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Sample records for galen aneurysmal malformation

  1. Selection of Endovascular Approach of Vein of Galen Aneurysmal Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Ito, O.; Goto, K.; Ogata, N.; Utsunomiya, H.; Sato, S.; Fukumura, A.

    2001-01-01

    Summary Vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation (VGAM) is one of the most difficult intracranial vascular lesions because this disease consists of extremely high flow shunts and affects infants and small children. Thanks to the development of various diagnostic modalities, early diagnosis became possible allowing us to prepare appropriately according to the patients' general and neurological conditions. Recent improvements of endovascular techniques and materials enabled both transarterial and transvenous approaches even to the newborn infants, widening therapeutic windows. In this article, we discuss the selection of endovascular approaches based upon angioarchitecture of VGAM presenting four representative cases from our file. PMID:20663400

  2. Vein of Galen Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Komiyama, M.; Nakajima, H.; Nishikawa, M.; Yamanaka, K.; Iwai, Y.; Yasui, T.; Morikawa, T.; Kitano, S.; Sakamoto, H.; Nishio, A.

    2001-01-01

    Summary Eleven patients with so-called “vein of Galen aneurysms ” are reported, six of whom presented with vein of Galen aneurysmal malformations (four with choroidal type and two with mural type malformations). The remaining five patients presented with vein of Galen aneurysmal dilatations secondarily due to an arteriovenous malformation in one patient, an arteriovenous fistula in another, dural arteriovenous fistulas in two patients, and a varix in another. Treatments for these patients were individualised with consideration given to the clinical manifestations and the angioarchitecture of their lesions. Endovascular intervention played a critical role in the treatment of these vein of Galen aneurysms. PMID:20663385

  3. Bilateral carotid and vertebral rete mirabile with vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation: an unreported association

    PubMed Central

    Mondel, Prabath Kumar; Saraf, Rashmi; Limaye, Uday S

    2014-01-01

    Rete mirabile is a fine meshwork of anastomosing vessels that replace the parent artery. A 30-year-old woman complained of slurring of speech, right eye proptosis, recurrent vomiting, and loss of bladder and bowel control, followed by drowsiness lasting 30–40 min, for the past 6 months. On cross sectional imaging and angiography, the patient was found to have a vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation, with bilateral carotid and vertebral rete mirabile. The patient was offered both endovascular and open surgical options but she refused any form of surgical treatment and opted for conservative management. At the 6 month follow-up, she continued to have occasional episodes of headache and vomiting but was otherwise normal. We describe the clinical, cross sectional, and angiographic features of this patient. A comparison with other patients with bilateral carotid and vertebral rete mirabile is also reported. PMID:25414211

  4. Vein of Galen Aneurysmal Malformation: Prognostic Markers Depicted on Fetal MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Matthias W; Vaught, Arthur J; Poretti, Andrea; Blakemore, Karin J

    2015-01-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) serves a dual role in the prenatal diagnostic work up of a vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation (VGAM). First, it may confirm the prenatal ultrasound findings and secondly it may identify prognostically important secondary complications of the VGAM. Progressive heart failure with development of fetal hydrops and hemispheric white matter injuries are associated with a poor outcome in children with a VGAM. We present the prenatal findings using both ultrasound and MRI of a fetus with VGAM including bilateral injury of the cerebral hemispheres, severe dilatation of the jugular veins, cardiomegaly, and hydrops fetalis. The neonate died within 30 minutes after delivery. Moreover, fetal MRI revealed complete placenta praevia, uterine fibroids, and wrapping of the umbilical cord around the fetal neck. This additional information is unrelated to the fetal pathology, but could have been of importance to plan the delivery. PMID:25924177

  5. Relapsing fetal bilateral hydrothorax, an isolated expression of a vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation

    PubMed Central

    Mannaerts, Dominique; Muys, Joke; Ramaekers, Paul; Jacquemyn, Yves

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral fetal hydrothorax presenting at 20 weeks of pregnancy, spontaneously resolving at 22 weeks and severely relapsing at 28 weeks in a fetus with normal karyotype. The cause was a high-output heart failure caused by vein of Galen malformation. PMID:25628327

  6. Spontaneous thrombosis of vein of Galen malformation

    PubMed Central

    Kariyappa, Kalpana Devi; Krishnaswami, Murali; Gnanaprakasam, Francis; Ramachandran, Madan; Krishnaswamy, Visvanathan

    2016-01-01

    Vein of Galen malformation (VOGM) is a rare intracranial vascular malformation. Before the advent and advancement of various endovascular techniques, there was dismal prognosis. Rarely, this condition may spontaneously thrombose without the need for surgical or endovascular treatment with good prognosis. We report a case of an 8-month-old infant who had serial imaging, suggestive of VOGM and presented to us for further management, wherein the imaging revealed spontaneous thrombosis. PMID:27857804

  7. Role of 3D power Doppler sonography in early prenatal diagnosis of Galen vein aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ergenoğlu, Mete Ahmet; Yeniel, Ahmet Özgür; Akdemir, Ali; Akercan, Fuat; Karadadaş, Nedim

    2013-01-01

    Vein of Galen aneurysm malformation (VGAM) is a rare congenital vascular anomaly. Although the cause of VGAM remains to be elucidated, the current hypothesis is persistence of the embryonic vascular supply, which leads to progressive enlargement and formation of the aneurysmal component of a typical VGAM. Here, we present a 36-year-old woman at 23 weeks’ gestation (gravida 3, para 2) who was evaluated using 3D power Doppler sonography for the prenatal diagnosis of a vein of Galen aneurysm. Investigation using 3D power Doppler sonography allowed for a non-invasive yet diffuse and detailed prenatal assessment of VGAM. Thus, we suggest that prenatal sonography with 3D power Doppler may be an option in cases of VGAM. PMID:24592100

  8. Spontaneous thrombosis of a vein of galen malformation

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Chandan B.; Srinivas, Dwarakanath; Sampath, Somanna

    2016-01-01

    Vein of Galen malformation (VOGM) is a rare congenital vascular anomaly, comprising about 1% of all intracranial vascular anomalies, predominantly affecting the children less than 1 year of age. A 6-month-old infant presented with complaints of increasing head size of 3 months duration and multiple episodes of vomiting associated with refusal to feed since 7 days. He was a known case of VOGM who had initially refused treatment. Investigations revealed a spontaneously thrombosed VOGM with obstructive hydrocephalous. Child improved uneventfully with ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Spontaneous thrombosis of a VOGM is a rare occurrence and carries a better prognosis. The relevant literature is discussed with emphasis on etiopathogenesis, mechanism, and management of spontaneous thrombosis of the malformation. PMID:26889287

  9. Vein of Galen malformation in a neonate: A case report and review of endovascular management

    PubMed Central

    Puvabanditsin, Surasak; Mehta, Rajeev; Palomares, Kristy; Gengel, Natalie; Da Silva, Christina Ferrucci; Roychowdhury, Sudipta; Gupta, Gaurav; Kashyap, Arun; Sorrentino, David

    2017-01-01

    Vein of Galen malformation (VOGM) is a rare congenital vascular malformation caused by the maldevelopment of its embryonic precursor, the median prosencephalic vein of Markowski. VOGM results in neonatal morbidity and mortality, and premature delivery does not improve the outcome. We report a term female neonate in whom a vein of Galen malformation was diagnosed prenatally at 37 wk of gestation during a growth ultrasound and confirmed by fetal magnetic resonance imaging. Signs of cardiac decompensation were evident in the fetus. Multiple interventional radiology embolizations of the feeding vessels were performed successfully on days 7, 10, 12, 14 and 19. A review of the literature on the endovascular management of neonates with these malformations is presented herein. PMID:28224101

  10. Vein of Galen malformation presenting as persistent pulmonary hypertension of newborn (PPHN)

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Sangeeta; Geethanath, Ruppa Mohanram; Abu-Harb, Majd

    2013-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformation is a recognised cause of persistent pulmonary hypertension in a newborn (PPHN). Vein of Galen malformation (VOGM) is a rare vascular malformation which can be life-threatening if not diagnosed and treated early. We describe a case of a term baby who presented at day 4 of life with PPHN secondary to VOGM. The neonate underwent two transarterial interventional embolisation procedures on day 9 and then another one due to developing ventricular dilation on day 44. He remains stable since and was doing well at clinical review at 10 weeks and 4 months of age. VOGM usually presents in the neonatal period with high-output cardiac failure. In a baby who presents atypically with pulmonary hypertension, a cranial ultrasound scan should be considered to look for extracardiac shunting in the brain, especially, VOGM. PMID:24072831

  11. The high risks of ventriculoperitoneal shunt procedures for hydrocephalus associated with vein of Galen malformations in childhood: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Jea, Andrew; Bradshaw, Tina J; Whitehead, William E; Curry, Daniel J; Dauser, Robert C; Luerssen, Thomas G

    2010-08-01

    Little to no pediatric or neurosurgical literature has been published about the complications of ventriculoperitoneal shunt procedures for hydrocephalus associated with vein of Galen malformations in childhood. The interventional neuroradiology literature, however, suggests that ventriculoperitoneal shunting as first-line treatment for hydrocephalus in children with vein of Galen malformations is fraught with short- and long-term dangers, including status epilepticus, intraventricular hemorrhage, subdural hematoma and hygroma, venous infarction, malignant dystrophic calcification, and worsening developmental delay. We present a single pediatric case where a ventriculoperitoneal shunt procedure for symptomatic hydrocephalus seemed to be the major contributing factor to the rapid neurological deterioration and eventual death of an infant with a vein of Galen malformation. Based on this experience and our review of the literature, we suggest the use of endovascular embolization of the vein of Galen malformation to reestablish a balance in hydrovenous dynamics as first-line treatment rather than directly addressing hydrocephalus with CSF diversion. The ventriculoperitoneal shunt procedure should be reserved for cases with symptomatic hydrocephalus in which the patient is a poor candidate for embolization, or for cases where endovascular therapy has already been maximized. The role of endoscopy in the treatment of hydrocephalus associated with vein of Galen malformations is not clear.

  12. Concurrent arterial aneurysms in brain arteriovenous malformations with haemorrhagic presentation

    PubMed Central

    Stapf, C; Mohr, J; Pile-Spellman, J; Sciacca, R; Hartmann, A; Schumacher, H; Mast, H

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of concurrent arterial aneurysms on the risk of incident haemorrhage from brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Methods: In a cross sectional study, 463 consecutive, prospectively enrolled patients from the Columbia AVM Databank were analysed. Concurrent arterial aneurysms on brain angiography were classified as feeding artery aneurysms, intranidal aneurysms, and aneurysms unrelated to blood flow to the AVM. Clinical presentation (diagnostic event) was categorised as intracranial haemorrhage proved by imaging or non-haemorrhagic presentation. Univariate and multivariate statistical models were applied to test the effect of age, sex, AVM size, venous drainage pattern, and the three types of aneurysms on the risk of AVM haemorrhage at initial presentation. Results: Arterial aneurysms were found in 117 (25%) patients with AVM (54 had feeding artery aneurysms, 21 had intranidal aneurysms, 18 had unrelated aneurysms, and 24 had more than one aneurysm type). Intracranial haemorrhage was the presenting symptom in 204 (44%) patients with AVM. In the univariate model, the relative risk for haemorrhagic AVM presentation was 2.28 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12 to 4.64) for patients with intranidal aneurysms and 1.88 (95% CI 1.14 to 3.08) for those with feeding artery aneurysms. In the multivariate model an independent effect of feeding artery aneurysms (odds ratio 2.11, 95% CI 1.18 to 3.78) on haemorrhagic AVM presentation was found. No significant effect was seen for intranidal and unrelated aneurysms. The attributable risk of feeding artery aneurysms for incident haemorrhage in patients with AVM was 6% (95% CI 1% to 11%). Conclusions: The findings suggest that feeding artery aneurysms are an independent determinant for increased risk of incident AVM haemorrhage. PMID:12185161

  13. Giant splenic artery aneurysm associated with arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Aditya; Whitehouse, Richard; Johnson, Robert W; Augustine, Titus

    2006-12-01

    Giant splenic artery aneurysms are extremely rare entities that have important clinical implications. The size and the natural history pose unique challenges in the management of these lesions. We present one such case that was associated with a primary arteriovenous malformation in the splenic hilum. This is the third largest aneurysm reported in literature so far and the characteristic feature is that this is the first case of a hilar arteriovenous fistula complicated by formation of a giant aneurysm and another smaller aneurysm. In our opinion the hilar malformation was congenital in origin and responsible for the formation of the two aneurysms. We also present an up to date review of literature on this subject.

  14. Multiple unusual aneurysms and arteriovenous malformation in a single patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nehls, D G; Carter, L P

    1985-07-01

    A patient with multiple unusual aneurysms and an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is presented. Aneurysms involving the meningohypophyseal trunk and the feeding vessel of the AVM were observed. Two additional aneurysms assumed a pantaloon appearance. The largest aneurysm was responsible for the patient's subarachnoid hemorrhage. This aneurysm and two adjacent aneurysms were clipped successfully, and the patient made an uneventful recovery. Subsequent angiography revealed a stable appearance of the remaining aneurysms and AVM.

  15. Management of intracranial aneurysms associated with arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Flores, Bruno C; Klinger, Daniel R; Rickert, Kim L; Barnett, Samuel L; Welch, Babu G; White, Jonathan A; Batjer, H Hunt; Samson, Duke S

    2014-09-01

    Intracranial or brain arteriovenous malformations (BAVMs) are some of the most interesting and challenging lesions treated by the cerebrovascular neurosurgeon. It is generally believed that the combination of BAVMs and intracranial aneurysms (IAs) is associated with higher hemorrhage rates at presentation and higher rehemorrhage rates and thus with a more aggressive course and natural history. There is wide variation in the literature on the prevalence of BAVM-associated aneurysms (range 2.7%-58%), with 10%-20% being most often cited in the largest case series. The risk of intracranial hemorrhage in patients with unruptured BAVMs and coexisting IAs has been reported to be 7% annually, compared with 2%-4% annually for those with BAVM alone. Several different classification systems have been applied in an attempt to better understand the natural history of this combination of lesions and implications for treatment. Independent of the classification used, it is clear that a few subtypes of aneurysms have a direct hemodynamic correlation with the BAVM itself. This is exemplified by the fact that the presence of a distal flow-related or an intranidal aneurysm appears to be associated with an increased hemorrhage risk, when compared with an aneurysm located on a vessel with no direct supply to the BAVM nidus. Debate still exists regarding the etiology of the association between those two vascular lesions, the subsequent implications for patients' risk of hemorrhagic stroke, and finally the determination of which patients warrant treatment and when. The ultimate goals of the treatment of a BAVM associated with an IA are to prevent hemorrhage, avoid stepwise neurological deterioration, and eliminate the mortality risk associated with recurrent hemorrhagic events. The treatment is only justifiable if the risks associated with an intervention are lower than or equivalent to the long-term risks of disability or mortality caused by the lesion itself. When faced with this

  16. [Galen's oncology].

    PubMed

    Vigliani, R

    1995-10-01

    "Claudius Galenus" is the Author of "De tumoribus praeter naturam". The book was studied on the original Greek text with Latin version edited by K.G. Kühn ("Opera omnia Claudii Galeni": VII, 705-732). This Galen's clinical and pathological oncology was examined as far as categorization, classification, morphology, etiology, pathogenesis, morphogenesis, topography, behaviour (with related therapeutic and prognostic implications) and terminology are concerned. Problems, aspects and concepts, more or less clarified by Galen, were extensively discussed with special reference to the Galen's scientific knowledge and compared with the modern oncology.

  17. Ruptured Aneurysm of Intercostal Arteriovenous Malformation Associated With Neurofibromatosis Type 1: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Jun; Seon, Hyun Ju Choi, Song; Jang, Nam Kyu

    2011-02-15

    Intercostal arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are rare, with most being secondary to trauma or iatrogenic therapeutic procedures. Only one case of presumably congenital AVM has been reported. Here we report the first case of a ruptured aneurysm of intercostal AVM associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 in a 32-year-old woman who experienced hypovolemic shock caused by massive hemothorax.

  18. [A case of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage associated with cerebral arteriovenous malformation and aneurysm (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Nishizaka, T; Tanji, H; Higa, K; Furukawa, F

    1977-02-01

    A 45-year-old man suddenly developed right hemiparesis and aphasia during work and lost conciousness next day, when he was admitted to us. Lumbar puncture showed bloody C.S.F. with the initial pressure of 220 mm H2O. Physical examination revealed hypertension and arteriosclerosis. Cerebral angiogram revealed an arteriovenous malformation in the left frontoparietal-parasagittal region and a saccular aneurysm at the left internal carotid-posterior communicating artery junction. In addition, the existence of putaminal hematoma was suspected on account of the displacement of the left anterior cerebral artery and the left lenticulostriate arteries. On the fourth day after admission his consciousness returned and the right hemiparesis gradually improved. One month later the disappearance of the displacement of the anterior cerebral artery was demonstrated by cerebral angiogram. A frontoparietal craniotomy was done and no hematoma was found around the arteriovenous malformation and the basis of the aneurysm did not adhere to the temporal lobe. Taking these findings into consideration, it is presumed that the hematoma in putaminal region was due to neither arteriovenous malformation nor aneurysm but was a hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage.

  19. Congenital Spinal Malformation and Stroke: Aneurysmal Dilatations and Bilateral Rotational Vertebral Artery Occlusion.

    PubMed

    de la Riva, Patricia; Martínez-Zabaleta, Maria Teresa; Pardo, Edurne; Samprón, Nicolás; Mondragón-Rezola, Elisabet; Arruti González, Maialen; Larrea, Jose Ángel; Martí-Massó, José Félix

    2016-03-01

    A 30-year-old woman suffered from acute vertebrobasilar stroke. Cranial tomography (CT) scans showed multiple vertebral abnormalities suggestive of congenital spine malformation, and angiographic CT revealed aneurysmal dilatations (ADs) at segment V2 of both vertebral arteries (VAs). Dynamic neuroimaging tests including angiography and angio-CT were performed and showed occlusion of both VAs at the point of the ADs with contralateral rotation of the neck. The presence of a bony structure causing the artery compression was excluded and embolic phenomena originating at the AD was proposed as the likely source of stroke. Even if infrequent, the presence of craniocervical anomalies should be considered in vertebrobasilar stroke of indeterminate etiology.

  20. Onyx, a New Liquid Embolic Material for Peripheral Interventions: Preliminary Experience in Aneurysm, Pseudoaneurysm, and Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformation Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Vanninen, Ritva L. Manninen, I.

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. To describe our preliminary experience with a new liquid embolization agent, Onyx, in peripheral interventions. Methods and results. We successfully treated two peripheral aneurysms (one in an internal iliac artery, one in a thoracic collateral artery of an aortic coarctation), two peripheral pseudoaneurysms (one in a lumbar artery, one in a renal artery), and one pulmonary arteriovenous malformation. Conclusion. Onyx is a promising alternative embolic material for peripheral interventions. It can be combined with coils in selected cases, and balloon catheters can be effectively used during slow injection of embolic material to control flow and protect the aneurysm neck.

  1. Fatal rupture of a brain arteriovenous malformation flow-related aneurysm during microcatheter removal: a rare complication.

    PubMed

    Gabrieli, Joseph; Clarençon, Frédéric; Di Maria, Federico; Fahed, Robert; Boch, Anne-Laure; Degos, Vincent; Chiras, Jacques; Sourour, Nader-Antoine

    2015-04-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are relatively frequently encountered in patients with brain arteriovenous malformations (BAVMs). They may be located on the circle of Willis, on arterial feeders, or even inside the nidus. Because BAVM-associated aneurysms represent a risk factor of bleeding, the question of the timing and modality of their management remains a matter of debate in unruptured BAVMs. The authors present a case of fatal periprocedural rupture of a flow-related aneurysm (FRA) during the removal of the microcatheter after injection of a liquid embolic agent. A 40-year-old man was treated at the authors' institution for the management of a Spetzler-Martin Grade III left unruptured frontal BAVM, revealed by seizures and a focal neurological deficit attributed to flow steal phenomenon. After a multidisciplinary meeting, endovascular treatment was considered to reduce the flow of the BAVM. A proximal FRA located on the feeding internal carotid artery (ICA) was purposely left untreated because it did not meet the criteria of the authors' institution for preventative treatment (i.e., small size [2.5 mm]). During embolization, at the time of microcatheter retrieval, and after glue injection, the aneurysm unexpectedly ruptured. The aneurysm's rupture was attributed to the stress (torsion/flexion) on the ICA caused by the microcatheter removal. Despite the attempts to manage the bleeding, the patient eventually died of the acute increase of intracranial pressure related to the massive subarachnoid hemorrhage. This case highlights a previously unreported mechanism of FRA rupture during BAVM embolization: the stress transmitted to the parent artery during the removal of the microcatheter.

  2. John Galen Howard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Joan

    1979-01-01

    A biographical sketch of John Galen Howard, founder of the Department of Architecture at the University of California at Berkeley, is presented. Howard's conservative outlook and idealistic nature are examined and his influence on the curriculum at the university is traced. (PHR)

  3. Iodine-containing cellulose mixed esters as radiopaque polymers for direct embolization of cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Mottu, F; Rüfenacht, D A; Laurent, A; Doelker, E

    2002-01-01

    The present study deals with the synthesis and characterization of radiopaque polymers which could, when solubilized in an appropriate water-miscible solvent, be useful embolic materials for the treatment of cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations. For this purpose cellulose (both microcrystalline and powdered) and partially substituted cellulose acetate (two different viscosity grades) were selected as starting materials to prepare iodine-containing polymers through various synthetic routes. The materials obtained were characterized by IR and NMR spectroscopy, molecular weight, iodine content, radiopacity and solubility in selected injectable organic solvents. The embolic liquids were evaluated for their precipitation behavior in a phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4) mimicking physiological conditions using an in vitro aneurysm model. A sheep model was also used to assess in vivo the radiopacity and precipitation properties of a highly concentrated solution of a cellulose acetate 2,3,4-triiodobenzoate mixed ester. All materials with 4-iodo- and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoyl groups gave sufficient radiopacity to be regarded as possible embolization materials, whereas iododeoxycellulose and iododeoxycellulose acetate were not radiopaque because of their low iodine content. Esters synthesized using cellulose as starting material were not soluble in the selected organic solvents due to the presence of many residual hydroxyl groups, but could be used for other biomedical applications where insoluble radiopaque materials are used. In contrast, solubility of the materials as well as satisfactory precipitation properties were ensured using cellulose acetate as the starting material. In conclusion, cellulose acetate iodobenzoate mixed esters dissolved in diglyme or dimethyl isosorbide (dimethyl sulfoxide is probably less appropriate because of its toxicity and hemolytic properties) could be useful embolic liquids for the treatment of cerebral aneurysms or arteriovenous

  4. Hippocrates as Galen's teacher.

    PubMed

    Jouanna, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Starting from the frescoes of the cathedral of Anagni which present an obvious relationship between Hippocrates as Galen's teacher and the medieval image of man's place in the universe dominated by the number four, this paper returns to the origins of this quaternary theory in Hippocratic medicine with the four humors (Nature of Man), then follows its evolution in Galen and finally into late Greek and Byzantine medicine where the quaternary division will have an unprecedented extension, with the four temperaments. In particular, a new piece of evidence from this late period attributed to Hippocrates (the small treatise of Greek Medicine The Pulse and the Human Temperament) appears as the veritable source of the Latin Letter attributed to Vindicianus. Therefore, contrary to what was believed until now, the doctrine of the four temperaments was not elaborated first in a Latin form. Throughout its history, the quaternary theory will remain connected to Hippocrates, but the image and teaching of the Father of Medicine will change as the theory evolves. A second rediscovered treatise of the late period (The Formation of Man) starts with this phrase: 'Words of Hippocrates to Galen his own pupil'. This seems a felicitous commentary to the medical scene in the cathedral of Anagni.

  5. Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Fistulas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Arteriovenous Malformations/Fistulas Embolization of brain ... Brain Aneurysms and Fistulas? What is Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Fistulas? Embolization of brain aneurysms and ...

  6. Galen and astrology: a Mésalliance?

    PubMed

    Cooper, Glen M

    2011-01-01

    The author examines the question of Galen's affinity with astrology, in view of Galen's extended astrological discussion in the De diebus decretoriis (Critical Days). The critical passages from Galen are examined, and shown to be superficial in understanding. The author performs a lexical sounding of Galen's corpus, using key terms with astrological valences drawn from the Critical Days, and assesses their absence in Galen's other works. He compares Galen's astrology with the astrology of Ptolemy's Tetrabiblos, and evaluates their respective strategies of scientific reasoning. Three types of inference are introduced and applied to Galen's astrology. Finally, he concludes that the empirical side of Galen's science does not depend upon astrological methods or concepts, but that these were introduced for their rhetorical effect in presenting his new medical methodology. It is suggested that continued attention to Galen's astrology has obscured the truly important empirical scientific method that Galen developed.

  7. Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arterial aneurysms. In: Cronenwett JL, Johnston KW, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ... general considerations. In: Cronenwett JL, Johnston KW, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  8. Sex-dichotomous effects of NOS1AP promoter DNA methylation on intracranial aneurysm and brain arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhepei; Zhao, Jikuang; Sun, Jie; Nie, Sheng; Li, Keqing; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Tiefeng; Duan, Shiwei; Di, Yazhen; Huang, Yi; Gao, Xiang

    2016-05-16

    The goal of this study was to investigate the contribution of NOS1AP-promoter DNA methylation to the risk of intracranial aneurysm (IA) and brain arteriovenous malformation (BAVM) in a Han Chinese population. A total of 48 patients with IAs, 22 patients with BAVMs, and 26 control individuals were enrolled in the study. DNA methylation was tested using bisulfite pyrosequencing technology. We detected significantly higher DNA methylation levels in BAVM patients than in IA patients based on the multiple testing correction (CpG4-5 methylation: 5.86±1.04% vs. 4.37±2.64%, P=0.006). In women, CpG4-5 methylation levels were much lower in IA patients (3.64±1.97%) than in BAVM patients (6.11±1.20%, P<0.0001). However, in men, CpG1-3 methylation levels were much higher in the controls (6.92±0.78%) than in BAVM patients (5.99±0.70%, P=0.008). Additionally, there was a gender-based difference in CpG1 methylation within the controls (men vs. women: 5.75±0.50% vs. 4.99±0.53%, P=0.003) and BAVM patients (men vs. women: 4.70±0.74% vs. 5.50±0.87%, P=0.026). A subgroup analysis revealed significantly higher CpG3 methylation in patients who smoked than in those who did not (P=0.041). Our results suggested that gender modulated the interaction between NOS1AP promoter DNA methylation in IA and BAVM patients. Our results also confirmed that regular tobacco smoking was associated with increased NOS1AP methylation in humans. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are required to replicate and extend these findings.

  9. Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Aneurysms Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  10. Craniospinal Polyostotic Fibrous Dysplasia, Aneurysmal Bone Cysts, and Chiari Type 1 Malformation Coexistence in a Patient with McCune-Albright Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Urgun, Kamran; Yılmaz, Baran; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Akakın, Akın; Konya, Deniz; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Kılıç, Türker

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are defined as benign cystic lesions of bone composed of blood-filled spaces. ABCs may be a secondary pathology superimposed on fibrous dysplasia (FD). Concomitant FD and ABC in relation with McCune-Albright syndrome is an extremely rare condition. Here, we report concomitant, double ABCs in bilateral occipital regions and FD from the skull base to the C2 vertebra with Chiari type 1 malformation. A 14-year-old female with a diagnosis of McCune-Albright syndrome presented with swellings at the back of her head. The lesions were consistent with ABCs and were totally resected with reconstruction of the calvarial defects. The coexistence of FD, bilateral occipital ABCs, and Chiari malformation type 1 in a McCune-Albright patient is an extremely rare condition and, to our knowledge, has not been reported to date. Exact diagnosis and appropriate surgical treatment usually lead to a good outcome.

  11. [Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of cerebro-vascular malformations by CT (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schumacher, M; Stoeter, P; Voigt, K

    1980-03-01

    In 38 patients, the diagnosis of a cerebrovascular malformation (17 arteriovenous agniomas including one low-flow- and two venous angiomas; 10 aneurysms; 4 arteriovenous fistulae of the cavernous sinus, the tentorium and one of the Great Vein of Galen; 6 megadolical basilar arteries) was initially made by computertomographic (CT) examination, including contrast enhancement. The characteristic and pathognomonic CT findings are described and compared with those of cerebral angiography also done in these cases. The problems of differential diagnosis and the reasons for a false CT diagnosis in 5 other patients with a cerebro-vascular malformation are investigated; and the diagnostic value of cerebral angiography and CT is discussed and their complementary functions are being pointed out.

  12. The “focus on aneurysm” principle: Classification and surgical principles of management of concurrent arterial aneurysm with arteriovenous malformation causing intracranial hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Vikas; Behari, Sanjay; Jaiswal, Awadhesh K.; Bhaisora, Kamlesh Singh; Shende, Yogesh P.; Phadke, Rajendra V.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Concurrent arterial aneurysms (AAs) occurring in 2.7-16.7% patients harboring an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) aggravate the risk of intracranial hemorrhage. Aim: We evaluate the variations of aneurysms simultaneously coexisting with AVMs. A classification-based management strategy and an abbreviated nomenclature that describes their radiological features is also proposed. Setting: Tertiary care academic institute. Statistics: Test of significance applied to determine the factors causing rebleeding in the groups of patients with concurrent AVM and aneurysm and those with only AVMs. Subjects and Methods: Sixteen patients (5 with subarachnoid hemorrhage and 11 with intracerebral/intraventricular hemorrhage; 10 with low flow [LF] and 6 with high flow [HF] AVMs) underwent radiological assessment of Spetzler Martin (SM) grading and flow status of AA + AVM. Their modified Rankin's score (mRS) at admission was compared with their follow-up (F/U) score. Results: Pre-operative mRS was 0 in 5, 2 in 6, 3 in 1, 4 in 3 and 5 in 1; and, SM grade I in 5, II in 3, III in 3, IV in 4 and V in 1 patients, respectively. AA associated AVMs were classified as: (I) Flow-related proximal (n = 2); (II) flow-related distal (n = 3); (III) intranidal (n = 5); (IV) extra-intranidal (n = 2); (V) remote major ipsilateral (n = 1); (VI) remote major contralateral (n = 1); (VII) deep perforator related (n = 1); (VIII) superficial (n = 1); and (IX) distal (n = 0). Their treatment strategy included: Flow related AA, SM I-III LF AVM: aneurysm clipping with AVM excision; nidal-extranidal AA, SM I-III LF AVM: Excision or embolization of both AA + AVM; nidal-extranidal and perforator-related AA, SM IV-V HF AVM: Only endovascular embolization or radiosurgery. Surgical decision-making for remote AA took into account their ipsilateral/contralateral filling status and vessel dominance; and, for AA associated with SM III HF AVM, it varied in each patient based on diffuseness of AVM nidus, flow

  13. Pediatric neuroanesthesia. Arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Newfield, P; Hamid, R K

    2001-06-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous malformations can occur singly, multiply, and in conjunction with aneurysms and denovo, family, or in conjunction with connective-tissue disorders. Intracranial hemorrhage is the most common presentation, occurring in 20% to 50% of cases. In children, seizures are the second most common presentation occurring in 15% to 20% of cases. The modalities available treatment of arteriovenous malformations are microsurgery, embolization, and stereotactic radiosurgery with heavy particles, alpha knife, or linear accelerator. Induction, maintenance, and emergence from anesthesia are designed to prevent rupture of arteriovenous malformation and aneurysm and to improve intracranial compliance in the presence of an intracranial hematoma, during both diagnostic (CT, MR scanning) and therapeutic procedures.

  14. Galen: Developer of the Reversal Design?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about Galen, a Greek physician who is known to psychologists largely for his personality theory of the four temperaments, and his method of diagnosing the basis of one of his patients' symptoms using a form of single-subject reversal design long before its formal description. Galen's method to diagnose the cause…

  15. Galen: developer of the reversal design?

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert T

    2007-01-01

    Galen, known to psychologists largely for his personality theory of the four temperaments, diagnosed the cause of a patient's symptoms with a form of reversal design long before its formal description (e.g., Sidman, 1960).

  16. [Galen and the refounding of medicine].

    PubMed

    Vegetti, M

    1995-01-01

    The writings of Galen discussed in this article present an outline of the project he devoted his life to. Firstly, the reconstruction of a higher model of medical knowledge, in terms of its epistemological legitimization and its cultural and social role. Galen's refoundation of the epistemological statute of medicine involved increased emphasis on axiomatization, albeit not without disregard to data obtained through experience as a final guarantee. Secondly, the construction of a lay morality, independent of the ties to power or religious constraints. Through anatomy and physiology, Galen was attempting to comprehend the providential notion that governed nature: a powerful ideology set against the uncertainty of philosophers and the propagation of irrationalist religions. From this extreme position, the galenic physician demanded that medicine be not only a general task of ideological and cultural orientation, but also a source of real, particular power over the control of moral behavior and social deviation.

  17. GALENICALS IN THE TREATMENT OF CRUSTED SCABIES

    PubMed Central

    Sugathan, P; Martin, Abhay Mani

    2010-01-01

    Crusted scabies is rare. It is a therapeutic challenge, as the common drugs used against scabies are unsatisfactory. The successful use of galenicals in a 10-year-old girl with crusted scabies is reported. PMID:20606896

  18. Galen: Developer of the Reversal Design?

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robert T

    2007-01-01

    Galen, known to psychologists largely for his personality theory of the four temperaments, diagnosed the cause of a patient's symptoms with a form of reversal design long before its formal description (e.g., Sidman, 1960). PMID:22478486

  19. Galen and the beginnings of Western physiology.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2014-07-15

    Galen (129-c. 216 AD) was a key figure in the early development of Western physiology. His teachings incorporated much of the ancient Greek traditions including the work of Hippocrates and Aristotle. Galen himself was a well-educated Greco-Roman physician and physiologist who at one time was a physician to the gladiators in Pergamon. Later he moved to Rome, where he was associated with the Roman emperors Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus. The Galenical school was responsible for voluminous writings, many of which are still extant. One emphasis was on the humors of the body, which were believed to be important in disease. Another was the cardiopulmonary system, including the belief that part of the blood from the right ventricle could enter the left through the interventricular septum. An extraordinary feature of these teachings is that they dominated thinking for some 1,300 years and became accepted as dogma by both the State and Church. One of the first anatomists to challenge the Galenical teachings was Andreas Vesalius, who produced a magnificent atlas of human anatomy in 1543. At about the same time Michael Servetus described the pulmonary transit of blood, but he was burned at the stake for heresy. Finally, with William Harvey and others in the first part of the 17th century, the beginnings of modern physiology emerged with an emphasis on hypotheses and experimental data. Nevertheless, vestiges of Galen's teaching survived into the 19th century.

  20. Galen, satire and the compulsion to instruct.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Ralph M

    2010-01-01

    This chapter explores Galen's attitude toward instruction and teaching, and in particular the ways in which he conceptualized and articulated the didactic function of his writings. Galen's own rhetoric about why he wrote was often strident - his disparagement of contemporaries is famous, and his fondness for polemic is often regarded as a function of an eristic and arrogant personality. I suggest, however, that Galen's self-avowed role as a kind of public censor may derive as much from an amalgamation of rhetorical postures found in various literary and philosophical genres as it does from an inherently intemperate character. By examining various passages in Galen's protreptic and psychological works, I argue that his frequent stances of vituperative indignation and self-righteousness often resemble those found in satirical writings, from Cynic diatribe through Greek and Roman satirical poetry. Galen no doubt felt himself to be working in a serious tradition of Platonic and Stoic moralizing, but his particular form of didacticism was informed by various strategies assimilated from Greco-Roman serio-comic traditions.

  1. GALEN's model of parts and wholes: experience and comparisons.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, J.; Rector, A.

    2000-01-01

    Part-whole relations play a critical role in the OpenGALEN Common Reference Model. We describe how particular characteristics of the underlying formalism have influenced GALEN's view on partonomy, and in more detail discuss how specific modelling issues have driven development of an extended set of partitive semantic links. PMID:11079977

  2. The fatal embrace: Galen and the history of ancient medicine.

    PubMed

    Nutton, Vivian

    2005-03-01

    The influence of Galen on the subsequent interpretation of the history of ancient medicine has been substantial. This paper explores the consequences of adopting a non-Galenic perspective in two different areas of research. It argues that Galen's own career, and his own views of the ideal physician, cannot be taken as typical of most ancient medical practitioners; and that the theory of the four humors, blood, bile, black bile, and phlegm, did not become a universal standard until after Galen. That theory was merely one of several variations on the theme of body fluids, and entered Greek medicine relatively late. Hippocratic contemporaries of Galen accepted it alongside other theories from the Corpus, e.g. Diseases I, that modern scholars have viewed as incompatible.

  3. Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment prevents repeat aneurysm rupture by placing a metal clip at the base of the aneurysm. Individuals ... the aneurysm, where it is used to insert metal coils that induce clot formation within the aneurysm. × ...

  4. Dialectic and science: Galen, Herophilus and Aristotle on phenomena.

    PubMed

    Tieleman, T

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines the nature of Galen's argument in the De placitis Hippocratis et Platonis, books 2-3, concerned with the location of the psychic functions within the body. To this question Galen applies a coherent set of methodological principles, integrating Aristotelian dialectic and scientific demonstration based on anatomical experiments. Galen disagrees with Aristotle in that he relegates the endoxa from the realm of dialectic to that of rhetoric. His attitude is marked by a distinctive emphasis on perceptible phenomena as the starting point for scientific inquiry. This and other features can be traced back to the Hellenistic scientist Herophilus.

  5. [N. Leonicenus interpretes of Galen on causa coniuncta].

    PubMed

    Mugnai, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    The philosopher and physician Nicolò Leoniceno, one of the most important members of the Medical Humanism, in the N. Leoniceni in libros Galeni e Graeca in linguam Latinam a se translatos Praefatio communis (1508) discusses his emendation to Galens's Ars Medicinalis (28, 4 Boudon = I 381 Kühn, [see text]). In spite of the debatable conjecture, it is a significant effort to solve a serious contradiction in Galen's text. Leoniceno rejects the solutions proposed by the Arabic and Medieval Latin commentators and offers the right interpretation of causa coniuncta in Galen's concept of disease.

  6. Measurement of blood flow in arteriovenous malformations before and after embolization using arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Suazo, L; Foerster, B; Fermin, R; Speckter, H; Vilchez, C; Oviedo, J; Stoeter, P

    2012-03-01

    The assessment of shunt reduction after an embolization of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) or fistula (AVF) from conventional angiography is often difficult and may be subjective. Here we present a completely non-invasive method using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure shunt reduction. Using pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL), we determined the relative amount of signal attributed to the shunt over 1.75 s and 6 different slices covering the lesion. This amount of signal from the shunt was related to the total signal from all slices and measured before and after embolization. The method showed a fair agreement between the PASL results and the judgement from conventional angiography. In the case of a total or subtotal shunt occlusion, PASL showed a shunt reduction between 69% and 92%, whereas in minimal shunt reduction as judged by conventional angiography, the ASL result was -6% (indicating slightly increased flow) to 35% in a partially occluded vein of Galen aneurysm. The PASL method proved to be fairly reproducible (up to 2% deviation between three measurements without interventions). On conclusion, PASL is able to reliably measure the amount of shunt reduction achieved by embolization of AVMs and AVFs.

