlated with the predicted kinematic history of the PR. A median valley-like depression occurs near the tip of the growing ridge axis. To test if this bathymetry is a dynamic feature supported by mantle or lithosphere strength or if it is due to isostatically compensated crustal thickness variations, we use three-dimensional gravity modelling to constrain the crustal structure in this region, from data collected by Hey in 1979 and 1982. The gravity anomaly at the PR tip depression suggests that the tip depression is not caused by crustal thinning. The data are consistent with a stress-supported PR tip depression caused by asthenospheric along-axis flow into the growing ridge axis (Phipps Morgan and Parmentier [1]). In contrast to the tip depression, seafloor in the sheared zone of material transferred through transform migration from the Cocos to Nazca plate is anomalously shallow and has a pronounced regional 300-400 m tilt towards the growing ridge axis over the 20 km width of the sheared zone. The gravity data also suggest that the sheared zone is not compensated by crustal thickening.

  4. Hydrogeological settings of a volcanic island (San Cristóbal, Galapagos) from joint interpretation of airborne electromagnetics and geomorphological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryet, A.; d'Ozouville, N.; Violette, S.; Deffontaines, B.; Auken, E.

    2012-08-01

    Many volcanic islands face freshwater stress and the situation may worsen with climate change and sea level rise. In this context, an optimum management of freshwater resources becomes crucial, but is often impeded by the lack of data. With the aim of investigating the hydrogeological settings of Southern San Cristóbal Island (Galapagos), we conducted an helicopter-borne, transient electromagnetic survey with the SkyTEM system. It provided unprecedented insights in the 3-D resistivity structure of this extinct basaltic shield. Combined with remote sensing and fieldwork, it allowed the definition of the first hydrogeological conceptual model of the island. Springs are fed by a series of perched aquifers overlying a regional basal aquifer subject to seawater intrusion. Dykes, evidenced by alignments of eruptive cones at the surface, correspond to sharp sub-vertical contrasts in resistivity in the subsurface, and impound groundwater in a summit channel. Combined with geomorphological observations, airborne electromagnetics is shown to be a useful tool for hydrogeological exploratory studies in complex, poorly known environments. It allows optimal development of land-based geophysical surveys and drilling campaigns.

  5. Hydrogeological settings of a volcanic island (San Cristóbal, Galapagos) from joint interpretation of airborne electromagnetics and geomorphological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryet, A.; d'Ozouville, N.; Violette, S.; Deffontaines, B.; Auken, E.

    2012-12-01

    Many volcanic islands face freshwater stress and the situation may worsen with climate change and sea level rise. In this context, an optimum management of freshwater resources becomes crucial, but is often impeded by the lack of data. With the aim of investigating the hydrogeological settings of southern San Cristóbal Island (Galapagos), we conducted a helicopter-borne, transient electromagnetic survey with the SkyTEM system. It provided unprecedented insights into the 3-D resistivity structure of this extinct basaltic shield. Combined with remote sensing and fieldwork, it allowed the definition of the first hydrogeological conceptual model of the island. Springs are fed by a series of perched aquifers overlying a regional basal aquifer subject to seawater intrusion. Dykes, evidenced by alignments of eruptive cones at the surface, correspond to sharp sub-vertical contrasts in resistivity in the subsurface, and impound groundwater in a summit channel. Combined with geomorphological observations, airborne electromagnetics are shown to be a useful for hydrogeological exploratory studies in complex, poorly known environments. They allow optimal development of land-based geophysical surveys and drilling campaigns.

  6. Molecular phylogeny and dating of an insular endemic moth radiation inferred from mitochondrial and nuclear genes: the genus Galagete (Lepidoptera: Autostichidae) of the Galapagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Patrick; Cibois, Alice; Landry, Bernard

    2007-10-01

    Galagete is a genus of microlepidoptera including 12 nominate species endemic to the Galapagos Islands. In order to better understand the diversification of this endemic insular radiation, to unravel relationships among species and populations, and to get insight into the early stages of speciation, we developed a phylogenetic reconstruction based on the combined mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (555bp) and II (453bp), and the nuclear elongation factor-1alpha (711bp) and wingless (351bp) genes. Monophyly of the genus is strongly supported in the Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses suggesting a single colonization event by a common ancestor. Two cases of paraphyly observed between species are hypothesized to represent imperfect species limits for G. espanolaensis nested within the G. turritella clade, and introgressive hybridization or lineage sorting in the case of the population of G. protozona from Santa Fe nested within the G. gnathodoxa clade. A geologically calibrated, relaxed molecular clock model was used for the first time to unravel the chronological sequence of an insular radiation. The first split occurring within the Galagete lineage on the archipelago is estimated at 3.3+/-0.4million years ago. The genus radiated relatively quickly in about 1.8million years, and gives an estimated speciation rate of 0.8 species per million years. Although the colonization scenario shows a stochastic dispersal pattern, the arrival of the ancestor and the diversification of the radiation coincide with the chronological emergence of the major islands.

  7. Some laelapine mites (Acari: Laelapidae) ectoparasitic on small mammals in the Galapagos Islands, including a new species of Gigantolaelaps from Aegialomys galapagoensis.

    PubMed

    Gettinger, Donald; Martins-Hatano, Fernanda; Gardner, Scott L

    2011-08-01

    A collection of laelapine mites from small mammals in the Galapagos Islands are identified and their host distributions reviewed. Two species of native rodents, Aegialomys galapagoensis and Nesoryzomys narboroughii, were infested only with laelapine species typical of Neotropical oryzomyine rodents; Rattus rattus was infested with Laelaps nuttalli, a host-specific ectoparasite endemic to Old World Rattus. A synopsis of Gigantolaelaps Fonseca is provided and we describe a new laelapine mite, Gigantolaelaps aegialomys n. sp., from the pelage of the rodent A. galapagoensis on Santa Fe Island. The new species has strong morphological affinities with a subgroup of Gigantolaelaps associated with a group of semiaquatic oryzomyine rodents ( Holochilus, Nectomys, Sooretamys, Pseudoryzomys , Oryzomys palustris). The other nominal species of this group, Gigantolaelaps mattogrossensis (Fonseca, 1935) and Gigantolaelaps goyanensis Fonseca, 1939 , are characterized by 10 setae on Tibia IV, large metapodal shields, and spiniform setae on Coxae I. Gigantolaelaps aegialomys is distinguished from these species by a lack of clearly spiniform setae on Coxa I, with setiform distal seta longer than the proximal; metapodal shields about the same size as the stigma; less than 100 µm separating the first pair of sternal setae.

  8. Diel use of a saltwater creek by white-tip reef sharks Triaenodon obesus (Carcharhiniformes: Carcharhinidae) in Academy Bay, Galapagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Peñiaherrera, César; Hearn, Alex R; Kuhn, Angela

    2012-06-01

    White-tip reef sharks are common inhabitants of the shallow waters surrounding the Galapagos Islands, where several known aggregation sites have become touristic attractions. With the aim to describe site fidelity and residency patterns of the white-tip reef sharks in a saltwater creek, we used the ultrasonic telemetry method. The study was undertaken in a saltwater channel South of Academy Bay, Santa Cruz Island, from May 2008-September 2009. A total of nine transmitters were attached to sharks and ultrasonic receivers were deployed at the inner and outside areas of the creek. From the total of fitted sharks, four lost their transmitters. The results obtained with the remaining sharks showed an elevated use of the inner area of the channel during the day, with more use of the external area during the night. However, none of the sharks were detected at the site every day, suggesting that they may have a number of preferred sites within their home range. More studies are needed to detail the home range and habitat use of this species, and to guide its protection level in the Academy Bay area.

  9. Remote characterization of marine bird habitats with satellite imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haney, J. Christopher

    1989-01-01

    Remote sensing techniques such as radar altimetry, synthetic aperture radar, coastal zone color scanning, and infrared radiometry provide effective, instantaneous, and relatively inexpensive means for characterizing critical habitats of marine birds. In order to make optimal use of satellite-derived data, the rationale for marine habitat classification is presented, and advantages and limitations of different remote sensing techniques are discussed. An application of remote characterization is used to test for short-term habitat use and selection by the Black-Capped Petrel (Pterodroma hasitata). By comparing synoptic satellite mapping (e.g. infrared radiometry) with ship-board censusing, it was possible to demonstrate that petrels did not use all marine habitats equally, nor did petrels use habitats in proportion to their availability (areal extent).

  10. Galapagos rift at 86 /sup 0/W 5. Variations in volcanism, structure, and hydrothermal activity along a 30-kilometer segment of the rift valley

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, R.D.; van Andel, T.H.; Holcomb, R.T.

    1982-02-10

    A 30-km segment of the Galapagos Rift near 86 /sup 0/W has been mapped in detail using the Angus towed camera system, the submersible Alvin, and multi-narrowbeam sonar data. Recent volcanic activity and active hydrothermal circulation are evident along the entire length of the segment mapped. There are, however, clear along-strike variations in these processes which render previous two-dimensional models obsolete. Although alternate explanations are possible, eruptive sequences appear to begin with the outpouring of surface-fed sheet flows and end with more channelized pillow flows. In the western portion of the rift studied, sheet flows dominate with the entire valley floor covered by recent flows associated with a broad shield volcano. The eastern portion, on the other hand, is narrower; consisting primarily of less voluminous pillow flows of apparently the same youthful age. Three possible models for the volcanic evolution of this rift segment are presented. According to the first model, the extrusive portion of the crust is formed by a distinct volcanic episode, followed by a long period of volcanic quiescence. The volcanic phase begins with voluminous sheet flows emerging from numerous eruptive fissures, which in time evolve into a narrow pillow ridge. Farther along-strike, where the flows are smaller and the extrusive zone narrow, the marginal portions undergo continued fissuring and subsequent uplift to form marginal highs and lows. This deformational activity also affects the extrusive zone once volcanic activity ends, converting the distinctly lobate topography of the active period into highly lineated fault-controlled terrain. According to the second model, extension and volcanism can be viewed as a continuous process without major periods of volcanic quiescence. The initial lava flows of a new eruptive sequence fill low areas, frequently spilling over local sills and flooding much of the rift valley.

  11. C-O-H ratios of silicate melt inclusions in basalts from the Galapagos Spreading Center near 95 degrees W: a laser decrepitation mass spectrometry study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yonover, R. N.; Sinton, J. M.; Sommer, M. A.; Gibson, E. K.

    1989-01-01

    Volatile ratios (primarily of H2O and CO2) in individual silicate melt (glass) inclusions in minerals have been analyzed using laser volatilization and mass spectrometry. A Nd-glass laser was used to produce 50-micrometer diameter pits in silicate melt inclusions. Released volatiles were analyzed directly with a computer-controlled quadrupole mass spectrometer. The detection limits for CO2 and H2O were on the order of 3 x 10(-14) and 3 x 10(-13) moles, respectively. The reproducibility for CO2/H2O was better than +/- 9%. The total range of volatile ratios from vitreous silicate glass inclusions contained in a suite of Galapagos lavas were: 0.018 to 1.193 for CO2/H2O; 0.002 to 0.758 for CO/H2O; 0 to 0.454 for CH4/H2O; and 0 to 0.432 for Ar/H2O. The mean CO2/H2O from the propagating rift (0.245 +/- 0.068) silicate glass inclusions is significantly lower than that of the actively failing rift (0.641 +/- 0.241); this difference probably reflects different degrees of degassing during magmatic histories for the two regions. Relatively undifferentiated failing rift magmas must have relatively short crustal residence times prior to eruption and, therefore, have not undergone significant degassing of CO2, as would appear to be the case for the more highly fractionated propagating rift magmas. The laser-mass spectrometric system described herein has the ability to act as a point-source probing device that can differentiate between the various volatile sites in minerals and rocks (as well as synthetic materials) on a micrometer scale.

