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Sample records for galaxy m82 faint

  1. Galaxy M82

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A colorful image showing violent star formation triggered when two galaxies bumped into each other has been captured by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

    In the image, the starburst galaxy M82 has a disturbed appearance caused by violent activity after an ancient encounter with its large galactic neighbor, M81. The image, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/pictures/wfpc .

    The huge lanes of dust that crisscross M82's disk are another telltale sign of the flurry of star formation. Below the center and to the right, a strong galactic wind is spewing knotty filaments of hydrogen and nitrogen gas. More than 100 super star clusters -- very bright, compact groupings of about 100,000 stars -- appear as white dots sprinkled throughout the galaxy's central area. The dark area just above center is a huge dust cloud.

    A collaboration of European and American scientists used these clusters to date the interaction between M82 and M81 to about 600 million years ago, when a region called M82 B (the bright area just below and to the left of the central dust cloud) exploded with new stars. Scientists have found that this ancient starburst was triggered by the encounter with M81. The results are published in the February 2001 issue of the Astronomical Journal.

    This discovery provides evidence linking the birth of super star clusters to violent interaction between galaxies. These clusters also provide insight into the rough-and-tumble universe of long ago, when galaxies bumped into each other more frequently.

    M82 is located 12 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major. The picture was taken Sept. 15, 1997. The natural-color composite was constructed from three exposures taken with blue, green and red filters.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md., manages space operations for the Hubble Space Telescope

  2. Special observations of the galaxy M 82, 11

    SciTech Connect

    Amirkhanyan, A.S.; Gagen-Torn, V.A.; Reshetnikov, V.P.

    1985-09-01

    The results are given of spectral observations of the peculiar galaxy M 82. A study is made of the splitting of the emission lines in the southern filaments, and the electron density in the gaseous clouds which compose them is found. For six positions the radial velocity curves are determined. New data enable us to return to the explanation of the polarization observed in filaments as due to the scattering of the radiation of the central regions by dust and free electrons.

  3. ROSAT HRI Observations of the Starburst Galaxy M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, E.; Bregman, J. N.

    1992-12-01

    Gas-dynamical models of starburst galaxies predict that supernova heating creates a bubble of hot gas which breaks out of the disk. Some models predict a polar outflow in which the hot gas escapes along an edge-brightened chimney-like structure, while others predict spherical galactic winds. In order to test these models we have obtained a 25 ksec ROSAT HRI image of the starburst galaxy M82. Our HRI image has a resolution of about 5''(70 pc) and a field of view of about 30' (20 kpc). The image includes photons with energies between 0.2 and 1.5 keV and is almost an order of magnitude more sensitive than previous images. The X-ray emission extends perpendicular to the disk 3-4 kpc which is comparable to the extent of the emission detected with the Einstein IPC, although our resolution is more than a factor of 10 better. The emission is neither collimated nor spherically distributed, but has a conical distribution in which the emission close to the center of the galaxy is more compact than the emission farther away from the disk. The X-ray emission is not edge-brightened and decreases in hardness with distance from the center of the galaxy. The mean energy in the core is about 0.85 keV, while the mean energy a few kpc from the disk is about 0.25 keV. The shape, temperature, and lack of edge-brightening of the emission is in conflict with some starburst models. ES wishes to acknowledge support from a NASA Graduate Student Research Program Fellowship.

  4. Dense gas in nearby galaxies. XIII. CO submillimeter line emission from the starburst galaxy M 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, R. Q.; Henkel, C.; Schulz, A.; Zielinsky, M.; Mauersberger, R.; Störzer, H.; Wilson, T. L.; Gensheimer, P.

    2000-06-01

    12CO J = 1-0, 2-1, 4-3, 7-6, and 13CO 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2 line emission was mapped with angular resolutions of 13'' - 22'' toward the nuclear region of the archetypical starburst galaxy M 82. There are two hotspots on either side of the dynamical center, with the south-western lobe being slightly more prominent. Lobe spacings are not identical for all transitions: For the submillimeter CO lines, the spacing is ~ 15''; for the millimeter lines (CO J = 2-1 and 1-0) the spacing is ~ 26'', indicating the presence of a `low' and a `high' CO excitation component. A Large Velocity Gradient (LVG) excitation analysis of the submillimeter lines leads to inconsistencies, since area and volume filling factors are almost the same, resulting in cloud sizes along the lines-of-sight that match the entire size of the M 82 starburst region. Nevertheless, LVG column densities agree with estimates derived from the dust emission in the far infrared and at submillimeter wavelengths. 22'' beam averaged total column densities are N(CO) ~ 5 1018 and N(H_2) ~ 1023 \\cmsq; the total molecular mass is a few 108 \\solmass. Accounting for high UV fluxes and variations in kinetic temperature and assuming that the observed emission arises from photon dominated regions (PDRs) resolves the problems related to an LVG treatment of the radiative transfer. Spatial densities are as in the LVG case (\

  5. Hot plasma and black hole binaries in starburst galaxy M82.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, R E; Ptak, A; Feigelson, E D; Garmire, G; Townsley, L; Brandt, W N; Sambruna, R; Bregman, J N

    2000-11-17

    High-resolution x-ray observations of the prototype starburst galaxy Messier 82 (M82) obtained with the advanced CCD (charge-coupled device) imaging spectrometer on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory provide a detailed view of hot plasma and energetic processes. Plasma with temperature of about 40,000,000 kelvin fills the inner 1 kiloparsec, which is much hotter than the 1,000,000 to 2,000,000 kelvin interstellar medium component in the Milky Way Galaxy. Produced by many supernova explosions, this central region is overpressurized and drives M82's prominent galactic wind into the intergalactic medium. We also resolved about 20 compact x-ray sources, many of which could be high-mass x-ray binary star systems containing black holes.

  6. A connection between star formation activity and cosmic rays in the starburst galaxy M82.

    PubMed

    2009-12-10

    Although Galactic cosmic rays (protons and nuclei) are widely believed to be mainly accelerated by the winds and supernovae of massive stars, definitive evidence of this origin remains elusive nearly a century after their discovery. The active regions of starburst galaxies have exceptionally high rates of star formation, and their large size-more than 50 times the diameter of similar Galactic regions-uniquely enables reliable calorimetric measurements of their potentially high cosmic-ray density. The cosmic rays produced in the formation, life and death of massive stars in these regions are expected to produce diffuse gamma-ray emission through interactions with interstellar gas and radiation. M82, the prototype small starburst galaxy, is predicted to be the brightest starburst galaxy in terms of gamma-ray emission. Here we report the detection of >700-GeV gamma-rays from M82. From these data we determine a cosmic-ray density of 250 eV cm(-3) in the starburst core, which is about 500 times the average Galactic density. This links cosmic-ray acceleration to star formation activity, and suggests that supernovae and massive-star winds are the dominant accelerators.

  7. A connection between star formation activity and cosmic rays in the starburst galaxy M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VERITAS Collaboration; Acciari, V. A.; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Boltuch, D.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Celik, O.; Cesarini, A.; Chow, Y. C.; Ciupik, L.; Cogan, P.; Colin, P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gibbs, K.; Gillanders, G. H.; Godambe, S.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Horan, D.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Imran, A.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Kildea, J.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Lebohec, S.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; McCutcheon, M.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nagai, T.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pizlo, F.; Pohl, M.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Smith, A. W.; Steele, D.; Swordy, S. P.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wagner, R. G.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Wissel, S.; Wood, M.; Zitzer, B.

    2009-12-01

    Although Galactic cosmic rays (protons and nuclei) are widely believed to be mainly accelerated by the winds and supernovae of massive stars, definitive evidence of this origin remains elusive nearly a century after their discovery. The active regions of starburst galaxies have exceptionally high rates of star formation, and their large size-more than 50 times the diameter of similar Galactic regions-uniquely enables reliable calorimetric measurements of their potentially high cosmic-ray density. The cosmic rays produced in the formation, life and death of massive stars in these regions are expected to produce diffuse γ-ray emission through interactions with interstellar gas and radiation. M82, the prototype small starburst galaxy, is predicted to be the brightest starburst galaxy in terms of γ-ray emission. Here we report the detection of >700-GeV γ-rays from M82. From these data we determine a cosmic-ray density of 250eVcm-3 in the starburst core, which is about 500 times the average Galactic density. This links cosmic-ray acceleration to star formation activity, and suggests that supernovae and massive-star winds are the dominant accelerators.

  8. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE MAPS THE DENSE, STAR-FORMING GAS IN THE NEARBY STARBURST GALAXY M82

    SciTech Connect

    Kepley, Amanda A.; Frayer, David; Leroy, Adam K.; Usero, Antonio; Walter, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    Observations of the Milky Way and nearby galaxies show that dense molecular gas correlates with recent star formation, suggesting that the formation of this gas phase may help regulate star formation. A key test of this idea requires wide-area, high-resolution maps of dense molecular gas in galaxies to explore how local physical conditions drive dense gas formation, but these observations have been limited because of the faintness of dense gas tracers like HCN and HCO{sup +}. Here we demonstrate the power of the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT)—the largest single-dish millimeter radio telescope—for mapping dense gas in galaxies by presenting the most sensitive maps yet of HCN and HCO{sup +} in the starburst galaxy M82. The HCN and HCO{sup +} in the disk of this galaxy correlates with both recent star formation and more diffuse molecular gas and shows kinematics consistent with a rotating torus. The HCO{sup +} emission extending to the north and south of the disk is coincident with the outflow previously identified in CO and traces the eastern edge of the hot outflowing gas. The central starburst region has a higher ratio of star formation to dense gas than the outer regions, pointing to the starburst as a key driver of this relationship. These results establish that the GBT can efficiently map the dense molecular gas at 90 GHz in nearby galaxies, a capability that will increase further with the 16 element feed array under construction.

  9. Local dark energy: HST evidence from the vicinity of the M81/M82 galaxy group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Kashibadze, O. G.; Makarov, D. I.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.

    2007-10-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope observations of the nearby galaxy group M81/M82 and its vicinity indicate that the dynamics of the expansion outflow around the group is dominated by the antigravity of the dark energy background. The local density of dark energy in the area is estimated to be near the global dark energy density or perhaps exactly equal to it. This conclusion agrees well with our previous results for the Local Group vicinity and the vicinity of the Cen A/M83 group.

  10. THE STAR CLUSTER SYSTEM IN THE NEARBY STARBURST GALAXY M82

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Sungsoon; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Hwang, Narae E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-03-20

    We present a photometric study of star clusters in the nearby starburst galaxy M82 based on the UBVI-, YJ- and H-band Hubble Space Telescope images. We find 1105 star clusters with V < 23 mag. Of those, 1070 are located in the disk region, while 35 star clusters are in the halo region. The star clusters in the disk are composed of a dominant blue population with a color peak at (B - V){sub 0} Almost-Equal-To 0.45, and a weaker red population. The luminosity function of the disk clusters shows a power-law distribution with a power-law index {alpha} = -2.04 {+-} 0.03, and the scale height of their distribution is h{sub z} = 9.''64 {+-} 0.''40 (164 {+-} 7 pc), similar to that of the stellar thin disk of M82. We have derived the ages of {approx}630 star clusters using the spectral energy distribution fit method by comparing UBVI(YJ)H-band photometric data with the simple stellar population models. The age distribution of the disk clusters shows that the most dominant cluster population has ages ranging from 100 Myr to 1 Gyr, with a peak at about 500 Myr. This suggests that M82 has undergone a disk-wide star formation about 500 Myr ago, probably through the interaction with M81. The brightest star clusters in the nuclear region are much brighter than those in other regions, indicating that more massive star clusters are formed in the denser environments. On the other hand, the colors of the halo clusters are similar to those of globular clusters in the Milky Way, and their ages are estimated to be older than 1 Gyr. These are probably genuine old globular clusters in M82.

  11. A 400-solar-mass black hole in the galaxy M82.

    PubMed

    Pasham, Dheeraj R; Strohmayer, Tod E; Mushotzky, Richard F

    2014-09-01

    M82 X-1, the brightest X-ray source in the galaxy M82, has been thought to be an intermediate-mass black hole (100 to 10,000 solar masses) because of its extremely high luminosity and variability characteristics, although some models suggest that its mass may be only about 20 solar masses. The previous mass estimates were based on scaling relations that use low-frequency characteristic timescales which have large intrinsic uncertainties. For stellar-mass black holes, we know that the high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (100-450 hertz) in the X-ray emission that occur in a 3:2 frequency ratio are stable and scale in frequency inversely with black hole mass with a reasonably small dispersion. The discovery of such stable oscillations thus potentially offers an alternative and less ambiguous means of mass determination for intermediate-mass black holes, but has hitherto not been realized. Here we report stable, twin-peak (3:2 frequency ratio) X-ray quasi-periodic oscillations from M82 X-1 at frequencies of 3.32 ± 0.06 hertz and 5.07 ± 0.06 hertz. Assuming that we can extrapolate the inverse-mass scaling that holds for stellar-mass black holes, we estimate the black hole mass of M82 X-1 to be 428 ± 105 solar masses. In addition, we can estimate the mass using the relativistic precession model, from which we get a value of 415 ± 63 solar masses. PMID:25132552

  12. A 400-solar-mass black hole in the galaxy M82.

    PubMed

    Pasham, Dheeraj R; Strohmayer, Tod E; Mushotzky, Richard F

    2014-09-01

    M82 X-1, the brightest X-ray source in the galaxy M82, has been thought to be an intermediate-mass black hole (100 to 10,000 solar masses) because of its extremely high luminosity and variability characteristics, although some models suggest that its mass may be only about 20 solar masses. The previous mass estimates were based on scaling relations that use low-frequency characteristic timescales which have large intrinsic uncertainties. For stellar-mass black holes, we know that the high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (100-450 hertz) in the X-ray emission that occur in a 3:2 frequency ratio are stable and scale in frequency inversely with black hole mass with a reasonably small dispersion. The discovery of such stable oscillations thus potentially offers an alternative and less ambiguous means of mass determination for intermediate-mass black holes, but has hitherto not been realized. Here we report stable, twin-peak (3:2 frequency ratio) X-ray quasi-periodic oscillations from M82 X-1 at frequencies of 3.32 ± 0.06 hertz and 5.07 ± 0.06 hertz. Assuming that we can extrapolate the inverse-mass scaling that holds for stellar-mass black holes, we estimate the black hole mass of M82 X-1 to be 428 ± 105 solar masses. In addition, we can estimate the mass using the relativistic precession model, from which we get a value of 415 ± 63 solar masses.

  13. THE RISE OF SN 2014J IN THE NEARBY GALAXY M82

    SciTech Connect

    Goobar, A.; Johansson, J.; Amanullah, R.; Ferretti, R.; Cao, Y.; Perley, D. A.; Tendulkar, S. P.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Nugent, P. E.; Harris, C.; Gal-Yam, A.; Ofek, E. O.; Dennefeld, M.; Valenti, S.; Arcavi, I.; Banerjee, D. P. K.; Venkataraman, V.; Joshi, V.; Ashok, N. M.; Cenko, S. B.; and others

    2014-03-20

    We report on the discovery of SN 2014J in the nearby galaxy M82. Given its proximity, it offers the best opportunity to date to study a thermonuclear supernova (SN) over a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Optical, near-IR, and mid-IR observations on the rising light curve, orchestrated by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory, show that SN 2014J is a spectroscopically normal Type Ia supernova (SN Ia), albeit exhibiting high-velocity features in its spectrum and heavily reddened by dust in the host galaxy. Our earliest detections start just hours after the fitted time of explosion. We use high-resolution optical spectroscopy to analyze the dense intervening material and do not detect any evolution in the resolved absorption features during the light curve rise. Similar to other highly reddened SNe Ia, a low value of total-to-selective extinction, R{sub V} ≲ 2, provides the best match to our observations. We also study pre-explosion optical and near-IR images from Hubble Space Telescope with special emphasis on the sources nearest to the SN location.

  14. The Rise of SN 2014J in the Nearby Galaxy M 82

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    A.Goobar; Johansson, J.; Amanullah, R.; Cao, Y.; Perley, D.A.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Ferreti, R.; Nugent, P. E.; Harris, C.; Cenko, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the discovery of SN 2014J in the nearby galaxy M 82. Given its proximity, it offers the best opportunity to date to study a thermonuclear supernova over a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Optical, near-IR and mid-IR observations on the rising lightcurve, orchestrated by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF), show that SN 2014J is a spectroscopically normal Type Ia supernova, albeit exhibiting high-velocity features in its spectrum and heavily reddened by dust in the host galaxy. Our earliest detections start just hours after the fitted time of explosion. We use high-resolution optical spectroscopy to analyze the dense intervening material and do not detect any evolution in the resolved absorption features during the lightcurve rise. Similarly to other highly reddened Type Ia supernovae, a low value of total-to-selective extinction, R (sub V) less than or approximately equal to 2, provides the best match to our observations. We also study pre-explosion optical and near-IR images from HST with special emphasis on the sources nearest to the SN location.

  15. Magnetic field surrounding the starburst nucleus of the galaxy M82 from polarized dust emission

    PubMed

    Greaves; Holland; Jenness; Hawarden

    2000-04-13

    Magnetic fields may play an important role in the star-formation process, especially in the central regions of 'starburst' galaxies where star formation is vigorous. But the field directions are very difficult to determine in the dense molecular gas out of which the stars form, so it has hitherto been impossible to test this hypothesis. Dust grains in interstellar clouds tend to be magnetically aligned, and it is possible to determine the alignment direction based on the polarization of optical light due to preferential extinction along the long axes of the aligned grains. This technique works, however, only for diffuse gas, not for the dense molecular gas. Here we report observations of polarized thermal emission from the aligned dust grains in the central region of M82, which directly traces the magnetic field structure (as projected onto the plane of the sky). Organized field lines are seen around the brightest star-forming regions, while in the dusty halo the field lines form a giant magnetic bubble possibly blown out by the galaxy's 'superwind'.

  16. EXTENDED HCN AND HCO{sup +} EMISSION IN THE STARBURST GALAXY M82

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, P.; Galaz, G.; Salter, D.; Herrera-Camus, R.; Bolatto, A. D.; Kepley, A.

    2014-12-20

    We mapped 3 mm continuum and line emission from the starburst galaxy M82 using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We targeted the HCN, HCO{sup +}, HNC, CS, and HC{sub 3}N lines, but here we focus on the HCN and HCO{sup +} emission. The map covers a field of 1.'2 with an ≈5'' resolution. The HCN and HCO{sup +} observations are short spacings corrected. The molecular gas in M82 had been previously found to be distributed in a molecular disk, coincident with the central starburst, and a galactic scale outflow which originates in the central starburst. With the new short spacings-corrected maps we derive some of the properties of the dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. From the HCN and HCO{sup +} J = (1-0) line emission, and under the assumptions of the gas being optically thin and in local thermodynamic equilibrium, we place lower limits on the amount of dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. The lower limits are 7 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} and 21 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}, or ≳ 2% of the total molecular mass in the outflow. The kinematics and spatial distribution of the dense gas outside the central starburst suggests that it is being expelled through chimneys. Assuming a constant outflow velocity, the derived outflow rate of dense molecular gas is ≥0.3 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, which would lower the starburst lifetime by ≥5%. The energy required to expel this mass of dense gas is (1-10) × 10{sup 52} erg.

  17. Extended HCN and HCO+ Emission in the Starburst Galaxy M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, P.; Galaz, G.; Salter, D.; Herrera-Camus, R.; Bolatto, A. D.; Kepley, A.

    2014-12-01

    We mapped 3 mm continuum and line emission from the starburst galaxy M82 using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We targeted the HCN, HCO+, HNC, CS, and HC3N lines, but here we focus on the HCN and HCO+ emission. The map covers a field of 1.'2 with an ≈5'' resolution. The HCN and HCO+ observations are short spacings corrected. The molecular gas in M82 had been previously found to be distributed in a molecular disk, coincident with the central starburst, and a galactic scale outflow which originates in the central starburst. With the new short spacings-corrected maps we derive some of the properties of the dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. From the HCN and HCO+ J = (1-0) line emission, and under the assumptions of the gas being optically thin and in local thermodynamic equilibrium, we place lower limits on the amount of dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. The lower limits are 7 × 106 M ⊙ and 21 × 106 M ⊙, or >~ 2% of the total molecular mass in the outflow. The kinematics and spatial distribution of the dense gas outside the central starburst suggests that it is being expelled through chimneys. Assuming a constant outflow velocity, the derived outflow rate of dense molecular gas is >=0.3 M ⊙ yr-1, which would lower the starburst lifetime by >=5%. The energy required to expel this mass of dense gas is (1-10) × 1052 erg.

  18. Large-Field CO(J = 1→0) Observations of the Starburst Galaxy M 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salak, Dragan; Nakai, Naomasa; Miyamoto, Yusuke; Yamauchi, Aya; Tsuru, Takeshi G.

    2013-06-01

    We present large-field (15.7 × 16.9 arcmin2) CO(J = 1→0) observations of the starburst galaxy M 82, at an angular resolution of 22" with the NRO 45-m telescope. The CO emission was detected in the galactic disk, outflow (driven by the galactic wind) up to ˜2 kpc above the galactic plane in the halo, and in tidal streams. The kinematics of the outflow (including CO line splitting) suggests that it has the shape of a cylinder that is diverging outwards. The mass and kinetic energy of the molecular gas outflow are estimated to be (0.26-1.0) × 109 M⊙ and (1-4) × 1056 erg. A clump of CO gas was discovered 3.5 kpc above the galactic plane; it coincides with a dark lane previously found in X-ray observations, and a peak in H I emission. A comparison with H I, hot molecular hydrogen and dust suggests that the molecular gas shows signatures of warm and cool components in the outflow and tidal streams, respectively.

  19. On the clustering of faint red galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haojie; Zheng, Zheng; Guo, Hong; Zhu, Ju; Zehavi, Idit

    2016-08-01

    Faint red galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey show a puzzling clustering pattern in previous measurements. In the two-point correlation function (2PCF), they appear to be strongly clustered on small scales, indicating a tendency to reside in massive haloes as satellite galaxies. However, their weak clustering on large scales suggests that they are more likely to be found in low-mass haloes. The interpretation of the clustering pattern suffers from the large sample variance in the 2PCF measurements, given the small volume of the volume-limited sample of such faint galaxies. We present improved clustering measurements of faint galaxies by making a full use of a flux-limited sample to obtain volume-limited measurements with an increased effective volume. In the improved 2PCF measurements, the fractional uncertainties on large scales drop by more than 40 per cent, and the strong contrast between small-scale and large-scale clustering amplitudes seen in previous work is no longer prominent. From halo occupation distribution modelling of the measurements, we find that a considerable fraction of faint red galaxies to be satellites in massive haloes, a scenario supported by the strong covariance of small-scale 2PCF measurements and the relative spatial distribution of faint red galaxies and luminous galaxies. However, the satellite fraction is found to be degenerate with the slope of the distribution profile of satellites in inner haloes. We compare the modelling results with semi-analytic model predictions and discuss the implications.

  20. Commentary "On Two H II Regions near the nucleus of M82" by Recillas-Cruz & Peimbert (1970): The archetype Galaxy of the Starburst Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recillas, E.; Mayya, Y. D.; Peimbert, M.

    2011-04-01

    This commentary on the paper "On Two H II Regions Near the Nucleus of M82" by E. Recillas-Cruz and M. Peimbert, 1970, BOTT, 5, 35, 247, will recall the first attempt to explain the unusual nuclear appearance of the extragalactic nuclear regions of the M82 galaxy. We present some comments as well on the many studies that since have been made on M82, the prototype of the "Starburst" phenomena.

  1. Detection of far-infrared forbidden O I and forbidden O III emission from the galaxy M82

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, D. M.; Genzel, R.; Townes, C. H.; Werner, M. W.; Storey, J. W. V.

    1984-01-01

    Observations in M82 of the lowest-lying transitions of neutral and doubly ionized oxygen, forbidden O I 63.2 microns and forbidden O III 88.4 microns, which have wavelengths at which the extinction toward M82 is negligible, are reported. For O III, the +220 km/s velocity of the line center with respect to the local standard of rest, the 300 km/s intrinsic line width, and the asymmetry of the profile are consistent with the systemic velocity and rotational broadening seen in other ionic lines in the nucleus of M82. The fraction of oxygen that is present in doubly ionized form, indicates that the ionization state is similar to that found in H II regions in the disk of the Milky Way Galaxy. The central velocity of the O I line is +130 km/s, and no broadening in excess of instrumental resolution is seen. This result appears to rule out association of this emission with the periphery of the central H II region.

  2. ON THE GeV AND TeV DETECTIONS OF THE STARBURST GALAXIES M82 AND NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Lacki, Brian C.; Thompson, Todd A.; Quataert, Eliot; Loeb, Abraham; Waxman, Eli

    2011-06-20

    The GeV and TeV emission from M82 and NGC 253 observed by Fermi, HESS, and VERITAS constrain the physics of cosmic rays (CRs) in these dense starbursts. We argue that the {gamma}-rays are predominantly hadronic in origin, as expected by previous studies. The measured fluxes imply that pionic losses are efficient for CR protons in both galaxies: we show that a fraction F{sub cal} {approx} 0.2-0.4 of the energy injected in high-energy primary CR protons is lost to inelastic proton-proton collisions (pion production) before escape, producing {gamma}-rays, neutrinos, and secondary electrons and positrons. We discuss the factor of {approx}2 uncertainties in this estimate, including supernova rate and leptonic contributions to the GeV-TeV emission. We argue that {gamma}-ray data on ULIRGs like Arp 220 can test whether M82 and NGC 253 are truly calorimetric, and we present upper limits on Arp 220 from the Fermi data. We show that the observed ratio of the GeV to GHz fluxes of the starbursts suggests that non-synchrotron cooling processes are important for cooling the CR electron/positron population. We briefly reconsider previous predictions in light of the {gamma}-ray detections, including the starburst contribution to the {gamma}-ray background and CR energy densities. Finally, as a guide for future studies, we list the brightest star-forming galaxies on the sky and present updated predictions for their {gamma}-ray and neutrino fluxes.

  3. The Optical Structure of the Starburst Galaxy M82. I. Dynamics of the Disk and Inner-Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westmoquette, M. S.; Smith, L. J.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Trancho, G.; Bastian, N.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.

    2009-05-01

    rotation axis of the ionized emission-line gas is offset from the stellar rotation axis and the photometric major axis by ~12°, not only within the nuclear regions but over the whole inner 2 kpc of the disk. This attests to the perturbations introduced from M82's past interactions within the M81 group. Finally, finding a turn-over in the stellar and ionized gas rotation curves on both sides of the galaxy indicates that our sight line, in places, extends at least half way through disk, and conflicts with the high levels of obscuration usually associated with the nuclear regions of M82. Based on observations with the Gemini and WIYN telescopes.

  4. THE OPTICAL STRUCTURE OF THE STARBURST GALAXY M82. I. DYNAMICS OF THE DISK AND INNER-WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Westmoquette, M. S.; Smith, L. J.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Gallagher, J. S.; Trancho, G.

    2009-05-01

    implications of this. We confirm that the rotation axis of the ionized emission-line gas is offset from the stellar rotation axis and the photometric major axis by {approx}12 deg. not only within the nuclear regions but over the whole inner 2 kpc of the disk. This attests to the perturbations introduced from M82's past interactions within the M81 group. Finally, finding a turn-over in the stellar and ionized gas rotation curves on both sides of the galaxy indicates that our sight line, in places, extends at least half way through disk, and conflicts with the high levels of obscuration usually associated with the nuclear regions of M82.

  5. Cold H I in faint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Narendra Nath; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisin, Serafim S.; Begum, Ayesha

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of a study of the amount and distribution of cold atomic gas, as well its correlation with recent star formation in a sample of extremely faint dwarf irregular galaxies. Our sample is drawn from the Faint Irregular Galaxy GMRT Survey (FIGGS) and its extension, FIGGS2. We use two different methods to identify cold atomic gas. In the first method, line-of-sight H I spectra were decomposed into multiple Gaussian components and narrow Gaussian components were identified as cold H I. In the second method, the brightness temperature (TB ) is used as a tracer of cold H I. We find that the amount of cold gas identified using the TB method is significantly larger than the amount of gas identified using Gaussian decomposition. We also find that a large fraction of the cold gas identified using the TB method is spatially coincident with regions of recent star formation, although the converse is not true. That is only a small fraction of the regions with recent star formation are also covered by cold gas. For regions where the star formation and the cold gas overlap, we study the relationship between the star formation rate density and the cold H I column density. We find that the star formation rate density has a power-law dependence on the H I column density, but that the slope of this power law is significantly flatter than that of the canonical Kennicutt-Schmidt relation.

  6. First Results from the ISO-IRAS Faint Galaxy Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolstencroft, R. D.; Wehrle, A. E.; Levine, D. A.

    1997-01-01

    We present the first result from the ISO-IRAS Faint Galaxy Survey (IIFGS), a program designed to obtain ISO observations of the most distant and luminous galaxies in the IRAS Faint Source Survey by filling short gaps in the ISO observing schedule with pairs of 12um ISOCAM AND 90um ISOPHOT observation.

  7. The ISO-IRAS Faint Galaxy Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Harding E.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the ISO-IRAS Faint Galaxy Survey ISO Satellite observations of over 600 IRAS sources have been obtained with the ISOCAM instrument. Because our survey strategy involved relatively short integrations, great care was required in developing analysis software including cosmic-ray and transient removal and calibration. These observations have now been through final pipeline processing at IPAC and ground-based follow-up is ongoing. The observations are for sources from two samples: a " Filler' sample selected to be at z greater than 0.1 and a fainter sample which selected for the highest redshift galaxies in the IRAS survey, with redshifts 0.2 less than z less than 1.0. I now have obtained ground-based follow-up spectrophotometry at Lick and Palomar observatories for 100 LFIRGs with 0.1 less than z less than 0.7. Our observations have confirmed that these systems are comparable to nearby LFIRGs such as Arp 220, with L (sub -)(fir) greater than 10(exp 11) L(sub -) sun and typically HII/Liner optical excitation. About 10% of the galaxies show true AGN (Sy2) excitation. Based on our work on a nearby complete sample of LFIRGS, we believe that the majority of these systems are luminous Starbursts, thus this project is tracing the luminous end of the galaxy star-forming luminosity function - the (infrared) star-formation history of the Universe to z approx. 1, a topic of some considerable recent interest. A by-product of these ISOCAM observations is approximately 1 square degree of deep 2 microns pointings outside the IRAS error boxes, allowing us an independent estimate of the mid-infrared log N - log S relation. Ground-based observations of this sample are continuing.

  8. Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectroscopy and Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Starburst Galaxy M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Lutz, D.; Kunze, D.; Sternberg, A.

    2001-05-01

    We present new infrared observations of the central regions of the starburst galaxy M82. The observations consist of near-infrared integral field spectroscopy in the H and K bands obtained with the MPE 3D instrument and of λ=2.4-45 μm spectroscopy from the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) onboard the Infrared Space Observatory. These measurements are used, together with data from the literature, to (1) reexamine the controversial issue of extinction, (2) determine the physical conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM) within the star-forming regions, and (3) characterize the composition of the stellar populations. Our results provide a set of constraints for detailed starburst modeling, which we present in a companion paper. We find that purely foreground extinction cannot reproduce the global relative intensities of H recombination lines from optical to radio wavelengths. A good fit is provided by a homogeneous mixture of dust and sources, and with a visual extinction of AV=52 mag. The SWS data provide evidence for deviations from commonly assumed extinction laws between 3 and 10 μm. The fine-structure lines of Ne, Ar, and S detected with SWS imply an electron density of ~300 cm-3, and abundance ratios Ne/H and Ar/H nearly solar and S/H about one-fourth solar. The excitation of the ionized gas indicates an average effective temperature for the OB stars of 37,400 K, with little spatial variation across the starburst regions. We find that a random distribution of closely packed gas clouds and ionizing clusters and an ionization parameter of ~10-2.3 represent well the star-forming regions on spatial scales ranging from a few tens to a few hundreds of parsecs. From detailed population synthesis and the mass-to-K-light ratio, we conclude that the near-infrared continuum emission across the starburst regions is dominated by red supergiants with average effective temperatures ranging from 3600 to 4500 K and roughly solar metallicity. Our data rule out significant

  9. Observations of carbon monoxide in the starburst galaxy M82 with a 690 GHz-wide spectral bandwidth receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, John Strawn

    2002-09-01

    A 690 GHz heterodyne receiver was developed to observe the J = 6 → 5 rotational emission line of carbon monoxide (CO) in extragalactic sources. This receiver is based on a niobium superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) mixer with a twin-slot antenna in a superconducting NbTiN ground plane. A 4 8 GHz low- noise amplifier was developed to amplify the intermediate frequency signal from the mixer with a spectral bandwidth of 1,700 km/s, enough to observe the broadest extragalactic submillimeter emission lines with a single receiver tuning. This amplifier is a quasi-monolithic microwave integrated circuit (QMMIC); three InP high- electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) were bump-bonded to a passive thin-film GaAs circuit. The measured amplifier gain is 32 dB and the noise is approximately 8 Kelvin from 4 to 8 GHz at a physical temperature of 4 Kelvin. The receiver double-sideband noise temperature is 180 Kelvin. Prior to this development effort, a versatile microwave simulation package was written to calculate and optimize the signal and noise performance of high-frequency circuits, especially those containing superconductors and superconducting tunnel junctions. Using this package, called SuperMix, C++ programs can be written to simulate and optimize circuits of arbitrary size, complexity, and topology. SuperMix was used to simulate the complete 690 GHz SIS receiver. The receiver was used at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory to map 12CO J = 6 → 5 emission in the central kiloparsec of the starburst galaxy M82 at a resolution of 14 arc seconds. Hot spots were found on either side of the dynamical center. The 12CO J = 6 → 5 map, along with measurements of nine other CO lines, were analyzed in the context of a two-component large velocity gradient (LVG) excitation model. Likelihood curves were calculated for the model parameters and related physical quantities based on the measured line intensities and their associated uncertainties to reveal how well

  10. THE OPTICAL STRUCTURE OF THE STARBURST GALAXY M82. II. NEBULAR PROPERTIES OF THE DISK AND INNER WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Westmoquette, M. S.; Smith, L. J.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Gallagher, J. S.; Trancho, G.

    2009-12-01

    In this second paper of the series, we present the results from optical Gemini-North GMOS-IFU and WIYN DensePak IFU spectroscopic observations of the starburst and inner wind zones of M82, with a focus on the state of the T approx 10{sup 4} K ionized interstellar medium. Our electron density maps show peaks of a few 1000 cm{sup -3} (implying very high thermal pressures), local small spatial-scale variations, and a falloff in the minor axis direction. We discuss the implications of these results with regards to the conditions/locations that may favor the escape of individual cluster winds that ultimately power the large-scale superwind. Our findings, when combined with the body of literature built up over the last decade on the state of the interstellar medium (ISM) in M82, imply that the starburst environment is highly fragmented into a range of clouds from small/dense clumps with low-filling factors (<1 pc, n {sub e} approx> 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}) to larger filling factor, less dense gas. The most compact clouds seem to be found in the cores of the star cluster complexes, whereas the cloud sizes in the inter-complex region are larger. These dense clouds are bathed with an intense radiation field and embedded in an extensive high temperature (T approx> 10{sup 6} K), X-ray-emitting ISM that is a product of the high star formation rates in the starburst zones of M82. The near-constant state of the ionization state of the approx10{sup 4} K gas throughout the M82 starburst zone can be explained as a consequence of the small cloud sizes, which allow the gas conditions to respond quickly to any changes. In Paper I, we found that the observed emission lines are composed of multiple components, including a broad (FWHM approx 150-350 km s{sup -1}) feature that we associate with emission from turbulent mixing layers on the surfaces of the gas clouds, resulting from the interaction of the fast wind outflows from the synchrotron self-Comptons. The large number of compact clouds

  11. Faint Submillimeter Galaxies Behind the Frontier Field Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Li-Yen; Cowie, Lennox; Barger, Amy; Wang, Wei-Hao; Chen, Chian-Chou

    2015-08-01

    Faint submillimeter galaxies are the major contributors to the submillimeter extragalactic background light and hence the dominant star-forming population in the dusty universe. Determining how much these galaxies overlap the optically selected samples is critical to fully account for the cosmic star formation history. To explore this faint submillimeter population, we have been observing nine galaxy clusters with the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, including five of the clusters in the HST Frontier Fields program. We have also been using the Submillimeter Array to determine the positions of our detected sources precisely. Our recent observations have discovered several high-redshift dusty galaxies with far-infrared luminosities similar to that of the Milky Way or luminous infrared galaxies but which are undetected in current deep radio, optical and near-infrared images. These remarkable results suggest that a substantial amount of star formation in even the faint submillimeter population may be hidden from rest-frame optical surveys.

  12. Chemical enrichment in Ultra-Faint Dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Donatella

    2016-08-01

    Our view of the Milky Way's satellite population has radically changed after the discovery, ten years ago, of the first Ultra-Faint Dwarf galaxies (UFDs). These extremely faint, dark-matter dominated, scarcely evolved stellar systems are found in ever-increasing number in our cosmic neighbourhood and constitute a gold-mine for studies of early star formation conditions and early chemical enrichment pathways. Here we show what can be learned from the measurements of chemical abundances in UFD stars read through the lens of chemical evolution studies, point out the limitations of the classic approach, and discuss the way to go to improve the models.

  13. On the Morphology of the HST Faint Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giavalisco, Mauro; Livio, Mario; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Macchetto, F. Duccio; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1996-08-01

    Deep imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has revealed a population of rapidly evolving galaxies, which account for < 50% of the total counts at I <~ 22.5, are well distinct from the passively evolving normal ellipticals and spirals, and have morphologies that elude the traditional Hubble classification scheme. This classification has been derived from the morphological properties of local galaxies observed at optical wavelengths. Since galaxy morphology is a function of the wavelength and of the localization and intensity of the star-formation activity, the appearance of galaxies at large redshifts is subject to k- correction and evolutionary effects of the stellar populations, even if the underlying dynamics does not change significantly. In addition, the strong dependence of the surface brightness on redshift as σ ~(1 +z)^-4^ implies that the observed morphology of distant galaxies is also affected by the limiting surface brightness that can be reached. This paper shows how local galaxies observed at UV wavelengths with the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) would appear to HST if placed at cosmological distances, with the UV light redshifted to the optical wavelengths. The simulated distant galaxies have morphologies that are of later type or more irregular than their local (optical) counterparts, and some are in qualitative agreement with those revealed by the faint HST surveys, suggesting that dynamical evolution has played a minor role in the evolution of the majority of the galaxies over a large fraction of the Hubble time. However, the dependence of galaxy morphology on the star-formation activity and on the wavelength must be properly understood before any conclusion on the overall morphological evolution of galaxies can be derived.

  14. THE PRIMEVAL POPULATIONS OF THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas M.; Tumlinson, Jason; Kalirai, Jason S.; Avila, Roberto J.; Ferguson, Henry C. E-mail: tumlinson@stsci.edu E-mail: avila@stsci.edu; and others

    2012-07-01

    We present new constraints on the star formation histories of the ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies, using deep photometry obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). A galaxy class recently discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the UFDs appear to be an extension of the classical dwarf spheroidals to low luminosities, offering a new front in efforts to understand the missing satellite problem. They are the least luminous, most dark-matter-dominated, and least chemically evolved galaxies known. Our HST survey of six UFDs seeks to determine if these galaxies are true fossils from the early universe. We present here the preliminary analysis of three UFD galaxies: Hercules, Leo IV, and Ursa Major I. Classical dwarf spheroidals of the Local Group exhibit extended star formation histories, but these three Milky Way satellites are at least as old as the ancient globular cluster M92, with no evidence for intermediate-age populations. Their ages also appear to be synchronized to within {approx}1 Gyr of each other, as might be expected if their star formation was truncated by a global event, such as reionization.

  15. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse ... reasons why teens faint: Physical triggers. Getting too hot or being in a crowded, poorly ventilated setting ...

  16. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fainting: Certain medicines, including those used for anxiety, depression, and high blood pressure (these drugs may cause a drop in blood pressure) Drug or alcohol use Hyperventilation Low blood sugar Seizures Sudden drop in blood pressure (such as ...

  17. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain does not get enough oxygen. You lose consciousness, or "pass out," for a brief time (usually ... Taking longer than a few seconds to regain consciousness Fainting when you turn your head to the ...

  18. A VIRUS-P Survey of Galaxy Clusters to Find Faint Lyα-emitting Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLinden, Emily; Finkelstein, S. L.; Siana, B. D.; Alavi, A.

    2014-01-01

    The VIRUS-P instrument on the 2.7m telescope at the McDonald Observatory was originally built as a prototype of the larger VIRUS instrument that will be used for HETDEX. We demonstrate that this multi-fiber, optical integral field unit spectrograph can be efficiently used to detect faint Lyα-emitting galaxies (LAEs) at intermediate redshift (z = 2-3) with the aid of gravitational lensing from galaxy clusters. The bulk z=2-3 LAEs to date have been discovered with narrowband imaging campaigns, which are highly efficient only at selecting L > L_star galaxies and only over a narrow redshift slice. By making use of gravitational lensing, however, we are able to observe intrinsically very faint galaxies that only appear to have brightnesses ≥ L_star. Gravitationally lensed faint LAEs, such as our sample from VIRUS-P, allow us to go fainter than existing narrowband surveys and therefore allow for better constraints at the faint end of the Lyα luminosity function at these intermediate redshifts.

  19. Spectrum from Faint Galaxy IRAS F00183-7111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has detected the building blocks of life in the distant universe, albeit in a violent milieu. Training its powerful infrared eye on a faint object located at a distance of 3.2 billion light-years, Spitzer has observed the presence of water and organic molecules in the galaxy IRAS F00183-7111. With an active galactic nucleus, this is one of the most luminous galaxies in the universe, rivaling the energy output of a quasar. Because it is heavily obscured by dust (see visible-light image in the inset), most of its luminosity is radiated at infrared wavelengths.

    The infrared spectrograph instrument onboard Spitzer breaks light into its constituent colors, much as a prism does for visible light. The image shows a low-resolution spectrum of the galaxy obtained by the spectrograph at wavelengths between 4 and 20 microns. Spectra are graphical representations of a celestial object's unique blend of light. Characteristic patterns, or fingerprints, within the spectra allow astronomers to identify the object's chemical composition and to determine such physical properties as temperature and density.

    The broad depression in the center of the spectrum denotes the presence of silicates (chemically similar to beach sand) in the galaxy. An emission peak within the bottom of the trough is the chemical signature for molecular hydrogen. The hydrocarbons (orange) are organic molecules comprised of carbon and hydrogen, two of the most common elements on Earth. Since it has taken more than three billion years for the light from the galaxy to reach Earth, it is intriguing to note the presence of organics in a distant galaxy at a time when life is thought to have started forming on our home planet.

    Additional features in the spectrum reveal the presence of water ice (blue), carbon dioxide ice (green) and carbon monoxide (purple) in both gas and solid forms. The magenta peak corresponds to singly ionized neon gas, a spectral line often used by

  20. Detectability of Ultra Faint Dwarf Galaxies with Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateu, C.; Antoja, T.; Aguilar, L.; Figueras, F.; Brown, A.; Antiche, E.; Hernández-Pérez, F.; Valenzuela, O.; Aparicio, A.; Hidalgo, S.; Velázquez, H.

    2014-07-01

    We present a technique to detect Ultra-Faint Dwarf Galaxies (UFDs) in the Galactic Halo, using sky and proper motion information.The method uses wavelet transforms to detect peaks in the sky and proper motion planes, and to evaluate the probability of these being stochastic fluctuations. We aim to map thoroughly the detection limits of this technique. For this, we have produced a library of 15,000 synthetic UFDs, embedded in the Gaia Universe Model Snapshot (GUMS) background (Robin et al. 2012), each at a different distance, different luminosity, half-light radius, velocity dispersion and center-of-mass velocity, varying in ranges that extend well beyond those spanned by known classical and ultra-faint dSphs. We use these synthetic UFDs as a benchmark to characterize the completeness and detection limits of our technique, and present our results as a function of different physical and observable parameters of the UFDs (see full poster for more details at https://gaia.ub.edu/Twiki/pub/GREATITNFC/ProgramFinalconference/Poster_UFGX_Bcn_C_Mateu.pdf).

  1. Discovery of Optical Transient in M82 : P60-M82-081119

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, M. M.; Cenko, S. B.; Rau, A.; Ofek, E. O.; Quimby, R.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    2008-11-01

    On UT 2008 Nov 19.536, P60-FasTING (Palomar 60-inch Fast Transients In Nearby Galaxies) discovered a possible nova in M82 at RA(J2000) = 09:55:58.390 DEC(J2000) = +69:40:56.17, offset from the nucleus by 29.5"E, 10.4"N. P60-M82-081119 had a brightness of g = 20.0 +/- 0.1 at peak corresponding to Mg = -7.8 at the distance of M82 (uncorrected for extinction). There is no counterpart in SDSS or SIMBAD.

  2. The Faint-End of the Galaxy Luminosity Function in the Hydra I Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanoi, H.; Tanaka, M.

    2007-05-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dwarf galaxies account for a large share of cluster galaxies and their properties should be closely related to the formation and evolution of clusters. Despite the obvious importance, however, the number of very faint (down to M ˜ -10) cluster samples available to date is limited and properties of such faint galaxies remain unclear. In this study, we aim to reveal very faint-end slopes of galaxy luminosity functions (LFs) in the Hydra I cluster (Abell 1060) at z = 0.0126, in which such very faint galaxies have not been probed yet. OBSERVATIONS: We base our analyses on the data taken with the Suprime-Cam on the Subaru telescope at Mauna Kea. A deep photometric survey was carried out in the B- and Rc-bands. We observed the central region as well as a peripheral region of Hydra I. This is because we aim to investigate the environmental dependence of properties of very faint galaxies. We subtract fore-/background galaxy contamination in the cluster fields and obtain intrinsic LFs of the cluster galaxies. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: We find that the LFs at the fainter magnitudes have a slightly steeper slope than that reported on the same cluster previously. The slope is flatter at faint magnitudes (M > -14) than that at the brighter magnitudes. This tendency is consistent with a composite LF constructed from several nearby clusters by previous work. Although the LFs in the Hydra central region are similar to those in the peripheral region at M < -14, the LF slope in the peripheral region is slightly flatter than that in the central region in the fainter magnitude range. This means that a larger number of dwarf galaxies reside in denser environments. This tend is seen only in the red galaxy LFs when we separate the Hydra member galaxies into red and blue galaxies. The Hydra I cluster is dominated by red galaxies down to M ˜ -10.

  3. Faint Lyα Emitters, Star-forming Galaxies, and Damped Lyα Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, M.; Haehnelt, M.; Bunker, A.; Becker, G.; Marleau, F.; Graham, J.; Cristiani, S.; Jarvis, M.; Lacey, C.; Morris, S.; Peroux, C.; Roettgering, H.; Theuns, T.

    2008-10-01

    We have discovered a population of faint single line emitters, likely to be identified with faint z˜ 3 Lyα emitters and with the host galaxies of damped Lyman alpha systems. The objects appear to constitute the bulk of the star-forming galaxies detected so far from the ground, and are likely to provide the gaseous reservoir from which present-day Milky way type galaxies have formed. Unlike color-selected (yman break galaxies, these objects appear to have low star-formation rates, relatively strong Lyalpha emission, and low masses, metallicities, and dust content (s.a. arXiv:0711.1354).

  4. Galaxy populations in the Antlia cluster - III. Properties of faint early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith Castelli, Analía. V.; Cellone, Sergio A.; Faifer, Favio R.; Bassino, Lilia P.; Richtler, Tom; Romero, Gisela A.; Calderón, Juan Pablo; Caso, Juan Pablo

    2012-01-01

    We present a new analysis of the early-type galaxy population in the central region of the Antlia cluster, focusing on the faint systems such as dwarf ellipticals (dEs) and dwarf spheroidals (dSphs). The colour-magnitude relation (CMR) and the relation between luminosity and mean effective surface brightness for galaxies in the central region of Antlia have been previously studied in Paper I of the present series. Now we confirm 22 early-type galaxies as Antlia members, using Gemini-GMOS and Magellan-MIKE spectra. Among them, 15 are dEs from the FS90 Antlia Group catalogue, two belong to the rare type of compact ellipticals (cEs) and five are new faint dwarfs that had never been catalogued before. In addition, we present 16 newly identified low-surface-brightness galaxy candidates, almost half of them displaying morphologies consistent with being Antlia's counterparts of Local Group dSphs, which extend the faint luminosity limit of our study down to MB=-10.1(BT= 22.6) mag. With these new data, we built an improved CMR in the Washington photometric system, i.e. integrated T1 magnitudes versus (C-T1) colours, which extends ˜4 mag faintwards the limit of spectroscopically confirmed Antlia members. When only confirmed early-type members are considered, this relation extends over 10 mag in luminosity with no apparent change in slope or increase in colour dispersion towards its faint end. The intrinsic colour scatter of the relation is compared with those reported for other clusters of galaxies; we argue that it is likely that the large scatter of the CMR, usually reported at faint magnitudes, is mostly due to photometric errors along with an improper membership/morphological classification. The distinct behaviour of the luminosity versus mean effective surface brightness relation at the bright and faint ends is analysed, while it is confirmed that dE galaxies on the same relation present a very similar effective radius, regardless of their colour. The projected spatial

  5. The morphology of faint galaxies in Medium Deep Survey images using WFPC2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffiths, R. E.; Casertano, S.; Ratnatunga, K. U.; Neuschaefer, L. W.; Ellis, R. S.; Gilmore, G. F.; Glazebrook, K.; Santiago, B.; Huchra, J. P.; Windhorst, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    First results from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Medium Deep Survey images taken with Wide Field/Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC2) demonstrate that galaxy classifications can be reliably performed to magnitudes I814 approximately less than 22.0 in the F815W band. Published spectroscopic surveys to this depth indicate a mean redshift of bar-z approximately 0.5. We have classified over 200 galaxies in nine WFPC2 fields according to a basic morphological scheme. The majority of these faint galaxies appear to be similar to regular Hubble-sequence examples observed at low redshift. To the precision of our classification scheme, the relative proportion of spheroidal and disk systems of normal appearance is as expected from nearby samples, indicating that the bulk of the local galaxy population was in place at half the Hubble time. However, the most intriguing result is the relatively high proportion (approximately 40%) of objects which are in some way anomalous, and which may be of relevance in understanding the origin of the familiar excess population of faint galaxies established by others. These diverse objects include apparently interacting pairs whose multiple structure is only revealed with HST's angular resolution, galaxies with superluminous star-forming regions, diffuse low surface brightness galaxies of various forms, and compact galaxies. These anomalous galaxies contribute a substantial fraction of the excess counts at our limiting magnitude, and may provide insights into the 'faint blue galaxy' problem.

  6. Sweating the small stuff: simulating dwarf galaxies, ultra-faint dwarf galaxies, and their own tiny satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Coral; Oñorbe, Jose; Bullock, James S.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Elbert, Oliver D.; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea; Hopkins, Philip F.; Kereš, Dušan

    2015-10-01

    We present Feedback in Realistic Environment (FIRE)/GIZMO hydrodynamic zoom-in simulations of isolated dark matter haloes, two each at the mass of classical dwarf galaxies (Mvir ≃ 1010 M⊙) and ultra-faint galaxies (Mvir ≃ 109 M⊙), and with two feedback implementations. The resulting central galaxies lie on an extrapolated abundance matching relation from M⋆ ≃ 106 to 104 M⊙ without a break. Every host is filled with subhaloes, many of which form stars. Each of our dwarfs with M⋆ ≃ 106 M⊙ has 1-2 well-resolved satellites with M⋆ = 3-200 × 103 M⊙. Even our isolated ultra-faint galaxies have star-forming subhaloes. If this is representative, dwarf galaxies throughout the Universe should commonly host tiny satellite galaxies of their own. We combine our results with the Exploring the Local Volume in Simulations (ELVIS) simulations to show that targeting ˜ 50 kpc regions around nearby isolated dwarfs could increase the chances of discovering ultra-faint galaxies by ˜35 per cent compared to random pointings, and specifically identify the region around the Phoenix dwarf galaxy as a good potential target. The well-resolved ultra-faint galaxies in our simulations (M⋆ ≃ 3-30 × 103 M⊙) form within Mpeak ≃ 0.5-3 × 109 M⊙ haloes. Each has a uniformly ancient stellar population ( > 10 Gyr) owing to reionization-related quenching. More massive systems, in contrast, all have late-time star formation. Our results suggest that Mhalo ≃ 5 × 109 M⊙ is a probable dividing line between haloes hosting reionization `fossils' and those hosting dwarfs that can continue to form stars in isolation after reionization.

  7. THE FAINT END OF THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Dell'Antonio, Ian P. E-mail: mkurtz@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: adiaferio@cfa.harvard.edu

    2012-04-15

    Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS) is a dense redshift survey covering a 4 deg{sup 2} region to a limiting R = 20.6. In the construction of the galaxy catalog and in the acquisition of spectroscopic targets, we paid careful attention to the survey completeness for lower surface brightness dwarf galaxies. Thus, although the survey covers a small area, it is a robust basis for computation of the slope of the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function to a limiting M{sub R} = -13.3 + 5log h. We calculate the faint-end slope in the R band for the subset of SHELS galaxies with redshifts in the range 0.02 {<=}z < 0.1, SHELS{sub 0.1}. This sample contains 532 galaxies with R < 20.6 and with a median surface brightness within the half-light radius of SB{sub 50,R} = 21.82 mag arcsec{sup -2}. We used this sample to make one of the few direct measurements of the dependence of the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function on surface brightness. For the sample as a whole the faint-end slope, {alpha} = -1.31 {+-} 0.04, is consistent with both the Blanton et al. analysis of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Liu et al. analysis of the COSMOS field. This consistency is impressive given the very different approaches of these three surveys. A magnitude-limited sample of 135 galaxies with optical spectroscopic redshifts with mean half-light surface brightness, SB{sub 50,R} {>=} 22.5 mag arcsec{sup -2} is unique to SHELS{sub 0.1}. The faint-end slope is {alpha}{sub 22.5} = -1.52 {+-} 0.16. SHELS{sub 0.1} shows that lower surface brightness objects dominate the faint-end slope of the luminosity function in the field, underscoring the importance of surface brightness limits in evaluating measurements of the faint-end slope and its evolution.

  8. The Aromatic Features in Very Faint Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ronin; Hogg, David W.; Moustakas, John

    2011-04-01

    We present optical and mid-infrared photometry of a statistically complete sample of 29 dwarf galaxies (Mr > - 15 mag) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic sample and observed in the mid-infrared with Spitzer IRAC. This sample contains nearby (redshift lsim0.005) galaxies 3 mag fainter than previously studied samples. We compare our sample with other star-forming galaxies that have been observed with both IRAC and SDSS. We examine the relationship of the infrared color, [3.6]-[7.8], sensitive to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance and also hot dust and stellar continuum, with star formation rates (SFRs), oxygen abundances, and radiation hardness, all estimated by optical emission lines. Consistent with studies of more luminous dwarfs, we find that these dwarf galaxies show much redder [3.6]-[7.8] color than luminous galaxies with similar specific SFRs. Unlike luminous galaxies, we find that these dwarf galaxies show no significant dependence at all of the [3.6]-[7.8] color on SFR, oxygen abundance, or radiation hardness, despite the fact that the sample spans a significant range in all of these quantities. When the dwarfs in our sample are compared with more luminous dwarfs, we find that the [3.6]-[7.8] color, potentially tracing the PAH emission, depends on oxygen abundance and radiation hardness. However, these two parameters are correlated with one another as well; we break this degeneracy by looking at the PAH-oxygen abundance relation at a fixed radiation hardness and the PAH-hardness relation at a fixed oxygen abundance. This test shows that the [3.6]-[7.8] color in dwarf galaxies appears to depend more directly on oxygen abundance based on the data currently available.

  9. Estimating sizes of faint, distant galaxies in the submillimetre regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, L.; Knudsen, K. K.; Fan, L.; Conway, J.; Coppin, K.; Decarli, R.; Drouart, G.; Hodge, J. A.; Karim, A.; Simpson, J. M.; Wardlow, J.

    2016-10-01

    We measure the sizes of redshift ˜2 star-forming galaxies by stacking data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We use a uv-stacking algorithm in combination with model fitting in the uv-domain and show that this allows for robust measures of the sizes of marginally resolved sources. The analysis is primarily based on the 344 GHz ALMA continuum observations centred on 88 submillimetre galaxies in the LABOCA ECDFS Submillimeter Survey (ALESS). We study several samples of galaxies at z ≈ 2 with M* ≈ 5 × 1010 M⊙, selected using near-infrared photometry (distant red galaxies, extremely red objects, sBzK-galaxies, and galaxies selected on photometric redshift). We find that the typical sizes of these galaxies are ˜0.6 arcsec which corresponds to ˜5 kpc at z = 2, this agrees well with the median sizes measured in the near-infrared z band (˜0.6 arcsec). We find errors on our size estimates of ˜0.1-0.2 arcsec, which agree well with the expected errors for model fitting at the given signal-to-noise ratio. With the uv-coverage of our observations (18-160 m), the size and flux density measurements are sensitive to scales out to 2 arcsec. We compare this to a simulated ALMA Cycle 3 data set with intermediate length baseline coverage, and we find that, using only these baselines, the measured stacked flux density would be an order of magnitude fainter. This highlights the importance of short baselines to recover the full flux density of high-redshift galaxies.

  10. The Molecular Baryon Cycle of M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, John; Matsushita, Satoki

    2016-10-01

    Baryons cycle into galaxies from the intergalactic medium and are converted into stars; a fraction of the baryons are ejected out of galaxies by stellar feedback. Here we present new high-resolution (3.″9 68 pc) 12CO(2–1) and 12CO(3–2) images that probe these three stages of the baryon cycle in the nearby starburst M82. We combine these new observations with previous 12CO(1–0) and [Fe ii] images to study the physical conditions within the molecular gas. Using a Bayesian analysis and the radiative transfer code RADEX, we model temperatures and densities of molecular hydrogen, as well as column densities of CO. Besides the disk, we concentrate on two regions within the galaxy: an expanding super-bubble and the base of a molecular streamer. Shock diagnostics, kinematics, and optical extinction suggest that the streamer is an inflowing filament, with a mass inflow rate of molecular gas of 3.5 {M}ȯ yr‑1. We measure the mass outflow rate of molecular gas of the expanding super-bubble to be 17 {M}ȯ yr‑1, five times higher than the inferred inflow rate and 1.3 times the star formation rate of the galaxy. The high mass outflow rate and large star formation rate will deplete the galaxy of molecular gas within eight million years, unless there are additional sources of molecular gas.

  11. A search for HI in some peculiar faint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, Ayesha; Chengalur, Jayaram N.

    2005-09-01

    We present a deep Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) search for HI 21-cm emission from three dwarf galaxies, viz. POX 186, SC 24 and KKR 25. Based, in part, on previous single-dish HI observations, these galaxies have been classified as a blue compact dwarf (BCD), a dwarf irregular and a transition galaxy, respectively. However, in conflict with previous single-dish detections, we do not detect HI in SC 24 or KKR 25. We suggest that the previous single-dish measurements were probably confused with the local Galactic emission. In the case of POX 186, we confirm the previous non-detection of HI but with substantially improved limits on its HI mass. Our derived upper limits on the HI mass of SC 24 and KKR 25 are similar to the typical HI mass limit for dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, whereas in the case of POX 186, we find that its gas content is somewhat smaller than is typical of BCD galaxies.

  12. A single prolific r-process event preserved in an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Alexander; Frebel, Anna; Chiti, Anirudh; Simon, Joshua

    2016-03-01

    The heaviest elements in the periodic table are synthesized through the r-process, but the astrophysical site for r-process nucleosynthesis is still unknown. Ultra-faint dwarf galaxies contain a simple fossil record of early chemical enrichment that may determine this site. Previous measurements found very low levels of neutron-capture elements in ultra-faint dwarfs, preferring supernovae as the r-process site. I present high-resolution chemical abundances of nine stars in the recently discovered ultra-faint dwarf Reticulum II, which display extremely enhanced r-process abundances 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than the other ultra-faint dwarfs. Stars with such extreme r-process enhancements are only rarely found in the Milky Way halo. The r-process abundances imply that the neutron-capture material in Reticulum II was synthesized in a single prolific event that is incompatible with r-process yields from ordinary core-collapse supernovae. Reticulum II provides an opportunity to discriminate whether the source of this pure r-process signature is a neutron star merger or magnetorotationally driven supernova. The single event is also a uniquely stringent constraint on the metal mixing and star formation history of this ultra-faint dwarf galaxy.

  13. The Asymmetric Wind in M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shopbell, P. L.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    1998-01-01

    We have obtained detailed Fabry-Perot imaging observations of the nearby galaxy M82 in order to understand the physical association between the high-velocity outflow and the starburst nucleus. The high spatial and kinematic resolution of our observations has allowed us to perform photometric analyses of Hα, [N II], and [O III] spectral lines at roughly 100,000 positions across the extent of the galaxy. The observed velocities of the emitting gas in M82 reveal a bipolar outflow of material, originating from the bright starburst regions in the galaxy's inner disk but misaligned with respect to the galaxy spin axis. The deprojected outflow velocity indicated by the optical filaments increases with radius from 525 to 655 km s-1. All three spectral lines show double components in the centers of the outflowing lobes, with the Hα line split by ~300 km s-1 over a region almost 1 kpc in size. The filamentary lobes lie along an axis tilted by 15° with respect to the spin axis, a finding confirmed by the regions of line splitting and by the ionization pattern over the outflow. The filaments are not simple surfaces of revolution, nor is the emission distributed evenly over the surfaces. We model these lobes as a composite of cylindrical and conical structures, collimated in the inner ~500 pc but expanding at a larger opening angle of ~25° beyond that radius. We compare our kinematic model with simulations of starburst-driven winds in which disk material surrounding the source is entrained by the wind. There is some evidence for rotation of the wind filaments about the outflow axis in support of entrainment, and we find strong similarities between the observed and predicted structures. The data reveal a remarkably low [N II]/Hα ratio in the region of the outflow, indicating that photoionization by the nuclear starburst may play a significant role in the excitation of the optical filament gas, particularly near the nucleus. An increase in the [O III]/Hα ratio along the

  14. On the faint-end of the high-z galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Bin; Ferrara, Andrea; Xu, Yidong

    2016-08-01

    Recent measurements of the Luminosity Function (LF) of galaxies in the Epoch of Reionization (EoR, zlower.5ex buildrel> over ˜ 6) indicate a very steep increase of the number density of low-mass galaxies populating the LF faint-end. However, as star formation in low-mass halos can be easily depressed or even quenched by ionizing radiation, a turnover is expected at some faint UV magnitudes. Using a physically-motivated analytical model, we quantify reionization feedback effects on the LF faint-end shape. We find that if reionization feedback is neglected, the power-law Schechter parameterization characterizing the LF faint-end remains valid up to absolute UV magnitude ˜-9. If instead radiative feedback is strong enough that quenches star formation in halos with circular velocity smaller than 50 km s-1, the LF starts to drop at absolute UV magnitude ˜-15, i.e. slightly below the detection limits of current (unlensed) surveys at z ˜ 5. The LFs may rise again at higher absolute UV magnitude, where, as a result of interplay between reionization process and galaxy formation, most of the galaxy light is from relic stars formed before the EoR. We suggest that the galaxy number counts data, particularly in lensed fields, can put strong constraints on reionization feedback. In models with stronger reionization feedback, stars in galaxies with absolute UV magnitude higher than ˜-13 and smaller than ˜-8 are typically older. Hence, the stellar age - UV magnitude relation can be used as an alternative feedback probe.

  15. Faint Dwarf Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Taylor, Matthew A.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Eigenthaler, Paul; Georgiev, Iskren Y.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hilker, Michael; Lançon, Ariane; Mamon, Gary; Mieske, Steffen; Miller, Bryan W.; Peng, Eric W.; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén

    2016-08-01

    We report the discovery of a very diverse set of five low-surface brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxy candidates in Hickson Compact Group 90 (HCG 90) detected in deep U- and I-band images obtained with VLT/VIMOS. These are the first LSB dwarf galaxy candidates found in a compact group of galaxies. We measure spheroid half-light radii in the range 0.7 ≲ reff/kpc ≲ 1.5 with luminosities of -11.65 ≲ MU ≲ -9.42 and -12.79 ≲ MI ≲ -10.58 mag, corresponding to a color range of (U - I)0 ≃ 1.1 - 2.2 mag and surface brightness levels of μU ≃ 28.1 mag/arcsec2 and μI ≃ 27.4 mag/arcsec2. Their colours and luminosities are consistent with a diverse set of stellar population properties. Assuming solar and 0.02 Z⊙ metallicities we obtain stellar masses in the range M_*|_{Z_odot } ˜eq 10^{5.7-6.3} M_{odot } and M_*|_{0.02 Z_odot } ˜eq 10^{6.3-8} M_{odot }. Three dwarfs are older than 1 Gyr, while the other two significantly bluer dwarfs are younger than ˜2 Gyr at any mass/metallicity combination. Altogether, the new LSB dwarf galaxy candidates share properties with dwarf galaxies found throughout the Local Volume and in nearby galaxy clusters such as Fornax. We find a pair of candidates with ˜2 kpc projected separation, which may represent one of the closest dwarf galaxy pairs found. We also find a nucleated dwarf candidate, with a nucleus size of reff ≃ 46 - 63 pc and magnitude MU, 0 = -7.42 mag and (U - I)0 = 1.51 mag, which is consistent with a nuclear stellar disc with a stellar mass in the range 104.9 - 6.5 M⊙.

  16. A Wide-Field Survey of the Clustering of Faint Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, David; Fahlman, Gregory G.; Richer, Harvey B.

    The observed clustering of galaxies at intermediate redshifts (z ~0.5-1) is a very useful diagnostic for testing galaxy evolution models. Previous studies of the angular correlation function (omega(theta)) at faint limits (I ~24) have suffered from a lack of precision due to samples containing only ~2-3 thousand galaxies. The introduction of wide-field mosaic cameras, such as the UH8k and CFH12k at CFHT, will significantly enlarge faint galaxy samples and thereby improve estimates of omega(theta). We are currently pursuing a galaxy clustering study in V and I with a survey area ~6 times larger (~0.2 sq. deg.) than our previous work (Woods and Fahlman 1997), using data obtained with the UH8k. Our analysis of the ~7000 galaxies contained in this data set will act as a pilot study leading towards the acquisition of deeper and larger samples of galaxies, to be obtained in the near future with mosaic cameras (this already being done to brighter limits by Postman et al. 1998). A preliminary analysis of a portion of the data is presented and the benefits of the upcoming, larger 2-d photometric surveys are summarized.

  17. LoCuSS: Exploring the selection of faint blue background galaxies for cluster weak-lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziparo, Felicia; Smith, Graham P.; Okabe, Nobuhiro; Haines, Chris P.; Pereira, Maria J.; Egami, Eiichi

    2016-10-01

    Cosmological constraints from galaxy clusters rely on accurate measurements of the mass and internal structure of clusters. An important source of systematic uncertainty in cluster mass and structure measurements is the secure selection of background galaxies that are gravitationally lensed by clusters. This issue has been shown to be particular severe for faint blue galaxies. We therefore explore the selection of faint blue background galaxies, by reference to photometric redshift catalogues derived from the COSMOS survey and our own observations of massive galaxy clusters at z ≃ 0.2. We show that methods relying on photometric redshifts of galaxies in/behind clusters based on observations through five filters, and on deep 30-band COSMOS photometric redshifts are both inadequate to safely identify faint blue background galaxies with the same 1 per cent contamination level that we have achieved with red galaxies. This is due to the small number of filters used by the former, and absence of massive galaxy clusters at redshifts of interest in the latter. Nevertheless, our least contaminated blue galaxy sample yields stacked weak-lensing results consistent with our previously published results based on red galaxies, and we show that the stacked clustercentric number density profile of these faint blue galaxies is consistent with expectations from consideration of the lens magnification signal of the clusters. Indeed, the observed number density of blue background galaxies changes by ˜10 - 30 per cent across the radial range over which other surveys assume it to be flat.

  18. A faint galaxy redshift survey behind massive clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, Brenda

    1999-12-01

    This thesis is concerned with the gravitational lensing effect by massive galaxy clusters. We have explored a new technique for measuring galaxy masses and for detecting high-z galaxies by their optical colors. A redshift survey has been obtained at the Keck for a magnitude limited sample of objects (I<23) behind three clusters, A1689, A2390, and A2218 within a radius of 0.5M pc. For each cluster we see both a clear trend of increasing flux and redshift towards the center. This behavior is the result of image magnifications, such that at fixed redshift one sees further down the luminosity function. The gradient of this magnification is, unlike measurements of image distortion, sensitive to the mass profile, and found to depart strongly from a pure isothermal halo. We have found that V RI color selection can be used effectively as a discriminant for finding high-z galaxies behind clusters and present five 4.1 < z < 5.1 spectra which are of very high quality due to their high mean magnification of {approximately}20, showing strong, visibly-saturated interstellar metal lines in some cases. We have also investigated the radio ring lens PKS 1830-211, locating the source and multiple images and detected molecular absorption at mm wavelengths. Broad molecular absorption of width 1/40kms is found toward the southwest component only, where surprisingly it does not reach the base of the continuum, which implies incomplete coverage of the SW component by molecular gas, despite the small projected size of the source, less than 1/8h pc at the absorption redshift.

  19. Isophotal shapes of early-type galaxies to very faint levels

    SciTech Connect

    Chaware, Laxmikant; Pandey, S. K.; Cannon, Russell; Kembhavi, Ajit K.; Mahabal, Ashish

    2014-06-01

    We report on a study of the isophotal shapes of early-type galaxies to very faint levels, reaching ∼0.1% of the sky brightness. The galaxies are from the Large Format Camera (LFC) fields obtained using the Palomar 5 m Hale Telescope, with integrated exposures ranging from 1 to 4 hr in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey r, i, and z bands. The shapes of isophotes of early-type galaxies are important, as they are correlated with the physical properties of the galaxies and are influenced by galaxy formation processes. In this paper, we report on a sample of 132 E and SO galaxies in one LFC field. We have redshifts for 53 of these, obtained using AAOmega on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The shapes of early-type galaxies often vary with radius. We derive average values of isophotal shape parameters in four different radial bins along the semi-major axis in each galaxy. We obtain empirical fitting formulae for the probability distribution of the isophotal parameters in each bin and investigate for possible correlations with other global properties of the galaxies. Our main finding is that the isophotal shapes of the inner regions are statistically different from those in the outer regions. This suggests that the outer and inner parts of early-type galaxies have evolved somewhat independently.

  20. Eight ultra-faint galaxy candidates discovered in year two of the Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Drlica-Wagner, A.

    2015-11-04

    We report the discovery of eight new ultra-faint dwarf galaxy candidates in the second year of optical imaging data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Six of these candidates are detected at high confidence, while two lower-confidence candidates are identified in regions of non-uniform survey coverage. The new stellar systems are found by three independent automated search techniques and are identified as overdensities of stars, consistent with the isochrone and luminosity function of an old and metal-poor simple stellar population. The new systems are faint (MV > -4.7 ) and span a range of physical sizes (17 pc < r1/2 < 181pc) and heliocentric distances (25 kpc < D < 214 kpc). All of the new systems have central surface brightnesses consistent with known ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (μ 27.5 mag arcsec -2). Roughly half of the DES candidates are more distant, less luminous, and/or have lower surface brightnesses than previously known Milky Way satellite galaxies. Most of the candidates are found in the southern part of the DES footprint close to the Magellanic Clouds. We find that the DES data alone exclude (p < 10-3) a spatially isotropic distribution of Milky Way satellites and that the observed distribution can be well, though not uniquely, described by an association between several of the DES satellites and the Magellanic system. Furthermore, our model predicts that the full sky may hold ~100 ultra-faint galaxies with physical properties comparable to the DES satellites and that 20%–30% of these would be spatially associated with the Magellanic Clouds.

  1. Eight ultra-faint galaxy candidates discovered in year two of the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Drlica-Wagner, A.

    2015-11-04

    We report the discovery of eight new ultra-faint dwarf galaxy candidates in the second year of optical imaging data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Six of these candidates are detected at high confidence, while two lower-confidence candidates are identified in regions of non-uniform survey coverage. The new stellar systems are found by three independent automated search techniques and are identified as overdensities of stars, consistent with the isochrone and luminosity function of an old and metal-poor simple stellar population. The new systems are faint (MV > -4.7 ) and span a range of physical sizes (17 pc < r1/2more » < 181pc) and heliocentric distances (25 kpc < D⊙ < 214 kpc). All of the new systems have central surface brightnesses consistent with known ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (μ 27.5 mag arcsec -2). Roughly half of the DES candidates are more distant, less luminous, and/or have lower surface brightnesses than previously known Milky Way satellite galaxies. Most of the candidates are found in the southern part of the DES footprint close to the Magellanic Clouds. We find that the DES data alone exclude (p < 10-3) a spatially isotropic distribution of Milky Way satellites and that the observed distribution can be well, though not uniquely, described by an association between several of the DES satellites and the Magellanic system. Furthermore, our model predicts that the full sky may hold ~100 ultra-faint galaxies with physical properties comparable to the DES satellites and that 20%–30% of these would be spatially associated with the Magellanic Clouds.« less

  2. Spectral evolution of galaxies. III - Cosmological predictions for the Space Telescope faint object camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzual A., G.

    1983-10-01

    The galactic spectral evolutionary models of Bruzual A. (1981) are employed to estimate parameters which will be observable by the wide-field camera and faint-object camera of the Space Telescope. The capabilities and bandpasses of the instruments are reviewed, and the results are presented in tables and graphs. Parameters calculated include the amplitude of the Lyman discontinuity at 912 A, stellar and galaxy rest-frame colors, color evolution, two-color diagrams as a function of redshift, luminosity evolution, surface brightness profiles, galaxy counts, and color and redshift distributions. In general, it is predicted that the space measurements will follow the trends noted in round-based observations.

  3. Star/galaxy separation at faint magnitudes: Application to a simulated Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Soumagnac, M.T.; et al.

    2013-06-21

    We address the problem of separating stars from galaxies in future large photometric surveys. We focus our analysis on simulations of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). In the first part of the paper, we derive the science requirements on star/galaxy separation, for measurement of the cosmological parameters with the Gravitational Weak Lensing and Large Scale Structure probes. These requirements are dictated by the need to control both the statistical and systematic errors on the cosmological parameters, and by Point Spread Function calibration. We formulate the requirements in terms of the completeness and purity provided by a given star/galaxy classifier. In order to achieve these requirements at faint magnitudes, we propose a new method for star/galaxy separation in the second part of the paper. We first use Principal Component Analysis to outline the correlations between the objects parameters and extract from it the most relevant information. We then use the reduced set of parameters as input to an Artificial Neural Network. This multi-parameter approach improves upon purely morphometric classifiers (such as the classifier implemented in SExtractor), especially at faint magnitudes: it increases the purity by up to 20% for stars and by up to 12% for galaxies, at i-magnitude fainter than 23.

  4. The relation between atomic gas and star formation rate densities in faint dwarf irregular galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, Sambit; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Kaisin, Serafim S.; Karachentsev, Igor D.