  7. Measurement of Blood Flow in Arteriovenous Malformations before and after Embolization Using Arterial Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Suazo, L.; Foerster, B.; Fermin, R.; Speckter, H.; Vilchez, C.; Oviedo, J.; Stoeter, P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The assessment of shunt reduction after an embolization of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) or fistula (AVF) from conventional angiography is often difficult and may be subjective. Here we present a completely non-invasive method using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure shunt reduction. Using pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL), we determined the relative amount of signal attributed to the shunt over 1.75 s and 6 different slices covering the lesion. This amount of signal from the shunt was related to the total signal from all slices and measured before and after embolization. The method showed a fair agreement between the PASL results and the judgement from conventional angiography. In the case of a total or subtotal shunt occlusion, PASL showed a shunt reduction between 69% and 92%, whereas in minimal shunt reduction as judged by conventional angiography, the ASL result was –6% (indicating slightly increased flow) to 35% in a partially occluded vein of Galen aneurysm. The PASL method proved to be fairly reproducible (up to 2% deviation between three measurements without interventions). On conclusion, PASL is able to reliably measure the amount of shunt reduction achieved by embolization of AVMs and AVFs PMID:22440600

  8. Life without the vein of Galen: Clinical and radiographic sequelae.

    PubMed

    Youssef, A Samy; Downes, Angela E; Agazzi, Siviero; Van Loveren, Harry R

    2011-09-01

    A thorough understanding of the anatomy of the pineal region, particularly venous drainage, is critical for gaining open surgical access to the pineal gland. The adverse sequelae after intraoperative venous occlusion are assumed to be catastrophic but have been scarcely reported. We report a case of pineocytoma in which the vein of Galen was ligated without postoperative adverse sequelae. Pineal region anatomy with emphasis on deep veins was reviewed in large anatomical studies. There are tremendous anatomical variations in the vein of Galen and its tributaries. Several confounding factors can be encountered during surgery and may lead to accidental sacrifice of the vein of Galen. Survival after focal occlusion of a major deep vein depends on the development of collateral circulation as shown in our case report. Venous drainage remains the cornerstone in the surgical planning of the pineal region. Anatomical variations and venous collaterals undoubtedly contributed to the mixed reports of adverse sequelae after venous sacrifice. Vein of Galen ligation may be survivable but consequences cannot be predicted without a thorough pre-ligation assessment of regional venous collateral drainage. Thorough understanding of the venous anatomy, meticulous planning of the surgical approach and avoidance of the occlusion of the vein of Galen and its major tributaries are key factors to successful pineal region surgery.

  9. Analysis of saccular aneurysms in the Barrow Ruptured Aneurysm Trial.

    PubMed

    Spetzler, Robert F; Zabramski, Joseph M; McDougall, Cameron G; Albuquerque, Felipe C; Hills, Nancy K; Wallace, Robert C; Nakaji, Peter

    2017-02-24

    OBJECTIVE The Barrow Ruptured Aneurysm Trial (BRAT) is a prospective, randomized trial in which treatment with clipping was compared to treatment with coil embolization. Patients were randomized to treatment on presentation with any nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Because all other randomized trials comparing these 2 types of treatments have been limited to saccular aneurysms, the authors analyzed the current BRAT data for this subgroup of lesions. METHODS The primary BRAT analysis included all sources of SAH: nonaneurysmal lesions; saccular, blister, fusiform, and dissecting aneurysms; and SAHs from an aneurysm associated with either an arteriovenous malformation or a fistula. In this post hoc review, the outcomes for the subgroup of patients with saccular aneurysms were further analyzed by type of treatment. The extent of aneurysm obliteration was adjudicated by an independent neuroradiologist not involved in treatment. RESULTS Of the 471 patients enrolled in the BRAT, 362 (77%) had an SAH from a saccular aneurysm. Patients with saccular aneurysms were assigned equally to the clipping and the coiling cohorts (181 each). In each cohort, 3 patients died before treatment and 178 were treated. Of the 178 clip-assigned patients with saccular aneurysms, 1 (1%) was crossed over to coiling, and 64 (36%) of the 178 coil-assigned patients were crossed over to clipping. There was no statistically significant difference in poor outcome (modified Rankin Scale score > 2) between these 2 treatment arms at any recorded time point during 6 years of follow-up. After the initial hospitalization, 1 of 241 (0.4%) clipped saccular aneurysms and 21 of 115 (18%) coiled saccular aneurysms required retreatment (p < 0.001). At the 6-year follow-up, 95% (95/100) of the clipped aneurysms were completely obliterated, compared with 40% (16/40) of the coiled aneurysms (p < 0.001). There was no difference in morbidity between the 2 treatment groups (p = 0.10). CONCLUSIONS In the

  10. Reflections on Religious Belief and Prosociality: Comment on Galen (2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Luke Galen (2012) offers a timely analysis of associations between religiosity and prosocial and antisocial attitudes and behaviors. After identifying 10 points of agreement, I raise 8 questions for further reflection and research: (1) Is ingroup giving and volunteerism not prosocial? (2) Are religion-related prosocial norms part of the religious…

  11. Is Religion Not Prosocial at All? Comment on Galen (2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saroglou, Vassilis

    2012-01-01

    Galen (2012), critically reviewing recent research on religion and prosociality, concludes that the religious prosociality hypothesis is a (congruence) fallacy. The observed effects are not real: They only reflect stereotypes and ingroup favoritism, are due to secular psychological effects, are inconsistent, and confound (e.g., by ignoring…

  12. Aneurysm in the brain

    MedlinePlus

    Aneurysm - cerebral; Cerebral aneurysm; Aneurysm - intracranial ... July 19, 2016. Szeder V, Tateshima S, Duckwiler GR. Intracranial aneurysms and subarachnoid hemorrhage. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, ...

  13. Congenital internal jugular vein aneurysm in an infant: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Awasthy, Neeraj; Khandelwal, Nidhi; Iyer, Krishna S

    2016-05-01

    A 1-month old baby boy presented with a mass at the root of the neck. On investigation, a saccular aneurysm arising from the internal jugular vein was diagnosed. The aneurysm was excised after ligating the patent internal jugular vein above and below the origin of the aneurysm. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of a vascular malformation. Vascular malformation of the internal jugular vein, presenting as neck mass, is extremely rare with no case described in neonates. We present one such interesting case.

  14. Brain Malformations

    MedlinePlus

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  15. Brain Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests don't provide enough information. Screening for brain aneurysms The use of imaging tests to screen ... and occupational therapy to relearn skills. Treating unruptured brain aneurysms Surgical clipping or endovascular coiling can be ...

  16. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the abdomen Most aneurysms are found during ...

  17. Brain Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  18. Glomuvenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Henning, J Scott; Kovich, Olympia I; Schaffer, Julie V

    2007-01-27

    A 9-year-old girl presented with a congenital, blue-purple, partially compressible plaque with a cobblestone surface on the left lateral foot and ankle. Similar, solitary, blue nodules later appeared elsewhere on the extremities. The lesions were tender to palpation and were associated with spontaneous paroxysms of pain and paresthesias. Histopathologic evaluation of a skin biopsy specimen showed rows of glomus cells that surrounded thin-walled vascular channels, which confirmed the diagnosis of glomuvenous malformations. This autosomal dominant condition, which is due to mutations in the GLMN gene, presents with clinical findings that are distinct from those of familial, multiple, cutaneous and mucosal venous malformations. Treatment options include excision, sclerotherapy, and laser therapy (ablative or pulsed dye).

  19. [The Galenic content of Isaac Beeckman's medical ideas (1617-1629)].

    PubMed

    Moreau, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    The Journal tenu par Isaac Beeckman de 1604 à 1634 has been studied in the history of the seventeenth-century scientific revolution following the theme of Isaac Beeckman's physical mathematical mechanistic view, his proto-molecular theory and his atomistic Lucretian influence. This article goes deeper into the medical ideas of the Journal: how Isaac Beeckman (1588-1637) settles the structure of living matter according to his intensive reading of Galen. It develops a different analysis from the traditionally triumphalist approach in the history of science, focused on the victory of Cartesian mechanism, particularly in the history of medicine taking up Galenism very briefly because of its obsolete physiology. The Galenic corpus inside Isaac Beeckman's Journal consists of the many commentaries of Galen which Beeckman has put down in writing since 1616 until 1627, after when the passages linked to Galen became fewer. Isaac Beeckman's study of Galenic medicine is analyzed according to three approaches: the teleological dimension of Galenism showing up the organic conception of human body corresponding to the divine Providence and consistent with Beeckman's Calvinist belief, the physiologic angle of Galenism, based on natural faculties, stressing the purely speculative aspect of Beeckman's commentaries, while the pathologic and therapeutic angle supports the Hippocratic humourism influence.

  20. And to end on a poetic note: Galen's authorial strategies in the pharmacological books.

    PubMed

    Totelin, Laurence M V

    2012-06-01

    This paper examines the authorial strategies deployed by Galen in his two main pharmacological treatises devoted to compound remedies: Composition of Medicines according to Types and Composition of Medicines according to Places. Some of Galen's methods of self assertion (use of the first person; writing of prefaces) are conventional. Others have not received much attention from scholars. Thus, here, I examine Galen's borrowing of his sources' 'I'; his use of the phrase 'in these words'; and his recourse to Damocrates' verse to conclude pharmacological books. I argue that Galen's authorial persona is very different from that of the modern author as defined by Roland Barthes. Galen imitates and impersonates his pharmacological sources. This re-enactment becomes a way to gain experience (peira) of remedies and guarantees their efficacy.

  1. Single-session, transarterial complete embolization of Galenic dural AV fistula.

    PubMed

    Laviv, Yosef; Kasper, Ekkehard; Perlow, Eliyahu

    2016-02-01

    Galenic dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) represents a unique, hard to treat subgroup of tentorial DAVFs. We present an unusual case of hemorrhagic Galenic DAVF in a 54-year-old woman. The fistula drained directly to the vein of Galen through multiple feeders. Complete occlusion of the fistula was achieved through transarterial embolization. Deep venous drainage remained intact and the patient recovered well. To our knowledge, this is the first report on complete closure of hemorrhagic Galenic DAVF using transarterial embolization with complete obliteration of vein of Galen. The presence of nonfunctioning straight sinus may have contributed to the success of treatment and it may be considered as a predictive marker for endovascular embolization.

  2. Brain aneurysm repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  3. Design and biocompatibility of endovascular aneurysm filling devices.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N; Hwang, Wonjun; Horn, John; Landsman, Todd L; Boyle, Anthony; Wierzbicki, Mark A; Hasan, Sayyeda M; Follmer, Douglas; Bryant, Jesse; Small, Ward; Maitland, Duncan J

    2015-04-01

    The rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, which can result in severe mental disabilities or death, affects approximately 30,000 people in the United States annually. The traditional surgical method of treating these arterial malformations involves a full craniotomy procedure, wherein a clip is placed around the aneurysm neck. In recent decades, research and device development have focused on new endovascular treatment methods to occlude the aneurysm void space. These methods, some of which are currently in clinical use, utilize metal, polymeric, or hybrid devices delivered via catheter to the aneurysm site. In this review, we present several such devices, including those that have been approved for clinical use, and some that are currently in development. We present several design requirements for a successful aneurysm filling device and discuss the success or failure of current and past technologies. We also present novel polymeric-based aneurysm filling methods that are currently being tested in animal models that could result in superior healing.

  4. Design and biocompatibility of endovascular aneurysm filling devices

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N.; Hwang, Wonjun; Horn, John; Landsman, Todd L.; Boyle, Anthony; Wierzbicki, Mark A.; Hasan, Sayyeda M.; Follmer, Douglas; Bryant, Jesse; Small, Ward; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2014-01-01

    The rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, which can result in severe mental disabilities or death, affects approximately 30,000 people in the United States annually. The traditional surgical method of treating these arterial malformations involves a full craniotomy procedure, wherein a clip is placed around the aneurysm neck. In recent decades, research and device development have focused on new endovascular treatment methods to occlude the aneurysm void space. These methods, some of which are currently in clinical use, utilize metal, polymeric, or hybrid devices delivered via catheter to the aneurysm site. In this review, we present several such devices, including those that have been approved for clinical use, and some that are currently in development. We present several design requirements for a successful aneurysm filling device and discuss the success or failure of current and past technologies. We also present novel polymeric based aneurysm filling methods that are currently being tested in animal models that could result in superior healing. PMID:25044644

  5. The breast: from Ancient Greek myths to Hippocrates and Galen.

    PubMed

    Iavazzo, C R; Trompoukis, C; Siempos, I I; Falagas, M E

    2009-01-01

    This is a historical article about Ancient Greek literature from mythological times until the first centuries AD with regard to the female breast. We endeavoured to collect several elegant narratives on the topic as well as to explore the knowledge of Ancient Greek doctors on the role, physiology and pathology of breast and the treatment of its diseases. We identified such descriptions in myths regarding Amazons, Hercules, Zeus, Hera and Amaltheia. Furthermore, descriptions on the topic were also found in the work of Hippocrates, Aristoteles, Soranos, Alexander of Aphrodisias, Celsus, Archigenis, Leonides, Galen and Oribasius. We may conclude that some of today's medical knowledge or practice regarding the breast was also known in the historical period.

  6. Hippocrates in the pseudo-Galenic Introduction: or how was medicine taught in Roman times?

    PubMed

    Petit, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    The Pseudo-Galenic Introduction (Introductio Sive medicus, 14.674-797 K.), a medical handbook of the Roman period, witnesses the importance of Hippocrates in medical teaching at the time. Numerous quotations, allusions and reminiscences from the Hippocratic Corpus illustrate Hippocrates' authority for Pseudo-Galen. In the light of the first critical edition of the text (C. Petit, Les Belles Lettres, Paris, 2009), this article discusses the function of Hippocrates, and the various reminiscences of the Hippocratic Corpus, in order to assess Pseudo-Galen's quotation technique and, ultimately, his reliability as a source for the history of medicine.

  7. [Congenital anomalies of cerebral artery and intracranial aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, K; Ito, Z; Hen, R; Uemura, K; Matsuoka, S

    1976-02-01

    It is well known that congenital anomalies such as polycystic kidney, aortic coarctation, Marfan syndrome, Ehler-Danlos syndrome are apt to be complicated by intracranial aneurysms. In this report we attempt to reveal the relation and incidence between cerebrovascular anomalies and intracranial aneurysms. The etiology of aneurysms has been discussed, too. 12 cases of persistent trigeminl artery, 2 cases of persistent hypoglossal artery and 11 cases of fenestration were obtained from 3841 patients who were angiographically examined in our clinic for 5 years. The incidence is 0.31%, 0.05% and 0.29%, respectively. Persistent trigeminal arteries were complicated by 2 cases of intracranial aneurysms and one case of arterivenous malformations (AVM), persistent hypoglossal arteries were complicated by one case of aneurysm, and fenestrations were complicated by 2 cases of aneurysms and one case of AVM. One case of congenital agenesis of right internal carotid artery was obtained which was complicated by aneurysm of anterior communicating artery. Totally, 8 cases of aneurysms and AVM were obtained from 26 cases of cerebrovascular anomalies (incidence 30.8%). On the other hand, thalamic or caudate hemorrhage revealed the highest incidence of complication of intracranial aneurysms among intracerebral hematomas (10.7%). Compared with the incidence of aneurysms between cerebro vascular anomalies (30.8%) and thalamic or caudate hemorrhage (10.7%), the difference is statistically signigicant (P less than 0.05). The cause of intracranial aneurysm has not yet been clarified. But it is well accepted that the defect of tunica media vasorum is most responsible factor as to the occurrence of intracranial aneurysms. We concluded that the genetic error of cerebral vessels including defect of media caused intracranial aneurysms, and this result was supported from the evidence that cerebrovascular anomalies showed statistically high incidence of complication of intracranial aneurysms.

  8. [Galen's "On bones for beginners" translation from the Greek text and discussion].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Tatsuo; Ikeda, Reitaro; Sawai, Tadashi

    2007-09-01

    Galen's article "On bones for beginners" was translated literally from the Greek text (Kühn's edition, vol. 2, pp. 732-778) into Japanese, applying the knowledge of modern anatomy. The previous Latin and English translations were utilized as references for the present translation. The present study has revealed that many of the current basic vocabularies for the bones and junctions were established already in Galen's treatises, but have changed their meanings and usages considerably. It has become also apparent that, for the skull, Galen did not observe individual bones but distinguished them by precise observations on the sutures of the skull in monkeys. The precise understanding of Galenic anatomy provides essential information to understand the origin of current anatomy.

  9. Intracranial arterial and arteriovenous malformations presenting with infarction. Lausanne Stroke Registry study.

    PubMed

    Herzig, R; Bogousslavsky, J; Maeder, P; Maeder-Ingvar, M; Reichhart, M; Urbano, L A; Leemann, B

    2005-02-01

    Cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are well-known sources of intracranial hemorrhage, but can also manifest as other clinical symptoms or remain clinically asymptomatic. The aim was to document and analyze cases of aneurysm or AVM with brain infarction. Survey on 4804 stroke patients treated at the Department of Neurology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland between 1978 and 2000 using the Lausanne Stroke Registry. Twenty patients presented with cerebral aneurysm and 21 with cerebral AVM. Hemorrhage was present in 100% of the AVM and in 75% of the aneurysm patients; in one (5%) of the remaining aneurysm patients, aneurysm and infarction were located in different territories. Infarction associated with Sylvian artery aneurysm was found in three (15%), vertebrobasilar ischemia because of fusiform left vertebral artery aneurysm in one (5%), and dural fistula draining to the distal transversal and left sigmoid sinus associated with a stroke in the territory of the left anterior inferior cerebellar artery in one patient. Ischemic stroke is infrequent, but important, complication in unruptured intracranial aneurysms and AVMs. The early recognition and therapy of these vascular malformations in selected patients can avoid a major neurological deficit or death caused by their rupture.

  10. The soul and the pneuma in the function of the nervous system after Galen.

    PubMed Central

    Quin, C E

    1994-01-01

    Galen's teaching on anatomy and physiology was generally accepted in the Middle Ages and this applies to the part he thought was played by the pneuma in the functions of the body. In this essay I have outlined the advances made after Galen in the study of the nervous system leading eventually to a time when the soul and the pneuma were no longer thought necessary for the proper functioning of the brain and nerves. PMID:8046725

  11. [Intracranial arteriovenous malformations in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Lin, L S; Shih, C J

    1993-12-01

    This paper analyzes the available literature on intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVM) in Taiwan. The incidence and symptoms of the disease are studied with a view to assisting practitioners in its recognition. The incidence of intracranial AVM in patients who have suffered hemorrhagic stroke in Taiwan is 2.5% to 4.8%, with the male to female ratio being 1.5:1. The peak age at which bleeding from intracranial AVM occurred ranged from 10 to 40 years; bleeding showed no seasonal variation. Sudden headaches, vomiting, and disturbance of consciousness were the commonest presenting symptoms of AVM, similar to the rupture of intracranial aneurysms. However, the possibility of focal neurological deficit among patients with intracranial AVM was higher than in patients with intracranial aneurysms. Risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, heart disease, smoking and alcohol intake showed no close relationship to bleeding in intracranial AVM. Pregnancy is not a risk factor in female patients with intracranial AVM with no history of hemorrhage. Small intracranial AVM are more likely to bleed. Since 1961 the majority of Taiwan's intracranial AVM patients have been treated surgically, while before that date general medicine was the treatment of choice. In recent years, several developments such as operation microscope, microsurgical instruments and microsurgical techniques have enhanced the efficacy of surgical intervention in the treatment of AVM. When the mortality and morbidity rates resulting from the two forms of treatment are compared, surgical treatment shows a better prognosis for the treatment of intracranial AVM.

  12. Anorectal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, Marc A; Peña, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Anorectal malformations comprise a wide spectrum of diseases, which can affect boys and girls, and involve the distal anus and rectum as well as the urinary and genital tracts. They occur in approximately 1 in 5000 live births. Defects range from the very minor and easily treated with an excellent functional prognosis, to those that are complex, difficult to manage, are often associated with other anomalies, and have a poor functional prognosis. The surgical approach to repairing these defects changed dramatically in 1980 with the introduction of the posterior sagittal approach, which allowed surgeons to view the anatomy of these defects clearly, to repair them under direct vision, and to learn about the complex anatomic arrangement of the junction of rectum and genitourinary tract. Better imaging techniques, and a better knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the pelvic structures at birth have refined diagnosis and initial management, and the analysis of large series of patients allows better prediction of associated anomalies and functional prognosis. The main concerns for the surgeon in correcting these anomalies are bowel control, urinary control, and sexual function. With early diagnosis, management of associated anomalies and efficient meticulous surgical repair, patients have the best chance for a good functional outcome. Fecal and urinary incontinence can occur even with an excellent anatomic repair, due mainly to associated problems such as a poorly developed sacrum, deficient nerve supply, and spinal cord anomalies. For these patients, an effective bowel management program, including enema and dietary restrictions has been devised to improve their quality of life. PMID:17651510

  13. Aneurysm growth and de novo aneurysms during aneurysm surveillance.

    PubMed

    Serrone, Joseph C; Tackla, Ryan D; Gozal, Yair M; Hanseman, Dennis J; Gogela, Steven L; Vuong, Shawn M; Kosty, Jennifer A; Steiner, Calen A; Krueger, Bryan M; Grossman, Aaron W; Ringer, Andrew J

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Many low-risk unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) are followed for growth with surveillance imaging. Growth of UIAs likely increases the risk of rupture. The incidence and risk factors of UIA growth or de novo aneurysm formation require further research. The authors retrospectively identify risk factors and annual risk for UIA growth or de novo aneurysm formation in an aneurysm surveillance protocol. METHODS Over an 11.5-year period, the authors recommended surveillance imaging to 192 patients with 234 UIAs. The incidence of UIA growth and de novo aneurysm formation was assessed. With logistic regression, risk factors for UIA growth or de novo aneurysm formation and patient compliance with the surveillance protocol was assessed. RESULTS During 621 patient-years of follow-up, the incidence of aneurysm growth or de novo aneurysm formation was 5.0%/patient-year. At the 6-month examination, 5.2% of patients had aneurysm growth and 4.3% of aneurysms had grown. Four de novo aneurysms formed (0.64%/patient-year). Over 793 aneurysm-years of follow-up, the annual risk of aneurysm growth was 3.7%. Only initial aneurysm size predicted aneurysm growth (UIA < 5 mm = 1.6% vs UIA ≥ 5 mm = 8.7%, p = 0.002). Patients with growing UIAs were more likely to also have de novo aneurysms (p = 0.01). Patient compliance with this protocol was 65%, with younger age predictive of better compliance (p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Observation of low-risk UIAs with surveillance imaging can be implemented safely with good adherence. Aneurysm size is the only predictor of future growth. More frequent (semiannual) surveillance imaging for newly diagnosed UIAs and UIAs ≥ 5 mm is warranted.

  14. Aneurysmal cyst of the petrosal bone.

    PubMed Central

    Lackmann, G M; Töllner, U

    1993-01-01

    An aneurysmal cyst of the petrosal bone presenting as hearing loss and recurrent bacterial meningitis is reported. None of the clinical or radiographic signs described previously were present. Because other diagnostic methods are not reliable, it is recommended that coronal thin section computed tomography be performed in every case of suspected malformation of the skull base and in the diagnosis of recurrent bacterial meningitis. PMID:8215531

  15. Brain aneurysm repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/pubmed/22556195 . Szeder V, Tateshima S, Duckwiler GR. Intracranial aneurysms and subarachnoid hemorrhage. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, ... chap 67. Read More Aneurysm in the brain Brain aneurysm repair Brain surgery Recovering after stroke Seizures Smoking - ...

  16. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... common cause of a thoracic aortic aneurysm is hardening of the arteries . This condition is more common ... aortic aneurysm repair - open Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular Hardening of the arteries High blood pressure Marfan syndrome ...

  17. Galen, father of systematic medicine. An essay on the evolution of modern medicine and cardiology.

    PubMed

    Pasipoularides, Ares

    2014-03-01

    Galen (129-217) was the ultimate authority on all medical subjects for 15 centuries. His anatomical/physiological concepts remained unchallenged until well into the 17th century. He wrote over 600 treatises, of which less than one-third exist today. The Galenic corpus is stupendous in magnitude; the index of word-entries in it contains 1300 pages. Galen's errors attracted later attention, but we should balance the merits and faults in his work because both exerted profound influences on the advancement of medicine and cardiology. Galen admonished us to embrace truth as identified by experiment, warning that everyone's writings must be corroborated by directly interrogating Nature. His experimental methods' mastery is demonstrated in his researches, spanning every specialty. In his life-sustaining schema, the venous, arterial, and nervous systems, with the liver, heart, and brain as their respective centers, were separate, each distributing through the body one of three pneumata: respectively, the natural, the vital, and the animal spirits. He saw blood carried both within the venous and arterial systems, which communicated by invisible "anastomoses," but circulation eluded him. The "divine Galen's" writings, however, contributed to Harvey's singular ability to see mechanisms completely differently than other researchers, thinkers and experimentalists. Galen was the first physician to use the pulse as a sign of illness. Some representative study areas included embryology, neurology, myology, respiration, reproductive medicine, and urology. He improved the science and use of drugs in therapeutics. Besides his astounding reputation as scientist-author and philosopher, Galen was deemed a highly ethical clinician and brilliant diagnostician.

  18. [Thrombosis of the ending internal carotid artery complicating giant aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Truffert, A; Jouvenot, M; Coulaud, X; Dandelot, J B

    1993-01-01

    A 30-year old man suddenly developed left hemiplegia. CT scan and cerebral angiography showed complete thrombosis of a right internal carotid giant aneurysm. Anterograde propagation of the thrombus in the parent artery led to ipsilateral hemispheric infarction, an exceptional presenting symptom of such vascular malformation. The diagnostic and etiopathogenic aspects are briefly discussed.

  19. Psychotherapy and moralising rhetoric in Galen's newly discovered Avoiding Distress (Peri Alypias).

    PubMed

    Xenophontos, Sophia

    2014-10-01

    In this article, I examine Galen's credentials as an ethical philosopher on the basis of his recently discovered essay Avoiding Distress (Peri alypias). As compensation for the scholarly neglect from which Galen's ethics suffers, I argue that his moral agenda is an essential part of his philosophical discourse, one that situates him firmly within the tradition of practical ethics of the Roman period. Galen's engagement with Stoic psychotherapy and the Platonic-Aristotelian educational model affirms his ethical authority; on the other hand, his distinctive moralising features such as the autobiographical perspective of his narrative and the intimacy between author and addressee render his Avoiding Distress exceptional among other essays, Greek or Latin, treating anxiety. Additionally, I show that Galen's self-projection as a therapist of the emotions corresponds to his role as a practising physician, especially as regards the construction of authority, the efficacy of his therapy and the importance of personal experience as attested in his medical accounts. Finally, the diligence with which Galen retextures his moral advice in his On the Affections and Errors of the Soul - a work of different nature and intent in relation to Avoiding Distress - is a testimony to the dynamics of his ethics and more widely to his philosophical medicine. The philosopher's lecture room is a 'hospital': you ought not to walk out of it in a state of pleasure, but in pain; for you are not in good condition when you arrive. Epictetus, Discourses 3.23.30.

  20. Aristotle and Galen on sex difference and reproduction: a new approach to an ancient rivalry.

    PubMed

    Connell, S M

    2000-09-01

    [I]n contrast to Aristotle's male oriented explanation of procreation the Galenic was 'feminist' inasmuch as both sexes were presented as contributing equally in conception and accordingly both had to experience pleasure... Anatomically, the two sexes were presented in Galenic accounts as complementary, the difference being that the man's genitalia were on the outside and the woman's on the inside. The clitoris was likened to the penis and the ovaries considered 'testicles' or 'stones' that produced seed. The male seed was, it is true, depicted by Galenists as superior in having 'spiritual' qualities lacking in the female, but Galen's reproductive schema was far more egalitarian than Aristotle's. (McLaren, 1985, p. 327)

  1. Preoperative factors affecting the outcome of unruptured posterior circulation aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Behzad; Morgan, Michael Kerin

    2011-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated preoperative variables contributing to adverse surgical outcome for repair of unruptured posterior circulation aneurysms on data collected prospectively between October 1989 and March 2010. Putative risk factors including age, sex, smoking status, positive family history, modified Rankin Score prior to the surgery, size of the aneurysm, specific site (basilar caput and trunk, vertebral artery and posterior inferior cerebellar artery), midline location, presence of calcium, thrombus or irregularity in the aneurysm on preoperative imaging, associated arteriovenous malformation and preoperative coiling were investigated using regression analyses. In a total of 121 operations, surgical mortality and morbidity was 16.3%. For patients with aneurysms less than 9mm this rate was 3.2%. Among the investigated variables we found that size, calcification of the aneurysm and age were each predictors of surgical outcome of unruptured posterior circulation aneurysms.

  2. [Popliteal aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Vaquero Morillo, F; Zorita Calvo, A; Fernández-Samos Gutiérrez, R; García Vázquez, J; Ortega Martín, J M; Fernández Morán, C

    1992-01-01

    We presented the review of 22 cases of popliteal aneurysms with a follow-time of three years. One case was a woman and 5 cases were bilaterals. The most part of cases begun as a latter acute ischemia. Sixteen cases were treated surgically, with a null rate of mortality, 2 amputations, 4 cases of residual intermittent claudication and 10 no-symptomatic patients, with present distal pulses. Etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, technics and results are presented and a comparison with other authors is made. Our experience support an interventionist attitude in cases of elderly nonsymptomatic patients, performed by internal way and saphenous vein substitution.

  3. Chapter 6: after Galen Late Antiquity and the Islamic world.

    PubMed

    Russell, Gül A

    2010-01-01

    It is usually assumed that after Galen there was nothing new until the Renaissance. Contrary to this view, there were significant modifications of the inherited legacy in Late Antiquity, followed by fundamental changes within the Arabic/Islamic world. Their formative influence extends from the medieval period of transmission to the Renaissance and the 17th century. The increasing emphasis on the primacy of the brain initiated the beginnings of ventricular localization of function in Late Antiquity, which was subsequently developed into a theory and transmitted to the West via Arabic. Following the unprecedented translation movement in 9th-century Baghdad, the cumulative Greek and Hellenistic knowledge of the brain, nerves, and the senses from diverse sources were brought together in the systematic, logically unified Arabic medical compendia of encyclopedic proportions, which embody divergence from accepted views and new diagnostic observations. Their Latin versions became standard texts in medical schools. The oldest extant schematic diagrams relevant to neurology (the eye, the ventricles, the visual system, and the nerves) date from this period, and served as models for the medieval Latin West. The development of coherent descriptions of the motor and sensory systems, and related clinical disorders, by analogy with the mechanisms of hydraulic automata, foreshadows some of the explanatory methods associated with the 17th century. Furthermore, an entirely new approach resulted in a paradigm shift in theory and methodology through the experimental studies on the physics of light and vision of Ibn al-Haytham (d. 1040), who showed that what is sensed is not the object itself, but a punctate optical "image" due to light reflected from its surface to the eye. This revolutionary approach to vision destroyed the viability of the Greek tradition of holistic forms and tactile sensory impressions. Ibn al-Haytham's theory of point-to-point correspondence formed the basis of

  4. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis or plaque buildup causes the ... weak and bulge outward like a balloon. An AAA develops slowly over time and has few noticeable ...

  5. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000162.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm To use the sharing features on this page, ... blood to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ...

  6. Cerebral aneurysm (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... loss of nerve function may indicate that an aneurysm may be causing pressure on adjacent brain tissue. ... changes or other neurological changes can indicate the aneurysm has ruptured and is bleeding into the brain. ...

  7. Submitral aneurysm and the new imaging modalities: Will magnetic resonance imaging be necessary?

    PubMed

    Morais, Humberto; Manuel, Valdano; Costa, João Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Submitral aneurysm is a rare cardiac malformation commonly reported in young adult African ancestry. Transthoracic echocardiogram is a gold standard test for diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed anatomic and functional information of the heart. We present a case of a large bilobed submitral aneurysm in-witch the magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the same findings of the transthoracic echocardiography and in addiction also showed a parietal thrombus.

  8. A case of left main pulmonary artery aneurysm associated with valvular pulmonary stenosis in a child.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ran; Son, Jae Sung; Park, Yong Mean

    2011-10-01

    Aneurysm of the main pulmonary artery is a rare clinical entity that can be congenital or acquired. Most cases occur in association with other congenital malformations, severe pulmonary hypertension, vasculitides, infectious agents, or collagen vascular disorders. We report here a pediatric case of left pulmonary artery aneurysm associated with valvular pulmonary stenosis and a hypoplastic right pulmonary artery, which we confirmed via multidetector computed tomography angiography.

  9. Pelvic Vascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, Brian M.; Gipson, Matthew G.; Smith, Mitchell T.

    2013-01-01

    Vascular malformations (VMs) comprise a wide spectrum of lesions that are classified by content and flow characteristics. These lesions, occurring in both focal and diffuse forms, can involve any organ and tissue plane and can cause significant morbidity in both children and adults. Since treatment strategy depends on the type of malformation, correct diagnosis and classification of a vascular lesion are crucial. Slow-flow VMs (venous and lymphatic malformations) are often treated by sclerotherapy, whereas fast-flow lesions (arteriovenous malformations) are generally managed with embolization. In addition, some cases of VMs are best treated surgically. This review will present an overview of VMs in the female pelvis as well as a discussion of endovascular therapeutic techniques. PMID:24436563

  10. Pediatric isolated bilateral iliac aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Chithra, R; Sundar, R Ajai; Velladuraichi, B; Sritharan, N; Amalorpavanathan, J; Vidyasagaran, T

    2013-07-01

    Aneurysms are rare in children. Isolated iliac artery aneurysms are very rare, especially bilateral aneurysms. Pediatric aneurysms are usually secondary to connective tissue disorders, arteritis, or mycotic causes. We present a case of a 3-year-old child with bilateral idiopathic common iliac aneurysms that were successfully repaired with autogenous vein grafts.

  11. Spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage and multiple intracranial aneurysms in a patient with Roberts/SC phocomelia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anthony C; Gemmete, Joseph J; Keegan, Catherine E; Witt, Cordelie E; Muraszko, Karin M; Than, Khoi D; Maher, Cormac O

    2011-11-01

    Roberts/SC phocomelia syndrome (RBS) is a rare but distinct genetic disorder with an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. It has been associated with microcephaly, craniofacial malformation, cavernous hemangioma, encephalocele, and hydrocephalus. There are no previously reported cases of RBS with intracranial aneurysms. The authors report on a patient with a history of RBS who presented with a spontaneous posterior fossa hemorrhage. Multiple small intracranial aneurysms were noted on a preoperative CT angiogram. The patient underwent emergency craniotomy for evacuation of the hemorrhage. A postoperative angiogram confirmed the presence of multiple, distal small intracranial aneurysms.

  12. Niccolo da Reggio's translations of Galen and their reception in France.

    PubMed

    McVaugh, Michael R

    2006-01-01

    In the first half of the fourteenth century, Niccolò da Reggio translated more than fifty works by Galen from Greek into Latin, and by mid-century most if not all of them had reached the papal court at Avignon, where Guy de Chauliac praised their accuracy and cited them regularly in his Great Surgery of 1363. Yet contemporary physicians at nearby Montpellier almost never referred to them, ordinarily preferring to quote from the older Arabic-Latin translations. Examining a particular context, the ways in which urological conditions were described in the old and new versions of Galen, suggests that medical teachers and commentators may have found it difficult to give up the familiarity of the traditional language in favor of Niccolò's new terminology.

  13. Hippocrates, Galen, and the uses of trepanation in the ancient classical world.

    PubMed

    Missios, Symeon

    2007-01-01

    Trepanation is the process by which a hole is drilled into the skull, exposing the intracranial contents for either medical or mystical purposes. It represents one of the oldest surgical procedures, and its practice was widespread in many ancient cultures and several parts of the world. Trepanation was used in ancient Greece and Rome, as described in several ancient texts. Hippocrates and Galen are two of the most prominent ancient Greek medical writers, and their works have influenced the evolution of medicine and neurosurgery across the centuries. The purpose of this paper is to examine Hippocrates' and Galen's written accounts of the technique and use of trepanation in the ancient Greek and Roman world. Examination of those records reveals the ancient knowledge of neurological anatomy, physiology, and therapeutics, and illustrates the state and evolution of neurosurgery in the classical world.

  14. Hot heads and cold brains. Aristotle, Galen and the "radiator theory".

    PubMed

    Longo, O

    1996-01-01

    The Author examines two similar theories about the functioning of human brain as a refrigerator: Falk's and Fialkowski's (1990) and Aristotle's (IVth century b.C.). There are surprising, although fortuitous, convergences between the two, with the remarkable difference, however, that Artistotle's doctrine (later severely criticized by Galen) thinks of the brain merely as an organ for the cooling of the body's (the heart's) heat, while according to the modern radiator theory the human brain developed starting as a refrigerator of itself.

  15. [Identification of the root of Punica granatum in galenic preparations using TLC].

    PubMed

    Ferrara, L; Schettino, O; Forgione, P; Rullo, V; Di Gennaro, S

    1989-05-01

    The alkaloids present in the root of "Punica granatum" have been extracted by two different methods: extraction by Soxlet and extraction by steam distillation. Then the extracts have been compared by TLC chromatography using different solvents and specific chromogen reagents. The presence of pseudo-pelletierine has been confirmed in both the extractive solution by reaction with conc. K2Cr2O7. The above results explains the toxic activity of the unsuitable galenic preparations.

  16. Design and biocompatibility of endovascular aneurysm filling devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N.; Hwang, Wonjun; Horn, John; Landsman, Todd L.; Boyle, Anthony; Wierzbicki, Mark A.; Hasan, Sayyeda M.; Follmer, Douglas; Bryant, Jesse; Small, Ward; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2014-08-04

    We report that the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, which can result in severe mental disabilities or death, affects approximately 30,000 people in the United States annually. The traditional surgical method of treating these arterial malformations involves a full craniotomy procedure, wherein a clip is placed around the aneurysm neck. In recent decades, research and device development have focused on new endovascular treatment methods to occlude the aneurysm void space. These methods, some of which are currently in clinical use, utilize metal, polymeric, or hybrid devices delivered via catheter to the aneurysm site. In this review, we present several such devices, including those that have been approved for clinical use, and some that are currently in development. We present several design requirements for a successful aneurysm filling device and discuss the success or failure of current and past technologies. Lastly, we also present novel polymeric based aneurysm filling methods that are currently being tested in animal models that could result in superior healing.

  17. Design and biocompatibility of endovascular aneurysm filling devices

    DOE PAGES

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N.; Hwang, Wonjun; Horn, John; ...