  12. Beyond habitat requirements: individual fine-scale site fidelity in a colony of the Galapagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki) creates conditions for social structuring.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jochen B W; Trillmich, Fritz

    2007-06-01

    Site fidelity has been widely discussed, but rarely been related explicitly to a species' social context. This is surprising, as fine-scale site fidelity constitutes an important structural component in animal societies by setting limits to an individual's social interaction space. The study of fine-scale site fidelity is complicated by the fact that it is inextricably linked to patterns of habitat use. We here document fine-scale site fidelity in the Galapagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki) striving to disentangle these two aspects of spatial behaviour. Regardless of sex and age, all individuals used small, cohesive home ranges, which were stable in size across the reproductive and non-reproductive season. Home ranges showed a large individual component and did not primarily reflect age- or sex-specific habitat requirements. Site specificity could be illustrated up to a resolution of several metres. Long-term site fidelity was indicated by home range persistence over 3 years and the degree of site fidelity was unaffected by habitat, but showed seasonal differences: it was lower between reproductive and non-reproductive periods than between reproductive seasons. We further examined static and social interaction within mother-offspring pairs, which constitute a central social unit in most mammalian societies. Regardless of the occupied habitat type, adult females with offspring had smaller home range sizes than non-breeding females, demonstrating the importance of spatial predictability for mother-offspring pairs that recurrently have to reunite after females' foraging sojourns. While social interaction with the mother dropped to naught in both sexes after weaning, analysis of static interaction suggested female-biased home range inheritance. Dispersal decisions were apparently not based on habitat quality, but determined by the offspring's sex. We discuss the implication of observed fine-scale site fidelity patterns on habitat use, dispersal decisions and social

  13. C-O-H ratios of silicate melt inclusions in basalts from the Galapagos Spreading Center near 95 degrees W: a laser decrepitation mass spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Yonover, R N; Sinton, J M; Sommer, M A; Gibson, E K

    1989-01-01

    Volatile ratios (primarily of H2O and CO2) in individual silicate melt (glass) inclusions in minerals have been analyzed using laser volatilization and mass spectrometry. A Nd-glass laser was used to produce 50-micrometer diameter pits in silicate melt inclusions. Released volatiles were analyzed directly with a computer-controlled quadrupole mass spectrometer. The detection limits for CO2 and H2O were on the order of 3 x 10(-14) and 3 x 10(-13) moles, respectively. The reproducibility for CO2/H2O was better than +/- 9%. The total range of volatile ratios from vitreous silicate glass inclusions contained in a suite of Galapagos lavas were: 0.018 to 1.193 for CO2/H2O; 0.002 to 0.758 for CO/H2O; 0 to 0.454 for CH4/H2O; and 0 to 0.432 for Ar/H2O. The mean CO2/H2O from the propagating rift (0.245 +/- 0.068) silicate glass inclusions is significantly lower than that of the actively failing rift (0.641 +/- 0.241); this difference probably reflects different degrees of degassing during magmatic histories for the two regions. Relatively undifferentiated failing rift magmas must have relatively short crustal residence times prior to eruption and, therefore, have not undergone significant degassing of CO2, as would appear to be the case for the more highly fractionated propagating rift magmas. The laser-mass spectrometric system described herein has the ability to act as a point-source probing device that can differentiate between the various volatile sites in minerals and rocks (as well as synthetic materials) on a micrometer scale.

  14. Minor and trace element geochemistry of volcanic rocks dredged from the Galapagos spreading center: Role of crystal fractionation and mantle heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Clague, D.A.; Frey, F.A.; Thompson, G.; Rindge, S.

    1981-10-10

    A wide range of rock types (abyssal tholeiite, Fe-Ti-rich basalt, andesite, and rhyodacite) were dredged from near 95/sup 0/ W and 85/sup 0/ W on the Galapagos spreading center. Computer modeling of major element compositions has shown that these rocks could be derived from common parental magmas by successive degrees of fractional crystallization. However, the P/sub 2/O/sub 5//K/sub 2/O ratio averages 0.83 at 95/sup 0/W and 1.66 at 85/sup 0/W and implies distinct mantle source compositions for the two areas. These source regions also have different rare earth element (REE) abundance patterns, with (La/Sm)/sub EF/ = 0.67 at 95/sup 0/W and 0.46 at 85/sup 0/W. The sequence of fractional lavas differs for the two areas and indicates earlier fractionation of apatite and titanomagnetite in the lavas from 95/sup 0/W. Incompatible trace element abundances in 26 samples are used to infer that the range of Fe-Ti-rich basalt from 85/sup 0/W represents 19 to 35% residual liquid following crystal fractionation of a mineral assemblage of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and lesser olivine. Most samples from 85/sup 0/W can be related to a common parental magma that contained approximately 9 wt %FeO*, 1 wt % TiO/sub 2/, and had an Mg number (Mg/sup 3/ = 100 Mg/(Mg+Fe/sup 2 +/)) of about 65. Although the samples from 95/sup 0/W cannot all be derived from a common parental magma, the inferred parental magmas may have been derived by varying degrees of partial melting of a common source. The fractionation sequence consists of two parts: an initial iron enrichment trend followed by a silica enrichment trend. The most iron rich lavas represent about 32% residual liquid derived by crystal fractionation of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and lesser olivine from a parental magma with an Mg number of about 66. The silicic enrichment trend results from crystallization of titanomagnetite and some apatite.

  15. Patterns of Lava Morphology and Fissures along the Galapagos Spreading Center 89.5º - 95º W by Automated Classification of Side-scan Sonar Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J. D.; White, S. M.

    2006-12-01

    High-resolution backscatter and bathymetry data were collected using the DSL-120A and SM2000 sonar systems along the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) between {89.5°} W and {95°} W during the GalAPAGS cruise. An expert system classifier was developed to allow the classification of the distributions of fine-scale features on the seafloor by integrating high-resolution sonar imagery with a limited set of near- bottom visual observations. Textural information is developed from the sonar imagery, and unique sonar signatures are extracted at locations where in situ data is available from near-bottom photographic surveys by the camera sled Medea. A machine learning program uses this signature data to formulate rules and conditions that are then fed to the knowledge-base of the expert system classifier to produce a complete classification of the sonar swath. This method provides a quantitative determination of features like fissures and collapsed flows, and lava morphology based on sheet, lobate, and pillow flow classes. The classification of lava morphology for the entire length of the GSC study area yields 11,753 km2 (6%) of sheet/lobate flows; 157,903 km2 (82%) of pillow flows; 12,818 km2 (7%) of fissured areas; and 9,705 km2 (5%) of shadows/no data. These percentages are similar to slow-spreading ridges despite the superficial resemblance between the axial rise at the GSC and fast-spreading ridges. The paucity of sheet and lobate flows along the ridge required grouping these two categories in order to extract a consistent class signature. The classification reveals a slight decrease of pillow abundance and an increase in fissuring from west to east along the GSC. Sheet/lobate flows reach abundances over 10% only in the segment farthest to the east in our study area. The tendency for fissures and sheet/lobate flows to both increase suggests that these features are related. This observation may be explained by fissure eruptions becoming more common to the east, where

  16. Experimental constraints on the generation of FeTi basalts, andesites, and rhyodacites at the Galapagos Spreading Center, 85°W and 95°W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juster, Thomas C.; Grove, Timothy L.; Perfit, Michael R.

    1989-07-01

    One-atmosphere experiments conducted on a synthetic glass similar to Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) FeTi basalt (POO.82N2), (Byerly et al., 1976) define liquid lines of descent at fO2 values between the quartz-fayalite-magnetite (QFM) buffer and 2 log units more oxidizing than the nickle-nickle oxide (NNO) buffer. The experiments provide a framework for understanding the development of FeTi basalts by fractionation at near-ocean floor conditions. GSC lavas from near 85°W initially follow a compositional trend, distinguished by FeO° (= FeO + 0.9Fe2O3) enrichment and SiO2 depletion, which is nearly identical to the trend observed in experiments at QFM to which olivine seeds were added. This compositional trend can be produced by crystallization along an olivine → pigeonite reaction boundary in a shallow crystal-rich magma reservoir. In contrast, GSC lavas from 95°W do not mimic the 1-atm liquid line of descent, but appear to have fractionated at somewhat higher pressure. Basaltic liquids from 95°W underwent fractional crystallization at 1-2 kbar, did not experience FeO° enrichment along an olivine → low-Ca pyroxene reaction boundary, and developed FeO° enrichment concomitant with SiO2 enrichment. This compositional variation is consistent with a differentiation process in which crystals are continually removed from contact with liquid. Rhyodacites from 95°W cannot be related to the basalts and FeTi basalts recovered at 95°W by shallow-level crystal fractionation. Instead, rhyolite liquids were formed either by fractionation of similar parents at greater depth and higher PH2O, or formed by fractionation of different parents. Andesite formed by mixing between basaltic and rhyodacitic liquids. As a consequence, mixed andesites define a trend of decreasing P2O5 which has been previously interpreted to represent apatite saturation at approximately 0.22 wt% P2O5, significantly earlier than at 85°W (where P2O5 decreases at approximately 0.7 wt% P2O5). Our

  17. High-Resolution Photo-Mosaicing of the Rosebud Hydrothermal Vent Site and Surrounding Lava Flows, Galapagos Rift 86W: Techniques and Interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzhanov, Y.; Mayer, L.; Fornari, D.; Shank, T.; Humphris, S.; Scheirer, D.; Kinsey, J.; Whitcomb, L.

    2003-12-01

    The Rosebud hydrothermal vent field was discovered in May 2002 in the Galapagos Rift near 86W during a series of Alvin dives and ABE autonomous vehicle surveys. Vertical-incidence digital imaging using a 3.1 Mpixel digital camera and strobe illumination from altitudes of 3-5m was carried out during the Alvin dives. A complete survey of the Rosebud vent site was carried out on Alvin Dive 3790. Submersible position was determined by post-cruise integration of 1.2 MHz bottom-lock Doppler sonar velocity data logged at 5Hz, integrated with heading and attitude data from a north-seeking fiber-optic gyroscope logged at 10Hz, and initialized with a surveyed-in long-baseline transponder navigation system providing geodetic position fixes at 15s intervals. The photo-mosaicing process consisted of three main stages: pre-processing, pair-wise image co-registration, and global alignment. Excellent image quality allowed us to avoid lens distortion correction, so images only underwent histogram equalization. Pair-wise co-registration of sequential frames was done partially automatically (where overlap exceeded 70 percent we employed a frequency-domain based technique), and partially manually (when overlap did not exceed 15 percent and manual feature extraction was the only way to find transformations relating the frames). Partial mosaics allowed us to determine which non-sequential frames had substantial overlap, and the corresponding transformations were found via feature extraction. Global alignment of the images consisted of construction of a sparse, nonlinear over-constrained system of equations reflecting positions of the frames in real-world coordinates. This system was solved using least squares, and the solution provided globally optimal positions of the frames in the overall mosaic. Over 700 images were mosaiced resulting in resolution of ~3 mm per pixel. The mosaiced area covers approximately 50 m x 60 m and clearly shows several biological zonations and distribution of

  18. The evidences of progressive pressurization of volcanic conduit as driving forces of unrest phenomena analyzed via modelling of multiplatform geodetic measurements: Fernandina (GALAPAGOS) and Maunaloa (HAWAII) case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, Susi; Castaldo, Raffaele; Casu, Francesco; D'Auria, Luca; De Luca, Claudio; De Novellis, Vincenzo; Solaro, Giuseppe; Tizzani, Pietro

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the source of the ground deformation pattern affecting the Mauna Loa (Hawaii) and Fernandina (Galapagos) volcanoes by jointly exploiting different dataset collected by both GPS and multiplatform and multiorbit SAR sensors. We exploited the advanced Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) techniques to analyze unrest episode in two different geodynamics context. Our main goal is the understanding of the relationship among the spatio-temporal evolution of the ground deformation field and the temporal volumetric variation of the detected geodetic source during the uplift phenomena. We highlight the huge opportunity in understanding volcano unrest phenomena offered by the joint use of remote sensing data and inversion procedures: this prospect is particularly relevant for the analysis of uplift events, when other geophysical measurements are not available. For Mauna Loa (Hawaii) and Fernandina (Galapagos) volcanoes, the performed statistic analysis support the source pipe-like as the more suitable geometry to explain the unrest phenomena in which magmatic masses intrude in volcanic conduits. In particular, the deformation time series achieved at MounaLoa volcano are achieved by 23 GPS permanent stations of the Hawaii surveillance network, processed by Nevada Geodetic Laboratory, 7 SAR dataset acquired from ascending and descending orbits, with different look angles and along different tracks, by the C-Band Envisat satellite along the 2003 - 2010 time period for a total of 189 SAR imagery. Moreover, we exploited 2 dataset collected from ascending and descending passes by the X-Band Cosmo Sky-Med constellation during the 2012 - 2015 time span . These SAR datasets have been processed through the advanced DInSAR technique referred to as P-SBAS (De Luca et al., 2016), which allows us to retrieve the Line of Sight (LOS) projection of the surface deformation and analyze its temporal evolution by generating displacement time series. Starting this data

  19. Lichens On Galapagos Giant Tortoises.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, J R; Weber, W A

    1964-06-19

    The association of Physcia picta with the giant Galdpagos tortoise is believed to be the first reported occurrence of lichens on land animals. The habitat is restricted to specific sites on the carapace of male tortoises.