    2014-12-01

    We use data for faint (MB > -14.5) dwarf irregular galaxies drawn from the Faint Irregular Galaxy GMRT Survey to study the correlation between the surface densities of atomic gas (Σgas,atomic) and star formation rate (ΣSFR) in the galaxies. The estimated gas-phase metallicity of our sample galaxies is Z ˜ 0.1 Z⊙. Understanding star formation in such molecule-poor gas is of particular importance since it is likely to be of direct relevance to simulations of early galaxy formation. For about 20 per cent (9/43) of our sample galaxies, we find that the H I distribution is significantly disturbed, with little correspondence between the optical and H I distributions. We exclude these galaxies from the comparison. We also exclude galaxies with very low star formation rates, for which stochastic effects make it difficult to estimate the true star formation rates. For the remaining galaxies, we compute the Σgas,atomic and ΣSFR averaged over the entire star-forming disc of the galaxy. For these galaxies, we find a nearly linear relation between the star formation rate and the atomic gas density, namely {log Σ _{SFR} = 0.91^{+0.23}_{-0.25} log Σ _{gas,atomic} - 3.84^{+0.15}_{-0.19}}. The corresponding gas consumption time-scale is ˜10 Gyr, i.e. significantly smaller than the ˜100 Gyr estimated for the outer regions of spiral galaxies. We also estimate the gas consumption time-scale computed using the global gas content and the global star formation rate for all galaxies with a reliable measurement of the star formation rate, regardless of whether the H I distribution is disturbed or not. The mean gas consumption time-scale computed using this entire gas reservoir is ˜18 Gyr, i.e. still significantly smaller than that estimated for the outer parts of spirals. The gas consumption time-scale for dwarfs is intermediate between the values of ˜100 and ˜2 Gyr estimated for the outer molecule-poor and inner molecule-rich regions of spiral discs.

  5. Faint blue counts from formation of dwarf galaxies at z approximately equals 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babul, Arif; Rees, Martin J.

    1993-01-01

    The nature of faint blue objects (FBO's) has been a source of much speculation since their detection in deep CCD images of the sky. Their high surface density argues against them being progenitors of present-day bright galaxies and since they are only weakly clustered on small scales, they cannot be entities that merged together to form present-day galaxies. Babul & Rees (1992) have suggested that the observed faint blue counts may be due to dwarf elliptical galaxies undergoing their initial starburst at z is approximately equal to 1. In generic hierarchical clustering scenarios, however, dwarf galaxy halos (M is approximately 10(exp 9) solar mass) are expected to form at an earlier epoch; for example, typical 10(exp 9) solar mass halos will virialize at z is approximately equal to 2.3 if the power-spectrum for the density fluctuations is that of the standard b = 2 cold dark matter (CDM) model. Under 'ordinary conditions' the gas would rapidly cool, collect in the cores, and undergo star-formation. Conditions at high redshifts are far from 'ordinary'. The intense UV background will prevent the gas in the dwarf halos from cooling, the halos being released from their suspended state only when the UV flux has diminished sufficiently.

  6. Ultra faint dwarf galaxies: an arena for testing dark matter versus modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Weikang; Ishak, Mustapha

    2016-10-01

    The scenario consistent with a wealth of observations for the missing mass problem is that of weakly interacting dark matter particles. However, arguments or proposals for a Newtonian or relativistic modified gravity scenario continue to be made. A distinguishing characteristic between the two scenarios is that dark matter particles can produce a gravitational effect, in principle, without the need of baryons while this is not the case for the modified gravity scenario where such an effect must be correlated with the amount of baryonic matter. We consider here ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies as a promising arena to test the two scenarios based on the above assertion. We compare the correlation of the luminosity with the velocity dispersion between samples of UFD and non-UFD galaxies, finding a significant loss of correlation for UFD galaxies. For example, we find for 28 non-UFD galaxies a strong correlation coefficient of ‑0.688 which drops to ‑0.077 for the 23 UFD galaxies. Incoming and future data will determine whether the observed stochasticity for UFD galaxies is physical or due to systematics in the data. Such a loss of correlation (if it is to persist) is possible and consistent with the dark matter scenario for UFD galaxies but would constitute a new challenge for the modified gravity scenario.

  7. FAINT TIDAL FEATURES IN GALAXIES WITHIN THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY WIDE FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, Adam M.; Abraham, Roberto G.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.

    2013-03-01

    We present an analysis of the detectability of faint tidal features in galaxies from the wide-field component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. Our sample consists of 1781 luminous (M{sub r{sup '}}<-19.3 mag) galaxies in the magnitude range 15.5 mag < r' < 17 mag and in the redshift range 0.04 < z < 0.2. Although we have classified tidal features according to their morphology (e.g., streams, shells, and tails), we do not attempt to interpret them in terms of their physical origin (e.g., major versus minor merger debris). Instead, we provide a catalog that is intended to provide raw material for future investigations which will probe the nature of low surface brightness substructure around galaxies. We find that around 12% of the galaxies in our sample show clear tidal features at the highest confidence level. This fraction rises to about 18% if we include systems with convincing, albeit weaker tidal features, and to 26% if we include systems with more marginal features that may or may not be tidal in origin. These proportions are a strong function of rest-frame color and of stellar mass. Linear features, shells, and fans are much more likely to occur in massive galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10.5} M {sub Sun }, and red galaxies are twice as likely to show tidal features than are blue galaxies.

  8. Finding faint H I structure in and around galaxies: Scraping the barrel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punzo, D.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Roerdink, J. B. T. M.

    2016-10-01

    Soon to be operational H I survey instruments such as APERTIF and ASKAP will produce large datasets. These surveys will provide information about the H I in and around hundreds of galaxies with a typical signal-to-noise ratio of ∼10 in the inner regions and ∼1 in the outer regions. In addition, such surveys will make it possible to probe faint H I structures, typically located in the vicinity of galaxies, such as extra-planar-gas, tails and filaments. These structures are crucial for understanding galaxy evolution, particularly when they are studied in relation to the local environment. Our aim is to find optimized kernels for the discovery of faint and morphologically complex H I structures. Therefore, using H I data from a variety of galaxies, we explore state-of-the-art filtering algorithms. We show that the intensity-driven gradient filter, due to its adaptive characteristics, is the optimal choice. In fact, this filter requires only minimal tuning of the input parameters to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of faint components. In addition, it does not degrade the resolution of the high signal-to-noise component of a source. The filtering process must be fast and be embedded in an interactive visualization tool in order to support fast inspection of a large number of sources. To achieve such interactive exploration, we implemented a multi-core CPU (OpenMP) and a GPU (OpenGL) version of this filter in a 3D visualization environment (SlicerAstro).

  9. DISCOVERY OF A NEW FAINT DWARF GALAXY ASSOCIATED WITH NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Sand, D. J.; Crnojević, D.; Strader, J.; Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P.; Caldwell, N.; McLeod, B.; Seth, A. C.

    2014-09-20

    We report the discovery of a new faint dwarf galaxy, which we dub Scl-MM-Dw1, at a projected distance of ∼65 kpc from the spiral galaxy NGC 253. The discovery results from the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS), a program with the Magellan/Megacam imager to study faint substructure in resolved stellar light around massive galaxies outside of the Local Group. We measure a tip of the red giant branch distance to Scl-MM-Dw1 of D = 3.9 ± 0.5 Mpc, consistent with that of NGC 253, making their association likely. The new dwarf's stellar population is complex, with an old, metal-poor red giant branch (≳10 Gyr, [Fe/H] ∼ –2), and an asymptotic giant branch with an age of ∼500 Myr. Scl-MM-Dw1 has a half-light radius of r{sub h} = 340 ± 50 pc and an absolute magnitude of M{sub V}  = –10.3 ± 0.6 mag, comparable to the Milky Way's satellites at the same luminosity. Once complete, our imaging survey of NGC 253 and other nearby massive galaxies will provide a census of faint substructure in halos beyond the Local Group, both to put our own environment into context and to confront models of hierarchical structure formation.

  10. A chemical confirmation of the faint Boötes II dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Andreas; Rich, R. Michael

    2014-10-10

    We present a chemical abundance study of the brightest confirmed member star of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Boötes II from Keck/HIRES high-resolution spectroscopy at moderate signal-to-noise ratios. At [Fe/H] = –2.93 ± 0.03(stat.) ± 0.17(sys.), this star chemically resembles metal-poor halo field stars and the signatures of other faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies at the same metallicities in that it shows enhanced [α/Fe] ratios, Solar Fe-peak element abundances, and low upper limits on the neutron-capture element Ba. Moreover, this star shows no chemical peculiarities in any of the eight elements we were able to measure. This implies that the chemical outliers found in other systems remain outliers pertaining to the unusual enrichment histories of the respective environments, while Boo II appears to have experienced an enrichment history typical of its very low mass. We also re-calibrated previous measurements of the galaxy's metallicity from the calcium triplet (CaT) and find a much lower value than reported before. The resulting broad metallicity spread, in excess of one dex, the very metal-poor mean, and the chemical abundance patterns of the present star imply that Boötes II is a low-mass, old, metal-poor dwarf galaxy and not an overdensity associated with the Sagittarius Stream as has been previously suggested based on its sky position and kinematics. The low, mean CaT metallicity of –2.7 dex falls right on the luminosity-metallicity relation delineated over four orders of magnitude from the more luminous to the faintest galaxies. Thus Boötes II's chemical enrichment appears representative of the galaxy's original mass, while tidal stripping and other mass loss mechanisms were probably not significant as for other low-mass satellites.

  11. Variable Stars in the Field of the Hydra II Ultra-Faint Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivas, Anna Katherina; Olsen, Knut A.; Blum, Robert D.; Nidever, David L.; Walker, Alistair R.; Martin, Nicolas; Besla, Gurtina; Gallart, Carme; Van Der Marel, Roeland P.; Majewski, Steven R.; Munoz, Ricardo; Kaleida, Catherine C.; Saha, Abhijit; Conn, Blair; Jin, Shoko

    2016-06-01

    We searched for variable stars in Hydra II, one of the recently discovered ultra-faint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way, using gri time-series obtained with the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. We discovered one RR Lyrae star in the galaxy which was used to derive a distance of 154±8 kpc to this system and to re-calculate its absolute magnitude and half-light radius.A comparison with other RR Lyrae stars in ultra-faint systems indicates similar pulsational properties among them, which are different to those found among halo field stars and those in the largest of the Milky Way satellites. We also report the discovery of 31 additional short period variables in the field of view (RR Lyrae, SX Phe, eclipsing binaries, and a likely anomalous cepheid) which are likely not related with Hydra II.

  12. Revealing a comet-like shape of the faint periphery of the nearby galaxy M 32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Ts. B.

    2016-02-01

    We performed BVRI photometry of the galaxy M 32 building images and isophote maps in magnitudes and in color indexes. While searching for the faint thick disk of M 32 we apply median filtering with aperture of 7.3 arcmin to detach the residual image of M 32 and its periphery above the surrounding magnitude or color background. The residual images in all photometric systems show that the periphery of M 32 possesses a comet-like shape with a tail oriented to SSE, in a direction opposite to the direction of M 110. The images calibrated in color indexes (b - v) and (b - v)+(r - i) show that the tail is redder than the local median background. The residual images in color indexes show that the red tail broadens and curves in direction towards S and SW. Simultaneously, the brightest part of M 32 occurs bounded from NW-NE-SE sides by a sickle-like formation with a significantly lower red color index. Generally, we do not find a faint thick disk of M 32. However, the comet-like shape on the periphery of M 32, especially as a formation with an increased red color index, provokes involuntarily the impression that the satellite M 32 overtakes the Andromeda galaxy. The redshifts show that the intimacy velocity of M 32 and Andromeda galaxy is about 100 km/s.

  13. Sweating the small stuff: simulating dwarf galaxies, ultra-faint dwarf galaxies, and their own tiny satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Coral Rose

    2016-06-01

    The high dark matter content and the shallow potential wells of low mass galaxies (10^3 Msun < Mstar < 10^9.5 Msun) make them excellent testbeds for differing theories of galaxy formation. Additionally, the recent up-tick in the number and detail of Local Group dwarf galaxy observations provides a rich dataset for comparison to simulations that attempt to answer important questions in near field cosmology: why are there so few observed dwarfs compared to the number predicted by simulations? What shuts down star formation in ultra-faint galaxies? Why do dwarfs have inverted age gradients and what does it take to convert a dwarf irregular (dIrrs) into a dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy?We to attempt to answer these questions by running ultra-high resolution cosmological FIRE simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies. We predict that many ultra-faint dwarfs should exist as satellites of more massive isolated Local Group dwarfs. The ultra-faints (Mstar < 10^4 Msun) formed in these simulations have uniformly ancient stellar populations (> 10 Gyr), having had their star formation shut down by reionization. Additionally, we show that the kinematics and ellipticities of isolated simulated dwarf centrals are consistent with observed dSphs satellites without the need for harassment from a massive host. We further show that most (but not all) observed *isolated* dIrrs in the Local Volume also have dispersion-supported stellar populations, contradicting the previous view that these objects are rotating. Finally, we investigate the stellar age gradients in dwarfs — showing that early mergers and strong feedback can create an inverted gradient, with the older stars occupying larger galactocentric radii.These results offer an interesting direction in testing models that attempt to solve dark matter problems via explosive feedback episodes. Can the same models that create large cores in simulated dwarfs preserve the mild stellar rotation that is seen in a minority of isolated d

  14. Measuring the orbital history of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Hercules with GSAOI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Tuan; Lu, Jessica; Simon, Josh; Peter, Annika; Boylan-Kolchin, Mike

    2014-02-01

    The Milky Way ultra-faint dwarf galaxies are the most dark matter dominated systems known to date. Their low masses, low luminosities, and extremely low metallicities offer a glimpse into galaxy formation at the earliest epochs, while their high inferred dark matter densities and proximity make them ideal candidates for indirect dark matter detection experiments. However, significant uncertainties remain in key observables such as the mass and infall history of these extreme objects. For example, without knowledge of their orbits, it is difficult to determine whether their masses are overestimated because their radial velocity dispersions have been inflated by past tidal encounters with the Milky Way. We propose to measure the proper motion of the Hercules ultra-faint dwarf galaxy using GSAOI to understand its orbital history. Hercules is a particularly intriguing target because structural and kinematic studies have motivated claims that it is tidally disrupting despite its relatively large present distance from the Milky Way and apparently high mass-to-light ratio. It also has a very old stellar population, making it a prime candidate for a "fossil galaxy" whose star formation was shut off by reionization. With observations in 2014A, 2015A, and 2017A in conjunction with HST data taken in 2011, we will be able to achieve 35 km/s proper motion precision, making it possible to reconstruct the orbit of Hercules. Knowledge of its perigalacticon will allow us to quantify the tidal effects of the Milky Way on its internal stellar dynamics, while its eccentricities and orbital energies will constrain the initial infall time into the Milky Way dark matter halo. This proposal aims to extend the technique developed of HST data to using background galaxies as absolute reference sources to ground based MCAO observations, which will be important for astrometry work after HST and for future extremely large telescopes.

  15. A panchromatic view of M82: Dust properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreras, Ignacio

    2015-08-01

    A combination of NUV and optical imaging of M82, the nearest star-bursting galaxy, allows us to probe the properties of the dust, both in the interstellar medium of the galaxy, as well as the dust entrained in the extraplanar gas blown by the super wind. We compare the photometric observations with sets of population synthesis models to derive the characteristics of the illumination source, and compare the results with simple dust models, leading us to conclude that the dust entrained in the extraplanar region is made up of small grains. In the galaxy, the extinction law reveals a strong presence of an NUV bump at 2175A, at odds with the standard extinction law for star-forming systems. We compare our results with the recent analyses of the dust in the region around SN2014J (hosted by M82).

  16. GHOSTS I: A new faint very isolated dwarf galaxy at D = 12 ± 2 Mpc

    SciTech Connect

    Monachesi, Antonela; Bell, Eric F.; Radburn-Smith, David J.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; De Jong, Roelof S.; Streich, David; Vlajić, Marija; Bailin, Jeremy; Holwerda, Benne W.; Alyson Ford, H.; Zucker, Daniel B.

    2014-01-10

    We report the discovery of a new faint dwarf galaxy, GHOSTS I, using HST/ACS data from one of our GHOSTS (Galaxy Halos, Outer disks, Substructure, Thick disk, and Star clusters) fields. Its detected individual stars populate an approximately 1 mag range of its luminosity function (LF). Using synthetic color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) to compare with the galaxy's CMD, we find that the colors and magnitudes of GHOSTS I's individual stars are most consistent with being young helium-burning and asymptotic giant branch stars at a distance of ∼12 ± 2 Mpc. Morphologically, GHOSTS I appears to be actively forming stars, so we tentatively classify it as a dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxy, although future Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations deep enough to resolve a larger magnitude range in its LF are required to make a more secure classification. GHOSTS I's absolute magnitude is M{sub V}∼−9.85{sub −0.33}{sup +0.40}, making it one of the least luminous dIrr galaxies known, and its metallicity is lower than [Fe/H] = –1.5 dex. The half-light radius of GHOSTS I is 226 ± 38 pc and its ellipticity is 0.47 ± 0.07, similar to Milky Way and M31 dwarf satellites at comparable luminosity. There are no luminous massive galaxies or galaxy clusters within ∼4 Mpc from GHOSTS I that could be considered as its host, making it a very isolated dwarf galaxy in the local universe.

  17. Calibration of HST wide field camera for quantitative analysis of faint galaxy images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnatunga, Kavan U.; Griffiths, Richard E.; Casertano, Stefano; Neuschaefer, Lyman W.; Wyckoff, Eric W.

    1994-01-01

    We present the methods adopted to optimize the calibration of images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera (WFC) (1991-1993). Our main goal is to improve quantitative measurement of faint images, with special emphasis on the faint (I approximately 20-24 mag) stars and galaxies observed as a part of the Medium-Deep Survey. Several modifications to the standard calibration procedures have been introduced, including improved bias and dark images, and a new supersky flatfield obtained by combining a large number of relatively object-free Medium-Deep Survey exposures of random fields. The supersky flat has a pixel-to-pixel rms error of about 2.0% in F555W and of 2.4% in F785LP; large-scale variations are smaller than 1% rms. Overall, our modifications improve the quality of faint images with respect to the standard calibration by about a factor of five in photometric accuracy and about 0.3 mag in sensitivity, corresponding to about a factor of two in observing time. The relevant calibration images have been made available to the scientific community.

  18. Studies of selected voids. Surface photometry of faint galaxies in the direction of 1600+18 in Hercules void.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Georgi

    Surface photometry, coordinates, magnitudes m(B), diameters, position angles and some morphological parameters are presented for ca. 1850 faint galaxies in a field of one square degree centered at 1600+18 (1950) (Hercules void). The distribution of the magnitudes of the galaxies in this direction is compared with ''Log Normal'' and ''Gauss'' ones and with similar results from SDDS studies of galaxies. Some candidates for primeval galaxies -- 38 large Low surface brightness galaxies were detected in the direction of the void. Major axes luminosity profiles are analyzed. Comparison between two different methods for automatic selection and classification -- a new package, based on MIDAS INVENTORY and SExtractor packages have been made.

  19. Cosmic Reionization on Computers: The Faint End of the Galaxy Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-07-01

    Using numerical cosmological simulations completed under the “Cosmic Reionization On Computers” project, I explore theoretical predictions for the faint end of the galaxy UV luminosity functions at z≳ 6. A commonly used Schechter function approximation with the magnitude cut at {M}{{cut}}˜ -13 provides a reasonable fit to the actual luminosity function of simulated galaxies. When the Schechter functional form is forced on the luminosity functions from the simulations, the magnitude cut {M}{{cut}} is found to vary between -12 and -14 with a mild redshift dependence. An analytical model of reionization from Madau et al., as used by Robertson et al., provides a good description of the simulated results, which can be improved even further by adding two physically motivated modifications to the original Madau et al. equation.

  20. Cosmic reionization on computers: The faint end of the galaxy luminosity function

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-07-01

    Using numerical cosmological simulations completed under the “Cosmic Reionization On Computers” project, I explore theoretical predictions for the faint end of the galaxy UV luminosity functions atmore » $$z\\gtrsim 6$$. A commonly used Schechter function approximation with the magnitude cut at $${M}_{{\\rm{cut}}}\\sim -13$$ provides a reasonable fit to the actual luminosity function of simulated galaxies. When the Schechter functional form is forced on the luminosity functions from the simulations, the magnitude cut $${M}_{{\\rm{cut}}}$$ is found to vary between -12 and -14 with a mild redshift dependence. Here, an analytical model of reionization from Madau et al., as used by Robertson et al., provides a good description of the simulated results, which can be improved even further by adding two physically motivated modifications to the original Madau et al. equation.« less

  1. The Chemical Evolution of the Bootes I Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frebel, Anna; Norris, John E.; Gilmore, Gerard; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2016-08-01

    We present chemical abundance measurements of two metal-poor red giant stars in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Boötes I, based on Magellan/MIKE high-resolution spectra. For Boo-980, with {{[Fe/H]}}=-3.1, we present the first elemental abundance measurements, while Boo-127, with {{[Fe/H]}}=-2.0, shows abundances in good agreement with previous measurements. Light and iron-peak element abundance ratios in the two Boötes I stars, as well as those of most other Boötes I members, collected from the literature, closely resemble those of regular metal-poor halo stars. Neutron-capture element abundances Sr and Ba are systematically lower than the main halo trend and also show a significant abundance spread. Overall, this is similar to what has been found for other ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. We apply corrections to the carbon abundances (commensurate with stellar evolutionary status) of the entire sample and find 21% of stars to be carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars, compared to 13% without using the carbon correction. We reassess the metallicity distribution functions for the CEMP stars and non-CEMP stars, and confirm earlier claims that CEMP stars might belong to a different, earlier population. Applying a set of abundance criteria to test to what extent Boötes I could be a surviving first galaxy suggests that it is one of the earliest assembled systems that perhaps received gas from accretion from other clouds in the system, or from swallowing a first galaxy or building block type object. This resulted in the two stellar populations observable today. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  2. Antlia B: A Faint Dwarf Galaxy Member of the NGC 3109 Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sand, D. J.; Spekkens, K.; Crnojević, D.; Hargis, J. R.; Willman, B.; Strader, J.; Grillmair, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    We report the discovery of Antlia B, a faint dwarf galaxy at a projected distance of ˜72 kpc from NGC 3109 ({M}V ˜ -15 {mag}), the primary galaxy of the NGC 3109 dwarf association at the edge of the Local Group. The tip of the red giant branch distance to Antlia B is D = 1.29 ± 0.10 Mpc, which is consistent with the distance to NGC 3109. A qualitative analysis indicates the new dwarf's stellar population has both an old, metal-poor red giant branch (≳ 10 {{Gyr}}, [Fe/H] ˜ -2), and a younger blue population with an age of ˜200-400 Myr, analogous to the original Antlia dwarf, another likely satellite of NGC 3109. Antlia B has H i gas at a velocity of {v}{helio,{{H}} {{I}}} = 376 km s-1, confirming the association with NGC 3109 (vhelio = 403 km s-1). The H i gas mass (MH i = 2.8 ± 0.2 × 105 {M}⊙ ), stellar luminosity (MV = -9.7 ± 0.6 mag) and half light radius (rh = 273 ± 29 pc) are all consistent with the properties of dwarf irregular and dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Volume, and is most similar to the Leo P dwarf galaxy. The discovery of Antlia B is the initial result from a Dark Energy Camera survey for halo substructure and faint dwarf companions to NGC 3109 with the goal of comparing observed substructure with expectations from the Λ+Cold Dark Matter model in the sub-Milky Way regime.

  3. Variable Stars in the Field of the Hydra II Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivas, A. Katherina; Olsen, Knut; Blum, Robert; Nidever, David L.; Walker, Alistair R.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Besla, Gurtina; Gallart, Carme; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Majewski, Steven R.; Kaleida, Catherine C.; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Saha, Abhijit; Conn, Blair C.; Jin, Shoko

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery of one RR Lyrae star in the ultra-faint satellite galaxy Hydra II based on time series photometry in the g, r and i bands obtained with the Dark Energy Camera at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. The association of the RR Lyrae star discovered here with Hydra II is clear because is located at 42\\prime\\prime from the center of the dwarf, well within its half-light radius of 102\\prime\\prime . The RR Lyrae star has a mean magnitude of i=21.30+/- 0.04 which is too faint to be a field halo star. This magnitude translates to a heliocentric distance of 151 ± 8 kpc for Hydra II; this value is ∼ 13% larger than the estimate from the discovery paper based on the average magnitude of several blue horizontal branch star candidates. The new distance implies a slightly larger half-light radius of {76}-10+12 pc and a brighter absolute magnitude of {M}V=-5.1+/- 0.3, which keeps this object within the realm of the dwarf galaxies. A comparison with other RR Lyrae stars in ultra-faint systems indicates similar pulsational properties among them, which are different to those found among halo field stars and those in the largest of the Milky Way satellites. We also report the discovery of 31 additional short period variables in the field of view (RR Lyrae, SX Phe, eclipsing binaries, and a likely anomalous cepheid) which are likely not related with Hydra II.

  4. Measurable Relationship between Bright Galaxies and Their Faint Companions in WHL J085910.0+294957, a Galaxy Cluster at z = 0.30: Vestiges of Infallen Groups?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joon Hyeop; Lee, Hye-Ran; Kim, Minjin; Seon, Kwang-Il; Kim, Sang Chul; Yang, Soung-Chul; Ree, Chang Hee; Lee, Jong Chul; Jeong, Hyunjin; Ko, Jongwan; Choi, Changsu

    2014-08-01

    The properties of satellite galaxies are closely related to their host galaxies in galaxy groups. In cluster environments, on the other hand, the interaction between close neighbors is known to be limited. Our goal is to examine the relationships between host and satellite galaxies in the harsh environment of a galaxy cluster. To achieve this goal, we study a galaxy cluster WHL J085910.0+294957 at z = 0.30 using deep images obtained with CQUEAN CCD camera mounted on the 2.1 m Otto Struve Telescope. After member selection based on the scaling relations of photometric and structural parameters, we investigate the relationship between bright (Mi <= -18) galaxies and their faint (-18 < Mi <= -15) companions. The weighted mean color of faint companion galaxies shows no significant dependence (<1σ to bootstrap uncertainties) on cluster-centric distance and local luminosity density as well as the luminosity and concentration of an adjacent bright galaxy. However, the weighted mean color shows marginal dependence (~2.2σ) on the color of an adjacent bright galaxy when the sample is limited to bright galaxies with at least two faint companions. By using a permutation test, we confirm that the correlation in color between bright galaxies and their faint companions in this cluster is statistically significant with a confidence level of 98.7%. The statistical significance increases if we additionally remove non-members using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric redshift information (~2.6σ and 99.3%). Our results suggest three possible scenarios: (1) vestiges of infallen groups, (2) dwarf capturing, and (3) tidal tearing of bright galaxies.

  5. Measurable relationship between bright galaxies and their faint companions in WHL J085910.0+294957, a galaxy cluster at z = 0.30: vestiges of infallen groups?

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Joon Hyeop; Lee, Hye-Ran; Kim, Minjin; Seon, Kwang-Il; Kim, Sang Chul; Yang, Soung-Chul; Ree, Chang Hee; Lee, Jong Chul; Jeong, Hyunjin; Ko, Jongwan; Choi, Changsu

    2014-08-20

    The properties of satellite galaxies are closely related to their host galaxies in galaxy groups. In cluster environments, on the other hand, the interaction between close neighbors is known to be limited. Our goal is to examine the relationships between host and satellite galaxies in the harsh environment of a galaxy cluster. To achieve this goal, we study a galaxy cluster WHL J085910.0+294957 at z = 0.30 using deep images obtained with CQUEAN CCD camera mounted on the 2.1 m Otto Struve Telescope. After member selection based on the scaling relations of photometric and structural parameters, we investigate the relationship between bright (M{sub i} ≤ –18) galaxies and their faint (–18 < M{sub i} ≤ –15) companions. The weighted mean color of faint companion galaxies shows no significant dependence (<1σ to bootstrap uncertainties) on cluster-centric distance and local luminosity density as well as the luminosity and concentration of an adjacent bright galaxy. However, the weighted mean color shows marginal dependence (∼2.2σ) on the color of an adjacent bright galaxy when the sample is limited to bright galaxies with at least two faint companions. By using a permutation test, we confirm that the correlation in color between bright galaxies and their faint companions in this cluster is statistically significant with a confidence level of 98.7%. The statistical significance increases if we additionally remove non-members using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric redshift information (∼2.6σ and 99.3%). Our results suggest three possible scenarios: (1) vestiges of infallen groups, (2) dwarf capturing, and (3) tidal tearing of bright galaxies.

  6. The quenching of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxies in the reionization era

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas M.; Tumlinson, Jason; Kalirai, Jason S.; Avila, Roberto J.; Gennaro, Mario; Ferguson, Henry C. E-mail: tumlinson@stsci.edu E-mail: avila@stsci.edu E-mail: gennaro@stsci.edu; and others

    2014-12-01

    We present new constraints on the star formation histories of six ultra-faint dwarf galaxies: Bootes I, Canes Venatici II, Coma Berenices, Hercules, Leo IV, and Ursa Major I. Our analysis employs a combination of high-precision photometry obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope, medium-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph on the W. M. Keck Observatory, and updated Victoria-Regina isochrones tailored to the abundance patterns appropriate for these galaxies. The data for five of these Milky Way satellites are best fit by a star formation history where at least 75% of the stars formed by z ∼ 10 (13.3 Gyr ago). All of the galaxies are consistent with 80% of the stars forming by z ∼ 6 (12.8 Gyr ago) and 100% of the stars forming by z ∼ 3 (11.6 Gyr ago). The similarly ancient populations of these galaxies support the hypothesis that star formation in the smallest dark-matter sub-halos was suppressed by a global outside influence, such as the reionization of the universe.

  7. The Quenching of the Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxies in the Reionization Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Thomas M.; Tumlinson, Jason; Geha, Marla; Simon, Joshua D.; Vargas, Luis C.; VandenBerg, Don A.; Kirby, Evan N.; Kalirai, Jason S.; Avila, Roberto J.; Gennaro, Mario; Ferguson, Henry C.; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Renzini, Alvio

    2014-12-01

    We present new constraints on the star formation histories of six ultra-faint dwarf galaxies: Bootes I, Canes Venatici II, Coma Berenices, Hercules, Leo IV, and Ursa Major I. Our analysis employs a combination of high-precision photometry obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope, medium-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph on the W. M. Keck Observatory, and updated Victoria-Regina isochrones tailored to the abundance patterns appropriate for these galaxies. The data for five of these Milky Way satellites are best fit by a star formation history where at least 75% of the stars formed by z ~ 10 (13.3 Gyr ago). All of the galaxies are consistent with 80% of the stars forming by z ~ 6 (12.8 Gyr ago) and 100% of the stars forming by z ~ 3 (11.6 Gyr ago). The similarly ancient populations of these galaxies support the hypothesis that star formation in the smallest dark-matter sub-halos was suppressed by a global outside influence, such as the reionization of the universe. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO-12549.

  8. WINDS, CLUMPS, AND INTERACTING COSMIC RAYS IN M82

    SciTech Connect

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M.; Everett, John E.; Zweibel, Ellen G.; Gallagher, J. S. III

    2013-05-01

    We construct a family of models for the evolution of energetic particles in the starburst galaxy M82 and compare them to observations to test the calorimeter assumption that all cosmic ray energy is radiated in the starburst region. Assuming constant cosmic ray acceleration efficiency with Milky Way parameters, we calculate the cosmic-ray proton and primary and secondary electron/positron populations as a function of energy. Cosmic rays are injected with Galactic energy distributions and electron-to-proton ratio via Type II supernovae at the observed rate of 0.07 yr{sup -1}. From the cosmic ray spectra, we predict the radio synchrotron and {gamma}-ray spectra. To more accurately model the radio spectrum, we incorporate a multiphase interstellar medium in the starburst region of M82. Our model interstellar medium is highly fragmented with compact dense molecular clouds and dense photoionized gas, both embedded in a hot, low density medium in overall pressure equilibrium. The spectra predicted by this one-zone model are compared to the observed radio and {gamma}-ray spectra of M82. {chi}{sup 2} tests are used with radio and {gamma}-ray observations and a range of model predictions to find the best-fit parameters. The best-fit model yields constraints on key parameters in the starburst zone of M82, including a magnetic field strength of {approx}250 {mu}G and a wind advection speed in the range of 300-700 km s{sup -1}. We find that M82 is a good electron calorimeter but not an ideal cosmic-ray proton calorimeter and discuss the implications of our results for the astrophysics of the far-infrared-radio correlation in starburst galaxies.

  9. Ultra-light dark matter in ultra-faint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Erminia; Spergel, David N.

    2016-08-01

    Cold Dark Matter (CDM) models struggle to match the observations at galactic scales. The tension can be reduced either by dramatic baryonic feedback effects or by modifying the particle physics of CDM. Here, we consider an ultra-light scalar field DM particle manifesting a wave nature below a DM particle mass-dependent Jeans scale. For DM mass m ˜ 10-22 eV, this scenario delays galaxy formation and avoids cusps in the centre of the dark matter haloes. We use new measurements of half-light mass in ultra-faint dwarf galaxies Draco II and Triangulum II to estimate the mass of the DM particle in this model. We find that if the stellar populations are within the core of the density profile then the data are in agreement with a Wave Dark Matter model having a DM particle with m ˜ 3.7-5.6 × 10-22 eV. The presence of this extremely light particle will contribute to the formation of a central solitonic core replacing the cusp of a Navarro-Frenk-White profile and bringing predictions closer to observations of cored central density in dwarf galaxies.

  10. A SPECTROSCOPIC CENSUS OF THE M82 STELLAR CLUSTER POPULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Westmoquette, M. S.; Bastian, N.; Smith, L. J.; Trancho, G.

    2009-08-20

    We present a spectroscopic study of the stellar cluster population of M82, the archetype starburst galaxy, based primarily on new Gemini-North multi-object spectroscopy of 49 star clusters. These observations constitute the largest to date spectroscopic data set of extragalactic young clusters, giving virtually continuous coverage across the galaxy; we use these data to deduce information about the clusters as well as the M82 post-starburst disk and nuclear starburst environments. Spectroscopic age dating places clusters in the nucleus and disk between (7, 15) and (30, 270) Myr, with distribution peaks at {approx}10 and 140 Myr, respectively. We find cluster radial velocities (RVs) in the range v{sub R} in (-160, 220)km s{sup -1} (with respect to the galaxy center), and line-of-sight Na I D interstellar absorption line velocities v {sup NaID}{sub R} in (-75, 200) km s{sup -1}, in many cases entirely decoupled from the clusters. As the disk cluster RVs lie on the flat part of the galaxy rotation curve, we conclude that they comprise a regularly orbiting system. Our observations suggest that the largest part of the population was created as a result of the close encounter with M81 {approx}220 Myr ago. Clusters in the nucleus are found in solid body rotation on the bar. The possible detection of Wolf-Rayet features in their spectra indicates that cluster formation continues in the central starburst zone. We also report the potential discovery of two old populous clusters in the halo of M82, aged {approx}>8 Gyr. Using these measurements and simple dynamical considerations, we derive a toy model for the invisible physical structure of the galaxy, and confirm the existence of two dominant spiral arms.

  11. Stellar Kinematics and Metallicities in the Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy Reticulum II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, J. D.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Li, T. S.; Nord, B.; Geha, M.; Bechtol, K.; Balbinot, E.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Lin, H.; Marshall, J.; Santiago, B.; Strigari, L.; Wang, M.; Wechsler, R. H.; Yanny, B.; Abbott, T.; Bauer, A. H.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dodelson, S.; Cunha, C. E.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Ogando, R.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tucker, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; DES Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    We present Magellan/M2FS, Very Large Telescope/GIRAFFE, and Gemini South/GMOS spectroscopy of the newly discovered Milky Way satellite Reticulum II. Based on the spectra of 25 Ret II member stars selected from Dark Energy Survey imaging, we measure a mean heliocentric velocity of 62.8+/- 0.5 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and a velocity dispersion of 3.3+/- 0.7 {km} {{{s}}}-1. The mass-to-light ratio of Ret II within its half-light radius is 470+/- 210 {M}⊙ /{L}⊙ , demonstrating that it is a strongly dark matter-dominated system. Despite its spatial proximity to the Magellanic Clouds, the radial velocity of Ret II differs from that of the LMC and SMC by 199 and 83 {km} {{{s}}}-1, respectively, suggesting that it is not gravitationally bound to the Magellanic system. The likely member stars of Ret II span 1.3 dex in metallicity, with a dispersion of 0.28 ± 0.09 dex, and we identify several extremely metal-poor stars with {{[Fe/H]}}\\lt -3. In combination with its luminosity, size, and ellipticity, these results confirm that Ret II is an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy. With a mean metallicity of {{[Fe/H]}}=-2.65+/- 0.07, Ret II matches Segue 1 as the most metal-poor galaxy known. Although Ret II is the third-closest dwarf galaxy to the Milky Way, the line-of-sight integral of the dark matter density squared is {{log}}10(J)=18.8+/- 0.6 {GeV}{ }2 {{cm}}-5 within 0.°2, indicating that the predicted gamma-ray flux from dark matter annihilation in Ret II is lower than that of several other dwarf galaxies. Based on data obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility under request number 157689.

  12. Stellar kinematics and metallicities in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Reticulum II

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, J. D.

    2015-07-23

    With this study, we present Magellan/M2FS, Very Large Telescope/GIRAFFE, and Gemini South/GMOS spectroscopy of the newly discovered Milky Way satellite Reticulum II. Based on the spectra of 25 Ret II member stars selected from Dark Energy Survey imaging, we measure a mean heliocentric velocity of $62.8\\pm 0.5\\;\\mathrm{km}\\;{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$ and a velocity dispersion of $3.3\\pm 0.7\\;\\mathrm{km}\\;{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$. The mass-to-light ratio of Ret II within its half-light radius is $470\\pm 210\\ {M}_{\\odot }/{L}_{\\odot }$, demonstrating that it is a strongly dark matter-dominated system. Despite its spatial proximity to the Magellanic Clouds, the radial velocity of Ret II differs from that of the LMC and SMC by 199 and 83 $\\mathrm{km}\\ {{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$, respectively, suggesting that it is not gravitationally bound to the Magellanic system. The likely member stars of Ret II span 1.3 dex in metallicity, with a dispersion of 0.28 ± 0.09 dex, and we identify several extremely metal-poor stars with ${\\rm{[Fe/H]}}\\lt -3$. In combination with its luminosity, size, and ellipticity, these results confirm that Ret II is an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy. With a mean metallicity of ${\\rm{[Fe/H]}}=-2.65\\pm 0.07$, Ret II matches Segue 1 as the most metal-poor galaxy known. Although Ret II is the third-closest dwarf galaxy to the Milky Way, the line-of-sight integral of the dark matter density squared is ${\\mathrm{log}}_{10}(J)=18.8\\pm 0.6\\;\\;\\mathrm{GeV}{\\;}^{2}\\;{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-5}\\;$ within 0fdg2, indicating that the predicted gamma-ray flux from dark matter annihilation in Ret II is lower than that of several other dwarf galaxies.

  13. The Lyα-LyC Connection: Evidence for an Enhanced Contribution of UV-faint Galaxies to Cosmic Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, Mark; Gronke, Max; Venkatesan, Aparna

    2016-09-01

    The escape of ionizing Lyman continuum (LyC) photons requires the existence of low-N H i sightlines, which also promote escape of Lyα. We use a suite of 2500 Lyα Monte-Carlo radiative transfer simulations through models of dusty, clumpy interstellar (“multiphase”) media from Gronke & Dijkstra, and compare the escape fractions of Lyα ({f}{{esc}}{{Ly}α }) and LyC radiation ({f}{{esc}}{{ion}}). We find that {f}{{esc}}{{ion}} and {f}{{esc}}{{Ly}α } are correlated: galaxies with a low {f}{{esc}}{{Ly}α } consistently have a low {f}{{esc}}{{ion}}, while galaxies with a high {f}{{esc}}{{Ly}α } exhibit a large dispersion in {f}{{esc}}{{ion}}. We argue that there is increasing observational evidence that Lyα escapes more easily from UV-faint galaxies. The correlation between {f}{{esc}}{{ion}} and {f}{{esc}}{{Ly}α } then implies that UV-faint galaxies contribute more to the ionizing background than implied by the faint-end slope of the UV luminosity function. In multiphase gases, the ionizing escape fraction is most strongly affected by the cloud covering factor, f cl, which implies that {f}{{esc}}{{ion}} is closely connected to the observed Lyα spectral line shape. Specifically, LyC-emitting galaxies typically having narrower, more symmetric line profiles. This prediction is qualitatively similar to that for “shell models.”

  14. Quantifying the faint structure of galaxies: the late-type spiral NGC 2403

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Michael K.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Irwin, M. J.; Arimoto, N.; Jablonka, P.

    2012-01-01

    Ground-based surveys have mapped the stellar outskirts of Local Group disc galaxies in unprecedented detail, but extending this work to other galaxies is necessary in order to overcome stochastic variations in evolutionary history and provide more stringent constraints on cosmological galaxy formation models. As part of our continuing programme of ultra-deep imagery of galaxies beyond the Local Group, we present a wide-field analysis of the isolated late-type spiral NGC 2403 using data obtained with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru telescope. The surveyed area reaches a maximum projected radius of 30 kpc or a deprojected radius of Rdp˜ 60 kpc. The colour-magnitude diagram reaches 1.5 mag below the tip of the metal-poor red giant branch (RGB) at a completeness rate >50 per cent for Rdp > rsim 12 kpc. Using the combination of diffuse light photometry and resolved star counts, we are able to trace the radial surface brightness (SB) profile over a much larger range of radii and SB than is possible with either technique alone. The exponential disc as traced by RGB stars dominates the SB profile out to ≳8 disc scalelengths, or Rdp˜ 18 kpc, and reaches a V-band SB of μV˜ 29 mag arcsec-2. Beyond this radius, we find evidence for an extended structural component with a significantly flatter SB profile than the inner disc and which we trace to Rdp˜ 40 kpc and μV˜ 32 mag arcsec-2. This component can be fit with a power-law index of γ˜ 3, has an axial ratio consistent with that of the inner disc and has a V-band luminosity integrated over all radii of 1-7 per cent that of the whole galaxy. At Rdp˜ 20 - 30 kpc, we estimate a peak metallicity [M/H] =-1.0 ± 0.3 assuming an age of 10 Gyr and zero α-element enhancement. Although the extant data are unable to discriminate between stellar halo or thick disc interpretations of this component, our results support the notion that faint, extended stellar structures are a common feature of all disc galaxies, even isolated, low

  15. DISCOVERY OF A CLOSE PAIR OF FAINT DWARF GALAXIES IN THE HALO OF CENTAURUS A

    SciTech Connect

    Crnojević, D.; Sand, D. J.; Caldwell, N.; McLeod, B.; Guhathakurta, P.; Toloba, E.; Simon, J. D.; Strader, J.

    2014-11-10

    As part of the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS), we report the discovery of a pair of faint dwarf galaxies (CenA-MM-Dw1 and CenA-MM-Dw2) at a projected distance of ∼90 kpc from the nearby elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 (CenA). We measure a tip of the red giant branch distance to each dwarf, finding D = 3.63 ± 0.41 Mpc for CenA-MM-Dw1 and D = 3.60 ± 0.41 Mpc for CenA-MM-Dw2, both of which are consistent with the distance to NGC 5128. A qualitative analysis of the color-magnitude diagrams indicates stellar populations consisting of an old, metal-poor red giant branch (≳12 Gyr, [Fe/H] ∼ –1.7 to –1.9). In addition, CenA-MM-Dw1 seems to host an intermediate-age population as indicated by its candidate asymptotic giant branch stars. The derived luminosities (M{sub V} = –10.9 ± 0.3 for CenA-MM-Dw1 and –8.4 ± 0.6 for CenA-MM-Dw2) and half-light radii (r{sub h} = 1.4 ± 0.04 kpc for CenA-MM-Dw1 and 0.36 ± 0.08 kpc for CenA-MM-Dw2) are consistent with those of Local Group dwarfs. CenA-MM-Dw1's low central surface brightness (μ {sub V,} {sub 0} = 27.3 ± 0.1 mag arcsec{sup –2}) places it among the faintest and most extended M31 satellites. Most intriguingly, CenA-MM-Dw1 and CenA-MM-Dw2 have a projected separation of only 3 arcmin (∼3 kpc): we are possibly observing the first, faint satellite of a satellite in an external group of galaxies.

  16. THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALPHA ELEMENTS IN ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Luis C.; Geha, Marla; Kirby, Evan N.; Simon, Joshua D.

    2013-04-20

    The Milky Way ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies contain some of the oldest, most metal-poor stars in the universe. We present [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], [Ti/Fe], and mean [{alpha}/Fe] abundance ratios for 61 individual red giant branch stars across eight UFDs. This is the largest sample of alpha abundances published to date in galaxies with absolute magnitudes M{sub V} > -8, including the first measurements for Segue 1, Canes Venatici II, Ursa Major I, and Leo T. Abundances were determined via medium-resolution Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy and spectral synthesis. The sample spans the metallicity range -3.4 <[Fe/H] < -1.1. With the possible exception of Segue 1 and Ursa Major II, the individual UFDs show on average lower [{alpha}/Fe] at higher metallicities, consistent with enrichment from Type Ia supernovae. Thus, even the faintest galaxies have undergone at least a limited level of chemical self-enrichment. Together with recent photometric studies, this suggests that star formation in the UFDs was not a single burst, but instead lasted at least as much as the minimum time delay of the onset of Type Ia supernovae ({approx}100 Myr) and less than {approx}2 Gyr. We further show that the combined population of UFDs has an [{alpha}/Fe] abundance pattern that is inconsistent with a flat, Galactic halo-like alpha abundance trend, and is also qualitatively different from that of the more luminous CVn I dSph, which does show a hint of a plateau at very low [Fe/H].

  17. A dwarf galaxy near the sight line to PKS 0454+0356 - A fading 'faint blue galaxy'?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steidel, Charles C.; Dickinson, Mark; Bowen, David V.

    1993-01-01

    We report the discovery of a dwarf galaxy (MB = -17.2 for H0 = 50 km/s per Mpc) at z = 0.072 which is only 4 arcsec (3.7/h(100) kpc) in projection from the line of sight to the bright quasar PKS 0454+0356 (z(em) = 1.345). The dwarf has very blue optical and optical/IR colors and exhibits line emission indicative of ongoing or recent star formation. However, there is no detection of Ca II 3934 A, 3969 A absorption at z(abs) = 0.072 to equivalent width limits (3 sigma) of about 40 mA, which would suggest an H I column density along the line of sight of less than 5 x 10 exp 19/sq cm, if the Ca II/H I ratio is similar to sight lines in the Galaxy. Based on the absence of Ca II absorption and the unusually weak line emission given the very blue color of the dwarf, we speculate that it may be close to exhausting its supply of gas. As its star formation rate declines, the galaxy's blue magnitude should fade substantially, eventually reaching a quiescent state in accord with its K luminosity of about 0.005 L*. Future observations of the sight line to PKS 0454+0356 using HST in search of Mg II resonance lines, or a search for 21 cm absorption against the quasar radio continuum, could place even more stringent limits on the extent of the gas associated with an intrinsically faint, star-forming dwarf.

  18. What do you gain from deconvolution? - Observing faint galaxies with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schade, David J.; Elson, Rebecca A. W.

    1993-01-01

    We describe experiments with deconvolutions of simulations of deep HST Wide Field Camera images containing faint, compact galaxies to determine under what circumstances there is a quantitative advantage to image deconvolution, and explore whether it is (1) helpful for distinguishing between stars and compact galaxies, or between spiral and elliptical galaxies, and whether it (2) improves the accuracy with which characteristic radii and integrated magnitudes may be determined. The Maximum Entropy and Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithms give the same results. For medium and low S/N images, deconvolution does not significantly improve our ability to distinguish between faint stars and compact galaxies, nor between spiral and elliptical galaxies. Measurements from both raw and deconvolved images are biased and must be corrected; it is easier to quantify and remove the biases for cases that have not been deconvolved. We find no benefit from deconvolution for measuring luminosity profiles, but these results are limited to low S/N images of very compact (often undersampled) galaxies.

  19. Faint submillimeter galaxies revealed by multifield deep ALMA observations: number counts, spatial clustering, and a dark submillimeter line emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Momose, Rieko; Kurono, Yasutaka

    2014-11-01

    We present the statistics of faint submillimeter/millimeter galaxies (SMGs) and serendipitous detections of a submillimeter/millimeter line emitter (SLE) with no multi-wavelength continuum counterpart revealed by the deep ALMA observations. We identify faint SMGs with flux densities of 0.1-1.0 mJy in the deep Band-6 and Band-7 maps of 10 independent fields that reduce cosmic variance effects. The differential number counts at 1.2 mm are found to increase with decreasing flux density down to 0.1 mJy. Our number counts indicate that the faint (0.1-1.0 mJy, or SFR{sub IR} ∼ 30-300 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) SMGs contribute nearly a half of the extragalactic background light (EBL), while the remaining half of the EBL is mostly contributed by very faint sources with flux densities of <0.1 mJy (SFR{sub IR} ≲ 30 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}). We conduct counts-in-cells analysis with multifield ALMA data for the faint SMGs, and obtain a coarse estimate of galaxy bias, b {sub g} < 4. The galaxy bias suggests that the dark halo masses of the faint SMGs are ≲ 7 × 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉}, which is smaller than those of bright (>1 mJy) SMGs, but consistent with abundant high-z star-forming populations, such as sBzKs, LBGs, and LAEs. Finally, we report the serendipitous detection of SLE-1, which has no continuum counterparts in our 1.2 mm-band or multi-wavelength images, including ultra deep HST/WFC3 and Spitzer data. The SLE has a significant line at 249.9 GHz with a signal-to-noise ratio of 7.1. If the SLE is not a spurious source made by the unknown systematic noise of ALMA, the strong upper limits of our multi-wavelength data suggest that the SLE would be a faint galaxy at z ≳ 6.

  20. Stellar kinematics and metallicities in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Reticulum II

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Simon, J. D.

    2015-07-23

    With this study, we present Magellan/M2FS, Very Large Telescope/GIRAFFE, and Gemini South/GMOS spectroscopy of the newly discovered Milky Way satellite Reticulum II. Based on the spectra of 25 Ret II member stars selected from Dark Energy Survey imaging, we measure a mean heliocentric velocity ofmore » $$62.8\\pm 0.5\\;\\mathrm{km}\\;{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$$ and a velocity dispersion of $$3.3\\pm 0.7\\;\\mathrm{km}\\;{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$$. The mass-to-light ratio of Ret II within its half-light radius is $$470\\pm 210\\ {M}_{\\odot }/{L}_{\\odot }$$, demonstrating that it is a strongly dark matter-dominated system. Despite its spatial proximity to the Magellanic Clouds, the radial velocity of Ret II differs from that of the LMC and SMC by 199 and 83 $$\\mathrm{km}\\ {{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$$, respectively, suggesting that it is not gravitationally bound to the Magellanic system. The likely member stars of Ret II span 1.3 dex in metallicity, with a dispersion of 0.28 ± 0.09 dex, and we identify several extremely metal-poor stars with $${\\rm{[Fe/H]}}\\lt -3$$. In combination with its luminosity, size, and ellipticity, these results confirm that Ret II is an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy. With a mean metallicity of $${\\rm{[Fe/H]}}=-2.65\\pm 0.07$$, Ret II matches Segue 1 as the most metal-poor galaxy known. Although Ret II is the third-closest dwarf galaxy to the Milky Way, the line-of-sight integral of the dark matter density squared is $${\\mathrm{log}}_{10}(J)=18.8\\pm 0.6\\;\\;\\mathrm{GeV}{\\;}^{2}\\;{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-5}\\;$$ within 0fdg2, indicating that the predicted gamma-ray flux from dark matter annihilation in Ret II is lower than that of several other dwarf galaxies.« less

  1. The very soft X-ray emission of X-ray-faint early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellegrini, S.; Fabbiano, G.

    1994-01-01

    A recent reanaylsis of Einstein data, and new ROSAT observations, have revealed the presence of at least two components in the X-ray spectra of X-ray faint early-type galaxies: a relatively hard component (kT greater than 1.5 keV), and a very soft component (kT approximately 0.2-0.3 keV). In this paper we address the problem of the nature of the very soft component and whether it can be due to a hot interstellar medium (ISM), or is most likely originated by the collective emission of very soft stellar sources. To this purpose, hydrodynamical evolutionary sequences for the secular behavior of gas flows in ellipticals have been performed, varying the Type Ia supernovae rate of explosion, and the dark matter amount and distribution. The results are compared with the observational X-ray data: the average Einstein spectrum for six X-ray faint early-type galaxies (among which are NGC 4365 and NGC 4697), and the spectrum obtained by the ROSAT pointed observation of NGC 4365. The very soft component could be entirely explained with a hot ISM only in galaxies such as NGC 4697, i.e., when the depth of the potential well-on which the average ISM temperature strongly depends-is quite shallow; in NGC 4365 a diffuse hot ISM would have a temperature larger than that of the very soft component, because of the deeper potential well. So, in NGC 4365 the softest contribution to the X-ray emission comes certainly from stellar sources. As stellar soft X-ray emitters, we consider late-type stellar coronae, supersoft sources such as those discovered by ROSAT in the Magellanic Clouds and M31, and RS CVn systems. All these candidates can be substantial contributors to the very soft emission, though none of them, taken separately, plausibly accounts entirely for its properties. We finally present a model for the X-ray emission of NGC 4365, to reproduce in detail the results of the ROSAT pointed observation, including the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) spectrum and radial

  2. THE DISTRIBUTION OF FAINT SATELLITES AROUND CENTRAL GALAXIES IN THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C. Y.; Jing, Y. P.; Li, Cheng

    2012-11-20

    We investigate the radial number density profile and the abundance distribution of faint satellites around central galaxies in the low-redshift universe using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) Legacy Survey. We consider three samples of central galaxies with magnitudes of M {sub r} = -21, -22, and -23 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey group catalog of Yang et al. The satellite distribution around these central galaxies is obtained by cross-correlating these galaxies with the photometric catalog of the CFHT Legacy Survey. The projected radial number density of the satellites obeys a power-law form with the best-fit logarithmic slope of -1.05, independent of both the central galaxy luminosity and the satellite luminosity. The projected cross-correlation function between central and satellite galaxies exhibits a non-monotonic trend with satellite luminosity. It is most pronounced for central galaxies with M {sub r} = -21, where the decreasing trend of clustering amplitude with satellite luminosity is reversed when satellites are fainter than central galaxies by more than 2 mag. A comparison with the satellite luminosity functions in the Milky Way (MW) and M31 shows that the MW/M31 system has about twice as many satellites as around a typical central galaxy of similar luminosity. The implications for theoretical models are briefly discussed.

  3. ACCURATE STELLAR KINEMATICS AT FAINT MAGNITUDES: APPLICATION TO THE BOOeTES I DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Koposov, Sergey E.; Gilmore, G.; Walker, M. G.; Belokurov, V.; Evans, N. Wyn; Okamoto, S.; Penarrubia, J.; Fellhauer, M.; Gieren, W.; Geisler, D.; Monaco, L.; Norris, J. E.; Wilkinson, M.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Zucker, D. B.

    2011-08-01

    We develop, implement, and characterize an enhanced data reduction approach which delivers precise, accurate, radial velocities from moderate resolution spectroscopy with the fiber-fed VLT/FLAMES+GIRAFFE facility. This facility, with appropriate care, delivers radial velocities adequate to resolve the intrinsic velocity dispersions of the very faint dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. Importantly, repeated measurements let us reliably calibrate our individual velocity errors (0.2 kms{sup -1} {<=} {delta}{sub V} {<=} 5 km s{sup -1}) and directly detect stars with variable radial velocities. We show, by application to the Booetes I dSph, that the intrinsic velocity dispersion of this system is significantly below 6.5 km s{sup -1} reported by previous studies. Our data favor a two-population model of Booetes I, consisting of a majority 'cold' stellar component, with velocity dispersion 2.4{sup +0.9}{sub -0.5} km s{sup -1}, and a minority 'hot' stellar component, with velocity dispersion {approx}9 km s{sup -1}, although we cannot completely rule out a single component distribution with velocity dispersion 4.6{sup 0.8}{sub -0.6} km s{sup -1}. We speculate that this complex velocity distribution actually reflects the distribution of velocity anisotropy in Booetes I, which is a measure of its formation processes.

  4. Far-infrared properties of submillimeter and optically faint radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnelli, B.; Lutz, D.; Berta, S.; Altieri, B.; Andreani, P.; Aussel, H.; Castañeda, H.; Cava, A.; Cepa, J.; Cimatti, A.; Daddi, E.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dominguez, H.; Elbaz, D.; Förster Schreiber, N.; Genzel, R.; Grazian, A.; Gruppioni, C.; Magdis, G.; Maiolino, R.; Nordon, R.; Pérez Fournon, I.; Pérez García, I.; Poglitsch, A.; Popesso, P.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Saintonge, A.; Santini, P.; Sanchez-Portal, M.; Shao, L.; Sturm, E.; Tacconi, L.; Valtchanov, I.; Wieprecht, E.; Wiezorrek, E.

    2010-07-01

    We use deep observations obtained with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) onboard the Herschel Space Observatory to study the far-infrared (FIR) properties of submillimeter and optically faint radio galaxies (SMGs and OFRGs). From literature we compiled a sample of 35 securely identified SMGs and nine OFRGs located in the GOODS-N and the A2218 fields. This sample is cross-matched with our PACS 100 μm and 160 μm multi-wavelength catalogs based on sources-extraction using prior detections at 24 μm. About half of the galaxies in our sample are detected in at least the PACS 160 μm bandpass. The dust temperatures and the infrared luminosities of our galaxies are derived by fitting their PACS and SCUBA 850 μm (only the upper limits for the OFRGs) flux densities with a single modified (β = 1.5) black body function. The median dust temperature of our SMG sample is Tdust = 36±8 K while for our OFRG sample it is Tdust = 47±3 K. For both samples, median dust temperatures derived from Herschel data agree well with previous estimates. In particular, Chapman et al. (2005, ApJ, 622, 772) found a dust temperature of Tdust = 36±7 K for a large sample of SMGs assuming the validity of the FIR/radio correlation (i.e., q= log10(LFIR[W]/L1.4 GHz[W Hz-1] /3.75×1012)). The agreement between our studies confirms that the local FIR/radio correlation effectively holds at high redshift even though we find < q > = 2.17±0.19, a slightly lower value than that observed in local systems. The median infrared luminosities of SMGs and OFRGs are 4.6×1012 L⊙ and 2.6×1012 L⊙, respectively. We note that for both samples the infrared luminosity estimates from the radio part of the spectral energy distribution (SED) are accurate, while estimates from the mid-IR are considerably (~×3) more uncertain. Our observations confirm the remarkably high luminosities of SMGs and thus imply median star-formation rates of 960 M⊙ yr-1 for SMGs with S(850 μm)>5 mJy and 460 M⊙ yr

  5. Detailed Chemical Abundances in the r-process-rich Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy Reticulum 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roederer, Ian U.; Mateo, Mario; Bailey, John I., III; Song, Yingyi; Bell, Eric F.; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Loebman, Sarah; Nidever, David L.; Olszewski, Edward W.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian B.; Valluri, Monica; Walker, Matthew G.

    2016-03-01

    The ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxy Reticulum 2 (Ret 2) was recently discovered in images obtained by the Dark Energy Survey. We have observed the four brightest red giants in Ret 2 at high spectral resolution using the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System. We present detailed abundances for as many as 20 elements per star, including 12 elements heavier than the Fe group. We confirm previous detection of high levels of r-process material in Ret 2 (mean [Eu/Fe] = +1.69 ± 0.05) found in three of these stars (mean [Fe/H] = -2.88 ± 0.10). The abundances closely match the r-process pattern found in the well-studied metal-poor halo star CS 22892-052. Such r-process-enhanced stars have not been found in any other UFD galaxy, though their existence has been predicted by at least one model. The fourth star in Ret 2 ([Fe/H] = -3.42 ± 0.20) contains only trace amounts of Sr ([Sr/Fe] = -1.73 ± 0.43) and no detectable heavier elements. One r-process enhanced star is also enhanced in C (natal [C/Fe] ≈ +1.1). This is only the third such star known, which suggests that the nucleosynthesis sites leading to C and r-process enhancements are decoupled. The r-process-deficient star is enhanced in Mg ([Mg/Fe] = +0.81 ± 0.14), and the other three stars show normal levels of α-enhancement (mean [Mg/Fe] = +0.34 ± 0.03). The abundances of other α and Fe-group elements closely resemble those in UFD galaxies and metal-poor halo stars, suggesting that the nucleosynthesis that led to the large r-process enhancements either produced no light elements or produced light-element abundance signatures indistinguishable from normal supernovae. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  6. VARIABLE STARS IN THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY URSA MAJOR I

    SciTech Connect

    Garofalo, Alessia; Moretti, Maria Ida; Cusano, Felice; Clementini, Gisella; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Dall'Ora, Massimo; Coppola, Giuseppina; Musella, Ilaria; Marconi, Marcella E-mail: fcusano@na.astro.it E-mail: ripepi@na.astro.it E-mail: imoretti@na.astro.it E-mail: ilaria@na.astro.it

    2013-04-10

    We have performed the first study of the variable star population of Ursa Major I (UMa I), an ultra-faint dwarf satellite recently discovered around the Milky Way (MW) by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Combining time series observations in the B and V bands from four different telescopes, we have identified seven RR Lyrae stars in UMa I, of which five are fundamental-mode (RRab) and two are first-overtone pulsators (RRc). Our V, B - V color-magnitude diagram of UMa I reaches V {approx} 23 mag (at a signal-to-noise ratio of {approx}6) and shows features typical of a single old stellar population. The mean pulsation period of the RRab stars (P{sub ab}) = 0.628, {sigma} = 0.071 days (or (P{sub ab}) = 0.599, {sigma} = 0.032 days, if V4, the longest period and brightest variable, is discarded) and the position on the period-amplitude diagram suggest an Oosterhoff-intermediate classification for the galaxy. The RR Lyrae stars trace the galaxy horizontal branch (HB) at an average apparent magnitude of (V(RR)) = 20.43 {+-} 0.02 mag (average on six stars and discarding V4), giving in turn a distance modulus for UMa I of (m - M){sub 0} = 19.94 {+-} 0.13 mag, distance d = 97.3{sup +6.0}{sub -5.7} kpc, in the scale where the distance modulus of the Large Magellanic Cloud is 18.5 {+-} 0.1 mag. Isodensity contours of UMa I red giants and HB stars (including the RR Lyrae stars identified in this study) show that the galaxy has an S-shaped structure, which is likely caused by the tidal interaction with the MW. Photometric metallicities were derived for six of the UMa I RR Lyrae stars from the parameters of the Fourier decomposition of the V-band light curves, leading to an average metal abundance of [Fe/H] = -2.29 dex ({sigma} = 0.06 dex, average on six stars) on the Carretta et al. metallicity scale.

  7. Star formation rate and extinction in faint z ∼ 4 Lyman break galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    To, Chun-Hao; Wang, Wei-Hao; Owen, Frazer N.

    2014-09-10

    We present a statistical detection of 1.5 GHz radio continuum emission from a sample of faint z ∼ 4 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). To constrain their extinction and intrinsic star formation rate (SFR), we combine the latest ultradeep Very Large Array 1.5 GHz radio image and the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) optical images in the GOODS-N. We select a large sample of 1771 z ∼ 4 LBGs from the ACS catalog using B {sub F435W}-dropout color criteria. Our LBG samples have I {sub F775W} ∼ 25-28 (AB), ∼0-3 mag fainter than M{sub UV}{sup ⋆} at z ∼ 4. In our stacked radio images, we find the LBGs to be point-like under our 2'' angular resolution. We measure their mean 1.5 GHz flux by stacking the measurements on the individual objects. We achieve a statistical detection of S {sub 1.5} {sub GHz} = 0.210 ± 0.075 μJy at ∼3σ for the first time on such a faint LBG population at z ∼ 4. The measurement takes into account the effects of source size and blending of multiple objects. The detection is visually confirmed by stacking the radio images of the LBGs, and the uncertainty is quantified with Monte Carlo simulations on the radio image. The stacked radio flux corresponds to an obscured SFR of 16.0 ± 5.7 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, and implies a rest-frame UV extinction correction factor of 3.8. This extinction correction is in excellent agreement with that derived from the observed UV continuum spectral slope, using the local calibration of Meurer et al. This result supports the use of the local calibration on high-redshift LBGs to derive the extinction correction and SFR, and also disfavors a steep reddening curve such as that of the Small Magellanic Cloud.

  8. On the nature of faint low surface brightness galaxies in the Coma cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, C.; Pelló, R.; Ulmer, M. P.; Cuillandre, J. C.; Durret, F.; Mazure, A.; Picat, J. P.; Scheidegger, R.

    2009-02-01

    Context: This project is the continuation of our study of faint Low Surface Brightness Galaxies (fLSBs) in one of the densest nearby (z = 0.023) galaxy regions known, the Coma cluster. Aims: Our goal is to improve our understanding of the nature of these objects by comparing the broad band spectral energy distribution with population synthesis models, in order to infer ages, dust extinction and spectral characteristics. Methods: The data were obtained with the MEGACAM and CFH12K cameras at the CFHT. We used the resulting photometry in 5 broad band filters (u*, B, V, R, and I) that included new u*-band data to fit spectral models. With these spectral fits we inferred a cluster membership criterium, as well as the ages, dust extinctions, and photometric types of these fLSBs. Results: We show that about half of the Coma cluster fLSBs have a spectral energy distribution well represented in our template library (best fit fLSBs, BF) while the other half present a flux deficit at ultraviolet wavelengths (moderately good fit fLSBs, MGF). Among the BF fLSBs, ~80% are probably part of the Coma cluster based on their spectral energy distribution. BF fLSBs are relatively young (younger than 2.3 Gyr for 90% of the sample) non-starburst objects. The later their type, the younger the fLSBs are. A significant part of the BF fLSBs are quite dusty objects (1/3 have AV greater than 1.5). BF fLSBs are low stellar mass objects (the later their type the less massive they are), with stellar masses comparable to globular clusters for the faintest ones. Their characteristics are partly correlated with infall directions, confirming the disruptive origin for at least part of them. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institute National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of

  9. SMA observations on faint submillimeter galaxies with S {sub 850} < 2 mJy: Ultra dusty low-luminosity galaxies at high redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2014-07-01

    We obtained Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of eight faint (intrinsic 850 μm fluxes < 2 mJy) submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) discovered in SCUBA images of the massive lensing cluster fields A370, A2390, and A1689 and detected five. In total, we obtain five SMA detections, all of which have de-lensed fluxes <1 mJy with estimated total infrared luminosities 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}, comparable to luminous infrared galaxies and normal star-forming galaxies. Based on the latest number counts, these galaxies contribute ∼70% of the 850 μm extragalactic background light and represent the dominant star-forming galaxy population in the dusty universe. However, only 40{sub −16}{sup +30}% of our faint SMGs would be detected in deep optical or near-infrared surveys, which suggests many of these sources are at high redshifts (z ≳ 3) or extremely dusty, and they are not included in current star formation history estimates.

  10. Extremely faint, diffuse satellite systems in the M31 halo: exceptional star clusters or tiny dwarf galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Dougal

    2013-10-01

    Recent years have seen the discovery of a variety of low surface brightness, diffuse stellar systems in the Local Group. Of particular prominence are the ultra-faint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way and the extended globular clusters seen in M31, M33, and NGC 6822. As part of the major Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey {PAndAS} we have discovered several very faint and diffuse stellar satellites in the M31 halo. In Cycle 19 we obtained ACS/WFC imaging for one of these, PAndAS-48, which has revealed it to be a puzzling and unusual object. On the size-luminosity plane it falls between the extended clusters and ultra-faint dwarfs; however, its characteristics do not allow us to unambiguously class it as either type of system. If PAndAS-48 is an extended cluster then it is the most elliptical, isolated, metal-poor, and lowest-luminosity example yet uncovered. Conversely, while its properties are generally consistent with those observed for the faint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way, it would be a factor 2-3 smaller in spatial extent than its Galactic counterparts at comparable luminosity. Here we propose deep resolved imaging of the remaining five similar objects in our sample, with the aim of probing this hitherto poorly-explored region of parameter space in greater detail. If we are able to confirm any of these objects as faint dwarfs, they will provide the first insight into the behaviour of this class of object in a galaxy other than the Milky Way.

  11. FAR-INFRARED AND MOLECULAR CO EMISSION FROM THE HOST GALAXIES OF FAINT QUASARS AT z {approx} 6

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ran; Wagg, Jeff; Carilli, Chris L.; Neri, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Omont, Alain; Riechers, Dominik A.; Bertoldi, Frank; Menten, Karl M.; Cox, Pierre; Strauss, Michael A.; Fan Xiaohui; Jiang Linhua

    2011-10-15

    We present new millimeter and radio observations of nine z {approx} 6 quasars discovered in deep optical and near-infrared surveys. We observed the 250 GHz continuum in eight of the nine objects and detected three of them. New 1.4 GHz radio continuum data have been obtained for four sources, and one has been detected. We searched for molecular CO (6-5) line emission in the three 250 GHz detections and detected two of them. Combined with previous millimeter and radio observations, we study the far-infrared (FIR) and radio emission and quasar-host galaxy evolution with a sample of 18 z {approx} 6 quasars that are faint at UV and optical wavelengths (rest-frame 1450 A magnitudes of m{sub 1450} {>=} 20.2). The average FIR-to-active galactic nucleus (AGN) UV luminosity ratio of this faint quasar sample is about two times higher than that of the bright quasars at z {approx} 6 (m{sub 1450} < 20.2). A fit to the average FIR and AGN bolometric luminosities of both the UV/optically faint and bright z {approx} 6 quasars, and the average luminosities of samples of submillimeter/millimeter-observed quasars at z {approx} 2-5, yields a relationship of L{sub FIR} {approx} L{sub bol}{sup 0.62}. Five of the 18 faint z {approx} 6 quasars have been detected at 250 GHz. These 250 GHz detections, as well as most of the millimeter-detected optically bright z {approx} 6 quasars, follow a shallower trend of L{sub FIR} {approx} L{sub bol}{sup 0.45} defined by the starburst-AGN systems in local and high-z universe. The millimeter continuum detections in the five objects and molecular CO detections in three of them reveal a few x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun} of FIR-emitting warm dust and 10{sup 10} M{sub sun} of molecular gas in the quasar host galaxies. All these results argue for massive star formation in the quasar host galaxies, with estimated star formation rates of a few hundred M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. Additionally, the higher FIR-to-AGN luminosity ratio found in these 250 GHz detected faint

  12. The search for faint radio supernova remnants in the outer Galaxy: five new discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbrandt, Stephanie; Foster, Tyler J.; Kothes, Roland; Geisbüsch, Jörn; Tung, Albert

    2014-06-01

    Context. High resolution and sensitivity large-scale radio surveys of the Milky Way are critical in the discovery of very low surface brightness supernova remnants (SNRs), which may constitute a significant portion of the Galactic SNRs still unaccounted for (ostensibly the "missing SNR problem"). Aims: The overall purpose here is to present the results of a systematic, deep data-mining of the Canadian Galactic plane Survey (CGPS) for faint, extended non-thermal and polarized emission structures that are likely the shells of uncatalogued SNRs. Methods: We examine 5 × 5 degree mosaics from the entire 1420 MHz continuum and polarization dataset of the CGPS after removing unresolved "point" sources and subsequently smoothing them. Newly revealed extended emission objects are compared to similarly prepared CGPS 408 MHz continuum mosaics, as well as to source-removed mosaics from various existing radio surveys at 4.8 GHz, 2.7 GHz, and 327 MHz, to identify candidates with non-thermal emission characteristics. We integrate flux densities at each frequency to characterise the radio spectra behaviour of these candidates. We further look for mid- and high-frequency (1420 MHz, 4.8 GHz) ordered polarized emission from the limb brightened "shell"-like continuum features that the candidates sport. Finally, we use IR and optical maps to provide additional backing evidence. Results: Here we present evidence that five new objects, identified as filling all or some of the criteria above, are strong candidates for new SNRs. These five are designated by their Galactic coordinate names G108.5+11.0, G128.5+2.6, G149.5+3.2, G150.8+3.8, and G160.1-1.1. The radio spectrum of each is presented, highlighting their steepness, which is characteristic of synchrotron radiation. CGPS 1420 MHz polarization data and 4.8 GHz polarization data also provide evidence that these objects are newly discovered SNRs. These discoveries represent a significant increase in the number of SNRs known in the outer

  13. Properties of galaxies at the faint end of the Hα luminosity function at z ~ 0.62

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Guijarro, Carlos; Gallego, Jesús; Villar, Víctor; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Lucía; Clément, Benjamin; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2016-07-01

    Context. Studies measuring the star formation rate density, luminosity function, and properties of star-forming galaxies are numerous. However, it exists a gap at 0.5 < z < 0.8 in Hα-based studies. Aims: Our main goal is to study the properties of a sample of faint Hα emitters at z ~ 0.62. We focus on their contribution to the faint end of the luminosity function and derived star formation rate density, characterising their morphologies and basic photometric and spectroscopic properties. Methods: We use a narrow-band technique in the near-infrared, with a filter centred at 1.06 μm. The data come from ultra-deep VLT/HAWK-I observations in the GOODS-S field with a total of 31.9 h in the narrow-band filter. In addition to our survey, we mainly make use of ancillary data coming from the CANDELS and Rainbow Cosmological Surveys Database, from the 3D-HST for comparison, and also spectra from the literature. We perform a visual classification of the sample and study their morphologies from structural parameters available in CANDELS. In order to obtain the luminosity function, we apply a traditional V/Vmax method and perform individual extinction corrections for each object to accurately trace the shape of the function. Results: Our 28 Hα-selected sample of faint star-forming galaxies reveals a robust faint-end slope of the luminosity function α = - 1.46-0.08+0.16 . The derived star formation rate density at z ~ 0.62 is ρSFR = 0.036-0.008+0.012 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3 . The sample is mainly composed of disks, but an important contribution of compact galaxies with Sérsic indexes n ~ 2 display the highest specific star formation rates. Conclusions: The luminosity function at z ~ 0.62 from our ultra-deep data points towards a steeper α when an individual extinction correction for each object is applied. Compact galaxies are low-mass, low-luminosity, and starburst-dominated objects with a light profile in an intermediate stage from early to late types. Based on observations

  14. Probing the Mass Distribution and Stellar Populations of M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Johnny; Martini, P.; Thompson, T. A.

    2012-01-01

    M82 is often considered the archetypical starburst galaxy because of its spectacular starbust-driven superwind. Its close proximity of 3.6 Mpc and nearly edge-on geometry make it a unique laboratory for studying the physics of rapid star formation and violent galactic winds. In addition, there is evidence that it has been tidally-truncated by its interaction with M81 and therefore has essentially no dark matter halo. The mass distribution of this galaxy is needed to estimate the power of its superwind, as well as determine if a dark matter halo is still present. Numerous studies have used stellar and gas dynamics to estimate the mass distribution, yet the substantial dust attenuation has been a significant challenge. We have measured the stellar kinematics in the near-infrared K-band with the LUCI-1 spectrograph at the Large Binocular Telescope. We used the '2CO stellar absorption bandhead at 2.29µm to measure the stellar rotation curve out to ˜4kpc, and our results confirm that the dark matter halo is still present. This is in stark contrast with the nearly Keplerian gas dynamics measured with HI and CO emission from the interstellar medium. We estimate M82's dynamical mass to be ˜1010 M⊙. We have also measured the equivalent width of the 12CO bandhead to provide new constraints on the spatial extent of the red supergiant population. The variation in the CO equivalent width with radius clearly shows that supergiants dominate the light within 0.5kpc radius. The superwind is likely launched from this region, where we estimate the enclosed mass is 2×109 M⊙.

