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Sample records for galaxy mcg-6-30-15 observed

  1. On the deep minimum state in the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6-30-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Wilms, Jörn; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Staubert, Rüdiger; Kendziorra, Eckhard

    2004-04-01

    We present a detailed spectral analysis of the first observation of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15 by the European Photon Imaging Camera on board the XMM-Newton observatory, together with contemporaneous data from the Proportional Counter Array on the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. Confirming our previously published result, we find that the presence of extremely broadened reflection features from an ionized relativistic accretion disc is required even when one employs the latest X-ray reflection models and includes the effect of complex absorption. The extremely broadened reflection features are also present if the primary continuum is modelled with a thermal Comptonization spectrum rather than a simple power-law continuum. With this fact established, we examine these data using a relativistic smearing function corresponding to a `generalized thin accretion disc' model. We find strong evidence for torquing of the central parts of the accretion disc (presumably through magnetic interactions with the plunging region of the disc and/or the rotating black hole itself). Indeed, within the context of these torqued disc models, this system appears to be in a torque-dominated (or `infinite-efficiency') state at the time of this observation. In addition, we find marginal evidence that the X-ray emitting corona radiates a greater fraction of the total dissipated energy in the inner portions of the disc. We also perform a study of spectral variability within our observation. We find that the disc reflection features maintain roughly a constant equivalent width with respect to the observed continuum, as predicted by simple reflection models. Taken together with other studies of MCG-6-30-15 that find disc features to possess constant intensity at higher flux states, we suggest that the flux of disc features undergoes a saturation once the source emerges from a deep minimum state. We discuss the implications of these results for the physics of the deep minimum `state

  2. The Broadband Spectral Variability of MCG-6-30-15 Observed by NuSTAR and XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinucci, A.; Matt, G.; Miniutti, G.; Guainazzi, M.; Parker, M. L.; Brenneman, L.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Arevalo, P.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Boggs, S. E.; Cappi, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Elvis, M.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Reynolds, C. S.; Risaliti, G.; Stern, D. K.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W.

    2014-05-01

    MCG-6-30-15, at a distance of 37 Mpc (z = 0.008), is the archetypical Seyfert 1 galaxy showing very broad Fe Kα emission. We present results from a joint NuSTAR and XMM-Newton observational campaign that, for the first time, allows a sensitive, time-resolved spectral analysis from 0.35 keV up to 80 keV. The strong variability of the source is best explained in terms of intrinsic X-ray flux variations and in the context of the light-bending model: the primary, variable emission is reprocessed by the accretion disk, which produces secondary, less variable, reflected emission. The broad Fe Kα profile is, as usual for this source, well explained by relativistic effects occurring in the innermost regions of the accretion disk around a rapidly rotating black hole. We also discuss the alternative model in which the broadening of the Fe Kα is due to the complex nature of the circumnuclear absorbing structure. Even if this model cannot be ruled out, it is disfavored on statistical grounds. We also detected an occultation event likely caused by broad-line region clouds crossing the line of sight.

  3. The Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer probes the dusty warm absorber in the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. C.; Canizares, C. R.; Marshall, H. L.; Morales, R.; Schulz, N. S.; Iwasawa, K.

    The Chandra HETGS spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15 show numerous narrow, unresolved (FWHM ≈< 200 km s-1) absorption lines from a wide range of ionization states of N, O, Mg, Ne, Si, S, Ar, and Fe. The initial analysis of these data, presented in Lee et al. (2001), shows that a dusty warm absorber model adequately explains the spectral features ≈> 0.48 keV (≈< 26 Å ). We attribute previous reports of an apparently highly redshifted O VII edge to the neutral Fe L absorption complex and the O VII resonance series (by transitions higher than He γ He α,β,γ are also seen at lower energies). The implied dust column density needed to explain the Fe I L edge feature agrees with that obtained from earlier reddening studies, which had already concluded that the dust should be associated with the ionized absorber (given the relatively lower observed X-ray absorption by cold gas). Our findings contradict the interpretation of Branduardi-Raymont et al. (2001), based on XMM RGS spectra, that this spectral region is dominated by highly relativistic soft X-ray line emission originating near the central black hole. Here we review these issues pertaining to the soft X-ray spectral features as addressed by Lee et al., (2001). Details found in Lee et al., 2001, ApJ., 554, L13

  4. Probing MCG-6-30-15 with the Chandra HETGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. C.; Canizares, C. R.; Fang, T.; Morales, R.; Fabian, A. C.; Marshall, H. L.; Schulz, N. S.

    The Chandra HETGS spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15 show numerous narrow, unresolved (FWHM ≈ < 200 m s-1) absorption lines from a wide range of ionization states of N, O, Mg, Ne, Si, S, Ar, and Fe. The initial analysis of these data, presented in Lee et al. (2001), shows that a dusty warm absorber is reasonable for explaining the soft X-ray spectral features ≈> 0.48 keV (≈< 26 Å ). The implied Hydrogen column density needed to explain the Fe I L edge feature at ~0.707 keV agrees with that obtained from earlier reddening studies. Both results point to dust embedded in the ionized absorber of MCG-6-30-15 (given the relatively lower observed X-ray absorption by cold gas). This conclusion is contrary to the results reported from XMM which call for relativistically broadened soft X-ray emission line. We also report on preliminary results from Lee et al. (in preparation) based on a full treatment of the warm absorber in MCG-6-30-15 in the Chandra spectral bandpass, which shows a distribution of v and NH which depend on ξ and may point to an outflow in the warm absorber of MCG-6-30-15. The results of the in-depth analysis are consistent with those previously published. This proceeding is intended as a review of the findings for the soft 0.5-1 keV X-ray spectrum of MCG-6-30-15 presented by Lee et al. (2001a,b) for the ~67 ks subset of the Chandra HETGS (Lee et al. 2001a,b) AO1 observation corresponding to the period with high continuum flux. Preliminary results (as presented during this meeting) for the full length of the 120 ks integration are reported as highlights from Lee et al., in preparation. Details from the initial papers can be found in Lee et al., 2001, ApJ., 554, L13, and the conference proceeding from ``X-ray emission from Accretion onto Black Holes''

  5. X-ray continuum variability of MCG-6-30-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, S.; Fabian, A. C.; Nandra, K.

    2003-03-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive examination of the X-ray continuum variability of the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15. The source clearly shows the strong, linear correlation between rms variability amplitude and flux first seen in Galactic X-ray binaries. The high-frequency power spectral density (PSD) of MCG-6-30-15 is examined in detail using a Monte Carlo fitting procedure and is found to be well represented by a steep power law at high frequencies (with a power-law index α~ 2.5), breaking to a flatter slope (α~ 1) below fbr~ 0.6-2.0 × 10-4 Hz, consistent with the previous results of Uttley, McHardy & Papadakis. The slope of the power spectrum above the break is energy dependent, with the higher energies showing a flatter PSD. At low frequencies the variations between different energy bands are highly coherent, while at high frequencies the coherence is significantly reduced. Time lags are detected between energy bands, with the soft variations leading the hard ones. The magnitude of the lag is small (<~200 s for the frequencies observed) and is most likely frequency dependent. These properties are remarkably similar to the temporal properties of the Galactic black hole candidate Cygnus X-1. The characteristic time-scales in these two types of source differ by ~105 assuming that these time-scales scale linearly with black hole mass then suggests a black hole mass ~106 Msolar for MCG-6-30-15. We speculate that the timing properties of MCG-6-30-15 may be analogous to those of Cyg X-1 in its high/soft state and discuss a simple phenomenological model, originally developed to explain the timing properties of Cyg X-1, which can explain many of the observed properties of MCG-6-30-15.

  6. Long-term monitoring of the archetype Seyfert galaxy MCG-6-30-15: X-ray, optical and near-IR variability of the corona, disc and torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira, P.; Arévalo, P.; Uttley, P.; McHardy, I. M. M.; Videla, L.

    2015-11-01

    We present long-term monitoring of MCG-6-30-15 in X-rays, optical and near-IR wavelengths, collected over 5 yr of monitoring. We determine the power spectrum density of all the observed bands and show that after taking into account the host contamination similar power is observed in the optical and near-IR bands. There is evidence for a correlation between the light curves of the X-ray photon flux and the optical B band, but it is not possible to determine a lag with certainty, with the most likely value being around 0 d. Strong correlation is seen between the optical and near-IR bands. Cross-correlation analysis shows some complex probability distributions and lags that range from 10 to 20 d, with the near-IR following the optical variations. Filtering the light curves in frequency space shows that the strongest correlations are those corresponding to the shortest time-scales. We discuss the nature of the X-ray variability and conclude that this is intrinsic and cannot be accounted for by absorption episodes due to material intervening in the line of sight. It is also found that the lags agree with the relation τ ∝ λ4/3, as expected for an optically thick geometrically thin accretion disc, although for a larger disc than that predicted by the estimated black hole mass and accretion rate in MCG-6-30-15. The cross-correlation analysis suggests that the torus is located at ˜20 light-days from the central source and at most at ˜50 light-days from the central region. This implies an active galactic nucleus bolometric luminosity of ˜3 × 1043 erg s-1 cm-2.

  7. Tracing the origin of the AGN fuelling reservoir in MCG-6-30-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimundo, S. I.; Davies, R. I.; Canning, R. E. A.; Celotti, A.; Fabian, A. C.; Gandhi, P.

    2017-02-01

    The active galaxy MCG-6-30-15 has a 400 pc diameter stellar kinematically distinct core, counter-rotating with respect to the main body of the galaxy. Our previous high spatial resolution (0.1 arcsec) H-band observations of this galaxy mapped the stellar kinematics and [Fe II] 1.64 μm gas dynamics though mainly restricted to the spatial region of the counter-rotating core. In this work, we probe the stellar kinematics on a larger field of view and determine the ionized and molecular gas dynamics to study the formation of the counter-rotating core and the implications for active galactic nucleus (AGN) fuelling. We present integral field spectroscopy observations with SINFONI in the H and K bands in the central 1.2 kpc and with VIMOS HR-blue in the central 4 kpc of the galaxy. Ionized gas outflows of vout ˜ 100 km s-1 are traced by the [Ca VIII] 2.32 μm coronal line and extend out to at least a radius of r ˜ 140 pc. The molecular gas, traced by the H2 2.12 μm emission, is also counter-rotating with respect to the main body of the galaxy, indicating that the formation of the distinct core was associated with inflow of external gas into the centre of MCG-6-30-15. The molecular gas traces the available gas reservoir for AGN fuelling and is detected as close as r ˜ 50-100 pc. External gas accretion is able to significantly replenish the fuelling reservoir suggesting that the event which formed the counter-rotating core was also the main mechanism providing gas for AGN fuelling.

  8. The changing X-ray time lag in MCG-6-30-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, E.; Fabian, A. C.; Marinucci, A.; Matt, G.; Parker, M. L.; Alston, W.; Brenneman, L. W.; Cackett, E. M.; Miniutti, G.

    2014-11-01

    MCG-6-30-15 is one of the most observed narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies in the X-ray band. In this paper, we examine the X-ray time lags in this source using a total of 600 ks in observations (440 ks exposure) taken with the XMM-Newton telescope (300 ks in 2001 and 300 ks in 2013). Both the old and new observations show the usual hard lag that increases with energy; however, the hard lag turns over to a soft lag at frequencies below ˜10-4 Hz. The highest frequencies (˜10-3 Hz) in this source show a clear soft lag, as previously presented for the first 300 ks observation, but no clear iron K lag is detected in either the old or new observation. The soft lag is more significant in the old observation than the new. The observations are consistent with a reverberation interpretation, where the soft, reflected emission is delayed with respect to the hard power-law component. These spectral timing results suggest that two distinct variability mechanisms are important in this source: intrinsic coronal variations (which lead to correlated variability in the reprocessed emission) and geometrical changes in the corona. Variability due to geometrical changes does not result in correlated variability in the reflection, and therefore inhibits the clear detection of an iron K lag.

  9. Probing the Dusty Warm Absorbers in MCG-6-30-15 & Mrk 766 with the Chandra HETG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canizares, Claude R.; Lee, Julia C.; Marshall, Herman L.; Schulz, Norbert S.

    2001-09-01

    HETG spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15 show numerous narrow, unresolved (FWHM < 200 km s-1) absorption lines from a wide range of ionization states of N, O, Mg, Ne, Si, S, Ar, and Fe. The initial analysis of these data, presented in Lee et al. (2001), shows that a dusty warm absorber model adequately explains the spectral features > 0.48 keV (< 26 Å ). We attribute previous reports of an apparently highly redshifted O VII edge to the 1s2-1snp (n > 5) O VII resonance lines, and a neutral Fe L absorption complex. The implied dust column density needed to explain the Fe L feature agrees with that obtained from earlier reddening studies, which had already concluded that the dust should be associated with the ionized absorber (given the relatively lower observed absorption by cold gas). Our findings contradict the interpretation of Branduardi-Raymont et al. (2001), based on XMM-Newton RGS spectra, that this spectral region is dominated by highly relativistic soft X-ray line emission originating near the central black hole. Here we review these issues and present more detailed measurements of the absorption lines, constrain the implied range of ionization in the warm absorber, and present the HETG spectrum of the Fe K line region. In addition, we present preliminary results on the HETG spectrum of another reddened Seyfert galaxy, Mrk 766, which Branduardi-Raymont et al. also reported as containing relativistic soft X-ray lines.

  10. Soft X-Ray Emission Lines from a Relativistic Accretion Disk in MCG -6-30-15 and Mrk 766

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Sako, M.; Kahn, S. M.; Brinkman, A. C.; Kaastra, J. S.; Page, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) spectra of the Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies MCG -6-30-15 and Mrk 766 are physically and spectroscopically inconsistent with standard models comprising a power-law continuum absorbed by either cold or ionized matter. We propose that the remarkably similar features detected in both objects in the 5 - 35 A band are H-like oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon emission lines, gravitation- ally redshifted and broadened by relativistic effects in the vicinity of a Kerr black hole. We discuss the implications of our interpretation, and demonstrate that the derived parameters can be physically self-consistent.

  11. Revealing the Dusty Warm Absorber in MCG -6-30-15 with the Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Julia C.; Ogle, Patrick M.; Canizares, Claude R.; Marshall, Herman L.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Morales, Raquel; Fabian, Andrew C.; Iwasawa, Kazushi

    2001-06-01

    We present detailed evidence for a warm absorber in the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG -6-30-15 and dispute earlier claims for relativistic O line emission. The High-Energy Transmission Grating spectra show numerous narrow, unresolved (FWHM<~200 km s-1) absorption lines from a wide range of ionization states of N, O, Mg, Ne, Si, S, Ar, and Fe. The O VII edge and the 1s2-1snp resonance line series to n=9 are clearly detected at rest in the active galactic nucleus frame. We attribute previous reports of an apparently highly redshifted O VII edge to the 1s2-1snp (n>5) O VII resonance lines and a neutral Fe L absorption complex. The shape of the Fe L feature is nearly identical to that seen in the spectra of several X-ray binaries and in laboratory data. The implied dust column density agrees with that obtained from reddening studies and gives the first direct X-ray evidence for dust embedded in a warm absorber. The O VIII resonance lines and the weak edge are also detected, and the spectral rollover below ~2 keV is explained by the superposition of numerous absorption lines and edges. We identify, for the first time, a KLL resonance in the O VI photoabsorption cross section, giving a measure of the O VI column density. The O VII (f) emission detected at the systemic velocity implies a covering fraction of ~5% (depending on the observed vs. time-averaged ionizing flux). Our observations show that a dusty warm absorber model is not only adequate to explain all the spectral features >~0.48 keV (<~26 Å) but that the data require it. This contradicts the interpretation of Branduardi-Raymont and coworkers that this spectral region is dominated by highly relativistic line emission from the vicinity of the black hole.

  12. Probing Supermassive Black Hole Spins in MCG--6-30-15 and NGC 1365 with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenneman, Laura; Walton, Dom; Marinucci, Andrea; Matt, Giorgio; Risaliti, Guido; Harrison, Fiona; Stern, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    We report on detailed spectral modeling of the Seyfert 1 AGNs NGC 1365 and MCG--6-30-15 using simultaneous, broadband X-ray spectra from XMM-Newton and NuSTAR. Both of these galaxies show evidence for relativistic reflection from the inner accretion disk in addition to complex, variable absorption. The high signal-to-noise across the 0.3-79 keV energy band enabled by these observations allows us to definitively disentangle the spectral signatures of the continuum, warm and cold absorption, and reflection from the torus and the inner disk in both sources. These deep pointings also enable the use of time-resolved spectral fitting in order to assess the role of each component in driving the spectral and temporal variability of the AGNs. This type of analysis allows us to isolate the relativistic reflection signatures in each object, facilitating the most accurate, precise constrains ever obtained on the spins of their supermassive black holes. We present our spin measurements, as well as a discussion of sources of systematic error. Finally, we place our results in the context of relativistic light-bending models in an effort to characterize the structure of the innermost regions of these AGNs.

  13. Measuring Supermassive Black Hole Spins in NGC 1365 and MCG--6-30-15 Using XMM-Newton and NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenneman, Laura; Marinucci, Andrea; Walton, Dom; Risaliti, Guido; Matt, Giorgio; Harrison, Fiona; Stern, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    We report on detailed spectral modeling of the Seyfert 1 AGN NGC 1365 and MCG--6-30-15 using simultaneous, broadband X-ray spectra from XMM-Newton and NuSTAR. Both of these galaxies show evidence for relativistic reflection from the inner accretion disk in addition to complex, variable absorption. The high signal-to-noise across the 0.2-79 keV energy band enabled by these observations allows us to definitively disentangle the spectral signatures of the continuum, warm and cold absorption, and reflection from the torus and the inner disk in both sources. These deep pointings also enable the use of time-resolved spectral fitting in order to assess the role of each component in driving the spectral and temporal variability of the AGN. This type of analysis allows us to isolate the relativistic reflection signatures in each object, facilitating the most accurate, precise constrains ever obtained on the spins of their supermassive black holes.

  14. Broad line emission from iron K- and L-shell transitions in the active galaxy 1H 0707-495.

    PubMed

    Fabian, A C; Zoghbi, A; Ross, R R; Uttley, P; Gallo, L C; Brandt, W N; Blustin, A J; Boller, T; Caballero-Garcia, M D; Larsson, J; Miller, J M; Miniutti, G; Ponti, G; Reis, R C; Reynolds, C S; Tanaka, Y; Young, A J

    2009-05-28

    Since the 1995 discovery of the broad iron K-line emission from the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6-30-15 (ref. 1), broad iron K lines have been found in emission from several other Seyfert galaxies, from accreting stellar-mass black holes and even from accreting neutron stars. The iron K line is prominent in the reflection spectrum created by the hard-X-ray continuum irradiating dense accreting matter. Relativistic distortion of the line makes it sensitive to the strong gravity and spin of the black hole. The accompanying iron L-line emission should be detectable when the iron abundance is high. Here we report the presence of both iron K and iron L emission in the spectrum of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0707-495. The bright iron L emission has enabled us to detect a reverberation lag of about 30 s between the direct X-ray continuum and its reflection from matter falling into the black hole. The observed reverberation timescale is comparable to the light-crossing time of the innermost radii around a supermassive black hole. The combination of spectral and timing data on 1H 0707-495 provides strong evidence that we are witnessing emission from matter within a gravitational radius, or a fraction of a light minute, from the event horizon of a rapidly spinning, massive black hole.

  15. Theoretical and Observational Studies of the Central Engines of AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivron, Ran

    1995-01-01

    In Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) the luminosity is so intense that the effect of radiation pressure on a particle may exceed the gravitational attraction. It was shown that when such luminosities are reached, relatively cold (not completely ionized) thermal matter clouds may form in the central engines of AGN, where most of the luminosity originates. We show that the spectrum of emission from cold clouds embedded in hot relativistic matter is similar to the observed spectrum. We also show that within the hot relativistic matter, cold matter moves faster than the speed of sound or the Alfven speed, and shocks form. The shocks provide a mechanism by which a localized perturbation can propagate throughout the central engine. The shocked matter can emit the observed luminosity, and can explain the flux and spectral variability. It may also provide an efficient mechanism for the outward transfer of angular momentum and provide the outward flow of winds. With observations from X-ray satellites, emission features from the cold and hot matter may be revealed. Our analysis of X-ray data from the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG - 6-30-15 over five years using detectors on the Ginga and Rosat satellites, revealed some interesting variable features. A source with hot matter emits non-thermal radiation which is Compton reflected from cold matter and then absorbed by warm (partially ionized) absorbing matter in the first model, which can be fit to the data if both the cold and warm absorbers are near the central engine. An alternative model in which the emission from the hot matter is partially covered by very warm matter (in which all elements except Iron are mostly ionized) is also successful. In this model the cold and warm matter may be at distances of up to 100 times the size of the central engine, well within the region where broad optical lines are produced. The flux variability is more naturally explained by the second model. Our results support the existence of cold matter in, or

  16. Assessing black hole spin in deep Suzaku observations of Seyfert 1 AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, A. R.; Reeves, J. N.; Lobban, A. P.; Porquet, D.; Markowitz, A. G.

    2011-10-01

    We present a broad-band analysis of deep Suzaku observations of nearby Seyfert 1 active galactic nuclei (AGN): Fairall 9, MCG-6-30-15, NGC 3516, 3783 and 4051. The use of deep observations (exposures >200 ks) with high signal-to-noise ratio allows the complex spectra of these objects to be examined in full, taking into account features such as the soft excess, reflection continuum and complex absorption components. After a self-consistent modelling of the broad-band data (0.6-100.0 keV, also making use of Burst Alert Telescope data from Swift), the subtle curvature which may be introduced as a consequence of warm absorbers has a measured affect upon the spectrum at energies >3 keV and the Fe K region. Forming a model (including absorption) of these AGN allows the true extent to which broadened disc line emission is present to be examined and as a result the measurement of accretion disc and black hole parameters which are consistent over the full 0.6-100.0 keV energy range. Fitting relativistic line emission models appears to rule out the presence of maximally spinning black holes in all objects at the 90 per cent confidence level, in particular MCG-6-30-15 at >99.5 per cent confidence. Relativistic Fe K line emission is only marginally required in NGC 3516 and not required in NGC 4051, over the full energy bandpass. None the less, statistically significant broadened 6.4 keV Fe Kα emission is detected in Fairall 9, MCG-6-30-15 and NGC 3783 yielding black hole spin estimates of a= 0.67+0.10- 0.11, a= 0.49+0.20- 0.12 and a < -0.04, respectively, when fitted with disc emission models.

  17. The Relativistic Iron Line Profile in the Seyfert 1 Galaxy IC4329a

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Done, C.; Madejski, G. M.; Zycki, P. T.

    2000-01-01

    We present simultaneous ASCA and RXTE data on the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy IC4329a. The iron line is significantly broadened, but not to the extent expected from an accretion disk which extends down to the last stable orbit around a black hole. We marginally detect a narrow line component, presumably from the molecular torus, but, even including this gives a line profile from the accretion disk which is significantly narrower that that seen in MCG-6-30-15, and is much more like that seen from the low/hard state galactic black hole candidates. This is consistent with the inner disk being truncated before the last stable orbit, forming a hot flow at small radii as in the ADAF models. However. we cannot rule out the presence of an inner disk which does not contribute to the reflected spectrum. either because of extreme ionisation suppressing the characteristic atomic features of the reflected spectrum or because the X-ray source is intrinsically anisotropic, so it does not illuminate the inner disk. The source was monitored by RXTE every 2 days for 2 months, and these snapshot spectra show that there is intrinsic spectral variability. The data are good enough to disentangle the power law from the reflected continuum and we see that the power law softens as the source brightens. The lack of a corresponding increase in the observed reflected spectrum implies that either the changes in disk inner radial extent/ionization structure are small, or that the variability is actually driven by changes in the seed photons which are decoupled from the hard X-ray mechanism.

  18. Ginga observations of Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Awaki, H.; Koyama, K.

    1993-01-01

    We observed twenty-eight Seyfert 2 galaxies with the Japanese X-ray satellite, Ginga, and found Seyfert 2 galaxies, in general, have the X-ray spectral characteristics of obscured Seyfert 1 nuclei. This results agrees with the predictions from the Unified Seyfert model proposed by Antonucci and Miller. However, among the observed Seyfert 2 galaxies, there are a few galaxies with no evidence of an obscuration, contrary to the general predictions of the unified model. We note that type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGN) will contribute to the Cosmic Diffuse X-ray Background, if the unified Seyfert model can be extended to the far distant AGN such as quasars.

  19. Spectroscopic Observations of Merging Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzelli, C. J.; Pastoriza, M. G.

    2000-07-01

    In this paper we describe the spectroscopic and infrared properties of a sample of 25 merging galaxy pairs, selected from the catalog of Arp & Madore, and we compare them with those observed in a similar sample of interacting galaxies (Donzelli & Pastoriza). It is noted that mergers as well as interacting systems comprise a wide range of spectral types, going from those corresponding to well-evolved stellar populations (older than 200 Myr) to those that show clear signatures of H II regions with stellar populations younger than 8 Myr. However, merger galaxies show on average more excited spectra than interacting pairs, which could be attributed to lower gas metallicity. From the emission lines we also found that merging systems show on average higher (about a factor of 2) star formation rates than interacting galaxies. Classical diagnostic diagrams show that only three of 50 of the galaxies (6%) present some form of nuclear activity: two Seyfert galaxies and one LINER. However, through a detailed analysis of the pure emission-line spectra, we conclude that this fraction may raise up to 23% of the mergers if we consider that some galaxies host a low-luminosity active nucleus surrounded by strong star-forming regions. This latter assumption is also supported by the infrared colors of the galaxies. Regarding to the total infrared luminosities, the merging galaxies show on average an IR luminosity, log(Lir)=10.7, lower than that of interacting systems, log(Lir)=10.9. We find that only three mergers of the sample (12%) can be classified as luminous infrared galaxies, while this fraction increases to 24% in the interacting sample. Based on observations made at CASLEO. Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan.

  20. Observations and Models of Galaxy Assembly Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Duncan A.

    2017-01-01

    The assembly history of dark matter haloes imparts various correlations between a halo’s physical properties and its large scale environment, i.e. assembly bias. It is common for models of the galaxy-halo connection to assume that galaxy properties are only a function of halo mass, implicitly ignoring how assembly bias may affect galaxies. Recently, programs to model and constrain the degree to which galaxy properties are influenced by assembly bias have been undertaken; however, the extent and character of galaxy assembly bias remains a mystery. Nevertheless, characterizing and modeling galaxy assembly bias is an important step in understanding galaxy evolution and limiting any systematic effects assembly bias may pose in cosmological measurements using galaxy surveys.I will present work on modeling and constraining the effect of assembly bias in two galaxy properties: stellar mass and star-formation rate. Conditional abundance matching allows for these galaxy properties to be tied to halo formation history to a variable degree, making studies of the relative strength of assembly bias possible. Galaxy-galaxy clustering and galactic conformity, the degree to which galaxy color is correlated between neighbors, are sensitive observational measures of galaxy assembly bias. I will show how these measurements can be used to constrain galaxy assembly bias and the peril of ignoring it.

  1. IRAS observations of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B. T.; Rowan-Robinson, M.

    1985-01-01

    The IRAS survey gives an unbiased view of the infrared properties of the active galaxies. Seyfert galaxies occupy much the same area in color-color plots as to normal infrared bright galaxies, but extend the range towards flatter 60 to 25 mm slopes. Statistically the Seyfert 1 galaxies can be distinguished from the Seyfert 2 galaxies, lying predominantly closer to the area with constant slopes between 25 and 200 mm. The infrared measurements of the Seyfert galaxies cannot distinguish between the emission mechanisms in these objects although they agree with the currently popular ideas; they do provide a measure of the total luminosity of the Seyferts. The quasar's position in the color-color diagrams continue the trend of the Seyferts. The quasar 3C48 is shown to be exceptional among the radio loud quasars in that it has a high infrared luminosity which dominates the power output of the quasar and is most likely associated with the underlying host galaxy.

  2. IRAS observations of Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, G. K.; Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B. T.

    1985-01-01

    Infrared Astronomy Satellite measurements at 25, 60 and 100 microns were used to analyze the infrared properties of Seyfert galaxies from the Markarian and NGC Catalogs. One hundred and sixteen of 186 Seyfert galaxies were detected. About 50% of all Seyfert galaxies in the sample have 60 micron luminosities in excess of 10 to the 10th power solar luminosity, and the mean 60 micron luminosity increase with the optical B absolute magnitude. The luminosity functions of the Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies appear quite similar. It is possible, however, to statistically separate the two types of galaxies in color-color plots. The 100- to 60- micron energy distributions flatten systematically with increasing 60- micron luminosity. The infrared measurements provide a measure of the bolometric luminosity of the Seyfert galaxies, but do not discriminate between the physical processes involved.

  3. Observations of faint field galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koo, David C.

    1987-01-01

    Number counts, colors, and angular correlations of field galaxies fainter than 20th mag are summarized. Resulting conclusions regarding the presence and nature of luminosity, spectral, and clustering evolution remain contraversial. Preliminary analysis of two major spectroscopic surveys near completion suggests that by z approximately 0.5, larger numbers of very blue galaxies of moderate luminosities are found than today. The skewer-like surveys also provide new probes of galaxy clustering on scales previously unexplored (larger than 200 Mpc) and over lookback times of several billion years.

  4. HC3N observations of nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xue-Jian; Wang, Jun-Zhi; Gao, Yu; Gu, Qiu-Sheng

    2017-03-01

    Aims: We aim to systematically study the properties of the different transitions of the dense molecular gas tracer HC3N in galaxies. Methods: We have conducted single-dish observations of HC3N emission lines towards a sample of nearby gas-rich galaxies. HC3N(J = 2-1) was observed in 20 galaxies with the Effelsberg 100-m telescope. HC3N(J = 24-23) was observed in nine galaxies with the 10-m Submillimeter Telescope (SMT). Results: HC3N 2-1 is detected in three galaxies: IC 342, M 66, and NGC 660 (> 3σ). HC3N 24-23 is detected in three galaxies: IC 342, NGC 1068, and IC 694. These are the first measurements of HC3N 2-1 in a relatively large sample of external galaxies, although the detection rate is low. For the HC3N 2-1 non-detections, upper limits (2σ) are derived for each galaxy, and stacking the non-detections is attempted to recover the weak signal of HC3N. The stacked spectrum, however, does not show any significant signs of HC3N 2-1 emission. The results are also compared with other transitions of HC3N observed in galaxies. Conclusions: The low detection rate of both transitions suggests low abundance of HC3N in galaxies, which is consistent with other observational studies. The comparison between HC3N and HCN or HCO+shows a large diversity in the ratios between HC3N and HCN or HCO+. More observations are needed to interpret the behavior of HC3N in different types of galaxies.

  5. Galaxy Alignments: Observations and Impact on Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Donnacha; Brown, Michael L.; Hoekstra, Henk; Joachimi, Benjamin; Kitching, Thomas D.; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Sifón, Cristóbal; Cacciato, Marcello; Choi, Ami; Kiessling, Alina; Leonard, Adrienne; Rassat, Anais; Schäfer, Björn Malte

    2015-11-01

    Galaxy shapes are not randomly oriented, rather they are statistically aligned in a way that can depend on formation environment, history and galaxy type. Studying the alignment of galaxies can therefore deliver important information about the physics of galaxy formation and evolution as well as the growth of structure in the Universe. In this review paper we summarise key measurements of galaxy alignments, divided by galaxy type, scale and environment. We also cover the statistics and formalism necessary to understand the observations in the literature. With the emergence of weak gravitational lensing as a precision probe of cosmology, galaxy alignments have taken on an added importance because they can mimic cosmic shear, the effect of gravitational lensing by large-scale structure on observed galaxy shapes. This makes galaxy alignments, commonly referred to as intrinsic alignments, an important systematic effect in weak lensing studies. We quantify the impact of intrinsic alignments on cosmic shear surveys and finish by reviewing practical mitigation techniques which attempt to remove contamination by intrinsic alignments.

  6. Observational properties of compact groups of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickson, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Compact groups are small, relatively isolated, systems of galaxies with projected separations comparable to the diameters of the galaxies themselves. Two well-known examples are Stephan's Quintet (Stephan, 1877) and Seyfert's Sextet (Seyfert 1948a,b). In groups such as these, the apparent space density of galaxies approaches 10(exp 6) Mpc(sub -3), denser even than the cores of rich clusters. The apparent unlikeliness of the chance occurrence of such tight groupings lead Ambartsumyan (1958, 1975) to conclude that compact groups must be physically dense systems. This view is supported by clear signs of galaxy interactions that are seen in many groups. Spectroscopic observations reveal that typical relative velocities of galaxies in the groups are comparable to their internal stellar velocities. This should be conducive to strong gravitational interactions - more so than in rich clusters, where galaxy velocities are typically much higher. This suggests that compact groups could be excellent laboratories in which to study galaxy interactions and their effects. Compact groups often contain one or more galaxies whose redshift differs greatly from those of the other group members. If these galaxies are at the same distance as the other members, either entire galaxies are being ejected at high velocities from these groups, or some new physical phenomena must be occurring. If their redshifts are cosmological, we must explain why so many discordant galaxies are found in compact groups. In recent years much progress has been made in addressing these questions. Here, the author discusses the current observational data on compact groups and their implications.

  7. SCUBA Observations of High Redshift Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Reuland, M; Rottgering, H; van Breugel, W

    2003-03-11

    High redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs) are key targets for studies of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies.The role of dust in these processes is uncertain. We have therefore observed the dust continuum emission from a sample of z > 3 radio galaxies with the SCUBA bolometer array. We confirm and strengthen the result found by Archibald et al. (1), that HzRGs are massive starforming systems and that submillimeter detection rate appears to be primarily a strong function of redshift. We also observed HzRG-candidates that have so far eluded spectroscopic redshift determination. Four of these have been detected, and provide evidence that they may be extremely obscured radio galaxies, possibly in an early stage of their evolution.

  8. Galaxy Zoo: Observing secular evolution through bars

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Edmond; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A.; Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Melvin, Thomas; Bell, Eric F.; Lintott, Chris; Schawinski, Kevin; Skibba, Ramin A.; Willett, Kyle W.

    2013-12-20

    In this paper, we use the Galaxy Zoo 2 data set to study the behavior of bars in disk galaxies as a function of specific star formation rate (SSFR) and bulge prominence. Our sample consists of 13,295 disk galaxies, with an overall (strong) bar fraction of 23.6% ± 0.4%, of which 1154 barred galaxies also have bar length (BL) measurements. These samples are the largest ever used to study the role of bars in galaxy evolution. We find that the likelihood of a galaxy hosting a bar is anticorrelated with SSFR, regardless of stellar mass or bulge prominence. We find that the trends of bar likelihood and BL with bulge prominence are bimodal with SSFR. We interpret these observations using state-of-the-art simulations of bar evolution that include live halos and the effects of gas and star formation. We suggest our observed trends of bar likelihood with SSFR are driven by the gas fraction of the disks, a factor demonstrated to significantly retard both bar formation and evolution in models. We interpret the bimodal relationship between bulge prominence and bar properties as being due to the complicated effects of classical bulges and central mass concentrations on bar evolution and also to the growth of disky pseudobulges by bar evolution. These results represent empirical evidence for secular evolution driven by bars in disk galaxies. This work suggests that bars are not stagnant structures within disk galaxies but are a critical evolutionary driver of their host galaxies in the local universe (z < 1).

  9. Space Observations of Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, Timothy M.; Leitherer, Claus

    1997-01-01

    Led by JHU postdoc Gerhardt Meurer, we completed our analysis of far-UV HST FOC images of nine nearby starbursts. We have been able to delineate the structure of the regions in which the unusually vigorous star-formation is occurring (Meurer et al 1995). At 0.1 arcsec (2 to 20 pc) resolution, the starbursts are resolved into multiple clumps and bright star clusters distributed over a region several hundred pc to a few kpc in size. This suggests that compact sites of star-formation may propagate from place to place within a larger central gas reservoir over the duration of the burst. The UV and optical properties of these clusters suggest that they may correspond to newly 'minted' globular clusters. These clusters typically produce about 10% to 50% of the far-UV light, and are preferentially located in the heart of the starburst, where the background UV surface brightness is highest. Thus, massive star cluster (globular cluster?) formation is a fundamental part of the starburst phenomenon. This confirms and generalizes the results of Whitmore et al (1993). Our starburst images are also being compared to our recent analysis of the HST FOC image of R136 in the LMC (De Marchi et al 1993). We have also extended our results on the UV photometric structure of starbursts to star-forming galaxies in the early universe (Meurer et al 1997). We show that the most actively- star-forming galaxies at all redshifts seem to have approximately the same bolometric surface-brightness, and that the high redshift galaxies may be larger and more luminous versions of local starbursts.

  10. AMOS Galaxy 15 Satellite Observations and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, D.

    2011-09-01

    In early April 2010, the Galaxy 15 geosynchronous satellite experienced an on-orbit anomaly. Even though the satellite's transmitters and articulating solar panel were still functioning, ground controllers lost the ability to command and maneuver the satellite. With its orbital position no longer maintained, Galaxy 15 began to drift eastward. This forced several other satellites to make collision avoidance maneuvers during the following months. Soon after the initial anomaly, Galaxy 15's operators predicted that the satellite’s reaction wheels would eventually become saturated, causing a loss of both spacecraft attitude and proper sunward orientation of the solar panels. This "off-pointing" event finally occurred in late December, ultimately leading to a depletion of Galaxy 15's batteries. This near-death experience had a fortunate side effect, however, in that it forced the satellite’s command unit to reboot and once again be able to both receive and execute ground commands. The satellite operators have since recovered control of the satellite. AMOS conducted non-resolved photometric observations of Galaxy 15 before, during and after these events. Similar observations were conducted of Galaxy 12, the nearly-identical replacement satellite. This presentation presents and discusses these temporal brightness signatures in detail, comparing the changing patterns in the observations to the known sequence of events.

  11. ROSAT observations of Coma Cluster galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, K. L.; White, S. D. M.

    1995-01-01

    The approximately 86 ks ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) image of the Coma Cluster is deeper than any previous X-ray observation of a galaxy cluster. We search for X-ray emission from 35 individual galaxies in a magnitude-limited sample, all of which lie within 20 arcmins of the optical axis in at least one of the four Coma pointings. We detect seven galaxies in the 0.4-2.4 keV band at a significance level exceeding 3 sigma, and a further four at above 2 sigma. Although we can set only upper limits on the individual flux from each of the other galaxies, we are able to measure their mean flux by stacking the observations. The X-ray luminosities of the seven detections range from 6.2 x 10(exp 40) to 1.5 x 10(exp 42) ergs/s (0.4-2.4 keV for H(sub 0) = 50 km/s/Mpc). For galaxies with a blue absolute magnitude of about -21 we find a mean X-ray luminosity of 1.3 x 10(exp 40) ergs/s. The ratio of X-ray to optical luminosity is substantially smaller for such subjects than for the brightest galaxies in the cluster. The X-ray luminosities of the four brightest galaxies are ill-defined, however, because of ambiguity in distinguishing galaxy emission from cluster emission. Each object appears to be related to significant structure in the diffuse intracluster medium. We also investigate emission in the softer 0.2-0.4 keV band where detections are less significant because of the higher background, and we discuss the properties of a number of interesting individual sources. The X-ray luminosities of the Coma galaxies are similar to those of galaxies in the Virgo Cluster and in other regions with relatively low galaxy density. We conclude that large-scale environmental effects do not significantly enhance or suppress the average X-ray emission from galaxies, but that individual objects vary in luminosity substantially in a way which may depend on the detailed history of their environment.

  12. UV Observations of Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggess, Albert

    We propose to obtain high-quality, broadened (equivalent to trailed) spectra for 9 Type I and 2 Type 2 Seyfert galaxies. Only broadened spectra have sufficient signal-to-noise ratios to allow detailed fitting of line profiles needed to investigate both the kinematics and dynamics of the emitting regions and their stratification. These spectra will also allow more accurate measurements of weak spectral features, such as: OI 1304 and He II 1640, needed to estimate reddening; N IV] 1486, O III] 1663 and N III] 1749, for abundance analyses; absorption lines such as Si IV l400 and C IV 1550, for estimating the covering factor of the broad line region (BLR); and Galactic halo absorption lines of Si II 1260, C II 1335 and Fe II 1608. There are broad features superposed on the spectrum of Seyfert galaxies: the 2200A dust absorption feature, the emission hump at 3200A and several other unidentified bumps and wiggles. Their detection, measurement and quantitative study also require spectra recorded with high signal-to-noise ratios. X-ray spectra are already available for all 9 Type 1 Seyferts, and these data will be combined with our UV continua to estimate the amounts of available ionizing radiation. We also plan to measure the fluxes of the prominent emission lines: L-alpha, SI IV 1400, C IV 1550, C III] 1900 and Mg II 2800, to extend our investigation of the L-alpha/H-beta ratio and to provide a homogeneous set of high quality data to allow the evaluation of models for individual objects instead of, as in the past, for an assumed "typical" Seyfert or quasar.

  13. Observing the epoch of galaxy formation

    PubMed Central

    Steidel, Charles C.

    1999-01-01

    Significant observational progress in addressing the question of the origin and early evolution of galaxies has been made in the past few years, allowing for direct comparison of the epoch when most of the stars in the universe were forming to prevailing theoretical models. There is currently broad consistency between theoretical expectations and the observations, but rapid improvement in the data will provide much more critical tests of theory in the coming years. PMID:10200244

  14. Multi-waveband observations of colliding galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleton, P. N.; Robson, E. I.; Schombert, James M.

    1990-11-01

    Colliding galaxies represent a major challenge to both theorists and observers because of the large variety of phenomena which are expected to come into play during the interaction. Strong gravitational fluctuations may drive non-linear waves and instabilities throughout the stars and gas leading to enhanced star formation, nuclear activity and ultimately a mixing of the morphological components of the original galaxies. One relatively uncomplicated class of colliding galaxy where stellar waves play an important role in star formation are ring galaxies. Ring galaxies are probably formed when a companion galaxy passes through the center of a disk system driving circular waves through the disk (Lynds and Toomre 1976, Toomre 1978, Struck-Marcell 1990). Off-center collisions can generate non-circular waves and can be loosely described as banana-shaped although they may exhibit more complex forms as the waves expand into the disk. The propagation of such stellar and gaseous waves through the disk leads to enhanced star formation (e.g., Appleton and Struck-Marcell 1987a; Jeske 1986) and provides a unique probe of the response of the interstellar medium (ISM) to a propagating wave (see Appleton and Struck-Marcell 1987b). Here, the authors report results for 3 systems; the irregular ring Arp 143 (=VV 117); Wakamatsu's Seyfert ring (A0959-755; see Wakamatsu and Nishida 1987) and the brighter member of the pair of ring galaxies comprising of AM 1358-221. The most complete multi-wavelength data is for Arp 143. Optical charge coupled device (CCD) observations made with the 60 inch Palomar telescope at BV and r band, near-IR images at J (1.25 microns), H (1.65 microns) and k (2.2 microns) bands from the infrared camera (IRCAM) InSb array camera on the 3.8m United Kingdon Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) telescope and very large array (VLA) observations at 20cm in both the neutral hydrogen line and radio continuum are described. The observations of Wakamatsu's ring and AM 1358 were

  15. Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Normal galaxies, radio galaxies, and Seyfert galaxies are considered. The large magellanic cloud and the great galaxy in Andromedia are highlighted. Quasars and BL lacertae objects are also discussed and a review of the spectral observations of all of these galaxies and celestial objects is presented.

  16. Models Constraints from Observations of Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffel, R.; Pastoriza, M. G.; Rodríguez-Ardila, A.; Dametto, N. Z.; Ruschel-Dutra, D.; Riffel, R. A.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Martins, L. P.; Mason, R.; Ho, L. C.; Palomar XD Team

    2015-08-01

    Studying the unresolved stellar content of galaxies generally involves disentangling the various components contributing to the spectral energy distribution (SED), and fitting a combination of simple stellar populations (SSPs) to derive information about age, metallicity, and star formation history. In the near-infrared (NIR, 0.85-2.5 μm), the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase - the last stage of the evolution of intermediate-mass (M ≲ 6 M⊙) stars - is a particularly important component of the SSP models. These stars can dominate the emission of stellar populations with ages ˜ 0.2-2 Gyr, being responsible for roughly half of the luminosity in the K band. In addition, when trying to describe the continuum observed in active galactic nuclei, the signatures of the central engine and from the dusty torus cannot be ignored. Over the past several years we have developed a method to disentangle these three components. Our synthesis shows significant differences between Seyfert 1 (Sy 1) and Seyfert 2 (Sy 2) galaxies. The central few hundred parsecs of our galaxy sample contain a substantial fraction of intermediate-age populations with a mean metallicity near solar. Two-dimensional mapping of the near-infrared stellar population of the nuclear region of active galaxies suggests that there is a spatial correlation between the intermediate-age stellar population and a partial ring of low stellar velocity dispersion (σ*). Such an age is consistent with a scenario in which the origin of the low-σ* rings is a past event which triggered an inflow of gas and formed stars which still keep the colder kinematics of the gas from which they have formed. We also discuss the fingerprints of features attributed to TP-AGB stars in the spectra of the nuclear regions of nearby galaxies.

  17. Galaxy simulations: Kinematics and mock observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Christopher E.

    2013-08-01

    There are six topics to my thesis, which are: (1) slow rotator production in varied simulation schemes and kinematically decoupled cores and twists in those simulations, (2) the change in number of clumps in radiation pressure and no-radiation pressure simulations, (3) Sunrise experiments and failures including UVJ color-color dust experiments and UVbeta slopes, (4) the Sunrise image pipeline and algorithms. Cosmological simulations of have typically produced too many stars at early times. We find that the additional radiation pressure (RP) feedback suppresses star formation globally by a factor of ~ 3. Despite this reduction, the simulation still overproduces stars by a factor of ~ 2 with respect to the predictions provided by abundance matching methods. In simulations with RP the number of clumps falls dramatically. However, only clumps with masses Mclump/Mdisk ≤ 8% are impacted by the inclusion of RP, and clump counts above this range are comparable. Above this mass, the difference between and RP and no-RP contrast ratios diminishes. If we restrict our selection to galaxies hosting at least a single clump above this mass range then clump numbers, contrast ratios, survival fractions and total clump masses show little discrepancy between RP and no-RP simulations. By creating mock Hubble Space Telescope observations we find that the number of clumps is slightly reduced in simulations with RP. We demonstrate that clumps found in any single gas, stellar, or mock observation image are not necessarily clumps found in another map, and that there are few clumps common to multiple maps. New kinematic observations from ATLAS3D have highlighted the need to understand the evolutionary mechanism leading to a spectrum of fast-rotator and slow-rotators in early-type galaxies. We address the formation of slow and fast rotators through a series of controlled, comprehensive hydrodynamic simulations sampling idealized galaxy merger formation scenarios constructed from model

  18. IUE observations of Fe 2 galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penston, M. V.; Snijders, M. A. J.; Boksenberg, A.; Haskell, J. D. J.; Fosbury, R. A. E.

    1981-01-01

    Repeated observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxies I Zw 1 and II Zw 136, which have very strong Fe II emission lines in the optical region, were made at low resolution with the IUE Satellite. The ultraviolet spectra are very similar: both are variable and show broad emission features of Fe II (especially the UV multiplets 1, 33, 60, 62, and 63) as well as the emission lines usually strong in Seyferts and quasars. The data strongly support the hypothesis that the optical Fe II emission lines are primarily due to collisional excitation and that resonance fluorescence makes only a minor contribution to the excitation of these lines.

  19. Radio observations of nearby moderately luminous IRAS galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongsheng; Su, Bumei

    1999-05-01

    Six nearby moderately luminous IRAS galaxies have been observed at two wavelength by using the Australian AT. Among them, radio emissions have been detected for two galaxies, i.e. IRAS 20272-4738 and IRAS 23156-4238, and their radio parameters, like radio fluxes, peak positions, source sizes and spectral indices, are obtained. The radio sources are confirmed with infrared, radio and optical observations. Some characteristics of the radio emissions of these galaxies are discussed with previous observational data.

  20. Millimeter and submillimeter observations of nearby radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, G. R.; Patten, Brian M.

    1991-01-01

    Radio galaxies are often observed to be strong long wavelength infrared sources. Twenty-six radio galaxies with strong compact cores were observed at wavelengths near 1 mm with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The detections and upper limits establish the presence of excess infrared emission for almost all of the galaxies in the sample. The exceptions are the BL Lac objects, which have smooth continuous spectra from radio to infrared wavelengths. The spectral energy distributions of the infrared emission from the radio galaxies favor a thermal origin due to emission from cool interstellar dust. The amounts of dust inferred to be present approach those observed in large spirals.

  1. AO Observations of Three Powerful Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    de Vries, W; van Bruegel, W; Quirrenbach, A

    2002-08-01

    The host galaxies of powerful radio sources are ideal laboratories to study active galactic nuclei (AGN). The galaxies themselves are among the most massive systems in the universe, and are believed to harbor supermassive black holes (SMBH). If large galaxies are formed in a hierarchical way by multiple merger events, radio galaxies at low redshift represent the end-products of this process. However, it is not clear why some of these massive ellipticals have associated radio emission, while others do not. Both are thought to contain SMBHs, with masses proportional to the total luminous mass in the bulge. It either implies every SMBH has recurrent radio-loud phases, and the radio-quiet galaxies happen to be in the ''low'' state, or that the radio galaxy nuclei are physically different from radio-quiet ones, i.e. by having a more massive SMBH for a given bulge mass. Here we present the first results from our adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy pilot program on three nearby powerful radio galaxies. Initiating a larger, more systematic AO survey of radio galaxies (preferentially with Laser Guide Star equipped AO systems) has the potential of furthering our understanding of the physical properties of radio sources, their triggering, and their subsequent evolution.

  2. Observational Searches for Star-Forming Galaxies at z > 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Steven L.

    2016-08-01

    Although the universe at redshifts greater than six represents only the first one billion years (< 10%) of cosmic time, the dense nature of the early universe led to vigorous galaxy formation and evolution activity which we are only now starting to piece together. Technological improvements have, over only the past decade, allowed large samples of galaxies at such high redshifts to be collected, providing a glimpse into the epoch of formation of the first stars and galaxies. A wide variety of observational techniques have led to the discovery of thousands of galaxy candidates at z > 6, with spectroscopically confirmed galaxies out to nearly z = 9. Using these large samples, we have begun to gain a physical insight into the processes inherent in galaxy evolution at early times. In this review, I will discuss (i) the selection techniques for finding distant galaxies, including a summary of previous and ongoing ground and space-based searches, and spectroscopic follow-up efforts, (ii) insights into galaxy evolution gleaned from measures such as the rest-frame ultraviolet luminosity function, the stellar mass function, and galaxy star-formation rates, and (iii) the effect of galaxies on their surrounding environment, including the chemical enrichment of the universe, and the reionisation of the intergalactic medium. Finally, I conclude with prospects for future observational study of the distant universe, using a bevy of new state-of-the-art facilities coming online over the next decade and beyond.

  3. HI--line Observations of Low Surface Brightness Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. L.; Taylor, C. L.; Brinks, E.; Skillman, E. D.

    1995-12-01

    We present HI--line observations of low--surface brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxies to survey their nearby environment (r <= 100 kpc) for HI bright companions. It is possible that star formation histories in dwarf galaxies can be strongly affected by interactions with nearby companions. If massive star formation can be triggered by galaxy--galaxy interactions, then the absence of such interactions likely explains the lack of star formation in LSB dwarf galaxies relative to their high surface brightness counterparts (HII galaxies). Taylor et al. (1995, ApJS, 99, 427) surveyed a sample of HII galaxies and found that 60% of the sample had nearby HI companions. In our sample of 18 LSB galaxies, we found that only 22% had companions detectable in HI. Furthermore, we find that the peak column densities for the LSB sample are all below {10(21) } HI atoms cm(-2) . This is below the empirically established level needed for star formation to occur in dwarf galaxies as discussed by Skillman (1987, in Star Formation in Galaxies, ed. C.J. Lonsdale Persson (NASA Conf. Pub. CP--2466), p.263), Kennicutt (1989, ApJ, 344, 685), van der Hulst et al. (1993, AJ, 106, 548), and Taylor et al. (1994, AJ, 107, 971).

  4. Comparing Simulations and Observations of Reionization-Epoch Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Romeel; Finlator, Kristian

    2006-05-01

    We propose to test and constrain models of early galaxy formation through comparisons with observations of reionization-epoch (z>6) galaxies observed using Spitzer. The goals are to (1) Make predictions for z>6 objects using state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation tailored to study the reionization epoch; (2) Develop a publicly-available tool called SPOC designed to obtain detailed constraints on physical properties of observed galaxies through comparisons with simulated galaxy catalogs; and (3) Use SPOC to test and constrain models of galaxy formation through comparisons with rapidly- advancing observations in the new frontier of early universe studies. The results of this study will yield deeper insights into the galaxy formation process at these mostly unexplored epochs, with implications for understanding the formation of massive galaxies, studying the topology and evolution of IGM reionization, and designing future surveys to detect first objects. The SPOC tool will facilitate a closer connection between observations and theory by enabling the community to interpret data within the framework of current hierarchical structure formation models, in turn providing detailed tests of these models that is essential for driving the field forward.

  5. ROSAT HRI observations of six early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlem, Michael; Stuhrmann, Norbert

    1998-04-01

    High-resolution ROSAT HRI soft X-ray observations of four E/S0 galaxies were conducted by us. The data show no signs of Seyfert activity in the X-ray regime. The central emission peaks of the four galaxies, NGC533, NGC2832, NGC4104 and NGC6329, are associated with their cooling flows. The half intensity radii of the cooling flows range from 0.8 to 3.5 kpc. We find a trend (based up to now on only five objects) of the radio power of the cores in E/S0 galaxies to increase with the size and the accretion rates of their cooling flows. In one galaxy, NGC4921, no centrally peaked extended gaseous envelope was found, which is most likely due to the fact that it is not an E/S0 galaxy, but an early-type spiral. NGC2885, the sixth galaxy in our initial sample, shows signs of X-ray emission from an AGN. It has also been classified as a Sy-1 AGN by Bade et al. (1995). However, optical imaging suggests that this galaxy is probably not an E or S0 type system either, but rather an early-type spiral galaxy. Thus, in the context of accretion rate vs. galaxy type models of low-luminosity AGNs, the presence of an X-ray luminous Sy-1 nucleus in NGC2885 is no surprise.

  6. The ergodicity bias in the observed galaxy distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jun; Zhang, Pengjie E-mail: pjzhang@shao.ac.cn

    2010-08-01

    The spatial distribution of galaxies we observed is subject to the given condition that we, human beings are sitting right in a galaxy — the Milky Way. Thus the ergodicity assumption is questionable in interpretation of the observed galaxy distribution. The resultant difference between observed statistics (volume average) and the true cosmic value (ensemble average) is termed as the ergodicity bias. We perform explicit numerical investigation of the effect for a set of galaxy survey depths and near-end distance cuts. It is found that the ergodicity bias in observed two- and three-point correlation functions in most cases is insignificant for modern analysis of samples from galaxy surveys and thus close a loophole in precision cosmology. However, it may become non-negligible in certain circumstances, such as those applications involving three-point correlation function at large scales of local galaxy samples. Thus one is reminded to take extra care in galaxy sample construction and interpretation of the statistics of the sample, especially when the characteristic redshift is low.

  7. Quantitative Morphology of Galaxies Observed in the Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchinski, L.; Madore, B.; Trewhella, M.; Freedman, W.

    2000-01-01

    We present a quantitative study of the far-ultraviolet (FUV) and optical morphology in 32 nearby galaxies and estimate the morphological k-correction expected if these objects were observed unevolved at high redshift.

  8. Millimeter and submillimeter observations of nearby radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, G.R.; Patten, B.M. Hawaii, University, Honolulu )

    1991-05-01

    Radio galaxies are often observed to be strong long wavelength infrared sources. Twenty-six radio galaxies with strong compact cores were observed at wavelengths near 1 mm with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The detections and upper limits establish the presence of excess infrared emission for almost all of the galaxies in the sample. The exceptions are the BL Lac objects, which have smooth continuous spectra from radio to infrared wavelengths. The spectral energy distributions of the infrared emission from the radio galaxies favor a thermal origin due to emission from cool interstellar dust. The amounts of dust inferred to be present approach those observed in large spirals. 55 refs.

  9. Selections from 2016: Counting Galaxies in the Observable Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-12-01

    Editors note:In these last two weeks of 2016, well be looking at a few selections that we havent yet discussed on AAS Nova from among the most-downloaded paperspublished in AAS journals this year. The usual posting schedule will resume after the AAS winter meeting.The Evolution of Galaxy Number Density at z 8 and Its ImplicationsPublished October2016Main takeaway:How many galaxies are there in the observable universe? The latest estimate is approximately 2 trillion, according to a study led by Christopher Conselice (University of Nottingham, UK). The authors produced this estimate by using observations of the number of galaxies in recent deep-field surveys by Hubble and other telescopes, and then extrapolating this number to account for small and faint galaxies that we arent able to see.Why its interesting:The original Hubble Deep Field study from the mid-1990s provided the basis for our previous working estimate of the number of galaxies the universe contains, which was around 120 billion. The new estimate from Conselice and collaborators therefore suggests that there are a factor of ten more galaxies in the universe than we previously thought!What to expect from observations:Right now we only have the capability to see roughly 10% of these 2 trillion galaxies. But future observatories like the James Webb Space Telescope will be able to pick out many more distant galaxies than what weve found so far, helping us to understand how these galaxies formed in the early universe.CitationChristopher J. Conselice et al 2016 ApJ 830 83. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/830/2/83

  10. A statistical study of merging galaxies: Theory and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Tapan K.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the expected frequency of merging galaxies is conducted, using the impulsive approximation. Results indicate that if we consider mergers involving galaxy pairs without halos in a single crossing time or orbital period, the expected frequency of mergers is two orders of magnitude below the observed value for the present epoch. If we consider mergers involving several orbital periods or crossing times, the expected frequency goes up by an order of magnitude. Preliminary calculation indicate that if we consider galaxy mergers between pairs with massive halos, the merger is very much hastened.

  11. International Ultraviolet Explorer observations of amorphous hot galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, S. A.; Gallac gher, J. S.; Hjellming, M.; Hunter, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    In order to better understand the nature of star formation processes in amorphous galaxies, short wavelength International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra of galaxies NGC 1705 and NGC 1800 were obtained. The IUE data for NGC 1705 were of excellent quality while the low signal-to-noise NGC 1800 observation was useful only as a rough guide to the ultraviolet energy distribution. It was found that NGC 1705 contains a normal mix of OB stars, which is consistent with the nearly constant recent star formation rate inferred from new optical data. The NGC 1800 is likely to have similar properties, and blue galaxies with amorphous structures thus do not show evidence for anomalies in stellar mass distributions. The UV spectra of amorphous galaxies and a variety of other hot extragalactic stellar systems have similar characteristics, which suggests OB stellar populations often are homogeneous in their properties.

  12. Observation of the microlensing toward the Andromeda galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulga, V. V.; Sazhin, M. V.; Gorbatko, N. P.

    Observation of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) stars microlensed by dark bodies in the halo of our Galaxy is considered. Observations toward the Andromeda galaxy significantly increase the probability to reveal microlensing effects in comparison with MACHO and EROS procedures for observations of LMC and SMC. This is due to: greater amount of background stars (stars from M31) for which it is possible to observe the microlensing effect; greater distance to M31 (690 kps). This fact allows us to consider ALL the dark bodies in our Galaxy whereas LMC and SMC are actually situated INSIDE (55 kps) the halo of the Galaxy. The probability of microlensing effects, their characteristic times and the maximum factor of M31 star brightness amplification are estimated for different models. If the mass of a dark body in the halo of our Galaxy is of the order of 1M, it is possible to detect 5-6 microlensing events in one year. When the maximum factor of brightness amplification is 10, the characteristic time of the event is 7-10 days. If masses of dark bodies is of the order of 10-3 M it is possible detect 175-200 events per year and duration of these events is 0.2-0.3 days provided that the maximum amplification factor is 10. Procedures of real astronomical observations to search for the microlensing effect are discussed in detail. Information about observational series obtained is given. This series was obtained with the telescope AFR-1 in observatory at Mount Majdanak in 1990-1992 (total duration of the series is about 1.5 years). Processing of long observational series is being performed for the purpose of revealing microlensing effect. Preliminary results of the processing are presented.

  13. Physical and observable properties of the first galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, John; Simeon Barrow, Kirk Stuart; O'Shea, Brian W.; Norman, Michael L.; Xu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    The Hubble Ultra Deep Field and Frontier Fields have discovered over 1,500 galaxies at redshifts greater than 6. We present observational predictions for this high-redshift population, using the Renaissance Simulations, a suite of high-resolution cosmological simulations, that enables the correlation between key observables and the physical properties of the first galaxies in the Universe. Using a sample of over 3,000 resolved galaxies along with the formation of 10,000 massive Population III stars, we show that the luminosity function flattens above a UV magnitude of -14 but does not drop to zero even to our resolution limit of M_UV = -4. We find that dark matter halos below the atomic cooling limit (~10^8 M_sun) can form stars if they are chemically enriched, and they have similar mass-to-light ratios as local ultra-faint dwarfs. We utilize stellar population synthesis models, dust extinction using Monte Carlo methods, and photo-ionization modeling, all sourced from the simulation data, to obtain synthetic observations of the first galaxies. Using these results, we will be able to constrain the following properties of the first galaxies: (1) star formation histories and stellar populations, (2) nebular emission and dust extinction, and (3) the faint end of the luminosity function.

  14. Spectral Observations of Two Galaxies with UV Excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karapetyan, E. L.

    2016-09-01

    Spectral observations of two galaxies with UV-excess from Kazarian's list are reported. The spectra were obtained with the 2.6-m telescope at the Byurakan Observatory using the SCORPIO spectral camera. A grism was used to obtain spectra in the wavelength interval λλ7420-3920 Å. The spectra of Kaz 151, Kaz 153 have Sy2 features. In the spectra of the Kaz 151, and Kaz 153 galaxies absorption lines are observed along with high excitation emission lines such as HeI λ5876 Å and HeII λ4686 Å.

  15. Low-Frequency Radio Observations of Galaxy Cluster Merger Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Weeren, Reinout

    2014-10-01

    In a few dozen merging galaxy clusters diffuse extended radio emission has been found, implying the presence of relativistic particles and magnetic fields in the intracluster medium. A major question is how these particles are accelerated up to such extreme energies. In this talk I will present LOFAR and JVLA radio observations of the Toothbrush galaxy cluster. The Toothbrush cluster hosts diffuse 2 Mpc extended radio emission in the form of a radio relic and halo. Our deep LOFAR and JVLA observations allow a radio spectral study to test the shock origin of the relic and underlying particle acceleration mechanisms.

  16. Cold Fronts in Clusters of Galaxies: Observations and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markevitch, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    Mergers of galaxy clusters -- some of the most energetic events in the Universe -- produce disturbances in hot intracluster medium, such as shocks and cold fronts, that can be used as tools to study the physics of galaxy clusters. Cold fronts may constrain viscosity and the structure and strength of the cluster magnetic fields. Combined with radio data, these observations also shed light on the production of ultrarelativistic particles that are known to coexist with the cluster thermal plasma. This talk will summarize the current X-ray observations of cluster mergers, as well as some recent radio data and high resolution hydrodynamic simulations.

  17. Structures and Components in Galaxy Clusters: Observations and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. M.; Churazov, E. M.; Ferrari, C.; Forman, W. R.; Kaastra, J. S.; Klein, U.; Markevitch, M.; de Plaa, J.

    2015-05-01

    Clusters of galaxies are the largest gravitationally bounded structures in the Universe dominated by dark matter. We review the observational appearance and physical models of plasma structures in clusters of galaxies. Bubbles of relativistic plasma which are inflated by supermassive black holes of AGNs, cooling and heating of the gas, large scale plasma shocks, cold fronts, non-thermal halos and relics are observed in clusters. These constituents are reflecting both the formation history and the dynamical properties of clusters of galaxies. We discuss X-ray spectroscopy as a tool to study the metal enrichment in clusters and fine spectroscopy of Fe X-ray lines as a powerful diagnostics of both the turbulent plasma motions and the energetics of the non-thermal electron populations. The knowledge of the complex dynamical and feedback processes is necessary to understand the energy and matter balance as well as to constrain the role of the non-thermal components of clusters.

  18. OBSERVABILITY OF DUAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN MERGING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wassenhove, Sandor; Volonteri, Marta; Bellovary, Jillian; Mayer, Lucio; Callegari, Simone; Dotti, Massimo

    2012-03-20

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) have been detected in the centers of most nearby massive galaxies. Galaxies today are not only the products of billions of years of galaxy mergers, but also billions of years of SMBH activity as active galactic nuclei (AGNs) that is connected to galaxy mergers. In this context, detection of AGN pairs should be relatively common. Observationally, however, dual AGNs are scant, being just a few percent of all AGNs. In this Letter, we investigate the triggering of AGN activity in merging galaxies via a suite of high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations. We follow the dynamics and accretion onto the SMBHs as they move from separations of tens of kiloparsecs to tens of parsecs. Our resolution, cooling, and star formation implementation produce an inhomogeneous, multi-phase interstellar medium, allowing us to accurately trace star formation and accretion onto the SMBHs. We study the impact of gas content, morphology, and mass ratio, focusing on AGN activity and dynamics across a wide range of relevant conditions. We test when the two AGNs are simultaneously detectable, for how long and at which separations. We find that strong dual AGN activity occurs during the late phases of the mergers, at small separations (<1-10 kpc) below the resolution limit of most surveys. Much of the SMBH accretion is not simultaneous, limiting the dual AGN fraction detectable through imaging and spectroscopy to a few percent, in agreement with observational samples.

  19. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF THE COLLISIONAL RING GALAXY NGC 922

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, A. H.; Galache, J. L.; Zezas, A.; Linden, T.; Kalogera, V.; Roberts, T. P.; Kilgard, R.; Wolter, A.; Trinchieri, G.

    2012-03-10

    In this paper, we report on Chandra observations of the starburst galaxy NGC 922. NGC 922 is a drop-through ring galaxy with an expanding ring of star formation, similar in many respects to the Cartwheel galaxy. The Cartwheel galaxy is famous for hosting 12 ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), most of which are in the star-forming ring. This is the largest number of ULXs seen in a single system and has led to speculation that the low metallicity of the Cartwheel (0.3 Z{sub Sun }) may optimize the conditions for ULX formation. In contrast, NGC 922 has metallicity near solar. The Chandra observations reveal a population of bright X-ray sources, including seven ULXs. The number of ULXs in NGC 922 and the Cartwheel scales with the star formation rate: we do not find any evidence for an excess of sources in the Cartwheel. Simulations of the binary population in these galaxies suggest that the ULX population in both systems is dominated by systems with strong wind accretion from supergiant donors onto direct-collapse black holes. The simulations correctly predict the ratio of the number of sources in NGC 922 and the Cartwheel. Thus, it would appear that the metallicity of the Cartwheel is not low enough to see a difference in the ULX population compared to NGC 922.

  20. Chandra Observations of the Collisional Ring Galaxy NGC 922

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestwich, A. H.; Galache, J. L.; Linden, T.; Kalogera, V.; Zezas, A.; Roberts, T. P.; Kilgard, R.; Wolter, A.; Trinchieri, G.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we report on Chandra observations of the starburst galaxy NGC 922. NGC 922 is a drop-through ring galaxy with an expanding ring of star formation, similar in many respects to the Cartwheel galaxy. The Cartwheel galaxy is famous for hosting 12 ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), most of which are in the star-forming ring. This is the largest number of ULXs seen in a single system and has led to speculation that the low metallicity of the Cartwheel (0.3 Z ⊙) may optimize the conditions for ULX formation. In contrast, NGC 922 has metallicity near solar. The Chandra observations reveal a population of bright X-ray sources, including seven ULXs. The number of ULXs in NGC 922 and the Cartwheel scales with the star formation rate: we do not find any evidence for an excess of sources in the Cartwheel. Simulations of the binary population in these galaxies suggest that the ULX population in both systems is dominated by systems with strong wind accretion from supergiant donors onto direct-collapse black holes. The simulations correctly predict the ratio of the number of sources in NGC 922 and the Cartwheel. Thus, it would appear that the metallicity of the Cartwheel is not low enough to see a difference in the ULX population compared to NGC 922.

  1. Magnetism in galaxies - Observational overview and next generation radio telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    2011-06-01

    The strength and structure of cosmic magnetic fields is best studied by observations of radio continuum emission, its polarization and its Faraday rotation. Fields with a well-ordered spiral structure exist in many types of galaxies. Total field strengths in spiral arms and bars are 20-30 μG and dynamically important. Strong fields in central regions can drive gas inflows towards an active nucleus. The strongest regular fields (10-15 μG) are found in interarm regions, sometimes forming ``magnetic spiral arms'' between the optical arms. The typical degree of polarization is a few % in spiral arms, but high (up to 50%) in interarm regions. The detailed field structures suggest interaction with gas flows. Faraday rotation measures of the polarization vectors reveals large-scale patterns in several spiral galaxies which are regarded as signatures of large-scale (coherent) fields generated by dynamos. - Polarization observations with the forthcoming large radio telescopes will open a new era in the observation of magnetic fields and should help to understand their origin. Low-frequency radio synchrotron emission traces low-energy cosmic ray electrons which can propagate further away from their origin. LOFAR (30-240 MHz) will allow us to map the structure of weak magnetic fields in the outer regions and halos of galaxies, in galaxy clusters and in the Milky Way. Polarization at higher frequencies (1-10 GHz), to be observed with the EVLA, MeerKAT, APERTIF and the SKA, will trace magnetic fields in the disks and central regions of galaxies in unprecedented detail. All-sky surveys of Faraday rotation measures towards a dense grid of polarized background sources with ASKAP and the SKA are dedicated to measure magnetic fields in distant intervening galaxies and clusters, and will be used to model the overall structure and strength of the magnetic field in the Milky Way.

  2. Some observational tests of a minimal galaxy formation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, J. D.

    2017-04-01

    Dark matter simulations can serve as a basis for creating galaxy histories via the galaxy-dark matter connection. Here, one such model by Becker is implemented with several variations on three different dark matter simulations. Stellar mass and star formation rates are assigned to all simulation subhaloes at all times, using subhalo mass gain to determine stellar mass gain. The observational properties of the resulting galaxy distributions are compared to each other and observations for a range of redshifts from 0 to 2. Although many of the galaxy distributions seem reasonable, there are noticeable differences as simulations, subhalo mass gain definitions or subhalo mass definitions are altered, suggesting that the model should change as these properties are varied. Agreement with observations may improve by including redshift dependence in the added-by-hand random contribution to star formation rate. There appears to be an excess of faint quiescent galaxies as well (perhaps due in part to differing definitions of quiescence). The ensemble of galaxy formation histories for these models tend to have more scatter around their average histories (for a fixed final stellar mass) than the two more predictive and elaborate semi-analytic models of Guo et al. and Henriques et al., and require more basis fluctuations (using principal component analysis) to capture 90 per cent of the scatter around their average histories. The codes to plot model predictions (in some cases alongside observational data) are publicly available to test other mock catalogues at https://github.com/jdcphysics/validation/. Information on how to use these codes is in Appendix A.