    2014-08-04

    We report that the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, which can result in severe mental disabilities or death, affects approximately 30,000 people in the United States annually. The traditional surgical method of treating these arterial malformations involves a full craniotomy procedure, wherein a clip is placed around the aneurysm neck. In recent decades, research and device development have focused on new endovascular treatment methods to occlude the aneurysm void space. These methods, some of which are currently in clinical use, utilize metal, polymeric, or hybrid devices delivered via catheter to the aneurysm site. In this review, we present several suchmore » devices, including those that have been approved for clinical use, and some that are currently in development. We present several design requirements for a successful aneurysm filling device and discuss the success or failure of current and past technologies. Lastly, we also present novel polymeric based aneurysm filling methods that are currently being tested in animal models that could result in superior healing.« less

  18. [Marcus Aurelius Antonius (121-180AD), philosopher and Roman emperor, and Galen's plague].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Sanz, Agustín

    2012-11-01

    The study of the aetiologies of diseases in Ancient Times is usually a speculative intellectual exercise. When some authors attribute a specific aetiology to an old disease, there is a great risk of committing a methodological error, known as presentism by the modern historiography. The authority of the investigator, more than the weight of the scientific truth, is usually the reason why the diagnosis has remained over the years. The great epidemic of the years 164-165AD and afterwards, could have been smallpox (haemorrhagic form). Claude Galen, the famous doctor, described the symptoms in several books of his great Opera Omnia. For this reason, it is currently known among the scholars as Galen's plague. The epidemic was described for the first time in Seleucia (Mesopotamia). Until now, the actual geographic origin is unknown. We propose here that the beginning might be the kingdom of the old Han dynasty (now the Chinese Popular Republic). The epidemic swept the Roman Empire, from the east to the west, and from the southern to the northern borders. An immediate consequence of the infection was a high morbidity and mortality. In this sense, Galen's epidemic was one of the many factors that caused the fall and destruction of the Roman Empire. On the other hand, there is a general agreement among historians, biographers and researchers that the philosopher emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (121-180AD was affected by the infection in the epidemic wave of 164-165AD. The death of Marcus Aurelius occurred on March 17 in the year 180AD, in Vindobonne, or perhaps Sirminium (near to Vienna). Many authors propose that the cause of the emperor's death was the same epidemic. We consider that it is not possible to demonstrate any of those speculative diagnoses. Finally, the epidemic of 189-190AD, that we have named of Commodus, was probably a different disease to the Galen's plague. There were several kinds of animals affected (anthropozoonoses). In this sense, this infection

  19. Large plaque-like glomuvenous malformation (glomangioma) simulating venous malformation.

    PubMed

    Vercellino, N; Nozza, P; Oddone, M; Bava, G L

    2006-07-01

    Glomuvenous malformations and venous malformations are vascular lesions that can be distinguished on the basis of clinical and pathological features. A vascular lesion of the skin and superficial and deep soft tissues of a lower limb in a 5-year-old child is described. The clinical and radiological features, including skeletal muscle involvement, were typical of venous malformation, whereas the histopathological features were those of a glomuvenous malformation. The clinical and histopathological features are briefly discussed.

  20. Palmar artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Shutze, Ryan A.; Liechty, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Aneurysms of the hand are rarely encountered and more rarely reported. The least common locations of these aneurysms are the palmar and digital arteries. The etiologies of these entities are quite varied, although they usually present as a pulsatile mass. Following a thorough evaluation, including arterial anatomic imaging, they should be repaired. The reported results following repair have been good. Herein we report a girl with a spontaneous palmar artery aneurysm and its management. PMID:28127131

  1. [Multiple intracranial arteriovenous malformation].

    PubMed

    Gelabert-González, Miguel; Santin-Amo, José María; Román-Pena, Paula; Vázquez Herrero, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Multiple cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are thought to be exceedingly rare lesions and have usually been reported as single cases. The incidence of multiple cerebral AVMs in major series ranges from 0.3% to 9% and, in the majority of cases, these malformations are associated with other vascular anomalies of the brain or soft tissues. We report a 62-year-old woman that presented with a left temporal haemorrhage. Angiography showed 3 AVMs located in the left temporal lobe, left cerebellar hemisphere and right temporal lobe. The lesions were treated with radiosurgery.

  2. Rare malformation of glans penis: arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Akin, Y; Sarac, M; Yucel, S

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric glans penis malformations, especially arteriovenous malformations (AVM), are very rare. Herein, we report two rare cases. A 14-year-old boy attended our outpatient clinic with chief complaints of purple swelling and rapidly growing lesion on the glans penis. The lesion was excised surgically after physical and radiological evaluations. Pathology reported AVM and the patient is being followed up. The second case is a 2-year-old boy who was admitted with a big lesion involving glans penis and genital area that has been present since birth. In physical and radiological evaluations, lesion on the glans penis was pulsatile. Parents of the patient did not want any surgery and patient has been in follow-up. Diagnosis of the vascular lesions on glans penis is very easy by physical and radiological examinations today. Long-term follow-up is very important for AVM. Clinicians must make a careful effort to document new glans lesions in the pediatric population and decrease anxiety in the parents of affected children.

  3. Giant renal artery aneurysm: A case report.

    PubMed

    Cindolo, Luca; Ingrosso, Manuela; De Francesco, Piergustavo; Castellan, Pietro; Berardinelli, Francesco; Fiore, Franco; Schips, Luigi

    2015-07-07

    A case of a 12 cm giant renal artery aneurysm (RAA) in an 59-year-old woman is reported. The patient was referred to our hospital for flank pain and spot hematuria. Ultrasonography (US) revealed some wide lacunar areas in her right kidney and a thin cortex. Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) revealed a giant right renal arteriovenous malformation (AVM). AngioCT scan showed a pervious right renal artery. The cavities of the right kidney were dilated and the parenchyma was markedly reduced. Two months later the patient underwent an open resection of the aneurysm and a right nephrectomy. She had an uneventful recovery and a healthy status (last follow-up: 9 month). In this particular case, a safe approach is the transabdominal approach since the aneurysm was very large, friable, and located on the right side. This report confirms the opportunity of a planned nephrectomy once there is adequate renal reserve in the opposite kidney using a midline approach.

  4. Bronchial Aneurysms Mimicking Aortic Aneurysms: Endovascular Treatment in Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Vernhet, Helene; Bousquet, Claudine; Jean, Betty; Lesnik, Alvian; Durand, Gerard; Giron, Jacques; Senac, Jean Paul

    1999-05-15

    Bronchial artery dilatation and aneurysm formation is a potential complication of local inflammation, especially in bronchiectasis. When the bronchial artery has an ectopic origin from the inferior segment of the aortic arch, aneurysms may mimick aortic aneurysms. Despite this particular location, endovascular treatment is possible. We report two such aneurysms that were successfully embolized with steel coils.

  5. Case notes and clinicians: Galen's "Commentary" on the Hippocratic "Epidemics" in the Arabic tradition.

    PubMed

    Pormann, Peter E

    2008-01-01

    Galen's "Commentaries" on the Hippocratic "Epidemics" constitute one of the most detailed studies of Hippocratic medicine from antiquity. The Arabic translation of the "Commentaries" by Ḥunayn ibn Isḥāq (d. c. 873) is of crucial importance because it preserves large sections now lost in Greek, and because it helped to establish an Arabic clinical literature. The present contribution investigate the translation of this seminal work into Syriac and Arabic. It provides a first survey of the manuscript tradition, and explores how physicians in the medieval Muslim world drew on it both to teach medicine to students, and to develop a framework for their own clinical research.

  6. [On the use of authority in medieval medicine: Aristotle, Galen and flying flies].

    PubMed

    Salmón, F; Sánchez Salor, E

    1993-01-01

    This study attempts to reflect on the role of authority in academic medicine during the lower Middle Ages. We chose a topic - the mechanisms of visual perception - that may have been potentially controversial in medieval classrooms, as the historical authorities Aristotle and Galen disagreed on this phenomenon. Whether conflict arose between authorities, and whether it necessitated reconciliation or explanation, are investigated in the light of the problem faced by the medieval physician who had to explain the vision of nonexistent objects. In our article we also reproduce six questiones composed by university physicians of the Studia in Sienna, Bologne and Montpellier, who dealt with the problem.

  7. Herophilus, Erasistratus, Aretaeus, and Galen: ancient roots of the Bell-Magendie Law.

    PubMed

    Tomey, Matthew I; Komotar, Ricardo J; Mocco, J

    2007-01-01

    Since the early 19th century, significant controversy has persisted over the competing claims of two men, Charles Bell and François Magendie, to a pivotal discovery: that the dorsal spinal roots subserve sensation, whereas the ventral spinal roots subserve motion. However, the foundations of neuroanatomy on which Bell and Magendie built their research was formed two millennia in advance. Exploration of the work of four ancient scholars--Herophilus, Erasistratus, Aretaeus, and Galen--reveals a remarkable early appreciation of the separate neural pathways (if not the correct physiology) responsible for sensory and motor control.

  8. Proteus Syndrome with Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Asilian, Ali; Kamali, Atefeh Sadat; Riahi, Nabet Tajmir; Adibi, Neda; Mokhtari, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare sporadic disorder that appears with localized macrosomia, congenital lipomatosis, and slow flow vascular malformations, connective tissue nevus, and epidermal nevus. There are usually some manifestations at birth. The vascular abnormalities that have been reported in Proteus syndrome are capillary and slow flow venous malformation. We report a case of a 10-year-old boy with confirmed Proteus syndrome characterized by high flow vascular malformation (arteriovenous [AV] malformation) unlike the usual vascular malformations seen in this syndrome. This case adds a new perspective to the established clinical findings of the Proteus syndrome.

  9. [Vesalius and De humani corporis fabrica: Galen's errors and the change of anatomy in the sixteenth century].

    PubMed

    Joutsivuo, T

    1997-01-01

    In medieval universities, human dissections were in general unusual, and public dissections were moreover strictly standardized. At public anatomical lessons three persons were needed to perform an autopsy. The Lector (a lecturer) read and commented on an authoritative text, which usually was Mondino dei Liuzzi's Anatomy. The Ostensor pointed out to the sector, normally a surgeon or a barber, the part of the body to be dissected. The procedure followed the text, the truth of which was not, questioned, and what was seen in a dissected body only confirmed what was stated in the text. In his De Humani corporis fabrica Vesalius criticized both the medieval method of dissection and the dependence of anatomy on authoritative texts. Vesalius wanted to unite the roles of lector, ostensor and sector. In Vesalius's view, a lecturer on anatomy must be able to dissect a cadaver himself and trust his own eyes more than authoritative text. Relying on his own eyes Vesalius gradually began to doubt the truth of various anatomical statements found in Galen's anatomical treatises. Galen (ca. 130-200) was the greatest medical authority during the Renaissance, and he was regarded as almost infallible. In Galen's person culminated the idealism of Renaissance humanism, according to which medical truth rested solely on ancient, especially Greek, heritage. The primary task of the medical humanist was to return to the ideas of the ancients. Vesalius's attitude toward this idealism was somewhat ambiguous. On one hand he found antique evidence for the view that anatomy should be based on one's own experience achieved by dissection of human cadavers. On the other hand he was forced to question the infallibility of Galen. Vesalius solved the discrepancy between the proof of his own eyes and the humanistic ideal by pointing out that anatomy had occupied a much higher level before Galen, in ancient Alexandria, and that Galen in his anatomical works had relied too much on animal dissection....

  10. Environmental risk assessment for the galenical formulation of solid medicinal products at Roche Basle, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Hoerger, Corinne C; Dörr, Benno; Schlienger, Claude; Straubt, Jürg O

    2009-04-01

    An environmental risk assessment for losses to wastewater from galenical manufacturing at solid medicinal products at F. Hoffmann-La Roche in Basle, Switzerland, was performed based on an annual total materials balance. This balance resulted in a loss factor of 0.2% relative to the sum of all starting materials, which was later confirmed as valid by analysis for 1 specific active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). The initial risk assessment for all 25 different APIs formulated resulted in no evident risk for the wastewater treatment plant, based on biodegradation no-effect data. However, based on acute ecotoxicity data, potential risk to the local receiving water, the River Rhine, was identified from 1 single API, the antibiotic sulfamethoxazole (SMX). A refinement of the risk assessment for SMX, based on chronic ecotoxicity data, or the predicted no-effect concentration (PNEC), and documented sewage works degradability, or the predicted environmental concentration (PEC), led to a significant decrease of the initial PEC/PNEC ratio to well below 1. In view of this refinement, the final conclusion is that the galenical production investigated poses no significant risk to the environment.

  11. Call-fleming syndrome (reversible cerebral artery vasoconstriction) and aneurysm associated with multiple recreational drug use.

    PubMed

    Drazin, Doniel; Alexander, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Drug abuse represents a significant health issue. Evidence suggests that recreational drug use has a direct effect on the cerebral vasculature and is of greater concern in those with undiagnosed aneurysms or vascular malformations. The authors report a case of thunderclap headache with a negative head CT and equivocal lumbar puncture after a drug-fueled weekend. The patient underwent diagnostic cerebral angiogram which demonstrated multisegmental, distal areas of focal narrowing of the middle, anterior, posterior, and posterior inferior cerebral artery and an incidental aneurysm. It is often difficult to determine the exact origin of symptoms; thus we were left with a bit of a chicken or the egg debate, trying to decipher which part came first. Either the aneurysm ruptured with associated concomitant vasospasm or it is a case of Call-Fleming syndrome (reversible cerebral artery vasoconstriction) with an incidental aneurysm. The authors proposed their management and rationale of this complex case.

  12. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Savarese, R P; Rosenfeld, J C; DeLaurentis, D A

    1986-05-01

    Between January 1976 and December 1982, 181 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated surgically, and in 13 patients the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA) share important characteristics with typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms. Diagnosis and surgical management of IAAA are distinctive which suggests that IAAA should be considered separately, as a varient of typical abdominal aortic aneurysms. IAAA occur predominantly in males. The presenting symptoms are often idiosyncratic and include severe abdominal or back pain, or both, and ureteral obstruction; the diagnosis of IAAA should be considered when these symptoms are present. Although grossly and microscopically, the perianeurysmal fibrosis resembles idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, the two conditions can be differentiated. At the present time, ultrasonography and computed tomography appear to offer reliable means for diagnosing IAAA. The presence of IAAA, whether established preoperatively or discovered unexpectedly at operation, necessitate certain modifications in the surgical approach, in order to avoid injuring the duodenum and the venous structures. Most patients can be successfully treated by resection and graft replacement. Rupture of the aneurysm in IAAA appears to be less frequent than in typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  13. Renal artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    González, J; Esteban, M; Andrés, G; Linares, E; Martínez-Salamanca, J I

    2014-01-01

    A renal artery aneurysm is defined as a dilated segment of renal artery that exceeds twice the diameter of a normal renal artery. Although rare, the diagnosis and incidence of this entity have been steadily increasing due to the routine use of cross-sectional imaging. In certain cases, renal artery aneurysms may be clinically important and potentially lethal. However, knowledge of their occurrence, their natural history, and their prognosis with or without treatment is still limited. This article aims to review the recent literature concerning renal artery aneurysms, with special consideration given to physiopathology, indications for treatment, different technical options, post-procedure complications and treatment outcomes.

  14. Pediatric cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Gemmete, Joseph J; Toma, Ahmed K; Davagnanam, Indran; Robertson, Fergus; Brew, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Childhood intracranial aneurysms differ from those in the adult population in incidence and gender prevalence, cause, location, and clinical presentation. Endovascular treatment of pediatric aneurysms is the suggested approach because it offers both reconstructive and deconstructive techniques and a better clinical outcome compared with surgery; however, the long-term durability of endovascular treatment is still questionable, therefore long-term clinical and imaging follow-up is necessary. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of intracranial aneurysms in children are discussed, and data from endovascular treatments are presented.

  15. Ruptured jejunal artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sílvia; Costa, Alexandre; Pereira, Tiago; Maciel, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Visceral artery aneurysms (VAAs), unlike aortic aneurysms, are very rare, but are also a potentially lethal vascular disease. Jejunal artery aneurysms only account for less than 3% of VAAs, but have a 30% risk of rupture, with 20% death rate, presenting with only few and vague symptoms. We report the case of a 76-year-old man presenting at the emergency department (ED) with a crampy epigastric pain and vomiting. An ultrasound performed diagnosed free abdominal fluid and immediate CT scan diagnosed jejunal artery aneurysm spontaneously rupturing, followed by hypovolaemic shock. Emergent surgery was undertaken, and aneurysmectomy, followed by partial enterectomy with primary anastomosis were performed, because of segmentary jejunal ischaemia. The patient's recovery was unremarkable. High level of suspicion, rapid diagnosis capability and prompt surgical or endovascular intervention, as well as an effective teamwork in the ED are critical to avoid the devastating consequences of ruptured VAAs. PMID:23771962

  16. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Mikami, Y; Kyogoku, M

    1994-08-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is a distinct clinicopathological entity, characterized by: (1) clinical presentation, such as back pain, weight loss, and increased ESR, (2) patchy and/or diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and (3) marked periaortic fibrosis resulting in thickening of the aneurysmal wall and occasional retroperitoneal fibrosis. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but some authors support the theory that IAAA is a subtype of atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm because of close relationship between IAAA and atherosclerotic change. In this article, we describe clinical and histological features of IAAA on the basis of the literature and our review of 6 cases of IAAA, emphasizing the similarity and difference between IAAA and atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Our review supports that marked lamellar fibrosis completely replacing the media and adventitia, patchy lymphocytic infiltration (mostly B cells) and endarteritis obliterans are characteristic features of IAAA.

  17. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... US) : Ultrasound is a highly accurate way to measure the size of an aneurysm. A physician may also use a special technique called Doppler ultrasound to examine blood flow through the aorta. Occasionally the aorta may not ...

  18. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® Web Sites with More Information About Aortic Aneurysm For ...

  19. Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... affects the risk of rupture. What are the dangers? Aneurysms may burst and bleed into the brain, ... Research Coordinating Committees CounterACT Rigor & Reproducibility Scientific Resources Animal Models Cell/Tissue/DNA Clinical and Translational Resources ...

  20. What Is an Aneurysm?

    MedlinePlus

    ... rupture causes dangerous bleeding inside the body. A dissection is a split in one or more layers ... layers of the artery wall. Both rupture and dissection often are fatal. Overview Most aneurysms occur in ...

  1. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Stanlies

    2015-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome.

  2. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  3. Splenic artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Tcbc-Rj, Rui Antônio Ferreira; Ferreira, Myriam Christina Lopes; Ferreira, Daniel Antônio Lopes; Ferreira, André Gustavo Lopes; Ramos, Flávia Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Splenic artery aneurysms - the most common visceral artery aneurysms - are found most often in multiparous women and in patients with portal hypertension. Indications for treatment of splenic artery aneurysm or pseudoaneurysm include specific symptoms, female gender and childbearing age, presence of portal hypertension, planned liver transplantation, a pseudoaneurysm of any size, and an aneurysm with a diameter of more than 2.5cm. Historically, the treatment of splenic artery aneurysm has been surgical ligation of the splenic artery, ligation of the aneurysm, or aneurysmectomy with or without splenectomy, depending on the aneurysm location. There are other percutaneous interventional techniques. The authors present a case of a splenic artery aneurysm in a 51-year-old woman, detected incidentally. RESUMO Aneurismas da artéria esplênica - os aneurismas arteriais viscerais mais comuns - são encontrados mais frequentemente em mulheres multíparas e em pacientes com hipertensão portal. As indicações para o seu tratamento incluem sintomas específicos, sexo feminino e idade fértil, presença de hipertensão portal, paciente em fila de transplante hepático, um pseudoaneurisma de qualquer tamanho, e um aneurisma com um diâmetro superior a 2,5cm. Historicamente, o tratamento do aneurisma da artéria esplênica tem sido a ligadura cirúrgica da artéria esplênica, a ligadura do aneurisma ou a aneurismectomia, com ou sem esplenectomia, dependendo do local do aneurisma. Existem outras técnicas intervencionistas percutâneas. Os autores apresentam o caso de um aneurisma de artéria esplênica em uma mulher de 51 anos de idade, diagnosticado incidentalmente.

  4. Chiari-like Malformation.

    PubMed

    Loughin, Catherine A

    2016-03-01

    Chiari-like malformation is a condition of the craniocervical junction in which there is a mismatch of the structures of the caudal cranial fossa causing the cerebellum to herniate into the foramen magnum. This herniation can lead to fluid buildup in the spinal cord, also known as syringomyelia. Pain is the most common clinical sign followed by scratching. Other neurologic signs noted are facial nerve deficits, seizures, vestibular syndrome, ataxia, menace deficit, proprioceptive deficits, head tremor, temporal muscle atrophy, and multifocal central nervous system signs. MRI is the diagnostic of choice, but computed tomography can also be used.

  5. Arteriovenous Malformation Management

    SciTech Connect

    Yakes, Wayne F.; Rossi, Plinio; Odink, Henk

    1996-11-15

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are rare vascular lesions that can present with a myriad of clinical presentations. In our institutions, initial workup consists of a clinical exam, color Doppler imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging. After the initial noninvasive workup, arteriography, at times closed system venography, and ethanol endovascular repair of the AVM is performed under general anesthesia. Depending on the size of the lesion, additional Swan-Ganz line and arterial line monitoring are performed. Patients are usually observed overnight and uneventfully discharged the following day if no complication occurs. Patients are followed at periodic intervals despite cure of their lesion. Long-term follow-up is essential in AVM management.

  6. [The Galenic treatise on the Anatomical Procedures and its first Latin translation by Demetrius Chalcondylas].

    PubMed

    Fortuna, S

    1999-01-01

    The Anatomical Procedures is Galen's most complete treatise on anatomy, which the Western culture came to know only in the Renaissance. Its first Latin translation was made by Demetrius Chalcondylas (1423-1511). He was a teacher of some translators of the ancient Greek physicians, and an owner of many Greek medical manuscripts. The translation by Chalcondylas was revised and published by Berengario da Carpi in 1529, and was reprinted only once, in 1531. Its philological analysis proves that it depends on a Greek manuscript, a copy of Par. gr. 1849, which is now lost. The humanist physician Nicolo Leoniceno knew the translation by Calchondylas before it was published, for he quoted it in his Apologia printed in 1522. Therefore, this translation circulated as a manuscript, which was so far ignored.

  7. Clinical-radiological evaluation of sequelae of stereotactic radiosurgery for intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Steinberg, G.K.; Marks, M.P.; DeLaPaz, R.L.; Chuang, F.Y.S.

    1989-12-01

    Stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery has been used to treat 322 patients with surgically-inaccessible intracranial vascular malformations. (The clinical results of this method for the treatment of angiographically demonstrable arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and angiographically occult vascular malformations (AOVMs) of the brain are described in separate reports of this symposium). The great majority of patients have had an uneventful post-treatment course with satisfactory health outcomes. However, several categories of delayed sequelae of stereotactic radiosurgery have been identified, involving the vascular structures essential for the integrity of the brain tissue and the brain parenchyma directly. These categories reflect both reaction to injury and to alterations in regional hemodynamic status, and include vasogenic edema, occlusion of functional vasculature, radiation necrosis, and local or remote effects on cerebral arterial aneurysms. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Rasmussen's aneurysm: A forgotten scourge☆

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Kshitij; Colaco, Brendon; Colaco, Clinton; Hellman, Michael; Meena, Nikhil

    2015-01-01

    Rasmussen's aneurysm is an inflammatory pseudo-aneurysmal dilatation of a branch of pulmonary artery adjacent to a tuberculous cavity. Life threatening massive hemoptysis from the rupture of a Rasmussen's aneurysm is an uncommon yet life threatening complication of cavitary tuberculosis (TB). We present a case of a young woman who presented with low-grade fever and hemoptysis. Computed tomographic (CT) angiography showed biapical cavitary lesions and actively bleeding aneurysms involving pulmonary artery, which successfully underwent glue embolization. PMID:26744661

  9. Mouse models of intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Emeto, Theophilus I; Lee, James; Marshman, Laurence; Moran, Corey; Seto, Sai-wang; Golledge, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm is a highly lethal medical condition. Current management strategies for unruptured intracranial aneurysms involve radiological surveillance and neurosurgical or endovascular interventions. There is no pharmacological treatment available to decrease the risk of aneurysm rupture and subsequent subarachnoid hemorrhage. There is growing interest in the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysm focused on the development of drug therapies to decrease the incidence of aneurysm rupture. The study of rodent models of intracranial aneurysms has the potential to improve our understanding of intracranial aneurysm development and progression. This review summarizes current mouse models of intact and ruptured intracranial aneurysms and discusses the relevance of these models to human intracranial aneurysms. The article also reviews the importance of these models in investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in the disease. Finally, potential pharmaceutical targets for intracranial aneurysm suggested by previous studies are discussed. Examples of potential drug targets include matrix metalloproteinases, stromal cell-derived factor-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, the renin-angiotensin system and the β-estrogen receptor. An agreed clear, precise and reproducible definition of what constitutes an aneurysm in the models would assist in their use to better understand the pathology of intracranial aneurysm and applying findings to patients.

  10. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, R; Schneider, K; von Segesser, L; Turina, M

    1988-06-11

    348 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm were reviewed for typical features of inflammatory aneurysm (IAAA) (marked thickening of aneurysm wall, retroperitoneal fibrosis and rigid adherence of adjacent structures). IAAA was present in 15 cases (14 male, 1 female). When compared with patients who had ordinary aneurysms, significantly more patients complained of back or abdominal pain (p less than 0.01). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was highly elevated. Diagnosis was established in 7 of 10 computed tomographies. 2 patients underwent emergency repair for ruptured aneurysm. Unilateral ureteral obstruction was present in 4 cases and bilateral in 1. Repair of IAAA was performed by a modified technique. Histological examination revealed thickening of the aortic wall, mainly of the adventitial layer, infiltrated by plasma cells and lymphocytes. One 71-year-old patient operated on for rupture of IAAA died early, and another 78-year-old patient after 5 1/2 months. Control computed tomographies revealed spontaneous regression of inflammatory infiltration after repair. Equally, hydronephrosis due to ureteral obstruction could be shown to disappear or at least to decrease. IAAA can be diagnosed by computed tomography with high sensitivity. Repair involves low risk, but modification of technique is necessary. The etiology of IAAA remains unclear.

  11. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  12. The Trouble with Opium. Taste, Reason and Experience in Late Galenic Pharmacology with Special Regard to the University of Leiden (1575-1625).

    PubMed

    Klerk, Saskia

    2014-01-01

    In the seventeenth century, the discrepancy between the taste of some drugs and their effects on the body was used to criticize Galenic medicine. In this paper, I argue that such contradictions were brought to light by the sixteenth-century study of drug properties within the Galenic tradition itself. Investigating how the taste of a drug corresponded to the effects it had on the body became a core problem for maintaining a medical practice that was both rational and effective. I discuss four physicians, connected to the University of Leiden, who attempted to understand drug properties, including taste, within a Galenic framework. The sixteenth-century discussions about the relationship between the senses, reason and experience, will help us understand the seventeenth-century criticism of Galenic medicine and the importance of discussions about materia medica for ideas regarding the properties of matter proposed in this period.

  13. Numerical simulation of aneurysm hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacVicar, Stephen; Huynh, Sophia; Rossmann, Jenn

    2003-11-01

    Rupture of intracranial aneurysms is the leading cause of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage, with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Numerical simulations of flow in a variety of two-dimensional and three-dimensional saccular aneurysm geometries were performed to evaluate possible sites and mechanisms for aneurysm growth and rupture. The governing equations were solved in their finite volume formulation for both steady and pulsatile flows. Recirculation zones and secondary flows were observed in aneurysms and arteries. Regions of elevated and oscillating shear stress were observed, often at the aneurysm's distal shoulder. The influence of several geometric factors, including vessel curvature, branching angle, and aneurysm shape, on flow patterns and fluid mechanical forces was studied, with the goal of assessing the risks posed by given aneurysm geometry.

  14. Juxtaphyseal aneurysmal bone cysts.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, M; Dellaero, D T; Harrelson, J M; Scully, S P

    1999-07-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts are benign primary or secondary lesions that commonly arise in long bones and often before skeletal maturity. Little has been written about aneurysmal bone cysts that abut the physeal plate. The records of 15 patients with juxtaphyseal aneurysmal bone cysts were reviewed. Fourteen of the patients were referred with abnormal radiographs after evaluation for pain in the affected limb. One patient presented with abnormal radiographs after fracture about the aneurysmal bone cyst. None of the patients had evidence of growth plate disruption. The children's ages ranged from 2 to 14 years, with a mean of 9.8 years. There were 10 boys and five girls. Lesion locations included: six in the proximal tibia, three in the distal fibula, two in the distal tibia, two in the proximal femur, one in the distal femur, and one in the distal radius. All of the lesions abutted the physeal plate and fell into one of the types in Campanacci's classification of juxtaphyseal aneurysmal bone cysts. Three lesions were classified as Type 1, eight were Type 2, and four were Type 3. This study included no cases of Type 4 or 5 lesions. Treatment of all lesions consisted of excision, curettage, and bone grafting with care taken to preserve the growth plate. Adjunctive cauterization was performed in two cases. There were no incidences of postoperative physeal plate arrest. Overgrowth of the fibula occurred in one patient. Three patients experienced recurrent lesions. One of the children underwent repeat curettage and bone grafting with no additional recurrence. In the other two children with recurrence, the lesion had grown away from the physeal plate while remaining static in size and asymptomatic. Based on this study, juxtaphyseal aneurysmal bone cysts may be treated satisfactorily with intralesional surgery and bone grafting with expectation of normal physeal growth.

  15. Pediatric intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, L N; Singh, S N

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage from intracranial aneurysms in the paediatric age group is extremely rare. Interestingly, occurrence of vasospasm has been reported to be less in comparison to the adults. Both coiling and clipping have been advocated in selected cases. Because of the thinness of the wall of the arteries, utmost care should be taken while handling these arteries during surgery. The overall results of surgery in children have been reported to be better than their adult counterparts. We present four such cases from our own experience. All these children were operated upon, where the solitary aneurysm in each case was clipped and all of them made a good recovery.

  16. [Diagnostics of genetic malformations in small ruminants].

    PubMed

    Ganter, M

    2013-01-01

    The epidemic occurrence of the Schmallenberg virus has induced numerous congenital malformations in small ruminants. Because of this high incidence of malformed lambs, an overview of the different causes of congenital malformations is provided. The most frequent infectious and physical causes as well as mineral and vitamin deficiencies and toxic agents which can induce congenital malformations are indicated. This list is supplemented by advice on sampling and laboratory diagnosis for an etiological diagnosis of the malformations.

  17. An enlarged intramuscular venous malformation in the femoral region successfully treated with complete resection

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Takuo; Ogata, Dai; Miyano, Kyohei; Tsuchida, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intramuscular venous malformations have been previously described as intramuscular hemangiomas, and various therapies have been applied for their treatment. This condition is relatively rare, and therefore, physicians often struggle to determine the appropriate therapy. We presented a case of an enlarged intramuscular venous malformation relapsed after surgery successfully treated with complete resection. Presentation of case We presented a case of an enlarged intramuscular venous malformation with postoperative recurrence successfully treated with complete resection. A 63-year-old woman presented with a subcutaneous mass in the right distal thigh. She experienced swelling in the right thigh 19 years previously and was diagnosed with a venous aneurysm. Three-dimensional CT angiography confirmed the presence of an irregular vessel assumed to be the feeding vessel, which was dendritically branched from the deep femoral artery. We performed surgical complete resection. Her pain and gait disturbance improved after surgery, and she has not experienced recurrence of the mass for the past 2 years. Discussion Conservative therapy is initially used for venous malformations. Sclerotherapy, laser therapy, or surgical resection is considered after low-dose aspirin therapy, in combination with the use of compressive garments. Surgical resection is indicated for completely resectable lesions and is appropriate for large lesions in terms of cosmetic benefit. However, partial resection may result in excessive bleeding or postoperative recurrence. Conclusion The therapy for venous malformations should be decided based on the degree of disability in daily living, adjacent tissue damage, and cosmetic concerns after appropriate differential diagnostic investigations and biopsy. PMID:26945489

  18. Pancreaticoduodenal arterial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Verta, M J; Dean, R H; Yao, J S; Conn, J; Mehn, W H; Bergan, J J

    1977-01-01

    Experience with four aneurysms of the pancreaticoduodenal artery is reviewed and compared to the reported experience of 19 other cases. In view of the common presentation of such lesions as intra-abdominal hemorrhage preceded by non-specific abdominal pain and other digestive symptoms, it is suggested that angiography perfomed preoperatively or intraoperatively allows definitive diagnosis and leads to specific therapy. PMID:406863

  19. Embolization of Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, H.; Hongo, K.; Kobayashi, S.; Takamae, T.; Okudera, H.; Koyama, J.I.; Oya, F.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Summary Treatment options for cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) are still controversial due to the recent result of stereotactic radiosurgery and the improved result of microsurgical resection. We investigated previously treated AVM cases and discussed the efficacy and safety of preoperative embolization especially for microsurgical resection of high-grade AVM in the Spetzler-Martin grading. Efficacy of preoperative embolization was evaluated based on 126 previously treated AVM cases at Shinshu University Hospital during the last 25 years. The safety of embolization was evaluated based on our previously-embolized 58 AVM cases (91 procedures) in the last 11 years after introduction of preoperative embolization for AVM. In all 126 cases, 82 were treated before introduction of embolization and 44 were treated after introduction of embolization. In 82 cases of the pre-embolization era, 63 lesions were removed totally in 63 AVMs (77%), partially resected in 11 (13%) and untreated in eight (10%). In 74 surgically removed cases, 11 (15%) cases showed severe intra/postoperative bleeding. In 44 cases of the embolization era, lesions were removed totally in 29 AVMs (66%), disappeared only with embolization in one (2%), disappeared with radiosurgery in seven (16%) and were untreated in five (11%). In 32 surgically removed cases, only one (2%) case showed severe intra/postoperative bleeding. In all 58 embolized cases, 44 were surgically removed, six were treated with radiosurgery, one was eliminated with embolization alone and six were partially obliterated and followed up for their location. In 91 procedures for 58 cases, two haemorrhagic and three ischemic complications occurred, three were transient and two remained having neurological deficits. The introduction of preoperative embolization improved the total removal rate and reduced the intra/postoperative bleeding rate in surgical removal of AVM. The total risk of embolization is low and well-designed preoperative

  20. Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Within the past decade, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) have evolved from rare curiosities to not uncommon clinical states, with the latest estimates suggesting a prevalence of ∼1 in 2,600. PAVMs provide anatomic right-to-left shunts, allowing systemic venous blood to bypass gas exchange and pulmonary capillary bed processing. Hypoxemia and enhanced ventilatory demands result, although both are usually asymptomatic. Paradoxical emboli lead to strokes and cerebral abscesses, and these commonly occur in individuals with previously undiagnosed PAVMs. PAVM hemorrhage is rare but is the main cause of maternal death in pregnancy. PAVM occlusion by embolization is the standard of care to reduce these risks. However, recent data demonstrate that currently recommended management protocols can result in levels of radiation exposure that would be classified as harmful. Recent publications also provide a better appreciation of the hematologic and cardiovascular demands required to maintain arterial oxygen content and oxygen consumption in hypoxemic patients, identify patient subgroups at higher risk of complications, and emphasize the proportion of radiologically visible PAVMs too small to treat by embolization. This review, therefore, outlines medical states that exacerbate the consequences of PAVMs. Chief among these is iron deficiency, which is commonly present due to concurrent hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: iron deficiency impairs hypoxemia compensations by restricting erythropoiesis and increases the risk of ischemic strokes. Management of periodontal disease, dental interventions, pulmonary hypertension, and pregnancy also requires specific consideration in the setting of PAVMs. The review concludes by discussing to what extent previously recommended protocols may benefit from modification or revision. PMID:25420112

  1. Diffusion of counterfeit drugs in developing countries and stability of galenics stored for months under different conditions of temperature and relative humidity

    PubMed Central

    Baratta, Francesca; Germano, Antonio; Brusa, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Aim To investigate the diffusion of counterfeit medicines in developing countries and to verify the stability of galenic dosage forms to determine the stability of galenics prepared and stored in developing countries. Methods We purchased 221 pharmaceutical samples belonging to different therapeutic classes both in authorized and illegal pharmacies and subjected them to European Pharmacopoeia, 7th ed. quality tests. An UV-visible spectrophotometric assay was used to determine the galenics stability under different conditions of temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH). Results A substantial percentage of samples was substandard (52%) and thus had to be considered as counterfeit. Stability tests for galenics showed that the tested dosage forms were stable for 24 months under “standard” (t = 25 ± 2°C, RH = 50 ± 5%) conditions. Under “accelerated” (t = 40 ± 2°C, RH = 50 ± 5%) conditions, samples were stable for 3 months provided that they were stored in glass containers. Stability results of samples stored in “accelerated” conditions were similar to those obtained by on site in tropical countries and could so supply precious information on the expected stability of galenics in tropical countries. Conclusion This study gives useful information about the presence of counterfeit medicinal products in the pharmacies of many developing countries. This should serve as an alarm bell and an input for the production of galenics. We recommend setting up of galenic laboratories in developing countries around the globe. PMID:22522996

  2. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sachs, T; Schermerhorn, M

    2010-06-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to be one of the most lethal vascular pathologies we encounter. Its management demands prompt and efficient evaluation and repair. Open repair has traditionally been the mainstay of treatment. However, the introduction of endovascular techniques has altered the treatment algorithm for ruptured AAA in most major medical centers. We present recent literature and techniques for ruptured AAA and its surgical management.

  3. Mycotic femoral aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Richard Scott; Bennett, Kenneth R

    2007-05-01

    After several weeks of fever and chills, a 31-year-old logger developed pain in his right thigh. Upon examination a tender, pulsating upper thigh mass was found with a long loud bruit arising from it. Severe aortic insufficiency was present; however, blood cultures were negative. An angiogram, captured blood with contrast spewing from the profunda femoral artery to fill a 5 x 10 cm sac. A false aneurysm was diagnosed and resected; numerous gram positive cocci were present in cut sections, but cultures from the cavity grew the gram negative bacteria Salmonella and Alcaligenes. After one month of intravenous ampicillin the aortic valve was replaced after being destroyed by endocarditis. Ampicillin was continued and recovery was uneventful. Mycotic aneurysms are commonly caused by Salmonella (10%), which was second only to Staphylococcus (30%). The femoral artery accounts for 38% of all mycotic aneurysms. They typically present with a pulsatile mass (52%), bruit (50%), and fever (48%). This diagnosis can be supported by leukocytosis (64-71%), positive blood cultures (50-85%), and a history of arterial trauma (51%) (injection drug use, intravascular procedure, or trauma) or endocarditis (10%).

  4. Cardiac arteriovenous malformation causing sudden death.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Beatriz; Suárez-Mier, M Paz; Argente, Trinidad

    2004-01-01

    Cardiac vascular malformations are rare. We report a subendocardial arteriovenous malformation (AVM), associated with extensive myocardial fibrosis, causing sudden death in a 25-year-old woman. To our knowledge, this is the first autopsy case reported.

  5. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood vessel... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food...

  6. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  7. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  8. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  9. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  10. Management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: State of the art and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Giovanni; Alafaci, Concetta; Macdonald, R. Loch

    2017-01-01

    Background: Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) accounts for 5% of strokes and carries a poor prognosis. It affects around 6 cases per 100,000 patient years occurring at a relatively young age. Methods: Common risk factors are the same as for stroke, and only in a minority of the cases, genetic factors can be found. The overall mortality ranges from 32% to 67%, with 10–20% of patients with long-term dependence due to brain damage. An explosive headache is the most common reported symptom, although a wide spectrum of clinical disturbances can be the presenting symptoms. Brain computed tomography (CT) allow the diagnosis of SAH. The subsequent CT angiography (CTA) or digital subtraction angiography (DSA) can detect vascular malformations such as aneurysms. Non-aneurysmal SAH is observed in 10% of the cases. In patients surviving the initial aneurysmal bleeding, re-hemorrhage and acute hydrocephalus can affect the prognosis. Results: Although occlusion of an aneurysm by surgical clipping or endovascular procedure effectively prevents rebleeding, cerebral vasospasm and the resulting cerebral ischemia occurring after SAH are still responsible for the considerable morbidity and mortality related to such a pathology. A significant amount of experimental and clinical research has been conducted to find ways in preventing these complications without sound results. Conclusions: Even though no single pharmacological agent or treatment protocol has been identified, the main therapeutic interventions remain ineffective and limited to the manipulation of systemic blood pressure, alteration of blood volume or viscosity, and control of arterial dioxide tension. PMID:28217390

  11. How Is an Aneurysm Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic conditions related to thoracic aortic aneurysms. The data collected through the GenTAC registry will help doctors and researchers better understand how genes, thoracic aortic aneurysms, and heart disease are linked. To learn more about GenTAC, visit https://gentac. ...