  15. Discovery of an Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy in the Intracluster Field of the Virgo Center: A Fossil of the First Galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, In Sung; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2014-11-01

    Ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs) are newcomers among galaxies, and are the faintest galaxies in the observed universe. To date, they have only been found around the Milky Way Galaxy and M31 in the Local Group. We present the discovery of a UFD in the intracluster field in the core of the Virgo cluster (Virgo UFD1), which is far from any massive galaxies. The color-magnitude diagram of the resolved stars in this galaxy shows a narrow red giant branch, similar to those of metal-poor globular clusters in the Milky Way. We estimate its distance by comparing the red giant branch with isochrones, and we obtain a value 16.4 ± 0.4 Mpc. This shows that it is indeed a member of the Virgo cluster. From the color of the red giants we estimate its mean metallicity to be very low, [Fe/H] =-2.4 ± 0.4. Its absolute V-band magnitude and effective radius are derived to be MV = -6.5 ± 0.2 and r eff = 81 ± 7 pc, much fainter and smaller than the classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Its central surface brightness is estimated to be as low as μ V, 0 = 26.37 ± 0.05 mag arcsec-2. Its properties are similar to those of the Local Group analogs. No evidence of tidal features are found in this galaxy. Considering its narrow red giant branch with no asymptotic giant branch stars, low metallicity, and location, it may be a fossil remnant of the first galaxies.

  16. DISCOVERY OF AN ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXY IN THE INTRACLUSTER FIELD OF THE VIRGO CENTER: A FOSSIL OF THE FIRST GALAXIES?

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, In Sung; Lee, Myung Gyoon E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-11-01

    Ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs) are newcomers among galaxies, and are the faintest galaxies in the observed universe. To date, they have only been found around the Milky Way Galaxy and M31 in the Local Group. We present the discovery of a UFD in the intracluster field in the core of the Virgo cluster (Virgo UFD1), which is far from any massive galaxies. The color-magnitude diagram of the resolved stars in this galaxy shows a narrow red giant branch, similar to those of metal-poor globular clusters in the Milky Way. We estimate its distance by comparing the red giant branch with isochrones, and we obtain a value 16.4 ± 0.4 Mpc. This shows that it is indeed a member of the Virgo cluster. From the color of the red giants we estimate its mean metallicity to be very low, [Fe/H] =–2.4 ± 0.4. Its absolute V-band magnitude and effective radius are derived to be M{sub V} = –6.5 ± 0.2 and r {sub eff} = 81 ± 7 pc, much fainter and smaller than the classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Its central surface brightness is estimated to be as low as μ {sub V,} {sub 0} = 26.37 ± 0.05 mag arcsec{sup –2}. Its properties are similar to those of the Local Group analogs. No evidence of tidal features are found in this galaxy. Considering its narrow red giant branch with no asymptotic giant branch stars, low metallicity, and location, it may be a fossil remnant of the first galaxies.

  17. Detections of Faint Lyα Emitters at z = 5.7: Galaxy Building Blocks and Engines of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressler, Alan; Martin, Crystal L.; Henry, Alaina; Sawicki, Marcin; McCarthy, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    We report results of an unprecedentedly deep, blind search for Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 5.7 using the Inamori-Magellan Areal Camera & Spectrograph (IMACS), with the goal of identifying missing sources of reionization that could also be basic building blocks for today's L* galaxies. We describe how improvements in wide field imaging with the Baade telescope, upgrades to IMACS, and the accumulation of ~20 hr of integration per field in excellent seeing led to the detection of single-emission-line sources as faint as F ≈ 2 × 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2, a sensitivity five times deeper than our first search. A reasonable correction for foreground interlopers implies a steep rise of approximately an order of magnitude in source density for a factor of four drop in flux, from F = 10-17.0 erg s-1 cm-2 to F = 10-17.6 (2.5 × 10-18) erg s-1 cm-2. At this flux the putative LAEs have reached a surface density of ~1 arcmin-2—a comoving volume density of 4 × 10-3 Mpc-3, several times the density of L* galaxies today. Such a population of faint LAEs would account for a significant fraction of the critical flux density required to complete reionization at this epoch, and would be good candidates for building blocks of stellar mass ~108-109 M sun for the young galaxies of this epoch. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  18. Diffuse light in z˜0.25 galaxy clusters: constraining tidal damage and the faint end of the luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibetti, Stefano; White, Simon D. M.

    The starlight coming from the intergalactic space in galaxy clusters and groups witnesses the violent tidal interactions that galaxies experience in these dense environments. Such interactions may be (at least partly) responsible for the transformation of normal star-forming galaxies into passive dwarf ellipticals (dEs).In this contribution we present the first systematic study of the IntraCluster Light (ICL) for a statistically representative sample (Zibetti et al. 2005), which comprises 683 clusters selected between z=0.2 and 0.3 from {˜}1500 °2 in the SDSS. Their ICL is studied by stacking the images in the g-, r-, and i-band after masking out all galaxies and polluting sources. In this way a very uniform background illumination is obtained, that allows us to measure surface brightnesses as faint as 31 mag arcsec-2 and to trace the ICL out to 700 kpc from the central galaxy. We find that the local fraction of light contributed by intracluster stars rapidly decreases as a function of the clustercentric distance, from ˜40% at 100 kpc to ˜5% at 500 kpc. By comparing the distribution and colours of the ICL and of the clusters galaxies, we find indication that the main source of ICL are the stars stripped from galaxies that plunge deeply into the cluster potential well along radial orbits. Thus, if dEs are the remnants of these stripped progenitors we should expect similar radial orbital anisotropies and correlations between the dE luminosity function and the amount of ICL in different clusters.The diffuse emission we measure is contaminated by faint unresolved galaxies: this makes our flux estimate depend to some extent on the assumed luminosity function, but, on the other hand, allows us to constrain the number of faint galaxies. Our present results disfavour steep (α) faint-end powerlaw slopes.

  19. THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS: HST SPECTROSCOPY OF FAINT GALAXIES LENSED BY THE FRONTIER FIELDS CLUSTER MACSJ0717.5+3745

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, K. B.; Treu, T.; Wang, X.; Jones, T. A.; Mason, C.; Brammer, G. B.; Stiavelli, M.; Bradač, M.; Hoag, A.; Dijkstra, M.; Dressler, A.; Fontana, A.; Pentericci, L.; Gavazzi, R.; Henry, A. L.; Kelly, P. L.; Malkan, M. A.; Poggianti, B.; Trenti, M.; Von der Linden, A.; and others

    2014-02-20

    The Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) is a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Large Program, which will obtain 140 orbits of grism spectroscopy of the core and infall regions of 10 galaxy clusters, selected to be among the very best cosmic telescopes. Extensive HST imaging is available from many sources including the CLASH and Frontier Fields programs. We introduce the survey by analyzing spectra of faint multiply-imaged galaxies and z ≳ 6 galaxy candidates obtained from the first 7 orbits out of 14 targeting the core of the Frontier Fields cluster MACSJ0717.5+3745. Using the G102 and G141 grisms to cover the wavelength range 0.8-1.7 μm, we confirm four strongly lensed systems by detecting emission lines in each of the images. For the 9 z ≳ 6 galaxy candidates clear from contamination, we do not detect any emission lines down to a 7 orbit 1σ noise level of ∼5 × 10{sup –18} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}. Taking lensing magnification into account, our flux sensitivity reaches ∼0.2-5 × 10{sup –18} erg s{sup –1}cm{sup –2}. These limits over an uninterrupted wavelength range rule out the possibility that the high-z galaxy candidates are instead strong line emitters at lower redshift. These results show that by means of careful modeling of the background—and with the assistance of lensing magnification—interesting flux limits can be reached for large numbers of objects, avoiding pre-selection and the wavelength restrictions inherent to ground-based multi-slit spectroscopy. These observations confirm the power of slitless HST spectroscopy even in fields as crowded as a cluster core.

  20. KECK SPECTROSCOPY OF FAINT 3>z>7 LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES: A HIGH FRACTION OF LINE EMITTERS AT REDSHIFT SIX

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, Daniel P.; Ellis, Richard S.; Ouchi, Masami

    2011-02-10

    As Ly{alpha} photons are scattered by neutral hydrogen, a change with redshift in the Ly{alpha} equivalent width (EW) distribution of distant galaxies offers a promising probe of the degree of ionization in the intergalactic medium and hence when cosmic reionization ended. This simple test is complicated by the fact that Ly{alpha} emission can also be affected by variations in the kinematics and dust content of the host galaxies. In the first paper in this series, we demonstrated both a luminosity- and redshift-dependent trend in the fraction of Ly{alpha} emitters seen within color-selected 'Lyman break' galaxies (LBGs) over the range 3 < z < 6; lower luminosity galaxies and those at higher redshift show an increased likelihood of strong emission. Here, we present the results from 12.5 hr exposures with the Keck DEIMOS spectrograph focused primarily on LBGs at z {approx_equal} 6 which enable us to confirm the redshift dependence of line emission more robustly and to higher redshift than was hitherto possible. We find that 54% {+-} 11% of faint z {approx_equal} 6 LBGs show strong (W{sub Ly{alpha},0}>25 A) emission, an increase of 55% from a sample of similarly luminous z {approx_equal} 4 galaxies. With a total sample of 74 z {approx_equal} 6 LBGs, we determine the luminosity-dependent Ly{alpha} EW distribution. Assuming continuity in these trends to the new population of z {approx_equal} 7 sources located with the Hubble WFC3/IR camera, we predict that unless the neutral fraction rises in the intervening 200 Myr, the success rate for spectroscopic confirmation using Ly{alpha} emission should be high.

  1. TURNING THE TIDES ON THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES: COMA BERENICES AND URSA MAJOR II

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, Ricardo R.; Geha, Maria; Willman, Beth E-mail: marla.geha@yale.ed

    2010-07-15

    We present deep CFHT/MegaCam photometry of the ultra-faint Milky Way satellite galaxies: Coma Berenices (ComBer) and Ursa Major II (UMa II). These data extend to r {approx} 25, corresponding to 3 mag below the main-sequence turn-offs in these galaxies. We robustly calculate a total luminosity of M{sub V} = -3.8 {+-} 0.6 for ComBer and M{sub V} = -3.9 {+-} 0.5 for UMa II, in agreement with previous results and confirming that these galaxies are among the faintest of the known dwarf satellites of the Milky Way. ComBer shows a fairly regular morphology with no signs of active tidal stripping down to a surface brightness limit of 32.4 mag arcsec{sup -2}. Using a maximum likelihood analysis, we calculate the half-light radius of ComBer to be r{sub half} = 74 {+-} 4 pc (5.8 {+-} 0.'3) and its ellipticity {epsilon} = 0.36 {+-} 0.04. In contrast, UMa II shows signs of ongoing disruption. We map its morphology down to {mu}{sub V} = 32.6 mag arcsec{sup -2} and found that UMa II is larger than previously determined, extending at least {approx}600 pc (1.{sup 0}1 on the sky) and it is also quite elongated with an overall ellipticity of {epsilon} = 0.50 {+-} 0.2. However, our estimate for the half-light radius, 123 {+-} 3 pc (14.1 {+-} 0.'3) is similar to previous results. We discuss the implications of these findings in the context of potential indirect dark matter detections and galaxy formation. We conclude that while ComBer appears to be a stable dwarf galaxy, UMa II shows signs of ongoing tidal interaction.

  2. Unveiling a Rich System of Faint Dwarf Galaxies in the Next Generation Fornax Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Roberto P.; Eigenthaler, Paul; Puzia, Thomas H.; Taylor, Matthew A.; Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Alamo-Martínez, Karla; Ribbeck, Karen X.; Ángel, Simón; Capaccioli, Massimo; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Galaz, Gaspar; Hempel, Maren; Hilker, Michael; Jordán, Andrés; Lançon, Ariane; Mieske, Steffen; Paolillo, Maurizio; Richtler, Tom; Sánchez-Janssen, Ruben; Zhang, Hongxin

    2015-11-01

    We report the discovery of 158 previously undetected dwarf galaxies in the Fornax cluster central regions using a deep coadded u-, g-, and i-band image obtained with the Dark Energy Camera wide-field camera mounted on the 4-m Blanco telescope at the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory as part of the Next Generation Fornax Survey (NGFS). The new dwarf galaxies have quasi-exponential light profiles, effective radii 0.1 < re < 2.8 kpc, and average effective surface brightness values 22.0 < μi < 28.0 mag arcsec-2. We confirm the existence of ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) in the Fornax core regions that resemble counterparts recently discovered in the Virgo and Coma galaxy clusters. We also find extremely low surface brightness NGFS dwarfs, which are several magnitudes fainter than the classical UDGs. The faintest dwarf candidate in our NGFS sample has an absolute magnitude of Mi = -8.0 mag. The nucleation fraction of the NGFS dwarf galaxy sample appears to decrease as a function of their total luminosity, reaching from a nucleation fraction of >75% at luminosities brighter than Mi ≃ -15.0 mag to 0% at luminosities fainter than Mi ≃ -10.0 mag. The two-point correlation function analysis of the NGFS dwarf sample shows an excess on length scales below ˜100 kpc, pointing to the clustering of dwarf galaxies in the Fornax cluster core.

  3. Dust Extinction toward Supernova 2014J in M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian; Jiang, B. W.; Li, Aigen; Li, Jun; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2015-08-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are powerful cosmological “standardizable candles” and the most precise distance indicators. However, the ultimate limiting factor in their use for precision cosmology rests on our ability to correct for the dust extinction toward them. SN 2014J in the starburst galaxy M82, the closest detected SN Ia in three decades, provides unparalleled opportunities to study the dust extinction. In order to derive the extinction as a function of wavelength, we model the color excesses toward SN 2014J observationally derived over a wide wavelength range in terms of dust models consisting of a mixture of silicate and graphite. The resulting extinction laws steeply rise toward the far ultraviolet, even steeper than that of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We infer a visual extinction of AV≈1.9 mag, a reddening of E(B-V)≈1.1 mag, and a total-to-selective extinction ratio of RV≈1.7, consistent with that previously derived from photometric, spectroscopic and polarimetric observations. The size distributions of the dust in the interstellar medium toward SN 2014J are skewed toward substantially smaller grains than that of the Milky Way and the SMC.

  4. The nature of starburst activity in M 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster Schreiber, Natascha M.

    2000-07-01

    Results of near-infrared integral field spectroscopy of the starburst galaxy M 82, obtained with the MPE (Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching, Germany) 3D instrument, are presented. These data provide the spatial distribution of key diagnostics (e.g. HI and HeI nebular emission lines, atomic and molecular stellar absorption features) for the composition of the populations of hot massive stars and cool evolved stars, on scales of 20-25 pc . Together with mid-infrared spectroscopy from the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) on board the ISO satellite ( ISO is an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) with the participation of ISAS and NASA. SWS is a joint project of SRON and MPE) and data from the literature, the 3D data are analyzed with a starburst model to constrain quantitatively the cutoffs of the initial mass function, and the spatial and chronological evolution of starburst activity.

  5. Probing the Peak Epoch of Cosmic Star Formation (1Faint Star-forming Galaxies Behind the Lensing Clusters: UV Luminosity Function and the Dust Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Anahita; Siana, Brian D.; Richard, Johan; Rafelski, Marc; Jauzac, Mathilde; Limousin, Marceau; Stark, Daniel; Teplitz, Harry I.

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining a complete census of cosmic star formation requires an understanding of faint star-forming galaxies that are far below the detection limits of current surveys. To search for the faint galaxies, we use the power of strong gravitational lensing from foreground galaxy clusters to boost the detection limits of HST to much fainter luminosities. Using the WFC3/UVIS on board the HST, we obtain deep UV images of 4 lensing clusters with existing deep optical and near-infrared data (three from Frontier Fields survey). Building multiband photometric catalogs and applying a photometric redshift selection, we uncover a large population of dwarf galaxies (-18.5galaxies keeps increasing steeply toward very faint magnitudes (MUV=-12.5). As an important implication of a steep faint-end slope LF, we show that the faint galaxies (-18.550%) at these redshifts. We use this unique sample to investigate further the various properties of dwarf galaxies as it is claimed to deviate from the trends seen for the more massive galaxies. Recent hydro-dynamical simulations and observations of local dwarfs show that these galaxies have episodic bursts of star formation on short time scales (< 10 Myr). We find that the bursty star formation histories (SFHs) cause a large intrinsic scatter in UV colors (β) at MUV > -16, comparing a sample of low mass galaxies from simulations with bursty SFHs with our comprehensive measurements of the observed β values. As this scatter can also be due to the dust extinction, we distinguish these two effects by measuring the dust attenuation using Balmer decrement (Hα/Hβ) ratios from our MOSFIRE/Keck spectroscopy.

  6. Probing Bursty Star Formation in Faint Galaxies with the Hubble Frontier Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Steven; Livermore, Rachael; Song, Mimi

    2015-08-01

    The Hubble Frontier Fields have magnified our view into the formation and evolution of galaxies in the first billion years after the Big Bang. One key issue these data can probe is how galaxies grow their stellar masses. Do they grow smoothly with time, dominated by steady gas inflow? Or is their growth more stochastic, dominated by starburst triggering events such as mergers or clumpy gas inflows? A bevy of observational studies have shown that the star formation rates (SFRs) of distant galaxies increase with time, while theoretical studies, which broadly agree on long timescales, show that the SFRs may vary significantly on shorter timescales. We have compiled a sample of galaxies over a wide dynamic range in SFR by combining the HFF imaging with the CANDELS and HUDF datasets. By comparing the scatter in SFRs to SPH and semi-analytic models with known star formation histories, we directly measure the fraction of galaxies at a given epoch undergoing starbursts. This has a variety of implications on the distant universe, including reionization, as a significant burst fraction could both increase the number of ionizing photons being produced, as well as disturb the interstellar medium enough to allow these photons to escape.

  7. The log N-log S curve for 3CR radio galaxies and the problem of identifying faint radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbidge, G. R.; Narlikar, J. V.

    1976-01-01

    The log N-log S slope of optically identified galaxies in the 3CR catalog is analyzed for galaxies with flux levels greater than 10 Jy and located at galactic latitudes greater than 7 deg. For the 86 galaxies with known redshifts, the slope is found to be about 1.16; for all 119 galaxies, the slope is found to be about 1.50. If the 113 unidentified sources are included, the slope steepens to about 1.81. It is shown that this steepness is caused by the unidentified sources. Assuming that the slope is due to evolution at redshifts of 1 to 3 and that the unidentified sources are bright ellipticals, the mean redshifts and apparent brightnesses of these galaxies are calculated. The results indicate that it is impossible to observe the unidentified sources with existing ground-based telescopes, implying that it is presently impossible to establish directly that evolution is responsible for the steep log N-log S curve of the 3CR galaxies.

  8. The Lyα–LyC Connection: Evidence for an Enhanced Contribution of UV-faint Galaxies to Cosmic Deionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, Mark; Gronke, Max; Venkatesan, Aparna

    2016-09-01

    The escape of ionizing Lyman continuum (LyC) photons requires the existence of low-N H i sightlines, which also promote escape of Lyα. We use a suite of 2500 Lyα Monte-Carlo radiative transfer simulations through models of dusty, clumpy interstellar (“multiphase”) media from Gronke & Dijkstra, and compare the escape fractions of Lyα ({f}{{esc}}{{Ly}α }) and LyC radiation ({f}{{esc}}{{ion}}). We find that {f}{{esc}}{{ion}} and {f}{{esc}}{{Ly}α } are correlated: galaxies with a low {f}{{esc}}{{Ly}α } consistently have a low {f}{{esc}}{{ion}}, while galaxies with a high {f}{{esc}}{{Ly}α } exhibit a large dispersion in {f}{{esc}}{{ion}}. We argue that there is increasing observational evidence that Lyα escapes more easily from UV-faint galaxies. The correlation between {f}{{esc}}{{ion}} and {f}{{esc}}{{Ly}α } then implies that UV-faint galaxies contribute more to the ionizing background than implied by the faint-end slope of the UV luminosity function. In multiphase gases, the ionizing escape fraction is most strongly affected by the cloud covering factor, f cl, which implies that {f}{{esc}}{{ion}} is closely connected to the observed Lyα spectral line shape. Specifically, LyC-emitting galaxies typically having narrower, more symmetric line profiles. This prediction is qualitatively similar to that for “shell models.”

  9. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. II - The IRAS faint source survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Hacking, Perry B.; Conrow, T. P.; Rowan-Robinson, M.

    1990-01-01

    The new IRAS Faint Source Survey data base is used to confirm the conclusion of Hacking et al. (1987) that the 60 micron source counts fainter than about 0.5 Jy lie in excess of predictions based on nonevolving model populations. The existence of an anisotropy between the northern and southern Galactic caps discovered by Rowan-Robinson et al. (1986) and Needham and Rowan-Robinson (1988) is confirmed, and it is found to extend below their sensitivity limit to about 0.3 Jy in 60 micron flux density. The count anisotropy at f(60) greater than 0.3 can be interpreted reasonably as due to the Local Supercluster; however, no one structure accounting for the fainter anisotropy can be easily identified in either optical or far-IR two-dimensional sky distributions. The far-IR galaxy sky distributions are considerably smoother than distributions from the published optical galaxy catalogs. It is likely that structure of the large size discussed here have been discriminated against in earlier studies due to insufficient volume sampling.

  10. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. II. The IRAS faint source survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lonsdale, C.J.; Hacking, P.B.; Conrow, T.P.; Rowan-Robinson, M. Queen Mary College, London )

    1990-07-01

    The new IRAS Faint Source Survey data base is used to confirm the conclusion of Hacking et al. (1987) that the 60 micron source counts fainter than about 0.5 Jy lie in excess of predictions based on nonevolving model populations. The existence of an anisotropy between the northern and southern Galactic caps discovered by Rowan-Robinson et al. (1986) and Needham and Rowan-Robinson (1988) is confirmed, and it is found to extend below their sensitivity limit to about 0.3 Jy in 60 micron flux density. The count anisotropy at f(60) greater than 0.3 can be interpreted reasonably as due to the Local Supercluster; however, no one structure accounting for the fainter anisotropy can be easily identified in either optical or far-IR two-dimensional sky distributions. The far-IR galaxy sky distributions are considerably smoother than distributions from the published optical galaxy catalogs. It is likely that structure of the large size discussed here have been discriminated against in earlier studies due to insufficient volume sampling. 105 refs.

  11. Constraints on Photoionization Feedback from Number Counts of Ultra-faint High-redshift Galaxies in the Frontier Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, M.; Yue, B.; Ferrara, A.; Merlin, E.; Fontana, A.; Amorín, R.; Grazian, A.; Mármol-Queralto, E.; Michałowski, M. J.; Mortlock, A.; Paris, D.; Parsa, S.; Pilo, S.; Santini, P.

    2016-06-01

    We exploit a sample of ultra-faint high-redshift galaxies (demagnified Hubble Space Telescope, HST, H 160 magnitude > 30) in the Frontier Fields clusters A2744 and M0416 to constrain a theoretical model for the UV luminosity function in the presence of photoionization feedback. The objects have been selected on the basis of accurate photometric redshifts computed from multi-band photometry including seven HST bands and deep K s and IRAC observations. Magnification is computed on an object-by-object basis from all available lensing models of the two clusters. We take into account source detection completeness as a function of luminosity and size, magnification effects, and systematics in the lens modeling of the clusters under investigation. We find that our sample of high-z galaxies constrain the cutoff halo circular velocity below which star formation is suppressed by photoionization feedback to {v}c{{cut}}\\lt 50 km s‑1. This circular velocity corresponds to a halo mass of ≈5.6 × 109 M ⊙ and ≈2.3 × 109 M ⊙ at z = 5 and 10, respectively: higher-mass halos can thus sustain continuous star formation activity without being quenched by external ionizing flux. More stringent constraints are prevented by the uncertainty in the modeling of the cluster lens, as embodied by systematic differences among the lens models available.

  12. THE BIMODAL GALAXY STELLAR MASS FUNCTION IN THE COSMOS SURVEY TO z approx 1: A STEEP FAINT END AND A NEW GALAXY DICHOTOMY

    SciTech Connect

    Drory, N.; Bundy, K.; Leauthaud, A.; Scoville, N.; Capak, P.; Salvato, M.; Ilbert, O.; Kneib, J. P.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; McCracken, H. J.; Sanders, D. B.; Thompson, D.; Willott, C. J.

    2009-12-20

    We present a new analysis of stellar mass functions in the COSMOS field to fainter limits than has been previously probed at z <= 1. The increase in dynamic range reveals features in the shape of the stellar mass function that deviate from a single Schechter function. Neither the total nor the red (passive) or blue (star-forming) galaxy stellar mass functions can be well fitted with a single Schechter function once the mass completeness limit of the sample probes below approx3 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}. We observe a dip or plateau at masses approx10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, just below the traditional M*, and an upturn toward a steep faint-end slope of alpha approx -1.7 at lower mass at all redshifts <=1. This bimodal nature of the mass function is not solely a result of the blue/red dichotomy. Indeed, the blue mass function is by itself bimodal at z approx 1. This suggests a new dichotomy in galaxy formation that predates the appearance of the red sequence. We propose two interpretations for this bimodal distribution. If the gas fraction increases toward lower mass, galaxies with M{sub baryon} approx 10{sup 10} M{sub sun} would shift to lower stellar masses, creating the observed dip. This would indicate a change in star formation efficiency, perhaps linked to supernovae feedback becoming much more efficient below approx10{sup 10} M{sub sun}. Therefore, we investigate whether the dip is present in the baryonic (stars+gas) mass function. Alternatively, the dip could be created by an enhancement of the galaxy assembly rate at approx10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, a phenomenon that naturally arises if the baryon fraction peaks at M{sub halo} approx 10{sup 12} M{sub sun}. In this scenario, galaxies occupying the bump around M{sub *} would be identified with central galaxies and the second fainter component of the mass function having a steep faint-end slope with satellite galaxies. The low-mass end of the blue and total mass functions exhibit a steeper slope than has been detected in

  13. THE COSMIC EVOLUTION OF FAINT SATELLITE GALAXIES AS A TEST OF GALAXY FORMATION AND THE NATURE OF DARK MATTER

    SciTech Connect

    Nierenberg, A. M.; Treu, T.; Menci, N.; Lu, Y.; Wang, W.

    2013-08-01

    The standard cosmological model based on cold dark matter (CDM) predicts a large number of subhalos for each galaxy-size halo. Matching the subhalos to the observed properties of luminous satellites of galaxies in the local universe poses a significant challenge to our understanding of the astrophysics of galaxy formation. We show that the cosmic evolution and host mass dependence of the luminosity function of satellites provide a powerful new diagnostic to disentangle astrophysical effects from variations in the underlying dark matter mass function. We illustrate this by comparing recent observations of satellites between redshifts 0.1 < z < 0.8 based on Hubble Space Telescope images, with predictions from three different state-of-the-art semi-analytic models applied to CDM power spectra, with one model also applied to a warm dark matter (WDM) spectrum. We find that even though CDM models provide a reasonable fit to the local luminosity function of satellites around galaxies comparable to the Milky Way, they do not reproduce the data as well for different redshifts and host galaxy stellar masses, indicating that further improvements in the description of star formation are likely needed. The WDM model matches the observed mass dependence and redshift evolution of satellite galaxies more closely, indicating that a modification of the underlying power spectrum may offer an alternative solution to this tension. We conclude by presenting predictions for the color distribution of satellite galaxies to demonstrate how future observations will be able to further distinguish between these models and to help constrain baryonic and non-baryonic physics.

  14. Do the compact radio sources in NGC 253 and M82 fade over time?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulvestad, James S.; Antonucci, Robert R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253 has been observed at a third epoch at 6 cm, and a second epoch at 3.6 cm, using the highest resolution configuration of the Very Large Array (VLA). Over a total time span of 4 yr between 1987 and 1991, no new compact radio sources have appeared. The flux density limit ranges from 3 mJy (3 times the power of Cas A) for most of the main body of the source to approximately 0.3 mJy off the diffuse source surrounding the nucleus. Furthermore, there is no evidence for significant source fading over 4 yr, in contrast to the result reported by Kronberg & Sramek (1985) for M82. More recent data suggest that, except for the strongest source in that galaxy, the compact radio sources in M82 may not be fading after all. If this suggestion proves correct, supernova rates of 0.2-0.3/yr in M82, estimated based on the assumed source fading, are incorrect. More accurate limits on source fading indicate that the current rate of production of radio supernovae in M82 is no greater than 0.1/yr, while that in NGC 253 is no greater than 0.25/yr.

  15. Star formation in infrared bright and infrared faint starburst interacting galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Susan A.; Bushouse, Howard A.; Towns, John W.

    1990-01-01

    Short wavelength IUE spectra of Arp 248b and UGC 8315N are combined with optical spectra and interpreted using a combination of spectrum synthesis and spectral diagnostics to place constraints on the massive star populations of the central regions of these galaxies and to deduce information about the star formation histories in the last 10(exp 8) years. The authors find that both galaxies have substantial fractions of their optical light coming from massive stars and that Arp 248b may be dominated in the UV by WR stars. The UV spectra are dominated by radiation from evolved massive stars and the authors place and age on the burst in Arp 248b of a few tens of millions of years.

  16. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF FAINT LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES NEAR REDSHIFT FIVE IN THE HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Cohen, Seth; Grogin, Norman; Hathi, Nimish; Ryan, Russell; Straughn, Amber; Windhorst, Rogier A. Pirzkal, Norbert; Xu Chun; Koekemoer, Anton; Panagia, Nino; Dickinson, Mark; Ferreras, Ignacio; Gronwall, Caryl; Kuemmel, Martin; Walsh, Jeremy; Meurer, Gerhardt; Pasquali, Anna; Yan, H.-J.

    2009-05-20

    We present the faintest spectroscopically confirmed sample of z {approx} 5 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) to date. The sample is based on slitless grism spectra of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field region from the Grism ACS Program for Extragalactic Science (GRAPES) and Probing Evolution and Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) projects, using the G800L grism on the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys. We report here confirmations of 39 galaxies, preselected as candidate LBGs using photometric selection criteria. We compare a 'traditional' V-dropout selection, based on the work of Giavalisco et al., to a more liberal one (with V - i > 0.9), and find that the traditional criteria are about 64% complete and 81% reliable. We also study the Ly{alpha} emission properties of our sample. We find that Ly{alpha} emission is detected in {approx}1/4 of the sample, and that the liberal V-dropout color selection includes {approx}55% of previously published line-selected Ly{alpha} sources. Finally, we examine our stacked two-dimensional spectra. We demonstrate that strong, spatially extended ({approx}1'') Ly{alpha} emission is not a generic property of these LBGs, but that a modest extension of the Ly{alpha} photosphere (compared to the starlight) may be present in those galaxies with prominent Ly{alpha} emission.

  17. A DEEP SEARCH FOR FAINT GALAXIES ASSOCIATED WITH VERY LOW-REDSHIFT C IV ABSORBERS: A CASE WITH COLD-ACCRETION CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Burchett, Joseph N.; Tripp, Todd M.; Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Ford, Amanda Brady; Davé, Romeel

    2013-12-20

    Studies of QSO absorber-galaxy connections are often hindered by inadequate information on whether faint/dwarf galaxies are located near the QSO sight lines. To investigate the contribution of faint galaxies to QSO absorber populations, we are conducting a deep galaxy redshift survey near low-z C IV absorbers. Here we report a blindly detected C IV absorption system (z {sub abs} = 0.00348) in the spectrum of PG1148+549 that appears to be associated either with an edge-on dwarf galaxy with an obvious disk (UGC 6894, z {sub gal} = 0.00283) at an impact parameter of ρ = 190 kpc or with a very faint dwarf irregular galaxy at ρ = 23 kpc, which is closer to the sightline but has a larger redshift difference (z {sub gal} = 0.00107, i.e., δv = 724 km s{sup –1}). We consider various gas/galaxy associations, including infall and outflows. Based on current theoretical models, we conclude that the absorber is most likely tracing (1) the remnants of an outflow from a previous epoch, a so-called {sup a}ncient outflow{sup ,} or (2) intergalactic gas accreting onto UGC 6894, ''cold mode'' accretion. The latter scenario is supported by H I synthesis imaging data that shows the rotation curve of the disk being codirectional with the velocity offset between UGC 6894 and the absorber, which is located almost directly along the major axis of the edge-on disk.

  18. BOO-1137-AN EXTREMELY METAL-POOR STAR IN THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY BOOeTES I

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, John E.; Yong, David; Gilmore, Gerard; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2010-03-01

    We present high-resolution (R {approx} 40,000), high-signal-to-noise ratio (20-90) spectra of an extremely metal-poor giant star Boo-1137 in the 'ultra-faint' dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph) Booetes I, absolute magnitude M{sub V} {approx} -6.3. We derive an iron abundance of [Fe/H] = -3.7, making this the most metal-poor star as yet identified in an ultra-faint dSph. Our derived effective temperature and gravity are consistent with its identification as a red giant in Booetes I. Abundances for a further 15 elements have also been determined. Comparison of the relative abundances, [X/Fe], with those of the extremely metal-poor red giants of the Galactic halo shows that Boo-1137 is 'normal' with respect to C and N, the odd-Z elements Na and Al, the iron-peak elements, and the neutron-capture elements Sr and Ba, in comparison with the bulk of the Milky Way halo population having [Fe/H] {approx}<-3.0. The alpha-elements Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti are all higher by DELTA[X/Fe] {approx} 0.2 than the average halo values. Monte Carlo analysis indicates that DELTA[alpha/Fe] values this large are expected with a probability {approx}0.02. The elemental abundance pattern in Boo-1137 suggests inhomogeneous chemical evolution, consistent with the wide internal spread in iron abundances we previously reported. The similarity of most of the Boo-1137 relative abundances with respect to halo values, and the fact that the alpha-elements are all offset by a similar small amount from the halo averages, points to the same underlying galaxy-scale stellar initial mass function, but that Boo-1137 likely originated in a star-forming region where the abundances reflect either poor mixing of supernova (SN) ejecta, or poor sampling of the SN progenitor mass range, or both.

  19. Triangulum II: Possibly a Very Dense Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.; Simon, Joshua D.; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2015-11-01

    Laevens et al. recently discovered Triangulum II (Tri II), a satellite of the Milky Way. Its Galactocentric distance is 36 kpc, and its luminosity is only 450 {L}⊙ . Using Keck/DEIMOS, we measured the radial velocities of six member stars within 1.‧2 of the center of Tri II, and we found a velocity dispersion of {σ }v={5.1}-1.4+4.0 {km} {{{s}}}-1. We also measured the metallicities of three stars and found a range of 0.8 dex in [Fe/H]. The velocity and metallicity dispersions identify Tri II as a dark matter-dominated galaxy. The galaxy is moving very quickly toward the Galactic center ({v}{{GSR}}=-262 {km} {{{s}}}-1). Although it might be in the process of being tidally disrupted as it approaches pericenter, there is no strong evidence for disruption in our data set. The ellipticity is low, and the mean velocity, < {v}{{helio}}> =-382.1+/- 2.9 {km} {{{s}}}-1, rules out an association with the Triangulum-Andromeda substructure or the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey stellar stream. If Tri II is in dynamical equilibrium, then it would have a mass-to-light ratio of {3600}-2100+3500 {M}⊙ {L}⊙ -1, the highest of any non-disrupting galaxy (those for which dynamical mass estimates are reliable). The density within the 3D half-light radius would be {4.8}-3.5+8.1 {M}⊙ {{{pc}}}-3, even higher than Segue 1. Hence, Tri II is an excellent candidate for the indirect detection of dark matter annihilation. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  20. The Nature of Faint Spitzer-selected Dust-obscured Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Alexandra; Bussmann, R. Shane; Dey, Arjun; Meger, Nicole; Alexander, David M.; Brodwin, Mark; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Dickinson, Mark E.; Frayer, David T.; Greve, Thomas R.; Huynh, Minh; Lin, Lihwai; Morrison, Glenn; Scott, Douglas; Yan, Chi-Hung

    2008-12-01

    We use deep far-IR, submillimeter, radio, and X-ray imaging and mid-IR spectroscopy to explore the nature of a sample of Spitzer-selected dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) in GOODS-N. A sample of 79 galaxies satisfy the criteria R - [ 24] > 14 (Vega) down to S24 > 100 μJy (median flux density S24 = 180 μJy). Twelve of these galaxies have IRS spectra available, which we use to measure redshifts and classify these objects as being dominated by star formation or active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in the mid-IR. The IRS spectra and Spitzer photometric redshifts confirm that the DOGs lie in a tight redshift distribution around z ~ 2. Based on mid-IR colors, 80% of DOGs are likely dominated by star formation; the stacked X-ray emission from this subsample of DOGs is also consistent with star formation. Since only a small number of DOGs are individually detected at far-IR and submillimeter wavelengths, we use a stacking analysis to determine the average flux from these objects and plot a composite IR (8-1000 μm) spectral energy distribution (SED). The average luminosity of these star-forming DOGs is LIR ~ 1 × 1012 L⊙. We compare the average star-forming DOG to the average bright (S850 > 5 mJy) submillimeter galaxy (SMG); the S24 > 100 μJy DOGs are 3 times more numerous but 8 times less luminous in the IR. The far-IR SED shape of DOGs is similar to that of SMGs (average dust temperature of around 30 K), but DOGs have a higher mid-IR-to-far-IR flux ratio. The average star formation-dominated DOG has a star formation rate of 200 M⊙ yr -1, which, given their space density, amounts to a contribution of 0.01 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3 (or 5%-10%) to the star formation rate density at z ~ 2.

  1. THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION OF ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES: EVIDENCE FOR IMF VARIATIONS WITH GALACTIC ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Geha, Marla; Brown, Thomas M.; Tumlinson, Jason; Kalirai, Jason S.; Avila, Roberto J.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Simon, Joshua D.; Kirby, Evan N.; VandenBerg, Don A.; Munoz, Ricardo R.; Guhathakurta, Puragra E-mail: tbrown@stsci.edu

    2013-07-01

    We present constraints on the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in two ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies, Hercules and Leo IV, based on deep Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging. The Hercules and Leo IV galaxies are extremely low luminosity (M{sub V} = -6.2, -5.5), metal-poor (([Fe/H]) = -2.4, -2.5) systems that have old stellar populations (>11 Gyr). Because they have long relaxation times, we can directly measure the low-mass stellar IMF by counting stars below the main-sequence turnoff without correcting for dynamical evolution. Over the stellar mass range probed by our data, 0.52-0.77 M{sub Sun }, the IMF is best fit by a power-law slope of {alpha}= 1.2{sub -0.5}{sup +0.4} for Hercules and {alpha} = 1.3 {+-} 0.8 for Leo IV. For Hercules, the IMF slope is more shallow than a Salpeter ({alpha} = 2.35) IMF at the 5.8{sigma} level, and a Kroupa ({alpha} = 2.3 above 0.5 M{sub Sun }) IMF slope at 5.4{sigma} level. We simultaneously fit for the binary fraction, f{sub binary}, finding f{sub binary}= 0.47{sup +0.16}{sub -0.14} for Hercules, and 0.47{sup +0.37}{sub -0.17} for Leo IV. The UFD binary fractions are consistent with that inferred for Milky Way stars in the same mass range, despite very different metallicities. In contrast, the IMF slopes in the UFDs are shallower than other galactic environments. In the mass range 0.5-0.8 M{sub Sun }, we see a trend across the handful of galaxies with directly measured IMFs such that the power-law slopes become shallower (more bottom-light) with decreasing galactic velocity dispersion and metallicity. This trend is qualitatively consistent with results in elliptical galaxies inferred via indirect methods and is direct evidence for IMF variations with galactic environment.

  2. Triangulum II: Possibly a Very Dense Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.; Simon, Joshua D.; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2015-11-01

    Laevens et al. recently discovered Triangulum II (Tri II), a satellite of the Milky Way. Its Galactocentric distance is 36 kpc, and its luminosity is only 450 {L}ȯ . Using Keck/DEIMOS, we measured the radial velocities of six member stars within 1.‧2 of the center of Tri II, and we found a velocity dispersion of {σ }v={5.1}-1.4+4.0 {km} {{{s}}}-1. We also measured the metallicities of three stars and found a range of 0.8 dex in [Fe/H]. The velocity and metallicity dispersions identify Tri II as a dark matter-dominated galaxy. The galaxy is moving very quickly toward the Galactic center ({v}{{GSR}}=-262 {km} {{{s}}}-1). Although it might be in the process of being tidally disrupted as it approaches pericenter, there is no strong evidence for disruption in our data set. The ellipticity is low, and the mean velocity, < {v}{{helio}}> =-382.1+/- 2.9 {km} {{{s}}}-1, rules out an association with the Triangulum–Andromeda substructure or the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey stellar stream. If Tri II is in dynamical equilibrium, then it would have a mass-to-light ratio of {3600}-2100+3500 {M}ȯ {L}ȯ -1, the highest of any non-disrupting galaxy (those for which dynamical mass estimates are reliable). The density within the 3D half-light radius would be {4.8}-3.5+8.1 {M}ȯ {{{pc}}}-3, even higher than Segue 1. Hence, Tri II is an excellent candidate for the indirect detection of dark matter annihilation. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  3. HUBBLE FRONTIER FIELDS FIRST COMPLETE CLUSTER DATA: FAINT GALAXIES AT z ∼ 5-10 FOR UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AND COSMIC REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ishigaki, Masafumi; Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Kawamata, Ryota; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Oguri, Masamune

    2015-01-20

    We present comprehensive analyses of faint dropout galaxies up to z ∼ 10 with the first full-depth data set of the A2744 lensing cluster and parallel fields observed by the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) program. We identify 54 dropouts at z ∼ 5-10 in the HFF fields and enlarge the size of the z ∼ 9 galaxy sample obtained to date. Although the number of highly magnified (μ ∼ 10) galaxies is small because of the tiny survey volume of strong lensing, our study reaches the galaxies' intrinsic luminosities comparable to the deepest-field HUDF studies. We derive UV luminosity functions with these faint dropouts, carefully evaluating by intensive simulations the combination of observational incompleteness and lensing effects in the image plane, including magnification, distortion, and multiplication of images, with the evaluation of mass model dependencies. Our results confirm that the faint-end slope, α, is as steep as –2 at z ∼ 6-8 and strengthen the evidence for the rapid decrease of UV luminosity densities, ρ{sub UV}, at z > 8 from the large z ∼ 9 sample. We examine whether the rapid ρ{sub UV} decrease trend can be reconciled with the large Thomson scattering optical depth, τ{sub e}, measured by cosmic microwave background experiments, allowing a large space of free parameters, such as an average ionizing photon escape fraction and a stellar-population-dependent conversion factor. No parameter set can reproduce both the rapid ρ{sub UV} decrease and the large τ {sub e}. It is possible that the ρ{sub UV} decrease moderates at z ≳ 11, that the free parameters significantly evolve toward high z, or that there exist additional sources of reionization such as X-ray binaries and faint active galactic nuclei.

  4. Faint and soft X-ray binaries in three dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orio, Marina

    2007-10-01

    We propose to observe three nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) companions of the Milky Way. These galaxies host old populations with little or no contamination of recent star formation, and appear to have a huge dark matter content. They are the ideal Rosetta stones to probe theories of X-ray binary formation, type Ia progenitors evolution, and dark matter halos.Recent observations of four other dSph with Chandra and XMM-Newton have revealed a large number of X-ray sources in the fields, effected by small column density of neutral hydrogen N(H).Using deep optical and UV images, archival HST and GALEX exposures, and later spectroscopic follow-up, we will be able to determine the nature of the sources and whether they belong to the galactic populations.

  5. VLBI observations of galactic nuclei at 18 centimeters - NGC 1052, NGC 4278, M82, and M104

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, D. B.; Marscher, A. P.

    1979-01-01

    Compact radio sources about a light year in size have been detected in the nuclei of the galaxies NGC 1052, NGC 3034 (M82), NGC 4278, and NGC 4594 (M104) at a wavelength of 18 cm. The compact nucleus detected in M81 at 6 cm was not seen at 18 cm. The compact source in M82 is unique among extragalactic sources in its size-spectrum relationship. It is either broadened by scattering within M82 or it lies behind, and is absorbed by, an H II region. In these galaxies, the size of the nuclear radio source at 18 cm is larger than it is at higher frequencies. The nucleus of the giant radio galaxy DA 240 was not detected.

  6. FAINT CO LINE WINGS IN FOUR STAR-FORMING (ULTRA)LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, Adam K.; Walter, Fabian; Decarli, Roberto; Zschaechner, Laura; Bolatto, Alberto; Weiss, Axel

    2015-09-20

    We report the results of a search for large velocity width, low-intensity line wings—a commonly used signature of molecular outflows—in four low redshift (ultra)luminous infrared galaxies that appear to be dominated by star formation. The targets were drawn from a sample of fourteen targets presented in Chung et al., who showed the stacked CO spectrum of the sample to exhibit 1000 km s{sup −1}-wide line wings. We obtained sensitive, wide bandwidth imaging of our targets using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We detect each target at very high significance but do not find the claimed line wings in these four targets. Instead, we constrain the flux in the line wings to be only a few percent. Casting our results as mass outflow rates following Cicone et al. we show them to be consistent with a picture in which very high mass loading factors preferentially occur in systems with high active galactic nucleus contributions to their bolometric luminosity. We identify one of our targets, IRAS 05083 (VII Zw 31), as a candidate molecular outflow.

  7. Starburst modeling of M82 - Test case for a biased initial mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, G. H.; Loken, K.; Rieke, M. J.; Tamblyn, P.

    1993-07-01

    We compute starburst models for M82, making use of recent theoretical tracks of stellar evolution. Detailed comparisons of our models and those of others demonstrate this technique to be quite reliable, with relatively little change in output parameters as a function of the selection of theoretical tracks or of estimates of the observational characteristics of the stars along these tracks. The models are matched to the observational constraints for M82 summarized by McLeod et al. (1993). The rate of star formation and time of observation were thoroughly optimized to produce the most favorable fit to the observations, but we still found that the recently proposed forms for the solar-neighborhood IMF cannot produce starbursts adequate to fit the observations of this galaxy. We then explored adjustments to the shape of the IMF to improve the fit to M82. We find (1) the shape of the IMF for high-mass stars need not be different from that observed locally; and (2) the most likely modification to the IMF in M82 is that stars with masses below a few solar masses form much less commonly than in the solar neighborhood.

  8. Dust scattering and the radiation pressure force in the M82 superwind

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, Carl T.; Thompson, Todd A.; Martini, Paul E-mail: thompson@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2013-11-20

    Radiation pressure on dust grains may be an important physical mechanism driving galaxy-wide superwinds in rapidly star-forming galaxies. We calculate the combined dust and gas Eddington ratio (Γ) for the archetypal superwind of M82. By combining archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer data, a standard dust model, Monte Carlo dust scattering calculations, and the Herschel map of the dust surface density distribution, the observed far-UV/near-UV surface brightness in the outflow constrains both the total UV luminosity escaping from the starburst along its minor axis (L {sub *,UV}) and the flux-mean opacity, thus allowing a calculation of Γ. We find that L {sub *,UV} ≈ (1-6) × 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1}, ∼2-12 times greater than the UV luminosity observed from our line of sight. On a scale of 1-3 kpc above the plane of M82, we find that Γ ∼ 0.01-0.06. On smaller scales (∼0.25-0.5 kpc), where the enclosed mass decreases, our calculation of L {sub *,UV} implies that Γ ∼ 0.1 with factor of few uncertainties. Within the starburst itself, we estimate the single-scattering Eddington ratio to be of order unity. Thus, although radiation pressure is weak compared to gravity on kpc scales above the plane of M82, it may yet be important in launching the observed outflow. We discuss the primary uncertainties in our calculation, the sensitivity of Γ to the dust grain size distribution, and the time evolution of the wind following M82's recent starburst episodes.

  9. The galaxy luminosity function in groups and clusters: the faint-end upturn and the connection to the field luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ting-Wen; Ménard, Brice; Mo, Houjun

    2016-07-01

    We characterize the luminosity functions of galaxies residing in z ˜ 0 groups and clusters over the broadest ranges of luminosity and mass reachable by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our measurements cover four orders of magnitude in luminosity, down to about Mr = -12 mag or L = 107 L⊙, and three orders of magnitude in halo mass, from 1012 to 1015 M⊙. We find a characteristic scale, Mr ˜ -18 mag or L ˜ 109 L⊙, below which the slope of the luminosity function becomes systematically steeper. This trend is present for all halo masses and originates mostly from red satellites. This ubiquitous faint-end upturn suggests that it is formation, rather than halo-specific environmental effect, that plays a major role in regulating the stellar masses of faint satellites. We show that the satellite luminosity functions can be described in a simple manner by a double Schechter function with amplitudes scaling with halo mass over the entire range of observables. Combining these conditional luminosity functions with the dark matter halo mass function, we accurately recover the entire field luminosity function over 10 visual magnitudes and reveal that satellite galaxies dominate the field luminosity function at magnitudes fainter than -17. We find that the luminosity functions of blue and red satellite galaxies show distinct shapes and we present estimates of the stellar mass fraction as a function of halo mass and galaxy type. Finally, using a simple model, we demonstrate that the abundances and the faint-end slopes of blue and red satellite galaxies can be interpreted in terms of their formation history, with two distinct modes separated by some characteristic time.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Superluminous supernovae in faint galaxies (McCrum+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrum, M.; Smartt, S. J.; Rest, A.; Smith, K.; Kotak, R.; Rodney, S. A.; Young, D. R.; Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Foley, R. J.; Fraser, M.; Wright, D.; Scolnic, D.; Tonry, J. L.; Urata, Y.; Huang, K.; Pastorello, A.; Botticella, M. T.; Valenti, S.; Mattila, S.; Kankare, E.; Farrow, D. J.; Huber, M. E.; Stubbs, C. W.; Kirshner, R. P.; Bresolin, F.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Flewelling, H.; Jedicke, R.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Morgan, J. S.; Price, P. A.; Sweeney, W.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2015-09-01

    From the period starting February 25th 2010 and ending July 9th 2011, 249 hostless transients or "orphans" were discovered in the PS1 Medium Deep fields. AN orphan is defined as an object that is >3.4" away from the centre of a catalogued galaxy or point source brighter than approximately 23.5m (in any of the gP1 rP1 iP1 filters that the transient was detected in). The PS1 observations are obtained through a set of five broadband filters, which we have designated as gP1, rP1, iP1, zP1, and yP1. Although the filter system for PS1 has much in common with that used in previous surveys, such as SDSS (Abazajian et al., 2009ApJS..182..543A), there are important differences. The gP1 filter extends 20nm redward of gSDSS, paying the price of 5577Å emission for greater sensitivity and lower systematics for photometric redshifts, and the zP1 filter is cut off at 930nm, giving it a different response than the detector response which defined zSDSS. SDSS has no corresponding yP1 filter. Further information on the passband shapes is described in Stubbs et al. (2010ApJS..191..376S). The PS1 photometric system and its response is covered in detailed in Tonry et al. (2012ApJ...750...99T, Cat. J/ApJ/750/99). Photometry is in the "natural" PS1 system, m=-2.5log(flux)+m', with a single zeropoint adjustment m' made in each band to conform to the AB magnitude scale. (8 data files).

  11. A bag of tricks: Using proper motions of Galactic stars to identify the Hercules ultra-faint dwarf galaxy members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrizio, M.; Raimondo, G.; Brocato, E.; Bellini, A.; Libralato, M.; Testa, V.; Cantiello, M.; Musella, I.; Clementini, G.; Carini, R.; Marconi, M.; Piotto, G.; Ripepi, V.; Buonanno, R.; Sani, E.; Speziali, R.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Discovered in the last decade as overdensities of resolved stars, the ultra-faint dwarfs (UFDs) are among the least luminous, most dark-matter dominated, and most metal-poor galaxies known today. They appear as sparse, loose objects with high mass-to-light ratios. Hercules is the prototype of the UFD galaxies. To date, there are still no firm constraints on its total luminosity due to the difficulty of disentangling Hercules bona-fide stars from the severe Galactic field contamination. Aims: To better constrain Hercules properties, we aim at removing foreground and background contaminants in the galaxy field using the proper motions of the Milky Way stars and the colour-colour diagram. Methods: We have obtained images of Hercules in the rSloan , BBessel and Uspec bands with the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) and LBC-BIN mode capabilities. The rSloan new dataset combined with data from the LBT archive span a time baseline of about 5 yr, allowing us to measure proper motions of stars in the Hercules direction for the first time. The Uspec data along with existing LBT photometry allowed us to use colour-colour diagram to further remove the field contamination. Results: Thanks to a highly-accurate procedure to derive the rSloan -filter geometric distortion solution for the LBC-red, we were able to measure stellar relative proper motions to a precision of better than 5 mas yr-1 down to rSloan≃ 22 mag and disentangle a significant fraction (>90%) of Milky Way contaminants. We ended up with a sample of 528 sources distributed over a large portion of the galaxy body (~0.12 deg2). Of these sources, 171 turned out to be background galaxies and additional foreground stars from the analysis of the Uspec - BBessel vs. BBessel - rSloan colour-colour diagram. This leaves us with a sample of 357 likely members of the Hercules UFD. We compared the cleaned colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) with evolutionary models and synthetic CMDs, confirming the presence in Hercules of

  12. Radio evolution of supernova SN 2008iz in M 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimani, N.; Sendlinger, K.; Brunthaler, A.; Menten, K. M.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Henkel, C.; Falcke, H.; Muxlow, T. W. B.; Beswick, R. J.; Bower, G. C.

    2016-08-01

    We report on multi-frequency Very Large Array (VLA) and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) radio observations for a monitoring campaign of supernova SN 2008iz in the nearby irregular galaxy M 82. We fit two models to the data, a simple time power-law, S ∝ tβ, and a simplified Weiler model, yielding decline indices of β = -1.22 ± 0.07 (days 100-1500) and -1.41 ± 0.02 (days 76-2167), respectively. The late-time radio light-curve evolution shows flux-density flares at ~970 and ~1400 days that are a factor of ~2 and ~4 higher than the expected flux, respectively. The later flare, except for being brighter, does not show signs of decline at least from results examined so far (2014 January 23; day 2167). We derive the spectral index, α, S ∝ να for frequencies 1.4 to 43 GHz for SN 2008iz during the period from ~430 to 2167 days after the supernova explosion. The value of α shows no signs of evolution and remains steep ≈-1 throughout the period, unlike that of SN 1993J, which started flattening at ~day 970. From the 4.8 and 8.4 GHz VLBI images, the supernova expansion is seen to start with a shell-like structure that becomes increasingly more asymmetric, then breaks up in the later epochs, with bright structures dominating the southern part of the ring. This structural evolution differs significantly from SN 1993J, which remains circularly symmetric over 4000 days after the explosion. The VLBI 4.8 and 8.4 GHz images are used to derive a deceleration index, m, for SN 2008iz, of 0.86 ± 0.02, and the average expansion velocity between days 73 and 1400 as (12.1 ± 0.2) × 103 km s-1. From the energy equipartition between magnetic field and particles, we estimate the minimum total energy in relativistic particles and the magnetic fields during the supernova expansion and also find the magnetic field amplification factor for SN 2008iz to be in the range of 55-400. The VLBI images (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  13. ON THE HEATING EFFICIENCY DERIVED FROM OBSERVATIONS OF YOUNG SUPER STAR CLUSTERS IN M82

    SciTech Connect

    Silich, Sergiy; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Torres-Campos, Ana; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana; Monreal-Ibero, Ana; Melo, Veronica E-mail: cmt@ll.iac.es

    2009-08-01

    Here, we discuss the mechanical feedback that massive stellar clusters provide to the interstellar medium of their host galaxy. We apply an analytic theory developed in a previous study for M82-A1 to a sample of 10 clusters located in the central zone of the starburst galaxy M82, all surrounded by compact and dense H II regions. We claim that the only way that such H II regions can survive around the selected clusters, is if they are embedded into a high-pressure ISM and if the majority of their mechanical energy is lost within the star cluster volume via strong radiative cooling. The latter implies that these clusters have a low heating efficiency, {eta}, and evolve in the bimodal hydrodynamic regime. In this regime, the shock-heated plasma in the central zones of a cluster becomes thermally unstable, loses its pressure and is accumulated there, whereas the matter injected by supernovae and stellar winds outside this volume forms a high-velocity outflow-the star cluster wind. We calculated the heating efficiency for each of the selected clusters and found that in all cases it does not exceed 10%. Such low heating efficiency values imply a low mechanical energy output and the impact that the selected clusters provide to the ISM of M82 is thus much smaller than what one would expect using stellar cluster synthetic models.

  14. Enhanced Turbulence in M82 and M51 from Observations of Interstellar CH+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchey, Adam M.; Welty, Daniel E.; Wallerstein, George

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations of diffuse molecular gas in M82 toward SN 2014J and in M51 toward its companion galaxy NGC 5195 have led to the discovery of high CH+ abundances in these extragalactic lines of sight. The column densities of CH+ are much higher in these directions (relative to the CH column densities) than would be expected based on other properties of the material. The equivalent widths of the λ5780.5 and λ5797.1 diffuse interstellar bands, for example, are suggestive of weak ambient radiation fields and/or significantly shielded environments, where the CH+ abundance would normally be expected to be rather low. We interpret these findings within the framework of recent models of turbulent dissipation regions, which find that the CH+ abundance is directly proportional to the average turbulent dissipation rate and inversely proportional to the square of the gas density. The high CH+ abundances toward SN 2014J and NGC 5195 then suggest that the average turbulent dissipation rates could be significantly enhanced in M82 and M51 (relative to typical values characterizing the local Galactic interstellar medium). As both M82 and M51 are interacting with neighboring galaxies, such enhanced interstellar turbulence could be due to those interactions, either directly (i.e., as a result of the gravitational encounter) or indirectly (e.g., through increased star formation and supernova rates).

  15. First Results from the MADCASH Survey: A Faint Dwarf Galaxy Companion to the Low-mass Spiral Galaxy NGC 2403 at 3.2 Mpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Sand, David J.; Price, Paul; Willman, Beth; Karunakaran, Ananthan; Spekkens, Kristine; Bell, Eric F.; Brodie, Jean P.; Crnojević, Denija; Forbes, Duncan A.; Hargis, Jonathan; Kirby, Evan; Lupton, Robert; Peter, Annika H. G.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Strader, Jay

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery of the faintest known dwarf galaxy satellite of a Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) stellar-mass host beyond the Local Group (LG), based on deep imaging with Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam. Magellanic Analog Dwarf Companions And Stellar Halos (MADCASH) J074238+652501-dw lies ˜35 kpc in projection from NGC 2403, a dwarf spiral galaxy at D ≈ 3.2 Mpc. This new dwarf has {M}g=-7.4+/- 0.4 and a half-light radius of 168 ± 70 pc, at the calculated distance of 3.39 ± 0.41 Mpc. The color-magnitude diagram reveals no evidence of young stellar populations, suggesting that MADCASH J074238+652501-dw is an old, metal-poor dwarf similar to low-luminosity dwarfs in the LG. The lack of either detected HI gas ({M}{HI}/{L}V\\lt 0.69 {M}⊙ /{L}⊙ , based on Green Bank Telescope observations) or GALEX NUV/FUV flux enhancement is consistent with a lack of young stars. This is the first result from the MADCASH survey, which is conducting a census of the stellar substructure and faint satellites in the halos of Local Volume LMC analogs via resolved stellar populations. Models predict a total of ˜4-10 satellites at least as massive as MADCASH J074238+652501-dw around a host with the mass of NGC 2403, with 2-3 within our field of view, slightly more than the one such satellite observed in our footprint. Based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  16. First Results from the MADCASH Survey: A Faint Dwarf Galaxy Companion to the Low-mass Spiral Galaxy NGC 2403 at 3.2 Mpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Sand, David J.; Price, Paul; Willman, Beth; Karunakaran, Ananthan; Spekkens, Kristine; Bell, Eric F.; Brodie, Jean P.; Crnojević, Denija; Forbes, Duncan A.; Hargis, Jonathan; Kirby, Evan; Lupton, Robert; Peter, Annika H. G.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Strader, Jay

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery of the faintest known dwarf galaxy satellite of a Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) stellar-mass host beyond the Local Group (LG), based on deep imaging with Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam. Magellanic Analog Dwarf Companions And Stellar Halos (MADCASH) J074238+652501-dw lies ˜35 kpc in projection from NGC 2403, a dwarf spiral galaxy at D ≈ 3.2 Mpc. This new dwarf has {M}g=-7.4+/- 0.4 and a half-light radius of 168 ± 70 pc, at the calculated distance of 3.39 ± 0.41 Mpc. The color–magnitude diagram reveals no evidence of young stellar populations, suggesting that MADCASH J074238+652501-dw is an old, metal-poor dwarf similar to low-luminosity dwarfs in the LG. The lack of either detected HI gas ({M}{HI}/{L}V\\lt 0.69 {M}ȯ /{L}ȯ , based on Green Bank Telescope observations) or GALEX NUV/FUV flux enhancement is consistent with a lack of young stars. This is the first result from the MADCASH survey, which is conducting a census of the stellar substructure and faint satellites in the halos of Local Volume LMC analogs via resolved stellar populations. Models predict a total of ˜4–10 satellites at least as massive as MADCASH J074238+652501-dw around a host with the mass of NGC 2403, with 2–3 within our field of view, slightly more than the one such satellite observed in our footprint. Based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  17. Deep Radio Imaging with MERLIN of the Supernova Remnants in M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muxlow, T. W. B.; Pedlar, A.; Riley, J. D.; McDonald, A. R.; Beswick, R. J.; Wills, K. A.

    An 8 day MERLIN deep integration at 5GHz of the central region of the starburst galaxy M82 has been used to investigate the radio structure of a number of supernova remnants in unprecedented detail revealing new shells and partial shell structures for the first time. In addition, by comparing the new deep 2002 image with an astrometrically aligned image from 36 hours of data taken in 1992, it has been possible to directly measure the expansion velocities of 4 of the most compact remnants in M82. For the two most compact remnants, 41.95+575 and 43.31+592, expansion velocities of 2800 ± 300 km s-1 and 8750 ± 400 km s-1 have been derived. These confirm and refine the measured expansion velocities which have been derived from VLBI multi-epoch studies. For remnants 43.18+583 and 44.01+596, expansion velocities of 10500 ± 750 km s -1 and 2400 ± 250 km s-1 have been measured for the first time. In addition, the peak of the radio emission for SNR 45.17+612 has moved between the two epochs implying velocities around 7500km s-1. The relatively compact remnants in M82 are thus found to be expanding over a wide range of velocities which appear unrelated to their size. The new 2002 map is the most sensitive high-resolution image yet made of M82, achieving an rms noise level of 17µJy beam-1. This establishes a first epoch for subsequent deep studies of expansion velocities for many SNR within M82.

  18. STELLAR POPULATIONS AND STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF ULTRA FAINT DWARF GALAXIES, CANES VENATICI I, BOOeTES I, CANES VENATICI II, AND LEO IV

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Sakurako; Arimoto, Nobuo; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Onodera, Masato

    2012-01-10

    We take deep images of four ultra faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies, Canes Venatici I (CVn I), Booetes I (Booe I), Canes Venatici II (CVn II), and Leo IV, using the Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) extend below main-sequence turnoffs (MSTOs) and yield measurements of the ages of stellar populations. The stellar populations of three faint galaxies, the Booe I, CVn II, and Leo IV dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), are estimated to be as old as the Galactic globular cluster M92. We confirm that Booe I dSph has no intrinsic color spread in the MSTO and no spatial difference in the CMD morphology, which indicates that Booe I dSph is composed of an old single stellar population. One of the brightest UFDs, CVn I dSph, shows a relatively younger age ({approx}12.6 Gyr) with respect to Booe I, CVn II, and Leo IV dSphs, and the distribution of red horizontal branch (HB) stars is more concentrated toward the center than that of blue HB stars, suggesting that the galaxy contains complex stellar populations. Booe I and CVn I dSphs show the elongated and distorted shapes. CVn II dSph has the smallest tidal radius of a Milky Way satellite and has a distorted shape, while Leo IV dSph shows a less concentrated spherical shape. The simple stellar population of faint UFDs indicates that the gases in their progenitors were removed more effectively than those of brighter dSphs at the occurrence of their initial star formation. This is reasonable if the progenitors of UFDs belong to less massive halos than those of brighter dSphs.

  19. DIFFUSE ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR GAS IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM OF M82 TOWARD SN 2014J

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchey, Adam M.; Welty, Daniel E.; York, Donald G.; Dahlstrom, Julie A.

    2015-02-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of interstellar absorption lines seen in moderately high resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra of SN 2014J in M82. Our observations were acquired over the course of six nights, covering the period from ∼6 days before to ∼30 days after the supernova reached its maximum B-band brightness. We examine complex absorption from Na I, Ca II, K I, Ca I, CH{sup +}, CH, and CN, arising primarily from diffuse gas in the interstellar medium (ISM) of M82. We detect Li I absorption over a range in velocity consistent with that exhibited by the strongest Na I and K I components associated with M82; this is the first detection of interstellar Li in a galaxy outside of the Local Group. There are no significant temporal variations in the absorption-line profiles over the 37 days sampled by our observations. The relative abundances of the various interstellar species detected reveal that the ISM of M82 probed by SN 2014J consists of a mixture of diffuse atomic and molecular clouds characterized by a wide range of physical/environmental conditions. Decreasing N(Na I)/N(Ca II) ratios and increasing N(Ca I)/N(K I) ratios with increasing velocity are indicative of reduced depletion in the higher-velocity material. Significant component-to-component scatter in the N(Na I)/N(Ca II) and N(Ca I)/N(Ca II) ratios may be due to variations in the local ionization conditions. An apparent anti-correlation between the N(CH{sup +})/N(CH) and N(Ca I)/N(Ca II) ratios can be understood in terms of an opposite dependence on gas density and radiation field strength, while the overall high CH{sup +} abundance may be indicative of enhanced turbulence in the ISM of M82. The Li abundance also seems to be enhanced in M82, which supports the conclusions of recent gamma-ray emission studies that the cosmic-ray acceleration processes are greatly enhanced in this starburst galaxy.

  20. A Deep Search for Faint Galaxies Associated with Very Low-redshift C IV Absorbers: A Case with Cold-accretion Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchett, Joseph N.; Tripp, Todd M.; Werk, Jessica K.; Howk, J. Christopher; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Ford, Amanda Brady; Davé, Romeel

    2013-12-01

    Studies of QSO absorber-galaxy connections are often hindered by inadequate information on whether faint/dwarf galaxies are located near the QSO sight lines. To investigate the contribution of faint galaxies to QSO absorber populations, we are conducting a deep galaxy redshift survey near low-z C IV absorbers. Here we report a blindly detected C IV absorption system (z abs = 0.00348) in the spectrum of PG1148+549 that appears to be associated either with an edge-on dwarf galaxy with an obvious disk (UGC 6894, z gal = 0.00283) at an impact parameter of ρ = 190 kpc or with a very faint dwarf irregular galaxy at ρ = 23 kpc, which is closer to the sightline but has a larger redshift difference (z gal = 0.00107, i.e., δv = 724 km s-1). We consider various gas/galaxy associations, including infall and outflows. Based on current theoretical models, we conclude that the absorber is most likely tracing (1) the remnants of an outflow from a previous epoch, a so-called "ancient outflow", or (2) intergalactic gas accreting onto UGC 6894, "cold mode" accretion. The latter scenario is supported by H I synthesis imaging data that shows the rotation curve of the disk being codirectional with the velocity offset between UGC 6894 and the absorber, which is located almost directly along the major axis of the edge-on disk. Based on observations obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope operated at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Also, based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the US, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are the University of Arizona, on behalf of the Arizona University System; Instituto Nazionale do Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute of Potsdam, and

  1. Deep HST/ACS Photometry of an Arc of Young Stars in the Southern Halo of M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwannajak, Chutipong

    2016-01-01

    We present deep HST/ACS photometry of an arclike, overdense region of stars in the southern halo of M82, located approximately 5 kpc from its disk. This arc feature was originally identified about a decade ago. The early ground-based studies suggested that it contains young stars with ages and metallicities similar to those that formed in the tidal tails between M81, M82, and NGC3077 during their interactions. The arc is clearly presented in the spatial distribution of stars in our field with significantly higher stellar density than the background M82 halo stars. The location of the tip of the red giant branch (RGB) reveals the arc to have a similar distance to M81 and M82, therefore confirming that it belongs to this interacting system. Combining our data with those from the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST), we construct a color-magnitude diagram (CMD) for the arc. A sequence of young stars is clearly presented on its CMD. This young main sequence is not seen in other parts of the M82 halo. Single-metallicity isochrones are used to derive the age of the young stars in the arc. We confirm that these stars exhibit ages consistent with young stars found in the HI bridges between M81, M82 and NGC3077. Furthermore, the mean metallicity of the RGB stars is also derived from their metallicity distribution function and found to be similar to that found in the HI bridges.

  2. MERLIN and VLA Observations of VII Zw 19: Distant Cousin of M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Sara C.; Garrington, S. T.; Turner, Jean L.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.

    2004-10-01

    We have observed the starburst dwarf galaxy VII Zw 19 at subarcsecond resolution with MERLIN and MERLIN+European VLBI Network (EVN) at 18 cm, with MERLIN at 6 cm, and with the Very Large Array (VLA) in the A configuration at 6 and 2 cm. The galaxy is detected at all VLA wavelengths and is resolved. It is also resolved at 18 cm by MERLIN but is not detected by the EVN or by MERLIN at 6 cm. VII Zw 19 has a complex structure of nonthermal radio emission at 18 cm extended over ~1200-1800 pc (4"-6"). That the EVN did not detect this emission indicates that there are no obvious point sources that could be radio supernovae. The 2 cm emission, predominantly thermal free-free emission, has a markedly different spatial distribution from the nonthermal emission. The radio colors show that the galaxy contains numerous supernova remnants, as well as many young H II regions, many of which are optically thick at 6 cm. Two extended regions of 2 cm emission have little 18 cm flux and are probably emission from young star clusters. VII Zw 19 resembles M82 in its radio and infrared spectrum, but the starburst region in VII Zw 19 is twice the size of the one in M82 and twice as luminous.

  3. Gamma-ray observations of NGC 253 and M82 with OSSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, D.; The, L. -S.; Kurfess, J. D.; Clayton, D. D.; Gehrels, N.; Leising, M. D.; Grabelsky, D. A.; Johnson, W. N.; Jung, G. V.; Kinzer, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    Gamma-ray observations of the nearby starburst galaxies NGC 253 and M82 over the energy range (0.05-10) MeV have been obtained with the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) spectrometer on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO). The priority of these galaxies as OSSE targets had been established on the grounds that the average supernova rate may be high in starbursts as indicated by infrared and radio observations, and at distances of approximately 3 Mpc a significant chance of supernova gamm-ray line detection exists. NGC 253 was detected in continuum emission up to 165 keV with a total significance of 4.4 sigma and an estimated luminosity of 3 x 10(exp 40) ergs/s. The spectrum is best fit by a power law of photon index approximately 2.5. We consider the possible contribution of different emission mechanisms, including inverse Compton scattering, bremsstrahlung, discrete sources, and Type Ia/Ib supernova continuum to the measured flux. No significant continuum flux was observed from M82. A search for the gamma-ray line from the decay of the most abundant radioactive element produced in supernovae (Ni-56 yields Co-56 yields Fe-56) yielded no significant detection: the 3 sigma upper limits to the line fluxes at 0.158, 0.812, 0.847, and 1.238 MeV for both galaxies are obtained.

  4. MEASUREMENT OF THE MASS AND STELLAR POPULATION DISTRIBUTION IN M82 WITH THE LBT

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, Johnny P.; Martini, Paul; Thompson, Todd A.

    2012-09-20

    We present a K-band spectroscopic study of the stellar and gas kinematics, mass distribution, and stellar populations of the archetypical starburst galaxy M82. Our results are based on a single spectrum at a position angle of 67.{sup 0}5 through the K-band nucleus. We used the {sup 12}CO stellar absorption band head at 2.29 {mu}m (CO{sub 2.29}) to measure the rotation curve out to nearly 4 kpc radius on both the eastern and western sides of the galaxy. Our data show that the rotation curve is flat from 1 to 4 kpc. This stands in sharp contrast to some previous studies, which have interpreted H I and CO emission-line position-velocity diagrams as evidence for a declining rotation curve. The kinematics of the Br{gamma}, H{sub 2}, and He I emission lines are consistent with, although characterized by slightly higher velocities than, the stellar kinematics. We derived M82's mass distribution from our stellar kinematic measurements and estimate that its total dynamical mass is {approx}10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. We measured the equivalent width of CO{sub 2.29} (W{sub 2.29}) as a function of distance from the center of the galaxy to investigate the spatial extent of the red supergiant (RSG) population. The variation in W{sub 2.29} with radius clearly shows that RSGs dominate the light inside 500 pc radius. M82's superwind is likely launched from this region, where we estimate that the enclosed mass is {approx}<2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }.

  5. Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program (SURFS UP). II. IRAC-detected Lyman-Break Galaxies at 6 ≲ z ≲ 10 behind Strong-lensing Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuang-Han; Bradač, Maruša; Lemaux, Brian C.; Ryan, R. E., Jr.; Hoag, Austin; Castellano, Marco; Amorín, Ricardo; Fontana, Adriano; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Cain, Benjamin; Lubin, L. M.; Merlin, Emiliano; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Schrabback, Tim; Treu, Tommaso; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; von der Linden, Anja; Knight, Robert I.

    2016-01-01

    We study the stellar population properties of the IRAC-detected 6 ≲ z ≲ 10 galaxy candidates from the Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program. Using the Lyman Break selection technique, we find a total of 17 galaxy candidates at 6 ≲ z ≲ 10 from Hubble Space Telescope images (including the full-depth images from the Hubble Frontier Fields program for MACS 1149 and MACS 0717) that have detections at signal-to-noise ratios ≥ 3 in at least one of the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm channels. According to the best mass models available for the surveyed galaxy clusters, these IRAC-detected galaxy candidates are magnified by factors of ˜1.2-5.5. Due to the magnification of the foreground galaxy clusters, the rest-frame UV absolute magnitudes M1600 are between -21.2 and -18.9 mag, while their intrinsic stellar masses are between 2 × 108M⊙ and 2.9 × 109M⊙. We identify two Lyα emitters in our sample from the Keck DEIMOS spectra, one at zLyα = 6.76 (in RXJ 1347) and one at zLyα = 6.32 (in MACS 0454). We find that 4 out of 17 z ≳ 6 galaxy candidates are favored by z ≲ 1 solutions when IRAC fluxes are included in photometric redshift fitting. We also show that IRAC [3.6]-[4.5] color, when combined with photometric redshift, can be used to identify galaxies which likely have strong nebular emission lines or obscured active galactic nucleus contributions within certain redshift windows.

  6. The galaxy UV luminosity function at z ≃ 2-4; new results on faint-end slope and the evolution of luminosity density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsa, Shaghayegh; Dunlop, James S.; McLure, Ross J.; Mortlock, Alice

    2016-03-01

    We present a new, robust measurement of the evolving rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) galaxy luminosity function (LF) over the key redshift range from z ≃ 2 to z ≃ 4. Our results are based on the high dynamic range provided by combining the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), CANDELS/GOODS-South, and UltraVISTA/COSMOS surveys. We utilize the unparalleled multifrequency photometry available in this survey `wedding cake' to compile complete galaxy samples at z ≃ 2, 3, 4 via photometric redshifts (calibrated against the latest spectroscopy) rather than colour-colour selection, and to determine accurate rest-frame UV absolute magnitudes (M1500) from spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. Our new determinations of the UV LF extend from M1500 ≃ -22 (AB mag) down to M1500 = -14.5, -15.5 and -16 at z ≃ 2, 3 and 4, respectively (thus, reaching ≃ 3-4 mag fainter than previous blank-field studies at z ≃ 2,3). At z ≃ 2, 3, we find a much shallower faint-end slope (α = -1.32 ± 0.03) than reported in some previous studies (α ≃ -1.7), and demonstrate that this new measurement is robust. By z ≃ 4, the faint-end slope has steepened slightly, to α = -1.43 ± 0.04, and we show that these measurements are consistent with the overall evolutionary trend from z = 0 to 8. Finally, we find that while characteristic number density (φ*) drops from z ≃ 2 to z ≃ 4, characteristic luminosity (M*) brightens by ≃ 1 mag. This, combined with the new flatter faint-end slopes, has the consequence that UV luminosity density (and hence unobscured star formation density) peaks at z ≃ 2.5-3, when the Universe was ≃ 2.5 Gyr old.