  20. Galapagos hot spot--spreading center system. 2. /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr and large ion lithophile element variations (85 /sup 0/W--101 /sup 0/W)

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, S.P.; Schilling, J.

    1982-12-10

    Thirty eight samples of basalts dredged from the Galapagos spreading center (GSC) between 85 /sup 0/W and 101.5 /sup 0/W longitudes have been analyzed for K, Rb, Cs, Ba, and Sr contents as well as for /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios. Basalts between 85 /sup 0/W and 89 /sup 0/W segment of the GSC range from 0.7025 to 0.7028 in /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr and those between 95.5 zW and 101.5 /sup 0/W range from 0.7026 to 0.7027. These basalts are characterized by LREE-depleted patterns. Basalts from 89 /sup 0/W to 95.5 /sup 0/W segment having slightly LREE-depleted to LREE-enriched patterns ((La/Sm)/sub E.F./ between 0.8 and 2.4) range from 0.7027 to 0.7031 in /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr. The longitudinal /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr variation shows a maximum at about 92 /sup 0/W, where the GSC is nearest to Darwin Island. The alkali and alkaline earth elements as well as several element ratios also show maxima in their longitudinal profiles, but these occur at about 91 /sup 0/W. The apparent shift of /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr maximum with respect to that of the trace elements may be related to differences in the degree of partial melting. The highest /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr from the GSC is only slightly lower than the highest /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr for tholeiitic basalts from the Galapagos Archipel-ago. Several possible hypotheses have been examined to account for these geochemical and Sr iso-topic variations. In the light of the presently available data, the most promising explanation seems to be a binary mixing of hot spot (or plumetype) material with the source of 'normal' mid-ocean ridge basalts and resulting rift propagation. Both end-members seem to be heterogeneous, and therefore it is at present difficult to put severe constraints on this binary mixing. Nevertheless, the flow pattern of mantle material from the hot spot does not appear to be radial but is preferentially channeled along the 91 /sup 0/W and 92.5 /sup 0/W fracture zones toward the rift.

  1. Millennial-scale isotope records from a wide-ranging predator show evidence of recent human impact to oceanic food webs.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Anne E; Ostrom, Peggy H; Welch, Andreanna J; Fleischer, Robert C; Gandhi, Hasand; Southon, John R; Stafford, Thomas W; Penniman, Jay F; Hu, Darcy; Duvall, Fern P; James, Helen F

    2013-05-28

    Human exploitation of marine ecosystems is more recent in oceanic than near shore regions, yet our understanding of human impacts on oceanic food webs is comparatively poor. Few records of species that live beyond the continental shelves date back more than 60 y, and the sheer size of oceanic regions makes their food webs difficult to study, even in modern times. Here, we use stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes to study the foraging history of a generalist, oceanic predator, the Hawaiian petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis), which ranges broadly in the Pacific from the equator to near the Aleutian Islands. Our isotope records from modern and ancient, radiocarbon-dated bones provide evidence of over 3,000 y of dietary stasis followed by a decline of ca. 1.8‰ in δ(15)N over the past 100 y. Fishery-induced trophic decline is the most likely explanation for this sudden shift, which occurs in genetically distinct populations with disparate foraging locations. Our isotope records also show that coincident with the apparent decline in trophic level, foraging segregation among petrel populations decreased markedly. Because variation in the diet of generalist predators can reflect changing availability of their prey, a foraging shift in wide-ranging Hawaiian petrel populations suggests a relatively rapid change in the composition of oceanic food webs in the Northeast Pacific. Understanding and mitigating widespread shifts in prey availability may be a critical step in the conservation of endangered marine predators such as the Hawaiian petrel.

  2. Millennial-scale isotope records from a wide-ranging predator show evidence of recent human impact to oceanic food webs

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Anne E.; Ostrom, Peggy H.; Welch, Andreanna J.; Fleischer, Robert C.; Gandhi, Hasand; Southon, John R.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Penniman, Jay F.; Hu, Darcy; Duvall, Fern P.; James, Helen F.

    2013-01-01

    Human exploitation of marine ecosystems is more recent in oceanic than near shore regions, yet our understanding of human impacts on oceanic food webs is comparatively poor. Few records of species that live beyond the continental shelves date back more than 60 y, and the sheer size of oceanic regions makes their food webs difficult to study, even in modern times. Here, we use stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes to study the foraging history of a generalist, oceanic predator, the Hawaiian petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis), which ranges broadly in the Pacific from the equator to near the Aleutian Islands. Our isotope records from modern and ancient, radiocarbon-dated bones provide evidence of over 3,000 y of dietary stasis followed by a decline of ca. 1.8‰ in δ15N over the past 100 y. Fishery-induced trophic decline is the most likely explanation for this sudden shift, which occurs in genetically distinct populations with disparate foraging locations. Our isotope records also show that coincident with the apparent decline in trophic level, foraging segregation among petrel populations decreased markedly. Because variation in the diet of generalist predators can reflect changing availability of their prey, a foraging shift in wide-ranging Hawaiian petrel populations suggests a relatively rapid change in the composition of oceanic food webs in the Northeast Pacific. Understanding and mitigating widespread shifts in prey availability may be a critical step in the conservation of endangered marine predators such as the Hawaiian petrel. PMID:23671094

  3. Evidence for True Polar Wander since mid-Cenozoic time: A Paleomagnetic Investigation of the Skewness of Magnetic Anomaly 12r (32 Ma) Between the Galapagos and Clarion Fracture Zones on the Pacific Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner-Johnson, B. C.; Gordon, R. G.

    2007-12-01

    In recent years, some researchers have asserted that there has been no motion of the Pacific hotspots relative to the spin axis since the age (ca. 47 Ma) of the elbow in the Hawaiian-Emperor chain (e.g., Tarduno et al. 2003). In contrast, the apparent polar wander of the Indo-Atlantic hotspots shows distinct motion of the hotspots relative to the spin axis over the same time interval (e.g., Morgan 1981; Besse and Courtillot 2002). If this latter shift is due to true polar wander, one would expect to see a similar shift of Pacific hotspots relative to the spin axis. Here we present critical new data and analyses to test these distinctly different hypotheses. Specifically, we present results of an investigation of the skewness of magnetic anomaly crossings of anomaly 12r between the Galapagos and Clipperton and between the Clipperton and Clarion fracture zones on the Pacific plate. We chose to focus on these adjacent regions for three reasons. First, numerical experiments showed that these crossings, of all those available from the Pacific plate, should contain the most information about the location of the 32 Ma paleomagnetic pole for the Pacific plate. Second, many of the available crossings are from vector aeromagnetic profiles, which have superior signal to noise ratios (Horner-Johnson and Gordon, 2003). Third, the rate of seafloor spreading recorded in these crossings exceeds the threshold (half rate of 50 mm/yr) above which no anomalous skewness occurs. Moreover, for the first time, we combine uncertainties in plate- hotspot rotations (Andrews et al. 2005) with paleomagnetic uncertainties to obtain the total uncertainties of our new paleomagnetic pole reconstructed into the Pacific hotspot frame of reference. The results show significant and unambiguous motion of Pacific hotspots relative to the spin axis since 32 Ma. Moreover, when the 32 Ma Pacific plate paleomagnetic pole is reconstructed into the Pacific hotspot reference frame, it is consistent with the

  4. Population divergence and gene flow in an endangered and highly mobile seabird

    PubMed Central

    Welch, A J; Fleischer, R C; James, H F; Wiley, A E; Ostrom, P H; Adams, J; Duvall, F; Holmes, N; Hu, D; Penniman, J; Swindle, K A

    2012-01-01

    Seabirds are highly vagile and can disperse up to thousands of kilometers, making it difficult to identify the factors that promote isolation between populations. The endemic Hawaiian petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis) is one such species. Today it is endangered, and known to breed only on the islands of Hawaii, Maui, Lanai and Kauai. Historical records indicate that a large population formerly bred on Molokai as well, but this population has recently been extirpated. Given the great dispersal potential of these petrels, it remains unclear if populations are genetically distinct and which factors may contribute to isolation between them. We sampled petrels from across their range, including individuals from the presumably extirpated Molokai population. We sequenced 524 bp of mitochondrial DNA, 741 bp from three nuclear introns, and genotyped 18 microsatellite loci in order to examine the patterns of divergence in this species and to investigate the potential underlying mechanisms. Both mitochondrial and nuclear data sets indicated significant genetic differentiation among all modern populations, but no differentiation was found between historic samples from Molokai and modern birds from Lanai. Population-specific nonbreeding distribution and strong natal philopatry may reduce gene flow between populations. However, the lack of population structure between extirpated Molokai birds and modern birds on Lanai indicates that there was substantial gene flow between these populations and that petrels may be able to overcome barriers to dispersal prior to complete extirpation. Hawaiian petrel populations could be considered distinct management units, however, the dwindling population on Hawaii may require translocation to prevent extirpation in the near future. PMID:22434012

  5. Population divergence and gene flow in an endangered and highly mobile seabird

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, A. J.; Fleischer, R. C.; James, H. F.; Wiley, A. E.; Ostrom, P. H.; Adams, J.; Duvall, F.; Holmes, N.; Hu, D.; Penniman, J.; Swindle, K. A.

    2012-01-01

    Seabirds are highly vagile and can disperse up to thousands of kilometers, making it difficult to identify the factors that promote isolation between populations. The endemic Hawaiian petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis) is one such species. Today it is endangered, and known to breed only on the islands of Hawaii, Maui, Lanai and Kauai. Historical records indicate that a large population formerly bred on Molokai as well, but this population has recently been extirpated. Given the great dispersal potential of these petrels, it remains unclear if populations are genetically distinct and which factors may contribute to isolation between them. We sampled petrels from across their range, including individuals from the presumably extirpated Molokai population. We sequenced 524 bp of mitochondrial DNA, 741 bp from three nuclear introns, and genotyped 18 microsatellite loci in order to examine the patterns of divergence in this species and to investigate the potential underlying mechanisms. Both mitochondrial and nuclear data sets indicated significant genetic differentiation among all modern populations, but no differentiation was found between historic samples from Molokai and modern birds from Lanai. Population-specific nonbreeding distribution and strong natal philopatry may reduce gene flow between populations. However, the lack of population structure between extirpated Molokai birds and modern birds on Lanai indicates that there was substantial gene flow between these populations and that petrels may be able to overcome barriers to dispersal prior to complete extirpation. Hawaiian petrel populations could be considered distinct management units, however, the dwindling population on Hawaii may require translocation to prevent extirpation in the near future.

  6. Population divergence and gene flow in an endangered and highly mobile seabird.

    PubMed

    Welch, A J; Fleischer, R C; James, H F; Wiley, A E; Ostrom, P H; Adams, J; Duvall, F; Holmes, N; Hu, D; Penniman, J; Swindle, K A

    2012-07-01

    Seabirds are highly vagile and can disperse up to thousands of kilometers, making it difficult to identify the factors that promote isolation between populations. The endemic Hawaiian petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis) is one such species. Today it is endangered, and known to breed only on the islands of Hawaii, Maui, Lanai and Kauai. Historical records indicate that a large population formerly bred on Molokai as well, but this population has recently been extirpated. Given the great dispersal potential of these petrels, it remains unclear if populations are genetically distinct and which factors may contribute to isolation between them. We sampled petrels from across their range, including individuals from the presumably extirpated Molokai population. We sequenced 524 bp of mitochondrial DNA, 741 bp from three nuclear introns, and genotyped 18 microsatellite loci in order to examine the patterns of divergence in this species and to investigate the potential underlying mechanisms. Both mitochondrial and nuclear data sets indicated significant genetic differentiation among all modern populations, but no differentiation was found between historic samples from Molokai and modern birds from Lanai. Population-specific nonbreeding distribution and strong natal philopatry may reduce gene flow between populations. However, the lack of population structure between extirpated Molokai birds and modern birds on Lanai indicates that there was substantial gene flow between these populations and that petrels may be able to overcome barriers to dispersal prior to complete extirpation. Hawaiian petrel populations could be considered distinct management units, however, the dwindling population on Hawaii may require translocation to prevent extirpation in the near future.

  7. Radar study of seabirds and bats on windward Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, M.H.; Cooper, B.A.; Day, Robert H.