  12. Genetic and Epigenetic Regulation of Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha Won

    2017-01-01

    Aneurysms are characterized by structural deterioration of the vascular wall leading to progressive dilatation and, potentially, rupture of the aorta. While aortic aneurysms often remain clinically silent, the morbidity and mortality associated with aneurysm expansion and rupture are considerable. Over 13,000 deaths annually in the United States are attributable to aortic aneurysm rupture with less than 1 in 3 persons with aortic aneurysm rupture surviving to surgical intervention. Environmental and epidemiologic risk factors including smoking, male gender, hypertension, older age, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, and family history are highly associated with abdominal aortic aneurysms, while heritable genetic mutations are commonly associated with aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. Similar to other forms of cardiovascular disease, family history, genetic variation, and heritable mutations modify the risk of aortic aneurysm formation and provide mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of human aortic aneurysms. This review will examine the relationship between heritable genetic and epigenetic influences on thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysm formation and rupture. PMID:28116311

  13. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF THE FACE CAPILLARY MALFORMATION].

    PubMed

    Galich, S P; Gindich, O A; Dabizha, A Yu; Ogorodnik, Ya P

    2015-08-01

    Results of surgical treatment of 37 patients for the head and neck capillary malformations were analyzed. Optimal surgical tactics, depending on the malformation form and localization, was proposed. Restitution of the tissues defect after excision of malformation, using the flaps transposition, have permitted to achieve good esthetic results.

  14. Reconstruction of middle ear malformations

    PubMed Central

    Schwager, Konrad

    2008-01-01

    Malformations of the middle ear are classified as minor and major malformations. Minor malformations appear with regular external auditory canal, tympanic membrane and aerated middle ear space. The conducting hearing loss is due to fixation or interruption of the ossicular chain. The treatment is surgical, following the rules of ossiculoplasty and stapes surgery. In major malformations (congenital aural atresia) there is no external auditory canal and a deformed or missing pinna. The mastoid and the middle ear space may be underdevelopped, the ossicular chain is dysplastic. Surgical therapy is possible in patients with good aeration of the temporal bone, existing windows, a near normal positioned facial nerve and a mobile ossicular chain. Plastic and reconstructive surgery of the pinna should proceed the reconstruction of the external auditory canal and middle ear. In cases of good prognosis unilateral aural atresia can be approached already in childhood. In patients with high risk of surgical failure, bone anchored hearing aids are the treatment of choice. Recent reports of implantable hearing devices may be discussed as an alternative treatment for selected patients. PMID:22073077

  15. Genetic causes of vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Brouillard, Pascal; Vikkula, Miikka

    2007-10-15

    Vascular malformations are localized defects of vascular development. They usually affect a limited number of vessels in a restricted area of the body. Although most malformations are sporadic, inheritance is observed, enabling genetic analysis. Usually, sporadic forms present with a single lesion whereas multiple lesions are observed in familial cases. The last decade has seen unraveling of several causative genes and beginning of elucidation of the pathophysiological pathways involved in the inherited forms. In parallel, definition of the clinical phenotypes has improved and disorders such as Parkes-Weber syndrome (PKWS), first thought to be sporadic, is now known to be part of a more common inheritable phenotype. In addition, the concept of double-hit mechanism that we proposed earlier to explain the incomplete penetrance, variable expressivity and multifocality of lesions in inherited venous anomalies is now becoming confirmed, as some somatic mutations have been identified in venous, glomuvenous and cerebral cavernous malformations. It is thus tempting to suggest that familial forms of vascular malformations follow paradominant inheritance and that sporadic forms, the etiopathogenic causes of which are still unelucidated, are caused by somatic mutations in the same genes.

  16. Polysplenia with pulmonary arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Papagiannis, J; Kanter, R J; Effman, E L; Pratt, P C; Marcille, R; Browning, I B; Armstrong, B E

    1993-03-01

    A patient with polysplenia syndrome, dextrocardia, left atrial isomerism, normal great vessel relationships, and no intracardiac shunts developed progressive cyanosis and clubbing. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) were diagnosed by angiography and confirmed by lung biopsy. Superior mesenteric arteriogram revealed hypoplasia of the intrahepatic portal vein branches and a portosystemic shunt. The possible etiologies of PAVMs are discussed.

  17. Arteriovenous malformation of the uterus.

    PubMed

    Dodia, Nazera; George, Suku

    2015-09-17

    We present the case of a 54-year-old woman with intermittent right-sided abdominal pain. Ultrasound scans showed an unusual vascular appearance of the uterus with a thinned endometrium. Contrast CT led to a strong suspicion of an arteriovenous malformation of the uterus. The patient was successfully treated with a hysterectomy with salpingo-oophorectomy.

  18. Vein graft aneurysms following popliteal aneurysm repair are more common than we think.

    PubMed

    Sharples, Alistair; Kay, Mark; Sykes, Timothy; Fox, Anthony; Houghton, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    True infrainguinal vein graft aneurysms are reported infrequently in the literature. We sought to identify the true incidence of these graft aneurysms after popliteal aneurysm repair and identify factors which may increase the risk of such aneurysms developing. Using a prospectively compiled database, we identified patients who underwent a popliteal aneurysm repair between January 1996 and January 2011 at a single district general hospital. Patients were routinely followed up in a graft surveillance programme. Out of 45 patients requiring repair of a popliteal aneurysm over a 15-year period, four (8.8%) patients developed aneurysmal graft disease. Of the patients who developed graft aneurysms, all had aneurysmal disease at other sites compared with 18 (45.0%) patients who did not develop graft aneurysms. Patients with graft aneurysms had a mean of 1.60 aneurysms elsewhere compared to 0.58 in patients with non-aneurysmal grafts (P = 0.005). True vein graft aneurysms occur in a significant number of patients following popliteal aneurysm repair. Our data would suggest this to be more likely in patients who have aneurysms elsewhere and therefore a predisposition to aneurysmal disease. It may be appropriate for patients with aneurysms at other sites to undergo more prolonged post-operative graft surveillance.

  19. Idiopathic pulmonary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kotwica, Tomasz; Szumarska, Joanna; Staniszewska-Marszalek, Edyta; Mazurek, Walentyna; Kosmala, Wojciech

    2009-05-01

    Pulmonary artery aneurysm (PAA) is an uncommon lesion, which may be associated with different etiologies including congenital cardiovascular diseases, systemic vasculitis, connective tissue diseases, infections, and trauma. Idiopathic PAA is sporadically diagnosed by exclusion of concomitant major pathology. We report a case of a 56-year-old female with an idiopathic pulmonary artery dilatation identified fortuitously by echocardiography and confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Neither significant pulmonary valve dysfunction nor pulmonary hypertension and other cardiac abnormalities which might contribute to the PAA development were found. Here, we describe echocardiographic and computed tomography findings and review the literature on PAA management.

  20. Right hepatic artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Astrid Del Pilar Ardila; Loures, Paulo; Calle, Juan Cristóbal Ospina; Cunha, Beatriz; Córdoba, Juan Camilo

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of an aneurysm of the right hepatic artery and its multidisciplinary management by general surgery, endoscopy and radiology services. Being a case of extremely low incidence, it is important to show its diagnostic and therapeutic approach. RESUMO Relatamos um caso de aneurisma da artéria hepática direita conduzido de forma multidisciplinar pelos Serviços de Cirurgia Geral, Endoscopia e Radiologia. Em se tratando de caso de incidência baixíssima, é importante mostrar o enfoque diagnóstico e terapêutico usado em seu manejo.

  1. Spontaneous thrombosis in giant intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, I R; Dorsch, N W; Besser, M

    1982-01-01

    Twelve patients in a series of 22 with giant intracranial aneurysms demonstrated neuroradiological features of partial or total spontaneous intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. The presence of this intra-aneurysmal clot significantly altered the computed tomographic appearance of the giant aneurysm. Massive intra-aneurysmal thrombosis did not protect against subarachnoid haemorrhage and the likelihood of rupture of a clot containing giant aneurysm was not significantly different from that of a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. Although parent artery occlusion from a thrombosed giant aneurysm, and massive aneurysmal thrombosis leading to the formation of giant serpentine aneurysm were documented, these are rare epiphenomena. The risk of embolisation from a partially thrombosed giant aneurysm, which was documented in one case, would appear to be greater than that from a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. The findings in this series, and a review of literature, suggest that the presence of intra-aneurysmal clot in giant intracranial aneurysms has little prognostic significance and does not alter the management or outcome after treatment. Images PMID:7175528

  2. Techniques in Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Phade, Sachin V.; Garcia-Toca, Manuel; Kibbe, Melina R.

    2011-01-01

    Endovascular repair of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVARs) has revolutionized the treatment of aortic aneurysms, with over half of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repairs performed endoluminally each year. Since the first endografts were placed two decades ago, many changes have been made in graft design, operative technique, and management of complications. This paper summarizes modern endovascular grafts, considerations in preoperative planning, and EVAR techniques. Specific areas that are addressed include endograft selection, arterial access, sheath delivery, aortic branch management, graft deployment, intravascular ultrasonography, pressure sensors, management of endoleaks and compressed limbs, and exit strategies. PMID:22121487

  3. Subject-specific modeling of intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebral, Juan R.; Hernandez, Monica; Frangi, Alejandro; Putman, Christopher; Pergolizzi, Richard; Burgess, James

    2004-04-01

    Characterization of the blood flow patterns in cerebral aneurysms is important to explore possible correlations between the hemodynamics conditions and the morphology, location, type and risk of rupture of intracranial aneurysms. For this purpose, realistic patient-specific models are constructed from computed tomography angiography and 3D rotational angiography image data. Visualizations of the distribution of hemodynamics forces on the aneurysm walls as well as the intra-aneurysmal flow patterns are presented for a number of cerebral aneurysms of different sizes, types and locations. The numerical models indicate that there are different classes of intra-aneurysmal flow patterns, that may carry different risks of rupture.

  4. Imaging of Spontaneous Ventriculomegaly and Vascular Malformations in Wistar rats: implications for Preclinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Tsang-Wei; Turtzo, L. Christine; Williams, Rashida A.; Lescher, Jacob D.; Dean, Dana D.; Frank, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Wistar rats are widely used in biomedical research and commonly serve as a model organism in neuroscience studies. In most cases when noninvasive imaging is not utilized, studies assume a consistent baseline condition in rats that lack visible differences. While performing a series of traumatic brain injury studies, we discovered mild spontaneous ventriculomegaly in 70/162 (43.2%) of Wistar rats that had been obtained from 2 different vendors. Advanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques, including MR angiography and diffusion tensor imaging, were utilized to evaluate the rats. Multiple neuropathologic abnormalities, including presumed arteriovenous malformations, aneurysms, cysts, white matter lesion and astrogliosis were found in association with ventriculomegaly. Postmortem micro-CT and immunohistochemical staining confirmed the presence of aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations. Diffusion tensor imaging significant decreases in fractional anisotropy and increases in mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity in multiple white matter tracts (p < 0.05). These results could impact the interpretation, e.g. of a pseudo-increase of axon integrity and a pseudo-decrease of myelin integrity, based on characteristics intrinsic to rats with ventriculomegaly. We suggest the use of baseline imaging to prevent the inadvertent introduction of a high degree of variability in preclinical studies of neurological disease or injury in the Wistar rats. PMID:25383642

  5. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs or symptoms of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The final recommendation statement summarizes what the Task ... the potential benefits and harms of screening for AAA: (1) Men ages 65 to 75 who smoke ...

  6. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI scan Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular Aortic angiography Hardening of ... Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla ...

  7. Inflammatory aneurysms treated with EVAR.

    PubMed

    Stone, William M; Fankhauser, Grant T

    2012-12-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAA) are being treated more frequently by endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Some authors caution against treating IAAA by EVAR because retroperitoneal inflammation may not subside post-operatively. A recent experience of 69 IAAA treated by open and endovascular methods is presented with results supporting the use of EVAR for IAAA. Several other studies evaluating EVAR in the treatment of IAAA are discussed.

  8. Hemodynamic Intervention of Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a pathological vascular response to hemodynamic stimuli. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms essentially alters the blood flow to stop them from continued growth and eventual rupture. Compared to surgical clipping, endovascular methods are minimally invasive and hence rapidly gaining popularity. However, they are not always effective with risks of aneurysm regrowth and various complications. We aim at developing a Virtual Intervention (VI) platform that allows: patient-specific flow calculation and risk prediction as well as recommendation of tailored intervention based on quantitative analysis. This is a lofty goal requiring advancement in three areas of research: (1). Advancement of image-based CFD; (2) Understanding the biological/pathological responses of tissue to hemodynamic factors in the context of cerebral aneurysms; and (3) Capability of designing and testing patient-specific endovascular devices. We have established CFD methodologies based on anatomical geometry obtained from 3D angiographic or CT images. To study the effect of hemodynamics on aneurysm development, we have created a canine model of a vascular bifurcation anastomosis to provide the hemodynamic environment similar to those in CA. Vascular remodeling was studied using histology and compared against the flow fields obtained from CFD. It was found that an intimal pad, similar to those frequently seen clinically, developed at the flow impingement site, bordering with an area of `groove' characteristic of an early stage of aneurysm, where the micro environment exhibits an elevated wall shear stresses. To further address the molecular mechanisms of the flow-mediated aneurysm pathology, we are also developing in vitro cell culture systems to complement the in vivo study. Our current effort in endovascular device development focuses on novel stents that alters the aneurysmal flow to promote thrombotic occlusion as well as favorable remodeling. Realization of an

  9. Clinical presentation of cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Cianfoni, Alessandro; Pravatà, Emanuele; De Blasi, Roberto; Tschuor, Costa Silvia; Bonaldi, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    Presentation of a cerebral aneurysm can be incidental, discovered at imaging obtained for unrelated causes, can occur in the occasion of imaging obtained for symptoms possibly or likely related to the presence of an unruptured aneurysm, or can occur with signs and symptoms at the time of aneurismal rupture. Most unruptured intracranial aneurysms are thought to be asymptomatic, or present with vague or non-specific symptoms like headache or dizziness. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsies, however, may typically indicate the presence of a posterior circulation aneurysm. Ruptured intracranial aneurysms are by far the most common cause of non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage and represent a neurological emergency with potentially devastating consequences. Subarachnoid hemorrhage may be easily suspected in the presence of sudden and severe headache, vomiting, meningism signs, and/or altered mental status. However, failure to recognize milder and more ambiguous clinical pictures may result in a delayed or missed diagnosis. In this paper we will describe the clinical spectrum of unruptured and ruptured intracranial aneurysms by discussing both typical and uncommon clinical features emerging from the literature review. We will additionally provide the reader with descriptions of the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, and main diagnostic pitfalls.

  10. Left Main Coronary Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Doustkami, Hossein; Maleki, Nasrollah; Tavosi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of the left main coronary artery are exceedingly rare clinical entities, encountered incidentally in approximately 0.1% of patients who undergo routine angiography. The most common cause of coronary artery aneurysms is atherosclerosis. Angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the severity of the coexisting coronary stenosis, patients with left main coronary artery aneurysms can be effectively managed either surgically or pharmacologically. We herein report a case of left main coronary artery aneurysm in a 72-year-old man with a prior history of hypertension presenting to our hospital because of unstable angina. The electrocardiogram showed ST-segment depression and T-wave inversion in the precordial leads. All the data of blood chemistry were normal. Echocardiography showed akinetic anterior wall, septum, and apex, mild mitral regurgitation and ejection fraction of 45%. Coronary angiography revealed a saccular aneurysm of the left main coronary artery with significant stenosis in the left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right coronary artery. The patient immediately underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and ligation of the aneurysm. At six months’ follow-up, he remained asymptomatic. PMID:27403190

  11. [False aneurysm of the left ventricle and coronary aneurysms in Behçet disease].

    PubMed

    Rolland, J M; Bical, O; Laradi, A; Robinault, J; Benzidia, R; Vanetti, A; Herreman, G

    1993-09-01

    A false left ventricular aneurysm and coronary artery aneurysm were discovered in a 29 year old patient with Behçet's syndrome. The operation under cardiopulmonary bypass consisted of closing the neck of the false aneurysm by an endo-aneurysmal approach with a Gore-Tex patch. The coronary artery aneurysms were respected. There were no postoperative complications. Cardiac involvement is rare in Behçet's syndrome (6%). The originality of this case is the association of two aneurysmal pathologies: the coronary and ventricular aneurysms due to the angiitis and the myocardial fragility induced by ischaemia.

  12. Cryptic vascular malformations involving the brainstem

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, A.; Enzmann, D.

    1983-01-01

    Six patients with angiographically cryptic vascular malformations involving the brainstem were examined with computed tomography (CT). The clinical and CT findings of cryptic vascular malformations of the brainstem are described and distinguished from those of brainstem glioma and multiple sclerosis. Calcification within a brainstem lesion that displays relatively little mass effect and shows little contrast enhancement, particularly when associated with a long history of waxing and waning brainstem symptoms, should suggest a vascular malformation.

  13. Aneurysms - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Aneurysms URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/aneurysms.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  14. Multiple cavernous malformations with supravermian arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Unalp, Aycan; Uran, Nedret

    2007-11-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation are congenital vascular abnormalities that have been reported in 0.4% of the population; they represent 5-13% of all cerebrovascular malformations. Onset of cerebral cavernous malformations may be associated with seizures, intracranial hemorrhages, focal neurological deficit or migraine-type headaches. Some patients may require surgical intervention due to hemorrhage. Multiple cavernomas in childhood have been reported in the literature, but they are rare. This manuscript presents a 12-year-old girl with multiple cavernomas accompanied by supravermian arachnoid cyst detected by neuroimaging techniques. This is the first report that demonstrates a case of pediatric multiple cavernous malformation coexisting with arachnoid cyst of the supravermian cistern.

  15. Postnatal growth and development of a cerebral arteriovenous malformation on serial magnetic resonance imaging in a child with hemangiomatosis. Case report.

    PubMed

    Song, Joon K; Niimi, Yasunari; Kupersmith, Mark J; Berenstein, Alejandro

    2007-05-01

    The authors report the case of a 3-week-old girl with two enhancing extraaxial masses in the posterior fossa, one in the left cerebellopontine angle (CPA) and the other to the right of the vein of Galen. Serial magnetic resonance images obtained in this patient at 3 months and then at 2.5 years of age documented regression of the enhancing mass in the left CPA and development of a cerebellar brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in the same CPA location. Also documented were regression of the pineal region mass and formation of the major draining vein of the AVM. The findings in this case support the theory that cerebral AVMs have early postnatal growth potential.

  16. Notch-dependent EMT is attenuated in patients with aortic aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Kostina, Aleksandra S; Uspensky, Vladimir Е; Irtyuga, Olga B; Ignatieva, Elena V; Freylikhman, Olga; Gavriliuk, Natalia D; Moiseeva, Olga M; Zhuk, Sergey; Tomilin, Alexey; Kostareva, Аnna А; Malashicheva, Anna B

    2016-04-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital heart malformation and the reasons for the aortopathies associated with bicuspid aortic valve remain unclear. NOTCH1 mutations are associated with bicuspid aortic valve and have been found in individuals with various left ventricular outflow tract abnormalities. Notch is a key signaling during cardiac valve formation that promotes the endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition. We address the role of Notch signaling in human aortic endothelial cells from patients with bicuspid aortic valve and aortic aneurysm. Aortic endothelial cells were isolated from tissue fragments of bicuspid aortic valve-associated thoracic aortic aneurysm patients and from healthy donors. Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition was induced by activation of Notch signaling. Effectiveness of the transition was estimated by loss of endothelial and gain of mesenchymal markers by immunocytochemistry and qPCR. We show that aortic endothelial cells from the patients with aortic aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve have down regulated Notch signaling and fail to activate Notch-dependent endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in response to its stimulation by different Notch ligands. Our findings support the idea that bicuspid aortic valve and associated aortic aneurysm is associated with dysregulation of the entire Notch signaling pathway independently on the specific gene mutation.

  17. Surgical management of a hypoplastic distal aortic arch and coarctation of aorta in a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome, ascending aortic aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Sabol, Frantisek; Kolesar, Adrián; Toporcer, Tomás; Bajmoczi, Milan

    2014-10-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome has been associated with cardiovascular malformations, but only 3 cases have been reported to be associated with aortic coarctation and surgical management is not defined. A 51-year old woman with Klippel-Feil syndrome associated with an aneurysm of the ascending aorta, hypoplastic aortic arch and aortic coarctation at the level of the left subclavian artery presented with shortness of breath 2 years after diagnosis. Imaging identified interim development of a 7.2-cm aneurysm at the level of the aortic coarctation. She underwent surgical repair with a Dacron interposition graft under hypothermic circulatory arrest. She continues to do well 18 months following repair.

  18. Endovascular Exclusion of Renal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Poul Erik Rohr, Nils

    2005-06-15

    A patient who was operated for an abdominal aortic aneurysm 7 years earlier presented with recently discovered iliac and renal artery aneurysms. The renal artery had an angulation of 90{sup o}, but the aneurysm was successfully excluded using a covered vascular stent graft placed over an extrastiff guidewire. Even in cases of complex anatomy of a renal aneurysm, endovascular treatment should be considered. With development of more flexible and low-profile endoprosthesis with accurate deployment, these have become more usable.

  19. Endovascular Treatment of an Aneurysmal Aberrant Systemic Artery Supplying a Pulmonary Sequestrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kristensen, Katrine Lawaetz; Duus, Louise Aarup; Elle, Bo

    2015-10-15

    An aberrant systemic artery originating from the abdominal aorta supplying a pulmonary sequestration is a rare congenital malformation. This causes a left-to-left shunt. Symptoms include recurrent pneumonias, hemoptysis, and, in the long term, heart failure. Aneurysm of the aberrant vessel is rarely seen. Traditionally, treatment of pulmonary sequestrations includes ligation of the feeding vessel and lobectomy. A new promising treatment is an endovascular approach. Only a few cases describe endovascular treatment of pulmonary sequestration. This is the first published case of a giant aneurysmal branch from the abdominal aorta to the normal basal segments of the lung, successfully occluded with an Amplatzer Vascular Plug II (AVP II, St.Jude Medical, MN, USA) alone.

  20. Microsurgical treatment of ophthalmic segment aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Gross, Bradley A; Du, Rose

    2013-08-01

    Ophthalmic segment aneurysms refer to superior hypophyseal artery aneurysms, true ophthalmic artery aneurysms, and their dorsal variant. Indications for treatment of these aneurysms include concerning morphological features, large size, visual loss, or rupture. Although narrow-necked aneurysms are ideal endovascular targets, more complex and larger lesions necessitating adjunctive stent or flow-diversion techniques may be suitably treated with long-lasting, effective clip ligation instead. This is particularly relevant in the consideration of ruptured ophthalmic segment aneurysms. This article provides a depiction of microsurgical treatment of ophthalmic segment aneurysms with an accompanying video demonstration. Emphasis is placed on microsurgical anatomy, the intradural anterior clinoidectomy and clipping technique. The intradural anterior clinoidectomy, demonstrated in detail in our Supplementary video, provides significant added exposure of the ophthalmic segment of the internal carotid artery, allowing for improved aneurysm visualization. In the management of superior hypophyseal artery aneurysms, emphasis is placed on identifying and preserving superior hypophyseal artery perforators, using serial fenestrated straight clips rather than a single right-angled fenestrated clip to obliterate the aneurysm. Post-clipping indocyanine green dye angiography is a crucial tool to confirm aneurysm obliteration and the preservation of the parent vasculature and adjacent superior hypophyseal artery perforators. With careful attention to the nuances of microsurgical clipping of ophthalmic segment aneurysms, rewarding results can be obtained.

  1. Paraclinoid aneurysm concealed by sphenoid wing meningioma.

    PubMed

    Petrecca, Kevin; Sirhan, Denis

    2009-02-01

    The coexistence of brain tumours and aneurysms is rare. In all previously reported cases the aneurysm was detectable by angiography. We report here a case in which a paraclinoid internal carotid artery aneurysm was coexistent and concealed from angiographic detection by an adjacent parasellar meningioma.

  2. [Albert Einstein and his abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Cervantes Castro, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The interesting case of Albert Einstein's abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. He was operated on at age 69 and, finding that the large aneurysm could not be removed, the surgeon elected to wrap it with cellophane to prevent its growth. However, seven years later the aneurysm ruptured and caused the death of the famous scientist.

  3. Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair: current endovascular perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Nathan; Minion, David; Bobadilla, Joseph L

    2014-01-01

    Thoracoabdominal aneurysms account for roughly 3% of identified aneurysms annually in the United States. Advancements in endovascular techniques and devices have broadened their application to these complex surgical problems. This paper will focus on the current state of endovascular thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair, including specific considerations in patient selection, operative planning, and perioperative complications. Both total endovascular and hybrid options will be considered. PMID:25170271

  4. Transcatheter Coil Embolization of Splenic Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Satoshi Hirota, Shozo; Maeda, Hiroaki; Achiwa, Sachiko Arai, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Nakao, Norio

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical results and technical problems of transcatheter coil embolization for splenic artery aneurysm. Subjects were 16 patients (8 men, 8 women; age range, 40-80 years) who underwent transcatheter embolization for splenic artery aneurysm (14 true aneurysms, 2 false aneurysms) at one of our hospitals during the period January 1997 through July 2005. Two aneurysms (12.5%) were diagnosed at the time of rupture. Multiple splenic aneurysms were found in seven patients. Aneurysms were classified by site as proximal (or strictly ostial) (n = 3), middle (n = 3), or hilar (n = 10). The indication for transcatheter arterial embolization was a false or true aneurysm 20 mm in diameter. Embolic materials were fibered coils and interlocking detachable coils. Embolization was performed by the isolation technique, the packing technique, or both. Technically, all aneurysms were devascularized without severe complications. Embolized aneurysms were 6-40 mm in diameter (mean, 25 mm). Overall, the primary technical success rate was 88% (14 of 16 patients). In the remaining 2 patients (12.5%), partial recanalization occurred, and re-embolization was performed. The secondary technical success rate was 100%. Seven (44%) of the 16 study patients suffered partial splenic infarction. Intrasplenic branching originating from the aneurysm was observed in five patients. We conclude that transcatheter coil embolization should be the initial treatment of choice for splenic artery aneurysm.

  5. Coil Embolization for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of coil embolization compared with surgical clipping to treat intracranial aneurysms. The Technology Endovascular coil embolization is a percutaneous approach to treat an intracranial aneurysm from within the blood vessel without the need of a craniotomy. In this procedure, a microcatheter is inserted into the femoral artery near the groin and navigated to the site of the aneurysm. Small helical platinum coils are deployed through the microcatheter to fill the aneurysm, and prevent it from further expansion and rupture. Health Canada has approved numerous types of coils and coil delivery systems to treat intracranial aneurysms. The most favoured are controlled detachable coils. Coil embolization may be used with other adjunct endovascular devices such as stents and balloons. Background Intracranial Aneurysms Intracranial aneurysms are the dilation or ballooning of part of a blood vessel in the brain. Intracranial aneurysms range in size from small (<12 mm in diameter) to large (12–25 mm), and to giant (>25 mm). There are 3 main types of aneurysms. Fusiform aneurysms involve the entire circumference of the artery; saccular aneurysms have outpouchings; and dissecting aneurysms have tears in the arterial wall. Berry aneurysms are saccular aneurysms with well-defined necks. Intracranial aneurysms may occur in any blood vessel of the brain; however, they are most commonly found at the branch points of large arteries that form the circle of Willis at the base of the brain. In 85% to 95% of patients, they are found in the anterior circulation. Aneurysms in the posterior circulation are less frequent, and are more difficult to treat surgically due to inaccessibility. Most intracranial aneurysms are small and asymptomatic. Large aneurysms may have a mass effect, causing compression on the brain and cranial nerves and neurological deficits. When an intracranial aneurysm ruptures and bleeds

  6. Aneurysm in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery variant: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Saad; Azeem, Abdul; Jiwani, Amyna; Javed, Gohar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There are variations in the anatomy of the vertebrobasilar system amongst which the Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery-Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery (AICA-PICA) variant is thought to have a prevalence of 20–24% (based on retrospective studies). Despite this, aneurysms of the AICA-PICA variant are rare. We present a case of an AICA-PICA aneurysm and discuss its presentation and management, along with a review of literature. Presentation of case We describe the case of a 35 year old female who presented with signs of meningismus. On the basis of radiological imaging it was initially misdiagnosed as a thrombosed arteriovenous malformation (AVM). The patient was eventually discharged with a plan of interval imaging and interventional radiology (if required). The patient presented again with similar signs and symptoms. Re-evaluation of imaging revealed an aneurysm of the AICA-PICA variant which was managed surgically. Discussion Aneurysms of the AICA-PICA variant are rare. The radiological features and surgical management represent a unique clinical entity and are discussed below. Conclusion The prevalence of the AICA-PICA variant might be high but aneurysms in this vessel are rare. The scant knowledge available on this subject makes it a diagnostic difficulty. PMID:27017276

  7. Rupture of lenticulostriate artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Heck, Olivier; Anxionnat, René; Lacour, Jean-Christophe; Derelle, Anne-Laure; Ducrocq, Xavier; Richard, Sébastien; Bracard, Serge

    2014-02-01

    The authors report on 3 rare cases of ruptured lenticulostriate artery (LSA) aneurysms that were heralded by deep cerebral hematomas. The hematomas were unilateral in 2 cases and bilateral in 1; in the bilateral case, only a single LSA aneurysm could be identified on the right side of the brain. Because of their small size (≤ 2 mm), fusiform aspect, and deep location within the brain, all of the aneurysms were treated conservatively. There was no hemorrhage recurrence, and follow-up angiography demonstrated spontaneous thrombosis in 2 of the 3 cases. The clinical course was favorable in 2 of the 3 patients. The course in the patient with the bilateral hematoma was marked by an ischemic event after the initial episode, resulting in an aggravation of deficits. The cause of this second event was uncertain. Because our knowledge about the natural history of LSA aneurysms is incomplete, there is no consensus concerning a therapeutic strategy. The authors' experience in 3 reported cases leads them to think that a conservative approach involving close angiographic monitoring may be proposed as first-line treatment. If the monitored aneurysm then persists or grows in size, its occlusion should be considered. Nonetheless, other studies are needed to further strengthen the legitimacy of this strategy.

  8. Bilateral asymptomatic giant renal artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Özkan, G; Ulusoy, Ş; Dinç, H; Kaynar, K; Sönmez, B; Akagündüz, K

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of renal artery aneurysm is very low. Approximately in 20% of these patients hypertension is observed. The diameter of aneurysm increases with accompanying complication rates. The most feared complication is rupture. The risk of rupture also increases with the diameter of aneurysm. We report an aneurysm with the biggest diameter reported in the literature. The patient had a 12 cm-diameter of aneurysm in one kidney and did not show any symptoms including hypertension until she was seventy years old. PMID:22435028

  9. Idiopathic thoracic aortic aneurysm at pediatric age.

    PubMed

    Marín-Manzano, E; González-de-Olano, D; Haurie-Girelli, J; Herráiz-Sarachaga, J I; Bermúdez-Cañete, R; Tamariz-Martel, A; Cuesta-Gimeno, C; Pérez-de-León, J

    2009-03-01

    A 6-year-old-boy presented with epigastric pain and vomiting over 1 year. Chest X-ray and esophagogastric transit showed a mediastinal mass. A chest computerized tomography angiogram demonstrated a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. Analytical determinations carried out were all negative. The aneurysm was surgically repaired using a Dacron patch. The anatomopathological study described atherosclerotic lesions with calcifications, compatible with an atherosclerotic aneurysm wall. Aneurysms are uncommon in the pediatric population. Usually, no pathogenesis can be determined, and thus, such cases are grouped as idiopathic. Direct repair with or without patch is a therapeutic alternative in pediatric aneurysms and can allow the growth of the aortic circumference.

  10. Spontaneous Regression of Aneurysm Remnant after Incomplete Surgical Clipping in a Patient with Ruptured Cerebral Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Hyo Sub; Ahn, JunHyong; Song, Joon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Cases of spontaneous regression of cerebral aneurysm remnant after incomplete surgical clipping have been rarely reported. This paper reports the regression of an aneurysm remnant after incomplete surgical clipping during postsurgical follow-up. A 50-year-old male presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage because of rupture of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm. An emergency clipping of the aneurysm was performed. A cerebral angiography, which was performed two weeks postoperatively, revealed an aneurysm remnant. The patient refused additional treatment and was discharged without apparent neurological deficit. One-year follow up cerebral angiography demonstrated a partially regressed aneurysm remnant. PMID:28184353

  11. Aneurysms of the thoracoabdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Motta, R; Lò, G; Galli, G; Spaggiari, A; Sandonà, F; Vitello, V; Altomani, V

    1985-01-01

    Five cases of thoracoabdominal aneurysms are reviewed. These cases were observed during the last 10 years and their incidence was 4% of all aortic aneurysms admitted in the same period. In all the patients the Crawford's technique by graft inclusion with visceral vessel reattachment by direct suture, without by-pass, was adopted. Of the five patients, two underwent elective surgery and three emergency surgery. While the mortality rate in the patients operated on election was 0%, on emergency it was 66,6%.

  12. Radiosurgery for brainstem arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Keisuke; Koga, Tomoyuki; Niranjan, Ajay; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C; Lunsford, L Dade

    2013-01-01

    The authors outlined the treatment result of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) inside the brainstem by reviewing the 4 existing studies in detail. The majority of patients with brainstem AVMs had a history of hemorrhage, leading to neurological deficits at the time of treatment in 72-73% of patients. The most frequent location was the midbrain or the pons depending on studies, while the medulla oblongata was the least common location throughout the series. The obliteration rate after radiosurgery was 44-73%, which was generally lower than in other locations, while the complication rate was 5-14%, which was expectedly higher than in other locations. No objective evidence for size is known, and therefore, patient selection and treatment planning should be carefully performed after judicious assessment of treatment risks and benefits among limited treatment options.

  13. Pathogenesis of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    KOMIYAMA, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVMs) represent a high risk of intracranial hemorrhages, which are substantial causes of morbidity and mortality of bAVMs, especially in children and young adults. Although a variety of factors leading to hemorrhages of bAVMs are investigated extensively, their pathogenesis is still not well elucidated. The author has reviewed the updated data of genetic aspects of bAVMs, especially focusing on clinical and experimental knowledge from hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which is the representative genetic disease presenting with bAVMs caused by loss-of-function in one of the two genes: endoglin and activin receptor-like kinase 1. This knowledge may allow us to infer the pathogensis of sporadic bAVMs and in the development of new medical therapies for them. PMID:27076383

  14. New insights into craniofacial malformations

    PubMed Central

    Twigg, Stephen R.F.; Wilkie, Andrew O.M.

    2015-01-01

    Development of the human skull and face is a highly orchestrated and complex three-dimensional morphogenetic process, involving hundreds of genes controlling the coordinated patterning, proliferation and differentiation of tissues having multiple embryological origins. Craniofacial malformations that occur because of abnormal development (including cleft lip and/or palate, craniosynostosis and facial dysostoses), comprise over one-third of all congenital birth defects. High-throughput sequencing has recently led to the identification of many new causative disease genes and functional studies have clarified their mechanisms of action. We present recent findings in craniofacial genetics and discuss how this information together with developmental studies in animal models is helping to increase understanding of normal craniofacial development. PMID:26085576

  15. Genetic Basis of Brain Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Parrini, Elena; Conti, Valerio; Dobyns, William B.; Guerrini, Renzo

    2016-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCD) represent a major cause of developmental disabilities, severe epilepsy, and reproductive disadvantage. Genes that have been associated to MCD are mainly involved in cell proliferation and specification, neuronal migration, and late cortical organization. Lissencephaly-pachygyria-severe band heterotopia are diffuse neuronal migration disorders causing severe global neurological impairment. Abnormalities of the LIS1, DCX, ARX, RELN, VLDLR, ACTB, ACTG1, TUBG1, KIF5C, KIF2A, and CDK5 genes have been associated with these malformations. More recent studies have also established a relationship between lissencephaly, with or without associated microcephaly, corpus callosum dysgenesis as well as cerebellar hypoplasia, and at times, a morphological pattern consistent with polymicrogyria with mutations of several genes (TUBA1A, TUBA8, TUBB, TUBB2B, TUBB3, and DYNC1H1), regulating the synthesis and function of microtubule and centrosome key components and hence defined as tubulinopathies. MCD only affecting subsets of neurons, such as mild subcortical band heterotopia and periventricular heterotopia, have been associated with abnormalities of the DCX, FLN1A, and ARFGEF2 genes and cause neurological and cognitive impairment that vary from severe to mild deficits. Polymicrogyria results from abnormal late cortical organization and is inconstantly associated with abnormal neuronal migration. Localized polymicrogyria has been associated with anatomo-specific deficits, including disorders of language and higher cognition. Polymicrogyria is genetically heterogeneous, and only in a small minority of patients, a definite genetic cause has been identified. Megalencephaly with normal cortex or polymicrogyria by MRI imaging, hemimegalencephaly and focal cortical dysplasia can all result from mutations in genes of the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway. Postzygotic mutations have been described for most MCD and can be limited to the dysplastic tissue in the

  16. Observation of cerebral aneurysm wall thickness using intraoperative microscopy: clinical and morphological analysis of translucent aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Song, Jihye; Park, Jung Eon; Kim, Hyoung Ryoul; Shin, Yong Sam

    2015-06-01

    Intracranial aneurysms suffer various interactions between hemodynamics and pathobiology, and rupture when this balance disrupted. Aneurysm wall morphology is a result of these interactions and reflects the quality of the maturation. However, it is a poorly documented in previous studies. The purpose of this study is to observe aneurysm wall thickness and describe the characteristics of translucent aneurysm by analyzing clinical and morphological parameters. 253 consecutive patients who underwent clipping surgery in a single institute were retrospectively analyzed. Only middle cerebral artery aneurysms (MCA) which exposed most part of the dome during surgery were included. Aneurysms were categorized based on intraoperative video findings. Aneurysms more than 90 % of super-thin dome and any aneurysms with entirely super-thin-walled daughter sac were defined as translucent aneurysm. A total of 110 consecutive patients with 116 unruptured MCA aneurysms were included. Ninety-two aneurysms (79.3 %) were assigned to the not-translucent group and 24 (20.7 %) to the translucent group. The relative proportion of translucent aneurysm in each age group was highest at ages 50-59 years and absent at ages 30-39 and 70-79 years. There was a trend that translucent aneurysms were smaller in size (p = 0.019). Multivariate logistic analysis showed that translucent aneurysm was strongly correlated with height <3 mm (p = 0.003). We demonstrated that the translucent aneurysms were smaller in size and the aneurysm height <3 mm was related. These results may provide information in determining treatment strategies in patients with small size aneurysm.

  17. Simultaneous rupture of two middle cerebral artery aneurysms presented with two aneurysm-associated intracerebral hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Havakeshian, Sina; Bozinov, Oliver; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl

    2013-12-01

    Simultaneous rupture of more than one intracranial aneurysm is a rare event and difficult to diagnose. In this case report, we present the case of a patient with a simultaneous rupture of two middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms with two separately localized aneurysm-associated intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH). Initially, the patient presented with headache and neck stiffness as well as progressive decrease of consciousness. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage with a frontal and temporal space-occupying ICH. CT angiography demonstrated two MCA aneurysms located in adjacency to the ICHs, one located at the M1 segment and the other in the bifurcation of the left MCA. Rupture of both aneurysms was confirmed during surgery, and both aneurysms were clipped microsurgically without complications. Although rupture of one aneurysm in patients with multiple aneurysms is the most common event, this case indicates that simultaneous rupture should be kept in mind in patients with multiple aneurysms. In patients with multiple aneurysms, the identification of the ruptured aneurysm(s) is necessary to avoid leaving a ruptured aneurysm untreated.