  7. SDSS-IV MaNGA: faint quenched galaxies - I. Sample selection and evidence for environmental quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, Samantha J.; Masters, Karen L.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Law, David; Nichol, Robert C.; Thomas, Daniel; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brownstein, Joel R.; Freischlad, Gordon; Gaulme, Patrick; Grabowski, Katie; Kinemuchi, Karen; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Daniel; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey; Wake, David A.

    2016-11-01

    Using kinematic maps from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey, we reveal that the majority of low-mass quenched galaxies exhibit coherent rotation in their stellar kinematics. Our sample includes all 39 quenched low-mass galaxies observed in the first year of MaNGA. The galaxies are selected with Mr > -19.1, stellar masses 109 M⊙ < M* < 5 × 109 M⊙, EWHα < 2 Å, and all have red colours (u - r) > 1.9. They lie on the size-magnitude and σ-luminosity relations for previously studied dwarf galaxies. Just six (15 ± 5.7 per cent) are found to have rotation speeds ve, rot < 15 km s-1 at ˜1 Re, and may be dominated by pressure support at all radii. Two galaxies in our sample have kinematically distinct cores in their stellar component, likely the result of accretion. Six contain ionized gas despite not hosting ongoing star formation, and this gas is typically kinematically misaligned from their stellar component. This is the first large-scale Integral Field Unit (IFU) study of low-mass galaxies selected without bias against low-density environments. Nevertheless, we find the majority of these galaxies are within ˜1.5 Mpc of a bright neighbour (MK < -23; or M* > 5 × 1010 M⊙), supporting the hypothesis that galaxy-galaxy or galaxy-group interactions quench star formation in low-mass galaxies. The local bright galaxy density for our sample is ρproj = 8.2 ± 2.0 Mpc-2, compared to ρproj = 2.1 ± 0.4 Mpc-2 for a star-forming comparison sample, confirming that the quenched low-mass galaxies are preferentially found in higher density environments.

  8. SDSS-IV MaNGA: Faint quenched galaxies I- Sample selection and evidence for environmental quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, Samantha J.; Masters, Karen L.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Law, David; Nichol, Robert C.; Thomas, Daniel; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brownstein, Joel R.; Freischlad, Gordon; Gaulme, Patrick; Grabowski, Katie; Kinemuchi, Karen; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Daniel; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey; Wake, David A.

    2016-08-01

    Using kinematic maps from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey, we reveal that the majority of low-mass quenched galaxies exhibit coherent rotation in their stellar kinematics. Our sample includes all 39 quenched low-mass galaxies observed in the first year of MaNGA. The galaxies are selected with Mr > -19.1, stellar masses 109 M⊙ < M⋆ < 5 × 109 M⊙, EWHα < 2 Å, and all have red colours (u - r) > 1.9. They lie on the size-magnitude and σ-luminosity relations for previously studied dwarf galaxies. Just six (15 ± 5.7 per cent) are found to have rotation speeds ve, rot < 15 km s-1 at ˜1 Re, and may be dominated by pressure support at all radii. Two galaxies in our sample have kinematically distinct cores in their stellar component, likely the result of accretion. Six contain ionised gas despite not hosting ongoing star formation, and this gas is typically kinematically misaligned from their stellar component. This is the first large-scale Integral Field Unit (IFU) study of low mass galaxies selected without bias against low-density environments. Nevertheless, we find the majority of these galaxies are within ˜1.5 Mpc of a bright neighbour (MK < -23; or M⋆ > 5 × 1010 M⊙), supporting the hypothesis that galaxy-galaxy or galaxy-group interactions quench star formation in low-mass galaxies. The local bright galaxy density for our sample is ρproj = 8.2 ± 2.0 Mpc-2, compared to ρproj = 2.1 ± 0.4 Mpc-2 for a star forming comparison sample, confirming that the quenched low mass galaxies are preferentially found in higher density environments.

  9. Probing the molecular interstellar medium of M82 with Herschel-SPIRE spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panuzzo, P.; Rangwala, N.; Rykala, A.; Isaak, K. G.; Glenn, J.; Wilson, C. D.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Barlow, M. J.; Bendo, G. J.; Bock, J. J.; Boselli, A.; Bradford, M.; Buat, V.; Castro-Rodríguez, N.; Chanial, P.; Charlot, S.; Ciesla, L.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Cormier, D.; Cortese, L.; Davies, J. I.; Dwek, E.; Eales, S. A.; Elbaz, D.; Fulton, T.; Galametz, M.; Galliano, F.; Gear, W. K.; Gomez, H. L.; Griffin, M.; Hony, S.; Levenson, L. R.; Lu, N.; Madden, S.; O'Halloran, B.; Okumura, K.; Oliver, S.; Page, M. J.; Papageorgiou, A.; Parkin, T. J.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Pohlen, M.; Polehampton, E. T.; Rigby, E. E.; Roussel, H.; Sacchi, N.; Sauvage, M.; Schulz, B.; Schirm, M. R. P.; Smith, M. W. L.; Spinoglio, L.; Stevens, J. A.; Srinivasan, S.; Symeonidis, M.; Swinyard, B.; Trichas, M.; Vaccari, M.; Vigroux, L.; Wozniak, H.; Wright, G. S.; Zeilinger, W. W.

    2010-07-01

    We present the observations of the starburst galaxy M82 taken with the Herschel SPIRE Fourier-transform spectrometer. The spectrum (194-671 μm) shows a prominent CO rotational ladder from J = 4-3 to 13-12 emitted by the central region of M82. The fundamental properties of the gas are well constrained by the high J lines observed for the first time. Radiative transfer modeling of these high-S/N 12CO and 13CO lines strongly indicates a very warm molecular gas component at ~500 K and pressure of ~3×106 K cm-3, in good agreement with the H2 rotational lines measurements from Spitzer and ISO. We suggest that this warm gas is heated by dissipation of turbulence in the interstellar medium (ISM) rather than X-rays or UV flux from the straburst. This paper illustrates the promise of the SPIRE FTS for the study of the ISM of nearby galaxies. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  10. HOW TO MAKE AN ULTRA-FAINT DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY: TIDAL STIRRING OF DISKY DWARFS WITH SHALLOW DARK MATTER DENSITY PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Lokas, Ewa L.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Mayer, Lucio E-mail: stelios@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2012-05-20

    In recent years the Sloan Digital Sky Survey has unraveled a new population of ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs) whose origin remains a puzzle in the vicinity of the Milky Way (MW). Using a suite of collisionless N-body simulations, we investigate the formation of UFDs in the context of the tidal stirring model for the formation of dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group (LG). Our simulations are designed to reproduce the tidal interactions between MW-sized host galaxies and rotationally supported dwarfs embedded in 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} dark matter (DM) halos. We explore a variety of inner density slopes {rho}{proportional_to}r{sup -{alpha}} for the dwarf DM halos, ranging from core-like ({alpha} = 0.2) to cuspy ({alpha} = 1), and different dwarf orbital configurations. Our experiments demonstrate that UFDs can be produced via tidal stirring of disky dwarfs on relatively tight orbits, consistent with a redshift of accretion by the host galaxy of z {approx} 1, and with intermediate values for the halo inner density slopes ({rho}{proportional_to}r{sup -0.6}). The inferred slopes are in excellent agreement with those resulting from both the modeling of the rotation curves of dwarf galaxies and recent cosmological simulations of dwarf galaxy formation. Comparing the properties of observed UFDs with those of their simulated counterparts, we find remarkable similarities in terms of basic observational parameters. We conclude that tidal stirring of rotationally supported dwarfs represents a viable mechanism for the formation of UFDs in the LG environment.

  11. The Detection of Ultra-faint Low Surface Brightness Dwarf Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster: A Probe of Dark Matter and Baryonic Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giallongo, E.; Menci, N.; Grazian, A.; Fassbender, R.; Fontana, A.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.

    2015-11-01

    We have discovered 11 ultra-faint (r ≲ 22.1) low surface brightness (LSB, central surface brightness 23 ≲ μr ≲ 26) dwarf galaxy candidates in one deep Virgo field of just 576 arcmin2 obtained by the Large Binocular Camera at the Large Binocular Telescope. Their association with the Virgo cluster is supported by their distinct position in the central surface brightness—total magnitude plane with respect to the background galaxies of similar total magnitude. They have typical absolute magnitudes and scale sizes, if at the distance of Virgo, in the range -13 ≲ Mr ≲ -9 and 250 ≲ rs ≲ 850 pc, respectively. Their colors are consistent with a gradually declining star formation history with a specific star formation rate of the order of 10-11 yr-1, i.e., 10 times lower than that of main sequence star-forming galaxies. They are older than the cluster formation age and appear to be regular in morphology. They represent the faintest extremes of the population of low luminosity LSB dwarfs that has recently been detected in wider surveys of the Virgo cluster. Thanks to the depth of our observations, we are able to extend the Virgo luminosity function down to Mr ˜ -9.3 (corresponding to total masses M ˜ 107 M⊙), finding an average faint-end slope α ≃ -1.4. This relatively steep slope puts interesting constraints on the nature of the dark matter and, in particular, on warm dark matter (WDM) often invoked to solve the overprediction of the dwarf number density by the standard cold dark matter scenario. We derive a lower limit on the WDM particle mass >1.5 keV.

  12. THE DETECTION OF ULTRA-FAINT LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS DWARF GALAXIES IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER: A PROBE OF DARK MATTER AND BARYONIC PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Giallongo, E.; Menci, N.; Grazian, A.; Fassbender, R.; Fontana, A.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.

    2015-11-01

    We have discovered 11 ultra-faint (r ≲ 22.1) low surface brightness (LSB, central surface brightness 23 ≲ μ{sub r} ≲ 26) dwarf galaxy candidates in one deep Virgo field of just 576 arcmin{sup 2} obtained by the Large Binocular Camera at the Large Binocular Telescope. Their association with the Virgo cluster is supported by their distinct position in the central surface brightness—total magnitude plane with respect to the background galaxies of similar total magnitude. They have typical absolute magnitudes and scale sizes, if at the distance of Virgo, in the range −13 ≲ M{sub r} ≲ −9 and 250 ≲ r{sub s} ≲ 850 pc, respectively. Their colors are consistent with a gradually declining star formation history with a specific star formation rate of the order of 10{sup −11} yr{sup −1}, i.e., 10 times lower than that of main sequence star-forming galaxies. They are older than the cluster formation age and appear to be regular in morphology. They represent the faintest extremes of the population of low luminosity LSB dwarfs that has recently been detected in wider surveys of the Virgo cluster. Thanks to the depth of our observations, we are able to extend the Virgo luminosity function down to M{sub r} ∼ −9.3 (corresponding to total masses M ∼ 10{sup 7} M{sub ⊙}), finding an average faint-end slope α ≃ −1.4. This relatively steep slope puts interesting constraints on the nature of the dark matter and, in particular, on warm dark matter (WDM) often invoked to solve the overprediction of the dwarf number density by the standard cold dark matter scenario. We derive a lower limit on the WDM particle mass >1.5 keV.

  13. The UDF05 Follow-up of the HUDF: I. The Faint-End Slope of the Lyman-Break Galaxy Population at zeta approx. 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oesch, P. A.; Stiavelli, M.; Carollo, C. M.; Bergeron, L. E.; Koekemoer, A.; Lucas, R. A.; Pavlovsky, C. M.; Trenti, M.; Lilly, S. J.; Beckwith, S. V. W.; Dahlen, T.; Ferguson, H. C.; Gardner, J. P.; Lacey, C.; Mobasher, B.; Panagia, N.; Rix, H.-W.

    2007-01-01

    We present the UDF05 project, a HST Large Program of deep ACS (F606W, F775W, F850LP, and NICMOS (Fll0W, Fl60W) imaging of three fields, two of which coincide with the NICP1-4 NICMOS parallel observations of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF). In this first paper we use the ACS data for the NICP12 field, as well as the original HUDF ACS data, to measure the UV Luminosity Function (LF) of z approximately 5 Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) down to very faint levels. Specifically, based on a V - i, i - z selection criterion, we identify a sample of 101 and 133 candidate z approximately 5 galaxies down to z(sub 850) = 28.5 and 29.25 magnitudes in the NICP12 field and in the HUDF, respectively. Using an extensive set of Monte Carlo simulations we derive corrections for observational biases and selection effects, and construct the rest-frame 1400 Angstroms LBG LF over the range M(sub 1400) = [-22.2, -17.1], i.e. down to approximately 0.04 L(sub *) at z = 5. We show that: (i) Different assumptions for the SED distribution of the LBG population, dust properties and intergalactic absorption result in a 25% variation in the number density of LBGs at z = 5 (ii) Under consistent assumptions for dust properties and intergalactic absorption, the HUDF is about 30% under-dense in z = 5 LBGs relative to the NICP12 field, a variation which is well explained by cosmic variance; (iii) The faint-end slope of the LF is independent of the specific assumptions for the input physical parameters, and has a value of alpha approximately -1.6, similar to the faint-end slope of the LF that has been measured for LBGs at z = 3 and z = 6. Our study therefore supports no variation in the faint-end of the LBG LF over the whole redshift range z = 3 to z = 6. The comparison with theoretical predictions suggests that (a,) the majority of the stars in the z = 5 LBG population are produced with a Top-Heavy IMF in merger-driven starbursts, and that (b) possibly, either the fraction of stellar mass produced in

  14. The LOFAR search for radio pulsars and fast transients in M 33, M 81, and M 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, K.; van Leeuwen, J.

    2016-08-01

    Context. The radio pulsar and rotating radio transient populations are only known in and near the Milky Way. Investigating such populations in other galaxies requires deep pulsar and transient searches. We performed 4-h radio observations of nearby galaxies M 33, M 81 and M 82 with LOFAR. Aims: Our main purpose was to characterise the bright end of the pulsar population in other galaxies, and compare it to that of the Milky Way. Methods: We searched for extragalactic radio pulsars through a periodic-pulse search, and for sporadic fast radio transients through a single-pulse search. We coherently combined at most 23 LOFAR Core High-Band Antenna (HBA) stations and covered M 33, M 81, and M 82 in their entirety using multiple tied-array beams. Results: No pulsating sources or single pulses were found. We have, therefore established stricter limits on the extragalactic pulsar flux density at lower frequencies than those obtained in previous Arecibo, GBT, and WSRT searches. Conclusions: We conclude that in nearby galaxies M 33, M 81, and M 82 there are no pulsars shining toward Earth with pseudo luminosities greater than a few times that of the brightest pulsars in our Milky Way.

  15. DISCOVERY OF CARBON RADIO RECOMBINATION LINES IN M82

    SciTech Connect

    Morabito, Leah K.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Salgado, Francisco; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Haverkorn, Marijke; Toribio, M. Carmen; Heald, George; Beck, Rainer; Adebahr, Björn; Best, Philip; Beswick, Robert; Bonafede, Annalisa; Brüggen, Marcus; Brunetti, Gianfranco; Chyży, Krzysztof T.; Conway, J. E.; Horellou, Cathy; Van Driel, Wim; Gregson, Jonathan; and others

    2014-11-10

    Carbon radio recombination lines (RRLs) at low frequencies (≲ 500 MHz) trace the cold, diffuse phase of the interstellar medium, which is otherwise difficult to observe. We present the detection of carbon RRLs in absorption in M82 with the Low Frequency Array in the frequency range of 48-64 MHz. This is the first extragalactic detection of RRLs from a species other than hydrogen, and below 1 GHz. Since the carbon RRLs are not detected individually, we cross-correlated the observed spectrum with a template spectrum of carbon RRLs to determine a radial velocity of 219 km s{sup –1}. Using this radial velocity, we stack 22 carbon-α transitions from quantum levels n = 468-508 to achieve an 8.5σ detection. The absorption line profile exhibits a narrow feature with peak optical depth of 3 × 10{sup –3} and FWHM of 31 km s{sup –1}. Closer inspection suggests that the narrow feature is superimposed on a broad, shallow component. The total line profile appears to be correlated with the 21 cm H I line profile reconstructed from H I absorption in the direction of supernova remnants in the nucleus. The narrow width and centroid velocity of the feature suggests that it is associated with the nuclear starburst region. It is therefore likely that the carbon RRLs are associated with cold atomic gas in the direction of the nucleus of M82.

  16. First Results from the Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS): First Simultaneous Detection of Lyα Emission and Lyman Break from a Galaxy at z = 7.51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilvi, V.; Pirzkal, N.; Malhotra, S.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Rhoads, J. E.; Windhorst, R.; Grogin, N. A.; Koekemoer, A.; Zakamska, N. L.; Ryan, R.; Christensen, L.; Hathi, N.; Pharo, J.; Joshi, B.; Yang, H.; Gronwall, C.; Cimatti, A.; Walsh, J.; O'Connell, R.; Straughn, A.; Ostlin, G.; Rothberg, B.; Livermore, R. C.; Hibon, P.; Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2016-08-01

    Galaxies at high redshifts are a valuable tool for studying cosmic dawn, therefore it is crucial to reliably identify these galaxies. Here, we present an unambiguous and first simultaneous detection of both the Lyα emission and the Lyman break from a z=7.512 +/- 0.004 galaxy, observed in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS). These spectra, taken with the G102 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), show a significant emission line detection (6σ ) in two observational position angles (PAs), with Lyα line flux of 1.06+/- 0.19× {10}-17 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2. The line flux is nearly a factor of four higher than that in the archival MOSFIRE spectroscopic observations. This is consistent with other recent observations, implying that ground-based near-infrared spectroscopy underestimates the total emission line fluxes, and if confirmed, can have strong implications for reionization studies that are based on ground-based Lyα measurements. A 4σ detection of the NV line in one PA also suggests a weak active galactic nucleus (AGN), and if confirmed, would make this source the highest-redshift AGN yet found. These observations from HST thus clearly demonstrate the sensitivity of the FIGS survey, and the capability of grism spectroscopy for studying the epoch of reionization.

  17. Ultra-faint ultraviolet galaxies at z ∼ 2 behind the lensing cluster A1689: The luminosity function, dust extinction, and star formation rate density

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, Anahita; Siana, Brian; Freeman, William R.; Dominguez, Alberto; Richard, Johan; Stark, Daniel P.; Robertson, Brant; Scarlata, Claudia; Teplitz, Harry I.; Rafelski, Marc; Kewley, Lisa

    2014-01-10

    We have obtained deep ultraviolet imaging of the lensing cluster A1689 with the WFC3/UVIS camera onboard the Hubble Space Telescope in the F275W (30 orbits) and F336W (4 orbits) filters. These images are used to identify z ∼ 2 star-forming galaxies via their Lyman break, in the same manner that galaxies are typically selected at z ≥ 3. Because of the unprecedented depth of the images and the large magnification provided by the lensing cluster, we detect galaxies 100× fainter than previous surveys at this redshift. After removing all multiple images, we have 58 galaxies in our sample in the range –19.5 < M {sub 1500} < –13 AB mag. Because the mass distribution of A1689 is well constrained, we are able to calculate the intrinsic sensitivity of the observations as a function of source plane position, allowing for accurate determinations of effective volume as a function of luminosity. We fit the faint-end slope of the luminosity function to be α = –1.74 ± 0.08, which is consistent with the values obtained for 2.5 < z < 6. Notably, there is no turnover in the luminosity function down to M {sub 1500} = –13 AB mag. We fit the UV spectral slopes with photometry from existing Hubble optical imaging. The observed trend of increasingly redder slopes with luminosity at higher redshifts is observed in our sample, but with redder slopes at all luminosities and average reddening of (E(B – V)) = 0.15 mag. We assume the stars in these galaxies are metal poor (0.2 Z {sub ☉}) compared to their brighter counterparts (Z {sub ☉}), resulting in bluer assumed intrinsic UV slopes and larger derived values for dust extinction. The total UV luminosity density at z ∼ 2 is 4.31{sub −0.60}{sup +0.68}×10{sup 26} erg s{sup –1} Hz{sup –1} Mpc{sup –3}, more than 70% of which is emitted by galaxies in the luminosity range of our sample. Finally, we determine the global star formation rate density from UV-selected galaxies at z ∼ 2 (assuming a constant dust

  18. IONIZATION SOURCE OF A MINOR-AXIS CLOUD IN THE OUTER HALO OF M82

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubayashi, K.; Taniguchi, Y.; Kajisawa, M.; Shioya, Y.; Sugai, H.; Shimono, A.; Hattori, T.; Ozaki, S.; Yoshikawa, T.; Nagao, T.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    2012-12-10

    The M82 ''cap'' is a gas cloud at a projected radius of 11.6 kpc along the minor axis of this well-known superwind source. The cap has been detected in optical line emission and X-ray emission and therefore provides an important probe of the wind energetics. In order to investigate the ionization source of the cap, we observed it with the Kyoto3DII Fabry-Perot instrument mounted on the Subaru Telescope. Deep continuum, H{alpha}, [N II]{lambda}6583/H{alpha}, and [S II]{lambda}{lambda}6716,6731/H{alpha} maps were obtained with subarcsecond resolution. The superior spatial resolution compared to earlier studies reveals a number of bright H{alpha} emitting clouds within the cap. The emission line widths ({approx}< 100 km s{sup -1} FWHM) and line ratios in the newly identified knots are most reasonably explained by slow to moderate shocks velocities (v{sub shock} 40-80 km s{sup -1}) driven by a fast wind into dense clouds. The momentum input from the M82 nuclear starburst region is enough to produce the observed shock. Consequently, earlier claims of photoionization by the central starburst are ruled out because they cannot explain the observed fluxes of the densest knots unless the UV escape fraction is very high (f{sub esc} > 60%), i.e., an order of magnitude higher than observed in dwarf galaxies to date. Using these results, we discuss the evolutionary history of the M82 superwind. Future UV/X-ray surveys are expected to confirm that the temperature of the gas is consistent with our moderate shock model.

  19. EVOLVING STARBURST MODELING OF FAR-INFRARED/SUBMILLIMETER/MILLIMETER LINE EMISSION. II. APPLICATION TO M 82

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Lihong

    2009-11-01

    We present starburst models for far-infrared/sub-millimeter/millimeter line emission of molecular and atomic gas in an evolving starburst region, which is treated as an ensemble of noninteracting hot bubbles that drive spherical shells of swept-up gas into a surrounding uniform gas medium. These bubbles and shells are driven by stellar winds and supernovae within massive star clusters formed during an instantaneous starburst. The underlying stellar radiation from the evolving clusters affects the properties and structure of photodissociation regions (PDRs) in the shells, and hence the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the molecular and atomic line emission from these swept-up shells and the associated parent giant molecular clouds contain a signature of the stage of evolution of the starburst. The physical and chemical properties of the shells and their structure are computed using a simple, well-known similarity solution for the shell expansion, a stellar population synthesis code, and a time-dependent PDR chemistry model. The SEDs for several molecular and atomic lines ({sup 12}CO and its isotope {sup 13}CO, HCN, HCO{sup +}, C, O, and C{sup +}) are computed using a nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium line radiative transfer model. By comparing our models with the available observed data of nearby infrared bright galaxies, especially M 82, we constrain the models and in the case of M 82, we provide estimates for the ages (5-6 Myr, 10 Myr) of recent starburst activity. We also derive a total H{sub 2} gas mass of approx(2-3.4) x 10{sup 8} M {sub sun} for the observed regions of the central 1 kpc starburst disk of M 82.

  20. ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES AS A TEST OF EARLY ENRICHMENT AND METALLICITY-DEPENDENT STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2012-01-20

    The close relation of star formation with molecular gas indicated by observations and assumed in recent models implies that the efficiency with which galaxies convert their gas into stars depends on gas metallicity. This is because abundance of molecular hydrogen is sensitive to abundance of dust, which catalyzes formation of H{sub 2} and helps to shield it from dissociating radiation. In this study, we point out that in the absence of significant pre-enrichment by Population III stars forming out of zero metallicity gas, such H{sub 2}-based star formation is expected to leave an imprint in the form of bi-modality in the metallicity distribution among dwarf galaxies and in the metallicity distribution of stars within individual galaxies. The bi-modality arises because when gas metallicity (and dust abundance) is low, formation of molecular gas is inefficient, the gas consumption timescale is long, and star formation and metal enrichment proceed slowly. When metallicity reaches a critical threshold value star formation and enrichment accelerate, which leads to rapid increase in both stellar mass and metallicity of galaxies. We demonstrate this process both using a simple analytical model and full cosmological simulations. In contrast, the observed metallicity distributions of dwarf galaxies or stars within them are not bi-modal. We argue that this discrepancy points to substantial early stochastic pre-enrichment by Population III stars to levels Z {approx} 10{sup -2} Z{sub Sun} in dense, star-forming regions of early galaxies.

  1. THE OPTICAL SPECTRA OF SPITZER 24 mum GALAXIES IN THE COSMIC EVOLUTION SURVEY FIELD. II. FAINT INFRARED SOURCES IN THE zCOSMOS-BRIGHT 10k CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Caputi, K. I.; Lilly, S. J.; Maier, C.; Carollo, C. M.; Aussel, H.; Floc'h, E. Le; Frayer, D.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fevre, O.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Scoville, N.; Zamorani, G.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Coppa, G.; Bongiorno, A.

    2009-12-20

    We have used the zCOSMOS-bright 10k sample to identify 3244 Spitzer/MIPS 24 mum-selected galaxies with 0.06 mJy < S{sub 24{sub m}}u{sub m} approx< 0.50 mJy and I{sub AB} < 22.5, over 1.5 deg{sup 2} of the COSMOS field, and studied different spectral properties, depending on redshift. At 0.2 < z < 0.3, we found that different reddening laws of common use in the literature explain the dust extinction properties of approx80% of our infrared (IR) sources, within the error bars. For up to 16% of objects, instead, the Halpha lambda6563/Hbeta lambda4861 ratios are too high for their IR/UV attenuations, which is probably a consequence of inhomogeneous dust distributions. In only a few of our galaxies at 0.2 < z < 0.3, the IR emission could be mainly produced by dust heated by old rather than young stars. Besides, the line ratios of approx22% of our galaxies suggest that they might be star-formation/nuclear-activity composite systems. At 0.5 < z < 0.7, we estimated galaxy metallicities for 301 galaxies: at least 12% of them are securely below the upper-branch mass-metallicity trend, which is consistent with the local relation. Finally, we performed a combined analysis of the H{sub d}elta equivalent width versus D{sub n} (4000) diagram for 1722 faint and bright 24 mum galaxies at 0.6 < z < 1.0, spanning two decades in mid-IR luminosity. We found that, while secondary bursts of star formation are necessary to explain the position of the most luminous IR galaxies in that diagram, quiescent, exponentially declining star formation histories can well reproduce the spectral properties of approx40% of the less luminous sources. Our results suggest a transition in the possible modes of star formation at total IR luminosities L{sub TIR} approx (3 +- 2) x 10{sup 11} L{sub sun}.

  2. LOCATING THE YOUNGEST H II REGIONS IN M82 WITH 7 mm CONTINUUM MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.-W.; Turner, Jean L.; Beck, Sara C.; Meier, David S.; Ho, Paul T. P. E-mail: turner@astro.ucla.edu E-mail: dmeier@nmt.edu

    2009-06-15

    We present 7 mm Very Large Array continuum images of the starburst galaxy M82. On arcsecond scales, two-thirds of the 7 mm continuum consists of free-free emission from H II regions. In the subarcsecond resolution map, we identify 14 compact sources, including 9 bright H II regions with N {sub lyc} > 10{sup 51} s{sup -1}. Four of the H II regions have rising spectra, implying emission measures >10{sup 8} cm{sup -6} pc. Except for one compact source with peculiar features, all other compact radio sources are found in dust lanes and do not have optical or near-infrared continuum counterparts. Four regions of extended, high brightness (EM >10{sup 7} cm{sup -6} pc) radio emission are found in our high-resolution map, including some as large as {approx}2'', or 30 pc, representing either associations of small H II regions, or sheet-like structures of denser gas. The good correlation between 7 mm emission and Spitzer IRAC 8 {mu}m continuum-removed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) feature suggests that PAH emission may track the recently formed OB stars. We find an excellent correlation between molecular gas and star formation, particularly dense gas traced by HCN, down to the {approx}45 pc scale in M82. We also find star formation efficiencies (SFEs) of 1%-10% on the same scale, based on CO maps. The highest SFE are found in regions with the highest dense gas fractions.

  3. Propeller effect in action in the ultraluminous accreting magnetar M82 X-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Suleimanov, Valery F.; Poutanen, Juri

    2016-03-01

    We present here the first convincing observational manifestation of a magnetar-like magnetic field in an accreting neutron star in binary system - the first pulsating ultraluminous X-ray source X-2 in the galaxy M82. Using the Chandra X-ray observatory data, we show that the source exhibit the bimodal distribution of the luminosity with two well-defined peaks separated by a factor of 40. This behaviour can be interpreted as the action of the `propeller regime' of accretion. The onset of the propeller in a 1.37 s pulsar at luminosity of ˜1040 erg s-1 implies the dipole component of the neutron star magnetic field of ˜1014 G.

  4. High-resolution 12.4 micron images of the starburst region in M82

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesco, C. M.; Gezari, D. Y.

    1992-01-01

    We present 12.4 micron images, made with 1" resolution, of the intense star-forming region in the galaxy M82. Considerable small-scale structure is evident, including several bright clumps less than about 20 pc in size which may be embedded with giant star clusters more massive than 3 x 100,000 solar mass. No correlation is seen between the infrared emission and the bright radio/X-ray point sources which are thought to be very young supernova remnants. We propose that high values of the ratio of nonthermal and infrared emission near the nucleus, and of the ratio LIR/LCO at one of the starburst lobes, can be attributed to disruption of the central region by supernova activity. However, we argue that the midinfrared-emitting dust is heated by young stars and not, as recently proposed, by supernova shocks.

  5. A near infrared spectroscopic study of the interstellar gas in the starburst core of M82

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Dan F.; Carr, John; Joy, Marshall; Gaffney, Niall

    1990-01-01

    Researchers used the McDonald Observatory Infrared Grating Spectrometer, to complete a program of spatially resolved spectroscopy of M82. The inner 300 pc of the starburst was observed with 4 inch (50 pc) resolution. Complete J, H and K band spectra with resolution 0.0035 micron (lambda/delta lambda=620 at K) were measured at the near-infrared nucleus of the galaxy. Measurements of selected spectral features including lines of FeII, HII and H2 were observed along the starburst ridge-line, so the relative distribution of the diagnostic features could be understood. This information was used to better define the extinction towards the starburst region, the excitation conditions in the gas, and to characterize the stellar populations there.

  6. Spectral Modeling of the Charge-exchange X-Ray Emission from M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuinai; Wang, Q. Daniel; Ji, Li; Smith, Randall K.; Foster, Adam R.; Zhou, Xin

    2014-10-01

    It has been proposed that the charge-exchange (CX) process at the interface between hot and cool interstellar gases could contribute significantly to the observed soft X-ray emission in star-forming galaxies. We analyze the XMM-Newton/reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) spectrum of M82 using a newly developed CX model combined with a single-temperature thermal plasma to characterize the volume-filling hot gas. The CX process is largely responsible for not only the strongly enhanced forbidden lines of the Kα triplets of various He-like ions but also good fractions of the Lyα transitions of C VI (~87%), O VIII, and N VII (gsim50%) as well. In total about a quarter of the X-ray flux in the RGS 6-30 Å band originates in the CX. We infer an ion incident rate of 3 × 1051 s-1 undergoing CX at the hot and cool gas interface and an effective area of the interface of ~2 × 1045 cm2 that is one order of magnitude larger than the cross section of the global biconic outflow. With the CX contribution accounted for, the best-fit temperature of the hot gas is 0.6 keV, and the metal abundances are approximately solar. We further show that the same CX/thermal plasma model also gives an excellent description of the EPIC-pn spectrum of the outflow Cap, projected at 11.6 kpc away from the galactic disk of M82. This analysis demonstrates that the CX is potentially an important contributor to the X-ray emission from starburst galaxies and also an invaluable tool to probe the interface astrophysics.

  7. Spectral modeling of the charge-exchange X-ray emission from M82

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuinai; Ji, Li; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Q. Daniel; Smith, Randall K.; Foster, Adam R.

    2014-10-10

    It has been proposed that the charge-exchange (CX) process at the interface between hot and cool interstellar gases could contribute significantly to the observed soft X-ray emission in star-forming galaxies. We analyze the XMM-Newton/reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) spectrum of M82 using a newly developed CX model combined with a single-temperature thermal plasma to characterize the volume-filling hot gas. The CX process is largely responsible for not only the strongly enhanced forbidden lines of the Kα triplets of various He-like ions but also good fractions of the Lyα transitions of C VI (∼87%), O VIII, and N VII (≳50%) as well. In total about a quarter of the X-ray flux in the RGS 6-30 Å band originates in the CX. We infer an ion incident rate of 3 × 10{sup 51} s{sup –1} undergoing CX at the hot and cool gas interface and an effective area of the interface of ∼2 × 10{sup 45} cm{sup 2} that is one order of magnitude larger than the cross section of the global biconic outflow. With the CX contribution accounted for, the best-fit temperature of the hot gas is 0.6 keV, and the metal abundances are approximately solar. We further show that the same CX/thermal plasma model also gives an excellent description of the EPIC-pn spectrum of the outflow Cap, projected at 11.6 kpc away from the galactic disk of M82. This analysis demonstrates that the CX is potentially an important contributor to the X-ray emission from starburst galaxies and also an invaluable tool to probe the interface astrophysics.

  8. Mid-IR FORCAST/SOFIA Observations of M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikola, T.; Herter, T. L.; Vacca, W. D.; Adams, J. D.; De Buizer, J. M.; Gull, G. E.; Henderson, C. P.; Keller, L. D.; Morris, M. R.; Schoenwald, J.; Stacey, G.; Tielens, A.

    2012-04-01

    We present 75'' × 75'' size maps of M82 at 6.4 μm, 6.6 μm, 7.7 μm, 31.5 μm, and 37.1 μm with a resolution of ~4'' that we have obtained with the mid-IR camera FORCAST on SOFIA. We find strong emission from the inner 60'' (~1 kpc) along the major axis, with the main peak 5'' west-southwest of the nucleus and a secondary peak 4'' east-northeast of the nucleus. The detailed morphology of the emission differs among the bands, which is likely due to different dust components dominating the continuum emission at short mid-IR wavelengths and long mid-IR wavelengths. We include Spitzer-IRS and Herschel/PACS 70 μm data to fit spectral energy distribution templates at both emission peaks. The best-fitting templates have extinctions of AV = 18 and AV = 9 toward the main and secondary emission peak and we estimated a color temperature of 68 K at both peaks from the 31 μm and 37 μm measurement. At the emission peaks the estimated dust masses are on the order of 104 M ⊙.

  9. The Spectroscopic Properties of Lyα-Emitters at z ˜2.7: Escaping Gas and Photons from Faint Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainor, Ryan F.; Steidel, Charles C.; Strom, Allison L.; Rudie, Gwen C.

    2015-08-01

    We present a spectroscopic survey of 318 faint ({R}˜ 27, L˜ 0.1{L}*), Lyα-emission-selected galaxies (LAEs) in regions centered on the positions of hyperluminous QSOs (HLQSOs) at 2.5\\lt z\\lt 3. A sample of 32 LAEs with rest-frame optical emission line spectra from Keck/Multi-Object Spectrometer For InfraRed Exploration (MOSFIRE) are used to interpret the LAE spectra in the context of their systemic redshifts. The fields are part of the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey, which includes substantial ancillary multi-wavelength imaging from both the ground and space. From a quantitative analysis of the diverse Lyα spectral morphologies, including line widths, asymmetries, and multi-peaked profiles, we find that peak widths and separations are typically smaller than among samples of more luminous continuum-selected galaxies (Lyman-break galaxies and their analogs; LBGs) at similar redshifts. We find tentative evidence for an association between Lyα spectral morphology and external illumination by the nearby HLQSO. Using the MOSFIRE subsample, we find that the peak of the resolved (R ≈ 1300) Lyα line is shifted by +200 km s-1 with respect to systemic across a diverse set of galaxies including both LAEs and LBGs. We also find a small number of objects with significantly blueshifted Lyα emission, a potential indicator of accreting gas. The Lyα-to-Hα line ratios measured for the MOSFIRE subset suggest that the LAEs in this sample have Lyα escape fractions {f}{esc,{Ly}α } ≈ 30%, significantly higher than typical LBG samples. Using redshifts calibrated by our MOSFIRE sample, we construct composite LAE spectra, finding the first evidence for metal-enriched outflows in such intrinsically faint high-redshift galaxies. These outflows have smaller continuum covering fractions ({f}{{c}}≈ 0.3) and velocities ({v}{ave} ≈ 100-200 km s-1, {v}{max} ≈ 500 km s-1) than those associated with typical LBGs, suggesting that the gas covering fraction is a likely driver of

  10. ROSAT PSPC observations of two X-ray-faint early-type galaxies: NGC 4365 and NGC 4382

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabbiano, G.; Kim, D.-W.; Trinchieri, G.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of ROSAT Positive Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) observations of the two early-type galaxies NGC 4365 and NGC 4382. These galaxies are among those observed with Einstein to have the lowest X-ray to optical flux ratios of early-type galaxies. The PSCP data show that for radii r greater than 50 arcsec the radial distributions of the X-ray surface brightness are consistent with the optical distributions of King (1978). We also find that these galaxies have X-ray spectra significantly different from those observed in X-ray-bright ellipticals, with a relative excess of counts detected in the softest spectral channels. This confirms earlier Einstein results. The characteristics of the ROSAT PSPC do not allow us to discriminate between possible spectral models. If we adopt a two-component thermal model on the grounds of physical plausibility, we find that the spectral data can be fitted with a very soft optically thin component, with kT approximately 0.2 keV, and a hard component with kT greater than (1.0-1.5) keV. The hard component has a luminosity consistent with that expected from the integrated emission of a population of low mass-X-ray binaries in these galaxies; the nature of the very soft component is more speculative. Candidates include the coronal emission of late-type stars, supersoft X-ray sources, RS CVn, and perhaps a hot Interstellar Medium (ISM). Alternatively, the spectal data may be fitted with a 0.6-1 keV bremsstrahlung spectrum (expontential plus Gaunt), and may suggest the presence of a totally new population of X-ray sources.

  11. Chemical footprint of star formation feedback in M 82 on scales of ~100 pc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginard, D.; Fuente, A.; García-Burillo, S.; Alonso-Albi, T.; Krips, M.; Gerin, M.; Neri, R.; Pilleri, P.; Usero, A.; Treviño-Morales, S. P.

    2015-06-01

    Context. M 82 is one of the nearest and brightest starburst galaxies. It has been extensively studied in the past decade and by now is considered the prototypical extragalactic photon-dominated region (PDR) and a reference for studying star formation feedback. Aims: Our aim is to characterize the molecular chemistry in M 82 at spatial scales of giant molecular clouds (GMCs), ~100 pc, to investigate the feedback effects of the star formation activity. Methods: We present interferometric observations of the CN 1 → 0 (113.491 GHz), N2H+1 → 0 (93.173 GHz), H(41)α (92.034 GHz), CH3CN (91.987 GHz), CS 3 → 2 (146.969 GHz), c-C3H2 31,2 → 22,1 (145.089 GHz), H2CO 20,2 → 10,1 (145.603 GHz), and HC3N 16 → 15 (145.601 GHz) lines carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI). PDR chemical modeling was used to interpret these observations. Results: Our results show that the abundances of N2H+, CS and H13CO+ remain quite constant across the galaxy, confirming that these species are excellent tracers of the dense molecular gas. In contrast, the abundance of CN increases by a factor of ~3 in the inner x2 bar orbits. The [CN]/[N2H+] ratio is well correlated with the H(41)α emission at all spatial scales down to ~100 pc. Chemical modeling shows that the variations in the [CN]/[N2H+] ratio can be explained as the consequence of differences in the local intestellar UV field and in the average cloud sizes within the nucleus of the galaxy. Conclusions: Our high spatial resolution imaging of the starburst galaxy M 82 shows that the star formation activity has a strong impact on the chemistry of the molecular gas. In particular, the entire nucleus behaves as a giant PDR whose chemistry is determined by the local UV flux. The detection of N2H+ shows the existence of a population of clouds with Av> 20 mag all across the galaxy plane. These clouds constitute the molecular gas reservoir for the formation of new stars and, although it is distributed throughout

  12. THE FAINT STELLAR HALOS OF MASSIVE RED GALAXIES FROM STACKS OF MORE THAN 42,000 SDSS LRG IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, Tomer; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2011-04-20

    We study the properties of massive galaxies at an average redshift of z {approx} 0.34 through stacking more than 42,000 images of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This is the largest data set ever used for such an analysis and it allows us to explore the outskirts of massive red galaxies at unprecedented physical scales. Our image stacks extend farther than 400 kpc, where the r-band profile surface brightness reaches 30 mag arcsec{sup -2}. This analysis confirms that the stellar bodies of LRGs follow a simple Sersic profile out to 100 kpc. At larger radii, the profiles deviate from the best-fit Sersic models and exhibit extra light in the r-, i-, and z-band stacks. This excess light can probably be attributed to unresolved intragroup or intracluster light or a change in the light profile itself. We further show that standard analyses of SDSS-depth images typically miss 20% of the total stellar light and underestimate the size of LRGs by 10% compared to our best-fit r-band Sersic model of n = 5.5 and r{sub e} = 13.1 kpc. If the excess light at r > 100 kpc is considered to be part of the galaxy, the best-fit r-band Sersic parameters are n = 5.8 and r{sub e} = 13.6 kpc. In addition, we study the radially dependent stack ellipticity and find an increase with radius from {epsilon} = 0.25 at r = 10 kpc to {epsilon} = 0.3 at r = 100 kpc. This provides support that the stellar light that we trace out to at least 100 kpc is physically associated with the galaxies themselves and may confirm that the halos of individual LRGs have higher ellipticities than their central parts. Lastly, we show that the broadband color gradients of the stacked images are flat beyond roughly 40 kpc, suggesting that the stellar populations do not vary significantly with radius in the outer parts of massive ellipticals.

  13. Research Experience for Teachers at NRAO-Green Bank: Measuring HI Luminosity-linewidth Profiles of Faint Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuck, T. S.; Fisher, J. R.

    2000-12-01

    The neutral hydrogen (HI) luminosity-linewidth profile relationship is a valuable tool in radio astronomy. Among other things, it helps astronomers determine distances, rotation velocities, and hydrogen densities in distant galaxies. Data for over 500 galaxies had been taken in October, 1999 by J. R. Fisher using the Arecibo Radio Telescope. The data helps to support research completed with the Infrared Astronomical Satellite and provide a comparison of luminosity-linewidth and supernovae Ia distance scales. During the summer, 2000 Research Experience for Teachers (RET), T. S. S. worked at the NRAO in Green Bank to reduce this HI data. In order to complete the task, a working knowledge of AIPS++ and Glish was acquired. Glish allows users easy access to all AIPS++ analysis routines and provides a means of writing customized applications by bundling together collections of commands into new functions. During the appointment, AIPS++ scripts were written that implement data correction factors, display data scans, and assist in making precise measurements. As a volunteer researcher, T.S.S. is continuing work on this project during the school year. In addition, selected high school students will assist in completing the data reduction for these galaxies. In any science education program whether it be elementary school or college, it is crucial that students be provided the opportunity to experience science rather than to simply be told about it. Science is a vehicle by which humans contribute to the understanding of the universe. Thanks to the RET experience, Oil City students will be going on a little "drive" this year. This poster will explore the astronomical journey taken by these students as well as the pedagogical destination.

  14. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF NGC 4342, AN OPTICALLY FAINT, X-RAY GAS-RICH EARLY-TYPE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdan, Akos; Forman, William R.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Jones, Christine; Randall, Scott W.; Li Zhiyuan; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Blom, Christina; Zhang Zhongli; Zhuravleva, Irina; Churazov, Eugene; Schindler, Sabine

    2012-08-10

    Chandra x-ray observations of NGC 4342, a low-stellar mass (M{sub K} = -22.79 mag) early-type galaxy, show luminous, diffuse x-ray emission originating from hot gas with temperature of kT {approx} 0.6 keV. The observed 0.5-2 keV band luminosity of the diffuse x-ray emission within the D{sub 25} ellipse is L{sub 0.5-2keV} = 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}. The hot gas has a significantly broader distribution than the stellar light, and shows strong hydrodynamic disturbances with a sharp surface brightness edge to the northeast and a trailing tail. We identify the edge as a cold front and conclude that the distorted morphology of the hot gas is produced by ram pressure as NGC 4342 moves through external gas. From the thermal pressure ratios inside and outside the cold front, we estimate the velocity of NGC 4342 and find that it moves supersonically (M {approx} 2.6) toward the northeast. Outside the optical extent of the galaxy, we detect {approx}17 bright (L{sub 0.5-8keV} > or approx. 3 x 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}) excess x-ray point sources. The excess sources are presumably LMXBs located in metal-poor globular clusters (GCs) in the extended dark matter halo of NGC 4342. Based on the number of excess sources and the average frequency of bright LMXBs in GCs, we estimate that NGC 4342 may host roughly 850-1700 GCs. In good agreement with this, optical observations hint that NGC 4342 may harbor 1200 {+-} 500 GCs. This number corresponds to a GC specific frequency of S{sub N} = 19.9 {+-} 8.3, which is among the largest values observed in full-size galaxies.

  15. Excitation of the molecular gas in the nuclear region of M 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loenen, A. F.; van der Werf, P. P.; Güsten, R.; Meijerink, R.; Israel, F. P.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; García-Burillo, S.; Harris, A. I.; Klein, T.; Kramer, C.; Lord, S.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Röllig, M.; Stutzki, J.; Szczerba, R.; Weiß, A.; Philipp-May, S.; Yorke, H.; Caux, E.; Delforge, B.; Helmich, F.; Lorenzani, A.; Morris, P.; Philips, T. G.; Risacher, C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2010-10-01

    We present high-resolution HIFI spectroscopy of the nucleus of the archetypical starburst galaxy M 82. Six 12CO lines, 2 13CO lines and 4 fine-structure lines have been detected. Besides showing the effects of the overall velocity structure of the nuclear region, the line profiles also indicate the presence of multiple components with different optical depths, temperatures, and densities in the observing beam. The data have been interpreted using a grid of PDR models. It is found that the majority of the molecular gas is in low density (n = 103.5 cm-3) clouds, with column densities of NH = 1021.5 cm-2 and a relatively low UV radiation field (G0 = 102). The remaining gas is predominantly found in clouds with higher densities (n = 105 cm-3) and radiation fields (G0 = 102.75), but somewhat lower column densities (NH = 1021.2 cm-2). The highest J CO lines are dominated by a small (1% relative surface filling) component, with an even higher density (n = 106 cm-3) and UV field (G0 = 103.25). These results show the strength of multi-component modelling for interpretating the integrated properties of galaxies.

  16. KECK SPECTROSCOPY OF FAINT 3 < z < 8 LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES: EVIDENCE FOR A DECLINING FRACTION OF EMISSION LINE SOURCES IN THE REDSHIFT RANGE 6 < z < 8

    SciTech Connect

    Schenker, Matthew A.; Ellis, Richard S.; Robertson, Brant E.; Stark, Daniel P.; Dunlop, James S.; McLure, Ross J.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Richard, Johan

    2012-01-10

    Using deep Keck spectroscopy of Lyman break galaxies selected from infrared imaging data taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we present new evidence for a reversal in the redshift-dependent fraction of star-forming galaxies with detectable Lyman alpha (Ly{alpha}) emission in the redshift range 6.3 < z < 8.8. Our earlier surveys with the DEIMOS spectrograph demonstrated a significant increase with redshift in the fraction of line emitting galaxies over the interval 4 < z < 6, particularly for intrinsically faint systems which dominate the luminosity density. Using the longer wavelength sensitivities of Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer and NIRSPEC, we have targeted 19 Lyman break galaxies selected using recent WFC3/IR data whose photometric redshifts are in the range 6.3 < z < 8.8 and which span a wide range of intrinsic luminosities. Our spectroscopic exposures typically reach a 5{sigma} sensitivity of <50 A for the rest-frame equivalent width (EW) of Ly{alpha} emission. Despite the high fraction of emitters seen only a few hundred million years later, we find only two convincing and one possible line emitter in our more distant sample. Combining with published data on a further seven sources obtained using FORS2 on the ESO Very Large Telescope, and assuming continuity in the trends found at lower redshift, we discuss the significance of this apparent reversal in the redshift-dependent Ly{alpha} fraction in the context of our range in continuum luminosity. Assuming all the targeted sources are at their photometric redshift and our assumptions about the Ly{alpha} EW distribution are correct, we would expect to find so few emitters in less than 1% of the realizations drawn from our lower redshift samples. Our new results provide further support for the suggestion that, at the redshifts now being probed spectroscopically, we are entering the era where the intergalactic medium is partially neutral. With the arrival of more

  17. THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM OF THE VIRGO GIANT ELLIPTICAL GALAXY NGC 4636. I. SUBARU/FAINT OBJECT CAMERA AND SPECTROGRAPH SPECTROSCOPY AND DATABASE

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hong Soo; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Hwang, Ho Seong; Arimoto, Nobuo; Tamura, Naoyuki; Onodera, Masato E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.k E-mail: masato.onodera@cea.f E-mail: naoyuki@subaru.naoj.or

    2010-01-20

    We present a spectroscopic study of the globular clusters (GCs) in the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 4636 in the Virgo Cluster. We selected target GC candidates using the Washington photometry derived from the deep CCD images taken at the KPNO 4 m Telescope. Then we obtained the spectra of 164 target objects in the field of NGC 4636 using the Multi-Object Spectroscopy mode of Faint Object Camera and Spectrograph on the Subaru 8.2 m Telescope. We have measured the velocities for 122 objects: 105 GCs in NGC 4636, the nucleus of NGC 4636, 11 foreground stars, two background galaxies, and three probable intracluster GCs in the Virgo Cluster. The GCs in NGC 4636 are located in the projected galactocentric radius within 10' (corresponding to 43 kpc). The measured velocities for the GCs range from approx300 km s{sup -1} to approx1600 km s{sup -1}, with a mean value of 932{sup +25}{sub -22} km s{sup -1}, which is in good agreement with the velocity for the nucleus of NGC 4636, 928 +- 45 km s{sup -1}. The velocity dispersion of the GCs in NGC 4636 is derived to be 231{sup +15}{sub -17} km s{sup -1}, and the velocity dispersion of the blue GCs is slightly larger than that of the red GCs. Combining our results with data in the literature, we produce a master catalog of radial velocities for 238 GCs in NGC 4636. The velocity dispersion of the GCs in the master catalog is found to be 225{sup +12}{sub -9} km s{sup -1} for the entire sample, 251{sup +18}{sub -12} km s{sup -1} for 108 blue GCs, and 205{sup +11}{sub -13} km s{sup -1} for 130 red GCs.

  18. LOWER-LUMINOSITY GALAXIES COULD REIONIZE THE UNIVERSE: VERY STEEP FAINT-END SLOPES TO THE UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AT z {>=} 5-8 FROM THE HUDF09 WFC3/IR OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bouwens, R. J.; Labbe, I.; Franx, M.; Illingworth, G. D.; Oesch, P. A.; Magee, D.; Stiavelli, M.; Carollo, C. M.; Van Dokkum, P.

    2012-06-10

    The HUDF09 data are the deepest near-IR observations ever, reaching to 29.5 mag. Luminosity functions (LFs) from these new HUDF09 data for 132 z {approx} 7 and z {approx} 8 galaxies are combined with new LFs for z {approx} 5-6 galaxies and the earlier z {approx} 4 LF to reach to very faint limits (<0.05 L*{sub z=3}). The faint-end slopes {alpha} are steep: -1.79 {+-} 0.12 (z {approx} 5), -1.73 {+-} 0.20 (z {approx} 6), -2.01 {+-} 0.21 (z {approx} 7), and -1.91 {+-} 0.32 (z {approx} 8). Slopes {alpha} {approx}< -2 lead to formally divergent UV fluxes, though galaxies are not expected to form below {approx} - 10 AB mag. These results have important implications for reionization. The weighted mean slope at z {approx} 6-8 is -1.87 {+-} 0.13. For such steep slopes, and a faint-end limit of -10 AB mag, galaxies provide a very large UV ionizing photon flux. While current results show that galaxies can reionize the universe by z {approx} 6, matching the Thomson optical depths is more challenging. Extrapolating the current LF evolution to z > 8, taking {alpha} to be -1.87 {+-} 0.13 (the mean value at z {approx} 6-8), and adopting typical parameters, we derive Thomson optical depths of 0.061{sup +0.009}{sub -0.006}. However, this result will change if the faint-end slope {alpha} is not constant with redshift. We test this hypothesis and find a weak, though uncertain, trend to steeper slopes at earlier times (d{alpha}/dz {approx} -0.05 {+-} 0.04) that would increase the Thomson optical depths to 0.079{sup +0.063}{sub -0.017}, consistent with recent WMAP estimates ({tau} = 0.088 {+-} 0.015). It may thus not be necessary to resort to extreme assumptions about the escape fraction or clumping factor. Nevertheless, the uncertainties remain large. Deeper WFC3/IR+ACS observations can further constrain the UV ionizing flux from faint galaxies.

  19. SN 2014J at M82 - I. A middle-class Type Ia supernova by all spectroscopic metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbany, L.; Moreno-Raya, M. E.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; González Hernández, J. I.; Méndez, J.; Vallely, P.; Baron, E.; Domínguez, I.; Hamuy, M.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Mollá, M.; Catalán, S.; Cooke, E. A.; Fariña, C.; Génova-Santos, R.; Karjalainen, R.; Lietzen, H.; McCormac, J.; Riddick, F. C.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Skillen, I.; Tudor, V.; Vaduvescu, O.

    2016-03-01

    We present the intensive spectroscopic follow up of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2014J in the starburst galaxy M82. Twenty-seven optical spectra have been acquired from 2014 January 22 to September 1 with the Isaac Newton and William Herschel Telescopes. After correcting the observations for the recession velocity of M82 and for Milky Way and host galaxy extinction, we measured expansion velocities from spectral line blueshifts and pseudo-equivalent width of the strongest features in the spectra, which gives an idea on how elements are distributed within the ejecta. We position SN 2014J in the Benetti, Branch et al. and Wang et al. diagrams. These diagrams are based on properties of the Si II features and provide dynamical and chemical information about the SN ejecta. The nearby SN 2011fe, which showed little evidence for reddening in its host galaxy, is shown as a reference for comparisons. SN 2014J is a border-line object between the Core-normal and Broad-line groups, which corresponds to an intermediate position between low-velocity gradient and high-velocity gradient objects. SN 2014J follows the R(Si II)-Δm15 correlation, which confirms its classification as a relatively normal SN Ia. Our description of the SN Ia in terms of the evolution of the pseudo-equivalent width of various ions as well as the position in the various diagrams put this specific SN Ia into the overall sample of SN Ia.

  20. A new observational and numerical study of tidal interactions in M81-M82-NGC3077 system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, M. S.; Ho, P. T. P.; Brouillet, N.; Lo, K. Y.

    1993-01-01

    A nearby system of interacting galaxies M81-M82-NGC3077 triplet (D = 3.3 Mpc; Freeman & Madore 1988) has been studied using multi-wavelength observations and numerical simulations to obtain a comprehensive understanding on the dynamics and the consequences of tidal interactions in a group environment. The VLA 12-field Mosaic H I observations of 2 x 1.5 deg. region have revealed a vast array of H I filaments which suggests that the severity and extent of tidal disruptions far exceed the previous estimates. A tidal remnant of the former H I disk of M82 extending up to 30 kpc (in projection) is identified for the first time, and the pervasive effects of the tidal disruption are traced into the inner disk by optical and CO observations, including a kinematic trace of a large scale bar potential (Yun, Ho, & Lo 1992). The H I disk of M81 is traced out to 40 kpc in radius, and a large scale (l approx. 20 kpc) velocity anomaly ('High Velocity Trough'), which may be a remnant of a gaseous collision, is found within the disk of M81. The large H I bridge between M81 and NGC 3077 (van der Hulst 1979) is also found to extend approx. greater than 50 kpc further, bending around NGC 3077, toward M82. The total H I detected in this experiment, 5.6 x 10(exp 9) solar mass, represents the majority of the single-dish flux (Appleton, Davies, & Stephenson 1981) and suggests that the bulk of H I found in the region belongs to the three galaxies and the tidal filaments. The impact and details of the tidal interactions have been further examined through the use of numerical techniques. The 'restricted 3-body' approach was used to simulate the observed distribution of tidal H I streamers connecting the three galaxies, and the success of the simulation is further strengthened by the accurate predictions on the gas kinematics.

  1. A 21 Centimeter Absorber Identified with a Spiral Galaxy: Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph and Wide-Field Camera Observations of 3CR 196

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Ross D.; Beaver, E. A.; Diplas, Athanassios; Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Barlow, Thomas A.; Lyons, Ronald W.

    1996-01-01

    We present imaging and spectroscopy of the quasar 3CR 196 (z(sub e) = 0.871), which has 21 cm and optical absorption at z(sub a) = 0.437. We observed the region of Ly alpha absorption in 3CR 196 at z(sub a) = 0.437 with the Faint Object Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. This region of the spectrum is complicated because of the presence of a Lyman limit and strong lines from a z(sub a) approx. z(sub e) system. We conclude that there is Ly alpha absorption with an H I column density greater than 2.7 x 10(exp 19) cm(exp -2) and most probably 1.5 x 10(exp 20) cm(exp -2). Based on the existence of the high H I column density along both the optical and radio lines of sight, separated by more than 15 kpc, we conclude that the Ly alpha absorption must arise in a system comparable in size to the gaseous disks of spiral galaxies. A barred spiral galaxy, previously reported as a diffuse object in the recent work of Boisse and Boulade, can be seen near the quasar in an image taken at 0.1 resolution with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on the HST. If this galaxy is at the absorption redshift, the luminosity is approximately L(sub *) and any H I disk should extend in front of the optical quasar and radio lobes of 3CR 196, giving rise to both the Ly alpha and 21 cm absorption. In the z(sub a) approx. z(sub e) system we detect Lyman lines and the Lyman limit, as well as high ion absorption lines of C III, N V, S VI, and O VI. This absorption probably only partially covers the emission-line region. The ionization parameter is approximately 0.1. Conditions in this region may be similar to those in broad absorption line QSOs.

  2. A Population of Faint Extended Line Emitters and the Host Galaxies of Optically Thick QSO Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Michael; Haehnelt, Martin; Bunker, Andrew; Becker, George; Marleau, Francine; Graham, James; Cristiani, Stefano; Jarvis, Matt; Lacey, Cedric; Morris, Simon; Peroux, Celine; Röttgering, Huub; Theuns, Tom

    2008-07-01

    We have conducted a long-slit search for low surface brightness Lyα emitters at redshift 2.67 < z < 3.75. A 92 hr long exposure with the ESO VLT FORS2 instrument down to a 1 σ surface brightness detection limit of 8 × 10-20 erg cm-2 s-1 arcsec-2 per arcsec2 aperture yielded a sample of 27 single line emitters with fluxes of a few × 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2. We present arguments that most objects are indeed Lyα. The large comoving number density, 3 × 10-2 h370 Mpc-3, the large covering factor, dN/dz ~ 0.2-1, and the often extended Lyα emission suggest that the emitters can be identified with the elusive host population of damped Lyα systems (DLAS) and high column density Lyman limit systems (LLS). A small inferred star formation rate, perhaps supplemented by cooling radiation, appears to energetically dominate the Lyα emission, and is consistent with the low metallicity, low dust content, and theoretically inferred low masses of DLAS, and with the relative lack of success of earlier searches for their optical counterparts. Some of the line profiles show evidence for radiative transfer in galactic outflows. Stacking surface brightness profiles, we find emission out to at least 4''. The centrally concentrated emission of most objects appears to light up the outskirts of the emitters (where LLS arise) down to a column density where the conversion from UV to Lyα photon becomes inefficient. DLAS, high column density LLS, and the emitter population discovered in this survey appear to be different observational manifestations of the same low-mass, protogalactic building blocks of present-day L* galaxies. Based partly on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the Paranal Observatories under Program ID LP173.A-0440, and partly on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science

  3. Physical Dust Models for the Extinction toward Supernova 2014J in M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian; Jiang, B. W.; Li, Aigen; Li, Jun; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2015-07-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are powerful cosmological “standardizable candles” and the most precise distance indicators. However, a limiting factor in their use for precision cosmology rests on our ability to correct for the dust extinction toward them. SN 2014J in the starburst galaxy M82, the closest detected SN Ia in three decades, provides unparalleled opportunities to study the dust extinction toward an SN Ia. In order to derive the extinction as a function of wavelength, we model the color excesses toward SN 2014J, which are observationally derived over a wide wavelength range, in terms of dust models consisting of a mixture of silicate and graphite. The resulting extinction laws steeply, rise toward the far-ultraviolet, even steeper than that of the SMC. We infer a visual extinction of {A}V≈ 1.9 {mag}, a reddening of E(B-V)≈ 1.1 {mag}, and a total-to-selective extinction ratio of RV ≈ 1.7, consistent with that previously derived from photometric, spectroscopic, and polarimetric observations. The size distributions of the dust in the interstellar medium toward SN 2014J are skewed toward substantially smaller grains than that of the Milky Way and the SMC.

  4. THE MULTI-PHASE COLD FOUNTAIN IN M82 REVEALED BY A WIDE, SENSITIVE MAP OF THE MOLECULAR INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, Adam K.; Martini, Paul; Walter, Fabian; Roussel, Hélène; Sandstrom, Karin; Ott, Jürgen; Weiss, Axel; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Schuster, Karl; Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava

    2015-12-01

    We present a wide area (≈8 × 8 kpc), sensitive map of CO (2–1) emission around the nearby starburst galaxy M82. Molecular gas extends far beyond the stellar disk, including emission associated with the well-known outflow as far as 3 kpc from M82's midplane. Kinematic signatures of the outflow are visible in both the CO and H i emission: both tracers show a minor axis velocity gradient and together they show double peaked profiles, consistent with a hot outflow bounded by a cone made of a mix of atomic and molecular gas. Combining our CO and H i data with observations of the dust continuum, we study the changing properties of the cold outflow as it leaves the disk. While H{sub 2} dominates the ISM near the disk, the dominant phase of the cool medium changes as it leaves the galaxy and becomes mostly atomic after about a kpc. Several arguments suggest that regardless of phase, the mass in the cold outflow does not make it far from the disk; the mass flux through surfaces above the disk appears to decline with a projected scale length of ≈1–2 kpc. The cool material must also end up distributed over a much wider angle than the hot outflow based on the nearly circular isophotes of dust and CO at low intensity and the declining rotation velocities as a function of height from the plane. The minor axis of M82 appears so striking at many wavelengths because the interface between the hot wind cavity and the cool gas produces Hα, hot dust, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission, and scattered UV light. We also show the level at which a face-on version of M82 would be detectable as an outflow based on unresolved spectroscopy. Finally, we consider multiple constraints on the CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor, which must change across the galaxy but appears to be only a factor of ≈2 lower than the Galactic value in the outflow.

  5. HERSCHEL-SPIRE IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY OF MOLECULAR GAS IN M82

    SciTech Connect

    Kamenetzky, J.; Glenn, J.; Rangwala, N.; Maloney, P.; Bradford, M.; Wilson, C. D.; Schirm, M. R. P.; Bendo, G. J.; Baes, M.; Boselli, A.; Cooray, A.; Isaak, K. G.; Lebouteiller, V.; Madden, S.; Panuzzo, P.; Wu, R.

    2012-07-01

    We present new Herschel-SPIRE imaging spectroscopy (194-671 {mu}m) of the bright starburst galaxy M82. Covering the CO ladder from J = 4 {yields} 3 to J = 13 {yields} 12, spectra were obtained at multiple positions for a fully sampled {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 3 arcmin map, including a longer exposure at the central position. We present measurements of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, [C I], [N II], HCN, and HCO{sup +} in emission, along with OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and HF in absorption and H{sub 2}O in both emission and absorption, with discussion. We use a radiative transfer code and Bayesian likelihood analysis to model the temperature, density, column density, and filling factor of multiple components of molecular gas traced by {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO, adding further evidence to the high-J lines tracing a much warmer ({approx}500 K), less massive component than the low-J lines. The addition of {sup 13}CO (and [C I]) is new and indicates that [C I] may be tracing different gas than {sup 12}CO. No temperature/density gradients can be inferred from the map, indicating that the single-pointing spectrum is descriptive of the bulk properties of the galaxy. At such a high temperature, cooling is dominated by molecular hydrogen. Photon-dominated region (PDR) models require higher densities than those indicated by our Bayesian likelihood analysis in order to explain the high-J CO line ratios, though cosmic-ray-enhanced PDR models can do a better job reproducing the emission at lower densities. Shocks and turbulent heating are likely required to explain the bright high-J emission.

  6. Spatially resolved Spitzer-IRS spectral maps of the superwind in M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirão, P.; Armus, L.; Lehnert, M. D.; Guillard, P.; Heckman, T.; Draine, B.; Hollenbach, D.; Walter, F.; Sheth, K.; Smith, J. D.; Shopbell, P.; Boulanger, F.; Surace, J.; Hoopes, C.; Engelbracht, C.

    2015-08-01

    We have mapped the superwind/halo region of the nearby starburst galaxy M82 in the mid-infrared with Spitzer - IRS. The spectral regions covered include the H2 S(1)-S(3), [Ne II], [Ne III] emission lines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features. We estimate the total warm H2 mass and the kinetic energy of the outflowing warm molecular gas to be between Mwarm ˜ 5 and 17 × 106 M⊙ and EK ˜ 6 and 20 × 1053 erg. Using the ratios of the 6.2, 7.7 and 11.3 μm PAH features in the IRS spectra, we are able to estimate the average size and ionization state of the small grains in the superwind. There are large variations in the PAH flux ratios throughout the outflow. The 11.3/7.7 and the 6.2/7.7 PAH ratios both vary by more than a factor of 5 across the wind region. The northern part of the wind has a significant population of PAH's with smaller 6.2/7.7 ratios than either the starburst disc or the southern wind, indicating that on average, PAH emitters are larger and more ionized. The warm molecular gas to PAH flux ratios (H2/PAH) are enhanced in the outflow by factors of 10-100 as compared to the starburst disc. This enhancement in the H2/PAH ratio does not seem to follow the ionization of the atomic gas (as measured with the [Ne III]/[Ne II] line flux ratio) in the outflow. This suggests that much of the warm H2 in the outflow is excited by shocks. The observed H2 line intensities can be reproduced with low-velocity shocks (v < 40 km s-1) driven into moderately dense molecular gas (102 < nH < 104 cm-3) entrained in the outflow.

  7. SWIFT ULTRAVIOLET OBSERVATIONS OF SUPERNOVA 2014J IN M82: LARGE EXTINCTION FROM INTERSTELLAR DUST

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Peter J.; Smitka, Michael T.; Wang, Lifan; Krisciunas, Kevin; Breeveld, Alice; Kuin, N. Paul; Page, Mat; De Pasquale, Massimiliano; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Milne, Peter A.; Siegel, Michael

    2015-05-20

    We present optical and ultraviolet (UV) photometry and spectra of the very nearby and highly reddened supernova (SN) 2014J in M82 obtained with the Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT). Comparison of the UVOT grism spectra of SN 2014J with Hubble Space Telescope observations of SN2011fe or UVOT grism spectra of SN 2012fr are consistent with an extinction law with a low value of R{sub V} ∼1.4. The high reddening causes the detected photon distribution in the broadband UV filters to have a much longer effective wavelength than for an unreddened SN. The light curve evolution is consistent with this shift and does not show a flattening due to photons being scattered back into the line of sight (LOS). The light curve shapes and color evolution are inconsistent with a contribution scattered into the LOS by circumstellar dust. We conclude that most or all of the high reddening must come from interstellar dust. We show that even for a single dust composition, there is not a unique reddening law caused by circumstellar scattering. Rather, when considering scattering from a time-variable source, we confirm earlier studies that the reddening law is a function of the dust geometry, column density, and epoch. We also show how an assumed geometry of dust as a foreground sheet in mixed stellar/dust systems will lead to a higher inferred R{sub V}. Rather than assuming the dust around SNe is peculiar, SNe may be useful probes of the interstellar reddening laws in other galaxies.

  8. A LIKELY MICRO-QUASAR IN THE SHADOW OF M82 X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiao-jie; Liu, Jifeng; Liu, Jiren E-mail: jfliu@nao.cas.cn

    2015-02-01

    The ultra-luminous X-ray source M82 X-1 is one of the most promising intermediate mass black hole candidates in the local universe based on its high X-ray luminosities (10{sup 40}–10{sup 41} erg s{sup −1}) and quasi-periodic oscillations, and is possibly associated with a radio flare source. In this work, applying the sub-pixel technique to the 120 ks Chandra observation (ID: 10543) of M82 X-1, we split M82 X-1 into two sources separated by 1.″1. The secondary source is not detected in other M82 observations. The radio flare source is not found to associate with M82 X-1, but is instead associated with the nearby transient source S1 with an outburst luminosity of ∼10{sup 39} erg s{sup −1}. With X-ray outburst and radio flare activities analogous to the recently discovered micro-quasar in M31, S1 is likely to be a micro-quasar hidden in the shadow of M82 X-1.

  9. Re-scrutiny of a best intermediate mass black hole candidate M82 X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jifeng; Xu, Xiaojie; Qiu, Yanli; Wang, Song

    2015-08-01

    While several recent works on ultraluminous X-ray sources show some of them to be stellar mass black holes or even neutron stars with special radiation mechanisms, M82 X-1 remains one of the best intermediate mass black hole candidates in the local universe. It exhibits amazing properties including quasi-periodic oscillations and extremely high X-ray luminosities suggesting an intermediate mass black hole, a 62-day orbital period from RXTE observations suggestive of a supergiant secondary, and possible radio flare emission that could result from relativistic beaming. Recently we have re-scrutinized this source with a wealth of data from Chandra, Swift/XRT and Hubble, and found three surprises about M82 X-1. Firstly, there is an X-ray transient that is only 1" away from M82 X-1, which has a peak luminosity only 1% of M82 X-1 and is usually hidden in the shadow of M82 X-1. This X-ray transient is associated with the previously reported radio flare. Secondly, two years' Swift/XRT observations, with much much better spatial resolution than RXTE observations, have shown that the 62-day period comes from another nearby less brighter ultra-luminous X-ray source, but definitely not from M82 X-1. Thirdly, we find an optical counterpart for M82 X-1 within the newly obtained 0.4" error circle on Hubble images, and its spectral energy distribution from Hubble photometry shows that it has excessive Halpha emission but no excessive SII emission. This lack of excessive SII emission suggests that the Halpha emission is not from the surrounding nebula but from an accretion disk. The monitoring of this Halpha emission line will allow us to determine the mass of the black hole via dynamical means.

  10. Diffuse interstellar bands versus known atomic and molecular species in the interstellar medium of M82 toward SN 2014J

    SciTech Connect

    Welty, Daniel E.; York, Donald G.; Ritchey, Adam M.; Dahlstrom, Julie A.

    2014-09-10

    We discuss the absorption due to various constituents of the interstellar medium (ISM) of M82 seen in moderately high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra of SN 2014J. Complex absorption from M82 is seen, at velocities 45 ≲ v {sub LSR} ≲ 260 km s{sup –1}, for Na I, K I, Ca I, Ca II, CH, CH{sup +}, and CN; many of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are also detected. Comparisons of the column densities of the atomic and molecular species and the equivalent widths of the DIBs reveal both similarities and differences in relative abundances, compared to trends seen in the ISM of our Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. Of the 10 relatively strong DIBs considered here, 6 (including λ5780.5) have strengths within ±20% of the mean values seen in the local Galactic ISM, for comparable N(K I); 2 are weaker by 20%-45% and 2 (including λ5797.1) are stronger by 25%-40%. Weaker than 'expected' DIBs (relative to N(K I), N(Na I), and E(B – V)) in some Galactic sight lines and toward several other extragalactic supernovae appear to be associated with strong CN absorption and/or significant molecular fractions. While the N(CH)/N(K I) and N(CN)/N(CH) ratios seen toward SN 2014J are similar to those found in the local Galactic ISM, the combination of high N(CH{sup +})/N(CH) and high W(5797.1)/W(5780.5) ratios has not been seen elsewhere. The centroids of many of the M82 DIBs are shifted relative to the envelope of the K I profile—likely due to component-to-component variations in W(DIB)/N(K I) that may reflect the molecular content of the individual components. We compare estimates for the host galaxy reddening E(B – V) and visual extinction A {sub V} derived from the various interstellar species with the values estimated from optical and near-IR photometry of SN 2014J.

  11. Faint dwarfs in nearby groups

    SciTech Connect

    Speller, Ryan; Taylor, James E. E-mail: taylor@uwaterloo.ca

    2014-06-20

    The number and distribution of dwarf satellite galaxies remain a critical test of cold dark matter-dominated structure formation on small scales. Until recently, observational information about galaxy formation on these scales has been limited mainly to the Local Group. We have searched for faint analogues of Local Group dwarfs around nearby bright galaxies, using a spatial clustering analysis of the photometric catalog of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8. Several other recent searches of SDSS have detected clustered satellite populations down to Δm{sub r} ≡ (m{sub r,} {sub sat} – m{sub r,} {sub main}) ∼ 6-8, using photometric redshifts to reduce background contamination. SDSS photometric redshifts are relatively imprecise, however, for faint and nearby galaxies. Instead, we use angular size to select potential nearby dwarfs and consider only the nearest isolated bright galaxies as primaries. As a result, we are able to detect an excess clustering signal from companions down to Δm{sub r} = 12, 4 mag fainter than most recent studies. We detect an overdensity of objects at separations <400 kpc, corresponding to about 4.6 ± 0.5 satellites per central galaxy, consistent with the satellite abundance expected from the Local Group, given our selection function. Although the sample of satellites detected is incomplete by construction, since it excludes the least and most compact dwarfs, this detection provides a lower bound on the average satellite luminosity function, down to luminosities corresponding to the faintest ''classical'' dwarfs of the Local Group.

  12. DISCOVERY OF A NEW PHOTOMETRIC SUB-CLASS OF FAINT AND FAST CLASSICAL NOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Kasliwal, M. M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Ofek, E. O.; Quimby, R.; Cenko, S. B.; Rau, A.

    2011-07-10

    We present photometric and spectroscopic follow-up of a sample of extragalactic novae discovered by the Palomar 60 inch telescope during a search for 'Fast Transients In Nearest Galaxies' (P60-FasTING). Designed as a fast cadence (1 day) and deep (g < 21 mag) survey, P60-FasTING was particularly sensitive to short-lived and faint optical transients. The P60-FasTING nova sample includes 10 novae in M 31, 6 in M 81, 3 in M 82, 1 in NGC 2403, and 1 in NGC 891. This significantly expands the known sample of extragalactic novae beyond the Local Group, including the first discoveries in a starburst environment. Surprisingly, our photometry shows that this sample is quite inconsistent with the canonical maximum-magnitude-rate-of-decline (MMRD) relation for classical novae. Furthermore, the spectra of the P60-FasTING sample are indistinguishable from classical novae. We suggest that we have uncovered a sub-class of faint and fast classical novae in a new phase space in luminosity-timescale of optical transients. Thus, novae span two orders of magnitude in both luminosity and time. Perhaps the MMRD, which is characterized only by the white dwarf mass, was an oversimplification. Nova physics appears to be characterized by a relatively rich four-dimensional parameter space in white dwarf mass, temperature, composition, and accretion rate.

  13. Discovery of a New Photometric Sub-class of Faint and Fast Classical Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, M. M.; Cenko, S. B.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Ofek, E. O.; Quimby, R.; Rau, A.