  3. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey (AGES) - HI Observations of the Isolated Galaxy UGC 2082

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taber, Timothy M.; Minchin, R.; AGES

    2011-01-01

    The Arecibo Galactic Environment Survey (AGES) is a 21-cm neutral hydrogen survey utilizing the Arecibo L-band Feed Array on the 305-m radio telescope at Arecibo Observatory. AGES uses a bandwidth of 100 MHz, allowing the detection of galaxies out to heliocentric velocities of 20000 km/s. Many different galaxy environments are being examined in AGES including isolated galaxies, where one objective is to find possible low surface brightness companion galaxies. The field surrounding isolated galaxy UGC 2082 was examined for this project, and 90 possible sources were found in the data cube. Of these, 46 are regarded as definite detections; the others will be re-observed with the L-Band Wide receiver at Arecibo Observatory in order to confirm their reality. Using optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and SuperCOSMOS the most likely optical counterparts have been chosen for each 21-cm source. 24 of the detected HI sources have no clear optical counterpart, many of these being dubious detections. A very faint companion galaxy to UGC 2082 was found at a heliocentric velocity of 590 km/s. This source is located approximately 66.5 arcminutes north of UGC 2082 (which has a measured heliocentric velocity of 713 km/s). Using the published Tully-Fisher distance to UGC 2082 of 14.7 Mpc, the projected physical separation of the two galaxies is 284.4 kpc. Another objective of AGES is to gain insight on the HI mass function and the large-scale structure of the universe. All of the detected sources in this data were plotted by right ascension or declination versus heliocentric velocity. These plots showed noticeable structure at both 5500 km/s and 11000 km/s. The Arecibo Observatory is part of the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center, which is operated by Cornell University under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  4. IUE observations of luminous blue star associations in irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, S. A.; Hunter, D. A.; Gallagher, J. S., III

    1987-01-01

    Two regions of recent star formation in blue irregular galaxies were observed with the IUE in the short wavelength, low dispersion mode. The spectra indicate that the massive star content is similar in these regions and is best fit by massive stars formed in a burst and now approximately 2.5 to 3.0 million years old.

  5. Radio-continuum observations of Sersic-Pastoriza galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, G. J.; Saikia, D. J.; Pedlar, A.; Axon, D. J.

    1989-07-01

    Preliminary results of radio continuum observations of selected Sersic-Pastoriza galaxies are presented. Subjects reported are their radio properties at 6 and 20 cm, estimates of linear polarization and spectral indices and a discussion of possible relationships between nuclear morphology and radio luminosity.

  6. HERSCHEL SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF LITTLE THINGS DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cigan, Phil; Young, Lisa; Cormier, Diane; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Madden, Suzanne; Brinks, Elias; Elmegreen, Bruce; Schruba, Andreas; Heesen, Volker; Collaboration: LITTLE THINGS Team

    2016-01-15

    We present far-infrared (FIR) spectral line observations of five galaxies from the Little Things sample: DDO 69, DDO 70, DDO 75, DDO 155, and WLM. While most studies of dwarfs focus on bright systems or starbursts due to observational constraints, our data extend the observed parameter space into the regime of low surface brightness dwarf galaxies with low metallicities and moderate star formation rates. Our targets were observed with Herschel at the [C ii] 158 μm, [O i] 63 μm, [O iii] 88 μm, and [N ii] 122 μm emission lines using the PACS Spectrometer. These high-resolution maps allow us for the first time to study the FIR properties of these systems on the scales of larger star-forming complexes. The spatial resolution in our maps, in combination with star formation tracers, allows us to identify separate photodissociation regions (PDRs) in some of the regions we observed. Our systems have widespread [C ii] emission that is bright relative to continuum, averaging near 0.5% of the total infrared (TIR) budget—higher than in solar-metallicity galaxies of other types. [N ii] is weak, suggesting that the [C ii] emission in our galaxies comes mostly from PDRs instead of the diffuse ionized interstellar medium (ISM). These systems exhibit efficient cooling at low dust temperatures, as shown by ([O i]+[C ii])/TIR in relation to 60 μm/100 μm, and low [O i]/[C ii] ratios which indicate that [C ii] is the dominant coolant of the ISM. We observe [O iii]/[C ii] ratios in our galaxies that are lower than those published for other dwarfs, but similar to levels noted in spirals.

  7. New Galaxies From Old? VLA Observations Strengthen the Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-01-01

    Astronomers using the Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope have found some of the best evidence to date that small, new galaxies can form from material pulled out of older galaxies. The new observations seriously weaken models of galactic evolution that attempt to explain the various types of galaxies seen in the universe as the result of different, but independent, processes. Steve Gottesman of the University of Florida in Gainesville, Tim Hawarden of the Joint Astronomy Center in Hilo, Hawaii, Caroline Simpson of Florida International University in Miami and Benjamin Malphrus of Morehead State University in Morehead, Kentucky, presented the results today to the American Astronomical Society meeting in San Antonio, TX. The astronomers used the VLA, a facility of the National Science Foundation, to study a galaxy system some 180 million light-years distant in the constellation Centaurus called NGC 5291. NGC 5291 is a peculiar spiral galaxy that appears to be interacting with a nearby object called the Seashell. The VLA observations show a large, elongated cloud of neutral hydrogen gas surrounding NGC 5291 and the Seashell. Within that gas cloud there are several concentrations. These mostly coincide with faint "knots" which were first seen on optical photographs taken twenty years ago with the UK Schmidt Telescope in Australia for the ESO/SRC Southern Sky Survey. In a detailed study at that time, using the 4-meter Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) and the 65m Parkes radio telescope, the knots were shown to be giant star-forming regions and the system was found to contain an extremely large cloud of gas. Though details were lacking then, astronomers suggested that the larger knots would turn out to be galaxies either in the process of formation or recently formed from the material of the parent system. Subsequently, similar suggestions were made about concentrations of material in the "tidal tails" ejected by galactic collisions elsewhere in the sky, but it was not

  8. A homogeneous sample of binary galaxies: Basic observational properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.

    1990-01-01

    A survey of optical characteristics for 585 binary systems, satisfying a condition of apparent isolation on the sky, is presented. Influences of various selection effects distorting the average parameters of the sample are noted. The pair components display mutual similarity over all the global properties: luminosity, diameter, morphological type, mass-to-luminosity ratio, angular momentum etc., which is not due only to selection effects. The observed correlations must be caused by common origin of pair members. Some features (nuclear activity, color index) could acquire similarity during synchronous evolution of double galaxies. Despite the observed isolation, the sample of double systems is seriously contaminated by accidental pairs, and also by members of groups and clusters. After removing false pairs estimates of orbital mass-to-luminosity ratio range from 0 to 30 f(solar), with the mean value (7.8 plus or minus 0.7) f(solar). Binary galaxies possess nearly circular orbits with a typical eccentrity e = 0.25, probably resulting from evolutionary selection driven by component mergers under dynamical friction. The double-galaxy population with space abundance 0.12 plus or minus 0.02 and characteristic merger timescale 0.2 H(exp -1) may significantly influence the rate of dynamical evolution of galaxies.

  9. Iron line profiles and BH spin in deep Suzaku observations of Seyfert 1 AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, A. R.; Reeves, J. N.; Lobban, A. P.; Porquet, D.; Markowitz, A. G.

    2012-03-01

    We present a broad-band analysis of deep Suzaku observations of nearby Seyfert 1 AGN: Fairall 9, MCG-6-30-15, NGC 3516, NGC 3783 and NGC 4051. The use of deep observations (exposures > 200 ks) with high S/N allows the complex spectra of these objects to be examined in full, taking into account features such as the soft excess, reflection continuum and complex absorption components. After a self-consistent modelling of the broad-band data (0.6-100.0 keV, also making use of BAT data from Swift), the subtle curvature which may be introduced as a consequence of warm absorbers has a measured affect upon the spectrum at energies > 3 keV and the FeK region. Forming a model (including absorption) of these AGN allows the true extent to which broadened diskline emission is present to be examined and as a result the measurement of accretion disc and black hole parameters which are consistent over the full 0.6-100.0 keV energy range.

  10. An observational study of quasar host galaxies, radio galaxies, and lyman alpha emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wold, Isak George Bayard

    In this thesis I provide observational constraints on quasar host galaxies, radio galaxies, and Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs). I develop and implement a method to provide stellar age constraints for the host galaxies of nearby (z<0.3) quasars. The observational strategy is to spectroscopically observe quasar host galaxies offset from the bright central point source to maximize the signal-to-noise of the stellar light. The central quasar is also spectroscopically observed, so that any nuclear light scattered into our off-axis spectrum can be efficiently modeled and subtracted. The reliability of my technique is tested via a Monte-Carlo routine in which the correspondence between synthetic spectra with known parameters and the model output is determined. Application of this model to a preliminary sample of 10 objects is presented and compared to previous studies. I present 1.4 GHz catalogs for the cluster fields A370 and A2390 observed with the Very Large Array. These are two of the deepest radio images of cluster fields ever taken. I construct differential number counts for each field and find results consistent with previous studies. I emphasize the need to account for cosmic variance. These high resolution, ultra-deep radio catalogs will be vital to future multiwavelength studies. Finally, I apply a newly developed search method to all of the deep GALEX grism fields, which correspond to some of the most intensively studied regions in the sky. My work provides the first large sample of z=0.67-1.16 LAEs (N=60) that can be used to investigate the physical properties of these galaxies. I catalog the candidate z=1 LAE samples in each field and give optical redshifts from both archival and newly obtained observations. With X-ray, UV, and optical data, I determine the false detection rate (cases where the emission line is either not confirmed or is not Lya) and the AGN contamination rate of my sample. With the remaining LAEs, I compute the LAE galaxy luminosity function

  11. Directly Observing the Galaxies Likely Responsible for Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livermore, R. C.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Lotz, J. M.

    2017-02-01

    We report a new analysis of the Hubble Frontier Fields clusters Abell 2744 and MACS 0416 using wavelet decomposition to remove the cluster light, enabling the detection of highly magnified (>50×) galaxies a factor of 10× fainter in luminosity than previous studies. We find 167 galaxies at z≳ 6, and with this sample we are able to characterize the UV luminosity function to {M}{UV}=-12.5 at z∼ 6, ‑14 at z∼ 7, and ‑15 at z∼ 8. We find a steep faint-end slope (α < -2), and with our improved statistics at the faint end we reduce the fractional uncertainty on α to < 2 % at z∼ 6{--}7 and 4% at z∼ 8. We also investigate the systematic uncertainty due to the lens modeling by using every available lens model individually and comparing the results; this systematic fractional uncertainty on α is < 4 % at all redshifts. We now directly observe galaxies in the luminosity regime where some simulations predict a change in the faint-end slope of the luminosity function, yet our results provide statistically very strong evidence against any turnover in the luminosity range probed, more consistent with simulations in which stars form in lower-mass halos. Thus, we find strong support for the extension of the steep luminosity function to {M}{UV}=-13 at z> 6, consistent with the number of faint galaxies needed to reionize the universe under standard assumptions.

  12. Radio observations of nearby moderately luminous IRAS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-sheng; Su, Bu-mei

    Six nearby moderately luminous IRAS galaxies have been observed at two wavelengths with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Radio emission was detected in two of them, IRAS 20272-4738 and IRAS 23156-4238, and their parameters including flux, peak position, size and spectral index, obtained. These sources were confirmed with infrared, radio and optical data. Combining with previous results we discuss their emission characteristics.

  13. The TANGO Project: Thorough ANalysis of radio-Galaxies Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocaña Flaquer, Breezy; Leon Tanne, Stephane; Combes, Francoise; Lim, Jeremy

    2010-05-01

    We present a sample of radio galaxies selected only on the basis of radio continuum emission and we confirm that these galaxies have lower molecular gas mass than other elliptical galaxies with different selection criteria.

  14. FIR colours and SEDs of nearby galaxies observed with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, A.; Ciesla, L.; Buat, V.; Cortese, L.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Bock, J.; Bomans, D. J.; Bradford, M.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Chanial, P.; Charlot, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D.; Corbelli, E.; Cooray, A.; Cormier, D.; Dariush, A.; Davies, J.; de Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Dwek, E.; Eales, S.; Elbaz, D.; Fadda, D.; Fritz, J.; Galametz, M.; Galliano, F.; Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; Gavazzi, G.; Gear, W.; Giovanardi, C.; Glenn, J.; Gomez, H.; Griffin, M.; Grossi, M.; Hony, S.; Hughes, T. M.; Hunt, L.; Isaak, K.; Jones, A.; Levenson, L.; Lu, N.; Madden, S. C.; O'Halloran, B.; Okumura, K.; Oliver, S.; Page, M.; Panuzzo, P.; Papageorgiou, A.; Parkin, T.; Perez-Fournon, I.; Pierini, D.; Pohlen, M.; Rangwala, N.; Rigby, E.; Roussel, H.; Rykala, A.; Sabatini, S.; Sacchi, N.; Sauvage, M.; Schulz, B.; Schirm, M.; Smith, M. W. L.; Spinoglio, L.; Stevens, J.; Sundar, S.; Symeonidis, M.; Trichas, M.; Vaccari, M.; Verstappen, J.; Vigroux, L.; Vlahakis, C.; Wilson, C.; Wozniak, H.; Wright, G.; Xilouris, E. M.; Zeilinger, W.; Zibetti, S.

    2010-07-01

    We present infrared colours (in the 25-500 μm spectral range) and UV to radio continuum spectral energy distributions of a sample of 51 nearby galaxies observed with SPIRE on Herschel. The observed sample includes all morphological classes, from quiescent ellipticals to active starbursts. Active galaxies have warmer colour temperatures than normal spirals. In ellipticals hosting a radio galaxy, the far-infrared (FIR) emission is dominated by the synchrotron nuclear emission. The colour temperature of the cold dust is higher in quiescent E-S0a than in star-forming systems probably because of the different nature of their dust heating sources (evolved stellar populations, X-ray, fast electrons) and dust grain properties. In contrast to the colour temperature of the warm dust, the f350/f500 index sensitive to the cold dust decreases with star formation and increases with metallicity, suggesting an overabundance of cold dust or an emissivity parameter β < 2 in low metallicity, active systems. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by Principal Investigator consortia. It is open for proposals for observing time from the worldwide astronomical community.

  15. COMPARISONS OF COSMOLOGICAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC GALAXY CLUSTER SIMULATIONS TO RADIO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Hao; Li Hui; Collins, David C.; Govoni, Federica; Murgia, Matteo; Norman, Michael L.; Cen Renyue; Feretti, Luigina; Giovannini, Gabriele E-mail: hli@lanl.gov E-mail: mlnorman@ucsd.edu E-mail: matteo@oa-cagliari.inaf.it E-mail: lferetti@ira.inaf.it

    2012-11-01

    Radio observations of galaxy clusters show that there are {mu}G magnetic fields permeating the intracluster medium (ICM), but it is hard to accurately constrain the strength and structure of the magnetic fields without the help of advanced computer simulations. We present qualitative comparisons of synthetic Very Large Array observations of simulated galaxy clusters to radio observations of Faraday rotation measure (RM) and radio halos. The cluster formation is modeled using adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamic simulations with the assumption that the initial magnetic fields are injected into the ICM by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at high redshift. In addition to simulated clusters in Xu et al., we present a new simulation with magnetic field injections from multiple AGNs. We find that the cluster with multiple injection sources is magnetized to a similar level as in previous simulations with a single AGN. The RM profiles from simulated clusters, both |RM| and the dispersion of RM ({sigma}{sub RM}), are consistent at a first order with the radial distribution from observations. The correlations between the {sigma}{sub RM} and X-ray surface brightness from simulations are in a broad agreement with the observations, although there is an indication that the simulated clusters could be slightly overdense and less magnetized with respect to those in the observed sample. In addition, the simulated radio halos agree with the observed correlations between the radio power versus the cluster X-ray luminosity and between the radio power versus the radio halo size. These studies show that the cluster-wide magnetic fields that originate from AGNs and are then amplified by the ICM turbulence match observations of magnetic fields in galaxy clusters.

  16. Observations of CO in the Magellanic irregular galaxy NGC 55

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heithausen, Andreas; Dettmar, Ralf-Juergen

    1990-01-01

    The content of molecular gas in galaxies, mainly H2, is one of the key observations necessary for the understanding of star formation processes and history. As the CO molecule is the most widely distributed molecule after H2 and has easily observable mm lines, it is used as a tracer for the molecular gas. CO was detected towards the direction where the H alpha and 6 cm radio continuum emission is strongest (Hummel et al. 1986). Here, researchers present the Gaussian line parameters in tabular form. The distribution of CO corresponds well with the intense HI cloud near the bar of NGC 55. The extent of the CO cloud is about 975 pc perpendicular to the major axis. As the radio continuum and the H alpha emission also peaks in this region, it is most probably associated with the star forming region in NGC 55. Assuming that the molecular gas is in virial equilibrium, researchers derive a mass of about 8 times 10(exp 7) solar magnitude. The molecular mass found indicates that the conversion factor for the molecular mass in Irr galaxies as inferred from CO line emission is indeed higher by up to a factor of 20 compared to the canonical value for the Galaxy.

  17. Observations of CO in the Magellanic irregular galaxy NGC 55

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heithausen, Andreas; Dettmar, Ralf-Juergen

    1990-07-01

    The content of molecular gas in galaxies, mainly H2, is one of the key observations necessary for the understanding of star formation processes and history. As the CO molecule is the most widely distributed molecule after H2 and has easily observable mm lines, it is used as a tracer for the molecular gas. CO was detected towards the direction where the H alpha and 6 cm radio continuum emission is strongest (Hummel et al. 1986). Here, researchers present the Gaussian line parameters in tabular form. The distribution of CO corresponds well with the intense HI cloud near the bar of NGC 55. The extent of the CO cloud is about 975 pc perpendicular to the major axis. As the radio continuum and the H alpha emission also peaks in this region, it is most probably associated with the star forming region in NGC 55. Assuming that the molecular gas is in virial equilibrium, researchers derive a mass of about 8 times 107 solar magnitude. The molecular mass found indicates that the conversion factor for the molecular mass in Irr galaxies as inferred from CO line emission is indeed higher by up to a factor of 20 compared to the canonical value for the Galaxy.

  18. H I OBSERVATIONS OF FIVE GROUPS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Freeland, E.; Wilcots, E.; Stilp, A.

    2009-07-15

    We present the results of H I observations of five groups of galaxies spanning a range of velocity dispersion and spiral fraction (brightest optical group member in parenthesis): NGC 7582 (NGC 7552), USGC U207 (NGC 2759), USGC U070 (NGC 664), USGC U412 (NGC 3822), USGC U451 (NGC 4065). Neutral intragroup gas is detected in three of the five groups. We present the discovery of a previously uncataloged galaxy in the USGC U070 group at {alpha}(2000) = 01{sup h}45{sup m}27{sup s}, {delta}(2000) = +0436'19'', which we are designating FSW J014526.92+043619.1. We compile an H I mass function for the group environment and find that the faint-end slope is consistent with being flat.

  19. HST/WFPC2 Observations of Warm Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surace, Jason A.; Sanders, D. B.; Vacca, William D.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Mazzarella, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    We present new high-resolution B- and I-band images of a nearly complete sample of nine ``warm'' (f25/f60 > 0.2), ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIGs) obtained with the Wide Field Planetary Camera of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HST images clearly reveal the presence of tidal tails and other features associated with merging galaxies. All of the warm ULIGs show evidence of complex structures such as dust lanes and spiral features in their inner few kiloparsecs. Additionally, they show compact, blue ``knots'' of star formation (between 4 and 31 knots per object) that appear similar to those seen in more nearby merger systems. Spectral synthesis modeling is used to estimate mean upper age limits and masses: the median upper age limit for the knots in individual galaxies is ~3 × 108 yr (ranging from ~107 to 1 × 109 yr), and the range of knot masses is ~105-109 M⊙. We also argue that these starburst knots cannot be significant contributors to the extremely high bolometric luminosity of these galaxies. Additionally, each object contains one or two knots whose luminosity and color are implausible in terms of star formation; we identify these as putative active nuclei. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that warm ULIGs may represent a critical transition stage in the evolution of ULIGs into optical quasi-stellar objects. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  20. Observational tests of nonlocal gravity: Galaxy rotation curves and clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahvar, S.; Mashhoon, B.

    2014-05-01

    A classical nonlocal generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation has recently been developed via the introduction of a scalar causal "constitutive" kernel that must ultimately be determined from observational data. It turns out that the nonlocal aspect of gravity in this theory can simulate dark matter; indeed, in the Newtonian regime of nonlocal gravity, we recover the phenomenological Tohline-Kuhn approach to modified gravity. A simple generalization of the Kuhn kernel in the context of nonlocal general relativity leads to a two-parameter modified Newtonian force law that involves an additional repulsive Yukawa-type interaction. We determine the parameters of our nonlocal kernel by comparing the predictions of the theory with observational data regarding the rotation curves of spiral galaxies. The best-fitting stellar mass-to-light ratio turns out to be in agreement with astrophysical models; moreover, our results are consistent with the Tully-Fisher relation for spiral galaxies. Light deflection in nonlocal gravity is consistent with general relativity at solar-system scales, while beyond galactic scales, an enhanced deflection angle is predicted that is compatible with lensing by the effective "dark matter." Furthermore, we extend our results to the internal dynamics of rich clusters of galaxies and show that the dynamical mass of the cluster obtained from nonlocal gravity is consistent with the measured baryonic mass.

  1. New water and remote galaxies complete ISO's observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    to deduce the presence of diverse materials in interstellar space, in the surroundings of stars, and in other galaxies. As previously reported, ISO has identified stony materials, tarry compounds of carbon, and vapours and ices like water and carbon monoxide. Together they give the first clear picture of how Mother Nature prepares, from elements manufactured in stars, the ingredients needed for planets and for life itself. Particularly striking for the human imagination are ISO's repeated discoveries of water in the deserts of space. They encourage expectations of life elsewhere in the Universe. Water has turned up around dying stars, newborn stars, in the general interstellar medium, in the atmospheres of the outer planets and in other galaxies too. A link to the Earth's oceans and the water we live by comes in the water- ice long known to be a major ingredient of comets, which are relics from the era of planet-building. A further link to the investigation of the origin of life is the apparent detection of water vapour in the mysterious atmosphere of Saturn's largest moon, Titan. A preliminary announcement comes from an international team headed by Athena Coustenis of Paris Observatory and Alberto Salama of the ISO Science Operations Center at Villafranca. The team used ISO's Short Wavelength Spectrometer during several hours of observations last December, when Titan was at its farthest from Saturn as seen by ISO. Emissions at wavelengths of 39 and 44 microns showed up, as an expected signature of water vapour. The news will excite the scientists involved in ESA's probe Huygens, launched last year aboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft. It will parachute into Titan's atmosphere to see what the chemistry of the Earth may have been like before life began. "Water vapour makes Titan much richer," comments Athena Coustenis. "We knew there was carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide in Titan's atmosphere, so we expected water vapour too. Now that we believe we've found it, we can

  2. Galaxy Populations and Evolution in Clusters IV Deep H 1 Observations of Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conselice, Christopher J.; ONeil, Karen; Gallagher, John S.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present deep Arecibo H I and WIYN optical observations of Virgo Cluster dwarf elliptical galaxies. Based on this data we argue that a significant fraction of low-mass galaxies in the Virgo Cluster recently underwent evolution. Our new observations consist of H I 21 cm line observations for 22 classified dE galaxies with optical radial velocities consistent with membership in the Virgo Cluster. Cluster members VCC 390 and VCC 1713 are detected with H 1 masses M H1= 6 x 10 sup 7 and 8 x 10 sup 7 M , respectively, while MH I values in the remaining 20 dE galaxies have upper limits as low as about 5 x 1O sup 5 M. We combine our results with those for 26 other Virgo Cluster dE galaxies with H 1 observations in the literature, seven of which have H I detection claims.

  3. Evidence of Spin and Energy Extraction in a Galactic Black Hole Candidate: The XMM-NEWTON/EPIC SPECTRUM of XTE 11650-500

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. M.; Fabian, A. C.; Wunands, R.; Reynolds, C. S.; Ehle, M.; Freyberg, M. J.; VanDerKlis, M.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Sanchez-Fernandez, C.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    2002-01-01

    We observed the Galactic black hole candidate XTE J1650-500 early in its fall of 2001 outburst with the XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging pn Camera (EPIC-pn). The observed spectrum is consistent with the source having been in the very high state. We h d a broad, skewed Fe Kar emission line that suggests the primary in this system may be a Kerr black hole and that indicates a steep disk emissivity profile that is hard to explain in terms of a standard accretion disk model. These results are quantitatively and qualitatively similar to those from an XMM-Newton observation of the Seyfert galaxy MCG -6-30-15. The steep emissivity in MCG -6-30-15 may be explained by the extraction and dissipation of rotational energy from a black hole with nearly maximal angular momentum or from material in the plunging region via magnetic connections to the inner accretion disk. If this process is at work in both sources, an exotic but fundamental general relativistic prediction may be confirmed across a factor of l0(exp 6) in black hole mass. We discuss these results in terms of the accretion flow geometry in stellar-mass black holes and the variety of enigmatic phenomena often observed in the very high state.

  4. WFPC2 Observations of the URSA Minor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mighell, Kenneth J.; Burke, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    We present our analysis of archival Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) observations in F555W (approximately V) and F814W (approximately I) of the central region of the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The V versus V - I color-magnitude diagram features a sparsely populated blue horizontal branch, a steep thin red giant branch, and a narrow subgiant branch. The main sequence reaches approximately 2 magnitudes below the main-sequence turnoff (V(sup UMi, sub TO) approximately equals 23.27 +/- 0.11 mag) of the median stellar population. We compare the fiducial sequence of the Galactic globular cluster M92 (NGC 6341). The excellent match between Ursa Minor and M92 confirms that the median stellar population of the UMi dSph galaxy is metal poor ([Fe/H](sub UMi) approximately equals [Fe/H](sub M92) approximately equals -2.2 dex) and ancient (age(sub UMi)approximately equalsage(sub M92) approximately equals 14 Gyr). The B - V reddening and the absorption in V are estimated to be E(B - V) = 0.03 +/- 0.01 mag and A(sup UMi, sub V) = 0.09 +/- 0.03 mag. A new estimate of the distance modulus of Ursa Minor, (m - M)(sup UMi, sub 0) = 19.18 +/- 0.12 mag, has been derived based on fiducial-sequence fitting M92 [DELTA.V(sub UMi - M92) = 4.60 +/- 0.03 mag and DELTA(V - I)(sub UMi - M92) = 0.010 +/- 0.005 mag] and the adoption of the apparent V distance modulus for M92 of (m - M)(sup M92, sub V) = 14.67 +/- 0.08 mag (Pont et al. 1998, A&A, 329, 87). The Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy is then at a distance of 69 +/- 4 kpc from the Sun. These HST observations indicate that Ursa Minor has had a very simple star formation history consisting mainly of a single major burst of star formation about 14 Gyr ago which lasted approximately < 2 Gyr. While we may have missed minor younger stellar populations due to the small field-of-view of the WFPC2 instrument, these observations clearly show that most of the stars in the central region Ursa Minor dwarf

  5. 1 Mpc giant radio galaxy IC 711 - 3 km Westerbork observations at 92 cm

    SciTech Connect

    Vallee, J.P.; Strom, R.G.

    1988-05-01

    New Westerbork obsevations at 92 cm of the galaxy IC 711 show a radio trail that extends 1 Mpc long, much farther out than previously observed at shorter wavelengths. These new observations confirm IC 711 as the longest head-tail galaxy known, and move IC 711 to the fifth rank among galaxies with the largest radio extension from an optical galaxy nucleus (after the classical double sources 3C 236, 3C 326, HB 13, and MSH 05-22). 20 references.

  6. Deep Radio Observations of the Toothbrush Galaxy Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Jones, C.; Forman, W. R.; Röttgering, H.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; de Gasperin, F.; Bonafede, A.; Pizzo, R.; Ferrari, C.; Orrù, E.; Ogrean, G. A.; LOFAR Busyweek Team; surveys KSP, LOFAR

    2014-01-01

    We present LOFAR and JVLA radio observations of the Toothbrush galaxy cluster. The Toothbrush cluster hosts diffuse 2 Mpc extended radio emission in the form of a radio relic and halo. XMM-Newton X-ray observations show that the cluster is undergoing a major merger event. Both the radio relic and halo are likely related to this ongoing merger. Radio relics are proposed to be direct tracers of shock waves in the intracluster medium. The XMM observations indeed reveal a shock, but there is a puzzling 200 kpc spatial offset between the shock position and relic. Our deep LOFAR and JVLA observations allow a detailed spectral study to test the shock origin of the relic and underlying particle acceleration mechanisms. Finally, the LOFAR observations highlight the science that could be obtained from a deep low-frequency all-sky survey.

  7. Multimolecule ALMA observations toward the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 1097

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, S.; Kohno, K.; Izumi, T.; Krips, M.; Meier, D. S.; Aladro, R.; Matsushita, S.; Takano, S.; Turner, J. L.; Espada, D.; Nakajima, T.; Terashima, Y.; Fathi, K.; Hsieh, P.-Y.; Imanishi, M.; Lundgren, A.; Nakai, N.; Schinnerer, E.; Sheth, K.; Wiklind, T.

    2015-01-01

    Context. The nearby Sy 1 galaxy NGC 1097 represents an ideal laboratory for exploring the molecular chemistry in the surroundings of an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Aims: Exploring the distribution of different molecular species allows us to understand the physical processes affecting the interstellar medium both in the AGN vicinity and in the outer star forming molecular ring. Methods: We carried out 3 mm ALMA observations that include seven different molecular species, namely HCN, HCO+, CCH, CS, HNCO, SiO, HC3N, and SO, as well as the 13C isotopologues of the first two. Spectra were extracted from selected positions and all species were imaged over the central 2 kpc (~30'') of the galaxy at a resolution of ~2.2'' × 1.5'' (150 pc × 100 pc). Results: HCO+ and CS appear to be slightly enhanced in the star forming ring. CCH shows the largest variations across NGC 1097 and is suggested to be a good tracer of both obscured and early stage star formation. HNCO, SiO, and HC3N are significantly enhanced in the inner circumnuclear disk surrounding the AGN. Conclusions: Differences in the molecular abundances are observed between the star forming ring and the inner circumnuclear disk. We conclude that the HCN/HCO+ and HCN/CS differences observed between AGN-dominated and starburst (SB) galaxies are not due to a HCN enhancement due to X-rays, but rather this enhancement is produced by shocked material at distances of 200 pc from the AGN. Additionally, we claim that lower HCN/CS is a combination of a small underabundance of CS in AGNs, together with excitation effects, where a high density gas component (~106 cm-3) may be more prominent in SB galaxies. However, the most promising are the differences found among the dense gas tracers that, at our modest spatial resolution, seem to outline the physical structure of the molecular disk around the AGN. In this picture, HNCO probes the well-shielded gas in the disk, surrounding the dense material moderately exposed to the X

  8. Spectroscopic observations of southern nearby galaxies. I. NGC 2442

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaja, E.; Agüero, E.; Paolantonio, S.

    1999-04-01

    The galaxy NGC 2442 was observed with a REOSC spectrograph, installed in the 2.15 m CASLEO telescope, in order to derive galactic parameters from the observed optical lines and to compare them with the results of radioastronomical observations made in the continuum, at 843 MHz, with the MOST and in the CO lines with the SEST telescope. Recent publications allowed us to extend the comparison to results from interferometric observations of Hα and H I 21 cm lines and of the continuum at 1415 MHz. The long slit observations were made placing the 5farcm 8 slit at six different positions on the optical image of the galaxy. The emission line intensity ratios at the nuclear region indicate that NGC 2442 is a LINER. The electron temperature and volume density are Te ~ 14 000 K and Ne ~ 530 cm(-3) , respectively. In contrast, a spectrum of a region 87arcsec to the NE shows the typical characteristics of a H Ii region. In this case Te ~ 6,500 K and Ne ~ 10 cm(-3) . Good correlations between the distributions of intensities, velocity fields and rotation curves have been found for the optical and radio lines. It is shown that the three intensity peaks along the line at PA = 40degr were not resolved by the observations at radio frequencies. The steep central rotation curve seen in CO has been confirmed and improved showing the existence of a disc or a ring, with a radius of 12.5 arcsec, rotating at 216/sin(i) km s(-1). Two velocity components in three optical spectra obtained in the nuclear region, have been related to two small Hα regions close to the nucleus and to the central ring. Asymmetries in the distributions of the emitting sources and irregularities in their velocity fields indicate the need of modelling the galaxy before any dynamical study is attempted. Based on observations made in the Complejo Astronomico El Leoncito, operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas de la Republica Argentina and the National

  9. Further radio observations of IRAS extreme infrared galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonucci, R. R. J.; Olszewski, E. W.

    1986-01-01

    Aaronson and Olszewski (1984) have identified five IRAS infrared sources, previously considered to be blank fields, with faint galaxies. The authors reported previously the results of their VLA D-array observations at 6 cm (Antonucci and Olszewski, 1985), which resulted in detections of all objects at the mJy level. The sources were unresolved by the ≡16 arcsec beam. The present paper reports on B-array observations at 6 and 20 cm, made in order to determine or limit the source angular sizes, and to measure the spectral indices. The source 0358+223 has an angular size of ≡3 arcsec at 20 cm, but no redshift is available for this object; also 0404+101 is marginally resolved at 20 cm. The other sources are unresolved by the ≡1.1 arcsec resolution deep 6 cm maps, implying linear sizes <2 kpc. The spectra are steep, indicating that the radiation mechanism is optically thin synchrotron emission.

  10. Constraining Galaxy Evolution Using Observed UV-Optical Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sally

    2007-01-01

    Our understanding of galaxy evolution depends on model spectra of stellar populations, and the models are only as good as the observed spectra and stellar parameters that go into them. We are therefore evaluating modem UV-optical model spectra using Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) as the reference standard. The NGSL comprises intermediate-resolution (R is approximately 1000) STIS spectra of 378 stars having a wide range in metallicity and age. Unique features of the NGSL include its broad wavelength coverage (1,800-10,100 A) and high-S/N, absolute spectrophotometry. We will report on a systematic comparison of model and observed UV-blue spectra, describe where on the HR diagram significant differences occur, and comment on current approaches to correct the models for these differences.

  11. Chandra Observations of Dying Radio Sources in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murgia, M.; Markevitch, M.; Govoni, F.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Mack, K.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The dying radio sources represent a very interesting and largely unexplored stage of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution. They are considered to be very rare, and almost all of the few known ones were found in galaxy clusters. However, considering the small number detected so far, it has not been possible to draw any firm conclusions about their X-ray environment. Aims. We present X-ray observations performed with the Chandra satellite of the three galaxy clusters Abell 2276, ZwCl 1829.3+6912, and RX J1852.1+5711, which harbor at their center a dying radio source with an ultra-steep spectrum that we recently discovered. Methods. We analyzed the physical properties of the X-ray emitting gas surrounding these elusive radio sources. We determined the global X-ray properties of the clusters, derived the azimuthally averaged profiles of metal abundance, gas temperature, density, and pressure. Furthermore, we estimated the total mass profiles. Results. The large-scale X-ray emission is regular and spherical, suggesting a relaxed state for these systems. Indeed, we found that the three clusters are also characterized by significant enhancements in the metal abundance and declining temperature profiles toward the central region. For all these reasons, we classified RX J1852.1+5711, Abell 2276, and ZwCl 1829.3+6912 as cool-core galaxy clusters. Conclusions. We calculated the non-thermal pressure of the radio lobes assuming that the radio sources are in the minimum energy condition. For all dying sources we found that this is on average about one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the external gas, as found for many other radio sources at the center of galaxy groups and clusters. We found marginal evidence for the presence of X-ray surface brightness depressions coincident with the fossil radio lobes of the dying sources in A2276 and ZwCl 1829.3+691. We estimated the outburst age and energy output for these two dying sources. The energy power from

  12. Chandra observations of dying radio sources in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, M.; Markevitch, M.; Govoni, F.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Mack, K.-H.

    2012-12-01

    Context. The dying radio sources represent a very interesting and largely unexplored stage of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution. They are considered to be very rare, and almost all of the few known ones were found in galaxy clusters. However, considering the small number detected so far, it has not been possible to draw any firm conclusions about their X-ray environment. Aims: We present X-ray observations performed with the Chandra satellite of the three galaxy clusters Abell 2276, ZwCl 1829.3+6912, and RX J1852.1+5711, which harbor at their center a dying radio source with an ultra-steep spectrum that we recently discovered. Methods: We analyzed the physical properties of the X-ray emitting gas surrounding these elusive radio sources. We determined the global X-ray properties of the clusters, derived the azimuthally averaged profiles of metal abundance, gas temperature, density, and pressure. Furthermore, we estimated the total mass profiles. Results: The large-scale X-ray emission is regular and spherical, suggesting a relaxed state for these systems. Indeed, we found that the three clusters are also characterized by significant enhancements in the metal abundance and declining temperature profiles toward the central region. For all these reasons, we classified RX J1852.1+5711, Abell 2276, and ZwCl 1829.3+6912 as cool-core galaxy clusters. Conclusions: We calculated the non-thermal pressure of the radio lobes assuming that the radio sources are in the minimum energy condition. For all dying sources we found that this is on average about one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the external gas, as found for many other radio sources at the center of galaxy groups and clusters. We found marginal evidence for the presence of X-ray surface brightness depressions coincident with the fossil radio lobes of the dying sources in A2276 and ZwCl 1829.3+691. We estimated the outburst age and energy output for these two dying sources. The energy power from

  13. THE ARECIBO GALAXY ENVIRONMENT SURVEY. III. OBSERVATIONS TOWARD THE GALAXY PAIR NGC 7332/7339 AND THE ISOLATED GALAXY NGC 1156

    SciTech Connect

    Minchin, R. F.; Momjian, E.; Auld, R.; Davies, J. I.; Smith, M. W. L.; Taylor, R.; Valls-Gabaud, D.; Van Driel, W.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Henning, P. A.; O'Neil, K. L.

    2010-10-15

    Two 5 deg{sup 2} regions around the NGC 7332/9 galaxy pair and the isolated galaxy NGC 1156 have been mapped in the 21 cm line of neutral hydrogen (H I) with the Arecibo L-band Feed Array out to a redshift of {approx}0.065 ({approx}20,000 km s{sup -1}) as part of the Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey. One of the aims of this survey is to investigate the environment of galaxies by identifying dwarf companions and interaction remnants; both of these areas provide the potential for such discoveries. The neutral hydrogen observations were complemented by optical and radio follow-up observations with a number of telescopes. A total of 87 galaxies were found, of which 39 (45%) were previously cataloged and 15 (17%) have prior redshifts. Two dwarf galaxies have been discovered in the NGC 7332 group and a single dwarf galaxy in the vicinity of NGC 1156. A parallel optical search of the area revealed one further possible dwarf galaxy near NGC 7332.

  14. High-energy gamma-ray observations of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1994-01-01

    During the period from 1992 May to early 1992 November, the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory obtained high-energy gamma-ray data for most of the sky. A total of 18 active galaxies have been seen with high certainty, and it is expected that more will be found in the data when a more thorough analysis is complete. All of those that have been seen are radio-loud quasars or BL Lacertae objects; most have already been identified as blazars. No Seyfert galaxies have been found thus far. If the spectra are represented as a power law in energy, spectral slopes ranging from approximately -1.7 to -2.4 are found. A wide range of z-values exits in the observed sample, eight having values in excess of 1.0. Time variations have been seen, with the timescale for a significant change being as short as days in at least one case. These results imply the existence of very large numbers of relativistic particles, probably close to the central object. Although a large extrapolation is required, their existence also suggests that these active galactic nuclei may be the source of the extragalactic cosmic rays.

  15. Far-Infrared Spectral Observations of the Galaxy by COBE

    SciTech Connect

    Reach, W.T.; Dwek, E.; Fixsen, D.J.; Hewagama, T.; Mather, J.C.; Shafer, R.A.; Banday, A.J.; Bennett, C.L.; Cheng, E.S.; Eplee Jr., R.E.,; Leisawi tz, D.; Lubin, P.M.; Read, S.M.; Rosen, L.P.; Shuman, F.G.D.; Smoot, G.F.; Sodroski, T.J.; Wright, E.L.

    1994-10-27

    We derive Galactic continuum spectra from 5-96 cm(-1) fromCOBE/FIRAS observations. The spectra are dominated by warm dust emission,which may be fitted with a single temperature in the range 16-21 K (fornu(2) emissivity) along each line of sight. Dust heated by the attenuatedradiation field in molecular clouds gives rise tointermediate-temperature (10-14 K) emission in the inner Galaxy only. Awidespread, very cold component (4-7 K) with optical depth that isspatially correlated with the warm component is also detected. The coldcomponent is unlikely to be due to very cold dust shielded from starlightbecause it is present at high latitude. We consider hypotheses that thecold component is due to enhanced submillimeter emissivity of the dustthat gives rise to the warm component, or that it may be due to verysmall, large, or fractal particles. Lack of substantial power above theemission from warm dust places strong constraints on the amount of coldgas in the Galaxy. The microwave sky brightness due to interstellar dustis dominated by the cold component, and its angular variation could limitour ability to discern primordial fluctuations in the cosmic microwavebackground radiation.

  16. Observational and Numerical Diagnostics of Galaxy Cluster Outer Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, D.; Vazza, F.; Ettori, S.; Molendi, S.; Nagai, D.; Lau, E.; Roncarelli, M.; Rossetti, M.; Snowden, S. L.; Gastaldello, F.

    2011-01-01

    Aims. We present the analysis of a local (z = 0.04 - 0.2) sample of 31 galaxy clusters with the aim of measuring the density of the X-ray emitting gas in cluster outskirts. We compare our results with numerical simulations to set constraints on the azimuthal symmetry and gas clumping in the outer regions of galaxy clusters. Methods. We exploit the large field-of-view and low instrumental background of ROSAT/PSPC to trace the density of the intracluster gas out to the virial radius. We perform a stacking of the density profiles to detect a signal beyond r(sub 200) and measure the typical density and scatter in cluster outskirts. We also compute the azimuthal scatter of the profiles with respect to the mean value to look for deviations from spherical symmetry. Finally, we compare our average density and scatter profiles with the results of numerical simulations. Results. As opposed to several recent results, we observe a steepening of the density profiles beyond approximately 0.3r(sub 500). Comparing our density profiles with simulations, we find that non-radiative runs predict too steep density profiles, whereas runs including additional physics and/or gas clumping are in better agreement with the observed gas distribution. We note a systematic difference between cool-core and non-cool core clusters beyond approximately 0.3r(sub 200), which we explain by a different distribution of the gas in the two classes. Beyond approximately r(sub 500), galaxy clusters deviate significantly from spherical symmetry, with only little differences between relaxed and disturbed systems. We find good agreement between the observed and predicted scatter profiles, but only when the 1% densest clumps are filtered out in the simulations. Conclusions. The general trend of steepening density around the virial radius indicates that the shallow density profiles found in several recent works were probably obtained along particular directions (e.g., filaments) and are not representative of the

  17. SATELLITES AROUND MASSIVE GALAXIES SINCE z {approx} 2: CONFRONTING THE MILLENNIUM SIMULATION WITH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Quilis, Vicent; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2012-06-20

    Minor merging has been postulated as the most likely evolutionary path to produce the increase in size and mass observed in the massive galaxies since z {approx} 2. In this Letter, we directly test this hypothesis, comparing the population of satellites around massive galaxies in cosmological simulations versus the observations. We use state-of-the-art, publically available, Millennium I and II simulations, and the associated semi-analytical galaxy catalogs to explore the time evolution of the fraction of massive galaxies that have satellites, the number of satellites per galaxy, the projected distance at which the satellites locate from the host galaxy, and the mass ratio between the host galaxies and their satellites. The three virtual galaxy catalogs considered here overproduce the fraction of galaxies with satellites by a factor ranging between 1.5 and 6 depending on the epoch, whereas the mean projected distance and ratio of the satellite mass over host mass are in closer agreement with data. The larger pull of satellites in the semi-analytical samples could suggest that the size evolution found in previous hydrodynamical simulations is an artifact due to the larger number of infalling satellites compared to the real universe. These results advise us to revise the physical ingredients implemented in the semi-analytical models in order to reconcile the observed and computed fraction of galaxies with satellites, and eventually, it would leave some room for other mechanisms explaining the galaxy size growth not related to the minor merging.

  18. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey: Observations towards the NGC 7817/7798 Galaxy Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Amanda; Robert Minchin

    2016-01-01

    The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey (AGES) examines the environment of neutral hydrogen gas in the interstellar medium. AGES uses the 305m Arecibo Radio Telescope and the Arecibo L-Band Feed Array to create a deep field neutral hydrogen survey which we used to detect galaxies in an area five square degrees around the galaxy pair NGC 7817/7798. By finding and investigating hydrogen rich galaxies we hope to gain a better understanding of how the environment affects galaxy evolution. H1 line profiles were made for the detected H1 emission and ten galaxies which had the characteristic double-horned feature were found. NGC 7798 was not detected, but NGC 7817 and the other galaxies were cross-identified in NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database as well as in Sloan Digital Sky Survey to obtain optical data. Out of the ten, two of the sources were uncatalogued. We analyzed the hydrogen spectra and aperture photometry to learn about the characteristics of these galaxies such as their heliocentric velocity, flux, and mass of the neutral hydrogen. Furthermore, we graphed the Tully-Fisher and the Baryonic Tully-Fisher of the ten sources and found that most followed the relation. One that is the biggest outlier is suspected be a galaxy cluster while other outliers may be caused by ram pressure stripping deforming the galaxy.

  19. Near-infrared observations of IRAS minisurvey galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carico, David P.; Soifer, B. T.; Elias, J. H.; Matthews, K.; Neugebauer, G.; Beichman, C.; Persson, C. J.; Persson, S. E.

    1987-01-01

    Near infrared photometry at J, H, and K was obtained for 82 galaxies from the IRAS minisurvey. The near infrared colors of these galaxies cover a larger range in J-H and H-K than do normal field spiral galaxies, and evidence is presented of a tighter correlation between the near and far infrared emission in far infrared bright galaxies than exists between the far infrared and the visible emission. These results suggest the presence of dust in the far infrared bright galaxies, with hot dust emission contributing to the 2.2 micron emission, and extinction by dust affecting both the near infrared colors and the visible luminosities. In addition, there is some indication that the infrared emission in many of the minisurvey galaxies is coming from a strong nuclear component.

  20. Sufficient observables for large-scale structure in galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carron, J.; Szapudi, I.

    2014-03-01

    Beyond the linear regime, the power spectrum and higher order moments of the matter field no longer capture all cosmological information encoded in density fluctuations. While non-linear transforms have been proposed to extract this information lost to traditional methods, up to now, the way to generalize these techniques to discrete processes was unclear; ad hoc extensions had some success. We pointed out in Carron and Szapudi's paper that the logarithmic transform approximates extremely well the optimal `sufficient statistics', observables that extract all information from the (continuous) matter field. Building on these results, we generalize optimal transforms to discrete galaxy fields. We focus our calculations on the Poisson sampling of an underlying lognormal density field. We solve and test the one-point case in detail, and sketch out the sufficient observables for the multipoint case. Moreover, we present an accurate approximation to the sufficient observables in terms of the mean and spectrum of a non-linearly transformed field. We find that the corresponding optimal non-linear transformation is directly related to the maximum a posteriori Bayesian reconstruction of the underlying continuous field with a lognormal prior as put forward in the paper of Kitaura et al.. Thus, simple recipes for realizing the sufficient observables can be built on previously proposed algorithms that have been successfully implemented and tested in simulations.

  1. H I Imaging Observations of Superthin Galaxies. I. UGC 7321

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uson, Juan M.; Matthews, L. D.

    2003-05-01

    We have used the Very Large Array to image the isolated ``superthin'' galaxy UGC 7321 in the H I line with a spatial resolution of 16" and a spectral resolution of 24 kHz (5.2 km s-1). We have reached a sensitivity of (0.36-0.40) mJy beam-1 channel-1, which correspond to a column density of (8-9)×1018 atoms cm-2 (1 σ). UGC 7321 has a gas-rich disk, with MHI=(1.06+/-0.01)×109 d210 Msolar and MHI/LB=1.0 (d10 is the distance to UGC 7321 in units of 10 Mpc, the value adopted in this paper), and no detectable radio continuum emission (FCONT=0.41+/-0.25 mJy). The global H I distribution of UGC 7321 is rather symmetric and extends to ~1.5 times the optical radius (DHI=8.65‧+/-0.15‧ at nHI=3×1019 atoms cm-2). An ``integral sign'' warp is observed in the H I disk, commencing near the edge of the stellar distribution and twisting back toward the equatorial plane in the outermost regions. In addition, the position-velocity diagram suggests the presence of a bar or inner arm within ~40" from the center. The rotation curve of UGC 7321 is slowly rising; it reaches its asymptotic velocity of ~110 km s-1 at ~2.5‧ from the center (about 0.9 optical radii) and declines near the edge of the H I disk. The ratio of the inferred dynamical mass to the mass in gas and stars is ~12d-110, implying that UGC 7321 is a highly dark-matter-dominated galaxy.

  2. (Star)bursts of FIRE: observational signatures of bursty star formation in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparre, Martin; Hayward, Christopher C.; Feldmann, Robert; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Muratov, Alexander L.; Kereš, Dušan; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-04-01

    Galaxy formation models are now able to reproduce observed relations such as the relation between galaxies' star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses (M*) and the stellar-mass-halo-mass relation. We demonstrate that comparisons of the short-time-scale variability in galaxy SFRs with observational data provide an additional useful constraint on the physics of galaxy formation feedback. We apply SFR indicators with different sensitivity time-scales to galaxies from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) simulations. We find that the SFR-M* relation has a significantly greater scatter when the Hα-derived SFR is considered compared with when the far-ultraviolet (FUV)-based SFR is used. This difference is a direct consequence of bursty star formation because the FIRE galaxies exhibit order-of-magnitude SFR variations over time-scales of a few Myr. We show that the difference in the scatter between the simulated Hα- and FUV-derived SFR-M* relations at z = 2 is consistent with observational constraints. We also find that the Hα/FUV ratios predicted by the simulations at z = 0 are similar to those observed for local galaxies except for a population of low-mass (M* ≲ 109.5 M⊙) simulated galaxies with lower Hα/FUV ratios than observed. We suggest that future cosmological simulations should compare the Hα/FUV ratios of their galaxies with observations to constrain the feedback models employed.

  3. A Catalog of Galaxy Clusters Observed by XMM-Newton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Mushotzky, R. M.; Kuntz, K. D.; Davis, David S.

    2007-01-01

    Images and the radial profiles of the temperature, abundance, and brightness for 70 clusters of galaxies observed by XMM-Newton are presented along with a detailed discussion of the data reduction and analysis methods, including background modeling, which were used in the processing. Proper consideration of the various background components is vital to extend the reliable determination of cluster parameters to the largest possible cluster radii. The various components of the background including the quiescent particle background, cosmic diffuse emission, soft proton contamination, and solar wind charge exchange emission are discussed along with suggested means of their identification, filtering, and/or their modeling and subtraction. Every component is spectrally variable, sometimes significantly so, and all components except the cosmic background are temporally variable as well. The distributions of the events over the FOV vary between the components, and some distributions vary with energy. The scientific results from observations of low surface brightness objects and the diffuse background itself can be strongly affected by these background components and therefore great care should be taken in their consideration.

  4. Constraints on decaying dark matter from Fermi observations of nearby galaxies and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, Leanna; Profumo, Stefano; Jeltema, Tesla E. E-mail: tesla@ucolick.org

    2010-12-01

    We analyze the impact of Fermi gamma-ray observations (primarily non-detections) of selected nearby galaxies, including dwarf spheroidals, and of clusters of galaxies on decaying dark matter models. We show that the fact that galaxy clusters do not shine in gamma rays puts the most stringent limits available to-date on the lifetime of dark matter particles for a wide range of particle masses and decay final states. In particular, our results put strong constraints on the possibility of ascribing to decaying dark matter both the increasing positron fraction reported by PAMELA and the high-energy feature in the electron-positron spectrum measured by Fermi. Observations of nearby dwarf galaxies and of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) do not provide as strong limits as those from galaxy clusters, while still improving on previous constraints in some cases.

  5. Ultraviolet observations of galaxies with the FAUST experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deharveng, J.-M.; Sasseen, T. P.; Buat, V.; Bowyer, S.; Lampton, M.; Wu, X.

    1994-01-01

    We have used the set of point sources detected by the Far Ultraviolet Space Telescope (FAUST) instrument to identify galaxies and study the total galaxy flux in a 250 A wide band peaking at 1650 A. A sample of 144 galaxies has been obtained after cross-reference with the RC3 catalog, elimination of objects confused with stars and various corrections for the photometry. The UV-B color dispersion is found to increase while the galaxies get redder from late to early types. The irregular galaxies appear on average redder and the Sbc galaxies bluer than indicated by the spectral energy distributions currently used for the calculations of K-corrections. Various arguments lead us to make the assumption of a constant dust extinction within each galaxy. The UV flux per unit area decreases on average from late to early type spirals. We find a weak correlation between the UV and far infra-red emission while the infra-red to UV flux ratio gets lower when galaxies get bluer (as measured by the UV to B flux ratio). The UV flux per unit area correlates with the HI gas surface density and the total gas surface density when this quantity is available. The correlation with the molecular gas alone is weak. In the Virgo cluster, the UV flux per unit area does not decrease in direct proportion to the HI deficiency. Galaxy counts per square degree and per magnitude interval have been obtained at high-galactic latitudes. Combined with data at fainter magnitudes, they show a variation as a function of magnitude with a near-euclidean slope over a range of 8 magnitudes.

  6. The shape of dark matter haloes - I. H I observations of edge-on galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, S. P. C.; van der Kruit, P. C.; Allen, R. J.; Freeman, K. C.

    2017-01-01

    We present neutral hydrogen observations for a sample of eight nearby, late-type, edge-on galaxies. All of the galaxies have been well resolved in the radial direction, while six have also been well resolved in the vertical direction. We find that each of the galaxies has approximately the same maximum surface brightness temperature throughout its disc. We argue that self-absorption is the main cause of this phenomenon and that subsequent decompositions will require a treatment of this.

  7. LOFAR, VLA, and Chandra Observations of the Toothbrush Galaxy Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Weeren, R. J.; Brunetti, G.; Brüggen, M.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Ogrean, G. A.; Williams, W. L.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Dawson, W. A.; Forman, W. R.; de Gasperin, F.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Jones, C.; Miley, G. K.; Rafferty, D. A.; Rudnick, L.; Sabater, J.; Sarazin, C. L.; Shimwell, T. W.; Bonafede, A.; Best, P. N.; Bîrzan, L.; Cassano, R.; Chyży, K. T.; Croston, J. H.; Dijkema, T. J.; Enßlin, T.; Ferrari, C.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; Horellou, C.; Jarvis, M. J.; Kraft, R. P.; Mevius, M.; Intema, H. T.; Murray, S. S.; Orrú, E.; Pizzo, R.; Sridhar, S. S.; Simionescu, A.; Stroe, A.; van der Tol, S.; White, G. J.

    2016-02-01

    We present deep LOFAR observations between 120 and 181 MHz of the “Toothbrush” (RX J0603.3+4214), a cluster that contains one of the brightest radio relic sources known. Our LOFAR observations exploit a new and novel calibration scheme to probe 10 times deeper than any previous study in this relatively unexplored part of the spectrum. The LOFAR observations, when combined with VLA, GMRT, and Chandra X-ray data, provide new information about the nature of cluster merger shocks and their role in re-accelerating relativistic particles. We derive a spectral index of α =-0.8+/- 0.1 at the northern edge of the main radio relic, steepening toward the south to α ≈ -2. The spectral index of the radio halo is remarkably uniform (α =-1.16, with an intrinsic scatter of ≤slant 0.04). The observed radio relic spectral index gives a Mach number of { M }={2.8}-0.3+0.5, assuming diffusive shock acceleration. However, the gas density jump at the northern edge of the large radio relic implies a much weaker shock ({ M }≈ 1.2, with an upper limit of { M }≈ 1.5). The discrepancy between the Mach numbers calculated from the radio and X-rays can be explained if either (i) the relic traces a complex shock surface along the line of sight, or (ii) if the radio relic emission is produced by a re-accelerated population of fossil particles from a radio galaxy. Our results highlight the need for additional theoretical work and numerical simulations of particle acceleration and re-acceleration at cluster merger shocks.

  8. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ASYMMETRY ORIGIN OF GALAXIES IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS. I. OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Plauchu-Frayn, I.; Coziol, R. E-mail: rcoziol@astro.ugto.m

    2010-06-15

    This paper presents the first of two analyses about the influence of environment on the formation and evolution of galaxies observed in the nearby universe. For our study, we used three different samples representing different density environments: galaxies in Compact Groups (HCGs), Isolated Pairs of Galaxies (KPGs), and Isolated Galaxies (KIGs), which were taken as references. Usingboth characteristic isophotal parameters and evidence of asymmetries in the optical and the near-infrared, we are able to establish differences in the characteristics of galaxies with different morphologies in different environments, allowing us to better understand their different formation histories. In this first paper, we present the isophotal and asymmetry analyses of a sample of 214 galaxies in different environments observed in the optical (V and I images). For each galaxy, we have determined different characteristic isophotal parameters and V - I color profiles, as a function of semi-major axis, and performed a full asymmetry analysis in residual images using the V filter. Evidence of asymmetry in the optical is almost missing in the KIG sample and significantly more common in the KPG than in the HCG samples. Our isophotal analysis suggests that the stellar populations in the HCG galaxies are older and more dynamically relaxed than in the KPG. The HCG galaxies seem to be at a more advanced stage of interaction than the KPGs. One possible explanation is that these structures formed at different epochs: compact groups of galaxies would have formed before close pairs of galaxies, which only began interacting recently. However, similarities in the formation process of galaxies with same morphology suggest CGs and close pairs of galaxies share similar conditions; they are new structures forming relatively late in low-density environments.

  9. The observed peripheral growth of disc galaxies from z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Sachdeva, Sonali; Saha, Kanak; Singh, Harinder P.

    2017-03-01

    Using images from the Hubble Space Telescope and Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we have computed both parametric and non-parametric measures, and examined the evolution in size, concentration, stellar mass, effective stellar mass density and asymmetry for a sample of 600 disc galaxies from z ~ 1 till z ~ 0. We find that disc galaxies have gained more than 50 per cent of their present stellar mass over the last 8 Gyr. Also, the increase in disc size is found to be peripheral. While the average total (Petrosian) radius almost doubles from z ~ 1 to z ~ 0, the average effective (half-light) radius undergoes a marginal increase in comparison. This indicates that galaxies grow more substantially in their outskirts, and is consistent with the inside-out growth picture. The substantial increase in mass and size indicates that accretion of external material has been a dominant mode of galaxy growth, where the circumgalactic environment plays a significant role.

  10. MAGPHYS: a publicly available tool to interpret observed galaxy SEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Cunha, Elisabete; Charlot, Stéphane; Dunne, Loretta; Smith, Dan; Rowlands, Kate

    2012-08-01

    We present a simple, physically-motivated model to interpret consistently the emission from galaxies at ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelengths. We combine this model with a Bayesian method to obtain robust statistical constraints on key parameters describing the stellar content, star formation activity and dust content of galaxies. Our model is now publicly available via a user-friendly code package, MAGPHYS at www.iap.fr/magphys. We present an application of this model to interpret a sample of ~1400 local (z<0.5) galaxies from the H-ATLAS survey. We find that, for these galaxies, the diffuse interstellar medium, powered mainly by stars older than 10 Myr, accounts for about half the total infrared luminosity. We discuss the implications of this result to the use of star formation rate indicators based on total infrared luminosity.

  11. Observations of the impact of starbursts on the interstellar medium in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlowe, Amanda T.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Schommer, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies play a crucial role in our understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies, and the concept of supernova-driven mass outflows is a vital ingredient in theories of the structure and evolution of dwarf galaxies. Despite the theoretical importance of these outflows, there is a very limited amount of direct observational evidence for their existence. We have therefore begun a detailed multi-wave-band search for outflows in dwarf (M(sub B) greater than or = -18) galaxies with extensive recent or ongoing centrally concentrated star formation. We report the first results of this search in the present paper. Observations of the ionized gas in dwarf amorphous galaxies with centrally concentrated populations of massive stars provide evidence for the large-scale expansion of their expansion of their ionized interstellar media. Fabry-Perot H alpha images reveal the presence of kiloparsec-scale 'superbubbles' and filaments which tend to be oriented along the galaxy minor axis. These structures are comparable in size to the chracteristic optical sizes of the galaxies, and dominate the morphology of the galaxies at low surface brightness in H alpha. Since expanding structure of this size and velocity are not observed in all low-mass galaxies with recent or ongoing star formation, we suggest that we are witnessing transient events that likely have a relatively low 'duty cycle' in such galaxies. That is, we argue that the particular galaxies in the present paper have had significantly elevated star formation rates over the past 10(exp 7)-10(exp 8) yr (i.e., these are starburst or young poststarburst systems). This interpretation is consistent with the optical colors and emission-line properties of these galaxies.

  12. IUE and Einstein observations of the LINER galaxy NGC 4579

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichert, G. A.; Puchnarewicz, E. M.; Mason, K. O.

    1990-01-01

    Results of International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) and Einstein observations of the LINER galaxy NGC 4579 are reported. Spatial profiles of the long wavelength IUE emission show a two component structure, with an unresolved core superimposed on broader underlying emission. The core spectrum shows strong C II lambda 2326 and broad Mg II lambda 2800 emission, and perhaps emission due to blends of Fe II multiplets (2300 to 23600 angstrom). The short wavelength emission is spatially unresolved, and shows C II lambda 1335, C III lambda 1909 broad C IV lambda 1550 emission, and a broad feature at approximately 1360 angstrom which may be due to 0.1 lambda 1356. Contrary to previous reports no evidence for He II lambda 1640 is found in the spectrum. An unresolved x ray source is detected at the location of the nucleus; its spectrum is well fitted by a power law of energy slope alpha approximately -0.5. These results further support the idea that NGC 4579 may contain a dwarf Seyfert nucleus.

  13. Characterizing Clumpy Structure of z 2 Galaxies in HST Observations from CANDELS and Hydrodynamical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozena, Mark; Faber, S. M.; Primack, J. R.; Dekel, A.; Ceverino, D.; Koo, D. C.; Fumagalli, M.; Wuyts, S.; Rosario, D. J.; Lai, K.; Kocevski, D. D.; McGrath, E. J.; Trump, J. R.; CANDELS

    2011-01-01

    The first data from the HST Multi-Cycle Treasury CANDELS (Cosmic Assembly Near Infra-red Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey - candels.ucolick.org) are producing images of thousands of z 2 galaxies in observed optical (ACS) and NIR (WFC3) bands. We have developed a new visual classification scheme for z 2 galaxies which is motivated by the significant population of galaxies that are dominated by giant clumps in the HST images, and by the theoretical predictions for clumpy galaxies based on analytic studies and zoom-in hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. This classification method was developed using about a thousand z 2 galaxies in the GOODS-S Early Release Survey (ERS) region imaged with ACS and WFC3. The ERS data have been observed in a way similar to the CANDELS observations. I will also discuss the latest cosmologically motivated ART hydrodynamical simulations by Ceverino, Dekel, and Primack. We render these simulated z 2 galaxies to mimic our HST ACS and WFC3 images and visually classify their stellar structure to compare them with the galaxies observed in ERS. We have compared the effects of dust extinction due to the complex clumpy distribution of gas within these simulations. Comparing the visual classification of the HST observations with the simulations provides new clues to galaxy assembly.

  14. GALAXY SPIN ALIGNMENT IN FILAMENTS AND SHEETS: OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tempel, Elmo; Libeskind, Noam I. E-mail: nlibeskind@aip.de

    2013-10-01

    The properties of galaxies are known to be affected by their environment. One important question is how their angular momentum reflects the surrounding cosmic web. We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to investigate the spin axes of spiral and elliptical galaxies relative to their surrounding filament/sheet orientations. To detect filaments, a marked point process with interactions (the {sup B}isous model{sup )} is used. Sheets are found by detecting 'flattened' filaments. The minor axes of ellipticals are found to be preferentially perpendicular to hosting filaments. A weak correlation is found with sheets. These findings are consistent with the notion that elliptical galaxies formed via mergers, which predominantly occurred along the filaments. The spin axis of spiral galaxies is found to align with the host filament, with no correlation between spiral spin and sheet normal. When examined as a function of distance from the filament axis, a much stronger correlation is found in the outer parts, suggesting that the alignment is driven by the laminar infall of gas from sheets to filaments. When compared with numerical simulations, our results suggest that the connection between dark matter halo and galaxy spin is not straightforward. Our results provide an important input to the understanding of how galaxies acquire their angular momentum.

  15. CO observations of nearby galaxies and the efficiency of star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Judith S.

    1987-01-01

    The CO distributions and total molecular content of 160 galaxies were observed using the 14 meter millimeter telescope of the FCRAO. For the luminous, relatively face-on Sc galaxies, the azimuthally averaged CO distributions are centrally peaked, while for the Sb and Sa galaxies the Co distributions often exhibit central CO holes up to 5 kpc across. None of the Sc galaxies have CO distributions which resemble the Milky Way. A general correlation was found between total CO and IR luminosities in galaxies. The scatter in this relation is highly correlated with dust temperature. No strong correlation of IR luminosities was found with HI masses, and it was thereby concluded that the infrared emission is more directly tied to the molecular content of galaxies. It is suggested that galaxies which have high Star Formation Effiencies (SFEs) produce more stars per unit molecular mass, thereby increasing the average temperature of the dust in the star forming regions. Irregular galaxies and galaxies previously identified as mergers have the highest observed star formation efficiencies. For the mergers, evidence was found that the IR/CO luminosity ratio increases with the merger age estimated by Joseph and Wright (1985).

  16. ROSAT Observations of Low Mass Disk Galaxies: No Evidence of Baryonic Blow Out

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothun, Gregory D.; Eriksen, James

    1994-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that galctic winds associated with star formation in low mass disk galaxies can be an effective means of relocating cold disk gas to a warm tenuous halo, we have obtained long exposure ROSAT PSPC observations of three such galaxies.

  17. UNIFICATION SCHEME OF RADIO GALAXIES AND QUASARS FALSIFIED BY THEIR OBSERVED SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, Ashok K.; Singh, Raj Laxmi

    2013-03-20

    In the currently popular orientation-based unified scheme, a radio galaxy appears as a quasar when its principal radio-axis happens to be oriented within a certain cone opening angle around the observer's line of sight. Due to geometrical projection, the observed sizes of quasars should therefore appear smaller than those of radio galaxies. We show that this simple, unambiguous prediction of the unified scheme is not borne out by the actually observed angular sizes of radio galaxies and quasars. Except in the original 3CR sample, based on which the unified scheme was proposed, in other much larger samples no statistically significant difference is apparent in the size distributions of radio galaxies and quasars. The population of low-excitation radio galaxies with apparently no hidden quasars inside, which might explain the observed excess number of radio galaxies at low redshifts, cannot account for the absence of any foreshortening of the sizes of quasars at large redshifts. On the other hand, from infrared and X-ray studies, there is evidence of a hidden quasar within a dusty torus in many radio galaxies, at z > 0.5. It is difficult to reconcile this with the absence of foreshortening of quasar sizes at even these redshifts, and perhaps one has to allow that the major radio axis may not have anything to do with the optical axis of the torus. Otherwise, to resolve the dichotomy of radio galaxies and quasars, a scheme quite different from the present might be required.

  18. Panchromatic observations of dwarf starburst galaxies: Infant super star clusters and a low-luminosity AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, Amy Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Globular star clusters and supermassive black holes are fundamental components of today's massive galaxies, with origins dating back to the very early universe. Both globular clusters and the seeds of supermassive black holes are believed to have formed in the progenitors of modern massive galaxies, although the details are poorly understood. Direct observations of these low-mass, distant, and hence faint systems are unobtainable with current capabilities. However, gas-rich dwarf starburst galaxies in the local universe, analogous in many ways to protogalaxies at high-redshift, can provide critical insight into the early stages of galaxy evolution including the formation of globular clusters and massive black holes. This thesis presents a panchromatic study of nearby dwarf starburst galaxies harboring nascent globular clusters still embedded in their birth material. Infant clusters are identified via their production of thermal radio emission at centimeter wavelengths, which comes from dense gas ionized by young massive stars. By combining radio observations with complementary data at ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelengths, we obtain a comprehensive view of massive clusters emerging from their gaseous and dusty birth cocoons. This thesis also presents the first example of a nearby dwarf starburst galaxy hosting an actively accreting massive central black hole. The black hole in this dwarf galaxy is unusual in that it is not associated with a bulge, a nuclear star cluster, or any other well-defined nucleus, likely reflecting an early phase of black hole and galaxy evolution that has not been previously observed.

  19. The Observability of Abundance Ratio Effects in Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serven, J. L.; Worthey, G.; Briley, M. M.

    2004-12-01

    Using synthetic spectra we construct a simple model of an elliptical galaxy, with a velocity dispersion σ = 200 km s-1. Absorption feature indices are defined for C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Ba, and Eu as a first step in determining the abundances of these elements in stellar populations, such as elliptical galaxies, for which integrated light spectra are available. Then using these indices and assuming a photon error such that S/N = 100 around 5000 Å , the feasibility of measuring individual elements in real galaxies is assessed. Of the elements studied only S, K, Cu, Zn, and Eu appear to be difficult to determine; the rest appear to be at least feasible.

  20. A comparison between observed and analytical velocity dispersion profiles of 20 nearby galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammad S.; Abdullah, Mohamed H.; Ali, Gamal B.

    2014-05-01

    We derive analytical expression for the velocity dispersion of galaxy clusters, using the statistical mechanical approach. We compare the observed velocity dispersion profiles for 20 nearby ( z≤0.1) galaxy clusters with the analytical ones. It is interesting to find that the analytical results closely match with the observed velocity dispersion profiles only if the presence of the diffuse matter in clusters is taken into consideration. This takes us to introduce a new approach to detect the ratio of diffuse mass, M diff , within a galaxy cluster. For the present sample, the ratio f= M diff / M, where M the cluster's total mass is found to has an average value of 45±12 %. This leads us to the result that nearly 45 % of the cluster mass is impeded outside the galaxies, while around 55 % of the cluster mass is settled in the galaxies.

  1. Using galaxy formation simulations to optimize LIGO follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolini, Elisa; Caiazzo, Ilaria; Davé, Romeel; Heyl, Jeremy S.

    2017-04-01

    The recent discovery of gravitational radiation from merging black holes poses a challenge of how to organize the electromagnetic follow-up of gravitational-wave events as well as observed bursts of neutrinos. We propose a technique to select the galaxies that are most likely to host the event given some assumptions of whether the particular event is associated with recent star formation, low-metallicity stars or simply proportional to the total stellar mass in the galaxy. We combine data from the 2-MASS Photometric Redshift Galaxy Catalogue with results from galaxy formation simulations to develop observing strategies that potentially reduce the area of sky to search by up to a factor of 2 relative to an unweighted search of galaxies, and a factor of 20 to a search over the entire LIGO localization region.