  18. Renal tract malformations: perspectives for nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Kerecuk, Larissa; Schreuder, Michiel F; Woolf, Adrian S

    2008-06-01

    Renal tract malformations are congenital anomalies of the kidneys and/or lower urinary tract. One challenging feature of these conditions is that they can present not only prenatally but also in childhood or adulthood. The most severe types of malformations, such as bilateral renal agenesis or dysplasia, although rare, lead to renal failure. With advances in dialysis and transplantation for young children, it is now possible to prevent the early death of at least some individuals with severe malformations. Other renal tract malformations, such as congenital pelviureteric junction obstruction and primary vesicoureteric reflux, are relatively common. Renal tract malformations are, collectively, the major cause of childhood end-stage renal disease. Their contribution to the number of adults on renal replacement therapy is less clear and has possibly been underestimated. Renal tract malformations can be familial, and specific mutations of genes involved in renal tract development can sometimes be found in affected individuals. These features provide information about the causes of malformations but also raise questions about whether to screen relatives. Whether prenatal decompression of obstructed renal tracts, or postnatal initiation of therapies such as prophylactic antibiotics or angiotensin blockade, improve long-term renal outcomes remains unclear.

  19. Vascular Malformations: Approach by an Interventional Radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Pimpalwar, Sheena

    2014-01-01

    Children with vascular malformations are best managed with a multidisciplinary team of specialists. Interventional radiology may deliver primary treatment such as staged sclerotherapy and embolization for malformations that are poor candidates for primary surgical resection or play a supportive role such as preoperative or intraoperative embolization. A thorough understanding of vascular morphology and flow dynamics is imperative to choosing the best treatment tool and technique. In this review, the author discusses the selection of techniques and tools used to treat vascular malformations based on their angiographic morphology. PMID:25045335

  20. Intra-aneurysmal microcatheter looping technique for stent-assisted embolization of complex intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C-C; Lv, N; Feng, Z-Z; Li, Z-F; Zhao, R; Li, Q; Liu, J-M

    2015-01-01

    The endovascular treatment of wide-necked, large and giant aneurysms remains challenging. This retrospective study investigated the feasibility and safety of an intra-aneurysmal microcatheter looping technique for stent-assisted embolization of complicated intracranial aneurysms. This technique was used for 31 patients with complicated cerebral aneurysms from January 2007 to November 2013. The clinical and angiographic results were retrospectively evaluated. The target aneurysms were successfully treated in all cases (100%). A flow diverter was used in seven procedures. There were no aneurysmal perforations or ischemic complications, except for a microguidewire perforation of the distal vessel in one case. Among the 24 cases with conventional stent-assisted embolization, complete embolization or neck residual was obtained in 21 cases. Partial occlusion occurred in three cases. In conclusion, the intra-aneurysmal microcatheter looping technique is a safe and feasible alternative treatment of complicated intracranial aneurysms. This approach is a reasonable choice for patients and leads to successful outcomes. PMID:26179063

  1. Anterior commissure absence without callosal agenesis: a new brain malformation.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, T N; Stevens, J M; Free, S L; Sander, J W; Shorvon, S D; Sisodiya, S M

    2002-04-23

    The authors report a novel human brain malformation characterized by the absence of the anterior commissure without callosal agenesis, but associated with gross unilateral panhemispheric malformation incorporating subependymal heterotopia, subcortical heterotopia, and gyral abnormalities including temporal malformation and polymicrogyria. In contrast, a normal anterior commissure was found in 125 control subjects and in 113 other subjects with a range of brain malformations.

  2. Aneurysms of the thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Le Roux, B. T.; Rogers, M. A.; Gotsman, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    Selected radiographs from 40 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm serve to illustrate most of the radiographic features of this disease. Surgical techniques are outlined and were used to modify the natural course of the disease in 14 patients, with three postoperative deaths. The remaining 26 patients were either moribund on admission and died shortly afterwards or declined operations and died later. Images PMID:5144643

  3. Giant Serpentine Aneurysms: Multidisciplinary Management

    PubMed Central

    Anshun, W.; Feng, L.; Daming, W.

    2000-01-01

    Summary Sixty-five cases of intracranial giant serpentine aneurysms (GSΛs), including 61 cases reported in the literature and four additional cases presented in this study were reviewed. The clinical presentation, possible causes, natural history, and especially management of GSAs are discussed with emphasis on the need for aggressive intervention and multidisciplinary management. PMID:20667180

  4. A method for semi-automatic segmentation and evaluation of intracranial aneurysms in bone-subtraction computed tomography angiography (BSCTA) images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Susanne; Ditt, Hendrik; Biermann, Christina; Lell, Michael; Keller, Jörg

    2009-02-01

    The rupture of an intracranial aneurysm has dramatic consequences for the patient. Hence early detection of unruptured aneurysms is of paramount importance. Bone-subtraction computed tomography angiography (BSCTA) has proven to be a powerful tool for detection of aneurysms in particular those located close to the skull base. Most aneurysms though are chance findings in BSCTA scans performed for other reasons. Therefore it is highly desirable to have techniques operating on standard BSCTA scans available which assist radiologists and surgeons in evaluation of intracranial aneurysms. In this paper we present a semi-automatic method for segmentation and assessment of intracranial aneurysms. The only user-interaction required is placement of a marker into the vascular malformation. Termination ensues automatically as soon as the segmentation reaches the vessels which feed the aneurysm. The algorithm is derived from an adaptive region-growing which employs a growth gradient as criterion for termination. Based on this segmentation values of high clinical and prognostic significance, such as volume, minimum and maximum diameter as well as surface of the aneurysm, are calculated automatically. the segmentation itself as well as the calculated diameters are visualised. Further segmentation of the adjoining vessels provides the means for visualisation of the topographical situation of vascular structures associated to the aneurysm. A stereolithographic mesh (STL) can be derived from the surface of the segmented volume. STL together with parameters like the resiliency of vascular wall tissue provide for an accurate wall model of the aneurysm and its associated vascular structures. Consequently the haemodynamic situation in the aneurysm itself and close to it can be assessed by flow modelling. Significant values of haemodynamics such as pressure onto the vascular wall, wall shear stress or pathlines of the blood flow can be computed. Additionally a dynamic flow model can be

  5. Behçet's disease with ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm following ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Atsushi; Kawashima, Masatou; Matsushima, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    A 48-year-old Japanese woman with Behçet's disease suffered successive rupture of thoracic aortic and cerebral aneurysms within one year. The patient underwent successful surgical treatment for both aneurysms. Histological examination of the aneurysm walls revealed lymphocyte infiltration into the adventitia with smooth muscle cell hyperplasia in the thickened intima. This is an extremely unusual presentation of Behçet's disease associated with both cerebral and aortic aneurysms.

  6. Endovascular aneurysm repair for multiple aneurysms as a sequel of hypereosinophilic syndrome.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, T; Hynes, N; Tawfick, W; Sultan, S

    2014-04-01

    This case represents the first report of multiple arterial aneurysms including aortic, iliac, visceral, and coronary aneurysms associated with hypereosinophilic syndrome. It presents an interesting case of epinephrine abuse and the unfortunate sequelae. This case illustrates novel approaches in emergency repair of internal iliac artery aneurysm rupture and the management of visceral artery aneurysms and exemplifies how multiple endovascular technologies can be utilized even in the high-risk polymorbid patient.

  7. [Galen from Pergamon (130-200)--views in ophthalmology. Part II--anatomic description of the eye].

    PubMed

    Bieganowski, Lech

    2005-01-01

    The article presents Galen's views on the anatomy of the eye. He believed that the eye was composed of membranes and fluids. He distinguished the following membranes of the eye: the cornea, the sclera, the choroid, the capsula of the lens and the retina, as well as the structure covering the muscles of the eye and joining the individual elements of the eye with the orbital cavity and the skull (i.e. the bulbar conjunctiva and Tenon's capsula). The following were considered as fluid substances of the eye: egg-shaped fluid (i.e. albuminous fluid), crystal fluid (i.e. the lens) and vitreous fluid. The article also outlines his theory of vision. It assumes the existence of a specific life force called pneuma which is under a considerable influence of the soul and which reaches the eye from the brain through small channels in the optic nerve. Due to this element the eye was supposed to have the vision ability located in the lens which was the most important part of the eye receiving the vision sensations.

  8. Glomuvenous malformation: magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Flors, Lucia; Norton, Patrick T; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2015-02-01

    We report a case of a glomuvenous malformation involving the dorsal aspect of the right hand and distal forearm in an 11-year-old boy. He had a history of multiple vascular anomalies since birth and presented with increasing right hand pain. MRI played an important role in characterizing and determining the extent of the lesion. In particular, dynamic time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography precisely defined its vascularity. The diagnosis was made histopathologically after partial resection of the lesion. Glomuvenous malformation is a rare developmental hamartoma that originates from the glomus body. Clinically they usually resemble a venous malformation but they are a different entity. In the appropriate clinical setting this rare condition must be included in the differential diagnosis of a vascular malformation, especially when subtle arterial enhancement, early venous shunting and progressive filling of dilated venous spaces are depicted on MRA.

  9. [Central nervous system malformations: neurosurgery correlates].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-León, Juan C; Betancourt-Fursow, Yaline M; Jiménez-Betancourt, Cristina S

    2013-09-06

    Congenital malformations of the central nervous system are related to alterations in neural tube formation, including most of the neurosurgical management entities, dysraphism and craniosynostosis; alterations of neuronal proliferation; megalencefaly and microcephaly; abnormal neuronal migration, lissencephaly, pachygyria, schizencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, heterotopia and cortical dysplasia, spinal malformations and spinal dysraphism. We expose the classification of different central nervous system malformations that can be corrected by surgery in the shortest possible time and involving genesis mechanisms of these injuries getting better studied from neurogenic and neuroembryological fields, this involves connecting innovative knowledge areas where alteration mechanisms in dorsal induction (neural tube) and ventral induction (telencephalization) with the current way of correction, as well as the anomalies of cell proliferation and differentiation of neuronal migration and finally the complex malformations affecting the posterior fossa and current possibilities of correcting them.

  10. Inner ear malformations: a practical diagnostic approach.

    PubMed

    Mazón, M; Pont, E; Montoya-Filardi, A; Carreres-Polo, J; Más-Estellés, F

    2016-12-29

    Pediatric sensorineural hearing loss is a major cause of disability; although inner ear malformations account for only 20-40% of all cases, recognition and characterization will be vital for the proper management of these patients. In this article relevant anatomy and development of inner ear are surveyed. The role of neuroimaging in pediatric sensorineural hearing loss and cochlear preimplantation study are assessed. The need for a universal system of classification of inner ear malformations with therapeutic and prognostic implications is highlighted. And finally, the radiological findings of each type of malformation are concisely described and depicted. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging play a crucial role in the characterization of inner ear malformations and allow the assessment of the anatomical structures that enable the selection of appropriate treatment and surgical approach.

  11. The Roles of Endoscope in Aneurysmal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIOKA, Hideyuki; KINOUCHI, Hiroyuki

    The neuroendoscope, with its higher magnification, better observation, and additional illumination, can provide us information that may not be available with the microscope in aneurysm surgery. Furthermore, recent advancement of the holding systems for the endoscope allows surgeons to perform microsurgical manipulation using both hands under the simultaneous endoscopic and microscopic monitoring. With this procedure, surgeons can inspect hidden structures, dissect perforators at the back of the aneurysm, identify important vessel segments without retraction of the aneurysm or arteries, and check for completion of clipping. In addition, we have recently applied endoscopic indocyanine green video angiography to aneurysm surgery. This newly developed technique can offer real-time assessment of the blood flow of vasculatures in the dead angles of the microscope, and will reduce operative morbidity related to vascular occlusion, improve the durability of aneurysm surgery by reducing incomplete clipping, and thus promote the outcome of aneurysm surgery. PMID:26041623

  12. Venous malformations: clinical diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Behravesh, Sasan; Yakes, Wayne; Gupta, Nikhil; Naidu, Sailendra; Chong, Brian W.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Venous malformation (VM) is the most common type of congenital vascular malformation (CVM). They are present at birth and are often symptomatic, causing morbidity and pain. VMs can be challenging to diagnose and are often confused with hemangioma in terminology as well as with imaging. An accurate clinical history and cross-sectional imaging are critical for diagnosis and for devising management. This manuscript will review imaging approaches to diagnosing VMs and current treatment strategies. PMID:28123976

  13. Malformation and plastic surgery in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, Ralf; Magritz, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Malformations of the head and neck show a huge variety of clinical symptoms with functional and esthetic consequences. Often times its rehabilitation requires multi-staged and multi-disciplinary procedures and concepts. These must consider eating, speech, mimic expression, hearing and “esthetics” or at least “normality”. A survey of the most common head and neck malformations and their treatment options are presented here. PMID:25587361

  14. The Microcephaly-Capillary Malformation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaa, Ghayda M.; Paciorkowski, Alex R.; Smyser, Christopher D.; Willing, Marcia C.; Lind, Anne C.; Dobyns, William B.

    2012-01-01

    We report on three children from two families with a new pattern recognition malformation syndrome consisting of severe congenital microcephaly (MIC), intractable epilepsy including infantile spasms, and generalized capillary malformations that was first reported recently in this journal [Carter et al. (2011); Am J Med Genet A 155: 301–306]. Two of our reported patients are an affected brother and sister, suggesting this is an autosomal recessive severe congenital MIC syndrome. PMID:21815250

  15. Venous Malformation: update on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis & management

    PubMed Central

    Dompmartin, Anne; Vikkula, Miikka; Boon, Laurence M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review was to discuss the current knowledge on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and therapeutic management of venous malformations. Venous malformations (VMs) are slow-flow vascular anomalies. They are simple, sporadic or familial (cutaneo-mucosal venous malformation or glomuvenous malformations), combined (e.g. capillaro-venous, capillaro-lymphaticovenous malformations) or syndromic (Klippel-Trenaunay, Blue Rubber Bleb Naevus and Maffucci). Genetic studies have identified causes of familial forms and of 40% of sporadic VMs. Another diagnostic advancement is the identification of elevated D-dimer level as the first biomarker of venous malformations within vascular anomalies. Those associated with pain are often responsive to Low Molecular Weight Heparin which should also be used to avoid disseminated intravascular coagulopathy secondary to intervention, especially if fibrinogen level is low. Finally, development of a modified sclerosing agent, ethylcellulose–ethanol, has improved therapy. It is efficient and safe, and widens indications for sclerotherapy to sensitive and dangerous areas such as hands, feet and periocular area. PMID:20870869

  16. Splenic Artery Aneurysm of the Hepatosplenomesenteric Trunk

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We herein report the case of a splenic artery aneurysm with a hepatosplenomesenteric trunk that presented in a pregnant woman. Catheter embolization was not performed due to the wide neck of the aneurysm and its close location to the trunk indicates a high risk of mesenteric trunk thrombosis. We instead performed surgical resection of the aneurysm after successful delivery of the infant by Caesarian section. The splenic artery was reconstructed by side-to-end anastomosis with the common hepatic artery. PMID:24386023

  17. Mandibular arteriovenous malformation: A rare life-threatening condition depicted on multidetector CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Amit Nandan Dhar; Pandey, Anubha; Kumar, Ishan; Agarwal, Arjit

    2014-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the mandible is a rare and potentially life-threatening condition which can lead to massive hemorrhage. The following is a description where a large mandibular AVM presented with torrential bleeding following tooth extraction for caries. An orthopantomogram (OPG) was performed which was suggestive of aneurysmal bone cyst or ameloblastoma. A computed tomography (CT) angiography revealed a large mandibular AVM with submandibular extension. It is important for both clinicians and radiologist to be aware of this type of lesion that can have life-threatening complications. It is important to define the anatomical location and the feeder vessels of the entity in detail preoperatively. This communication highlights the common differential and use of multidetector CT (MDCT) angiography along with other imaging modalities to prevent a fatal hemorrhage and arrive at a correct diagnosis. PMID:24959049

  18. Congenital Vascular Malformations of the Liver: An Association With Trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Burdall, Oliver C; Grammatikopoulos, Tassos; Sellars, Maria; Hadzic, Nedim; Davenport, Mark

    2016-12-01

    A link between congenital vascular malformation (CVM) of the liver and trisomy 21 has been suggested. We reviewed all children with trisomy 21 referred for investigation to a specialist pediatric hepatobiliary unit (1985-2015). Forty-five children with trisomy 21 were identified; 7 (15%) had a defined CVMs (4 girls). All such infants were also diagnosed with a range of cardiac defects. CVMs were divided according to the nature of the vascular connection. Group (i) (n = 3): Abnormal venovenous anomaly. This included portocaval shunt and patent ductus venosus (n = 2). Group (ii) (n = 4): Involvement of all 3 vascular systems. Two infants had arterioportal hypertension caused by hepatic arteries feeding into a left portal vein aneurysm within the umbilical fissure. Two infants had more complex hepatic artery to hepatic vein shunts developing early cardiorespiratory failure with progressive jaundice. Our series shows a clear association between cardiac anomalies and CVM in children with trisomy 21.

  19. Elective Treatment of Middle Colic Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Takafumi; Ota, Rikako; Ohno, Takashi; Kodama, Wataru; Uchida, Naotaka; Hayashi, Eiichi; Fukino, Syunsuke

    2014-01-01

    Middle colic artery aneurysms are rare and most have been reported with rupture or symptom. We report the successful elective treatment of a middle colic artery aneurysm without symptom, which is very rare. It failed to perform transcatheter arterial embolization for anatomical reasons, and, thus, the patient, a 77-year-old man, underwent surgical resection in spite of a history of laparotomy. Although a common cause of middle colic artery aneurysms is segmental arterial mediolysis, the present pathological findings indicated that fragmented or degenerated elastic fibers may also play an important role like aortic aneurysms. PMID:25298839

  20. Elective treatment of middle colic artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kengo; Hamasaki, Takafumi; Ota, Rikako; Ohno, Takashi; Kodama, Wataru; Uchida, Naotaka; Hayashi, Eiichi; Fukino, Syunsuke

    2014-01-01

    Middle colic artery aneurysms are rare and most have been reported with rupture or symptom. We report the successful elective treatment of a middle colic artery aneurysm without symptom, which is very rare. It failed to perform transcatheter arterial embolization for anatomical reasons, and, thus, the patient, a 77-year-old man, underwent surgical resection in spite of a history of laparotomy. Although a common cause of middle colic artery aneurysms is segmental arterial mediolysis, the present pathological findings indicated that fragmented or degenerated elastic fibers may also play an important role like aortic aneurysms.

  1. Right ventricular outflow tract aneurysm with thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Peer, Syed Murfad; Bhat, P.S. Seetharama; Furtado, Arul Dominic; Chikkatur, Raghavendra

    2012-01-01

    Right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) aneurysm is a known complication of tetralogy of Fallot repair when a ventriculotomy is done. It leads to RV dysfunction and may require re-operation. We describe a rare instance of a patient who developed an RVOT aneurysm after trans-ventricular repair of tetralogy of Fallot, which was complicated with the formation of a thrombus in the aneurysm sac. The patient underwent re-operation with thrombectomy, excision of the RVOT aneurysm and pulmonary valve replacement. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of this combination and its implications have not been reported. PMID:22232231

  2. Pathomechanisms and treatment of pediatric aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Krings, Timo; Geibprasert, Sasikhan; terBrugge, Karel G

    2010-10-01

    Pediatric aneurysms are rare diseases distinct from classical adult aneurysms and therefore require different treatment strategies. Apart from saccular aneurysms that are more commonly found in older children, three major pathomechanisms may be encountered: trauma, infection, and dissection. The posterior circulation and more distal locations are more commonly encountered in children compared to adults, and there is an overall male predominance. Clinical findings are not only confined to subarachnoid hemorrhage but may also comprise mass effects, headaches or neurological deficits. In traumatic aneurysms, the skull base and distal anterior communicating artery are commonly affected, and the hemorrhage occurs often delayed (2-4 weeks following the initial trauma). Infectious aneurysms are mostly bacterial in origin, and hemorrhage occurs early after a septic embolic shower. Dissecting aneurysms are the most often encountered aneurysm type in children and can lead to mass effect, hemorrhage, or ischemia depending on the fate of the intramural hematoma. Treatment strategies in pediatric aneurysms include endosaccular coil treatment only for the "classical berry-type" aneurysms; in the other instances, parent vessel occlusion, flow reversal, surgical options, or a combined treatment with bypass and parent vessel occlusion have to be contemplated.

  3. Natural history of true pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Takao, H; Doi, I; Watanabe, T; Yoshioka, N; Ohtomo, K

    2010-01-01

    Advances in non-invasive diagnostic techniques, such as CT and ultrasonography, have improved our ability to detect unruptured pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms. No definitive study evaluating the natural history of these lesions or their preferred method of treatment has been published. In this report, we describe five patients with eight unruptured true pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms followed without treatment. Of these patients, four had coeliac axis stenosis (n = 1) or occlusion (n = 3) and one had occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery. The mean diameter of the aneurysms was 12.0 mm (range 7–17 mm). The mean duration of follow-up was 29.4 months (range 6–57 months). There was no aneurysm rupture during a total of 147 patient-months (243 aneurysm-months) of follow-up. Of the eight aneurysms, three increased in size over the follow-up period. We conclude that the risk of rupture of true pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms might be lower than expected from the data on ruptured aneurysms; however, careful follow-up of untreated aneurysms is necessary. PMID:20647516

  4. [Approach to juxtarenal inflammatory aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Scuro, A; Barzaghi, M E; Griso, A; Ferrari Ruffino, S; Kontothanassis, D; Mirandola, M; Leonardi, G; D'Agata, M

    2004-01-01

    The incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) in a late review of the literature is estimated about 2-15% overall aortic aneurysms. In our data this type of aneurysm is 3.6 overall aortic aneurysms treated. In the majority of the cases, IAAA is juxtarenal or infrarenal. Ethiopathogenesis of IAAA till today is not certain. Recent hypothesis on IAAA attribute the same ethiopathogenesis in both atherosclerotic and inflammatory aneurysm. The interaction of genetic, environmental and infective factors should be able to determine an autoimmune inflammatory reaction of variable severity. 80% of the patients suffering from IAAA present abdominal or lumbar pain, loss of weight and increase of the RC sedimentation velocity. The IAAA's natural history goes to rupture. Entrapment of nearstanding organs totally involved in the fibrotic process is the most frequent complication. Usually there is a compression of the ureter and the duodenum with consequenced hydroureteronephrosis and bowel obstruction. Preoperative diagnosis is possible; CT scan and MRI guarantee and accuracy about 90%. Intraoperatively the external wall of IAAA appears whitish and translucent and always there are tenacious adhesion given by the avventital wounds inflammation. Confirm is given by the histological examination of the aneurysmatic wall and peravventitial tissues. Our experience and a late review of the literature concorde that surgical indication for the treatment of IAAA is the same for the atherosclerotic one. This conviction is supported by the fact that the diagnostic methodical evolution and the improvement in mininvasive surgical technique lowered perioperating morbility and mortaliy. We prefer, according with many authors, retroperitoneal approach to juxtarenal IAAA, instead of standardized transperitoneal access with xifo-pubical or transversal under costal incision. This approach offers some advantages as easier exposition of aorta, whose postero-lateral wall is hardly ever

  5. [A case of successful treatment of concomitant ruptured intracranial aneurysm and visceral aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Diogo, Cláudia; Baltazar, José; Fernandes, Mário

    2012-01-01

    The association between intracranial and visceral aneurysms is very rare, with a bad prognosis. The rupture usually appears in the Emergency Room, and it implies an immediate treatment. We describe the case of a woman with rupture of an anterior communicant artery aneurysm and rupture of a pancreatic duodenal artery aneurysm. The actuation of all specialties allowed the direct surgical treatment of the visceral aneurysm, without the aggravation of the cerebral hemorrhage that the eventual Aorta Artery clamping could provoke. The maintenance of the hemodynamic stability was essential for the posterior treatment of the intracranial aneurysm.

  6. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair in HIV Patients with Ruptured Abdominal Aneurysm and Low CD4

    PubMed Central

    Orrapin, Saritphat; Arworn, Supapong; Reanpang, Termpong

    2016-01-01

    We report two HIV infected patients with ruptured abdominal aneurysm by using endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) technique. A 59-year-old Thai man had a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and a 57-year-old man had a ruptured iliac artery aneurysm. Both patients had a CD4 level below 200 μ/L indicating a low immune status at admission. They were treated by EVAR. Neither patient had any complications in 3 months postoperatively. EVAR may have a role in HIV patients with ruptured abdominal aneurysm together with very low immunity. PMID:27703834

  7. Pulmonary artery aneurysm with patent arterial duct: resection of aneurysm and ductal division.

    PubMed

    Tefera, Endale; Teodori, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Congenital or acquired aneurysm of the pulmonary artery (PA) is rare. Although aneurysms are described following surgical treatment of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), occurrence of this lesion in association with PDA without previous surgery is extremely uncommon. An eight-year-old patient with PDA and aneurysm of the main PA is described in this report. Clinical diagnosis of PDA was made upon presentation. Diagnosis of PA aneurysm was suspected on chest x-ray and was confirmed on transthoracic echocardiography. Successful surgical resection of the aneurysm and division of the duct were performed under cardiopulmonary bypass. The patient did well on follow-up both from clinical and echocardiographic point of view.

  8. Extended use of endovascular aneurysm sealing for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Böckler, Dittmar; Holden, Andrew; Krievins, Dainis; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M; Peters, Andreas S; Geisbüsch, Philipp; Reijnen, Michel

    2016-09-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) is now an established treatment modality for suitable patients presenting with aneurysm rupture. EVAR for ruptured aneurysms reduces transfusion, mechanical ventilation, intensive care. and hospital stay when compared with open surgery. In the emergency setting, however, EVAR is limited by low applicability due to adverse clinical or anatomical characteristics and increased need for reintervention. In addition, ongoing bleeding from aortic side branches post-EVAR can cause hemodynamic instability, larger hematomas, and abdominal compartment syndrome. Endovascular aneurysm sealing, based on polymer filling of the aneurysm, has the potential to overcome some of the limitations of EVAR for ruptured aneurysms and to improve outcomes. Recent literature suggests that endovascular aneurysm sealing can be performed with early mortality similar to that of EVAR for ruptured aortic aneurysms, but experience is limited to a few centers and a small number of patients. The addition of chimney grafts can increase the applicability of endovascular aneurysm sealing in order to treat short-neck and juxtarenal aneurysms as an alternative to fenestrated endografts. Further evaluation of the technique, with larger longitudinal studies, is necessary before advocating wider implementation of endovascular aneurysm sealing in the emergency setting.

  9. Spontaneous regression of intracranial aneurysm following remote ruptured aneurysm treatment with pipeline stent assisted coiling.

    PubMed

    Tsimpas, Asterios; Ashley, William W; Germanwala, Anand V

    2016-10-01

    Spontaneous aneurysm regression is a rare phenomenon. We present the interesting case of a 54-year-old woman who was admitted with a Hunt/Hess grade IV, Fisher grade III subarachnoid hemorrhage and multiple intracranial aneurysms. She was treated with coiling of the largest paraclinoid aneurysm and placement of a flow diverting pipeline embolization device that covered all internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms. A follow-up angiogram at 6 months showed remodeling of the ICA with complete obliteration of all treated aneurysms. A distant, untreated, right frontal M2 aneurysm regressed spontaneously, after the flow was diverted away from it with the stent. The literature is reviewed, and potential pathophysiological mechanisms leading to aneurysm regression are discussed.

  10. Spontaneous regression of intracranial aneurysm following remote ruptured aneurysm treatment with pipeline stent assisted coiling.

    PubMed

    Tsimpas, Asterios; Ashley, William W; Germanwala, Anand V

    2015-08-13

    Spontaneous aneurysm regression is a rare phenomenon. We present the interesting case of a 54-year-old woman who was admitted with a Hunt/Hess grade IV, Fisher grade III subarachnoid hemorrhage and multiple intracranial aneurysms. She was treated with coiling of the largest paraclinoid aneurysm and placement of a flow diverting pipeline embolization device that covered all internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms. A follow-up angiogram at 6 months showed remodeling of the ICA with complete obliteration of all treated aneurysms. A distant, untreated, right frontal M2 aneurysm regressed spontaneously, after the flow was diverted away from it with the stent. The literature is reviewed, and potential pathophysiological mechanisms leading to aneurysm regression are discussed.

  11. Aneurysmal wall imaging in a case of cortical superficial siderosis and multiple unruptured aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Yalo, Bertrand; Pop, Raoul; Zinchenko, Ielyzaveta; Diaconu, Mihaela; Chibbaro, Salvatore; Manisor, Monica; Wolff, Valerie; Beaujeux, Remy

    2016-11-09

    We report a case of interhemispheric and bifrontal cortical superficial siderosis in association with two intracranial aneurysms. The patient had no clinical history suggestive of aneurysm rupture, no feature of amyloid angiopathy or other apparent etiology for cortical siderosis. We performed high resolution brain MRI with dark blood T1 sequences before and after IV contrast injection. An anterior communicating aneurysm showed partial wall enhancement on the posterior wall whereas a left posterior communicating aneurysm did not. In the light of recent reports of the association of wall enhancement with unstable aneurysms, we considered wall enhancement to be a marker of inflammation and remodeling of the aneurysm wall, resulting in chronic hemorrhagic suffusion in the subarachnoid spaces. To our knowledge, this is the first report offering proof for a possible link between apparently unruptured aneurysms and cortical siderosis.

  12. Scintigraphy of aneurysmal bone cysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, T.M.

    1984-04-01

    Bone scintigrams with Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals of 25 aneurysmal bone cysts showed abnormal activity in every case. In 22 cases, the activity was correlated with the true pathologic extent of the lesions; only three exhibited a false-positive extended pattern of uptake beyond the true tumor margins. Sixteen scintigrams (64%) revealed increased uptake, chiefly around the periphery of the lesions, with less activity in their centers. This feature could not be explained simply by the cystic nature of the lesions, since aneurysmal bone cysts may contain considerable fibrous tissue septa containing trabeculae of reactive new bone. However, there was no correlation between any specific anatomic or histologic pattern and the intensity and pattern of abnormal scintigraphic activity.

  13. Time evolution and hemodynamics of cerebral aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher; Tateshima, Satoshi; Viñuela, Fernando; Cebral, Juan

    2011-03-01

    Cerebral aneurysm rupture is a leading cause of hemorrhagic strokes. Because they are being more frequently diagnosed before rupture and the prognosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage is poor, clinicians are often required to judge which aneurysms are prone to progression and rupture. Unfortunately, the processes of aneurysm initiation, growth and rupture are not well understood. Multiple factors associated to these processes have been identified. Our goal is to investigate two of them, arterial hemodynamics (using computational fluid dynamics) and the peri-aneurysmal environment, by studying a group of growing cerebral aneurysms that are followed longitudinally in time. Six patients with unruptured untreated brain aneurysms which exhibited growth during the observation period were selected for the study. Vascular models of each aneurysm at each observation time were constructed from the corresponding computed tomography angiography (CTA) images. Subsequently, models were aligned, and geometrical differences quantified. Blood flow was modeled with the 3D unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equation for a Newtonian fluid, and wall shear stress distribution and flow patterns were calculated and visualized. Analysis of the simulations and changes in geometry revealed asymmetric growth patterns and suggests that areas subject to vigorous flows, i.e. relative high wall shear stress and concentrated streamlines patterns; correspond to regions of aneurysm growth. Furthermore, in some cases the geometrical evolution of aneurysms is clearly affected by contacts with bone structures and calcifications in the wall, and as a consequence the hemodynamics is greatly modified. Thus, in these cases the peri-aneurysmal environment must be considered when analyzing aneurysm evolution.

  14. Correlation Between Aneurysm Size and Hemodynamics in One Individual with Multiple Small Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Britz, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Objective A large number of cases are needed in the patient-specific modeling of intracranial aneurysms to establish the statistical significance due to individual variation of risk factors that are difficult to account for. However, these risk factors are critical in hemorrhage risk as demonstrated in large clinical studies. Rupture risks for aneurysms in an individual are easier to compare because these aneurysms are under the same physiological environment, and their only differences are the local hemodynamic factors associated with their anatomic locations. Methods Eight small aneurysms (< 7 mm) from one individual were analyzed using patient-specific hemodynamic modeling. Four scenarios with different perfusion assumptions were performed to account for the flow rate at two smaller communicating arteries. Wall shear stresses (WSS) at these aneurysms were compared to determine their relationship with the aneurysm size. Results Each of the three largest aneurysms is either the most proximal or distal aneurysm in a given artery so that blood pressure does not have a direct influence on aneurysm size. No wall shear stress-derived hemodynamic variables are found to be related to aneurysm size. Discussion A study of multiple aneurysms from one individual offers a unique opportunity to examine various hemodynamic factors without selection biases. Aneurysms greater than 4 mm (Group 1) have a higher product of maximum WSS and area of low WSS; aneurysms smaller than 4 mm (Group 2) have a lower product of maximum WSS and area of low WSS. In addition, aneurysm size is linearly correlated with the flow rate at the parent artery in each group. PMID:27555981

  15. Correlation Between Aneurysm Size and Hemodynamics in One Individual with Multiple Small Intracranial Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Jou, Liangder; Britz, Gavin

    2016-07-12

    Objective A large number of cases are needed in the patient-specific modeling of intracranial aneurysms to establish the statistical significance due to individual variation of risk factors that are difficult to account for. However, these risk factors are critical in hemorrhage risk as demonstrated in large clinical studies. Rupture risks for aneurysms in an individual are easier to compare because these aneurysms are under the same physiological environment, and their only differences are the local hemodynamic factors associated with their anatomic locations. Methods Eight small aneurysms (< 7 mm) from one individual were analyzed using patient-specific hemodynamic modeling. Four scenarios with different perfusion assumptions were performed to account for the flow rate at two smaller communicating arteries. Wall shear stresses (WSS) at these aneurysms were compared to determine their relationship with the aneurysm size. Results Each of the three largest aneurysms is either the most proximal or distal aneurysm in a given artery so that blood pressure does not have a direct influence on aneurysm size. No wall shear stress-derived hemodynamic variables are found to be related to aneurysm size. Discussion A study of multiple aneurysms from one individual offers a unique opportunity to examine various hemodynamic factors without selection biases. Aneurysms greater than 4 mm (Group 1) have a higher product of maximum WSS and area of low WSS; aneurysms smaller than 4 mm (Group 2) have a lower product of maximum WSS and area of low WSS. In addition, aneurysm size is linearly correlated with the flow rate at the parent artery in each group.

  16. Pathological findings of saccular cerebral aneurysms-impact of subintimal fibrin deposition on aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Hokari, Masaaki; Nakayama, Naoki; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2015-07-01

    Although several studies have suggested that aneurysmal wall inflammation and laminar thrombus are associated with the rupture of saccular aneurysms, the mechanisms leading to the rupture remain obscure. We performed full exposure of aneurysms before clip application and attempted to keep the fibrin cap on the rupture point. Using these specimens in a nearly original state before surgery, we conducted a pathological analysis and studied the differences between ruptured and unruptured aneurysms to clarify the mechanism of aneurysmal wall degeneration. This study included ruptured (n = 28) and unruptured (n = 12) saccular aneurysms resected after clipping. All of the ruptured aneurysms were obtained within 24 h of onset. Immunostainings for markers of inflammatory cells (CD68) and classical histological staining techniques were performed. Clinical variables and pathological findings from ruptured and unruptured aneurysms were compared. Patients with ruptured or unruptured aneurysms did not differ by age, gender, size, location, and risk factors, such as hypertension, smoking, and hyperlipidemia. The absence or fragmentation of the internal elastica lamina, the myointimal hyperplasia, and the thinning of the aneurysmal wall were generally observed in both aneurysms. The existence of subintimal fibrin deposition, organized laminar thrombus, intramural hemorrhage, neovascularization, and monocyte infiltration are more frequently observed in ruptured aneurysms. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that ruptured aneurysm was associated with presence of subintimal fibrin deposition and monocyte infiltration. These findings suggest that subintimal fibrin deposition and chronic inflammation have a strong impact on degeneration of the aneurysmal wall leading to their rupture, and this finding may be caused by endothelial dysfunction.

  17. Cerebral vasospasm. Part I. In cerebral vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Mohr, J P; Kase, C S

    1983-01-01

    This review enumerates the many proposed mechanisms of vasospasm, including cellular elements, agents derived from the blood and injured cerebral tissues, alteration of calcium: magnesium ratios, free radical reactions, hypothalamic injury, clogging of the subarachnoid space, obstructions of the vasa vasorum and necrosis of the media with subintimal proliferation and intraluminal acidosis. At present, no single agent has been demonstrated as the only source of vasospasm, and whether the disorder is spasm or a chronic arteriopathy remains the subject of argument. The factors influencing the frequency, timing, severity and distribution of angiographically documented vasospasm are discussed, including data from our own population-based study over a 3 year period showing an incidence of vasospasm of 73%. Special emphasis is given to the observation that differences in patient populations play a major role in the incidence and severity of reported vasospasm: those from non-selective populations show a higher incidence of vasospasm and a greater severity of the syndromes attributed to spasm. Hypotheses are offered to account for the low frequency of vasospasm in hemorrhages from arteriovenous malformations and mycotic aneurysms. Clinical syndromes of vasospasm are reviewed, with special emphasis on our own material. The mode of onset and subsequent course of syndromes include those of sudden onset consistent with embolism, and those of gradual onset suggesting a low flow state. Their relationship to the severity of the subarachnoid hemorrhage and the vasospasm is presented. The paucity of syndromes of isolated deep infarcts of the lacunar type is noted. An account is given of the many failed therapies and the future hopes for early surgery. Innovations in medical therapy, including the use of some platelet inhibitors available only in some countries, and rationales for the use of aspirin and even heparin is discussed.

  18. Preemptive Medicine for Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    AOKI, Tomohiro; NOZAKI, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Most of cerebral aneurysms (CAs) are incidentally discovered without any neurological symptoms and the risk of rupture of CAs is relatively higher in Japanese population. The goal of treatments for patients with CAs is complete exclusion of the aneurysmal rupture risk for their lives. Since two currently available major treatments, microsurgical clipping and endovascular coiling, have inherent incompleteness to achieve cure of CAs with some considerable treatment risks, and there is no effective surgical or medical intervention to inhibit the formation of CAs in patients with ruptured and unruptured CAs, new treatment strategies with lower risk and higher efficacy should be developed to prevent the formation, growth, and rupture of CAs. Preemptive medicine for CAs should be designed to prevent or delay the onset of symptoms from CAs found in an asymptomatic state or inhibit the de novo formation of CAs, but we have no definite methods to distinguish rupture-prone aneurysms from rupture-resistant ones. Recent advancements in the research of CAs have provided us with some clues, and one of the new treatment strategies for CAs will be developed based on the findings that several inflammatory pathways may be involved in the formation, growth, and rupture of CAs. Preemptive medicine for CAs will be established with specific biomarkers and imaging modalities which can sensor the development of CAs. PMID:27053328

  19. Ruptured Intracranial Dermoid Cyst Associated with Rupture of Cerebral Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Hong

    2011-01-01

    Many tumors have been reported to coexist with cerebral aneurysm. However, intracranial dermoid cysts associated with cerebral aneurysm are very rare. We report a case in which rupture of a cerebral aneurysm resulted in a ruptured dermoid cyst. We present this interesting case and review current literature about the relationship between tumors and aneurysm formation. PMID:22259693

  20. Virus-induced congenital malformations in cattle.

    PubMed

    Agerholm, Jørgen S; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Peperkamp, Klaas; Windsor, Peter A

    2015-09-24

    Diagnosing the cause of bovine congenital malformations (BCMs) is challenging for bovine veterinary practitioners and laboratory diagnosticians as many known as well as a large number of not-yet reported syndromes exist. Foetal infection with certain viruses, including bovine virus diarrhea virus (BVDV), Schmallenberg virus (SBV), blue tongue virus (BTV), Akabane virus (AKAV), or Aino virus (AV), is associated with a range of congenital malformations. It is tempting for veterinary practitioners to diagnose such infections based only on the morphology of the defective offspring. However, diagnosing a virus as a cause of BCMs usually requires laboratory examination and even in such cases, interpretation of findings may be challenging due to lack of experience regarding genetic defects causing similar lesions, even in cases where virus or congenital antibodies are present. Intrauterine infection of the foetus during the susceptible periods of development, i.e. around gestation days 60-180, by BVDV, SBV, BTV, AKAV and AV may cause malformations in the central nervous system, especially in the brain. Brain lesions typically consist of hydranencephaly, porencephaly, hydrocephalus and cerebellar hypoplasia, which in case of SBV, AKAV and AV infections may be associated by malformation of the axial and appendicular skeleton, e.g. arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. Doming of the calvarium is present in some, but not all, cases. None of these lesions are pathognomonic so diagnosing a viral cause based on gross lesions is uncertain. Several genetic defects share morphology with virus induced congenital malformations, so expert advice should be sought when BCMs are encountered.