    2011-07-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic follow-up of a sample of extragalactic novae discovered by the Palomar 60 inch telescope during a search for "Fast Transients In Nearest Galaxies" (P60-FasTING). Designed as a fast cadence (1 day) and deep (g < 21 mag) survey, P60-FasTING was particularly sensitive to short-lived and faint optical transients. The P60-FasTING nova sample includes 10 novae in M 31, 6 in M 81, 3 in M 82, 1 in NGC 2403, and 1 in NGC 891. This significantly expands the known sample of extragalactic novae beyond the Local Group, including the first discoveries in a starburst environment. Surprisingly, our photometry shows that this sample is quite inconsistent with the canonical maximum-magnitude-rate-of-decline (MMRD) relation for classical novae. Furthermore, the spectra of the P60-FasTING sample are indistinguishable from classical novae. We suggest that we have uncovered a sub-class of faint and fast classical novae in a new phase space in luminosity-timescale of optical transients. Thus, novae span two orders of magnitude in both luminosity and time. Perhaps the MMRD, which is characterized only by the white dwarf mass, was an oversimplification. Nova physics appears to be characterized by a relatively rich four-dimensional parameter space in white dwarf mass, temperature, composition, and accretion rate.

  14. TWO CANDIDATE OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS OF M82 X-1 FROM HST OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Song; Liu, Jifeng; Bai, Yu; Guo, Jincheng E-mail: songw@bao.ac.cn

    2015-10-20

    Optical counterparts can provide significant constraints on the physical nature of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). In this Letter, we identify six point sources in the error circle of a ULX in M82, namely M82 X-1, by registering Chandra positions onto Hubble Space Telescope images. Two objects are considered as optical counterpart candidates of M82 X-1, which show F658N flux excess compared to the optical continuum that may suggest the existence of an accretion disk. The spectral energy distributions of the two candidates match well with the spectra for supergiants, with stellar types as F5-G0 and B5-G0, respectively. Deep spatially resolved spectroscopic follow-up and detailed studies are needed to identify the true companion and confirm the properties of this BH system.

  15. First Results from the Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS): First Simultaneous Detection of Lyα Emission and Lyman Break from a Galaxy at z = 7.51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilvi, V.; Pirzkal, N.; Malhotra, S.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Rhoads, J. E.; Windhorst, R.; Grogin, N. A.; Koekemoer, A.; Zakamska, N. L.; Ryan, R.; Christensen, L.; Hathi, N.; Pharo, J.; Joshi, B.; Yang, H.; Gronwall, C.; Cimatti, A.; Walsh, J.; O’Connell, R.; Straughn, A.; Ostlin, G.; Rothberg, B.; Livermore, R. C.; Hibon, P.; Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2016-08-01

    Galaxies at high redshifts are a valuable tool for studying cosmic dawn, therefore it is crucial to reliably identify these galaxies. Here, we present an unambiguous and first simultaneous detection of both the Lyα emission and the Lyman break from a z=7.512 +/- 0.004 galaxy, observed in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS). These spectra, taken with the G102 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), show a significant emission line detection (6σ ) in two observational position angles (PAs), with Lyα line flux of 1.06+/- 0.19× {10}-17 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2. The line flux is nearly a factor of four higher than that in the archival MOSFIRE spectroscopic observations. This is consistent with other recent observations, implying that ground-based near-infrared spectroscopy underestimates the total emission line fluxes, and if confirmed, can have strong implications for reionization studies that are based on ground-based Lyα measurements. A 4σ detection of the NV line in one PA also suggests a weak active galactic nucleus (AGN), and if confirmed, would make this source the highest-redshift AGN yet found. These observations from HST thus clearly demonstrate the sensitivity of the FIGS survey, and the capability of grism spectroscopy for studying the epoch of reionization.

  16. OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED POLARIMETRY OF HIGHLY REDDENED Type Ia SUPERNOVA 2014J: PECULIAR PROPERTIES OF DUST IN M82

    SciTech Connect

    Kawabata, K. S.; Akitaya, H.; Itoh, R.; Moritani, Y.; Yamanaka, M.; Maeda, K.; Nogami, D.; Ui, T.; Kawabata, M.; Mori, K.; Takaki, K.; Ueno, I.; Chiyonobu, S.; Harao, T.; Matsui, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Nagae, O.; Nomoto, K.; Suzuki, N.; Tanaka, M.; and others

    2014-11-01

    We present optical and near-infrared multi-band linear polarimetry of the highly reddened Type Ia supernova (SN) 2014J that appeared in M82. SN 2014J exhibits large polarization at shorter wavelengths, e.g., 4.8% in the B band, which decreases rapidly at longer wavelengths, while the position angle of the polarization remains at approximately 40° over the observed wavelength range. These polarimetric properties suggest that the observed polarization is likely predominantly caused by the interstellar dust within M82. Further analysis shows that the polarization peaks at a wavelengths much shorter than those obtained for the Galactic dust. The wavelength dependence of the polarization can be better described by an inverse power law rather than by the Serkowski law for Galactic interstellar polarization. These points suggest that the nature of the dust in M82 may be different from that in our Galaxy, with polarizing dust grains having a mean radius of <0.1 μm.

  17. KECK SPECTROSCOPY OF FAINT 3 < z < 7 LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES. III. THE MEAN ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM AT z {approx_equal} 4

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Tucker; Ellis, Richard S.; Stark, Daniel P.

    2012-05-20

    We present and discuss the mean rest-frame ultraviolet spectrum for a sample of 81 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) selected to be B-band dropouts at z {approx_equal} 4. The sample is mostly drawn from our ongoing Keck/DEIMOS survey in the GOODS fields and augmented with archival Very Large Telescope data. In general, we find similar spectroscopic trends to those found in earlier surveys of LBGs at z = 3. Specifically, low-ionization absorption lines which trace neutral outflowing gas are weaker in galaxies with stronger Ly{alpha} emission, bluer UV spectral slopes, lower stellar masses, lower UV luminosities, and smaller half-light radii. This is consistent with a physical picture whereby star formation drives outflows of neutral gas which scatter Ly{alpha} and produce strong low-ionization absorption lines, while increasing galaxy stellar mass, size, metallicity, and dust content. Typical galaxies are thus expected to have stronger Ly{alpha} emission and weaker low-ionization absorption at earlier times, and we indeed find somewhat weaker low-ionization absorption at higher redshifts. In conjunction with earlier results from our survey, we argue that the reduced low-ionization absorption is likely caused by lower covering fraction and/or velocity range of outflowing neutral gas at earlier epochs. Although low-ionization absorption decreases at higher redshift, fine-structure emission lines are stronger, suggesting a greater concentration of neutral gas at small galactocentric radius ({approx}< 5 kpc). Our continuing survey will enable us to extend these diagnostics more reliably to higher redshift and determine the implications for the escape fraction of ionizing photons which governs the role of early galaxies in cosmic reionization.

  18. TRANSITION TO THE DISK DOMINANT STATE OF A NEW ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE IN M82

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Jing; Feng Hua; Kaaret, Philip

    2010-06-10

    We report on the identification of a third, new ultraluminous X-ray source in the starburst galaxy M82. Previously, the source was observed at fluxes consistent with the high state of Galactic black hole binaries (BHBs). We observe fluxes up to (6.5 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} in the ultraluminous regime. When the source is not in the low/hard state, spectral fitting using a multicolor disk model shows that the disk luminosity varies as the disk inner temperature raised to the power 4.8 {+-} 0.9, consistent with the behavior of Galactic BHBs in the thermal dominant state. Fitting the spectrum with a multicolor disk model with general relativistic corrections suggests that the source harbors a rapidly spinning black hole with a mass less than 100 solar masses. A soft excess was found in the source spectrum that could be blackbody emission from a photosphere created by a massive outflow. The source also showed soft dips during a flare.

  19. Fainting Starting Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Pederiva, Federica; Barbi, Egidio; Zennaro, Floriana; Neri, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Complications such as mechanical accidents, infections, and thrombosis are commonly described in the presence of a central venous catheter. We present a case of a boy who had fainting episodes due to dislocation of a central venous catheter.

  20. X-ray QPOs from the Ultra-luminous X-ray Source in M82: Evidence Against Beaming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2003-01-01

    We report the discovery with the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) CCD cameras onboard XMM-Newton of a 54 mHz quasiperiodic oscillation (QPO) in the greater than 2 keV X-ray flux from the ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX) X41.4+60 in the starburst galaxy M82. This is the first detection of a QPO in the X-ray flux from an extra-Galactic ULX, and confirms that the source is a compact object. The QPO is detected in the combined PN and MOS data at the approx. 6sigma level, and separately at lower significances in both the PN and MOS instruments. It had a centroid frequency of 54.3 +/- 0.9 mHz, a coherence Q is identical with nu(sub 0)/Delta nu(sub fwhm) is approx. 5, and an amplitude (rms) in the 2 - 10 keV band of 8.5%. Below about 0.2 Hz the power spectrum can be described by a power-law with index approx. 1, and integrated amplitude (rms) of 13.5%. The X-ray spectrum requires a curving continuum, with a disk-blackbody (diskbb) at T = 3.1 keV providing an acceptable, but not unique, fit. A broad Fe line centered at 6.55 keV is required in all fits, but the equivalent width (EW) of the line is sensitive to the choice of continuum model. There is no evidence of a reflection component. The implied bolometric luminosity is approx. 4 - 5 x 10(exp 40) ergs/s. Data from several archival Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) pointings at M82 also show evidence for QPOs in the 50 - 100 mHz frequency range. Several Galactic black hole candidates (BHCs), including GRS 1915+105, GRO J1655-40, and XTE 1550-564, show QPOs in the same frequency range as the 50 - 100 mHz QPOs in X41.4+60, which at first glance suggests a possible connection with such objects. However, strong, narrow QPOs provide solid evidence for disk emission, and thus present enormous theoretical difficulties for models which rely on either geometrically or relativistically beamed emission to account for the high X-ray luminosities. We discuss the implications of our findings for models of the ULX sources.

  1. CHARACTERIZING FAINT GALAXIES IN THE REIONIZATION EPOCH: LBT CONFIRMS TWO L < 0.2 L* SOURCES AT z = 6.4 BEHIND THE CLASH/FRONTIER FIELDS CLUSTER MACS0717.5+3745

    SciTech Connect

    Vanzella, E.; Cusano, F.; Fontana, A.; Grazian, A.; Castellano, M.; Pentericci, L.; Giallongo, E.; Zitrin, A.; Coe, D.; Bradley, L.; Postman, M.; Giavalisco, M.; Rosati, P.; Nonino, M.; Cristiani, S.; Smit, R.; Bouwens, R.; Balestra, I.; Zheng, W.; Infante, L.; and others

    2014-03-01

    We report the LBT/MODS1 spectroscopic confirmation of two images of faint Lyα emitters at z = 6.4 behind the Frontier Fields galaxy cluster MACSJ0717.5+3745. A wide range of lens models suggests that the two images are highly magnified, with a strong lower limit of μ > 5. These are the faintest z > 6 candidates spectroscopically confirmed to date. These may also be multiple images of the same z = 6.4 source as supported by their similar intrinsic properties, but the lens models are inconclusive regarding this interpretation. To be cautious, we derive the physical properties of each image individually. Thanks to the high magnification, the observed near-infrared (restframe ultraviolet) part of the spectral energy distributions and Lyα lines are well detected with S/N(m {sub 1500}) ≳ 10 and S/N(Lyα) ≅ 10-15. Adopting μ > 5, the absolute magnitudes, M {sub 1500}, and Lyα fluxes are fainter than –18.7 and 2.8 × 10{sup –18} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}, respectively. We find a very steep ultraviolet spectral slope β = –3.0 ± 0.5 (F {sub λ} = λ{sup β}), implying that these are very young, dust-free, and low metallicity objects, made of standard stellar populations or even extremely metal poor stars (age ≲ 30 Myr, E(B – V) = 0 and metallicity 0.0-0.2 Z/Z {sub ☉}). The objects are compact (<1 kpc{sup 2}) and with a stellar mass M {sub *} < 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}. The very steep β, the presence of the Lyα line, and the intrinsic FWHM (<300 km s{sup –1}) of these newborn objects do not exclude a possible leakage of ionizing radiation. We discuss the possibility that such faint galaxies may resemble those responsible for cosmic reionization.

  2. Optical-faint, Far-infrared-bright Herschel Sources in the CANDELS Fields: Ultra-luminous Infrared Galaxies at z > 1 and the Effect of Source Blending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Haojing; Stefanon, Mauro; Ma, Zhiyuan; Willner, S. P.; Somerville, Rachel; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Davé, Romeel; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Cava, Antonio; Wiklind, Tommy; Kocevski, Dale; Rafelski, Marc; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Cooray, Asantha; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Grogin, Norman A.

    2014-07-01

    The Herschel very wide field surveys have charted hundreds of square degrees in multiple far-IR (FIR) bands. While the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is currently the best resource for optical counterpart identifications over such wide areas, it does not detect a large number of Herschel FIR sources and leaves their nature undetermined. As a test case, we studied seven "SDSS-invisible," very bright 250 μm sources (S 250 > 55 mJy) in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey fields where we have a rich multi-wavelength data set. We took a new approach to decompose the FIR sources, using the near-IR or the optical images directly for position priors. This is an improvement over the previous decomposition efforts where the priors are from mid-IR data that still suffer from the problem of source blending. We found that in most cases the single Herschel sources are made of multiple components that are not necessarily at the same redshifts. Our decomposition succeeded in identifying and extracting their major contributors. We show that these are all ultra-luminous infrared galaxies at z ~ 1-2 whose high L IR is mainly due to dust-obscured star formation. Most of them would not be selected as submillimeter galaxies. They all have complicated morphologies indicative of mergers or violent instability, and their stellar populations are heterogeneous in terms of stellar masses, ages, and formation histories. Their current ultra-luminous infrared galaxy phases are of various degrees of importance in their stellar mass assembly. Our practice provides a promising starting point for developing an automatic routine to reliably study bright Herschel sources.

  3. OPTICAL-FAINT, FAR-INFRARED-BRIGHT HERSCHEL SOURCES IN THE CANDELS FIELDS: ULTRA-LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES AT z > 1 AND THE EFFECT OF SOURCE BLENDING

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Haojing; Stefanon, Mauro; Ma, Zhiyuan; Willner, S. P.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Somerville, Rachel; Davé, Romeel; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Cava, Antonio; Wiklind, Tommy; Kocevski, Dale; Rafelski, Marc; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Cooray, Asantha; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Grogin, Norman A.

    2014-07-01

    The Herschel very wide field surveys have charted hundreds of square degrees in multiple far-IR (FIR) bands. While the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is currently the best resource for optical counterpart identifications over such wide areas, it does not detect a large number of Herschel FIR sources and leaves their nature undetermined. As a test case, we studied seven ''SDSS-invisible'', very bright 250 μm sources (S {sub 250} > 55 mJy) in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey fields where we have a rich multi-wavelength data set. We took a new approach to decompose the FIR sources, using the near-IR or the optical images directly for position priors. This is an improvement over the previous decomposition efforts where the priors are from mid-IR data that still suffer from the problem of source blending. We found that in most cases the single Herschel sources are made of multiple components that are not necessarily at the same redshifts. Our decomposition succeeded in identifying and extracting their major contributors. We show that these are all ultra-luminous infrared galaxies at z ∼ 1-2 whose high L {sub IR} is mainly due to dust-obscured star formation. Most of them would not be selected as submillimeter galaxies. They all have complicated morphologies indicative of mergers or violent instability, and their stellar populations are heterogeneous in terms of stellar masses, ages, and formation histories. Their current ultra-luminous infrared galaxy phases are of various degrees of importance in their stellar mass assembly. Our practice provides a promising starting point for developing an automatic routine to reliably study bright Herschel sources.

  4. The Lyα properties of faint galaxies at z ∼ 2-3 with systemic redshifts and velocity dispersions from Keck-MOSFIRE

    SciTech Connect

    Erb, Dawn K.; Steidel, Charles C.; Trainor, Ryan F.; Strom, Allison L.; Konidaris, Nicholas P.; Matthews, Keith; Bogosavljević, Milan; Shapley, Alice E.; Nestor, Daniel B.; Mace, Gregory; McLean, Ian S.; Kulas, Kristin R.; Law, David R.; Rudie, Gwen C.; Reddy, Naveen A.; Pettini, Max

    2014-11-01

    We study the Lyα profiles of 36 spectroscopically detected Lyα-emitters (LAEs) at z ∼ 2-3, using Keck MOSFIRE to measure systemic redshifts and velocity dispersions from rest-frame optical nebular emission lines. The sample has a median optical magnitude R=26.0, and ranges from R≃23 to R>27, corresponding to rest-frame UV absolute magnitudes M {sub UV} ≅ –22 to M {sub UV} > –18.2. Dynamical masses range from M {sub dyn} < 1.3 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉} to M {sub dyn} = 6.8 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}, with a median value of M {sub dyn} = 6.3 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}. Thirty of the 36 Lyα emission lines are redshifted with respect to the systemic velocity with at least 1σ significance, and the velocity offset with respect to systemic Δv {sub Lyα} is correlated with the R-band magnitude, M {sub UV}, and the velocity dispersion measured from nebular emission lines with >3σ significance: brighter galaxies with larger velocity dispersions tend to have larger values of Δv {sub Lyα}. We also make use of a comparison sample of 122 UV-color-selected R<25.5 galaxies at z ∼ 2, all with Lyα emission and systemic redshifts measured from nebular emission lines. Using the combined LAE and comparison samples for a total of 158 individual galaxies, we find that Δv {sub Lyα} is anti-correlated with the Lyα equivalent width with 7σ significance. Our results are consistent with a scenario in which the Lyα profile is determined primarily by the properties of the gas near the systemic redshift; in such a scenario, the opacity to Lyα photons in lower mass galaxies may be reduced if large gaseous disks have not yet developed and if the gas is ionized by the harder spectrum of young, low metallicity stars.

  5. Faint-object spectrograph optical bench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, J. M., Jr.; Lyon, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The Faint-Object Spectrograph (FOS) is one of five scientific instruments under development for use with the Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA) of NASA's Space Telescope. It is a dual-channel spectrograph operating with two independent 512-channel pulse-counting Digicons. The FOS will be employed in connection with the study of scientific questions associated with quasars, active galaxies, normal distant and local group galaxies, a wide class of objects within the Milky Way Galaxy and neighboring galaxies, and objects within the solar system. The FOS contains an optical bench which supports all optical elements. Dimensional stability was the primary design requirement for the optical bench. This led to the selection of a graphite/epoxy structure using laminates with very low coefficients of thermal expansion and high stiffness. The technical requirements are considered and details of fabrication are discussed.

  6. Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Normal galaxies, radio galaxies, and Seyfert galaxies are considered. The large magellanic cloud and the great galaxy in Andromedia are highlighted. Quasars and BL lacertae objects are also discussed and a review of the spectral observations of all of these galaxies and celestial objects is presented.

  7. Accretion mode of the ultraluminous X-ray source M82 X-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karino, S.; Miller, J. C.

    2016-11-01

    Periodic pulsations have been found in emission from the ultraluminous X-ray source M82 X-2, strongly suggesting that the emitter is a rotating neutron star rather than a black hole. However, the radiation mechanisms and accretion mode involved have not yet been clearly established. In this paper, we examine the applicability to this object of standard accretion modes for high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). We find that spherical wind accretion, which drives OB-type HMXBs, cannot apply here but that there is a natural explanation in terms of an extension of the picture for standard Be-type HMXBs. We show that a neutron star with a moderately strong magnetic field, accreting from a disc-shaped wind emitted by a Be-companion, could be compatible with the observed relation between spin and orbital period. A Roche lobe overflow picture is also possible under certain conditions.

  8. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS IN M81 AND M82

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Sohn, Jubee; Lee, Jong Hwan; Lim, Sungsoon; Jang, In Sung; Ko, Youkyung; Koo, Bon-Chul; Hwang, Narae; Kim, Sang Chul; Park, Byeong-Gon

    2015-05-01

    We present spectroscopy of 28 supernova remnant (SNR) candidates as well as one H ii region in M81 and two SNR candidates in M82. Twenty-six of the M81 candidates turn out to be genuine SNRs, and two in M82 may be shocked condensations in the galactic outflow or SNRs. The distribution of [N ii]/Hα ratios of M81 SNRs is bimodal. M81 SNRs are divided into two groups in the spectral line ratio diagrams: an [O iii]-strong group and an [O iii]-weak group. The latter are larger and may have faster shock velocities. [N ii]/Hα ratios of the SNRs show a strong correlation with [S ii]/Hα ratios. They show a clear radial gradient in their [N ii]/Hα and [S ii]/Hα ratios: dLog ([N ii]/Hα)/dLog R = −0.018 ± 0.008 dex kpc{sup −1} and dLog ([S ii]/Hα)/dLog R = −0.016 ± 0.008 dex kpc{sup −1}, where R is the deprojected galactocentric distance. We estimate the nitrogen and oxygen abundances of the SNRs from comparison with shock-ionization models. We obtain a value for the nitrogen radial gradient of dLog(N/H)/dLog R= −0.023 ± 0.009 dex kpc{sup −1}, and find little evidence for an oxygen gradient. This nitrogen abundance shows a gradient that is a few times flatter than those of the planetary nebulae and H ii regions. We find that five SNRs are matched with X-ray sources. Their X-ray hardness colors are consistent with thermal SNRs.

  9. A CENSUS OF THE HIGH-DENSITY MOLECULAR GAS IN M82

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, B. J.; Bradford, C. M.; Bock, J. J.; Nguyen, H. T.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Aguirre, J. E.; Earle, L.; Glenn, J.; Kamenetzky, J.; Maloney, P. R.; Inami, H.; Matsuhara, H.

    2010-10-10

    We present a three-pointing study of the molecular gas in the starburst nucleus of M82 based on 190-307 GHz spectra obtained with Z-Spec at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We present intensity measurements, detections, and upper limits, for 20 transitions, including several new detections of CS, HNC, C{sub 2}H, H{sub 2}CO, and CH{sub 3}CCH lines. We combine our measurements with previously published measurements at other frequencies for HCN, HNC, CS, C{sup 34}S, and HCO{sup +} in a multi-species likelihood analysis constraining gas mass, density and temperature, and the species' relative abundances. We find some (1.7-2.7) x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun} of gas with n{sub H{sub 2}} between (1-6) x 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3} and T > 50 K. While the mass and temperature are comparable to values inferred from mid-J CO transitions, the thermal pressure is a factor of 10-20 greater. The molecular interstellar medium is largely fragmented and is subject to ultraviolet irradiation from the star clusters. It is also likely subject to cosmic rays and mechanical energy input from the supernovae, and is warmer on average than the molecular gas in the massive star formation (SF) regions in the Milky Way. The typical conditions in the dense gas in M82's central kiloparsec appear unfavorable for further SF; if any appreciable stellar populations are currently forming, they are likely biased against low-mass stars, producing a top-heavy initial mass function.

  10. Contribution of the 1s2l3l' Dielectronic Recombination in Li-Like Ar to the Hypothesized Dark Matter Related Faint Feature in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Amy; Silwal, Roshani; Dreiling, Joan; Ajello, Marco; Gillaspy, John; Kilgore, Ethan; Ralchenko, Yuri; Takacs, Endre

    2016-05-01

    Driven by the recent detection of an unidentified emission line previously reported at 3.55-3.57 keV in a stacked spectrum of galaxy clusters, we investigate the resonant DR process in Li-like Ar as a possible source of or contributor to the emission line. We are particularly interested in the Li-like transition 1 s22l-1s2l3l', which produces a 3.62 keV photon near the unidentified line at 3.57 keV. The Electron Beam Ion Trap at NIST was used to produce and trap the highly-charged ions of argon. The energy of the quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, set to a current of 60 mA, was incremented in steps of 15 eV to scan over all of the Li-like Ar DR resonances, including the resonance peak of interest. A solid-state germanium detector was used to take x-ray measurements perpendicular to the trap region. The DR cross section was measured and normalized to the well-known photoionization cross sections using radiative recombination peaks in the measured spectra. Our measurements are compared to the AtomDB emission lines used to fit the spectra containing the unidentified line, and conclusions are presented.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: M82 radio sources flux density variations (Gendre+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendre, M. A.; Fenech, D. M.; Beswick, R. J.; Muxlow, T. W. B.; Argo, M. K.

    2014-05-01

    The 2009 monitoring campaign of M82 consisted of seven wide-field MERLIN (Thomasson 1986) observations at a frequency of 4.994GHz, observed between 2009 May and 2010 April. These were made using parallel hands of circular polarization, and were correlated with a total bandwidth of 16 MHz divided into 32 channels. Across all epochs combined a total on-source integration time of 286.5h was used. Each observing epoch was reduced and analysed individually and a deep exposure map was produced by combining all of these data. In addition to these, a single e-MERLIN observation was included in this study. This observation was made in 2010 December as part of the e-MERLIN commissioning programme and used a total bandwidth of 512MHz with a median frequency of 6.26GHz. These data were correlated into four individual sub-bands each divided into 512 frequency channels. These e-MERLIN observations were observed prior the installation of the new e-MERLIN wide-band IF system in spring 2011 and consequently only one hand of polarization was used and the data displayed reduced sensitivity in parts of the observing band. (2 data files).

  12. High angular resolution mm- and submm-observations of dense molecular gas in M82

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wild, W.; Eckart, Andreas; Genzel, Reinhard; Harris, Andrew I.; Jackson, James M.; Jaffe, D. T.; Lugten, J. B.; Stutzki, J.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers observed CO(7-6), CO(3-2), HCN(3-2) and HCO+(3-2) line emission toward the starburst nucleus of M82 and have obtained an upper limit to H13CN(3-2). These are the first observations of the CO(7-6), HCN(3-2) and HCO+(3-2) lines in any extragalactic source. Researchers took the CO(7-6) spectrum in January 1988 at the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) with the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics/Univ. of California, Berkeley 800 GHz Heterodyne Receiver. In March 1989 researchers used the Institute for Radio Astronomy in the Millimeter range (IRAM) 30 m telescope to observe the CO(3-2) line with the new MPE 350 GHz Superconductor Insulator Superconductor (SIS) receiver and the HCN(3-2) and HCO+(3-2) lines with the (IRAM) 230 GHz SIS receiver (beam 12" FWHM, Blundell et al. 1988). The observational parameters are summarized.

  13. OBSERVATIONS OF THE M82 SN 2014J WITH THE KILODEGREE EXTREMELY LITTLE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Siverd, Robert J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua; Goobar, Ariel

    2015-01-20

    We report observations of the bright M82 supernova 2014J serendipitously obtained with the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT). The supernova (SN) was observed at high cadence for over 100 days, from pre-explosion, to early rise and peak times, through the secondary bump. The high cadence KELT data with high signal-to-noise ratio is completely unique for SN 2014J and for any other SNIa, with the exception of the (yet) unpublished Kepler data. Here, we report determinations of the SN explosion time and peak time. We also report measures of the ''smoothness'' of the light curve on timescales of minutes/hours never before probed, and we use this to place limits on energy produced from short-lived isotopes or inhomogeneities in the explosion or the circumstellar medium. From the non-observation of significant perturbations of the light curves, we derive a 3σ upper limit corresponding to 8.7 × 10{sup 36} erg  s{sup –1} for any such extra sources of luminosity at optical wavelengths.

  14. A possible 55-d X-ray period of the ultraluminous accreting pulsar M82 X-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Albert K. H.; Hu, Chin-Ping; Lin, Lupin Chun-Che; Li, K. L.; Jin, Ruolan; Liu, C. Y.; Yen, David Chien-Chang

    2016-10-01

    We report on the possible detection of a 55-d X-ray modulation for the ultraluminous accreting pulsar M82 X-2 from archival Chandra observations. Because M82 X-2 is known to have a 2.5-d orbital period, if the 55-d period is real, then it will be the superorbital period of the system. We also investigated variabilities of three other nearby ultraluminous X-ray sources in the central region of M82 with the Chandra data, and we did not find any evidence of periodicities. Furthermore, we re-examined the previously reported 62-d periodicity near the central region of M82 by performing a systematic timing study with all the archival Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer and Swift data. Using various dynamic timing analysis methods, we have confirmed that the 62-d period is not stable, suggesting that it is not the orbital period of M82 X-1; this is in agreement with previous work.

  15. DIFFERENCE IN THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION BETWEEN H{sub 2}O AND CO{sub 2} ICES IN M 82 FOUND WITH AKARI

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagishi, Mitsuyoshi; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Ishihara, Daisuke; Oyabu, Shinki; Onaka, Takashi; Shimonishi, Takashi; Suzuki, Toyoaki; Minh, Young Chol

    2013-08-20

    With AKARI, we obtain the spatially resolved near-infrared (NIR) (2.5-5.0 {mu}m) spectra for the nearby starburst galaxy M 82. These spectra clearly show absorption features due to interstellar ices. Based on the spectra, we created the column density maps of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} ices. As a result, we find that the spatial distribution of H{sub 2}O ice is significantly different from that of CO{sub 2} ice; H{sub 2}O ice is widely distributed, while CO{sub 2} ice is concentrated near the galactic center. Our result reveals for the first time variations in CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ice abundance ratio on a galactic scale, suggesting that an ice-forming interstellar environment changes within a galaxy. We discuss the cause of the spatial variations in the ice abundance ratio, utilizing spectral information on the hydrogen recombination Br{alpha} and Br{beta} lines and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 3.3 {mu}m emission appearing in the AKARI NIR spectra.

  16. HUBBLE'S SEARCH FOR FAINT FIELD STARS IN GALACTIC HALO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Left A NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of a randomly selected area of sky taken to search for faint red stars that might constitute dark matter in our Milky Way Galaxy. (Dark matter is material of an unknown type that makes up most of the mass of our galaxy). If the dark matter in our Galaxy was made of faint red stars -- as many scientists have previously conjectured -- then about 38 such stars should have been visible in this HST image. The simulated stars (diamond-shaped symbols), based on theoretical calculations, illustrate what scientists would have seen if the dark matter were locked-up in faint red stars. These surprising results rule out dim stars as an explanation for dark matter in our Galaxy. Right The unmodified HST image shows the region is actually so devoid of stars that far more distant background galaxies can easily be seen. The field is in the constellation Eridanus, far outside the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. This region was chosen to highlight stars in the galactic halo, where dark matter exists, and to avoid the contribution of faint stars in the plane of the Galaxy. Technical Information: The image was constructed from seven exposures totaling almost three hours of searching by HST. The field shown is about 1.5 arc-minutes across. The image was taken in near-infrared light (814 nm) with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, on Feb 8, 1994. This observation is part of the HST parallel observing program. Credit: J Bahcall, Institute for Advance Study, Princeton and NASA

  17. THE EXTREMELY RED HOST GALAXY OF GRB 080207

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Leslie; Cresci, Giovanni; Palazzi, Eliana; Rossi, Andrea; Klose, Sylvio; Savaglio, Sandra; Michalowski, Michal; Pian, Elena

    2011-08-01

    We present optical, near-infrared, and Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the host galaxy of the dark Swift gamma-ray burst GRB 080207. The host is faint, with extremely red optical-infrared colors (R - K = 6.3, 24 {mu}m/R-band flux {approx}1000) making it an extremely red object (ERO) and a dust-obscured galaxy (DOG). The spectral energy distribution (SED) shows the clear signature of the 1.6 {mu}m photometric 'bump', typical of evolved stellar populations. We use this bump to establish the photometric redshift z{sub phot} as 2.2{sup +0.2}{sub -0.3}, using a vast library of SED templates, including M 82. The star formation rate (SFR) inferred from the SED fitting is {approx}119 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, the stellar mass 3 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, and A{sub V} extinction from 1 to 2 mag. The ERO and DOG nature of the host galaxy of the dark GRB 080207 may be emblematic of a distinct class of dark GRB hosts, with high SFRs, evolved and metal-rich stellar populations, and significant dust extinction within the host galaxy.

  18. The Extremely Red Host Galaxy of GRB 080207

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Leslie; Palazzi, Eliana; Rossi, Andrea; Savaglio, Sandra; Cresci, Giovanni; Klose, Sylvio; Michałowski, Michał; Pian, Elena

    2011-08-01

    We present optical, near-infrared, and Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the host galaxy of the dark Swift gamma-ray burst GRB 080207. The host is faint, with extremely red optical-infrared colors (R - K = 6.3, 24 μm/R-band flux ~1000) making it an extremely red object (ERO) and a dust-obscured galaxy (DOG). The spectral energy distribution (SED) shows the clear signature of the 1.6 μm photometric "bump," typical of evolved stellar populations. We use this bump to establish the photometric redshift z phot as 2.2+0.2 - 0.3, using a vast library of SED templates, including M 82. The star formation rate (SFR) inferred from the SED fitting is ~119 M sun yr-1, the stellar mass 3 × 1011 M sun, and AV extinction from 1 to 2 mag. The ERO and DOG nature of the host galaxy of the dark GRB 080207 may be emblematic of a distinct class of dark GRB hosts, with high SFRs, evolved and metal-rich stellar populations, and significant dust extinction within the host galaxy.

  19. A Stellar-mass Black Hole in the Ultra-luminous X-ray Source M82 X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okajima, Takashi; Ebisawa, Ken; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro

    2007-01-01

    We have analyzed the archival XMM-Newton data of the archetypal Ultra-Luminous X-ray Source (ULX) M82 X-1 with an LO5 ksec exposure when the source was in the steady state. Thanks to the high photon statistics from the large effective area and long exposure, we were able to discriminate different X-ray continuum spectral models. Neither the standard accretion disk model (where the radial dependency of the disk effective temperature is T(r) proportional to r(sup -3/4)) nor a power-law model gives a satisfactory fit. In fact, observed curvature of the M82 X-1 spectrum was just between those of the two models. When the exponent of the radial dependence (p in T(r) proportional to r(sup -P)) of the disk temperature is allowed to be free, we obtained p = 0.61 (sup +0.03)(sub -0.02). Such a reduction of p from the standard value 3/4 under extremely high mass accretion rates is predicted from the accretion disk theory as a consequence of the radial energy advection. Thus, the accretion disk in M82 X-1 is considered to be in the Slim disk state, where an optically thick Advection Dominant Accretion Flow (ADAF) is taking place. We have applied a theoretical slim disk spectral model to M82 X-1, and estimated the black hole mass approximately equal to 19 - 32 solar mass. We conclude that M82 X-1 is a stellar black hole which has been produced through evolution of an extremely massive star, shining at a several times the super-Eddington luminosity.

  20. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  1. Numerical simulation of galaxies in the M81 galaxy group.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P. S.; Thronson, H. A., Jr.

    The M81 galaxy group is a typical nearby galaxy group which consists of 15 members, including M82 and NGC 3077. Recent observations of the M81 group using the VLA (Yun, Ho, Lo, 1994) show a large scale H I map of the whole system, with M81, M82 and NGC 3077 inter-connected by a large amount of H I gas. In addition, two gas concentrations are observed at the eastern side of M81. The authors simulate the system numerically to reproduce the morphology, the spatial distribution of these 3 galaxies, and the H I gas surrounding the system.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Opt-NIR HST photometry of cluster candidates in M82 (Li+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; de Grijs, R.; Anders, P.; Li, C.

    2015-02-01

    The main data set we used was obtained as part of the M82 Hubble Heritage Program (HST proposal GO-10776; PI: Mountain). In 2006 March, the Hubble Heritage Team observed a large, four-color mosaic image of M82 with the ACS/Wide Field Channel (WFC; pixel size ~0.05") on board the HST, through the F435W (B), F555W (V), F814W (I), and F658N filters. A second data set, obtained with WFC3 (proposal GO-11360, PI: O'Connell), employing the filters F336W (U), F110W (roughly equivalent to a combination of the near-IR Y and J bands), and F160W (roughly similar to the near-IR H band) has also been included. (2 data files).

  3. "Galaxy," Defined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willman, B.; Strader, J.

    2012-09-01

    A growing number of low luminosity and low surface brightness astronomical objects challenge traditional notions of both galaxies and star clusters. To address this challenge, we propose a definition of galaxy that does not depend on a cold dark matter model of the universe: a galaxy is a gravitationally bound collection of stars whose properties cannot be explained by a combination of baryons and Newton's laws of gravity. After exploring several possible observational diagnostics of this definition, we critically examine the classification of ultra-faint dwarfs, globular clusters, ultra-compact dwarfs, and tidal dwarfs. While kinematic studies provide an effective diagnostic of the definition in many regimes, they can be less useful for compact or very faint systems. To explore the utility of using the [Fe/H] spread as a complementary diagnostic, we use published spectroscopic [Fe/H] measurements of 16 Milky Way dwarfs and 24 globular clusters to uniformly calculate their [Fe/H] spreads and associated uncertainties. Our principal results are (1) no known, old star cluster less luminous than MV = -10 has a significant (gsim0.1 dex) spread in its iron abundance; (2) known ultra-faint dwarf galaxies can be unambiguously classified with a combination of kinematic and [Fe/H] observations; (3) the observed [Fe/H] spreads in massive (gsim 106 M ⊙) globular clusters do not necessarily imply that they are the stripped nuclei of dwarfs, nor a need for dark matter; and (4) if ultra-compact dwarf galaxies reside in dark matter halos akin to those of ultra-faint dwarfs of the same half-light radii, then they will show no clear dynamical signature of dark matter. We suggest several measurements that may assist the future classification of massive globular clusters, ultra-compact dwarfs, and ultra-faint galaxies. Our galaxy definition is designed to be independent of the details of current observations and models, while our proposed diagnostics can be refined or replaced as

  4. Galaxy-galaxy(-galaxy) lensing as a sensitive probe of galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghiha, H.; Hilbert, S.; Schneider, P.; Simon, P.

    2012-11-01

    Context. The gravitational lensing effect provides various ways to study the mass environment of galaxies. Aims: We investigate how galaxy-galaxy(-galaxy) lensing can be used to test models of galaxy formation and evolution. Methods: We consider two semi-analytic galaxy formation models based on the Millennium Run N-body simulation: the Durham model by Bower et al. (2006, MNRAS, 370, 645) and the Garching model by Guo et al. (2011, MNRAS, 413, 101). We generate mock lensing observations for the two models, and then employ Fast Fourier Transform methods to compute second- and third-order aperture statistics in the simulated fields for various galaxy samples. Results: We find that both models predict qualitatively similar aperture signals, but there are large quantitative differences. The Durham model predicts larger amplitudes in general. In both models, red galaxies exhibit stronger aperture signals than blue galaxies. Using these aperture measurements and assuming a linear deterministic bias model, we measure relative bias ratios of red and blue galaxy samples. We find that a linear deterministic bias is insufficient to describe the relative clustering of model galaxies below ten arcmin angular scales. Dividing galaxies into luminosity bins, the aperture signals decrease with decreasing luminosity for brighter galaxies, but increase again for fainter galaxies. This increase is likely an artifact due to too many faint satellite galaxies in massive group and cluster halos predicted by the models. Conclusions: Our study shows that galaxy-galaxy(-galaxy) lensing is a sensitive probe of galaxy evolution.

  5. RadioAstron Space-VLBI observation of SN2014J and the possible AGN in M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovsky, Kirill V.; Voytsik, Petr A.; Alakoz, Alexei V.; Asaki, Yoshiharu; Bach, Uwe; Feiler, Roman; Gawronski, Marcin P.; Giroletti, Marcello; Kharinov, Mikhail A.; Ipatov, Alexander V.; Kutkin, Alexander M.; Rahimov, Ismail A.; Schinzel, Frank K.; Wolak, Pawel

    2014-06-01

    The Type Ia supernova SN2014J (ATel #5786, CBET #3792) appeared in M82 around 2014 January 14.75 UT (Zheng et al., arXiv:1401.7968). On 2014 March 27 05:20-06:00 UT (71.5d after explosion) it was observed with the RadioAstron Space-VLBI array consisting of the 10m Space radio telescope (Kardashev et al., 2013 ARep, 57, 153) operating simultaneously at 1.6 and 4.8 GHz, the Effelsberg 100m (observing at 4.8 GHz), Usuda 64m (1.6 GHz), Kalyazin 64m (1.6 and 4.8 GHz), Torun 32m (1.6 GHz), and Svetloe 32m (4.8 GHz) telescopes. ...

  6. An optical-near-IR study of a triplet of super star clusters in the starburst core of M82

    SciTech Connect

    Westmoquette, M. S.; Bastian, N.; Smith, L. J.; Seth, A. C.; Gallagher III, J. S.; Ryon, J. E.; O'Connell, R. W.; Silich, S.; Mayya, Y. D.; González, D. Rosa; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.

    2014-07-10

    We present HST/STIS optical and Gemini/NIFS near-IR IFU spectroscopy and archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of the triplet of super star clusters (A1, A2, and A3) in the core of the M82 starburst. Using model fits to the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) spectra and the weakness of red supergiant CO absorption features (appearing at ∼6 Myr) in the NIFS H-band spectra, the ages of A2 and A3 are 4.5 ± 1.0 Myr. A1 has strong CO bands, consistent with our previously determined age of 6.4 ± 0.5 Myr. The photometric masses of the three clusters are 4-7 × 10{sup 5} M{sub ☉}, and their sizes are R{sub eff} = 159, 104, 59 mas (∼2.8, 1.8, 1.0 pc) for A1, A2, and A3. The STIS spectra yielded radial velocities of 320 ± 2, 330 ± 6, and 336 ± 5 km s{sup –1} for A1, A2, and A3, placing them at the eastern end of the x{sub 2} orbits of M82's bar. Clusters A2 and A3 are in high-density (800-1000 cm{sup –3}) environments, and like A1, are surrounded by compact H II regions. We suggest the winds from A2 and A3 have stalled, as in A1, due to the high ISM ambient pressure. We propose that the three clusters were formed in situ on the outer x{sub 2} orbits in regions of dense molecular gas subsequently ionized by the rapidly evolving starburst. The similar radial velocities of the three clusters and their small projected separation of ∼25 pc suggest that they may merge in the near future unless this is prevented by velocity shearing.

  7. Spatially Resolved Star Formation History Along the Disk of M82 Using Multi-band Photometric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Merino, L. H.; Rosa-González, D.; Mayya, Y. D.

    2011-01-01

    We present results on the star formation history and extinction in the disk of M82 over spatial scales of 10'' (~180 pc). Multi-band photometric data covering the far-ultraviolet to the near-infrared bands were fitted to a grid of synthetic spectral energy distributions. We obtained distribution functions of age and extinction for each of the 117 apertures analyzed, taking into account observational errors through Monte Carlo simulations. These distribution functions were fitted with Gaussian functions to obtain the mean ages and extinctions together with their errors. The zones analyzed include the high surface brightness complexes defined by O'Connell & Mangano. We found that these complexes share the same star formation history and extinction as the field stellar populations in the disk. There is an indication that the stellar populations are marginally older at the outer disk (450 Myr at ~3 kpc) as compared to the inner disk (100 Myr at 0.5 kpc). For the nuclear region (radius less than 500 pc), we obtained an age of less than 10 Myr. The results obtained in this work are consistent with the idea that the 0.5-3 kpc part of the disk of M82 formed around 90% of the stellar mass in a star-forming episode that started around 450 Myr ago and lasted for about 350 Myr. We found that field stars are the major contributors to the flux over the spatial scales analyzed in this study, with the stellar cluster contribution being 7% in the nucleus and 0.7% in the disk.

  8. Kinematics of faint white dwarfs.

    PubMed

    Luyten, W J

    1978-10-01

    An analysis has been made for solar motion for 128 very faint white dwarfs of color class b or a. While about 40% of these stars may be high-velocity objects, it seems definitely indicated that the luminosity of all of them is considerably lower than that for the "normal" white dwarf of the same color. PMID:16592566

  9. Kinematics of faint white dwarfs.

    PubMed

    Luyten, W J

    1978-10-01

    An analysis has been made for solar motion for 128 very faint white dwarfs of color class b or a. While about 40% of these stars may be high-velocity objects, it seems definitely indicated that the luminosity of all of them is considerably lower than that for the "normal" white dwarf of the same color.

  10. Kinematics of faint white dwarfs

    PubMed Central

    Luyten, Willem J.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis has been made for solar motion for 128 very faint white dwarfs of color class b or a. While about 40% of these stars may be high-velocity objects, it seems definitely indicated that the luminosity of all of them is considerably lower than that for the “normal” white dwarf of the same color. PMID:16592566

  11. The faint radio sky: radio astronomy becomes mainstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Radio astronomy has changed. For years it studied relatively rare sources, which emit mostly non-thermal radiation across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, i.e. radio quasars and radio galaxies. Now, it is reaching such faint flux densities that it detects mainly star-forming galaxies and the more common radio-quiet active galactic nuclei. These sources make up the bulk of the extragalactic sky, which has been studied for decades in the infrared, optical, and X-ray bands. I follow the transformation of radio astronomy by reviewing the main components of the radio sky at the bright and faint ends, the issue of their proper classification, their number counts, luminosity functions, and evolution. The overall "big picture" astrophysical implications of these results, and their relevance for a number of hot topics in extragalactic astronomy, are also discussed. The future prospects of the faint radio sky are very bright, as we will soon be flooded with survey data. This review should be useful to all extragalactic astronomers, irrespective of their favourite electromagnetic band(s), and even stellar astronomers might find it somewhat gratifying.

  12. Spectrophotometric Redshifts in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pharo, John; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.

    2016-06-01

    We have combined HST grism spectroscopy and deep broadband imaging to measure spectro-photometric redshifts (SPZs) of faint galaxies. Using a technique pioneered by Ryan et al. 2007, one can combine spectra and photometry to yield an SPZ that is more accurate than pure photometric redshifts, and can probe more deeply than ground-based spectroscopic redshifts. By taking mid-resolution spectra from the HST Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS), SPZs can be found for measurements potentially down to 27th magnitude (the typical brightness of a dwarf galaxy at redshift ˜1.5). A galaxy’s redshift is vital for understanding its place in the growth and evolution of the universe. The measurement of high-accuracy SPZs for FIGS sources will improve the faint-end and high-redshift portions of the luminosity function, and make possible a robust analysis of the FIGS fields for signs of Large Scale Structure (LSS). The improved redshift and distance measurements allowed for the identification of a structure at z=0.83 in one of the FIGS fields.

  13. Spectrophotometric Redshifts in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pharo, John; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.

    2016-06-01

    We have combined HST grism spectroscopy and deep broadband imaging to measure spectro-photometric redshifts (SPZs) of faint galaxies. Using a technique pioneered by Ryan et al. 2007, one can combine spectra and photometry to yield an SPZ that is more accurate than pure photometric redshifts, and can probe more deeply than ground-based spectroscopic redshifts. By taking mid-resolution spectra from the HST Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS), SPZs can be found for measurements potentially down to 27th magnitude (the typical brightness of a dwarf galaxy at redshift ∼1.5). A galaxy’s redshift is vital for understanding its place in the growth and evolution of the universe. The measurement of high-accuracy SPZs for FIGS sources will improve the faint-end and high-redshift portions of the luminosity function, and make possible a robust analysis of the FIGS fields for signs of Large Scale Structure (LSS). The improved redshift and distance measurements allowed for the identification of a structure at z=0.83 in one of the FIGS fields.

  14. The faint young Sun problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feulner, Georg

    2012-05-01

    For more than four decades, scientists have been trying to find an answer to one of the most fundamental questions in paleoclimatology, the “faint young Sun problem.” For the early Earth, models of stellar evolution predict a solar energy input to the climate system that is about 25% lower than today. This would result in a completely frozen world over the first 2 billion years in the history of our planet if all other parameters controlling Earth's climate had been the same. Yet there is ample evidence for the presence of liquid surface water and even life in the Archean (3.8 to 2.5 billion years before present), so some effect (or effects) must have been compensating for the faint young Sun. A wide range of possible solutions have been suggested and explored during the last four decades, with most studies focusing on higher concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide, methane, or ammonia. All of these solutions present considerable difficulties, however, so the faint young Sun problem cannot be regarded as solved. Here I review research on the subject, including the latest suggestions for solutions of the faint young Sun problem and recent geochemical constraints on the composition of Earth's early atmosphere. Furthermore, I will outline the most promising directions for future research. In particular I would argue that both improved geochemical constraints on the state of the Archean climate system and numerical experiments with state-of-the-art climate models are required to finally assess what kept the oceans on the Archean Earth from freezing over completely.

  15. ESTIMATING THE FIRST-LIGHT TIME OF THE TYPE IA SUPERNOVA 2014J IN M82

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, WeiKang; Shivvers, Isaac; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Fox, Ori D.; Graham, Melissa L.; Kelly, Patrick L.; Mauerhan, Jon C.; Itagaki, Koichi

    2014-03-01

    The Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2014J in M82 (d ≈ 3.5 Mpc) was serendipitously discovered by S. Fossey's group on 2014 January 21 UT and has been confirmed to be the nearest known SN Ia since at least SN 1986G. Although SN 2014J was not discovered until ∼7 days after first light, both the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope at Lick Observatory and K. Itagaki obtained several prediscovery observations of SN 2014J. With these data, we are able to constrain the object's time of first light to be January 14.75 UT, only 0.82 ± 0.21 days before our first detection. Interestingly, we find that the light curve is well described by a varying power law, much like SN 2013dy, which makes SN 2014J the second example of a changing power law in early-time SN Ia light curves. A low-resolution spectrum taken on January 23.388 UT, ∼8.70 days after first light, shows that SN 2014J is a heavily reddened but otherwise spectroscopically normal SN Ia.

  16. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... kids: drink plenty of fluids, especially in hot weather or during physical activity take frequent breaks and move around as much as possible when sitting or standing for long periods of time slowly breathe into a paper bag ... Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  17. Galaxy NGC 247

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image of the dwarf spiral galaxy NGC 247 was taken by Galaxy Evolution Explorer on October 13, 2003, in a single orbit exposure of 1600 seconds. The region that looks like a 'hole' in the upper part of the galaxy is a location with a deficit of gas and therefore a lower star formation rate and ultraviolet brightness. Optical images of this galaxy show a bright star on the southern edge. This star is faint and red in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer ultraviolet image, revealing that it is a foreground star in our Milky Way galaxy. The string of background galaxies to the North-East (upper left) of NGC 247 is 355 million light years from our Milky Way galaxy whereas NGC 247 is a mere 9 million light years away. The faint blue light that can be seen in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer image of the upper two of these background galaxies may indicate that they are in the process of merging together.

  18. Spectro-imaging of M 82 at 3.3μm: evidence for dissociation of carriers in the starburst.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, P.; Rouan, D.; Lacombe, F.; Tiphene, D.

    1995-05-01

    We present subarcsecond infrared images in the 3.3μm PAH feature of M 82, the prototype of starburst galaxies. Observations were done using the Paris-Meudon Observatory CIRCUS IR Camera at the CFHT 3m60 telescope. The most interesting results derive from the map of line-to-continuum ratio (R=[3.3μm]/Cont) which exhibits very peculiar features: i) a strong anti-correlation, at large scale, with the continuum intensity, the line being practically lacking in the central lane where peaks the continuum emission, a clear indication of the destruction of the carrier of the line by some process associated to the starburst phenomenon; ii) the region where R is maximum is found essentially in an extended bow (540x240pc) south of the starburst region and coinciding tightly with the external part of the molecular disk traced by CO and HCN emission; iii) on smaller scales a rather complex and clumpy structure is found, both in the bow of enhanced R and at center, where almost total depletion of PAH (lowest value of R) is found in several bubbles, a few of them at location of strong radio SNR, and in a channel, north of the nucleus, that coincides rather precisely with the superwind direction. There is indication of two different regimes of depletion: a partial depletion and a quasi-complete depletion in the central lane around the nucleus. It is shown that the 3-4μm continuum emission cannot be explained by reddened starlight or by classical dust thermal emission, and is larger than predicted by models. The ratio R should give a fair estimate of the local 3.3μm line carrier abundance. Mechanisms of destruction and production of PAHs are investigated; in particular, we show that the two regimes of depletion may correspond to two different destructive processes: one, more efficient, that may correspond to electron bombardment in the SN dominated central region and one driven by UV photons in the molecular disk. For the later, we show that three competitive mechanisms are

  19. Measurement of the 1s2l3l’ Dielectronic Recombination Emission Line in Li-Like Ar and Its Contribution to the Faint X-Ray Feature Found in the Stacked Spectrum of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Amy Christina; Silwal, Roshani; Dreiling, Joan; Borovik, Alexander; Ajello, Marco; Gillaspy, John; Kilgore, Ethan; Ralchenko, Yuri; Takacs, Endre

    2016-06-01

    Driven by the recent detection of an unidentified emission line previously reported at 3.55-3.57 keV in a stacked spectrum of galaxy clusters, we investigated the resonant DR process in Li-like Ar as a possible source of, or contributor to, the emission line. The Li-like transition 1s22l-1s2l3l’ was suggested to produce a 3.62 keV photon [1] near the unidentified line at 3.57 keV and was the primary focus of our investigation. Apart from the mentioned transitions, we have found other features that can be possible contributors to the emission in this region. The Electron Beam Ion Trap at NIST was used to produce and trap the highly-charged ions of argon. The energy of the quasi-monoenergetic electron beam was incremented in steps of 15 eV to scan over all of the Li-like Ar DR resonances. A Johann-type crystal spectrometer and a solid-state germanium detector were used to take x-ray measurements perpendicular to the electron beam. The DR cross sections were measured and normalized to the well-known photoionization cross sections using radiative recombination peaks in the measured spectra. Corrections for different instrument and method related effects such as charge state balance, electron beam space charge, and charge exchange have been considered. Our high-resolution crystal spectra allowed the experimental separation of features that are less than 2 eV apart. We have used a collisional radiative model NOMAD [2] aided by atomic data calculations by FAC [3] to interpret our observations and account for the corrections and uncertainties. Experimental results were compared to the AtomDB theoretical emission lines used to fit the galaxy cluster spectra containing the unidentified 3.57 keV line. These data points can be added benchmarks in the database and used to accurately interpret spectra from current x-ray satellites, including Hitomi, Chandra, and XMM-Newton x-ray observatories.[1] Bulbul E. et al., 2014, ApJ, 789, 13[2] Ralchenko Yu. et al., 2014, JQSRT, 71

  20. The faint radio AGN population in the spotlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera Ruiz, Noelia; Middelberg, Enno

    2016-08-01

    To determine the AGN component in the faint radio population is fundamental in galaxy evolution studies. A relatively easy and direct way to determine which galaxies do have a radio-active AGN is a detection using the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) technique. The goal of this project is to study with statistically relevant numbers the faint radio source population using VLBI observations. To achieve this goal, the project is divided into two parts. In the first part, we have observed ~3000 radio sources in the COSMOS extragalactic field with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 1.4GHz. We have detected 468 sources. In the second part, we have observed ~200 radio sources in the COSMOS field with extremely high sensitivity using the VLBA together with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at 1.4GHz, to explore an even fainter population in the flux density regime of tens of uJy. We are currently calibrating this data. In this overview I will present the survey design, observations, and calibration, along with some first results.

  1. CO observations of galaxies with the Nobeyama 45-M telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofue, Y.; Handa, T.; Hayashi, M.; Nakai, N.

    1987-01-01

    High-resolution (15 inch), filled aperture maps of the CO (J = 1-0) line emission were obtained for several nearby, CO-bright galaxies like M82, M83, IC342, and NGC891 in order to study star forming activity in these galaxies.

  2. Deep infrared galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, Matthew; Houck, J. R.; Hacking, Perry B.

    1992-01-01

    High signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra of 17 infrared-bright emission-line galaxies near the north ecliptic pole are presented. Reddening-corrected line ratios forbidden O III 5007/H-beta, N II 6583/H-alpha, S II (6716 + 6731)/H-alpha, and O I 6300/H-alpha are used to discriminate between candidate energy generation mechanisms in each galaxy. These criteria have frequently been applied to optically selected samples of galaxies in the past, but this is the first time they have been applied to a set of faint flux-limited infrared-selected objects. The analysis indicates the sample contains seven starburst galaxies and three (AGN). However, seven galaxies in the present sample elude the classification scheme based on these line ratios. It is concluded that a two-component (starburst plus AGN) model for energy generation is inadequate for infrared galaxies.

  3. On the Nature of the mHz X-Ray QPOs from ULX M82 X-1: Evidence for Timing-Spectral (anti) Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1 we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its energy spectral power-law index. These quantities are known to correlate in stellar mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibiting Type-C QPOs (approx 0.2-15 Hz). The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of its mHz QPOs as Type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of Type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass. We resolved the count rates of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling and identify observations in which M82 X-1 was at least as bright as source 5. Using only those observations, we detect QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which the energy spectral power-law index varied from 1.7-2.2. Interestingly, we find evidence for an anti-correlation (Pearsons correlation coefficient = -0.95) between the power-law index and the QPO centroid frequency. While such an anti-correlation is observed in StMBHs at high Type-C QPO frequencies (approx 5-15 Hz), the frequency range over which it holds in StMBHs is significantly smaller (factor of approx 1.5-3) than the QPO range reported here from M82 X-1 (factor of 6). However, it remains possible that contamination from source 5 can bias our result. Joint Chandra/XMM-Newton observations in the future can resolve this problem and confirm the timing-spectral anti-correlation reported here.

  4. A Broadband X-Ray Spectral Study of the Intermediate-mass Black Hole Candidate M82 X-1 with NuSTAR, Chandra, and Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brightman, Murray; Harrison, Fiona A.; Barret, Didier; Davis, Shane W.; Fürst, Felix; Madsen, Kristin K.; Middleton, Matthew; Miller, Jon M.; Stern, Daniel; Tao, Lian; Walton, Dominic J.

    2016-09-01

    M82 X-1 is one of the brightest ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) known, which, assuming Eddington-limited accretion and other considerations, makes it one of the best intermediate-mass black-hole (IMBH) candidates. However, the ULX may still be explained by super-Eddington accretion onto a stellar remnant black hole. We present simultaneous NuSTAR, Chandra, and Swift/XRT observations during the peak of a flaring episode with the aim of modeling the emission of M82 X-1 and yielding insights into its nature. We find that thin accretion disk models all require accretion rates at or above the Eddington limit in order to reproduce the spectral shape, given a range of black-hole masses and spins. Since at these high Eddington ratios the thin-disk model breaks down due to radial advection in the disk, we discard the results of the thin-disk models as unphysical. We find that the temperature profile as a function of disk radius (T(r)\\propto {r}-p) is significantly flatter (p={0.55}-0.04+0.07) than expected for a standard thin disk (p = 0.75). A flatter profile is instead characteristic of a slim disk, which is highly suggestive of super-Eddington accretion. Furthermore, radiation hydrodynamical simulations of super-Eddington accretion have shown that the predicted spectra of these systems are very similar to what we observe for M82 X-1. We therefore conclude that M82 X-1 is a super-Eddington accretor. Our mass estimates inferred from the inner disk radius imply a stellar remnant black hole ({M}{{BH}} = {26}-6+9 M ⊙) when assuming zero spin and face-on inclination, or an IMBH for maximal spin and a highly inclined disk.

  5. A Morphological and Multicolor Survey for Faint QSOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck-Winchatz, Bernhard

    The study of the evolution of the bulk of the quasar population requires a sample of objects from the populous faint end of the luminosity function. Such quasars are frustratingly dim with m ~ 24 at intermediate redshift. Recent ground-based surveys have failed to produce reliable samples largely due to the substantial morphological contamination by faint compact galaxies having colors similar to QSOs. In order to establish a more reliable ultrafaint sample, we have used the Apache Point 3.5-m telescope to take deep U-band CCD images in 24 of the 28 high galactic latitude fields of the ``Groth-Westphal Strip''. These fields have previously been imaged with F606W, F814W WFPC2 filters form Hubble Space Telescope, and cover 0.025 deg2 of the sky. Our approach hence combines multicolor information spanning 3000-10,000 A in three filters with the 0.1'' spatial resolution of HST to establish a multicolor and morphological survey for faint QSOs/AGN. The limiting magnitude of F606W = 24.0 (roughly B = 24.5) is approximately two magnitudes fainter than the limiting magnitudes of the faintest existing ground-based surveys. We identify 10 high likelihood UV-excess candidates with stellar or stellar nucleus + galaxy morphology in WFPC2. The surface density of QSO candidates to z ~ 2.1, F606W = 24.0 is 420+180-130deg -2 . To further eliminate possible contamination by compact emission line galaxies, we apply a F606W - F814W color-cut, which reduces the total number of candidates to 7 and the surface density to 290+160-110 . Our results are in excellent agreement with extrapolations of existing surveys, and with predictions of several popular empirical and physically-based models of the evolution of the QSO population. Thus, even pending followup confirming spectroscopy, the observed surface density of QSO candidates is already low enough to provide interesting constraints for such models.

  6. Optical multicolors - A poor person's z machine for galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koo, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility, limits, accuracy, and uncertainties of using optical broadband colors in the form of two-color plots to measure the redshifts of faint galaxies are explored. Comparison of redshifts from slit spectra and 4-m photographic UBVI photometry of 100 faint galaxies confirms that colors do yield redshifts. These galaxies of 17-23 mag in B span a wide range of intrinsic color and are thus unlike previous samples of faint galaxies that were largely radio or cluster galaxies of early (red) type. For redshifts less than 0.35, two-thirds of the color redshifts agree with the spectroscopic values to within + or - 0.04 in z; for higher redshifts to z of 0.6, the errors increase to + or - 0.06. These accuracies were achieved for blue as well as red galaxies, and ensure that multicolors can serve as a poor person's redshift machine to study distant galaxies in clusters and the field.

  7. Galaxy Messier 83

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image of the spiral galaxy Messier 83 was taken by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer on June 7, 2003. Located 15 million light years from Earth and known as the Southern Pinwheel Galaxy, Messier 83 displays significant amounts of ultraviolet emissions far from the optically bright portion of the galaxy. It is also known to have an extended hydrogen disc that appears to radiate a faint ultraviolet emission. The red stars in the foreground of the image are Milky Way stars.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer mission is led by the California Institute of Technology, which is also responsible for the science operations and data analysis. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., a division of Caltech, manages the mission and built the science instrument. The mission was developed under NASA's Explorers Program, managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The mission's international partners include South Korea and France.

  8. The phylogeography of Y-chromosome haplogroup h1a1a-m82 reveals the likely Indian origin of the European Romani populations.

    PubMed

    Rai, Niraj; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Tamang, Rakesh; Pathak, Ajai Kumar; Singh, Vipin Kumar; Karmin, Monika; Singh, Manvendra; Rani, Deepa Selvi; Anugula, Sharath; Yadav, Brijesh Kumar; Singh, Ashish; Srinivasagan, Ramkumar; Yadav, Anita; Kashyap, Manju; Narvariya, Sapna; Reddy, Alla G; van Driem, George; Underhill, Peter A; Villems, Richard; Kivisild, Toomas; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2012-01-01

    Linguistic and genetic studies on Roma populations inhabited in Europe have unequivocally traced these populations to the Indian subcontinent. However, the exact parental population group and time of the out-of-India dispersal have remained disputed. In the absence of archaeological records and with only scanty historical documentation of the Roma, comparative linguistic studies were the first to identify their Indian origin. Recently, molecular studies on the basis of disease-causing mutations and haploid DNA markers (i.e. mtDNA and Y-chromosome) supported the linguistic view. The presence of Indian-specific Y-chromosome haplogroup H1a1a-M82 and mtDNA haplogroups M5a1, M18 and M35b among Roma has corroborated that their South Asian origins and later admixture with Near Eastern and European populations. However, previous studies have left unanswered questions about the exact parental population groups in South Asia. Here we present a detailed phylogeographical study of Y-chromosomal haplogroup H1a1a-M82 in a data set of more than 10,000 global samples to discern a more precise ancestral source of European Romani populations. The phylogeographical patterns and diversity estimates indicate an early origin of this haplogroup in the Indian subcontinent and its further expansion to other regions. Tellingly, the short tandem repeat (STR) based network of H1a1a-M82 lineages displayed the closest connection of Romani haplotypes with the traditional scheduled caste and scheduled tribe population groups of northwestern India.

  9. The Phylogeography of Y-Chromosome Haplogroup H1a1a-M82 Reveals the Likely Indian Origin of the European Romani Populations

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Ajai Kumar; Singh, Vipin Kumar; Karmin, Monika; Singh, Manvendra; Rani, Deepa Selvi; Anugula, Sharath; Yadav, Brijesh Kumar; Singh, Ashish; Srinivasagan, Ramkumar; Yadav, Anita; Kashyap, Manju; Narvariya, Sapna; Reddy, Alla G.; Underhill, Peter A.; Villems, Richard; Kivisild, Toomas; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2012-01-01

    Linguistic and genetic studies on Roma populations inhabited in Europe have unequivocally traced these populations to the Indian subcontinent. However, the exact parental population group and time of the out-of-India dispersal have remained disputed. In the absence of archaeological records and with only scanty historical documentation of the Roma, comparative linguistic studies were the first to identify their Indian origin. Recently, molecular studies on the basis of disease-causing mutations and haploid DNA markers (i.e. mtDNA and Y-chromosome) supported the linguistic view. The presence of Indian-specific Y-chromosome haplogroup H1a1a-M82 and mtDNA haplogroups M5a1, M18 and M35b among Roma has corroborated that their South Asian origins and later admixture with Near Eastern and European populations. However, previous studies have left unanswered questions about the exact parental population groups in South Asia. Here we present a detailed phylogeographical study of Y-chromosomal haplogroup H1a1a-M82 in a data set of more than 10,000 global samples to discern a more precise ancestral source of European Romani populations. The phylogeographical patterns and diversity estimates indicate an early origin of this haplogroup in the Indian subcontinent and its further expansion to other regions. Tellingly, the short tandem repeat (STR) based network of H1a1a-M82 lineages displayed the closest connection of Romani haplotypes with the traditional scheduled caste and scheduled tribe population groups of northwestern India. PMID:23209554

  10. CAN THE 62 DAY X-RAY PERIOD OF ULX M82 X-1 BE DUE TO A PRECESSING ACCRETION DISK?

    SciTech Connect

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E. E-mail: tod.strohmayer@nasa.gov

    2013-09-10

    We have analyzed all archival Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer/Proportional Counter Array monitoring observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source M82 X-1 in order to study the properties of its 62 day X-ray period, which was found by Kaaret and Feng in 2007. Based on its high coherence, it has been argued that the observed period is the orbital period of the binary. Utilizing a much longer data set than in previous studies, we find the following. (1) The phase-resolved X-ray (3-15 keV) spectra-modeled with a thermal accretion disk and a power law-suggest that the accretion disk's contribution to the total flux is strongly modulated with phase. (2) Suggestive evidence for a sudden phase shift of approximately 0.4 in phase (25 days) between the first and the second halves of the light curve separated by roughly 1000 days. If confirmed, the implied timescale to change the period is {approx}10 yr, which is exceptionally fast for an orbital phenomenon. These two independent pieces of evidence are consistent with the periodicity being due to a precessing accretion disk, similar to the super-orbital periods observed in systems like Her X-1, LMC X-4, and SS433. However, the timing evidence for a change in the period needs to be confirmed with additional observations. This should be possible with further monitoring of M82 with instruments such as the Swift X-Ray Telescope.

  11. Discovery of new variable radio sources in the nucleus of the nearby galaxy messier 82.

    PubMed

    Kronberg, P P; Sramek, R A

    1985-01-01

    Widespread variability has been discovered in a large population of radio sources close to the nucleus of an active galaxy. The galaxy, Messier 82 (M82), and others similar to it show evidence for enhanced nuclear activity and unusually strong far-infrared emission. The observational data, obtained with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Large Array in New Mexico over the past 3 years, provide the first direct "look" at a starburst-the phenomenon of sudden, rapid star formation which occurs near the nucleus of a small fraction of galaxies. Nearly all the brightest of about 40 radio sources in M82' s nucleus decreased in intensity over 2.7 years up to October 1983. One source, which in February 1981 was ten times as bright as our Galaxy's most luminous supernova remnant, turned off within only a few months. Most of the other ten strongest sources are declining so rapidly that they will fade into the background within 30 years. Thus, new supernovae are expected to appear in M82' s nucleus every few years. The discovery has revealed the "engine room" of the mysterious activity in M82 and, by implication, similar active galaxies which have disturbed nuclei and which are unusually luminous in the far infrared. An estimate of the rate of energy input by the radio-visible supernovae closely matches the far-infrared luminosities which were recently measured for M82 and other similar galaxies. PMID:17809994

  12. Radio loud far-infrared galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dey, Arjun; Vanbreugel, Wil; Shields, Joseph C.

    1990-01-01

    The first results are presented of a multiwavelength study of Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) galaxies with excess radio emission. The sample was selected by cross correlating the IRAS Faint Source Survey, and the Point Source Catalogue with the Texas radio survey. Recent optical (imaging and spectroscopic) and radio (VLA) observations are discussed. These observations will be used to investigate possible connections between radio galaxy activity, star formation and galaxy interactions.

  13. OPTOPUS spectroscopy of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnur, G. F. O.

    The spectra of selected H II regions in the center of the starburst galaxy NGC 1808 and of many faint galaxies surrounding the NGC 1808 were obtained simultaneously, using the Optopus fiber-optics spectrograph facility (described by Lund, 1986) at the ESO 3.6-m telescope. The preparation of Optopus plates (each of which employed more than 40 fibers), observations, and the procedures of data processing and Optopus calibration are described together with the problems caused by cosmic ray events. Preliminary results are included.

  14. Faint detection of exoplanets in microlensing surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Robert A.

    2014-06-20

    We propose a new approach to discovering faint microlensing signals below traditional thresholds, and for estimating the binary-lens mass ratio and the apparent separation from such signals. The events found will be helpful in accurately estimating the true distribution of planetary semimajor axes, which is an important goal of space microlensing surveys.

  15. Luminous Blue Compact Galaxies: Probes of galaxy assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Cassidy Louann

    The life cycles of galaxies over cosmic time is yet to be fully understood. How did galaxies evolve from their formative stages to the structures we observe today? This dissertation details the identification and analysis of a sample of Luminous Blue Compact Galaxies (LBCGs), a class of galaxy in the local (z < 0.05) universe exhibiting blue colors, high surface brightness, and high star formation rates. These systems appear to be very similar in their global properties to the early evolutionary phases of most galaxies, however their locality permits detailed investigation over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum in contrast to the smaller angular sizes and extreme faintness of distant galaxies. We use a combination of optical, ultraviolet, and infrared data to investigate a sample of LBCGs utilizing space and ground-based data.

  16. An Active Ac/Ds Transposon System for Activation Tagging in Tomato Cultivar M82 Using Clonal Propagation1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jared D.; Pereira, Andy; Dickerman, Allan W.; Veilleux, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a model organism for Solanaceae in both molecular and agronomic research. This project utilized Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation and the transposon-tagging construct Activator (Ac)/Dissociator (Ds)-ATag-Bar_gosGFP to produce activation-tagged and knockout mutants in the processing tomato cultivar M82. The construct carried hygromycin resistance (hyg), green fluorescent protein (GFP), and the transposase (TPase) of maize (Zea mays) Activator major transcript X054214.1 on the stable Ac element, along with a 35S enhancer tetramer and glufosinate herbicide resistance (BAR) on the mobile Ds-ATag element. An in vitro propagation strategy was used to produce a population of 25 T0 plants from a single transformed plant regenerated in tissue culture. A T1 population of 11,000 selfed and cv M82 backcrossed progeny was produced from the functional T0 line. This population was screened using glufosinate herbicide, hygromycin leaf painting, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Insertion sites of transposed Ds-ATag elements were identified through thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and resulting product sequences were aligned to the recently published tomato genome. A population of 509 independent, Ds-only transposant lines spanning all 12 tomato chromosomes has been developed. Insertion site analysis demonstrated that more than 80% of these lines harbored Ds insertions conducive to activation tagging. The capacity of the Ds-ATag element to alter transcription was verified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR in two mutant lines. The transposon-tagged lines have been immortalized in seed stocks and can be accessed through an online database, providing a unique resource for tomato breeding and analysis of gene function in the background of a commercial tomato cultivar. PMID:23569107

  17. Can the 62 Day X-ray Period of ULX M82 X-1 Be Due to a Precessing Accretion Disk?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed all the archival RXTE/PCA monitoring observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1 in order to study the properties of its previously discovered 62 day X-ray period (Kaaret & Feng 2007). Based on the high coherence of the modulation it has been argued that the observed period is the orbital period of the binary. Utilizing a much longer data set than in previous studies we find: (1) The phase-resolved X-ray (3-15 keV) energy spectra - modeled with a thermal accretion disk and a power-law corona - suggest that the accretion disk's contribution to the total flux is responsible for the overall periodic modulation while the power-law flux remains approximately constant with phase. (2) Suggestive evidence for a sudden phase shift-of approximately 0.3 in phase (20 days)-between the first and the second halves of the light curve separated by roughly 1000 days. If confirmed, the implied timescale to change the period is approx. = 10 yrs, which is exceptionally fast for an orbital phenomenon. These independent pieces of evidence are consistent with the 62 day period being due to a precessing accretion disk, similar to the so-called super-orbital periods observed in systems like Her X-1, LMC X-4, and SS433. However, the timing evidence for a change in the period needs to be confirmed with additional observations. This should be possible with further monitoring of M82 with instruments such as the X-ray telescope (XRT) on board Swift.

  18. Discovering Teenage Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Staring for the equivalent of every night for two weeks at the same little patch of sky with ESO's Very Large Telescope, an international team of astronomers has found the extremely faint light from teenage galaxies billions of light years away. These galaxies, which the research team believes are the building blocks of normal galaxies like our Milky Way, had eluded detection for three decades, despite intensive searches. ESO PR Photo 52/07 ESO PR Photo 52/07 A 92-hour long spectrum Two-dimensional spectrum obtained in 92 hours of exposure time, showing the line emitter candidates. The quasar absorption lines are visible close to the centre of the image. The team, led by Martin Haehnelt of the University of Cambridge, UK, Michael Rauch and George Becker of the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution, USA, and Andy Bunker of the Anglo-Australian Observatory, reports their results in the 1 March 2008 issue of the Astrophysical Journal. "This is the first time that the sky has been searched to this depth and the unrivalled sensitivity of the picture taken with the VLT was key to succeeding," says Haehnelt. Experts have long speculated that galaxies like ours were created by the amalgamation of proto-galaxies early in the history of the Universe, but the light from these fragments was so faint that astronomers had struggled to prove they were there at all. Astronomers thought that the teenage galaxies must be out there because they were blocking part of the light from objects even further away in space. "Previous attempts have usually been frustrated by the difficulty of detecting extremely faint objects: the amount of time required even with an 8-metre class telescope like the VLT considerably exceeds typical observing time awards. We have thus exploited the periods of less good weather with the FORS2 spectrograph at the VLT, taking advantage of the service observing mode," says Becker. In service mode, ESO staff astronomers at Paranal are responsible for carrying

  19. THE VERY FAINT END OF THE UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OVER COSMIC TIME: CONSTRAINTS FROM THE LOCAL GROUP FOSSIL RECORD

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Conroy, Charlie

    2014-10-10

    We present a new technique to estimate the evolution of the very faint end of the UV luminosity function (LF) out to z ∼ 5. Measured star formation histories (SFHs) from the fossil record of Local Group (LG) galaxies are used to reconstruct the LF down to M {sub UV} ∼–5 at z ∼ 5 and M {sub UV} ∼–1.5 at z < 1. Such faint limits are well beyond the current observational limits and are likely to remain beyond the limits of next-generation facilities. The reconstructed LFs, when combined with direct measurements of the LFs at higher luminosity, are well-fit by a standard Schechter function with no evidence of a break to the faintest limits probed by this technique. The derived faint-end slope, α, steepens from ≈ – 1.2 at z < 1 to ≈ – 1.6 at 4 < z < 5. We test the effects of burstiness in the SFHs and find the recovered LFs to be only modestly affected. Incompleteness corrections for the faintest LG galaxies and the (unlikely) possibility of significant luminosity-dependent destruction of dwarf galaxies between high redshift and the present epoch are important uncertainties. These and other uncertainties can be mitigated with more detailed modeling and future observations. The reconstructed faint end LF from the fossil record can therefore be a powerful and complementary probe of the high-redshift faint galaxies believed to play a key role in the reionization of the universe.