  2. Observing the Earliest Galaxies: Looking for the Sources of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, Garth

    2015-04-01

    Systematic searches for the earliest galaxies in the reionization epoch finally became possible in 2009 when the Hubble Space Telescope was updated with a powerful new infrared camera during the final Shuttle servicing mission SM4 to Hubble. The reionization epoch represents the last major phase transition of the universe and was a major event in cosmic history. The intense ultraviolet radiation from young star-forming galaxies is increasingly considered to be the source of the photons that reionized intergalactic hydrogen in the period between the ``dark ages'' (the time before the first stars and galaxies at about 100-200 million years after the Big Bang) and the end of reionization around 800-900 million years. Yet finding and measuring the earliest galaxies in this era of cosmic dawn has proven to a challenging task, even with Hubble's new infrared camera. I will discuss the deep imaging undertaken by Hubble and the remarkable insights that have accrued from the imaging datasets taken over the last decade on the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF, HUDF09/12) and other regions. The HUDF datasets are central to the story and have been assembled into the eXtreme Deep Field (XDF), the deepest image ever from Hubble data. The XDF, when combined with results from shallower wide-area imaging surveys (e.g., GOODS, CANDELS) and with detections of galaxies from the Frontier Fields, has provided significant insights into the role of galaxies in reionization. Yet many questions remain. The puzzle is far from being fully solved and, while much will done over the next few years, the solution likely awaits the launch of JWST. NASA/STScI Grant HST-GO-11563.

  3. HST Observations of the Host Galaxy of GRB970508

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruchter, A.; Pian, E.

    1998-08-01

    The field of GRB970508 was imaged by HST with the STIS CCD in open filter mode (50CCD) on 1998 August 5.78-6.03 for a total exposure time of 11,568 seconds. An extended object, which we believe to be the host galaxy of GRB970508, was detected at the astrometric position of the optical transient of GRB970508. The galaxy has high signal-to-noise in our data and is clearly resolved, with a major axis of approximately 0."5 .

  4. Low X-Ray Luminosity Galaxy Clusters: Main Goals, Sample Selection, Photometric and Spectroscopic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilo Castellón, José Luis; Alonso, M. Victoria; García Lambas, Diego; Valotto, Carlos; O'Mill, Ana Laura; Cuevas, Héctor; Carrasco, Eleazar R.; Ramírez, Amelia; Astudillo, José M.; Ramos, Felipe; Jaque Arancibia, Marcelo; Ulloa, Natalie; Órdenes, Yasna

    2016-06-01

    We present our study of 19 low X-ray luminosity galaxy clusters (L{}X ˜ 0.5-45 × 1043 erg s-1), selected from the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counters Pointed Observations and the revised version of Mullis et al. in the redshift range of 0.16-0.7. This is the introductory paper of a series presenting the sample selection, photometric and spectroscopic observations, and data reduction. Photometric data in different passbands were taken for eight galaxy clusters at Las Campanas Observatory; three clusters at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory; and eight clusters at the Gemini Observatory. Spectroscopic data were collected for only four galaxy clusters using Gemini telescopes. Using the photometry, the galaxies were defined based on the star-galaxy separation taking into account photometric parameters. For each galaxy cluster, the catalogs contain the point-spread function and aperture magnitudes of galaxies within the 90% completeness limit. They are used together with structural parameters to study the galaxy morphology and to estimate photometric redshifts. With the spectroscopy, the derived galaxy velocity dispersion of our clusters ranged from 507 km s-1 for [VMF98]022 to 775 km s-1 for [VMF98]097 with signs of substructure. Cluster membership has been extensively discussed taking into account spectroscopic and photometric redshift estimates. In this sense, members are the galaxies within a projected radius of 0.75 Mpc from the X-ray emission peak and with clustercentric velocities smaller than the cluster velocity dispersion or 6000 km s-1, respectively. These results will be used in forthcoming papers to study, among the main topics, the red cluster sequence, blue cloud and green populations, the galaxy luminosity function, and cluster dynamics.

  5. NIR SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATION OF MASSIVE GALAXIES IN THE PROTOCLUSTER AT z = 3.09

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Mariko; Yamada, Toru; Ichikawa, Takashi; Kajisawa, Masaru; Matsuda, Yuichi; Tanaka, Ichi

    2015-01-20

    We present the results of near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the K-band-selected candidate galaxies in the protocluster at z = 3.09 in the SSA22 field. We observed 67 candidates with K {sub AB} < 24 and confirmed redshifts of the 39 galaxies at 2.0 < z {sub spec} < 3.4. Of the 67 candidates, 24 are certainly protocluster members with 3.04 ≤ z {sub spec} ≤ 3.12, which are massive red galaxies that have been unidentified in previous optical observations of the SSA22 protocluster. Many distant red galaxies (J – K {sub AB} > 1.4), hyper extremely red objects (J – K {sub AB} > 2.1), Spitzer MIPS 24 μm sources, active galactic nuclei (AGNs) as well as the counterparts of Lyα blobs and the AzTEC/ASTE 1.1 mm sources in the SSA22 field are also found to be protocluster members. The mass of the SSA22 protocluster is estimated to be ∼2-5 × 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉}, and this system is plausibly a progenitor of the most massive clusters of galaxies in the current universe. The reddest (J – K {sub AB} ≥ 2.4) protocluster galaxies are massive galaxies with M {sub star} ∼ 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉} showing quiescent star formation activities and plausibly dominated by old stellar populations. Most of these massive quiescent galaxies host moderately luminous AGNs detected by X-ray. There are no significant differences in the [O III] λ5007/Hβ emission line ratios and [O III] λ5007 line widths and spatial extents of the protocluster galaxies from those of massive galaxies at z ∼ 2-3 in the general field.

  6. GAS INFLOW AND OUTFLOW HISTORIES IN DISK GALAXIES AS REVEALED FROM OBSERVATIONS OF DISTANT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Toyouchi, Daisuke; Chiba, Masashi

    2015-09-01

    We investigate gas inflow and outflow histories in Milky Way-like disk galaxies, to get new insights into the baryonic processes in galaxy formation and evolution. For this purpose, we solve the equations for the evolution of the surface mass densities of gas and metals at each radius in a galactic disk, based on the observed structural properties of distant star-forming galaxies, including the redshift evolution of their stellar mass distribution, their scaling relation between the mass of baryonic components, star formation rate (SFR), and chemical abundance, as well as the supposed evolution of their radial metallicity gradients (RMGs). We find that the efficiency of gas inflow for a given SFR decreases with time and that the inflow rate is always nearly proportional to the SFR. For gas outflow, although its efficiency for a given SFR is a decreasing function of time, similar to gas inflow, the outflow rate is not necessarily proportional to the SFR and the relation between the outflow rate and SFR strongly depends on the evolution of the adopted RMG. We also find that the results on the outflow rate can be reproduced in the framework of a momentum-driven (energy-driven) wind mechanism if the RMG is steepening (flattening) with time. Therefore if the well-measured RMGs and their evolution for Milky Way-like galaxies are obtained from future observations, then our results will be useful to constrain the main driving mechanism for their galactic outflows.

  7. VLBA Observations of Low Luminosity Flat Spectrum Radio Galaxies and BL Lac Objects: Polarisation Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondi, M.; Dallacasa, D.; Stanghellini, C.; Marchã, M. J. M.

    We obtained two-epoch VLBA observations at 5 GHz of a list of radio galaxies drawn from the 200 mJy sample (Marcha et al. 1996). The objects selected for milli-arcsecond scale observations are classified, on the basis of their optical spectroscopic and polarimetric properties, as BL Lac objects, normal weak line radio galaxies, broad line radio galaxies, and transition objects (those with intermediate properties). We present preliminary results on the radio polarization properties, on the milli-arcsecond scale, of objects with different optical properties and discuss structural variations detected from the two epochs.

  8. IRTF Observations of Lensed Star-Forming Galaxies Identified in the SDSS Imaging Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allyn Smith, J.; Allam, S. S.; Tucker, D. L.; Lin, H.; SDSS Bright Arcs Search Team

    2009-12-01

    The SDSS Bright Arcs Search Team (see poster by H. Lin et al. #478.02) has been carrying out an ongoing systematic search for bright, strongly-lensed, high-redshift galaxies in samples of SDSS luminous red galaxies, clusters, and interacting/merging galaxy pairs. So far we have spectroscopically confirmed a dozen lensing systems, with source galaxy redshifts z = 0.4 - 2.7, with 6 of these among the brightest known z > 2 lensed galaxies, including the 8 O'Clock Arc (Allam et al. 2007) and the Clone (Lin et al. 2008). Here, we report on our JHK imaging of several of these confirmed lensed systems based upon observations taken with the SpeX and NSFCAM2 on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. Further, we discuss our future plans for NIR imaging of this sample.

  9. A Sneak Peek at the JWST Era: Observing Galaxies Below the Hubble Limit with Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livermore, Rachael C.

    2016-01-01

    The installation of WFC3 on the Hubble Space Telescope pushed the frontier of high-redshift galaxy studies to only 500 Myr after the Big Bang. However, observations in this epoch remain challenging and are limited to the brightest galaxies; the fainter sources believed to be responsible for reionizing the Universe remain beyond the grasp of Hubble. With gravitational lensing, however, we can benefit from the magnification of faint sources, which brings them within reach of today's telescopes. The Hubble Frontier Fields program is a deep survey of strongly lensing clusters observed in the optical and near-infrared. Unfortunately, detecting highly magnified, intrinsically faint galaxies in these fields has proved challenging due to the bright foregound cluster galaxies and intracluster light. We have developed a technique using wavelet decomposition to overcome these difficulties and detect galaxies at z~7 with intrinsic UV magnitudes as faint as MUV = -13. We present this method and the resulting luminosity functions, which support a steep faint-end slope extending out to the observational limits. Our method has uncovered hundreds of galaxies at z > 6 fainter than any that have been seen before, providing our first insight into the small galaxy population during the epoch of reionization and a preview of the capabilities of JWST.

  10. THE OBSERVED RELATION BETWEEN STELLAR MASS, DUST EXTINCTION, AND STAR FORMATION RATE IN LOCAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zahid, H. J.; Kewley, L. J.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Yates, R. M.

    2013-02-15

    In this study, we investigate the relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and star formation rate (SFR) using {approx}150,000 star-forming galaxies from SDSS DR7. We show that the relation between dust extinction and SFR changes with stellar mass. For galaxies at the same stellar mass, dust extinction is anti-correlated with the SFR at stellar masses <10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }. There is a sharp transition in the relation at a stellar mass of 10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }. At larger stellar masses, dust extinction is positively correlated with the SFR for galaxies at the same stellar mass. The observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR presented in this study helps to confirm similar trends observed in the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR. The relation reported in this study provides important new constraints on the physical processes governing the chemical evolution of galaxies. The correlation between SFR and dust extinction for galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10} M {sub Sun} is shown to extend to the population of quiescent galaxies suggesting that the physical processes responsible for the observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR may be related to the processes leading to the shutdown of star formation in galaxies.

  11. CCD surface photometry of field galaxies. I - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    Images of 105 galaxies selected from a larger complete sample of intrinsically luminous galaxies have been obtained for the purpose of computing surface brightness profiles. The intensity profiles along the major and minor axes are computed by a method in which elliptical contours whose position angle and ellipticity are allowed to vary with radius are fitted to the true isophotes of a galaxy. The resulting profiles and ellipse parameters are listed for each object. An extensive comparison of the present photometry with that of other workers is made to assess the reliability of the data. For most objects, additional photometric information is given, including an isophotal radius and magnitude within a limiting isophote of 24.0 mag/sq arcsec, an approximate total magnitude, the effective radius containing one-half the total light, and the mean surface brightness inside this radius. A full analysis of the data is deferred to a second paper where the profiles will be decomposed into bulge and disk components.

  12. OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON THE MOLECULAR GAS CONTENT IN NEARBY STARBURST DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Cannon, John M.; Holtzman, Jon

    2012-06-01

    Using star formation histories derived from optically resolved stellar populations in 19 nearby starburst dwarf galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, we measure the stellar mass surface densities of stars newly formed in the bursts. By assuming a star formation efficiency (SFE), we then calculate the inferred gas surface densities present at the onset of the starbursts. Assuming an SFE of 1%, as is often assumed in normal star-forming galaxies, and assuming that the gas was purely atomic, translates to very high H I surface densities ({approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}), which are much higher than have been observed in dwarf galaxies. This implies either higher values of SFE in these dwarf starburst galaxies or the presence of significant amounts of H{sub 2} in dwarfs (or both). Raising the assumed SFEs to 10% or greater (in line with observations of more massive starbursts associated with merging galaxies), still results in H I surface densities higher than observed in 10 galaxies. Thus, these observations appear to require that a significant fraction of the gas in these dwarf starbursts galaxies was in the molecular form at the onset of the bursts. Our results imply molecular gas column densities in the range 10{sup 19}-10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} for the sample. In the galaxies where CO observations have been made, these densities correspond to values of the CO-H{sub 2} conversion factor (X{sub CO}) in the range >(3-80) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} (K km s{sup -1}){sup -1}, or up to 40 Multiplication-Sign greater than Galactic X{sub CO} values.

  13. ROSAT observations of quiescent low mass disk galaxies: No evidence of baryonic blow out

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothun, Gregory D.; Eriksen, James; Schombert, James M.

    1994-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that galactic winds associated with star formation in low mass disk galaxies can be an effective means of relocating cold disk gas to a warm tenuous halo, we have obtained long exposure ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) observations of three such galaxies. The sensitivity of the PSPC to the presence of an extended, approximately 0.15 KEV halo of 10(exp 9) solar mass of gas, is quite high for the exposure times we used. We failed to detect this halo in all three cases and the observed x-ray luminosity of the galaxy is two orders of magnitude less than the hypothetical case in which the mass of gas that has been expelled by previous generations of star formation is equal to the stellar mass of the galaxy itself. This limit is much less than the actual mass of cold gas in these galaxies. Thus, we were unable to verify directly the presence of significant galactic winds in these three galaxies either because they are not operative, because their halos are not sufficiently massive to aid in the retention of this gas, or because the amount of injected gas is just a small percentage of the cold disk gas. If the latter reason is emblematic of low mass galaxies then we would not expect the detection of halos. We also report here the serendipitous detection of Abell 1560, a distance class 7 cluster of unknown redshift.

  14. Kinematic signatures of AGN feedback in moderately powerful radio galaxies at z ~ 2 observed with SINFONI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collet, C.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; De Breuck, C.; Lehnert, M. D.; Best, P.; Bryant, J. J.; Hunstead, R.; Dicken, D.; Johnston, H.

    2016-02-01

    relatively low, up to AV ~ 2 mag. The ratio of line widths, σ, to bulk velocity, v, is so large that even the gas in galaxies with regular velocity fields is unlikely to be gravitationally bound. It is unclear, however, whether the large line widths are due to turbulence or unresolved, local outflows as are sometimes observed at low redshifts. We compare our sources with sets of radio galaxies at low and high redshift, finding that they may have more in common with gas-rich nearby radio galaxies with similar jet power than with the most powerful high-z radio galaxies. Comparison of the kinetic energy with the energy supply from the AGNs through jet and radiation pressure suggests that the radio source still plays a dominant role for feedback, consistent with low-redshift radio-loud quasars. Based on observations carried out with the Very Large Telescope of ESO under Program IDs 084.A-0324 and 085.A-0897, and at ATCA under Program ID C2604.

  15. A Multi-wavelength Study of Nearby Galaxies Based on Molecular Line Surveys: MIPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Giovanni; Wang, Zhong; Bush, Stephanie; Cox, Thomas J.; Keto, Eric; Pahre, Michael; Rosolowsky, Erik; Smith, Howard

    2008-03-01

    Dense molecular gas, warm dust, and hot ionized gas are different components of the multi-step transformation of cold gas into stars and star clusters. While empirical laws on star formation in galaxies have been established based on global measurements of these components, substantial galaxy-to-galaxy variations still exist and remain unexplained. To understand the mechanisms that induce and regulate star formation and thus galaxy evolution, we need to study processes on the local scales of typical star forming regions and giant molecular clouds. In a set of pilot studies, we analyzed the Spitzer and Galex data of nearby giant spirals M31, M33 and M99, and compared with the new interferometric CO maps of matching angular resolution. We found evidence that variations in local condition, environmental effects, and viewing geometry may explain much of the large scatter in the empirical relationships. Based on the success of this initial investigation, we have collected high- resolution CO images of 63 late-type galaxies from several large surveys, and we are working on obtaining a complete set of Spitzer and Galex data for these galaxies. A companion Spitzer archival research program will re-examine the existing observations along with CO, HI, UV and optical data, focusing on correlations in spatially resolved, individual star-forming regions. Here we propose MIPS imaging of the 11 galaxies in our CO sample that have not already been observed by Spitzer. A GO proposal will request IRAC time for these galaxies, which are a significant addition to our study because they substantially increase the fraction of gas-rich late types in the full sample. Insight from this program will be applicable to not only nearby system, but also high red-shift galaxies for which only integrated quantities are measurable.

  16. Determining the Hubble Constant from Gravitational-wave Observations of Merging Binary Neutron Stars and Electromagnetic Observations of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Hong; Brady, Patrick; Pankow, Chris; Kaplan, David; van Sistine, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Active research has been made in the past few decades on measuring the Hubble constant H0. Most of the research use electromagnetic observations only. In our research, we propose a different method of determining the Hubble constant more accurately with both electromagnetic observations of galaxies and gravitational-wave observations of signals that happen in these galaxies. Our method is based on the method proposed by Bernard Schutz in 1986, in which one uses information from galaxy surveys as prior information for the location of a gravitational wave source. Since the first direct detection of gravitational waves in 2015, this approach has been made more supported and useful. We show how accurate we can constrain H0 by combining the results from a couple of hundreds of simulated gravitational-wave observations of merging binary neutron stars from a network of two advanced interferometers. This accuracy will be expectedly dramatically improved when we use a network of three advanced detectors. We also show various systematic effects on the measurements of H0 due to the incompleteness of galaxy catalog, the uncertainty in the measurements of the redshifts of galaxies, and so forth. We will also review the ongoing work.

  17. Jellyfish: Observational Properties of Extreme Ram-Pressure Stripping Events in Massive Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conor, McPartland; Ebeling, Harald; Roediger, Elke

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the physical origin and observational signatures of extreme ram-pressure stripping (RPS) in 63 massive galaxy clusters at z=0.3-0.7, based on data in the F606W passband obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Using a training set of a dozen ``jellyfish" galaxies identified earlier in the same imaging data, we define quantitative morphological criteria to select candidate galaxies which are similar to known cases of RPS. Considering a sample of 16 ``jellyfish" galaxies (10 of which we present for the first time), we visually derive estimates of the projected direction of motion based on dynamical features such as apparent compression shocks and debris trails. Our findings suggest that the observed events occur primarily at large distances from the cluster core and involve infall trajectories featuring high impact parameters. Simple models of cluster growth show that such trajectories are consistent with two scenarios: 1) galaxy infall along filaments; and 2) infall at high velocities (≥1000 km/s) characteristic of cluster mergers. The observed distribution of events is best described by timescales of ˜few Myr in agreement with recent numerical simulations of RPS. The broader areal coverage of the Hubble Frontier Fields should provide an even larger sample of RPS events to determine the relative contributions of infall and cluster mergers. Prompted by the discovery of several jellyfish galaxies whose brightness in the F606W passband rivals or exceeds that of the respective brightest cluster galaxy, we attempt to constrain the luminosity function of galaxies undergoing RPS. The observed significant excess at the bright end compared to the luminosity functions of blue cluster members strongly suggests enhanced star formation, thus challenging theoretical and numerical studies according to which RPS merely displaces existing star-forming regions. In-depth studies of individual objects will help test our

  18. Einstein SSS+MPC observations of Seyfert type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Turner, T. J.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Weaver, K.

    1989-01-01

    The X-ray spectra of 27 Seyfert galaxies measured with the Solid State Spectrometer (SSS) onboard the Einstein Observatory is investigated. This new investigation features the utilization of simultaneous data from the Monitor Proportional Counter (MPC) and automatic correction for systematic effects in the SSS. The new results are that the best-fit single power law indices agree with those previously reported, but that soft excesses are inferred for at least 20 percent of the measured spectra. The soft excesses are consistent with either an approximately 0.25 keV black body or Fe-L line emission.

  19. Ultraviolet Galaxy Counts From STIS Observations of The Hubble Deep Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. P.; Brown, T. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present galaxy counts in the near and far ultraviolet (NUV and FUV) obtained from Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations of portions of the Hubble Deep Field North, (HDFN), the Hubble Deep Field South, (HDFS) and a parallel field near the HDFN. All three fields have deep (AB>29) optical imaging, and we determine magnitudes by taking the ultraviolet flux detected within the limiting optical isophote. An analysis of the UV-optical colors of detected objects, combined with a visual inspection of the UV images, indicates that there are no detectable objects in the UV images which are not also detected in the optical. We measure the detection area and completeness as a function of magnitude by taking the size-magnitude distribution of galaxies in the entire HDFN WFPC2 V+I image, applying the measured UV-optical colors from the detected galaxies, and determining the total area over which each galaxy would have been detected in the UV images. The average area for the simulated galaxies in each UV magnitude bin, (including galaxies which would not be detected at all), provides the effective area and completeness for the bin. We test this procedure with Monte Carlo simulations. The galaxy counts reach to AB=29 in both the NUV and FUV; 1 magnitude fainter than the HDF F30OW counts, and 7 magnitudes fainter than balloon-based counts. We compare our measured counts to various models.

  20. X-ray reflection from black-hole accretion discs with a radially stratified ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, J.; Domcek, V.; Dovčiak, M.; Guainazzi, M.; Marinucci, A.

    2015-07-01

    Recent X-ray observations have suggested a very high compactness of coronae in Active Galactic Nuclei as well as in X-ray Binaries. The compactness of the source implies that the black-hole accretion disc irradiation is a strong function of radius. We will show how the X-ray spectra are modified assuming the radially stratified ionisation according to the illumination by a point-like source on the black-hole rotational axis. We will discuss how this affects the measurements of the other model parameters, such as spin and radial emissivity. We will show the application of this model to the recent XMM-Newton/NUSTAR data of an active galaxy MCG-6-30-15.

  1. Giant Clumps in Star-forming Galaxies at z>1 in CANDELS Observations and CANDElized Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yicheng; Closson Ferguson, Henry; Ravindranath, Swara; Primack, Joel; Dekel, Avishai; Koo, David; Faber, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    A common feature of star-forming galaxies at z>1 is the existence of giant star-forming clumps, which are fundamental to our understanding of the accretion history of galaxies, formation of bulges, and evolution of gas-rich disks. In this talk, I will present our work on understanding the nature of clumps in high-redshift galaxies by comparing CANDELS observations with CANDELized high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. The CANDELized simulations take into account of all observational effects, e.g., spatial resolution and sensitivity, of CANDELS images and thus provide a direct way to compare clumps identified in both observations and simulations. The comparison with the cosmological simulations also sheds a light on the roles that clumps play in the broad picture of galaxy formation and evolution. Our work focus on three questions: (1) When and how clumps are formed? (2) How they evolve once formed? (3) Can we use clumps as diagnostics of physical mechanisms that govern star formation, e.g., feedback? The three aspects provide important clues of tracing how distant clumpy galaxies evolve into galaxies seen in the local universe.

  2. Multiwavelength observations of giant radio galaxy 3C 35 and 3C 284

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sabyasachi; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Patra, Dusmanta; Konar, Chiranjib

    2016-07-01

    We report multi wavelength observations of large radio galaxy 3C35 and 3C284. The low frequency observations were done with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) starting from 150 MHz. The high frequency observations were done with Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA). Our main motivation for these observations is to estimate the spectral ages of these galaxies and to examine any proof of extended emission at low radio frequencies due to an earlier cycle of activity. The spectral age is measured by fitting the spectra with different spectral ageing models e.g. Kardashev-Pacholczyk (KP), Jaffe-Perola (JP) and Continuous Injection (CI).

  3. (12)CO (3-2) & (1-0) emission line observations of nearby starburst galaxy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereux, Nicholas; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Sanders, D. B.; Nakai, N.; Young, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    New measurements of the (12)CO (1-0) and (12)CO (3-2) line emission are presented for the nuclei of seven nearby starburst galaxies selected from a complete sample of 21 nearby starburst galaxies for which the nuclear star formation rates are measured to be comparable to the archetype starburst galaxies M82 and NGC 253. The new observations capitalize on the coincidence between the beam size of the 45 m Nobeyama telescope at 115 GHz and that of the 15 m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope at 345 GHz to measure the value of the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio in a 15 sec (less than or equal to 2.5 kpc) diameter region centered on the nuclear starburst. In principle, the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio provides a measure of temperature and optical depth for the (12)CO gas. The error weighted mean value of the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the seven starburst galaxy nuclei is -0.64 +/- 0.06. The (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the starburst galaxy nuclei is significantly higher than the average value measured for molecular gas in the disk of the Galaxy, implying warmer temperatures for the molecular gas in starburst galaxy nuclei. On the other hand, the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the starburst galaxy nuclei is not as high as would be expected if the molecular gas were hot, greater than 20 K, and optically thin, tau much less than 1. The total mass of molecular gas contained within the central 1.2-2.8 kpc diameter region of the starburst galaxy nuclei ranges from 10(exp 8) to 10(exp 9) solar mass. While substantial, the molecular gas mass represents only a small percentage, approximately 9%-16%, of the dynamical mass in the same region.

  4. Simulations of high-z galaxy observations with an E-ELT/MOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puech, Mathieu; Disseau, Karen; Pentericci, Laura

    2013-12-01

    I will present simulated observations of two important science cases of the 39m E-ELT, ie, the mass assembly in galaxies over z=2-5 and the detection of very high-z galaxies. These simulations are currently used to constrain the top level requirements of MOSAIC, which is a new MOS concept for the E-ELT. MOSAIC largely builds on two E-ELT instrument phase A studies, namely EAGLE, an MOAO-fed NIR multi-IFU spectragraph and OPTIMOS-EVE, a GLAO-limited fiber-fed NIR spectrograph. I will give a short summary of the MOSAIC study and detail how galaxy simulations are currently used to constrain the instrument conceptual design, and in particular simulations of the detection of UV interstellar lines in very distant (i.e.: z > 6) galaxies.

  5. Constraining the Evolution of Galaxy Properties in Interacting Systems with UV-FIR Observations and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, Lauranne; Zezas, A.; Brassington, N.; Smith, H. A.; Ashby, M. N.; da Cunha, E.; Hayward, C. C.; Jonsson, P.; Hernquist, L. E.; Fazio, G. G.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of galaxies is greatly influenced by their interactions. As part of the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Survey (SIGS), we imaged 48 nearby systems with Spitzer. We measured and modeled the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) at wavelengths from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-infrared (FIR) of the set of these galaxies with publicly available Herschel SPIRE observations. We fit these SEDs with the Bayesian SED-fitting program MAGPHYS developed by da Cunha et al. (2008). In order to determine the reliability of the parameters extracted, we determined how well MAGPHYS recovers parameters of hydrodynamic simulations run with GADGET (Springel et al. 2005) and for which simulated photometry was calculated using the SUNRISE radiative transfer code (Jonsson et al. 2010). We present our conclusions on the variations with interaction stage of galaxy properties including: star formation histories; dust luminosities, temperatures, and masses; and stellar masses. We discuss how successfully MAGPHYS recovers galaxy properties and which instruments are most crucial for constraining masses, star formation histories, and dust properties. We compare the simulations directly to the observations, examining how unique a diagnostic an interacting galaxy SED can be. Finally, we compare and discuss how well the many simple star formation estimating relations (using 24 micron flux, for example) succeed and why.

  6. Submillimeter Observations of CLASH 2882 and the Evolution of Dust in this Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli; Staguhn, Johannes; Arendt, Richard G; Kovacs, Attila; Decarli, Roberto; Egami, Eiichi; Michalowski, Michal J.; Rawle, Timothy D.; Toft, Sune; Walter, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Two millimeter observations of the MACS J1149.6+2223 cluster have detected a source that was consistent with the location of the lensed MACS 1149-JD galaxy at z = 9.6. A positive identification would have rendered this galaxy as the youngest dust forming galaxy in the universe. Follow up observation with the AzTEC 1.1 mm camera and the IRAM NOrthern Extended Millimeter Array (NOEMA) at 1.3 mm have not confirmed this association. In this paper we show that the NOEMA observations associate the 2 mm source with [PCB2012] 2882,12 source number 2882 in the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) catalog of MACS J1149.6 +2223. This source, hereafter referred to as CLASH 2882, is a gravitationally lensed spiral galaxy at z = 0.99. We combine the Goddard IRAM Superconducting 2-Millimeter Observer (GISMO) 2 mm and NOEMA 1.3 mm fluxes with other (rest frame) UV to far-IR observations to construct the full spectral energy distribution of this galaxy, and derive its star formation history, and stellar and interstellar dust content. The current star formation rate of the galaxy is 54/mu/Solar Mass/yr, and its dust mass is about 5 × 10(exp 7)/mu Solar Mass, where mu is the lensing magnification factor for this source, which has a mean value of 2.7. The inferred dust mass is higher than the maximum dust mass that can be produced by core collapse supernovae and evolved AGB stars. As with many other star forming galaxies, most of the dust mass in CLASH 2882 must have been accreted in the dense phases of the interstellar medium.

  7. Observational Manifestation of Chaos in Grand Design Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, Alexei M.; Sagdeev, Roald Z.; Khoruzii, Oleg V.; et al.

    To study dynamic properties of the gaseous disk of the grand design spiral galaxy NGC 3631 we calculate the Lyapunov characteristic numbers (LCN) for different families of streamlines in the disk. For the trajectories near separatrices of the giant vortices and near saddle points presenting in the velocity field, the LCN turned out to be positive. The result is insensitive to the method of the calculation. Both methods -- using two trajectories and based on linearized equations -- give the identical results. The values of the LCN in the gaseous disk of NGC 3631 are independent on the Riemannian metric used for the calculations in agreement with the classical mathematical theorem. The spectra of the 'short-time' LCN (stretching numbers) evaluated for the same trajectories turned out to be non-invariant. We confirmed this result obtained for the real galactic disk on classical model examples.

  8. VERITAS Observations of the Cygnus Region of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Ralph; VERITAS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Cygnus region is a very active region of our Galaxy, with many sources of GeV and TeV gamma-ray emission, such as supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebulae, high mass X-ray binaries and massive star clusters. A detailed study of the Cygnus region can give insight into the processes of particle acceleration in astrophysical sources. VERITAS is an array of four 12-meter diameter imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes located at Mt. Hopkins, AZ, USA. From 2007 through 2012 nearly 300 hours of data was gathered in the Cygnus region, covering 67 to 83 degrees Galactic longitude and -2 to 5 degrees in Galactic latitude. An update of the Fermi-LAT and VERITAS analysis of this region is presented. In particular we examine the source and hotspot regions within the Milagro dataset covering this region and the comparison between these objects in the three different instruments.

  9. The evolution of C/O in dwarf galaxies from Hubble Space Telescope FOS observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garnett, D. R.; Skillman, E. D.; Dufour, R. J.; Peimbert, M.; Torres-Peimbert, S.; Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E.; Shields, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    We present UV observations of seven H II regions in low-luminosity dwarf irregular galaxies and the Magellanic Clouds obtained with the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in order to measure the C/O abundance ratio in the interstellar medium (ISM) of those galaxies. We measure both O III 1666 A and C III 1909 A in our spectra, enabling us to determine C(+2)/O(+2) with relatively small uncertainties. The results from our HST observations show a continuous increase in C/O with increasing O/H, consistent with a power law having an index of 0.43 +/- 0.09 over the range -4.7 to -3.6 in log (O/H). One possible interpretation of this trend is that the most metal-poor galaxies are the youngest and dominated by the products of early enrichment by massive stars, while more metal-rich galaxies show increasing, delayed contributions of carbon from intermediate-mass stars. Our results also suggest that it may not be appropiate to combine abundances in irregular galaxies with those in spiral galaxies to study the evolution of chemical abundances. Our measured C/O ratios in the most metal-poor galaxies are consistent with predictions of nucleosynthesis from massive stars for Weaver & Woosley's best estimate for the 12C(alpha, gamma) 16O nuclear reaction rate, assuming negligible contanmination from carbon produced in intermediate-mass stars in these galaxies. We detect a weak N III 1750 A multiplet in SMC N88A and obtain interesting upper limits for two other objects. Our 2 sigma uppr limits on the 1750 A feature indicate that the N(+2)/O(+2) ratios in these objects are not significantly larger than the N(+)/O(+) ratios measured from optical spectra. This behavior is consistent with predictions of photionization models, although better detections of N III are needed to confirm the results.

  10. Herschel Observed Stripe 82 Quasars and Their Host Galaxies: Connections between AGN Activity and host Galaxy Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X. Y.; Wu, Xue-Bing

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present a study of 207 quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalogs and the Herschel Stripe 82 survey. Quasars within this sample are high-luminosity quasars with a mean bolometric luminosity of 1046.4 erg s-1. The redshift range of this sample is within z < 4, with a mean value of 1.5 ± 0.78. Because we only selected quasars that have been detected in all three Herschel-SPIRE bands, the quasar sample is complete yet highly biased. Based on the multi-wavelength photometric observation data, we conducted a spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting through UV to FIR. Parameters such as active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity, far-IR (FIR) luminosity, stellar mass, as well as many other AGN and galaxy properties are deduced from the SED fitting results. The mean star formation rate (SFR) of the sample is 419 M ⊙ yr-1 and the mean gas mass is ˜1011.3 M ⊙. All of these results point to an IR luminous quasar system. Compared with star formation main sequence (MS) galaxies, at least 80 out of 207 quasars are hosted by starburst galaxies. This supports the statement that luminous AGNs are more likely to be associated with major mergers. The SFR increases with the redshift up to z = 2. It is correlated with the AGN bolometric luminosity, where {L}{{FIR}}\\propto {L}{{Bol}}0.46+/- 0.03. The AGN bolometric luminosity is also correlated with the host galaxy mass and gas mass. Yet the correlation between L FIR and L Bol has higher significant level, implies that the link between AGN accretion and the SFR is more primal. The M BH/M * ratio of our sample is 0.02, higher than the value 0.005 in the local universe. It might indicate an evolutionary trend of the M BH-M * scaling relation.

  11. Comparing Simulations and Observations of Galaxy Evolution: Methods for Constraining the Nature of Stellar Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummels, Cameron

    Computational hydrodynamical simulations are a very useful tool for understanding how galaxies form and evolve over cosmological timescales not easily revealed through observations. However, they are only useful if they reproduce the sorts of galaxies that we see in the real universe. One of the ways in which simulations of this sort tend to fail is in the prescription of stellar feedback, the process by which nascent stars return material and energy to their immediate environments. Careful treatment of this interaction in subgrid models, so-called because they operate on scales below the resolution of the simulation, is crucial for the development of realistic galaxy models. Equally important is developing effective methods for comparing simulation data against observations to ensure galaxy models which mimic reality and inform us about natural phenomena. This thesis examines the formation and evolution of galaxies and the observable characteristics of the resulting systems. We employ extensive use of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations in order to simulate and interpret the evolution of massive spiral galaxies like our own Milky Way. First, we create a method for producing synthetic photometric images of grid-based hydrodynamical models for use in a direct comparison against observations in a variety of filter bands. We apply this method to a simulation of a cluster of galaxies to investigate the nature of the red-sequence/blue-cloud dichotomy in the galaxy color-magnitude diagram. Second, we implement several subgrid models governing the complex behavior of gas and stars on small scales in our galaxy models. Several numerical simulations are conducted with similar initial conditions, where we systematically vary the subgrid models, afterward assessing their efficacy through comparisons of their internal kinematics with observed systems. Third, we generate an additional method to compare observations with simulations, focusing on the tenuous circumgalactic

  12. Dense Cloud Cores revealed by ALMA CO observations in the low metallicity dwarf galaxy WLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio, M.; Elmegreen, B.; Hunter, D.; Cortes, J.; Brinks, E.; Cigan, P.

    2017-03-01

    Understanding stellar birth requires observations of the clouds in which they form. These clouds are dense and self-gravitating, and in all existing observations, they are molecular with H2 the dominant species and CO the best available. When the abundances of carbon and oxygen are low compared to hydrogen, and the opacity from dust is also low, as in primeval galaxies and local dwarf irregular galaxies CO forms slowly and is easily destroyed, so it cannot accumulate inside dense clouds. Then we lose our ability to trace the gas in regions of star formation and we lose critical information on the temperatures, densities, and velocities of the material that collapses. I will report on high resolution observations with ALMA of CO clouds in the local group dwarf irregular galaxy WLM, which has a metallicity that is 13% of the solar value and 50% lower than the previous CO detection threshold and the properties derived of very small dense CO clouds mapped..

  13. Interacting binary galaxies. III. Observations of NGC 1587/1588 and NGC 7236/7237

    SciTech Connect

    Borne, K.D.; Hoessel, J.G.

    1988-07-01

    The catalog of isolated galaxy pairs prepared by Karachentsev has been culled for its E-E constituents, and the results are reported. Radial variations of rotation velocity and velocity dispersion are extracted from the spectroscopic data for each of the two galaxies of a given pair. Such observations are described for two Karachentsev pairs, Nos. 99 and 564. The observed disturbances in rotation velocity and luminosity distribution are discussed in terms of the gravitational interaction hypothesis. It is argued that observational evidence of tidal friction in action is evidenced by these findings. One of the highest rotation rates known for an E2 galaxy of average luminosity is found in NGC 1587, the brighter component of K99. Because this rotation is in the same sense as the binary orbital motion, the net angular momentum in this isolated binary system is large, challenging simple tidal torque theories to identify the source of the momentum. 62 references.

  14. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: AEGIS observations of a Dual AGNat z = 0.7

    SciTech Connect

    Gerke1, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Lotz, Jennifer; Yan,Renbin; Barmby, P.; Coil, Alison L.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Ivison,R.J.; Lin, Lihw ai; Koo, David C.; Nandra, Kirpal; Salim, Samir; Small,Todd; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S.M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2006-10-13

    We present evidence for a dual Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) within an early-type galaxy at z = 0.709 in the Extended Groth Strip. The galaxy lies on the red sequence, with absolute magnitude M{sub B} = -21.0 ( AB, w , with h = 0 0.7) and rest-frame color U - B = 1.38. Its optical spectrum shows strong, double-peaked [O III] emission lines and weak H{beta} emission, with Seyfert-like line ratios. The two narrow peaks are separate by 630 km s-1 in velocity and arise from two distinct regions, spatially resolved in the DEIMOS spectrum, with a projected physical separation of 1.2 kpc. HST/ACS imaging shows an early-type (E/S0) galaxy with hints of disturbed structure, consistent with the remnant of a dissipationless merger. Multiwavelength photometric information from the AEGIS consortium confirm the identification of a dust-obscured AGN in an early-type galaxy, with detections in X-ray, optical, infrared and radio wavebands. These data are most readily explained as a single galaxy harboring two AGN--the first such system to be observed in an otherwise typical early-type galaxy.

  15. Observations of dwarfs in nearby voids: implications for galaxy formation and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustilnik, Simon A.

    2016-10-01

    The intermediate results of the ongoing study of deep samples of ~200 galaxies residing in nearby voids, are presented. Their properties are probed via optical spectroscopy, ugri surface photometry, and HI 21-cm line measurements, with emphasis on their evolutionary status. We derive directly the hydrogen mass M(HI), the ratio M(HI)/LB and the evolutionary parameter gas-phase O/H. Their luminosities and integrated colours are used to derive stellar mass M* and the second evolutionary parameter - gas mass-fraction f g). The colours of the outer parts, typically representative of the galaxy oldest stellar population, are used to estimate the upper limits on time since the beginning of the main SF episode. We compare properties of void galaxies with those of the similar late-type galaxies in denser environments. Most of void galaxies show smaller O/H for their luminosity, in average by ~30\\%, indicating slower evolution. Besides, the fraction of ~10\\% of the whole void sample or ~30\\% of the least luminous void LSB dwarfs show the oxygen deficiency by a factor of 2-5. The majority of this group appear very gas-rich, with f g ~(95-99)%, while their outer parts appear rather blue, indicating the time of onset of the main star-formation episode of less than 1-4 Gyr. Such unevolved LSBD galaxies appear not rare among the smallest void objects, but turned out practically missed to date due to the strong observational selection effects. Our results evidense for unusual evolutionary properties of the sizable fraction of void galaxies, and thus, pose the task of better modelling of dwarf galaxy formation and evolution in voids.

  16. Herschel Extreme Lensing Line Observations: [CII] Variations in Galaxies at Redshifts z=1–3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Finkelstein, K.; Yang, Huan; Carilli, Chris; Combes, Françoise; Dassas, Karine; Finkelstein, Steven; Frye, Brenda; Gerin, Maryvonne; Guillard, Pierre; Nesvadba, Nicole; Rigby, Jane; Shin, Min-Su; Spaans, Marco; Strauss, Michael A.; Papovich, Casey

    2017-01-01

    We observed the [C ii] line in 15 lensed galaxies at redshifts 1 < z < 3 using HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory and detected 14/15 galaxies at 3σ or better. High magnifications enable even modestly luminous galaxies to be detected in [C ii] with Herschel. The [C ii] luminosity in this sample ranges from 8 × 107 L⊙ to 3.7 × 109 L⊙ (after correcting for magnification), confirming that [C ii] is a strong tracer of the ISM at high redshifts. The ratio of the [C ii] line to the total far-infrared (FIR) luminosity serves as a measure of the ratio of gas to dust cooling and thus the efficiency of the grain photoelectric heating process. It varies between 3.3% and 0.09%. We compare the [C ii]/FIR ratio to that of galaxies at z = 0 and at high redshifts and find that they follow similar trends. The [C ii]/FIR ratio is lower for galaxies with higher dust temperatures. This is best explained if increased UV intensity leads to higher FIR luminosity and dust temperatures, but gas heating does not rise due to lower photoelectric heating efficiency. The [C ii]/FIR ratio shows weaker correlation with FIR luminosity. At low redshifts highly luminous galaxies tend to have warm dust, so the effects of dust temperature and luminosity are degenerate. Luminous galaxies at high redshifts show a range of dust temperatures, showing that [C ii]/FIR correlates most strongly with dust temperature. The [C ii] to mid-IR ratio for the HELLO sample is similar to the values seen for low-redshift galaxies, indicating that small grains and PAHs dominate the heating in the neutral ISM, although some of the high [CII]/FIR ratios may be due to turbulent heating. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  17. Observational probes of the connection between Star Formation Efficiency and Dark Matter halo mass of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinova, Veselina; Colombo, Dario; Rosolowsky, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Modern simulations predict that the stellar mass and the star formation efficiency of a galaxy are tightly linked to the dark matter (DM) halo mass of that galaxy. This prediction relies on a specific model of galaxy evolution and so testing this prediction directly tests our best models of galaxy formation and evolution. Recent DM numerical studies propose relationships between star formation efficiency and the DM halo mass with two domains based on SF feedback (low-mass) vs. AGN feedback (high-mass), see Moster et al. (2013). The observational probe of such parameters in the relationship imply globally important physics that are fundamental as, e.g., the star formation law (e.g., Kennicutt et al., 1998), the universal depletion time (Leroy et al. 2008), and the origin of the cold gas phase with respect to the stellar disc (Davis et al.2011). Thus, we can directly measure whether this parameterization is correct by estimating the stellar mass, star formation efficiency and dynamical (DM) mass for a set of galaxies at strategically selected points to test if they fall on the predicted relationship.We use CO data from the Extragalactic Database for Galaxy Evolution survey (EDGE) in conjunction with archival 21-cm data and spectroscopic data from Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field spectroscopy Area survey (CALIFA) to measure the stellar vs. halo mass and star-formation-efficiency vs. halo mass relations of the galaxies. We also analyze archival 21-cm spectra to estimate rotation speeds, atomic gas masses and halo masses for a set of EDGE galaxies. Data from CALIFA are used for high quality star formation efficiency and stellar mass measurements. By linking these three parameters - stellar mass, star formation efficiency (SFE) and DM halo mass - we can test the simulation models of how the gas is cooling in the potential wells of the dark matter halos and then forms stars.

  18. Real & Simulated IFU Observations of Low-Mass Early-Type Galaxies: Environmental Influence Probed for Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sybilska, Agnieszka; Łokas, Ewa Luiza; Fouquet, Sylvain

    2017-03-01

    We combine high-quality IFU data with a new set of numerical simulations to study low-mass early type galaxies (dEs) in dense environments. Our earlier study of dEs in the Virgo cluster has produced the first large-scale maps of kinematic and stellar population properties of dEs in those environments (Ryś et al. 2013, 2014, 2015). A quantitative discrimination between various (trans)formation processes proposed for these objects is, however, a complex issue, requiring a priori assumptions about the progenitors of galaxies we observe and study today. To bridge this gap between observations and theoretical predictions, we use the expertise gained in the IFU data analysis to look ``through the eye of SAURON'' at our new suite of high-resolution N-body simulations of dEs in the Virgo cluster. Mimicking the observers perspective as closely as possible, we can also indicate the existing instrumental and viewer limitations regarding what we are/are not able to detect as observers.

  19. Local Group Dwarf Galaxies in the LCDM Cosmology: Theory Meets Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollerud, Erik Jon

    2012-05-01

    Dwarf galaxies include some of the most extreme low-luminosity objects in the universe, and provide important windows into a wide variety of processes in galaxy formation and evolution. In this thesis, I describe a series of comparisons between observations of dwarf galaxies and predictions of the ΛCDM concordance cosmology, with a focus on Local Group satellites. I first correct the Milky Way satellite luminosity function for luminosity bias under the assumption of a typical ΛCDM satellite distribution, finding consistency with the observations and a prediction of possibly hundreds of faint Milky Way satellites. I also describe a new technique to connect the luminous properties of these satellites (as well as brighter galaxies) to their expected dark matter halo properties. I further consider the brightest Milky Way satellite, the Large Magellanic cloud (LMC), in a cosmological context by comparing it to similar galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This shows that ΛCDM n-body simulations provide a good match to observations of such satellites. I also show that, while LMC-like satellites are not uncommon, the LMC is unusual in how blue it is, especially given that the SDSS satellites are significantly redder than typical galaxies of their size. Finally, I present a large new data for faint satellites of M31, the nearest galaxy similar to the Milky Way, providing a second data point for detailed studies of faint satellite systems. I also shows that its satellites are very similar in their general properties to that of the Milky Way satellites.

  20. Modeling spatially and spectrally resolved observations to diagnose the formation of elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Gregory Frantz

    2013-03-01

    In extragalactic astronomy, a central challenge is that we cannot directly watch what happens to galaxies before and after they are observed. This dissertation focuses on linking predictions of galaxy time-evolution directly with observations, evaluating how interactions, mergers, and other processes affect the appearance of elliptical galaxies. The primary approach is to combine hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation, including all major components, with dust radiative transfer to predict their observational signatures The current paradigm implies that a quiescent elliptical emerges following a formative starburst event. These trigger accretion onto the central supermassive black hole (SMBH), which then radiates as an active galactic nucleus (AGN). However, it is not clear the extent to which SMBH growth is fueled by these events nor how important is their energy input at setting the appearance of the remnant. This thesis presents results drawing from three phases in the formation of a typical elliptical: 1) I evaluate how to disentangle AGN from star formation signatures in mid-infrared spectra during a dust-enshrouded starburst, making testable predictions for robustly tracing SMBH growth with the James Webb Space Telescope; 2) I develop a model for the rate of merger-induced post-starburst galaxies selected from optical spectra, resolving tension between their observed rarity and merger rates from other estimates; and 3) I present results from Hubble Space Telescope imaging of elliptical galaxies in galaxy clusters at 1 < z < 2, the precursors of present-day massive clusters with M ~ 1015 solar masses, demonstrating that their stars formed over an extended period and ruling out the simplest model for their formation history. These results lend support to a stochastic formation history for ellipticals driven by mergers or interactions. However, significant uncertainties remain in how to evaluate the implications of galaxy appearance, in particular their

  1. 12CO(1-0) observation of isolated late-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauty, S.; Casoli, F.; Boselli, A.; Gerin, M.; Lequeux, J.; Braine, J.; Gavazzi, G.; Dickey, J.; Kazès, I.; Fouqué, P.

    2003-12-01

    We present 12CO(J=1-0) line observations of 99 galaxies obtained with the SEST 15 m, the Kitt Peak 12 m and the IRAM 30 m telescopes. The target galaxies were selected from the catalogue of isolated galaxies of Karachentseva (\\cite{Karachentseva73}). These data are thus representative of the CO properties of isolated late-type galaxies. All objects were observed in their central position, those with large angular sizes were mapped. These new measurements are used to estimate the molecular gas mass of the target galaxies. The molecular gas is on average ~ 18% of the atomic gas mass. Tables 1 and 2 are also available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/411/381 Based on observations made with the 12-m National Radio Astronomical Observatory, Kitt Peak, Arizona, with the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre telescope SEST, La Silla, Chile, with the IRAM 30 m radiotelescope, Pico Veleta, Granada, Spain.

  2. Integral Observations of the Reflection Component of Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabian, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    The data were analyzed by Dr. Fabian's student Adrian Turner and included in his thesis (completed Sept 2004). We did not detect MCG-6 using the then current software and the spectrum of the Circinus galaxy turned out to be even worse then the published BeppoSAX spectrum. We decided not to do any more work on it. We were contacted about the data in March by Thierry Courvoisier (the data were thea public) as he had a student, Simona Soidi, working on a compilation of spectra. Dr. Fabian sent them the chapter from Adrian's thesis and we provided some general comments on what they were doing on 6 objects. This has since been accepted for publication with Fabian as a co-author. A paper on the Integral AGN catalogue appeared on astro-ph a few days ago which contains an detection of MCG-6 with a very poor spectrum. We didn't detect it because the software back then required a source to be detected within something like 30 min exposure in order to work. Integral is NOT very sensitive.

  3. VLA observations of radio sources in interacting galaxy pairs in poor clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batuski, David J.; Hanisch, Robert J.; Burns, Jack O.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of 16 radio sources in interacting galaxies in 14 poor clusters were made using the Very Large Array in the B configuration at lambda of 6 and 2 cm. These sources had been unresolved in earlier observations at lambda of 21 cm, and were chosen as a sample to determine which of three models for radio source formation actually pertains in interacting galaxies. From the analysis of this sample, the starburst model appears most successful, but the 'central monster' model could pertain in some cases.

  4. Characterizing ultraviolet and infrared observational properties for galaxies. II. Features of attenuation law

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Ye-Wei; Kong, Xu; Lin, Lin E-mail: xkong@ustc.edu.cn

    2014-07-01

    Variations in the attenuation law have a significant impact on observed spectral energy distributions for galaxies. As one important observational property for galaxies at ultraviolet and infrared wavelength bands, the correlation between infrared-to-ultraviolet luminosity ratio and ultraviolet color index (or ultraviolet spectral slope), i.e., the IRX-UV relation (or IRX-β relation), offered a widely used formula for correcting dust attenuation in galaxies, but the usability appears to be in doubt now because of considerable dispersion in this relation found by many studies. In this paper, on the basis of spectral synthesis modeling and spatially resolved measurements of four nearby spiral galaxies, we provide an interpretation of the deviation in the IRX-UV relation with variations in the attenuation law. From both theoretical and observational viewpoints, two components in the attenuation curve, the linear background and the 2175 Å bump, are suggested to be the parameters in addition to the stellar population age (addressed in the first paper of this series) in the IRX-UV function; different features in the attenuation curve are diagnosed for the galaxies in our sample. Nevertheless, it is often difficult to ascertain the attenuation law for galaxies in actual observations. Possible reasons for preventing the successful detection of the parameters in the attenuation curve are also discussed in this paper, including the degeneracy of the linear background and the 2175 Å bump in observational channels, the requirement for young and dust-rich systems to study, and the difficulty in accurate estimates of dust attenuations at different wavelength bands.

  5. Observationally Constrained Metal Signatures of Galaxy Evolution in the Stars and Gas of Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corlies, Lauren N.

    The halos of galaxies - consisting of gas, stars, and satellite galaxies - are formed and shaped by the most fundamental processes: hierarchical merging and the flow of gas into and out of galaxies. While these processes are hard to disentangle, metals are tied to the gas that fuels star formation and entrained in the wind that the deaths of these stars generate. As such, they can act as important indicators of the star formation, the chemical enrichment, and the outflow histories of galaxies. Thus, this thesis aims to take advantage of such metal signatures in the stars and gas to place observational constraints on current theories of galaxy evolution as implemented in cosmological simulations. The first two chapters consider the metallicities of stars in the stellar halo of the Milky Way and its surviving satellite dwarf galaxies. Chapter 2 pairs an N-body simulation with a semi-analytic model for supernova-driven winds to examine the early environment of a Milky Way-like galaxy. At z = 10, progenitors of surviving z = 0 satellite galaxies are found to sit preferentially on the outskirts of progenitor halos of the eventual main halo. The consequence of these positions is that main halo progenitors are found to more effectively cross-pollute each other than satellite progenitors. Thus, inhomogeneous cross-pollution as a result of different high-z spatial locations of different progenitors can help to explain observed differences in abundance patterns measured today. Chapter 3 expands this work into the analysis of a cosmological, hydrodynamical simulation of dwarf galaxies in the early universe. We find that simple assumptions for modeling the extent of supernova-driven winds used in Chapter 2 agree well with the simulation whereas the presence of inhomogeneous mixing in the simulation has a large effect on the stellar metallicities. Furthermore, the star-forming halos show both bursty and continuous SFHs, two scenarios proposed by stellar metallicity data

  6. COMPARING THE OBSERVABLE PROPERTIES OF DWARF GALAXIES ON AND OFF THE ANDROMEDA PLANE

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Rich, R. M.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Chapman, Scott C.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Ferguson, Annette M.; Irwin, Michael J.; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2015-01-20

    The thin, extended planes of satellite galaxies detected around both the Milky Way and Andromeda are not a natural prediction of the Λ-cold dark matter paradigm. Galaxies in these distinct planes may have formed and evolved in a different way (e.g., tidally) from their off-plane neighbors. If this were the case, one would expect the on- and off-plane dwarf galaxies in Andromeda to have experienced different evolutionary histories, which should be reflected by the chemistries, dynamics, and star formation histories of the two populations. In this work, we present new, robust kinematic observations for two on-plane M31 dwarf spheroidal galaxies (And XVI and XVII) and compile and compare all available observational metrics for the on- and off-plane dwarfs to search for a signal that would corroborate such a hypothesis. We find that, barring their spatial alignment, the on- and off-plane Andromeda dwarf galaxies are indistinguishable from one another, arguing against vastly different formative and evolutionary histories for these two populations.

  7. Alma observations of nearby luminous infrared galaxies with various agn energetic contributions using dense gas tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of our ALMA Cycle 0 observations, using HCN/HCO{sup +}/HNC J = 4-3 lines, of six nearby luminous infrared galaxies with various energetic contributions from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) estimated from previous infrared spectroscopy. These lines are very effective for probing the physical properties of high-density molecular gas around the hidden energy sources in the nuclear regions of these galaxies. We find that HCN to HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 flux ratios tend to be higher in AGN-important galaxies than in starburst-dominated regions, as was seen at the J = 1-0 transition, while there is no clear difference in the HCN-to-HNC J = 4-3 flux ratios among observed sources. A galaxy with a starburst-type infrared spectral shape and very large molecular line widths shows a high HCN-to-HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 flux ratio, which could be due to turbulence-induced heating. We propose that enhanced HCN J = 4-3 emission relative to HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 could be used to detect more energetic activity than normal starbursts, including deeply buried AGNs, in dusty galaxy populations.

  8. A general relativistic signature in the galaxy bispectrum: the local effects of observing on the lightcone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeh, Obinna; Jolicoeur, Sheean; Maartens, Roy; Clarkson, Chris

    2017-03-01

    Next-generation galaxy surveys will increasingly rely on the galaxy bispectrum to improve cosmological constraints, especially on primordial non-Gaussianity. A key theoretical requirement that remains to be developed is the analysis of general relativistic effects on the bispectrum, which arise from observing galaxies on the past lightcone, as well as from relativistic corrections to the dynamics. As an initial step towards a fully relativistic analysis of the galaxy bispectrum, we compute for the first time the local relativistic lightcone effects on the bispectrum, which come from Doppler and gravitational potential contributions. For the galaxy bispectrum, the problem is much more complex than for the power spectrum, since we need the lightcone corrections at second order. Mode-coupling contributions at second order mean that relativistic corrections can be non-negligible at smaller scales than in the case of the power spectrum. In a primordial Gaussian universe, we show that the local lightcone projection effects for squeezed shapes at z ~ 1 mean that the bispectrum can differ from the Newtonian prediction by gtrsim 10% when the short modes are k lesssim (50 Mpc)‑1. These relativistic projection effects, if ignored in the analysis of observations, could be mistaken for primordial non-Gaussianity. For upcoming surveys which probe equality scales and beyond, all relativistic lightcone effects and relativistic dynamical corrections should be included for an accurate measurement of primordial non-Gaussianity.

  9. NGC 5548: LACK OF A BROAD Fe K{alpha} LINE AND CONSTRAINTS ON THE LOCATION OF THE HARD X-RAY SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Brenneman, L. W.; Elvis, M.; Krongold, Y.; Liu, Y.; Mathur, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of the co-added and individual 0.7-40 keV spectra from seven Suzaku observations of the Sy 1.5 galaxy NGC 5548 taken over a period of eight weeks. We conclude that the source has a moderately ionized, three-zone warm absorber, a power-law continuum, and exhibits contributions from cold, distant reflection. Relativistic reflection signatures are not significantly detected in the co-added data, and we place an upper limit on the equivalent width of a relativistically broad Fe K{alpha} line at EW {<=} 26 eV at 90% confidence. Thus NGC 5548 can be labeled as a 'weak' type 1 active galactic nucleus (AGN) in terms of its observed inner disk reflection signatures, in contrast to sources with very broad, strong iron lines such as MCG-6-30-15, which are likely much fewer in number. We compare physical properties of NGC 5548 and MCG-6-30-15 that might explain this difference in their reflection properties. Though there is some evidence that NGC 5548 may harbor a truncated inner accretion disk, this evidence is inconclusive, so we also consider light bending of the hard X-ray continuum emission in order to explain the lack of relativistic reflection in our observation. If the absence of a broad Fe K{alpha} line is interpreted in the light-bending context, we conclude that the source of the hard X-ray continuum lies at radii r{sub s} {approx}> 100 r{sub g}. We note, however, that light-bending models must be expanded to include a broader range of physical parameter space in order to adequately explain the spectral and timing properties of average AGNs, rather than just those with strong, broad iron lines.

  10. Deep Fabry-Perot Hα observations of two Sculptor group galaxies, NGC 247 and 300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Marcelin, M.; Epinat, B.; Carignan, C.; de Denus-Baillargeon, M.-M.; Daigle, O.; Hernandez, O.

    2011-09-01

    It has been suggested that diffuse ionized gas can extend all the way to the end of the H I disc, and even beyond, such as in the case of the warped galaxyNGC 253 (Bland-Hawthorn et al.). Detecting ionized gas at these radii could carry significant implications as to the distribution of dark matter in galaxies. With the aim of detecting this gas, we carried out a deep Hα kinematical analysis of two Sculptor group galaxies, NGC 247 and 300. The Fabry-Perot data were taken at the 36-cm Marseille Telescope in La Silla, Chile, offering a large field of view. With almost 20 hours of observations for each galaxy, very faint diffuse emission is detected. Typical emission measures of 0.1 cm-6 pc are reached. For NGC 247, emission extending up to a radius comparable with that of the H I disc (r˜ 13 arcmin) is found, but no emission is seen beyond the H I disc. For NGC 300, we detect ionized gas on the entirety of our field of view (rmax˜ 14 arcmin), and find that the bright H II regions are embedded in a diffuse background. Using the deep data, extended optical rotation curves are obtained, as well as mass models. These are the most extended optical rotation curves thus far for these galaxies. We find no evidence suggesting that NGC 247 has a warped disc, and to account for our non-detection of Hα emission beyond its H I disc, as opposed to the warped galaxy NGC 253, our results favour the model in which, only through a warp, ionization by hot young stars in the central region of a galaxy can let photons escape and ionize the interstellar medium in the outer parts.

  11. BLAST OBSERVATIONS OF RESOLVED GALAXIES: TEMPERATURE PROFILES AND THE EFFECT OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI ON FIR TO SUBMILLIMETER EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, Donald V.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Pascale, Enzo; Bock, James J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon; Klein, Jeff; Rex, Marie; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; Martin, Peter G.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Olmi, Luca; Patanchon, Guillaume

    2009-12-20

    Over the course of two flights, the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) made resolved maps of seven nearby (<25 Mpc) galaxies at 250, 350, and 500 mum. During its 2005 June flight from Sweden, BLAST observed a single nearby galaxy, NGC 4565. During the 2006 December flight from Antarctica, BLAST observed the nearby galaxies NGC 1097, NGC 1291, NGC 1365, NGC 1512, NGC 1566, and NGC 1808. We fit physical dust models to a combination of BLAST observations and other available data for the galaxies observed by Spitzer. We fit a modified blackbody to the remaining galaxies to obtain total dust mass and mean dust temperature. For the four galaxies with Spitzer data, we also produce maps and radial profiles of dust column density and temperature. We measure the fraction of BLAST detected flux originating from the central cores of these galaxies and use this to calculate a 'core fraction', an upper limit on the 'active galactic nucleus fraction' of these galaxies. We also find our resolved observations of these galaxies give a dust mass estimate 5-19 times larger than an unresolved observation would predict. Finally, we are able to use these data to derive a value for the dust mass absorption coefficient of kappa = 0.29 +- 0.03 m{sup 2} kg{sup -1} at 250 mum. This study is an introduction to future higher-resolution and higher-sensitivity studies to be conducted by Herschel and SCUBA-2.

  12. Deep Galex Observations of the Coma Cluster: Source Catalog and Galaxy Counts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, D.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Mobasher, B.; Miller, N.; Smith, R.; Arnouts, S.; Milliard, B.; Jenkins, L.

    2010-01-01

    We present a source catalog from deep 26 ks GALEX observations of the Coma cluster in the far-UV (FUV; 1530 Angstroms) and near-UV (NUV; 2310 Angstroms) wavebands. The observed field is centered 0.9 deg. (1.6 Mpc) south-west of the Coma core, and has full optical photometric coverage by SDSS and spectroscopic coverage to r-21. The catalog consists of 9700 galaxies with GALEX and SDSS photometry, including 242 spectroscopically-confirmed Coma member galaxies that range from giant spirals and elliptical galaxies to dwarf irregular and early-type galaxies. The full multi-wavelength catalog (cluster plus background galaxies) is 80% complete to NUV=23 and FUV=23.5, and has a limiting depth at NUV=24.5 and FUV=25.0 which corresponds to a star formation rate of 10(exp -3) solar mass yr(sup -1) at the distance of Coma. The GALEX images presented here are very deep and include detections of many resolved cluster members superposed on a dense field of unresolved background galaxies. This required a two-fold approach to generating a source catalog: we used a Bayesian deblending algorithm to measure faint and compact sources (using SDSS coordinates as a position prior), and used the GALEX pipeline catalog for bright and/or extended objects. We performed simulations to assess the importance of systematic effects (e.g. object blends, source confusion, Eddington Bias) that influence source detection and photometry when using both methods. The Bayesian deblending method roughly doubles the number of source detections and provides reliable photometry to a few magnitudes deeper than the GALEX pipeline catalog. This method is also free from source confusion over the UV magnitude range studied here: conversely, we estimate that the GALEX pipeline catalogs are confusion limited at NUV approximately 23 and FUV approximately 24. We have measured the total UV galaxy counts using our catalog and report a 50% excess of counts across FUV=22-23.5 and NUV=21.5-23 relative to previous GALEX

  13. Near-Infrared Faint Galaxies in the Subaru Deep Field: Comparing the Theory with Observations for Galaxy Counts, Colors, and Size Distributions to K ~ 24.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totani, Tomonori; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Maihara, Toshinori; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Motohara, Kentaro

    2001-10-01

    Galaxy counts in the K band, (J-K) colors, and apparent size distributions of faint galaxies in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF) down to K~24.5 were studied in detail. Special attention has been paid to take into account various selection effects, including the cosmological dimming of surface brightness, to avoid any systematic bias that may be the origin of controversy in previously published results. We also tried to be very careful about systematic model uncertainties; we present a comprehensive survey of these systematic uncertainties and dependence on various parameters, and we have shown that the dominant factors to determine galaxy counts in this band are cosmology and number evolution. We found that the pure luminosity evolution (PLE) model is very consistent with all the SDF data down to K~22.5, without any evidence for number or size evolution in a low-density, Λ-dominated flat universe, which is now favored by various cosmological observations. On the other hand, a number evolution of galaxies with η~2, when invoked as the luminosity conserving mergers as φ*~(1+z)η and L*~(1+z)-η for all types of galaxies, is necessary to explain the data in the Einstein-de Sitter universe. If the popular Λ-dominated universe is taken for granted, our result then gives a strong constraint on the number evolution of giant elliptical or early-type galaxies to z~1-2 that must be met by any models in the hierarchically clustering universe, since such galaxies are the dominant population in this magnitude range (K<~22.5). A number evolution with η~1 is already difficult to reconcile with the data in this universe. On the other hand, number evolution of late-type galaxies and/or dwarf galaxies, which has been suggested by previous studies of optical galaxies, is allowed from the data. In the fainter magnitude range of K>~22.5, we found a slight excess of observed counts over the prediction of the PLE model when elliptical galaxies are treated as a single population. We

  14. The impact of compact radio sources on their host galaxies: observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadhunter, C.

    2016-02-01

    I review the observational evidence that CSS/GPS radio sources have a significant impact on the evolution of their host galaxies, particularly on the kpc-scales of the galaxy bulges. Starting with an overview of the observational evidence for jet-cloud interactions and warm ionised outflows in CSS/GPS sources, I then consider the challenges involved in quantifying the feedback effect of the warm outflows in terms of their mass outflow rates and kinetic powers. For the best-observed cases it is shown that the warm outflows may have a major negative feedback effect in the very central regions, but probably lack the power to heat and eject the full cool ISM contents of the host galaxies. In contrast, the recently-discovered neutral and molecular outflows are more massive and powerful and therefore carry more destructive potential. However, the feedback effect of such outflows is not necessarily negative: there is now clear observational evidence that the molecular outflows are formed as the hot, compressed gas cools behind fast shocks driven into the ISM by the relativistic jets. The natural endpoint of this process is the formation of stars. Therefore, jet-induced star formation may be a significant process in CSS/GPS radio galaxies. Finally, I discuss whether CSS/GPS sources are ``imposters'' in flux-limited radio samples, due the flux boosting of the radio sources by strong jet-cloud interactions in the early stages of radio source evolution.

  15. Extending ALFALFA: Reducing L-Band Wide Observations of Optically Selected Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Evan; O'Donoghue, Aileen A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    Observations of galaxies in the Virgo Cluster were completed at the Arecibo Observatory in the spring and summer of 2015. 161 targets were observed, selected by photometry criteria such as magnitude and shape from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The targets, some too dim to be detected by Arecibo's ALFA drift scanner, were observed with the L-Band Wide detector. Once reductions in an IDL environment were done, these data were matched to the targets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the GALEX/MAST catalog. 115 of the 161 targets observed had positive detections, a 71% success rate. Comparing the galaxies that were detected against the galaxies that were not detected (by the L-Band Wide receiver) will allow us to refine our method of using photometric data to select HI-rich galaxies in the 2000 km/s to 9000 km/s range to refine our selection for the Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS), which uses the same method of target selection.

  16. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Observations of the Host Galaxy of GRB 970508

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruchter, A. S.; Pian, E.; Gibbons, R.; Thorsett, S. E.; Ferguson, H.; Petro, L.; Sahu, K. C.; Livio, M.; Caraveo, P.; Frontera, F.; Kouveliotou, C.; Macchetto, D.; Palazzi, E.; Pedersen, H.; Tavani, M.; van Paradijs, J.

    2000-12-01

    We report on observations of the field of GRB 970508 made in 1998 early August, 454 days after outburst, with the STIS CCD camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The images, taken in open filter (50CCD) mode, clearly reveal the presence of a galaxy that was overwhelmed in earlier (1997 June) HST images by emission from the optical transient (OT). The galaxy is regular in shape: after correcting for the HST/STIS PSF, it is well fitted by an exponential disk with a scale length of 0.046"+/-0.006" and an ellipticity of 0.70+/-0.07. All observations are marginally consistent with a continuous decline in OT emission as t-1.3 beginning 2 days after outburst; however, we find no direct evidence in the late-time HST image for emission from the OT, and the surface brightness profile of the galaxy is most regular if we assume that the OT emission is negligible, suggesting that the OT may have faded more rapidly at late times than is predicted by the power-law decay. Due to the wide bandwidth of the STIS clear mode, the estimated magnitude of the galaxy is dependent on the galaxy spectrum that is assumed. Using colors obtained from late-time ground-based observations to constrain the spectrum, we find V=25.4+/-0.15, a few tenths of a magnitude brighter than earlier ground-based estimates that were obtained by observing the total light of the galaxy and the OT and then subtracting the estimated OT brightness, assuming that it fades as a single power law. This again suggests that the OT may have faded faster at late time than the power law predicts. The position of the OT agrees with that of the isophotal center of the galaxy to 0.01", which, at the galaxy redshift z=0.83, corresponds to an offset from the center of the host of <~70 pc. This remarkable agreement raises the possibility that the gamma-ray burst may have been associated with either an active galactic nucleus or a nuclear starburst.

  17. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Observations of the Local Group Dwarf Galaxy Leo I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallart, Carme; Freedman, Wendy L.; Mateo, Mario; Chiosi, Cesare; Thompson, Ian B.; Aparicio, Antonio; Bertelli, Gianpaolo; Hodge, Paul W.; Lee, Myung G.; Olszewski, Edward W.; Saha, Abhijit; Stetson, Peter B.; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.

    1999-04-01

    We present deep HST F555W (V) and F814W (I) observations of a central field in the Local Group dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy Leo I. The resulting color-magnitude diagram (CMD) reaches I~=26 and reveals the oldest ~=10-15 Gyr old turnoffs. Nevertheless, a horizontal branch is not obvious in the CMD. Given the low metallicity of the galaxy, this likely indicates that the first substantial star formation in the galaxy may have been somehow delayed in Leo I in comparison with the other dSph satellites of the Milky Way. The subgiant region is well and uniformly populated from the oldest turnoffs up to the 1 Gyr old turnoff, indicating that star formation has proceeded in a continuous way, with possible variations in intensity but no big gaps between successive bursts, over the galaxy's lifetime. The structure of the red clump of core He-burning stars is consistent with the large amount of intermediate-age population inferred from the main sequence and the subgiant region. In spite of the lack of gas in Leo I, the CMD clearly shows star formation continuing until 1 Gyr ago and possibly until a few hundred Myr ago in the central part of the galaxy.

  18. Optical studies of galaxies in clusters. Observations of spirals in Virgo. III.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperandio, M.; Chincarini, G.; Rampazzo, R.; de Souza, R.

    1995-04-01

    We present the analysis of the rotation curves of a sample of 32 spiral galaxies derived from the spectroscopic observations of a sample of 47 galaxies. For 15 galaxies we were either unable to detect emission lines or measure a reasonably good rotation curve. Of the 32 rotation curves 23 are of galaxies member of the Virgo Cluster and 9 selected from the "field". Analysis of mass and density distribution have been obtained. The mass distribution of cluster galaxies belongs to the Type III proposed by Burstein & Rubin (1985) with few exceptions (NGC 4519 Type I, NGC 2280, NGC 4189, NGC 5861, NGC 6070 Type II) and, is unrelated to the morphological type. Density distribution curves from equidensity surface spheroids model, computed for the Virgo sample, result to be primarily composed of three classes. Rotation curves, none of which shows a peculiar trend, have been parametrized using the criteria introduced by Whitmore et al. (1984). The clustercentric distance of Virgo spirals does not correlate neither with OG nor with OGML in agreement with the findings of Distefano et al. (1990) and Amram et al. (1993, 1994) for other clusters.