  1. [Venous malformations: clinical characteristics and differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Casanova, D; Boon, L-M; Vikkula, M

    2006-01-01

    Venous malformations (VM) are localized defects of blood vessels that are due to vascular dysmorphogenesis. These slow-flow lesions can affect any tissue or organ. Clinically, a cutaneous VM is characterized by a bluish mass that is compressible on palpation. Phleboliths are commonly present. Symptoms depend on location and size. VM are often sporadic and isolated, however, they can be associated with other malformations and be part of a syndrome; Klippel-Trenaunay (capillary-lymphatico-venous malformation with limb hypertrophy) is the most common. Glomuvenous malformation (GVM) is another type of venous anomaly. In contrast to VM, GVM is often painful on palpation and not compressible. Clinical diagnosis of VM is often made in the presence of a bluish cutaneous lesion: however, other lesions can mimick VM. The most frequent anomalies are a blue naevus, a hemorrhagic lymphatic malformation, a sub-cutaneous hemangioma or even the presence of dilated superficial normal veins due to underlying venous stenoses. This chapter will detail the clinical characteristics of venous anomalies and their differential diagnosis.

  2. Giant Serpentine Aneurysm of the Middle Cerebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Joo; Kwun, Byung Duk; Kim, Chang Jin

    2010-01-01

    Giant serpentine aneurysms are rare and have distinct angiographic findings. The rarity, large size, complex anatomy and hemodynamic characteristics of giant serpentine aneurysms make treatment difficult. We report a case of a giant serpentine aneurysm of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) that presented as headache. Treatment involved a superficial temporal artery (STA)-MCA bypass followed by aneurysm resection. The patient was discharged without neurological deficits, and early and late follow-up angiography disclosed successful removal of the aneurysm and a patent bypass graft. We conclude that STA-MCA bypass and aneurysm excision is a successful treatment method for a giant serpentine aneurysm. PMID:20856671

  3. Aneurysms of medium-sized arteries in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Awais, Mazen; Williams, David M; Deeb, G Michael; Shea, Michael J

    2013-11-01

    Marfan syndrome is a relatively common connective tissue disorder that causes skin, ocular, skeletal, and cardiovascular abnormalities. High morbidity and mortality occur with aortic aneurysm and dissection. Other large-artery aneurysms, including carotid, subclavian, and iliac artery aneurysms, have also been associated with Marfan syndrome. It is not clear whether small- to medium-sized artery aneurysms are associated with Marfan syndrome. This report describes 4 patients with Marfan syndrome who have associated small- to medium-sized artery aneurysms with several complications. Additional investigations are needed to determine whether Marfan syndrome can cause small- to medium-sized artery aneurysms and how patients with these aneurysms should be treated.

  4. The Helsinki Rat Microsurgical Sidewall Aneurysm Model

    PubMed Central

    Marbacher, Serge; Marjamaa, Johan; Abdelhameed, Essam; Hernesniemi, Juha; Niemelä, Mika; Frösen, Juhana

    2014-01-01

    Experimental saccular aneurysm models are necessary for testing novel surgical and endovascular treatment options and devices before they are introduced into clinical practice. Furthermore, experimental models are needed to elucidate the complex aneurysm biology leading to rupture of saccular aneurysms. Several different kinds of experimental models for saccular aneurysms have been established in different species. Many of them, however, require special skills, expensive equipment, or special environments, which limits their widespread use. A simple, robust, and inexpensive experimental model is needed as a standardized tool that can be used in a standardized manner in various institutions. The microsurgical rat abdominal aortic sidewall aneurysm model combines the possibility to study both novel endovascular treatment strategies and the molecular basis of aneurysm biology in a standardized and inexpensive manner. Standardized grafts by means of shape, size, and geometry are harvested from a donor rat's descending thoracic aorta and then transplanted to a syngenic recipient rat. The aneurysms are sutured end-to-side with continuous or interrupted 9-0 nylon sutures to the infrarenal abdominal aorta. We present step-by-step procedural instructions, information on necessary equipment, and discuss important anatomical and surgical details for successful microsurgical creation of an abdominal aortic sidewall aneurysm in the rat. PMID:25350840

  5. Two cases of giant serpentine aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kumabe, T; Kaneko, U; Ishibashi, T; Kaneko, K; Uchigasaki, S

    1990-06-01

    Giant serpentine aneurysm (GSA) is an entity defined on radiological and pathological grounds as a giant, partially thrombosed aneurysm containing tortuous vascular channels. We have had the opportunity to study two patients with GSAs, which has allowed for a complete comparative anatomical and radiological study. This report emphasizes the etiology of the GSAs. Twenty-two patients with GSAs have been reported in the literature, of which pathological studies were done in 10. In most of these, the aneurysm was found to be filled with an organized thrombus, but in our patients the aneurysm was filled with relatively new clot. The aneurysm enlarged and a change in the tortuous vascular channel was observed over a period of 1 year in the first patient, whereas a globoid aneurysm developed into a GSA in the brief period of just 2 weeks in the second patient. This rapid transformation of a globoid aneurysm into a GSA is of particular interest when the etiology of GSAs is considered. Our patients therefore shed some interesting light on the possible pathophysiology of GSAs. That is, the bloodstream may change dynamically in a giant aneurysm and may become a serpentine channel under conditions that lead to a "Coanda effect."

  6. Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage from Adrenal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez Valverde, F.M. Balsalobre, M.; Torregrosa, N.; Molto, M.; Gomez Ramos, M.J.; Vazquez Rojas, J.L.

    2007-04-15

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage is a very rare but serious disorder of the adrenal gland that can require emergent treatment. We report on a 42-year-old man who underwent selective angiography for diagnosis and treatment of retroperitoneal hemorrhage from small adrenal artery aneurysm. This case gives further details about the value of transluminal artery embolization in the management of visceral aneurysm rupture.

  7. [Gigantic aneurysm of the popliteal artery].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Samos, R; Zorita, A; Vázquez, J G; Morán, C; Vaquero, F

    1990-01-01

    A giant popliteal aneurysm case, whose first symptom was an acute ischemia on the limb, caused by thrombosis, which was successfully treated, is reported. Although popliteal aneurysm is not a rare event, the interest of this case is focused on its extraordinary size and unique location.

  8. Aneurysmal bone cyst and other nonneoplastic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlin, D.C.; McLeod, R.A.

    1982-08-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst is a benign proliferative tumefaction of bone. Histologic similarities indicate a kinship among classic aneurysmal bone cysts, essentially 'solid' proliferative lesions in bones; giant cell reparative granulomas of the jaws, at the base of the skull, and in the small bones of the hands and feet; skeletal lesions of hyperparathyroidism; and even pseudosarcomatous myositis ossificans, proliferative myositis, and proliferative fasciitis.

  9. Congenital hepatic artery aneurysm simulating pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, P.M.; Matalon, T.A.S.; Petasnick, J.P.; Roseman, D.L.

    1984-09-01

    The authors report a case of a hepatic artery aneurysm that simulated a mass in the head of the pancreas. The correct diagnosis was made preoperatively based on several findings: curvilinear calcification within the mass on CT, a well-defined crystic collection on ultrasound, absence of biliary duct dilatation or jaundice, and a presence of other aneurysms.

  10. Pantopaque simulating thrombosed intracranial aneurysms on MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lidov, M.W.; Silvers, A.R.; Mosesson, R.E.; Stollman, A.L.; Som, P.M.

    1996-03-01

    A patient is presented in whom iophendylate (Pantopaque) within the basal cisterns closely resembled the appearance on MRI of thrombosed aneurysms of the middle cerebral arteries. The sometimes subtle differences between the appearances on MRI of Pantopaque and aneurysmal clot are discussed to permit accurate diagnosis without resorting to more invasive diagnostic tests, such as cerebral angiography. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Vesalius on the anatomy and function of the recurrent laryngeal nerves: medical illustration and reintroduction of a physiological demonstration from Galen.

    PubMed

    Lanska, Douglas J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the anatomical illustrations and physiological demonstrations of sixteenth-century Flemish-born anatomist and physician Andreas Vesalius concerning the recurrent laryngeal nerves. Although Vesalius was primarily an anatomist, he also used vivisection as a pedagogical device to help his students understand the function of structures within the fabric of the body that they had previously studied in anatomical detail. Vesalius's masterwork, De humani corporis fabrica or simply the Fabrica (1543, 1555), was ostensibly an anatomy text, but Vesalius included textual and figural references to his use of vivisection to explicate the function of specific structures. Even as he began to criticize the errors in Galen's anatomical works, Vesalius nevertheless adopted some of Galen's classic physiological demonstrations, in particular the ligation (and subsequent release) of the recurrent laryngeal nerves of a pig to demonstrate their role in generating the pig's squeal. Vesalius's illustrations concerning the recurrent laryngeal nerve in the Fabrica were of two types: elegant anatomical woodcut plates-unsurpassed for their clarity, accuracy, and detail - and the distinctly inelegant historiated initial Q, depicting a throng of putti busily engaged in vivisecting a pig. Vesalius' anatomical plates were heavily plagiarized while the historiated initials, showing the rough work of an anatomist or surgeon, were largely ignored and remain little recognized today. While Vesalius' anatomical illustrations of the recurrent laryngeal nerves contained some errors, they were a dramatic departure from prior meager efforts at medical illustration and indeed far surpassed all contemporary published illustrations by others. Vesalius was also influential in reviving Galen's approach to vivisection, at least for pedagogical purposes, if not really then yet as a full-fledged investigative technique.

  12. Ovine craniofacial malformation: a morphometrical study.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, T; Kuiper, H; Pielmeier, R; Ganter, M; Distl, O; Staszyk, C

    2012-12-01

    Craniofacial malformation in 64 sheep was phenotypically described as mandibular distoclusion. Digital radiographs were examined in order to determine the degree of morphological changes in certain bones of the skull. Therefore, laterolateral standardised digital radiographs were used to determine anatomic reference points. Subsequently, five reference lines were defined and 16 linear and seven angular measurements were determined to describe malformations in the bones of the skull. Statistical analysis revealed a significant shortening of the rostral part of the corpus mandibulae and of the ramus mandibulae. However, the molar part of the mandible remained unchanged. These morphological changes caused premolar and molar malocclusion. No further craniofacial abnormalities, such as an elongation of the maxilla or of the incisive bone, were identified. In conclusion, the phenotypically observed mandibular distoclusion is caused by a shortening of specific parts of the mandible. This form of ovine craniofacial malformation is therefore best described as brachygnathia inferior.

  13. Debendox in early pregnancy and fetal malformation.

    PubMed

    Fleming, D M; Knox, J D; Crombie, D L

    1981-07-11

    During the mid-1960s, 22 977 pregnant women in Scotland and England were followed up prospectively for the incidence of malformations in their infants evident at birth or within six weeks. During the first 13 weeks of gestation 620 of these women had been prescribed Debendox (dicyclomine-doxylamine-pyridoxine) and 743 other women agents other than Debendox containing pyridoxine. Of the 620 women given Debendox, 589 (95%) had a normal outcome of pregnancy, 8 (13%) delivered a malformed infant, and 23 (3.7%) had other outcomes. Of the 22 357 women who were given Debendox, 445 (2.0%) produced infants with malformation; and the rates for all abnormal outcomes among women given Debendox and those not given the drug were 5.0% and 5.4% respectively. These results support the hypothesis that Debendox is not teratogenic.

  14. Debendox in early pregnancy and fetal malformation.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, D M; Knox, J D; Crombie, D L

    1981-01-01

    During the mid-1960s, 22 977 pregnant women in Scotland and England were followed up prospectively for the incidence of malformations in their infants evident at birth or within six weeks. During the first 13 weeks of gestation 620 of these women had been prescribed Debendox (dicyclomine-doxylamine-pyridoxine) and 743 other women agents other than Debendox containing pyridoxine. Of the 620 women given Debendox, 589 (95%) had a normal outcome of pregnancy, 8 (13%) delivered a malformed infant, and 23 (3.7%) had other outcomes. Of the 22 357 women who were given Debendox, 445 (2.0%) produced infants with malformation; and the rates for all abnormal outcomes among women given Debendox and those not given the drug were 5.0% and 5.4% respectively. These results support the hypothesis that Debendox is not teratogenic. PMID:6789952

  15. [Diagnosis and management of Mondini malformation].

    PubMed

    Yang, W; Fang, Y; Yang, S

    1997-02-01

    Owing to the development of imaging technology and audiology, some of the sensorineural hearing loss cases that were previcusly considered to be of unknown cause have been found to be inner ear malformation. Five cases of Mondini malformation are reviewed in this paper. CSF otorhinorrhea occurred in four cases, Klippel-Feil syndrome in three, and concurrent otosclerosis in one patient. In discussion, the authors point out that: 1) CT scanning is an supplement to audiologic tests for such patients; 2) perilymph fistula in Mondini malformation is often found at the oval window and its vicinity, the foot plate and the round window; 3) the fistula can be treated by plugging with fascial tissue via tympanoplastic approach with endaural incision. The mucosa around the fistula should be stripped away and the plugging tissue should be of dumb-bell shape.

  16. Meningitis after cochlear implantation in Mondini malformation.

    PubMed

    Page, E L; Eby, T L

    1997-01-01

    Although the potential for CSF leakage and subsequent meningitis after cochlear implantation in the malformed cochlea has been recognized, this complication has not been previously reported. We report a case of CSF otorhinorrhea and meningitis after minor head trauma developing 2 years after cochlear implantation in a child with Mondini malformation. Leakage of CSF was identified from the cochleostomy around the electrode of the implant, and this leak was sealed with a temporalis fascia and muscle plug. Although this complication appears to be rare, care must be taken to seal the cochleostomy in children with inner ear malformations at the initial surgery, and any episode of meningitis after surgery must be thoroughly investigated to rule out CSF leakage from the labyrinth.

  17. A nonlinear biomathematical model for the study of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Nieto, J J; Torres, A

    2000-08-01

    The formation and rupture of aneurysms is a significant medical problem, but is not clearly understood. Most intracranial aneurysm are located in the circle of Willis. We consider a nonlinear mathematical model that simulates the blood flow inside the aneurysm, one of the relevant factors in the evolution of an aneurysm. Different techniques from nonlinear analysis are used in order to obtain, from the model, several consequences that would help to understand some medical aspects of aneurysms of the circle of Willis.

  18. [Aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery: case report].

    PubMed

    Adorno, Juan Oscar Alarcón; de Andrade, Guilherme Cabral

    2002-12-01

    The intracranial aneurysms of the posterior circulation have been reported between 5 and 10% of all cerebral aneurysms and the aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are considered rare, can cause cerebello pontine angle (CPA) syndrome with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage. Since 1948 few cases were described in the literature. We report on a 33 year-old female patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to sacular aneurysm of the left AICA. She was submitted to clipage of the aneurysm without complications.

  19. Clipping of bilateral MCA aneurysms and a coiled ACOM aneurysm through a modified lateral supraorbital craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Hage, Ziad A; Charbel, Fady T

    2015-01-01

    We showcase the microsurgical clipping of a left middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm-(B) done through a modified right lateral supraorbital craniotomy, as well as clipping of a previously coiled anterior communicating (ACOM) artery aneurysm-(C) and a bilobed right MCA aneurysm-(A). Splitting of the right sylvian fissure is initially performed following which a subfrontal approach is used to expose and dissect the contralateral sylvian fissure. The left MCA aneurysm is identified and clipped. The ACOM aneurysm is then clipped following multiple clip repositioning based on flow measurements. The right MCA aneurysm is then identified and each lobe is clipped separately. The first picture showcased in this video is a side to side right and left ICA injection in AP projection. In this picture, (A) points to the bilobed right MCA aneurysm, (B) to the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm, and (C) to the previously coiled anterior communicating (ACOM) artery aneurysm. The red dotted line shows that both MCA aneurysms lie within the same plane which makes it easier to clip both of them, through one small craniotomy. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/4cQC7nHsL5I .

  20. Multiple fusiform cerebral aneurysms – case report

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Katarzyna; Dołowy, Joanna; Kuśmierska, Małgorzata; Kuniej, Tomasz; Jaźwiec, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: A true aneurysym is a dilation of arterial lumen as a consequence of congenital or acquired abnormalities leading to a reduction of mechanical resistance of vascular wall, most commonly caused by its defected structure in the form of absence or weakening of the muscular and/or elastic layer. From the pathophysiological point of view, cerebral aneurysms can be classified as ‘saccular’ – most commonly occurring, and ‘other types’, including fusiform/dolichoectatic, dissecting, serpentine, posttraumatic, mycotic and giant aneurysms with or without intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. Case Report: We present a rare case of a patient with multiple fusiform dilations of cerebral vessels and giant fusiform aneurysm in supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery. The patient presented to hospital because of sudden, severe vertigo with nausea, impaired balance and disturbed vision. Vascular anomalies were detected on CT scanning without contrast. The diagnostic work-up was complemented by CT angiography, MRI and cerebral angiography. Conclusions: Aneurysm located within the intracranial arteries is one of the most common vascular defects of the brain. The number, size and location of aneurysms are highly variable. Aneurysms can have either supra- or infratentorial location, affecting a single or multiple arteries within one or both brain hemispheres. There is often a correlation between the location of the aneurysm and its etiology, as in case of so-called mirror-image aneurysms. Symmetrically located aneurysms may indicate a defect in vascular structure. Asymmetric location, as in the patient described above, is more likely due to acquired causes, mainly atherosclerosis, but also septic emboli or blood disorders. PMID:22802866

  1. Total knee arthroplasty in vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Bhende, Harish; Laud, Nanadkishore; Deore, Sandeep; Shashidhar, V

    2015-01-01

    In Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome, vascular malformations are not only in skin and superficial soft tissues but also in deep tissues like muscles bones and joints. It is well documemted that these recurrent intraarticular bleeds can cause early arthritis and joint pain. Performing arthroplasty in such patients is difficult and fraught with complications. We describe such a case where navigated total knee arthroplasty was performed with success to avoid the problems of intra medullary alignment used in the presence of intra medullary vascular malformations. We also suggest certain measures when knee arthroplasty is considered in such patients. PMID:26538765

  2. Atypical presentations in Chiari II malformation.

    PubMed

    Rath, G P; Bithal, P K; Chaturvedi, A

    2006-01-01

    Myelomeningocele with Chiari II malformation and hydrocephalus is a common association seen in infants with a congenital failure of neurulation. Here we report two cases of such an association presenting with different sets of problems. The first patient presented with severe inspiratory stridor due to bilateral abductor vocal cord paralysis, which was relieved completely within 24 h of definitive surgery. The second patient experienced intraoperative cardiac arrest. Definitive surgery was followed after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The cause of the perioperative sequence of events in both cases is attributed to the associated pathologies of Chiari II malformation.

  3. Percutaneous Cryotherapy of Vascular Malformation: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelis, F.; Neuville, A.; Labreze, C.; Kind, M.; Bui, B.; Midy, D.; Palussiere, J.; Grenier, N.

    2013-06-15

    The present report describes a case of percutaneous cryotherapy in a 36-year-old woman with a large and painful pectoral venous malformation. Cryoablation was performed in a single session for this 9-cm mass with 24 h hospitalisation. At 2- and 6-month follow-up, the pain had completely disappeared, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a significant decrease in size. Percutaneous cryoablation shows promise as a feasible and apparently safe method for local control in patients with symptomatic venous vascular malformations.

  4. Cochlear Implantation in Children with Cochlear Malformation.

    PubMed

    Saikawa, Etsuko; Takano, Kenichi; Ogasawara, Noriko; Tsubomatsu, Chieko; Takahashi, Nozomi; Shirasaki, Hideaki; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear implantation (CI) has proven to be an effective treatment for severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Inner ear malformation is a rare anomaly and occurs in approximately 20% of cases with congenital SNHL. In cases with cochlear malformation, CI can be successfully performed in nearly all patients, the exceptions being those with complete labyrinthine and cochlear aplasia. It is important to evaluate the severity of inner ear deformity and other associated anomalies during the preimplantation radiological assessment in order to identify any complication that may potentially occur during the surgery and subsequent patient management.

  5. Neurodevelopmental malformations of the cerebellar vermis in genetically engineered rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformati...

  6. Growth of giant intracranial aneurysms: An aneurysmal wall disorder?

    PubMed

    Ferracci, F-X; Gilard, V; Cebula, H; Magne, N; Lejeune, J-P; Langlois, O; Proust, F

    2017-03-01

    The enlargement of giant intracranial aneurysms (IA) can be observed in 30 % of cases resulting in a neurological deficit and epilepsy due to its mass effect. This growth process could be due to a morphological disorder of the IA wall. The authors report on 2 cases of giant IA growth responsible for intracranial hypertension. The treatment of these giant IA required a microsurgical excision combined with a series of cerebral revascularization procedures. The role of vasa vasorum on the inflammatory granuloma outside the vessel, which induced the enlargement, is discussed. These cases illustrate the abluminal vasculopathy as the main involvement of this unfavourable natural history.

  7. Comparable mid-term survival in patients undergoing elective fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair and endovascular aneurysm repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Gottsäter, Anders; Acosta, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate mid-term survival in patients undergoing elective fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair and standard endovascular aneurysm repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm. Methods: Consecutive patients treated from 2007 to 2011 with elective fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (n = 81) and endovascular aneurysm repair (n = 201) were evaluated concerning age, cardiovascular medication, comorbidities, and mid-term mortality. Results: Patients in the elective fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair group were younger than the endovascular aneurysm repair group (p = 0.006). In comparison with the endovascular aneurysm repair group, a lower proportion of patients in the elective fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair group had diabetes (p = 0.013) and anemia (p = 0.003), and a higher proportion had arterial hypertension (p = 0.009). When entering age, endovascular aneurysm repair or fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair operation, diabetes, anemia, and hypertension in a Cox regression model, only age (hazard ratio: 1.07; 95% confidence interval: 1.03–1.11; p < 0.001) was a risk factor for mid-term mortality. Conclusion: Careful patient selection and medical optimization resulted in comparable mid-term survival in patients undergoing elective fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair and endovascular aneurysm repair. PMID:26770700

  8. Intracranial aneurysm growth quantification in CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzian, Azadeh; Manniesing, Rashindra; Metz, Coert T.; Klein, Stefan; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; van der Lugt, Aad; Niessen, Wiro J.

    2012-02-01

    Next to aneurysm size, aneurysm growth over time is an important indicator for aneurysm rupture risk. Manual assessment of aneurysm growth is a cumbersome procedure, prone to inter-observer and intra-observer variability. In clinical practice, mainly qualitative assessment and/or diameter measurement are routinely performed. In this paper a semi-automated method for quantifying aneurysm volume growth over time in CTA data is presented. The method treats a series of longitudinal images as a 4D dataset. Using a 4D groupwise non-rigid registration method, deformations with respect to the baseline scan are determined. Combined with 3D aneurysm segmentation in the baseline scan, volume change is assessed using the deformation field at the aneurysm wall. For ten patients, the results of the method are compared with reports from expert clinicians, showing that the quantitative results of the method are in line with the assessment in the radiology reports. The method is also compared to an alternative method in which the volume is segmented in each 3D scan individually, showing that the 4D groupwise registration method agrees better with manual assessment.

  9. Complications of endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Orrù, Emanuele; Roccatagliata, Luca; Cester, Giacomo; Causin, Francesco; Castellan, Lucio

    2013-10-01

    The number of neuroendovascular treatments of both ruptured and unruptured aneurysms has increased substantially in the last two decades. Complications of endovascular treatments of cerebral aneurysms are rare but can potentially lead to acute worsening of the neurological status, to new neurological deficits or death. Some of the possible complications, such as vascular access site complications or systemic side effects associated with contrast medium (e.g. contrast medium allergy, contrast induced nephropathy) can also be encountered in diagnostic angiography. The most common complications of endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms are related to acute thromboembolic events and perforation of the aneurysm. Overall, the reported rate of thromboembolic complications ranges between 4.7% and 12.5% while the rate of intraprocedural rupture of cerebral aneurysms is about 0.7% in patients with unruptured aneurysms and about 4.1% in patients with previously ruptured aneurysms. Thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications may occur during different phases of endovascular procedures and are related to different technical, clinical and anatomic reasons. A thorough knowledge of the different aspects of these complications can reduce the risk of their occurrence and minimize their clinical sequelae. A deep understanding of complications and of their management is thus part of the best standard of care.

  10. Insights on a Giant Aneurysm Treated Endovascularly.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Francesca; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Ulm, Arthur John

    2016-07-01

    Background Endovascular treatment with stent-assisted Guglielmi detachable coils is an accepted method for treating intracranial giant aneurysms that otherwise would require more invasive or destructive treatment or could not be treated at all. Nevertheless, there is a paucity of information concerning inner postcoiling aneurysmal changes in human subjects over the long term. We report a postmortem analysis of a patient with a giant aneurysm at the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) who was treated endovascularly and studied pathologically 24 months after treatment. Materials and Method The head was removed at autopsy and prefixed in a 10% neutral buffered formalin solution. The brain was gently removed from the skull base after cutting the intracranial nerves and vascular structures. The giant VBJ aneurysm and its relationship with the brainstem, cranial nerves, and vessels were captured photographically and analyzed. Afterward, under operating microscope guidance, the vertebrobasilar system with the aneurysm was gently and carefully detached from the brainstem and carefully analyzed. Results No complete fibrous obliteration of the aneurysm lumen could be detected in our case, and no endothelialization had taken place 24 months after treatment. Conclusions Our findings agree with those of previous similar reports. Coiling, in particular in large or giant aneurysms, may be burdened by the risk of coil compaction and recanalization, but it has the advantage of not affecting the flow in the perforating arteries.

  11. Cerebral aneurysms following radiotherapy for medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, P.J.; Sung, J.H.

    1989-04-01

    Three patients, two males and one female aged 21, 14, and 31 years, respectively, developed cerebral saccular aneurysms several years after undergoing radiotherapy for cerebellar medulloblastoma at 2, 5, and 14 years of age, respectively. Following surgery, all three received combined cobalt-60 irradiation and intrathecal colloidal radioactive gold (/sup 198/Au) therapy, and died from rupture of the aneurysm 19, 9, and 17 years after the radiotherapy, respectively. Autopsy examination revealed no recurrence of the medulloblastoma, but widespread radiation-induced vasculopathy was found at the base of the brain and in the spinal cord, and saccular aneurysms arose from the posterior cerebral arteries at the basal cistern or choroidal fissure. The aneurysms differed from the ordinary saccular aneurysms of congenital type in their location and histological features. Their locations corresponded to the areas where intrathecally administered colloidal /sup 198/Au is likely to pool, and they originated directly from a segment of the artery rather than from a branching site as in congenital saccular aneurysms. It is, therefore, concluded that the aneurysms in these three patients were most likely radiation-induced.

  12. Treatment of Basilar Aneurysms with SMP Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, J. M.; Rodriguez, J. N.; Maitland, D. J.; Wilson, T. S.; Hartman, J.

    2006-11-01

    Researchers in the Medical Division at LLNL are currently developing a shape memory polymer (SMP) foam aneurysm treatment technique. This technique involves the catheter delivery of a compressed piece of SMP foam to an aneurysm. When the foam is heated by laser radiation from a diffusing fiber-optic element embedded within the catheter, the foam expands, filling the aneurysm volume. If proven successful, such a treatment alternative will provide clinicians the ability to not only isolate an aneurysm from the vascular system with one device, but also to customize the shape of the lumen beneath the aneurysm neck. Consequently, the flow patterns beneath the aneurysm neck could potentially be optimized to minimize the hemodynamic stresses on the lumen. In this computational study, multiple lumen shapes are simulated beneath the necks of several patient-specific basilar aneurysms. A comparison is made between the pre-treatment and post-treatment configurations, as well as with a conventional surgical clipping configuration. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. UCRL-ABS-222933.

  13. Trigger factors for rupture of intracranial aneurysms in relation to patient and aneurysm characteristics.

    PubMed

    Vlak, Monique H M; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Greebe, Paut; van der Bom, Johanna G; Algra, Ale

    2012-07-01

    Female gender, age above 60 years, and an aneurysm larger than 5 mm or location on the posterior circulation are associated with a higher rupture risk of intracranial aneurysms. We hypothesized that this association is explained by a higher susceptibility to (one of) the eight trigger factors that were recently identified. We included 250 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. We calculated relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of aneurysmal rupture for trigger factors according to sex, age, site, and size of the aneurysms by means of the case-crossover design. None of the triggers except for physical exercise differed according to patient and aneurysm characteristics. In the hour after exposure to physical exercise: (1) patients over the age of 60 have a six-times-higher risk of rupture (RR 13; 95% CI 6.3-26) than those of 60 years of age and under (RR 2.3; 1.3-4.1); (2) aneurysms at the internal carotid artery have a higher risk than those at other locations (RR 17; 7.8-37), but this was only statistically significant when compared to anterior communicating artery aneurysms (RR 3.2; 1.6-6.1); (3) aneurysms 5 mm or smaller had a higher risk of rupture (RR 9.5; 4.6-19) than larger aneurysms (RR 2.4; 1.3-4.3); and (4) women and men had similar risks. A higher susceptibility to exercise might explain part of the higher risk of rupture in older patients. Why women and patients with aneurysms larger than 5 mm or posterior circulation aneurysms have a higher risk of rupture remains to be settled.

  14. Aneurysm Characteristics Associated with the Rupture Risk of Intracranial Aneurysms: A Self-Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Huibin; Ji, Wenjun; Qian, Zenghui; Li, Youxiang; Jiang, Chuhan; Wu, Zhongxue; Wen, Xiaolong; Xu, Wenjuan; Liu, Aihua

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed the rupture risk of intracranial aneurysms (IAs) according to aneurysm characteristics by comparing the differences between two aneurysms in different locations within the same patient. We utilized this self-controlled model to exclude potential interference from all demographic factors to study the risk factors related to IA rupture. A total of 103 patients were diagnosed with IAs between January 2011 and April 2015 and were enrolled in this study. All enrolled patients had two IAs. One IA (the case) was ruptured, and the other (the control) was unruptured. Aneurysm characteristics, including the presence of a daughter sac, the aneurysm neck, the parent artery diameter, the maximum aneurysm height, the maximum aneurysm width, the location, the aspect ratio (AR, maximum perpendicular height/average neck diameter), the size ratio (SR, maximum aneurysm height/average parent diameter) and the width/height ratio (WH ratio, maximum aneurysm width/maximum aneurysm height), were collected and analyzed to evaluate the rupture risks of the two IAs within each patient and to identify the independent risk factors associated with IA rupture. Multivariate, conditional, backward, stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the independent risk factors associated with IA rupture. The multivariate analysis identified the presence of a daughter sac (odds ratio [OR], 13.80; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.65-115.87), a maximum aneurysm height ≥7 mm (OR, 4.80; 95% CI, 1.21-18.98), location on the posterior communicating artery (PCOM) or anterior communicating artery (ACOM; OR, 3.09; 95% CI, 1.34-7.11) and SR (OR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.16-3.91) as factors that were significantly associated with IA rupture. The presence of a daughter sac, the maximum aneurysm height, PCOM or ACOM locations and SR (>1.5±0.7) of unruptured IAs were significantly associated with IA rupture.

  15. [Aneurysm of the splenic artery].

    PubMed

    Botoi, G

    2005-01-01

    The work is presenting the case of a young patient with splenic aneurysm, a more and more frequent diagnosis in these last years. The peculiarity consist in the biphase and bi-directional evolution, first toward the gastric lumen, with hematemesis and consequently, after about a month, in the peritoneal cavity, with hemoperitoneum. The positive diagnosis and the final surgical solution was obtained after successive procedures, due to the lack of an appropriate technical equipment (angiographic exploration) due to the lack of the medical information at one time (inefficient anamnesis and the lack of the documentation) and finally, due to some elements that disturbed the surgical reasoning.

  16. Rasmussen's Aneurysm: A Forgotten Entity?

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, A. N.; Costello, R.; Lee, M. J.

    2008-01-15

    We present the case of a rare entity which is a complication of a disease process that had almost disappeared from the Western World. With the recent resurgence in reported cases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) in Western communities, it is important to recognize complications and sequelae. A young alcoholic male with confirmed active TB suffered a cardiac arrest following massive haemoptysis. Multidetector computed tomography angiography diagnosed a Rasmussen's aneurysm, confirmed by digital subtraction angiography and then successfully embolized with glue. We outline this rare case and the embolization technique and review previously documented reports.

  17. Genetic basis of congenital cardiovascular malformations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular malformations are a singularly important class of birth defects and due to dramatic improvements in medical and surgical care, there are now large numbers of adult survivors. The etiologies are complex, but there is strong evidence that genetic factors play a crucial role. Over the la...

  18. Chiari I Malformation in Nephropathic Cystinosis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Kavya I; Hesselink, John; Trauner, Doris A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the relative incidence of Chiari I malformations in children with cystinosis compared with those in the general population. Study design Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were performed on 53 patients with nephropathic cystinosis and 120 controls, age range 3-18 years. Results Ten of 53 (18.9%) cystinosis patients had Chiari I or tonsillar ectopia, and only 2 of 120 controls (1.6%) had a similar finding. At least 2 of the patients had symptoms or signs thought to be related to the malformation, and one had surgical decompression. Two had an associated cervical syrinx. Conclusions Children with cystinosis have a 12-fold higher prevalence of Chiari I malformations than the general pediatric population. Chiari I malformations should be high on the differential diagnosis when individuals with cystinosis develop neurologic signs and symptoms, and MRI scans should be performed on children with cystinosis who present with new-onset headache, ataxia, incontinence, or other unexplained neurologic symptoms. PMID:26265281

  19. Angular craniometry in craniocervical junction malformation.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Ricardo Vieira; Ferreira, Edson Dener Zandonadi

    2013-10-01

    The craniometric linear dimensions of the posterior fossa have been relatively well studied, but angular craniometry has been poorly studied and may reveal differences in the several types of craniocervical junction malformation. The objectives of this study were to evaluate craniometric angles compared with normal subjects and elucidate the main angular differences among the types of craniocervical junction malformation and the correlation between craniocervical and cervical angles. Angular craniometries were studied using primary cranial angles (basal and Boogard's) and secondary craniocervical angles (clivus canal and cervical spine lordosis). Patients with basilar invagination had significantly wider basal angles, sharper clivus canal angles, larger Boogard's angles, and greater cervical lordosis than the Chiari malformation and control groups. The Chiari malformation group does not show significant differences when compared with normal controls. Platybasia occurred only in basilar invagination and is suggested to be more prevalent in type II than in type I. Platybasic patients have a more acute clivus canal angle and show greater cervical lordosis than non-platybasics. The Chiari group does not show significant differences when compared with the control, but the basilar invagination groups had craniometric variables significantly different from normal controls. Hyperlordosis observed in the basilar inavagination group was associated with craniocervical kyphosis conditioned by acute clivus canal angles.

  20. Congenital Malformations in River Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Albarella, Sara; Ciotola, Francesca; D'Anza, Emanuele; Coletta, Angelo; Zicarelli, Luigi; Peretti, Vincenzo

    2017-02-10

    The world buffalo population is about 168 million, and it is still growing, in India, China, Brazil, and Italy. In these countries, buffalo genetic breeding programs have been performed for many decades. The occurrence of congenital malformations has caused a slowing of the genetic progress and economic loss for the breeders, due to the death of animals, or damage to their reproductive ability or failing of milk production. Moreover, they cause animal welfare reduction because they can imply foetal dystocia and because the affected animals have a reduced fitness with little chances of survival. This review depicts, in the river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) world population, the present status of the congenital malformations, due to genetic causes, to identify their frequency and distribution in order to develop genetic breeding plans able to improve the productive and reproductive performance, and avoid the spreading of detrimental gene variants. Congenital malformations most frequently reported in literature or signaled by breeders to the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production of the University Federico II (Naples, Italy) in river buffalo are: musculoskeletal defects (transverse hemimelia, arthrogryposis, umbilical hernia) and disorders of sexual development. In conclusion this review put in evidence that river buffalo have a great variety of malformations due to genetic causes, and TH and omphalocele are the most frequent and that several cases are still not reported, leading to an underestimation of the real weight of genetic diseases in this species.