  20. Surface photometry of galaxies in low density regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennik, J.; Hopp, U.; Kovachev, B.; Kuhn, B.; Elsaesser, H.

    1996-06-01

    We perform detailed surface photometry, based on B- and/or R-band CCD images of 92 faint galaxies. They are a subsample of those galaxies which were studied by Hopp et al. (1994) in the direction of three nearby voids. We derive integral photometric parameters and radial surface brightness profiles and compare them to those of several faint galaxy samples, located in different environments, and of a bright field galaxy sample. According to the obtained photometric characteristics, our sample is a mixture of intrinsically bright and faint galaxies, about 60% of them belonging to the bright subsample (M_B_<-19.0). These bright ones show mean characteristics of typical Freeman's disks and are mainly located in the background of the observed voids. The faint subsample (M_B_>=-19.0) has parameters typical for the low-surface-brightness (LSB) galaxies. There are a few well isolated galaxies both among the bright and faint subsamples. About 40% of studied galaxies reveal ellipticity and position angle variations along of the radius. The (B-R) colour indices of the observed galaxies span over a wide range of 0.5-1.8mag with a median value at 1.11 mag, rather blue. About 30% of the observed galaxies reveal radial colour gradients at a 5σ significance level. These galaxies show typically red centers and are getting bluer towards the periphery. The most isolated galaxies in our sample show relatively blue colours (B_T_-R_T_=~0.8). About 40% of the studied galaxies have surface brightness profiles which can be described by the model of single exponential disk. 38% of our galaxies have more complicated profiles and either can be approximated by two exponentials or show the presence of a small bulge. 20% of the observed galaxies have central light depression and outer irregularities - typical for some dwarf galaxies. These profile type frequencies are similar to those of faint field galaxy sample. The evolutionary history of both the isolated and clustered galaxies obviously

  1. The magnetic field evolution of ULX NuSTAR J095551+6940.8 in M82 - a legacy of accreting magnetar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y. Y.; Song, L. M.; Zhang, C. M.; Tong, H.

    2016-09-01

    Ultraluminous X-ray sources are usually believed to be black holes with mass about 102-3 M⊙. However, the recent discovery of NuSTAR J095551+6940.8 in M82 by Bachetti et al. shows that it holds the spin period P = 1.37 s and period derivative dot{P}≈ -2× 10^{-10} s s^{-1}, which provides a strong evidence that some ultraluminous X-ray sources could be neutron stars. We obtain that the source may be an evolved magnetar according to our simulation by employing the model of accretion induced the polar magnetic field decay and standard spin-up torque of an accreting neutron star. The results show that NuSTAR J095551+6940.8 is still in the spin-up process, and the polar magnetic field decays to about 4.5 × 1012 G after accreting ˜10-2.5 M⊙, while the strong magnetic field exists in the out-polar region, which could be responsible for the observed low field magnetar. The ultra luminosity of the source can be explained by the beaming effect and two kinds of accretion-radial random accretion and disc accretion. Since the birth rate of magnetars is about ten per cent of the normal neutron stars, we guess that several ultraluminous X-ray sources should share the similar properties to that of NuSTAR J095551+6940.8.

  2. First results from the Faint Object Camera - Observations of PKS 0521 - 36

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macchetto, F.; Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Blades, J. C.; Boksenberg, A.

    1991-01-01

    The Faint Object Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope was used to observe the radio galaxy PKS 0521 - 36 which hosts a prominent radio jet. Images of the jet show spatial structure comparable to VLA data and significantly better than optical ground-based observations. The jet structure is resolved at FOC resolution. In addition to the radio knot, well resolved by the FOC, an extension of the jet toward the nucleus is apparent. The rest of the jet does not show much clumpiness, implying that the synchrotron electrons must be accelerated all along the jet to account for the extent in the optical region.

  3. The Population of Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Barker, Ed; Buckalew, Brent; Burkhardt, Andrew; Cowardin, Heather; Frith, James; Gomez, Juan; Kaleida, Catherine; Lederer, Susan M.; Lee, Chris H.

    2016-01-01

    The 6.5-m Magellan telescope 'Walter Baade' at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile has been used for spot surveys of the GEO orbital regime to study the population of optically faint GEO debris. The goal is to estimate the size of the population of GEO debris at sizes much smaller than can be studied with 1-meter class telescopes. Despite the small size of the field of view of the Magellan instrument (diameter 0.5-degree), a significant population of objects fainter than R = 19th magnitude have been found with angular rates consistent with circular orbits at GEO. We compare the size of this population with the numbers of GEO objects found at brighter magnitudes by smaller telescopes. The observed detections have a wide range in characteristics starting with those appearing as short uniform streaks. But there are a substantial number of detections with variations in brightness, flashers, during the 5-second exposure. The duration of each of these flashes can be extremely brief: sometimes less than half a second. This is characteristic of a rapidly tumbling object with a quite variable projected size times albedo. If the albedo is of the order of 0.2, then the largest projected size of these objects is around 10-cm. The data in this paper was collected over the last several years using Magellan's IMACS camera in f/2 mode. The analysis shows the brightness bins for the observed GEO population as well as the periodicity of the flashers. All objects presented are correlated with the catalog: the focus of the paper will be on the uncorrelated, optically faint, objects. The goal of this project is to better characterize the faint debris population in GEO that access to a 6.5-m optical telescope in a superb site can provide.

  4. Mirages in galaxy scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosenkov, A. V.; Sotnikova, N. Ya.; Reshetnikov, V. P.

    2014-06-01

    We analysed several basic correlations between structural parameters of galaxies. The data were taken from various samples in different passbands which are available in the literature. We discuss disc scaling relations as well as some debatable issues concerning the so-called Photometric Plane for bulges and elliptical galaxies in different forms and various versions of the famous Kormendy relation. We show that some of the correlations under discussion are artificial (self-correlations), while others truly reveal some new essential details of the structural properties of galaxies. Our main results are as follows: At present, we cannot conclude that faint stellar discs are, on average, more thin than discs in high surface brightness galaxies. The `central surface brightness-thickness' correlation appears only as a consequence of the transparent exponential disc model to describe real galaxy discs. The Photometric Plane appears to have no independent physical sense. Various forms of this plane are merely sophisticated versions of the Kormendy relation or of the self-relation involving the central surface brightness of a bulge/elliptical galaxy and the Sérsic index n. The Kormendy relation is a physical correlation presumably reflecting the difference in the origin of bright and faint ellipticals and bulges. We present arguments that involve creating artificial samples to prove our main idea.

  5. Enhancement classification of galaxy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkinson, John

    With the advent of astronomical imaging technology developments, and the increased capacity of digital storage, the production of photographic atlases of the night sky have begun to generate volumes of data which need to be processed autonomously. As part of the Tonantzintla Digital Sky Survey construction, the present work involves software development for the digital image processing of astronomical images, in particular operations that preface feature extraction and classification. Recognition of galaxies in these images is the primary objective of the present work. Many galaxy images have poor resolution or contain faint galaxy features, resulting in the misclassification of galaxies. An enhancement of these images by the method of the Heap transform is proposed, and experimental results are provided which demonstrate the image enhancement to improve the presence of faint galaxy features thereby improving classification accuracy. The feature extraction was performed using morphological features that have been widely used in previous automated galaxy investigations. Principal component analysis was applied to the original and enhanced data sets for a performance comparison between the original and reduced features spaces. Classification was performed by the Support Vector Machine learning algorithm.

  6. The formation of Jupiter's faint rings

    PubMed

    Burns; Showalter; Hamilton; Nicholson; de Pater I; Ockert-Bell; Thomas

    1999-05-14

    Observations by the Galileo spacecraft and the Keck telescope showed that Jupiter's outermost (gossamer) ring is actually two rings circumscribed by the orbits of the small satellites Amalthea and Thebe. The gossamer rings' unique morphology-especially the rectangular end profiles at the satellite's orbit and the enhanced intensities along the top and bottom edges of the rings-can be explained by collisional ejecta lost from the inclined satellites. The ejecta evolves inward under Poynting-Robertson drag. This mechanism may also explain the origin of Jupiter's main ring and suggests that faint rings may accompany all small inner satellites of the other jovian planets.

  7. The formation of Jupiter's faint rings

    PubMed

    Burns; Showalter; Hamilton; Nicholson; de Pater I; Ockert-Bell; Thomas

    1999-05-14

    Observations by the Galileo spacecraft and the Keck telescope showed that Jupiter's outermost (gossamer) ring is actually two rings circumscribed by the orbits of the small satellites Amalthea and Thebe. The gossamer rings' unique morphology-especially the rectangular end profiles at the satellite's orbit and the enhanced intensities along the top and bottom edges of the rings-can be explained by collisional ejecta lost from the inclined satellites. The ejecta evolves inward under Poynting-Robertson drag. This mechanism may also explain the origin of Jupiter's main ring and suggests that faint rings may accompany all small inner satellites of the other jovian planets. PMID:10325220

  8. Expectations for the Hard X-Ray Continuum and Gamma-Ray Line Fluxes from the Type Ia Supernova SN 2014J in M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The, Lih-Sin; Burrows, Adam

    2014-05-01

    The hard X-ray continuum and gamma-ray lines from a Type Ia supernova dominate its integrated photon emissions and can provide unique diagnostics of the mass of the ejecta, the 56Ni yield and spatial distribution, its kinetic energy and expansion speed, and the mechanism of explosion. Such signatures and their time behavior "X-ray" the bulk debris field in direct fashion, and do not depend on the ofttimes problematic and elaborate UV, optical, and near-infrared spectroscopy and radiative transfer that have informed the study of these events for decades. However, to date no hard photons have ever been detected from a Type Ia supernova in explosion. With the advent of the supernova SN 2014J in M82, at a distance of ~3.5 Mpc, this situation may soon change. Both NuSTAR and INTEGRAL have the potential to detect SN 2014J, and, if spectra and light curves can be measured, would usefully constrain the various explosion models published during the last ~30 yr. In support of these observational campaigns, we provide predictions for the hard X-ray continuum and gamma-line emissions for 15 Type Ia explosion models gleaned from the literature. The model set, containing as it does deflagration, delayed detonation, merger detonation, pulsational delayed detonation, and sub-Chandrasekhar helium detonation models, collectively spans a wide range of properties, and hence signatures. We provide a brief discussion of various diagnostics (with examples), but importantly make the spectral and line results available electronically to aid in the interpretation of the anticipated data.

  9. Expectations for the hard x-ray continuum and gamma-ray line fluxes from the typE IA supernova SN 2014J in M82

    SciTech Connect

    The, Lih-Sin; Burrows, Adam E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-05-10

    The hard X-ray continuum and gamma-ray lines from a Type Ia supernova dominate its integrated photon emissions and can provide unique diagnostics of the mass of the ejecta, the {sup 56}Ni yield and spatial distribution, its kinetic energy and expansion speed, and the mechanism of explosion. Such signatures and their time behavior 'X-ray' the bulk debris field in direct fashion, and do not depend on the ofttimes problematic and elaborate UV, optical, and near-infrared spectroscopy and radiative transfer that have informed the study of these events for decades. However, to date no hard photons have ever been detected from a Type Ia supernova in explosion. With the advent of the supernova SN 2014J in M82, at a distance of ∼3.5 Mpc, this situation may soon change. Both NuSTAR and INTEGRAL have the potential to detect SN 2014J, and, if spectra and light curves can be measured, would usefully constrain the various explosion models published during the last ∼30 yr. In support of these observational campaigns, we provide predictions for the hard X-ray continuum and gamma-line emissions for 15 Type Ia explosion models gleaned from the literature. The model set, containing as it does deflagration, delayed detonation, merger detonation, pulsational delayed detonation, and sub-Chandrasekhar helium detonation models, collectively spans a wide range of properties, and hence signatures. We provide a brief discussion of various diagnostics (with examples), but importantly make the spectral and line results available electronically to aid in the interpretation of the anticipated data.

  10. a Faint and Lonely Brown Dwarf in the Solar Vicinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-04-01

    Discovery of KELU-1 Promises New Insights into Strange Objects Brown Dwarfs are star-like objects which are too small to become real stars, yet too large to be real planets. Their mass is too small to ignite those nuclear processes which are responsible for the large energies and high temperatures of stars, but it is much larger than that of the planets we know in our solar system. Until now, very few Brown Dwarfs have been securely identified as such. Two are members of double-star systems, and a few more are located deep within the Pleiades star cluster. Now, however, Maria Teresa Ruiz of the Astronomy Department at Universidad de Chile (Santiago de Chile), using telescopes at the ESO La Silla observatory, has just discovered one that is all alone and apparently quite near to us. Contrary to the others which are influenced by other objects in their immediate surroundings, this new Brown Dwarf is unaffected and will thus be a perfect object for further investigations that may finally allow us to better understand these very interesting celestial bodies. It has been suggested that Brown Dwarfs may constitute a substantial part of the unseen dark matter in our Galaxy. This discovery may therefore also have important implications for this highly relevant research area. Searching for nearby faint stars The story of this discovery goes back to 1987 when Maria Teresa Ruiz decided to embark upon a long-term search (known as the Calan-ESO proper-motion survey ) for another type of unusual object, the so-called White Dwarfs , i.e. highly evolved, small and rather faint stars. Although they have masses similar to that of the Sun, such stars are no larger than the Earth and are therefore extremely compact. They are particularly interesting, because they most probably represent the future end point of evolution of our Sun, some billions of years from now. For this project, the Chilean astronomer obtained large-field photographic exposures with the 1-m ESO Schmidt telescope at

  11. Comparisons of the galaxy age, stellar velocity dispersion and K-band luminosity distributions between grouped galaxies and isolated ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ping; Deng, Xin-Fa

    2016-02-01

    In two volume-limited Main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 (SDSS DR10), we compare the age, stellar velocity dispersion and K-band luminosity distributions of grouped galaxies with those of isolated galaxies, to explore the environmental dependence of these properties of galaxies. It is found that grouped galaxies have preferentially larger stellar velocity dispersions and are preferentially older than isolated galaxies. We also note apparent difference of K-band luminosity distribution at both extremes of density in the luminous volume-limited Main galaxy sample: grouped galaxies are preferentially more luminous than isolated galaxies, while this difference in the faint volume-limited Main galaxy sample is very small.

  12. THE FAINT-END SLOPE OF THE REDSHIFT 5.7 Ly{alpha} LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Alaina L.; Martin, Crystal L.; Dressler, Alan; McCarthy, Patrick; Sawicki, Marcin

    2012-01-10

    Using new Keck DEIMOS spectroscopy, we examine the origin of the steep number counts of ultra-faint emission-line galaxies recently reported by Dressler et al. We confirm six Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs), three of which have significant asymmetric line profiles with prominent wings extending 300-400 km s{sup -1} redward of the peak emission. With these six LAEs, we revise our previous estimate of the number of faint LAEs in the Dressler et al. survey. Combining these data with the density of bright LAEs in the Cosmic Evolution Survey and Subaru Deep Field provides the best constraints to date on the redshift 5.7 LAE luminosity function (LF). Schechter function parameters, {phi}* = 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -3}, L* = 9.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}, and {alpha} = -1.70, are estimated using a maximum likelihood technique with a model for slit-losses. To place this result in the context of the UV-selected galaxy population, we investigate how various parameterizations of the Ly{alpha} equivalent width distribution, along with the measured UV-continuum LF, affect shape and normalization of the Ly{alpha} LF. The nominal model, which uses z {approx} 6 equivalent widths from the literature, falls short of the observed space density of LAEs at the bright end, possibly indicating a need for higher equivalent widths. This parameterization of the equivalent width distribution implies that as many as 50% of our faintest LAEs should have M{sub UV} > -18.0, rendering them undetectable in even the deepest Hubble Space Telescope surveys at this redshift. Hence, ultra-deep emission-line surveys find some of the faintest galaxies ever observed at the end of the reionization epoch. Such faint galaxies likely enrich the intergalactic medium with metals and maintain its ionized state in the post-reionization era. Observations of these objects provide a glimpse of the building blocks of present-day galaxies at an early time.

  13. Reconstruction of SDSS Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Laura K.; Obric, M.; West, A. A.; Dalcanton, J.

    2006-12-01

    We present The SDSS Multiple Offspring Recombination Engine (SMORE), a newly developed code that automatically and interactively recombines galaxies fragmented by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Photo pipeline. The SDSS software was optimized for the faint-end of the brightness limit and tends to over-deblend galaxies with angular sizes over 2 arcmin, sometimes separating spiral arms and HII regions from their parent galaxies. This process can remove a large percentage of the flux from the galaxy and bias datasets due to incorrect photometry. SMORE automatically builds galaxies from the fragments ("children"). Decisions on which child to include are made on the basis of its g-r and r-i color (relative to the mean colors of the largest galaxy children), size, distance to the center of the galaxy, type (as assigned by SDSS Photo) and the position angle. If there are pieces for which a decision cannot be made and their relative flux is more than 5% of the total flux of the galaxy, the interactive SMORE gives a user option to manually choose which of those children should be included. Recombined galaxies are built on a clean background without foreground and background objects and new photometry is performed.

  14. OPTICAL–INFRARED PROPERTIES OF FAINT 1.3 mm SOURCES DETECTED WITH ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Yabe, Kiyoto; Ohta, Kouji; Seko, Akifumi; Makiya, Ryu; Akiyama, Masayuki

    2015-09-10

    We report optical-infrared (IR) properties of faint 1.3 mm sources (S{sub 1.3mm} = 0.2–1.0 mJy) detected with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey field. We searched for optical/IR counterparts of eight ALMA-detected sources (≥4.0σ, the sum of the probability of spurious source contamination is ∼1) in a K-band source catalog. Four ALMA sources have K-band counterpart candidates within a 0.″4 radius. Comparison between ALMA-detected and undetected K-band sources in the same observing fields shows that ALMA-detected sources tend to be brighter, more massive, and more actively forming stars. While many of the ALMA-identified submillimeter-bright galaxies (SMGs) in previous studies lie above the sequence of star-forming galaxies in the stellar mass–star formation rate plane, our ALMA sources are located in the sequence, suggesting that the ALMA-detected faint sources are more like “normal” star-forming galaxies rather than “classical” SMGs. We found a region where multiple ALMA sources and K-band sources reside in a narrow photometric redshift range (z ∼ 1.3–1.6) within a radius of 5″ (42 kpc if we assume z = 1.45). This is possibly a pre-merging system and we may be witnessing the early phase of formation of a massive elliptical galaxy.

  15. The Spiderweb Galaxy: A Forming Massive Cluster Galaxy at z ~ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George K.; Overzier, Roderik A.; Zirm, Andrew W.; Ford, Holland C.; Kurk, Jaron; Pentericci, Laura; Blakeslee, John P.; Franx, Marijn; Illingworth, Garth D.; Postman, Marc; Rosati, Piero; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Venemans, Bram P.; Helder, Eveline

    2006-10-01

    We present a deep image of the radio galaxy MRC 1138-262 taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) at a redshift of z=2.2. The galaxy is known to have properties of a cD galaxy progenitor and be surrounded by a 3 Mpc-sized structure, identified with a protocluster. The morphology shown on the new deep HST ACS image is reminiscent of a spider's web. More than 10 individual clumpy features are observed, apparently star-forming satellite galaxies in the process of merging with the progenitor of a dominant cluster galaxy 11 Gyr ago. There is an extended emission component, implying that star formation was occurring over a 50×40 kpc region at a rate of more than 100 Msolar yr-1. A striking feature of the newly named ``Spiderweb galaxy'' is the presence of several faint linear galaxies within the merging structure. The dense environments and fast galaxy motions at the centers of protoclusters may stimulate the formation of these structures, which dominate the faint resolved galaxy populations in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The new image provides a unique testbed for simulations of forming dominant cluster galaxies.

  16. A Search for Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Lederer, Susan M.; Barker, Edwin S.; Cowardin, Heather; Abercromby, Kira J.; ilha, Jiri

    2011-01-01

    Existing optical surveys for debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) have been conducted with meter class telescopes, which have detection limits in the range of 18th-19th magnitude. We report on a new search for optically faint debris at GEO using the 6.5-m Magellan 1 telescope Walter Baade at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to go as faint as possible and characterize the brightness distribution of debris fainter than R = 20th magnitude, corresponding to a size smaller than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175. We wish to compare the inferred size distribution for GEO debris with that for LEO debris. We describe results obtained during 9.4 hours of observing time during 25-27 March 2011. We used the IMACS f/2 instrument, which has a mosaic of 8 CCDs, and a field of view of 30 arc-minutes in diameter. This is the widest field of view of any instrument on either Magellan telescope. All observations were obtained through a Sloan r filter. The limiting magnitude for 5 second exposures is estimated to be fainter than 22. With this small field of view and the limited observing time, our objective was to search for optically faint objects from the Titan 3C Transtage (1968-081) fragmentation in 1992. Eight debris pieces and the parent rocket body are in the Space Surveillance Network public catalog. We successfully tracked two cataloged pieces of Titan debris (SSN # 25001 and 33519) with the 6.5-m telescope, followed by a survey for objects on similar orbits but with a spread in mean anomaly. To detect bright objects over a wider field of view (1.6x1.6 degrees), we observed the same field centers at the same time through a similar filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. We will describe our experiences using Magellan, a telescope never used previously for orbital debris research, and our initial results.

  17. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): galaxy pairwise velocity dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveday, Jon; Christodoulou, Leonidas

    2016-10-01

    We describe preliminary measurements of the pairwise velocity dispersion (PVD) of galaxies in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey as a function of projected separation and galaxy luminosity. Due to the faint magnitude limit (r < 19.8) and highly-complete spectroscopic sampling of the GAMA survey, we are able to measure the PVD to smaller scales and for lower-luminosity galaxies than previous SDSS-based work. We see no strong scale-dependence at most luminosities in the quasi-linear regime. We observe an apparent drop in PVD towards very small scales (below ~ 0.1h -1 Mpc), but this could in part be due to a restriction of the streaming model employed. At intermediate scales, the PVD is highest (~ 500 km/s) at intermediate luminosities, dropping at both fainter and brighter luminosities.

  18. Faint Radio Sources in the NOAO Bootes Field. VLBA Imaging And Optical Identifications

    SciTech Connect

    Wrobel, J.M.; Taylor, Greg B.; Rector, T.A.; Myers, S.T.; Fassnacht, C.D.; /UC, Davis

    2005-06-13

    As a step toward investigating the parsec-scale properties of faint extragalactic radio sources, the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) was used at 5.0 GHz to obtain phase-referenced images of 76 sources in the NOAO Booetes field. These 76 sources were selected from the FIRST catalog to have peak flux densities above 10 mJy at 5'' resolution and deconvolved major diameters of less than 3'' at 1.4 GHz. Fifty-five of these faint radio sources were identified with accretion-powered radio galaxies and quasars brighter than 25.5 mag in the optical I band. On VLA scales at 1.4 GHz, a measure of the compactness of the faint sources (the ratio of the peak flux density from FIRST to the integrated flux density from the NVSS catalog) spans the full range of possibilities arising from source-resolution effects. Thirty of the faint radio sources, or 39{sub -7}{sup +9}%, were detected with the VLBA at 5.0 GHz with peak flux densities above 6 {sigma} {approx} 2 mJy at 2 mas resolution. The VLBA detections occur through the full range of compactness ratios. The stronger VLBA detections can themselves serve as phase-reference calibrators, boding well for opening up much of the radio sky to VLBA imaging. For the adopted cosmology, the VLBA resolution corresponds to 17 pc or finer. Most VLBA detections are unresolved or slightly resolved but one is diffuse and five show either double or core-jet structures; the properties of these latter six are discussed in detail. Eight VLBA detections are unidentified and fainter than 25.5 mag in the optical I band; their properties are highlighted because they likely mark optically-obscured active nuclei at high redshift.

  19. A Peculiar Faint Satellite in the Remote Outer Halo of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, A. D.; Huxor, A. P.; Martin, N. F.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Dotter, A.; McConnachie, A. W.; Ibata, R. A.; Irwin, M. J.; Lewis, G. F.; Sakari, C. M.; Tanvir, N. R.; Venn, K. A.

    2013-06-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope imaging of a newly discovered faint stellar system, PAndAS-48, in the outskirts of the M31 halo. Our photometry reveals this object to be comprised of an ancient and very metal-poor stellar population with age >~ 10 Gyr and [Fe/H] lsim -2.3. Our inferred distance modulus (m - M)0 = 24.57 ± 0.11 confirms that PAndAS-48 is most likely a remote M31 satellite with a three-dimensional galactocentric radius of 149^{+19}_{-8} kpc. We observe an apparent spread in color on the upper red giant branch that is larger than the photometric uncertainties should allow, and briefly explore the implications of this. Structurally, PAndAS-48 is diffuse, faint, and moderately flattened, with a half-light radius r_h=26^{+4}_{-3} pc, integrated luminosity MV = -4.8 ± 0.5, and ellipticity \\epsilon =0.30^{+0.08}_{-0.15}. On the size-luminosity plane it falls between the extended globular clusters seen in several nearby galaxies and the recently discovered faint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way; however, its characteristics do not allow us to unambiguously classify it as either type of system. If PAndAS-48 is a globular cluster then it is among the most elliptical, isolated, and metal-poor of any seen in the Local Group, extended or otherwise. Conversely, while its properties are generally consistent with those observed for the faint Milky Way dwarfs, it would be a factor of ~2-3 smaller in spatial extent than any known counterpart of comparable luminosity. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO 12515.

  20. A PECULIAR FAINT SATELLITE IN THE REMOTE OUTER HALO OF M31

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, A. D.; Dotter, A.; Huxor, A. P.; Martin, N. F.; Ibata, R. A.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; McConnachie, A. W.; Irwin, M. J.; Lewis, G. F.; Sakari, C. M.; Venn, K. A.; Tanvir, N. R.

    2013-06-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope imaging of a newly discovered faint stellar system, PAndAS-48, in the outskirts of the M31 halo. Our photometry reveals this object to be comprised of an ancient and very metal-poor stellar population with age {approx}> 10 Gyr and [Fe/H] {approx}< -2.3. Our inferred distance modulus (m - M){sub 0} = 24.57 {+-} 0.11 confirms that PAndAS-48 is most likely a remote M31 satellite with a three-dimensional galactocentric radius of 149{sup +19}{sub -8} kpc. We observe an apparent spread in color on the upper red giant branch that is larger than the photometric uncertainties should allow, and briefly explore the implications of this. Structurally, PAndAS-48 is diffuse, faint, and moderately flattened, with a half-light radius r{sub h}=26{sup +4}{sub -3} pc, integrated luminosity M{sub V} = -4.8 {+-} 0.5, and ellipticity {epsilon}=0.30{sup +0.08}{sub -0.15}. On the size-luminosity plane it falls between the extended globular clusters seen in several nearby galaxies and the recently discovered faint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way; however, its characteristics do not allow us to unambiguously classify it as either type of system. If PAndAS-48 is a globular cluster then it is among the most elliptical, isolated, and metal-poor of any seen in the Local Group, extended or otherwise. Conversely, while its properties are generally consistent with those observed for the faint Milky Way dwarfs, it would be a factor of {approx}2-3 smaller in spatial extent than any known counterpart of comparable luminosity.

  1. Orbital objects detection algorithm using faint streaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, Makoto; Yanagisawa, Toshifumi; Kurosaki, Hirohisa; Oda, Hiroshi; Hanada, Toshiya

    2016-02-01

    This study proposes an algorithm to detect orbital objects that are small or moving at high apparent velocities from optical images by utilizing their faint streaks. In the conventional object-detection algorithm, a high signal-to-noise-ratio (e.g., 3 or more) is required, whereas in our proposed algorithm, the signals are summed along the streak direction to improve object-detection sensitivity. Lower signal-to-noise ratio objects were detected by applying the algorithm to a time series of images. The algorithm comprises the following steps: (1) image skewing, (2) image compression along the vertical axis, (3) detection and determination of streak position, (4) searching for object candidates using the time-series streak-position data, and (5) selecting the candidate with the best linearity and reliability. Our algorithm's ability to detect streaks with signals weaker than the background noise was confirmed using images from the Australia Remote Observatory.

  2. Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, F. E.

    2014-10-01

    Recent years have seen tremendous progress in finding and charactering star-forming galaxies at high redshifts across the electromagnetic spectrum, giving us a more complete picture of how galaxies evolve, both in terms of their stellar and gas content, as well as the growth of their central supermassive black holes. A wealth of studies now demonstrate that star formation peaked at roughly half the age of the Universe and drops precariously as we look back to very early times, and that their central monsters apparently growth with them. At the highest-redshifts, we are pushing the boundaries via deep surveys at optical, X-ray, radio wavelengths, and more recently using gamma-ray bursts. I will review some of our accomplishments and failures. Telescope have enabled Lyman break galaxies to be robustly identified, but the UV luminosity function and star formation rate density of this population at z = 6 - 8 seems to be much lower than at z = 2 - 4. High escape fractions and a large contribution from faint galaxies below our current detection limits would be required for star-forming galaxies to reionize the Universe. We have also found that these galaxies have blue rest-frame UV colours, which might indicate lower dust extinction at z > 5. There has been some spectroscopic confirmation of these Lyman break galaxies through Lyman-α emission, but the fraction of galaxies where we see this line drops at z > 7, perhaps due to the onset of the Gunn-Peterson effect (where the IGM is opaque to Lyman-α).

  3. The LMT Galaxies' 3 mm Spectroscopic Survey: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa González, D.; Schloerb, P.; Vega, O.; Hunt, L.; Narayanan, G.; Calzetti, D.; Yun, M.; Terlevich, E.; Terlevich, R.; Mayya, Y. D.; Chávez, M.; Montaña, A.; Pérez García, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    The molecular phase of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies offers fundamental insight for understanding star-formation processes and how stellar feedback affects the nuclear activity of certain galaxies. We present here Large Millimeter Telescope spectra obtained with the Redshift Search Receiver, a spectrograph that covers simultaneously the 3 mm band from 74 to 111 GHz with a spectral resolution of around 100 km/s. Our selected galaxies, have been detected previously in HCN, and have different degrees of nuclear activity — one normal galaxy (NGC 6946), the starburst prototype (M82) and two %ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs, IRAS 17208-0014 and Mrk 231). We plotted our data in the HCO+/HCN vs. HCN/13CO diagnostic diagram finding that NGC 6946 and M82 are located close to other normal galaxies; and that both IRAS 17208-0014 and Mrk 231 are close to the position of the well known ULIRG Arp 220 reported by Snell et al. (2011). We found that in Mrk 231 - a galaxy with a well known active galactic nucleus - the HCO+/HCN ratio is similar to the ratio observed in normal galaxies.

  4. The Most Powerful Cosmic Telescopes for Constraining the Faint-end Slope of the z > 7 Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammons, Stephen; Wong, K. C.; Zabludoff, A. I.; Keeton, C. R.; French, D.

    2012-01-01

    It is likely that intergalactic hydrogen was reionized by redshifts of 6 < z < 10, but it is not known whether the flux density of UV photons from the earliest galaxies was sufficient to do so. Measurements of the faint end slope of the luminosity function at these redshifts can help to address this question. I explore the use of the densest galaxy fields to lens faint objects into detectability, increasing source counts and providing improved constraints on dlog N / dlog L. First, I present galaxy spectroscopy for the first two dense beams identified from the SDSS. We have now confirmed that these beams have integrated masses of 3-4 x 1015 solar masses, surpassing even the most massive single cluster lensing fields. This increased mass should result in 50-1000% more detected sources at z > 7 than other current methods with equivalent exposure time. Second, I compare the high-redshift detection efficiencies of lensing and blank fields including realistic assumptions for the intrinsic sizes and morphologies of sources at z > 7. We find that there are heretofore uncorrected biases introduced by lensing due to the difficulty of detecting faint, highly elongated objects at high magnification. To interpret high-redshift, magnified number counts correctly, incompleteness due to this bias must be addressed with lensing simulations. The correction for incompleteness near the detection limit may exceed a factor of ten. Including finite source size and realistic shape assumptions, luminosity function slopes must be steeper than -dlog N / dlog L 2 at the faint end for cosmic telescopes to surpass blank field surveys in z > 7 detection efficiency. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. ON THE NATURE OF THE mHz X-RAY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS FROM ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE M82 X-1: SEARCH FOR TIMING-SPECTRAL CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E. E-mail: tod.strohmayer@nasa.gov

    2013-07-10

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1, we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its hardness ratio (5-10 keV/3-5 keV), an indicator of the energy spectral power-law index. When stellar-mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibit type-C low-frequency QPOs ({approx}0.2-15 Hz), the centroid frequency of the QPO is known to correlate with the energy spectral index. The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of M82 X-1's mHz QPOs as type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass. We resolved the count rates and the hardness ratios of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling. We detected QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which M82 X-1's hardness ratio varied from 0.42 to 0.47. Our primary results are (1) that we do not detect any correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the hardness ratio (a substitute for the energy spectral power-law index) and (2) similar to some accreting X-ray binaries, we find that M82 X-1's mHz QPO frequency increases with its X-ray count rate (Pearson's correlation coefficient = +0.97). The apparent lack of a correlation between the QPO centroid frequency and the hardness ratio poses a challenge to the earlier claims that the mHz QPOs of M82 X-1 are the analogs of the type-C low-frequency QPOs of StMBHs. On the other hand, it is possible that the observed relation between the hardness ratio and the QPO frequency represents the saturated portion of the correlation seen in type-C QPOs of StMBHs-in which case M82 X-1's mHz QPOs can still be analogous to type-C QPOs.

  6. On the Nature of the mHz X-ray Quasi-Periodic Oscillations from Ultraluminous X-ray source M82 X-1: Search for Timing-Spectral Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1, we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its hardness ratio (5-10 keV/3-5 keV), an indicator of the energy spectral power-law index. When stellar-mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibit type-C low-frequency QPOs (0.2-15 Hz), the centroid frequency of the QPO is known to correlate with the energy spectral index. The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of M82 X-1's mHz QPOs as type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass.We resolved the count rates and the hardness ratios of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling.We detected QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which M82 X-1's hardness ratio varied from 0.42 to 0.47. Our primary results are (1) that we do not detect any correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the hardness ratio (a substitute for the energy spectral power-law index) and (2) similar to some accreting X-ray binaries, we find that M82 X-1's mHz QPO frequency increases with its X-ray count rate (Pearson's correlation coefficient = +0.97). The apparent lack of a correlation between the QPO centroid frequency and the hardness ratio poses a challenge to the earlier claims that the mHz QPOs of M82 X-1 are the analogs of the type-C low-frequency QPOs of StMBHs. On the other hand, it is possible that the observed relation between the hardness ratio and the QPO frequency represents the saturated portion of the correlation seen in type-C QPOs of StMBHs-in which case M82 X-1's mHz QPOs can still be analogous to type-C QPOs.

  7. Searching for Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Lederer, Susan M.; Abercromby, Kira J.; Barker, Edwin S.; Burkhardt, Andrew; Cowardin, Heather; Krisko, Paula; Silha, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    We report on results from a search for optically faint debris (defined as R > 20th magnitude, or smaller than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175)) at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) using the 6.5-m Magellan telescope "Walter Baade" at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to characterize the brightness distribution of debris to the faintest limiting magnitude possible. Our data was obtained during 6 hours of observing time during the photometric nights of 26 and 27 March 2011 with the IMACS f/2 instrument, which has a field of view (fov) of 0.5 degrees in diameter. All observations were obtained through a Sloan r filter, and calibrated by observations of Landolt standard stars. Our primary objective was to search for optically faint objects from one of the few known fragmentations at GEO: the Titan 3C Transtage (1968-081) fragmentation in 1992. Eight debris pieces and the parent rocket body are in the Space Surveillance Network public catalog. We successfully tracked two cataloged pieces of Titan debris with the 6.5-m telescope, followed by a survey for unknown objects on similar orbits but with different mean anomalies. To establish the bright end of the debris population, calibrated observations were acquired on the same field centers, telescope rates, and time period with a similar filter on the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. We will show the calibrated brightness distributions from both telescopes, and compare the observed brightness distributions with that predicted for various population models of debris of different sizes.

  8. HUBBLE SERVES UP A GALAXY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    What may first appear as a sunny side up egg is actually NASA Hubble Space Telescope's face-on snapshot of the small spiral galaxy NGC 7742. But NGC 7742 is not a run-of-the-mill spiral galaxy. In fact, this spiral is known to be a Seyfert 2 active galaxy, a type of galaxy that is probably powered by a black hole residing in its core. The core of NGC 7742 is the large yellow 'yolk' in the center of the image. The lumpy, thick ring around this core is an area of active starbirth. The ring is about 3,000 light-years from the core. Tightly wound spiral arms also are faintly visible. Surrounding the inner ring is a wispy band of material, which is probably the remains of a once very active stellar breeding ground. Credit: Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI/NASA)

  9. The Host Galaxies of Type Ia Supernovae at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quimby, R.; Aldering, G.; Nugent, P.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Blanc, G.; Burns, M. S.; Conley, A.; Deustua, S.; Doi, M.; Ellis, R.; Fabbro, S.; Folatelli, G.; Fruchter, A.; Garavini, G.; Gibbons, R.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D. E.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. A.; Irwin, M.; Kim, A.; Knop, R. A.; Lidman, C.; McMahon, R.; Mendez, J.; Nobili, S.; Pain, R.; Panagia, N.; Pennypacker, C. R.; Perlmutter, S.; Raux, J.; Regnault, N.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Schaefer, B.; Schahmaneche, K.; Spadafora, A. L.; Walton, N.; Wang, L.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yasuda, N.; Supernova Cosmology Project Collaboration

    2002-12-01

    We use the luminosities and B-V colors from the host galaxies of 74 high-redshift (0.17 < z < 0.86) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the Supernova Cosmology Project (SCP) to search for environmental effects on supernovae peak luminosities. Using the galaxy luminosity-metallicity relation and the radial metallicity gradient of galaxies as indicators of the progenitor metallicity, we find no significant correlation between peak SNe Ia luminosity and host galaxy metallicity. The projected radial distribution of supernovae tracks the galaxy light and shows no deficit of SNe Ia near the galaxy cores (Shaw effect). The host galaxy luminosity function is calculated, and shown to be consistent with the subset of the Caltech Faint Galaxy Redshift Survey (Cohen et al. 2000) in the same redshift range, as well as the luminosity function of nearby galaxies measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Blanton et al. 2001).

  10. THE SPIRAL GALAXY M100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    An image of the grand design of spiral galaxy M100 obtained with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope resolves individual stars within the majestic spiral arms. (These stars typically appeared blurred together when viewed with ground-based telescopes.) Hubble has the ability to resolve individual stars in other galaxies and measure accurately the light from very faint stars. This makes space telescope invaluable for identifying a rare class of pulsating stars, called Cepheid Variable stars embedded within M100's spiral arms. Cepheids are reliable cosmic distance mileposts. The interval it takes for the Cepheid to complete one pulsation is a direct indication of the stars's intrinsic brightness. This value can be used to make a precise measurement of the galaxy's distance, which turns out to be 56 million light-years. M100 (100th object in the Messier catalog of non-stellar objects) is a majestic face-on spiral galaxy. It is a rotating system of gas and stars, similar to our own galaxy, the Milky Way. Hubble routinely can view M100 with a level of clarity and sensitivity previously possible only for the very few nearby galaxies that compose our 'Local Group.'' M100 is a member of the huge Virgo cluster of an estimated 2,500 galaxies. The galaxy can be seen by amateur astronomers as a faint, pinwheel-shaped object in the spring constellation Coma Berenices. Technical Information: The Hubble Space Telescope image was taken on December 31, 1993 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC 2). This color picture is a composite of several images taken in different colors of light. Blue corresponds to regions containing hot newborn stars. The Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science. Credit: J. Trauger, JPL and NASA

  11. a Faint and Lonely Brown Dwarf in the Solar Vicinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-04-01

    Discovery of KELU-1 Promises New Insights into Strange Objects Brown Dwarfs are star-like objects which are too small to become real stars, yet too large to be real planets. Their mass is too small to ignite those nuclear processes which are responsible for the large energies and high temperatures of stars, but it is much larger than that of the planets we know in our solar system. Until now, very few Brown Dwarfs have been securely identified as such. Two are members of double-star systems, and a few more are located deep within the Pleiades star cluster. Now, however, Maria Teresa Ruiz of the Astronomy Department at Universidad de Chile (Santiago de Chile), using telescopes at the ESO La Silla observatory, has just discovered one that is all alone and apparently quite near to us. Contrary to the others which are influenced by other objects in their immediate surroundings, this new Brown Dwarf is unaffected and will thus be a perfect object for further investigations that may finally allow us to better understand these very interesting celestial bodies. It has been suggested that Brown Dwarfs may constitute a substantial part of the unseen dark matter in our Galaxy. This discovery may therefore also have important implications for this highly relevant research area. Searching for nearby faint stars The story of this discovery goes back to 1987 when Maria Teresa Ruiz decided to embark upon a long-term search (known as the Calan-ESO proper-motion survey ) for another type of unusual object, the so-called White Dwarfs , i.e. highly evolved, small and rather faint stars. Although they have masses similar to that of the Sun, such stars are no larger than the Earth and are therefore extremely compact. They are particularly interesting, because they most probably represent the future end point of evolution of our Sun, some billions of years from now. For this project, the Chilean astronomer obtained large-field photographic exposures with the 1-m ESO Schmidt telescope at

  12. Chandra Observations of Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestwich, Andrea; Lavoie, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present early X-ray results from Chandra for two starburst galaxies, M82 and NGC3256, obtained using AXAF CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-I) and the HRC. For M82 the arcsecond spatial resolution enables us to separate the point source component from the extended emission for the first time. Astrometry reveals that most of the X-ray sources are not coincident with the family of compact radio sources believed to be Super Nova Remnants (SNRs). In addition, based on three epoch Chandra observations, several of the X-ray sources are clearly variable indicating that they are binaries. When we deconvolve the extended and point source components detected in the hard X-ray band, we find that 50 percent arises from the extended component. This fact, together with its morphology, constrains the various models proposed to explain the hard X-ray emission. For NGC3256 we resolve two closely separated nuclei. These new data support a pure starburst origin for the total X-ray emission rather than a composite AGN/starburst, thereby making NGC3256 one of the most X-ray luminous starburst galaxies known.

  13. Hot Young Solution to Faint Sun Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riofrio, L.

    2006-12-01

    The "Faint Young Sun" has been a paradox of astrophysics. The standard solar model predicts that 4 billion years ago Earth was too cold to support life. Geology and the fossil record contradict this prediction. The paradox and possible solution are a fascinating combination of astrophysics, relativity and the Earth sciences. Models predict that 4 billion years ago the Sun shone with only 70 % of its present luminosity. Since power P is related to temperature T by the Stefan-Boltzmann Law P ∝ T4, Earth temperature would have been only 91 % of its present value. That temperature is approximately 283K, so temperature in the past would have been only 258K. Earth's surface would have frozen solid, making evolution of life very unlikely. Geology shows evidence of extensive sedimentation 4 billion years ago. Other geological markers corroborate the presence of liquid water on Earth during this period. Paleontology dates the earliest organisms at least 3.4 to 4 billion years old. Clearly liquid water and life both existed when the model predicts Earth was frozen solid. This conflict with observations is the Faint Young Sun paradox. Fortunately, Relativity and Space/Time can help save the standard solar model. The Sun converts its fuel to energy according to E=mc2. Unified Space/Time predicts that c is given by: GM=tc3. Where t is age of the Universe, GM combines its mass and gravitational constant. Solving, we have c(t)=(GM)^{1/3} t^{-1/3}. Billions of years ago, solar output and temperature were therefore higher than originally calculated. Earth is estimated to be 4.6 billion years and the Universe 13.7 billion years old, 1.5 times its age at the time of Earth's formation. Energy e=mc2 is adjusted by (1.5)^{2/3} = 1.31 times the initial estimate. Multiplying by that estimate of 70 %, the Sun's actual output was 0.917 of the present value. Temperature was then (0.917)^{1/4} = 98 % of today's value. If we start with an estimate of 76 %, the Sun's true output was exactly

  14. Radio loud far-infrared galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, A; Shields, J.C. . Dept. of Astronomy); Van Breugel, W.J.M. )

    1990-03-01

    We present the first results of a multiwavelength study of IRAS galaxies with excess radio emission. The sample was selected by cross-correlating the IRAS Faint Source Survey (for {vert bar}b{vert bar} {ge} 50{degree}) and the Point Source Catalogue (for 10{degree} < {vert bar}b{vert bar} < 50{degree}) with the Texas radio survey. Recent optical (imaging and spectroscopic) and radio (VLA) observations are discussed. These observations will be used to investigate possible connections between radio galaxy activity, star formation and galaxy interactions. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Is the faint young Sun paradox solved?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, E. T.; Toon, O. B.

    2013-12-01

    How did the early Earth remain warm despite weak solar luminosity? The faint young Sun paradox has stubbornly resisted a self-consistent solution since it was first introduced by Sagan and Mullen [1] over four decades ago. However, recent revisions to expected paleo-ocean temperatures [2, 3] along with new results from three-dimensional climate models [4] may allow this long standing problem to be finally put to rest. Here we use a modified version of the Community Atmosphere Model version 3 from the National Center for Atmospheric Research to study early climate. We find that resolving the faint young Sun paradox becomes less problematic when viewing a full representation of the climate system. For the late Archean climate (80% solar constant), relatively modest amounts of CO2 (≤0.02 bar) and CH4 (0.001 bar) yield surface temperatures equal to the present day with no other alterations to climate. Cooler climates with large ice caps but with temperate tropical regions can be supported with considerably smaller greenhouse gas burdens. The incorporation of systematic climate system elements expected for the Archean such as fewer cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) [5], reduced land albedos [5], and an increased atmospheric inventory of N2 [6], can provide a combined 10 to 20 K of additional surface warming given reasonable assumptions. With the inclusion of 0.001 bar of CH4, 2 PAL of N2, reduced land albedos, and reduced CCN, present day mean surface temperatures can be maintained for the earliest Archean (75% solar constant) with only ~0.01 bar of CO2. However, lower requirements for atmospheric CO2 may imply that photochemical hazes were frequent during the Archean. [1] Sagan, C., & Mullen, G. Science 177, 52 (1972) [2] Hren, M.T., Tice, M.M., & Chamberlin, C.P. Nature 462, 205 (2009) [3] Blake. R.E., Chang, S.J., & Lepland, A. Nature 464, 1029 (2010) [4] Wolf, E.T., & Toon, O.B. Astrobiology 13(7), 1 (2013) [5] Rosing, M.T., Bird, D.K., Sleep, N.H., & Bjerrum, C

  16. SELFI: an object-based, Bayesian method for faint emission line source detection in MUSE deep field data cubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meillier, Céline; Chatelain, Florent; Michel, Olivier; Bacon, Roland; Piqueras, Laure; Bacher, Raphael; Ayasso, Hacheme

    2016-04-01

    We present SELFI, the Source Emission Line FInder, a new Bayesian method optimized for detection of faint galaxies in Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) deep fields. MUSE is the new panoramic integral field spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) that has unique capabilities for spectroscopic investigation of the deep sky. It has provided data cubes with 324 million voxels over a single 1 arcmin2 field of view. To address the challenge of faint-galaxy detection in these large data cubes, we developed a new method that processes 3D data either for modeling or for estimation and extraction of source configurations. This object-based approach yields a natural sparse representation of the sources in massive data fields, such as MUSE data cubes. In the Bayesian framework, the parameters that describe the observed sources are considered random variables. The Bayesian model leads to a general and robust algorithm where the parameters are estimated in a fully data-driven way. This detection algorithm was applied to the MUSE observation of Hubble Deep Field-South. With 27 h total integration time, these observations provide a catalog of 189 sources of various categories and with secured redshift. The algorithm retrieved 91% of the galaxies with only 9% false detection. This method also allowed the discovery of three new Lyα emitters and one [OII] emitter, all without any Hubble Space Telescope counterpart. We analyzed the reasons for failure for some targets, and found that the most important limitation of the method is when faint sources are located in the vicinity of bright spatially resolved galaxies that cannot be approximated by the Sérsic elliptical profile. The software and its documentation are available on the MUSE science web service (muse-vlt.eu/science).

  17. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  18. The intrinsic shape of galaxies in SDSS/Galaxy Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Silvio; Padilla, Nelson D.

    2013-09-01

    By modelling the axis ratio distribution of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 galaxies, we find the intrinsic 3D shapes of spirals and ellipticals. We use morphological information from the Galaxy Zoo project and assume a non-parametric distribution intrinsic of shapes, while taking into account dust extinction. We measure the dust extinction of the full sample of spiral galaxies and find a smaller value than previous estimations, with an edge-on extinction of E_0 = 0.284^{+0.015}_{-0.026} in the SDSS r band. We also find that the distribution of minor to major axis ratio has a mean value of 0.267 ± 0.009, slightly larger than previous estimates mainly due to the lower extinction used; the same affects the circularity of galactic discs, which are found to be less round in shape than in previous studies, with a mean ellipticity of 0.215 ± 0.013. For elliptical galaxies, we find that the minor to major axis ratio, with a mean value of 0.584 ± 0.006, is larger than previous estimations due to the removal of spiral interlopers present in samples with morphological information from photometric profiles. These interlopers are removed when selecting ellipticals using Galaxy Zoo data. We find that the intrinsic shapes of galaxies and their dust extinction vary with absolute magnitude, colour and physical size. We find that bright elliptical galaxies are more spherical than faint ones, a trend that is also present with galaxy size, and that there is no dependence of elliptical galaxy shape with colour. For spiral galaxies, we find that the reddest ones have higher dust extinction as expected, due to the fact that this reddening is mainly due to dust. We also find that the thickness of discs increases with luminosity and size, and that brighter, smaller and redder galaxies have less round discs.

  19. Spectral Indices of Faint Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Hansung B.; Hales, Christopher A.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Yun, Min Su

    2015-01-01

    The significant improvement in bandwidth and the resultant sensitivity offered by the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) allows us to explore the faint radio source population. Through the study of the radio continuum we can explore the spectral indices of these radio sources. Robust radio spectral indices are needed for accurate k-corrections, for example in the study of the radio - far-infrared (FIR) correlation. We present an analysis of measuring spectral indices using two different approaches. In the first, we use the standard wideband imaging algorithm in the data reduction package CASA. In the second, we use a traditional approach of imaging narrower bandwidths to derive the spectral indices. For these, we simulated data to match the observing parameter space of the CHILES Con Pol survey (Hales et al. 2014). We investigate the accuracy and precision of spectral index measurements as a function of signal-to noise, and explore the requirements to reliably probe possible evolution of the radio-FIR correlation in CHILES Con Pol.

  20. Detection of Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, P.; Lederer, S.; Barker, E.; Cowardin, H.; Abercromby, K.; Silha, J.; Burkhardt, A.

    2014-01-01

    There have been extensive optical surveys for debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) conducted with meter-class telescopes, such as those conducted with MODEST (the Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope, a 0.6-m telescope located at Cerro Tololo in Chile), and the European Space Agency's 1.0-m space debris telescope (SDT) in the Canary Islands. These surveys have detection limits in the range of 18th or 19th magnitude, which corresponds to sizes larger than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175. All of these surveys reveal a substantial population of objects fainter than R = 15th magnitude that are not in the public U.S. Satellite Catalog. To detect objects fainter than 20th magnitude (and presumably smaller than 10 cm) in the visible requires a larger telescope and excellent imaging conditions. This combination is available in Chile. NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office has begun collecting orbital debris observations with the 6.5-m (21.3-ft diameter) "Walter Baade" Magellan telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. The goal is to detect objects as faint as possible from a ground-based observatory and begin to understand the brightness distribution of GEO debris fainter than R = 20th magnitude.

  1. Did Dwarf Galaxies Reionize the Universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atek, Hakim; Richard, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Jauzac, Mathilde

    2015-08-01

    The identification of the first generation of galaxies and the possible sources of cosmic reionzation is one of the foremost challenges in modern astrophysics. Great progress has been made in characterizing galaxy populations at redshift z=6-7 through photometric observations in blank fields. However, the integrated UV luminosity density of these galaxies remains insufficient to reionize the IGM at z>6 and calls for the contribution of fainter sources. In order to access those intrinsically faint galaxies, we exploit the gravitational lensing magnification offered by massive galaxy clusters. I will present the first results of the Hubble Frontier Fields program that aims at peering deeper into the distant Universe. Using the first HFF clusters, I will show how combining HST capabilities with gravitational telescopes can be an efficient way to probe the galaxy luminosity function to unprecedented depth. We can now put constraints on the faint-end slope of the UV luminosity function at z~7 down to an absolute magnitude of MUV=-15.5 AB, which is about 0.01L*, and two magnitudes deeper than the deep blank fields. I will also discuss the implications of the new constraints on the galaxy UV luminosity density on the cosmic reionization and what the upcoming JWST will achieve in cluster fields.

  2. Local Group dwarf galaxies: nature and nurture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawala, Till; Scannapieco, Cecilia; White, Simon

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies in a high-resolution, hydrodynamical cosmological simulation of a Milky Way sized halo and its environment. Our simulation includes gas cooling, star formation, supernova feedback, metal enrichment and ultraviolet heating. In total, 90 satellites and more than 400 isolated dwarf galaxies are formed in the simulation, allowing a systematic study of the internal and environmental processes that determine their evolution. We find that 95 per cent of satellite galaxies are gas free at z= 0, and identify three mechanisms for gas loss: supernova feedback, tidal stripping and photoevaporation due to re-ionization. Gas-rich satellite galaxies are only found with total masses above ˜5 × 109 M⊙. In contrast, for isolated dwarf galaxies, a total mass of ˜109 M⊙ constitutes a sharp transition; less massive galaxies are predominantly gas free at z= 0, more massive, isolated dwarf galaxies are often able to retain their gas. In general, we find that the total mass of a dwarf galaxy is the main factor which determines its star formation, metal enrichment and its gas content, but that stripping may explain the observed difference in gas content between field dwarf galaxies and satellites with total masses close to 109 M⊙. We also find that a morphological transformation via tidal stripping of infalling, luminous dwarf galaxies whose dark matter is less concentrated than their stars cannot explain the high total mass-to-light ratios of the faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  3. Modelling nova populations in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hai-Liang; Woods, T. E.; Yungelson, L. R.; Gilfanov, M.; Han, Zhanwen

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical modelling of the evolution of classical and recurrent novae plays an important role in studies of binary evolution, nucleosynthesis and accretion physics. However, from a theoretical perspective the observed statistical properties of novae remain poorly understood. In this paper, we have produced model populations of novae using a hybrid binary population synthesis approach for differing star formation histories (SFHs): a starburst case (elliptical-like galaxies), a constant star formation rate case (spiral-like galaxies) and a composite case (in line with the inferred SFH for M31). We found that the nova rate at 10 Gyr in an elliptical-like galaxy is ˜10-20 times smaller than a spiral-like galaxy with the same mass. The majority of novae in elliptical-like galaxies at the present epoch are characterized by low-mass white dwarfs (WDs), long decay times, relatively faint absolute magnitudes and long recurrence periods. In contrast, the majority of novae in spiral-like galaxies at 10 Gyr have massive WDs, short decay times, are relatively bright and have short recurrence periods. The mass-loss time distribution for novae in our M31-like galaxy is in agreement with observational data for Andromeda. However, it is possible that we underestimate the number of bright novae in our model. This may arise in part due to the present uncertainties in the appropriate bolometric correction for novae.

  4. Uncovering Blue Diffuse Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Bethan; Koposov, Sergey; Stark, Daniel; Belokurov, Vasily; Pettini, Max; Olszewski, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs) and the star-formation within their chemically pristine environments are fundamental to our understanding of the galaxy formation process at early times. However, traditional emission-line surveys detect only the brightest metal-poor galaxies where star-formation occurs in compact, starbursting environments, and thereby give us only a partial view of the dwarf galaxy population. To avoid such biases, we have developed a new search algorithm based on the morphological, rather then spectral, properties of XMPs and have applied to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database of images. Using this novel approach, we have discovered ~100 previously undetected, faint blue galaxies, each with isolated HII regions embedded in a diffuse continuum. In this talk I will present the first results from follow-up optical spectroscopy of this sample, which reveals these blue diffuse dwarfs (BDDs) to be young, very metal-poor and actively forming stars despite their intrinsically low luminosities. I will present evidence showing that BDDs appear to bridge the gap between quiescent dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies and blue compact galaxies (BCDs) and as such offer an ideal opportunity to assess how star-formation occurs in more `normal' metal-poor systems.

  5. Dust and Molecular Gas from the Optically Faint Quasars at z 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ran; Carilli, C.; Neri, R.; Riechers, D.; Wagg, J.; Walter, F.; Bertoldi, F.; Omont, A.; Cox, P.; Menten, K.; Fan, X.; Strauss, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present millimeter observations of the twelve z 6 quasars discovered from the SDSS southern survey. These objects are typically one or two magnitudes fainter in the optical (i.e., 20.6 faint quasars at z 6 reveal strong FIR emission from 40 to 60 K warm dust and highly excited molecular gas in the quasar host galaxies. The molecular gas masses of the two CO detections are all about 10^10 Msun, which are comparable to that of the CO-detected optically bright quasars at z 6. Their FIR-to-CO luminosity ratios are also consistent with that of the previous CO-detected quasars at z 2 to 6 and the dusty starbusrt systems, e.g., the submillimeter galaxies. However, their FIR-to-UV luminosity ratios are higher than that of the millimeter-detected optically bright quasars at z 6. This confirms the shallow nonlinear FIR-to-AGN luminosity relationship found with other AGN-starburst systems at local and high-z universe. All these results suggest massive star formation coeval with rapid black hole accretion in the host galaxies of the millimeter-detected optically faint quasars at z 6. Further high-resolution imaging of the Molecular CO emission (e.g., with ALMA) will be important to measure the dynamical masses of the spheroidal hosts and understand the black hole-bulge relationship of the optically faint quasars at the earliest epoch.

  6. SN 2009E: a faint clone of SN 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, A.; Pumo, M. L.; Navasardyan, H.; Zampieri, L.; Turatto, M.; Sollerman, J.; Taddia, F.; Kankare, E.; Mattila, S.; Nicolas, J.; Prosperi, E.; San Segundo Delgado, A.; Taubenberger, S.; Boles, T.; Bachini, M.; Benetti, S.; Bufano, F.; Cappellaro, E.; Cason, A. D.; Cetrulo, G.; Ergon, M.; Germany, L.; Harutyunyan, A.; Howerton, S.; Hurst, G. M.; Patat, F.; Stritzinger, M.; Strolger, L.-G.; Wells, W.

    2012-01-01

    Context.1987A-like events form a rare sub-group of hydrogen-rich core-collapse supernovae that are thought to originate from the explosion of blue supergiant stars. Although SN 1987A is the best known supernova, very few objects of this group have been discovered and, hence, studied. Aims: In this paper we investigate the properties of SN 2009E, which exploded in a relatively nearby spiral galaxy (NGC 4141) and that is probably the faintest 1987A-like supernova discovered so far. We also attempt to characterize this subgroup of core-collapse supernovae with the help of the literature and present new data for a few additional objects. Methods: The lack of early-time observations from professional telescopes is compensated by frequent follow-up observations performed by a number of amateur astronomers. This allows us to reconstruct a well-sampled light curve for SN 2009E. Spectroscopic observations which started about 2 months after the supernova explosion, highlight significant differences between SN 2009E and the prototypical SN 1987A. Modelling the data of SN 2009E allows us to constrain the explosion parameters and the properties of the progenitor star, and compare the inferred estimates with those available for the similar SNe 1987A and 1998A. Results: The light curve of SN 2009E is less luminous than that of SN 1987A and the other members of this class, and the maximum light curve peak is reached at a slightly later epoch than in SN 1987A. Late-time photometric observations suggest that SN 2009E ejected about 0.04 M⊙ of 56Ni, which is the smallest 56Ni mass in our sample of 1987A-like events. Modelling the observations with a radiation hydrodynamics code, we infer for SN 2009E a kinetic plus thermal energy of about 0.6 foe, an initial radius of ~7 × 1012 cm and an ejected mass of ~19 M⊙. The photospheric spectra show a number of narrow (v ≈ 1800 km s-1) metal lines, with unusually strong Ba II lines. The nebular spectrum displays narrow emission lines of

  7. NASA Researches the 'FaINT' Side of Sonic Booms

    NASA Video Gallery

    As the latest in a continuing progression of NASA supersonics research projects aimed at reducing or mitigating the effect of sonic booms, the Farfield Investigation of No Boom Threshold, or FaINT,...

  8. Clots May Be the Cause of Fainting in Some Elderly

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the brain and cause a loss of consciousness. Still, Moores said, fainting spells are "certainly not ... That refers to a short-lived loss of consciousness due to certain triggers, such as seeing the ...

  9. FAINT END OF 1.3 mm NUMBER COUNTS REVEALED BY ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Ohta, Kouji; Seko, Akifumi; Yabe, Kiyoto; Akiyama, Masayuki

    2013-06-01

    We present the faint end of number counts at 1.3 mm (238 GHz) obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Band 6 observations were carried out targeting 20 star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 1.4 in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey field. In the observations, we serendipitously detect 15 sources (≥3.8σ, S{sub 1.3} {sub mm} = 0.15-0.61 mJy) other than the targeted sources. We create number counts by using these ''sub-mJy sources'', which probe the faintest flux range among surveys at millimeter wavelengths. The number counts are consistent with (flux-scaled) number counts at 850 μm and 870 μm obtained with gravitational lensing clusters. The ALMA number counts agree well with model predictions, which suggest that these sub-mJy populations are more like ''normal'' star-forming galaxies than ''classical'' submillimeter galaxies with intense star-forming activity. In this flux range, ∼80% of the extragalactic background light at 1.3 mm is resolved into individual sources.

  10. The influence of diffuse scattered light. II. Observations of galaxy haloes and thick discs and hosts of blue compact galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandin, Christer

    2015-05-01

    Studies of deep photometry of galaxies have presented discoveries of excess light in surface-brightness and colour profiles at large radii in the form of diffuse faint haloes and thick discs. In a majority of the cases, it has seemed necessary to use exotic stellar populations or alternative physical solutions to explain the excess. Few studies have carefully scrutinized the role of scattered light in this context. I explore the influence of scattered light on ground-based observations of haloes and thick discs around edge-on galaxies, haloes around face-on disc galaxies, host galaxies around blue compact galaxies (BCGs), and haloes around elliptical galaxies. Surface-brightness structures of all considered types of galaxies are modelled and analysed to compare scattered-light haloes and thick discs with measurements. I simulate the influence of scattered light and accurate sky subtraction on simplified Sérsic-type and face-on disc galaxy models. All galaxy models are convolved with both lower-limit and brighter point spread functions (PSFs); for a few galaxies it was possible to use dedicated PSFs. The results show bright scattered-light haloes and high amounts of red excess at large radii and faint surface brightnesses for nearly all types of galaxies; exceptions are the largest elliptical-type galaxies where the influence of scattered light is smaller. Studies have underestimated the role of scattered light to explain their surface-brightness profiles. My analysis shows surface-brightness profiles that include scattered light that are very similar to and overlap measurements at all radii. The derivation of physical properties of haloes, thick discs, and BCG hosts from diffuse data is misleading since accurate and radially extended PSFs are non-existent. Significantly improved analyses that include new measurements of PSFs are required to study diffuse faint structures further.

  11. Radio Galaxy Zoo: host galaxies and radio morphologies derived from visual inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, J. K.; Wong, O. I.; Willett, K. W.; Norris, R. P.; Rudnick, L.; Shabala, S. S.; Simmons, B. D.; Snyder, C.; Garon, A.; Seymour, N.; Middelberg, E.; Andernach, H.; Lintott, C. J.; Jacob, K.; Kapińska, A. D.; Mao, M. Y.; Masters, K. L.; Jarvis, M. J.; Schawinski, K.; Paget, E.; Simpson, R.; Klöckner, H.-R.; Bamford, S.; Burchell, T.; Chow, K. E.; Cotter, G.; Fortson, L.; Heywood, I.; Jones, T. W.; Kaviraj, S.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Maksym, W. P.; Polsterer, K.; Borden, K.; Hollow, R. P.; Whyte, L.

    2015-11-01

    We present results from the first 12 months of operation of Radio Galaxy Zoo, which upon completion will enable visual inspection of over 170 000 radio sources to determine the host galaxy of the radio emission and the radio morphology. Radio Galaxy Zoo uses 1.4 GHz radio images from both the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST) and the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) in combination with mid-infrared images at 3.4 μm from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and at 3.6 μm from the Spitzer Space Telescope. We present the early analysis of the WISE mid-infrared colours of the host galaxies. For images in which there is >75 per cent consensus among the Radio Galaxy Zoo cross-identifications, the project participants are as effective as the science experts at identifying the host galaxies. The majority of the identified host galaxies reside in the mid-infrared colour space dominated by elliptical galaxies, quasi-stellar objects and luminous infrared radio galaxies. We also find a distinct population of Radio Galaxy Zoo host galaxies residing in a redder mid-infrared colour space consisting of star-forming galaxies and/or dust-enhanced non-star-forming galaxies consistent with a scenario of merger-driven active galactic nuclei (AGN) formation. The completion of the full Radio Galaxy Zoo project will measure the relative populations of these hosts as a function of radio morphology and power while providing an avenue for the identification of rare and extreme radio structures. Currently, we are investigating candidates for radio galaxies with extreme morphologies, such as giant radio galaxies, late-type host galaxies with extended radio emission and hybrid morphology radio sources.

  12. THE DISCOVERY OF AN ULTRA-FAINT STAR CLUSTER IN THE CONSTELLATION OF URSA MINOR

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, R. R.; Geha, M.; Vargas, L. C.; Cote, P.; Stetson, P.; Santana, F. A.; Simon, J. D.; Djorgovski, S. G.

    2012-07-01

    We report the discovery of a new ultra-faint globular cluster in the constellation of Ursa Minor, based on stellar photometry from the MegaCam imager at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We find that this cluster, Munoz 1, is located at a distance of 45 {+-} 5 kpc and at a projected distance of only 45' from the center of the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Using a maximum-likelihood technique we measure a half-light radius of 0.'5, or equivalently 7 pc, and an ellipticity consistent with being zero. We estimate its absolute magnitude to be M{sub V} -0.4 {+-} 0.9, which corresponds to L{sub V} = 120{sup +160}{sub -65} L{sub Sun} and we measure a heliocentric radial velocity of -137 {+-} 4 km s{sup -1} based on Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy. This new satellite is separate from Ursa Minor by {approx}30 kpc and 110 km s{sup -1} suggesting the cluster is not obviously associated with the dSph, despite the very close angular separation. Based on its photometric properties and structural parameters we conclude that Munoz 1 is a new ultra-faint stellar cluster. Along with Segue 3 this is one of the faintest stellar clusters known to date.

  13. Observations of faint comets at McDonald Observatory: 1978-1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, E. S.; Cochran, A. L.; Rybski, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    Modern observational techniques, developed for spectroscopy and photometry of faint galaxies and quasars, successfully applied to faint comets on the 2.7 m telescope. The periodic comets Van Biesbrock, Ashbrook-Jackson, Schwassmann-Wachmann 1, Tempel 2, Encke, Forbes, Brooks 2, Stephan-Oterma and the new comets Bradfield (19791), Bowell (1980b), Chernis-Petrauskas (1980k) were observed. The comets ranged in magnitude from 10th to 20th magnitude. For comets fainter than 19th magnitude, reflectance spectra at 100A resolution and area photometry were obtained. On comets of 17th or 18th magnitude, spectrometric scans (6A resolution) of the nucleus or inner coma region. On those comets which are brighter than 16th magnitude spatial spectrophotometric (6A resolution) studies of the inner and extended comae were done. An extensive spatial study of the comae of P/Encke and P/Stephen-Oterma, correlated with heliocentric distance is taking place. The observing process used is described and examples of the results obtained to date are discussed.

  14. A New Faint Milky Way Satellite Discovered in the Pan-STARRS1 3π Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laevens, Benjamin P. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bernard, Edouard J.; Bell, Eric F.; Sesar, Branimir; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Schlafly, Edward F.; Slater, Colin T.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Flewelling, Heather; Hodapp, Klaus A.; Kaiser, Nicholas; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Lupton, Robert H.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Price, Paul A.; Tonry, John L.; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Waters, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    We present the discovery of a faint Milky Way satellite, Laevens 2/Triangulum II, found in the Panoramic Survey Telescope And Rapid Response System 3π imaging data and confirmed with follow-up wide-field photometry from the Large Binocular Cameras. The stellar system, with an absolute magnitude of MV = -1.8 ± 0.5, a heliocentric distance of 30-2+2 kpc, and a half-mass-radius of 34-8+9 pc, shows remarkable similarity to faint, nearby, small satellites such as Willman 1, Segue 1, Segue 2, and Boötes II. The discovery of Laevens 2/Triangulum II further populates the region of parameter space for which the boundary between dwarf galaxies and globular clusters becomes tenuous. Follow-up spectroscopy will ultimately determine the nature of this new satellite, whose spatial location hints at a possible connection with the complex Triangulum-Andromeda stellar structures. The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are The University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Instituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; The Ohio State University, and The Research Corporation, on behalf of The University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota, and University of Virginia.

  15. The Environment of Galaxies at Low Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Nicolas B.; Ivezić, Željko

    2008-02-01

    We compare environmental effects in two analogous samples of galaxies, one from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the other from a semianalytic model (SAM) based on the Millennium Simulation (MS), to test to what extent current SAMs of galaxy formation are reproducing environmental effects. We estimate the large-scale environment of each galaxy using a Bayesian density estimator based on distances to all 10 nearest neighbors, and we compare broadband photometric properties of the two samples as a function of environment. The feedbacks implemented in the semianalytic model produce a qualitatively correct galaxy population with similar environmental dependence as that seen in SDSS galaxies. In detail, however, the colors of MS galaxies exhibit an exaggerated dependence on environment: the field contains too many blue galaxies, whereas clusters contain too many red galaxies, compared to the SDSS sample. We also find that the MS contains a population of highly clustered, relatively faint red galaxies with velocity dispersions comparable to their Hubble flow. Such high-density galaxies, if they exist, would be overlooked in any low-redshift survey, since their membership to a cluster cannot be determined because of the "fingers-of-God" effect.

  16. HST observations of faint Cold Classical KBOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penteado, Paulo F.; Trilling, David E.; Grundy, Will

    2016-10-01

    The size distribution of the known Kuiper Belt Objects has been described by a double power law, with a break at R magnitude 25. There are two leading interpretations to this break: 1) It is the result of the collisional evolution, with the objects smaller than the break being the population most affected by collisional erosion. 2) The size distribution break is primordial, set during the Kuiper Belt formation.The low inclination KBOs, the Cold Classical population, is thought to have been dynamically isolated since the formation of the Solar System, and thus only collisions between Cold Classicals would have affected their size distribution. If the distribution is collisional, it probes parameters of the Kuiper Belt history: strengths of the bodies, impact energies and frequency, and the the number of objects. If the distribution is primordial, it reveals parameters of the Kuiper Belt accretion, as well as limits on its subsequent collisional history.We obtained HST observations of 16 faint Cold Classicals, which we combine with archival HST observations of 20 others, to examine the distribution of two properties of the smallest KBOs: colors and binary fraction. These properties can differentiate between a primordial and a collisional origin of the size distribution break. If the smaller bodies have been through extensive collisional evolution, they will have exposed materials from their interiors, which has not been exposed to weathering, and thus should be bluer than the old surfaces of the larger bodies. Another constraint can be derived from the fraction of binary objects: the angular momentum of the observed binaries is typically too high to result from collisions, thus a collisionally-evolved population would have a lower binary fraction, due to the easier separation of binaries, compared to the disruption of similar-sized bodies, and the easier disruption of the binary components, due to the smaller size.We present the constraints to the color and binary

  17. Two New Ultra-Faint Star Clusters in the Milky Way Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongwon

    2016-08-01

    Kim 1 & 2 are two new star clusters discovered in the Stromlo Missing Satellite Survey. Kim 1, located at a heliocentric distance of 19.8 +/- 0.9 kpc, features an extremely low total luminosity (M V = 0.3 +/- 0.5 mag) and low star concentration. Together with the large ellipticity (ɛ = 0.42 +/- 0.10) and irregular isophotes, these properties suggest that Kim 1 is an intermediate mass star cluster being stripped by the Galactic tidal field. Kim 2 is a rare ultra-faint outer halo globular cluster located at a heliocentric distance of 104.7 +/- 4.1 kpc. The cluster exhibits evidence of significant mass loss such as extra-tidal stars and mass-segregation. Kim 2 is likely to follow an orbit confined to the peripheral region of the Galactic halo, and/or to have formed in a dwarf galaxy that was later accreted into the Galactic halo.

  18. Seeing Baby Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Visible/DSS Click on image for larger version Ultraviolet/GALEX Click on image for larger version Poster Version Click on image for larger version

    The unique ultraviolet vision of NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer reveals, for the first time, dwarf galaxies forming out of nothing more than pristine gas likely leftover from the early universe. Dwarf galaxies are relatively small collections of stars that often orbit around larger galaxies like our Milky Way.

    The forming dwarf galaxies shine in the far ultraviolet spectrum, rendered as blue in the call-out on the right hand side of this image. Near ultraviolet light, also obtained by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, is displayed in green, and visible light from the blue part of the spectrum here is represented by red. The clumps (in circles) are distinctively blue, indicating they are primarily detected in far ultraviolet light.

    The faint blue overlay traces the outline of the Leo Ring, a huge cloud of hydrogen and helium that orbits around two massive galaxies in the constellation Leo (left panel). The cloud is thought likely to be a primordial object, an ancient remnant of material that has remained relatively unchanged since the very earliest days of the universe. Identified about 25 years ago by radio waves, the ring cannot be seen in visible light.

    Only a portion of the Leo Ring has been imaged in the ultraviolet, but this section contains the telltale ultraviolet signature of recent massive star formation within this ring of pristine gas. Astronomers have previously only seen dwarf galaxies form out of gas that has already been cycled through a galaxy and enriched with metals elements heavier than helium produced as stars evolve.