  19. Observational Studies of the Angular Structure of the Radio Galaxy 3C 234 at Decameter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megn, A. V.; Braude, S. Ya.; Rashkovskiy, S. L.; Sharykin, N. K.; Shepelev, V. A.; Inyutin, G. A.; Vashchishin, R. V.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Bulatsen, V. G.

    2003-12-01

    An analysis of the angular structure of the radio galaxy 3C 234 at decameter wavelengths based on data obtained on the URAN-1 and URAN-2 interferometers is presented. Four of the five model components that describe the radio-brightness distribution at centimeter wavelengths are observed at decameter wavelengths: two compact components and two neighboring extended components. The fifth, undetected, component is the most extended, and encompasses the central region of the radio source, including the nucleus of the galaxy. Self-absorption is detected in the compact components, whose angular sizes are determined to be 0.27±0.03″ (northeast component) and 0.55±0.05″ (southwest component), in agreement with direct measurements at centimeter wavelengths. Most of the decameter emission of the radio galaxy is associated with its extended components.

  20. Improving Type Ia Supernova Standard Candle Cosmology Measurements Using Observations of Early-Type Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Joshua Evan

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are the current standard-bearers for dark energy but face several hurdles for their continued success in future large surveys. For example, spectroscopic classification of the myriad SNe soon to be discovered will not be possible, and systematics from uncertainties in dust corrections and the evolution of SN demographics and/or empirical calibrations used to standardize SNe Ia must be studied. Through the identification of low-dust host galaxies and through increased understanding of both the SN - progenitor connections and empirical calibrations, host galaxy information may offer opportunities to improve the cosmological utility of SNe Ia. The first half of this thesis analyzes the sample of SNe Ia discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey augmented with HST-observed SNe Ia in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields. Correlations between properties of SNe and their host galaxies are examined at high redshift. Using galaxy color and quantitative morphology to determine the red sequence in 25 clusters, a model is developed to distinguish passively evolving early-type galaxies from star-forming galaxies in both clusters and the field. With this approach, 6 early-type cluster member hosts and 11 SN Ia early-type field hosts are identified. For the first time at z > 0.9, the correlation between host galaxy type and the rise and fall time of SN Ia light curves is confirmed. The relatively simple spectral energy distributions of early-type galaxies also enables stellar mass measurements for these hosts. In combination with literature host mass measurements, these measurements are used to show, at z > 0.9, a hint of the correlation between host mass and Hubble residuals reported at lower redshift. By simultaneously fitting cluster galaxy formation histories and dust content to the scatter of the cluster red sequences, it is shown that dust reddening of early-type cluster SN hosts is likely less

  1. Discordance of the unified scheme with observed properties of quasars and high-excitation galaxies in the 3CRR sample

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2014-07-01

    We examine the consistency of the unified scheme of Fanaroff-Riley type II radio galaxies and quasars with their observed number and size distributions in the 3CRR sample. We separate the low-excitation galaxies from the high-excitation ones, as the former might not harbor a quasar within and thus may not be partaking in the unified scheme models. In the updated 3CRR sample, at low redshifts (z < 0.5), the relative number and luminosity distributions of high-excitation galaxies and quasars roughly match the expectations from the orientation-based unified scheme model. However, a foreshortening in the observed sizes of quasars, which is a must in the orientation-based model, is not seen with respect to radio galaxies even when the low-excitation galaxies are excluded. This dashes the hope that the unified scheme might still work if one includes only the high-excitation galaxies.

  2. Feedback and Brightest Cluster Galaxy Formation: ACS Observations of the Radio Galaxy TN J1338-1942 at z = 4.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirm, Andrew W.; Overzier, R. A.; Miley, G. K.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Clampin, M.; De Breuck, C.; Demarco, R.; Ford, H. C.; Hartig, G. F.; Homeier, N.; Illingworth, G. D.; Martel, A. R.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Venemans, B.; Ardila, D. R.; Bartko, F.; Benítez, N.; Bouwens, R. J.; Bradley, L. D.; Broadhurst, T. J.; Brown, R. A.; Burrows, C. J.; Cheng, E. S.; Cross, N. J. G.; Feldman, P. D.; Franx, M.; Golimowski, D. A.; Goto, T.; Gronwall, C.; Holden, B.; Infante, L.; Kimble, R. A.; Krist, J. E.; Lesser, M. P.; Mei, S.; Menanteau, F.; Meurer, G. R.; Motta, V.; Postman, M.; Rosati, P.; Sirianni, M.; Sparks, W. B.; Tran, H. D.; Tsvetanov, Z. I.; White, R. L.; Zheng, W.

    2005-09-01

    We present deep optical imaging of the z=4.1 radio galaxy TN J1338-1942, obtained using the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as ground-based near-infrared imaging data from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope (VLT). The radio galaxy is known to reside within a large galaxy overdensity (both in physical extent and density contrast). There is good evidence that this ``protocluster'' region is the progenitor of a present-day rich galaxy cluster. TN J1338 is the dominant galaxy in the protocluster in terms of size and luminosity (in both the optical and near-infrared) and therefore seems destined to evolve into the brightest cluster galaxy. The high spatial resolution ACS images reveal several kiloparsec-scale features within and around the radio galaxy. The continuum light is aligned with the radio axis and is resolved into two clumps in the i775 and z850 bands. These components have luminosities ~109 Lsolar and sizes of a few kpc. The estimated nebular continuum, scattered light, synchrotron- and inverse Compton-scattering contributions to the aligned continuum light are only a few percent of the observed total, indicating that the observed flux is likely dominated by forming stars. The estimated star formation rate for the whole radio galaxy is ~200 Msolar yr-1. A simple model in which the jet has triggered star formation in these continuum knots is consistent with the available data. A striking, but small, linear feature is evident in the z850 aligned light and may be indicative of a large-scale shock associated with the advance of the radio jet. The rest of the aligned light also seems morphologically consistent with star formation induced by shocks associated with the radio source, as seen in other high-z radio galaxies (e.g., 4C 41.17). An unusual feature is seen in Lyα emission. A wedge-shaped extension emanates from the radio galaxy perpendicularly to the radio axis. This ``wedge

  3. A deep Chandra observation of the interacting star-forming galaxy Arp 299

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasopoulou, K.; Zezas, A.; Ballo, L.; Della Ceca, R.

    2016-08-01

    We present results from a 90 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation of the X-ray luminous interacting galaxy system Arp 299 (NGC 3690/IC 694). We detect 25 discrete X-ray sources with luminosities above ˜4.0 × 1038 erg s-1 covering the entire Ultra Luminous X-ray source (ULX) regime. Based on the hard X-ray spectra of the non-nuclear discrete sources identified in Arp 299, and their association with young, actively star-forming region of Arp 299 we identify them as HMXBs. We find in total 20 off-nuclear sources with luminosities above the ULX limit, 14 of which are point-like sources. Furthermore we observe a marginally significant deficit in the number of ULXs, with respect to the number expected from scaling relations of X-ray binaries with the star formation rate (SFR). Although the high metallicity of the galaxy could result in lower ULX numbers, the good agreement between the observed total X-ray luminosity of ULXs, and that expected from the relevant scaling relation indicates that this deficit could be the result of confusion effects. The integrated spectrum of the galaxy shows the presence of a hot gaseous component with kT = 0.72 ± 0.03 keV, contributing ˜20 per cent of the soft (0.1-2.0 keV) unabsorbed luminosity of the galaxy. A plume of soft X-ray emission in the west of the galaxy indicates a large scale outflow. We find that the AGN in NGC 3690 contributes only 22 per cent of the observed broad-band X-ray luminosity of Arp 299.

  4. GBT CO observations of two ACT dusty star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Jesus; Baker, Andrew J.; Wilson, Grant; Yun, Min Su; Frayer, David T.; Harris, Andrew I.; Marriage, Tobias; Gralla, Megan; Su, Ting; Aretxaga, Itziar; Hall, Kirsten; Hughes, David; Hughes, John Patrick; Keeton, Charles R.; Menanteau, Felipe; Montana, Alfredo; Tagore, Amitpal; Tang, Yuping; Atacama Cosmology Telescope Team

    2017-01-01

    We report new observations of low-J CO emission lines in two dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) originally detected in a 470 deg^2 survey with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). Continuum and spectral line followup of the DSFG sample from which these two objects are drawn is allowing us to characterize the physical conditions and redshift distribution of this important population. The new observations, obtained with the Ka and Q-band receivers on the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), complement higher-J CO observations with the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) and the IRAM 30m telescope, trace the galaxies' cold gas reservoirs, and enable estimates of lensing magnifications within modest uncerstainties.This work has been supported by a Student Observing Support grant from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory.

  5. The no-spin zone: rotation versus dispersion support in observed and simulated dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Coral; Pace, Andrew B.; Bullock, James S.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Oñorbe, Jose; Elbert, Oliver D.; Fitts, Alex; Hopkins, Philip F.; Kereš, Dušan

    2017-02-01

    We perform a systematic Bayesian analysis of rotation versus dispersion support (vrot/σ) in 40 dwarf galaxies throughout the local volume (LV) over a stellar mass range of 10^{3.5} M_{⊙}< M_{star }< 108 M_{⊙}. We find that the stars in ∼80 per cent of the LV dwarf galaxies studied - both satellites and isolated systems - are dispersion-supported. In particular, we show that 6/10 isolated dwarfs in our sample have vrot/σ ≲ 1.0, while all have vrot/σ ≲ 2.0. These results challenge the traditional view that the stars in gas-rich dwarf irregulars (dIrrs) are distributed in cold, rotationally supported stellar discs, while gas-poor dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) are kinematically distinct in having dispersion-supported stars. We see no clear trend between vrot/σ and distance to the closest L⋆ galaxy, nor between vrot/σ and M⋆ within our mass range. We apply the same Bayesian analysis to four FIRE hydrodynamic zoom-in simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies (10^9 M_{⊙}< M_{vir}< 10^{10} M_{⊙}) and show that the simulated isolated dIrr galaxies have stellar ellipticities and stellar vrot/σ ratios that are consistent with the observed population of dIrrs and dSphs without the need to subject these dwarfs to any external perturbations or tidal forces. We posit that most dwarf galaxies form as puffy, dispersion-dominated systems, rather than cold, angular-momentum-supported discs. If this is the case, then transforming a dIrr into a dSph may require little more than removing its gas.

  6. VALIDATION OF THE EQUILIBRIUM MODEL FOR GALAXY EVOLUTION TO z ∼ 3 THROUGH MOLECULAR GAS AND DUST OBSERVATIONS OF LENSED STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Saintonge, Amélie; Lutz, Dieter; Genzel, Reinhard; Tacconi, Linda J.; Berta, Stefano; Förster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Sturm, Eckhard; Wuyts, Eva; Wuyts, Stijn; Magnelli, Benjamin; Nordon, Raanan; Baker, Andrew J.; Bandara, Kaushala

    2013-11-20

    We combine IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer and Herschel PACS and SPIRE measurements to study the dust and gas contents of high-redshift star-forming galaxies. We present new observations for a sample of 17 lensed galaxies at z = 1.4-3.1, which allow us to directly probe the cold interstellar medium of normal star-forming galaxies with stellar masses of ∼10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, a regime otherwise not (yet) accessible by individual detections in Herschel and molecular gas studies. The lensed galaxies are combined with reference samples of submillimeter and normal z ∼ 1-2 star-forming galaxies with similar far-infrared photometry to study the gas and dust properties of galaxies in the SFR-M{sub *}-redshift parameter space. The mean gas depletion timescale of main-sequence (MS) galaxies at z > 2 is measured to be only ∼450 Myr, a factor of ∼1.5 (∼5) shorter than at z = 1 (z = 0), in agreement with a (1 + z){sup –1} scaling. The mean gas mass fraction at z = 2.8 is 40% ± 15% (44% after incompleteness correction), suggesting a flattening or even a reversal of the trend of increasing gas fractions with redshift recently observed up to z ∼ 2. The depletion timescale and gas fractions of the z > 2 normal star-forming galaxies can be explained under the 'equilibrium model' for galaxy evolution, in which the gas reservoir of galaxies is the primary driver of the redshift evolution of specific star formation rates. Due to their high star formation efficiencies and low metallicities, the z > 2 lensed galaxies have warm dust despite being located on the star formation MS. At fixed metallicity, they also have a gas-to-dust ratio 1.7 times larger than observed locally when using the same standard techniques, suggesting that applying the local calibration of the δ{sub GDR}-metallicity relation to infer the molecular gas mass of high-redshift galaxies may lead to systematic differences with CO-based estimates.

  7. The Milky Way Bulge: Observed Properties and a Comparison to External Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Oscar A.; Gadotti, Dimitri

    The Milky Way bulge offers a unique opportunity to investigate in detail the role that different processes such as dynamical instabilities, hierarchical merging, and dissipational collapse may have played in the history of the Galaxy formation and evolution based on its resolved stellar population properties. Large observation programs and surveys of the bulge are providing for the first time a look into the global view of the Milky Way bulge that can be compared with the bulges of other galaxies, and be used as a template for detailed comparison with models. The Milky Way has been shown to have a boxy/peanut (B/P) bulge and recent evidence seems to suggest the presence of an additional spheroidal component. In this review we summarize the global chemical abundances, kinematics and structural properties that allow us to disentangle these multiple components and provide constraints to understand their origin. The investigation of both detailed and global properties of the bulge now provide us with the opportunity to characterize the bulge as observed in models, and to place the mixed component bulge scenario in the general context of external galaxies. When writing this review, we considered the perspectives of researchers working with the Milky Way and researchers working with external galaxies. It is an attempt to approach both communities for a fruitful exchange of ideas.

  8. Velocities of warm galactic outflows from synthetic Hα observations of star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceverino, Daniel; Arribas, Santiago; Colina, Luis; Rodríguez Del Pino, Bruno; Dekel, Avishai; Primack, Joel

    2016-08-01

    The velocity structure imprinted in the Hα emission line profiles contains valuable information about galactic outflows. Using a set of high-resolution zoom-in cosmological simulations of galaxies at z ≃ 2, we generate Hα emission line profiles, taking into account the temperature-dependent Hα emissivity, as well as dust extinction. The Hα line can be described as a sum of two Gaussians, as typically done with observations. In general, its properties are in good agreement with those observed in local isolated galaxies with similar masses and star formation rates, assuming a spatially constant clumping factor of c ≃ 24. Blueshifted outflows are very common in the sample. They extend several kpc above the galaxy discs. They are also spread over the full extent of the discs. However, at small radii, the material with high velocities tends to remain confined within a thick disc, as part of galactic fountains or a turbulent medium, most probably due to the deeper gravitational potential at the galaxy centre.

  9. Hubble Space Telescope and Very Large Array Observations of the H2O Gigamaser Galaxy TXS 2226-184.

    PubMed

    Falcke; Wilson; Henkel; Brunthaler; Braatz

    2000-02-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope/Wide-Field and Planetary Camera 2 images in Halpha + [N ii] lambdalambda6548, 6583 lines and continuum radiation and a VLA map at 8 GHz of the H2O gigamaser galaxy TXS 2226-184. This galaxy has the most luminous H2O maser emission known to date. Our red continuum images reveal a highly elongated galaxy with a dust lane crossing the nucleus. The surface brightness profile is best fitted by a bulge plus exponential disk model, favoring classification as a highly inclined spiral galaxy (i=70&j0;). The color map confirms that the dust lane is aligned with the galaxy major axis and is crossing the putative nucleus. The Halpha + [N ii] map exhibits a gaseous, jetlike structure perpendicular to the nuclear dust lane and the galaxy major axis. The radio map shows compact, steep spectrum emission that is elongated in the same direction as the Halpha + [N ii] emission. By analogy with Seyfert galaxies, we therefore suspect that this alignment reflects an interaction between the radio jet and the interstellar medium. The axes of the nuclear dust disk, the radio emission, and the optical line emission apparently define the axis of the active galactic nucleus. The observations suggest that in this galaxy the nuclear accretion disk, obscuring torus, and large-scale molecular gas layer are roughly coplanar. Our classification of the host galaxy strengthens the trend for megamasers to be found preferentially in highly inclined spiral galaxies.

  10. THE OBSERVED PROPERTIES OF DWARF GALAXIES IN AND AROUND THE LOCAL GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    McConnachie, Alan W.

    2012-07-15

    Positional, structural, and dynamical parameters for all dwarf galaxies in and around the Local Group are presented, and various aspects of our observational understanding of this volume-limited sample are discussed. Over 100 nearby galaxies that have distance estimates reliably placing them within 3 Mpc of the Sun are identified. This distance threshold samples dwarfs in a large range of environments, from the satellite systems of the MW and M31, to the quasi-isolated dwarfs in the outer regions of the Local Group, to the numerous isolated galaxies that are found in its surroundings. It extends to, but does not include, the galaxies associated with the next nearest groups, such as Maffei, Sculptor, and IC 342. Our basic knowledge of this important galactic subset and their resolved stellar populations will continue to improve dramatically over the coming years with existing and future observational capabilities, and they will continue to provide the most detailed information available on numerous aspects of dwarf galaxy formation and evolution. Basic observational parameters, such as distances, velocities, magnitudes, mean metallicities, as well as structural and dynamical characteristics, are collated, homogenized (as far as possible), and presented in tables that will be continually updated to provide a convenient and current online resource. As well as discussing the provenance of the tabulated values and possible uncertainties affecting their usage, the membership and spatial extent of the MW sub-group, M31 sub-group, and the Local Group are explored. The morphological diversity of the entire sample and notable sub-groups is discussed, and timescales are derived for the Local Group members in the context of their orbital/interaction histories. The scaling relations and mean stellar metallicity trends defined by the dwarfs are presented, and the origin of a possible 'floor' in central surface brightness (and, more speculatively, stellar mean metallicity) at

  11. Implications of a variable IMF for the interpretation of observations of galaxy populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauwens, Bart; Schaye, Joop; Franx, Marijn

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the effect of a metallicity-dependent stellar initial mass function (IMF), as deduced observationally by Martín-Navarro et al., on the inferred stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs) of a representative sample of 186 886 SDSS galaxies. Relative to a Chabrier IMF, for which we show the implied masses to be close to minimal, the inferred masses increase in both the low- and high-metallicity regimes due to the addition of stellar remnants and dwarf stars, respectively. The resulting galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) shifts towards higher masses by 0.5 dex, without affecting the high-mass slope (and thus the need for effective quenching). The implied low-redshift SFR density increases by an order of magnitude. However, these results depend strongly on the assumed IMF parametrization, which is not directly constrained by the observations. Varying the low-end IMF slope instead of the high-end IMF slope, while maintaining the same dwarf-to-giant ratio, results in a much more modest GSMF shift of 0.2 dex and a 10 per cent increase in the SFR density relative to the Chabrier IMF. A bottom-heavy IMF during the late, metal-rich evolutionary stage of a galaxy would help explain the rapid quenching and the bimodality in the galaxy population by on the one hand making galaxies less quenched (due to the continued formation of dwarf stars) and on the other hand reducing the gas consumption time-scale. We conclude that the implications of the observational evidence for a variable IMF could vary from absolutely dramatic to mild but significant.

  12. LBT/LUCIFER OBSERVATIONS OF THE z {approx} 2 LENSED GALAXY J0900+2234

    SciTech Connect

    Bian Fuyan; Fan Xiaohui; Bechtold, Jill; McGreer, Ian D.; Just, Dennis W.; Sand, David J.; Green, Richard F.; Thompson, David; Peng, Chien Y.; Seifert, Walter; Ageorges, Nancy; Buschkamp, Peter; Juette, Marcus; Knierim, Volker

    2010-12-20

    We present rest-frame optical images and spectra of the gravitationally lensed, star-forming galaxy J0900+2234 (z = 2.03). The observations were performed with the newly commissioned LUCIFER1 near-infrared (NIR) instrument mounted on the Large Binocular Telescope. We fitted lens models to the rest-frame optical images and found that the galaxy has an intrinsic effective radius of 7.4 {+-} 0.8 kpc with a lens magnification factor of about 5 for the A and B components. We also discovered a new arc belonging to another lensed high-z source galaxy, which makes this lens system a potential double Einstein ring system. Using the high signal-to-noise ratio rest-frame spectra covered by the H + K band, we detected H{beta}, [O III], H{alpha}, [N II], and [S II] emission lines. Detailed physical properties of this high-z galaxy were derived. The extinction toward the ionized H II regions (E{sub g} (B - V)) was computed from the flux ratio of H{alpha} and H{beta} and appears to be much higher than that toward the stellar continuum (E{sub s} (B - V)), derived from the optical and NIR broadband photometry fitting. The metallicity was estimated using N2 and O3N2 indices. It is in the range of 1/5 - 1/3 solar abundance, which is much lower than for typical z {approx} 2 star-forming galaxies. From the flux ratio of [S II]{lambda}6717 and [S II]{lambda}6732, we found that the electron number density of the H II regions in the high-z galaxy was {approx_equal}1000 cm{sup -3}, consistent with other z {approx} 2 galaxies but much higher than that in local H II regions. The star formation rate was estimated via the H{alpha} luminosity, after correction for the lens magnification, to be about 365 {+-} 69 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. Combining the FWHM of H{alpha} emission lines and the half-light radius, we found that the dynamical mass of the lensed galaxy is (5.8 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}. The gas mass is (5.1 {+-} 1.1) x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun} from the H{alpha} flux surface density

  13. Hitomi observations of the Perseus Cluster / Constant metallicity in the outskirts of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Norbert; Simionescu, Aurora; Urban, Ondrej; Allen, Steven

    2016-07-01

    X-ray observations with the Suzaku satellite reveal a remarkably homogeneous distribution of iron out to the virial radii of nearby galaxy clusters. Observations of the Virgo Cluster, that also allow us to measure the abundances of Si, S, and Mg out to the outskirts, show that the chemical composition of the intra-cluster medium is constant on large scales. These observations require that most of the metal enrichment and mixing of the intergalactic medium occurred before clusters formed, probably more than ten billion years ago, during the period of maximal star formation and black hole activity. We estimate the ratio between the number of SN Ia and the total number of supernovae enriching the intergalactic medium to be between 15-20%, generally consistent with the metal abundance patterns in our own Galaxy.

  14. Herschel+Hubble Observations of a Multiply-Lensed Sub-millimeter Galaxy at z~3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayyeri, Hooshang; Cooray, Asantha R.; Calanog, Jae Alyson B.; Riechers, Dominik A.; Frayer, David T.; Herschel HERMES, H-ATLAS

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of our deep Keck/NIRC2 and Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) observations of an extremely star forming lensed dusty Sub-Millimeter Galaxy (SMG) identified from the Herschel Astrohysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS). The object under study forms a complex lensing system that consists of four foreground aligned galaxies at z ~ 1 (measured from Keck/DEIMOS observations) with multiple lensing features that consist of giant arcs and counter images. Molecular line observations of the background source with Green Bank Telescope (GBT) and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) put it at a redshift of 2.685. Multi-band data from Keck, HST and Herschel yields a Star Formation Rate in excess of 1000 Solar masses per year putting this system among the most intensely star forming systems at z>2. The measured SFR puts this system well above the main sequence of star forming galaxies at z ~ 3. The measured gas fraction and molecular gas surface density measurements from long wavelength observations are consistent with theoretical models and observational trends of gas rich SMGs at high redshifts.

  15. Molecular Carbon in the Galaxy: Laboratory and Observational Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saykally, Richard James

    2003-01-01

    In a collaboration with the Mats Larsson group from Stockholm, we carried out a new measurement of the rate of dissociative recombination of H(sup *, sub j), using a new pulsed supersonic beam source of rotationally cold H(sup *, sub j). This source was first designed and characterized in our lab by IR cavity ringdown spectroscopy, determining a rotationaYtranslationa1 temperature of 20-60K, depending on conditions. This new source was then taken to Stockholm for the recombination rate studies at the CRYRING storage ring. The recombination rate constant measured against temperature yields values consistent with the most recent calculations, whereas previous experimental measurements varied over a range of 10(exp 4) and were poor agreement with theory. This is a crucial achievement for understanding the ion chemistry of diffuse clouds. Moreover, this result in combination with recent observations implies a greatly enhanced (factor of 40) cosmic ray ionization rate in a diffuse cloud (zeta Persei) relative to previous studies. The implications of this are discussed in our recent Nature paper. An enhanced cosmic-ray flux towards zeta Persei inferred from a laboratory study of the H(sup *, sub j)-e(sup -) recombination rate.

  16. OBSERVATIONS OF STARBURST GALAXIES WITH FAR-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROGRAPHIC EXPLORER: GALACTIC FEEDBACK IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, J. P.; Heckman, T.; Meurer, G.; Strickland, D.; Aloisi, A.; Leitherer, C.; Sembach, K.; Calzetti, D.; Martin, C. L. E-mail: heckman@pha.jhu.edu E-mail: dks@pha.jhu.edu E-mail: leitherer@stsci.edu E-mail: cmartin@physics.ucsb.edu

    2009-03-15

    We have analyzed FUSE (905-1187 A) spectra of a sample of 16 local starburst galaxies. These galaxies cover almost three orders of magnitude in star-formation rates and over two orders of magnitude in stellar mass. Absorption features from the stars and interstellar medium are observed in all the spectra. The strongest interstellar absorption features are generally blue-shifted by {approx} 50-300 km s{sup -1}, implying the almost ubiquitous presence of starburst-driven galactic winds in this sample. The outflow velocites increase with both the star-formation rate and the star-formation rate per unit stellar mass, consistent with a galactic wind, driven by the population of massive stars. We find outflowing coronal-phase gas (T {approx}10{sup 5.5} K) detected via the O VI absorption line in nearly every galaxy. The O VI absorption-line profile is optically thin, is generally weak near the galaxy-systemic velocity, and has a higher mean outflow velocity than seen in the lower ionization lines. The relationship between the line width and column density for the O VI absorbing gas is in good agreement with expectations for radiatively cooling and outflowing gas. Such gas will be created in the interaction of the hot out-rushing wind seen in X-ray emission and cool dense ambient material. O VI emission is not generally detected in our sample, suggesting that radiative cooling by the coronal gas is not dynamically significant in draining energy from galactic winds. We find that the measured outflow velocities in the H I and H II phases of the interstellar gas in a given galaxy increase with the strength (equivalent width) of the absorption feature and not with the ionization potential of the species. The strong lines often have profiles consisting of a broad and optically-thick component centered near the galaxy-systemic velocity and weaker but highly blue-shifted absorption. This suggests that the outflowing gas with high velocity has a lower column density than the more

  17. Cosmological implications of ROSAT observations of groups and clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, Laurence P.; Jones, Christine; Forman, William

    1995-01-01

    We have combined ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) and optical observations of a sample of groups and clusters of galaxies to determine the fundamental parameters of these systems (e.g., the dark matter distribution, gas mass fraction, baryon mass fraction, mass-to-light ratio, and the ratio of total-to-luminous mass). Imaging X-ray spectroscopy of groups and clusters show that the gas is essentially isothermal beyond the central region, indicating that the total mass density (mostly dark matter) scales as rho(sub dark) varies as 1/r squared. The density profile of the hot X-ray emitting gas is fairly flat in groups with rho(sub gas) varies as 1/r and becomes progressively steeper in hotter richer systems, with rho(sub gas) varies as 1/r squared in the richest clusters. These results show, that in general, the hot X-ray-emitting gas is the most extended mass component in groups and clusters, the galaxies are the most centrally concentrated component, and the dark matter is intermediate between the two. The flatter density rofile of the hot gas compared to the dark matter produces a gas mass fraction that increases with radius within each object. There is also a clear trend of increasing gas mass fraction (from 2% to 30%) between elliptical galaxies and rich clusters due to the greater detectable extent of the X-ray emission in richer systems. For the few systems in which the X-ray emission can be traced to the virial radius (where the overdensity delta is approximately equal 200), the gas mass fraction (essentially the baryon mass fraction) approaches a roughly constant value of 30%, suggesting that this is the true primordial value. Based on standard big bang nucleosynthesis, the large baryon mass fraction implies that Omega = 0.1 - 0.2. The antibiased gas distribution suggests that feedback from galaxy formation and hydrodynamics play important roles in the formation of structure on the scale of galaxies to rich clusters. All the groups and

  18. Surface Brightness Profiles and Energetics of Intracluster Gas in Cool Galaxy Clusters and ROSAT Observations of Bright, Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary results on the elliptical galaxy NGC 1407 were published in the proceedings of the first ROSAT symposium. NGC 1407 is embedded in diffuse X-ray-emitting gas which is extensive enough that it is likely to be related to the surrounding group of galaxies, rather than just NGC 1407. Spectral data for NGC 1407 (AO2) and IC 1459 (AO3) are also included in a complete sample of elliptical galaxies I compiled in collaboration with David Davis. This allowed us to construct the first complete X-ray sample of optically-selected elliptical galaxies. The complete sample allows us to apply Malmquist bias corrections to the observed correlation between X-ray and optical luminosities. I continue to work on the implications of this first complete X-ray sample of elliptical galaxies. Paul Eskridge Dave Davis and I also analyzed three long ROSAT PSPC observations of the small (but not dwarf) elliptical galaxy M32. We found the X-ray spectra and variability to be consistent with either a Low Mass X-Ray Binary (LMXRB) or a putative 'micro"-AGN.

  19. A Line-of-Sight Galaxy Cluster Collision: Simulated X-Ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu Hone, J. A.; Ricker, P. M.; Lamb, D. Q.; Karen Yang, H.-Y.

    2009-07-01

    Several lines of evidence have suggested that the galaxy cluster Cl 0024+17, an apparently relaxed system, is actually a collision of two clusters, the interaction occurring along our line of sight. In this paper, we present a high-resolution N-body/hydrodynamics simulation of such a collision. We have created mock X-ray observations of our simulated system using MARX, a program that simulates the on-orbit performance of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We analyze these simulated data to generate radial profiles of the surface brightness and temperature. At later times, t = 2.0-3.0 Gyr after the collision, the simulated surface brightness profiles are better fit by a superposition of two β-model profiles than a single profile, in agreement with the observations of Cl 0024+17. In general, due to projection effects, much of the post-collision density and temperature structure of the clusters is not seen in the observations. In particular, the observed temperatures from spectral fitting are much lower than the temperature of the hottest gas. We determine from our fitted profiles that if the system is modeled as a single cluster, the hydrostatic mass estimate is a factor ~2-3 less than the actual mass, but if the system is modeled as two galaxy clusters in superposition, a hydrostatic mass estimation can be made which is accurate to within ~10%. We examine some implications of these results for galaxy cluster X-ray surveys.

  20. A Galaxy Cluster Collision Viewed Along the Line of Sight: Simulated X-ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZuHone, John; Ricker, P.; Lamb, D.; Yang, H.

    2008-03-01

    Several lines of evidence have suggested that the the galaxy cluster Cl0024+17, an apparently relaxed system, is actually a collision of two clusters, the interaction occurring along our line of sight. In this paper we present a N-body/hydrodynamics simulation of such a collision between two galaxy clusters. We have created mock X-ray observations of our simulated system using MARX, a program that simulates the on-orbit performance of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We analyze this simulated data to generate profiles of the surface brightness and temperature profiles. The surface brightness profiles are better fit by a superposition of two β-model profiles rather than a single profile, in agreement with the observations of Cl 0024+17. However, due to projection effects, much of the density and temperature structure of the clusters post-collision is not seen in the observations. In particular, the observed temperatures from spectral fitting are lower than the temperature of the highest-temperature gas in the clusters. We determine from our fitted profiles that if the system is modeled as a single cluster, then the hydrostatic mass estimate is a factor 2-3 less than the actual mass, but if the system is modeled as two galaxy clusters in superposition, a hydrostatic mass estimation can be made which is accurate to within 10-20%.

  1. XMM-Newton Observations of the Cluster of Galaxies Sersic 159-03

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaastra, J. S.; Ferrigno, C.; Tamura, T.; Paerels, F. B. S.; Peterson, J. R.; Mittaz, J. P. D.

    2000-01-01

    The cluster of galaxies Sersic 159-03 was observed with the XMM-Newton X-ray observatory as part of the Guaranteed Time program. X-ray spectra taken with the EPIC and RGS instruments show no evidence for the strong cooling flow derived from previous X-ray observations. There is a significant lack of cool gas below 1.5 keV as compared to standard isobaric cooling flow models. While the oxygen is distributed more or less uniformly over the cluster, iron shows a strong concentration in the center of the cluster, slightly offset from the brightness center but within the central cD galaxy. This points to enhanced type Ia supernova activity in the center of the cluster. There is also an elongated iron-rich structure ex- tending to the east of the cluster, showing the inhomogeneity of the iron distribution. Finally, the temperature drops rapidly beyond 4' from the cluster center.

  2. VLBI observations of the nucleus of the radio galaxy Cygnus A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellermann, K. I.; Downes, A. J. B.; Pauling-Toth, I. I. K.; Preuss, E.; Witzel, A.; Shaffer, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    The central component of the radio galaxy Cygnus A has been observed in several (very long baseline interferometry) experiments between 1975 and 1979, and the results have been combined to derive a model for the brightness distribution. Some 65% of the nuclear emission appears to come from a compact core. The remaining flux density comes from a more extended region (or regions) up to 4 or 5 mas away lying along a position angle near 100 deg, which is close to that of the extended lobes. Evidence that compact central components reflect the collimation and transport of energy to the outer lobes of radio galaxies is discussed, and several interpretations of the observed asymmetries are considered.

  3. EXAMINING THE RADIO-LOUD/RADIO-QUIET DICHOTOMY WITH NEW CHANDRA AND VLA OBSERVATIONS OF 13 UGC GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kharb, P.; Axon, D. J.; Robinson, A.; Capetti, A.; Balmaverde, B.; Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, D.; Grandi, P.; Giovannini, G.; Montez, R.

    2012-04-15

    We present the results from new {approx}15 ks Chandra-ACIS and 4.9 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) observations of 13 galaxies hosting low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This completes the multiwavelength study of a sample of 51 nearby early-type galaxies described in Capetti and Balmaverde and Balmaverde and Capetti. The aim of the three previous papers was to explore the connection between the host galaxies and AGN activity in a radio-selected sample. We detect nuclear X-ray emission in eight sources and radio emission in all but one (viz., UGC 6985). The new VLA observations improve the spatial resolution by a factor of 10: the presence of nuclear radio sources in 12 of the 13 galaxies confirms their AGN nature. As previously indicated, the behavior of the X-ray and radio emission in these sources depends strongly on the form of their optical surface brightness profiles derived from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, i.e., on their classification as 'core', 'power-law', or 'intermediate' galaxies. With more than twice the number of 'power-law' and 'intermediate' galaxies compared to previous work, we confirm with a much higher statistical significance that these galaxies lie well above the radio-X-ray correlation established in Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies and the low-luminosity 'core' galaxies. This result highlights the fact that the 'radio-loud/radio-quiet' dichotomy is a function of the host galaxy's optical surface brightness profile. We present radio-optical-X-ray spectral indices for all 51 sample galaxies. Survival statistics point to significant differences in the radio-to-optical and radio-to-X-ray spectral indices between the 'core' and 'power-law galaxies (Gehan's Generalized Wilcoxon test probability p for the two classes being statistically similar is <10{sup -5}), but not in the optical-to-X-ray spectral indices (p = 0.25). Therefore, the primary difference between the 'core' and 'power-law' galaxies is in their ability to launch

  4. GALEX Ultraviolet Observations of the Interacting Galaxy NGC 4438 in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, A.; Boissier, S.; Cortese, L.; Gil de Paz, A.; Buat, V.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Madore, B. F.; Barlow, T.; Bianchi, L.; Byun, Y.-I.; Donas, J.; Forster, K.; Friedman, P. G.; Heckman, T. M.; Jelinsky, P.; Lee, Y.-W.; Malina, R.; Martin, D. C.; Milliard, B.; Morrissey, P.; Neff, S.; Rich, R. M.; Schiminovich, D.; Seibert, M.; Siegmund, O.; Small, T.; Szalay, A. S.; Welsh, B.; Wyder, T. K.

    2005-04-01

    We present GALEX near-ultraviolet (2310 Å) and far-ultraviolet (1530 Å) images of the interacting galaxy NGC 4438 (Arp 120) in the center of the Virgo Cluster. These images show an extended (20 kpc) tidal tail at the northwest edge of the galaxy that was previously undetected at other wavelengths; this tail is 15-25 kpc from NGC 4438's nucleus. Except for in the nucleus, the UV morphology of NGC 4438 is totally different from the Hα + [N II] morphology, which is more similar to the X-ray emission, confirming its gas cooling origin. We study the star formation history of NGC 4438 by combining spectrophotometric data in the UV-visible-near-IR wavelength range with population synthesis and galaxy evolution models. The data are consistent with a recent (~10 Myr), instantaneous burst of star formation in the newly discovered UV northwestern tail that is significantly younger than the age of the tidal interaction with NGC 4435, dated by dynamical models at ~100 Myr ago. Recent star formation events are also present at the edge of the northern arm and in the southern tail, while totally lacking in the other regions, which are dominated by the old stellar population that was perturbed during the dynamical interaction with NGC 4435. The contribution of this recent starburst to the total galaxy stellar mass is lower than 0.1%, an extremely low value for such a violent interaction. High-velocity, off-center tidal encounters such as that observed in Arp 120 are thus not sufficient to significantly increase the star formation activity of cluster galaxies.

  5. The star formation-AGN interplay in merging galaxies: insights from hydrodynamical simulations and observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Galarza, Juan R.; Smith, Howard Alan; Weiner, Aaron; Hayward, Christopher C.; Lanz, Lauranne; Zezas, Andreas; Rosenthal, Lee; Ashby, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Thermal emission from an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) can provide a significant contribution to the bolometric luminosity of galaxies, and its effect at infrared wavelengths can mimic the process of star-formation, jeopardizing star formation rate (SFR) diagnostics. It is therefore important to model the AGN emission and to quantify its effect on the estimated SFRs when SED fitting tools are applied. We tackle this problem by studying the dust radiative transfer calculations of hydrodynamically simulated binary galaxy mergers covering a broad range of parameters, including stellar mas ratios, gas contents, AGN luminosity and viewing angles. We apply the energy balance SED fitting codes CHIBURST and CIGALE to the mock SEDs of our simulated merger, and then compare with the results of applying the same codes to the SEDs of observed merging galaxies in the Local Universe. At different stages of the interaction, we compare their derived SFRs and AGN fractions with those predicted by the hydrodynamical simulations, for a broad range of the interaction parameters, but focus on the stages near coalescence, when the AGN contribution exceed 10% of the total luminosity. We show that the contribution to IR luminosity is greatest during and immediately after coalescence, when the two supermassive black holes of the interacting pair merge and undergo and enhanced period of accretion. Under certain conditions, CIGALE succeeds at recovering the SFRs and AGN fractions with higher accuracy than other available codes, such as MAGPHYS, even during these extreme stages. Our results show that using the IR luminosity as a simple surrogate for star formation can significantly overestimate the true SFR by underestimating the contribution from the AGN. Finally, we study the effect of using different parametric star formation histories (SFHs) when fitting the SEDs of galaxies, and show that a delayed SFH is usually a reasonable choice for merging galaxies.

  6. The properties, origin and evolution of stellar clusters in galaxy simulations and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbs, C. L.; Adamo, A.; Few, C. G.; Calzetti, D.; Dale, D. A.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Evans, A. S.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grasha, K.; Grebel, E. K.; Johnson, K. E.; Kim, H.; Lee, J. C.; Messa, M.; Ryon, J. E.; Smith, L. J.; Thilker, D.; Ubeda, L.; Whitmore, B.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the properties and evolution of star particles in two simulations of isolated spiral galaxies, and two galaxies from cosmological simulations. Unlike previous numerical work, where typically each star particle represents one `cluster', for the isolated galaxies we are able to model features we term `clusters' with groups of particles. We compute the spatial distribution of stars with different ages, and cluster mass distributions, comparing our findings with observations including the recent LEGUS survey. We find that spiral structure tends to be present in older (100s Myr) stars and clusters in the simulations compared to the observations. This likely reflects differences in the numbers of stars or clusters, the strength of spiral arms, and whether the clusters are allowed to evolve. Where we model clusters with multiple particles, we are able to study their evolution. The evolution of simulated clusters tends to follow that of their natal gas clouds. Massive, dense, long-lived clouds host massive clusters, whilst short-lived clouds host smaller clusters which readily disperse. Most clusters appear to disperse fairly quickly, in basic agreement with observational findings. We note that embedded clusters may be less inclined to disperse in simulations in a galactic environment with continuous accretion of gas on to the clouds than isolated clouds and correspondingly, massive young clusters which are no longer associated with gas tend not to occur in the simulations. Caveats of our models include that the cluster densities are lower than realistic clusters, and the simplistic implementation of stellar feedback.

  7. HALOGAS: H I OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING OF THE NEARBY EDGE-ON SPIRAL GALAXY NGC 4244

    SciTech Connect

    Zschaechner, Laura K.; Rand, Richard J.; Heald, George H.; Gentile, Gianfranco; Kamphuis, Peter E-mail: rjr@phys.unm.edu E-mail: Gianfranco.Gentile@ugent.be

    2011-10-10

    We present 21 cm observations and models of the H I kinematics and distribution of NGC 4244, a nearby edge-on Scd galaxy observed as part of the Westerbork HALOGAS (Hydrogen Accretion in LOcal GAlaxieS) survey. Our models give insight into the H I kinematics and distribution with an emphasis on the potential existence of extraplanar gas as well as a negative gradient in rotational velocity with height above the plane of the disk (a lag). Our models yield strong evidence against a significantly extended halo and instead favor a warp component along the line of sight as an explanation for most of the observed thickening of the disk. Based on these models, we detect a lag of -9{sup +3}{sub -2} km s{sup -1} kpc{sup -1} in the approaching half and -9 {+-} 2 km s{sup -1} kpc{sup -1} in the receding half. This lag decreases in magnitude to -5 {+-} 2 km s{sup -1} kpc{sup -1} and -4 {+-} 2 km s{sup -1} kpc{sup -1} near a radius of 10 kpc in the approaching and receding halves, respectively. Additionally, we detect several distinct morphological and kinematic features including a shell that is probably driven by star formation within the disk.

  8. A systematic observational study of radio properties of H2O megamaser Seyfert-2 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. W.; Zhang, J. S.; Henkel, C.; Liu, J.; Müller, P.; Wang, J. Z.; Guo, Q.; Wang, J.; Li, J.

    2017-04-01

    A systematic study is performed on radio properties of H2O megamaser host Seyfert 2 galaxies, through multiband radio continuum observations (at 11, 6.0, 3.6, 2.0 and 1.3 cm) with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope within a total time duration of 4 d. For comparison, a control Seyfert 2 galaxy sample without detected maser emission was also observed. Spectral indices were determined for those sources for which measurements exist at two adjacent bands assuming a power-law dependence Sν ∝ ν-α, where S is the flux density and ν is the frequency. Comparisons of the radio continuum properties between megamaser and non-masing Seyfert 2s show no difference in spectral indices. However, a difference in radio luminosity is statistically significant, i.e. the maser galaxies tend to have higher radio luminosities by a factor of 2-3 than the non-masing ones, commonly reaching values above a critical threshold of 1029 erg s-1 Hz-1. This result confirms an earlier conclusion by Zhang et al., but is based on superior data with respect to the time interval within which the data were obtained, with respect to the observational facility (only one telescope used), and the number of frequency bands.

  9. Observations of Paschen alpha in a Complete Sample of Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Gary J.; Goodrich, Robert W.; Depoy, D. L.

    1996-05-01

    We present infrared spectrophotometry of the Paα (n = 4-3) emission line of hydrogen, together with optical spectrophotometry of Hα and Hβ, of a flux-limited sample of 11 radio sources. The sample consists of all FR II 3CR radio sources with 0.1 <= z <= 0.2 and 5^h^ < R.A. < 16^h^ which contains eight narrow-line radio galaxies (3CR 135, 184.1, 219, 223, 236, 319, 321, and 327), two broad-line radio galaxies (3CR 234 and 3CR 303), and one quasar (3CR 273). The observations were aimed at the detection of obscured broad lines, hidden from our view by dust absorption, as a means of testing theories of the unification of radio galaxies and quasars. All the objects except 3CR 236 and 3CR 273 show significant reddening of the narrow and broad lines, typically of order A_V_ ~ 1.5 for narrow lines and ~3 for broad lines. We detect highly obscured broad-line regions in 3CR 184.1, 219, and 223, which appear to be narrow-line objects in the optical, so these should be reclassified as broad-line radio galaxies. In all cases except 3CR 273 and 3CR 303, the broad lines are reddened more than the narrow lines, locating much of the dust responsible for absorbing the broad-line emission between the broad- and narrow-line regions. The dereddened line luminosities range up to those of low-luminosity quasars. The results are broadly consistent with models which seek to unify radio galaxies and quasars through orientation, where an axisymmetric equatorial obscuring region hides the quasar nucleus from view unless the radio axis is pointing close to our line of sight. These data provide the first opportunity to model the distribution of broad-line region extinctions in a complete sample, rather than model just the fraction of quasars and radio galaxies. We develop a simple unification model that matches the observed distribution of extinctions, explains our observations, and makes predictions about the fraction of obscured quasars that will be present in samples of higher radio

  10. X-ray Scaling Relations of SPT Selected Galaxy Clusters Observed with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulbul, Esra; Chiu, Inon; McDonald, Michael; Bautz, Mark W.; Benson, Bradford; Bleem, Lindsey; Miller, Eric D.; Mohr, Joseph J.

    2017-01-01

    We will present results of X-ray observations of a sample of 68 South Pole Telescope selected galaxy clusters observed with XMM-Newton. Using X-ray follow-up observations with XMM-Newton, we estimate the temperature, luminosity, and mass of the intracluster medium within R500 for each cluster. From these, we constrain the Mg-Tx, Lx-Tx, and Yx-Mgas scaling relations for a sample of massive clusters at 0.1

  11. VLBI observations of a complete sample of radio galaxies. 4: The radio galaxies NGC 2484, 3C 109, and 3C 382

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovannini, G.; Feretti, L.; Venturi, T.; Lara, L.; Marcaide, J.; Rioja, M.; Spangler, S. R.; Wehrle, A. E.

    1994-01-01

    We present here new Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) observations of one Fanaroff and Riley (F-R) I radio galaxy (NGC 2484) and two broad-line F-R II radio galaxies (3C 109 and 3C 382). For 3C 109 new Very Large Array (VLA) maps are also shown. These sources belong to a complete sample of radio galaxies under study for a better knowledge of their structures at parsec resolution. The parsec structure of these three objects is very similar: asymmetric emission, which we interpret as the core plus a one-side jet. The parsec-scale jet is always on the same side of the main kiloparsec-scale jet. The limit on the jet to counterjet brightness ratio, the ratio of the core radio power to the total radio power and the synchrotron-self Compton model allow us to derive some constraints on the jet velocity and orientation with respect to the line of sight. From these data and from those published on two other sources of our sample, we suggest that parsec-scale jets are relativistic in both F-R I and F-R II radio galaxies and that parsec scale properties in F-R I and F-R II radio galaxies are very similar despite the large difference between these two classes of radio galaxies on the kiloparsec scale.

  12. Observational study of the candidate polar-ring galaxies NGC 304 and NGC 7625

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karataeva, G. M.; Kuznetsov, A. N.

    2008-09-01

    We present the results of our photometric ( BV R) and spectroscopic CCD observations of NGC 304 and NGC 7625, candidate polar-ring galaxies, performed with the 6-m Special Astrophysical Observatory telescope. For NGC 304, such a study has been carried out for the first time. We have obtained basic integrated characteristics of the galaxies and determined their morphological types (S0 for NGC 304 and Sa for NGC 7625). The absolute magnitudes of the galaxies, M B = -20m.81 for NGC 304 and M B = -19m.34 for NGC7625, are indicative of their fairly high luminosities. The disk and bulge parameters have been determined forNGC 304 (µ0 = 20m.60, h = 3.86 kpc, µ e = 21m.59, r e = 1.26 kpc in the B band); these correspond to the parameters of S0-type objects. The rotation velocity for NGC 304 (200 km s-1) reaches its maximum at a galactocentric distance of 3.1 kpc, which yields a mass estimate for the galaxy of 2.8 × 1010 mathcal{M}_ odot . The observed photometric features at the center of NGC 304 indicate that it may have an inner ring structure, although we have failed to confirm the existence of two kinematic systems based on our spectroscopic observations. In NGC 7625, the disk makes a dominant contribution to the total brightness. The derived integrated color indices ( B-V = 0m.81 and V-R = 0m.61) agree with previous determinations of other authors. We have estimated the учештсешщт in the inner galactic regions. In the outer regions, we have detected structures with bluer colors ( B-V = 0m.60), which may be indicative of a polar ring with a minor stellar component.

  13. Simultaneous Broadband Observations of jet-dominated active galaxies with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furniss, Amy

    2014-08-01

    The exceptionally energetic particle populations at work within powerful relativistic jets associated with active galaxies make these sources natural targets for the NuSTAR hard X-ray instrument. This space-based satellite can observe their emission between 3 and 70 keV with unprecedented sensitivity. This emission is likely due to the synchrotron process, and particles responsible for the hard X-ray emission are also expected to produce gamma-rays via inverse Compton process observed by instruments such as Fermi Large Area Telescope, VERITAS, MAGIC and HESS. Since the launch of NuSTAR, the instrument has led simultaneous broadband campaigns on multiple gamma-ray emitting jetted active galaxies. NuSTAR was able to observe Mrk 421 during unprecedented low and high states, as well as variability in Mrk 501 consistent with a magnetic reconnection event. Additionally, the extreme blazar 1ES 0229+200 was observed with NuSTAR, together with ground based gamma-ray instruments, providing the first complete picture of the broadband emission. These invaluable observations of BL Lac-type objects were supplemented with NuSTAR observations of the exceptionally variable flat spectrum radio quasar 3C 279, observed during the highest gamma-ray state yet observed by the Fermi LAT instrument. We will share the results from these multiwavelength campaigns, with particular emphasis on the implications for the study of the most relativistic particle populations at work within the Universe.

  14. Galaxy Survey On the Fly: Prospects of Rapid Galaxy Cataloging to Aid the Electromagnetic Follow-Up of Gravitational Wave Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartos, I.; Crotts, A. P. S.; Márka, S.

    2015-03-01

    Galaxy catalogs are essential for efficient searches of the electromagnetic counterparts of extragalactic gravitational wave (GW) signals with highly uncertain localization. We show that one can efficiently catalog galaxies within a short period of time with 1-2 m class telescopes such as the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) or MDM, in response to an observed GW signal from a compact binary coalescence. We find that a rapid galaxy survey is feasible on the relevant time scale of ≲ 1 week, with a maximum source distance of \\gt 200 Mpc and a sky area of 100 deg2. With PTF-like telescopes, even 1 day is sufficient for such a survey. This catalog can then be provided to other telescopes to aid electromagnetic follow-up observations to find kilonovae from binary coalescences, as well as other sources. We consider Hα observations, which track the star formation rate (SFR) and are therefore correlated with the rate of compact binary mergers. Hα surveys are also able to filter out galaxies that are farther away than the maximum GW source distance. Rapid galaxy surveys that follow GW triggers could achieve ˜90% completeness with respect to SFR, which is currently unavailable. This will significantly reduce the required effort and enhance the immediate availability of catalogs compared to possible future all-sky surveys.

  15. Structure and kinematics of polar ring galaxies: new observations and estimation of the dark halo shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, A.; Khoperskov, S.; Khoperskov, A.; Smirnova, K.; Smirnova, A.; Saburova, A.; Reshetnikov, V.

    The polar ring galaxies (PRGs) represent an interesting type of peculiar systems in which the outer matter is rotating in the plane which is roughly perpendicular to the disk of the main galaxy. Despite the long-lasting study of the PRGs, the amount of observational data detailed enough is insufficient; there still remain many open questions. Among the most interesting issues, there are: estimating the flattening of dark matter halos in these systems and verifying the assumption that the most massive polar structures were formed by accretion of the matter from intergalactic filaments. The new catalog recently compiled by our team using SDSS images increased, by several times, the number of known PRGs. The current paper gives an overview of our latest results on the study of morphological and photometric structure of the PRGs. Using the stellar and ionized gas kinematics data based on spectroscopic observations with the Russian 6-m telescope, we estimate the shape of dark matter halo in individual galaxies.

  16. Using Hydro-Simulations To Interpret Observed Kinematic Maps Of Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Raymond

    2016-09-01

    Our understanding of disk formation at z 2 is being shaped by several ongoing kinematics surveys using IFUs and slits. Primitive disks that have formed by this epoch are kinematically complex. Several processes that disrupt disks, including clumpy and smooth accretion as well as major mergers, are expected to drive these irregularities and leave signatures in the kinematic maps. While global measurements of rotation and dispersion provide a reasonable description of galaxy kinematics, the rich details of the full kinematic maps have yet to be incorporated into our analyses. In this presentation, I will present new work aimed at exploiting the full information of these data sets. We investigate mock observations (kinematic and photometric maps) for the VELA suite of ART zoom/in cosmological simulations of galaxy formation using a full dust-radiative transfer model with SUNRISE. We find that quantitative morphological indices, once applied to galaxy kinematic maps, are good discriminators of ordered, perturbed and destroyed disks. I will discuss how these indices can be applied to observational data to investigate the disk fraction at z 2.

  17. Time-resolved visible/near-infrared spectrometric observations of the Galaxy 11 geostationary satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bédard, Donald; Wade, Gregg A.

    2017-01-01

    Time-resolved spectrometric measurements of the Galaxy 11 geostationary satellite were collected on three consecutive nights in July 2014 with the 1.6-m telescope at the Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic in Québec, Canada. Approximately 300 low-resolution spectra (R ≈ 700 , where R = λ / Δλ) of the satellite were collected each night, covering a spectral range between 425 and 850 nm. The two objectives of the experiment were to conduct material-type identification from the spectra and to study how the spectral energy distribution inferred from these measurements varied as the illumination and observation geometry changed on nightly timescales. We present results that indicate the presence of a highly reflective aluminized surface corresponding to the solar concentrator arrays of the Galaxy 11 spacecraft. Although other material types could not be identified using the spectra, the results showed that the spectral energy distribution of the reflected sunlight from the Galaxy 11 spacecraft varied significantly, in a systematic manner, over each night of observation. The variations were quantified using colour indices calculated from the time-resolved spectrometric measurements.

  18. A distance to the galaxy NGC4258 from observations of Cepheid variable stars.

    PubMed

    Maoz, E; Newman, J A; Ferrarese, L; Stetson, P B; Zepf, S E; Davis, M; Freedman, W L; Madore, B F

    1999-09-23

    Cepheid variable stars pulsate in a way that is correlated with their intrinsic luminosity, making them useful as 'standard candles' for determining distances to galaxies; the potential systematic uncertainties in the resulting distances have been estimated to be only 8-10%. They have played a crucial role in establishing the extragalactic distance scale and hence the value of the Hubble constant. Here we report observations of Cepheids in the nearby galaxy NGC4258; the distance calculated from the Cepheids is 8.1 +/- 0.4 Mpc, where the uncertainty does not include possible systematic errors. There is an independently determined geometric distance to this galaxy of 7.2 +/- 0.5 Mpc, based on the observed proper motions of water masers orbiting the central black hole; the distances differ by 1.3sigma. If the maser-based distance is adopted and the Cepheid distance scale revised accordingly, the derived value of the Hubble constant would increase by 12 +/- 9%, while the expansion age of the Universe would decrease by the same amount.

  19. OSSE observations of the ultraluminous infrared galaxies ARP 220 and MRK 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermer, C. D.; Shier, L. M.; Sturner, S. J.; McNaron-Brown, K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    1997-01-01

    The results of oriented scintillation spectrometer experiment (OSSE) observations of the ultraluminous infrared galaxies Arp 220 and Mrk 273 are reported. The pointings of Arp 220 and Mrk 273 concentrated on their upper limits. The gamma ray luminosities from these sources were found to be between one and two orders of magnitude smaller than the infrared luminosities. Multiwavelength luminosity spectra are produced from the radio to the gamma ray regime, and are compared with the typical multiwavelength spectra of active galactic nuclei. The lack of measured gamma ray emission provides no evidence for the existence of buried active galactic nuclei in these ultraluminous infrared galaxies, but is consistent with an origin of the infrared luminosity from starburst activity.

  20. Optical emission in the radio lobes of radio galaxies. II - New observations of 21 radio lobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, P.; Tyson, J. A.; Saslaw, W. C.

    1983-02-01

    The authors report new identifications of optical emission associated with the radio lobes of double radio galaxies. Optical emission is present in the outer radio structure of the sources 3C 219, 3C 244.1, 3C 247, 3C 252, 3C 268.2, 3C 321, 3C 319, 3C 337, and possibly in 3C 330. The authors have not found emission to the detection limit of V ≡ 24 in the sources 3C 79, 3C 173.1, 3C 223, 3C 325, and 3C 381. Of the 21 separate sources in optical studies of extended lobes of radio galaxies reported to date, 16 radio sources observed so far show significant optical emission within one or both lobes, while in 11 of these the optical object is within 2arcsec of the radio peak.

  1. Synthetic HI observations of spiral structure in the outer disk in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoperskov, Sergey A.; Bertin, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    > By means of 3D hydrodynamical simulations, in a separate paper we have discussed the properties of non-axisymmetric density wave trains in the outermost regions of galaxy disks, based on the picture that self-excited global spiral modes in the bright optical stellar disk are accompanied by low-amplitude short trailing wave signals outside corotation; in the gas, such wave trains can penetrate through the outer Lindblad resonance and propagate outwards, forming prominent spiral patterns. In this paper we present the synthetic 21 cm velocity maps expected from simulated models of the outer gaseous disk, focusing on the case when the disk is dominated by a two-armed spiral pattern, but considering also other more complex situations. We discuss some aspects of the spiral pattern in the gaseous periphery of galaxy disks noted in our simulations that might be interesting to compare with specific observed cases.

  2. Reconstructing the primordial spectrum of fluctuations of the universe from the observed nonlinear clustering of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.; Matthews, Alex; Kumar, P.; Lu, Edward

    1991-01-01

    It was discovered that the nonlinear evolution of the two point correlation function in N-body experiments of galaxy clustering with Omega = 1 appears to be described to good approximation by a simple general formula. The underlying form of the formula is physically motivated, but its detailed representation is obtained empirically by fitting to N-body experiments. In this paper, the formula is presented along with an inverse formula which converts a final, nonlinear correlation function into the initial linear correlation function. The inverse formula is applied to observational data from the CfA, IRAs, and APM galaxy surveys, and the initial spectrum of fluctuations of the universe, if Omega = 1.

  3. Simulated observations of high-redshift galaxies with the HARMONI spectrograph for the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrew, Sarah; Zieleniewski, Simon; Houghton, Ryan C. W.; Thatte, Niranjan; Devriendt, Julien; Tecza, Matthias; Clarke, Fraser; O'Brien, Kieran; Häußler, Boris

    2016-08-01

    We show the results of a study into the performance of the E-ELT integral field spectrograph HARMONI for observations of galaxies at 2 < z < 4. Using the instrument simulation pipeline HSIM, we performed mock observations of galaxies in this redshift range using two different methods: (i) passive galaxies modeled with simple analytical spatial profiles and star formation histories; and (ii) a single z = 3 galaxy extracted from a high-resolution cosmological simulation, with a more complex and physically representative morphology and star formation history. We describe the software tools developed to convert the simulation data into a spectral cube containing the spatial and spectral properties of the galaxy's light. From the mock observations we estimate how well the intrinsic properties of the galaxy can be recovered using commonly used analysis tools. The HSIM pipeline also allows us to study observational biases and their likely impact on the data. We discuss the implications of the project for the future science with HARMONI in the critical redshift regime for mass assembly in galaxies.

  4. Spitzer Observations of MAMBO Galaxies: Weeding Out Active Nuclei in Starbursting Protoellipticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivison, R. J.; Greve, T. R.; Serjeant, S.; Bertoldi, F.; Egami, E.; Mortier, A. M. J.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Barmby, P.; Bei, L.; Dole, H.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Fazio, G. G.; Frayer, D. T.; Gordon, K. D.; Hines, D. C.; Huang, J.-S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Misselt, K. A.; Miyazaki, S.; Morrison, J. E.; Papovich, C.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Rieke, M. J.; Rieke, G. H.; Rigby, J.; Rigopoulou, D.; Smail, I.; Wilson, G.; Willner, S. P.

    2004-09-01

    We present 3.6-24 μm Spitzer observations of an unbiased sample of nine luminous, dusty galaxies selected at 1200 μm by MAMBO on the IRAM 30 m telescope, a population akin to the well-known submillimeter or SCUBA galaxies (hereafter SMGs). Owing to the coarse resolution of submillimeter/millimeter cameras, SMGs have traditionally been difficult to identify at other wavelengths. We compare our multiwavelength catalogs to show that the overlap between 24 and 1200 μm must be close to complete at these flux levels. We find that all (4/4) of the most secure >=4 σ SMGs have >=4 σ counterparts at 1.4 GHz, while the fraction drops to 7/9 using all >=3 σ SMGs. We show that combining mid-infrared (MIR) and marginal (>=3 σ) radio detections provides plausible identifications in the remaining cases, enabling us to identify the complete sample. Accretion onto an obscured central engine is betrayed by the shape of the MIR continuum emission for several sources, confirming Spitzer's potential to weed out active galaxies. We demonstrate the power of an S24μm/S8μm versus S8μm/S4.5μm color-color plot as a diagnostic for this purpose. However, we conclude that the majority (~75%) of SMGs have rest-frame mid/far-IR spectral energy distributions commensurate with obscured starbursts. Sensitive 24 μm observations are clearly a useful route to identify and characterize reliable counterparts to high-redshift far-IR-bright galaxies, complementing what is possible via deep radio imaging.

  5. Low-frequency radio observations of Seyfert galaxies: A test of the unification scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, V.; Shastri, P.; Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.; Athreya, R.

    2013-06-01

    Aims: We present low-frequency radio imaging and spectral properties of a well-defined sample of Seyfert galaxies using GMRT 240/610 MHz dual frequency observations. Radio spectra of Seyfert galaxies over 240 MHz to 5.0 GHz are investigated using 240 MHz, 610 MHz flux densities derived from GMRT, and 1.4 GHz and 5.0 GHz flux densities mainly from published VLA data. We test the predictions of Seyfert unification scheme by comparing the radio properties of Seyfert type 1s and type 2s. Methods: We chose a sample such that the two Seyferts subtypes have matched distributions in parameters that are independent of the orientation of AGN, obscuring torus, and the host galaxy. Our sample selection criteria allowed us to assume that the two Seyfert subtypes are intrinsically similar within the framework of the unification scheme. Results: The new observations at 240/610 MHz, together with archival observations at 1.4 GHz, 5.0 GHz show that types 1s and 2s have statistically similar radio luminosity distributions at 240 MHz, 610 MHz, 1.4 GHz, and 5.0 GHz. The spectral indices at selected frequency intervals (α240 MHz610 MHz, α610 MHz1.4 GHz, and α1.4 GHz5.0 GHz), as well as index measured over 240 MHz to 5.0 GHz (αint) for the two Seyfert subtypes, have similar distributions with median spectral index (α) ~ -0.7 (Sν ∝ να), consistent with the synchrotron emission from optically thin plasma. In our snapshot 240/610 MHz GMRT observations, most of the Seyfert galaxies primarily show an unresolved central radio component, except for a few sources in which faint kpc-scale extended emission is apparent at 610 MHz. Our results on the statistical comparison of the multifrequency radio properties of our sample Seyfert galaxies agree with the predictions of the Seyfert unification scheme. Figures 2, 4 and Appendix A are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Detection of Lensing Substructure Using Alma Observations of the Dusty Galaxy SDP.81

    DOE PAGES

    Hezaveh, Yashar D.; Dalal, Neal; Marrone, Daniel P.; ...

    2016-05-19

    We study the abundance of substructure in the matter density near galaxies using ALMA Science Verification observations of the strong lensing system SDP.81. We present a method to measure the abundance of subhalos around galaxies using interferometric observations of gravitational lenses. Using simulated ALMA observations we explore the effects of various systematics, including antenna phase errors and source priors, and show how such errors may be measured or marginalized. We apply our formalism to ALMA observations of SDP.81. We find evidence for the presence of a M = 108.96±0.12 M⊙ subhalo near one of the images, with a significance ofmore » 6.9σ in a joint fit to data from bands 6 and 7; the effect of the subhalo is also detected in both bands individually. We also derive constraints on the abundance of dark matter (DM) subhalos down to M ~ 2 × 107 M⊙, pushing down to the mass regime of the smallest detected satellites in the Local Group, where there are significant discrepancies between the observed population of luminous galaxies and predicted DM subhalos. We find hints of additional substructure, warranting further study using the full SDP.81 data set (including, for example, the spectroscopic imaging of the lensed carbon monoxide emission). We compare the results of this search to the predictions of ΛCDM halos, and find that given current uncertainties in the host halo properties of SDP.81, our measurements of substructure are consistent with theoretical expectations. Finally, observations of larger samples of gravitational lenses with ALMA should be able to improve the constraints on the abundance of galactic substructure.« less

  7. Detection of Lensing Substructure Using Alma Observations of the Dusty Galaxy SDP.81

    SciTech Connect

    Hezaveh, Yashar D.; Dalal, Neal; Marrone, Daniel P.; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Morningstar, Warren; Wen, Di; Blandford, Roger D.; Carlstrom, John E.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Kemball, Athol; Marshall, Philip J.; Murray, Norman; Levasseur, Laurence Perreault; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2016-05-19

    We study the abundance of substructure in the matter density near galaxies using ALMA Science Verification observations of the strong lensing system SDP.81. We present a method to measure the abundance of subhalos around galaxies using interferometric observations of gravitational lenses. Using simulated ALMA observations we explore the effects of various systematics, including antenna phase errors and source priors, and show how such errors may be measured or marginalized. We apply our formalism to ALMA observations of SDP.81. We find evidence for the presence of a M = 108.96±0.12 M subhalo near one of the images, with a significance of 6.9σ in a joint fit to data from bands 6 and 7; the effect of the subhalo is also detected in both bands individually. We also derive constraints on the abundance of dark matter (DM) subhalos down to M ~ 2 × 107 M, pushing down to the mass regime of the smallest detected satellites in the Local Group, where there are significant discrepancies between the observed population of luminous galaxies and predicted DM subhalos. We find hints of additional substructure, warranting further study using the full SDP.81 data set (including, for example, the spectroscopic imaging of the lensed carbon monoxide emission). We compare the results of this search to the predictions of ΛCDM halos, and find that given current uncertainties in the host halo properties of SDP.81, our measurements of substructure are consistent with theoretical expectations. Finally, observations of larger samples of gravitational lenses with ALMA should be able to improve the constraints on the abundance of galactic substructure.

  8. Einstein observations of the Hydra A cluster and the efficiency of galaxy formation in groups and clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, L. P.; Arnaud, K. A.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.

    1990-01-01

    The Einstein imaging proportional counter observations of the poor cluster of galaxies centered on the radio galaxy Hydra A are examined. From the surface brightness profile, it is found that the X-ray-emitting gas in the Hydra A cluster must be condensing out of the intracluster medium at a rate of 600 solar masses/yr. This is one of the largest mass deposition rates observed in a cluster of galaxies. The ratio of gas mass to stellar mass is compared for a variety of systems, showing that this ratio correlates with the gas temperature.

  9. The ``Sausage'' and ``Toothbrush'' clusters of galaxies and the prospects of LOFAR observations of clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röttgering, H.; van Weeren, R.; Brüggen, M.; Croston, J.; Hoeft, M.; Ogrean, G.; Barthel, P.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Brunetti, G.; Cassano, R.; Chyży, K.; Conway, J.; De Gasperin, F.; Ferrari, C.; Heald, G.; Jackson, N.; Jarvis, M.; Lehnert, M.; Macario, G.; Miley, G.; Orrú, E.; Pizzo, R.; Rafferty, D.; Stroe, A.; Tasse, C.; van der Tol, S.; White, G.; Wise, M.; LOFAR Collaboration

    2013-04-01

    LOFAR, the Low Frequency Radio Array, is a new pan-European radio telescope that is almost fully operational. One of its main drivers is to make deep images of the low frequency radio sky. To be able to do this a number of challenges need to be addressed. These include the high data rates, removal of radio frequency interference, calibration of the beams and correcting for the corrupting influence of the ionosphere. One of the key science goals is to study merger shocks, particle acceleration mechanisms and the structure of magnetic fields in nearby and distant merging clusters. Recent studies with the GMRT and WSRT radio telescopes of the ``Sausage'' and the ``Toothbrush'' clusters have given a very good demonstration of the power of radio observations to study merging clusters. Recently we discovered that both clusters contain relic and halo sources, large diffuse regions of radio emission not associated with individual galaxies. The 2 Mpc northern relic in the Sausage cluster displays highly aligned magnetic fields and and exhibits a strong spectral index gradient that is a consequence of cooling of the synchrotron emitting particles in the post-shock region. We have argued that these observations provide strong evidence that shocks in merging clusters are capable of accelerating particles. For the Toothbrush cluster we observe a puzzling linear relic that extends over 2 Mpc. The proposed scenario is that a triple-merger can lead to such a structure. With LOFAR's sensitivity it will not only be possible to trace much weaker shocks, but also to study those shocks due to merging clusters up to redshifts of at least one.

  10. An Observational Guide to Identifying Pseudobulges and Classical Bulges in Disc Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, David B.; Drory, Niv

    In this review our aim is to summarize the observed properties of pseudobulges and classical bulges. We utilize an empirical approach to studying the properties of bulges in disc galaxies, and restrict our analysis to statistical properties. A clear bimodality is observed in a number of properties including morphology, structural properties, star formation, gas content & stellar population, and kinematics. We conclude by summarizing those properties that isolate pseudobulges from classical bulges. Our intention is to describe a practical, easy to use, list of criteria for identifying bulge types.

  11. Analysis of LAC Observations of Clusters of Galaxies and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, J.

    1996-01-01

    The following publications are included and serve as the final report: The X-ray Spectrum of Abell 665; Clusters of Galaxies; Ginga Observation of an Oxygen-rich Supernova Remnant; Ginga Observations of the Coma Cluster and Studies of the Spatial Distribution of Iron; A Measurement of the Hubble Constant from the X-ray Properties and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect of Abell 2218; Non-polytropic Model for the Coma Cluster; and Abundance Gradients in Cooling Flow Clusters: Ginga LAC (Large Area Counter) and Einstein SSS (Solid State Spectrometer) Spectra of A496, A1795, A2142, and A2199.

  12. Compton Observatory observations of clusters of galaxies and extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This task involved the investigation of the emission of clusters of galaxies, particularly those which contain extended radio emission, in the gamma-ray region of the spectrum. Observations were made of several clusters using the Compton Observatory EGRET instrument. For each cluster a measured flux or upper limit on the gamma-ray flux was obtained. In only one case, Abell 2199, was there a significant measured flux. This source is spatially confused with a know blazar in the field of view. The observation is consistent with all emissions being from the blazar.

  13. From Observations to Self-consistent Modelling of the ISM in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Avillez, M.; Breitschwerdt, D.