  1. Differential Gene Expression in Human Cerebrovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Shenkar, Robert; Elliott, J. Paul; Diener, Katrina; Gault, Judith; Hu, Ling-Jia; Cohrs, Randall J.; Phang, Tzulip; Hunter, Lawrence; Breeze, Robert E.; Awad, Issam A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to identify genes with differential expression in cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs), arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and control superficial temporal arteries (STAs) and to confirm differential expression of genes previously implicated in the pathobiology of these lesions. METHODS Total ribonucleic acid was isolated from four CCM, four AVM, and three STA surgical specimens and used to quantify lesion-specific messenger ribonucleic acid expression levels on human gene arrays. Data were analyzed with the use of two separate methodologies: gene discovery and confirmation analysis. RESULTS The gene discovery method identified 42 genes that were significantly up-regulated and 36 genes that were significantly down-regulated in CCMs as compared with AVMs and STAs (P = 0.006). Similarly, 48 genes were significantly up-regulated and 59 genes were significantly down-regulated in AVMs as compared with CCMs and STAs (P = 0.006). The confirmation analysis showed significant differential expression (P < 0.05) in 11 of 15 genes (angiogenesis factors, receptors, and structural proteins) that previously had been reported to be expressed differentially in CCMs and AVMs in immunohistochemical analysis. CONCLUSION We identify numerous genes that are differentially expressed in CCMs and AVMs and correlate expression with the immunohistochemistry of genes implicated in cerebrovascular malformations. In future efforts, we will aim to confirm candidate genes specifically related to the pathobiology of cerebrovascular malformations and determine their biological systems and mechanistic relevance. PMID:12535382

  2. Congenital Malformations in River Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    PubMed Central

    Albarella, Sara; Ciotola, Francesca; D’Anza, Emanuele; Coletta, Angelo; Zicarelli, Luigi; Peretti, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary Congenital malformations (due to genetic causes) represent a hidden danger for animal production, above all when genetic selection is undertaken for production improvements. These malformations are responsible for economic losses either because they reduce the productivity of the farm, or because their spread in the population would decrease the total productivity of that species/breed. River buffalo is a species of increasing interest all over the world for its production abilities, as proved by the buffalo genome project and the genetic selection plans that are currently performed in different countries. The aim of this review is to provide a general view of different models of congenital malformations in buffalo and their world distribution. This would be useful either for those who performed buffalo genetic selection or for researchers in genetic diseases, which would be an advantage to their studies with respect to the knowledge of gene mutations and interactions in this species. Abstract The world buffalo population is about 168 million, and it is still growing, in India, China, Brazil, and Italy. In these countries, buffalo genetic breeding programs have been performed for many decades. The occurrence of congenital malformations has caused a slowing of the genetic progress and economic loss for the breeders, due to the death of animals, or damage to their reproductive ability or failing of milk production. Moreover, they cause animal welfare reduction because they can imply foetal dystocia and because the affected animals have a reduced fitness with little chances of survival. This review depicts, in the river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) world population, the present status of the congenital malformations, due to genetic causes, to identify their frequency and distribution in order to develop genetic breeding plans able to improve the productive and reproductive performance, and avoid the spreading of detrimental gene variants. Congenital

  3. Treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and unruptured intracranial aneurysms by neurosurgeons in Colombia: A survey

    PubMed Central

    Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel; Gutiérrez Paternina, Juan J.; Buendía de Ávila, María E.; Preciado Mesa, Edgar I.; Barrios, Rubén Sabogal; Niño-Hernández, Lucía M.; Jaramillo, Keith Suárez

    2011-01-01

    Background: Trends in management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and unruptured intracranial aneurysms among neurosurgeons is very variable and had not been previously described in any Latin American country. This study was conducted to determine the preferences of Colombian neurosurgeons in pharmacologic, surgical, and endovascular management of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Methods: A survey-based descriptive study was performed in a sample of members from the Colombian Association of Neurosurgery. Questions about pharmacologic, surgical, and endovascular management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and unruptured intracranial aneurysm were carried out. We calculated the mean and the standard deviation of the results obtained from the continuous variables. The results of the categorical variables are presented as percentages. Results: The preference of medication with poor clinical evidence, such as magnesium sulfate, aspirin, statins, and anti-fibrinolytics was lower than 10%. The use of intravenous nimodipine and systemic glucocorticoids was as high as 31%. The availability of endovascular therapy was 69%. The indication for treatment of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms that required intervention was less than 13.8%. In patients with ruptured or unruptured intracranial aneurysms, coiling was the preferred method for exclusion. Conclusions: Reported compliance of evidence-based clinical guidelines was similar to that described in developed countries, and even better. However, there is little agreement in treating patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms. For other issues, the conducts reported by Colombian neurosurgeons are in accordance with the current guidelines. PMID:22059120

  4. Endovascular exclusion of patch aneurysms of intercostal arteries after thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Juthier, Francis; Rousse, Natacha; Banfi, Carlo; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Vincentelli, André; Prat, Alain; Bachet, Jean

    2013-02-01

    Reimplantation of the largest patent intercostal arteries is usually performed during thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair. This may lead to aneurysmal evolution of the intercostal arteries patch. We report the successful percutaneous endovascular repair in 4 Marfan patients of aneurysms of the intercostal arteries patch that developed after thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair (Crawford type II) during a mean delay of 70 months (range, 48 to 91 months). All patients had previously undergone one or several aortic surgical procedures and had patent subclavian and hypogastric arterial networks. No in-hospital deaths or spinal cord ischemic injuries occurred, which emphasizes the importance of the vascular collateral network.

  5. Rare Case of Multiple Aneurysms with Rupture of the Deep Femoral Artery Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Dulić, Grgur; Požgain, Zrinka; Pinotić, Krešimir; Šego, Krunoslav; Selthofer, Robert; Rončević, Ivica

    2015-11-01

    Profunda femoris artery aneurysms (PFAA) are very rare and easily overlooked. Currently, around 100 PFAA and 20 ruptured PFAA have been described in the literature. This is a report on a case of ruptured PFAA with thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm. A ligation of the profunda femoris artery (PFA) and a femoropopliteal supragenicular bypass with vascular prosthesis were performed in the surgical treatment, which showed good results on the further follow-ups. A month after the procedure the patient had a rupture of the thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with fatal result. Therefore, it is recommended to perform a search for another aneurysm, especially on the aortoiliac segment, in every diagnosed PFAA case.

  6. [Endovascular treatment of giant intracranial aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Bracard, S; Derelle, A L; Tonnelet, R; Barbier, C; Proust, F; Anxionnat, R

    2016-02-01

    Giant aneurysms are defined as having a maximal diameter higher than 25mm. The dynamic aspect of giant aneurysms, in particular, is its growth, which was responsible for parenchyma sequellae either due to haemorrhagic complications or a compression of cranial nerves. The treatment of these giant aneurysms was challenging because of its size, the mass effect and the neck diameter. These morphologic conditions required complex endovascular procedures such as remodelling, stenting, using flow diverters. Subsequently, the complex procedures increased the risk of morbidity because of ischemic complications. Despite these procedures, the risk of recurrence was high.

  7. [Cirsoid aneurysm: apropos of a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Valesi, M G; De Giovanni, M; Coppolino, S; Tentarelli, M N

    1983-12-01

    The authors, after mentioning the anatomopathologic, physiopathologic and clinical features of cyrsoid aneurysms, presently classed in the chapter of the congenital artero-venous fistulas, show a case, angiographically discovered, of cyrsoid aneurysm with palmar location, elsewhere already subjected twice to unsuccessful operation, and successfully operated at the Institute of Surgical Pathology of the Pavia University. The Authors think the morphologic and topographic features of such lesion, its relative local malignancy and trend to relapsing, justify why the old denomination of cyrsoid aneurysm was kept, even in the frame of the more general chapter of artero-venous fistulas.

  8. Galen's use of Aristotle.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, S K

    1997-01-01

    The thought of Aristotle has stamped itself on the whole subsequent course of Natural philosophy including the philosophy of healing art since the 4th century B. C. He is known to be the great codifier of ancient Natural philosophy. He developed coherent theories of generation and functional morphology of animals and heredity in his treaties. Aristotle dissected about 70 species of animals and founded the basis of comparative Anatomy.

  9. [Inflammatory aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. Surgical aspects].

    PubMed

    Kieffer, E; Chiche, L; Bertal, A; Bahnini, A; Koskas, F

    1997-12-01

    In the Western world, inflammatory aneurysms account for only 1 to 5%, of all operated thoracic aorta aneurysms. Takayasu's disease is by far the commonest cause although all forms of aortitis may result in aneurysm formation. Usually observed in young patients, these aneurysms are suitable for often major surgery with results that are globally better than in degenerative or dissecting aneurysms. However, they pose, two specific problems: the progression of the inflammatory disease which may require pre- and/or post-operative steroid therapy and that of the risk, at least in theory, of a late pseudo-aneurysm, which justifies regular long-term follow-up after surgery.

  10. Infectious or Noninfectious? Ruptured, Thrombosed Inflammatory Aortic Aneurysm with Spondylolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin; Papiewski, Andrzej; Szubert, Wojciech; Szopinski, Piotr

    2013-06-15

    Osteolysis of vertebrae due to inflammatory aortic aneurysm is rarely observed. However, it is estimated that up to 10 % of infectious aneurysms coexist with bone tissue destruction, most commonly the vertebrae. Inflammatory aneurysms with no identified infection factor, along with infiltration of adjacent muscle and in particular extensive destruction of bone tissue have rarely been described in the literature. A case of inflammatory aneurysm with posterior wall rupture and inflammatory infiltration of the iliopsoas muscle and spine, together with extensive vertebral body destruction, is presented. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular aneurysm repair EVAR.

  11. Treatment of arteriovenous malformations with stereotactic radiosurgery employing both magnetic resonance angiography and standard angiography as a database

    SciTech Connect

    Petereit, D.; Mehta, M.; Turski, P.; Levin, A.; Strother, C.; Mistretta, C.; Mackie, R.; Gehring, M.; Kubsad, S.; Kinsella, T. )

    1993-01-15

    Twenty-one arteriovenous malformations were prospectively evaluated using magnetic resonance angiography, compare it to stereotactic angiography, employ magnetic resonance angiography in follow-up, and semiquanitfy flow. A correlative evaluation between flow and response to stereotactic radiosurgery was carried out. Phase contrast angiograms were obtained at flow velocities of 400, 200, 100, 60 and 20 cm/sec. The fractionated velocities provided images that selectively demonstrated the arterial and venous components of the arteriovenous malformations. Qualitative assessment of the velocity within the arteriovenous malformations and the presence of fistulae were also determined by multiple velocity images. In addition, 3-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiograms were obtained to define the exact size and shape of the nidus. This technique also permitted evaluation of the nidus and feeding arteries for the the presence of low flow aneurysms. Correlation between the two imaging modalities was carried out by subjective and semiquantitative estimation of flow velocity and estimation of nidus size. The following velocity parameters were employed: fast, intermediate, slow, and none. Early analysis suggests that slower flowing arteriovenous malformations may obliterate faster after stereotactic radiosurgery an flow parameters should be employed to predict response. In conclusion, magnetic resonance angiography permits semiquantitative flow velocity assessment and may therefore be superior to stereotactic angiography. An additional advantage of magnetic resonance angiography is the generation of serial transverse images which can replace the conventional CT scan employed for stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning. A single diagnostic test may therefore be used for diagnosis, radiosurgical treatment planning, follow-up, and treatment selection by identifying patients likely to respond early to radiosurgical management.

  12. Endovascular coil embolization of aneurysm neck for the treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysm with bleb formation

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jun; Gu, Weijin; Zhang, Xiaolong; Geng, Daoying; Lu, Gang; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Ge, Liang; Ji, Lihua

    2014-01-01

    Background Ruptured intracranial aneurysm (ICA) with bleb formation (RICABF) is a special type of ruptured ICA. However, the exact role and effectiveness of endovascular coil embolization (ECE) in RICABF is unknown. We aimed to investigate the effectiveness and safety of ECE of aneurysm neck for RICABF treatment. Material/Methods We retrospectively assessed consecutive patients who were hospitalized in our endovascular intervention center between October 2004 and May 2012. Overall, 86 patients underwent ECE of aneurysm neck for 86 RICABF. Treatments outcomes included secondary rupture/bleeding rate, aneurysm neck embolization rate, residual/recurrent aneurysm, intraoperative incidents, and post-embolization complications, as well as improvements in the Glasgow outcome scale (extended) (GOS-E). Results Complete occlusion was achieved in 72 aneurysms (72/86, 83.7%), while 12 aneurysms (12/86, 14.0%) had a residual neck, and 2 aneurysms (2/86, 2.3%) had a residual aneurysm. The postoperative GOS-E was 3 in 3 patients (3.5%), 4 in 10 patients (11.6%), and 5 in 73 patients (84.9%). Follow-up angiography was performed in all patients (mean 9.0 months, interquartile range of 9.0). Recurrence was found in 3 patients (3/86, 3.5%). No aneurysm rupture or bleeding was reported. Conclusions Our mid-term follow-up study showed that ECE of aneurysm neck was an effective and safe treatment modality for RICABF. The long-term effectiveness and safety of this interventional radiology technique need to be investigated in prospective and comparative studies. PMID:24986761

  13. Coil occlusion of a subclavian mycotic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kische, Stephan; Ince, Hüseyin; Peuster, Matthias

    2010-06-01

    We report the first successful application of nonferromagnetic embolization coils for endovascular exclusion of a mycotic right subclavian artery aneurysm. A 58-year-old woman presented with acute cervical pain and a pulsatile mass in the right supraclavicular fossa under antibiotic medication for subacute infectious endocarditis. Diagnostic work-up including duplex sonography, digital subtraction angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a saccular aneurysm of the extrathoracic right subclavian artery. As an alternative to open surgery or stent-graft repair, this pathology was electively treated by transcatheter coil embolization. No neurological deficit or ischemic symptoms were noted during 9 months clinical follow-up. Multislice computed tomography scan revealed complete occlusion of the mycotic aneurysm 6 months after the interventional procedure. Transcatheter closure with Inconel embolization coils is a cost-effective and safe therapeutic option in patients with mycotic aneurysm originating from the subclavian artery.

  14. [Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta].

    PubMed

    Tovar Martín, E; Acea Nebril, B

    1993-01-01

    Approximately 10 per cent of abdominal aneurysms have an excessively thick wall that sometimes involve duodenum, cava or colon by an inflammatory process. Between February 1986 and December 1992, 147 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were treated surgically and in 13 (8.8%) the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Their mean age was 67.3 years (70.1 years in non inflammatory group) and all were symptomatics initially (abdominal pain in 53%, rupture in 23%, mass in 15%). The operative mortality for elective resection was 37% in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAA) decreasing to 9% in the AAA group without inflammatory involvement. We conclude that surgery is indicated in these patients to prevent rupture and to hasten the subsidense of inflammatory process ever with postoperative morbi-mortality increased.

  15. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... aortic aneurysm repair - open Aortic angiography Chest MRI Hardening of the ... Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla ...

  16. Apical aneurysm of Chagas's heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, J S; Mello De Oliveira, J A; Frederigue, U; Lima Filho, E C

    1981-01-01

    A retrospective study of Chagas's heart disease was carried out by a review of necropsy reports with special reference to the lesion known as the apical aneurysm. It was concluded that this lesion was more frequent in men, was unrelated to age, and was unrelated to heart weight. Patients dying of the cardiac consequences of Chagas's cardiomyopathy were more likely to have an apical aneurysm than those whose death was unrelated to the disease but the mode of death (sudden, or with heart failure) was unconnected with its presence. Transillumination from within the ventricle at necropsy was not only useful in demonstrating the aneurysm but also showed areas of myocardial thinning elsewhere. Thrombosis within the lesion was frequent. The aetiology of the apical aneurysm is discussed and it is concluded that while ischaemia, inflammation, thrombosis, and mechanical factors may produce and localise this lesion, the underlying cause is the basic pathogenetic process-parasympathetic nerve cell destruction. Images PMID:7295439

  17. [Unruptured cerebral aneurysms: Controversies on population screening].

    PubMed

    Delgado Lopez, Pedro David; Castilla Díez, José Manuel; Martín Velasco, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    The idea of population screening of unruptured intracranial aneurysms is interesting because, despite recent advances in surgical and endovascular treatment, the mortality related to aneurismal subarachnoid haemorrhage reaches 30%. Screening is justified whenever the morbidity and mortality of the treatment (markedly lower for unruptured compared to ruptured aneurysms) overcomes the inherent risk of harbouring a brain aneurysm. Although, at present, this balance does not seem to favour population-based screening, it is justified in certain sub-populations with an increased risk of rupture. In this review, an analysis is made of the requirements for implementing a screening program, when would it be justified, what is to be expected from treatment (in terms of effectiveness, morbidity and costs), and what medical-legal issues are relevant and to determine the usefulness of the program. A study protocol is proposed aimed at examining the usefulness of population screening for brain aneurysms by magnetic resonance angiography.

  18. Familial aortic aneurysm in Leonberg dogs.

    PubMed

    Chetboul, Valérie; Tessier, Dominique; Borenstein, Nicolas; Delisle, Françoise; Zilberstein, Luca; Payen, Guillaume; Leglaive, Eric; Franc, Brigitte; Derumeaux, Geneviève; Pouchelon, Jean-Louis

    2003-10-15

    A thoracic aortic aneurysm was diagnosed in a 6-month-old male Leonberg dog by use of radiography, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The aneurysm was associated with a twisted ascending aorta and dilatation of several other thoracic arteries (pulmonary trunk, brachiocephalic trunk, and left subclavian artery). Histologic examination of the aorta revealed cystic medial necrosis, with disruption of the elastic network, collagen fibers, and the muscle glycoprotein fibrillin-1. The dam and sire of the dog and 8 littermates were examined by use of transthoracic echocardiography. The sire and 1 male littermate also had an aneurysm of the ascending aorta. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of familial aortic aneurysm in dogs.

  19. Case Report: A Troublesome Ophthalmic Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Meling, T. R.; Sorteberg, W.; Bakke, S. J.; Jacobsen, E. A.; Lane, P.; Vajkoczy, P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective and Importance When treating large unruptured ophthalmic artery (OA) aneurysms causing progressive blindness, surgical clipping is still the preferred method because aneurysm sac decompression may relieve optic nerve compression. However, endovascular treatment of OA aneurysms has made important progress with the introduction of stents. Although this development is welcomed, it also makes the choice of treatment strategy less straightforward than in the past, with the potential of missteps. Clinical Presentation A 56-year-old woman presented with a long history of progressive unilateral visual loss and magnetic resonance imaging showing a 20-mm left-sided OA aneurysm. Intervention Because of her long history of very poor visual acuity, we considered her left eye to be irredeemable and opted for endovascular therapy. The OA aneurysms was treated with stent and coils but continued to grow, threatening the contralateral eye. Because she failed internal carotid artery (ICA) balloon test occlusion, we performed a high-flow extracranial-intracranial bypass with proximal ICA occlusion in the neck. However, aneurysm growth continued due to persistent circulation through reversed blood flow in distal ICA down to the OA and the cavernous portion of the ICA. Due to progressive loss of her right eye vision, we surgically occluded the ICA proximal to the posterior communicating artery and excised the coiled, now giant, OA aneurysm. This improved her right eye vision, but her left eye was permanently blind. Conclusion This case report illustrates complications of the endovascular and surgical treatment of a large unruptured OA aneurysm. PMID:25485220

  20. Aortoiliac aneurysm with congenital right pelvic kidney.

    PubMed

    Date, Kazuma; Okada, Shuuichi; Ezure, Masahiko; Takihara, Hitomi; Okonogi, Shuuichi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Sato, Yasushi; Kaneko, Tatsuo

    2015-05-01

    The association of congenital pelvic kidney with abdominal aortoiliac aneurysm is an extremely rare clinical finding. Previous reports have described various methods of aneurysm repair with successful preservation of the function of pelvic kidney. However, to our knowledge, reconstruction of more than two renal arteries has not been established. We report a case of abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated by congenital right pelvic kidney in a 72-year-old man. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a maximum diameter of 54 mm and a right common iliac aneurysm of 45 mm. In addition, he had a congenital right pelvic kidney and CT angiography identified three right pelvic renal arteries. The upper artery originated from the bifurcation of the terminal aorta and the lower two originated from the right common iliac artery. Three-dimensional CT was helpful for the accurate planning of the operation. Open surgical repair of the aortoiliac aneurysm with a Dacron bifurcated graft replacement was decided and reimplantation of all three right pelvic kidney arteries to the right limb of the graft was also performed. For renal preservation, the right pelvic kidney arteries were perfused with cold Ringer's lactate using a rapid infusion pump and coronary perfusion cannula. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and worsening of renal function was not observed. The perfusion of renal arteries with cold Ringer's solution was thought to be a simple and appropriate procedure for renal protection.

  1. Flow Studies in Basilar Tip Aneurysm Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Russell; Selby, Kathy; Saloner, David; Savas, Omer

    2001-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry and flow visualization are performed on two models of basilar tip bifurcation aneurysms. The models are intended to correspond to an aneurysm at two stages during its growth. The models are subject to steady flow conditions covering the physiological range of Reynold’s numbers while being subject to both symmetric and asymmetric outflow conditions. A brief investigation is also made using pulsatile input flow with a physiologically representative waveform. Experiment showed a general pattern of increasing unsteadiness in the aneurysm head with increasing Reynold’s number. Only for a case of a small-headed model and asymmetric outflow could a quasi-stable flow pattern be established. For the same model with symmetric outflow conditions, instability in the aneurysm head occurs at the low end of physiological Reynold’s numbers. A larger-headed aneurysm model displayed a similar onset of instability for both symmetric and asymmetric outflow conditions, with flow within the aneurysm head being less pronounced than the small-headed model.

  2. Medical management of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Norbert; Rodionov, Roman N; Mahlmann, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are the most common arterial aneurysms. Endovascular or open surgical aneurysm repair is indicated in patients with large AAA ≥ 5.5 cm in diameter as this prevents aneurysm rupture. The presence even of small AAAs not in need of immediate repair is associated with a very high cardiovascular risk including myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death. This risk by far exceeds the risk of aneurysm rupture. These patients therefore should be considered as high-risk patients and receive optimal medical treatment and life-style modification of their cardiovascular risk factors to improve their prognosis. In addition, these patients should be followed-up for aneurysm growth and receive medical treatment to decrease aneurym progression and rupture rate. Treatment with statins has been shown to reduce cardiovascular mortality in these patients, and also slows the rate of AAA growth. Use of beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors and AT1-receptor antagonists does not affect AAA growth but may be indicated for comorbidities. Antibiotic therapy with roxithromycin has a small effect on AAA growth, but this effect must be critically weighed against the potential risk of wide-spread use of antibiotics.

  3. Cytogenomic Aberrations in Congenital Cardiovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Azamian, Mahshid; Lalani, Seema R.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cardiovascular malformations are the most common birth defects, with a complex multifactorial etiology. Genetic factors play an important role, illuminated by numerous cytogenetically visible abnormalities, as well as submicroscopic genomic imbalances affecting critical genomic regions in the affected individuals. Study of rare families with Mendelian forms, as well as emerging next-generation sequencing technologies have uncovered a multitude of genes relevant for human congenital cardiac diseases. It is clear that the complex embryology of human cardiac development, with an orchestrated interplay of transcription factors, chromatin regulators, and signal transduction pathway molecules can be easily perturbed by genomic imbalances affecting dosage-sensitive regions. This review focuses on chromosomal abnormalities contributing to congenital heart diseases and underscores several genomic disorders linked to human cardiac malformations in the last few decades. PMID:27385961

  4. Occipitoatlantoaxial malformation in an adult goat.

    PubMed

    Seva, Juan I; Gómez, Serafin; Pallarés, Francisco J; Sánchez, Pedro; Bernabé, Antonio

    2008-09-01

    An occipitoatlantoaxial malformation was diagnosed in a 1-year-old Murciano-Granadina goat. At clinical examination, the head and cranial part of the neck were deviated to the right. Clinical signs of spinal cord or brain disease were not observed. At necropsy, morphological abnormalities were seen in the craniovertebral junction and cervical vertebrae, characterized by a firm attachment and incomplete articulation between the occipital bone and the atlas, and scoliosis in the cervical regions. The definitive diagnosis was bilateral asymmetrical occipitoatlantoaxial fusion with rotation of the atlas and atlantoaxial subluxation. To the authors' knowledge, this case report is the second occipitoatlantoaxial malformation described in a goat and the first description in an adult goat.

  5. Arteriovenous malformation in chronic gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Cavett, C M; Selby, J H; Hamilton, J L; Williamson, J W

    1977-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations of the gastrointestinal tract are uncommon and treatment is problematic because routine barium contrast studies and endoscopy fail to demonstrate the lesion. Diagnosis is by selective mesenteric arteriography, demonstrating a characteristic vascular tuft and very early venous phase. Two cases of arteriovenous malformation are presented and 47 other reported cases are reviewed. Forty-five per cent were found in the cecum; 37, or 80%, involved the distal ileum, cecum ascending colon, or hepatic flexure. Seventy-five per cent of all patients fall into the 50--80 year age range. The literature reveals a recurring pattern of chronic gastrointestinal blood loss, anemia, and delay (even negative abdominal explorations) before the diagnosis is finally made. A more aggressive approach to chronic gastrointestinal bleeding is suggested through the use of selective mesenteric arteriography. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:299801

  6. Animal Models in Studying Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Xu, Hongzhi; Qin, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an important cause of hemorrhagic stroke. The etiology is largely unknown and the therapeutics are controversial. A review of AVM-associated animal models may be helpful in order to understand the up-to-date knowledge and promote further research about the disease. We searched PubMed till December 31, 2014, with the term "arteriovenous malformation," limiting results to animals and English language. Publications that described creations of AVM animal models or investigated AVM-related mechanisms and treatments using these models were reviewed. More than 100 articles fulfilling our inclusion criteria were identified, and from them eight different types of the original models were summarized. The backgrounds and procedures of these models, their applications, and research findings were demonstrated. Animal models are useful in studying the pathogenesis of AVM formation, growth, and rupture, as well as in developing and testing new treatments. Creations of preferable models are expected.

  7. Animal Models in Studying Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Xu, Hongzhi; Qin, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an important cause of hemorrhagic stroke. The etiology is largely unknown and the therapeutics are controversial. A review of AVM-associated animal models may be helpful in order to understand the up-to-date knowledge and promote further research about the disease. We searched PubMed till December 31, 2014, with the term “arteriovenous malformation,” limiting results to animals and English language. Publications that described creations of AVM animal models or investigated AVM-related mechanisms and treatments using these models were reviewed. More than 100 articles fulfilling our inclusion criteria were identified, and from them eight different types of the original models were summarized. The backgrounds and procedures of these models, their applications, and research findings were demonstrated. Animal models are useful in studying the pathogenesis of AVM formation, growth, and rupture, as well as in developing and testing new treatments. Creations of preferable models are expected. PMID:26649296

  8. FTO variant associated with malformation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rohena, Luis; Lawson, Michelle; Guzman, Edwin; Ganapathi, Mythily; Cho, Megan T; Haverfield, Eden; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame

    2016-04-01

    Common FTO variants are associated with obesity. However, it has recently been shown that homozygous FTO c.947G>A variant, which predicts p.R316Q, and c.956C>T, which predicts p.S319F, are associated with a malformation syndrome inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. We present a similar homozygous FTO c.965G>A variant that predicts p.R322Q, associated with a lethal malformation syndrome in a consanguineous Yemeni family. Functional studies showed that the p.R316Q, p.S219F, and p.R322Q variants render the FTO protein inactive. We further expand on the phenotype of homozygous FTO loss-of-function mutations to include eye abnormalities, gingival overgrowth, craniosynostosis, and cutaneous photosensitivity.

  9. From bench to bedside: utility of the rabbit elastase aneurysm model in preclinical studies of intracranial aneurysm treatment.

    PubMed

    Brinjikji, Waleed; Ding, Yong H; Kallmes, David F; Kadirvel, Ramanathan

    2016-05-01

    Preclinical studies are important in helping practitioners and device developers improve techniques and tools for endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Thus an understanding of the major animal models used in such studies is important. The New Zealand rabbit elastase induced arterial aneurysm of the common carotid artery is one of the most commonly used models in testing the safety and efficacy of new endovascular devices. In this review we discuss: (1) the various techniques used to create the aneurysm, (2) complications of aneurysm creation, (3) natural history of the arterial aneurysm, (4) histopathologic and hemodynamic features of the aneurysm, (5) devices tested using this model, and (6) weaknesses of the model. We demonstrate how preclinical studies using this model are applied in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms in humans. The model has similar hemodynamic, morphological, and histologic characteristics to human aneurysms, and demonstrates similar healing responses to coiling as human aneurysms. Despite these strengths, however, the model does have many weaknesses, including the fact that the model does not emulate the complex inflammatory processes affecting growing and ruptured aneurysms. Furthermore, the extracranial location of the model affects its ability to be used in preclinical safety assessments of new devices. We conclude that the rabbit elastase model has characteristics that make it a simple and effective model for preclinical studies on the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms, but further work is needed to develop aneurysm models that simulate the histopathologic and morphologic characteristics of growing and ruptured aneurysms.

  10. False-negative indocyanine green videoangiography among complex unruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysms: the importance of further aneurysm inspection.

    PubMed

    Kulwin, Charles; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2014-10-01

    Successful surgical treatment of cerebral aneurysms requires complete occlusion of the aneurysm lumen while maintaining patency of the adjacent branching and perforating arteries. Intraoperative flow assessment allows aneurysm clip repositioning in the event these requirements are not met, avoiding the risk of postoperative rehemorrhage or infarction. A number of modalities have been proposed for primarily intraoperative qualitative blood flow assessment, including microdoppler ultrasonography, intraoperative digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and more recently noninvasive fluorescent angiography including indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescent imaging. Puncture of the aneurysm dome to exclude aneurysm sac filling may also assess the efficacy of clip placement. Although a high concordance between ICG and DSA has been reported, there remains an important subset of aneurysms for which negative ICG study may erroneously suggest aneurysm occlusion. A high-risk situation for such a false-negative study is an atherosclerotic middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm in which vessel wall plaque interferes with the ICG signal. Furthermore, a decreased flow within the aneurysm may not allow enough emission light for detection under the current technology. In this report, we describe our experience with cases of MCA aneurysms with false-negative ICG-VA studies requiring clip adjustment for optimal surgical treatment and discuss two illustrative cases of MCA aneurysms with intraoperative fluorescence studies that were falsely negative, requiring puncture of the aneurysm to correctly identify incomplete aneurysm occlusion.

  11. Embolization and radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Plasencia, Andres R.; Santillan, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) requires a multidisciplinary management including microsurgery, endovascular embolization, and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). This article reviews the recent advancements in the multimodality treatment of patients with AVMs using endovascular neurosurgery and SRS. We describe the natural history of AVMs and the role of endovascular and radiosurgical treatment as well as their interplay in the management of these complex vascular lesions. Also, we present some representative cases treated at our institution. PMID:22826821

  12. Arteriovenous malformations: epidemiology and clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Laakso, Aki; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2012-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the brain are relatively rare congenital developmental vascular lesions. They may cause hemorrhagic stroke, epilepsy, chronic headache, or focal neurologic deficits, and the incidence of asymptomatic AVMs is increasing due to widespread availability of noninvasive imaging methods. Since the most severe complication of an AVM is hemorrhagic stroke, most epidemiologic studies have concentrated on the hemorrhage risk and its risk factors. In this article, the authors discuss the epidemiology, presenting symptoms, and hemorrhage risk associated with brain AVMs.

  13. Analysis and Comparison of 2-D Hemodynamic Numerical Simulation of Elastic Aneurysm and Rigid Aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. W.; Ding, G. H.; Yin, W. Y.; Yang, X. J.; Shi, W. C.; Zhang, X. L.

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of hemodynamic parameters on the formation, growth and rupture of an aneurysm. Our simulation of the elastic and rigid aneurysm is based on a DSA or other clinic image. The simulatied results are that there are great differences in the distribution of velocity magnitude at some sections which are predicted by the two models. For the elastic wall model, the distribution of velocity magnitude of one outlet is obviously off-center, which influences the distribution of wall shear stress (WSS) and exchange of substance through the vessel wall. The currents of the distributions of WSS along the wall of aneurysm for the two models are similar. But there are obvious differences between the two models in the values especially at the neck of aneurysm. This study demonstrates obviously that the elastic wall model suits the simulation for growth and rupture of an aneurysm better.

  14. Effect of saccular aneurysm and parent artery morphology on hemodynamics of cerebral bifurcation aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Farnoush, A; Qian, Y; Takao, H; Murayama, Y; Avolio, A

    2012-01-01

    Morphological descriptors of aneurysms have been used to assess aneurysm rupture. This study investigated the relation between the morphological parameters and the flow related parameter of energy loss (EL). Four size indices and one shape index were assessed in idealized middle cerebral artery models with various aneurysm morphologies. Four patient-specific aneurysms (2 ruptured, 2 unruptured) were virtually manipulated by removing the aneurysms from their parent arteries and merging them with the idealized bifurcation models. EL was calculated from the energy difference between inflow and outflow. The results indicate that among size indices, EL is mostly dependent on bottleneck factor and less dependent on the aspect ratio. Results also showed that there is a direct relationship between nonsphericity index (NSI) and EL in manipulated models. No specific correlation was found between EL and NSI in patient-specific models.

  15. Flow Instability and Wall Shear Stress Ocillation in Intracranial Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Hyoungsu; Jayamaran, Mahesh; Richardson, Peter; Karniadakis, George

    2009-11-01

    We investigate the flow dynamics and oscillatory behavior of wall shear stress (WSS) vectors in intracranial aneurysms using high-order spectral/hp simulations. We analyze four patient- specific internal carotid arteries laden with aneurysms of different characteristics : a wide-necked saccular aneurysm, a hemisphere-shaped aneurysm, a narrower-necked saccular aneurysm, and a case with two adjacent saccular aneurysms. Simulations show that the pulsatile flow in aneurysms may be subject to a hydrodynamic instability during the decelerating systolic phase resulting in a high-frequency oscillation in the range of 30-50 Hz. When the aneurysmal flow becomes unstable, both the magnitude and the directions of WSS vectors fluctuate. In particular, the WSS vectors around the flow impingement region exhibit significant spatial and temporal changes in direction as well as in magnitude.

  16. [Unruptured brain aneurysms: when to screen and when to treat?].

    PubMed

    Fiehler, J

    2012-02-01

    The detection rate of intracranial aneurysms has increased with the improved availability of non-invasive imaging methods. Moreover, persons who have relatives with intracranial aneurysms increasingly demand imaging to rule out aneurysms. To deal with these problems, radiologists require basic knowledge regarding the detection and treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms. The prevalence of aneurysms in the normal population is 2 - 3 %. It increases to 4 - 10 % in persons with one relative with an aneurysm and to about 20 % in persons with two relatives with an aneurysm. The average natural rupture risk is estimated to be 5 % within 5 years of detection. In the individual case it depends on several variables that are discussed here. According to the literature, the risk of endovascular aneurysm treatment is about 5 %. On the basis of these data, the benefit of MRA screening needs to be discussed individually with the patient.

  17. A ruptured cerebral mycotic aneurysm caused by Abiotrophia defectiva endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Sung; Shang, Shih-Ta; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2010-02-01

    We describe a case of ruptured cerebral mycotic aneurysm caused by Abiotrophia defectiva endocarditis in a previously healthy man. The patient underwent craniotomy with clipping of aneurysm and received antibiotic treatment for 6 weeks and survived.

  18. The experimental study on aneurysm with PIV system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yueshe, Wang; Xiaoqi, Ma; Di, Li

    2013-07-01

    Cerebral aneurysm, a local enlargement of an artery caused by weakness in the wall of a cerebral artery, has the high death rate and disability rate, and is a threat to public health. The forming mechanism of aneurysm is complex, which motivated many researchers to conduct studies in this field. The results indicated that increasing heart frequency can aggravate the oscillation of wall shear stress, and push The growth points of aneurysm along the aneurysm wall, thereby significantly affecting bthe growth and rupture mechanism of aneurysm. In addition, it is found that the curvature of the vessel is the key to induce the secondary vortex in the aneurysm; the secondary vortex increases the magnitude of WSS near the dome of aneurysm, which can cause the rupture of aneurysm dome. there is a linear relationship between the velocity of blood flow and the square root of hear frequency.

  19. Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... español Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Browse Sections The Basics Overview What is AAA? ... doctor about getting screened (tested) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). If AAA isn't found and treated ...

  20. Aneurysms of the posterior cerebral artery in children.

    PubMed

    Romero, F J; Tàpies, C; Ibarra, B; Rovira, M

    1988-01-01

    Two cases of aneurysms of the posterior cerebral artery, diagnosed by CT and confirmed angiographically, are reported. In the first case, the aneurysm was discovered fortuitously. The second began with intracerebral haemorrhage. A review of the literature is reported.

  1. Debendox and congenital malformations in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed Central

    Harron, D W; Griffiths, K; Shanks, R G

    1980-01-01

    An investigation was carried out in Northern Ireland into the alleged association between fetal abnormalities and Debendox, an antiemetic drug used in pregnancy. During the period 1966-78 the total number of births each year and the overall incidence of congenital malformations per 10 000 births fell. The incidences of cleft lip, cleft palate, reduction deformities, and defects of the heart and great vessels fell from 1966 to 1976 but increased in 1977 and 1978. During the same period (1966-78) the number of prescriptions for Debendox issued by general practitioners increased more than fourfold. These observations suggest that there is no relation between congenital malformations and the use of Debendox. This conclusion, however, does not take into account other drug- or environmental-related factors that may have resulted in a reduction in the number of congenital malformations and would hence have masked an increase associated with greater usage of Debendox. In particular, the amount of Debendox sold direct to the public without a prescription and the use of the drug by patients who were not pregnant could not be established. The amount of drug used in these ways is probably small, and it is difficult to see how it might influence the conclusions reached. PMID:7437804

  2. Debendox and congenital malformations in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Harron, D W; Griffiths, K; Shanks, R G

    1980-11-22

    An investigation was carried out in Northern Ireland into the alleged association between fetal abnormalities and Debendox, an antiemetic drug used in pregnancy. During the period 1966-78 the total number of births each year and the overall incidence of congenital malformations per 10 000 births fell. The incidences of cleft lip, cleft palate, reduction deformities, and defects of the heart and great vessels fell from 1966 to 1976 but increased in 1977 and 1978. During the same period (1966-78) the number of prescriptions for Debendox issued by general practitioners increased more than fourfold. These observations suggest that there is no relation between congenital malformations and the use of Debendox. This conclusion, however, does not take into account other drug- or environmental-related factors that may have resulted in a reduction in the number of congenital malformations and would hence have masked an increase associated with greater usage of Debendox. In particular, the amount of Debendox sold direct to the public without a prescription and the use of the drug by patients who were not pregnant could not be established. The amount of drug used in these ways is probably small, and it is difficult to see how it might influence the conclusions reached.

  3. Abdominal aortic aneurysms in women

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ruby C.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has long been recognized as a condition predominantly afflicting males, with sex-associated differences described for almost every aspect of the disease from pathophysiology and epidemiology to morbidity and mortality. Women are generally spared from AAA formation by the immunomodulating effects of estrogen but once they develop, the natural history of AAAs in women appears to be more aggressive, with more rapid expansion, a higher tendency to rupture at smaller diameters, and higher mortality following rupture. However, simply repairing AAA at smaller diameters in women is a debatable solution, as even elective endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) is fraught with higher morbidity and mortality in women compared to men. The goal of this review is to summarize what is currently known about the effect of gender on AAA presentation, treatment, and outcomes. Additionally, we aim to review current controversies over screening recommendations and threshold for repair in women. PMID:26747679

  4. Management of Splenic Artery Aneurysms and False Aneurysms with Endovascular Treatment in 12 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Guillon, R.; Garcier, J.M.; Abergel, A.; Mofid, R.; Garcia, V.; Chahid, T.; Ravel, A.; Pezet, D.; Boyer, L.

    2003-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the endovascular treatment of splenic artery aneurysms and false aneurysms. Methods: Twelve patients (mean age 59 years, range 47-75 years) with splenic artery aneurysm (n = 10) or false aneurysm (n = 2) were treated. The lesion was asymptomatic in 11 patients; hemobilia was observed in one patient. The lesion was juxta-ostial in one case, located on the intermediate segment of the splenic artery in four, near the splenic hilus in six,and affected the whole length of the artery in one patient. In 10 cases, the maximum lesion diameter was greater than 2 cm; in one case 30% growth of an aneurysm 18 mm in diameter had occurred in 6 months;in the last case, two distal aneurysms were associated (17 and 18 mm in diameter). In one case, stent-grafting was attempted; one detachable balloon occlusion was performed; the 10 other patients were treated with coils. Results: Endovascular treatment was possible in 11 patients (92%) (one failure: stenting attempt). In four cases among 11, the initial treatment was not successful (residual perfusion of aneurysm); surgical treatment was carried out in one case, and a second embolization in two. Thus in nine cases (75%) endovascular treatment was successful: complete and persistent exclusion of the aneurysm but with spleen perfusion persisting at the end of follow-upon CT scans (mean 13 months). An early and transient elevation of pancreatic enzymes was observed in four cases. Conclusion: Ultrasound and CT have made the diagnosis of splenic artery aneurysm or false aneurysm more frequent. Endovascular treatment, the morbidity of which is low, is effective and spares the spleen.