    The visible data come from the Digitized Sky Survey of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md. The

  19. A MINUET OF GALAXIES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This troupe of four galaxies, known as Hickson Compact Group 87 (HCG 87), is performing an intricate dance orchestrated by the mutual gravitational forces acting between them. The dance is a slow, graceful minuet, occurring over a time span of hundreds of millions of years. The Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 on NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) provides a striking improvement in resolution over previous ground-based imaging. In particular, this image reveals complex details in the dust lanes of the group's largest galaxy member (HCG 87a), which is actually disk-shaped, but tilted so that we see it nearly edge-on. Both 87a and its elliptically shaped nearest neighbor (87b) have active galactic nuclei which are believed to harbor black holes that are consuming gas. A third group member, the nearby spiral galaxy 87c, may be undergoing a burst of active star formation. Gas flows within galaxies can be intensified by the gravitational tidal forces between interacting galaxies. So interactions can provide fresh fuel for both active nuclei and starburst phenomena. These three galaxies are so close to each other that gravitational forces disrupt their structure and alter their evolution. From the analysis of its spectra, the small spiral near the center of the group could either be a fourth member or perhaps an unrelated background object. The HST image was made by combining images taken in four different color filters in order to create a three-color picture. Regions of active star formation are blue (hot stars) and also pinkish if hot hydrogen gas is present. The complex dark bands across the large edge-on disk galaxy are due to interstellar dust silhouetted against the galaxy's background starlight. A faint tidal bridge of stars can be seen between the edge-on and elliptical galaxies. HCG 87 was selected for Hubble imaging by members of the public who visited the Hubble Heritage website (http://heritage.stsci.edu) during the month of May and registered their votes

  20. DISTANT CLUSTER OF GALAXIES [left

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    One of the deepest images to date of the universe, taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST), reveals thousands of faint galaxies at the detection limit of present day telescopes. Peering across a large volume of the observable cosmos, Hubble resolves thousands of galaxies from five to twelve billion light-years away. The light from these remote objects has taken billions of years to cross the expanding universe, making these distant galaxies fossil evidence' of events that happened when the universe was one-third its present age. A fraction of the galaxies in this image belong to a cluster located nine billion light-years away. Though the field of view (at the cluster's distance) is only two million light-years across, it contains a multitude of fragmentary objects. (By comparison, the two million light-years between our Milky Way galaxy and its nearest large companion galaxy, in the constellation Andromeda, is essentially empty space!) Very few of the cluster's members are recognizable as normal spiral galaxies (like our Milky Way), although some elongated members might be edge-on disks. Among this zoo of odd galaxies are ``tadpole-like'' objects, disturbed and apparently merging systems dubbed 'train-wrecks,' and a multitude of faint, tiny shards and fragments, dwarf galaxies or possibly an unknown population of objects. However, the cluster also contains red galaxies that resemble mature examples of today's elliptical galaxies. Their red color comes from older stars that must have formed shortly after the Big Bang. The image is the full field view of the Wide Field and Planetary Camera-2. The picture was taken in intervals between May 11 and June 15, 1994 and required an 18-hour long exposure, over 32 orbits of HST, to reveal objects down to 29th magnitude. [bottom right] A close up view of the peculiar radio galaxy 3C324 used to locate the cluster. The galaxy is nine billion light-years away as measured by its spectral redshift (z=1.2), and located in the

  1. Morphological Transformation from Galaxy Harassment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ben; Lake, George; Katz, Neal

    1998-03-01

    Galaxy morphologies in clusters have undergone a remarkable transition over the past several billion yr. Distant clusters at z ~ 0.4 are filled with small spiral galaxies, many of which are disturbed and show evidence of multiple bursts of star formation. This population is absent from nearby clusters, where spheroidals comprise the faint end of the luminosity function. Our numerical simulations follow the evolution of disk galaxies in a rich cluster resulting from encounters with brighter galaxies and the cluster's tidal field, or ``galaxy harassment.'' After a bursting transient phase, they undergo a complete morphological transformation from ``disks'' to ``spheroidals.'' We examine the remnants and find support for our theory in detailed comparisons of the photometry and kinematics of the spheroidal galaxies in clusters. Our model naturally accounts for the intermediate-age stellar population seen in these spheroidals, as well as for the trend in the dwarf-to-giant ratio with cluster richness. The final shapes are typically prolate and are flattened primarily by velocity anisotropy. Their mass-to-light ratios are in the range 3-8, in good agreement with observations.

  2. The Galaxy in Context: Structural, Kinematic, and Integrated Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Gerhard, Ortwin

    2016-09-01

    Our Galaxy, the Milky Way, is a benchmark for understanding disk galaxies. It is the only galaxy whose formation history can be studied using the full distribution of stars from faint dwarfs to supergiants. The oldest components provide us with unique insight into how galaxies form and evolve over billions of years. The Galaxy is a luminous (L⋆) barred spiral with a central box/peanut bulge, a dominant disk, and a diffuse stellar halo. Based on global properties, it falls in the sparsely populated “green valley” region of the galaxy color-magnitude diagram. Here we review the key integrated, structural and kinematic parameters of the Galaxy, and point to uncertainties as well as directions for future progress. Galactic studies will continue to play a fundamental role far into the future because there are measurements that can only be made in the near field and much of contemporary astrophysics depends on such observations.

  3. Spiral Galaxies Stripped Bare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    Six spectacular spiral galaxies are seen in a clear new light in images from ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. The pictures were taken in infrared light, using the impressive power of the HAWK-I camera, and will help astronomers understand how the remarkable spiral patterns in galaxies form and evolve. HAWK-I [1] is one of the newest and most powerful cameras on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). It is sensitive to infrared light, which means that much of the obscuring dust in the galaxies' spiral arms becomes transparent to its detectors. Compared to the earlier, and still much-used, VLT infrared camera ISAAC, HAWK-I has sixteen times as many pixels to cover a much larger area of sky in one shot and, by using newer technology than ISAAC, it has a greater sensitivity to faint infrared radiation [2]. Because HAWK-I can study galaxies stripped bare of the confusing effects of dust and glowing gas it is ideal for studying the vast numbers of stars that make up spiral arms. The six galaxies are part of a study of spiral structure led by Preben Grosbøl at ESO. These data were acquired to help understand the complex and subtle ways in which the stars in these systems form into such perfect spiral patterns. The first image shows NGC 5247, a spiral galaxy dominated by two huge arms, located 60-70 million light-years away. The galaxy lies face-on towards Earth, thus providing an excellent view of its pinwheel structure. It lies in the zodiacal constellation of Virgo (the Maiden). The galaxy in the second image is Messier 100, also known as NGC 4321, which was discovered in the 18th century. It is a fine example of a "grand design" spiral galaxy - a class of galaxies with very prominent and well-defined spiral arms. About 55 million light-years from Earth, Messier 100 is part of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies and lies in the constellation of Coma Berenices (Berenice's Hair, named after the ancient Egyptian queen Berenice II). The third

  4. Growing Galaxies Gently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    helium as "heavy elements". [2] By carefully splitting up the faint light coming from a galaxy into its component colours using powerful telescopes and spectrographs, astronomers can identify the fingerprints of different chemicals in remote galaxies, and measure the amounts of heavy elements present. With the SINFONI instrument on the VLT astronomers can go one better and get a separate spectrum for each part of an object. This allows them to make a map that shows the quantity of heavy elements present in different parts of a galaxy and also determine where in the galaxy star formation is occurring most vigorously. More information This research was presented in a paper, Gas accretion in distant galaxies as the origin of chemical abundance gradients, by Cresci et al., to appear in Nature on 14 October 2010. The team is composed of G. Cresci (Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Italy), F. Mannucci (Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Italy), R. Maiolino (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Italy), A. Marconi (Universitá di Firenze, Italy), A. Gnerucci (Universitá di Firenze, Italy) and L. Magrini (Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Italy). ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world's most advanced visible

  5. Deep imaging of high redshift QSO fields below the Lyman limit. II - Number counts and colors of field galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steidel, Charles C.; Hamilton, Donald

    1993-01-01

    We present an analysis of the number counts and colors of faint galaxies to about 26.5 mag in the fields of two high Galactic latitude, very-high-redshift QSOs. We concentrate on the general properties of the field galaxies at faint magnitudes. In particular, we readdress the faint galaxy number counts and colors as a function of apparent magnitude and we reexamine the possible contribution of very-high-redshift galaxies to the faint samples. We find that the number counts to R = 26 are well fitted by the relation log N(m) = 0.31R + C. The G-band counts for the same galaxies are consistent with the same slope fainter than G about 23.5, but exhibit a much steeper slope at brighter magnitudes. At R = 25.5, the differential number counts have reached about 1.2 x 10 exp 5/sq deg; the same surface density of galaxies is reached at G = 26.5. We confirm the existence of a gradual 'blueing' trend of the field galaxies toward fainter apparent magnitude; however, the blueing trend appears to extend only as faint as G about 24, fainter than which both the (G-R) and (U sub n-G) colors appear to level off. The mean colors of faint galaxies are considerably redder than flat spectrum. There are essentially no objects to R = 26 which have spectral energy distributions which are bluer than flat spectrum. The potential contribution of very-high-redshift galaxies may have been underestimated in previous analyses; the current data are consistent with the same population of relatively luminous galaxies at z about 3 as exist at z about 0.7.

  6. Enhanced faint companion photometry and astrometry using wavelength diversity.

    PubMed

    Burke, Daniel; Devaney, Nicholas

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we examine approaches to faint companion detection and estimation in multi-spectral images. We will employ the Hotelling observer, which is the optimal linear algorithm for signal detection. We have shown how to use this observer to estimate faint object position and brightness in the presence of residual speckle, which usually limits astrometric and photometric techniques. These speckles can be reduced by differential imaging techniques such as Angular Differential Imaging and Spectral Differential Imaging. Here we present results based on simulations of adaptive-optics-corrected images from an Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) that contain quasi-static speckle noise. The simulation includes Angular Differential Imaging and Spectral Differential Imaging to reduce the residual speckle and subsequent multi-wavelength processing. We examine the feasibility of this approach on simulated ELT observations of faint companions.

  7. STAR CLUSTER DISRUPTION IN THE STARBURST GALAXY MESSIER 82

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shuo; Li, Chengyuan; De Grijs, Richard; Anders, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Using high-resolution, multiple-passband Hubble Space Telescope images spanning the entire optical/near-infrared wavelength range, we obtained a statistically complete U-band-selected sample of 846 extended star clusters across the disk of the nearby starburst galaxy M82. Based on a careful analysis of the clusters' spectral energy distributions, we determined their galaxy-wide age and mass distributions. The M82 clusters exhibit three clear peaks in their age distribution, thus defining relatively young, log (t yr{sup –1}) ≤ 7.5, intermediate-age, log (t yr{sup –1}) in [7.5, 8.5], and old samples, log (t yr{sup –1}) ≥ 8.5. Comparison of the completeness-corrected mass distributions offers a firm handle on the galaxy's star cluster disruption history. The most massive star clusters in the young and old samples are (almost) all concentrated in the most densely populated central region, while the intermediate-age sample's most massive clusters are more spatially dispersed, which may reflect the distribution of the highest-density gas throughout the galaxy's evolutionary history, combined with the solid-body nature of the galaxy's central region.

  8. Cosmic ray interactions in starbursting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M.

    High quality gamma-ray and radio observations of nearby galaxies offer an unprecedented opportunity to quantitatively study the properties of their cosmic ray populations. Accounting for various interactions and energy losses, I developed a multi-component, single-zone model of the cosmic ray populations in the central molecular zones of star-forming galaxies. Using observational knowledge of the interstellar medium and star formation, I successfully predicted the radio, gamma-ray, and neutrino spectra for nearby starbursts. Using chi-squared tests to compare the models with observational radio and gamma-ray data, I placed constraints on magnetic field strengths, cosmic ray energy densities, and galactic wind (advection) speeds. The initial models were applied to and tested on the prototypical starburst galaxy M82. To further test the model and to explore the differences in environment between starbursts and active galactic nuclei, I studied NGC 253 and NGC 1068, both nearby giant spiral galaxies which have been detected in gamma-rays. Additionally, I demonstrated that the excess GeV energy gamma-ray emission in the Galactic Center is likely not diffuse emission from an additional population of cosmic rays accelerated in supernova remnants. Lastly, I investigated cosmic ray populations in the starburst nuclei of Arp 220, a nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxy which displays a high-intensity mode of star formation more common in young galaxies, and I showed that the nuclei are efficient cosmic-ray proton calorimeters.

  9. Unidentified IRAS sources: Ultrahigh luminosity galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. R.; Schneider, D. P.; Danielson, G. E.; Beichman, C. A.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B. T.

    1985-01-01

    Optical imaging and spectroscopy measurements were obtained for six of the high galactic latitude infrared sources reported by Houck, et al. (1984) from the IRAS survey to have no obvious optical counterparts on the POSS prints. All are identified with visually faint galaxies that have total luminosities in the range 5 x 10 to the 11th power stellar luminosity to 5 x 10 to the 12th power stellar luminosity. This luminosity emerges virtually entirely in the infrared. The origin of the luminosity, which is one to two orders of magnitude greater than that of normal galaxies, is not known at this time.

  10. Galaxy pairs in deep HST images: Evidence for evolution in the galaxy merger rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkey, Jordan M.; Keel, William C.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Franklin, Barbara E.

    1994-01-01

    We use four deep serendipitous fields observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide-Field Camera to constrain the rate of galaxy merging between the current epoch and z approximately equals 0.7. Since most mergers occur between members of bound pairs, the merger rate is given to a good approximation by (half) the rate of disappearance of galaxies in pairs. An objective criterion for pair membership shows that 34% +/- 9% of our HST galaxies with I = 18-22 belong to pairs, compared to 7% locally. This means that about 13% of the galaxy population has disappeared due to merging in the cosmic epoch corresponding to this magnitude interval (or 0.1 approximately less than z approximately less than 0.7). Our pair fraction is a lower limit: correction for pair members falling below our detection threshold might raise the fraction to approximately 50%. Since we address only two-galaxy merging, these values do not include physical systems of higher multiplicity. Incorporating I-band field-galaxy redshift distributions, the pair fraction grows with redshift as alpha(1 + z)(exp 3.5 +/- 0.5) and the merger rate as (1 + z)(exp 2.5 +/- 0.5). This may have significant implications for the interpretation of galaxy counts (disappearance of faint blue galaxies), the cosmological evolution of faint radio sources and quasars (which evolve approximately as (1 + z)(exp 3), the similarity in the power law is necessary but not sufficient evidence for a causal relation), statistics of QSO companions, the galaxy content in distant clusters, and the merging history of a 'typical' galaxy.

  11. Satellite Galaxies of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    This beautiful 13 x 13 image (click for the full view!) holds more than meets the eye. Look closely at the small concentration of blue stars just to the left of center. This is Eridanus II, one of nine new ultra-faint galaxies discovered just last year aroundthe Milky Way. Detected as part of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and presented in a study led by Sergey E. Koposov (Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge), these new galaxies add to a growing list of very dim satellites that orbit within the Milky Ways potential. Since their discovery, these DES satellites have been used to answer a number of astronomical questions. In particular, the large dark-matter fraction of these ultra-faint galaxies makes them excellent laboratories for testing models of dark matter in the universe. Check back with us on Wednesday to learn more about what Eridanus II has revealed about dark matter! And for more information on the nine DES-discovered ultra-faint satellites, check out the paper below.CitationSergey E. Koposov et al 2015 ApJ 805 130. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/805/2/130

  12. Galaxies in the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livermore, Rachael C.

    2015-08-01

    The CANDELS survey has revolutionized the study of galaxies in the epoch of reionization, with the wide field and near-infrared coverage enabling the discovery of candidates for the brightest galaxies in the crucial redshift range 6 < z < 9. I will present results from spectroscopic followup of these candidates with Keck/MOSFIRE and DEIMOS, and will discuss the implications for reionization of the rapid drop-off in detection of Lyman alpha emission between z~6 and z~7.Complementing the results from CANDELS, the Hubble Frontier Fields open up the faint end of the luminosity function with their combination of deep HST imaging and magnification from gravitational lensing. I will discuss methods of removing the foreground galaxies and intracluster light through modelling and wavelet decomposition. This enables us to detect the faintest high-redshift galaxies in the fields, and provides insight into the faint-end slope of the luminosity function at 6 < z < 9, revealing the galaxies believed to be responsible for the bulk of the energy contributing to reionization in this epoch.

  13. Study of Interacting/Merging IRAS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2003-07-01

    A new sample of 1178 faint IRAS galaxies (Byurakan-IRAS Galaxy sample, BIG) has been constructed by means of optical identifications of IRAS point sources from PSC in the region +61° <δ<+90° at high galactic latitudes with a surface of 1487 deg^{2}. Compact galaxies, interacting pairs and groups, mergers, radio, and X-ray sources are among the identified objects. Spectral observations in Byurakan (Armenia), SAO (Russia) and OHP (France) revealed new AGNs and high-luminosity infrared galaxies. 50 optical counterparts are interacting/merging pairs and multiple systems. 15 of them have been observed at SAO 6m telescope with Multi-Pupil Fibre Spectrograph (MPFS) to study their velocity fields and dynamics to reveal physical mergers. These objects are of special interest due to star-formation, nuclear activity and interaction phenomena occuring there, giving possibility to study connections between these phenomena and their interrelationship.

  14. The faint end of the 250 μm luminosity function at z < 0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Norberg, P.; Bethermin, M.; Bourne, N.; Cooray, A.; Cowley, W.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Farrah, D.; Lacey, C.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S.; Oliver, S.; Viero, M.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We aim to study the 250 μm luminosity function (LF) down to much fainter luminosities than achieved by previous efforts. Methods: We developed a modified stacking method to reconstruct the 250 μm LF using optically selected galaxies from the SDSS survey and Herschel maps of the GAMA equatorial fields and Stripe 82. Our stacking method not only recovers the mean 250 μm luminosities of galaxies that are too faint to be individually detected, but also their underlying distribution functions. Results: We find very good agreement with previous measurements in the overlapping luminosity range. More importantly, we are able to derive the LF down to much fainter luminosities (~ 25 times fainter) than achieved by previous studies. We find strong positive luminosity evolution L*250(z)∝(1+z)4.89±1.07 and moderate negative density evolution Φ*250(z)∝(1+z)-1.02±0.54 over the redshift range 0.02

  15. SEGUE 2: THE LEAST MASSIVE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Bullock, James S.; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Cohen, Judith G.; Geha, Marla

    2013-06-10

    Segue 2, discovered by Belokurov et al., is a galaxy with a luminosity of only 900 L{sub Sun }. We present Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy of 25 members of Segue 2-a threefold increase in spectroscopic sample size. The velocity dispersion is too small to be measured with our data. The upper limit with 90% (95%) confidence is {sigma}{sub v} < 2.2 (2.6) km s{sup -1}, the most stringent limit for any galaxy. The corresponding limit on the mass within the three-dimensional half-light radius (46 pc) is M{sub 1/2} < 1.5 (2.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }. Segue 2 is the least massive galaxy known. We identify Segue 2 as a galaxy rather than a star cluster based on the wide dispersion in [Fe/H] (from -2.85 to -1.33) among the member stars. The stars' [{alpha}/Fe] ratios decline with increasing [Fe/H], indicating that Segue 2 retained Type Ia supernova ejecta despite its presently small mass and that star formation lasted for at least 100 Myr. The mean metallicity, ([Fe/H]) = -2.22 {+-} 0.13 (about the same as the Ursa Minor galaxy, 330 times more luminous than Segue 2), is higher than expected from the luminosity-metallicity relation defined by more luminous dwarf galaxy satellites of the Milky Way. Segue 2 may be the barest remnant of a tidally stripped, Ursa Minor-sized galaxy. If so, it is the best example of an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy that came to be ultra-faint through tidal stripping. Alternatively, Segue 2 could have been born in a very low mass dark matter subhalo (v{sub max} < 10 km s{sup -1}), below the atomic hydrogen cooling limit.

  16. Central star formation in S0 galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressel, L. L.; Oconnell, R. W.; Telesco, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    As a class, S0 galaxies are characterized by a lack of resolved bright stars in the disk. However, several lines of evidence support the hypothesis that a high rate of star formation is occurring at the centers of some S0 galaxies. Many of the warmest, most powerful far infrared sources in nearby bright galaxies occur in S0 galaxies. (Dressel 1988, Ap. J., 329, L69). The ratios of radio continuum flux to far infrared flux for these S0 galaxies are comparable to the ratios found for spiral galaxy disks and for star-burst galaxies. Very Large Array (VLA) maps of some of these S0 galaxies show that the radio continuum emission originates in the central few kiloparsecs. It is diffuse or clumpy, unlike the radio sources in active S0 galaxies, which are either extremely compact or have jet-lobe structures. Imaging of some of these galaxies at 10.8 microns shows that the infrared emission is also centrally concentrated. Many of the infrared-powerful S0 galaxies are Markarian galaxies. In only one case in this sample is the powerful ultraviolet emission known to be generated by a Seyfert nucleus. Optical spectra of the central few kiloparsecs of these S0 galaxies generally show deep Balmer absorption lines characteristic of A stars, and H beta emission suggestive of gas heated by O stars. A key question to our understanding of these galaxies is whether they really are S0 galaxies, or at least would have been recognized as S0 galaxies before the episode of central star formation began. Some of Nilson's classifications (used here) have been confirmed by Sandage or de Vaucouleurs and collaborators from better plates; some of the galaxies may be misclassified Sa galaxies (the most frequent hosts of central star formation); some are apparently difficult to classify because of mixed characteristics, faint non-S0 features, or peculiarities. More optical imaging is needed to characterize the host galaxies and to study the evolution of their star-forming regions.

  17. 1. Dyea Dock looking south. Note faint evenly spaced circular ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Dyea Dock looking south. Note faint evenly spaced circular dark pieces of grass up through the middle of the picture indicating posts making up the pier. Photograph made from park service cherry picker. - Dyea Dock & Association (Ruins), Skagway, Skagway, AK

  18. The dark side of galaxy formation.

    PubMed

    Smail, Ian

    2002-12-15

    I discuss the discovery of a population of extremely luminous, but very dusty and very distant, galaxies in the submillimetre (submm) waveband. Almost all the light emitted by the stars in these galaxies is absorbed by interstellar dust (which is produced by the same stars) and re-radiated in the far-infrared. This leaves little to be detected at optical wavelengths and results in most of these galaxies being effectively invisible in even the deepest optical images obtainable with the Hubble space telescope. Yet this population contributes most of the light emitted by galaxies at wavelengths of lambda > or approximately equal 100 microm over the lifetime of the Universe. Together with other observations, this suggests that perhaps up to half of all the stars seen in galaxies today were formed in very dusty regions in the early Universe. Hence, studying the galaxies detected in the submm wavebands is critical for developing and testing models of galaxy formation and evolution. Individually, these luminous submm galaxies are forming stars a thousand times faster than our Galaxy is at the present-day, sufficiently fast to form all the stars in the most luminous galaxy in the local Universe within a short period, up to ca. 0.1-1 Gyr. Detailed study of a handful of examples of this population confirm these estimates and unequivocally identify the bulk of this submm-selected population with dusty, star-burst galaxies in the very distant Universe. The extreme faintness of this population in the optical and near-infrared wavebands, resulting from their obscuration by dust, means that our understanding of the detailed nature of these galaxies is only slowly growing. I give a brief summary of the properties of these highly obscured systems and describe the wide range of facilities currently being developed that will greatly aid in their study.

  19. The dark side of galaxy formation.

    PubMed

    Smail, Ian

    2002-12-15

    I discuss the discovery of a population of extremely luminous, but very dusty and very distant, galaxies in the submillimetre (submm) waveband. Almost all the light emitted by the stars in these galaxies is absorbed by interstellar dust (which is produced by the same stars) and re-radiated in the far-infrared. This leaves little to be detected at optical wavelengths and results in most of these galaxies being effectively invisible in even the deepest optical images obtainable with the Hubble space telescope. Yet this population contributes most of the light emitted by galaxies at wavelengths of lambda > or approximately equal 100 microm over the lifetime of the Universe. Together with other observations, this suggests that perhaps up to half of all the stars seen in galaxies today were formed in very dusty regions in the early Universe. Hence, studying the galaxies detected in the submm wavebands is critical for developing and testing models of galaxy formation and evolution. Individually, these luminous submm galaxies are forming stars a thousand times faster than our Galaxy is at the present-day, sufficiently fast to form all the stars in the most luminous galaxy in the local Universe within a short period, up to ca. 0.1-1 Gyr. Detailed study of a handful of examples of this population confirm these estimates and unequivocally identify the bulk of this submm-selected population with dusty, star-burst galaxies in the very distant Universe. The extreme faintness of this population in the optical and near-infrared wavebands, resulting from their obscuration by dust, means that our understanding of the detailed nature of these galaxies is only slowly growing. I give a brief summary of the properties of these highly obscured systems and describe the wide range of facilities currently being developed that will greatly aid in their study. PMID:12626261

  20. Local Group Galaxy Emission-line Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaha, Cindy; Baildon, Taylor; Mehta, Shail; Garcia, Edgar; Massey, Philip; Hodge, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of the Local Group Galaxy Emission-line Survey of Hα emission regions in M31, M33 and seven dwarf galaxies in (NGC6822, IC10, WLM, Sextans A and B, Phoenix and Pegasus). Using data from the Local Group Galaxy Survey (LGGS - see Massey et al, 2006), we used continuum-subtracted Ha emission line images to define emission regions with a faint flux limit of 10 -17 ergs-sec-1-cm-2above the background. We have obtained photometric measurements for roughly 7450 Hα emission regions in M31, M33 and five of the seven dwarf galaxies (no regions for Phoenix or Pegasus). Using these regions, with boundaries defined by Hα-emission flux limits, we also measured fluxes for the continuum-subtracted [OIII] and [SII] images and constructed a catalog of Hα fluxes, region sizes and [OIII]/ Hα and [SII]/ Hα line ratios. The HII region luminosity functions and size distributions for the spiral galaxies M31 and M33 are compared with those of the dwarf galaxies NGC 6822 and IC10. For M31 and M33, the average [SII]/ Hα and [OIII]/ Hα line ratios, plotted as a function of galactocentric radius, display a linear trend with shallow slopes consistent with other studies of metallicity gradients in these galaxies. The galaxy-wide averages of [SII]/ Hα line ratios correlate with the masses of the dwarf galaxies following the previously established dwarf galaxy mass-metallicity relationship. The slope of the luminosity functions for the dwarf galaxies varies with galaxy mass. The Carleton Catalog of this Local Group Emission-line Survey will be made available on-line.

  1. On the population of H I dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, D.H.; Szomoru, A.; Guhathakurta, P.; Van gorkom, J.H. Groningen, State University Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ Columbia University, New York )

    1991-05-01

    Results are reported from a 21 cm survey of fields in the Perseus-Pisces supercluster and a foreground void, which was designed to find gas-rich dwarf galaxies or optically faint H I clouds with masses greater than 10 to the 8th solar masses. Sixteen objects have been detected in the supercluster, nine of them previously uncataloged. No objects were found in the void fields, an indication that H I dwarf galaxies follow the spatial structure defined by bright galaxies, although the results do not rule out a moderate 'bias' between dwarfs and bright galaxies. The number of galaxies detected is smaller than expected from a simple extrapolation of the optical luminosity function. These data leave no room for a substantial population of H I dwarfs or gas-rich, low surface brightness giants that could have been missed by conventional, optical galaxy catalogs. 24 refs.

  2. NEW CONSTRAINTS ON THE FAINT END OF THE UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z ∼ 7-8 USING THE GRAVITATIONAL LENSING OF THE HUBBLE FRONTIER FIELDS CLUSTER A2744

    SciTech Connect

    Atek, Hakim; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Richard, Johan; Clement, Benjamin; Jauzac, Mathilde; Schaerer, Daniel; Limousin, Marceau; Jullo, Eric; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Egami, Eiichi; Ebeling, Harald

    2015-02-10

    Exploiting the power of gravitational lensing, the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) program aims at observing six massive galaxy clusters to explore the distant universe far beyond the limits of blank field surveys. Using the complete Hubble Space Telescope observations of the first HFF cluster A2744, we report the detection of 50 galaxy candidates at z ∼ 7 and eight candidates at z ∼ 8 in a total survey area of 0.96 arcmin{sup 2} in the source plane. Three of these galaxies are multiply imaged by the lensing cluster. Using an updated model of the mass distribution in the cluster we were able to calculate the magnification factor and the effective survey volume for each galaxy in order to compute the ultraviolet galaxy luminosity function (LF) at both redshifts 7 and 8. Our new measurements reliably extend the z ∼ 7 UV LF down to an absolute magnitude of M {sub UV} ∼ –15.5. We find a characteristic magnitude of M{sub UV}{sup ⋆}=−20.90{sub −0.73}{sup +0.90} mag and a faint-end slope α=−2.01{sub −0.28}{sup +0.20}, close to previous determinations in blank fields. We show here for the first time that this slope remains steep down to very faint luminosities of 0.01 L {sup *}. Although prone to large uncertainties, our results at z ∼ 8 also seem to confirm a steep faint-end slope below 0.1 L {sup *}. The HFF program is therefore providing an extremely efficient way to study the faintest galaxy populations at z > 7 that would otherwise be inaccessible with current instrumentation. The full sample of six galaxy clusters will provide even better constraints on the buildup of galaxies at early epochs and their contribution to cosmic reionization.

  3. Great Observatories Present Rainbow of a Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer, Hubble and Chandra space observatories teamed up to create this multi-wavelength, false-colored view of the M82 galaxy. The lively portrait celebrates Hubble's 'sweet sixteen' birthday.

    X-ray data recorded by Chandra appears in blue; infrared light recorded by Spitzer appears in red; Hubble's observations of hydrogen emission appear in orange, and the bluest visible light appears in yellow-green.

    About the Movie M82 is shown in all its wavelength glory. Dissolving from Chandra X-ray Observatory images of three X-ray energy bands to images in three bands of the infrared spectrum taken by the Spitzer Space Telescope, and ending with the Hubble Space Telescope's visible- and near-infrared-light image. The three observatories' images were composited to reveal the galaxy's stars, as well as gas and dust features.

    Note: The size of the Full-Res TIFF for the still image is 4299 samples x 3490 lines.

  4. Evidence of nuclear disks in starburst galaxies from their radial distribution of supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Illana, R.; Pérez-Torres, M. Á.; Alberdi, A.

    2012-04-01

    Galaxy-galaxy interactions are expected to be responsible for triggering massive star formation and possibly accretion onto a supermassive black hole, by providing large amounts of dense molecular gas down to the central kiloparsec region. Several scenarios to drive the gas further down to the central ~100 pc, have been proposed, including the formation of a nuclear disk around the black hole, where massive stars would produce supernovae. Here, we probe the radial distribution of supernovae and supernova remnants in the nuclear regions of the starburst galaxies M 82, Arp 299-A, and Arp 220, by using high-angular resolution (≲ 0.''1) radio observations published in the literature (for M 82 and Arp 220), or obtained by ourselves from the European VLBI Network (Arp 299-A). Our main goal was to characterize the nuclear starbursts in those galaxies and thus test scenarios that propose that nuclear disks of sizes ~100 pc form in the central regions of starburst galaxies. We obtained the radial distribution of supernovae (SNe) in the nuclear starbursts of M 82, Arp 299-A, and Arp 220, and derived scale-length values for the putative nuclear disks powering the bursts in those central regions. The scale lengths for the (exponential) disks range from ~20-30 pc for Arp 299-A and Arp 220, up to ~140 pc for M 82. The radial distribution of SNe for the nuclear disks in Arp 299-A and Arp 220 is also consistent with a power-law surface density profile of exponent γ = 1, as expected from detailed hydrodynamical simulations of nuclear disks. Our results support scenarios where a nuclear disk of size ~100 pc is formed in (U)LIRGs, and sustained by gas pressure, in which case the accretion onto the black hole could be lowered by supernova feedback. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. FAINT NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET/FAR-ULTRAVIOLET STANDARDS FROM SWIFT/UVOT, GALEX, AND SDSS PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Michael H.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Brown, Peter E-mail: hoversten@astro.psu.ed E-mail: brown@astro.psu.ed

    2010-12-10

    At present, the precision of deep ultraviolet photometry is somewhat limited by the dearth of faint ultraviolet standard stars. In an effort to improve this situation, we present a uniform catalog of 11 new faint (u {approx} 17) ultraviolet standard stars. High-precision photometry of these stars has been taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Galaxy Evolution Explorer archives and combined with new data from the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope to provide precise photometric measures extending from the near-infrared to the far-ultraviolet. These stars were chosen because they are known to be hot (20, 000 < T{sub eff} < 50, 000 K) DA white dwarfs with published Sloan spectra that should be photometrically stable. This careful selection allows us to compare the combined photometry and Sloan spectroscopy to models of pure hydrogen atmospheres to both constrain the underlying properties of the white dwarfs and test the ability of white dwarf models to predict the photometric measures. We find that the photometry provides good constraints on white dwarf temperatures, which demonstrates the ability of Swift/UVOT to investigate the properties of hot luminous stars. We further find that the models reproduce the photometric measures in all 11 passbands to within their systematic uncertainties. Within the limits of our photometry, we find the standard stars to be photometrically stable. This success indicates that the models can be used to calibrate additional filters to our standard system, permitting easier comparison of photometry from heterogeneous sources. The largest source of uncertainty in the model fitting is the uncertainty in the foreground reddening curve, a problem that is especially acute in the UV.

  6. The galaxy population of the z= 1 cluster of galaxies MG2016+112

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toft, S.; Soucail, G.; Hjorth, J.

    2003-09-01

    A photometric redshift analysis of galaxies in the field of the wide-separation gravitational lens MG2016+112 reveals a population of 69 galaxies with photometric redshifts consistent with being in a cluster at the redshift of the giant elliptical lensing galaxy z= 1.00. The Ks-band luminosity function of the cluster galaxies is well represented by the Schechter function with a characteristic magnitude K*s= 18.90+0.45-0.57 and faint-end slope α=-0.60+0.39-0.33, consistent with what is expected for a passively evolving population of galaxies formed at high redshift, zf > 2. From the total Ks-band flux of the cluster galaxies and a dynamical estimate of the total mass of the cluster, the rest-frame Ks-band mass-to-light ratio of the cluster is derived to be M/LKs= 27+64-17h50(M/LKs)solar, in agreement with the upper limit derived earlier from Chandra X-ray observations and the value derived locally in the Coma cluster. The cluster galaxies span a red sequence with a considerable scatter in the colour-magnitude diagrams, suggesting that they contain young stellar populations in addition to the old populations of main-sequence stars that dominate the Ks-band luminosity function. This is in agreement with spectroscopic observations which show that 5 out of the 6 galaxies in the field confirmed to be at the redshift of the lensing galaxy have emission lines. The projected spatial distribution of the cluster galaxies is filamentary-like rather than centrally concentrated around the lensing galaxy, and shows no apparent luminosity segregation. A handful of the cluster galaxies show evidence of merging/interaction. The results presented in this paper suggest that a young cluster of galaxies is assembling around MG2016+112.

  7. Neutral Hydrogen in Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grcevich, Jana

    The gas content of the faintest and lowest mass dwarf galaxies provide means to study the evolution of these unique objects. The evolutionary histories of low mass dwarf galaxies are interesting in their own right, but may also provide insight into fundamental cosmological problems. These include the nature of dark matter, the disagreement between the number of observed Local Group dwarf galaxies and that predicted by lambda cold dark matter models, and the discrepancy between the observed census of baryonic matter in the Milky Way's environment and theoretical predictions. This thesis explores these questions by studying the neutral hydrogen (HI) component of dwarf galaxies. First, limits on the HI mass of the ultra-faint dwarfs are presented, and the HI content of all Local Group dwarf galaxies is examined from an environmental standpoint. We find that those Local Group dwarfs within 270 kpc of a massive host galaxy are deficient in HI as compared to those at larger galactocentric distances. Ram-pressure arguments are invoked, which suggest halo densities greater than 2-3 x 10-4 cm-3 out to distances of at least 70 kpc, values which are consistent with theoretical models and suggest the halo may harbor a large fraction of the host galaxy's baryons. We also find that accounting for the incompleteness of the dwarf galaxy count, known dwarf galaxies whose gas has been removed could have provided at most 2.1 x 108 M⊙ of HI gas to the Milky Way. Second, we examine the possibility of discovering unknown gas-rich ultra-faint galaxies in the Local Group using HI. The GALFA-HI Survey catalog is searched for compact, isolated HI clouds which are most similar to the expected HI characteristics of low mass dwarf galaxies. Fifty-one Local Group dwarf galaxy candidates are identified through column density, brightness temperature, and kinematic selection criteria, and their properties are explored. Third, we present hydrodynamic simulations of dwarf galaxies experiencing a

  8. The Thousand-Ruby Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    (farther out than those seen in this image) are populated with baby stars. X-ray observations of the heart of Messier 83 have shown that its centre is a hive of vigorous star formation, held deep within a cloud of superheated gas, with temperatures of 7 million degrees Celsius. Messier 83 is also one of the most prolific producers of supernovae, that is, exploding stars: this is one of the two galaxies, which had 6 supernovae in the past 100 years. One of these, SN 1957D was observable for 30 years! The Wide Field Imager (WFI) is a specialised astronomical camera attached to the 2.2-metre Max-Planck Society/ESO telescope, sited at the La Silla observatory in Chile. Located nearly 2400 m above sea level, atop the mountains of the Atacama Desert, ESO's La Silla enjoys some of the clearest and darkest skies on the whole planet, making the site ideally suited for studying the farthest depths of the Universe. To make this image, the WFI stared at M83 for roughly 100 minutes through a series of specialist filters, allowing the faint detail of the galaxy to reveal itself. The brighter stars in the foreground are stars in our own galaxy, whilst behind M83 the darkness is peppered with the faint smudges of distant galaxies.

  9. Local Universe Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, Claude

    2015-08-01

    One of the outstanding problems in cosmology is addressing the "small-scale crisis" and understanding structure formation at the smallest scales. Standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter cosmological simulations of Milky Way-size DM halos predict many more DM sub-halos than the number of dwarf galaxies observed. This is the so-called Missing Satellites Problem. The most popular interpretation of the Missing Satellites Problem is that the smallest dark matter halos in the universe are extremely inefficient at forming stars. The virialized extent of the Milky Way's halo should contain ~500 satellites, while only ˜100 satellites and dwarfs are observed in the whole Local Group. Despite the large amount of theoretical work and new optical observations, the discrepancy, even if reduced, still persists between observations and hierarchical models, regardless of the model parameters. It may be possible to find those isolated ultra-faint missing dwarf galaxies via their neutral gas component, which is one of the goals we are pursuing with the SKA precursor KAT-7 in South Africa, and soon with the SKA pathfinder MeerKAT.

  10. HUBBLE AND KECK DISCOVER GALAXY BUILDING BLOCK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a very small, faint galaxy 'building block' newly discovered by a unique collaboration between ground- and space-based telescopes. Hubble and the 10-meter Keck Telescopes in Hawaii joined forces, using a galaxy cluster which acts as gravitational lens to detect what scientists believe is one of the smallest very distant objects ever found. The galaxy cluster Abell 2218 was used by a team of European and American astronomers led by Richard Ellis (Caltech) in their systematic search for intrinsically faint distant star-forming systems. Without help from Abell 2218's exceptional magnifying power to make objects appear about 30 times brighter, the galaxy building block would have been undetectable. In the image to the right, the object is seen distorted into two nearly identical, very red 'images' by the gravitational lens. The image pair represents the magnified result of a single background object gravitationally lensed by Abell 2218 and viewed at a distance of 13.4 billion light-years. The intriguing object contains only one million stars, far fewer than a mature galaxy, and scientists believe it is very young. Such young star-forming systems of low mass at early cosmic times are likely to be the objects from which present-day galaxies have formed. In the image to the left, the full overview of the galaxy cluster Abell 2218 is seen. This image was taken by Hubble in 1999 at the completion of Hubble Servicing Mission 3A. Credit: NASA, ESA, Richard Ellis (Caltech) and Jean-Paul Kneib (Observatoire Midi-Pyrenees, France) Acknowledgment: NASA, A. Fruchter and the ERO Team (STScI and ST-ECF)

  11. The Radio-Gamma Correlation in Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, B.; Becker Tjus, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a systematic study of non-thermal electron-proton plasma and its emission processes in starburst galaxies in order to explain the correlation between the luminosity in the radio band and the recently observed gamma luminosity. In doing so, a steady state description of the cosmic-ray (CR) electrons and protons within the spatially homogeneous starburst is considered where continuous momentum losses are included as well as catastrophic losses due to diffusion and advection. The primary source of the relativistic CRs, e.g., supernova remnants, provides a quasi-neutral plasma with a power-law spectrum in momentum where we account for rigidity-dependent differences between the electron and proton spectrum. We examine the resulting leptonic and hadronic radiation processes by synchrotron radiation, inverse Compton scattering, Bremsstrahlung, and hadronic pion production. Finally, the observations of NGC 253, M82, NGC 4945, and NGC 1068 in the radio and gamma-ray bands as well as the observed supernova rate are used to constrain a best-fit model. In the case of NGC 253, M82, and NGC 4945 our model is able to accurately describe the data, showing that: (i) supernovae are the dominant particle accelerators for NGC 253, M82, and NGC 4945, but not for NGC 1068; (ii) all considered starburst galaxies are poor proton calorimeters in which for NGC 253 the escape is predominantly driven by the galactic wind, whereas the diffusive escape dominates in NGC 4945 and M82 (at energies >1 TeV); and (iii) secondary electrons from hadronic pion production are important to model the radio flux, but the associated neutrino flux is below the current observation limit.

  12. The Radio–Gamma Correlation in Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, B.; Becker Tjus, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a systematic study of non-thermal electron–proton plasma and its emission processes in starburst galaxies in order to explain the correlation between the luminosity in the radio band and the recently observed gamma luminosity. In doing so, a steady state description of the cosmic-ray (CR) electrons and protons within the spatially homogeneous starburst is considered where continuous momentum losses are included as well as catastrophic losses due to diffusion and advection. The primary source of the relativistic CRs, e.g., supernova remnants, provides a quasi-neutral plasma with a power-law spectrum in momentum where we account for rigidity-dependent differences between the electron and proton spectrum. We examine the resulting leptonic and hadronic radiation processes by synchrotron radiation, inverse Compton scattering, Bremsstrahlung, and hadronic pion production. Finally, the observations of NGC 253, M82, NGC 4945, and NGC 1068 in the radio and gamma-ray bands as well as the observed supernova rate are used to constrain a best-fit model. In the case of NGC 253, M82, and NGC 4945 our model is able to accurately describe the data, showing that: (i) supernovae are the dominant particle accelerators for NGC 253, M82, and NGC 4945, but not for NGC 1068; (ii) all considered starburst galaxies are poor proton calorimeters in which for NGC 253 the escape is predominantly driven by the galactic wind, whereas the diffusive escape dominates in NGC 4945 and M82 (at energies >1 TeV); and (iii) secondary electrons from hadronic pion production are important to model the radio flux, but the associated neutrino flux is below the current observation limit.

  13. Simulating high-z gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvaterra, R.; Maio, U.; Ciardi, B.; Campisi, M. A.

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the nature of high-z host galaxies of long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) by means of state-of-the-art numerical simulations of cosmic structure formation and evolution of galaxies. We combine results from different runs with various box sizes and resolutions. By assigning to each simulated galaxy the probability to host an LGRB, assumed to be proportional to the mass of young stars, we provide a full description of the physical properties of high-z LGRB host galaxy population. We find that LGRBs at z > 6 are hosted in galaxies with typical star formation rates SFR ≃ 0.03-0.3 M⊙ yr-1, stellar masses M⋆ ≃ 106-108 M⊙ and metallicities Z ≃ 0.01-0.1 Z⊙. Furthermore, the ratio between their doubling time and the corresponding cosmic time seems to be universally equal to ˜0.1-0.3, independently from the redshift. The distribution of their UV luminosity places LGRB hosts in the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function, well below the current capabilities of space- or ground-based optical facilities. This is in line with recent reports of non-detection of LGRB hosts using extremely deep Hubble Space Telescope and Very Large Telescope observations. In conclusion, high-z LGRBs are found to trace the position of those faint galaxies that are thought to be the major actors in the re-ionization of the Universe.

  14. Comparing Stellar Populations of Galaxies across the Hubble Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleida, Catherine C.; Parkash, Vaishali; Jansen, Rolf

    2014-02-01

    We propose to investigate the spatial distributions of stellar populations within a statistically significant set of galaxies, representing the full range of luminosity and morphological type. By obtaining new, near-infrared images of these galaxies to complement existing optical and near-UV data, we can self-consistently probe the older stellar populations, dust extinction, and metallicity, and ultimately determine ages of and age variations within the stellar components of these galaxies. This information can then be used to compare stellar populations between luminous and faint galaxies of the same Hubble type, and between similar luminosity galaxies of different types. Galaxy candidates for this study were drawn from the Nearby Field Galaxy Survey (Jansen 2000), which provides U, B, and R optical images and both nuclear and globally integrated spectra. Near- infrared J, H, and K_s surface photometry can break the age-dust- metallicity degeneracy in galaxy spectral energy distributions (SEDs), but existing 2MASS image data is not sufficiently deep for this purpose. We therefore request observing time on the Infrared Side Port Imager (ISPI) on the CTIO 4-m Blanco telescope to secure J, H, and K_s images reaching out to the optical radius for 12 NFGS galaxies observable from Cerro Tololo in 2014A. Specific results expected from this sample are the distributions of age, dust, and metallicity across galaxies of differing type and luminosity. These distributions will allow us to address systematic trends in assembly history that can confront simulations of hierarchical galaxy formation.

  15. Comparing Stellar Populations of Galaxies across the Hubble Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleida, Catherine C.; Parkash, Vaishali; Jansen, Rolf

    2014-08-01

    We propose to investigate the spatial distributions of stellar populations within a statistically significant set of galaxies, representing the full range of luminosity and morphological type. By obtaining new, near-infrared images of these galaxies to complement existing optical and near-UV data, we can self-consistently probe the older stellar populations, dust extinction, and metallicity, and ultimately determine ages of and age variations within the stellar components of these galaxies. This information can then be used to compare stellar populations between luminous and faint galaxies of the same Hubble type, and between similar luminosity galaxies of different types. Galaxy candidates for this study were drawn from the Nearby Field Galaxy Survey (Jansen 2000), which provides U, B, and R optical images and both nuclear and globally integrated spectra. Near- infrared J, H, and K_s surface photometry can break the age-dust- metallicity degeneracy in galaxy spectral energy distributions (SEDs), but existing 2MASS image data is not sufficiently deep for this purpose. We therefore request observing time on the Infrared Side Port Imager (ISPI) on the CTIO 4-m Blanco telescope to secure J, H, and K_s images reaching out to the optical radius for 19 NFGS galaxies observable from Cerro Tololo in 2014B. Specific results expected from this sample are the distributions of age, dust, and metallicity across galaxies of differing type and luminosity. These distributions will allow us to address systematic trends in assembly history that can confront simulations of hierarchical galaxy formation.

  16. Photometric Properties of Galaxies in Poor Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Prabhu, T.

    We study several statistical properties of galaxies in four poor clusters of galaxies using optical photometry. We select these poor clusters as luminous, extended X-ray sources identified with poor galaxy systems in the EMSS catalogue of clusters of galaxies. The clusters are at moderate redshifts (0.08galaxy populations are clearly evolved, as traced by the tightness of their color--magnitude relations and accordance of the latter with those of the Virgo Cluster. The fraction of blue galaxies is similar to those of low-redshift richness 0 clusters and higher than those of richer clusters at similar redshifts. The luminosity functions (LFs) of the individual clusters are not significantly different from each other. Using these, we construct composite LFs in B, V , and R bands (to MV=-18). The faint-end of these LFs are flat, like the V-band LF of other (e.g., MKW/AWM) poor clusters, but steeper than the field LF in the R-band. In terms of the statistical properties of their member galaxies, poor clusters appear to be lower-mass extensions of their rich counterparts.

  17. The Hunt for Missing Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    Theories of galaxy formation and evolution predict that there should be significantly more dwarf galaxies than have been observed. Are our theories wrong? Or are dwarf galaxies just difficult to detect? Recent results from a survey of a galaxy cluster 62 million light-years away suggest there may be lots of undiscovered dwarf galaxies hiding throughout the universe!Hiding in FaintnessThe missing dwarf problem has had hints of a resolution with the recent discovery of Ultra-Diffuse Galaxies (UDGs) in the Coma and Virgo galaxy clusters. UDGs have low masses and large radii, resulting in a very low surface brightness that makes them extremely difficult to detect. If many dwarfs are UDGs, this could well explain why weve been missing them!But the Coma and Virgo galaxy clusters are similar in that theyre both very massive. Are there UDGs in other galaxy clusters as well? To answer this question, an international team of scientists is running the Next Generation Fornax Survey (NGFS), a survey searching for faint dwarf galaxies in the central 30 square degrees of the Fornax galaxy cluster.The NGFS uses near-UV and optical observations from the Dark Energy Camera mounted on the 4m Blanco Telescope in Chile. The survey is still underway, but in a recent publication led by Roberto P. Muoz (Institute of Astrophysics at the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile), the team has released an overview of the first results from only the central 3 square degrees of the NGFS field.Surprising DetectionGalaxy radii vs. their absolute i-band magnitudes, for the dwarfs found in NGFS as well as other stellar systems in the nearby universe. The NGFS dwarfs are similar to the ultra-diffuse dwarfs found in the Virgo and Coma clusters, but are several orders of magnitude fainter. [Muoz et al. 2015]In just this small central field, the team has found an astounding 284 low-surface-brightness dwarf galaxy candidates 158 of them previously undetected. At the bright end of this sample are dwarf

  18. Can waterbelt climates resolve the faint young Sun paradox?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, E. T.; Toon, O. B.

    2012-12-01

    Ancient sediments indicate that liquid water and primitive life were ubiquitous on the Archean Earth despite the faint young Sun. However, energy balance and radiative-convective models require improbably high greenhouse gas abundances to obtain non-glacial climates, violating constraints from geochemical data. A self-consistent solution to the faint young Sun paradox has remained elusive. Here we use the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model version 3 with thermodynamic ocean and sea ice components to simulate the climate circa 2.8 billion years ago. To maintain present day surface temperatures, 0.06 bar of CO2 in a 1 bar atmosphere is required to compensate for a 20 percent reduction in the solar constant. However, waterbelt climates having stable low latitude sea ice margins can be maintained with as little as 500 ppm of CO2 and no additional trace greenhouse species. With 5000 ppm of CO2 nearly 60 percent of the planet remains free from ice. The early Earth is resistant to hard snowball glaciations instead favoring waterbelt climates. The coexistence of a faint young Sun and a weak greenhouse does not exclude the presence of liquid water at the Archean surface.

  19. Complete Element Abundances of Nine Stars in the r-process Galaxy Reticulum II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Alexander P.; Frebel, Anna; Simon, Joshua D.; Chiti, Anirudh

    2016-10-01

    We present chemical abundances derived from high-resolution Magellan/Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle spectra of the nine brightest known red giant members of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Reticulum II (Ret II). These stars span the full metallicity range of Ret II (‑3.5 < [Fe/H] < ‑2). Seven of the nine stars have extremely high levels of r-process material ([Eu/Fe] ∼ 1.7), in contrast to the extremely low neutron-capture element abundances found in every other ultra-faint dwarf galaxy studied to date. The other two stars are the most metal-poor stars in the system ([Fe/H] < ‑3), and they have neutron-capture element abundance limits similar to those in other ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. We confirm that the relative abundances of Sr, Y, and Zr in these stars are similar to those found in r-process halo stars, but they are ∼0.5 dex lower than the solar r-process pattern. If the universal r-process pattern extends to those elements, the stars in Ret II display the least contaminated known r-process pattern. The abundances of lighter elements up to the iron peak are otherwise similar to abundances of stars in the halo and in other ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. However, the scatter in abundance ratios is large enough to suggest that inhomogeneous metal mixing is required to explain the chemical evolution of this galaxy. The presence of low amounts of neutron-capture elements in other ultra-faint dwarf galaxies may imply the existence of additional r-process sites besides the source of r-process elements in Ret II. Galaxies like Ret II may be the original birth sites of r-process enhanced stars now found in the halo. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  20. The Dependence of galaxy colors on luminosity and environment at z~0.4

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, H.K.C.; Hsieh, B.C.; Lin, Huan; Gladders, M.D.; /Carnegie Inst. Observ.

    2005-08-01

    The authors analyze the B-R{sub c} colors of galaxies as functions of luminosity and local galaxy density using a large photometric redshift catalog based on the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey. They select two samples of galaxies with a magnitude limit of M{sub R{sub e}} < -18.5 and redshift ranges of 0.2 {le} z < 0.4 and 0.4 {le} x < 0.6 containing 10{sup 5} galaxies each. they model the color distributions of subsamples of galaxies and derive the red galaxy fraction and peak colors of red and blue galaxies as functions of galaxy luminosity and environment. The evolution of these relationships over the redshift range of x {approx} 0.5 to z {approx} 0.05 is analyzed in combination with published results from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. They find that there is a strong evolution in the restframe peak color of bright blue galaxies in that they become redder with decreasing redshift, while the colors of faint blue galaxies remain approximately constant. This effect supports the ''downsizing'' scenario of star formation in galaxies. While the general dependence of the galaxy color distributions on the environment is small, they find that the change of red galaxy fraction with epoch is a function of the local galaxy density, suggesting that the downsizing effect may operate with different timescales in regions of different galaxy densities.

  1. Spectral and Temporal Properties of the Ultraluminous X-Ray Pulsar in M82 from 15 years of Chandra Observations and Analysis of the Pulsed Emission Using NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brightman, Murray; Harrison, Fiona; Walton, Dominic J.; Fuerst, Felix; Hornschemeier, Ann; Zezas, Andreas; Bachetti, Matteo; Grefenstette, Brian; Ptak, Andrew; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Yukita, Mihoko

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery by Bachetti et al. of a pulsar in M82 that can reach luminosities of up to 1040 erg s‑1, a factor of ∼100 times the Eddington luminosity for a 1.4 M⊙ compact object, poses a challenge for accretion physics. In order to better understand the nature of this source and its duty cycle, and in light of several physical models that have been subsequently published, we conduct a spectral and temporal analysis of the 0.5–8 keV X-ray emission from this source from 15 years of Chandra observations. We analyze 19 ACIS observations where the point-spread function (PSF) of the pulsar is not contaminated by nearby sources. We fit the Chandra spectra of the pulsar with a power-law model and a disk blackbody model, subjected to interstellar absorption in M82. We carefully assess for the effect of pile-up in our observations, where four observations have a pile-up fraction of >10%, which we account for during spectral modeling with a convolution model. When fitted with a power-law model, the average photon index when the source is at high luminosity (LX > 1039 erg s‑1) is Γ = 1.33 ± 0.15. For the disk blackbody model, the average temperature is Tin = 3.24 ± 0.65 keV, the spectral shape being consistent with other luminous X-ray pulsars. We also investigated the inclusion of a soft excess component and spectral break, finding that the spectra are also consistent with these features common to luminous X-ray pulsars. In addition, we present spectral analysis from NuSTAR over the 3–50 keV range where we have isolated the pulsed component. We find that the pulsed emission in this band is best fit by a power-law with a high-energy cutoff, where Γ = 0.6 ± 0.3 and {E}{{C}}={14}-3+5 keV. While the pulsar has previously been identified as a transient, we find from our longer-baseline study that it has been remarkably active over the 15-year period, where for 9/19 (47%) observations that we analyzed, the pulsar appears to be emitting at a luminosity in

  2. Stellar halos around Local Group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnachie, Alan W.

    2016-08-01

    The Local Group is now home to 102 known galaxies and candidates, with many new faint galaxies continuing to be discovered. The total stellar mass range spanned by this population covers a factor of close to a billion, from the faintest systems with stellar masses of order a few thousand to the Milky Way and Andromeda, with stellar masses of order 1011 M ⊙. Here, I discuss the evidence for stellar halos surrounding Local Group galaxies spanning from dwarf scales (with the case of the Andromeda II dwarf spheroidal), though to intermediate mass systems (M33) and finishing with M31. Evidence of extended stellar populations and merging is seen across the luminosity function, indicating that the processes that lead to halo formation are common at all mass scales.

  3. Particle-based ablation model for faint meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokan, E.; Campbell-Brown, M.

    2014-07-01

    Modeling the ablation of meteoroids as they enter the atmosphere is a way of determining their physical structure and elemental composition. This can provide insight into the structure of parent bodies when combined with an orbit computed from observations. The Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory (CAMO) is a source of new, high-resolution observations of faint meteors [1]. These faint objects tend to have pre-atmospheric masses around 10^{-5} kg, corresponding to a radius of 1 mm. A wide-field camera with a 28° field of view provides guidance to a high-resolution camera that tracks meteors in flight with 1.5° field of view. Meteors are recorded with a scale of 4 m per pixel at a range of 135 km, at 110 frames per second, allowing us to investigate detailed meteor morphology. This serves as an important new constraint for ablation models, in addition to meteor brightness (lightcurves) and meteoroid deceleration. High-resolution observations of faint meteors have revealed that contemporary ablation models are not able to predict meteor morphology, even while matching the observed lightcurve and meteoroid deceleration [2]. This implies that other physical processes, in addition to fragmentation, must be considered for faint meteor ablation. We present a new, particle-based approach to modeling the ablation of small meteoroids. In this model, we simulate the collisions between atmospheric particles and the meteoroid to determine the rate of evaporation and deceleration. Subsequent collisions simulated between evaporated meteoroid particles and ambient atmospheric particles then produce light that would be observed by high-resolution cameras. Preliminary results show simultaneous agreement with meteor morphology, lightcurves, and decelerations recorded with CAMO. A sample comparison of simulated and observed meteor morphology is given in the attached figure. Several meteoroids are well-represented as solid, stony bodies, but some require modeling as a dustball [3

  4. Feedback in low-mass galaxies in the early Universe.

    PubMed

    Erb, Dawn K

    2015-07-01

    The formation, evolution and death of massive stars release large quantities of energy and momentum into the gas surrounding the sites of star formation. This process, generically termed 'feedback', inhibits further star formation either by removing gas from the galaxy, or by heating it to temperatures that are too high to form new stars. Observations reveal feedback in the form of galactic-scale outflows of gas in galaxies with high rates of star formation, especially in the early Universe. Feedback in faint, low-mass galaxies probably facilitated the escape of ionizing radiation from galaxies when the Universe was about 500 million years old, so that the hydrogen between galaxies changed from neutral to ionized-the last major phase transition in the Universe.

  5. Optical Identification of IRAS Point Sources. Galaxies. IX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Sargsyan, L. A.

    2004-01-01

    The ninth list of objects from the BIG (Byurakan-IRAS Galaxies) sample is presented; 87 galaxies are identified with 60 point sources from the IRAS PSC catalog in the region +69° +73° and 03h50m 09h50m with an area of 117 deg2. Most of the identified galaxies are compact with bright bulges and faint peripheries. The identified objects include 7 Sy candidates, 8 interacting pairs (of which one is a merger” candidate), and 6 LSB galaxies. The optical coordinates and their deviations from the IR coordinates, the V magnitudes, morphological types, angular dimensions, and position angles are given. The identified galaxies are of morphological types Sa-Sc and have optical stellar magnitudes in the range 15.5m-21.5m with angular sizes in the range 3″-26″. Finding charts from DSS2 are provided for these objects.

  6. Feedback in low-mass galaxies in the early Universe.

    PubMed

    Erb, Dawn K

    2015-07-01

    The formation, evolution and death of massive stars release large quantities of energy and momentum into the gas surrounding the sites of star formation. This process, generically termed 'feedback', inhibits further star formation either by removing gas from the galaxy, or by heating it to temperatures that are too high to form new stars. Observations reveal feedback in the form of galactic-scale outflows of gas in galaxies with high rates of star formation, especially in the early Universe. Feedback in faint, low-mass galaxies probably facilitated the escape of ionizing radiation from galaxies when the Universe was about 500 million years old, so that the hydrogen between galaxies changed from neutral to ionized-the last major phase transition in the Universe. PMID:26156371

  7. STRUCTURES OF LOCAL GALAXIES COMPARED TO HIGH-REDSHIFT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, Sara M.; De Mello, DuIlia F.; Gallagher, John S.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Matt Mountain, C.; Smith, Linda J.

    2009-08-15

    The rest-frame far-ultraviolet morphologies of eight nearby interacting and starburst galaxies (Arp 269, M 82, Mrk 8, NGC 520, NGC 1068, NGC 3079, NGC 3310, and NGC 7673) are compared with 54 galaxies at z {approx} 1.5 and 46 galaxies at z {approx} 4 observed in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The nearby sample is artificially redshifted to z {approx} 1.5 and 4 by applying luminosity and size scaling. We compare the simulated galaxy morphologies to real z {approx} 1.5 and 4 UV-bright galaxy morphologies. We calculate the Gini coefficient (G), the second-order moment of the brightest 20% of the galaxy's flux (M {sub 20}), and the Sersic index (n). We explore the use of nonparametric methods with two-dimensional profile fitting and find the combination of M {sub 20} with n an efficient method to classify galaxies as having merger, exponential disk, or bulge-like morphologies. When classified according to G and M {sub 20} 20/30% of real/simulated galaxies at z {approx} 1.5 and 37/12% at z {approx} 4 have bulge-like morphologies. The rest have merger-like or intermediate distributions. Alternatively, when classified according to the Sersic index, 70% of the z {approx} 1.5 and z {approx} 4 real galaxies are exponential disks or bulge-like with n>0.8, and {approx} 30% of the real galaxies are classified as mergers. The artificially redshifted galaxies have n values with {approx} 35% bulge or exponential at z {approx} 1.5 and 4. Therefore, {approx} 20%-30% of Lyman-break galaxies have structures similar to local starburst mergers, and may be driven by similar processes. We assume merger-like or clumpy star-forming galaxies in the GOODS field have morphological structure with values n < 0.8 and M {sub 20}> - 1.7. We conclude that Mrk 8, NGC 3079, and NGC 7673 have structures similar to those of merger-like and clumpy star-forming galaxies observed at z {approx} 1.5 and 4.

  8. The Hunt for Dwarf Galaxies' Ancestors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies are typically very faint, and are therefore hard to find. Given that, what are our chances of finding their distant ancestors, located billions of light-years away? A recent study aims to find out.Ancient CounterpartsDwarf galaxies are a hot topic right now, especially as we discover more and more of them nearby. Besides being great places to investigate a variety of astrophysical processes, local group dwarf galaxies are also representative of the most common type of galaxy in the universe. For many of these dwarf galaxies, their low masses and typically old stellar populations suggest that most of their stars were formed early in the universes history, and further star formation was suppressed when the universe was reionized at redshifts of z ~ 610. If this is true, most dwarf galaxies are essentially fossils: theyve evolved little since that point.To test this theory, wed like to find counterparts to our local group dwarf galaxies at these higher redshifts of z = 6 or 7. But dwarf galaxies, since they dont exhibit lots of active star formation, have very low surface brightnesses making them very difficult to detect. What are the chances that current or future telescope sensitivities will allow us to detect these? Thats the question Anna Patej and Abraham Loeb, two theorists at Harvard University, have addressed in a recent study.Entering a New RegimeThe surface brightness vs. size for 73 local dwarf galaxies scaled back to redshifts of z=6 (top) and z=7 (bottom). So far weve been able to observe high-redshift galaxies within the boxed region of the parameter space. JWST will open the shaded region of the parameter space, which includes some of the dwarf galaxies. [Patej Loeb 2015]Starting from observational data for 87 Local-Group dwarf galaxies, Patej and Loeb used a stellar population synthesis code to evolve the galaxies backward in time to redshifts of z = 6 and 7. Next, they narrowed this sample to only those dwarfs for which most star

  9. Extended ionized gas in elliptical galaxies. II. Velocity and monochromatic maps of 11 elliptical and lenticular galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plana, H.; Boulesteix, J.; Amram, Ph.; Carignan, C.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.

    1998-02-01

    For the last ten years faint ionized gas detection has been carried out for elliptical galaxies with success. The kinematics is essential to understand galaxy gas origin and fate. Here we present a sample of 11 elliptical and lenticular galaxies observed with the ``Cigale" scanning Perot-Fabry instrument. For each galaxy monochromatic and velocity map of ionized gas is presented. Geometrical properties such as viewing angles and axis ratios are also derived from observations. Double gaseous components are found in 3 galaxies of our sample, implying an external origin for at least part of the observed gas. % Based on observations collected with the S.A.O. 6 m telescope located in Nizhnij Arkhyz (Russia), the 3.6 m CFH telescope and the 3.6 m telescope at ESO.

  10. Exploring Optically Compact Dwarf Galaxies for Kinematic Structures and Extended HI Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Most, Hans; Cannon, J. M.; Salzer, J. J.; Rosenberg, J. L.

    2012-01-01

    We present Very Large Array H I spectral line and optical imaging of eight optically compact (optical radii <1 kpc), star-forming dwarf galaxies. These galaxies were chosen because of their optically compact stellar distributions, faint blue magnitudes, ongoing star formation, and relative proximity. The sample includes ADBS 113845+2008, which was found to have an HI halo that extends nearly 40 optical scale lengths from the stellar body (Cannon et al. 2009). Using this larger sample, we are working to discern if the "giant gas disk" dwarf galaxy is common or rare. We are also exploring the kinematics and dark matter contents of each of the sample galaxies.

  11. Hot Gas and AGN Feedback in Galaxies and Nearby Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Christine; Forman, William; Bogdan, Akos; Randall, Scott; Kraft, Ralph; Churazov, Eugene

    2013-07-01

    Massive galaxies harbor a supermassive black hole at their centers. At high redshifts, these galaxies experienced a very active quasar phase, when, as their black holes grew by accretion, they produced enormous amounts of energy. At the present epoch, these black holes still undergo occasional outbursts, although the mode of their energy release is primarily mechanical rather than radiative. The energy from these outbursts can reheat the cooling gas in the galaxy cores and maintain the red and dead nature of the early-type galaxies. These outbursts also can have dramatic effects on the galaxy-scale hot coronae found in the more massive galaxies. We describe research in three areas related to the hot gas around galaxies and their supermassive black holes. First we present examples of galaxies with AGN outbursts that have been studied in detail. Second, we show that X-ray emitting low-luminosity AGN are present in 80% of the galaxies studied. Third, we discuss the first examples of extensive hot gas and dark matter halos in optically faint galaxies.

  12. A faint type of supernova from a white dwarf with a helium-rich companion.

    PubMed

    Perets, H B; Gal-Yam, A; Mazzali, P A; Arnett, D; Kagan, D; Filippenko, A V; Li, W; Arcavi, I; Cenko, S B; Fox, D B; Leonard, D C; Moon, D-S; Sand, D J; Soderberg, A M; Anderson, J P; James, P A; Foley, R J; Ganeshalingam, M; Ofek, E O; Bildsten, L; Nelemans, G; Shen, K J; Weinberg, N N; Metzger, B D; Piro, A L; Quataert, E; Kiewe, M; Poznanski, D

    2010-05-20

    Supernovae are thought to arise from two different physical processes. The cores of massive, short-lived stars undergo gravitational core collapse and typically eject a few solar masses during their explosion. These are thought to appear as type Ib/c and type II supernovae, and are associated with young stellar populations. In contrast, the thermonuclear detonation of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, whose mass approaches the Chandrasekhar limit, is thought to produce type Ia supernovae. Such supernovae are observed in both young and old stellar environments. Here we report a faint type Ib supernova, SN 2005E, in the halo of the nearby isolated galaxy, NGC 1032. The 'old' environment near the supernova location, and the very low derived ejected mass ( approximately 0.3 solar masses), argue strongly against a core-collapse origin. Spectroscopic observations and analysis reveal high ejecta velocities, dominated by helium-burning products, probably excluding this as a subluminous or a regular type Ia supernova. We conclude that it arises from a low-mass, old progenitor, likely to have been a helium-accreting white dwarf in a binary. The ejecta contain more calcium than observed in other types of supernovae and probably large amounts of radioactive (44)Ti. PMID:20485429

  13. Faint Object Camera observations of M87 - The jet and nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boksenberg, A.; Macchetto, F.; Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Blades, J. C.; Crane, P.; Deharveng, J. M.; Disney, M. J.; Jakobsen, P.; Kamperman, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    UV and optical images of the central region and jet of the nearby elliptical galaxy M87 have been obtained with about 0.1 arcsec resolution in several spectral bands with the Faint Object Camera (FOC) on the HST, including polarization images. Deconvolution enhances the contrast of the complex structure and filamentary patterns in the jet already evident in the aberrated images. Morphologically there is close similarity between the FOC images of the extended jet and the best 2-cm radio maps obtained at similar resolution, and the magnetic field vectors from the UV and radio polarimetric data also correspond well. We observe structure in the inner jet within a few tenths arcsec of the nucleus which also has been well studied at radio wavelengths. Our UV and optical photometry of regions along the jet shows little variation in spectral index from the value 1.0 between markedly different regions and no trend to a steepening spectrum with distance along the jet.

  14. STAR FORMATION IN ULTRA-FAINT DWARFS: CONTINUOUS OR SINGLE-AGE BURSTS?

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, David; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Sutherland, Ralph

    2015-01-30

    We model the chemical evolution of six ultra-faint dwarfs (UFDs): Bootes I, Canes Venatici II, Coma Berenices, Hercules, Leo IV, and Ursa Major I based on their recently determined star formation histories. We show that two single-age bursts cannot explain the observed [α/Fe] versus [Fe/H] distribution in these galaxies and that some self-enrichment is required within the first burst. An alternative scenario is modeled, in which star formation is continuous except for short interruptions when one or more supernovae temporarily blow the dense gas out from the center of the system. This model allows for self-enrichment and can reproduce the chemical abundances of the UFDs in which the second burst is only a trace population. We conclude that the most likely star formation history is one or two extended periods of star formation, with the first burst lasting for at least 100 Myr. As found in earlier work, the observed properties of UFDs can be explained by formation at a low mass (M{sub vir}∼10{sup 7} M{sub ⊙}), rather than being stripped remnants of much larger systems.

  15. A faint type of supernova from a white dwarf with a helium-rich companion.

    PubMed

    Perets, H B; Gal-Yam, A; Mazzali, P A; Arnett, D; Kagan, D; Filippenko, A V; Li, W; Arcavi, I; Cenko, S B; Fox, D B; Leonard, D C; Moon, D-S; Sand, D J; Soderberg, A M; Anderson, J P; James, P A; Foley, R J; Ganeshalingam, M; Ofek, E O; Bildsten, L; Nelemans, G; Shen, K J; Weinberg, N N; Metzger, B D; Piro, A L; Quataert, E; Kiewe, M; Poznanski, D

    2010-05-20

    Supernovae are thought to arise from two different physical processes. The cores of massive, short-lived stars undergo gravitational core collapse and typically eject a few solar masses during their explosion. These are thought to appear as type Ib/c and type II supernovae, and are associated with young stellar populations. In contrast, the thermonuclear detonation of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, whose mass approaches the Chandrasekhar limit, is thought to produce type Ia supernovae. Such supernovae are observed in both young and old stellar environments. Here we report a faint type Ib supernova, SN 2005E, in the halo of the nearby isolated galaxy, NGC 1032. The 'old' environment near the supernova location, and the very low derived ejected mass ( approximately 0.3 solar masses), argue strongly against a core-collapse origin. Spectroscopic observations and analysis reveal high ejecta velocities, dominated by helium-burning products, probably excluding this as a subluminous or a regular type Ia supernova. We conclude that it arises from a low-mass, old progenitor, likely to have been a helium-accreting white dwarf in a binary. The ejecta contain more calcium than observed in other types of supernovae and probably large amounts of radioactive (44)Ti.

  16. FAINT FUZZY STAR CLUSTERS IN NGC 1023 AS REMNANTS OF MERGED STAR CLUSTER COMPLEXES

    SciTech Connect

    Bruens, R. C.; Kroupa, P.; Fellhauer, M. E-mail: pavel@astro.uni-bonn.de

    2009-09-10

    In the lenticular galaxy NGC 1023 a third population of globular clusters (GCs), called faint fuzzies (FFs), was discovered next to the blue and red GC populations by Larsen and Brodie. While these FFs have colors comparable to the red population, the new population is fainter, larger (R{sub eff}>7 pc) and, most importantly, shows clear signs of corotation with the galactic disk of NGC 1023. We present N-body simulations verifying the hypothesis that these disk-associated FFs are related to the young massive cluster complexes (CCs) observed by Bastian et al. in M51, who discovered a mass-radius relation for these CCs. Our models have an initial configuration based on the observations from M51 and are placed on various orbits in a galactic potential derived for NGC 1023. All computations end up with a stable object containing 10%-60% of the initial CC mass after an integration time of 5 Gyr. A conversion to visual magnitudes demonstrates that the resulting objects cover exactly the observed range for FFs. Moreover, the simulated objects show projected half-mass radii between 3.6 and 13.4 pc, in good agreement with the observed FF sizes. We conclude that objects like the young massive CCs in M51 are likely progenitors of the FFs observed in NGC 1023.

  17. The Unexpected Past of a Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-08-01

    in this way effectively `eats' the smaller one. Thus the Milky Way may contain the remains of many smaller galaxies it has met and consumed in the past. A natural consequence of this theory is that the Milky Way halo may at least partially consist of stars which originally belonged to these smaller galaxies. However, it is also possible that some of the halo stars formed during the early collapse of the gas cloud from which the Milky Way formed. Like the Milky Way, the two nearest, large spiral galaxies (the Andromeda nebula and M33 in the neighbouring Triangulum constellation) are also surrounded by halos of old stars. Contrarily, investigations of the smaller galaxies in the Local Group have until now not shown that they possess such halos. These dwarf galaxies greatly outnumber the large spiral galaxies - to date about two dozen are known - and they are considered to be the last survivors of the earlier cannibalism phase. The nearest are the well-known Magellanic Clouds, about 170,000 (Large Cloud) and 250,000 light years distant (Small Cloud). They can be seen with the unaided eye from the Southern hemisphere. Recent studies indicate that they orbit the Milky Way and that they may eventually fall prey to our galaxy in a future round of cannibalism. So far, no evidence has been found of an old halo around the Magellanic Clouds. This does not necessarily imply that all dwarf galaxies must likewise lack halos: it is also possible that the halos of the Magellanic Clouds were stripped away when they came too close to the Milky Way sometime in the past. The isolated WLM dwarf galaxy Down in the southern sky, in the constellation of Cetus (the Whale or the Sea Monster), lies a relative faint and distant, small galaxy which astronomers normally refer to as the WLM dwarf galaxy . It was first seen in 1909 by the famous astrophotographer Max Wolf on photographic plates obtained at the Heidelberg Observatory (Germany), but it was only in 1926 that its true nature was

  18. CEPHEID VARIABLE STAR IN GALAXY M100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of a region of the galaxy M100 shows a class of pulsating star called a Cepheid Variable. Though rare, these stars are reliable distance indicators to galaxies. Based on the Hubble observation, the distance to M100 has been measured accurately as 56 million light-years (+/- 6 million light-years), making it the farthest object where intergalactic distances have been determined precisely. Hubble's high resolution pinpoints a Cepheid, which is located in a starbirth region in one of the galaxy's spiral arms (bottom frame). The top three frames were taken on (from left to right) May 9, May 4, May 31, and they reveal that the star (in center of each box) changes brightness. Cepheids go through these changes rhythmically over a few weeks. The interval it takes for the Cepheid to complete one pulsation is a direct indication of the stars's intrinsic brightness. This value can be used to make a precise measurement of the galaxy's distance. Only Hubble Space Telescope has the required sensitivity and resolution to detect these 'cosmic milepost' type stars out to great distances from Earth, according to astronomers. Typically, Cepheids in a crowded region of a distant galaxy are too faint and the resolution too poor, as seen from ground-based telescopes, to be detected clearly. Hubble was used to make twelve one-hour exposures, timed carefully in a two-month observing window, to discover 20 Cepheid variable stars in the M100 galaxy. Though M100 is the most distant galaxy in which Cepheid variables have been discovered, HST must find Cepheids in even more distant galaxies before accurate distances can be used to calculate a definitive size and age for the universe. Technical Information: The Hubble Space Telescope image was taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC 2). This black and white picture was taken at visible light wavelengths. Target Information: M100 (100th object in the Messier catalog of non-stellar objects) is a

  19. Faint AGNs at z > 4 in the CANDELS GOODS-S field: looking for contributors to the reionization of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Fiore, F.; Fontana, A.; Pentericci, L.; Vanzella, E.; Dickinson, M.; Kocevski, D.; Castellano, M.; Cristiani, S.; Ferguson, H.; Finkelstein, S.; Grogin, N.; Hathi, N.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Newman, J. A.; Salvato, M.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Establishing the number of faint active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z = 4-6 is crucial to understanding their cosmological importance as main contributors to the reionization of the Universe. Aims: In order to derive the AGN contribution to the cosmological ionizing emissivity we have selected faint AGN candidates at z> 4 in the CANDELS GOODS-South field, which is one of the deepest fields with extensive multiwavelength coverage from Chandra, HST, Spitzer, and various ground-based telescopes. Methods: We have adopted a relatively novel criterion. As a first step, high redshift galaxies are selected in the NIR H band down to very faint levels (H ≤ 27) using reliable photometric redshifts. At z> 4 this corresponds to a selection criterion based on the galaxy rest-frame UV flux. AGN candidates are then picked up from this parent sample if they show X-ray fluxes above a threshold of FX ˜ 1.5 × 10-17 erg cm-2 s-1 (0.5-2 keV), corresponding to a probability of spurious detections of 2 × 10-4 in the deep X-ray 4 Ms Chandra image. Results: We have found 22 AGN candidates at z> 4 and we have derived the first estimate of the UV luminosity function in the redshift interval 4 galaxies. The faint end of the derived luminosity function is about two to four magnitudes fainter at z ˜ 4-6 than that derived from previous UV surveys. We estimated ionizing emissivities and hydrogen photoionization rates in the same redshift interval under reasonable assumptions and after discussion of possible caveats, the most important being the large uncertainties involved in the estimate of photometric redshift for sources with featureless, almost power-law SEDs and/or low average escape fraction of ionizing photons from the AGN host galaxies. Both effects could, in principle, significantly reduce the estimated average volume densities and/or ionizing emissivities, especially at the highest

  20. Photometric Properties of Poor Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Prabhu, T. P.

    2002-12-01

    We study several statistical properties of galaxies in four poor clusters of galaxies using multi-color optical photometry obtained at the Vainu Bappu Telescope, India. The clusters, selected from the EMSS Catalog, are at moderate redshifts (0.08 < z < 0.25), of equivalent Abell richness R=0, and appear to be dynamically young. The early-type galaxy populations are clearly evolved, as traced by the tightness of the color-magnitude relations and the accordance of the latter with those of the Virgo cluster. The blue galaxy fractions are similar to those of R=0 clusters and higher than those of richer clusters at similar redshifts. The composite luminosity functions (LFs) in B, V, and R bands are flat at the faint end, similar to the V-band LF derived by Yamagata & Maehara for other (MKW/AWM) poor clusters but steeper than the R-band field LF derived by Lin et al. In terms of the statistical properties of their member galaxies, poor clusters appear to be lower-mass extensions of their rich counterparts. The brightest galaxies of three of these poor clusters appear to be luminous ellipticals with no incontrovertible signatures of a halo. It is likely that they were formed from multiple mergers early in the history of the clusters.