    Since we are on the verge of studying the ISM in great detail due to immensely improved observational facilities and techniques in all wavelength ranges and similar progress on the computer hard- and software side, a major goal of this symposium will be to stimulate an intense discussion between observers and theoreticians on a self-consistent picture of the ISM. Observers should tell us WHAT we see on ALL scales of the ISM, near and far, and what boundary conditions would be appropriate for realistic models, and theoreticians should point out what assumptions and simplifications their codes need, and WHAT future observations could test their models. Thus, the workshop will start with sessions on ISM observations: Bubbles, superbubbles, stellar winds, chimneys, galactic fountains, HVCs, X-ray halos, diffuse ionized gas in galaxies, formation of molecular clouds, magnetic fields and the dynamo mechanism in the Galaxy, and turbulence in the ISM. All these subjects are of great importance for the task at hand. Followed on the last day with a session on the self consistent picture of the ISM where observations that give us information of the self-consistent picture will discussed as well as the numerical modeling and techniques.

  14. Non-Gaussianities due to relativistic corrections to the observed galaxy bispectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Dio, E.; Perrier, H.; Durrer, R.; Marozzi, G.; Moradinezhad Dizgah, A.; Noreña, J.; Riotto, A.

    2017-03-01

    High-precision constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity (PNG) will significantly improve our understanding of the physics of the early universe. Among all the subtleties in using large scale structure observables to constrain PNG, accounting for relativistic corrections to the clustering statistics is particularly important for the upcoming galaxy surveys covering progressively larger fraction of the sky. We focus on relativistic projection effects due to the fact that we observe the galaxies through the light that reaches the telescope on perturbed geodesics. These projection effects can give rise to an effective fNL that can be misinterpreted as the primordial non-Gaussianity signal and hence is a systematic to be carefully computed and accounted for in modelling of the bispectrum. We develop the technique to properly account for relativistic effects in terms of purely observable quantities, namely angles and redshifts. We give some examples by applying this approach to a subset of the contributions to the tree-level bispectrum of the observed galaxy number counts calculated within perturbation theory and estimate the corresponding non-Gaussianity parameter, fNL, for the local, equilateral and orthogonal shapes. For the local shape, we also compute the local non-Gaussianity resulting from terms obtained using the consistency relation for observed number counts. Our goal here is not to give a precise estimate of fNL for each shape but rather we aim to provide a scheme to compute the non-Gaussian contamination due to relativistic projection effects. For the terms considered in this work, we obtain contamination of fNLloc ~ Script O(1).

  15. Comparative Analysis of Gas Halos in High Redshift Galaxies: Observations vs Λ-CDM Simluations with Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher W.; Klypin, A.; Ceverino, D.; Kacprzak, G. G.

    2007-12-01

    Analysis of mock quasar spectra of metal absorption lines in the proximity of formed galaxies in cosmological simulation is a highly promising approach for interpreting the efficiency with which gas is converted into stars in galaxies, the mechanisms of gas inflow in the context of the cosmic web, and the star-gas feedback processes in galaxies. We are undertaking a wholesale approach to use powerful Λ-CDM simulations to interpret high-quality absorption line data (HIRES/UVES) and high-quality galaxy imaging data (HST) for inferring the interplay between galaxies and metal enriched gas in the vicinity of galaxies (few hundred kpc). The simulations are performed using the Eulerian Gasdynamics plus N-body Adaptive Refinement Tree (ART) code, which has gas cell resolutions of 20-50 pc. Physical processes implemented in the code include radiative cooling, star formation, metal enrichment and thermal feedback due to type II and type Ia supernovae. We quantitatively compare the observed and simulated spatial and kinematic distribution of HI, MgII, CIV, and OVI absorption lines over a range of impact parameters as a function of redshift, and discuss key insights for interpreting the underlying temperature, density, and ionization structure of the halo/cosmic-web interface, and the influence of galaxies on its chemical enrichment. Disparities between the simulations and the statistical cross sections and velocity spreads of the absorption line data in turn provide powerful constraints on the galaxy feedback recipes, which we quantitatively examine.

  16. Radio continuum observations of local star-forming galaxies using the Caltech Continuum Backend on the green bank telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Rabidoux, Katie; Pisano, D. J.; Kepley, Amanda A.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Balser, Dana S.

    2014-01-01

    We observed radio continuum emission in 27 local (D < 70 Mpc) star-forming galaxies with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope between 26 GHz and 40 GHz using the Caltech Continuum Backend. We obtained detections for 22 of these galaxies at all four sub-bands and four more marginal detections by taking the average flux across the entire bandwidth. This is the first detection (full or marginal) at these frequencies for 22 of these galaxies. We fit spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for all of the four sub-band detections. For 14 of the galaxies, SEDs were best fit by a combination of thermal free-free and nonthermal synchrotron components. Eight galaxies with four sub-band detections had steep spectra that were only fit by a single nonthermal component. Using these fits, we calculated supernova rates, total number of equivalent O stars, and star formation rates within each ∼23'' beam. For unresolved galaxies, these physical properties characterize the galaxies' recent star formation on a global scale. We confirm that the radio-far-infrared correlation holds for the unresolved galaxies' total 33 GHz flux regardless of their thermal fractions, though the scatter on this correlation is larger than that at 1.4 GHz. In addition, we found that for the unresolved galaxies, there is an inverse relationship between the ratio of 33 GHz flux to total far-infrared flux and the steepness of the galaxy's spectral index between 1.4 GHz and 33 GHz. This relationship could be an indicator of the timescale of the observed episode of star formation.

  17. A comparative study of local galaxy clusters - I. Derived X-ray observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Bartlett, J. G.; Evrard, A.

    2014-02-01

    We examine systematic differences in the derived X-ray properties of galaxy clusters as reported by three different groups: Vikhlinin et al., Mantz et al. and Plank Collaboration. The sample overlap between any two pairs of works ranges between 16 to 28 galaxy clusters. We find systematic differences in most reported X-ray properties, including the total cluster mass, M500. The most extreme case is an average 45 ± 5 per cent difference in cluster mass between the Plank Collaboration and Mantz et al., for clusters at z > 0.13 (averaged over 16 clusters). These differences also induce differences in cluster observables defined within an R500 aperture. After accounting for aperture differences, we find very good agreement in gas mass estimates between the different groups. However, the soft-band X-ray luminosity, LX, core-excised spectroscopic temperature, TX, and gas thermal energy, YX = MgasTX display mean differences at the 5-15 per cent level. We also find that the low (z ≤ 0.13) and high (z ≥ 0.13) redshift galaxy cluster samples in Plank Collaboration appear to be systematically different: the YSZ/YX ratio for each of these two sub-samples is ln (YSZ/YX) = -0.06 ± 0.04 and ln (YSZ/YX) = 0.08 ± 0.04, respectively.

  18. Chandra Observation of the Core of the Galaxy Cluster AWM 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furusho, T.; Yanasaki, N. Y.; Ohashi, T.

    2003-01-01

    We present results from a Chandra observation of the core region of the nearby X-ray bright galaxy cluster AWM 7. There are blob-like substructures, which are seen in the energy band 2-10 keV, within 10 kpc (20") of the cD galaxy NGC 1129, and the brightest sub-peak has a spatial extent more than 4 kpc. We also notice that the central soft X-ray peak is offset from the optical center by 1.3 kpc. These structures have no correlated features in optical, infrared, or radio band. Energy spectrum of the hard sub-peak indicates a temperature higher than 3 keV with a metallicity less than 0.3 solar, or a power-law spectrum with photon index approximately 1.2. A hardness ratio map and a narrow Fe-K band image jointly indicate two Fe-rich blobs symmetrically located around the cD galaxy, with the direction perpendicular to the sub-peak direction. In larger scales (r less than 60 kpc), the temperature gradually drops from 4 keV to 2 keV toward the cluster center and the metal abundance rises steeply to a peak of 1.5 solar at r approximately equal to 7 kpc. These results indicate that a dynamical process is going on in the central region of AWM 7, which probably creates heated gas blobs and drives metal injection.

  19. Rotation curve fitting and its fatal attraction to cores in realistically simulated galaxy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, Juan C. B.; Hayward, Christopher C.; Springel, Volker; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia

    2017-04-01

    We study the role of systematic effects in observational studies of the cusp-core problem under the minimum disc approximation using a suite of high-resolution (25-pc softening length) hydrodynamical simulations of dwarf galaxies. We mimic realistic kinematic observations and fit the mock rotation curves with two analytic models commonly used to differentiate cores from cusps in the dark matter distribution. We find that the cored pseudo-isothermal sphere (ISO) model is strongly favoured by the reduced χ ^2_ν of the fits in spite of the fact that our simulations contain cuspy Navarro-Frenk-White profiles (NFW). We show that even idealized measurements of the gas circular motions can lead to the incorrect answer if velocity underestimates induced by pressure support, with a typical size of order ∼5 km s-1 in the central kiloparsec, are neglected. Increasing the spatial resolution of the mock observations leads to more misleading results because the inner region, where the effect of pressure support is most significant, is better sampled. Fits to observations with a spatial resolution of 100 pc (2 arcsec at 10 Mpc) favour the ISO model in 78-90 per cent of the cases, while at 800-pc resolution, 41-77 per cent of the galaxies indicate the fictitious presence of a dark matter core. The coefficients of our best-fitting models agree well with those reported in observational studies; therefore, we conclude that NFW haloes cannot be ruled out reliably from this type of analysis.

  20. Abundance patterns in the interstellar medium of early-type galaxies observed with Suzaku

    SciTech Connect

    Konami, Saori; Matsushita, Kyoko; Tamagawa, Toru; Nagino, Ryo

    2014-03-01

    We have analyzed 17 early-type galaxies, 13 ellipticals and 4 S0 galaxies, observed with Suzaku, and investigated metal abundances (O, Mg, Si, and Fe) and abundance ratios (O/Fe, Mg/Fe, and Si/Fe) in the interstellar medium (ISM). The emission from each on-source region, which is four times the effective radius, r {sub e}, is reproduced with one-temperature (1T) or two-temperature (2T) thermal plasma models as well as a multi-temperature model, using APEC plasma code version 2.0.1. The multi-temperature model gave almost the same abundances and abundance ratios with the 1T or 2T models. The weighted averages of the O, Mg, Si, and Fe abundances of all the sample galaxies derived from the multi-temperature model fits are 0.83 ± 0.04, 0.93 ± 0.03, 0.80 ± 0.02, and 0.80 ± 0.02 solar, respectively, in solar units according to the solar abundance table by Lodders in 2003. These abundances show no significant dependence on the morphology and environment. The systematic differences in the derived metal abundances between versions 2.0.1 and 1.3.1 of the APEC plasma codes were investigated. The derived O and Mg abundances in the ISM agree with the stellar metallicity within an aperture with a radius of one r {sub e} derived from optical spectroscopy. From these results, we discuss the past and present Type Ia supernova rates and star formation histories in early-type galaxies.

  1. AN OBSERVED LINK BETWEEN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND VIOLENT DISK INSTABILITIES IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bournaud, Frederic; Juneau, Stephanie; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Mullaney, James; Daddi, Emanuele; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Elbaz, David; Salmi, Fadia; Dekel, Avishai; Dickinson, Mark

    2012-09-20

    We provide evidence for a correlation between the presence of giant clumps and the occurrence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in disk galaxies. Giant clumps of 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} arise from violent gravitational instability in gas-rich galaxies, and it has been proposed that this instability could feed supermassive black holes (BHs). We use emission line diagnostics to compare a sample of 14 clumpy (unstable) disks and a sample of 13 smoother (stable) disks at redshift z {approx} 0.7. The majority of clumpy disks in our sample have a high probability of containing AGNs. Their [O III] {lambda}5007 emission line is strongly excited, inconsistent with low-metallicity star formation (SF) alone. [Ne III] {lambda}3869 excitation is also higher. Stable disks rarely have such properties. Stacking ultra sensitive Chandra observations (4 Ms) reveals an X-ray excess in clumpy galaxies, which confirms the presence of AGNs. The clumpy galaxies in our intermediate-redshift sample have properties typical of gas-rich disk galaxies rather than mergers, being in particular on the main sequence of SF. This suggests that our findings apply to the physically similar and numerous gas-rich unstable disks at z > 1. Using the observed [O III] and X-ray luminosities, we conservatively estimate that AGNs hosted by clumpy disks have typical bolometric luminosities of the order of a few 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}, BH growth rates m-dot{sub BH}{approx}10{sup -2} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, and that these AGNs are substantially obscured in X-rays. This moderate-luminosity mode could provide a large fraction of today's BH mass with a high duty cycle (>10%), accretion bursts with higher luminosities being possible over shorter phases. Violent instabilities at high redshift (giant clumps) are a much more efficient driver of BH growth than the weak instabilities in nearby spirals (bars), and the evolution of disk instabilities with mass and redshift could explain the simultaneous downsizing of

  2. Testing the dark matter origin of the WMAP-Planck haze with radio observations of spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Eric; Linden, Tim; Profumo, Stefano; Hooper, Dan E-mail: dhooper@fnal.gov E-mail: profumo@ucsc.edu

    2013-07-01

    If the Galactic WMAP radio haze, as recently confirmed by Planck, is produced by dark matter annihilation or decay, similar diffuse radio halos should exist around other galaxies with physical properties comparable to the Milky Way. If instead the haze is due to an astrophysical mechanism peculiar to the Milky Way or to a transient event, a similar halo need not exist around all Milky Way ''twins''. We use radio observations of 66 spiral galaxies to test the dark matter origin of the haze. We select galaxies based on morphological type and maximal rotational velocity, and obtain their luminosities from a 1.49 GHz catalog and additional radio observations at other frequencies. We find many instances of galaxies with radio emission that is less than 5% as bright as naively expected from dark matter models that could produce the Milky Way haze, and at least 3 galaxies that are less than 1% as bright as expected, assuming dark matter distributions, magnetic fields, and cosmic ray propagation parameters equal to those of the Milky Way. For reasonable ranges for the variation of these parameters, we estimate the fraction of galaxies that should be expected to be significantly less bright in radio, and argue that this is marginally compatible with the observed distribution. While our findings therefore cannot rule out a dark matter origin for the radio haze at this time, we find numerous examples (including the Andromeda Galaxy) where, if dark matter is indeed the origin of the Milky Way haze, some mechanism must be in place to suppress the corresponding haze of the external galaxy. We point out that Planck data will offer opportunities to improve this type of constraint in a highly relevant frequency range and for a potentially larger set of candidate galaxies.

  3. SMA observations on faint submillimeter galaxies with S {sub 850} < 2 mJy: Ultra dusty low-luminosity galaxies at high redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2014-07-01

    We obtained Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of eight faint (intrinsic 850 μm fluxes < 2 mJy) submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) discovered in SCUBA images of the massive lensing cluster fields A370, A2390, and A1689 and detected five. In total, we obtain five SMA detections, all of which have de-lensed fluxes <1 mJy with estimated total infrared luminosities 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}, comparable to luminous infrared galaxies and normal star-forming galaxies. Based on the latest number counts, these galaxies contribute ∼70% of the 850 μm extragalactic background light and represent the dominant star-forming galaxy population in the dusty universe. However, only 40{sub −16}{sup +30}% of our faint SMGs would be detected in deep optical or near-infrared surveys, which suggests many of these sources are at high redshifts (z ≳ 3) or extremely dusty, and they are not included in current star formation history estimates.

  4. Multi-Wavelength Observations of the Supernova Remnant Populations in the Nearby Spiral Galaxies IC 342 and NGC 4258

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannuti, Thomas; Chomiuk, L.; Grimes, C. K.; Staggs, W. D.; Tussey, J. M.; Laine, S.; Schlegel, E.

    2011-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are intimately tied to many crucial processes associated with the interstellar medium of galaxies, such as the acceleration of cosmic-ray particles and the deposition of vast amounts of kinetic energy and chemically-enriched material. Well-known observational challenges in the study of SNRs located in the Milky Way Galaxy (for example, formidable extinction along Galactic lines of sight and considerable uncertainties in the distances to these sources) have motivated searches for SNRs in nearby galaxies at such characteristic wavelengths as X-ray, optical and radio. These searches have revealed a considerable number of SNRs and led to new insights into their properties, but the SNR populations in only a handful of nearby galaxies have been adequately surveyed at multiple wavelengths. To help remedy this situation, we are conducting a multi-wavelength study of the SNR population of selected nearby galaxies. To illustrate our work, we present the results of studies of the SNR population in two nearby spiral galaxies, IC 342 and NGC 4258. Our results draw upon the analysis of pointed archival radio and X-ray observations of these two galaxies. Initial results will be presented and discussed.

  5. Relativistic Fe Kα line study in Seyfert 1 galaxies observed with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantovani, G.; Nandra, K.; Ponti, G.

    2016-06-01

    We present an analysis of a sample of Seyfert 1 galaxies observed with Suzaku. The aim of this work is to examine critically the evidence for a relativistic Fe Kα line in the X-ray spectra of these active galactic nuclei. The sample was compiled from those sources in which a relativistic component was missing in at least one XMM-Newton observation. We analysed the Suzaku spectra of these objects in order to have more constraints on the high-energy emission, including the Compton reflection hump. The results show that the relativistic Fe Kα line is detected (at >95 per cent confidence) in all sources observed with high-signal-to-noise ratio (e.g. where the counts in the 5-7 keV energy band are ≳4 × 104). This is in agreement with the idea that relativistic lines are a ubiquitous feature in the spectra of Seyfert galaxies, but are often difficult to detect without very high-quality data. We also investigate the relation between the Fe Kα line and the reflection continuum at high energies. For most of the sample, the strength of the reflection component is consistent with that of the line. There are exceptions in both senses, however i.e. where the reflection continuum is strong but with weak line emission, and vice versa. These observations present a challenge for standard reflection models.

  6. A Galaxy Cluster Collision Viewed Along the Line of Sight: Simulated X-ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZuHone, John; Ricker, P.; Lamb, D.; Yang, H.

    2008-05-01

    Several lines of evidence have suggested that the the galaxy cluster Cl 0024+17, an apparently relaxed system, is actually a collision of two clusters, the interaction occurring along our line of sight. In this paper we present a high-resolution N-body/hydrodynamics simulation of such a collision. We have created mock X-ray observations of our simulated system using MARX, a program that simulates the on-orbit performance of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We analyze these simulated data to generate profiles of the surface brightness and temperature. The simulated surface brightness profiles are better fit by a superposition of two β-model profiles than a single profile, in agreement with the observations of Cl 0024+17. However, due to projection effects, much of the post-collision density and temperature structure of the clusters is not seen in the observations. In particular, the observed temperatures from spectral fitting are much lower than the temperature of the hottest gas. We determine from our fitted profiles that if the system is modeled as a single cluster, the hydrostatic mass estimate is a factor 2-3 less than the actual mass, but if the system is modeled as two galaxy clusters in superposition, a hydrostatic mass estimation can be made which is accurate to within 10-20%.

  7. LATE-TIME OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 080319B: JET BREAK, HOST GALAXY, AND ACCOMPANYING SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Tanvir, N. R.; O'Brien, P. T.; Wiersema, K.; Starling, R. L. C.; Rol, E.; Levan, A. J.; Svensson, K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Granot, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Fynbo, J.; Hjorth, J.; Curran, P. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Genet, F.

    2010-12-10

    The Swift-discovered GRB 080319B was by far the most distant source ever observed at naked-eye brightness, reaching a peak apparent magnitude of 5.3 at a redshift of z = 0.937. We present our late-time optical (Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini, and Very Large Telescope) and X-ray (Chandra) observations, which confirm that an achromatic break occurred in the power-law afterglow light curve at {approx}11 days post-burst. This most likely indicates that the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow was collimated, which for a uniform jet would imply a total energy in the jet E{sub jet} {approx}> 10{sup 52} erg. Our observations also show a late-time excess of red light, which is well explained if the GRB was accompanied by a supernova (SN), similar to those seen in some other long-duration GRBs. The latest observations are dominated by light from the host and show that the GRB took place in a faint dwarf galaxy (r(AB) {approx} 27.0, rest frame M{sub B} {approx} -17.2). This galaxy is small even by the standards of other GRB hosts, which is suggestive of a low-metallicity environment. Intriguingly, the properties of this extreme event-a small host and bright SN-are entirely typical of the very low luminosity bursts such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218.

  8. Observational Constraints on the Link Between the Intracluster Medium and Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Donahue, Megan; CLASH

    2017-01-01

    We use data from Chandra, HST, Spitzer, and Herschel to study the nature of feedback in the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) of cool core galaxy clusters. Using the 16-band photometry HST available with CLASH in combination with observations taken with Spitzer, Herschel, and Chandra, we study the nature of the feedback mechanism required to offset cooling. While a great deal of progress has been made on this front, there is still much to learn from the feedback-affected stellar populations of cool core BCGs and X-ray observations of the intracluster medium (ICM).With UV through FIR SED fitting, we estimate the star formation rate, dust content, and starburst duration in UV-bright cool core BCGs in CLASH, and examine relationships between these findings and ICM cooling time and free-fall time profiles derived from Chandra X-ray imaging. We present observational evidence constraining the duration of feedback episodes and find a very tight relationship between the BCG star formation rate and the ratio of ICM cooling time to free-fall time (tcool/tff). Our observational results are fully consistent with a scenario where condensation of a depleting supply of thermally instable overdensities of the ICM gas are fueling long-duration (> 1 Gyr) BCG starbursts. We discuss the implications of our findings for theoretical models of BCG-ICM interaction.

  9. CHARACTERIZING ULTRAVIOLET AND INFRARED OBSERVATIONAL PROPERTIES FOR GALAXIES. I. INFLUENCES OF DUST ATTENUATION AND STELLAR POPULATION AGE

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Yewei; Kong Xu; Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr.; Hao, Cai-Na; Zhou Xu E-mail: xkong@ustc.edu.cn

    2012-09-20

    The correlation between infrared-to-ultraviolet luminosity ratio and ultraviolet color (or ultraviolet spectral slope), i.e., the IRX-UV (or IRX-{beta}) relation, found in studies of starburst galaxies is a prevalent recipe for correcting extragalactic dust attenuation. Considerable dispersion in this relation discovered for normal galaxies, however, complicates its usability. In order to investigate the cause of the dispersion and to have a better understanding of the nature of the IRX-UV relation, in this paper, we select five nearby spiral galaxies, and perform spatially resolved studies on each of the galaxies, with a combination of ultraviolet and infrared imaging data. We measure all positions within each galaxy and divide the extracted regions into young and evolved stellar populations. By means of this approach, we attempt to discover separate effects of dust attenuation and stellar population age on the IRX-UV relation for individual galaxies. In this work, in addition to dust attenuation, stellar population age is interpreted to be another parameter in the IRX-UV function, and the diversity of star formation histories is suggested to disperse the age effects. At the same time, strong evidence shows the need for more parameters in the interpretation of observational data, such as variations in attenuation/extinction law. Fractional contributions of different components to the integrated luminosities of the galaxies suggest that the integrated measurements of these galaxies, which comprise different populations, would weaken the effect of the age parameter on IRX-UV diagrams. The dependence of the IRX-UV relation on luminosity and radial distance in galaxies presents weak trends, which offers an implication of selective effects. The two-dimensional maps of the UV color and the infrared-to-ultraviolet ratio are displayed and show a disparity in the spatial distributions between the two galaxy parameters, which offers a spatial interpretation of the scatter

  10. Observed galaxy number counts on the lightcone up to second order: I. Main result

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Maartens, Roy; Clarkson, Chris E-mail: roy.maartens@gmail.com

    2014-09-01

    We present the galaxy number overdensity up to second order in redshift space on cosmological scales for a concordance model. The result contains all general relativistic effects up to second order that arise from observing on the past light cone, including all redshift effects, lensing distortions from convergence and shear, and contributions from velocities, Sachs-Wolfe, integrated SW and time-delay terms. This result will be important for accurate calculation of the bias on estimates of non-Gaussianity and on precision parameter estimates, introduced by nonlinear projection effects.

  11. CO observations of the SAB galaxies NGC 157, 2903, 4321, and 5248, and the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, D. M.; Elmegreen, B. G.

    1982-04-01

    Extragalactic carbon monoxide emission regions can, in principle, be located more precisely than the telescope beamwidth by using optically derived velocity distributions which have much higher angular resolution. Using this technique, the CO emission from five distant galaxies was analyzed. CO emission from NGC 1068 is strongest in the central region. In NGC 4321, it is strongest in the long bright spiral arms. CO emission from NGC 157 and NGC 2903 occurs more uniformly over the disk of these galaxies; the H II regions and dust clouds are more uniformly distributed in these galaxies as well. In NGC 157, the CO is brightest from the area including the NE spiral arm, which has more continuity and bright star formation than the SW arm. These results agree with the expectation that CO emission should be intensified near the H II regions and obvious dust clouds that usually concentrate near the spiral arms.

  12. BIMA CO (1-0) Observations of the Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy NGC 404

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, C. L.; Petitpas, G. R.

    2004-12-01

    We present high resolution observations of the CO emission in NGC 404, a nearby dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxy (D = 3.3 Mpc). NGC 404 is only the third dwarf elliptical to have its CO emission mapped by interferometric observations, and is the first outside the Local Group. Our observations show a very concentrated, marginally resolved structure about 9 × 9 arcseconds in diameter. This corresponds to a very small cloud at the center of a much larger distribution of stars. NGC 404 is surrounded by a doughnut shaped distribution of HI gas centered on the stellar component. The CO and HI appear to be kinematically distinct components, suggesting that the HI may be part of the galaxy's original gas distribution, while the CO may be recycled from the products of stellar evolution. C.L.T. has been supported by CSU Sacramento via a Research and Creative Activity Award. G.R.P. has been supported by the Laboratory for Millimeter-Wave Astronomy through NSF grant AST 99-81289

  13. KEPLER OBSERVATIONS OF THE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY II ZW 229.015

    SciTech Connect

    Carini, M. T.; Ryle, Wesley T.

    2012-04-10

    The Seyfert 1 galaxy II ZW 229.015 has been observed with the Kepler spacecraft since quarter 4 of Kepler science operations. The results of the quarters 4-7 (1 year) Kepler observations are presented in this paper. We find the source to be highly variable on multiple timescales, with discrete variations occurring on timescales as short as tens of hours with amplitudes as small as 0.5%. Such small amplitude, rapid variability has never before been detected in active galactic nuclei. The presence of a strong galaxy component dilutes the variability determined from the photometric aperture used in the standard Kepler PDC analysis. Using the tools provided by the Kepler Guest Observer Office and simultaneous V-band photometry found in the literature, we determine an optimal customized aperture for photometry of this source with Kepler. The results of a PSRESP analysis reveal tentative evidence of a characteristic variability timescale in the power spectrum. Using this timescale, we estimate the mass of the central supermassive black hole and this estimate is consistent with the virial mass estimate from reverberation mapping studies.

  14. Redshift observations of Abell/ACO galaxy clusters in two candidate superclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batuski, D. J.; Maurogordato, S.; Balkowski, C.; Olowin, R. P.

    1995-02-01

    The results of spectroscopic observations of five R greater than or equal to 1 clusters of galaxies from the Abell (1958) and Abell et al. (1989) (hereafter ACO) catalogs are presented. The observations were conducted at the ESO 3.6m telescope with the EFOSC spectrograph and PUMA hole-punch aperture plates. Two of the clusters (A2576 and A2628) had been identified as members of one candidate supercluster that appears particularly dense in projection, and the other three clusters (A3802, A3817, and A3834) were in another candidate supercluster, based on redshifts estimated from the magnitudes of tenth brightest galaxies. Our observations confirm very similar redshifts for A2576 and A2628 ( z = 0.1875 and z = 0.1858, respectively) and for A3802 and A3834 (z = 0.1579 and z = 0.1518). From the agreement in redshifts and the proximity on the sky, it is suggestive that both pairs are indeed components of superclusters, although redshifts of other nearby candidates must be measured to determine the significance of the structure present. The fifth cluster, A3817, has a mean redshift of z = 0.2115, and so appears to be background to any possible A3802/A3834 supercluster. We note that the complex of clusters around A2576 and A2628 is a region of high spatial density, even ignoring the many clusters with unmeasured redshift. The region is an exceptional opportunity for large-scale structure study.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: X-ray observations of HCG galaxies (Tzanavaris+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Gallagher, S. C.; Lenkic, L.; Desjardins, T. D.; Walker, L. M.; Johnson, K. E.; Mulchaey, J. S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we study a sample of 15 compact groups (CGs) observed with Chandra/ACIS, Swift/UVOT and Spitzer/IRAC-MIPS for which archival data exist, allowing us to obtain SFRs, stellar masses, sSFRs and X-ray fluxes and luminosities. Table 1 shows the group sample, including redshifts, luminosity distances and group evolutionary types. Allowing for the fact that some galaxies do not fall in the field of view of all three instruments, the total number of CG galaxies analyzed is 47. Details on the Swift and Spitzer observations and data for systems in this sample can be found in Tzanavaris et al. (2010ApJ...716..556T) and (L. Lenkic et al. 2015, in preparation). For Chandra/ACIS observations we refer the reader to Tzanavaris et al. (2014, J/ApJS/212/9) and Desjardins et al. (2013ApJ...763..121D; 2014ApJ...790..132D). (2 data files).

  16. Multi-wavelength observations of galaxy clusters: Population evolution and scaling relations for intermediate-redshift clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Thomas Patrick

    Galaxy clusters are key signatures of the formation of structure in the Universe due to their positions at the nodes of the cosmic web. However, these privileged positions feature significant amounts of activity as a consequence of frequent accretion and collisions with other galaxies and clusters of galaxies. Thus, a rigorous understanding of cluster evolution constrains not only cosmological structure formation but also galaxy dynamics in the most extreme environments. Here, we examine the evolution of clusters in two situations: how the properties of the hot intracluster gas changes with the total masses of the clusters at the observational frontiers of mass and redshift; and how cluster galaxies evolve with redshift in some of the most massive clusters in the Universe. In Chapter 2 we examine a population of moderate-luminosity clusters at intermediate redshifts using the XMM-Newton telescope with well-determined masses from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations. We find that these systems do not deviate from scaling relations between mass, luminosity, and temperature derived from more massive clusters, implying that, even at the redshifts and masses probed here, gravitational energetics still dominate over supernovae. In Chapter 3 we utilize new techniques to maximize a multi-wavelength dataset from HST of 25 massive galaxy clusters. We present new methods for detection and photometry of galaxies in the presence of inconsistent, diffuse background. Using these techniques, we construct a photometric catalog down to M* + 4-5 for clusters at redshift z 0:2 to z 0:9, which we validate with comparisons to spectral observations and a similar catalog. We also consider the luminosity function for these clusters; we find a drop-off in the faint-end slope when only selecting red sequence galaxies. Finally, in Chapter 4, we exploit our new photometric catalogs to study the evolution of the red galaxies, the "red sequence of galaxies," in these massive clusters of

  17. A nearby GRB host galaxy: VLT/X-shooter observations of HG 031203

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseva, N. G.; Izotov, Y. I.; Fricke, K. J.; Henkel, C.

    2011-10-01

    Context. Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), which release enormous amounts of energy into the interstellar medium, occur in galaxies of generally low metallicity. For a better understanding of this phenomenon, detailed observations of the specific properties of the host galaxies (HG) and the environment near the LGRBs are mandatory. Aims: We aim at a spectroscopic analysis of HG 031203, the host galaxy of a LRGB burst, to obtain its properties. Our results will be compared with those of previous studies and the properties of a sample of luminous compact emission-line galaxies (LCGs) selected from SDSS DR7. Methods: Based on VLT/X-shooter spectroscopic observations taken from commissioning mode in the wavelength range ~λλ3200-24 000 Å, we use standard direct methods to evaluate physical conditions and element abundances. The resolving power of the instrument also allowed us to trace the kinematics of the ionised gas. Furthermore, we use X-shooter data together with Spitzer observations in the mid-infrared range for testing hidden star formation. Results: We derive an interstellar oxygen abundance of 12 + log O/H = 8.20 ± 0.03 for HG 031203. The observed fluxes of hydrogen lines correspond to the theoretical recombination values after correction for extinction with a single value C(Hβ) = 1.67. We produce the CLOUDY photoionisation H ii region model that reproduces observed emission-line fluxes of different ions in the optical range. This model also predicts emission-line fluxes in the near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) ranges that agree well with the observed ones. This implies that the star-forming region observed in the optical range is the only source of ionisation and there is no additional source of ionisation seen in the NIR and MIR ranges that is hidden in the optical range. We find the composite kinematic structure from profiles of the strong emission lines by decomposing them into two Gaussian narrow and broad components. These components

  18. HST WFC3 Early Release Science: Emission-Line Galaxies from IR Grism Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straughn, A. N.; Kuntschner, H.; Kuemmel, M.; Walsh, J. R.; Cohen, S. H.; Gardner, J. P.; Windhorst, R. A.; O'Connell, R. W.; Pirzkal, N.; Meurer, G.; McCarthy, P. J.; Hathi, N. P.; Malhotra, S.; Rhoads, J.; Balick, B.; Bond, H. E.; Calzetti, D.; Disney, M. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, J. A.; Hall, D. N. B.; Holtzman, J. A.; Kimlbe, R. A.; Trauger, J. T.; Young, E. T.

    2010-01-01

    We present grism spectra of emission line galaxies (ELGs) from 0.6-1.6 microns from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These new infrared grism data augment previous optical Advanced Camera for Surveys G800L (0.6-0.95 micron) grism data in GOODS South, extending the wavelength coverage well past the G800L red cutoff. The ERS grism field was observed at a depth of 2 orbits per grism, yielding spectra of hundreds of faint objects, a subset of which are presented here. ELGs are studied via the Ha, [O III ], and [OII] emission lines detected in the redshift ranges 0.2 less than or equal to z less than or equal to 1.6, 1.2 less than or equal to z less than or equal to 2.4 and 2.0 less than or equal to z less than or equal to 3.6 respectively in the G102 (0.8-1.1 microns; R approximately 210) and C141 (1.1-1.6 microns; R approximately 130) grisms. The higher spectral resolution afforded by the WFC3 grisms also reveals emission lines not detectable with the G800L grism (e.g., [S II] and [S III] lines). From these relatively shallow observations, line luminosities, star formation rates, and grism spectroscopic redshifts are determined for a total of 25 ELGs to M(sub AB)(F098M) approximately 25 mag. The faintest source in our sample with a strong but unidentified emission line--is MAB(F098M)=26.9 mag. We also detect the expected trend of lower specific star formation rates for the highest mass galaxies in the sample, indicative of downsizing and discovered previously from large surveys. These results demonstrate the remarkable efficiency and capability of the WFC3 NIR grisms for measuring galaxy properties to faint magnitudes.

  19. Galaxy formation in the Planck cosmology - I. Matching the observed evolution of star formation rates, colours and stellar masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriques, Bruno M. B.; White, Simon D. M.; Thomas, Peter A.; Angulo, Raul; Guo, Qi; Lemson, Gerard; Springel, Volker; Overzier, Roderik

    2015-08-01

    We have updated the Munich galaxy formation model to the Planck first-year cosmology, while modifying the treatment of baryonic processes to reproduce recent data on the abundance and passive fractions of galaxies from z = 3 down to z = 0. Matching these more extensive and more precise observational results requires us to delay the reincorporation of wind ejecta, to lower the surface density threshold for turning cold gas into stars, to eliminate ram-pressure stripping in haloes less massive than {˜ }10^{14}{ M_{⊙}}, and to modify our model for radio mode feedback. These changes cure the most obvious failings of our previous models, namely the overly early formation of low-mass galaxies and the overly large fraction of them that are passive at late times. The new model is calibrated to reproduce the observed evolution both of the stellar mass function and of the distribution of star formation rate at each stellar mass. Massive galaxies (log M⋆/M⊙ ≥ 11.0) assemble most of their mass before z = 1 and are predominantly old and passive at z = 0, while lower mass galaxies assemble later and, for log M⋆/M⊙ ≤ 9.5, are still predominantly blue and star forming at z = 0. This phenomenological but physically based model allows the observations to be interpreted in terms of the efficiency of the various processes that control the formation and evolution of galaxies as a function of their stellar mass, gas content, environment and time.

  20. Chemical evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies based on model calculations incorporating observed star formation histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, H.; Murayama, T.

    We investigate the chemical evolution model explaining the chemical composition and the star formation histories (SFHs) simultaneously for the dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). Recently, wide imaging photometry and multi-object spectroscopy give us a large number of data. Therefore, we start to develop the chemical evolution model based on an SFH given by photometric observations and estimates a metallicity distribution function (MDF) comparing with spectroscopic observations. With this new model we calculate the chemical evolution for 4 dSphs (Fornax, Sculptor, Leo II, Sextans), and then we found that the model of 0.1 Gyr for the delay time of type Ia SNe is too short to explain the observed [alpha /Fe] vs. [Fe/H] diagrams.

  1. Dissecting High-Redshift Galaxies with GRBs: Three Hosts at z 6 Observed with HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, J. T. W.

    2016-10-01

    The first detection of three GRB hosts at z 6 is presented, along with their comparison to Lyman-break galaxies, potential star formation histories and a brief look at their impact on the high-redshift galaxy luminosity function.

  2. An x-ray study of luminous infrared galaxies observed with ASCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misaki, K.; Iwasawa, K.; Taniguchi, Y.; Terashima, Y.; Kunieda, H.; Watarai, H.

    The discovery of ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) has provided a clue to an evolutionary connection between starburst and active galactic nuclei. The IRAS color is suggested to be a possible trace of the evolution. We present the results of ASCA observations of two ULIRGs, IRAS20551-4250 and IRAS23128-5919, which are southern 100 μm bright galaxies with LIR ~ 1012Lsolar. Both are mergers and have a ``warm'' IRAS color (25μm100μm >= 0.15). The ASCA spectrum of IRAS20551-4250 can be characterized by two components, one of which is a soft thermal component (kT ~ 0.3keV) and the other is a hard power-law component absorbed by a column density of 1022 cm-2. The observed X-ray luminosity is ~ 2.5 × 1042 ergs/s in the rest frame 2-10keV band (assuming H0 = 50 km/s/Mpc). IRAS23128-5919 also shows a hard spectrum (LX ~ 3 × 1042 ergs/s), but thermal emission is not as clear as that in IRAS20551-4250. Since these targets are similar in infrared luminosity as well as in hard X-rays but not in soft X-rays, LIR would be associated with hard X-rays. In addition to these results, we here compare X-ray properties of ULIRGs with IR properties.

  3. The Bright and Dark Sides of High-redshift Starburst Galaxies from Herschel and Subaru Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, A.; Daddi, E.; Renzini, A.; Rodighiero, G.; Silverman, J. D.; Kashino, D.; Rodríguez-Muñoz, L.; Mancini, C.; Mainieri, V.; Man, A.; Franceschini, A.; Valentino, F.; Calabrò, A.; Jin, S.; Darvish, B.; Maier, C.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Sanders, D. B.

    2017-04-01

    We present rest-frame optical spectra from the FMOS-COSMOS survey of 12 z ∼ 1.6 Herschel starburst galaxies, with star formation rate (SFR) elevated by ×8, on average, above the star-forming main sequence (MS). Comparing the Hα to IR luminosity ratio and the Balmer decrement, we find that the optically thin regions of the sources contain on average only ∼10% of the total SFR, whereas ∼90% come from an extremely obscured component that is revealed only by far-IR observations and is optically thick even in Hα. We measure the [N ii]6583/Hα ratio, suggesting that the less obscured regions have a metal content similar to that of the MS population at the same stellar masses and redshifts. However, our objects appear to be metal-rich outliers from the metallicity–SFR anticorrelation observed at fixed stellar mass for the MS population. The [S ii]6732/[S ii]6717 ratio from the average spectrum indicates an electron density n e ∼ 1100 cm‑3 , larger than what was estimated for MS galaxies but only at the 1.5σ level. Our results provide supporting evidence that high-z MS outliers are analogous of local ULIRGs and are consistent with a major-merger origin for the starburst event.

  4. A CHANDRA OBSERVATION OF THE NEARBY SCULPTOR GROUP Sd GALAXY NGC 7793

    SciTech Connect

    Pannuti, Thomas G.; Staggs, Wayne D.; Schlegel, Eric M.; Filipovic, Miroslav D.; Payne, Jeffrey L.; Petre, Robert

    2011-07-15

    We conducted a Chandra ACIS observation of the nearby Sculptor Group Sd galaxy NGC 7793 as part of a multiwavelength study of supernova remnants (SNRs) in nearby galaxies. At the assumed distance to NGC 7793 of 3.91 Mpc, the limiting unabsorbed luminosity of the detected discrete X-ray sources is L{sub X} (0.2-10.0 keV) {approx}3x10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. A total of 22 discrete sources were detected at the {approx}3{sigma} level or greater including one ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX). Based on multiwavelength comparisons, we identify X-ray sources coincident with one SNR, the candidate microquasar N7793-S26, one H II region, and two foreground Galactic stars. We also find that the X-ray counterpart to the candidate radio SNR R3 is time variable in its X-ray emission: we therefore rule out the possibility that this source is a single SNR. A marked asymmetry is seen in the distribution of the discrete sources with the majority lying in the eastern half of this galaxy. All of the sources were analyzed using quantiles to estimate spectral properties and spectra of the four brightest sources (including the ULX) were extracted and analyzed. We searched for time variability in the X-ray emission of the detected discrete sources using our measured fluxes along with fluxes measured from prior Einstein and Roentgensatellit observations. From this study, three discrete X-ray sources are established to be significantly variable. A spectral analysis of the galaxy's diffuse emission is characterized by a temperature of kT = 0.19-0.25 keV. The luminosity function of the discrete sources shows a slope with an absolute value of {Gamma} = -0.65 {+-} 0.11 if we exclude the ULX. If the ULX is included, the luminosity function has a long tail to high L{sub X} with a poor-fitting slope of {Gamma} = -0.62 {+-} 0.2. The ULX-less slope is comparable to the slopes measured for the distributions of NGC 6946 and NGC 2403 but much shallower than the slopes measured for the distributions of

  5. NuSTAR Observations of the Powerful Radio Galaxy Cygnus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Lohfink, Anne M.; Ogle, Patrick M.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Wik, Daniel R.; Madejski, Grzegorz; Ballantyne, David R.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Fuerst, Felix; Hailey, Charles J.; Lanz, Lauranne; Miller, Jon M.; Saez, Cristian; Stern, Daniel; Walton, Dominic J.; Zhang, William

    2015-08-01

    We present NuSTAR observations of the powerful radio galaxy Cygnus A, focusing on the central absorbed active galactic nucleus (AGN). Cygnus A is embedded in a cool-core galaxy cluster, and hence we also examine archival XMM-Newton data to facilitate the decomposition of the spectrum into the AGN and intracluster medium components. NuSTAR gives a source-dominated spectrum of the AGN out to \\gt 70 keV. In gross terms, the NuSTAR spectrum of the AGN has the form of a power law ({{Γ }}∼ 1.6-1.7) absorbed by a neutral column density of {N}{{H}}∼ 1.6× {10}23 {{cm}}-2. However, we also detect curvature in the hard (\\gt 10 keV) spectrum resulting from reflection by Compton-thick matter out of our line of sight to the X-ray source. Compton reflection, possibly from the outer accretion disk or obscuring torus, is required even permitting a high-energy cut off in the continuum source; the limit on the cut-off energy is {E}{cut}\\gt 111 keV(90% confidence). Interestingly, the absorbed power law plus reflection model leaves residuals suggesting the absorption/emission from a fast (15,000-26,000 {km} {{{s}}}-1 ), high column-density ({N}W\\gt 3× {10}23 {{cm}}-2), highly ionized (ξ ∼ 2500 {erg} {cm} {{{s}}}-1) wind. A second, even faster ionized wind component is also suggested by these data. We show that the ionized wind likely carries a significant mass and momentum flux, and may carry sufficient kinetic energy to exercise feedback on the host galaxy. If confirmed, the simultaneous presence of a strong wind and powerful jets in Cygnus A demonstrates that feedback from radio-jets and sub-relativistic winds are not mutually exclusive phases of AGN activity but can occur simultaneously.

  6. Dark Matter Constraints from Observations of 25 Milky Way Satellite Galaxies with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Albert, A.; Anderson, B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Hays, E.; Perkins, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    The dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are some of the most dark-matter-dominated objects known. Due to their proximity, high dark matter content, and lack of astrophysical backgrounds, dwarf spheroidal galaxies are widely considered to be among the most promising targets for the indirect detection of dark matter via gamma rays. Here we report on gamma ray observations of 25 Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies based on 4 years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. None of the dwarf galaxies are significantly detected in gamma rays, and we present gamma ray flux upper limits between 500MeV and 500 GeV. We determine the dark matter content of 18 dwarf spheroidal galaxies from stellar kinematic data and combine LAT observations of 15 dwarf galaxies to constrain the dark matter annihilation cross section. We set some of the tightest constraints to date on the annihilation of dark matter particles with masses between 2 GeV and 10TeV into prototypical standard model channels. We find these results to be robust against systematic uncertainties in the LAT instrument performance, diffuse gamma ray background modeling, and assumed dark matter density profile.

  7. Dark matter constraints from observations of 25 Milky Way satellite galaxies with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; et al.

    2014-02-11

    The dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are some of the most dark-matter-dominated objects known. Due to their proximity, high dark matter content, and lack of astrophysical backgrounds, dwarf spheroidal galaxies are widely considered to be among the most promising targets for the indirect detection of dark matter via gamma rays. Here we report on gamma-ray observations of 25 Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies based on 4 years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. None of the dwarf galaxies are significantly detected in gamma rays, and we present gamma-ray flux upper limits between 500 MeV and 500 GeV. We determine the dark matter content of 18 dwarf spheroidal galaxies from stellar kinematic data and combine LAT observations of 15 dwarf galaxies to constrain the dark matter annihilation cross section. We set some of the tightest constraints to date on the the annihilation of dark matter particles with masses between 2 GeV and 10 TeV into prototypical Standard Model channels. We find these results to be robust against systematic uncertainties in the LAT instrument performance, diffuse gamma-ray background modeling, and assumed dark matter density profile.

  8. Redshift evolution of stellar mass versus gas fraction relation in 0 < z < 2 regime: observational constraint for galaxy formation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morokuma-Matsui, Kana; Baba, Junichi

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the redshift evolution of molecular gas mass fraction (f_mol = M_mol/M_star +M_mol, where Mmol is molecular gas mass and M⋆ is stellar mass) of galaxies in the redshift range of 0 < z < 2 as a function of the stellar mass by combining carbon monoxide (CO) literature data. We observe a stellar-mass dependence of the fmol evolution where massive galaxies have largely depleted their molecular gas at z = 1, whereas the fmol value of less massive galaxies drastically decreases from z = 1. We compare the observed M⋆ - fmol relation with theoretical predictions from cosmological hydrodynamic simulations and semi-analytical models for galaxy formation. Although the theoretical studies approximately reproduce the observed mass dependence of the fmol evolution, they tend to underestimate the fmol values, particularly of less massive (<1010 M⊙) and massive galaxies (>1011 M⊙) when compared with the observational values. Our result suggests the importance of the feedback models which suppress the star formation while simultaneously preserving the molecular gas in order to reproduce the observed M⋆ - fmol relation.

  9. The Spatial Distribution of Star Formation in Galaxies: Observing the Emergence of Galactic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Erica June

    A high resolution measurement of the distribution of star formation within galaxies is key to understanding the emergence of galactic structure. The aim of this thesis is to understand how the structure of galaxies is built by developing a new method to spatially resolve their star formation. Using Ha maps for 2676 galaxies, this thesis shows where star formation is distributed in galaxies during the epoch 0.7 < z < 1.5 when a third of the total star formation in the history of the universe occurred. Across the star formation rate - stellar mass plane (the "main sequence"), star formation is `spatially coherent': in galaxies with higher than average star formation rates, Ha is enhanced throughout the disk; similarly, in galaxies with low star formation rates Ha is depressed throughout the disk. This places constraints both on the mechanisms for enhancing and quenching star formation as well as on how the structure of galaxies is built. The disk scale length of star formation in galaxies is larger than that of the stars, a direct demonstration that the disks of galaxies grow inside-out. While most star formation in most galaxies occurs in disks, not all of it does. With the first spatially resolved measurement of the Balmer decrement at z > 1, it can be seen that galaxies with M* > 1010M ⊙ have significant dust attenuation toward their centers. This means that we are witnessing the build-up of the dense stellar cores of massive galaxies through dust-obscured in-situ star formation. The most massive galaxies are thought to have formed their dense stellar cores at even earlier cosmic epochs. This thesis presents the first confirmed example of a massive galaxy core in the process of formation at z = 2.3. It has one of the highest velocity dispersions ever measured for a normal star forming galaxy and also appears to be building through very dense, dust-enshrouded star formation.

  10. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ASYMMETRY ORIGIN OF GALAXIES IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS. II. NEAR-INFRARED OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Plauchu-Frayn, I.; Coziol, R. E-mail: rcoziol@astro.ugto.m

    2010-08-15

    In this second paper of two analyses, we present near-infrared (NIR) morphological and asymmetry studies performed in a sample of 92 galaxies found in different density environments: galaxies in compact groups (CGs; HCGs in the Hickson Catalog of Compact Groups of Galaxies), isolated pairs of galaxies (KPGs in Karachentsev's list of isolated pairs of galaxies), and isolated galaxies (KIGs in Karachentseva's Catalog of Isolated Galaxies). Both studies have proved useful for identifying the effect of interactions on galaxies. In the NIR, the properties of the galaxies in HCGs, KPGs, and KIGs are more similar than they are in the optical. This is because the NIR band traces the older stellar populations, which formed earlier and are more relaxed than the younger populations. However, we found asymmetries related to interactions in both KPG and HCG samples. In HCGs, the fraction of asymmetric galaxies is even higher than what we found in the optical. In the KPGs the interactions look like very recent events, while in the HCGs galaxies are more morphologically evolved and show properties suggesting they suffered more frequent interactions. The key difference seems to be the absence of star formation in the HCGs; while interactions produce intense star formation in the KPGs, we do not see this effect in the HCGs. This is consistent with the dry merger hypothesis; the interaction between galaxies in CGs is happening without the presence of gas. If the gas was spent in stellar formation (to build the bulge of the numerous early-type galaxies), then the HCGs possibly started interacting sometime before the KPGs. On the other hand, the dry interaction condition in CGs suggests that the galaxies are on merging orbits, and consequently such system cannot be that much older either. Cosmologically speaking, the difference in formation time between pairs of galaxies and CGs may be relatively small. The two phenomena are typical of the formation of structures in low

  11. Deep MUSE observations in the HDFS. Morpho-kinematics of distant star-forming galaxies down to 108M⊙

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, T.; Epinat, B.; Bouché, N.; Brinchmann, J.; Boogaard, L. A.; Ventou, E.; Bacon, R.; Richard, J.; Weilbacher, P. M.; Wisotzki, L.; Krajnović, D.; Vielfaure, J.-B.; Emsellem, E.; Finley, H.; Inami, H.; Schaye, J.; Swinbank, M.; Guérou, A.; Martinsson, T.; Michel-Dansac, L.; Schroetter, I.; Shirazi, M.; Soucail, G.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: Whereas the evolution of gas kinematics of massive galaxies is now relatively well established up to redshift z ~ 3, little is known about the kinematics of lower mass (M⋆≤ 1010M⊙) galaxies. We use MUSE, a powerful wide-field, optical integral-field spectrograph (IFS) recently mounted on the VLT, to characterize this galaxy population at intermediate redshift. Methods: We made use of the deepest MUSE observations performed so far on the Hubble Deep Field South (HDFS). This data cube, resulting from 27 h of integration time, covers a one arcmin2 field of view at an unprecedented depth (with a 1σ emission-line surface brightness limit of 1 × 10-19 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2) and a final spatial resolution of ≈0.7''. We identified a sample of 28 resolved emission-line galaxies, extending over an area that is at least twice the seeing disk, spread over a redshift interval of 0.2 galaxies are at z ~ 0.3 - 0.7, which is a redshift range poorly studied so far with IFS kinematics. We used the public HST images and multiband photometry over the HDFS to constrain the stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR) of the galaxies and to perform a morphological analysis using Galfit, providing estimates of the disk inclination, disk scale length, and position angle of the major axis. We derived the resolved ionized gas properties of these galaxies from the MUSE data and model the disk (both in 2D and in 3D with GalPaK3D) to retrieve their intrinsic gas kinematics, including the maximum rotation velocity and velocity dispersion. Results: We build a sample of resolved emission-line galaxies of much lower stellar mass and SFR (by ~1 - 2 orders of magnitude) than previous IFS surveys. The gas kinematics of most of the spatially resolved MUSE-HDFS galaxies is consistent with disk-like rotation, but about 20% have velocity dispersions that are larger than the rotation velocities and 30% are part of a close pair and/or show clear signs of recent

  12. Observational Manifestation of Chaos in the Gaseous Disk of the Grand Design Spiral Galaxy NGC 3631

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, A. M.; Khoruzhii, O. V.; Polyachenko, E. V.

    2002-10-01

    The main goal of the paper is to demonstrate the presence of chaotic trajectories in the gaseous disk of a real spiral galaxy. As an example we have chosen NGC 3631. First, we show the stationarity of the 3-D velocity field restored from the observed line-of-sight velocity field of the gaseous disk. That allows to analyse behaviour of the trajectories of the fluid particles (gas clouds) in the disk, calculating the corresponding observed streamlines. We estimate the Lyapunov characteristic numbers using their independence of the metrics and show the existence of chaotic trajectories outside the vortices which are present in the velocity field, and in the vicinity of the saddle point. Related spectra of the stretching numbers for some trajectories are also calculated.

  13. Chandra Observations of the Evening Core of the Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, K. A.; Heckman, T. M.; Dahlem, M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Chandra observations of the core of the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253 reveal a heavily absorbed source of hard X-rays embedded within the nuclear starburst region. The source has an unabsorbed, 2 to 10 keV luminosity of greater than or equal to 10(exp 39) erg per s and photoionizes the surrounding gas. We observe this source through a dusty torus with a neutral absorbing column density of N(sub eta) approximately 2 x 10(exp 23)cm (exp -2). The torus is hundreds of pc across and collimates the starburst-driven nuclear outflow. We suggest that the ionizing source is an intermediate-mass black hole or a weakly accreting supermassive black hole, which may signal the beginnings or endings of AGN (active galactic nuclei) activity.

  14. Observed galaxy number counts on the lightcone up to second order: II. Derivation

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Maartens, Roy; Clarkson, Chris E-mail: roy.maartens@gmail.com

    2014-11-01

    We present a detailed derivation of the observed galaxy number over-density on cosmological scales up to second order in perturbation theory. We include all relativistic effects that arise from observing on the past lightcone. The derivation is in a general gauge, and applies to all dark energy models (including interacting dark energy) and to metric theories of modified gravity. The result will be important for accurate cosmological parameter estimation, including non-Gaussianity, since all projection effects need to be taken into account. It also offers the potential for new probes of General Relativity, dark energy and modified gravity. This paper accompanies Paper I which presents the key results for the concordance model in Poisson gauge.

  15. EVN observations of the radio galaxy M87 following a TeV flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giroletti, M.; Giovannini, G.; Beilicke, M.; Cesarini, A.; Krawczynski, H.

    2010-02-01

    We report on EVN observations of the radio galaxy M87, taken at 5 GHz on 2010 Feb 10. Data were acquired by 7 radio telescopes from 21:40 UT on Feb 10 to 8:30 UT on Feb 11, directly streamed to the central data processor at JIVE, and correlated in real-time (eVLBI). This permits us to promptly report on the status of the radio jet of the source, following the increase in gamma ray emission above 100GeV reported by MAGIC (ATel #2431) The observations have an angular resolution of about 7 mas x 3 mas and rms noise of 0.12 mJy/beam.

  16. LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES. I. SPATIALLY RESOLVED OBSERVATIONS WITH THE SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Colina, Luis; Diaz-Santos, Tanio; Rieke, George H.; Engelbracht, Charles W.; Smith, J.-D. T.; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G.

    2010-06-15

    We present results from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectral mapping observations of 15 local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs). In this paper, we investigate the spatial variations of the mid-IR emission which includes fine structure lines, molecular hydrogen lines, polycyclic aromatic features (PAHs), continuum emission, and the 9.7 {mu}m silicate feature. We also compare the nuclear and integrated spectra. We find that the star formation takes place in extended regions (several kpc) as probed by the PAH emission, as well as the [Ne II]12.81 {mu}m and [Ne III]15.56 {mu}m emissions. The behavior of the integrated PAH emission and 9.7 {mu}m silicate feature is similar to that of local starburst galaxies. We also find that the minima of the [Ne III]15.56 {mu}m/[Ne II]12.81 {mu}m ratio tends to be located at the nuclei and its value is lower than that of H II regions in our LIRGs and nearby galaxies. It is likely that increased densities in the nuclei of LIRGs are responsible for the smaller nuclear [Ne III]15.56 {mu}m/[Ne II]12.81 {mu}m ratios. This includes the possibility that some of the most massive stars in the nuclei are still embedded in ultracompact H II regions. In a large fraction of our sample, the 11.3 {mu}m PAH emission appears more extended than the dust 5.5 {mu}m continuum emission. We find a dependency of the 11.3 {mu}m PAH/7.7 {mu}m PAH and [Ne II]12.81 {mu}m/11.3 {mu}m PAH ratios with the age of the stellar populations. Smaller and larger ratios, respectively, indicate recent star formation. The estimated warm (300 K galaxies. Finally we find that the [Ne II]12.81 {mu}m velocity fields for most of the LIRGs in our sample are compatible with a rotating disk at {approx}kpc scales, and they are in a good agreement with H{alpha} velocity fields.

  17. Hubble Space Telescope observations determine the age of some of the oldest stars in our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-05-01

    Globular clusters like NGC 6752 are compact, spherically shaped collections of several hundred thousand stars which orbit our galaxy. Virtually all of the stars in these clusters began their lives at the time of the formation of our galaxy. Astronomers therefore believe that globular clusters contain the oldest sample of stars that we can easily study and that an accurate determination of the ages of such stars would also define the age of our own galaxy since its formation. The age of our galaxy, in turn, sets a firm lower limit on the age of the Universe. Obtaining accurate ages of stars in globular clusters has previously been hindered by the inability to determine accurate distances to these clusters. Using the Wide Field and Planetary Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope, a team of astronomers in Italy, the US and Canada obtained long exposure images of NGC 6752 in April 1995. These sharp images allowed them to detect and measure the brightness and color of a number of faint white dwarf stars in the cluster. With dwarfs are the condensed cores of stars that have reached the final stage of their lives as stars. They represent the stellar remains of the more massive stars in NGC 6752 which have completed their evolution. By comparing the apparent brightness and color of these stars with a sample of white dwarfs in the neighborhood of the Sun which have known distances, the team determined the distance to NGC 6752 to be 13,300 light years with an uncertainty of less than 5%. This distance provides an accurate measure of the luminosity of the brightest stars in NGC 67523 that are still burning hydrogen at their center. In turn, the knowledge of this luminosity allows to estimate the time elapsed since the formation of the stars in the cluster, hence the cluster age. This leads rather directly to an age of 15 billion years with a 10% uncertainty. Using current estimates of the time interval between the Big Bang and the era of galaxy formation gives 16-17 billion

  18. RADIO GALAXY 3C 230 OBSERVED WITH GEMINI LASER ADAPTIVE-OPTICS INTEGRAL-FIELD SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbring, Eric

    2011-11-15

    The Altair laser-guide-star adaptive optics facility combined with the near-infrared integral-field spectrometer on Gemini North have been employed to study the morphology and kinematics of 3C 230 at z = 1.5, the first such observations of a high-redshift radio galaxy. These suggest a bi-polar outflow spanning 0.''9 ({approx}16 kpc projected distance for a standard {Lambda} CDM cosmology) reaching a mean relative velocity of 235 km s{sup -1} in redshifted H{alpha} +[N II] and [S II] emission. Structure is resolved to 0.''1 (0.8 kpc), which is well correlated with optical images from the Hubble Space Telescope and Very Large Array radio maps obtained at similar spatial resolution. Line diagnostics suggest that over the 10{sup 7} yr to 10{sup 8} yr duration of its active galactic nucleus activity, gas has been ejected into bright turbulent lobes at rates comparable to star formation, although constituting perhaps only 1% of the baryonic mass in the galaxy.

  19. The outer limits of galaxy clusters: Observations to the virial radius with Suzaku, XMM, and Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Eric D.; Bautz, Marshall; George, Jithin; Mushotzky, Richard; Davis, David; Henry, J. Patrick

    2012-03-01

    The outskirts of galaxy clusters, near the virial radius, remain relatively unexplored territory and yet are vital to our understanding of cluster growth, structure, and mass. In this presentation, we show the first results from a program to constrain the state of the outer intra-cluster medium (ICM) in a large sample of galaxy clusters, exploiting the strengths of three complementary X-ray observatories: Suzaku (low, stable background), XMM-Newton (high sensitivity), and Chandra (good spatial resolution). By carefully combining observations from the cluster core to beyond r200, we are able to identify and reduce systematic uncertainties that would impede our spatial and spectral analysis using a single telescope. Our sample comprises nine clusters at z ~ 0.1-0.2 fully covered in azimuth to beyond r200, and our analysis indicates that the ICMis not in hydrostatic equilibrium in the cluster outskirts, where we see clear azimuthal variations in temperature and surface brightness. In one of the clusters, we are able to measure the diffuse X-ray emission well beyond r200, and we find that the entropy profile and the gas fraction are consistent with expectations from theory and numerical simulations. These results stands in contrast to recent studies which point to gas clumping in the outskirts; the extent to which differences of cluster environment or instrumental effects factor in this difference remains unclear. From a broader perspective, this project will produce a sizeable fiducial data set for detailed comparison with high-resolution numerical simulations.

  20. Hubble Space Telescope photometry of the central regions of Virgo Cluster elliptical galaxies. 1: Observations, discussion, and conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Walter; Ford, Holland C.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Bosch, Frank C. Van Den; Ferrarese, Laura

    1994-01-01

    Using the Hubble Space Telescope we have observed at 10 pc resolution the nuclei of a luminosity-limited sample of 14 E and E/SO galaxies in the Virgo Cluster with magnitudes B(sub T) = 9.4 to 13.4. In this paper we present the images, and discuss the results of the detailed analysis of the surface photometry given in two companion papers. We find that the nuclear and near-nuclear morphologies confirm and strengthen the previously recognized dichotomy of 'E' galaxies into 'true' and 'disky' subtypes. The latter, usually classified E4 or later, often show a bright nuclear disk of radius approximately 100 pc. Essentially all early-type galaxies with -18 greater than M(sub B) greater than -20 are disky. Most true E galaxies are classified E4 or earlier. Most galaxies of both types show dust in the nuclear regions, the most remarkable example being a compact dust disk in NGC 4261. Other than dust, no anomalies were detected in the centers of the three galaxies in our sample which show clear kinematic evidence for a decoupled component.

  1. H I observations of two new dwarf galaxies: Pisces A and B with the SKA Pathfinder KAT-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, C.; Libert, Y.; Lucero, D. M.; Randriamampandry, T. H.; Jarrett, T. H.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Tollerud, E. J.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Pisces A and Pisces B are the only two galaxies found via optical imaging and spectroscopy out of 22 Hi clouds identified in the GALFAHI survey as dwarf galaxy candidates. Aims: We derive the Hi content and kinematics of Pisces A and B. Methods: Our aperture synthesis Hi observations used the seven-dish Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7), which is a pathfinder instrument for MeerKAT, the South African precursor to the mid-frequency Square Kilometre Array (SKA-MID). Results: The low rotation velocities of ~5 km s-1 and ~10 km s-1 in Pisces A and B, respectively, and their Hi content show that they are really dwarf irregular galaxies (dIrr). Despite that small rotation component, it is more the random motions ~9-11 km s-1 that provide most of the gravitational support, especially in the outer parts. The study of their kinematics, especially the strong gradients of random motions, suggest that those two dwarf galaxies are not yet in equilibrium. Conclusions: These Hi- rich galaxies may be indicative of a large population of dwarfs at the limit of detectability. However, such gas-rich dwarf galaxies will most likely never be within the virial radius of MW-type galaxies and become subhalo candidates. Systems such as Pisces A and B are more likely to be found at a few Mpc s from MW-type galaxies. The final FITS cube is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/L3

  2. The Confirmation and Characterization of the Highest Redshift Galaxies: The Power of Complementary Observations by Keck, Spitzer and Hubble.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, Garth D.

    2017-01-01

    Extraordinary numbers of high-redshift galaxies have been detected in deep Hubble imaging over the last ~20-yrs. While much is learned from the images, spectroscopy holds the key to both confirming their redshifts and to characterizing their astrophysical properties. The faintness of the galaxies requires our biggest telescopes and high-throughput instruments to do such spectroscopy, and many such combinations are now available on 8-10 m class telescopes. This talk will largely concentrate on Keck's role given the focus of this special session. Since the HDF in 1995 and the HUDF and GOODS in 2003-4, Keck and its powerful optical instruments such as LRIS and DEIMOS have played a major role in spectroscopic studies. With the advent of the WFC3/IR in 2009 and near-IR imaging of fields such as HUDF09, CANDELS and HUDF12 between 2009-and 2012, not only were greater insights for z~1-6 galaxies enabled, but whole new opportunities were opened up for the detection of large samples of galaxies in the first billion years at z>6. The recognition that Spitzer could measure galaxies in the IR well into the confusion-limited regime also resulted in much enhanced datasets on the most distant galaxies. Keck soon was positioned to take advantage of these new higher redshift sources with instruments such as MOSFIRE. The result was a series of detections of the highest redshift galaxies. I will discuss the role that Keck spectroscopy has played in pushing the spectroscopic frontiers for high-redshift galaxies and highlight the synergies that have resulted from Hubble, Spitzer and Keck observations.

  3. Hard X-Ray Emission of the Luminous Infrared Galaxy NGC 6240 as Observed by Nustar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puccetti, S.; Comastri, A.; Bauer, F. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Fiore, F.; Harrison, F. A.; Luo, B.; Stern, D.; Urry, C. M.; Alexander, D. M.; Annuar, A.; Arévalo, P.; Balokovic, M.; Boggs, S. E.; Brightman, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Gandhi, P.; Hailey, C. J.; Koss, M. J.; La Massa, S.; Marinucci, A.; Ricci, C.; Walton, D. J.; Zappacosta, L.; Zhang, W.

    2016-01-01

    We present a broadband (approx.0.3-70 keV) spectral and temporal analysis of NuSTAR observations of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 6240 combined with archival Chandra, XMM-Newton, and BeppoSAX data. NGC 6240 is a galaxy in a relatively early merger state with two distinct nuclei separated by approx.1.5. Previous Chandra observations resolved the two nuclei and showed that they are both active and obscured by Compton-thick material. Although they cannot be resolved by NuSTAR, we were able to clearly detect, for the first time, both the primary and the reflection continuum components thanks to the unprecedented quality of the NuSTAR data at energies >10 keV. The NuSTAR hard X-ray spectrum is dominated by the primary continuum piercing through an absorbing column density which is mildly optically thick to Compton scattering (tau approx. = 1.2, NH approx. 1.5×10(exp 24)/sq cm. We detect moderately hard X-ray (>10 keV) flux variability up to 20% on short (15-20 ks) timescales. The amplitude of the variability is largest at approx..30 keV and is likely to originate from the primary continuum of the southern nucleus. Nevertheless, the mean hard X-ray flux on longer timescales (years) is relatively constant. Moreover, the two nuclei remain Compton-thick, although we find evidence of variability in the material along the line of sight with column densities NH < or = 2×10(exp 23)/sq cm over long (approx.3-15 yr) timescales. The observed X-ray emission in the NuSTAR energy range is fully consistent with the sum of the best-fit models of the spatially resolved Chandra spectra of the two nuclei.

  4. RXTE Observations of the Seyfert 2 Galaxy MrK 348

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David A.; Georgantopoulos, Ioannis; Warwick, Robert S.

    2000-01-01

    We present RXTE monitoring observations of the Seyfert 2 galaxy Mrk 348 spanning a 6 month period. The time-averaged spectrum in the 3-20 keV band shows many features characteristic of a Compton-thin Seyfert 2 galaxy, namely a hard underlying power-law continuum (Gamma approximately equal 1.8) with heavy soft X-ray absorption (N(sub H) approximately 10(exp 23)/sq cm) plus measurable iron K.alpha emission (equivalent width approximately 100 eV) and, at high energy, evidence for a reflection component (R approximately < 1). During the first half of the monitoring period the X-ray continuum flux from Mrk 348 remained relatively steady. However this was followed by a significant brightening of the source (by roughly a factor of 4) with the fastest change corresponding to a doubling of its X-ray flux on a timescale of about 20 days. The flux increase was accompanied by a marked softening of X-ray spectrum most likely attributable to a factor approximately 3 decline in the intrinsic line-of-sight column density. In contrast the iron K.alpha line and the reflection components showed no evidence of variability. These observations suggest a scenario in which the central X-ray source is surrounded by a patchy distribution of absorbing material located within about a light-week of the nucleus of Mrk 348. The random movement of individual clouds within the absorbing screen, across our line of sight, produces substantial temporal variations in the measured column density on timescales of weeks to months and gives rise to the observed X-ray spectral variability. However, as viewed from the nucleus the global coverage and typical thickness of the cloud layer remains relatively constant.

  5. THE MASS-DEPENDENT STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF DISK GALAXIES: INFALL MODEL VERSUS OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R. X.; Hou, J. L.; Shen, S. Y.; Shu, C. G.

    2010-10-10

    We introduce a simple model to explore the star formation histories of disk galaxies. We assume that the disk originate and grows by continuous gas infall. The gas infall rate is parameterized by the Gaussian formula with one free parameter: the infall-peak time t{sub p} . The Kennicutt star formation law is adopted to describe how much cold gas turns into stars. The gas outflow process is also considered in our model. We find that, at a given galactic stellar mass M{sub *}, the model adopting a late infall-peak time t{sub p} results in blue colors, low-metallicity, high specific star formation rate (SFR), and high gas fraction, while the gas outflow rate mainly influences the gas-phase metallicity and star formation efficiency mainly influences the gas fraction. Motivated by the local observed scaling relations, we 'construct' a mass-dependent model by assuming that the low-mass galaxy has a later infall-peak time t{sub p} and a larger gas outflow rate than massive systems. It is shown that this model can be in agreement with not only the local observations, but also with the observed correlations between specific SFR and galactic stellar mass SFR/M{sub *} {approx} M{sub *} at intermediate redshifts z < 1. Comparison between the Gaussian-infall model and the exponential-infall model is also presented. It shows that the exponential-infall model predicts a higher SFR at early stage and a lower SFR later than that of Gaussian infall. Our results suggest that the Gaussian infall rate may be more reasonable in describing the gas cooling process than the exponential infall rate, especially for low-mass systems.

  6. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Design, Observations, Data Reduction, and Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Coil, Alison L.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Yan, Renbin; Harker, Justin J.; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P.; Lai, Kamson; Madgwick, Darren S.; Noeske, K. G.; Wirth, Gregory D.; Connolly, A. J.; Kaiser, N.; Kirby, Evan N.; Lemaux, Brian C.; Lin, Lihwai; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Luppino, G. A.; Marinoni, C.; Matthews, Daniel J.; Metevier, Anne; Schiavon, Ricardo P.