    1997-01-01

    Modified marine surveillance radar was used to study the presence/ absence, abundance, and flight activity of four nocturnal species: Hawaiian darkrumped petrel [Pterodroma phaeopygia sandwichensis (Ridgeway)], Newell's shearwater [Puffinus auricularis newelli (Henshaw)], Band-rumped storm-petrel [Oceanodroma castro (Harcourt)], and Hawaiian hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus semotus Sanborn & Crespo). Hawaiian seabirds were recorded flying to or from inland nesting colonies at seven sampling sites on the windward side of the island of Hawai'i. In total, 527 radar "targets" identified as petrel or shearwater-type on the basis of speed, flight behavior, and radar signal strength were observed during eight nights of sampling. Mean movement rates (targets per minute) for seabird targets were 0.1, 0.1, 0.3, 3.8, 0.9, and 2.2 for surveys at Kahakai, Kapoho, Mauna Loa, Pali Uli, Pu'ulena Crater, and Waipi'o Valley, respectively. Two percent of the petrel and shearwater-type targets detected on radar were confirmed visually or aurally. Flight paths for seabird targets showed strong directionality at six sampling sites. Mean flight speed for seabird targets (n = 524) was 61 km/hr for all survey areas. Peak detection times for seabirds were from 0430 to 0530 hours for birds flying to sea and 2000 to 2150 hours for birds returning to colonies. Most inland, low-elevation sampling sites could not be surveyed reliably for seabirds during the evening activity periods because of radar interference from insects and rapidly flying bats. At those inland sites predawn sampling was the best time for using radar to detect Hawaiian seabirds moving seaward. Hawaiian hoary bats were recorded at eight sampling sites. Eighty-six to 89 radar targets that exhibited erratic flight behavior were identified as "batlike" targets; 17% of these batlike radar targets were confirmed visually. Band-rumped storm-petrels were not identified during our surveys.

  8. Shear Wave Splitting Beneath the Galapagos Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, F. R.; Burkett, P. G.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; Solomon, S. C.; Silver, P. G.

    2004-12-01

    We report measurements of teleseismic shear wave splitting in the Galápagos Archipelago. The inferred lateral variations in azimuthal anisotropy allow us to examine the dynamics of an evolving hotspot-ridge system. The data are from SKS and SKKS phases, as well as S waves from deep sources, recorded by a relatively dense network of 10 portable broadband seismometers deployed from 1999 to 2003 for the IGUANA (Imaging Galápagos Upwelling and Neotectonics of the Archipelago) experiment and from the GSN broadband station in Santa Cruz (PAYG). We find a delay time between fast and slow shear waves of 0.4 to 0.9 s and fast polarization directions of N85-90° E beneath five stations at the leading and southern edge of the archipelago. Despite clear seismic signals, we did not find any anisotropy at the six stations located in the interior of the archipelago. For those stations that show shear wave splitting, there is an increase in the delay time toward the expected location of the Galápagos hotspot at the western edge of the archipelago. With the exception of Española, fast polarization directions (N85-90° E) are close to the current direction of absolute plate motion of the overlying Nazca plate (N91° E). The lack of azimuthal anisotropy in the interior of the archipelago is interpreted as an absence of strongly oriented mantle fabric beneath these stations. The apparent isotropy in this dynamic region, where we expect considerable mantle strain, is surprising. It is not likely that the olivine a-axis is oriented vertically beneath the interior of the archipelago as the Galápagos plume is thought to lie at the western edge. It is also unlikely that there are two layers of perpendicularly-oriented anisotropy which are solely confined to the center of the archipelago. However, there appears to be some correlation between the region of apparent isotropy and a zone of anomalously low upper mantle velocities imaged beneath Santiago and Marchena from surface waves by Villagomez and others, though the low-velocity region is spatially more confined. This pattern suggests that the presence of melt in the upper mantle may weaken the effects of fabric on shear wave splitting, as suggested by Holtzman and others. An alternative explanation is that the flow field in the near ridge setting is complex, resulting in apparent isotropy. Due to the very young lithospheric age and to the effect of both the neighboring ridge and Galápagos hotspot, the lithosphere thickness is likely thinner than 40 km. Therefore no more than about 40% of the recorded delay time could originate from the lithosphere. We propose that the splitting pattern in the Galápagos Archipelago may be the result of plate drag and frozen lithospheric anisotropy which, beneath the center of the archipelago, is weakened by the presence of melt in the upper mantle.

  9. Submarine thermal springs on the Galapagos Rift

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corliss, J.B.; Dymond, J.; Gordon, L.I.; Edmond, J.M.; Von Herzen, R. P.; Ballard, Richard D.; Green, K.; Williams, D.; Bainbridge, A.; Crane, K.; Van Andel, T. H.

    1979-01-01

    The submarine hydrothermal activity on and near the Galápagos Rift has been explored with the aid of the deep submersible Alvin. Analyses of water samples from hydrothermal vents reveal that hydrothermal activity provides significant or dominant sources and sinks for several components of seawater; studies of conductive and convective heat transfer suggest that two-thirds of the heat lost from new oceanic lithosphere at the Galápagos Rift in the first million years may be vented from thermal springs, predominantly along the axial ridge within the rift valley. The vent areas are populated by animal communities. They appear to utilize chemosynthesis by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria to derive their entire energy supply from reactions between the seawater and the rocks at high temperatures, rather than photosynthesis

  10. Seafloor Characterization/Galapagos Propagating Rift

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    rate. L..Lagma aBndie Kilauea Iki is an extensively studied passive lava lake formed during the 1959 eruption of Kilauea Volcano . The lava lake magma...new data, and a reinterpretation of the results. Despite the fact that the analogy is imperfect, observations at Kilauea Iki lead to insights into...press, 1993. Barth, G.A., M.C. Kleinrock, and R. T. Helz, The magma body at Kilauea Iki lava lake: potential insights into mid-ocean ridge magma chambers

  11. Seafloor Characterization/Galapagos Propagating Rift

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-18

    spreading rate. - B , " Kilauea Iki is an extensively studied wassive lava lake formed during the 1959 eruption of Kilauea Volcano . The lava lake magma...some new data, and a reinterpretation of the results. Despite the fact that the analogy is imperfect, observations at Kilauea Iki lead to insigh into...1993. Barth, G.A., M.C. Kleinrock, and R. T. Helz, The magma body at Kilauea lki lava lake: potential insights into mid-ocean ridge magma chambers, J

  12. Robert Wartenberg: stormy petrel of neurology; rebel of book reviewers.

    PubMed

    Boshes, L D

    1996-12-01

    This "Sherlock Holmes" in the discipline of neurology, always searching for truth accuracy and dependability of researcher, clinician or writer, advanced his endowment into book reviewing. His acrid criticism was accurate, for the succeeding edition always embodied all recommendations, but at all times everyone benefited from the Wartenberg warmth, for he never made enemies with his microscopic scrutiny of facts in his unique but complete review of a tome.

  13. Spring-time distributions of migratory marine birds in the southern California Current: Oceanic eddy associations and coastal habitat hotspots over 17 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, P. P. W.; Sydeman, W. J.; Bograd, S. J.; Hyrenbach, K. D.

    2006-02-01

    We used a 17-year time series of shipboard observations to address the hypothesis that marine birds associate with persistent hydrographic features in the southern California Current System (CCS). Overall, approximately 27,000 km of ocean habitat were surveyed, averaging 1600 km per cruise. We identified mesoscale features (eddy centers and the core of the California Current), based on dynamic height anomalies, and considered habitat associations for seven migratory seabird species: black-footed albatross ( Phoebastria nigripes), Cook's petrel ( Pterodroma cookii), Leach's storm-petrel ( Oceanodroma leucorhoa), dark shearwaters (mainly sooty shearwater Puffinus griseus, with a few short-tailed shearwaters Puffinus tenuirostris), northern fulmar ( Fulmarus glacialis), red phalarope ( Phalaropus fulicaria), and red-necked phalarope ( Phalaropus lobatus). We explored associations (presence/absence and density relationships) of marine birds with mesoscale features (eddies, current jet) and metrics of primary productivity (chlorophyll a and nitrate concentrations). Mesoscale eddies were consistently identified in the study region, but were spatially and temporally variable. The resolved eddies were large-scale features associated with meanders of the equatorward-flowing California Current. Cook's petrel was found offshore with no specific habitat affinities. Black-footed albatross, red phalarope, and Leach's storm petrel were found in association with offshore eddies and/or the core of the California Current, but the functional relationship for these species varied, possibly reflecting differences in flight capabilities. The more coastal species, including the shearwaters, fulmar, and red-necked phalarope, were positively associated with proxies of primary productivity. Of the hydrographic habitats considered, the upwelling region of Point Conception appears to be an important "hotspot" of sustained primary production and marine bird concentrations. Point Conception and

  14. Isotopic characterization of flight feathers in two pelagic seabirds: Sampling strategies for ecological studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiley, Anne E.; Ostrom, Peggy H.; Stricker, Craig A.; James, Helen F.; Gandhi, Hasand

    2010-01-01

    We wish to use stable-isotope analysis of flight feathers to understand the feeding behavior of pelagic seabirds, such as the Hawaiian Petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis) and Newell’s Shearwater (Puffinus auricularis newelli). Analysis of remiges is particularly informative because the sequence and timing of remex molt are often known. The initial step, reported here, is to obtain accurate isotope values from whole remiges by means of a minimally invasive protocol appropriate for live birds or museum specimens. The high variability observed in D13C and D15N values within a feather precludes the use of a small section of vane. We found the average range within 42 Hawaiian Petrel remiges to be 1.3‰ for both D13C and D15N and that within 10 Newell’s Shearwater remiges to be 1.3‰ and 0.7‰ for D13C and D15N, respectively. The D13C of all 52 feathers increased from tip to base, and the majority of Hawaiian Petrel feathers showed an analogous trend in D15N. Although the average range of DD in 21 Hawaiian Petrel remiges was 11‰, we found no longitudinal trend. We discuss influences of trophic level, foraging location, metabolism, and pigmentation on isotope values and compare three methods of obtaining isotope averages of whole feathers. Our novel barb-sampling protocol requires only 1.0 mg of feather and minimal preparation time. Because it leaves the feather nearly intact, this protocol will likely facilitate obtaining isotope values from remiges of live birds and museum specimens. As a consequence, it will help expand the understanding of historical trends in foraging behavior

  15. Broad-scale trophic shift in the pelagic North Pacific revealed by an oceanic seabird.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Peggy H; Wiley, Anne E; James, Helen F; Rossman, Sam; Walker, William A; Zipkin, Elise F; Chikaraishi, Yoshito

    2017-03-29

    Human-induced ecological change in the open oceans appears to be accelerating. Fisheries, climate change and elevated nutrient inputs are variously blamed, at least in part, for altering oceanic ecosystems. Yet it is challenging to assess the extent of anthropogenic change in the open oceans, where historical records of ecological conditions are sparse, and the geographical scale is immense. We developed millennial-scale amino acid nitrogen isotope records preserved in ancient animal remains to understand changes in food web structure and nutrient regimes in the oceanic realm of the North Pacific Ocean (NPO). Our millennial-scale isotope records of amino acids in bone collagen in a wide-ranging oceanic seabird, the Hawaiian petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis), showed that trophic level declined over time. The amino acid records do not support a broad-scale increase in nitrogen fixation in the North Pacific subtropical gyre, rejecting an earlier interpretation based on bulk and amino acid specific δ(15)N chronologies for Hawaiian deep-sea corals and bulk δ(15)N chronologies for the Hawaiian petrel. Rather, our work suggests that the food web structure in the NPO has shifted at a broad geographical scale, a phenomenon potentially related to industrial fishing.

  16. An overlooked pink species of land iguana in the Galapagos.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Gabriele; Fabiani, Anna; Marquez, Cruz; Snell, Howard L; Snell, Heidi M; Tapia, Washington; Sbordoni, Valerio

    2009-01-13

    Despite the attention given to them, the Galápagos have not yet finished offering evolutionary novelties. When Darwin visited the Galápagos, he observed both marine (Amblyrhynchus) and land (Conolophus) iguanas but did not encounter a rare pink black-striped land iguana (herein referred to as "rosada," meaning "pink" in Spanish), which, surprisingly, remained unseen until 1986. Here, we show that substantial genetic isolation exists between the rosada and syntopic yellow forms and that the rosada is basal to extant taxonomically recognized Galápagos land iguanas. The rosada, whose present distribution is a conundrum, is a relict lineage whose origin dates back to a period when at least some of the present-day islands had not yet formed. So far, this species is the only evidence of ancient diversification along the Galápagos land iguana lineage and documents one of the oldest events of divergence ever recorded in the Galápagos. Conservation efforts are needed to prevent this form, identified by us as a good species, from extinction.