  1. Observing Dwarf Galaxies in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Dwarf galaxies in the Local Group are key probes of both dark matter and galaxy formation. They are the smallest, oldest, most dark matter-dominated, and least chemically enriched stellar systems currently known. However, despite two decades of major computational, theoretical, and observational advances in this field, we are still working toward a complete understanding of star and galaxy formation at the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. In the last year, large sky surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and Pan-STARRS have made an unprecedented series of discoveries, nearly doubling the population of Milky Way satellite galaxies that was known at the start of 2015. This increase in the number of nearby dwarfs may significantly improve the sensitivity of searches for dark matter annihilation radiation. Many of these new dwarfs are likely to have originated as satellites of the Magellanic Clouds, providing a unique opportunity to study the effect of galactic environment on the formation of the faintest dwarfs. I will provide an overview of recent discoveries and how they fit in to the previously known population of nearby dwarf galaxies, highlighting a few of the most interesting objects from the perspective of dark matter and stellar nucleosynthesis.

  2. The brighter galaxies reionized the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mahavir; Theuns, Tom; Frenk, Carlos; Bower, Richard; Crain, Robert; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen in the Universe was (re)ionized between redshifts z ≈ 10 and z ≈ 6. The nature of the sources of the ionizing radiation is hotly debated, with faint galaxies below current detection limits regarded as prime candidates. Here, we consider a scenario in which ionizing photons escape through channels punctured in the interstellar medium by outflows powered by starbursts. We take account of the observation that strong outflows occur only when the star formation density is sufficiently high, and estimate the galaxy-averaged escape fraction as a function of redshift and luminosity from the resolved star formation surface densities in the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulation. We find that the fraction of ionizing photons that escape from galaxies increases rapidly with redshift, reaching values of 5-20 per cent at z > 6, with the brighter galaxies having higher escape fractions. Combining the dependence of escape fraction on luminosity and redshift with the observed luminosity function, we demonstrate that galaxies emit enough ionizing photons to match the existing constraints on reionization while also matching the observed ultraviolet-background post-reionization. Our findings suggest that galaxies above the current Hubble Space Telescope detection limit emit half of the ionizing radiation required to reionize the Universe.

  3. Choirs H I galaxy groups: The metallicity of dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, Sarah M.; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Meurer, Gerhardt; Bekki, Kenji; Dopita, Michael A.; Nicholls, David C.; Kilborn, Virginia

    2014-02-10

    We present a recalibration of the luminosity-metallicity relation for gas-rich, star-forming dwarfs to magnitudes as faint as M{sub R} ∼ –13. We use the Dopita et al. metallicity calibrations to calibrate the relation for all the data in this analysis. In metallicity-luminosity space, we find two subpopulations within a sample of high-confidence Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 star-forming galaxies: 52% are metal-rich giants and 48% are metal-medium galaxies. Metal-rich dwarfs classified as tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) candidates in the literature are typically of metallicity 12 + log(O/H) = 8.70 ± 0.05, while SDSS dwarfs fainter than M{sub R} = –16 have a mean metallicity of 12 + log(O/H) = 8.28 ± 0.10, regardless of their luminosity, indicating that there is an approximate floor to the metallicity of low-luminosity galaxies. Our hydrodynamical simulations predict that TDGs should have metallicities elevated above the normal luminosity-metallicity relation. Metallicity can therefore be a useful diagnostic for identifying TDG candidate populations in the absence of tidal tails. At magnitudes brighter than M{sub R} ∼ –16, our sample of 53 star-forming galaxies in 9 H I gas-rich groups is consistent with the normal relation defined by the SDSS sample. At fainter magnitudes, there is an increase in dispersion of the metallicity of our sample, suggestive of a wide range of H I content and environment. In our sample, we identify three (16% of dwarfs) strong TDG candidates (12 + log(O/H) > 8.6) and four (21%) very metal-poor dwarfs (12 + log(O/H) < 8.0), which are likely gas-rich dwarfs with recently ignited star formation.

  4. Distribution of Faint Atomic Gas in Hickson Compact Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Yun, Min Su; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zhu, Guangtun; Braatz, James A.

    2015-10-01

    We present 21 cm H i observations of four Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) with evidence for a substantial intragroup medium using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). By mapping H i emission in a region of 25‧ × 25‧ (140–650 kpc) surrounding each HCG, these observations provide better estimates of H i masses. In particular, we detected 65% more H i than that detected in the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) imaging of HCG 92. We also identify whether the diffuse gas has the same spatial distribution as the high surface brightness (HSB) H i features detected in the VLA maps of these groups by comparing the H i strengths between the observed and modeled masses based on VLA maps. We found that the H i observed with the GBT has a similar spatial distribution to the HSB structures in HCG 31 and HCG 68. Conversely, the observed H i distributions in HCG 44 and HCG 92 were extended and showed significant offsets from the modeled masses. Most of the faint gas in HCG 44 lies to the northeast–southwest region and in HCG 92 lies in the northwest region of their respective groups. The spatial and dynamical similarities between the total (faint+HSB) and the HSB H i indicate that the faint gas is of tidal origin. We found that the gas will survive ionization by the cosmic UV background and the escaping ionizing photons from the star-forming regions and stay primarily neutral for at least 500 Myr.

  5. DISTRIBUTION OF FAINT ATOMIC GAS IN HICKSON COMPACT GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zhu, Guangtun; Yun, Min Su; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Braatz, James A.

    2015-10-10

    We present 21 cm H i observations of four Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) with evidence for a substantial intragroup medium using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). By mapping H i emission in a region of 25′ × 25′ (140–650 kpc) surrounding each HCG, these observations provide better estimates of H i masses. In particular, we detected 65% more H i than that detected in the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) imaging of HCG 92. We also identify whether the diffuse gas has the same spatial distribution as the high surface brightness (HSB) H i features detected in the VLA maps of these groups by comparing the H i strengths between the observed and modeled masses based on VLA maps. We found that the H i observed with the GBT has a similar spatial distribution to the HSB structures in HCG 31 and HCG 68. Conversely, the observed H i distributions in HCG 44 and HCG 92 were extended and showed significant offsets from the modeled masses. Most of the faint gas in HCG 44 lies to the northeast–southwest region and in HCG 92 lies in the northwest region of their respective groups. The spatial and dynamical similarities between the total (faint+HSB) and the HSB H i indicate that the faint gas is of tidal origin. We found that the gas will survive ionization by the cosmic UV background and the escaping ionizing photons from the star-forming regions and stay primarily neutral for at least 500 Myr.

  6. Stellar Ultraviolet Rocket Research Program. [faint object spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A 1/4 meter ultraviolet spectrometer, developed to measure the ultraviolet flux from several standard type stars was flown successfully on Aerobee rockets. The ultraviolet flux from alpha Lyr, eta U Ma, zeta Oph, delta Ori, alpha CMa, beta CMa, and alpha Leo were measured. These values agreed with the OAO data obtained by Code in the 1200 to 3400 A region to + or - 9%. The design and calibration of a faint object spectrometer for observing stars and nebula with a 3 A resolution and a 3% accuracy in a 60 second observation are discussed.

  7. Are the infrared-faint radio sources pulsars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, A. D.; Keith, M.; Hobbs, G.; Norris, R. P.; Mao, M. Y.; Middelberg, E.

    2011-07-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects which are strong at radio wavelengths but undetected in sensitive Spitzer observations at infrared wavelengths. Their nature is uncertain and most have not yet been associated with any known astrophysical object. One possibility is that they are radio pulsars. To test this hypothesis we undertook observations of 16 of these sources with the Parkes Radio Telescope. Our results limit the radio emission to a pulsed flux density of less than 0.21 mJy (assuming a 50 per cent duty cycle). This is well below the flux density of the IFRS. We therefore conclude that these IFRS are not radio pulsars.

  8. Ultradiffuse galaxies: the high-spin tail of the abundant dwarf galaxy population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorisco, N. C.; Loeb, A.

    2016-06-01

    Recent observations have revealed the existence of an abundant population of faint, low surface brightness (SB) galaxies, which appear to be numerous and ubiquitous in nearby galaxy clusters, including the Virgo, Coma and Fornax clusters. With median stellar masses of dwarf galaxies, these ultradiffuse galaxies (UDGs) have unexpectedly large sizes, corresponding to a mean SB of 24 ≲ <μe>r mag-1 arcsec2 ≲ 27 within the effective radius. We show that the UDG population represents the tail of galaxies formed in dwarf-sized haloes with higher-than-average angular momentum. By adopting the standard model of disc formation - in which the size of galaxies is set by the spin of the halo - we recover both the abundance of UDGs as a function of the host cluster mass and the distribution of sizes within the UDG population. According to this model, UDGs are not failed L* galaxies, but genuine dwarfs, and their low SB is not uniquely connected to the harsh cluster environment. We therefore expect a correspondingly abundant population of UDGs in the field, with possibly different morphologies and colours.

  9. Internal kinematics of modelled interacting disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberger, T.; Kapferer, W.; Schindler, S.; Böhm, A.; Kutdemir, E.; Ziegler, B. L.

    2006-10-01

    We present an investigation of galaxy-galaxy interactions and their effects on the velocity fields of disc galaxies in combined N-body/hydrodynamic simulations, which include cooling, star formation with feedback, and galactic winds. Rotation curves (RCs) of the gas are extracted from these simulations in a way that follows the procedure applied to observations of distant, small, and faint galaxies as closely as possible. We show that galaxy-galaxy mergers and fly-bys disturb the velocity fields significantly and hence the RCs of the interacting galaxies, leading to asymmetries and distortions in the RCs. Typical features of disturbed kinematics are significantly rising or falling profiles in the direction of the companion galaxy and pronounced bumps in the RCs. In addition, tidal tails can leave strong imprints on the rotation curve. All these features are observable for intermediate redshift galaxies, on which we focus our investigations. We use a quantitative measure for the asymmetry of rotation curves to show that the appearance of these distortions strongly depends on the viewing angle. We also find in this way that the velocity fields settle back into relatively undisturbed equilibrium states after unequal mass mergers and fly-bys. About 1 Gyr after the first encounter, the RCs show no severe distortions anymore. These results are consistent with previous theoretical and observational studies. As an illustration of our results, we compare our simulated velocity fields and direct images with rotation curves from VLT/FORS spectroscopy and ACS images of a cluster at z=0.53 and find remarkable similarities.

  10. PHOTODISSOCIATION CHEMISTRY FOOTPRINTS IN THE STARBURST GALAXY NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    MartIn, Sergio; MartIn-Pintado, J.; Viti, S.

    2009-12-01

    UV radiation from massive stars is thought to be the dominant heating mechanism of the nuclear interstellar medium (ISM) in the late stages of evolution of starburst galaxies, creating large photodissociation regions (PDRs) and driving a very specific chemistry. We report the first detection of PDR molecular tracers, namely HOC{sup +} and CO{sup +}, and also confirm the detection of the PDR tracer HCO toward the starburst galaxy NGC 253, claimed to be mainly dominated by shock heating and in an earlier stage of evolution than M 82, the prototypical extragalactic PDR. Our CO{sup +} detection suffers from significant blending to a group of transitions of {sup 13}CH{sub 3}OH, tentatively detected for the first time in the extragalactic ISM. These species are efficiently formed in the highly UV-irradiated outer layers of molecular clouds, as observed in the late stage nuclear starburst in M 82. The molecular abundance ratios we derive for these molecules are very similar to those found in M 82. This strongly supports the idea that these molecules are tracing the PDR component associated with the starburst in the nuclear region of NGC 253. The presence of large abundances of PDR molecules in the ISM of NGC 253, which is dominated by shock chemistry, clearly illustrates the potential of chemical complexity studies to establish the evolutionary state of starbursts in galaxies. A comparison with the predictions of chemical models for PDRs shows that the observed molecular ratios are tracing the outer layers of UV-illuminated clouds up to two magnitudes of visual extinction. We combine the column densities of PDR tracers reported in this paper with those of easily photodissociated species, such as HNCO, to derive the fraction of material in the well-shielded core relative to the UV-pervaded envelopes. Chemical models, which include grain formation and photodissociation of HNCO, support the scenario of a photo-dominated chemistry as an explanation to the abundances of the

  11. Galaxy NGC 1850

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    By spying on a neighboring galaxy, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has captured an image of a young, globular-like star cluster -- a type of object unknown in our Milky Way Galaxy.

    The image, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, is online at http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2001/25 and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc. The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    The double cluster NGC 1850 lies in a neighboring satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. It has two relatively young components. The main, globular-like cluster is in the center. A smaller cluster is seen below and to the right, composed of extremely hot, blue stars and fainter red T-Tauri stars. The main cluster is about 50 million years old; the smaller one is 4 million years old.

    A filigree pattern of diffuse gas surrounds NGC 1850. Scientists believe the pattern formed millions of years ago when massive stars in the main cluster exploded as supernovas.

    Hubble can observe a range of star types in NGC 1850, including the faint, low-mass T-Tauri stars, which are difficult to distinguish with ground-based telescopes. Hubble's fine angular resolution can pick out these stars, even in other galaxies. Massive stars of the OB type emit large amounts of energetic ultraviolet radiation, which is absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere. From Hubble's position above the atmosphere, it can detect this ultraviolet light.

    NGC 1850, the brightest star cluster in the Large Magellanic Cloud, is in the southern constellation of Dorado, called the Goldfish or the Swordfish. This image was created from five archival exposures taken by the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 between April 3, 1994 and February 6, 1996. More information about the Hubble Space Telescope is online at http://www.stsci.edu. More information about the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 is at http://wfpc2.jpl.nasa.gov.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore

  12. A Cluster and a Sea of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    A new wide-field image released today by ESO displays many thousands of distant galaxies, and more particularly a large group belonging to the massive galaxy cluster known as Abell 315. As crowded as it may appear, this assembly of galaxies is only the proverbial "tip of the iceberg", as Abell 315 - like most galaxy clusters - is dominated by dark matter. The huge mass of this cluster deflects light from background galaxies, distorting their observed shapes slightly. When looking at the sky with the unaided eye, we mostly only see stars within our Milky Way galaxy and some of its closest neighbours. More distant galaxies are just too faint to be perceived by the human eye, but if we could see them, they would literally cover the sky. This new image released by ESO is both a wide-field and long-exposure one, and reveals thousands of galaxies crowding an area on the sky roughly as large as the full Moon. These galaxies span a vast range of distances from us. Some are relatively close, as it is possible to distinguish their spiral arms or elliptical halos, especially in the upper part of the image. The more distant appear just like the faintest of blobs - their light has travelled through the Universe for eight billion years or more before reaching Earth. Beginning in the centre of the image and extending below and to the left, a concentration of about a hundred yellowish galaxies identifies a massive galaxy cluster, designated with the number 315 in the catalogue compiled by the American astronomer George Abell in 1958 [1]. The cluster is located between the faint, red and blue galaxies and the Earth, about two billion light-years away from us. It lies in the constellation of Cetus (the Whale). Galaxy clusters are some of the largest structures in the Universe held together by gravity. But there is more in these structures than the many galaxies we can see. Galaxies in these giants contribute to only ten percent of the mass, with hot gas in between galaxies

  13. Lambda = 3 mm line survey of nearby active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aladro, R.; Martín, S.; Riquelme, D.; Henkel, C.; Mauersberger, R.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Weiß, A.; Lefevre, C.; Kramer, C.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Armijos-Abendaño, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    Aims: We aim to better understand the imprints that the nuclear activity in galaxies leaves in the molecular gas. Methods: We used the IRAM 30 m telescope to observe the frequency range ~[86-116] GHz towards the central regions of the starburst galaxies M 83, M 82, and NGC 253, the galaxies hosting an active galactic nucleus (AGN) M 51, NGC 1068, and NGC 7469, and the ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) Arp 220 and Mrk 231. Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), we calculated the column densities of 27 molecules and 10 isotopologues (or their upper limits in case of non-detections). Results: Among others, we report the first tentative detections of CH3CHO, HNCO, and NS in M 82 and, for the first time in the extragalactic medium, HC5N in NGC 253. Hα recombination lines were only found in M 82 and NGC 253. Vibrationally excited lines of HC3N were only detected in Arp 220. CH3CCH emission is only seen in the starburst-dominated galaxies. By comparison of the fractional abundances among the galaxies, we looked for the molecules that are best suited to characterise the chemistry of each group of galaxies (starbursts, AGNs and ULIRGs), as well as the differences among galaxies within the same group. Conclusions: Suitable species for characterising and comparing starburst galaxies are CH3OH and HNCO as tracers of large-scale shocks, which dominate early to intermediate starburst stages, and CH3CCH, c-C3H2, and HCO as tracers of UV fields, which control the intermediate-to-old or post starburst phases. M 83 shows signs of a shock-dominated environment. NGC 253 is characterised by both strong shocks and some UV fields. M 82 stands out for its bright photo-dissociated region tracers, which indicate an UV field-dominated environment. Regarding AGNs, the abundances of HCN and CN (previously claimed as enhanced in AGNs) in M 51 are similar to those in starburst galaxies, while the HCN/HCO+ ratio is high in M 51 and NGC 1068, but not in NGC 7469. We did not find

  14. NIFTE: The Near Infrared Faint-Object Telescope Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, James J.; Lange, Andrew E.; Matsumoto, T.; Eisenhardt, Peter B.; Hacking, Perry B.; Schember, Helene R.

    1994-01-01

    The high sensitivity of large format InSb arrays can be used to obtain deep images of the sky at 3-5 micrometers. In this spectral range cool or highly redshifted objects (e.g. brown dwarfs and protogalaxies) which are not visible at shorter wavelengths may be observed. Sensitivity at these wavelengths in ground-based observations is severly limited by the thermal flux from the telescope and from the earth's atmosphere. The Near Infrared Faint-Object Telescope Experiment (NIFTE), a 50 cm cooled rocket-borne telescope combined with large format, high performance InSb arrays, can reach a limiting flux less than 1 micro-Jy(1-sigma) over a large field-of-view in a single flight. In comparison, the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) will require days of observation to reach a sensitivity more than one order of magnitude worse over a similar area of the sky. The deep 3-5 micrometer images obtained by the rocket-borne telescope will assist in determining the nature of faint red objects detected by ground-based telescopes at 2 micrometers, and by ISO at wavelengths longer than 5 micrometers.

  15. A Tool for Optimizing Observation Planning for Faint Moving Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arredondo, Anicia; Bosh, Amanda S.; Levine, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    Observations of small solar system bodies such as trans-Neptunian objects and Centaurs are vital for understanding the basic properties of these small members of our solar system. Because these objects are often very faint, large telescopes and long exposures may be necessary, which can result in crowded fields in which the target of interest may be blended with a field star. For accurate photometry and astrometry, observations must be planned to occur when the target is free of background stars; this restriction results in limited observing windows. We have created a tool that can be used to plan observations of faint moving objects. Features of the tool include estimates of best times to observe (when the object is not too near another object), a finder chart output, a list of possible astrometric and photometric reference stars, and an exposure time calculator. This work makes use of the USNOFS Image and Catalogue Archive operated by the United States Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station (S.E. Levine and D.G. Monet 2000), the JPL Horizons online ephemeris service (Giorgini et al. 1996), the Minor Planet Center's MPChecker (http://cgi.minorplanetcenter.net/cgi-bin/checkmp.cgi), and source extraction software SExtractor (Bertin & Arnouts 1996). Support for this work was provided by NASA SSO grant NNX15AJ82G.

  16. The Radio Luminosity Function and Galaxy Evolution of Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forootaninia, Zahra

    2015-05-01

    This thesis presents a study of the radio luminosity function and the evolution of galaxies in the Abell 2256 cluster (z=0.058, richness class 2). Using the NED database and VLA deep data with an rms sensitivity of 18 mu Jy.beam--1, we identified 257 optical galaxies as members of A2256, of which 83 are radio galaxies. Since A2256 is undergoing a cluster-cluster merger, it is a good candidate to study the radio activity of galaxies in the cluster. We calculated the Univariate and Bivariate radio luminosity functions for A2256, and compared the results to studies on other clusters. We also used the SDSS parameter fracDev to roughly classify galaxies as spirals and ellipticals, and investigated the distribution and structure of galaxies in the cluster. We found that most of the radio galaxies in A2256 are faint, and are distributed towards the outskirts of the cluster. On the other hand, almost all very bright radio galaxies are ellipticals which are located at the center of the cluster. We also found there is an excess in the number of radio spiral galaxies in A2256 compared to the number of radio ellipticals, counting down to a radio luminosity of log(luminosity)=20.135 W/Hz..

  17. An algorithm to build mock galaxy catalogues using MICE simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Gaztañaga, E.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.

    2015-02-01

    We present a method to build mock galaxy catalogues starting from a halo catalogue that uses halo occupation distribution (HOD) recipes as well as the subhalo abundance matching (SHAM) technique. Combining both prescriptions we are able to push the absolute magnitude of the resulting catalogue to fainter luminosities than using just the SHAM technique and can interpret our results in terms of the HOD modelling. We optimize the method by populating with galaxies friends-of-friends dark matter haloes extracted from the Marenostrum Institut de Ciències de l'Espai dark matter simulations and comparing them to observational constraints. Our resulting mock galaxy catalogues manage to reproduce the observed local galaxy luminosity function and the colour-magnitude distribution as observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. They also reproduce the observed galaxy clustering properties as a function of luminosity and colour. In order to achieve that, the algorithm also includes scatter in the halo mass-galaxy luminosity relation derived from direct SHAM and a modified Navarro-Frenk-White mass density profile to place satellite galaxies in their host dark matter haloes. Improving on general usage of the HOD that fits the clustering for given magnitude limited samples, our catalogues are constructed to fit observations at all luminosities considered and therefore for any luminosity subsample. Overall, our algorithm is an economic procedure of obtaining galaxy mock catalogues down to faint magnitudes that are necessary to understand and interpret galaxy surveys.

  18. Constraints on the alignment of galaxies in galaxy clusters from ~14 000 spectroscopic members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sifón, Cristóbal; Hoekstra, Henk; Cacciato, Marcello; Viola, Massimo; Köhlinger, Fabian; van der Burg, Remco F. J.; Sand, David J.; Graham, Melissa L.

    2015-03-01

    Torques acting on galaxies lead to physical alignments, but the resulting ellipticity correlations are difficult to predict. As they constitute a major contaminant for cosmic shear studies, it is important to constrain the intrinsic alignment signal observationally. We measured the alignments of satellite galaxies within 90 massive galaxy clusters in the redshift range 0.05 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts with high-quality data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We used phase-space information to select 14 576 cluster members, 14 250 of which have shape measurements and measured three different types of alignment: the radial alignment of satellite galaxies toward the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), the common orientations of satellite galaxies and BCGs, and the radial alignments of satellites with each other. Residual systematic effects are much smaller than the statistical uncertainties. We detect no galaxy alignment of any kind out to at least 3r200. The signal is consistent with zero for both blue and red galaxies, bright and faint ones, and also for subsamples of clusters based on redshift, dynamical mass, and dynamical state. These conclusions are unchanged if we expand the sample with bright cluster members from the red sequence. We augment our constraints with those from the literature to estimate the importance of the intrinsic alignments of satellites compared to those of central galaxies, for which the alignments are described by the linear alignment model. Comparison of the alignment signals to the expected uncertainties of current surveys such as the Kilo-Degree Survey suggests that the linear alignment model is an adequate treatment of intrinsic alignments, but it is not clear whether this will be the case for larger surveys. Table is available in electronic form at

  19. High-resolution spectra of distant compact narrow emission line galaxies: Progrenitors of spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koo, David C.; Guzman, Rafael; Faber, S. M.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Kron, Richard G.; Takamiya, Marianne

    1995-01-01

    Emission-line velocity widths have been determined for 17 faint (B approximately 20-23) very blue, compact galaxies whose redshifts range from z = 0.095 to 0.66. The spectra have a resolution of 8 Km/s and were taken with the HIRES echelle spectrograph of the Keck 10 m telescope. The galaxies are luminous with all but two within 1 mag of M(sub B) approximately -21. Yet they exhibit narrow velocity widths between sigma = 28-157 km/s, more consistent with typical values of extreme star-forming galaxies than with those of nearby spiral galaxies of similar luminosity. In particular, objects with sigma is less than or equal to 65 km/s follow the same correlations between sigma and both blue and H beta luminosities as those of nearby H II galaxies. These results strengthen the identification of H II glaxies as thier local counterparts. The blue colors and strong emission lines suggest these compact galaxies are undergoing a recent, strong burst of star formation. Like those which characterize some H II galaxies, this burst could be a nuclear star-forming event within a much larger, older stellar population. If the burst is instead a major episode in the total star-forming history, these distant galaxies could fade enough to match the low luminosities and surface brightnesses typical of nearby spheroidals like NGC 185 or NGC 205. Together with evidence for recent star formation, exponential light profiles, and subsolar metallicities, the postfading correlations between luminosity and velocity width and bewtween luminosity and surface brightness suggest that among the low-sigma galaxies, we may be witnessing, in situ, the progenitors of today's spheroidal galaxies.

  20. MAXI/GSC detection of the historically brightest flares from the Sy2 galaxy NGC 2992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoro, H.; Ueno, S.; Tomida, H.; Nakahira, S.; Ishikawa, M.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Sugawara, Y.; Mihara, T.; Sugizaki, M.; Serino, M.; Iwakiri, W.; Shidatsu, M.; Sugimoto, J.; Takagi, T.; Matsuoka, M.; Kawai, N.; Isobe, N.; Sugita, S.; Yoshii, T.; Tachibana, Y.; Ono, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Yoshida, A.; Sakamoto, T.; Kawakubo, Y.; Kitaoka, Y.; Tsunemi, H.; Shomura, R.; Nakajima, M.; Tanaka, K.; Masumitsu, T.; Kawase, T.; Ueda, Y.; Kawamuro, T.; Hori, T.; Tanimoto, A.; Tsuboi, Y.; Nakamura, Y.; Sasaki, R.; Yamauchi, M.; Furuya, K.; Yamaoka, K.

    2016-06-01

    At 10:02 UT on 2016 June 2, the MAXI/GSC nova-alert system (Negoro et al. 2016, PASJ, 68, SP1, A1) triggered on faint X-ray enhancement positionally consistent with a nearby Seyfert 1.9 galaxy NGC 2992.

  1. Small-scale Conformity of the Virgo Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hye-Ran; Lee, Joon Hyeop; Jeong, Hyunjin; Park, Byeong-Gon

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the small-scale conformity in color between bright galaxies and their faint companions in the Virgo Cluster. Cluster member galaxies are spectroscopically determined using the Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12. We find that the luminosity-weighted mean color of faint galaxies depends on the color of adjacent bright galaxy as well as on the cluster-scale environment (gravitational potential index). From this result for the entire area of the Virgo Cluster, it is not distinguishable whether the small-scale conformity is genuine or if it is artificially produced due to cluster-scale variation of galaxy color. To disentangle this degeneracy, we divide the Virgo Cluster area into three sub-areas so that the cluster-scale environmental dependence is minimized: A1 (central), A2 (intermediate), and A3 (outermost). We find conformity in color between bright galaxies and their faint companions (color-color slope significance S ˜ 2.73σ and correlation coefficient {cc}˜ 0.50) in A2, where the cluster-scale environmental dependence is almost negligible. On the other hand, the conformity is not significant or very marginal (S ˜ 1.75σ and {cc}˜ 0.27) in A1. The conformity is not significant either in A3 (S ˜ 1.59σ and {cc}˜ 0.44), but the sample size is too small in this area. These results are consistent with a scenario in which the small-scale conformity in a cluster is a vestige of infallen groups and these groups lose conformity as they come closer to the cluster center.

  2. Small-scale Conformity of the Virgo Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hye-Ran; Lee, Joon Hyeop; Jeong, Hyunjin; Park, Byeong-Gon

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the small-scale conformity in color between bright galaxies and their faint companions in the Virgo Cluster. Cluster member galaxies are spectroscopically determined using the Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12. We find that the luminosity-weighted mean color of faint galaxies depends on the color of adjacent bright galaxy as well as on the cluster-scale environment (gravitational potential index). From this result for the entire area of the Virgo Cluster, it is not distinguishable whether the small-scale conformity is genuine or if it is artificially produced due to cluster-scale variation of galaxy color. To disentangle this degeneracy, we divide the Virgo Cluster area into three sub-areas so that the cluster-scale environmental dependence is minimized: A1 (central), A2 (intermediate), and A3 (outermost). We find conformity in color between bright galaxies and their faint companions (color–color slope significance S ˜ 2.73σ and correlation coefficient {cc}˜ 0.50) in A2, where the cluster-scale environmental dependence is almost negligible. On the other hand, the conformity is not significant or very marginal (S ˜ 1.75σ and {cc}˜ 0.27) in A1. The conformity is not significant either in A3 (S ˜ 1.59σ and {cc}˜ 0.44), but the sample size is too small in this area. These results are consistent with a scenario in which the small-scale conformity in a cluster is a vestige of infallen groups and these groups lose conformity as they come closer to the cluster center.

  3. Dark Galaxies and Lost Baryons (IAU S244)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Jonathan I.; Disney, Michael J.

    2008-05-01

    ; Numerical simulation of the dwarf companions of giant galaxies A. Nelson and P. Williams; Delayed galaxies C. Struck, M. Hancock, B. Smith, P. Appleton, V. Charmandaris and M. Giroux; Probe of dark galaxies via disturbed/lopsided isolated galaxies I. Karachentsev, V. Karachentseva, W. Huchtmeier, D. Makarov and S. Kaisin; Star formation thresholds J. Schaye; Scaling relations of dwarf galaxies without supernova-driven winds K. Tassis, A. Kravtsov and N. Gnedin; Star formation in massive low surface brightness galaxies K. O'Neil; Linking clustering properties and the evolution of low surface brightness galaxies D. Bomans and S. Rosenbaum; Too small to form a galaxy: how the UV background determines the baryon fraction M. Hoeft, G. Yepes and S. Gottlober; Star formation in damped Lyman selected galaxies L. Christensen; Dark-matter content of early-type galaxies with planetary nebulae N. Napolitano et al.; Hunting for ghosts: low surface brightnesses from pixels R. Scaramella and S. Sabatini; Baryonic properties of the darkest galaxies E. Grebel; The dwarf low surface brightness population in different environments of the local universe S. Sabatini, J. Davies, S. Roberts and R. Scaramella; Mass modelling of dwarf spheroidal galaxies J. Klimentowski et al.; Evolution of dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A Group L. Makarova and D. Makarov; A flat faint end of the Fornax cluster galaxy luminosity function S. Mieske, M. Hilker, L. Infante and C. Mendes de Oliveira; Can massive dark halos destroy the discs of dwarf galaxies? B. Fuchs and O. Esquivel; 'Dark galaxies' and local very metal-poor gas-rich galaxies: possible interrelations S. Pustilnik; Morphology and environment of dwarf galaxies in the local universe H. Ann; Arecibo survey of HI emission from disk galaxies at redshift z 0.2 B. Catinella, M. Haynes, J. Gardner, A. Connolly and R. Giovanelli; AGES observations of

  4. ONLY THE LONELY: H I IMAGING OF VOID GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kreckel, K.; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Platen, E.; Van de Weygaert, R.; Van der Hulst, J. M.; Aragon-Calvo, M. A.; Yip, C.-W.; Kovac, K.; Peebles, P. J. E.

    2011-01-15

    Void galaxies, residing within the deepest underdensities of the Cosmic Web, present an ideal population for the study of galaxy formation and evolution in an environment undisturbed by the complex processes modifying galaxies in clusters and groups, as well as provide an observational test for theories of cosmological structure formation. We have completed a pilot survey for the H I imaging aspects of a new Void Galaxy Survey (VGS), imaging 15 void galaxies in H I in local (d < 100 Mpc) voids. H I masses range from 3.5 x 10{sup 8} to 3.8 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}, with one nondetection with an upper limit of 2.1 x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}. Our galaxies were selected using a structural and geometric technique to produce a sample that is purely environmentally selected and uniformly represents the void galaxy population. In addition, we use a powerful new backend of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope that allows us to probe a large volume around each targeted galaxy, simultaneously providing an environmentally constrained sample of fore- and background control samples of galaxies while still resolving individual galaxy kinematics and detecting faint companions in H I. This small sample makes up a surprisingly interesting collection of perturbed and interacting galaxies, all with small stellar disks. Four galaxies have significantly perturbed H I disks, five have previously unidentified companions at distances ranging from 50 to 200 kpc, two are in interacting systems, and one was found to have a polar H I disk. Our initial findings suggest void galaxies are a gas-rich, dynamic population which present evidence of ongoing gas accretion, major and minor interactions, and filamentary alignment despite the surrounding underdense environment.

  5. Les galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, Francoise

    2016-08-01

    Considerable progress has been made on galaxy formation and evolution in recent years, and new issues. The old Hubble classification according to the tuning fork of spirals, lenticulars and ellipticals, is still useful but has given place to the red sequence, the blue cloud and the green valley, showing a real bimodality of types between star forming galaxies (blue) and quenched ones (red). Large surveys have shown that stellar mass and environment density are the two main factors of the evolution from blue to red sequences. Evolution is followed directly with redshift through a look-back time of more than 12 billion years. The most distant galaxy at z=11. has already a stellar mass of a billion suns. In an apparent anti-hierarchical scenario, the most massive galaxies form stars early on, while essentially dwarf galaxies are actively star-formers now. This downsizing feature also applies to the growth of super-massive black holes at the heart of each bulgy galaxy. The feedback from active nuclei is essential to explain the distribution of mass in galaxies, and in particular to explain why the fraction of baryonic matter is so low, lower by more than a factor 5 than the baryonic fraction of the Universe. New instruments just entering in operation, like MUSE and ALMA, provide a new and rich data flow, which is developed in this series of articles.

  6. Variable Stars in a Distant Spiral Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) view of the magnificent spiral galaxy NGC 4603, the most distant galaxy in which a special class of pulsating stars called Cepheid variables have been found. It is associated with the Centaurus cluster, one of the most massive assemblages of galaxies in the nearby universe. The Local Group of galaxies, of which the Milky Way is a member, is moving in the direction of Centaurus at a speed of more than a million miles an hour under the influence of the gravitational pull of the matter in that direction. Clusters of young bright blue stars highlight the galaxy's spiral arms. In contrast, red giant stars in the process of dying are also found. Only the very brightest stars in NGC 4603 can be seen individually, even with the unmatched ability of the Hubble Space Telescope to obtain detailed images of distant objects. Much of the diffuse glow comes from fainter stars that cannot be individually distinguished by Hubble. The reddish filaments are regions where clouds of dust obscure blue light from the stars behind them. This galaxy was observed by a team affiliated with the HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale. Because NGC 4603 is much farther away than the other galaxies studied with Hubble by the Key Project team, 108 million light-years, its stars appear very faint from the Earth, and so accurately measuring their brightness, as is required for distinguishing the characteristic variations of Cepheids, is extremely difficult. Determining the distance to the galaxy required an unprecedented statistical analysis based on extensive computer simulations.

  7. Luminosity dependence of the spatial and velocity distributions of galaxies: semi-analytic models versus the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Jing, Y. P.; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Börner, Gerhard; Kang, Xi; Wang, Lan

    2007-04-01

    By comparing semi-analytic galaxy catalogues with data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we show that current galaxy formation models reproduce qualitatively the dependence of galaxy clustering and pairwise peculiar velocities on luminosity, but some subtle discrepancies with the data still remain. The comparisons are carried out by constructing a large set of mock galaxy redshift surveys that have the same selection function as the SDSS Data Release Four (DR4). The mock surveys are based on two sets of semi-analytic catalogues presented by Croton et al. and Kang et al. From the mock catalogues, we measure the redshift-space projected two-point correlation function wp(rp), the power spectrum P(k) and the pairwise velocity dispersion (PVD) in Fourier space σ12(k) and in configuration space σ12(rp), for galaxies in different luminosity intervals. We then compare these theoretical predictions with the measurements derived from the SDSS DR4. On large scales and for galaxies brighter than L*, both sets of mock catalogues agree well with the data. For fainter galaxies, however, both models predict stronger clustering and higher pairwise velocities than observed. We demonstrate that this problem can be resolved if the fraction of faint satellite galaxies in massive haloes is reduced by ~30 per cent compared to the model predictions. A direct look into the model galaxy catalogues reveals that a significant fraction (15 per cent) of faint galaxies (-18 < M0.1r - 5 log10h < -17) reside in haloes with Mvir > 1013 Msolar, and this population is predominantly red in colour. These faint red galaxies are responsible for the high PVD values of low-luminosity galaxies on small scales.

  8. Dwarf galaxies in the coma cluster: Star formation properties and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Derek M.

    The infall regions of galaxy clusters are unique laboratories for studying the impact of environment on galaxy evolution. This intermediate region links the low-density field environment and the dense core of the cluster, and is thought to host recently accreted galaxies whose star formation is being quenched by external processes associated with the cluster. In this dissertation, we measure the star formation properties of galaxies at the infall region of the nearby rich cluster of galaxies, Coma. We rely primarily on Ultraviolet (UV) data owing to its sensitivity to recent star formation and we place more emphasis on the properties of dwarf galaxies. Dwarf galaxies are good tracers of external processes in clusters but their evolution is poorly constrained as they are intrinsically faint and hence more challenging to detect. We make use of deep GALEX far-UV and near-UV observations at the infall region of the Coma cluster. This area of the cluster has supporting photometric coverage at optical and IR wavelengths in addition to optical spectroscopic data that includes deep redshift coverage of dwarf galaxies in Coma. Our GALEX observations were the deepest exposures taken for a local galaxy cluster. The depth of these images required alternative data analysis techniques to overcome systematic effects that limit the default GALEX pipeline analysis. Specifically, we used a deblending method that improved detection efficiency by a factor of ˜2 and allowed reliable photometry a few magnitudes deeper than the pipeline catalog. We performed deep measurements of the total UV galaxy counts in our field that were used to measure the source confusion limit for crowded GALEX fields. The star formation properties of Coma members were studied for galaxies that span from starbursts to passive galaxies. Star-forming galaxies in Coma tend to have lower specific star formation rates, on average, as compared to field galaxies. We show that the majority of these galaxies are likely

  9. Modeling abundances in star forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Chiaki

    2015-08-01

    Heavy elements are produced from various types of supernovae (and AGB stars). I first show that elemental abundances of extremely metal-poor stars are consistent not with pair-instability supernovae but with faint supernovae. Then I introduce subclasses of Type Ia supernovae such as SN 2002cx-like objects and sub-Chandrasekhar mass explosions. These "minor" supernovae are important in the early Universe or metal-poor systems such as dwarf spheroidal galaxies. With "major" chemical enrichment sources, I show cosmic chemical enrichment in our cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations. The feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is also included with a new model for the formation of black holes motivated by the first star formation. AGN-driven outflows transport metals into the circumgalactic medium and the intergalactic medium. Nonetheless, the metallicity changes of galaxies are negligible, and the mass-metallicity relations, which are mainly generated by supernova feedback at the first star burst, are preserved. Within galaxies, metallicity radial gradients are produced, which can be affected by AGN feedback but are more sensitive to the merging histories. We find a weak correlation between the gradients and galaxy mass, which is consistent with available observations. These simulations also provide predictions of supernova/hypernova/GRB rates and the properties of their host galaxies.

  10. DWARF GALAXIES AND THE COSMIC WEB

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez-Llambay, Alejandro; Abadi, Mario G.; Navarro, Julio F.; Gottloeber, Stefan; Steinmetz, Matthias; Yepes, Gustavo; Hoffman, Yehuda

    2013-02-01

    We use a cosmological simulation of the formation of the Local Group of Galaxies to identify a mechanism that enables the removal of baryons from low-mass halos without appealing to feedback or reionization. As the Local Group forms, matter bound to it develops a network of filaments and pancakes. This moving web of gas and dark matter drifts and sweeps a large volume, overtaking many halos in the process. The dark matter content of these halos is unaffected but their gas can be efficiently removed by ram pressure. The loss of gas is especially pronounced in low-mass halos due to their lower binding energy and has a dramatic effect on the star formation history of affected systems. This 'cosmic web stripping' may help to explain the scarcity of dwarf galaxies compared with the numerous low-mass halos expected in {Lambda}CDM and the large diversity of star formation histories and morphologies characteristic of faint galaxies. Although our results are based on a single high-resolution simulation, it is likely that the hydrodynamical interaction of dwarf galaxies with the cosmic web is a crucial ingredient so far missing from galaxy formation models.

  11. A Hero’s Dark Horse: Discovery of an Ultra-faint Milky Way Satellite in Pegasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongwon; Jerjen, Helmut; Mackey, Dougal; Da Costa, Gary S.; Milone, Antonino P.

    2015-05-01

    We report the discovery of an ultra-faint Milky Way satellite galaxy in the constellation of Pegasus. The concentration of stars was detected by applying our overdensity detection algorithm to the SDSS-DR 10 and confirmed with deeper photometry from the Dark Energy Camera at the 4 m Blanco telescope. Fitting model isochrones indicates that this object, Pegasus III, features an old and metal-poor stellar population ([Fe/H] ˜ -2.1) at a heliocentric distance of 205 ± 20 kpc. The new stellar system has an estimated half-light radius of {{r}h}=78-24+30 pc and a total luminosity of {{M}V}˜ -4.1+/- 0.5 that places it into the domain of dwarf galaxies on the size-luminosity plane. Pegasus III is spatially close to the MW satellite Pisces II. It is possible that the two might be physically associated, similar to the Leo IV and Leo V pair. Pegasus III is also well aligned with the Vast Polar Structure, which suggests a possible physical association.

  12. NuSTAR Observations of Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, Andrew; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Wik, Daniel R.; Yukita, Mihoko; Lehmer, Bret; Zezas, Andreas; Maccarone, Tom; Venters, Tonia M.; Antoniou, Vallia; Harrison, Fiona; Stern, Daniel; NuSTAR Starburst Team

    2016-01-01

    NuSTAR, the first satellite with hard X-ray focusing optics, opens up the possibility to not only detect starburstn galaxies above 10 keV for the first time but also characterize their hard X-ray properties. Here we present an overview of a NuSTAR program to survey seven normal/starburst galaxies: NGC 253, M82, M83, NGC 3256, NGC 3310, Arp 299, and M31. We also discuss data analysis strategies. All galaxies have been observed coordinated with either Chandra or XMM-Newton or both. The main results of these observations were: we characterized the typical starburst spectrum above 10 keV and showed that the spectrum is soft (photon index ~ 3) above 7 keV and determined that individually detected sources are generally black holes in a "transition" accretion state or neutron star systems accreting near the Eddington rate, and variability on time scales of weeks to months is typically detected. In the case of NGC 253 we decomposed the unresolved hard X-ray emission between background, unresolved binaries and truly diffuse flux and found that the diffuse flux upper limit is marginally above model predictions for inverse-Compton scattering of IR photons by cosmic rays.

  13. Faint UBVRI Standard Star Fields at +50° Declination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clem, James L.; Landolt, Arlo U.

    2016-10-01

    Precise and accurate CCD-based UBVRI photometry is presented for ∼2000 stars distributed around the sky in a declination zone centered approximately at +50°. Their photometry has been calibrated to the standard Johnson UBV and Kron–Cousins RI systems through observations of the UBVRI standard stars presented in the various works of Landolt. The magnitude and color range for these stars are 12 ≲ V ≲ 22 and ‑0.3 ≲ (B ‑ V) ≲ 1.8, respectively. Each star averages 13 measures in each UBVRI filter from data taken on 41 different photometric nights obtained over a 21 month period. Hence, there now exists a network of faint UBVRI photometric standard stars centered on the declination zones δ = ‑50°, 0°, and +50°.

  14. Very faint X-ray binaries with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armas Padilla, M.

    2016-06-01

    A population of very faint X-ray binaries has been discovered in the last years thanks to the improvement in sensitivity and resolution of the new generations of X-ray missions. These systems show anomalously low luminosities, below 10^{36} ergs/sec, challenging our understanding of accretion physics and binary evolution models, and thereby opening new windows for both observational and theoretical work on accretion onto compact objects. XMM-Newton is playing a crucial role in the study of this dim family of objects thanks to its incomparable spectral capabilities at low luminosities. I will review the state-of-the-art of the field and present our XMM results in both black hole and neutron star objects. Finally, I will discuss the possibilities that the new generation of X-ray telescopes offer for this research line.

  15. A LARGE AND FAINT PHOTOMETRIC CATALOG ON THE ECLIPTIC

    SciTech Connect

    Buie, Marc W.; Trilling, David E.; Wasserman, Lawrence H.; Crudo, Richard A. E-mail: david.trilling@nau.edu E-mail: rcrudo@gmail.com

    2011-06-01

    A photometric catalog, developed for the calibration of the Deep Ecliptic Survey, is presented. The catalog contains 213,272 unique sources that were measured in V and R filters and transformed to the Johnson-Cousins systems using the Landolt standard catalog. All of the sources lie within 6{sup 0} of the ecliptic and cover all longitudes except for the densest stellar regions nearest the galactic center. Seventeen percent of the sources in the catalog are derived from three or more nights of observation. The catalog contains sources as faint as R {approx}19 but the largest fraction fall in the R {approx}15-16 (V {approx}16-17) mag range. All magnitude bins down to R = 19 have a significant fraction of objects with uncertainties {<=}0.1 mag.

  16. A sample of Swift/SDSS faint blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Bernardo; Giommi, Paolo; Turriziani, Sara

    2015-12-01

    We aim here to provide a complete sample of faint (fr ≳ 1 mJy, fx ≳ 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1) blazars and blazar candidates serendipitously discovered in deep Swift images centered on Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By stacking all available images, we obtain exposures ranging from 104 to more than a million seconds. Since GRBs are thought to explode randomly across the sky, this set of deep fields can be considered as an unbiased survey of ≈ 12 square degrees of extragalactic sky, with sensitivities reaching a few 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.5-2 keV band. We then derive the x-ray Log N Log S and show that, considering that our sample may be contaminated by sources other than blazars, we are in agreement with previous estimations based on data and simulations.

  17. The faint young sun-climate paradox - Continental influences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endal, A. S.; Schatten, K. H.

    1982-01-01

    We examine the various mechanisms which have been proposed to compensate for the climatic effects of a 30% increase in the solar luminosity over the past 4 1/2 billion years. Although atmospheric greenhouse effects have received most attention, other mechanisms may have played a role of comparable importance. In particular, we note that the development of continents during the past 2 1/2 billion years could have had a significant secular effect on the atmosphere-ocean heat transport system. As a result, past climates may have been less susceptible to complete freeze-over. A simple energy balance model is used to demonstrate the magnitude of this effect. Because the CO2 greenhouse effect is not the only means of compensating for solar evolution, the faint-young-sun problem should not be used to infer past levels of atmospheric CO2.

  18. Constraints on Feedback in the Local Universe: The Relation Between Star Formation and AGN Activity in Early Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaddi, Sravani; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi Alison

    2016-01-01

    We address the relation between star formation and AGN activity in a sample of 231 nearby (0.0002 < z < 0.0358) early type galaxies by carrying out a multi-wavelength study using archival observations in the UV, IR and radio. Our results indicate that early type galaxies in the current epoch are rarely powerful AGNs, with P < 1022 WHz-1 for a majority of the galaxies. Only massive galaxies are capable of hosting powerful radio sources while less massive galaxies are hosts to lower radio power sources. Evidence of ongoing star formation is seen in approximately 7% of the sample. The SFR of these galaxies is less than 0.1 M⊙yr-1. They also tend to be radio faint (P < 1022 WHz-1). There is a nearly equal fraction of star forming galaxies in radio faint (P < 1022 WHz-1) and radio bright galaxies (P ≥ 1022 WHz-1) suggesting that both star formation and radio mode feedback are constrained to be very low in our sample. We notice that our galaxy sample and the Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) follow similar trends in radio power versus SFR. This may be produced if both radio power and SFR are related to stellar mass.

  19. A spectroscopic search for faint secondaries in cataclysmic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vande Putte, D.; Smith, Robert Connon; Hawkins, N. A.; Martin, J. S.

    2003-06-01

    The secondary in cataclysmic variables (CVs) is usually detected by cross-correlation of the CV spectrum with that of a K or M dwarf template, to produce a radial velocity curve. Although this method has demonstrated its power, it has its limits in the case of noisy spectra, such as are found when the secondary is faint. A method of coadding spectra, called skew mapping, has been proposed in the past. Gradually, examples of its application are being published; none the less, so far no journal article has described the technique in detail. To answer this need, this paper explores in detail the capabilities of skew mapping when determining the amplitude of the radial velocity for faint secondaries. It demonstrates the power of the method over techniques that are more conventional, when the signal-to-noise ratio is poor. The paper suggests an approach to assessing the quality of results. This leads in the case of the investigated objects to a first tier of results, where we find K2= 127 +/- 23 km s-1 for SY Cnc, K2= 144 +/- 18 km s-1 for RW Sex and K2= 262 +/- 14 km s-1 for UX UMa. These we believe to be the first direct determinations of K2 for these objects. Furthermore, we also obtain K2= 263 +/- 30 km s-1 for RW Tri, close to a skew mapping result obtained elsewhere. In the first three cases, we use these results to derive the mass of the white dwarf companion. A second tier of results includes UU Aqr, EX Hya and LX Ser, for which we propose more tentative values of K2. Clear failures of the method are also discussed (EF Eri, VV Pup and SW Sex).

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE STAR FORMATION RATE, SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE, AND THE PRESENCE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FOR HIGH STELLAR MASS AND LOW STELLAR MASS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; Song Jun; Chen Yiqing; Jiang Peng; Ding Yingping

    2012-07-10

    Using two volume-limited main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 (SDSS DR8), we explore the environmental dependence of the star formation rate (SFR), specific star formation rate (SSFR), and the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) for high stellar mass (HSM) and low stellar mass (LSM) galaxies. It is found that the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR for luminous HSM galaxies and faint LSM ones remains very strong: galaxies in the lowest density regime preferentially have higher SFR and SSFR than galaxies in the densest regime, while the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR for luminous LSM galaxies is substantially reduced. Our result also shows that the fraction of AGNs in HSM galaxies decreases as a function of density, while the one in LSM galaxies depends very little on local density. In the faint LSM galaxy sample, the SFR and SSFR of galaxies strongly decrease with increasing density, but the fraction of AGNs depends very little on local density. Such a result can rule out that AGNs are fueled by the cold gas in the disk component of galaxies that is also driving the star formation of those galaxies.

  1. GIANT GALAXIES, DWARFS, AND DEBRIS SURVEY. I. DWARF GALAXIES AND TIDAL FEATURES AROUND NGC 7331

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, Johannes; Pasquali, Anna; Grebel, Eva K.; Gallagher, John S. III

    2012-12-01

    The Giant GAlaxies, Dwarfs, and Debris Survey (GGADDS) concentrates on the nearby universe to study how galaxies have interacted in groups of different morphology, density, and richness. In these groups, we select the dominant spiral galaxy and search its surroundings for dwarf galaxies and tidal interactions. This paper presents the first results from deep wide-field imaging of NGC 7331, where we detect only four low-luminosity candidate dwarf companions and a stellar stream that may be evidence of a past tidal interaction. The dwarf galaxy candidates have surface brightnesses of {mu}{sub r} Almost-Equal-To 23-25 mag arcsec{sup -2} with (g - r){sub 0} colors of 0.57-0.75 mag in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey filter system, consistent with their being dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. A faint stellar stream structure on the western edge of NGC 7331 has {mu}{sub g} Almost-Equal-To 27 mag arcsec{sup -2} and a relatively blue color of (g - r){sub 0} = 0.15 mag. If it is tidal debris, then this stream could have formed from a rare type of interaction between NGC 7331 and a dwarf irregular or transition-type dwarf galaxy. We compare the structure and local environments of NGC 7331 to those of other nearby giant spirals in small galaxy groups. NGC 7331 has a much lower ({approx}2%) stellar mass in the form of early-type satellites than found for M31 and lacks the presence of nearby companions like luminous dwarf elliptical galaxies or the Magellanic Clouds. However, our detection of a few dSph candidates suggests that it is not deficient in low-luminosity satellites.

  2. Galaxy NGC 1512

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A rainbow of colors is captured in the center of a magnificent barred spiral galaxy, as witnessed by the three cameras of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

    The color-composite image of the galaxy NGC 1512 was created from seven images taken with the JPL-designed and built Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2), along with the Faint Object Camera and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer. Hubble's unique vantage point high above the atmosphere allows astronomers to see objects over a broad range of wavelengths from the ultraviolet to the infrared and to detect differences in the regions around newly born stars.

    The new image is online at http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2001/16 and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc .

    The image reveals a stunning 2,400 light-year-wide circle of infant star clusters in the center of NGC 1512. Located 30 million light-years away in the southern constellation of Horologium, NGC 1512 is a neighbor of our Milky Way galaxy.

    With the Hubble data, a team of Israeli and American astronomers performed one of the broadest, most detailed studies ever of such star-forming regions. Results will appear in the June issue of the Astronomical Journal. The team includes Dr. Dan Maoz, Tel-Aviv University, Israel and Columbia University, New York, N.Y.; Dr. Aaron J. Barth, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Mass.; Dr. Luis C. Ho, The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington; Dr. Amiel Sternberg, Tel-Aviv University, Israel; and Dr. Alexei V. Filippenko, University of California, Berkeley.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md., manages space operations for the Hubble Space Telescope for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Institute is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy Inc., for NASA under contract with NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international

  3. A Stellar Stream Surrounds the Whale Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    The -cold dark matter cosmological model predicts that galaxies are assembled through the disruption and absorption of small satellite dwarf galaxies by their larger hosts. A recent study argues that NGC 4631, otherwise known as the Whale galaxy, shows evidence of such a recent merger in the form of an enormous stellar stream extending from it.Stream SignaturesAccording to the -CDM model, stellar tidal streams should be a ubiquitous feature among galaxies. When satellite dwarf galaxies are torn apart, they spread out into such streams before ultimately feeding the host galaxy. Unfortunately, these streams are very faint, so were only recently starting to detect these features.Stellar tidal streams have been discovered around the Milky Way and Andromeda, providing evidence of these galaxies growth via recent (within the last 8 Gyr) mergers. But discovering stellar streams around other Milky Way-like galaxies would help us to determine if the model of hierarchical galaxy assembly applies generally.To this end, the Stellar Tidal Stream Survey, led by PI David Martnez-Delgado (Center for Astronomy of Heidelberg University), is carrying out the first systematic survey of stellar tidal streams. In a recent study, Martnez-Delgado and collaborators present their detection of a giant (85 kpc long!) stellar tidal stream extending into the halo of NGC 4631, the Whale galaxy.Modeling a SatelliteThe top image is a snapshot from an N-body simulation of a single dwarf satellite, 3.5 Gyr after it started interacting with the Whale galaxy. The satellite has been torn apart and spread into a stream that reproduces observations, which are shown in the lower image (scale is not the same). [Martnez-Delgado et al. 2015]The Whale galaxy is a nearby edge-on spiral galaxy interacting with a second spiral, NGC 4656. But the authors dont believe that the Whale galaxys giant tidal stellar stream is caused by its interactions with NGC 4656. Instead, based on their observations, they believe

  4. The influence of halo evolution on galaxy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Simon

    2015-03-01

    If Einstein-Newton gravity holds on galactic and larger scales, then current observations demonstrate that the stars and interstellar gas of a typical bright galaxy account for only a few percent of its total nonlinear mass. Dark matter makes up the rest and cannot be faint stars or any other baryonic form because it was already present and decoupled from the radiation plasma at z = 1000, long before any nonlinear object formed. The weak gravito-sonic waves so precisely measured by CMB observations are detected again at z = 4 as order unity fluctuations in intergalactic matter. These subsequently collapse to form today's galaxy/halo systems, whose mean mass profiles can be accurately determined through gravitational lensing. High-resolution simulations link the observed dark matter structures seen at all these epochs, demonstrating that they are consistent and providing detailed predictions for all aspects of halo structure and growth. Requiring consistency with the abundance and clustering of real galaxies strongly constrains the galaxy-halo relation, both today and at high redshift. This results in detailed predictions for galaxy assembly histories and for the gravitational arena in which galaxies live. Dark halos are not expected to be passive or symmetric but to have a rich and continually evolving structure which will drive evolution in the central galaxy over its full life, exciting warps, spiral patterns and tidal arms, thickening disks, producing rings, bars and bulges. Their growth is closely related to the provision of new gas for galaxy building.

  5. Galaxy evolution in the environment of ABCG 209

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, C. P.; Mercurio, A.; Merluzzi, P.; La Barbera, F.; Massarotti, M.; Busarello, G.; Girardi, M.

    2004-10-01

    We examine the environmental effects on the photometric properties of galaxies for the rich galaxy cluster ABCG 209 at z=0.209. We use archive CFHT optical imaging of a 42×28 arcmin2 field centred on the cluster to produce a galaxy sample complete to B=25.0 and R=24.5. Both the composite and red sequence galaxy luminosity functions are found to be dependent on the local galaxy surface density, their faint-end slopes becoming shallower with increasing density. We explain this as a combination of the morphology-density relation, and dwarf galaxies being cannibalised and/or disrupted by the cD galaxy and the ICM in the cluster core. The B-R colour of the red sequence itself appears 0.02 mag redder for the highest-density regions, indicative of their stellar populations being marginally (<5%) older or (<20%) more metal-rich. This may be due to the galaxies themselves forming earliest in the rarest overdensities marked by rich clusters, or their star-formation being suppressed earliest by the ICM.

  6. Adding New Light on Galaxy Evolution with Keck and CANDELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, David C.; Faber, Sandra; Barro, Guillermo; Guo, Yicheng; Yesuf, Hassen

    2015-08-01

    We present highlights of early results from recent Keck spectroscopy of distant (z ~ 0.5 to 2.5) galaxies and AGNs using very deep 2 to 5 hour exposures with Keck's multi-slit near-infrared spectrograph (MOSFIRE) and 8 to 24 hour exposures with the optical multi-slit spectrograph (DEIMOS). The targets are galaxies and AGN's at redshifts from 0.5 to 2.5 within the CANDELS fields where a superb set of the deepest multiwavelength images and spectra exist, providing key information ranging from stellar masses, star formation rates, galaxy structure and morphology, to AGN's identified from X-ray fluxes. Our main science goals that exploit these exceptionally deep spectra include: 1) obtaining measures of galactic wind strengths and speeds from FeII and MgII absorption and emission in the restframe near-UV of galaxies with and without AGN; 2) estimating gas metallicities from emission lines of faint low-mass galaxies; 3) mapping the kinematics of galaxies from multiple slit coverage of extended galaxies; and 4) analyzing the stellar populations from absorption lines and indices and the presence of AGN's from line ratios of compact galaxies.

  7. A Study of the Stellar Population in Selected SO Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, M.; Danks, A.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this program was to observe at least two SO galaxies with abnormal colors in the blue and clear optical signatures of dust and gas. The galaxies NGC 2217 and NGC 1808 were observed at least in one of the IUE cameras (1200-200 and 2000-3200 A) during the 13th episode, using the 4 US1 shifts assigned to this program. The galaxy NGC 2217 had been found to be part of a subgroup of SO galaxies with external gas rotating in retrograde motion with respect to the stars. This galaxy is a face-on object with indications of large amount of gas, quite rare for a SO galaxy. We observed this object on three different occasions with IUE at different positions of the large aperture (spacecraft roll angle) with respect to the nuclear region. These exposures allowed us to take full advantage of the spatial resolution of IUE by mapping nuclear and bulge region of this galaxy. We found that the data point to a marginally earlier stellar population toward the central region. The UV light as a whole is dominated by a late-type stellar population of principally G and K stars. The almost face-on view of this galaxy appears optically thick to UV light. It is conceivable that in analogy to out own Galaxy, the stellar populations weakly detected in NGC 2217, are mostly halo and late-type stars in the center with an increasing contribution of dust and early stellar populations (so far undetected) as we move outward along the faint spiral arms. This result is contrary to our initial expectation, since the counterrotating gas does not appear to be enhancing star formation in this galaxy. Even more interesting were the observations of NGC 1808; galaxy which has been classified, with a handful of other objects, both as a starburst and Seyfert galaxy. Attachment: 'The White-Dwarf Companions of 56 Persei and HR 3643.'

  8. Properties of an H I-selected galaxy sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szomoru, Arpad; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Van Gorkom, Jacqueline H.; Knapen, Johan H.; Weinberg, David H.; Fruchter, Andrew S.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the properties of a sample of galaxies identified in a 21cm, H I-line survey of selected areas in the Perseus-Pisces supercluster and its foreground void. Twelve fields were observed in the supercluster, five of them (target fields) centered on optically bright galaxies, and the other seven (blank fields) selected to contain no bright galaxies within 45 min. of their centers. We detected nine previously uncatalogued, gas-rich galaxies, six of them in the target fields. We also detected H I from seven previously catalogued galaxies in these fields. Observations in the void covered the same volume as the 12 supercluster fields at the same H I-mass sensitivity, but no objects were detected. Combining out H I data with optical broadband and H alpha imaging, we conclude that the properties of H I-selected galaxies do not differ substantially from those of late-type galaxies found in optical surveys. In particular, the galaxies in our sample do not appear to be unusually faint for their H I mass, or for their circular velocity. We find tentative evidence for a connection between optical surface brightness and degree of isolation, in the sense that low surface brightness galaxies tend to be more isolated. The previously catalogued, optically bright galaxies in our survey volume dominate the total H I mass density and cross section; the uncatalogued galaxies contribute only approximately 19 percent of the mass and approximately 12 percent of the cross section. Thus, existing estimates of the density and cross section of neutral hydrogen, most of which are based on optically selected galaxy samples, are probably accurate. Such estimates can be used to compare the nearby universe to the high-redshift universe probed by quasar absorption lines.

  9. A Study of the Stellar Population in Selected SO Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, M.; Danks, A.

    1997-03-01

    The goal of this program was to observe at least two SO galaxies with abnormal colors in the blue and clear optical signatures of dust and gas. The galaxies NGC 2217 and NGC 1808 were observed at least in one of the IUE cameras (1200-200 and 2000-3200 A) during the 13th episode, using the 4 US1 shifts assigned to this program. The galaxy NGC 2217 had been found to be part of a subgroup of SO galaxies with external gas rotating in retrograde motion with respect to the stars. This galaxy is a face-on object with indications of large amount of gas, quite rare for a SO galaxy. We observed this object on three different occasions with IUE at different positions of the large aperture (spacecraft roll angle) with respect to the nuclear region. These exposures allowed us to take full advantage of the spatial resolution of IUE by mapping nuclear and bulge region of this galaxy. We found that the data point to a marginally earlier stellar population toward the central region. The UV light as a whole is dominated by a late-type stellar population of principally G and K stars. The almost face-on view of this galaxy appears optically thick to UV light. It is conceivable that in analogy to out own Galaxy, the stellar populations weakly detected in NGC 2217, are mostly halo and late-type stars in the center with an increasing contribution of dust and early stellar populations (so far undetected) as we move outward along the faint spiral arms. This result is contrary to our initial expectation, since the counterrotating gas does not appear to be enhancing star formation in this galaxy. Even more interesting were the observations of NGC 1808; galaxy which has been classified, with a handful of other objects, both as a starburst and Seyfert galaxy. Attachment: 'The White-Dwarf Companions of 56 Persei and HR 3643.'

  10. Using Data Mining to Find Bent-Double Radio Galaxies in the FIRST Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath,C; Cantu-Paz,E; Fodor,I; Tang,N A

    2001-06-22

    In this paper, the authors describe the use of data mining techniques to search for radio-emitting galaxies with a bent-double morphology. In the past, astronomers from the FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm) survey identified these galaxies through visual inspection. This was not only subjective but also tedious as the on-going survey now covers 8000 square degrees, with each square degree containing about 90 galaxies. In this paper, they describe how data mining can be used to automate the identification of these galaxies. They discuss the challenges faced in defining meaningful features that represent the shape of a galaxy and their experiences with ensembles of decision trees for the classification of bent-double galaxies.

  11. Freeze, flight, fight, fright, faint: adaptationist perspectives on the acute stress response spectrum.

    PubMed

    Bracha, H Stefan

    2004-09-01

    This article reviews the existing evolutionary perspectives on the acute stress response habitual faintness and blood-injection-injury type-specific phobia (BIITS phobia). In this article, an alternative evolutionary perspective, based on recent advances in evolutionary psychology, is proposed. Specifically, that fear-induced faintness (eg, fainting following the sight of a syringe, blood, or following a trivial skin injury) is a distinct Homo sapiens-specific extreme-stress survival response to an inescapable threat. The article suggests that faintness evolved in response to middle paleolithic intra-group and inter-group violence (of con-specifics) rather than as a pan-mammalian defense response, as is presently assumed. Based on recent literature, freeze, flight, fight, fright, faint provides a more complete description of the human acute stress response sequence than current descriptions. Faintness, one of three primary physiological reactions involved in BIITS phobia, is extremely rare in other phobias. Since heritability estimates are higher for faintness than for fears or phobias, the author suggests that trait-faintness may be a useful complement to trait-anxiety as an endophenotype in research on the human fear circuitry. Some implications for the forthcoming Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition as well as for clinical, health services, and transcriptomic research are briefly discussed.

  12. Gamma-rays from pulsar wind nebulae in starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannheim, Karl; Elsässer, Dominik; Tibolla, Omar

    2012-07-01

    Recently, gamma-ray emission at TeV energies has been detected from the starburst galaxies NGC253 (Acero et al., 2009) [1] and M82 (Acciari et al., 2009) [2]. It has been claimed that pion production due to cosmic rays accelerated in supernova remnants interacting with the interstellar gas is responsible for the observed gamma rays. Here, we show that the gamma-ray pulsar wind nebulae left behind by the supernovae contribute to the TeV luminosity in a major way. A single pulsar wind nebula produces about ten times the total luminosity of the Sun at energies above 1 TeV during a lifetime of 105 years. A large number of 3 × 104 pulsar wind nebulae expected in a typical starburst galaxy at a distance of 4 Mpc can readily produce the observed TeV gamma rays.

  13. THE [O III] NEBULA OF THE MERGER REMNANT NGC 7252: A LIKELY FAINT IONIZATION ECHO

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, Francois; Kelson, Daniel D.; Villanueva, Edward V.; Seitzer, Patrick; Walth, Gregory L.

    2013-08-20

    We present images and spectra of a {approx}10 kpc-sized emission-line nebulosity discovered in the prototypical merger remnant NGC 7252 and dubbed the ''[O III] nebula'' because of its dominant [O III] {lambda}5007 line. This nebula seems to yield the first sign of episodic active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity still occurring in the remnant, {approx}220 Myr after the coalescence of two gas-rich galaxies. Its location and kinematics suggest it belongs to a stream of tidal-tail gas falling back into the remnant. Its integrated [O III] {lambda}5007 luminosity is 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, and its spectrum features some high-excitation lines, including He II {lambda}4686. In diagnostic line-ratio diagrams, the nebula lies in the domain of Seyfert galaxies, suggesting that it is photoionized by a source with a power-law spectrum. Yet, a search for AGN activity in NGC 7252 from X-rays to radio wavelengths yields no detection, with the most stringent upper limit set by X-ray observations. The upper luminosity limit of L{sub 2-10{sub keV,0}}<5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} estimated for the nucleus is {approx}10{sup 3} times lower than the minimum ionizing luminosity of {approx}> 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} necessary to excite the nebula. This large discrepancy suggests that the nebula is a faint ionization echo excited by a mildly active nucleus that has declined by {approx}3 orders of magnitude over the past 20,000-200,000 yr. In many ways this nebula resembles the prototypical ''Hanny's Voorwerp'' near IC 2497, but its size is 3 Multiplication-Sign smaller and its [O III] luminosity {approx}100 Multiplication-Sign lower. We propose that it be classified as an extended emission-line region (EELR). The [O III] nebula is then the lowest-luminosity ionization echo and EELR discovered so far, indicative of recent, probably sputtering AGN activity of Seyfert-like intensity in NGC 7252.

  14. Cloning Hubble Deep Fields. II. Models for Evolution by Bright Galaxy Image Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwens, Rychard; Broadhurst, Tom; Silk, Joseph

    1998-10-01

    In a companion paper, we outlined a methodology for generating parameter-free, model-independent ``no-evolution'' fields of faint galaxy images, demonstrating the need for significant evolution in the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) at faint magnitudes. Here we incorporate evolution into our procedure, by transforming the input bright galaxy images with redshift, for comparison with the HDF at faint magnitudes. Pure luminosity evolution is explored with the assumption that galaxy surface brightness evolves uniformly, at a rate chosen to reproduce the I-band counts. This form of evolution exacerbates the size discrepancy identified by our no-evolution simulations by increasing the area of a galaxy visible to a fixed isophote. Reasonable dwarf-augmented models are unable to generate the count excess invoking moderate rates of stellar evolution. A plausible fit to the counts and sizes is provided by ``mass-conserving'' density-evolution, consistent with small-scale hierarchical growth, in which the product of disk area and space density is conserved with redshift. Here the increased surface brightness generated by stellar evolution is accommodated by the reduced average galaxy size, for a wide range of geometries. These models are useful for calculating the rates of incompleteness and the degree of overcounting. Finally we demonstrate the potential for improvement in quantifying evolution at fainter magnitudes using the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera, with its superior UV and optical performance.

  15. Cluster of galaxies & Cosmology - X-ray analysis of fossil group RXJ1720.1+2360

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozada, Monica

    2012-09-01

    We present the results on the X-ray analysis of fossil group of galaxies RXJ1720.1+2360. Fossil Groups are systems associated to extended emission in X-rays with one single central elliptical galaxy surrounded by very faint companions. This unusual lack of bright galaxies in the group is presumably due to galactic cannibalism. In this study we present for the first time the imaging and spectral analysis of the XMM-Newton data of RXJ1720.1+2360. This work is part of a systematic study to determine the X-ray properties of fossil groups.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Ultraviolet Excess Galaxies (Mitchell+ 1982)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, K. J.; Brotzman, L. E.; Warnock, A.; Usher, P. D.

    2015-05-01

    The catalog contains a list of 412 faint galaxies selected for their apparent ultraviolet excess. The galaxies were selected from a 3-color (UBV) plate taken with the Palomar 48-inch Schmidt telescope. The 14-inch-square plates cover an area of 30 square degrees centered on Kapteyn Selected Area 28. The catalog includes running numbers, coordinates, color codes, magnitude codes, morphologies, diameters, and notes. The catalogued galaxies were selected by eye from the Palomar Schmidt 3-color (UBV) plate PS24771, centered on Kapteyn Selexted Area 28 and taken by Usher under conditions of good seeing and transparency. (1 data file).

  17. The evolutionary status of high and extremely low surface brightness dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janowiecki, Steven

    2015-10-01

    Studying dwarf galaxies can shed light on the original building blocks of galaxy formation. Most large galaxies are thought to be built up over billions of years through the collisions and mergers of smaller galaxies. The dwarf galaxies we see today are the evolved remnants of those building blocks, and by understanding their nature and evolution, we can study the raw ingredients of galaxy formation. Blue Compact Dwarf galaxies (BCDs) and Almost Dark galaxies are at opposite extremes of today's population of dwarf galaxies. BCDs are exceptionally compact and host very intense starbursts, while Almost Dark galaxies are much more diffuse and have weak stellar populations. This work studies the evolutionary context of BCDs by using deep, high-resolution images to study the detailed structure of their components, and by fitting our multi-wavelength observations with models to describe the properties of their stars, gas, and dust. BCDs appear to have exceptionally compact old stellar populations and unusually large star formation rates, when compared to typical dwarf galaxies. By contrast, the optically faint, gas-dominated Almost Dark galaxies have extremely low star formation rates and weak stellar populations. In particular, one of the Almost Darks studied in this work has very unusual properties and is in disagreement with widely-studied scaling relations for large samples of galaxies. It appears to have too little stellar mass, a distribution of HI that is too extended to be supported by its modest rotation, and the highest well-measured gas mass-to-light ratio ever observed. These two extreme classes may represent evolutionary stages that all galaxies pass through, and appear to be extreme ends of the broad continuum of dwarf galaxy properties. In order to use today's dwarf galaxies as windows into the building blocks of early galaxy formation, these unusual states and evolutionary pathways must be understood.

  18. The evolutionary status of high and extremely low surface brightness dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janowiecki, Steven

    2015-07-01

    Studying dwarf galaxies can shed light on the original building blocks of galaxy formation. Most large galaxies are thought to be built up over billions of years through the collisions and mergers of smaller galaxies. The dwarf galaxies we see today are the evolved remnants of those building blocks, and by understanding their nature and evolution, we can study the raw ingredients of galaxy formation. Blue Compact Dwarf galaxies (BCDs) and Almost Dark galaxies are at opposite extremes of today's population of dwarf galaxies. BCDs are exceptionally compact and host very intense starbursts, while Almost Dark galaxies are much more diffuse and have weak stellar populations. This work studies the evolutionary context of BCDs by using deep, high-resolution images to study the detailed structure of their components, and by fitting our multi-wavelength observations with models to describe the properties of their stars, gas, and dust. BCDs appear to have exceptionally compact old stellar populations and unusually large star formation rates, when compared to typical dwarf galaxies. By contrast, the optically faint, gas-dominated Almost Dark galaxies have extremely low star formation rates and weak stellar populations. In particular, one of the Almost Darks studied in this work has very unusual properties and is in disagreement with widely-studied scaling relations for large samples of galaxies. It appears to have too little stellar mass, a distribution of HI that is too extended to be supported by its modest rotation, and the highest well-measured gas mass-to-light ratio ever observed. These two extreme classes may represent evolutionary stages that all galaxies pass through, and appear to be extreme ends of the broad continuum of dwarf galaxy properties. In order to use today's dwarf galaxies as windows into the building blocks of early galaxy formation, these unusual states and evolutionary pathways must be understood.

  19. The properties of fossil groups of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigenthaler, P.; Zeilinger, W. W.

    2009-12-01

    Numerical simulations as well as optical and X-ray observations over the last few years have shown that poor groups of galaxies can evolve to what is called a fossil group. Dynamical friction as the driving process leads to the coalescence of individual galaxies in ordinary poor groups leaving behind nothing more than a central, massive elliptical galaxy supposed to contain the merger history of the whole group. Due to merging timescales for less-massive galaxies and gas cooling timescales of the X-ray intragroup medium exceeding a Hubble time, a surrounding faint-galaxy population having survived this galactic cannibalism as well as an extended X-ray halo similar to that found in ordinary groups, is expected