    2013-09-01

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z ~ 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude MB = -20 at z ~ 1 via ~90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 deg2 divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R AB = 24.1. Objects with z <~ 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted ~2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z ~ 1.45, where the [O II] 3727 Å doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm-1 grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R ~ 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or other artifacts that in some cases remain after data reduction. Redshift

  7. Search for dark matter annihilation signatures in H.E.S.S. observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Backes, M.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goudelis, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Hadsch, D.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Morâ, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reichardt, I.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Serpico, P.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spieß, F.; Stawarz, L.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.; H. E. S. S. Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group are close satellites of the Milky Way characterized by a large mass-to-light ratio and are not expected to be the site of nonthermal high-energy gamma-ray emission or intense star formation. Therefore they are among the most promising candidates for indirect dark matter searches. During the last years the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes observed five of these dwarf galaxies for more than 140 hours in total, searching for TeV gamma-ray emission from annihilation of dark matter particles. The new results of the deep exposure of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy, the first observations of the Coma Berenices and Fornax dwarves and the reanalysis of two more dwarf spheroidal galaxies already published by the H.E.S.S. Collaboration, Carina and Sculptor, are presented. In the absence of a significant signal new constraints on the annihilation cross section applicable to weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are derived by combining the observations of the five dwarf galaxies. The combined exclusion limit depends on the WIMP mass and the best constraint is reached at 1-2 TeV masses with a cross-section upper bound of ˜ 3.9 ×10-24 cm3 s-1 at a 95% confidence level.

  8. Observations of MilkyWay Dwarf Spheroidal galaxies with the Fermi-LAT detector and

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T.H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /UC, Santa Cruz /INFN, Pisa /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /IASF, Milan /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard

    2010-05-26

    We report on the observations of 14 dwarf spheroidal galaxies with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope taken during the first 11 months of survey mode operations. The Fermi telescope, which is conducting an all-sky {gamma}-ray survey in the 20 MeV to >300 GeV energy range, provides a new opportunity to test particle dark matter models through the expected {gamma}-ray emission produced by pair annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies, the largest galactic substructures predicted by the cold dark matter scenario, are attractive targets for such indirect searches for dark matter because they are nearby and among the most extreme dark matter dominated environments. No significant {gamma}-ray emission was detected above 100 MeV from the candidate dwarf galaxies. We determine upper limits to the {gamma}-ray flux assuming both power-law spectra and representative spectra from WIMP annihilation. The resulting integral flux above 100 MeV is constrained to be at a level below around 10{sup -9} photons cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Using recent stellar kinematic data, the {gamma}-ray flux limits are combined with improved determinations of the dark matter density profile in 8 of the 14 candidate dwarfs to place limits on the pair annihilation cross-section ofWIMPs in several widely studied extensions of the standard model, including its supersymmetric extension and other models that received recent attention. With the present data, we are able to rule out large parts of the parameter space where the thermal relic density is below the observed cosmological dark matter density and WIMPs (neutralinos here) are dominantly produced non-thermally, e.g. in models where supersymmetry breaking occurs via anomaly mediation. The {gamma}-ray limits presented here also constrain some WIMP models proposed to explain the Fermi and PAMELA e{sup +}e{sup -} data, including low-mass wino-like neutralinos and models with TeV masses pair

  9. Constraining the History of the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy Using Observations of Its Tidal Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, K. V.; Majewski, S. R.; Siegel, M. H.; Reid, I. N.; Kunkel, W. E.

    1999-10-01

    We present a comparison of semianalytic models of the phase-space structure of tidal debris with measurements of average distances, velocities, and surface densities of stars associated with the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy, compiled from all observations reported since its discovery in 1994. We find that several interesting features in the data can be explained by these models. The properties of stars about +/-10 deg-15 deg away from the center of Sgr-in particular, the orientation of material perpendicular to Sgr's orbit and the kink in the velocity gradient-are consistent with those expected for unbound material stripped during the most recent pericentric passage ~50 Myr ago. The break in the slope of the surface density seen by Mateo, Olszewski, & Morrison at b~-35 deg can be understood as marking the end of this material. However, the detections beyond this point are unlikely to represent debris in a trailing streamer, torn from Sgr during the immediately preceding passage ~0.7 Gyr ago, as the surface density of this streamer would be too low compared with observations in these regions. The low-b detections are more plausibly explained by a leading streamer of material that was lost more that 1 Gyr ago and has wrapped all the way around the Galaxy to intercept the line of sight. The distance and velocity measurements at b=-40 deg reported by Majewski et al. in a companion paper also support this hypothesis. We determine debris models with these properties on orbits that are consistent with the currently known positions and velocities of Sgr in Galactic potentials with halo components that have circular velocities v_circ=140-200 km s^-1. In all cases, the orbits oscillate between ~12 and ~40 kpc from the Galactic center with radial time periods of 0.55-0.75 Gyr. The best match to the data is obtained in models where Sgr currently has a mass of ~10^9 M_solar and has orbited the Galaxy for at least the last 1 Gyr, during which time it has reduced its mass by a factor

  10. CONTAMINATION OF THE CENTRAL SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH DECREMENTS IN AMiBA GALAXY CLUSTER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guo-Chin; Ho, Paul T. P.; Lin, Kai-Yang; Molnar, Sandor M.; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Koch, Patrick M.; Umetsu, Keiichi; Altamirano, Pablo; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chang, Shu-Hao; Chang, Su-Wei; Chen, Ming-Tang; Han, Chih-Chiang; Huang, Yau-De; Hwang, Yuh-Jing; Birkinshaw, Mark; Wu, Jiun-Huei Proty; Huang, Chih-Wei Locutus; Liao, Yu-Wei; Wang, Fu-Cheng

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the contamination of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect for six galaxy clusters, A1689, A1995, A2142, A2163, A2261, and A2390, observed by the Y. T. Lee Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy in 2007. With the range of baselines used, we find that the largest effect (of order 13%-50% of the central SZ flux density) comes from primary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background and exceeds the thermal noise in all six cases. Contamination from discrete radio sources is estimated to be at a level of 3%-60% of the central SZ flux density. We use the statistics of these contaminating sources to estimate and correct the errors in the measured SZ effects of these clusters.

  11. New far infrared observations of the central 30 arcmin of the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dent, W. A.; Werner, M. W.; Gatley, I.; Becklin, E. E.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Keene, J.; Whitcomb, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of the 55 micron and 125 micron emissions of the central 30 arcmin of the Galaxy were performed with 1 arcmin resolution with instrumentation on-board the Kuiper flying observatory. The flux distributions detected showed both wavelengths with peaks near the galactic center, some extension along the galactic plane, and the 125 micron feature located 30 arcsec south. An asymmetry was found around Sgr A, and the variation in dust temperature across the region was calculated from the ratio of the two wavelengths. The temperature peak was around Sgr A, with subsidiary peaks associated with the 55 micron emission. A common heating source was indicated by correlations between cm wavelength sources and the temperature maps. Additionally, the distributions of NH3 and formaldehyde were also correlated with the dust distribution at the center.

  12. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. I - IRAS pointed observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Hacking, Perry B.

    1989-04-01

    Redshifts for 66 galaxies were obtained from a sample of 93 60-micron sources detected serendipitously in 22 IRAS deep pointed observations, covering a total area of 18.4 sq deg. The flux density limit of this survey is 150 mJy, 4 times fainter than the IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC). The luminosity function is similar in shape with those previously published for samples selected from the PSC, with a median redshift of 0.048 for the fainter sample, but shifted to higher space densities. There is evidence that some of the excess number counts in the deeper sample can be explained in terms of a large-scale density enhancement beyond the Pavo-Indus supercluster. In addition, the faintest counts in the new sample confirm the result of Hacking et al. (1989) that faint IRAS 60-micron source counts lie significantly in excess of an extrapolation of the PSC counts assuming no luminosity or density evolution.

  13. INTEGRAL/SPI Observations of Electron-Positron Annihilation Radiation from our Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Watanabe, K.; Knoedlseder, J.; Jean, P.; Lonjou, V.; Weidenspointer, G.; Skinner, G.; Vedrenne, G.; Roques, J.-P.; Schanne, S.; Schoenfelder, V.

    2005-01-01

    The spectrometer on INTEGRAL (SPI) is a coded-aperture gamma-ray telescope with moderate angular resolution (3 deg) and superior energy resolution (2 keV at 511 kev). One of it's principal science goals is the detailed study of 511 keV electron-positron annihilation from our Galaxy. The origin of this radiation remains a mystery, however current morphological studies suggest an older stellar population. There has also been recent speculation on the possibility of the existence of light (< 100 MeV) dark matter particles whose annihilation or decay could produce the observed 511 keV emission. In this paper we summarize the current results from SPI, compare them with previous results and discuss their implication on possible models for the production of the annihilation radiation.

  14. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. I - IRAS pointed observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Hacking, Perry B.

    1989-01-01

    Redshifts for 66 galaxies were obtained from a sample of 93 60-micron sources detected serendipitously in 22 IRAS deep pointed observations, covering a total area of 18.4 sq deg. The flux density limit of this survey is 150 mJy, 4 times fainter than the IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC). The luminosity function is similar in shape with those previously published for samples selected from the PSC, with a median redshift of 0.048 for the fainter sample, but shifted to higher space densities. There is evidence that some of the excess number counts in the deeper sample can be explained in terms of a large-scale density enhancement beyond the Pavo-Indus supercluster. In addition, the faintest counts in the new sample confirm the result of Hacking et al. (1989) that faint IRAS 60-micron source counts lie significantly in excess of an extrapolation of the PSC counts assuming no luminosity or density evolution.

  15. Catching the `Bullet' with Parkes: A Pilot Study for large-scale galaxy cluster observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malu, Siddharth; Carretti, Ettore; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Wieringa, Mark; Narasimha, D.

    2011-10-01

    We propose to observe the ‘bullet’ cluster of galaxies - 1E 0657-56 - which consists of two sub-clusters in the process of merging and manifests relatively cold clouds plowing through hot intra-cluster gas, using the Parkes Telescope at 18 GHz. We aim to image the sub-structure in the gas pressure distribution via the inverse-Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons (the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect; SZE). The observations constitute a probe of fine structure in the physical state of the intra-cluster gas, the physics of propagation and stability of cold fronts in cluster mergers and a measure of cluster magnetic field. The small scale structure has been observed with the ATCA already (Wilson et al. MNRAS 2011; Malu et al. arXiv:1005.1394), but the large scale emission, essential to recover the entire amount of the SZ effects, is missed by those observations because of lack of sensitivity on scales larger than the primary beam. Combining with single dish observations is thus essential to derive cluster physical quantities (like electron density and gas temperature) and we propose here to conduct them with the Parkes telescope.

  16. Galaxy pairs and clusters in a lambda CDM universe: Bridging observation and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrier, Joel Craig

    2008-06-01

    I use computer simulations to examine the evolution of close galaxy pair counts and the formation of galaxy clusters. I show that the evolution of the close pair fraction is much weaker than the strong evolution in the dark matter halo merger rate. I continue with a discussion of how galaxy cluster-sized dark matter halos are assembled. This result, contrary to some expectations, shows that galaxy clusters in simulations are built from field halos instead of groups. I conclude by presenting preliminary results of a method to determine the pair fraction of galaxies at z=3 and apply it to a spectroscopic sample of LBGs. I show that the pair fraction is a factor of ~ 4 higher at z ~ 3 compared to local galaxy samples with similar number densities.

  17. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: DESIGN, OBSERVATIONS, DATA REDUCTION, AND REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Harker, Justin J.; Lai, Kamson; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Yan Renbin; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P. E-mail: djm70@pitt.edu E-mail: mdavis@berkeley.edu E-mail: koo@ucolick.org E-mail: phillips@ucolick.org; and others

    2013-09-15

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z {approx} 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude M{sub B} = -20 at z {approx} 1 via {approx}90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 deg{sup 2} divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R{sub AB} = 24.1. Objects with z {approx}< 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted {approx}2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z {approx} 1.45, where the [O II] 3727 A doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm{sup -1} grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R {approx} 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or

  18. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Design, Observations, Data Reduction, and Redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Coil, Alison L; Guhathakurta, Puraga; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Wilmer, C. N. A.; Yan, Renbin; Harker, Justin J.; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P.; Lai, Kamson; Madgwick, Darren S.; Noeske, K. G.; Wirth, Gregory D.; Kirby, Evan N.; Lotz, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z approx. 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude MB = -20 at z approx. 1 via approx.90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 Sq. deg divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R(sub AB) = 24.1. Objects with z approx. < 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted approx. 2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z approx. 1.45, where the [O ii] 3727 Ang. doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm(exp -1) grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R approx. 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or other

  19. Observations of Mg II Absorption near z ~ 1 Galaxies Selected from the DEEP2 Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Elizabeth; Simcoe, Robert A.

    2011-10-01

    We study the frequency of Mg II absorption in the outer halos of galaxies at z = 0.6-1.4 (with median z = 0.87), using new spectra obtained of 10 background quasars with galaxy impact parameters of b < 100 kpc. The quasar sight lines were selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR6 QSO catalog based on proximity to galaxies in the DEEP2 redshift survey. In addition to the 10 small impact systems, we examine 40 additional galaxies at 100 kpc < b < 500 kpc serendipitously located in the same fields. We detect Mg II absorbers with equivalent width Wr = 0.15-1.0 Å, though not all absorbers correlate with DEEP galaxies. We find five unique absorbers within Δv = 500 km s-1 and b < 100 kpc of a DEEP galaxy; this small sample contains both early- and late-type galaxies and has no obvious trends with star formation rate. No Mg II is detected more than 100 kpc from galaxies; inside this radius the covering fraction scales with impact parameter and galaxy luminosity in a very similar fashion to samples studied at lower redshift. In all but one case, when Mg II is detected without a spectroscopically confirmed galaxy, there exists a plausible photometric candidate which was excluded because of slit collision or apparent magnitude. We do not detect any strong absorbers with Wr > 1.0 Å, consistent with other samples of galaxy-selected Mg II systems. We speculate that Mg II systems with 0.3 < Wr < 1.0 trace old relic material from galactic outflows and/or the halo assembly process, and that in contrast, systems with large Wr are more likely to reflect the more recent star-forming history of their associated galaxies. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  20. The large-scale observational signatures of low-mass galaxies during reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Keri L.; Iliev, Ilian T.; Mellema, Garrelt; Ahn, Kyungjin; Shapiro, Paul R.

    2016-03-01

    Observations of the epoch of reionization give us clues about the nature and evolution of the sources of ionizing photons, or early stars and galaxies. We present a new suite of structure formation and radiative transfer (RT) simulations from the PRACE4LOFAR project designed to investigate whether the mechanism of radiative feedback, or the suppression of star formation in ionized regions from UV radiation, can be inferred from these observations. Our source halo mass extends down to 108 M⊙, with sources in the mass range 108-109 M⊙ expected to be particularly susceptible to feedback from ionizing radiation, and we vary the aggressiveness and nature of this suppression. Not only do we have four distinct source models, we also include two box sizes (67 and 349 Mpc), each with two grid resolutions. This suite of simulations allows us to investigate the robustness of our results. All of our simulations are broadly consistent with the observed electron-scattering optical depth of the cosmic microwave background and the neutral fraction and photoionization rate of hydrogen at z ˜ 6. In particular, we investigate the redshifted 21-cm emission in anticipation of upcoming radio interferometer observations. We find that the overall shape of the 21-cm signal and various statistics are robust to the exact nature of source suppression, the box size, and the resolution. There are some promising model discriminators in the non-Gaussianity and small-scale power spectrum of the 21-cm signal.

  1. NuSTAR observations of the powerful radio-galaxy Cygnus A

    DOE PAGES

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Lohfink, Anne M.; Ogle, Patrick M.; ...

    2015-07-29

    Here, we present NuSTAR observations of the powerful radio galaxy Cygnus A, focusing on the central absorbed active galactic nucleus (AGN). Cygnus A is embedded in a cool-core galaxy cluster, and hence we also examine archival XMM-Newton data to facilitate the decomposition of the spectrum into the AGN and intracluster medium components. NuSTAR gives a source-dominated spectrum of the AGN out tomore » $$\\gt 70$$ keV. In gross terms, the NuSTAR spectrum of the AGN has the form of a power law ($${\\rm{\\Gamma }}\\sim 1.6-1.7$$) absorbed by a neutral column density of $${N}_{{\\rm{H}}}\\sim 1.6\\times {10}^{23}\\;\\;{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-2}$$. However, we also detect curvature in the hard ($$\\gt 10$$ keV) spectrum resulting from reflection by Compton-thick matter out of our line of sight to the X-ray source. Compton reflection, possibly from the outer accretion disk or obscuring torus, is required even permitting a high-energy cut off in the continuum source; the limit on the cut-off energy is $${E}_{\\mathrm{cut}}\\gt 111$$ keV(90% confidence). Interestingly, the absorbed power law plus reflection model leaves residuals suggesting the absorption/emission from a fast ($$15,000-26,000\\;\\;\\mathrm{km}\\;\\;{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}\\;$$), high column-density ($${N}_{W}\\gt 3\\times {10}^{23}\\;\\;{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-2}$$), highly ionized ($$\\xi \\sim 2500\\;\\mathrm{erg}\\;\\mathrm{cm}\\;{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$$) wind. A second, even faster ionized wind component is also suggested by these data. We show that the ionized wind likely carries a significant mass and momentum flux, and may carry sufficient kinetic energy to exercise feedback on the host galaxy. If confirmed, the simultaneous presence of a strong wind and powerful jets in Cygnus A demonstrates that feedback from radio-jets and sub-relativistic winds are not mutually exclusive phases of AGN activity but can occur simultaneously.« less

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SCUBA observations of COSMOS galaxies (Casey+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, C. M.; Chen, C.-C.; Cowie, L. L.; Barger, A. J.; Capak, P.; Ilbert, O.; Koss, M.; Lee, N.; Le Floc'h, E.; Sanders, D. B.; Williams, J. P.

    2014-10-01

    We present deep 450μm and 850μm observations of a large, uniformly covered 394arcmin2 area in the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field obtained with the Scuba-2 instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). We achieve root-mean-square noise values of σ450=4.13mJy and σ850=0.80mJy. The differential and cumulative number counts are presented and compared to similar previous works. Individual point sources are identified at >3.6σ significance, a threshold corresponding to a 3-5% sample contamination rate. We identify 78 sources at 450μm and 99 at 850μm, with flux densities S450=13-37mJy and S850=2-16mJy. Only 62-76% of 450μm sources are 850μm detected and 61-81% of 850μm sources are 450μm detected. The positional uncertainties at 450μm are small (1-2.5 arcsec) and therefore allow a precise identification of multiwavelength counterparts without reliance on detection at 24μm or radio wavelengths; we find that only 44% of 450μm sources and 60% of 850μm sources have 24μm or radio counterparts. 450μm selected galaxies peak at =1.95+/-0.19 and 850μm selected galaxies peak at =2.16+/-0.11. The two samples occupy similar parameter space in redshift and luminosity, while their median SED peak wavelengths differ by ~20-50μm (translating to ΔTdust=8-12K, where 450μm selected galaxies are warmer). The similarities of the 450μm and 850μm populations, yet lack of direct overlap between them, suggests that submillimetre surveys conducted at any single far-infrared wavelength will be significantly incomplete (>~30%) at censusing infrared-luminous star formation at high z. (8 data files).

  3. Near-infrared observations of galaxies in Pisces-Perseus. V. On the origin of bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, L. K.; Pierini, D.; Giovanardi, C.

    2004-02-01

    We investigate the scaling relations of bulge and disk structural parameters for a sample of 108 disk galaxies. Structural parameters of individual galaxies are obtained from two-dimensional bulge/disk decomposition of their H-band surface brightness distributions. Bulges are modelled with a generalized exponential (Sérsic) with variable integer shape index n. We find that bulge effective scalelengths reB and luminosity MB increase with increasing n, but disk properties are independent of bulge shape. As Hubble type T increases, bulges become less luminous and their mean effective surface brightness <μeB> gets fainter; disk <μeD> shows a similar, but much weaker, trend. When bulge parameters (<μeB>, reB, MB) are compared with disk ones (<μeD>, reD, MD), they are tightly correlated for n=1 bulges. The correlations gradually worsen with increasing n such that n=4 bulges appear virtually independent of their disks. The Kormendy relation, <μeB> vs. reB, is shown to depend on bulge shape n; the two parameters are tightly correlated in n=4 bulges (r=0.8), and increasingly less so as n decreases; disk <μeD> and reD are well correlated (r=0.7). Bulge-to-disk size ratios reB/reD are independent of Hubble type, but smaller for exponential bulges; the mean reB/reD for n=1 bulges is 4 times smaller than that for n=4, with a spread which is 9 times smaller. Strongly barred SB galaxies with exponential bulges are more luminous than their unbarred counterparts. Exponential bulges appear to be closely related to their underlying disks, while bulges with higher n values are less so; n=4 bulges and their disks apparently have no relation. We interpret our results as being most consistent with a secular evolutionary scenario, in which dissipative processes in the disk are responsible for building up the bulges in most spirals. Based on observations at the TIRGO, NOT, and VATT telescopes. TIRGO (Gornergrat, CH) is operated by IRA-CNR, Arcetri, Firenze. NOT (La Palma, Canary

  4. NuSTAR observations of the powerful radio-galaxy Cygnus A

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Lohfink, Anne M.; Ogle, Patrick M.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Wik, Daniel R.; Madejski, Grzegorz; Ballantyne, David R.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Fuerst, Felix; Hailey, Charles J.; Lanz, Lauranne; Miller, Jon M.; Saez, Cristian; Stern, Daniel; Walton, Dominic J.; Zhang, William

    2015-07-29

    Here, we present NuSTAR observations of the powerful radio galaxy Cygnus A, focusing on the central absorbed active galactic nucleus (AGN). Cygnus A is embedded in a cool-core galaxy cluster, and hence we also examine archival XMM-Newton data to facilitate the decomposition of the spectrum into the AGN and intracluster medium components. NuSTAR gives a source-dominated spectrum of the AGN out to $\\gt 70$ keV. In gross terms, the NuSTAR spectrum of the AGN has the form of a power law (${\\rm{\\Gamma }}\\sim 1.6-1.7$) absorbed by a neutral column density of ${N}_{{\\rm{H}}}\\sim 1.6\\times {10}^{23}\\;\\;{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-2}$. However, we also detect curvature in the hard ($\\gt 10$ keV) spectrum resulting from reflection by Compton-thick matter out of our line of sight to the X-ray source. Compton reflection, possibly from the outer accretion disk or obscuring torus, is required even permitting a high-energy cut off in the continuum source; the limit on the cut-off energy is ${E}_{\\mathrm{cut}}\\gt 111$ keV(90% confidence). Interestingly, the absorbed power law plus reflection model leaves residuals suggesting the absorption/emission from a fast ($15,000-26,000\\;\\;\\mathrm{km}\\;\\;{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}\\;$), high column-density (${N}_{W}\\gt 3\\times {10}^{23}\\;\\;{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-2}$), highly ionized ($\\xi \\sim 2500\\;\\mathrm{erg}\\;\\mathrm{cm}\\;{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$) wind. A second, even faster ionized wind component is also suggested by these data. We show that the ionized wind likely carries a significant mass and momentum flux, and may carry sufficient kinetic energy to exercise feedback on the host galaxy. If confirmed, the simultaneous presence of a strong wind and powerful jets in Cygnus A demonstrates that feedback from radio-jets and sub-relativistic winds are not mutually exclusive phases of AGN activity but can occur simultaneously.

  5. VLT/X-shooter observations of blue compact galaxies Haro 11 and ESO 338-IG 004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseva, N. G.; Izotov, Y. I.; Fricke, K. J.; Henkel, C.

    2012-05-01

    Context. Strongly star-forming galaxies of subsolar metallicities are typical of the high-redshift universe. Here we therefore provide accurate data for two low-z analogs, the well-known low-metallicity emission-line galaxies Haro 11 and ESO 338-IG 004. Aims: Our main goal is to derive their spectroscopic properties and to examine whether a previously reported near-infrared (NIR) excess in Haro 11 can be confirmed. Methods: On the basis of Very Large Telescope/X-shooter spectroscopic observations in the wavelength range ~λλ3000-24 000 Å, we use standard direct methods to derive physical conditions and element abundances. Furthermore, we use X-shooter data together with Spitzer observations in the mid-infrared range to attempt to find hidden star formation. Results: We derive interstellar oxygen abundances of 12 + log O/H = 8.33 ± 0.01, 8.10 ± 0.04, and 7.89 ± 0.01 in the two H ii regions B and C of Haro 11 and in ESO 338-IG 004, respectively. The observed fluxes of the hydrogen lines correspond to the theoretical recombination values after correction for extinction with a single value of the extinction coefficient C(Hβ) across the entire wavelength range from the near-ultraviolet to the NIR and mid-infrared for each of the studied H ii regions. Thus, we confirm our previous findings obtained for several low-metallicity emission-line galaxies (Mrk 59, II Zw 40, Mrk 71, Mrk 996, SBS 0335-052E, PHL 293B, and GRB HG 031203) that the extinction coefficient C(Hβ) is not higher in the NIR than in the optical range and therefore that there are no emission-line regions contributing to the line emission in the NIR range, which are hidden in the optical range. The agreement between the extinction-corrected and CLOUDY-predicted fluxes implies that a H ii region model including only stellar photoionisation is able to account for the observed fluxes, in both the optical and NIR ranges. No additional excitation mechanism such as shocks from stellar winds and supernova

  6. A multi-wavelength study of the IRAS Deep Survey galaxy sample. I. Optical observations. The redshift distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Valle, A.; Mazzei, P.; Bettoni, D.; Aussel, H.; de Zotti, G.

    2006-08-01

    Context: The IRAS Deep Survey (IDS) of the North Ecliptic Pole region remains one of the deepest complete far-infrared-selected galaxy samples available. ISOCAM observations in the LW3 filter (12-18 μm) of 3.2 arcmin × 3.2 arcmin fields centered on the nominal positions of 94 out of the 98 IDS sources yielding 116 ISOCAM detections. The resulting sample has allowed us to assess the source reliability, identify confusion effects, and pinpoint optical counterparts. Aims: To fully exploit the potential of this sample for investigating galaxy evolution, we carried out optical observations of candidate identifications to 100 out of the 116 ISOCAM sources. Methods: Optical imaging was acquired for 88 galaxies in 54 IDS fields: 44 galaxies were imaged in both the B- and the R-band, 33 only in the R-band, and 11 only in the B-band. These observations aimed at extending the MIR/FIR spectral energy distribution to the optical region and achieving morphological information. In addition, spectra were obtained for 65 IDS fields, 20 of which had not been observed before. Redshifts were measured for the 85 galaxies found within the positional error circles of 77 ISOCAM sources detected in those IDS fields. Results: These observations allowed us to acquire spectroscopic redshifts of all counterparts that until now lacked them, so that, in combination with the results by Ashby et al. (1996), we now have redshifts for all IDS/ISOCAM galaxies in the field and, in particular, for the complete sub-sample of IDS galaxies defined by Mazzei et al. (2001). Conclusions: In several cases we find evidence of multiple galaxies with very close redshifts within the error circles around ISOCAM positions, hinting at an important role for interactions in triggering the star formation activity. Although the z distribution of the complete sub-sample has a tail extending up to z≃ 0.37, our results are inconsistent with the extreme cosmological evolution advocated by some models.

  7. Simulating Astro-H Observations of Sloshing Gas Motions in the Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZuHone, J. A.; Miller, E. D.; Simionescu, A.; Bautz, M. W.

    2016-04-01

    Astro-H will be the first X-ray observatory to employ a high-resolution microcalorimeter, capable of measuring the shift and width of individual spectral lines to the precision necessary for estimating the velocity of the diffuse plasma in galaxy clusters. This new capability is expected to bring significant progress in understanding the dynamics, and therefore the physics, of the intracluster medium. However, because this plasma is optically thin, projection effects will be an important complicating factor in interpreting future Astro-H measurements. To study these effects in detail, we performed an analysis of the velocity field from simulations of a galaxy cluster experiencing gas sloshing and generated synthetic X-ray spectra, convolved with model Astro-H Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) responses. We find that the sloshing motions produce velocity signatures that will be observable by Astro-H in nearby clusters: the shifting of the line centroid produced by the fast-moving cold gas underneath the front surface, and line broadening produced by the smooth variation of this motion along the line of sight. The line shapes arising from inviscid or strongly viscous simulations are very similar, indicating that placing constraints on the gas viscosity from these measurements will be difficult. Our spectroscopic analysis demonstrates that, for adequate exposures, Astro-H will be able to recover the first two moments of the velocity distribution of these motions accurately, and in some cases multiple velocity components may be discerned. The simulations also confirm the importance of accurate treatment of point-spread function scattering in the interpretation of Astro-H/SXS spectra of cluster plasmas.

  8. Constraints on the Energy Content of the Universe from a Combination of Galaxy Cluster Observables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Sandor M.; Haiman, Zoltan; Birkinshaw, Mark; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate that constraints on cosmological parameters from the distribution of clusters as a function of redshift (dN/dz) are complementary to accurate angular diameter distance (D(sub A)) measurements to clusters, and their combination significantly tightens constraints on the energy density content of the Universe. The number counts can be obtained from X-ray and/or SZ (Sunyaev-Ze'dovich effect) surveys, and the angular diameter distances can be determined from deep observations of the intra-cluster gas using their thermal bremsstrahlung X-ray emission and the SZ effect. We combine constraints from simulated cluster number counts expected from a 12 deg(sup 2) SZ cluster survey and constraints from simulated angular diameter distance measurements based on the X-ray/SZ method assuming a statistical accuracy of 10% in the angular diameter distance determination of 100 clusters with redshifts less than 1.5. We find that Omega(sub m), can be determined within about 25%, Omega(sub lambda) within 20% and w within 16%. We show that combined dN/dz+(sub lambda) constraints can be used to constrain the different energy densities in the Universe even in the presence of a few percent redshift dependent systematic error in D(sub lambda). We also address the question of how best to select clusters of galaxies for accurate diameter distance determinations. We show that the joint dN/dz+ D(lambda) constraints on cosmological parameters for a fixed target accuracy in the energy density parameters are optimized by selecting clusters with redshift upper cut-offs in the range 0.55 approx. less than 1. Subject headings: cosmological parameters - cosmology: theory - galaxies:clusters: general

  9. SIMULATING ASTRO-H OBSERVATIONS OF SLOSHING GAS MOTIONS IN THE CORES OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    ZuHone, J. A.; Miller, E. D.; Bautz, M. W.; Simionescu, A.

    2016-04-10

    Astro-H will be the first X-ray observatory to employ a high-resolution microcalorimeter, capable of measuring the shift and width of individual spectral lines to the precision necessary for estimating the velocity of the diffuse plasma in galaxy clusters. This new capability is expected to bring significant progress in understanding the dynamics, and therefore the physics, of the intracluster medium. However, because this plasma is optically thin, projection effects will be an important complicating factor in interpreting future Astro-H measurements. To study these effects in detail, we performed an analysis of the velocity field from simulations of a galaxy cluster experiencing gas sloshing and generated synthetic X-ray spectra, convolved with model Astro-H Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) responses. We find that the sloshing motions produce velocity signatures that will be observable by Astro-H in nearby clusters: the shifting of the line centroid produced by the fast-moving cold gas underneath the front surface, and line broadening produced by the smooth variation of this motion along the line of sight. The line shapes arising from inviscid or strongly viscous simulations are very similar, indicating that placing constraints on the gas viscosity from these measurements will be difficult. Our spectroscopic analysis demonstrates that, for adequate exposures, Astro-H will be able to recover the first two moments of the velocity distribution of these motions accurately, and in some cases multiple velocity components may be discerned. The simulations also confirm the importance of accurate treatment of point-spread function scattering in the interpretation of Astro-H/SXS spectra of cluster plasmas.

  10. The VIMOS VLT deep survey. The evolution of galaxy clustering to z ≃ 2 from first epoch observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Fèvre, O.; Guzzo, L.; Meneux, B.; Pollo, A.; Cappi, A.; Colombi, S.; Iovino, A.; Marinoni, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Scaramella, R.; Bottini, D.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Picat, J. P.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnaboldi, M.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Blaizot, J.; Bolzonella, M.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Ilbert, O.; Marano, B.; Mathez, G.; Mazure, A.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Busarello, G.; Lamareille, F.; Mellier, Y.; Merluzzi, P.; Ripepi, V.; Rizzo, D.

    2005-09-01

    This paper presents the evolution of the clustering of the main population of galaxies from z≃2 to z=0.2, from the first epoch VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS), a magnitude limited sample with 17.5 ≤ IAB ≤ 24. The sample allows a direct estimate of evolution from within the same survey over the time base sampled. We have computed the correlation functions ξ(r_p,π) and w_p(r_p), and the correlation length r_0(z), for the VVDS-02h and VVDS-CDFS fields, for a total of 7155 galaxies in a 0.61 deg2 area. We find that the correlation length in this sample slightly increases from z=0.5 to z=1.1, with r_0(z)=2.2{-}2.9 h-1 Mpc (comoving), for galaxies comparable in luminosity to the local 2dFGRS and SDSS samples, indicating that the amplitude of the correlation function was ≃2.5 times lower at z≃1 than observed locally. The correlation length in our lowest redshift bin z=[0.2, 0.5] is r_0=2.2 h-1 Mpc, lower than for any other population at the same redshift, indicating the low clustering of very low luminosity galaxies, 1.5 mag fainter than in the 2dFGRS or SDSS. The correlation length increases to r_0˜3.6 h-1 Mpc at higher redshifts z=[1.3, 2.1], as we are observing increasingly brighter galaxies, comparable to galaxies with MB_{AB}=-20.5 locally. We compare our measurement to the DEEP2 measurements in the range z=[0.7, 1.35] (Coil et al. 2004, ApJ, in press) and find comparable results when applying the same magnitude and color selection criteria as in their survey. The slowly varying clustering of VVDS galaxies as redshift increases is markedly different from the predicted evolution of the clustering of dark matter, indicating that bright galaxies traced higher density peaks when the large scale structures were emerging from the dark matter distribution 9-10 billion years ago, being supporting evidence for a strong evolution of the galaxy vs. dark matter bias.

  11. AKARI observations of dust processing in merger galaxies: NGC2782 and NGC7727

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onaka, Takashi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Sakon, Itsuki; Ohsawa, Ryou; Mori, Tamami; Wu, Ronin; Kaneda, Hidehiro

    2015-08-01

    Dust grains are the major reservoir of heavy elements and play significant roles in the thermal balance and chemistry in the interstellar medium. Where dust grains are formed and how they evolve in the ISM are one of the key issues for the understanding of the material evolution in the Universe. Although theoretical studies have been made, very little is so far known observationally about the lifecycle of dust grains in the ISM and that associated with Galactic scale events. The lifecycle of very small carbonaceous grains that contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) or PAH-like atomic groups are of particular interest because they emit distinct band emission in the near- to mid-infrared region and they are thought to be most vulnerable to environmental conditions. PAHs may be formed in carbon-rich stars, while recent AKARI observations suggest that they may be formed by fragmentation of large carbonaceous grains in shocks in a supernova remnant or a galactic wind (Onaka et al. 2010, A&A, 514, 15; Seok et al. 2012, ApJ, 744, 160).Here we report results of AKARI observations of two mergers. NGC2782 (Arp 215) and NGC7727 (Arp 222). NGC2782 is a merger of 200Myr old. It shows a very long western tail of HI gas by a tidal interaction and the eastern tail that consists mainly of stellar components without an appreciable amount of gas and is thought to be a relic of the colliding low-mass galaxy whose gas component has been stripped off Smith 1994, AJ, 107, 1695. We found significant emission at the 7 μm band of the IRC onboard AKARI, which must come from PAH 6.2 and 7.7 μm bands, in the eastern tail. Based on dust model fitting, we found a low abundance of ~10nm size dust despite of the presence of PAHs, suggesting that PAHs may be formed from fragmentation of ~10nm carbonaceous dust grains. NGC7727 is a 1.2Gyr old merger and shows a SED similar to the NGC2782 tail in the northern tail of the merger event product, suggesting also the formation of PAHs from

  12. Simulations of nonthermal electron transport in multidimensional flows: synthetic observations of radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tregillis, I. L.; Jones, T. W.; Ryu, Dongsu; Park, Charles

    2002-05-01

    We have applied an effective numerical scheme for cosmic-ray transport to 3D MHD simulations of jet flow in radio galaxies (see the companion paper by Jones et al. herein). The marriage of relativistic particle and 3D magnetic field information allows us to construct a rich set of 'synthetic observations' of our simulated objects. The information is sufficient to calculate the 'true' synchrotron emissivity at a given frequency using explicit information about the relativistic electrons. This enables us to produce synchrotron surface-brightness maps, including polarization. Inverse-Compton X-ray surface-brightness maps may also be produced. First results intended to explore the connection between jet dynamics and electron transport in radio lobes are discussed. We infer lobe magnetic field values by comparison of synthetically observed X-ray and synchrotron fluxes, and find these 'inverse-Compton' fields to be quite consistent with the actual RMS field averaged over the lobe. The simplest minimum energy calculation from the synthetic observations also seems to agree with the actual simulated source properties.

  13. Subaru weak lensing observations of ACT SZ-selected galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Masahiro

    2010-07-01

    The abundance of massive clusters as a function of redshift is a very powerful probe of cosmology, including the equation of state of dark energy, when combined with precise constraints on the initial conditions of structure formation from WMAP. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, which is independent of redshift, offers a unique means of finding clusters up to high redshifts. However, systematic SZ surveys of cosmological volumes are currently in their infancy, and require crosscalibration with weak gravitational lensing to determine the relationship between SZ observables and mass. We request one night for a multi-band observation with Suprime-Cam of the two most SZ luminous clusters (previously unknown) in ~ 200 sq. deg. of early data from the equatorial region of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) survey, with estimated masses of 10^15h^-1M_sun at redshifts z = 0.46 and 0.81. To obtain unbiased lensing signals, multi-band imaging is needed so that a pure catalog of background galaxies can be identified via photometric redshifts. This observation will allow for a determination of the masses to within 10-20%, and is the first step in enabling precision cosmology with SZ-selected cluster samples, eventually done in combination with the Hyper Suprime-Cam Survey.

  14. X-ray observations of the Compton-thick Seyfert 2 galaxy, NGC 5643

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, G.; Bianchi, S.; Marinucci, A.; Guainazzi, M.; Iwawasa, K.; Jimenez Bailon, E.

    2013-08-01

    We present results from a ~55 ks long XMM-Newton observation of the obscured AGN, NGC 5643, performed in July 2009. A previous, shorter (about 10 ks) XMM-Newton observation in February 2003 had left two major issues open, the nature of the hard X-ray emission (Compton-thin vs. Compton-thick) and of the soft X-ray excess (photoionized vs. collisionally ionized matter). The new observation shows that the source is Compton-thick and that the dominant contribution to the soft X-ray emission is by photoionized matter (even if it is still unclear whether collisionally ionized matter may contribute as well). We also studied three bright X-ray sources that are in the field of NGC 5643. The ULX NGC 5643 X-1 was confirmed to be very luminous, even if more than a factor 2 fainter than in 2003. We then provided the first high-quality spectrum of the cluster of galaxies Abell 3602. The last source, CXOJ143244.5-442020, is likely an unobscured AGN, possibly belonging to Abell 3602.

  15. A NEW CHEMICAL EVOLUTION MODEL FOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES BASED ON OBSERVED LONG STAR FORMATION HISTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    Homma, Hidetomo; Murayama, Takashi; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki

    2015-02-01

    We present a new chemical evolution model for dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) in the local universe. Our main aim is to explain both their observed star formation histories and metallicity distribution functions simultaneously. Applying our new model for the four local dSphs, that is, Fornax, Sculptor, Leo II, and Sextans, we find that our new model reproduces the observed chemical properties of the dSphs consistently. Our results show that the dSphs have evolved with both a low star formation efficiency and a large gas outflow efficiency compared with the Milky Way, as suggested by previous works. Comparing the observed [α/Fe]-[Fe/H] relation of the dSphs with the model predictions, we find that our model favors a longer onset time of Type Ia supernovae (i.e., 0.5 Gyr) than that suggested in previous studies (i.e., 0.1 Gyr). We discuss the origin of this discrepancy in detail.

  16. How does our choice of observable influence our estimation of the centre of a galaxy cluster? Insights from cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Weiguang; Power, Chris; Biffi, Veronica; Borgani, Stefano; Murante, Giuseppe; Fabjan, Dunja; Knebe, Alexander; Lewis, Geraint F.; Poole, Greg B.

    2016-03-01

    Galaxy clusters are an established and powerful test-bed for theories of both galaxy evolution and cosmology. Accurate interpretation of cluster observations often requires robust identification of the location of the centre. Using a statistical sample of clusters drawn from a suite of cosmological simulations in which we have explored a range of galaxy formation models, we investigate how the location of this centre is affected by the choice of observable - stars, hot gas, or the full mass distribution as can be probed by the gravitational potential. We explore several measures of cluster centre: the minimum of the gravitational potential, which would expect to define the centre if the cluster is in dynamical equilibrium; the peak of the density; the centre of brightest cluster galaxy (BCG); and the peak and centroid of X-ray luminosity. We find that the centre of BCG correlates more strongly with the minimum of the gravitational potential than the X-ray defined centres, while active galactic nuclei feedback acts to significantly enhance the offset between the peak X-ray luminosity and minimum gravitational potential. These results highlight the importance of centre identification when interpreting clusters observations, in particular when comparing theoretical predictions and observational data.

  17. Hubble Space Telescope First Observations of the Brightest Stars in the Virgo Galaxy M100 = NGC 4321

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, W. L.; Madore, B. F.; Stetson, P. B.; Hughes, S. M. G.; Holtzman, J. A.; Mould, J. R.; Trauger, J. T.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Ballester, G. E.; Burrows, C. J.; Casertano, S.; Clarke, J. T; Crisp, D.; Ferrarese, L.; Ford, H.; Graham, J. A.; Griffiths, R. E.; Hester, J. J.; Hill, R.; Hoessel, J. G.; Huchra, J.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Scowen, P. A.; Sparks, B.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.

    1994-01-01

    As part of both the Early Release Observations fromthe Hubble Space Telescope and the Key PRoject on the Extragalctic Distance Scale, we have obtained multi-wavelength BVR WFPC2 images for the face-on Virgo cluster spiral galaxy M11 = NGC 4321.

  18. a Serendipitous 695-KS HETG Observation of the Circinus Galaxy: the Deepest Ever Study of a TYPE-2 AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    We propose an archival program to perform a 695-ks Chandra HETG study of the Circinus Galaxy. The data, most of which were obtained serendipitously as part of an AO-10 campaign to study SN1996cr, give us an unprecedented view of one of our nearest AGN. We will use this extraordinary dataset to: (1) measure the mass and energy imparted by the AGN outflow into its kpc-scale environment; (2) create a full kinematic map of the galaxy in conjunction with SINFONI IFU observations, thereby directly constraining the extent of the outflow; and (3) examine the Compton-thick nature of the AGN.

  19. Radial velocities of galaxies in the cluster Klemola 22 from observations with OPTOPUS, the ESO multiple object spectroscopy facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristiani, S.; D'Odorico, S.; de Souza, R.; Lund, G.; Quintana, H.

    1987-06-01

    This paper presents the first results obtained with the ESO multiple fiber spectroscopic facility (OPTOPUS). Radial velocities and magnitudes are given for 44 galaxies in the cluster Klemola 22. The average redshift is 16160 km s-1 and the velocity dispersion 742 km s-1. The galaxy Kle 22/17 shows strong emission lines of [O III], with a FWHM of 850 km s-1, and is classified as a type 2 Seyfert. From these observations, the average efficiency of OPTOPUS, including telescope, spectrograph and detector, is computed as 1 detected photoelectron Å-1s-1 for an object of 15 B magnitude.

  20. High Resolution Narrow-Field Versus Low Resolution Widefield Observations of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaccioli, M.; Davoust, E.; Lelievre, G.; Nieto, J. L.

    There is an increasing evidence that small-scale phenomena occurring in the inner regions of galaxies are related to large-scale phenomena such as, merging or violent interactions between galaxies. The aim of this communication is to illustrate the complementarity between high-resolution, small-field telescopes and Schmidt-type telescopes for the study of this phenomenology.

  1. A Catalog Sample of Low-mass Galaxies Observed in X-Rays with Central Candidate Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucita, A. A.; Manni, L.; De Paolis, F.; Giordano, M.; Ingrosso, G.

    2017-03-01

    We present a sample of X-ray-selected candidate black holes in 51 low-mass galaxies with z ≤ 0.055 and masses up to 1010 M ⊙ obtained by cross-correlating the NASA-SLOAN Atlas with the 3XMM catalog. We have also searched in the available catalogs for radio counterparts of the black hole candidates and find that 19 of the previously selected sources also have a radio counterpart. Our results show that about 37% of the galaxies of our sample host an X-ray source (associated with a radio counterpart) spatially coincident with the galaxy center, in agreement with other recent works. For these nuclear sources, the X-ray/radio fundamental plane relation allows one to estimate the mass of the (central) candidate black holes, which are in the range of 104–2 × 108 M ⊙ (with a median value of ≃3 × 107 M ⊙ and eight candidates having masses below 107 M ⊙). This result, while suggesting that X-ray emitting black holes in low-mass galaxies may have had a key role in the evolution of such systems, makes it even more urgent to explain how such massive objects formed in galaxies. Of course, dedicated follow-up observations both in the X-ray and radio bands, as well as in the optical, are necessary in order to confirm our results.

  2. Investigating early-type galaxy evolution with a multiwavelength approach - I. X-ray properties of 12 galaxies observed with Swift and XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinchieri, G.; Rampazzo, R.; Mazzei, P.; Marino, A.; Wolter, A.

    2015-05-01

    We report here the results from the X-ray observations of 12 early-type galaxies (ETGs) observed with Swift and XMM-Newton, originally selected from a sample of galaxies with Spitzer and/or GALEX data. With the combined analysis of new X-ray and optical-UV observations and of previously available data from archives, we aim at investigating the relation between X-ray luminosity and evolutionary phases of ETGs. We will interpret the results with the additional aid of smoothed particle hydrodynamics chemo-photometric simulations. All galaxies have been detected in the X-ray band, with luminosities Lx > 1039 erg s-1. X-ray emitting gas has been detected in about half of the sample, with luminosities from ≥1039 to 1040 erg s-1. UVOT images show a variety of morphologies, from absence of peculiar features relative to optical wavelengths typical of red and dead early-types, to well defined almost circular rings clearly emerging in the U band, to more spectacular and complex features connected to recent or even ongoing star formation (SF). We find little evidence of any influence of the SF activity on their global X-ray properties, and in particular, on the luminosity-weighted age of the system, usually estimated in the nuclear region. However, with the present data we cannot exclude that such a relation exists on smaller scales, related to the specific sites where we see evidence of newly formed stars, such as outer rings and arcs and peculiar features observed in UV images.

  3. CO-EVOLUTION OF GALAXIES AND CENTRAL BLACK HOLES: OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE ON THE TRIGGER OF AGN FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Y.

    2012-05-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the extended emission-line region (EELR) around quasars is presented. A new Subaru/Suprime-Cam observation is combined with a literature search, resulting in a compilation of 81 EELR measurements for type-1 and type-2 quasars with an associated active galactic nucleus (AGN) and host galaxy properties. It is found that the EELR phenomenon shows clear correlation with the Eddington ratio, which links EELR to the constituents of principal component 1, or eigenvector 1, of the AGN emission correlations. We also find that EELR is preferentially associated with gas-rich, massive blue galaxies. This supports the idea that the primary determinant of EELR creation is gas availability and that the gas may be brought in by galaxy merger, triggering the current star formation as well as AGN activity, and also gives an explanation for the fact that most luminous EELRs are found around radio-loud sources with low Eddington ratio. By combining all the observations, it is suggested that EELR quasars occupy the massive blue corner of the green valley, the AGN realm, on the galaxy color-stellar mass diagram. Once a galaxy is pushed to this corner, an activated AGN would create an EELR by energy injection into the interstellar gas and eventually blow it away, leading to star formation quenching. The results presented here provide a piece of evidence for the presence of such an AGN feedback process, which may play a leading role in the co-evolution of galaxies and central super-massive black holes.

  4. Chandra X-ray observations of the hyper-luminous infrared galaxy IRAS F15307+3252

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Gandhi, P.; Hogan, M. T.; Gendron-Marsolais, M.-L.; Edge, A. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Russell, H. R.; Iwasawa, K.; Mezcua, M.

    2017-01-01

    Hyper-luminous infrared galaxies (HyLIRGs) lie at the extreme luminosity end of the IR galaxy population with LIR > 1013 L⊙. They are thought to be closer counterparts of the more distant sub-millimeter galaxies, and should therefore be optimal targets to study the most massive systems in formation. We present deep Chandra observations of IRAS F15307+3252 (100 ks), a classical HyLIRG located at z = 0.93 and hosting a radio-loud AGN (L1.4 GHz ˜ 3.5 × 1025 W Hz-1). The Chandra images reveal the presence of extended (r = 160 kpc), asymmetric X-ray emission in the soft 0.3-2.0 keV band that has no radio counterpart. We therefore argue that the emission is of thermal origin originating from a hot intragroup or intracluster medium virializing in the potential. We find that the temperature (˜2 keV) and bolometric X-ray luminosity (˜3 × 1043 erg s-1) of the gas follow the expected LX-ray-T correlation for groups and clusters, and that the gas has a remarkably short cooling time of 1.2 Gyr. In addition, VLA radio observations reveal that the galaxy hosts an unresolved compact steep-spectrum (CSS) source, most likely indicating the presence of a young radio source similar to 3C186. We also confirm that the nucleus is dominated by a redshifted 6.4 keV Fe Kα line, strongly suggesting that the AGN is Compton-thick. Finally, Hubble images reveal an overdensity of galaxies and sub-structure in the galaxy that correlates with soft X-ray emission. This could be a snapshot view of on-going groupings expected in a growing cluster environment. IRAS F15307+3252 might therefore be a rare example of a group in the process of transforming into a cluster.

  5. From Observations to Self-Consistent Modelling of the ISM in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Avillez, M. A.; Breitschwerdt, D.

    2004-03-01

    Research of the interstellar medium (ISM) has been advancing rapidly during the last 10 years, mainly due to immensely improved observational facilities and techniques in all wavelength ranges. We are now able to investigate the ISM in external galaxies and even the intergalactic and intracluster medium in great detail. Increased spatial and spectral resolution have provided us with a great deal of information on the interstellar gas in its various phases, the magnetic field and the cosmic rays, and of course, also the stellar component, which is the driving agent of the interstellar matter cycle. Since only fairly recently, a sufficient amount of computing power has become available to tackle these problems with some prospect of obtaining a self-consistent picture of the ISM, a major goal of this workshop was to bring together observers and theoreticians sufficiently close, so that intense discussions about the necessities and desiderata of modelling the ISM could be stimulated. Observers have shown in great detail on this conference of what is seen on all scales of the ISM, near and far, and what boundary conditions would be appropriate for realistic models, and theoreticians pointed out what assumptions and simplifications their codes need, and how future observations could test their models. As a first step towards this goal, some self-consistent numerical simulations with a minimum number of relevant physical processes were also presented on this meeting. There was wide agreement, that this approach - to keep observers and theoreticians in close contact and also in sometimes quite controversial discussions - will bear fruitful results in the near future. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-1939-4

  6. Large-Field CO(J = 1→0) Observations of the Starburst Galaxy M 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salak, Dragan; Nakai, Naomasa; Miyamoto, Yusuke; Yamauchi, Aya; Tsuru, Takeshi G.

    2013-06-01

    We present large-field (15.7 × 16.9 arcmin2) CO(J = 1→0) observations of the starburst galaxy M 82, at an angular resolution of 22" with the NRO 45-m telescope. The CO emission was detected in the galactic disk, outflow (driven by the galactic wind) up to ˜2 kpc above the galactic plane in the halo, and in tidal streams. The kinematics of the outflow (including CO line splitting) suggests that it has the shape of a cylinder that is diverging outwards. The mass and kinetic energy of the molecular gas outflow are estimated to be (0.26-1.0) × 109 M⊙ and (1-4) × 1056 erg. A clump of CO gas was discovered 3.5 kpc above the galactic plane; it coincides with a dark lane previously found in X-ray observations, and a peak in H I emission. A comparison with H I, hot molecular hydrogen and dust suggests that the molecular gas shows signatures of warm and cool components in the outflow and tidal streams, respectively.

  7. Suzaku Observations of Chemical Enrcihment History of Galaxy Cluster A3112

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezer, Cemile; Nihal Ercan, Enise; Bulbul, Esra

    2016-07-01

    Galaxy clusters are known as grand reservoir of metals as their intracluster medium (ICM) are gradually enriched by supernova (SN) explosions. The azimuthal and spatial distributions of these metals from cluster's centre out to the virial radius are of vital importance since they record all the information on nucleosynthesis and chemical enrichment history of the formation. In this study, we present results from Suzaku observations of an archetypal cluster A3112 out to ˜1470 kpc. We additionally used overlapping Chandra observations to detect unresolved point sources. We studied the total number of SN explosions and the ratio of type Ia (SN Ia) to core-collapse (SNcc) integrated over the cluster lifetime by directly fitting the X-ray spectra. We investigated almost flat radial distribution of the relative contribution of SN Ia to SNcc and the percentage of SN Ia contributing to ICM is found to be 10%-25%. We also studied the α element (Mg, Si and S) abundances. Ultimate results will be presented and they are expected to unravel the enrichment type of the evolution.

  8. Observations of the Coma Cluster of galaxies /A 1656/ at frequency 102.5 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubanov, A. G.

    1982-04-01

    The results of observations of the galaxy cluster Abell 1656 in the constellation Coma Berenices at 102.5 MHz are presented. The observations were made with a meridian large phase array telescope and a cross-type wide-range telescope, and a chart of the brightness distribution with resolution 48 arcmin by 26 arcmin and a strip distribution of the brightness of the cluster with 10 arcmin resolution were obtained. The flux and dimensions of the radio source Coma C, the confusion effect, the contribution of individual discrete sources, the fluctuations in the galactic background, and the flux of the radio halo were evaluated. It is shown that not far from the radio source Coma C there is one further extended radio source with flux 7 + or -2 Jy and a steep spectrum. It is argued that the large extension of the radio halo must be due to an effective mechanism of acceleration or reacceleration of the relativistic particles in the intergalactic medium of the cluster.

  9. Constraining star formation and AGN in z ~ 2 massive galaxies using high-resolution MERLIN radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, C. M.; Chapman, S. C.; Muxlow, T. W. B.; Beswick, R. J.; Alexander, D. M.; Conselice, C. J.

    2009-05-01

    We present high spatial resolution Multi-Element Radio-Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN) 1.4-GHz radio observations of two high-redshift (z ~ 2) sources, RGJ123623 (HDF147) and RGJ123617 (HDF130), selected as the brightest radio sources from a sample of submillimetre-faint radio galaxies. They have starburst classifications from their rest-frame ultraviolet spectra. However, their radio morphologies are remarkably compact (<80 and <65mas, respectively), demanding that the radio luminosity be dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN) rather than starbursts. Near-infrared (IR) imaging [Hubble Space Telescope Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) F160W] shows large-scale sizes (R1/2 ~ 0.75arcsec, diameters ~12kpc) and spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting to photometric points (optical through the mid-IR) reveals massive (~5 × 1011Msolar), old (a few Gyr) stellar populations. Both sources have low flux densities at observed 24 μm and are undetected in observed 70 μm and 850 μm, suggesting a low mass of interstellar dust. They are also formally undetected in the ultradeep 2 Ms Chandra data, suggesting that any AGN activity is likely intrinsically weak. We suggest both galaxies have evolved stellar populations, low star formation rates and low accretion rates on to massive black holes (108.6Msolar) whose radio luminosity is weakly beamed (by factors of a few). A cluster-like environment has been identified near HDF130 by an overdensity of galaxies at z = 1.99, reinforcing the claim that clusters lead to more rapid evolution in galaxy populations. These observations suggest that high-resolution radio (MERLIN) can be a superb diagnostic tool of AGN in the diverse galaxy populations at z ~ 2.

  10. H I observations of the nearest starburst galaxy NGC 253 with the SKA precursor KAT-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucero, D. M.; Carignan, C.; Elson, E. C.; Randriamampandry, T. H.; Jarrett, T. H.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Heald, G. H.

    2015-07-01

    We present H I observations of the Sculptor group starburst spiral galaxy NGC 253, obtained with the Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7). KAT-7 is a pathfinder for the Square Kilometre Array precursor MeerKAT, under construction. The short baselines and low system temperature of the telescope make it very sensitive to large-scale, low-surface-brightness emission. The KAT-7 observations detected 33 per cent more flux than previous Very Large Array observations, mainly in the outer parts and in the halo for a total H I mass of 2.1 ± 0.1 × 109 M⊙. H I can be found at large distances perpendicular to the plane out to projected distances of ˜9-10 kpc away from the nucleus and ˜13-14 kpc at the edge of the disc. A novel technique, based on interactive profile fitting, was used to separate the main disc gas from the anomalous (halo) gas. The rotation curve (RC) derived for the H I disc confirms that it is declining in the outer parts, as seen in previous optical Fabry-Perot measurements. As for the anomalous component, its RC has a very shallow gradient in the inner parts and turns over at the same radius as the disc, kinematically lagging by 100 km s-1. The kinematics of the observed extra-planar gas is compatible with an outflow due to the central starburst and galactic fountains in the outer parts. However, the gas kinematics shows no evidence for inflow. Analysis of the near-IR WISE data, shows clearly that the star formation rate is compatible with the starburst nature of NGC 253.

  11. GIANT LOBES OF CENTAURUS A RADIO GALAXY OBSERVED WITH THE SUZAKU X-RAY SATELLITE

    SciTech Connect

    Stawarz, L.; Gandhi, P.; Takahashi, T.; Takei, Y.; Tanaka, Y. T.; Fukazawa, Y.; Madejski, G.; O'Sullivan, S. P.; Cheung, C. C.; Feain, I. J.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Kataoka, J.; Takeuchi, Y.; Ostrowski, M.; Reville, B.; Siemiginowska, A.; Simionescu, A.; Werner, N.

    2013-03-20

    We report on Suzaku observations of selected regions within the southern giant lobe of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. In our analysis we focus on distinct X-ray features detected with the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer within the range 0.5-10 keV, some of which are likely associated with fine structure of the lobe revealed by recent high-quality radio intensity and polarization maps. With the available photon statistics, we find that the spectral properties of the detected X-ray features are equally consistent with thermal emission from hot gas with temperatures kT > 1 keV, or with a power-law radiation continuum characterized by photon indices {Gamma} {approx} 2.0 {+-} 0.5. However, the plasma parameters implied by these different models favor a synchrotron origin for the analyzed X-ray spots, indicating that a very efficient acceleration of electrons up to {approx}> 10 TeV energies is taking place within the giant structure of Centaurus A, albeit only in isolated and compact regions associated with extended and highly polarized radio filaments. We also present a detailed analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission filling the whole field of view of the instrument, resulting in a tentative detection of a soft excess component best fitted by a thermal model with a temperature of kT {approx} 0.5 keV. The exact origin of the observed excess remains uncertain, although energetic considerations point to thermal gas filling the bulk of the volume of the lobe and mixed with the non-thermal plasma, rather than to the alternative scenario involving a condensation of the hot intergalactic medium around the edges of the expanding radio structure. If correct, this would be the first detection of the thermal content of the extended lobes of a radio galaxy in X-rays. The corresponding number density of the thermal gas in such a case is n{sub g} {approx} 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3}, while its pressure appears to be in almost exact equipartition with the volume-averaged non-thermal pressure

  12. ROSAT PSPC observations of two X-ray-faint early-type galaxies: NGC 4365 and NGC 4382

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabbiano, G.; Kim, D.-W.; Trinchieri, G.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of ROSAT Positive Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) observations of the two early-type galaxies NGC 4365 and NGC 4382. These galaxies are among those observed with Einstein to have the lowest X-ray to optical flux ratios of early-type galaxies. The PSCP data show that for radii r greater than 50 arcsec the radial distributions of the X-ray surface brightness are consistent with the optical distributions of King (1978). We also find that these galaxies have X-ray spectra significantly different from those observed in X-ray-bright ellipticals, with a relative excess of counts detected in the softest spectral channels. This confirms earlier Einstein results. The characteristics of the ROSAT PSPC do not allow us to discriminate between possible spectral models. If we adopt a two-component thermal model on the grounds of physical plausibility, we find that the spectral data can be fitted with a very soft optically thin component, with kT approximately 0.2 keV, and a hard component with kT greater than (1.0-1.5) keV. The hard component has a luminosity consistent with that expected from the integrated emission of a population of low mass-X-ray binaries in these galaxies; the nature of the very soft component is more speculative. Candidates include the coronal emission of late-type stars, supersoft X-ray sources, RS CVn, and perhaps a hot Interstellar Medium (ISM). Alternatively, the spectal data may be fitted with a 0.6-1 keV bremsstrahlung spectrum (expontential plus Gaunt), and may suggest the presence of a totally new population of X-ray sources.

  13. Observations of extended and counterrotating disks of ionized gas in S0 galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dettmar, Ralf-Juergen; Jullien-Dettmar, Marlies; Barteldrees, Andreas

    1990-01-01

    While many E/S0 galaxies have been found to show emission line spectra in their nuclear regions, the question of the presence and nature of extended disks of ionized gas in these galaxies has been addressed only in recent years. Typically the ionized gas is detected in the inner region on a scale of approx. 1 kpc (e.g., Phillips et al. 1986, Caldwell 1984). Here researchers present evidence that the disks of ionized gas of at least some S0 galaxies are much more extended than previously believed. In addition, with the detection of the counterrotation of gas and stars in NGC 7007 they strengthen the basis for arguments that the source of gas in S0 galaxies is external

  14. CO observations of infrared bright galaxies - The efficiency of star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. S.; Schloerb, F. P.; Kenney, J. D.; Lord, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    CO emission has been detected in each of 14 of the IR-bright galaxies listed in IRAS Circular 15; for the nine galaxies of the largest angular size, the CO emission distributions along the major axis have been mapped. A strong correlation is noted between total CO luminosities and IR ones for galaxies in each of three ranges of dust temperature. The ratio of IR/CO luminosities increases with the ratio of 60/100-micron flux densities, consistent with emission of thermal origin at the characteristic temperature given by the dust temperature. If this luminosity ratio is a measure of the emergent stellar luminosity/unit molecular mass, or the efficiency of star formation, this efficiency varies over almost two orders of magnitude from one galaxy to another.

  15. Probing the Disk-Jet Connection of the Radio Galaxy 3C120 Observed With Suzaku

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, Jun; Reeves, James N.; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Markowitz, Alex G.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Arimoto, Makoto; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tsubuku, Yoshihiro; Ushio, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Shin; Gallo, Luigi C.; Madejski, Greg M.; Terashima, Yuichi; Isobe, Naoki; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Kohmura, Takayoshi; /Tokyo Inst. Tech. /NASA, Goddard /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /JAXA, Sagamihara /SLAC /Ehime U. /Wako, RIKEN /Saitama U. /Kogakuin U.

    2007-01-03

    Broad line radio galaxies (BLRGs) are a rare type of radio-loud AGN, in which the broad optical permitted emission lines have been detected in addition to the extended jet emission. Here we report on deep (40ksec x 4) observations of the bright BLRG 3C 120 using Suzaku. The observations were spaced a week apart, and sample a range of continuum fluxes. An excellent broadband spectrum was obtained over two decades of frequency (0.6 to 50 keV) within each 40 ksec exposure. We clearly resolved the iron K emission line complex, finding that it consists of a narrow K{sub {alpha}} core ({sigma} {approx_equal} 110 eV or an EW of 60 eV), a 6.9 keV line, and an underlying broad iron line. Our confirmation of the broad line contrasts with the XMM-Newton observation in 2003, where the broad line was not required. The most natural interpretation of the broad line is iron K line emission from a face-on accretion disk which is truncated at {approx} 10 r{sub g}. Above 10 keV, a relatively weak Compton hump was detected (reflection fraction of R {approx_equal} 0.6), superposed on the primary X-ray continuum of {Lambda} {approx_equal} 1.75. Thanks to the good photon statistics and low background of the Suzaku data, we clearly confirm the spectral evolution of 3C 120, whereby the variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy. More strikingly, we discovered that the variability is caused by a steep power-law component of {Lambda} {approx_equal} 2.7, possibly related to the non-thermal jet emission. We discuss our findings in the context of similarities and differences between radio-loud/quiet objects.

  16. ALMA observations of atomic carbon in z ∼ 4 dusty star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothwell, M. S.; Aguirre, J. E.; Aravena, M.; Bethermin, M.; Bisbas, T. G.; Chapman, S. C.; De Breuck, C.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Greve, T. R.; Hezaveh, Y.; Ma, J.; Malkan, M.; Marrone, D. P.; Murphy, E. J.; Spilker, J. S.; Strandet, M.; Vieira, J. D.; Weiß, A.

    2017-04-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array [C I](1 - 0) (rest frequency 492 GHz) observations for a sample of 13 strongly lensed dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) originally discovered at 1.4 mm in a blank-field survey by the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We compare these new data with available [C I] observations from the literature, allowing a study of the interstellar medium (ISM) properties of ∼30 extreme DSFGs spanning a redshift range 2 < z < 5. Using the [C I] line as a tracer of the molecular ISM, we find a mean molecular gas mass for SPT-DSFGs of 6.6 × 1010 M⊙. This is in tension with gas masses derived via low-J 12CO and dust masses; bringing the estimates into accordance requires either (a) an elevated CO-to-H2 conversion factor for our sample of αCO ∼ 2.5 and a gas-to-dust ratio ∼200, or (b) an high carbon abundance X_{C I} ˜ 7× 10^{-5}. Using observations of a range of additional atomic and molecular lines (including [C I], [C II]and multiple transitions of CO), we use a modern photodissociation region code (3D-PDR) to assess the physical conditions (including the density, UV radiation field strength and gas temperature) within the ISM of the DSFGs in our sample. We find that the ISM within our DSFGs is characterized by dense gas permeated by strong UV fields. We note that previous efforts to characterize photodissociation region regions in DSFGs may have significantly under-estimated the density of the ISM. Combined, our analysis suggests that the ISM of extreme dusty starbursts at high redshift consists of dense, carbon-rich gas not directly comparable to the ISM of starbursts in the local Universe.

  17. Theoretical uncertainties due to AGN subgrid models in predictions of galaxy cluster observable properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.-Y. Karen; Sutter, P. M.; Ricker, Paul M.

    2012-12-01

    Cosmological constraints derived from galaxy clusters rely on accurate predictions of cluster observable properties, in which feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is a critical component. In order to model the physical effects due to supermassive black holes (SMBH) on cosmological scales, subgrid modelling is required, and a variety of implementations have been developed in the literature. However, theoretical uncertainties due to model and parameter variations are not yet well understood, limiting the predictive power of simulations including AGN feedback. By performing a detailed parameter-sensitivity study in a single cluster using several commonly adopted AGN accretion and feedback models with FLASH, we quantify the model uncertainties in predictions of cluster integrated properties. We find that quantities that are more sensitive to gas density have larger uncertainties (˜20 per cent for Mgas and a factor of ˜2 for LX at R500), whereas TX, YSZ and YX are more robust (˜10-20 per cent at R500). To make predictions beyond this level of accuracy would require more constraints on the most relevant parameters: the accretion model, mechanical heating efficiency and size of feedback region. By studying the impact of AGN feedback on the scaling relations, we find that an anti-correlation exists between Mgas and TX, which is another reason why YSZ and YX are excellent mass proxies. This anti-correlation also implies that AGN feedback is likely to be an important source of intrinsic scatter in the Mgas-TX and LX-TX relations.

  18. Observation of the Coma cluster of galaxies with ROSAT during the all-sky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briel, U. G.; Henry, J. P.; Boehringer, H.

    1992-01-01

    The Coma cluster of galaxies was observed with the position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) during the ROSAT all sky survey. We find evidence for substructure in this cluster. Diffuse X-ray emission is detected from the regions of the NGC 4839 and 4911 subgroups at 6 percent and 1 percent of the total cluster emission respectively. There may be emission associated with the NGC 4874 and 4889 subgroups as well. The NGC 4839 group appears to be in the process of merging with the cluster. These X-ray data show that at least some of the groups previously found in projection are in fact physical objects possessing potential wells deep enough to trap their own X-ray gas. Because of the unlimited field of view of the all sky survey and the low background of the PSPC, we were able to measure the azimuthally averaged surface brightness of Coma out to approximately 100 arcmin, twice as far as was previously possible. Given the validity of our mass models, these new X-ray data imply that within 5/h(50) Mpc the binding mass of the Coma cluster is 1.8 +/- 0.6 x 10 exp 15/h(50) solar mass, and the fraction of cluster mass contained in hot gas is 0.30 +/- 0.14h(50) exp -3/2. Furthermore, the binding mass is more centrally concentrated than is the X-ray gas.

  19. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. I. IRAS pointed observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lonsdale, C.J.; Hacking, P.B.

    1989-04-01

    Redshifts for 66 galaxies were obtained from a sample of 93 60-micron sources detected serendipitously in 22 IRAS deep pointed observations, covering a total area of 18.4 sq deg. The flux density limit of this survey is 150 mJy, 4 times fainter than the IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC). The luminosity function is similar in shape with those previously published for samples selected from the PSC, with a median redshift of 0.048 for the fainter sample, but shifted to higher space densities. There is evidence that some of the excess number counts in the deeper sample can be explained in terms of a large-scale density enhancement beyond the Pavo-Indus supercluster. In addition, the faintest counts in the new sample confirm the result of Hacking et al. (1989) that faint IRAS 60-micron source counts lie significantly in excess of an extrapolation of the PSC counts assuming no luminosity or density evolution. 81 refs.

  20. High resolution infrared astronomy satellite observations of a selected spiral galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.

    1991-01-01

    The H I, infrared, CO, H alpha and H beta band observations of M51, the prototypical grand-design spiral galaxy, are used to study the consequences of star formation for the distribution of H I and dust. Using the new Very Large Array (VLA) map of 21 cm emission, the Owens Valley Radio Observatory CO mosaic map, and an H alpha imate, new tests were performed with the idea of Tilanus and Allen that the H I is largely a photodissociation product in star-forming regions. It is confirmed that the H I spiral arms are generally coincident with the H II region arms, and offset downstream from the CO arms. The radial distributions of total gas, H alpha and H I surface density have a simple explanation in the dissociation picture. The distributions also demonstrate how the surface density of H I might be related to the star formation efficiency in molecule-rich galaxies. The large width of the H I regions along the arms compared to that of the giant H II regions can be understood in terms of a simple calculation of the expected size of an H I region associated with a typical giant H II region. The longer lifetime of the stars producing dissociating radiation vs. those producing ionizing radiation and the relatively long molecular formation timescale will also contribute to the greater width of the H I arms if stars are continuously forming on the arms. The lack of detailed coincidence of the H I and H II regions along the inner arms has a variety of possible explanations. Two simple tests were performed to probe the origins of the IRAS emission in M51. First, it was found that the infrared excess (IFE) of M51 is 24, suggesting that a substantial fraction of the infrared emission arises from dust heated by photons which do not originate in massive star-formaing regions. Second, radial cuts through the IRAS bands show that at 12, 25, and 60 microns, the arm-interarm contrast of the IRAS emission is substantially less than that of the H alpha emission, providing further

  1. Linear polarization observations in selected celestial zones - the central region of our Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Bignell, R.C.; Simard-Normandin, M.; Vallee, J.P.