  17. Body size, performance and fitness in galapagos marine iguanas.

    PubMed

    Wikelski, Martin; Romero, L Michael

    2003-07-01

    Complex organismal traits such as body size are influenced by innumerable selective pressures, making the prediction of evolutionary trajectories for those traits difficult. A potentially powerful way to predict fitness in natural systems is to study the composite response of individuals in terms of performance measures, such as foraging or reproductive performance. Once key performance measures are identified in this top-down approach, we can determine the underlying physiological mechanisms and gain predictive power over long-term evolutionary processes. Here we use marine iguanas as a model system where body size differs by more than one order of magnitude between island populations. We identified foraging efficiency as the main performance measure that constrains body size. Mechanistically, foraging performance is determined by food pasture height and the thermal environment, influencing intake and digestion. Stress hormones may be a flexible way of influencing an individual's response to low-food situations that may be caused by high population density, famines, or anthropogenic disturbances like oil spills. Reproductive performance, on the other hand, increases with body size and is mediated by higher survival of larger hatchlings from larger females and increased mating success of larger males. Reproductive performance of males may be adjusted via plastic hormonal feedback mechanisms that allow individuals to assess their social rank annually within the current population size structure. When integrated, these data suggest that reproductive performance favors increased body size (influenced by reproductive hormones), with an overall limit imposed by foraging performance (influenced by stress hormones). Based on our mechanistic understanding of individual performances we predicted an evolutionary increase in maximum body size caused by global warming trends. We support this prediction using specimens collected during 1905. We also show in a common-garden experiment that body size may have a genetic component in iguanids. This 'performance paradigm' allows predictions about adaptive evolution in natural populations.

  18. Alien species pathways to the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Toral-Granda, M Verónica; Causton, Charlotte E; Jäger, Heinke; Trueman, Mandy; Izurieta, Juan Carlos; Araujo, Eddy; Cruz, Marilyn; Zander, Kerstin K; Izurieta, Arturo; Garnett, Stephen T

    2017-01-01

    Alien species, one of the biggest threats to natural ecosystems worldwide, are of particular concern for oceanic archipelagos such as Galápagos. To enable more effective management of alien species, we reviewed, collated and analysed all available records of alien species for Galápagos. We also assembled a comprehensive dataset on pathways to and among the Galápagos Islands, including tourist and resident numbers, tourist vessels, their itineraries and visitation sites, aircraft capacity and occupancy, air and sea cargo and biosecurity interceptions. So far, 1,579 alien terrestrial and marine species have been introduced to Galápagos by humans. Of these, 1,476 have become established. Almost half of these were intentional introductions, mostly of plants. Most unintentional introductions arrived on plants and plant associated material, followed by transport vehicles, and commodities (in particular fruit and vegetables). The number, frequency and geographic origin of pathways for the arrival and dispersal of alien species to and within Galápagos have increased over time, tracking closely the increase in human population (residents and tourists) on the islands. Intentional introductions of alien species should decline as biosecurity is strengthened but there is a danger that unintentional introductions will increase further as tourism on Galápagos expands. This unique world heritage site will only retain its biodiversity values if the pathways for invasion are managed effectively.

  19. Alien species pathways to the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Trueman, Mandy; Izurieta, Juan Carlos; Araujo, Eddy; Cruz, Marilyn; Zander, Kerstin K.; Izurieta, Arturo

    2017-01-01

    Alien species, one of the biggest threats to natural ecosystems worldwide, are of particular concern for oceanic archipelagos such as Galápagos. To enable more effective management of alien species, we reviewed, collated and analysed all available records of alien species for Galápagos. We also assembled a comprehensive dataset on pathways to and among the Galápagos Islands, including tourist and resident numbers, tourist vessels, their itineraries and visitation sites, aircraft capacity and occupancy, air and sea cargo and biosecurity interceptions. So far, 1,579 alien terrestrial and marine species have been introduced to Galápagos by humans. Of these, 1,476 have become established. Almost half of these were intentional introductions, mostly of plants. Most unintentional introductions arrived on plants and plant associated material, followed by transport vehicles, and commodities (in particular fruit and vegetables). The number, frequency and geographic origin of pathways for the arrival and dispersal of alien species to and within Galápagos have increased over time, tracking closely the increase in human population (residents and tourists) on the islands. Intentional introductions of alien species should decline as biosecurity is strengthened but there is a danger that unintentional introductions will increase further as tourism on Galápagos expands. This unique world heritage site will only retain its biodiversity values if the pathways for invasion are managed effectively. PMID:28902860

  20. Fossil pollen as a guide to conservation in the Galapagos.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Jacqueline F N; Froyd, Cynthia A; van der Knaap, W O; Coffey, Emily E; Tye, Alan; Willis, Katherine J

    2008-11-21

    Paleoecological evidence from the past 8000 years in the Galápagos Islands shows that six presumed introduced or doubtfully native species (Ageratum conyzoides, Borreria laevis/Diodia radula-type, Brickellia diffusa, Cuphea carthagenensis, Hibiscus diversifolius, and Ranunculus flagelliformis) are in fact native to the archipelago. Fossil pollen and macrofossils from four sites in the highlands of Santa Cruz Island reveal that all were present thousands of years before the advent of human impact, refuting their classification as introduced species. These findings have substantial implications not only for conservation in Galápagos but for the management of introduced species and pantropical weeds in general.

  1. Coevolution in the Galapagos: An Example for the Biology Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, Alton L.

    1990-01-01

    Several examples of coevolution which can be used in biology classes are presented. Discussed are evolutionary processes in general, giant cacti, and reptile and cacti association. The effects of human interference are briefly described. (CW)

  2. Ultraphyric Lavas of Northern Galapagos Islands: Mineral Scale Compositional Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teasdale, R.; Altman, K.; Hiller, J.; Schlom, T.; Harpp, K.; Barr, J.

    2008-12-01

    Volcanoes of northern Galápagos Islands, Wolf, Darwin, Pinta, Marchena, and Genovesa have each erupted subaerial lava flows with abundant coarse plagioclase crystals up to several cm across. These megacrysts make up "ultraphyric lavas" that are largely absent in the rest of the archipelago, revealing unique petrogenetic processes at northern island volcanoes. Wolf and Darwin Islands have high proportions of ultraphyric lavas, making up 25-50% of exposed material. Lavas are generally horizontal (<10 degrees) pahoehoe flows. Similar flows are present but less abundant at Pinta, Marchena, and Genovesa. Plagioclase megacrysts are subhedral to euhedral, heavily fractured, and often have embayed crystal textures. Plagioclase in lavas from Genovesa, Wolf and Darwin volcanoes are indistinguishable from one another compositionally. Electron microprobe analyses of the rims of megacrysts and phenocrysts generally have lower An compositions than cores. Core compositions have highest An compositions (maximum, An96), with rims ranging from An57 to An93. In some cases, cores are as much as 30% An higher than rims. Groundmass plagioclase crystals are typically less anorthite-rich (< An85). High An cores are consistent with crystal growth in a more primitive magma, possibly in a crystal-mush zone. Lower rim (and groundmass) compositions suggest megacrysts were exposed to more evolved magma following initial crystallization, consistent with entrainment into a new magma as xenocrysts. There is no clear correlation between flow thickness and crystal abundance to suggest megacrysts were exclusively entrained into magmas of specific volumes. Rather, crystal compositions and variation in An composition between cores and rims indicate that significant time intervals between eruptions of megacryst-bearing flows likely allowed long periods of crystal growth to occur, followed by disaggregation from crystal mush zones and eruption in host lavas.

  3. Understanding Magmatic Plumbing System Dynamics at Fernandina Island, Galapagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, K. C.; McGuire, M.; Geist, D.; Harpp, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    Fernandina is the most active Galápagos volcano, and is located closest to the seismically defined hotspot. Allan and Simkin (2000) observed that the subaerial edifice is constructed of homogeneous basalts (Mg# = 49 ± 2) with highly variable plagioclase phenocryst contents and sparse olivine. Geist et al. (2006) proposed a magmatic plumbing system in which the volcano is supplied by interconnected sills, the shallowest of which is density-stratified: olivine and pyroxene are concentrated at greater depths, whereas less dense plagioclase mush is higher in the sill. Consequently, olivine-rich lava erupts laterally during submarine events, but plagioclase-rich lava supplies subaerial vents. To test this hypothesis, we examine lavas erupted in 1995, 2005, and 2009. These SW flank eruptions emerged alternatively from en echelon radial fissures on the lower flanks and circumferential fissures near the caldera rim. The 1995 radial fissure unzipped downslope and then formed a cone 4 km from the coast, sending flows to the ocean. In 2005, circumferential fissures erupted five flows south of the 1995 fissure. As in 1995, the 2009 fissures opened down the SW flank before focusing to a cone near the 1995 vents, producing 6 km-long flows that also reached the ocean. By correlating plagioclase crystal size distribution and morphologies with single event chronological sequences, we examine Fernandina's magmatic plumbing system. Modal plagioclase in 1995 lava decreases (20% to <5%) throughout the middle eruptive phase. Early 2005 samples are nearly aphyric (Chadwick et al., 2010), with 1-2% plagioclase. The 2009 eruption has reduced plagioclase, similar to mid-1995 samples. Preliminary observations suggest that less plagioclase-rich mush is being flushed out during early-to-medial event sequences, whereas plag phenocrysts are transported more during later phases. Plausible plumbing dynamics suggest a zone of plagioclase-rich mush that is eroded and incorporated into radial fissure eruptions.

  4. Coevolution in the Galapagos: An Example for the Biology Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, Alton L.

    1990-01-01

    Several examples of coevolution which can be used in biology classes are presented. Discussed are evolutionary processes in general, giant cacti, and reptile and cacti association. The effects of human interference are briefly described. (CW)

  5. Isabela, Galapagos Islands as seen from STS-59

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-04-14

    STS059-213-019 (9-20 April 1994) --- SRL scientists will use these photographs with the radar imagery to discriminate among different ages of basalt flows, and different ecosystems of shrub communities, on these equatorial volcanic islands. Aims are twofold: to understand the history of physical and biological systems on the islands themselves, and to extend what is learned to other, less-well-known areas globally. Hasselblad photograph.

  6. Element patterns in albatrosses and petrels: influence of trophic position, foraging range, and prey type.

    PubMed

    Anderson, O R J; Phillips, R A; Shore, R F; McGill, R A R; McDonald, R A; Bearhop, S

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the concentrations of 22 essential and non-essential elements among a community of Procellariiformes (and their prey) to identify the extent to which trophic position and foraging range governed element accumulation. Stable isotope analysis (SIA) was used to characterise trophic (delta(15)N) and spatial patterns (delta(13)C) among species. Few consistent patterns were observed in element distributions among species and diet appeared to be highly influential in some instances. Arsenic levels in seabird red blood cells correlated with delta(15)N and delta(13)C, demonstrating the importance of trophic position and foraging range for arsenic distribution. Arsenic concentrations in prey varied significantly across taxa, and in the strength of association with delta(15)N values (trophic level). In most instances, element patterns in Procellariiformes showed the clearest separation among species, indicating that a combination of prey selection and other complex species-specific characteristics (e.g. moult patterns) were generally more important determining factors than trophic level per se.

  7. Unexpected hydrogen isotope variation in oceanic pelagic seabirds.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Peggy H; Wiley, Anne E; Rossman, Sam; Stricker, Craig A; James, Helen F

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen isotopes have significantly enhanced our understanding of the biogeography of migratory animals. The basis for this methodology lies in predictable, continental patterns of precipitation δD values that are often reflected in an organism's tissues. δD variation is not expected for oceanic pelagic organisms whose dietary hydrogen (water and organic hydrogen in prey) is transferred up the food web from an isotopically homogeneous water source. We report a 142‰ range in the δD values of flight feathers from the Hawaiian petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis), an oceanic pelagic North Pacific species, and inquire about the source of that variation. We show δD variation between and within four other oceanic pelagic species: Newell's shearwater (Puffinus auricularis newellii), Black-footed albatross (Phoebastria nigripes), Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) and Buller's shearwater (Puffinus bulleri). The similarity between muscle δD values of hatch-year Hawaiian petrels and their prey suggests that trophic fractionation does not influence δD values of muscle. We hypothesize that isotopic discrimination is associated with water loss during salt excretion through salt glands. Salt load differs between seabirds that consume isosmotic squid and crustaceans and those that feed on hyposmotic teleost fish. In support of the salt gland hypothesis, we show an inverse relationship between δD and percent teleost fish in diet for three seabird species. Our results demonstrate the utility of δD in the study of oceanic consumers, while also contributing to a better understanding of δD systematics, the basis for one of the most commonly utilized isotope tools in avian ecology.

  8. Unexpected hydrogen isotope variation in oceanic pelagic seabirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostrom, Peggy H.; Wiley, Anne E.; Rossman, Sam; Stricker, Craig A.; James, Helen F.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes have significantly enhanced our understanding of the biogeography of migratory animals. The basis for this methodology lies in predictable, continental patterns of precipitation δD values that are often reflected in an organism's tissues. δD variation is not expected for oceanic pelagic organisms whose dietary hydrogen (water and organic hydrogen in prey) is transferred up the food web from an isotopically homogeneous water source. We report a 142% range in the δD values of flight feathers from the Hawaiian petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis), an oceanic pelagic North Pacific species, and inquire about the source of that variation. We show δD variation between and within four other oceanic pelagic species: Newell's shearwater (Puffinus auricularis newellii), Black-footed albatross (Phoebastria nigripes), Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) and Buller's shearwater (Puffinus bulleri). The similarity between muscle δD values of hatch-year Hawaiian petrels and their prey suggests that trophic fractionation does not influence δD values of muscle. We hypothesize that isotopic discrimination is associated with water loss during salt excretion through salt glands. Salt load differs between seabirds that consume isosmotic squid and crustaceans and those that feed on hyposmotic teleost fish. In support of the salt gland hypothesis, we show an inverse relationship between δD and percent teleost fish in diet for three seabird species. Our results demonstrate the utility of δD in the study of oceanic consumers, while also contributing to a better understanding of δD systematics, the basis for one of the most commonly utilized isotope tools in avian ecology.

  9. Diet of feral cats in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, S.C.; Hansen, H.; Nelson, D.; Swift, R.; Banko, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    We documented the diet of feral cats by analysing the contents of 42 digestive tracts from Kilauea and Mauna Loa in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. Small mammals, invertebrates, and birds were the most common prey types consumed by feral cats. Birds occurred in 27.8-29.2% of digestive tracts. The total number of bird, small mammal, and invertebrate prey differed between Kilauea and Mauna Loa. On Mauna Loa, significantly more (89%) feral cats consumed small mammals, primarily rodents, than on Kilauea Volcano (50%). Mice (Mus musculus) were the major component of the feral cat diet on Mauna Loa, whereas Orthoptera were the major component of the diet on Kilauea. We recovered a mandible set, feathers, and bones of an endangered Hawaiian Petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis) from a digestive tract from Mauna Loa. This specimen represents the first well-documented endangered seabird to be recovered from the digestive tract of a feral cat in Hawai'i and suggests that feral cats prey on this species.

  10. Videographic evidence of endangered species depredation by feral cat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Judge, Seth; Lippert, Jill S.; Misajon, Kathleen; Hu, Darcy; Hess, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Feral cats (Felis cafus) have long been implicated as nest predators of endangered 'Ua'u (Hawaiian Petrel; Pterodroma sandwichensis) on Hawaii Island, but until recently, visual confirmation has been limited by available technology. 'Ua'u nest out of view, deep inside small cavities, on alpine lava flows. During the breeding seasons of 2007 and 2008, we monitored known burrows within Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. Digital infrared video cameras assisted in determining the breeding behaviour and nesting success at the most isolated of burrows. With 7 cameras, we collected a total of 819 videos and 89 still photographs of adult and nestling 'Ua'u at 14 burrows. Videos also confirmed the presence of rats (Rattus spp.) at 2 burrows, 'Ōmao (Myadestes obscurus) at 8 burrows, and feral cats at 6 burrows. A sequence of videos showed a feral cat taking a downy 'Ua'u chick from its burrow, representing the first direct evidence of 'Ua'u depredation by feral cat in Hawai'i. This technique provides greater understanding of feral cat behaviour in 'Ua'u colonies, which may assist in the development of more targeted management strategies to reduce nest predation on endangered insular bird species.

  11. Will the Effects of Sea-Level Rise Create Ecological Traps for Pacific Island Seabirds?

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Michelle H; Courtot, Karen N; Berkowitz, Paul; Storlazzi, Curt D; Moore, Janet; Flint, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    More than 18 million seabirds nest on 58 Pacific islands protected within vast U.S. Marine National Monuments (1.9 million km2). However, most of these seabird colonies are on low-elevation islands and sea-level rise (SLR) and accompanying high-water perturbations are predicted to escalate with climate change. To understand how SLR may impact protected islands and insular biodiversity, we modeled inundation and wave-driven flooding of a globally important seabird rookery in the subtropical Pacific. We acquired new high-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) and used the Delft3D wave model and ArcGIS to model wave heights and inundation for a range of SLR scenarios (+0.5, +1.0, +1.5, and +2.0 m) at Midway Atoll. Next, we classified vegetation to delineate habitat exposure to inundation and identified how breeding phenology, colony synchrony, and life history traits affect species-specific sensitivity. We identified 3 of 13 species as highly vulnerable to SLR in the Hawaiian Islands and quantified their atoll-wide distribution (Laysan albatross, Phoebastria immutabilis; black-footed albatross, P. nigripes; and Bonin petrel, Pterodroma hypoleuca). Our models of wave-driven flooding forecast nest losses up to 10% greater than passive inundation models at +1.0 m SLR. At projections of + 2.0 m SLR, approximately 60% of albatross and 44% of Bonin petrel nests were overwashed displacing more than 616,400 breeding albatrosses and petrels. Habitat loss due to passive SLR may decrease the carrying capacity of some islands to support seabird colonies, while sudden high-water events directly reduce survival and reproduction. This is the first study to simulate wave-driven flooding and the combined impacts of SLR, groundwater rise, and storm waves on seabird colonies. Our results highlight the need for early climate change planning and restoration of higher elevation seabird refugia to prevent low-lying protected islands from becoming ecological traps in the face of rising

  12. Will the effects of sea-level rise create ecological traps for Pacific Island seabirds?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Michelle H.; Courtot, Karen; Berkowitz, Paul; Storlazzi, Curt; Moore, Janet; Flint, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    More than 18 million seabirds nest on 58 Pacific islands protected within vast U.S. Marine National Monuments (1.9 million km2). However, most of these seabird colonies are on low-elevation islands and sea-level rise (SLR) and accompanying high-water perturbations are predicted to escalate with climate change. To understand how SLR may impact protected islands and insular biodiversity, we modeled inundation and wave-driven flooding of a globally important seabird rookery in the subtropical Pacific. We acquired new high-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) and used the Delft3D wave model and ArcGIS to model wave heights and inundation for a range of SLR scenarios (+0.5, +1.0, +1.5, and +2.0 m) at Midway Atoll. Next, we classified vegetation to delineate habitat exposure to inundation and identified how breeding phenology, colony synchrony, and life history traits affect species-specific sensitivity. We identified 3 of 13 species as highly vulnerable to SLR in the Hawaiian Islands and quantified their atoll-wide distribution (Laysan albatross, Phoebastria immutabilis; black-footed albatross, P. nigripes; and Bonin petrel, Pterodroma hypoleuca). Our models of wave-driven flooding forecast nest losses up to 10% greater than passive inundation models at +1.0 m SLR. At projections of + 2.0 m SLR, approximately 60% of albatross and 44% of Bonin petrel nests were overwashed displacing more than 616,400 breeding albatrosses and petrels. Habitat loss due to passive SLR may decrease the carrying capacity of some islands to support seabird colonies, while sudden high-water events directly reduce survival and reproduction. This is the first study to simulate wave-driven flooding and the combined impacts of SLR, groundwater rise, and storm waves on seabird colonies. Our results highlight the need for early climate change planning and restoration of higher elevation seabird refugia to prevent low-lying protected islands from becoming ecological traps in the face of

  13. Will the Effects of Sea-Level Rise Create Ecological Traps for Pacific Island Seabirds?

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Michelle H.; Courtot, Karen N.; Berkowitz, Paul; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Moore, Janet; Flint, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    More than 18 million seabirds nest on 58 Pacific islands protected within vast U.S. Marine National Monuments (1.9 million km2). However, most of these seabird colonies are on low-elevation islands and sea-level rise (SLR) and accompanying high-water perturbations are predicted to escalate with climate change. To understand how SLR may impact protected islands and insular biodiversity, we modeled inundation and wave-driven flooding of a globally important seabird rookery in the subtropical Pacific. We acquired new high-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) and used the Delft3D wave model and ArcGIS to model wave heights and inundation for a range of SLR scenarios (+0.5, +1.0, +1.5, and +2.0 m) at Midway Atoll. Next, we classified vegetation to delineate habitat exposure to inundation and identified how breeding phenology, colony synchrony, and life history traits affect species-specific sensitivity. We identified 3 of 13 species as highly vulnerable to SLR in the Hawaiian Islands and quantified their atoll-wide distribution (Laysan albatross, Phoebastria immutabilis; black-footed albatross, P. nigripes; and Bonin petrel, Pterodroma hypoleuca). Our models of wave-driven flooding forecast nest losses up to 10% greater than passive inundation models at +1.0 m SLR. At projections of + 2.0 m SLR, approximately 60% of albatross and 44% of Bonin petrel nests were overwashed displacing more than 616,400 breeding albatrosses and petrels. Habitat loss due to passive SLR may decrease the carrying capacity of some islands to support seabird colonies, while sudden high-water events directly reduce survival and reproduction. This is the first study to simulate wave-driven flooding and the combined impacts of SLR, groundwater rise, and storm waves on seabird colonies. Our results highlight the need for early climate change planning and restoration of higher elevation seabird refugia to prevent low-lying protected islands from becoming ecological traps in the face of rising

  14. 77 FR 14035 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... Galapagos giant tortoises (Geochelone nigra) from Galapagos, Ecuador, for the purpose of enhancement of the....21(g) for Galapagos tortoise (Chelonoidis nigra), to enhance their propagation or survival....

  15. Temporal and spatial variation in mercury concentrations in some albatrosses and petrels from the sub-Antarctic

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.R.; Furness, R.W.; Lewis, S.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Mercury concentrations in albatrosses and some other large procellariiforms are very much higher than found in other groups of seabirds. Analysis of mercury concentrations in feather samples collected prior to 1950 and after this date showed slight, but significant, increased in three out of ten sub-Antarctic procellariiform species. The lack of widespread and pronounced increases in mercury concentrations in procellariiforms between these periods may indicate that industrial and agricultural emissions of mercury in the southern hemisphere have been relatively minor and the high concentrations are predominantly due to natural processes. Mercury concentrations were relatively consistent between body feathers of individuals, and showed no variation related to adult age (in years). Within species, mercury concentrations tended to be highest in New Zealand populations and lowest in Falkland Island and South Georgia populations. Mercury concentrations also varied among species, but not in a way that could be related to diet. 27 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. At-sea distribution and scale-dependent foraging behaviour of petrels and albatrosses: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Pinaud, David; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2007-01-01

    1. In order to study and predict population distribution, it is crucial to identify and understand factors affecting individual movement decisions at different scales. Movements of foraging animals should be adjusted to the hierarchical spatial distribution of resources in the environment and this scale-dependent response to environmental heterogeneity should differ according to the forager's characteristics and exploited habitats. 2. Using First-Passage Time analysis, we studied scales of search effort and habitat used by individuals of seven sympatric Indian Ocean Procellariiform species fitted with satellite transmitters. We characterized their search effort distribution and examined whether species differ in scale-dependent adjustments of their movements according to the marine environment exploited. 3. All species and almost all individuals (91% of 122 individuals) exhibited an Area-Restricted Search (ARS) during foraging. At a regional scale (1000s km), foraging ranges showed a large spatial overlap between species. At a smaller scale (100s km, at which an increase in search effort occurred), a segregation in environmental characteristics of ARS zones (where search effort is high) was found between species. 4. Spatial scales at which individuals increased their search effort differed between species and also between exploited habitats, indicating a similar movement adjustment for predators foraging in the same habitat. ARS zones of the two populations of wandering albatross Diomedea exulans (Crozet and Kerguelen) were similar in their adjustments (i.e. same ARS scale) as well as in their environmental characteristics. These two populations showed a weak spatial overlap in their foraging distribution, with males foraging in more southerly waters than females in both populations. 5. This study demonstrates that predators of several species adjust their foraging behaviour to the heterogeneous environment and these scale-dependent movement adjustments depend on both forager and environment characteristics.