    1988-07-01

    The Algonquin Radio Observatory and the very large array have been used to obtain the linear polarization integrated over the angular size of a radio galaxy or quasar. All sources are located in a celestial angular zone encompassing the central region of the Galaxy. In addition to the total intensity (Stokes I) flux density, the percentage and position angle of the linear polarization (Stokes Q and U) are obtained for 14 sources at several centimetric wavelengths. 15 references.

  2. TWO EPOCHS OF VERY LARGE ARRAY OBSERVATIONS OF WATER MASER EMISSION IN THE ACTIVE GALAXY NGC 6240

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Yoshiaki

    2010-12-15

    Studies of 22 GHz H{sub 2}O maser emission from the merging galaxy NGC 6240 with double nuclei are presented. Two epochs of Very Large Array (VLA) observations in the A-configuration in spectral-line mode were carried out at 0.1 arcsec resolution by covering the redshifted velocity range of {approx}300 km s{sup -1} with respect to the systemic velocity of the galaxy. The purpose of these new observations is twofold: to detect an H{sub 2}O maser that an earlier VLA observation pinpointed in the southern nucleus in the northern nucleus as well to clarify the kinematics of the double nuclei, and to understand the origin of the maser in the galaxy. In the second epoch, one velocity feature peaking at V{sub LSR} = 7491.1 km s{sup -1}, redshifted by {approx}200 km s{sup -1} relative to the systemic velocity, was detected only toward the southern nucleus. The detection of an H{sub 2}O maser feature at or near this velocity had never been reported in earlier observations. However, including the known velocity features at redshifted velocities, no other velocity features were observed toward either nuclei throughout these epochs. The maser remains unresolved at an angular resolution of {approx}0.''1, corresponding to a linear size of less than about 45 pc. The two epochs of VLA observations show that the maser intensity is variable on timescales of at least three months, while the correlation between the maser intensity and the radio continuum intensity is not certain from our data. It is plausible that the maser in NGC 6240 is associated with the activity of an active galactic nucleus in the southern nucleus. Alternatively, the maser can be explained by star-forming activity at the site of massive star formation in the galaxy.

  3. CATALOG OF OBSERVED TANGENTS TO THE SPIRAL ARMS IN THE MILKY WAY GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Vallée, Jacques P.

    2014-11-01

    From the Sun's location in the Galactic disk, one can use different arm tracers (CO, H I, thermal or ionized or relativistic electrons, masers, cold and hot dust, etc.) to locate a tangent to each spiral arm in the disk of the Milky Way. We present a master catalog of the astronomically observed tangents to the Galaxy's spiral arms, using different arm tracers from the literature. Some arm tracers can have slightly divergent results from several papers, so a mean value is taken—see the Appendix for CO, H II, and masers. The catalog of means currently consists of 63 mean tracer entries, spread over many arms (Carina, Crux-Centaurus, Norma, Perseus origin, near 3 kpc, Scutum, Sagittarius), stemming from 107 original arm tracer entries. Additionally, we updated and revised a previous statistical analysis of the angular offset and linear separation from the mid-arm for each different mean arm tracer. Given enough arm tracers, and summing and averaging over all four spiral arms, one could determine if arm tracers have separate and parallel lanes in the Milky Way. This statistical analysis allows a cross-cut of a Galactic spiral arm to be made, confirming a recent discovery of a linear separation between arm tracers. Here, from the mid-arm's CO to the inner edge's hot dust, the arm halfwidth is about 340 pc; doubling would yield a full arm width of 680 pc. We briefly compare these observations with the predictions of many spiral arm theories, notably the density wave theory.

  4. Fermi-LAT and Suzaku Observations of the Radio Galaxy Centaurus B

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuta, Junichiro; Tanaka, Y.T.; Stawarz, L.; O'Sullivan, S.P.; Cheung, C.C.; Kataoka, J.; Funk, S.; Yuasa, T.; Odaka, H.; Takahashi, T.; Svoboda, J.; /European Space Agency

    2012-08-17

    CentaurusB is a nearby radio galaxy positioned in the Southern hemisphere close to the Galactic plane. Here we present a detailed analysis of about 43 months accumulation of Fermi-LAT data and of newly acquired Suzaku X-ray data for Centaurus B. The source is detected at GeV photon energies, although we cannot completely exclude the possibility that it is an artifact due to incorrect modeling of the bright Galactic diffuse emission in the region. The LAT image provides a weak hint of a spatial extension of the {gamma} rays along the radio lobes, which is consistent with the lack of source variability in the GeV range. We note that the extension cannot be established statistically due to the low number of the photons. Surprisingly, we do not detect any diffuse emission of the lobes at X-ray frequencies, with the provided upper limit only marginally consistent with the previously claimed ASCA flux. The broad-band modeling shows that the observed {gamma}-ray flux of the source may be produced within the lobes, if the diffuse non-thermal X-ray emission component is not significantly below the derived Suzaku upper limit. This association would imply that efficient in-situ acceleration of the ultrarelativistic particles is occurring and that the lobes are dominated by the pressure from the relativistic particles. However, if the diffuse X-ray emission is much below the Suzaku upper limits, the observed {gamma}-ray flux is not likely to be produced within the lobes, but instead within the unresolved core of Centaurus B. In this case, the extended lobes could be dominated by the pressure of the magnetic field.

  5. Catalog of Observed Tangents to the Spiral Arms in the Milky Way Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallée, Jacques P.

    2014-11-01

    From the Sun's location in the Galactic disk, one can use different arm tracers (CO, H I, thermal or ionized or relativistic electrons, masers, cold and hot dust, etc.) to locate a tangent to each spiral arm in the disk of the Milky Way. We present a master catalog of the astronomically observed tangents to the Galaxy's spiral arms, using different arm tracers from the literature. Some arm tracers can have slightly divergent results from several papers, so a mean value is taken—see the Appendix for CO, H II, and masers. The catalog of means currently consists of 63 mean tracer entries, spread over many arms (Carina, Crux-Centaurus, Norma, Perseus origin, near 3 kpc, Scutum, Sagittarius), stemming from 107 original arm tracer entries. Additionally, we updated and revised a previous statistical analysis of the angular offset and linear separation from the mid-arm for each different mean arm tracer. Given enough arm tracers, and summing and averaging over all four spiral arms, one could determine if arm tracers have separate and parallel lanes in the Milky Way. This statistical analysis allows a cross-cut of a Galactic spiral arm to be made, confirming a recent discovery of a linear separation between arm tracers. Here, from the mid-arm's CO to the inner edge's hot dust, the arm halfwidth is about 340 pc doubling would yield a full arm width of 680 pc. We briefly compare these observations with the predictions of many spiral arm theories, notably the density wave theory.

  6. Chandra X-Ray Observations of the Spiral Galaxy M81

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Ghosh, Kajal K.; McCollough, Michael L.; Pannuti, Thomas G.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Wu, Kinwah

    2003-01-01

    A Chandra X-Ray Observatory ACIS-S imaging observation is used to study the population of X-ray sources in the nearby Sab galaxy M81 (NGC 3031). A total of 177 sources are detected with 124 located within the D(sub 25) isophote to a limiting X-ray luminosity of approx. 3 x 10(exp 36) ergs/s. Source positions, count rates, luminosities in the 0.3-8.0 keV band, limiting optical magnitudes, and potential counterpart identifications are tabulated. Spectral and timing analysis of the 36 brightest sources are reported including the low luminosity active galactic nucleus, SN 1993J, and the Einstein-discovered ultraluminous X-ray source X6. The nucleus accounts for approx. 86%, or 5 x 10(exp 40) ergs/s, of the total X-ray emission from M81. Its spectrum is well fitted by an absorbed power law with photon index 1.98 +/- 0.08, consistent with previous observations (average index 1.9). SN 1993J has softened and faded since its discovery. At an age of 2594 days, SN 1993J displayed a complex thermal spectrum from a reverse shock rich in Fe L and highly ionized Mg, Si, and S but lacking O. A hard X-ray component, emitted by a forward shock, is also present. X6 is spatially coincident with a stellar object with optical brightness and colors consistent with an O9-B1 main-sequence star. It is also coincident with a weak radio source with a flux density of approx. 95 microJy at lambda = 3.6 cm. The continuum-dominated X-ray spectrum of X6 is most closely reproduced by a blackbody disk model suggesting the X-ray source is an approx. 18 solar mass object accreting at nearly its Eddington limit.

  7. The Dark Matter Halos of Massive, Relaxed Galaxy Clusters Observed With Chandra

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Robert W.; Allen, S.W.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-10-11

    We use the Chandra X-ray Observatory to study the dark matter halos of 34 massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters, spanning the redshift range 0.06 < z < 0.7. The observed dark matter and total mass (dark-plus-luminous matter) profiles can be approximated by the Navarro Frenk & White (hereafter NFW) model for cold dark matter (CDM) halos; for {approx} 80 percent of the clusters, the NFW model provides a statistically acceptable fit. In contrast, the singular isothermal sphere model can, in almost every case, be completely ruled out. We observe a well-defined mass-concentration relation for the clusters with a normalization and intrinsic scatter in good agreement with the predictions from simulations. The slope of the mass-concentration relation, c {infinity} M{sub vir}{sup a}/(1 + z){sup b} with a = -0.41 {+-} 0.11 at 95 percent confidence, is steeper than the value a {approx} -0.1 predicted by CDM simulations for lower mass halos. With the slope a included as a free fit parameter, the redshift evolution of the concentration parameter, b = 0.54 {+-} 0.47 at 95 percent confidence, is also slower than, but marginally consistent with, the same simulations (b {approx} 1). Fixing a {approx} -0.1 leads to an apparent evolution that is significantly slower, b = 0.20 {+-} 0.45, although the goodness of fit in this case is significantly worse. Using a generalized NFW model, we find the inner dark matter density slope, a, to be consistent with unity at 95 percent confidence for the majority of clusters. Combining the results for all clusters for which the generalized NFW model provides a good description of the data, we measure ? = 0.88 {+-} 0.29 at 95 percent confidence, in agreement with CDM model predictions.

  8. A catalog of 2810 nearby galaxies - The effect of the Virgocentric flow model on their observed velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraan-Korteweg, R. C.

    1986-12-01

    A catalog of 2810 nearby galaxies has been prepared. The conditions for an inclusion into the catalog ensure that most galaxies for which the effect of the overdensity of the Virgo cluster on their observed redshifts is not negligible are listed. Three main entities define the catalog: (1) a magnitude-limited catalog with BT ≤ 13m.4, (2) a volume-limited catalog with v0 ≤ 500 km s-1, and (3) a Virgo catalog for galaxies within a 10°-cone around M87 limited at BT ≤ 14m.95. In correspondence to a virgocentric nonlinear flow model (Silk 1974, 1977), distances are calculated for all galaxies in the catalog with known redshifts. In addition to the positions, the recession velocities and the calculated distances, morphological types, diameters, axis ratios, apparent blue magnitudes, and absorption-corrected luminosities based on rVir = 21.7 Mpc are listed. Some sample pages of the catalog are presented. The whole catalog will be made available upon request. A magnetic tape version of the catalog can be provided as well. The nonlinear flow model itself, the choice of the adopted parameters and the significance of individual parameters on the flow pattern are described in detail.

  9. ALMA observations of the Antennae galaxies. I. A new window on a prototypical merger

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Brogan, Crystal; Evans, Aaron; Hibbard, John; Leroy, Adam; Remijan, Anthony; Sheth, Kartik; Chandar, Rupali; Johnson, Kelsey; Privon, George

    2014-11-10

    We present the highest spatial resolution (≈0.''5) CO (3-2) observations to date of the 'overlap' region in the merging Antennae galaxies (NGC 4038/39), taken with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. We report on the discovery of a long (3 kpc), thin (aspect ratio 30/1), filament of CO gas that breaks up into roughly 10 individual knots. Each individual knot has a low internal velocity dispersion (≈10 km s{sup –1}); the dispersion of the ensemble of knots in the filament is also low (≈10 km s{sup –1}). At the other extreme, we find that the individual clouds in the supergiant molecular cloud 2 region discussed by Wilson and collaborators have a large range of internal velocity dispersions (10 to 80 km s{sup –1}), and a large dispersion among the ensemble (≈80 km s{sup –1}). Other large-scale features observed in CO emission, and their correspondence with historical counterparts using observations in other wavelengths, are also discussed. We compare the locations of small-scale CO features with a variety of multi-wavelength observations, in particular broad- (BVIJH) and narrow-band data (H{sub α} and Pa{sub β}) taken with the Hubble Space Telescope, and radio (3.6 cm) continuum observations taken with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. This comparison leads to the development of an evolutionary classification system that provides a framework for studying the sequence of star cluster formation and evolution—from diffuse supergiant molecular clouds (SGMCs) to proto, embedded, emerging, young, intermediate/old clusters. The relative timescales have been assessed by determining the fractional population of sources at each evolutionary stage. The main uncertainty in this estimate is the identification of four regions as candidate protoclusters (i.e., strong compact CO emission but no clearly associated radio emission). Using the evolutionary framework, we estimate that the maximum age range of clusters in a single GMC is ≈10 Myr

  10. Observed versus modelled u-, g-, r-, i-, z-band photometry of local galaxies - evaluation of model performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, K. S. Alexander; Lisker, Thorsten; Grebel, Eva K.

    2012-12-01

    We test how well available stellar population models can reproduce observed u-, g-, r-, i-, z-band photometry of the local galaxy population (0.02 ≤ z ≤ 0.03) as probed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our study is conducted from the perspective of a user of the models, who has observational data in hand and seeks to convert them into physical quantities. Stellar population models for galaxies are created by synthesizing star formation histories and chemical enrichments using single stellar populations from several groups (STARBURST99, GALAXEV, the Maraston models, GALEV). The role of dust is addressed through a simplistic, but observationally motivated, dust model that couples the amplitude of the extinction to the star formation history, metallicity and the viewing angle. Moreover, the influence of emission lines is considered (for the subset of models for which this component is included). The performance of the models is investigated by (1) comparing their prediction with the observed galaxy population in the SDSS using the (u - g)-(r - i) and (g - r)-(i - z) colour planes, (2) comparing predicted stellar mass and luminosity weighted ages and metallicities, specific star formation rates, mass-to-light ratios and total extinctions with literature values from studies based on spectroscopy. Strong differences between the various models are seen with several models occupying regions in the colour-colour diagrams where no galaxies are observed. We would therefore like to emphasize the importance of the choice of model. Using our preferred model we find that the star formation history, metallicity and also dust content can be constrained over a large part of the parameter space through the use of u-, g-, r-, i-, z-band photometry. However, strong local degeneracies are present due to overlap of models with high and low extinction in certain parts of the colour space.

  11. NIHAO X: reconciling the local galaxy velocity function with cold dark matter via mock H I observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macciò, Andrea V.; Udrescu, Silviu M.; Dutton, Aaron A.; Obreja, Aura; Wang, Liang; Stinson, Greg R.; Kang, Xi

    2016-11-01

    We used 87 high-resolution hydrodynamical cosmological simulations from the NIHAO suite to investigate the relation between the maximum circular velocity (V_max^DM) of a dark matter halo in a collisionless simulation and the velocity width of the H I gas in the same halo in the hydrodynamical simulation. These two quantities are normally used to compare theoretical and observational velocity functions and have led to a possible discrepancy between observations and predictions based on the cold dark matter (CDM) model. We show that below 100 km s-1, there is clear bias between H I -based velocities and V_max^DM, that leads to an underestimation of the actual circular velocity of the halo. When this bias is taken into account, the CDM model has no trouble in reproducing the observed velocity function and no lack of low-velocity galaxies is actually present. Our simulations also reproduce the linewidth-stellar mass (Tully-Fisher) relation and H I sizes, indicating that the H I gas in our simulations is as extended as observed. The physical reason for the lower than expected linewidths is that, in contrast to high-mass galaxies, low-mass galaxies no longer have extended thin H I rotating discs, as is commonly assumed.

  12. HST/ACS observations of Lyman-break galaxies and Lyα emitters associated with radio galaxies at z>4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overzier, R. A.

    2006-03-01

    Distant radio galaxies may pinpoint overdense regions in the early universe. We have collected data with HST/ACS towards several overdensities of Lyα emitters associated with radio galaxies discovered by Venemans et al. Using the Lyman break selection technique we find statistical evidence for additional galaxies associated with the radio galaxies TN J1338-1942 at z=4.1 and TN J0924-2201 at z=5.2. In the case of TN J1338-1942, the angular distribution of candidate Lyman break galaxies is highly filamentary across the ˜12 arcmin2 field, with more than half of the objects clustered in a 4.4 arcmin2 region that includes the radio galaxy. Both fields appear to be significantly richer in Lyman break galaxies than the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields, suggesting that the radio galaxies are embedded in galaxy groups or (forming) clusters. The Lyman break galaxies have mild to moderate star formation rates and relatively blue UV continuum colours. Except for their high equivalent width Lyα, the properties of spectroscopically confirmed Lyα emitters associated with these radio galaxies are consistent with those of normal Lyman break galaxies at relatively low luminosities. The two radio galaxies have some intriguing properties: TN J1338-1942 is extremely bright in the rest-frame UV, and has a highly disturbed morphology presumed to arise from interactions between the jet and the surrounding medium, and a starburst-driven superwind. The UV star formation rate and (projected) size of TN J0924-2201 are typical of relatively faint Lyman break galaxies at z˜3-5. Yet it is a luminous, radio-loud AGN, suggesting the presence of a supermassive black hole that may have acquired its mass before the host galaxy produced the bulk of its stars.

  13. Spitzer 24 Micron Observations of Optical/Near-Infrared-Selected Extremely Red Galaxies: Evidence for Assembly of Massive Galaxies at Z approximately equal to 1-2?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Lin; Choi, Philip I.; Fadda, D.; Marleau, F. R.; Soifer, B. T.; Im, M.; Armus, L.; Frayer, D. T.; Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.; Thompson, D. J.; Teplitz, H. I.; Helou, G.; Appleton, P. N.; Chapman, S.; Fan, F.; Heinrichsen, I.; Lacy, M.; Shupe, D. L.; Squires, G. K.; Surace, J.; Wilson, G.

    2004-01-01

    We carried out direct measurement of the fraction of dusty sources in a sample of extremely red galaxies with (R - Ks) >= 5.3 mag and Ks < 20:2 mag, using 24 micron data from the Spitzer Space Telescope. Combining deep 24 micron Ks- and R-band data over an area of 64 arcmin(sup 2) in ELAIS N1 of the Spitzer First Look Survey (FLS), we find that 50% +/- 6% of our extremely red object (ERO) sample have measurable 24 micron flux above the 3 (sigma) flux limit of 40 (micro)Jy. This flux limit corresponds to a star formation rate (SFR) of 12 solar masses per year 1, much more sensitive than any previous long-wavelength measurement. The 24 micron-detected EROs have 24 micron/2.2 micron and 24 micron/0.7 micron flux ratios consistent with infrared luminous, dusty sources at z >= 1, and are an order of magnitude too red to be explained by an infrared quiescent spiral or a pure old stellar population at any redshift. Some of these 24 micron-detected EROs could be active galactic nuclei; however, the fraction among the whole ERO sample is probably small, 10%-20%, as suggested by deep X-ray observations as well as optical spectroscopy. Keck optical spectroscopy of a sample of similarly selected EROs in the FLS field suggests that most of the EROs in ELAIS N1 are probably at z 1. The mean 24 micron flux (167 (micro)Jy) of the 24 micron-detected ERO sample roughly corresponds to the rest-frame 12 micron luminosity, (nu)L(nu)(12 micron, of 3x10(exp 10)(deg) solar luminosities at z 1. Using the c IRAS (nu)L(nu)(12 (micron) and infrared luminosity LIR(8-1000 (micron), we infer that the (LIR) of the 24 micron- detected EROs is 3 x 10(exp 11) and 1 x 10(exp 12) solar luminosities at z = 1.0 and similar to that of local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). The corresponding SFR would be roughly 50-170 solar masses per year. If the timescale of this starbursting phase is on the order of 108 yr as inferred for the local LIRGs and ULIRGs, the

  14. Molecular Gas Content of an Extremely Star-forming Herschel Observed Lensed Dusty Galaxy at z=2.685

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayyeri, Hooshang; Cooray, Asantha R.; H-ATLAS

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of combined deep near-infrared, far infrared and millimeter observations of an extremely star forming lensed dusty star-forming galaxy (DSFG) identified from the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS). The high redshift DSFG is gravitationally lensed by a massive WISE identified cluster at z~1 (spectroscopically confirmed with Keck/DEIMOS and Gemini/GMOS) producing multiply lensed images and arcs observed in the optical. The DSFG is spectroscopically confirmed at z=2.685 from CO(1-0) observations by GBT and separately from CO(3-2) observations by CARMA. We use the combined spectroscopic and imaging observations to construct a detailed lens model of the background DSFG which allowed us to study the sources plane properties of the target. Multi-band data from Keck/NIRC2, HST/WFC3 and Herschel yields star formation rate and stellar mass well above the main sequence. Observations of the dust continuum by the Sub-millimeter Array yields an observed total ISM mass of 6.5E+11 M* which is responsible for the intense observed star formation rates. Comparing the measured SFR with molecular gas measurements from CO(1-0) observations reveals that this system has relatively short gas depletion time scale which is consistent with the starburst phase observed in high redshift sub-millimeter galaxies.

  15. First Observational Support for Overlapping Reionized Bubbles Generated by a Galaxy Overdensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, M.; Dayal, P.; Pentericci, L.; Fontana, A.; Hutter, A.; Brammer, G.; Merlin, E.; Grazian, A.; Pilo, S.; Amorin, R.; Cristiani, S.; Dickinson, M.; Ferrara, A.; Gallerani, S.; Giallongo, E.; Giavalisco, M.; Guaita, L.; Koekemoer, A.; Maiolino, R.; Paris, D.; Santini, P.; Vallini, L.; Vanzella, E.; Wagg, J.

    2016-02-01

    We present an analysis of deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) multi-band imaging of the BDF field specifically designed to identify faint companions around two of the few Lyα emitting galaxies spectroscopically confirmed at z ˜ 7. Although separated by only 4.4 proper Mpc these galaxies cannot generate H ii regions large enough to explain the visibility of their Lyα lines, thus requiring a population of fainter ionizing sources in their vicinity. We use deep HST and VLT-Hawk-I data to select z ˜ 7 Lyman break galaxies around the emitters. We select six new robust z ˜ 7 LBGs at Y ˜ 26.5-27.5 whose average spectral energy distribution is consistent with the objects being at the redshift of the close-by Lyα emitters. The resulting number density of z ˜ 7 LBGs in the BDF field is a factor of approximately three to four higher than expected in random pointings of the same size. We compare these findings with cosmological hydrodynamic plus radiative transfer simulations of a universe with a half neutral IGM: we find that indeed Lyα emitter pairs are only found in completely ionized regions characterized by significant LBG overdensities. Our findings match the theoretical prediction that the first ionization fronts are generated within significant galaxy overdensities and support a scenario where faint, “normal” star-forming galaxies are responsible for reionization.

  16. Chandra Observation of Abell 1142: A Cool-core Cluster Lacking a Central Brightest Cluster Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuanyuan; Buote, David A.; Gastaldello, Fabio; van Weeren, Reinout

    2016-04-01

    Abell 1142 is a low-mass galaxy cluster at low redshift containing two comparable brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) resembling a scaled-down version of the Coma Cluster. Our Chandra analysis reveals an X-ray emission peak, roughly 100 kpc away from either BCG, which we identify as the cluster center. The emission center manifests itself as a second beta-model surface brightness component distinct from that of the cluster on larger scales. The center is also substantially cooler and more metal-rich than the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM), which makes Abell 1142 appear to be a cool-core cluster. The redshift distribution of its member galaxies indicates that Abell 1142 may contain two subclusters, each of which contain one BCG. The BCGs are merging at a relative velocity of ≈1200 km s-1. This ongoing merger may have shock-heated the ICM from ≈2 keV to above 3 keV, which would explain the anomalous LX-TX scaling relation for this system. This merger may have displaced the metal-enriched “cool core” of either of the subclusters from the BCG. The southern BCG consists of three individual galaxies residing within a radius of 5 kpc in projection. These galaxies should rapidly sink into the subcluster center due to the dynamical friction of a cuspy cold dark matter halo.

  17. CHANDRA OBSERVATION OF ABELL 1142: A COOL-CORE CLUSTER LACKING A CENTRAL BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXY?

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yuanyuan; Weeren, Reinout van; Buote, David A.; Gastaldello, Fabio

    2016-04-10

    Abell 1142 is a low-mass galaxy cluster at low redshift containing two comparable brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) resembling a scaled-down version of the Coma Cluster. Our Chandra analysis reveals an X-ray emission peak, roughly 100 kpc away from either BCG, which we identify as the cluster center. The emission center manifests itself as a second beta-model surface brightness component distinct from that of the cluster on larger scales. The center is also substantially cooler and more metal-rich than the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM), which makes Abell 1142 appear to be a cool-core cluster. The redshift distribution of its member galaxies indicates that Abell 1142 may contain two subclusters, each of which contain one BCG. The BCGs are merging at a relative velocity of ≈1200 km s{sup −1}. This ongoing merger may have shock-heated the ICM from ≈2 keV to above 3 keV, which would explain the anomalous L{sub X}–T{sub X} scaling relation for this system. This merger may have displaced the metal-enriched “cool core” of either of the subclusters from the BCG. The southern BCG consists of three individual galaxies residing within a radius of 5 kpc in projection. These galaxies should rapidly sink into the subcluster center due to the dynamical friction of a cuspy cold dark matter halo.

  18. Galaxy-galaxy(-galaxy) lensing as a sensitive probe of galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghiha, H.; Hilbert, S.; Schneider, P.; Simon, P.

    2012-11-01

    Context. The gravitational lensing effect provides various ways to study the mass environment of galaxies. Aims: We investigate how galaxy-galaxy(-galaxy) lensing can be used to test models of galaxy formation and evolution. Methods: We consider two semi-analytic galaxy formation models based on the Millennium Run N-body simulation: the Durham model by Bower et al. (2006, MNRAS, 370, 645) and the Garching model by Guo et al. (2011, MNRAS, 413, 101). We generate mock lensing observations for the two models, and then employ Fast Fourier Transform methods to compute second- and third-order aperture statistics in the simulated fields for various galaxy samples. Results: We find that both models predict qualitatively similar aperture signals, but there are large quantitative differences. The Durham model predicts larger amplitudes in general. In both models, red galaxies exhibit stronger aperture signals than blue galaxies. Using these aperture measurements and assuming a linear deterministic bias model, we measure relative bias ratios of red and blue galaxy samples. We find that a linear deterministic bias is insufficient to describe the relative clustering of model galaxies below ten arcmin angular scales. Dividing galaxies into luminosity bins, the aperture signals decrease with decreasing luminosity for brighter galaxies, but increase again for fainter galaxies. This increase is likely an artifact due to too many faint satellite galaxies in massive group and cluster halos predicted by the models. Conclusions: Our study shows that galaxy-galaxy(-galaxy) lensing is a sensitive probe of galaxy evolution.

  19. X-ray observations of dust obscured galaxies in the Chandra deep field south

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corral, A.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Comastri, A.; Ranalli, P.; Akylas, A.; Salvato, M.; Lanzuisi, G.; Vignali, C.; Koutoulidis, L.

    2016-08-01

    We present the properties of X-ray detected dust obscured galaxies (DOGs) in the Chandra deep field south. In recent years, it has been proposed that a significant percentage of the elusive Compton-thick (CT) active galactic nuclei (AGN) could be hidden among DOGs. This type of galaxy is characterized by a very high infrared (IR) to optical flux ratio (f24 μm/fR > 1000), which in the case of CT AGN could be due to the suppression of AGN emission by absorption and its subsequent re-emission in the IR. The most reliable way of confirming the CT nature of an AGN is by X-ray spectroscopy. In a previous work, we presented the properties of X-ray detected DOGs by making use of the deepest X-ray observations available at that time, the 2Ms observations of the Chandra deep fields, the Chandra deep field north (CDF-N), and the Chandra deep field south (CDF-S). In that work, we only found a moderate percentage (<50%) of CT AGN among the DOGs sample. However, we pointed out that the limited photon statistics for most of the sources in the sample did not allow us to strongly constrain this number. In this paper, we further explore the properties of the sample of DOGs in the CDF-S presented in that work by using not only a deeper 6Ms Chandra survey of the CDF-S, but also by combining these data with the 3Ms XMM-Newton survey of the CDF-S. We also take advantage of the great coverage of the CDF-S region from the UV to the far-IR to fit the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of our sources. Out of the 14 AGN composing our sample, 9 are highly absorbed (NH > 1023 cm-2), whereas 2 look unabsorbed, and the other 3 are only moderately absorbed. Among the highly absorbed AGN, we find that only three could be considered CT AGN. In only one of these three cases, we detect a strong Fe Kα emission line; the source is already classified as a CT AGN with Chandra data in a previous work. Here we confirm its CT nature by combining Chandra and XMM-Newton data. For the other two CT

  20. The star formation histories of local group dwarf galaxies. I. Hubble space telescope/wide field planetary camera 2 observations

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2014-07-10

    We present uniformly measured star formation histories (SFHs) of 40 Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies based on color-magnitude diagram (CMD) analysis from archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We demonstrate that accurate SFHs can be recovered from CMDs that do not reach the oldest main sequence turn-off (MSTO), but emphasize that the oldest MSTO is critical for precisely constraining the earliest epochs of star formation. We find that: (1) the average lifetime SFHs of dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) can be approximated by an exponentially declining SFH with τ ∼ 5 Gyr; (2) lower luminosity dSphs are less likely to have extended SFHs than more luminous dSphs; (3) the average SFHs of dwarf irregulars (dIrrs), transition dwarfs, and dwarf ellipticals can be approximated by the combination of an exponentially declining SFH (τ ∼ 3-4 Gyr) for lookback ages >10-12 Gyr ago and a constant SFH thereafter; (4) the observed fraction of stellar mass formed prior to z = 2 ranges considerably (80% for galaxies with M < 10{sup 5} M{sub ☉} to 30% for galaxies with M > 10{sup 7} M{sub ☉}) and is largely explained by environment; (5) the distinction between 'ultra-faint' and 'classical' dSphs is arbitrary; (6) LG dIrrs formed a significantly higher fraction of stellar mass prior to z = 2 than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies from Leitner and the SFHs from the abundance matching models of Behroozi et al. This may indicate higher than expected star formation efficiencies at early times in low mass galaxies. Finally, we provide all the SFHs in tabulated electronic format for use by the community.

  1. Observational evidence of a slow downfall of star formation efficiency in massive galaxies during the past 10 Gyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, C.; Elbaz, D.; Pannella, M.; Ciesla, L.; Wang, T.; Koekemoer, A.; Rafelski, M.; Daddi, E.

    2016-05-01

    We study the causes of the reported mass-dependence in the slope of the SFR-M∗ relation, the so-called main sequence of star-forming galaxies, and discuss its implication on the physical processes that shaped the star formation history of massive galaxies over cosmic time. We made use of the near-infrared high-resolution imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope in the CANDELS fields to perform a careful bulge-to-disk decomposition of distant galaxies and measure for the first time the slope of the SFR-Mdisk relation at z = 1. We find that this relation very closely follows the shape of the nominal SFR-M∗ correlation, still with a pronounced flattening at the high-mass end. This clearly excludes, at least at z = 1, the progressive growth of quiescent stellar bulges in star-forming galaxies as the main driver for the change of slope of the main sequence. Then, by stacking the Herschel data available in the CANDELS field, we estimated the gas mass (Mgas = MH i + MH2) and the star formation efficiency (SFE ≡ SFR/Mgas) at different positions on the SFR-M∗ relation. We find that the relatively low SFRs observed in massive galaxies (M∗> 5 × 1010 M⊙) are not caused by a reduced gas content, but by a star formation efficiency that is lower by up to a factor of 3 than in galaxies with lower stellar mass. The trend at the lowest masses is probably linked to the dominance of atomic over molecular gas. We argue that this stellar-mass-dependent SFE can explain the varying slope of the main sequence since z = 1.5, hence over 70% of the Hubble time. The drop in SFE occurs at lower masses in the local Universe (M∗> 2 × 1010 M⊙) and is not present at z = 2. Altogether, this provides evidence for a slow decrease in star formation efficiency in massive main sequence galaxies. The resulting loss of star formation is found to be rising starting from z = 2 to reach a level similar to the mass growth of the quiescent population by z = 1. We finally discuss the possible

  2. Observations of environmental quenching in groups in the 11 Gyr since z = 2.5: Different quenching for central and satellite galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, Tomer; Illingworth, Garth D.; Magee, Daniel; Oesch, Pascal; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Leja, Joel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J.; Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Marchesini, Danilo; Patel, Shannon G.; Quadri, Ryan F.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Wake, David A.; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2014-07-10

    We present direct observational evidence for star formation quenching in galaxy groups in the redshift range 0 < z < 2.5. We utilize a large sample of nearly 6000 groups, selected by fixed cumulative number density from three photometric catalogs, to follow the evolving quiescent fractions of central and satellite galaxies over roughly 11 Gyr. At z ∼ 0, central galaxies in our sample range in stellar mass from Milky Way/M31 analogs (M{sub *}/M{sub ☉} = 6.5 × 10{sup 10}) to nearby massive ellipticals (M{sub *}/M{sub ☉} = 1.5 × 10{sup 11}). Satellite galaxies in the same groups reach masses as low as twice that of the Large Magellanic Cloud (M{sub *}/M{sub ☉} = 6.5 × 10{sup 9}). Using statistical background subtraction, we measure the average rest-frame colors of galaxies in our groups and calculate the evolving quiescent fractions of centrals and satellites over seven redshift bins. Our analysis shows clear evidence for star formation quenching in group halos, with a different quenching onset for centrals and their satellite galaxies. Using halo mass estimates for our central galaxies, we find that star formation shuts off in centrals when typical halo masses reach between 10{sup 12} and 10{sup 13} M{sub ☉}, consistent with predictions from the halo quenching model. In contrast, satellite galaxies in the same groups most likely undergo quenching by environmental processes, whose onset is delayed with respect to their central galaxy. Although star formation is suppressed in all galaxies over time, the processes that govern quenching are different for centrals and satellites. While mass plays an important role in determining the star formation activity of central galaxies, quenching in satellite galaxies is dominated by the environment in which they reside.

  3. Observations of Environmental Quenching in Groups in the 11 GYR Since z = 2.5: Different Quenching For Central and Satellite Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tal, Tomer; Dekel, Avishai; Marchesini, Danilo; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J.; Patel, Shannon G.; Quadri, Ryan F.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Wake, David A.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Oesch, Pascal; Muzzin, Adam; Brammer, Gabriel B.; vanDokkum, Peter G.; Franx, Marijn; Illingworth, Garth D.; Leja, Joel; Magee, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We present direct observational evidence for star formation quenching in galaxy groups in the redshift range 0 less than z less than 2.5. We utilize a large sample of nearly 6000 groups, selected by fixed cumulative number density from three photometric catalogs, to follow the evolving quiescent fractions of central and satellite galaxies over roughly 11 Gyr. At z approximately 0, central galaxies in our sample range in stellar mass from Milky Way/M31 analogs (M=6.5x10(exp 10) M/solar mass) to nearby massive ellipticals (M=1.5x10(exp 11) M/solar mass). Satellite galaxies in the same groups reach masses as low as twice that of the Large Magellanic Cloud (M=6.5x10(exp 9) M/solar mass). Using statistical background subtraction, we measure the average rest-frame colors of galaxies in our groups and calculate the evolving quiescent fractions of centrals and satellites over seven redshift bins. Our analysis shows clear evidence for star formation quenching in group halos, with a different quenching onset for centrals and their satellite galaxies. Using halo mass estimates for our central galaxies, we find that star formation shuts off in centrals when typical halo masses reach between 10(exp 12) and 10(exp 13) M/solar mass, consistent with predictions from the halo quenching model. In contrast, satellite galaxies in the same groups most likely undergo quenching by environmental processes, whose onset is delayed with respect to their central galaxy. Although star formation is suppressed in all galaxies over time, the processes that govern quenching are different for centrals and satellites. While mass plays an important role in determining the star formation activity of central galaxies, quenching in satellite galaxies is dominated by the environment in which they reside.

  4. Kinematic Properties of Double-barred Galaxies: Simulations versus Integral-field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Min; Debattista, Victor P.; Shen, Juntai; Cappellari, Michele

    2016-09-01

    Using high-resolution N-body simulations, we recently reported that a dynamically cool inner disk embedded in a hotter outer disk can naturally generate a steady double-barred (S2B) structure. Here we study the kinematics of these S2B simulations, and compare them to integral-field observations from ATLAS 3D and SAURON. We show that S2B galaxies exhibit several distinct kinematic features, namely: (1) significantly distorted isovelocity contours at the transition region between the two bars, (2) peaks in σ LOS along the minor axis of inner bars, which we term “σ-humps,” that are often accompanied by ring/spiral-like features of increased σ LOS, (3) {h}3{--}\\bar{v} anti-correlations in the region of the inner bar for certain orientations, and (4) rings of positive h 4 when viewed at low inclinations. The most impressive of these features are the σ-humps these evolve with the inner bar, oscillating in strength just as the inner bar does as it rotates relative to the outer bar. We show that, in cylindrical coordinates, the inner bar has similar streaming motions and velocity dispersion properties as normal large-scale bars, except for σ z , which exhibits peaks on the minor axis, i.e., humps. These σ z humps are responsible for producing the σ-humps. For three well-resolved early-type S2Bs (NGC 2859, NGC 2950, and NGC 3941) and a potential S2B candidate (NGC 3384), the S2B model qualitatively matches the integral-field data well, including the “σ-hollows” previously identified. We also discuss the kinematic effect of a nuclear disk in S2Bs.

  5. ROSAT PSPC and HRI observations of the composite starburst/Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1672

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, W. N.; Halpern, Jules P.; Iwasawa, K.

    1995-01-01

    The nearby barred spiral galaxy NGC 1672 has been observed with the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) and High Resolution Imager (HRI) instruments on board the ROSAT X-ray satellite. NGC 1672 is thought to have an obscured Seyfert nucleus, and it has strong starburst activity as well. Three bright X-ray sources with luminosities 1-2 x 10(exp 40) erg/s are clearly identified with NGC 1672. The strongest lies at the nucleus, and the other two lie at the ends of NGC 1672's prominent bar, locations that are also bright in H alpha and near-infrared images. The nuclear source is resolved by the HRI on about the scale of the recently identified nuclear ring, and one of the sources at the ends of the bar is also probably resolved. The X-ray spectrum of the nuclear source is quite soft, having a Raymond-Smith plasma temperature of approximately equals 0.7 keV and little evidence for intrinsic absorption. The ROSAT band X-ray flux of the nuclear source appears to be dominated not by X-ray binary emission but rather by diffuse gas emission. The absorption and emission properties of the sources, as well as their spatial extents, lead us to models of superbubbles driven by supernovae. However, the large density and emission measure of the nuclear X-ray source stretch the limits that can be comfortably accommodated by these models. We do not detect direct emission from the putative Seyfert nucleus, although an alternative model for the nuclear source is thermal emission from gas that is photoionized by a hidden Seyfert nucleus. The spectra of the other two X-ray sources are harder than that of the nuclear source, and have similar difficulties with regard to superbubble models.

  6. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Observations of the Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy Markarian 59

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuan, Trinh X.; Lecavelier des Etangs, Alain; Izotov, Yuri I.

    2002-02-01

    New Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) far-UV spectroscopy of the nearby metal-deficient (Zsolar/8) cometary blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy Markarian (Mrk) 59 is discussed. The data are used to investigate element abundances in its interstellar medium. The H I absorption lines are characterized by narrow cores that are interstellar in origin and by broad wings that are stellar in origin. The mean interstellar H I column density is ~7×1020 cm-2 in Mrk 59. No H2 lines are seen and N(H2) is <~1015 cm-2 at the 10 σ level. The lack of diffuse H2 is due to the combined effect of a strong UV radiation field that destroys the H2 molecules and a low metallicity that leads to a scarcity of dust grains necessary for H2 formation. P Cygni profiles of the S VI λλ933.4, 944.5 and O VI λλ1031.9, 1037.6 lines are seen, indicating the presence of very hot O stars and a stellar wind terminal velocity of ~1000 km s-1. By fitting the line profiles with multiple components having each a velocity dispersion b=7 km s-1 and spanning a radial velocity range of 100 km s-1, some of which can be saturated, we derive heavy element abundances in the neutral gas. We find logN(O I)/N(H I)=-5.0+/-0.3 or [O I/H I]=-1.5 for the neutral gas, about a factor of 10 below the oxygen abundance of the supergiant H II region, implying self-enrichment of the latter. Based on observations made with the NASA-CNES-CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. FUSE is operated for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University under NASA contract NAS 5-32985.

  7. Deep Chandra Observations of NGC 1404: Cluster Plasma Physics Revealed by an Infalling Early-type Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuanyuan; Kraft, Ralph P.; Roediger, Elke; Nulsen, Paul; Forman, William R.; Churazov, Eugene; Randall, Scott W.; Jones, Christine; Machacek, Marie E.

    2017-01-01

    The intracluster medium (ICM), as a magnetized and highly ionized fluid, provides an ideal laboratory to study plasma physics under extreme conditions that cannot be achieved on Earth. NGC 1404 is a bright elliptical galaxy that is being gas stripped as it falls through the ICM of the Fornax Cluster. We use the new Chandra X-ray observations of NGC 1404 to study ICM microphysics. The interstellar medium of NGC 1404 is characterized by a sharp leading edge, 8 kpc from the Galaxy center, and a short downstream gaseous tail. Contact discontinuities are resolved on unprecedented spatial scales (0.″5 = 45 pc) due to the combination of the proximity of NGC 1404, the superb spatial resolution of Chandra, and the very deep (670 ks) exposure. At the leading edge, we observe sub-kiloparsec-scale eddies generated by Kelvin–Helmholtz instability (KHI) and put an upper limit of 5% Spitzer on the isotropic viscosity of the hot cluster plasma. We also observe mixing between the hot cluster gas and the cooler galaxy gas in the downstream stripped tail, which provides further evidence of a low viscosity plasma. The assumed ordered magnetic fields in the ICM ought to be smaller than 5 μG to allow KHI to develop. The lack of an evident magnetic draping layer just outside the contact edge is consistent with such an upper limit.

  8. The Sérsic-Pastoriza galaxy NGC 1808. I. Radio-continuum, optical and H I observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, D. J.; Unger, S. W.; Pedlar, A.; Yates, G. J.; Axon, D. J.; Wolstencroft, R. D.; Taylor, K.; Gyldenkerne, K.

    1990-08-01

    The authors present radio-continuum observations made at high angular resolution with the VLA at 20, 6 and 2 cm of the central region of the Sérsic-Pastoriza galaxy NGC 1808. These observations reveal a population of compact radio sources, reminiscent of those found in the archetypal starburst galaxies M82 and NGC 253. The bulk of these compact features are not coincident with the optical hot-spots and are likely to be individual or unresolved groups of SNRs. The authors have also made H I observations of NGC 1808 with the VLA. Although this was primarily to search for unusual motions which may enable the authors to understand the nuclear activity, they also obtained information on the large-scale distribution and dynamics of gas in this system. The neutral hydrogen is largely concentrated in a central bar, with weak emission from the spiral arms. An absorption profile against the radio emission from the nuclear region shows two features straddling the systemic velocity. The velocity field of the galaxy is largely consistent with rotation although there is evidence of significant non-circular motions in the bar. The authors discuss any possible relationship between these non-circular motions and the starburst/nuclear activity in the central region of NGC 1808.

  9. First survey of Wolf-Rayet star populations over the full extension of nearby galaxies observed with CALIFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles-Caballero, D.; Díaz, A. I.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Kehrig, C.; García-Benito, R.; Sánchez, S. F.; Walcher, C. J.; Galbany, L.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Vílchez, J. M.; González Delgado, R. M.; van de Ven, G.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Lyubenova, M.; Meidt, S.; Falcon-Barroso, J.; Mast, D.; Mendoza, M. A.; Califa Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    The search of extragalactic regions with conspicuous presence of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars outside the Local Group is challenging task owing to the difficulty in detecting their faint spectral features. In this exploratory work, we develop a methodology to perform an automated search of WR signatures through a pixel-by-pixel analysis of integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data belonging to the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area survey, CALIFA. This procedure has been applied to a sample of nearby galaxies spanning a wide range of physical, morphological, and environmental properties. This technique allowed us to build the first catalogue of regions rich in WR stars with spatially resolved information, and enabled us to study the properties of these complexes in a two-dimensional (2D) context. The detection technique is based on the identification of the blue WR bump (around He iiλ4686 Å, mainly associated with nitrogen-rich WR stars; WN) and the red WR bump (around C ivλ5808 Å, mainly associated with carbon-rich WR stars; WC) using a pixel-by-pixel analysis that maximizes the number of independent regions within a given galaxy. We identified 44 WR-rich regions with blue bumps distributed in 25 out of a total of 558 galaxies. The red WR bump was identified only in 5 of those regions. Most of the WR regions are located within one effective radius from the galaxy centre, and around one-third are located within ~1 kpc or less from the centre. We found that the majority of the galaxies hosting WR populations in our sample are involved in some kind of interaction process. Half of the host galaxies share some properties with gamma-ray burst (GRB) hosts where WR stars, such as potential candidates to the progenitors of GRBs, are found. We also compared the WR properties derived from the CALIFA data with stellar population synthesis models, and confirm that simple star models are generally not able to reproduce the observations. We conclude that other effects, such as

  10. Suzaku observations of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 2255: The northeast radio relic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akamatsu, H.; Mizuno, M.; Ota, N.; Zhang, Y.-Y.; van Weeren, R. J.; Kawahara, H.; Fukazawa, Y.; Kaastra, J. S.; Kawaharada, M.; Nakazawa, K.; Ohashi, T.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Takizawa, M.; Vink, J.; Zandanel, F.

    2017-04-01

    We present the results of deep 140 ks Suzaku X-ray observations of the north-east (NE) radio relic of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 2255. The temperature structure of Abell 2255 is measured out to 0.9 times the virial radius (1.9 Mpc) in the NE direction for the first time. The Suzaku temperature map of the central region suggests a complex temperature distribution, which agrees with previous work. Additionally, on a larger-scale, we confirm that the temperature drops from 6 keV around the cluster center to 3 keV at the outskirts, with two discontinuities at r 5' (450 kpc) and 12' (1100 kpc) from the cluster center. Their locations coincide with surface brightness discontinuities marginally detected in the XMM-Newton image, which indicates the presence of shock structures. From the temperature drop, we estimate the Mach numbers to be ℳinner 1.2 and, ℳouter 1.4. The first structure is most likely related to the large cluster core region ( 350-430 kpc), and its Mach number is consistent with the XMM-Newton observation (ℳ 1.24: Sakelliou & Ponman 2006, MNRAS, 367, 1409). Our detection of the second temperature jump, based on the Suzaku key project observation, shows the presence of a shock structure across the NE radio relic. This indicates a connection between the shock structure and the relativistic electrons that generate radio emission. Across the NE radio relic, however, we find a significantly lower temperature ratio (T1/T2 1.44 ± 0.16 corresponds to ℳX-ray 1.4) than the value expected from radio wavelengths, based on the standard diffusive shock acceleration mechanism (T1/T2> 3.2 or ℳRadio> 2.8). This may suggest that under some conditions, in particular the NE relic of A2255 case, the simple diffusive shock acceleration mechanism is unlikely to be valid, and therefore, more a sophisticated mechanism is required.

  11. HST Observations of Star Formation in Interacting Galaxies: NGC 4194, the "Medusa"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weistrop, D.; Eggers, D.; Nelson, C. H.; Kaiser, M. E.

    2001-01-01

    Ultraviolet and visible imaging of the blue compact galaxy NGC4194 was obtained to survey the star-forming knots in the center of this galaxy. Photometry and image analysis were performed on these regions. Comparison with evolutionary tracks indicates many of the knots are reddened with a typical E(B-V)approx.0.3. The knot ages range from 10(exp 6-10(exp 8)years. Some of the knots may have masses 3-5x10(exp 5) solar mass. The FUV fluxes correspond to the flux from 60-3.8x10(exp 3) O5V stars.

  12. UIT Observations of Early-Type Galaxies and Analysis of the FUSE Spectrum of a Subdwarf B Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohl, Raymond G.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This work covers Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) observations of early-type galaxies (155 nm) and Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectra of a Galactic subdwarf B star (sdB). Early UV space astronomy missions revealed that early-type galaxies harbor a population of stars with effective temperatures greater than that of the main sequence turn-off (about 6,000 K) and UV emission that is very sensitive to characteristics of the stellar population. We present UV (155 nm) surface photometry and UV-B color profiles for 8 E and SO galaxies observed by UIT. Some objects have de Vaucouleurs surface brightness profiles, while others have disk-like profiles, but we find no other evidence for the presence of a disk or young, massive stars. There is a wide range of UV-B color gradients, but there is no correlation with metallicity gradients. SdB stars are the leading candidate UV emitters in old, high metallicity stellar populations (e.g., early-type galaxies). We observed the Galactic sdB star PG0749+658 with FUSE and derived abundances with the aim of constraining models of the heavy element distribution in sdB atmospheres. All of the elements measured are depleted with respect to solar, except for Cr and Mn, which are about solar, and Ni, which is enhanced. This work was supported in part by NASA grants NAG5-700 and NAG5-6403 to the University of Virginia and NAS5-32985 to Johns Hopkins University.

  13. Ultraviolet to Mid-Infrared Observations of Star-forming Galaxies at z~2: Stellar Masses and Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapley, Alice E.; Steidel, Charles C.; Erb, Dawn K.; Reddy, Naveen A.; Adelberger, Kurt L.; Pettini, Max; Barmby, Pauline; Huang, Jiasheng

    2005-06-01

    We present the broadband UV through mid-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of a sample of 72 spectroscopically confirmed star-forming galaxies at z=2.30+/-0.3. Located in a 72 arcmin2 field centered on the bright background QSO, HS 1700+643, these galaxies were preselected to lie at z~2 solely on the basis of their rest-frame UV colors and luminosities and should be representative of UV-selected samples at high redshift. In addition to deep ground-based photometry spanning from 0.35 to 2.15 μm, we make use of Spitzer IRAC data, which probe the rest-frame near-IR at z~2. The range of stellar populations present in the sample is investigated with simple, single-component stellar population synthesis models. The inability to constrain the form of the star formation history limits our ability to determine the parameters of extinction, age, and star formation rate without using external multiwavelength information. Emphasizing stellar mass estimates, which are much less affected by these uncertainties, we find =10.32+/-0.51 for the sample. The addition of Spitzer IRAC data as a long-wavelength baseline reduces stellar mass uncertainties by a factor of 1.5-2 relative to estimates based on optical-Ks photometry alone. However, the total stellar mass estimated for the sample is remarkably insensitive to the inclusion of IRAC data. We find correlations between stellar mass and rest-frame R band (observed Ks) and rest-frame 1.4 μm (observed 4.5 μm) luminosities, although with significant scatter. Even at rest-frame 1.4 μm, the mass-to-light ratio varies by a factor of 15 indicating that even the rest-frame near-IR, when taken alone, is a poor indicator of stellar mass in star-forming galaxies at z~2. Allowing for the possibility of episodic star formation, we find that typical galaxies in our sample could contain up to 3 times more stellar mass in an old underlying burst than what was inferred from single-component modeling. In contrast, mass

  14. The spiral-compact galaxy pair AM 2208-251: Computer simulations versus observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klaric, Mario; Byrd, Gene G.

    1990-01-01

    The system AM2208-251 is a roughly edge-on spiral extending east-west with a smaller round compact E system about 60 arcsec east of the spiral nucleus along the major axis of the spiral. Bertola, Huchtmeier, and Zeilinger (1990) have presented optical spectroscopic as well as single dish 21 cm observations of this system. Their spectroscopic data show, via emission lines lambda lambda 3727-29A, a rising rotation curve near the nucleus. These spectroscopic observations may indicate a tidal interaction in the system. In order to learn more about such pairs, the authors simulated the interaction using the computer model developed by Miller (1976 a,b, 1978) and modified by the authors (Byrd 1986, 1987, 1988). To do the simulation they need an idea of the mutual orbits of the two galaxies. Their computer model is a two-dimensional polar N-body program. It consists of a self-gravitating disk of particles, within an inert axially symmetric stabilizing halo potential. The particles are distributed in a 24(radial) by 36(azimuthal) polar grid. Self consistent calculations can be done only within the grid area. The disk is modeled with a finite Mestel disk, where all the particles initially move in circular orbits with constant tangential velocities (Mestel 1963), resulting in a flat rotation curve. The gas particles in the spiral's disk, which make up 30 percent of its mass, collide in the following manner. The number of particles in each bin of the polar grid is counted every time step. If it is greater than a given critical density, all the particles in the bin collide, obtaining in the result the same velocities, equal to the average for the bin. This process produces clumps of gas particles-the star formation sites. The authors suppress the collision in the inner part of the disk (within the circle r = 6) to represent the hole seen in the gas in the nuclear bulge of spirals. They thus avoid spurious effects due to collisions in that region. They also varied the size of

  15. NIBLES - an HI census of stellar mass selected SDSS galaxies. II. Arecibo follow-up HI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, Z.; Schneider, S.; van Driel, W.; Lehnert, M. D.; Minchin, R.

    2016-11-01

    We obtained Arecibo Hi line follow-up observations of 154 of the 2600 galaxies in the Nançay Interstellar Baryons Legacy Extragalactic Survey (NIBLES) sample. These observations are on average four times more sensitive than the original observations at the Nançay Radio Telescope. The main goal of this survey is to characterize the underlying Hi properties of the NIBLES galaxies which were undetected or marginally detected at Nançay. Of the Nançay non-detections, 85% were either clearly or marginally detected at Arecibo, while 89% of the Nançay marginal detections were clearly detected. Based on the statistics of the detections relative to g-i color and r-band luminosity (Lr) distribution among our Arecibo observations, we anticipate 60% of our 867 Nançay non-detections and marginal detections could be detected at the sensitivity of our Arecibo observations. Follow-up observations of our low luminosity (Lr < 108.5L⊙) blue sources indicate that they have, on average, more concentrated stellar mass distributions than the Nançay detections in the same luminosity range, suggesting we may be probing galaxies with intrinsically different properties. These follow-up observations enable us to probe Hi mass fractions, log(MHI/M⋆) 0.5 dex and 1 dex lower, on average, than the NIBLES and ALFALFA surveys respectively. Reduced spectra are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A60

  16. Projected axis ratios of galaxy clusters in the Horizon-AGN simulation: Impact of baryon physics and comparison with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suto, Daichi; Peirani, Sébastien; Dubois, Yohan; Kitayama, Tetsu; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Sasaki, Shin; Suto, Yasushi

    2017-02-01

    We characterize the non-sphericity of galaxy clusters by the projected axis ratio of spatial distribution of star, dark matter, and X-ray surface brightness (XSB). We select 40 simulated groups and clusters of galaxies with mass larger than 5 × 1013 M⊙ from the Horizon simulation that fully incorporates the relevant baryon physics, in particular, the active galactic nucleus feedback. We find that the baryonic physics around the central region of galaxy clusters significantly affects the non-sphericity of dark matter distribution even beyond the central region, approximately up to half of the virial radius. Therefore it is very difficult to predict the probability density function (PDF) of the projected axis ratio of XSB from dark-matter-only N-body simulations as attempted in previous studies. Indeed, we find that the PDF derived from our simulated clusters exhibits much better agreement with that from the observed X-ray clusters. This indicates that our present methodology to estimate the non-sphericity directly from the Horizon simulation is useful and promising. Further improvements in both numerical modeling and observational data will establish the non-sphericity of clusters as a cosmological test complementary to more conventional statistics based on spherically averaged quantities.

  17. Multi-wavelength Observations of the Dissociative Merger in the Galaxy Cluster CIZA J0107.7+5408

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, S. W.; Clarke, T. E.; van Weeren, R. J.; Intema, H. T.; Dawson, W. A.; Mroczkowski, T.; Blanton, E. L.; Bulbul, E.; Giacintucci, S.

    2016-06-01

    We present results based on X-ray, optical, and radio observations of the massive galaxy cluster CIZA J0107.7+5408. We find that this system is a post-core-passage, dissociative, binary merger, with the optical galaxy density peaks of each subcluster leading their associated X-ray emission peaks. This separation occurs because the diffuse gas experiences ram pressure forces, while the effectively collisionless galaxies (and presumably their associated dark matter (DM) halos) do not. This system contains double-peaked diffuse radio emission, possibly a double radio relic with the relics lying along the merger axis and also leading the X-ray cores. We find evidence for a temperature peak associated with the SW relic, likely created by the same merger shock that is powering the relic radio emission in this region. Thus, this system is a relatively rare, clean example of a dissociative binary merger, which can in principle be used to place constraints on the self-interaction cross-section of DM. Low-frequency radio observations reveal ultra-steep spectrum diffuse radio emission that is not correlated with the X-ray, optical, or high-frequency radio emission. We suggest that these sources are radio phoenixes, which are preexisting non-thermal particle populations that have been re-energized through adiabatic compression by the same merger shocks that power the radio relics. Finally, we place upper limits on inverse Compton emission from the SW radio relic.

  18. Color distributions in early-type galaxies. I. BVRI observations with a scanning CCD

    SciTech Connect

    Boroson, T.A.; Thompson, I.B.; Shectman, S.A.

    1983-12-01

    An RCA CCD has been used in a scanning mode on the Palomar 1.5-m telescope to obtain high precision photometric images of three early-type galaxies. Advantages of this mode of operation include much reduced pixel-to-pixel sensitivity variations and more accurate sky subtraction. Frames in B, V, R, and I of NGC 4486 (M87) have been used to show, by comparison with published high quality surface photometry and aperture photometry, that this instrument produces measurements accurate at the 0.02-mag level at surface brightnesses above that of the sky. These frames of M87 and similar images of NGC 2300 and NGC 2768 reveal several interesting features of color variations in the inner regions of these early-type galaxies. NGC 2768 is found to have a dust ring or disk perpendicular to its plane of symmetry. All the colors appear to become bluer gradually outward from the center, with M87 showing the strongest gradients. The shapes of the contours of constant color are rounder, at small radii (<20 arcsec), than the isophotes in NGC 2300 and NGC 2768. This is not predicted by any galaxy formation picture, but would seem to support dissipationless collapse or mergers as the dominant processes in the formation of early-type galaxies.

  19. High resolution ALMA observations of dense molecular medium in the central regions of active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Kotaro; Ando, Ryo; Taniguchi, Akio; Izumi, Takuma; Tosaki, Tomoka

    In the central regions of active galaxies, dense molecular medium are exposed to various types of radiation and energy injections, such as UV, X-ray, cosmic ray, and shock dissipation. With the rapid progress of chemical models and implementation of new-generation mm/submm interferometry, we are now able to use molecules as powerful diagnostics of the physical and chemical processes in galaxies. Here we give a brief overview on the recent ALMA results to demonstrate how molecules can reveal underlying physical and chemical processes in galaxies. First, new detections of Galactic molecular absorption systems with elevated HCO/H13CO+ column density ratios are reported, indicating that these molecular media are irradiated by intense UV fields. Second, we discuss the spatial distributions of various types of shock tracers including HNCO, CH3OH and SiO in NGC 253 and NGC 1068. Lastly, we provide an overview of proposed diagnostic methods of nuclear energy sources using ALMA, with an emphasis on the synergy with sensitive mid-infrared spectroscopy, which will be implemented by JWST and SPICA to disentangle the complex nature of heavily obscured galaxies across the cosmic time.

  20. ROSAT Observations of a Complete Nearby Sample of Low Luminosity Radio Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, Stefi

    2001-01-01

    We are studying the X-ray emission in a sample of nearby radio galaxies. The X-rays probe several important components: (1) the active galactic nuclei; (2) the interstellar medium of the host galaxy; and (3) the intergalactic or intracluster medium through which the jets propagate. The interaction of the radio plasma with the hot ambient gas will allow us to constrain the properties of the environments and the energetics of the radio source propagation. We have made excellent progress reducing the ROSAT new and archival data on our complete sample of nearby radio galaxies. The data reduction has taken longer than originally anticipated because we have identified bubbles of x-ray emission around many of the central galaxies and we have been exploring many different methodologies for assuring the results are robust before we publish and complete our interpretation. We have now begun the final phases of the work, with a draft paper under construction and a planned for submission date of early 2001. This work comprises 1/3 of the thesis work of a graduate student and will be the final phase in the completion of the thesis.

  1. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the CFA Seyfert 2 Galaxies: The Fueling of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Paul; Pogge, Richard W.

    1999-12-01

    We present an investigation of possible fueling mechanisms operating in the inner kiloparsec of Seyfert galaxies. We analyze visible and near-infrared Hubble Space Telescope images of 24 Seyfert 2 galaxies from the CfA Redshift Survey sample. In particular, we are searching for the morphological signatures of dynamical processes responsible for transporting gas from kiloparsec scales into the nucleus. The circumnuclear regions are very rich in gas and dust, often taking the form of nuclear spiral dust lanes on scales of a few hundred parsecs. While these nuclear spirals are found in 20 of our 24 Seyfert galaxies, we find only five nuclear bars among the entire sample, strongly reinforcing the conclusions of other investigators that nuclear bars are not the primary means of transporting this material into the nucleus. An estimate of the gas density in the nuclear spirals, based on extinction measurements, suggests that the nuclear spiral dust lanes are probably shocks in nuclear gas disks that are not strongly self-gravitating. Since shocks can dissipate energy and angular momentum, these spiral dust lanes may be the channels by which gas from the host galaxy disks is being fed into the central engines.

  2. Super Massive Black Holes in Disk Galaxies: HST/STIS Observations for 3 new Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coccato, L.; Sarzi, M.; Corsini, E. M.; Pizzella, A.; Bertola, F.

    We present long-slit HST/STIS measurements of the ionized-gas kinematics in the nucleus of three disk galaxies, namely NGC 2179, NGC 4343, NGC 4435. The sample galaxies have been selected on the basis of their ground-based spectroscopy, for displaying a strong central velocity gradient for the ionized gas, which is consistent with the presence of a circumnuclear Keplerian disk (CNKD, Bertola et al. 1998; Funes et al. 2002) rotating around a super massive black hole (SMBH). For each target galaxy we obtained the Hα and [NII] 6583A kinematics along the major axis and two 0.25'' parallel offset positions. Out of three objects only NGC 4435 turned out to have a disk of ionized gas in regular motion and a regular dust-lane morphology. Preliminary modeling indicates a SMBH mass (MBH) one order of magnitude lower than the one expected from the MBH - αc relation for galaxies (Ferrarese & Merritt 2000; Gebhardt et al. 2000).

  3. Far-infrared observations of an unbiased sample of gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, S. A.; Michałowski, M. J.; Bourne, N.; Baes, M.; Fritz, J.; Cooray, A.; De Looze, I.; De Zotti, G.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Maddox, S. J.; Scott, D.; Smith, D. J. B.; Smith, M. W. L.; Symeonidis, M.; Valiante, E.

    2015-04-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most energetic phenomena in the Universe; believed to result from the collapse and subsequent explosion of massive stars. Even though it has profound consequences for our understanding of their nature and selection biases, little is known about the dust properties of the galaxies hosting GRBs. We present analysis of the far-infrared properties of an unbiased sample of 20 BeppoSAX and Swift GRB host galaxies (at an average redshift of z = 3.1) located in the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey, the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey, the Herschel Fornax Cluster Survey, the Herschel Stripe 82 Survey and the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey, totalling 880 deg2, or ˜3 per cent of the sky in total. Our sample selection is serendipitous, based only on whether the X-ray position of a GRB lies within a large-scale Herschel survey - therefore our sample can be considered completely unbiased. Using deep data at wavelengths of 100-500 μm, we tentatively detected 1 out of 20 GRB hosts located in these fields. We constrain their dust masses and star formation rates (SFRs), and discuss these in the context of recent measurements of submillimetre galaxies and ultraluminous infrared galaxies. The average far-infrared flux of our sample gives an upper limit on SFR of <114 M⊙ yr-1. The detection rate of GRB hosts is consistent with that predicted assuming that GRBs trace the cosmic SFR density in an unbiased way, i.e. that the fraction of GRB hosts with SFR > 500 M⊙ yr-1 is consistent with the contribution of such luminous galaxies to the cosmic star formation density.

  4. FIRST OBSERVATIONAL SUPPORT FOR OVERLAPPING REIONIZED BUBBLES GENERATED BY A GALAXY OVERDENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, M.; Pentericci, L.; Fontana, A.; Merlin, E.; Grazian, A.; Pilo, S.; Amorin, R.; Giallongo, E.; Guaita, L.; Paris, D.; Dayal, P.; Hutter, A.; Brammer, G.; Koekemoer, A.; Cristiani, S.; Dickinson, M.; Ferrara, A.; Gallerani, S.; Giavalisco, M.; Maiolino, R.; and others

    2016-02-10

    We present an analysis of deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) multi-band imaging of the BDF field specifically designed to identify faint companions around two of the few Lyα emitting galaxies spectroscopically confirmed at z ∼ 7. Although separated by only 4.4 proper Mpc these galaxies cannot generate H ii regions large enough to explain the visibility of their Lyα lines, thus requiring a population of fainter ionizing sources in their vicinity. We use deep HST and VLT-Hawk-I data to select z ∼ 7 Lyman break galaxies around the emitters. We select six new robust z ∼ 7 LBGs at Y ∼ 26.5–27.5 whose average spectral energy distribution is consistent with the objects being at the redshift of the close-by Lyα emitters. The resulting number density of z ∼ 7 LBGs in the BDF field is a factor of approximately three to four higher than expected in random pointings of the same size. We compare these findings with cosmological hydrodynamic plus radiative transfer simulations of a universe with a half neutral IGM: we find that indeed Lyα emitter pairs are only found in completely ionized regions characterized by significant LBG overdensities. Our findings match the theoretical prediction that the first ionization fronts are generated within significant galaxy overdensities and support a scenario where faint, “normal” star-forming galaxies are responsible for reionization.

  5. Broad Line Radio Galaxies Observed with Fermi-LAT: The Origin of the GeV Gamma-Ray Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, J.; Stawarz, L.; Takahashi, Y.; Cheung, C.C.; Hayashida, M.; Grandi, P.; Burnett, T.H.; Celotti, A.; Fegan, S.J.; Fortin, P.; Maeda, K.; Nakamori, T.; Taylor, G.B.; Tosti, G.; Digel, S.W.; McConville, W.; Finke, J.; D'Ammando, F.; /IASF, Palermo /INAF, Rome

    2012-06-07

    We report on a detailed investigation of the {gamma}-ray emission from 18 broad line radio galaxies (BLRGs) based on two years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. We confirm the previously reported detections of 3C 120 and 3C 111 in the GeV photon energy range; a detailed look at the temporal characteristics of the observed {gamma}-ray emission reveals in addition possible flux variability in both sources. No statistically significant {gamma}-ray detection of the other BLRGs was however found in the considered dataset. Though the sample size studied is small, what appears to differentiate 3C 111 and 3C 120 from the BLRGs not yet detected in {gamma}-rays is the particularly strong nuclear radio flux. This finding, together with the indications of the {gamma}-ray flux variability and a number of other arguments presented, indicate that the GeV emission of BLRGs is most likely dominated by the beamed radiation of relativistic jets observed at intermediate viewing angles. In this paper we also analyzed a comparison sample of high accretion-rate Seyfert 1 galaxies, which can be considered radio-quiet counterparts of BLRGs, and found none were detected in {gamma}-rays. A simple phenomenological hybrid model applied for the broad-band emission of the discussed radio-loud and radio-quiet type 1 active galaxies suggests that the relative contribution of the nuclear jets to the accreting matter is {ge} 1% on average for BLRGs, while {le} 0.1% for Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  6. Properties of Galaxy Groups Selected from Chandra X-ray Observations of the Boötes Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajgel, B.; Lopes, P. A. A.; Jones, C.; Forman, W. R.; Murray, S. S.

    2014-10-01

    Galaxy groups are not simply scaled down versions of rich clusters (e.g. Mulchaey 2000, Voit 2005). Due to a group's shallow gravitational potential, feedback processes play an important role in the group's evolution. It is important to understand galaxy groups since, in hierarchical clustering, they are the building blocks of large scale structure. Thus, in addition to determining the characteristics of groups, it is important to determine the mass function over the range that includes poor clusters and groups. We present the properties of the galaxy groups selected in the Chandra X-Boötes survey (Kenter et al. 2005). Group redshifts are measured from the AGES (Kochanek et al. 2012) spectroscopic data. We use photometric data from the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey (NDWFS) (Jannuzi & Dey 1999) to estimate the group richness (N_{gals}) and the optical luminosity (L_{opt}). Our final sample comprises 32 systems at z < 0.80, with 14 below z = 0.35. For these systems we estimate velocity dispersions (σ_{gr}) and perform a virial analysis to obtain the radius (R_{200} and R_{500}) and mass (M_{200} and M_{500}) for groups with at least five galaxy members. We use the Chandra X-ray observations to derive the X-ray luminosity (L_{X}). We examine the performance of the group properties σ_{gr}, L_{opt} and L_{X}, as proxies for the group mass. Understanding how these observables measure the total mass is important to estimate how well the cluster/group mass function is determined. By extending the mass function to the group regime, we predict the number of groups that new X-ray surveys, eROSITA, will detect.

  7. Herschel and JCMT observations of the early-type dwarf galaxy NGC 205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Looze, I.; Baes, M.; Parkin, T. J.; Wilson, C. D.; Bendo, G. J.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Cooray, A.; Cormier, D.; Fritz, J.; Galliano, F.; Gear, W.; Gentile, G.; Lebouteiller, V.; Madden, S. C.; Roussel, H.; Sauvage, M.; Smith, M. W. L.; Spinoglio, L.; Verstappen, J.; Young, L.