  17. Pelagic seabird surveys in the Tuamotu and Gambier Archipelagos, French Polynesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vanderwerf, Eric A.; Pierce, Ray J.; Gill, Verena A.; Wragg, Graham; Raust, Philippe; Tibbitts, T. Lee

    2006-01-01

    We conducted pelagic seabird surveys in the Gambier and Tuamotu Archipelagos in the southeastern Pacific Ocean totaling 40 hours during 7-27 March 2003 and 22.5 hours during 22-27 July 2001. We used a 300-m-wide strip transect to estimate seabird density, and we estimated relative abundance of birds at all distances. In 2001, we observed a total of 326 birds of 18 species. The mean relative abundance of all birds was 14.3 ?? 3.1/h. Red-footed Booby Sula sula was the most abundant species (5.6/h), followed by White Tern Gygis alba (3.4/h), and Great Crested or Swift Tern Sterna bergii (1.2/h). In 2003, we observed a total of 1463 birds of 25 species. The mean relative abundance of all birds was 36.6 ?? 11.4/h and the mean density of all birds was 4.14 ?? 0.72/km2. Brown Noddy Anous stolidus was the most abundant species (17.6/h, 1.5/km2), followed by White Tern (8.4/h, 1.3/km2), and Red-footed Booby (4.6/h, 0.8/km2). Several globally or locally rare species were observed infrequently, including Phoenix Petrel Pterodroma alba (0.1/h, 0.03/km2). Distribution of birds was uneven, with long periods of no birds punctuated by occasional feeding flocks. In 2003, species diversity was related to length of observation period, with more species observed on longer segments (r2 = 0.58, F1.5 = 6.03, P = 0.05). Although the duration and extent of our surveys were limited, these data are valuable because little published information is available on pelagic seabirds in southeastern Polynesia.

  18. Foraging segregation and genetic divergence between geographically proximate colonies of a highly mobile seabird

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiley, Anne E.; Welch, Andreanna J.; Ostrom, P.H.; James, Helen F.; Stricker, C.A.; Fleischer, R.C.; Gandhi, H.; Adams, J.; Ainley, D.G.; Duvall, F.; Holmes, N.; Hu, D.; Judge, S.; Penniman, J.; Swindle, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    Foraging segregation may play an important role in the maintenance of animal diversity, and is a proposed mechanism for promoting genetic divergence within seabird species. However, little information exists regarding its presence among seabird populations. We investigated genetic and foraging divergence between two colonies of endangered Hawaiian petrels (Pterodroma sandwichensis) nesting on the islands of Hawaii and Kauai using the mitochondrial Cytochrome b gene and carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen isotope values (?? 13C, ?? 15N and ??D, respectively) of feathers. Genetic analyses revealed strong differentiation between colonies on Hawaii and Kauai, with ?? ST = 0. 50 (p < 0. 0001). Coalescent-based analyses gave estimates of <1 migration event per 1,000 generations. Hatch-year birds from Kauai had significantly lower ?? 13C and ?? 15N values than those from Hawaii. This is consistent with Kauai birds provisioning chicks with prey derived from near or north of the Hawaiian Islands, and Hawaii birds provisioning young with prey from regions of the equatorial Pacific characterized by elevated ?? 15N values at the food web base. ?? 15N values of Kauai and Hawaii adults differed significantly, indicating additional foraging segregation during molt. Feather ??D varied from -69 to 53???. This variation cannot be related solely to an isotopically homogeneous ocean water source or evaporative water loss. Instead, we propose the involvement of salt gland excretion. Our data demonstrate the presence of foraging segregation between proximately nesting seabird populations, despite high species mobility. This ecological diversity may facilitate population coexistence, and its preservation should be a focus of conservation strategies. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag (outside the USA).

  19. Foraging segregation and genetic divergence between geographically proximate colonies of a highly mobile seabird.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Anne E; Welch, Andreanna J; Ostrom, Peggy H; James, Helen F; Stricker, Craig A; Fleischer, Robert C; Gandhi, Hasand; Adams, Josh; Ainley, David G; Duvall, Fern; Holmes, Nick; Hu, Darcy; Judge, Seth; Penniman, Jay; Swindle, Keith A

    2012-01-01

    Foraging segregation may play an important role in the maintenance of animal diversity, and is a proposed mechanism for promoting genetic divergence within seabird species. However, little information exists regarding its presence among seabird populations. We investigated genetic and foraging divergence between two colonies of endangered Hawaiian petrels (Pterodroma sandwichensis) nesting on the islands of Hawaii and Kauai using the mitochondrial Cytochrome b gene and carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen isotope values (δ(13)C, δ(15)N and δD, respectively) of feathers. Genetic analyses revealed strong differentiation between colonies on Hawaii and Kauai, with Φ(ST) = 0.50 (p < 0.0001). Coalescent-based analyses gave estimates of <1 migration event per 1,000 generations. Hatch-year birds from Kauai had significantly lower δ(13)C and δ(15)N values than those from Hawaii. This is consistent with Kauai birds provisioning chicks with prey derived from near or north of the Hawaiian Islands, and Hawaii birds provisioning young with prey from regions of the equatorial Pacific characterized by elevated δ(15)N values at the food web base. δ(15)N values of Kauai and Hawaii adults differed significantly, indicating additional foraging segregation during molt. Feather δD varied from -69 to 53‰. This variation cannot be related solely to an isotopically homogeneous ocean water source or evaporative water loss. Instead, we propose the involvement of salt gland excretion. Our data demonstrate the presence of foraging segregation between proximately nesting seabird populations, despite high species mobility. This ecological diversity may facilitate population coexistence, and its preservation should be a focus of conservation strategies.

  20. Designing Tools for Ocean Exploration. Galapagos Rifts Expedition--Grades 9-12. Overview: Ocean Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

    This activity teaches about the complexity of ocean exploration, the technological applications and capabilities required for ocean exploration, the importance of teamwork in scientific research projects, and developing abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry. The activity provides learning objectives, a list of needed materials, key…

  1. Hematology, plasma chemistry, and serology of the flightless cormorant (Phalacrocorax harrisi) in the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Travis, Erika K; Vargas, F Hernan; Merkel, Jane; Gottdenker, Nicole; Miller, R Eric; Parker, Patricia G

    2006-01-01

    The flightless cormorant (Phalacrocorax harrisi) is an endemic species of the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador. Health studies of the species have not previously been conducted. In August 2003, baseline samples were collected from flightless cormorant colonies on the islands of Isabela and Fernandina. Seventy-six birds, from nestlings to adults, were evaluated. Genetic sexing of 70 cormorants revealed 37 females and 33 males. Hematology assessment consisted of packed cell volume (n=19), leukograms (n=69), and blood smear evaluation (n=69). Microscopic evaluation of blood smears revealed microfilaria in 33% (23/69) of the cormorants. Plasma chemistries were performed on 46 cormorants. There was no significant difference in chemistry values or complete blood counts between male and female cormorants or between age groups. Based on a serologic survey to assess exposure to avian pathogens, birds (n=69) were seronegative for West Nile virus, avian paramyxovirus type 1 (Newcastle disease virus), avian paramyxovirus types 2 and 3, avian influenza, infectious bursal disease, infectious bronchitis, Marek's disease (herpes), reovirus, avian encephalomyelitis, and avian adenovirus type 2. Antibodies to avian adenovirus type 1 and Chlamydophila psittaci were found in 31% (21/68) and 11% (7/65) of flightless cormorants respectively. Chlamydophila psittaci was detected via polymerase chain reaction in 6% (2/33) of the cormorants. The overall negative serologic findings of this research suggest that the flightless cormorant is an immunologically naïve species, which may have a reduced capacity to cope with the introduction of novel pathogens.

  2. Stress physiology as a predictor of survival in Galapagos marine iguanas.

    PubMed

    Romero, L Michael; Wikelski, Martin

    2010-10-22

    Although glucocorticoid hormones are considered important physiological regulators for surviving adverse environmental stimuli (stressors), evidence for such a role is sparse and usually extrapolated from glucocorticoid effects under laboratory, short-term and/or non-emergency conditions. Galápagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) provide an excellent model for determining the ultimate function of a glucocorticoid response because susceptibility to starvation induced by El Niño conditions is essentially their only major natural stressor. In a prospective study, we captured 98 adult male marine iguanas and assessed four major components of their glucocorticoid response: baseline corticosterone titres; corticosterone responses to acute stressors (capture and handling); the maximal capacity to secrete corticosterone (via adrenocorticotropin injection); and the ability to terminate corticosterone responses (negative feedback). Several months after collecting initial measurements, weak El Niño conditions affected the Galápagos and 23 iguanas died. The dead iguanas were typified by a reduced efficacy of negative feedback (i.e. poorer post-stress suppression of corticosterone release) compared with surviving iguanas. We found no prior differences between dead and alive iguanas in baseline corticosterone concentrations, responses to acute stressors, nor in capacity to respond. These data suggest that a greater ability to terminate a stress response conferred a survival advantage during starvation.

  3. Human disturbance alters endocrine and immune responses in the Galapagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus).

    PubMed

    French, Susannah S; DeNardo, Dale F; Greives, Timothy J; Strand, Christine R; Demas, Gregory E

    2010-11-01

    Anthropogenic disturbance is a relevant and widespread facilitator of environmental change and there is clear evidence that it impacts natural populations. While population-level responses to major anthropogenic changes have been well studied, individual physiological responses to mild disturbance can be equally critical to the long-term survival of a species, yet they remain largely unexamined. The current study investigated the impact of seemingly low-level anthropogenic disturbance (ecotourism) on stress responsiveness and specific fitness-related immune measures in different breeding stages of the marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus). Specifically, we found stress-induced elevations in plasma corticosterone among tourist-exposed populations relative to undisturbed populations. We also found changes in multiple immunological responses associated with stress-related effects of human disturbance, including bacterial killing ability, cutaneous wound healing, and hemolytic complement activity, and the responses varied according to reproductive state. By identifying health-related consequences of human disturbance, this study provides critical insight into the conservation of a well-known species that has a very distinct ecology. The study also broadens the foundation of knowledge needed to understand the global significance of various levels of human disturbance.

  4. Age Constraints on the Eruptive History of the Northern Galapagos Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinton, C. W.; Harpp, K. S.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Soule, S. A.; Mv1007 Flamingo Science Team

    2011-12-01

    The Northern Galápagos Volcanic Province, located north of the Galápagos Archipelago and centered near the 90° 50'W Galápagos transform fault (GTF), is represented by a complex set of islands, seamount chains and ridges. To better understand the dynamics of ridge-hotspot interaction in this unique region, we collected bathymetry, sidescan sonar, magnetic, sub-bottom seismic, and gravity data during the 2010 FLAMINGO (MV1007) cruise of the R/V Melville. In addition to the geophysical studies, lava samples were recovered by dredge at 43 locations on both the Nazca Plate and Cocos Plate. The bathymetric mapping shows that region on the Nazca Plate west of the GTF is dominated by numerous seamounts aligned in three volcanic lineaments, the largest of which is the Wolf-Darwin Lineament. Faulting patterns and seamount morphology suggest that the locations and orientations of the lineaments may be partly controlled by the lithospheric stress field associated with the GTF. In contrast, east of the GTF on the Cocos Plate, there is little evidence of constructional volcanism - instead, there are several linear, nearly ridge-parallel, faulted features with up to 1km of relief. In this paper, we present new 40Ar/39Ar ages from the lavas collected in this region. These data allow us to constrain the age and duration of volcanism, thereby testing different models for interactions between the Galápagos plume and the Galápagos Spreading Center.

  5. Human disturbance alters endocrine and immune responses in the Galapagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus)

    PubMed Central

    French, Susannah S; DeNardo, Dale F.; Greives, Timothy J.; Strand, Christine R.; Demas, Gregory E.