    2012-07-01

    We present Herschel dust continuum, James Clerk Maxwell Telescope CO (3-2) observations and a search for [C II] 158 ?m and [O I] 63 ?m spectral line emission for the brightest early-type dwarf satellite of Andromeda, NGC 205. While direct gas measurements [Mg˜ 1.5 × 106 M⊙, H I+ CO (1-0)] have proven to be inconsistent with theoretical predictions of the current gas reservoir in NGC 205 (>107 M⊙), we revise the missing interstellar medium mass problem based on new gas mass estimates (CO (3-2), [C II], [O I]) and indirect measurements of the interstellar medium content through dust continuum emission. Based on Herschel observations, covering a wide wavelength range from 70 to 500 ?m, we are able to probe the entire dust content in NGC 205 (? M⊙ at Td˜ 18-22 K) and rule out the presence of a massive cold dust component (? M⊙, Td˜ 12 K), which was suggested based on millimetre observations from the inner 18.4 arcsec. Assuming a reasonable gas-to-dust ratio of ˜400, the dust mass in NGC 205 translates into a gas mass Mg˜ 4-7 × 106 M⊙. The non-detection of [O I] and the low L[C II]-to-LCO(1-0) line intensity ratio (˜1850) imply that the molecular gas phase is well traced by CO molecules in NGC 205. We estimate an atomic gas mass of 1.5 × 104 M⊙ associated with the [C II] emitting photodissociation regions in NGC 205. From the partial CO (3-2) map of the northern region in NGC 205, we derive a molecular gas mass of ? M⊙. Upon comparison with the molecular gas mass estimated from CO (1-0) observations (? M⊙), we find most of the H2 gas in NGC 205 to be locked in diffuse regions of low density and/or temperature, characteristic for an interstellar medium with little star formation activity. New total gas mass estimates from Herschel dust continuum (4-7 × 106 M⊙), Herschel [C II] line spectroscopic mapping (1.5 × 104 M⊙) and James Clerk Maxwell Telescope CO (3-2) observations (7 × 105 M⊙), including the H I mass (? M⊙) and a correction

  8. Hubble space telescope observations of young star clusters in NGC-4038/4039, 'the antennae' galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Schweizer, Francois

    1995-01-01

    New, high-resolution images of the disks of NGC 4038/4039 obtained with the Wide Field Camera of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) are presented. NGC 4038/4039, nicknamed The Antennae, is a prototypical example of a pair of colliding galaxies believed to be at an early stage of a merger. Down to the limiting magnitude of V approximately 23 mag, the HST images reveal a population of over 700 blue pointlike objects within the disks. The mean absolute magnitude of these objects is M(sub V) = -11 mag, with the brightest objects reaching M(sub V) approximately -15. Their mean apparent color indices ar U - V = -0.7 mag and V - 1 = 0.8 mag on the Johnson UVI passband system, while their mean indices corrected for internal reddening are (u - v)(sub 0) = -1.0 mag and (V - I(sub 0) = 0.5. Their mean effective radius, determined from slightly resolved images, is 18 pc (for H(sub 0) = 50 km/s /Mpc). Based on their luminosities and resolution, most of these objects cannot be individual stars, but are likely young compact star clusters. The brighter ones are similar to the objects found in NGC 1275 and NGC 7252, which appear to be young globular clusters formed during recent galazy mergers. Based on their U - V and V - I colors, the brightest, bluest clusters of NGC 4038/4039 appear to be less than 10 Myr old. Most of these bright clusters are relatively tightly clustered themselves, with typically a dozen individual clusters belonging to a complex identified as a giant H II region from ground-based observations. The cluster luminosity function (LF) is approximately a power law, phi(L)dL proportional to L(exp -1.78+/-0.05)dL, with no hint of a turnover at fainter magnitudes. This power-law shape agrees with the LF of Magellanic Cloud clusters and Galactic open clusters, but differs from the LF of old globular cluster systems that is typically Gaussian with a Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of approximately 3 mag. Besides the blue clusters, we also find about a dozen extremely

  9. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  10. Star formation activity in spiral galaxy disks and the properties of radio halos: Observational evidence for a direct dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlem, Michael; Lisenfeld, Ute; Golla, Gotz

    1995-01-01

    In this article we address observationally the questions: how does star formation (SF) in the disks of galaxies lead to the creation of radio halos, and what minimum energy input into the interstellar medium (ISM) is needed to facilitate this? For the investigation we use a sample of five edge-on galaxies exhibiting radio continuum emmission in their halos and enhanced SF spread over large parts of their disks. In a detailed study of the two galaxies in our sample for which we have the best data, NGC 891 and NGC 4631, we show that the radio halos cut off abruptly at galactocentric radii smaller than those of the underlying thin radio disks. Our most important result is that the halo cutoffs are spatially coincident with the radii where the SF activity in the underlying disks drops sharply. The difference in radius of the emission distributions tracing ongoing SF in the disks (IRAS 50 micrometers, H alpha) versus that of the nonthermal radio continuum thin disks (tracing the distribution of cosmic-ray (CR) electrons) is typically a few kpc. This difference in extent is caused by CR diffusion. We have measured the CR diffusion coefficients in the thin disks of both NGC 891 and NGC 4631. For radial diffusion of CR electrons within the galactic disks the values are D(sub r) = 1.1-2.5 x 10 (exp 29) sq cm/s (NGC 4631) and D(sub r) = 1.2 x 10(exp 29) sq cm/s (NGC 891). For motions in the z-direction in areas within the thin disks where no outflows occur, we derive a firm upper limit of D(sub z) less than or equal to 0.2 x 10(exp 28) sq cm/s for NGC 891. The value for NGC 4631 is D(sub z = 1.4 x 10 (exp 28) sq cm/s. The other three galaxies in our sample, NGC 3044, NGC 4666, and NGC 5775 show (at the sensitivity of our data) less extended, more filamentary radio halos. Isolates spurs or filaments of nonthermal radio continuum emission in their halos are traced only above the most actively star-forming regions in the disks. This, in conjuction with the results obtained for

  11. CO detections and IRAS observations of bright radio spiral galaxies at cz equal or less than 9000 kilometers per second

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, D. B.; Mirabel, I. F.

    1985-01-01

    CO emission has been detected from 20 of 21 bright radio spirals with strong extended nuclear sources, including the most distant (NGC 7674) and the most luminous (IC 4553 = Arp 220, NGC 6240) galaxies yet detected in CO. All of these galaxies are rich in molecular gas, with M total(H2) = 3 x 10 to the 8th - 2 x 10 to the 10th solar masses. IRAS observations show that they have a strong far-infrared (FIR) excess, with L(FIR)/L(B) approximately equal to 1-35 and L(FIR) (40-400 microns) approximately equal to 10 to the 10th - 10 to the 12th L solar masses. The primary luminosity source for these radio cores appears to be star formation in molecular clouds. A strong correlation is found between the FIR and extended 21 cm continuum flux, implying that the fraction of massive stars formed is independent of the star formation rate. The ratio L(FIR)/M(H2) provides a measure of the current rate of star formation, which is found to be a factor 3-20 larger in these galaxies than for the ensemble of molecular clouds in the Milky Way. At these rates their molecular gas will be depleted in about 10 to the 8th yr.

  12. Pushing the Limits, Episode 2: K2 Observations of Extragalactic RR Lyrae Stars in the Dwarf Galaxy Leo IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, L.; Pál, A.; Plachy, E.; Ripepi, V.; Moretti, M. I.; Szabó, R.; Kiss, L. L.

    2015-10-01

    We present the first observations of extragalactic pulsating stars in the K2 ecliptic survey of the Kepler space telescope. The variability of all three RR Lyrae stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Leo IV was successfully detected, at a brightness of Kp ≈ 21.5 mag, from data collected during Campaign 1. We identified one modulated star and another likely Blazhko candidate with periods of 29.8 ± 0.9 days and more than 80 days, respectively. EPIC 210282473 represents the first star beyond the Magellanic Clouds for which the Blazhko period and cycle-to-cycle variations in the modulation were unambiguously measured. The photometric [Fe/H] indices of the stars agree with earlier results that Leo IV is a very metal-poor galaxy. Two out of the three stars blend with brighter background galaxies in the K2 frames. We demonstrate that image subtraction can be reliably used to extract photometry from faint confused sources, which will be crucial not only for the K2 mission but also for future space photometric missions.

  13. High resolution radio and optical observations of the central starburst in the low-metallicity dwarf galaxy II Zw 40

    SciTech Connect

    Kepley, Amanda A.; Reines, Amy E.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Walker, Lisa May E-mail: areines@nrao.edu E-mail: lisamay@virginia.edu

    2014-02-01

    The extent to which star formation varies in galaxies with low masses, low metallicities, and high star formation rate surface densities is not well constrained. To gain insight into star formation under these physical conditions, this paper estimates the ionizing photon fluxes, masses, and ages for young massive clusters in the central region of II Zw 40—the prototypical low-metallicity dwarf starburst galaxy—from radio continuum and optical observations. Discrete, cluster-sized sources only account for half the total radio continuum emission; the remainder is diffuse. The young (≲ 5 Myr) central burst has a star formation rate surface density that significantly exceeds that of the Milky Way. Three of the 13 sources have ionizing photon fluxes (and thus masses) greater than R136 in 30 Doradus. Although isolating the effects of galaxy mass and metallicity is difficult, the H II region luminosity function and the internal extinction in the center of II Zw 40 appear to be primarily driven by a merger-related starburst. The relatively flat H II region luminosity function may be the result of an increase in interstellar medium pressure during the merger and the internal extinction is similar to that generated by the clumpy and porous dust in other starburst galaxies.

  14. Sardinia Radio Telescope wide-band spectral-polarimetric observations of the galaxy cluster 3C 129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, M.; Govoni, F.; Carretti, E.; Melis, A.; Concu, R.; Trois, A.; Loi, F.; Vacca, V.; Tarchi, A.; Castangia, P.; Possenti, A.; Bocchinu, A.; Burgay, M.; Casu, S.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pisanu, T.; Poddighe, A.; Poppi, S.; D'Amico, N.; Bachetti, M.; Corongiu, A.; Egron, E.; Iacolina, N.; Ladu, A.; Marongiu, P.; Migoni, C.; Perrodin, D.; Pilia, M.; Valente, G.; Vargiu, G.

    2016-10-01

    We present new observations of the galaxy cluster 3C 129 obtained with the Sardinia Radio Telescope in the frequency range 6000-7200 MHz, with the aim to image the large-angular-scale emission at high-frequency of the radio sources located in this cluster of galaxies. The data were acquired using the recently commissioned ROACH2-based backend to produce full-Stokes image cubes of an area of 1°×1° centred on the radio source 3C 129. We modelled and deconvolved the telescope beam pattern from the data. We also measured the instrumental polarization beam patterns to correct the polarization images for off-axis instrumental polarization. Total intensity images at an angular resolution of 2.9 arcmin were obtained for the tailed radio galaxy 3C 129 and for 13 more sources in the field, including 3C 129.1 at the galaxy cluster centre. These data were used, in combination with literature data at lower frequencies, to derive the variation of the synchrotron spectrum of 3C 129 along the tail of the radio source. If the magnetic field is at the equipartition value, we showed that the lifetimes of radiating electrons result in a radiative age for 3C 129 of tsyn ≃ 267 ± 26 Myr. Assuming a linear projected length of 488 kpc for the tail, we deduced that 3C 129 is moving supersonically with a Mach number of M = vgal/cs = 1.47. Linearly polarized emission was clearly detected for both 3C 129 and 3C 129.1. The linear polarization measured for 3C 129 reaches levels as high as 70 per cent in the faintest region of the source where the magnetic field is aligned with the direction of the tail.

  15. Observation of Weak Low-ionization Winds in Host Galaxies of Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei at z ~1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesuf, Hassen; David C. Koo, S. M. Faber, J. Xavier Prochaska, Yicheng Guo, F. S. Liu, Emily C. Cunningham, Alison L. Coil, Puragra Guhathakurta

    2017-01-01

    A key physical manifestation of active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback is predicted to be powerful galactic winds. However, the relative roles between AGN activity and star formation in driving such winds remain largely unexplored at high redshifts, near the peak of cosmic activity for both. We study winds in 12 X-ray AGN host galaxies at z ~ 1 in the CANDELS fields using deep Keck rest-frame UV spectroscopy. We find, using the low-ionization Fe II 2586 absorption in the stacked spectra, that the AGN show a median centroid velocity shift of -137 km/s and a median velocity dispersion of 103 km/ s. The centroid velocity and the velocity dispersions are obtained from a two component (ISM+wind) absorption line model. For comparison, a star-forming and X-ray undetected galaxies at a similar redshift, matched roughly in stellar mass and galaxy inclination, show the outflows to have a median centroid velocity of -135 km/s and a median velocity dispersion of 140 km/s. Thus, winds in the AGN are similar in velocities to those found in star-formation-driven winds, and are weak to escape and expel substantial cool gas from galaxies. A joint reanalysis of the z ~ 0.5 AGN sample and our sample yields a centroid velocity of -139 (+48, -87) km/s and a velocity dispersion of 82 (+47,-37) km/s. For the combined sample, about half the total equivalent width of the Fe II 2586 absorption is due to the wind. We do not observe winds with bulk velocities greater than 500 km/s predicted by some AGN feedback models.

  16. The Galaxy End Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eales, Stephen; de Vis, Pieter; Smith, Matthew W. L.; Appah, Kiran; Ciesla, Laure; Duffield, Chris; Schofield, Simon

    2017-03-01

    A common assumption is that galaxies fall in two distinct regions of a plot of specific star formation rate (SSFR) versus galaxy stellar mass: a star-forming galaxy main sequence (GMS) and a separate region of 'passive' or 'red and dead galaxies'. Starting from a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies designed to contain most of the stellar mass in this volume, and thus representing the end-point of ≃12 billion years of galaxy evolution, we investigate the distribution of galaxies in this diagram today. We show that galaxies follow a strongly curved extended GMS with a steep negative slope at high galaxy stellar masses. There is a gradual change in the morphologies of the galaxies along this distribution, but there is no clear break between early-type and late-type galaxies. Examining the other evidence that there are two distinct populations, we argue that the 'red sequence' is the result of the colours of galaxies changing very little below a critical value of the SSFR, rather than implying a distinct population of galaxies. Herschel observations, which show at least half of early-type galaxies contain a cool interstellar medium, also imply continuity between early-type and late-type galaxies. This picture of a unitary population of galaxies requires more gradual evolutionary processes than the rapid quenching process needed to explain two distinct populations. We challenge theorists to predict quantitatively the properties of this 'Galaxy End Sequence'.

  17. Spectroscopic observations of the distant cluster of galaxies Abell 370 - A catalogue of 84 spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucail, G.; Mellier, Y.; Fort, B.; Cailloux, M.

    1988-06-01

    Spectroscopic and photometric data are presented on 84 objects in the field of the distant cluster of galaxies Abell 370 (z = 0.374) obtained with the multiaperture spectroscopic systems PUMA developed at the Toulouse Observatory for the CFHT and ESO. The redshift and the spectral types as well as CCD photometry in the B and R bands are given with a discussion on the accuracy of the different data and measurements.

  18. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF FAR-INFRARED COOLING LINES IN INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFT (ULTRA)-LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rigopoulou, D.; Magdis, G. E.; Thatte, N.; Hopwood, R.; Clements, D.; Swinyard, B. M.; Pearson, C.; Farrah, D.; Huang, J.-S.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Bock, J. J.; Cooray, A.; Griffin, M. J.; Oliver, S.; Smith, A.; Wang, L.; Riechers, D.; Scott, D.; Vaccari, M.; Valtchanov, I.

    2014-01-20

    We report the first results from a spectroscopic survey of the [C II] 158 μm line from a sample of intermediate redshift (0.2 galaxies, (U)LIRGs (L {sub IR} > 10{sup 11.5} L {sub ☉}), using the Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver-Fourier Transform Spectrometer on board the Herschel Space Observatory. This is the first survey of [C II] emission, an important tracer of star formation, at a redshift range where the star formation rate density of the universe increases rapidly. We detect strong [C II] 158 μm line emission from over 80% of the sample. We find that the [C II] line is luminous, in the range (0.8-4) × 10{sup –3} of the far-infrared continuum luminosity of our sources, and appears to arise from photodissociation regions on the surface of molecular clouds. The L{sub [C} {sub II]}/L {sub IR} ratio in our intermediate redshift (U)LIRGs is on average ∼10 times larger than that of local ULIRGs. Furthermore, we find that the L{sub [C} {sub II]}/L {sub IR} and L{sub [CII]}/L{sub CO(1-0)} ratios in our sample are similar to those of local normal galaxies and high-z star-forming galaxies. ULIRGs at z ∼ 0.5 show many similarities to the properties of local normal and high-z star-forming galaxies. Our findings strongly suggest that rapid evolution in the properties of the star-forming regions of (U)LIRGs is likely to have occurred in the last 5 billion years.

  19. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF NGC 4342, AN OPTICALLY FAINT, X-RAY GAS-RICH EARLY-TYPE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdan, Akos; Forman, William R.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Jones, Christine; Randall, Scott W.; Li Zhiyuan; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Blom, Christina; Zhang Zhongli; Zhuravleva, Irina; Churazov, Eugene; Schindler, Sabine

    2012-08-10

    Chandra x-ray observations of NGC 4342, a low-stellar mass (M{sub K} = -22.79 mag) early-type galaxy, show luminous, diffuse x-ray emission originating from hot gas with temperature of kT {approx} 0.6 keV. The observed 0.5-2 keV band luminosity of the diffuse x-ray emission within the D{sub 25} ellipse is L{sub 0.5-2keV} = 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}. The hot gas has a significantly broader distribution than the stellar light, and shows strong hydrodynamic disturbances with a sharp surface brightness edge to the northeast and a trailing tail. We identify the edge as a cold front and conclude that the distorted morphology of the hot gas is produced by ram pressure as NGC 4342 moves through external gas. From the thermal pressure ratios inside and outside the cold front, we estimate the velocity of NGC 4342 and find that it moves supersonically (M {approx} 2.6) toward the northeast. Outside the optical extent of the galaxy, we detect {approx}17 bright (L{sub 0.5-8keV} > or approx. 3 x 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}) excess x-ray point sources. The excess sources are presumably LMXBs located in metal-poor globular clusters (GCs) in the extended dark matter halo of NGC 4342. Based on the number of excess sources and the average frequency of bright LMXBs in GCs, we estimate that NGC 4342 may host roughly 850-1700 GCs. In good agreement with this, optical observations hint that NGC 4342 may harbor 1200 {+-} 500 GCs. This number corresponds to a GC specific frequency of S{sub N} = 19.9 {+-} 8.3, which is among the largest values observed in full-size galaxies.

  20. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF GALAXY ZOO MERGERS: FREQUENCY OF BINARY ACTIVE NUCLEI IN MASSIVE MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Stacy H.; Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Lintott, Chris J.; Oh, Kyuseok; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Keel, William C.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Treister, Ezequiel

    2012-07-10

    We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} that already have optical active galactic nucleus (AGN) signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N{sub H} {approx}< 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (<40 counts per nucleus; f{sub 2-10keV} {approx}< 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}) to reliably separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGNs in these mergers are rare (0%-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

  1. Chandra Observations of Galaxy Zoo Mergers: Frequency of Binary Active Nuclei in Massive Mergers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Oh, Kyuseok; Bonning, Erin W.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris J.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Treister, Ezequiel

    2012-01-01

    We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 1011 M that already have optical AGN signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N(sub H) approx < 1.1 10(exp 22)/sq cm) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (< 40 counts per nucleus; (sub -10) keV approx < 1.2 10(exp -13) erg/s/sq cm) to reliably separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGN in these mergers are rare (0-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

  2. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies: Keystones of galaxy evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1994-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most insignificant extragalactic stellar systems in terms of their visibility, but potentially very significant in terms of their role in the formation and evolution of much more luminous galaxies. We discuss the present observational data and their implications for theories of the formation and evolution of both dwarf and giant galaxies. The putative dark-matter content of these low-surface-brightness systems is of particular interest, as is their chemical evolution. Surveys for new dwarf spheroidals hidden behind the stars of our Galaxy and those which are not bound to giant galaxies may give new clues as to the origins of this unique class of galaxy.

  3. Hubble space telescope observations of the afterglow, supernova, and host galaxy associated with the extremely bright GRB 130427A

    SciTech Connect

    Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hounsell, R. A.; Graham, J.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Cenko, S. B.; Kouveliotou, C.; Misra, K.

    2014-09-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 130427A. At z = 0.34, this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova (SN) and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E {sub iso} > 10{sup 54} erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated SN. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability, and invariant point-spread function of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host, and SN contributions to the observed light ∼17 rest-frame days after the burst, utilizing a host subtraction spectrum obtained one year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys grism observations show that the associated SN, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, v {sub ph} ∼ 15, 000 km s{sup –1}). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (v {sub ph} ∼ 30, 000 km s{sup –1}), but this SN is significantly fainter and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated ∼4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}), possibly interacting disk galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size, and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it, are also strikingly similar to those of GRB 980425/SN 1998bw. The similarity of the SNe and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests that broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  4. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the Afterglow, Supernova and Host Galaxy Associated with the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levan, A.J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Hounsell, R. A.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Graham, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pe'er, A.; Misra, K.; Wiersema, K.

    2014-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst, GRB 130427A. At z=0.34 this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E(sub iso) greater than 10(exp 54) erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated supernova. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability and and invariant PSF of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host and supernova contributions to the observed light approximately 17 rest-frame days after the burst utilising a host subtraction spectrum obtained 1 year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) grism observations show that the associated supernova, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, vph approximately 15,000 kilometers per second). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (vph approximately 30,000 kilometers per second), but SN 2010bh (vph approximately 30,000 kilometers per second but this SN is significantly fainter, and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated approximately 4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 Solar Mass yr(exp-1)), possibly interacting disc galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it are also strikingly similar to those of GRB980425SN 1998bw. The similarity of supernovae and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the Afterglow, Supernova, and Host Galaxy Associated with the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Hounsell, R. A.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Graham, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pe'er, A.; Misra, K.; Wiersema, K.

    2014-09-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 130427A. At z = 0.34, this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova (SN) and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E iso > 1054 erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated SN. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability, and invariant point-spread function of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host, and SN contributions to the observed light ~17 rest-frame days after the burst, utilizing a host subtraction spectrum obtained one year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys grism observations show that the associated SN, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, v ph ~ 15, 000 km s-1). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (v ph ~ 30, 000 km s-1), but this SN is significantly fainter and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated ~4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 M ⊙ yr-1), possibly interacting disk galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size, and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it, are also strikingly similar to those of GRB 980425/SN 1998bw. The similarity of the SNe and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests that broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  6. Neutral Hydrogen Observations of the Extremely Metal-Poor Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy SBS 0335-052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinks, E.; Pustilnik, S.; Thuan, T. X.; Izotov, Y. I.

    2002-02-01

    We present VLA H I observations of one of the most metal-deficient blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies known, SBS 0335-052, which sports an oxygen abundance of only 1/40 that of the Sun. We study the structure and dynamics of the neutral gas in this chemically young object at a spatial resolution of 20''×15'' ( 5.4×3.9 kpc at a distance of 54 Mpc), and a velocity resolution of 21.2 kms-1.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ALMA observations in 107 galaxies at z=0.2-2.5 (Scoville+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoville, N.; Aussel, H.; Sheth, K.; Scott, K. S.; Sanders, D.; Ivison, R.; Pope, A.; Capak, P.; vanden Bout, P.; Manohar, S.; Kartaltepe, J.; Robertson, B.; Lilly, S.

    2017-02-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle 0 observations for project (#2011.0. 00097.S) analyzed here were obtained in 2012 March-October in Band 7 at 350GHz (λ=850μm). On-source integration times were 1, 2, and 4 minutes per galaxy at z=0.3, 0.9, and 2, respectively. With continuum bandwidths of 8GHz, the 1σ rms sensitivity was 0.5, 0.4, and 0.3mJy and typical synthesized beam sizes were {simeq}0.6''. The data were calibrated and imaged with natural weighting using CASA. (3 data files).

  8. Neutral Hydrogen Observations of the Extremely Metal-Poor Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy SBS 0335-052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinks, E.; Pustilnik, S.; Thuan, T. X.; Lipovetsky, V.; Izotov, Yu. I.

    2000-11-01

    We present VLA HI observations of one of the most metal-deficient blue compa ct dwarf (BCD) galaxies known, SBS 0335-052, which sports an oxygen abundance of only 1/40th that of the Sun. We study the structure and dynamics of the neutral gas in this chemically young object at a spatial resolution of 20'' x 15'' (5.4 x 3.9 kpc at an assumed distance of 54 Mpc), and a velocity resolution of 21.2 km/s. We detected a large HI complex associated with this object with an overall size of about 64 x 21 kpc and elongated in the East-West direction. There are two prominent, slightly resolved peaks visible which are separated by 22 kpc (84''). The eastern peak is nearly coincident with the position of the optical galaxy SBS 0335-052. The western peak is about a factor of 1.3 brighter in the HI line and is identified with a faint blue compact galaxy, SBS 0335-052W, which has an mV = 19, and a metallicity close to the lowest values known for BCDs, about 1/50th that of the Sun. The radial velocities of both systems are similar, suggesting that the two BCDs form a pair of dwarf galaxies embedded in a common HI envelope. Alternatively, the BCDs could be the nuclei of two distinct interacting primordial HI clouds. The estimated total dynamical mass, assuming the BCDs form a bound system, is larger than 7 x 109 Mo. This is to be compared to a total gaseous mass Mgas = 2.0 x 109 Mo, and a total stellar mass Mstar < 108 Mo. Hence, the mass of the SBS 0335-052 system is dominated by dark matter. Because of the disturbed HI velocity field and the presence of what might be tidal tails at either end of the system, we favor the hypothesis that the star formation trigger in this system was provided by a tidal interaction, either with the nearby giant galaxy NGC 1376 or as a result of the mutual gravitational interaction of the two HI clouds proper.

  9. Study of galaxies in the Lynx-Cancer void. VI. H I-observations with Nançay Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustilnik, S. A.; Martin, J.-M.

    2016-12-01

    Context. Void population consists mainly of late-type and low surface brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxies, whose atomic hydrogen is the main component of their baryonic matter. Therefore observations of void galaxy Hi are mandatory to understand both their evolution and dynamics. Aims: Our aim was to obtain integrated Hi parameters for a fainter part of the nearby Lynx-Cancer void galaxy sample (total of 45 objects) with the Nançay Radio Telescope (NRT) and to conduct the comparative analysis of the whole 103 void galaxies with known Hi data with a sample of similar galaxies residing in denser environments of the Local Volume. Methods: For Hi observations we used the NRT with its sensitive antenna/receiver system FORT and standard processing. The comparison of the void and "control" samples on the parameter M(HI)/LB is conducted with the non-parametric method "The 2 × 2 Contingency Table test". Results: We obtained new Hi data for about 40% of the Lynx-Cancer galaxy sample. Along with data from the literature, we use for further analysis data for 103 void objects. The proxy of the evolutional parameter M(HI)/LB of the void sample is compared with that of 82 galaxies of morphological types 8-10 residing in the Local Volume groups and aggregates. Conclusions: At the confidence level of P = 0.988, we conclude that for the same luminosity, these void galaxies are systematically gas-richer, in average by 39%. This result is consistent with the authors' earlier conclusion on the smaller gas metallicities and evidences for the slower low-mass galaxy evolution in voids. The reduced spectra (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A86

  10. HST WFC3/IR OBSERVATIONS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS HOST GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2: SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES GROW IN DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Treister, Ezequiel; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Simmons, Brooke; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2011-02-01

    We present the rest-frame optical morphologies of active galactic nucleus (AGN) host galaxies at 1.5 < z < 3, using near-infrared imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3, the first such study of AGN host galaxies at these redshifts. The AGNs are X-ray-selected from the Chandra Deep Field South and have typical luminosities of 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}galaxies of these AGNs have low Sersic indices indicative of disk-dominated light profiles, suggesting that secular processes govern a significant fraction of the cosmic growth of black holes. That is, many black holes in the present-day universe grew much of their mass in disk-dominated galaxies and not in early-type galaxies or major mergers. The properties of the AGN host galaxies are furthermore indistinguishable from their parent galaxy population and we find no strong evolution in either effective radii or morphological mix between z {approx} 2 and z {approx} 0.05.

  11. The shape of dark matter haloes - V. Analysis of observations of edge-on galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, S. P. C.; van der Kruit, P. C.; Allen, R. J.; Freeman, K. C.

    2017-01-01

    In previous papers in this series, we measured the stellar and H I content in a sample of edge-on galaxies. In the present paper, we perform a simultaneous rotation curve and vertical force field gradient decomposition for five of these edge-on galaxies. The rotation curve decomposition provides a measure of the radial dark matter potential, while the vertical force field gradient provides a measure of the vertical dark matter potential. We fit dark matter halo models to these potentials. Using our H I self-absorption results, we find that a typical dark matter halo has a less dense core (0.094 ± 0.230 M⊙ pc-3) than that for an optically thin H I model (0.150 ± 0.124 M⊙ pc-3). The H I self-absorption dark matter halo has a longer scale-length Rc of 1.42 ± 3.48 kpc, versus 1.10 ± 1.81 kpc for the optically thin H I model. The median halo shape is spherical at q = 1.0 ± 0.6 for self-absorbing H I, while it is prolate at q = 1.5 ± 0.6 for the optically thin case. Our best results were obtained for ESO 274-G001 and UGC 7321, for which we were able to measure the velocity dispersion in Paper III. These two galaxies have very different halo shapes, with one oblate and one strongly prolate. Overall, we find that the many assumptions required make this type of analysis susceptible to errors.

  12. Chandra and MMT observations of low-mass black hole active galactic nuclei accreting at low rates in dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, W.; Zhou, H.; Dou, L.; Dong, X.-B.; Wang, T.-G.; Fan, X.

    2014-02-10

    We report on Chandra X-ray observations of four candidate low-mass black hole (M {sub bh} ≲ 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) that have the estimated Eddington ratios among the lowest (∼10{sup –2}) found for this class. The aims are to validate the nature of their AGNs and to confirm the low Eddington ratios that are derived from the broad Hα line, and to explore this poorly studied regime in the AGN parameter space. Among them, two objects with the lowest significance of the broad lines are also observed with the Multi-Mirror Telescope, and the high-quality optical spectra taken confirm them as Seyfert 1 AGNs and as having small black hole masses. X-ray emission is detected from the nuclei of two of the galaxies, which is variable on timescales of ∼10{sup 3} s, whereas no significant (or only marginal at best) detection is found for the remaining two. The X-ray luminosities are on the order of 10{sup 41} erg s{sup –1} or even lower, on the order of 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1} for non-detections, which are among the lowest regimes ever probed for Seyfert galaxies. The low X-ray luminosities, compared to their black hole masses derived from Hα, confirm their low accretion rates assuming typical bolometric corrections. Our results hint at the existence of a possibly large population of under-luminous low-mass black holes in the local universe. An off-nucleus ultra-luminous X-ray source in one of the dwarf galaxies is detected serendipitously, with a luminosity (6-9)× 10{sup 39} erg s{sup –1} in 2-10 keV.

  13. Joint ROSAT-Compton GRO observations of the X-ray bright Seyfert galaxy IC 4329A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madejski, G. M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Turner, T. J.; Done, C.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Hartman, R. C.; Gehrels, N.; Connors, A.; Fabian, A. C.; Nandra, K.

    1995-01-01

    We report a simultaneous ROSAT and Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) observation of the X-ray-bright Seyfert galaxy IC 4329A. For the GRO Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) detector, we also present the sum of the data for this and earlier observations. The overall spectrum is very well described as a power law with an energy spectral index of approximately 1 absorbed at low energies plus a strong Compton reflection component, typical for Seyfert 1 galaxies. The low energy absorption can be well described by a sum of a neutral column density of approximately 3 x 10(exp 21)sq cm, most of which is associated with the edge-on galactic disk of IC 4329A, plus an edgelike feature at approximately 700 eV; this feature implies either complex absorption (due to additional ionized material, or due to a partial covering), or a soft excess. The data only weakly constrain the presence of a high-energy cutoff in the underlying power law; they are compatible with an exponential cutoff at any energy E(sub c) approximately greater than 100 keV. The relative steepness of the OSSE data, with the power-law energy index of 1.6 +/- 0.2, can be accounted for entirely by the contribution of the high-energy tail of the reflection component when E(sub c) approaches infinity. (We find that the definite cutoff at an energy E(sub c)approximately 130 keV suggested in the recently published analysis of the OSSE data for this subject is due to a data reduction error.) Including nonsimultaneous Ginga observations with 2 keV fluxes matching well that of ROSAT gives us likely broad-band X-ray/gamma-ray spectra of the object from approximately 0.1 keV up to several hundred keV. We also report the ROSAT spectrum of the companion object to the Seyfert galaxy, the elliptical galaxy IC 4329.

  14. Observed trend in the star formation history and the dark matter fraction of galaxies at redshift z ≈ 0.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Shravan; Cappellari, Michele

    2015-12-01

    We study the star formation history for a sample of 154 galaxies with stellar mass 10^{10}≲ M_{*} ≲ 10^{12} { M_{⊙}} in the redshift range 0.7 < z < 0.9. We do this using stellar population models combined with full-spectrum fitting of good quality spectra and high-resolution photometry. For a subset of 68 galaxies (M_{*}≳ 10^{11}{ M_{⊙}}) we additionally construct dynamical models. These use an axisymmetric solution to the Jeans equations, which allows for velocity anisotropy, and adopts results from abundance matching techniques to account for the dark matter content. We find that (i) the trends in star formation history observed in the local Universe are already in place by z ˜ 1: the most massive galaxies are already passive, while lower mass ones have a more extended star formation histories, and the lowest mass galaxies are actively forming stars; (ii) we place an upper limit of a factor 1.5 to the size growth of the massive galaxy population; (iii) we present strong evidence for low dark matter fractions within 1Re (median of 9 per cent and 90th percentile of 21 per cent) for galaxies with M_{*} ≳ 10^{11} { M_{⊙}} at these redshifts; and (iv) we confirm that these galaxies have, on average, a Salpeter normalization of the stellar initial mass function.

  15. Investigation of the Activity of the Nucleus of Seyfert Galaxy NGC 7469 during the Observation Period from 1990 TO 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolkova, L. S.; Artamonov, B. P.

    We combine many published photometrical observations of the Seyfert Galaxy (SG) NGC 7469 and also new results from Hubble Space Telescope which can be used for future research of some properties of the activity of the nuclear of the SG. A drift of the activity maximum from 1997 to 1998 is observed with an increased of the wave length similarly to some blazars in radio range. Analyzing the surface photometry according to data obtained both at the Maidanak observatory and HST data an intensity asymmetry at the SG central region image is observed at different periods. The existence of a second component might be supposed. The radius of the active region itself inside the SG kernel is 40-50 parsec.

  16. Chandra Observations of Galaxy Zoo Mergers: Frequency of Binary Active Nuclei in Massive Mergers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Schwainski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Oh, Kyuseok; Bonning, Erin W.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris J.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Treister, Ezequiel

    2012-01-01

    We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 10(sup 11) solar mass that already have optical AGN signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N(sub H) less than or approximately 1.1 x 10(exp 22) per square centimeter) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (less than 40 counts per nucleus; f(sub 2-10 keV) less than or approximately 1.2 x 10(exp -13) ergs per second per square centimeter) to separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGN in these mergers are rare (0-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

  17. LENS MODELS OF HERSCHEL-SELECTED GALAXIES FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION NEAR-IR OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Calanog, J. A.; Cooray, A.; Ma, B.; Casey, C. M.; Fu, Hai; Wardlow, J.; Amber, S.; Baker, A. J.; Baes, M.; Bock, J.; Bourne, N.; Dye, S.; Bussmann, R. S.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; and others

    2014-12-20

    We present Keck-Adaptive Optics and Hubble Space Telescope high resolution near-infrared (IR) imaging for 500 μm bright candidate lensing systems identified by the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey and Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey. Out of 87 candidates with near-IR imaging, 15 (∼17%) display clear near-IR lensing morphologies. We present near-IR lens models to reconstruct and recover basic rest-frame optical morphological properties of the background galaxies from 12 new systems. Sources with the largest near-IR magnification factors also tend to be the most compact, consistent with the size bias predicted from simulations and previous lensing models for submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). For four new sources that also have high-resolution submillimeter maps, we test for differential lensing between the stellar and dust components and find that the 880 μm magnification factor (μ{sub 880}) is ∼1.5 times higher than the near-IR magnification factor (μ{sub NIR}), on average. We also find that the stellar emission is ∼2 times more extended in size than dust. The rest-frame optical properties of our sample of Herschel-selected lensed SMGs are consistent with those of unlensed SMGs, which suggests that the two populations are similar.

  18. Searching for the 3.5 keV Line in the Stacked Suzaku Observations of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulbul, Esra; Markevitch, Maxim; Foster, Adam; Miller, Eric; Bautz, Mark; Loewenstein, Mike; Randall, Scott W.; Smith, Randall K.

    2016-11-01

    We perform a detailed study of the stacked Suzaku observations of 47 galaxy clusters, spanning a redshift range of 0.01-0.45, to search for the unidentified 3.5 keV line. This sample provides an independent test for the previously detected line. We detect a 2σ -significant spectral feature at 3.5 keV in the spectrum of the full sample. When the sample is divided into two subsamples (cool-core and non-cool core clusters), the cool-core subsample shows no statistically significant positive residuals at the line energy. A very weak (˜ 2σ confidence) spectral feature at 3.5 keV is permitted by the data from the non-cool-core clusters sample. The upper limit on a neutrino decay mixing angle of {\\sin }2(2θ )=6.1× {10}-11 from the full Suzaku sample is consistent with the previous detections in the stacked XMM-Newton sample of galaxy clusters (which had a higher statistical sensitivity to faint lines), M31, and Galactic center, at a 90% confidence level. However, the constraint from the present sample, which does not include the Perseus cluster, is in tension with previously reported line flux observed in the core of the Perseus cluster with XMM-Newton and Suzaku.

  19. Distribution of Molecules in the Circumnuclear Disk and Surrounding Starburst Ring in the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 1068 Observed with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, S.; Nakajima, T.; Kohno, K.; Harada, N.; Herbst, E.; Tamura, Y.; Izumi, T.; Taniguchi, A.; Tosaki, T.

    2015-12-01

    We report distributions of several molecular transitions including shock and dust related species (13CO and C18O J = 1-0, 13CN N = 1-0, CS J = 2-1, SO JN = 32-21, HNCO JKa,Kc = 50,5-40,4, HC3N J = 11-10, 12-11, CH3OH JK = 2K-1K, and CH3CN JK = 6K-5K) in the nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 observed with ALMA. The central ˜1' (˜4.3 kpc) of this galaxy was observed in the 100 GHz region with an angular resolution of ˜4" x 2" (290 pc x 140 pc) to study the effects of an active galactic nucleus and its surrounding starburst ring on molecular abundances. We report a classification of molecular distributions into three main categories. Organic molecules such as CH3CN are found to be concentrated in the circumnuclear disk. In the starburst ring, the intensity of methanol at each clumpy region is not consistent with that of 13CO.

  20. ALMA CO Observations of Shocks and Star Formation in the Interacting Galaxies IC 2163 and NGC 2207

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Debra M.; Elmegreen, Bruce; Kaufman, Michele; Brinks, Elias; Struck, Curtis; Bournaud, Frederic; Sheth, Kartik; Juneau, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    The spiral galaxies IC 2163 and NGC 2207 are a well-studied pair undergoing a grazing collision. ALMA CO observations of masses, column densities, and velocities are combined with HI, Hα, optical, and 24 micron data to study the star formation rates and efficiencies. The close encounter of the galaxies produced in-plane tidal forces in IC 2163, resulting in a large shock with high molecular velocity gradients and both radial and azimuthal streaming (100 km/s) that formed a pile-up of molecular gas in the resulting cuspy-oval or ``eyelid'' structure at mid-radius. The encounter also produced forces nearly orthogonal to the plane of NGC 2207, resulting in a warp. By comparing with the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation for star formation, we find that some regions of NGC 2207 with unusually high turbulent speeds (40-50 km/s) and high star formation rates (>0.01 Mo/pc2/Myr) have gas that is predominantly atomic with high density cores. Half of the CO mass is in 300 clouds each more massive than 4.0x105 Mo. The mass distribution functions for the CO clouds and star complexes in the eyelid in IC 2163 both have a slope similar to what is observed in Milky Way clouds; the CO slope is steeper in NGC 2207. The CO distribution in NGC 2207 also includes a nuclear ring, a mini-bar, and a mini-starburst region that dominates the 24 micron, radio, and Hα emission in both galaxies. Dust extinction, molecular column densities, and slightly negative molecular velocities indicate the mini-starburst region has ejected a jet of molecular gas nearly perpendicular to the plane of NGC 2207 on the near side with a kinetic energy of 1052 ergs. The large scale star formation efficiency, measured as the ratio of the summed masses of the star complexes near molecular clouds to the combined star complex and cloud masses, is 7% overall; it is 23% in the mini-starburst. The maximum age of star complexes in the galactic-scale shock front at the eyelid is about the same as the time since closest

  1. VLT/GIRAFFE spectroscopic observations of the metal-poor blue compact dwarf galaxy SBS 0335-052E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, Y. I.; Schaerer, D.; Blecha, A.; Royer, F.; Guseva, N. G.; North, P.

    2006-11-01

    Aims.We present two-dimensional spectroscopy of the extremely metal-deficient blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy SBS 0335-052E to study physical conditions, element abundances and kinematical properties of the ionised gas in this galaxy. Methods: .Observations were obtained in the spectral range λ3620-9400 Å with the imaging spectrograph GIRAFFE on the UT2 of the Very Large Telescope (VLT). These observations are the first ones carried out so far with GIRAFFE in the ARGUS mode which allows one to simultaneously obtain 308 spectra covering a 11.4 arcsec×7.3 arcsec region. Results: .We produced images of SBS 0335-052E in the continuum and in emission lines of different stages of excitation. While the maximum of emission in the majority of lines, including the strong lines Hβ 4861 Å, Hα 6563 Å, [O iii] 4363,5007 Å, [O ii] 3726,3729 Å, coincides with the youngest south-eastern star clusters 1 and 2, the emission of He II 4686 Å line is offset to the more evolved north-west clusters 4, 5. This suggests that hard ionising radiation responsible for the He II λ4686 Å emission is not related to the most massive youngest stars, but rather is related to fast radiative shocks. This conclusion is supported by the kinematical properties of the ionised gas from the different emission lines as the velocity dispersion in the He II λ4686 Å line is systematically higher, by ~50-100%, than that in other lines. The variations of the emission line profiles suggest the presence of an ionised gas outflow in the direction perpendicular to the galaxy disk. We find a relatively high electron number density Ne of several hundred cm-3 in the brightest part of SBS 0335-052E. There is a small gradient of the electron temperature Te and oxygen abundance from the East to the West with systematically higher Te and lower 12+log O/H in the western part of the galaxy. The oxygen abundances for the whole H II region and its brightest part are 12 + log O/H = 7.29 ± 0.02 and 7.31 ± 0

  2. Velocity dispersions in the bulges of spiral and S0 galaxies. II Further observations and a simple three-component model for spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, B. C.; Kirshner, R. P.

    1981-11-01

    We have obtained velocity dispersions for 24 galaxies in the Virgo cluster to supplement our earlier results. A 2000 channel intensified Reticon scanner has again been used on the 1.3 m telescope of McGraw-Hill Observatory, and a Fourier quotient technique has been employed to yield dispersions. We have confirmed our earlier result that spiral bulges exhibit a relation between total luminosity and velocity dispersion with the form L ∝ σ4, but with velocity dispersions that are 17 ± 8% smaller than elliptical galaxies at the same absolute magnitude. However, possible systematic errors may still affect the reality of this gap. The scatter in the L ∝ σ4 relationship is substantially larger for the spiral bulges than for the elliptical galaxies. This larger scatter probably indicates that spiral bulges comprise a more heterogeneous sample than do elliptical galaxies. We also find that the bulge components of SO galaxies follow a L ∝ σ4 relation with no gap with the ellipticals. The similarity in this relation for the spheroidal components of spiral, SO, and elliptical galaxies indicates that the systems are dynamically similar. We have compared our velocity dispersions with rotational velocities determined from neutral hydrogen widths. For a totally bulge dominated spiral the ratio of the asymptotic rotational velocity to the velocity dispersion is about 1.4. This suggests that the mass responsible for producing the flat rotation curves (presumably the "halo") resides in a spheroidal component rather than in the disk. Our study also substantiates our earlier result that the massive halo is not merely an extension of the bulge, but is a separate dynamical component for most of our galaxies. A simple three-component model has been constructed to aid in the interpretation of this data. These models provide an independent indication of the existence of massive halos in spiral galaxies.

  3. First Results from the NuSTAR AGN Physics Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenneman, Laura; Fuerst, F.; Matt, G.; Walton, D.; Madejski, G. M.; Marinucci, A.; Elvis, M.; Risaliti, G.; Harrison, F.; Stern, D.; Boggs, S.; Christensen, F.; Craig, W. W.; Zhang, W.; NuSTAR Team

    2013-04-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR, launched June 2012) is revolutionizing our knowledge of the physics at work in active galactic nuclei (AGN). With its high collecting area, focusing optics and low background from 3-79 keV, NASA's newest X-ray observatory is providing an unprecedented look at the spectral and timing properties of AGN in this energy range, which have been notoriously difficult to access. NuSTAR has observed several AGN to date simultaneously with XMM-Newton, Suzaku and/or Swift for the purposes of understanding their coronal properties (e.g., plasma temperature, optical depth) and measuring the spins of their supermassive black holes. We present the first results from these observing campaigns, highlighting the spectral and timing analysis of the bright, nearby AGN IC 4329A, NGC 4151, NGC 1365 and MCG--6-30-15. These are the highest signal-to-noise datasets ever obtained across the 0.2-79 keV energy band for these three sources, allowing us to cleanly deconvolve the X-ray continuum, absorption and reflection components in each galaxy for the first time via time-averaged and time-resolved spectroscopy.

  4. SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF γ-RAY BRIGHT RADIO GALAXIES: ORIGIN OF THE X-RAY EMISSION AND BROADBAND MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Fukazawa, Yasushi; Itoh, Ryosuke; Tokuda, Shin'ya; Finke, Justin; Stawarz, Łukasz; Tanaka, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-10

    We performed a systematic X-ray study of eight nearby γ-ray bright radio galaxies with Suzaku in order to understand the origins of their X-ray emissions. The Suzaku spectra for five of those have been presented previously, while the remaining three (M87, PKS 0625–354, and 3C 78) are presented here for the first time. Based on the Fe-K line strength, X-ray variability, and X-ray power-law photon indices, and using additional information on the [O III] line emission, we argue for a jet origin of the observed X-ray emission in these three sources. We also analyzed five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) GeV gamma-ray data on PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 to understand these sources within the blazar paradigm. We found significant γ-ray variability in the former object. Overall, we note that the Suzaku spectra for both PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 are rather soft, while the LAT spectra are unusually hard when compared with other γ-ray detected low-power (FR I) radio galaxies. We demonstrate that the constructed broadband spectral energy distributions of PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 are well described by a one-zone synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton model. The results of the modeling indicate lower bulk Lorentz factors compared to those typically found in other BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects, but consistent with the values inferred from modeling other LAT-detected FR I radio galaxies. Interestingly, the modeling also implies very high peak (∼10{sup 16} Hz) synchrotron frequencies in the two analyzed sources, contrary to previously suggested scenarios for Fanaroff-Riley (FR) type I/BL Lac unification. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of the FR I/BL Lac unification schemes.

  5. Luminous Infrared Galaxies with the Submillimeter Array. IV. 12CO J = 6-5 Observations of VV 114

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliwa, Kazimierz; Wilson, Christine D.; Krips, Melanie; Petitpas, Glen R.; Iono, Daisuke; Juvela, Mika; Matsushita, Satoki; Peck, Alison; Yun, Min

    2013-11-01

    We present high-resolution (~2.''5) observations of 12CO J = 6-5 toward the luminous infrared galaxy VV 114 using the Submillimeter Array. We detect 12CO J = 6-5 emission from the eastern nucleus of VV 114 but do not detect the western nucleus or the central region. We combine the new 12CO J = 6-5 observations with previously published or archival low-J CO observations, which include 13CO J = 1-0 Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array cycle 0 observations, to analyze the beam-averaged physical conditions of the molecular gas in the eastern nucleus. We use the radiative transfer code RADEX and a Bayesian likelihood code to constrain the temperature (T kin), density (n_{H_{2}}), and column density (N_{^{12CO}}) of the molecular gas. We find that the most probable scenario for the eastern nucleus is a cold (T kin = 38 K), moderately dense (n_{H_{2}} = 102.89 cm-3) molecular gas component. We find that the most probable 12CO to 13CO abundance ratio ([12CO]/[13CO]) is 229, which is roughly three times higher than the Milky Way value. This high abundance ratio may explain the observed high 12CO/ 13CO line ratio (>25). The unusual 13CO J = 2-1/J = 1-0 line ratio of 0.6 is produced by a combination of moderate 13CO optical depths (τ = 0.4-1.1) and extremely subthermal excitation temperatures. We measure the CO-to-H2 conversion factor, αCO, to be 0.5^{+0.6}_{-0.3} M ⊙ (K km s-1 pc2)-1, which agrees with the widely used factor for ultra luminous infrared galaxies of Downes & Solomon (αCO = 0.8 M ⊙ (K km s-1 pc2)-1).

  6. Comparing Dark Energy Survey and HST –CLASH observations of the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7–4431: Implications for stellar mass versus dark matter

    DOE PAGES

    Palmese, A.; Lahav, O.; Banerji, M.; ...

    2016-08-20

    We derive the stellar mass fraction in the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7–4431 observed with the Dark Energy Survey (DES) during the Science Verification period. We compare the stellar mass results from DES (five filters) with those from the Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey (CLASH; 17 filters). When the cluster spectroscopic redshift is assumed, we show that stellar masses from DES can be estimated within 25 per cent of CLASH values. We compute the stellar mass contribution coming from red and blue galaxies, and study the relation between stellar mass and the underlying dark matter using weak lensingmore » studies with DES and CLASH. An analysis of the radial profiles of the DES total and stellar mass yields a stellar-to-total fraction of f* = (6.8 ± 1.7) × 10–3 within a radius of r200c ≃ 2 Mpc. Our analysis also includes a comparison of photometric redshifts and star/galaxy separation efficiency for both data sets. We conclude that space-based small field imaging can be used to calibrate the galaxy properties in DES for the much wider field of view. In conclusion, the technique developed to derive the stellar mass fraction in galaxy clusters can be applied to the ~100 000 clusters that will be observed within this survey and yield important information about galaxy evolution.« less

  7. H I observations of galaxies in the southern filament of the Virgo Cluster with the Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder KAT-7 and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorgho, A.; Hess, K.; Carignan, C.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2017-01-01

    We map the H I distribution of galaxies in a ˜1.5 × 2.5° region located at the virial radius south of the Virgo Cluster using the KAT-7 and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope interferometers. Because of the different beam sizes of the two telescopes, a similar column density sensitivity of NH I ˜ 1 × 1018 atoms cm- 2 was reached with the two observations over 16.5 km s-1. We pioneer a new approach to combine the observations and take advantage of their sensitivity to both the large- and small-scale structures. Out to an unprecedented extent, we detect an H I tail of ˜60 kpc being stripped off NGC 4424, a peculiar spiral galaxy. The properties of the galaxy, together with the shape of the tail, suggest that NGC 4424 is a post-merger galaxy undergoing ram pressure stripping as it falls towards the centre of the Virgo Cluster. We detect a total of 14 galaxies and three H I clouds lacking optical counterparts. One of the clouds is a new detection with an H I mass of 7 × 107 M⊙ and a strong H I profile with W50 = 73 km s-1. We find that 10 out of the 14 galaxies present H I deficiencies not higher than those of the cluster's late spirals, suggesting that the environmental effects are not more pronounced in the region than elsewhere in the cluster.

  8. Comparing Dark Energy Survey and HST-CLASH observations of the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431: implications for stellar mass versus dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmese, A.; Lahav, O.; Banerji, M.; Gruen, D.; Jouvel, S.; Melchior, P.; Aleksić, J.; Annis, J.; Diehl, H. T.; Hartley, W. G.; Jeltema, T.; Romer, A. K.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Seitz, S.; Suchyta, E.; Zhang, Y.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D.; Vikram, V.

    2016-12-01

    We derive the stellar mass fraction in the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431 observed with the Dark Energy Survey (DES) during the Science Verification period. We compare the stellar mass results from DES (five filters) with those from the Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey (CLASH; 17 filters). When the cluster spectroscopic redshift is assumed, we show that stellar masses from DES can be estimated within 25 per cent of CLASH values. We compute the stellar mass contribution coming from red and blue galaxies, and study the relation between stellar mass and the underlying dark matter using weak lensing studies with DES and CLASH. An analysis of the radial profiles of the DES total and stellar mass yields a stellar-to-total fraction of f⋆ = (6.8 ± 1.7) × 10-3 within a radius of r200c ≃ 2 Mpc. Our analysis also includes a comparison of photometric redshifts and star/galaxy separation efficiency for both data sets. We conclude that space-based small field imaging can be used to calibrate the galaxy properties in DES for the much wider field of view. The technique developed to derive the stellar mass fraction in galaxy clusters can be applied to the ˜100 000 clusters that will be observed within this survey and yield important information about galaxy evolution.

  9. RELICS OF GALAXY MERGING: OBSERVATIONAL PREDICTIONS FOR A WANDERING MASSIVE BLACK HOLE AND ACCOMPANYING STAR CLUSTER IN THE HALO OF M31

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Saito, Yuriko; Miki, Yohei; Mori, Masao

    2014-07-01

    Galaxies and massive black holes (BHs) presumably grow via galactic merging events and subsequent BH coalescence. As a case study, we investigate the merging event between the Andromeda galaxy (M31) and a satellite galaxy. We compute the expected observational appearance of the massive BH that was at the center of the satellite galaxy prior to the merger and is currently wandering in the M31 halo. We demonstrate that a radiatively inefficient accretion flow with a bolometric luminosity of a few tens of solar luminosities develops when Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion onto the BH is assumed. We compute the associated broadband spectrum and show that the radio band (observable with EVLA, ALMA, and the Square Kilometre Array) is the best frequency range in which to detect the emission. We also evaluate the mass and the luminosity of the stars bound by the wandering BH and find that such a star cluster is sufficiently luminous that it could correspond to one of the star clusters found by the PAndAS survey. The discovery of a relic massive BH wandering in a galactic halo will provide a direct means of investigating in detail the coevolution of galaxies and BHs. It also means a new population of BHs (off-center massive BHs) and offers targets for clean BH imaging that avoid strong interstellar scattering in the centers of galaxies.

  10. Distributions of molecules in the circumnuclear disk and surrounding starburst ring in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068 observed with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Shuro; Nakajima, Taku; Kohno, Kotaro; Harada, Nanase; Herbst, Eric; Tamura, Yoichi; Izumi, Takuma; Taniguchi, Akio; Tosaki, Tomoka

    2014-07-01

    Sensitive observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) allow astronomers to observe the detailed distributions of molecules with relatively weak intensity in nearby galaxies. In particular, we report distributions of several molecular transitions including shock and dust related species (13CO J = 1-0, C18O J = 1-0, 13CN N = 1-0, CS J = 2-1, SO JN = 32-21, HNCO JKa,Kc = 50,5-40,4, HC3N J = 11-10, 12-11, CH3OH JK = 2K-1K, and CH3CN JK = 6K-5K) in the nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 observed with the ALMA early science program. The central ˜ 1'(˜ 4.3 kpc) of this galaxy was observed in the 100-GHz region covering ˜ 96-100 GHz and ˜ 108-111 GHz with an angular resolution of ˜ 4'' × 2'' (290 pc × 140 pc) to study the effects of an active galactic nucleus and its surrounding starburst ring on molecular abundances. Here, we present images and report a classification of molecular distributions into three main categories: (1) molecules concentrated in the circumnuclear disk (CND) (SO JN = 32-21, HC3N J = 11-10, 12-11, and CH3CN JK = 6K-5K), (2) molecules distributed both in the CND and the starburst ring (CS J = 2-1 and CH3OH JK = 2K-1K), and (3) molecules distributed mainly in the starburst ring (13CO J = 1-0 and C18O J = 1-0). Since most of the molecules such as HC3N observed in the CND are easily dissociated by UV photons and X-rays, our results indicate that these molecules must be effectively shielded. In the starburst ring, the relative intensity of methanol at each clumpy region is not consistent with those of 13CO, C18O, or CS. This difference is probably caused by the unique formation and destruction mechanisms of CH3OH.

  11. Multifrequency radio observations of Cygnus A - Spectral aging in powerful radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carilli, C. L.; Perley, R. A.; Dreher, J. W.; Leahy, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the radio spectrum across the lobes of Cygnus A is presented in order to critically test the synchroton spectral aging theory. The results are in good agreement with the jet model for powerful radio galaxies, involving particle acceleration at the hot spots and outflow into the radio lobes, with subsequent energy loss due to synchrotron radiation. The hot spot spectra are well represented by a spectral aging model involving continuous injection of relativistic particles. Both hot spots have spectral break frequencies around 10 GHz. An injection index of 0.5 is found for both hot spots, consistent with diffusive shock acceleration at a strong nonrelativistic shock in a Newtonian fluid. The LF hot spot emission spectrum falls below the injected power law. This effect is isolated to the hot spots, and is best explained by a low-energy cutoff in the particle distribution.

  12. Precise Stellar Masses at 1Galaxies Observed by HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigby, Jane; Gladders, Michael; Sharon, Keren; Wuyts, Eva

    2012-12-01

    We propose IRAC imaging of 22 strong lensing fields to a depth complementary to upcoming HST Cycle 20 imaging. All but four of these fields have extant but shallow IRAC imaging; here we seek here the depth necessary to fully exploit the investment in HST imaging, and extensive ground-based spectroscopy. With this ensemble of data we will characterise the nature of star formation in galaxies at 1

  13. XMM-Newton and Chandra Observations of the Galaxy Group NGC 5044. 1; Evidence for Limited Multiphase Hot Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buote, David A.; Lewis, Aaron D.; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Mathews, William G.

    2003-01-01

    Using new XMM and Chandra observations, we present an analysis of the temperature structure of the hot gas within a radius of 100 kpc of the bright nearby galaxy group NGC 5044. A spectral deprojection analysis of data extracted from circular annuli reveals that a two-temperature model (2T) of the hot gas is favored over single-phase or cooling flow (M = 4.5 +/- 0.2 solar mass/yr) models within the central approx.30 kpc. Alternatively, the data can be fitted equally well if the temperature within each spherical shell varies continuously from approx.T(sub h) to T(sub c) approx. T(sub h)/2, but no lower. The high spatial resolution of the Chandra data allows us to determine that the temperature excursion T(sub h) approaches T(sub c) required in each shell exceeds the temperature range between the boundaries of the same shell in the best-fitting single-phase model. This is strong evidence for a multiphase gas having a limited temperature range. We do not find any evidence that azimuthal temperature variations within each annulus on the sky can account for the range in temperatures within each shell. We provide a detailed investigation of the systematic errors on the derived spectral models considering the effects of calibration, plasma codes, bandwidth, variable NH, and background rate. We find that the RGS gratings and the EPIC and ACIS CCDs give fully consistent results when the same models are fitted over the same energy ranges for each instrument. The cooler component of the 2T model has a temperature (T(sub c) approx. 0.7 keV) similar to the kinetic temperature of the stars. The hot phase has a temperature (T(sub h) approx. 1.4 keV) characteristic of the virial temperature of the solar mass halo expected in the NGC 5044 group. However, in view of the morphological disturbances and X-ray holes visible in the Chandra image within R approx. equals 10 kpc, bubbles of gas heated to approx.T(sub h) in this region may be formed by intermittent AGN feedback. Some

  14. The CO-12 and CO-13 J=2-1 and J=1-0 observations of hot and cold galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Shuding; Schloerb, F. Peter; Young, Judith

    1990-01-01

    Researchers observed the nuclear regions of the galaxies NGC 2146 and IC 342 in CO-12 and CO-13 J=1-0 and J=2-1 lines using the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (FCRAO) 14m telescope. NGC 2146 is a peculiar Sab spiral galaxy. Its complex optical morphology and strong nuclear radio continuum emission suggest that it is experiencing a phase of violent activity and could have a polar ring which may have resulted from an interaction. IC 342 is a nearby luminous Scd spiral galaxy. Strong CO, infrared and radio continuum emission from the nuclear region of IC 342 indicate enhanced star-forming activity, and interferometric CO-12 J=1-0 observations reveal a bar-like structure centered on the nucleus, along the dark lane in the NS direction. These two galaxies are selected based on their different dust temperatures and star formation efficiencies (SFE) as derived from the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) S sub 60 mu/S sub 100 mu flux density ratio and L sub IR/M(H2), respectively, with a relatively high SFE and dust temperature of 45 K in NGC 2146 and a relatively low SFE and dust temperature of 35 K in IC 342. The data from the different CO-12 and CO-13 lines are used to study the physical conditions in the molecular clouds in the galaxies. Researchers also consider the radiative transfer to determine whether a warm and optically thin gas component exists in these galaxies, as has been suggested in the case of M82 (Knapp et al. 1980), and whether the warm gas is related to the dust properties. Since optically thin CO-12 gas is rarely detected in our own Galaxy (except in outflow sources), to confirm its existence in external galaxies is very important in understanding the molecular content of external galaxies and its relationship to star formation activity. The present CO-12 J=2-1 and CO-13 J=2-1 and J=1-0 data for NGC 2146 are the first detections of this galaxy to our knowledge. The CO-12 J=1-0 distribution in NGC 2146 has been measured as part of the FCRAO

  15. Herschel Extreme Lensing Line Observations: Dynamics of Two Strongly Lensed Star-Forming Galaxies near Redshift z=2*

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, James E.; Rigby, Jane Rebecca; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Allam, Sahar; Carilli, Chris; Combes, Francoise; Finkelstein, Keely; Finkelstein, Steven; Frye, Brenda; Gerin, Maryvonne; Guillard, Pierre; Nesvadba, Nicole; Spaans, Marco; Strauss, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    We report on two regularly rotating galaxies at redshift z approx. = 2, using high-resolution spectra of the bright [C microns] 158 micrometers emission line from the HIFI instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. Both SDSS090122.37+181432.3 ("S0901") and SDSSJ120602.09+514229.5 ("the Clone") are strongly lensed and show the double-horned line profile that is typical of rotating gas disks. Using a parametric disk model to fit the emission line profiles, we find that S0901 has a rotation speed of v sin(i) approx. = 120 +/- 7 kms(sup -1) and a gas velocity dispersion of (standard deviation)g < 23 km s(sup -1) (1(standard deviation)). The best-fitting model for the Clone is a rotationally supported disk having v sin(i) approx. = 79 +/- 11 km s(sup -1) and (standard deviation)g 4 kms(sup -1) (1(standard deviation)). However, the Clone is also consistent with a family of dispersion-dominated models having (standard deviation)g = 92 +/- 20 km s(sup -1). Our results showcase the potential of the [C microns] line as a kinematic probe of high-redshift galaxy dynamics: [C microns] is bright, accessible to heterodyne receivers with exquisite velocity resolution, and traces dense star-forming interstellar gas. Future [C microns] line observations with ALMA would offer the further advantage of spatial resolution, allowing a clearer separation between rotation and velocity dispersion.

  16. Far-infrared observations of Sagittarius A - The luminosity and dust density in the central parsec of the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becklin, E. E.; Gatley, I.; Werner, M. W.

    1982-01-01

    Far-infrared observations of the central 4 arcmin of the Galaxy with 30-arcsec resolution made simultaneously at 30 microns, 50 microns, and 100 microns are presented. The 30-micron radiation peaks strongly at the position of the galactic center, as determined from the 2-micron surface brightness and the density of ionized gas. The 50- and 100-micron emission is much more extended along the plane and shows two emission lobes, one on either side of the 30-micron peak. At the position of the galactic center itself there is a local minimum in the 100-micron surface brightness. It is concluded that the dust density decreases inward over the central few parsecs of the Galaxy and that the dust density in the central parsec is so low that optical and ultraviolet radiation freely traverses this region. The total luminosity of the sources heating the dust which radiates the far-infrared emission from the central few parsecs is deduced to be between 1 x 10 to the 7th and 3 x 10 to the 7th solar luminosities.

  17. Spot the difference. Impact of different selection criteria on observed properties of passive galaxies in zCOSMOS-20k sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresco, M.; Pozzetti, L.; Cimatti, A.; Zamorani, G.; Bolzonella, M.; Lamareille, F.; Mignoli, M.; Zucca, E.; Lilly, S. J.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Bardelli, S.; Bongiorno, A.; Caputi, K.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Kampczyk, P.; Knobel, C.; Kovač, K.; Le Borgne, J.-F.; Le Brun, V.; Maier, C.; Pelló, R.; Peng, Y.; Perez-Montero, E.; Presotto, V.; Silverman, J. D.; Tanaka, M.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Barnes, L.; Bordoloi, R.; Cappi, A.; Diener, C.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Le Floc'h, E.; López-Sanjuan, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Nair, P.; Oesch, P.; Scarlata, C.; Scoville, N.; Welikala, N.

    2013-10-01

    Aims: We present the analysis of photometric, spectroscopic, and morphological properties for differently selected samples of passive galaxies up to z = 1 extracted from the zCOSMOS-20k spectroscopic survey. This analysis intends toexplore the dependence of galaxy properties on the selection criterion adopted, study the degree of contamination due to star-forming outliers, and provide a comparison between different commonly used selection criteria. This work is a first step to fully investigating the selection effects of passive galaxies for future massive surveys such as Euclid. Methods: We extracted from the zCOSMOS-20k catalog six different samples of passive galaxies, based on morphology (3336 "morphological" early-type galaxies), optical colors (4889 "red-sequence" galaxies and 4882 "red UVJ" galaxies), specific star-formation rate (2937 "quiescent" galaxies), a best fit to the observed spectral energy distribution (2603 "red SED" galaxies), and a criterion that combines morphological, spectroscopic, and photometric information (1530 "red & passive early-type galaxies"). For all the samples, we studied optical and infrared colors, morphological properties, specific star-formation rates (SFRs), and the equivalent widths of the residual emission lines; this analysis was performed as a function of redshift and stellar mass to inspect further possible dependencies. Results: We find that each passive galaxy sample displays a certain level of contamination due to blue/star-forming/nonpassive outliers. The morphological sample is the one that presents the higher percentage of contamination, with ~12-65% (depending on the mass range) of galaxies not located in the red sequence, ~25-80% of galaxies with a specific SFR up to ~25 times higher than the adopted definition of passive, and significant emission lines found in the median stacked spectra, at least for log (M/M⊙) < 10.25. The red & passive ETGs sample is the purest, with a percentage of contamination in color

  18. Observations and modeling of the dust emission from the H2-bright galaxy-wide shock in Stephan's Quintet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillard, P.; Boulanger, F.; Cluver, M. E.; Appleton, P. N.; Pineau Des Forêts, G.; Ogle, P.

    2010-07-01

    Context. Spitzer Space Telescope observations have detected powerful mid-infrared (mid-IR) H2 rotational line emission from the X-ray emitting large-scale shock (~15 × 35 kpc2) associated with a galaxy collision in Stephan's Quintet (SQ). Because H2 forms on dust grains, the presence of H2 is physically linked to the survival of dust, and we expect some dust emission to originate in the molecular gas. Aims: To test this interpretation, IR observations and dust modeling are used to identify and characterize the thermal dust emission from the shocked molecular gas. Methods: The spatial distribution of the IR emission allows us to isolate the faint PAH and dust continuum emission associated with the molecular gas in the SQ shock. We model the spectral energy distribution (SED) of this emission, and fit it to Spitzer observations. The radiation field is determined with GALEX UV, HST V-band, and ground-based near-IR observations. We consider two limiting cases for the structure of the H2 gas: it is either diffuse and penetrated by UV radiation, or fragmented into clouds that are optically thick to UV. Results: Faint PAH and dust continuum emission are detected in the SQ shock, outside star-forming regions. The 12/24 μm flux ratio in the shock is remarkably close to that of the diffuse Galactic interstellar medium, leading to a Galactic PAH/VSG abundance ratio. However, the properties of the shock inferred from the PAH emission spectrum differ from those of the Galaxy, which may be indicative of an enhanced fraction of large and neutrals PAHs. In both models (diffuse or clumpy H2 gas), the IR SED is consistent with the expected emission from dust associated with the warm (> 150 K) H2 gas, heated by a UV radiation field of intensity comparable to that of the solar neighborhood. This is in agreement with GALEX UV observations that show that the intensity of the radiation field in the shock is GUV = 1.4±0.2 [Habing units]. Conclusions: The presence of PAHs and dust

  19. Radio emission in the directions of cD and related galaxies in poor clusters. III - VLA observations at 20 cm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. O.; White, R. A.; Hough, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    VLA radio maps and optical identifications of a sample of sources in the directions of 21 Yerkes poor cluster fields are presented. The majority of the cluster radio sources are associated with the dominant D or cD galaxies (approximately 70 percent). Our analysis of dominant galaxies in rich and poor clusters indicates that these giant galaxies are much more often radio emitters (approximately 25 percent of cD's are radio active in the poor clusters), have steeper radio spectra, and have simpler radio morphologies (i.e., double or other linear structure) than other less bright ellipticals. A strong continuum of radio properties in cD galaxies is seen from rich to poor clusters. It is speculated that the location of these dominant galaxies at the cluster centers (i.e., at the bottom of a deep, isolated gravitational potential well) is the crucial factor in explaining their multifrequency activity. Galaxy cannibalism and gas infall models as fueling mechanisms for the observed radio and X-ray emission are discussed

  20. Radio emission in the directions of cD and related galaxies in poor clusters. III. VLA observations at 20 cm

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, J.O.; White, R.A.; Hough, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    VLA radio maps and optical identifications of a sample of sources in the directions of 21 Yerkes poor cluster fields are presented. The majority of the cluster radio sources are associated with the dominant D or cD galaxies (approx.70%). Our analysis of dominant galaxies in rich and poor clusters indicates that these giant galaxies are much more often radio emitters (approx.25% of cD's are radio active in the poor clusters), have steeper radio spectra, and have simpler radio morphologies (i.e., double or other linear structure) than other less bright ellipticals. A strong continuum of radio properties in cD galaxies is seen from rich to poor clusters. We speculate that the location of these dominant galaxies at the cluster centers (i.e., at the bottom of a deep, isolated gravitational potential well) is the crucial factor in explaining their multifrequency activity. We briefly discuss galaxy cannibalism and gas infall models as fueling mechanisms for the observed radio and x-ray emission.

  1. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF A SPECTACULAR NEW STRONG-LENSING GALAXY CLUSTER: MACS J1149.5+2223 AT z = 0.544

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Graham P.; Ebeling, Harald; Ma, Cheng-Jiun; Limousin, Marceau; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Jauzac, Mathilde; Swinbank, A. M.; Richard, Johan; Edge, Alastair C.; Smail, Ian; Jullo, Eric; Sand, David J.

    2009-12-20

    We present Advanced Camera for Surveys observations of MACS J1149.5+2223, an X-ray luminous galaxy cluster at z = 0.544 discovered by the Massive Cluster Survey. The data reveal at least seven multiply imaged galaxies, three of which we have confirmed spectroscopically. One of these is a spectacular face-on spiral galaxy at z = 1.491, the four images of which are gravitationally magnified by 8 approx< mu approx< 23. We identify this as an L* (M{sub B} approx = -20.7), disk-dominated (B/T approx< 0.5) galaxy, forming stars at approx6 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. We use a robust sample of multiply imaged galaxies to constrain a parameterized model of the cluster mass distribution. In addition to the main cluster dark matter halo and the bright cluster galaxies, our best model includes three galaxy-group-sized halos. The relative probability of this model is P(N{sub halo} = 4)/P(N{sub halo} < 4) >= 10{sup 12} where N{sub halo} is the number of cluster/group-scale halos. In terms of sheer number of merging cluster/group-scale components, this is the most complex strong-lensing cluster core studied to date. The total cluster mass and fraction of that mass associated with substructures within R <= 500 kpc, are measured to be M{sub tot} = (6.7 +- 0.4) x 10{sup 14} M{sub sun} and f{sub sub} = 0.25 +- 0.12, respectively. Our model also rules out recent claims of a flat density profile at approx>7sigma confidence, thus highlighting the critical importance of spectroscopic redshifts of multiply imaged galaxies when modeling strong-lensing clusters. Overall our results attest to the efficiency of X-ray selection in finding the most powerful cluster lenses, including complicated merging systems.

  2. ROSAT HRI and ASCA Observations of the Spiral Galaxy NGC 6946 and its Northeast Complex of Luminous Supernova