    2010-01-01

    Anthropogenic disturbance is a relevant and widespread facilitator of environmental change and there is clear evidence that it impacts natural populations. While population-level responses to major anthropogenic changes have been well studied, individual physiological responses to mild disturbance can be equally critical to the long-term survival of a species, yet they remain largely unexamined. The current study investigated the impact of seemingly low-level anthropogenic disturbance (ecotourism) on stress responsiveness and specific fitness-related immune measures in different breeding stages of the marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus). Specifically, we found stress-induced elevations in plasma corticosterone among tourist-exposed populations relative to undisturbed populations. We also found changes in multiple immunological responses associated with stress-related effects of human disturbance, including bacterial killing ability, cutaneous wound healing, and hemolytic complement activity, and the responses varied according to reproductive state. By identifying health-related consequences of human disturbance, this study provides critical insight into the conservation of a well-known species that has a very distinct ecology. The study also broadens the foundation of knowledge needed to understand the global significance of various levels of human disturbance. PMID:20708010

  6. Diet, digestion, and food preferences of Galapagos land iguanas. [Conolophus pallidus

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, K.A.; Tracy, C.R.; Porter, W.P.

    1984-01-01

    The choice of food types and the length of time food passed through the gastrointestinal tract were determined in free-ranging Conolophus pallidus on Isla Santa Fe, Galapogos throughout the year. Natural foods were analyzed for energy, percent cellulose, percent nitrogen, and calcium as indices of the quality of food. Foods of highest quality were found to be among the preferred foods, but not all preferred foods were of high quality with respect to the nutrients measured. Passage time of food through the gastrointestinal tract, digestive efficiency, and digestion of cellulose were determined on captive Conolophus subcristatus. Ability to digest cellulose and digestive efficiency varied among five caged iguanas. Intra- and interspecific variabilities in digestive capacities result from variability in ecological factors, and interspecific variability among iguanines probably reflects differences in colic anatomy and the ability to absorb nutrients from the hindgut. 23 references, 4 tables.

  7. Galapagos on the Potomac--Or the Evolution of Federal Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Dale

    1984-01-01

    The research on effective schools provides an opportunity for federally supported school improvement. A new challenge to policymakers will be presented by the satellite delivery of a totally engineered learning environment to subscribing homes. (MLF)

  8. Eruption Dynamics and Flow Morphology during the 2005 Sierra Negra Eruption, Galapagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rader, E.; Harpp, K.; Geist, D.

    2006-12-01

    Sierra Negra volcano began erupting on October 22nd, 2005. The eruption lasted nine days and provided an opportunity to examine emplacement of lava flows and their morphology. During the first two days, fire fountaining produced a broad, unchannelized flow that coated the northern caldera wall and benches directly below the vents as it moved onto the eastern caldera floor. After the first day of the eruption, the caldera floor a'a flow grew primarily by inflation, lateral spreading along linear upwelling regions, and pahoehoe breakouts at the perimeter. Simultaneously, four 4km long rootless flows formed on the northern flanks of the volcano, supplied by spatter from the vents inboard of the caldera rim. Samples from different morphological types of lava from the caldera floor, bench, and outer flanks were collected and examined by BSE imaging. Transitions from pahoehoe to a'a and back to pahoehoe were observed in a low viscosity flow on the caldera bench that cascaded over a steep escarpment. Plagioclase microlite content in the bench flow varies little, with 27% in pahoehoe and 33% in a'a, on average. Consequently, we propose that the transformation was driven by changes in strain rate rather than cooling. As the lava first flowed over the bench edge, the increased strain rate caused it to become a'a. The elevation drop was small enough, however, that the flow remained sufficiently hot to revert to pahoehoe as it pooled on the flat surface at the base of the drop; comparable flows have been described on Kilauea. Similarly, pahoehoe breakouts from the caldera floor a'a flow were driven by pressure from the inflating flow, causing well-insulated lava to emerge from the a'a body as pahoehoe. Quenched lava collected from the incandescent breakouts have higher crystal contents than those collected closer to the vents, indicating that they experienced ~30° cooling during transport within the inflating flow. At the southern tip of the caldera floor flow, several km from the vents, lavas with toothpaste morphology were observed in breakouts. The greater crystallinity and imbricated feldspar crystals in these samples also likely reflect cooling during transport in the flow.

  9. The Galapagos archipelago: A natural laboratory to examine sharp hydroclimatic, geologic and anthropogenic gradients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Percy, Madelyn; Schmitt, Sarah; Riveros-Iregui, Diego; Mirus, Benjamin B.

    2016-01-01

    Poor understanding of the water cycle in tropical ecosystems has the potential to exacerbate water shortages and water crises in the region. We suggest that the Galápagos Islands provide an excellent proxy to regions across the tropics as a result of sharp hydroclimatic, anthropogenic, and pedohydrologic gradients across the archipelago. Hydroclimatic and pedohydrologic gradients are found across different elevations on single islands, as well as across the archipelago, whereas anthropogenic gradients reflect land use and land cover change across islands as population and growth in tourism have affected individual islands differently. This article highlights specific opportunities to further examine our understanding of the interactions between water and critical zone processes in tropical ecosystems, making connections between the Galápagos archipelago and much of the understudied tropics. The Galápagos archipelago offers a natural laboratory through which we can examine current threats to freshwater security as well as the dynamics of coupled natural and human systems.

  10. Environmental Education in the Galapagos: Where Do We Go From Here?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepath, Carl M.

    2009-01-01

    Our future leaders' environmental understanding improves their resource management skills and decision-making capacity. Community awareness and "hands-on" involvement preserves bio-diversity and addresses human impacts. This report discusses the importance of environmental education, and effective learning programs. Quality education in…

  11. Corticosterone levels predict survival probabilities of Galapagos marine iguanas during El Nino events.

    PubMed

    Romero, L M; Wikelski, M

    2001-06-19

    Plasma levels of corticosterone are often used as a measure of "stress" in wild animal populations. However, we lack conclusive evidence that different stress levels reflect different survival probabilities between populations. Galápagos marine iguanas offer an ideal test case because island populations are affected differently by recurring El Niño famine events, and population-level survival can be quantified by counting iguanas locally. We surveyed corticosterone levels in six populations during the 1998 El Niño famine and the 1999 La Niña feast period. Iguanas had higher baseline and handling stress-induced corticosterone concentrations during famine than feast conditions. Corticosterone levels differed between islands and predicted survival through an El Niño period. However, among individuals, baseline corticosterone was only elevated when body condition dropped below a critical threshold. Thus, the population-level corticosterone response was variable but nevertheless predicted overall population health. Our results lend support to the use of corticosterone as a rapid quantitative predictor of survival in wild animal populations.

  12. Signs of Recent Volcanism and Hydrothermal Activity Along the Eastern Segment of the Galapagos Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raineault, N.; Smart, C.; Mayer, L. A.; Ballard, R. D.; Fisher, C. R.; Marsh, L.; Shank, T. M.

    2016-12-01

    Since the initial discovery of the Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC) vents in 1977, large-scale disturbances resulting from eruptive and tectonic activity have both destroyed and created vent habitats along the GSC. In 2015, the E/V Nautilus returned to the GSC with remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) to explore 17 kilometers of the rift valley from the Rosebud site in the west, to a previously unexplored temperature anomaly east of the Tempus Fugit vent site. In the years to over a decade since scientists last visited the Rosebud, Rose Garden, and Tempus Fugit sites, there were many changes. Most notably, the Rosebud site, where scientists found a nascent vent community and left site markers in 2002, was apparently covered with glassy basaltic sheet flows. In addition to visual exploration, oceanographic sensor measurements and direct sampling, we used the ROV Hercules imaging suite, comprised of stereo cameras and a structured light laser sensor to map an area of diffuse flow in the Tempus Fugit field (100 m x 150 m). The centimeter-level photographic and bathymetric maps created with this system, along with ROV HD video, samples, and environmental sensors, documented hydrothermal activity and changes in biological community structure (e.g., Riftia tubeworms observed in nascent stages of community development in 2011 were now, in 2015, in greater abundance (with tubes almost 4 m in length). The detection of active venting and associated faunal assemblages will provide insight into the temporal and spatial variability of venting activity at the Tempus Fugit site. On a visual survey of the Rift east of the Tempus Fugit site, extinct sulfide chimney structures were discovered and sampled. There were several chimneys and sulfide deposits in a span of over 8 km that ranged in height from over a half meter to 1.5 m tall. Diffuse flow hosting white and blue bacterial mats was observed near the chimneys complexes. The base of a large chimney structure, venting white fluids, as well as adjacent chemically-stained sediments supported vent-endemic fauna including the Pompeii worm (Alvinella pompejana) and other polychaete worms, along with pycnogonids, rat-tail fish, and galatheid crabs. This discovery provided the first evidence that the eastern segment of the GSC may have contained high-temperature, black smoker vents.

  13. Lineage sorting in multihost parasites: Eidmanniella albescens and Fregatiella aurifasciata on seabirds from the Galapagos Islands

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Parra, Jose L; Levin, Iris I; Johnson, Kevin P; Parker, Patricia G

    2015-01-01

    Parasites comprise a significant percentage of the biodiversity of the planet and are useful systems to test evolutionary and ecological hypotheses. In this study, we analyze the effect of host species identity and the immediate local species assemblage within mixed species colonies of nesting seabirds on patterns of genetic clustering within two species of multihost ectoparasitic lice. We use three genetic markers (one mitochondrial, COI, and two nuclear, EF1-α and wingless) and maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees to test whether (1) parasites show lineage sorting based on their host species; and (2) switching of lineages to the alternate host species depends on the immediate local species assemblage of individual hosts within a colony. Specifically, we examine the genetic structure of two louse species: Eidmanniella albescens, infecting both Nazca (Sula granti) and blue-footed boobies (Sula nebouxii), and Fregatiella aurifasciata, infecting both great (Fregata minor) and magnificent frigatebirds (Fregata magnificens). We found that host species identity was the only factor explaining the patterns of genetic structure in both parasites. In both cases, there is evident genetic differentiation depending on the host species. Thus, a revision of the taxonomy of these louse species is needed. One possible explanation of this pattern is extremely low louse migration rates between host species, perhaps influenced by fine-scale spatial separation of host species within mixed colonies, and low parasite infrapopulation numbers. PMID:26380662

  14. Carriage of antibiotic-resistant enteric bacteria varies among sites in Galapagos reptiles.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Emily; Hong, Pei-Ying; Bedon, Lenin Cruz; Mackie, Roderick I

    2012-01-01

    Increased overlap between humans and wildlife populations has increased the risk for novel disease emergence. Detecting contacts with a high risk for transmission of pathogens requires the identification of dependable measures of microbial exchange. We evaluated antibiotic resistance as a molecular marker for the intensity of human-wildlife microbial connectivity in the Galápagos Islands. We isolated Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica from the feces of land iguanas (Conolophus sp.), marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus), giant tortoises (Geochelone nigra), and seawater, and tested these bacteria with the use of the disk diffusion method for resistance to 10 antibiotics. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were found in reptile feces from two tourism sites (Isla Plaza Sur and La Galapaguera on Isla San Cristóbal) and from seawater close to a public use beach near Puerto Baquerizo Moreno on Isla San Cristóbal. No resistance was detected at two protected beaches on more isolated islands (El Miedo on Isla Santa Fe and Cape Douglas on Isla Fernandina) and at a coastal tourism site (La Lobería on Isla San Cristóbal). Eighteen E. coli isolates from three locations, all sites relatively proximate to a port town, were resistant to ampicillin, doxycycline, tetracycline, and trimethoprin/sulfamethoxazole. In contrast, only five S. enterica isolates showed a mild decrease in susceptibility to doxycycline and tetracycline from these same sites (i.e., an intermediate resistance phenotype), but no clinical resistance was detected in this bacterial species. These findings suggest that reptiles living in closer proximity to humans potentially have higher exposure to bacteria of human origin; however, it is not clear from this study to what extent this potential exposure translates to ongoing exchange of bacterial strains or genetic traits. Resistance patterns and bacterial exchange in this system warrant further investigation to understand better how human associations influence disease risk in endemic Galápagos wildlife.

  15. Three-dimensional magnetic modeling of a propagating rift, Galapagos 95°30‧W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephen P.; Hey, R. N.

    1986-03-01

    A combined Deep Tow and Seabeam investigation at 95°30'W on the Cocos-Nazca spreading center has revealed the crustal contact between the propagating rift and the dying rift systems. The observed 27-km offset between the axes creates an ideal situation for the application of magnetic methods. The normally magnetized crust of the propagating rift tip penetrates into older crust, which was created when the earth's main field was reversed. As the V-shaped structure of the rift clearly violates the conventional two-dimensional assumptions, a full three-dimensional analysis is required. In addition, the distorting influence of over 1000 m bathymetric relief must be removed from the observed field. Inversions have been performed on the gridded representations of the observed magnet