  5. Thoracic aortic aneurysm: reading the enemy's playbook.

    PubMed

    Elefteriades, John A

    2008-05-01

    The vast database of the Yale Center for Thoracic Aortic Disease--which includes information on 3000 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm or dissection, with 9000 catalogued images and 9000 patient-years of follow-up--has, over the last decade, permitted multiple glimpses into the "playbook" of this virulent disease. Understanding the precise behavioral features of thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection permits us more effectively to combat this disease. In this monograph, we will first review certain fundamentals--in terms of anatomy, nomenclature, imaging, diagnosis, medical, surgical, and stent treatment. After reviewing these fundamentals, we will proceed with a detailed exploration of lessons learned by peering into the operational playbook of thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection. Among the glimpses afforded in the behavioral playbook of this disease are the following: 1 Thoracic aortic aneurysm, while lethal, is indolent. Mortality usually does not occur until after years of growth. 2 The aneurysmal ascending thoracic aorta grows slowly: about 0.1 cm per year (the descending aorta grows somewhat faster). 3 Over a patient's lifetime, "hinge points" at which the likelihood of rupture or dissection skyrockets are seen at 5.5 cm for the ascending and 6.5 cm for the descending aorta. Intervening at 5 cm diameter for the ascending and 6 cm for the descending prevents most adverse events. 4 Symptomatic aneurysms require resection regardless of size. 5 The yearly rate of rupture, dissection, or death is 14.1% for a patient with a thoracic aorta of 6 cm diameter. 6 The mechanical properties of the aorta deteriorate markedly at 6 cm diameter (distensibility falls, and wall stress rises)--a finding that "dovetails" perfectly with observations of the clinical behavior of the thoracic aorta. 7 Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection are largely inherited diseases, with a predominantly autosomal-dominant pattern. The specific genetics are being elucidated at the

  6. Cerebral Aneurysm Perforations during Treatment with Detachable Coils

    PubMed Central

    Layton, K.F.; Cloft, H.J.; Kallmes, D.F.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Perforation of intracranial aneurysms during endovascular treatment with platinum microcoils is a well-known and serious complication reported to occur in 2-4% of patients. Inflation of a remodelling balloon across the aneurysm neck or within the proximal parent vessel is an additional technique that theoretically might be useful to reduce flow within the aneurysm and achieve hemostasis. In the case reports that follow, we present our experience using this technique for managing intraprocedural aneurysm rupture. PMID:20569548

  7. Traumatic aneurysm and arteriovenous fistula of the splenic artery.

    PubMed

    Oğuzkurt, L; Balkanci, F; Ariyürek, M; Demirkazik, F B

    1996-01-01

    Aneurysmal arteriovenous fistulas are rare and mostly seen in adults. A 13-year-old girl developed a subcapsular hematoma of the spleen following blunt abdominal trauma. Follow-up ultrasonography 4 months after the trauma revealed an aneurysm at the splenic hilum. Selective splenic angiography demonstrated the lesion to be an aneurysmal arteriovenous fistula. Repeat ultrasonography enabled us to be certain of the traumatic origin of the aneurysm and arteriovenous fistula which are very unusual in the pediatric age group.

  8. Epidemiology and genetics of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Caranci, F; Briganti, F; Cirillo, L; Leonardi, M; Muto, M

    2013-10-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5-10% of the population), a fraction of which rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage with devastating consequences. Until now, the exact etiology of intracranial aneurysms formation remains unclear. The low incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage in comparison with the prevalence of unruptured IAs suggests that the vast majority of intracranial aneurysms do not rupture and that identifying those at highest risk is important in defining the optimal management. The most important factors predicting rupture are aneurysm size and site. In addition to ambiental factors (smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and hypertension), epidemiological studies have demonstrated a familiar influence contributing to the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms, with increased frequency in first- and second-degree relatives of people with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In comparison to sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located at the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Other than familiar occurrence, there are several heritable conditions associated with intracranial aneurysm formation, including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, neurofibromatosis type I, Marfan syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type I, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II and IV. The familial occurrence and the association with heritable conditions indicate that genetic factors may play a role in the development of intracranial aneurysms. Genome-wide linkage studies in families and sib pairs with intracranial aneurysms have identified several loci on chromosomes showing suggestive evidence of linkage, particularly on chromosomes 1p34.3-p36.13, 7q11, 19q13.3, and Xp22. For the loci on 1p34.3-p36.13 and 7q11, a moderate positive association with positional candidate genes has been demonstrated (perlecan gene, elastin gene, collagen type 1 A2 gene

  9. Color-Coded Digital Subtraction Angiography in the Management of a Rare Case of Middle Cerebral Artery Pure Arterial Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, Caleb E; Pamias-Portalatin, Eva; Mendoza-Torres, Jorge; Effio, Euclides; Moran, Yadira; Rodriguez-Mercado, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Summary The advent of flow dynamics and the recent availability of perfusion analysis software have provided new diagnostic tools and management possibilities for cerebrovascular patients. To this end, we provide an example of the use of color-coded angiography and its application in a rare case of a patient with a pure middle cerebral artery (MCA) malformation. A 42-year-old male chronic smoker was evaluated in the emergency room due to sudden onset of severe headache, nausea, vomiting and left-sided weakness. Head computed tomography revealed a right basal ganglia hemorrhage. Cerebral digital subtraction angiography (DSA) showed a right middle cerebral artery malformation consisting of convoluted and ectatic collateral vessels supplying the distal middle cerebral artery territory-M1 proximally occluded. An associated medial lenticulostriate artery aneurysm was found. Brain single-photon emission computed tomography with and without acetazolamide failed to show problems in vascular reserve that would indicate the need for flow augmentation. Twelve months after discharge, the patient recovered from the left-sided weakness and did not present any similar events. A follow-up DSA and perfusion study using color-coded perfusion analysis showed perforator aneurysm resolution and adequate, albeit delayed perfusion in the involved vascular territory. We propose a combined congenital and acquired mechanism involving M1 occlusion with secondary dysplastic changes in collateral supply to the distal MCA territory. Angiographic and cerebral perfusion work-up was used to exclude the need for flow augmentation. Nevertheless, the natural course of this lesion remains unclear and long-term follow-up is warranted. PMID:25496681

  10. Spontaneous gastroduodenal artery aneurysm rupture in acute surgery.

    PubMed

    Savage, Jessica; Hsee, Li

    2012-06-29

    Among the rarest of the visceral aneurysms, gastroduodenal artery (GDA) aneurysms often present with spontaneous rupture and are associated with a high mortality rate. Their aetiology is poorly understood. This report describes a case of haemorrhagic shock due to sudden GDA aneurysm rupture in a patient with a significant autoimmune history.

  11. 21 CFR 882.4175 - Aneurysm clip applier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4175 Aneurysm clip applier. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip applier is a device used by the surgeon for holding and applying intracranial... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aneurysm clip applier. 882.4175 Section...

  12. 21 CFR 882.4175 - Aneurysm clip applier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aneurysm clip applier. 882.4175 Section 882.4175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4175 Aneurysm clip applier. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip applier is a device used by the surgeon for holding and applying...

  13. 21 CFR 882.4175 - Aneurysm clip applier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aneurysm clip applier. 882.4175 Section 882.4175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4175 Aneurysm clip applier. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip applier is a device used by the surgeon for holding and applying...

  14. 21 CFR 882.4175 - Aneurysm clip applier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aneurysm clip applier. 882.4175 Section 882.4175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4175 Aneurysm clip applier. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip applier is a device used by the surgeon for holding and applying...

  15. 21 CFR 882.4175 - Aneurysm clip applier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aneurysm clip applier. 882.4175 Section 882.4175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4175 Aneurysm clip applier. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip applier is a device used by the surgeon for holding and applying...

  16. Malformations in neotropical viperids: qualitative and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, S S; Grego, K F; Lorigados, C A B; Fonseca-Pinto, A C B C; Fernandes, W; Sá-Rocha, L C; Catão-Dias, J L

    2013-11-01

    Malformations can occur in all living species, but there is little information about anomalies that occur in snakes and their frequency. This study assessed malformations in newborn South American pit vipers (Bothrops jararaca) and South American rattlesnakes (Crotalus durissus) from wild captured pregnant females (240 and 35 litters, respectively). Newborn snakes were measured, weighed, sexed and studied grossly and by radiography for the presence of malformations. Ninety-five malformed pit vipers were identified from 4,087 births (2.3%), while 36 malformed rattlesnakes were found from 324 births (11.1%). Spinal abnormalities were the most common in both species, followed by fusion of ventral scales. Pit vipers showed a greater range of malformations including schistosomia (22.1%), kinked tail (13.7%), bicephaly (3.1%) and hydrocephaly (2.1%).

  17. Extracranial vascular malformations (hemangiomas and vascular malformations) in children and adolescents – diagnosis, clinic, and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eivazi, Behfar; Werner, Jochen A.

    2014-01-01

    The field of extracranial vascular anomalies is considered as special focus of pediatric otolaryngology and it has shown a rapid development during the last years. The reason for this interest is finally also due to the global acceptance of the classification introduced by the ISSVA (International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies). Hemangiomas are the most frequently observed vascular tumors. Today the systemic propranolol therapy is mostly used for therapy of hemangiomas requiring treatment. Increasingly, the topical application of beta blocker is discussed while the benefit in the head and neck seems to be limited. Vascular malformations are classified according to the morphology of the affected part of the vascular system in arterial, venous, arterio-venous, lymphatic, capillary, and combined vascular malformations. Conventional surgery, sclerosing therapy, and laser treatment are invasive options for the treatment of lymphatic malformations. The options for the treatment of venous malformations could be significantly improved during the last years. In this context, the use of Nd:YAG laser, the conservative treatment of the localized disseminated intravascular coagulation with low-molecular weight heparin, the re-discovery of bleomycin as effective sclerosing agent, and the improvement of alcohol-based embolization agents must be mentioned. Today the treatment with dye laser is the preferred therapy for capillary malformations and it is superior to other therapeutic options as for example photodynamic therapy. Arterio-venous malformations as representatives for high-flow lesions are the high-risk lesions. Frequently they are compared to malignant head and neck tumors, in particular when a curative treatment can no longer be assured because of diffuse or multifocal extent and when the disease shows a progressive course. The combined treatment of embolization and surgical resection and if necessary consecutive defect reconstruction have turned out to be

  18. Hemangiomas and Vascular Malformations: Current Theory and Management

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Gresham T.; Friedman, Adva B.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are a heterogeneous group of congenital blood vessel disorders more typically referred to as birthmarks. Subcategorized into vascular tumors and malformations, each anomaly is characterized by specific morphology, pathophysiology, clinical behavior, and management approach. Hemangiomas are the most common vascular tumor. Lymphatic, capillary, venous, and arteriovenous malformations make up the majority of vascular malformations. This paper reviews current theory and practice in the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of these more common vascular anomalies. PMID:22611412

  19. Chiari Type I malformation presenting with bilateral hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Dolgun, Habibullah; Turkoglu, Erhan; Kertmen, Hayri; Yilmaz, Erdal R; Sekerci, Zeki

    2009-09-01

    Chiari Type I malformations can present with several clinical signs and symptoms. We describe a 44-year-old female patient presenting with bilateral hearing loss with hydrocephalus coexisting with Chiari Type I malformation and a unilateral arachnoid cyst. Thus, sensorineural hearing loss may be caused by hydrocephalus with Chiari Type I malformation. The placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt without a posterior fossa decompression is an effective treatment.

  20. [Diagnosis of fetal malformations with ultrasound--state of development].

    PubMed

    Fendel, M; Fendel, H

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasonography is of great importance for the prenatal diagnosis of fetal malformations and abnormalities. An early diagnosis in the second trimester is of great interest for an intrauterine or an extrauterine therapy planning (the choice of the time and mode of delivery). Defects of the neural tube including hydrocephalus, malformations of the extremities, the gastrointestinal tract, omphaloceles, the urogenital and cardiac system are described. Four cases of fetal malformations are presented: fetal myelomeningocele, hydrocephalus, bilateral hydronephrosis and lymphangioma with fetal ascites.

  1. Treatment of Infected Aneurysms of the Abdominal Aorta and Iliac Artery with Endovascular Aneurysm Repair and Percutaneous Drainage.

    PubMed

    Chino, Shuji; Kato, Noriyuki; Noda, Yoshihiro; Oue, Kensuke; Tanaka, Satofumi; Hashimoto, Takashi; Higashigawa, Takatoshi; Miyake, Yoichiro; Okabe, Manabu

    2016-10-01

    Infected aneurysm remains one of the most challenging diseases for vascular surgeons. We describe the successful treatment of 2 cases of infected aneurysms with endovascular aneurysm repair and percutaneous computed tomography-guided drainage. This strategy may be an effective alternative to open surgical repair in selected patients.

  2. Endovascular occlusion of intracranial aneurysms with electrically detachable coils: Correlation of aneurysm neck size and treatment results

    SciTech Connect

    Zubillaga, A.F.; Guglielmi, G.; Vinuela, F.; Duckwiler, G.R.

    1994-05-01

    To devise a method to measure aneurysm neck size on angiographic films, and to correlate the sizes obtained with the extent of endovascular aneurysm occlusion, performed with electrically detachable coils. The angiograms of 79 intracranial aneurysms treated by endovascular occlusion using electrically detachable coils were retrospectively analyzed. A method using the average reported caliber of the major intracranial vessels was applied to determine the aneurysm neck sizes on the diagnostic angiograms. The cases were divided into two groups according to neck size, 4 mm being the discriminative value for small and wide necks. The posttreatment angiogram of each case was analyzed to evaluate the degree of occlusion achieved by the technique. Necks were successfully measured in 95% of the aneurysms. Complete aneurysm thrombosis was observed in 85% of the small-necked aneurysms and in 15% of the wide-necked aneurysms. Accurate angiographic measurements of neck diameter can be obtained in most aneurysms. The size of an aneurysm neck correlates well with the results of the endovascular treatment. Small-necked aneurysms can be satisfactorily occluded with this technique. In wide-necked aneurysms this technique should be reserved for lesions having a high surgical risk. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Cognitive impairments after surgical repair of ruptured and unruptured aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Hillis, A.; Anderson, N.; Sampath, P.; Rigamonti, D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To determine the frequency and severity of neuropsychological impairments associated with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, and associated with repair of intracerebral aneurysms.
METHODS—Two groups of patients who underwent repair of intracerebral aneurysms were studied: patients with unruptured aneurysms (n=20) and patients with ruptured aneurysms (n=27). All patients were administered a battery of standardised neuropsychological tests about 3 months after surgery. A subset of 12 patients with unruptured aneurysms were administered the battery both before and after elective repair of the aneurysm(s). A subset of six patients with ruptured aneurysms were given the test at both 3 months and 1year after surgery.
RESULTS—As previously reported for patients with ruptured aneurysms, patients with both ruptured and unruptured aneurysms performed, as a group, significantly below published norms on many of the neuropsychological tests after surgery. However, there were significant differences between preoperative and postoperative performance in the unruptured aneurysm group only on a few tests: measures of word fluency, verbal recall, and frontal lobe function. Performance of patients with ruptured aneurysms was significantly below that of patients with unruptured aneurysms only on a few tests of verbal and visual memory. In addition, group differences compared with published norms reflected severely impaired performance by a minority of patients, rather than moderately impaired performance in a majority of patients.
CONCLUSIONS—Although patients who undergo repair of ruptured aneursyms perform, as a group, below published norms on many neuropsychological tests, significant impairments are seen in a minority of patients. Some of the impairments are associated with subarachnoid haemorrhage, whereas others (found in patients who underwent repair of unruptured aneurysms) are due to general effects of neurosurgery and perioperative management

  4. Notch receptor expression in human brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Hill-Felberg, Sandra; Wu, Hope Hueizhi; Toms, Steven A; Dehdashti, Amir R

    2015-08-01

    The roles of the Notch pathway proteins in normal adult vascular physiology and the pathogenesis of brain arteriovenous malformations are not well-understood. Notch 1 and 4 have been detected in human and mutant mice vascular malformations respectively. Although mutations in the human Notch 3 gene caused a genetic form of vascular stroke and dementia, its role in arteriovenous malformations development has been unknown. In this study, we performed immunohistochemistry screening on tissue microarrays containing eight surgically resected human brain arteriovenous malformations and 10 control surgical epilepsy samples. The tissue microarrays were evaluated for Notch 1-4 expression. We have found that compared to normal brain vascular tissue Notch-3 was dramatically increased in brain arteriovenous malformations. Similarly, Notch 4 labelling was also increased in vascular malformations and was confirmed by western blot analysis. Notch 2 was not detectable in any of the human vessels analysed. Using both immunohistochemistry on microarrays and western blot analysis, we have found that Notch-1 expression was detectable in control vessels, and discovered a significant decrease of Notch 1 expression in vascular malformations. We have demonstrated that Notch 3 and 4, and not Notch 1, were highly increased in human arteriovenous malformations. Our findings suggested that Notch 4, and more importantly, Notch 3, may play a role in the development and pathobiology of human arteriovenous malformations.

  5. A case report: Pulmonary venous malformation complicated with pulmonary hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Supakul, Nucharin; Fan, Rong; Karmazyn, Boaz

    2012-12-01

    Pulmonary venous malformation is extremely rare. We present imaging and clinical findings of a 17-year-old male with multifocal subcutaneous venous malformations and multiple cystic lesions in the liver and spleen, suggestive of slow flow vascular malformation. In the right lung, chest radiography followed by chest CT demonstrated large tortuous pulmonary veins and cystic emphysematous changes. Tc99m-MAA (pertechnetate-labeled macroaggregated albumin) lung perfusion scan demonstrated only 3% of normal perfusion to the right lung, with no evidence of arteriovenous shunting. The child had diffuse intraparenchymal hemorrhage throughout the right lower and middle lobes and underwent resection. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of venous malformation complicated with bleeding.

  6. EGFR mutation of adenocarcinoma in congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Mizue; Sakai, Fumikazu; Arimura, Ken; Katsura, Hideki; Koh, Eitetsu; Sekine, Yasuo; Hiroshima, Kenzo

    2014-03-01

    An 80-year-old man underwent right upper lobectomy for the resection of multiple cysts accompanied by a nodule. The pathological diagnosis was adenocarcinoma with surrounding atypical epithelial cell proliferation in a Type 1 congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation. There was epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in the adenocarcinoma and surrounding atypical epithelial cells that had proliferated. Malignant transformation of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation may be related to the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in this case, with atypical epithelial cell proliferation as a precursor. We emphasize the importance of complete resection of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation and the possibility of treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in epidermal growth factor receptor-mutated cases.

  7. Abdominal aortic aneurysm: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Sourabh; Qamar, Arman; Sharma, Vishal; Sharma, Alka

    2011-01-01

    An arterial aneurysm is defined as a focal dilation of a blood vessel with respect to the original artery. The risk of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) increases dramatically in the presence of the following factors: age older than 60 years, smoking, hypertension and Caucasian ethnicity. The likelihood that an aneurysm will rupture is influenced by the aneurysm size, expansion rate, continued smoking and persistent hypertension. The majority of AAAs are asymptomatic and are detected as an incidental finding on ultrasonography, abdominal computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging performed for other purposes. It can also present with abdominal pain or complications such as thrombosis, embolization and rupture. Approximately 30% of asymptomatic AAAs are discovered as a pulsatile abdominal mass on routine physical examination. Abdominal ultrasonography is considered the screening modality of choice for detecting AAAs because of its high sensitivity and specificity, as well as its safety and relatively lower cost. The decision to screen for AAAs is challenging. The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommended that men between the age of 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked should be screened at least once for AAAs by abdominal ultrasonography. Management options for patients with an asymptomatic AAA include reduction of risk factors such as smoking, hypertension and dyslipidemia; medical therapy with beta-blockers; watchful waiting; endovascular stenting; and surgical repair depending on the size and expansion rate of the aneurysm and underlying comorbidities. PMID:21523201

  8. Radiological features of azygous vein aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Arabinda Kumar; Moore, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Mediastinal masses are most commonly associated with malignancy. Azygous vein aneurysm is a very rare differential diagnosis of mediastinal mass. We report here three cases of azygous vein aneurysm including children and adult patients. In the pediatric patient it was further complicated by thrombosis and secondary pulmonary embolism. We describe the radiological features on CXR, MRI, CT, PET-CT, US and angiogram and their differential diagnosis. Imaging findings of continuity with azygous vein, layering of contrast medium on enhanced CT and dynamic MRA showing filling of the mass at the same time as the azygous vein without prior enhancement will be strongly suggestive of azygous vein aneurysm with transtracheal ultrasound being the definitive test in these patients. It is important to keep a vascular origin mass in the differential diagnosis of mediastinal masses. Also, in young healthy patients with pulmonary embolism, a vascular etiology such as azygous vein aneurysm should be carefully evaluated. This article will help the clinicians to learn about the imaging features of azygous vein aneurysm on different imaging modalities.

  9. Brain abscess after endosaccular embolisation of a cerebral aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangzhong; Zhan, Shengquan; Chen, Wei; Li, Zhaojie; Zhou, Dong; Zeng, Shaojian; Lin, Xiaofeng; Tang, Kai; Zhou, Dexiang; Shu, Hang

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular embolization has become an important treatment option for cerebral aneurysms, along with surgical clipping. But few literatures mentioned infectious complications after coiling of aneurysms. We present a patient with a brain abscess that developed after endosaccular embolization of a left middle cerebral artery aneurysm. The brain abscess was located adjacent to the aneurysm and discovered more than 2 months after embolization. We discuss the clinical implications of this rare complication and review the literature for infections related to the coils used for embolization of aneurysms.

  10. Anterior clinoidal meningioma coincidental with bilateral intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Paraskevopoulos, D; Magras, I; Balogiannis, I; Polyzoidis, K

    2011-01-01

    Coexistence of aneurysms and brain tumors is a rare occurrence. Coincidence is highest in patients with meningiomas rather than other types of tumors. We report a case in which a meningioma of the left anterior clinoid process was coexisting with a right middle cerebral artery (MCA) and a left anterior cerebral artery (ACA) aneurysm. While the right MCA aneurysm was detected preoperatively, the left ACA aneurysm was not detectable, being concealed by the major finding of the region. This report focuses on pitfalls of diagnosis and questions the surgical planning in aneurysms concealed by coincidental brain tumors. PMID:24391419

  11. Anterior clinoidal meningioma coincidental with bilateral intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Paraskevopoulos, D; Magras, I; Balogiannis, I; Polyzoidis, K

    2011-10-01

    Coexistence of aneurysms and brain tumors is a rare occurrence. Coincidence is highest in patients with meningiomas rather than other types of tumors. We report a case in which a meningioma of the left anterior clinoid process was coexisting with a right middle cerebral artery (MCA) and a left anterior cerebral artery (ACA) aneurysm. While the right MCA aneurysm was detected preoperatively, the left ACA aneurysm was not detectable, being concealed by the major finding of the region. This report focuses on pitfalls of diagnosis and questions the surgical planning in aneurysms concealed by coincidental brain tumors.

  12. Radiological features of uncommon aneurysms of the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Kalisz, Kevin; Rajiah, Prabhakar

    2016-01-01

    Although aortic aneurysms are the most common type encountered clinically, they do not span the entire spectrum of possible aneurysms of the cardiovascular system. As cross sectional imaging techniques with cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging continue to improve and becomes more commonplace, once rare cardiovascular aneurysms are being encountered at higher rates. In this review, a series of uncommon, yet clinically important, cardiovascular aneurysms will be presented with review of epidemiology, clinical presentation and complications, imaging features and relevant differential diagnoses, and aneurysm management. PMID:27247710

  13. Somatic Mutations in Cerebral Cortical Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Jamuar, Saumya S.; Lam, Anh-Thu N.; Kircher, Martin; D'Gama, Alissa M.; Wang, Jian; Barry, Brenda J.; Zhang, Xiaochang; Hill, Robert Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Rozzo, Aldo; Servattalab, Sarah; Mehta, Bhaven K.; Topcu, Meral; Amrom, Dina; Andermann, Eva; Dan, Bernard; Parrini, Elena; Guerrini, Renzo; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Leventer, Richard J.; Shen, Yiping; Wu, Bai Lin; Barkovich, A. James; Sahin, Mustafa; Chang, Bernard S.; Bamshad, Michael; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Shendure, Jay; Poduri, Annapurna; Yu, Timothy W.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although there is increasing recognition of the role of somatic mutations in genetic disorders, the prevalence of somatic mutations in neurodevelopmental disease and the optimal techniques to detect somatic mosaicism have not been systematically evaluated. METHODS Using a customized panel of known and candidate genes associated with brain malformations, we applied targeted high-coverage sequencing (depth, ≥200×) to leukocyte-derived DNA samples from 158 persons with brain malformations, including the double-cortex syndrome (subcortical band heterotopia, 30 persons), polymicrogyria with megalencephaly (20), periventricular nodular heterotopia (61), and pachygyria (47). We validated candidate mutations with the use of Sanger sequencing and, for variants present at unequal read depths, subcloning followed by colony sequencing. RESULTS Validated, causal mutations were found in 27 persons (17%; range, 10 to 30% for each phenotype). Mutations were somatic in 8 of the 27 (30%), predominantly in persons with the double-cortex syndrome (in whom we found mutations in DCX and LIS1), persons with periventricular nodular heterotopia (FLNA), and persons with pachygyria (TUBB2B). Of the somatic mutations we detected, 5 (63%) were undetectable with the use of traditional Sanger sequencing but were validated through subcloning and subsequent sequencing of the subcloned DNA. We found potentially causal mutations in the candidate genes DYNC1H1, KIF5C, and other kinesin genes in persons with pachygyria. CONCLUSIONS Targeted sequencing was found to be useful for detecting somatic mutations in patients with brain malformations. High-coverage sequencing panels provide an important complement to whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing in the evaluation of somatic mutations in neuropsychiatric disease. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and others.) PMID:25140959

  14. Laser treatment of oral vascular malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, U.; Gaimari, G.; Mohsen, M.; Tenore, G.; Palaia, G.

    2014-01-01

    Oral Vascular Malformations (OVM) are congenital anomalies characterized by morph-structural and/or functional changes of nature in severity and extension. OVM can affect any type of vessels arterial, venous or lymphatic and any capillary or anatomical. They are divided into two categories: low and high flow. In this study were treated 40 patients with OVM with a range size from 2 mm to 44 mm; they were subjected to clinical examination supported by Colour-Doppler Ultrasound instrumental examination and only for doubt cases the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was prescribed. Only low flow venous and capillary malformations were treated by GaAlAs laser (Wiser®, Lambda, Brindole,Italy, 980nm) and KTP laser (SmartLite®, DEKA, Florence, Italy, 532nm) with two different techniques: the Transmucosal Thermophotocoagulation (TMT) and the Intralesional Photocoagulation (ILP). These techniques permitted a good control of haemostasis, avoiding bleeding both during surgery and in the postoperative. It is obtained an excellent and good healing respectively in 10% and 60% of cases, a moderate and poor resolution respectively in 22.5% and 7.5% of cases. A clear diagnosis allowed the management of Venous malformations (VM) by laser devices with wavelengths highly absorbed in haemoglobin in safety and efficacy and according to the principles of minimal invasive surgery. The aim of this study was to verify if the laser is effective in the treatment of OVM for the purpose of the clinical findings and the postoperative course. The Authors concluded that the laser can be considered the "gold standard" for treating OVM.

  15. Malformations of the tooth root in humans

    PubMed Central

    Luder, Hans U.

    2015-01-01

    The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus, even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on root formation

  16. BIOLOGY OF VASCULAR MALFORMATIONS OF THE BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Gabrielle G.; Golanov, Eugene; Awad, Issam A.; Young, William L.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose This review discusses recent research on the genetic, molecular, cellular, and developmental mechanisms underlying the etiology of vascular malformations of the brain (VMBs), including cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), sporadic brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM), and the AVMs of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Summary of Review The identification of gene mutations and genetic risk factors associated with CCM, HHT, and sporadic AVM has enabled the development of animal models for these diseases and provided new insights into their etiology. All of the genes associated with VMBs to date have known or plausible roles in angiogenesis and vascular remodeling. Recent work suggests that the angiogenic process most severely disrupted by VMB gene mutation is that of vascular stabilization, the process whereby vascular endothelial cells form capillary tubes, strengthen their intercellular junctions, and recruit smooth muscle cells to the vessel wall. In addition, there is now good evidence that in some cases CCM lesion formation involves a genetic two-hit mechanism, in which a germline mutation in one copy of a CCM gene is followed by a somatic mutation in the other copy. There is also increasing evidence that environmental second hits can produce lesions when there is a mutation to a single allele of a VMB gene. Conclusions Recent findings begin to explain how mutations in VMB genes render vessels vulnerable to rupture when challenged with other inauspicious genetic or environmental factors, and have suggested candidate therapeutics. Understanding of the cellular mechanisms of VMB formation and progression in humans has lagged behind that in animal models. New knowledge of lesion biology will spur new translational work. Several well-established clinical and genetic database efforts are already in place, and further progress will be facilitated by collaborative expansion and standardization of these. PMID:19834013

  17. Oral vascular malformations: laser treatment and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, U.; Rocchetti, F.; Gaimari, G.; Tenore, G.; Palaia, G.; Lo Giudice, G.

    2016-03-01

    Vascular malformations are a very heterogeneous group of circulatory system's diseases that can involve different kind of vessels: arterial, venous or lymphatic ones. Many treatments, such as conventional surgery, embolization, steroid therapy and laser therapy, are available for vascular lesions. The laser approach relies more therapeutic techniques: the transmucosal thermophotocoagulation, intralesional photocoagulation, the excisional biopsy. Today laser is demonstrated to be the gold standard technique to treat vascular lesions that allows a safe and efficient treatment and a lower post-operative healing time. The only disadvantage is the risk of carbonization that could be avoided by using the multiple-spot single pulsed wave technique.

  18. [Recurrent meningitis in inner ear malformations].

    PubMed

    Claros, Pedro; Matusialk, Monika

    2008-01-01

    Authors present two cases of children with reccurent meningitis and unilateral deafness. Implemented diagnostics (CT, NMR, ABR) revealed one side inner ear congenital malformation in one case and anterior fossa bony defect accompanied by labirynthine deformation in the other case. The presence of perilymphatic fistulae in oval and round windows and cerebrospinal fluid leakage has been confirmed in both cases during surgery. Carefull obliteration of the Eustachian tube and both windows has been performed. Non- complicated postoperative course (2 months and 6 years - respectively) has prooved the effectiveness of applied treatment.

  19. Congenital malformations of the temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Mukerji, Shraddha S; Parmar, Hemant A; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Mukherji, Suresh K

    2011-08-01

    Congenital ear or temporal bone malformations are a diagnostic challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Newer imaging techniques can detect subtle changes in middle ear and cochlear anatomy. This information is invaluable with increasing use of hearing restoration surgeries and/or cochlear implants in such patients. This article discusses the embryogenesis, classification system, and salient imaging findings of congenital outer, middle ear, and inner ear anomalies in children. Both high-resolution computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of the temporal bones are described.

  20. Intrapulmonary arteriovenous malformation causing recurrent strokes

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Kareem; Premachandra, Lalith; Vankawala, Viren; Sun, Qi

    2015-01-01

    This case reveals a left pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) as a cause of recurrent cerebral and cerebellar emboli. Extensive workup excluded other etiologies of emboli formation, and the patient was transferred to a tertiary care center for percutaneous embolotherapy. In the absence of a clear etiology, PAVM should be considered as a potential cause of recurrent cerebral emboli, especially in the absence of carotid disease, intracardiac thrombus, atrial septal defect, and patent foramen ovale. Diagnostic work-up for the PAVM can be cost effective and expedited by utilization of agitated saline contrast echocardiography, as noted in our case. PMID:26486114

  1. Single-session Coil Embolization of Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Keun

    2013-01-01

    Objective There is no clear treatment strategy for the management of multiple intracranial aneurysms because of variable anatomical distribution, difficult identification of the aneurysm ruptured, and poor overall outcomes. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of single-session coil embolization for multiple intracranial aneurysms. Methods Between September 2008 and December 2012, 209 aneurysms in 117 patients were treated at our institute. Twenty eight among the 117 patients had multiple aneurysms with a total of 71, and 60 of the 71 aneurysms underwent coil embolization in a single-session. Results A total of 60 aneurysms were treated with a single-session coil embolization, of which the most frequent locations were in the posterior communicating artery, followed by the middle cerebral artery. Immediate post-embolization angiographies showed total occlusion in 49 (81.7%) aneurysms, remnant neck in 6 (10%), and body-filling in 5 (8.3%). Procedure-related complications had developed in 2 (3.3%) of the 60 embolized aneurysms: an asymptomatic thromboembolic event, and a partial coil protrusion without a subsequent thromboembolic complication. Conclusion With careful evaluation of individual aneurysm characteristics and configuration, multiple intracranial aneurysms previously thought to require multimodality therapy can be safely treated in a single-session coil embolization. PMID:24167798

  2. Intracranial Non-traumatic Aneurysms in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Sorteberg, Angelika; Dahlberg, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    An intracranial aneurysm in a child or adolescent is a rare, but potentially devastating condition. As little as approximately 1200 cases are reported between 1939 and 2011, with many of the reports presenting diverting results. There is consensus, though, in that pediatric aneurysms represent a pathophysiological entity different from their adult counterparts. In children, there is a male predominance. About two-thirds of pediatric intracranial aneurysms become symptomatic with hemorrhage and the rate of re-hemorrhage is higher than in adults. The rate of hemorrhage from an intracranial aneurysm peaks in girls around menarche. The most common aneurysm site in children is the internal carotid artery, in particular at its terminal ending. Aneurysms in the posterior circulation are more common in children than adults. Children more often develop giant aneurysms, and may become symptomatic from the mass effect of the aneurysm (tumorlike symptoms). The more complex nature of pediatric aneurysms poses a larger challenge to treatment alongside with higher demands to the durability of treatment. Outcome and mortality are similar in children and adults, but long-term outcome in the pediatric population is influenced by the high rate of aneurysm recurrences and de novo formation of intracranial aneurysms. This urges the need for life-long follow-up and screening protocols. PMID:24696670

  3. [Superior mesenteric artery aneurysm treated with endovascular stentgraft implantation].

    PubMed

    Juszkat, Robert; Zarzecka, Anna; Winckiewicz, Marek; Majewski, Wacław

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysms of the superior mesenteric are very rare and comprises 5.5% of all visceral artery aneurysms. A 60-year-old male was admitted to the General and Vascular Surgery Department due to the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) aneurysm, diagnosed in angio CT. Due to wide neck of the aneurysm and its localization in the mid-die segment of the SMA, a decision to implant a stentgraft was made. After surgical exposure of the right common femoral artery, a stentgraft Viabahn was implanted into the SMA. Control angiography revealed total aneurysm exclusion and patent SMA. Periprocedural course was uneventful. Follow-up CT scan 2 year after the procedure revealed no contrast filling of the aneurysm and patent SMA. A stentgraft implantation is a effective method of treatment of the wide-necked SMA aneurysms.

  4. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Current and Future Status

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, R. J. Ivancev, K.

    2008-05-15

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has rapidly expanded since its introduction in the early 1990s. Early experiences were associated with high rates of complications including conversion to open repair. Perioperative morbidity and mortality results have improved but these concerns have been replaced by questions about long-term durability. Gradually, too, these problems have been addressed. Challenges of today include the ability to roll out the endovascular technique to patients with adverse aneurysm morphology. Fenestrated and branch stent-graft technology is in its infancy. Only now are we beginning to fully understand the advantages, limitations, and complications of such technology. This paper outlines some of the concepts and discusses the controversies and challenges facing clinicians involved in endovascular aneurysm surgery today and in the future.

  5. Giant and thrombosed left ventricular aneurysm.

    PubMed

    de Agustin, Jose Alberto; de Diego, Jose Juan Gomez; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Rodrigo, Jose Luis; Almeria, Carlos; Mahia, Patricia; Luaces, Maria; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Macaya, Carlos; de Isla, Leopoldo Perez

    2015-07-26

    Left ventricular aneurysms are a frequent complication of acute extensive myocardial infarction and are most commonly located at the ventricular apex. A timely diagnosis is vital due to the serious complications that can occur, including heart failure, thromboembolism, or tachyarrhythmias. We report the case of a 78-year-old male with history of previous anterior myocardial infarction and currently under evaluation by chronic heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a huge thrombosed and calcified anteroapical left ventricular aneurysm. Coronary angiography demonstrated that the left anterior descending artery was chronically occluded, and revealed a big and spherical mass with calcified borders in the left hemithorax. Left ventriculogram confirmed that this spherical mass was a giant calcified left ventricular aneurysm, causing very severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The patient underwent cardioverter-defibrillator implantation for primary prevention.

  6. Intracranial aneurysm formation after radiotherapy for medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kamide, Tomoya; Mohri, Masanao; Misaki, Kouichi; Uchiyama, Naoyuki; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The development of an intracranial aneurysm after radiotherapy is rare but secondary effect of cranial irradiation in a primary disease treatment. Case Description: The patient was a 17-year-old male adolescent who was diagnosed as having a posterior fossa medulloblastoma when he was 8 years old. He had undergone tumor resection with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. A distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm was identified by magnetic resonance imaging 8 years after radiotherapy and grew rapidly throughout the next 1 year. The patient underwent microsurgical clipping and was discharged without deficit. Conclusion: This experience demonstrates that physicians caring for patients who have undergone intracranial radiotherapy should carefully consider the possibility of an aneurysmal formation when conducting follow-up imaging. PMID:27999713

  7. Uterine cirsoid aneurysm: MRI and MRA

    SciTech Connect

    Joja, Ikuo; Asakawa, Mari; Motoyama, Kazumi

    1996-03-01

    Uterine cirsoid aneurysm is uncommon. It is important to make a diagnosis of this disease preoperatively, because repeated curettages may induce life-threatening massive genital bleeding. We present a case of a 51-year-old woman with uterine cirsoid aneurysm in whom MRI and MRA were very useful for the preoperative diagnosis. The radiologic appearances on ultrasonography, CT, conventional SE MRI, MRA, dynamic MRI, and pelvic angiography are presented. Conventional SE T1-weighted and T2-weighted images demonstrated multiple flow voids in the uterus and bilateral adnexal regions. MRA demonstrated a cluster of distinct, tortuous, and coiled vascular channels in the pelvis. MRA could obtain images almost equal to angiography and was considered to be an excellent noninvasive imaging technique for the diagnosis of uterine cirsoid aneurysm. 28 refs., 7 figs

  8. Extra-anatomic endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a horseshoe kidney supplied by the aneurysmal aorta.

    PubMed

    Rey, Jorge; Golpanian, Samuel; Yang, Jane K; Moreno, Enrique; Velazquez, Omaida C; Goldstein, Lee J; Chahwala, Veer

    2015-07-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated by a horseshoe kidney (HSK, fused kidney) represents a unique challenge for repair. Renal arteries arising from the aneurysmal aorta can further complicate intervention. Reports exist describing the repair of these complex anatomies using fenestrated endografts, hybrid open repairs (debranching), and open aneurysmorrhaphy with preservation of renal circulation. We describe an extra-anatomic, fully endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a HSK partially supplied by a renal artery arising from the aneurysm. We successfully applied aortouni-iliac endografting, femorofemoral bypass, and retrograde renal artery perfusion via the contralateral femoral artery to exclude the abdominal aortic aneurysm and preserve circulation to the HSK.

  9. Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms: Clipping Versus Coiling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ann; Huang, Judy

    2015-09-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) have an estimated incidence of up to 10 % and can lead to serious morbidity and mortality. Because of this, the natural history of IAs has been studied extensively, with rupture rates ranging from 0.5 to 7 %, depending on aneurysm characteristics. The spectrum of presentation of IAs ranges from incidental detection to devastating subarachnoid hemorrhage. Although the gold standard imaging technique is intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography, other modalities such as computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) are being increasingly used for screening and treatment planning. Management of these patients depends upon a number of factors including aneurysmal, patient, institutional, and operator factors. The ultimate goal of treating patients with IAs is complete and permanent occlusion of the aneurysm sac in order to eliminate future hemorrhagic risk, while preserving or restoring the patient's neurological function. The most common treatment approaches include microsurgical clipping and endovascular coiling, and multiple studies have compared these two techniques. To date, three large prospective, randomized studies have been done: a study from Finland, International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT), and the Barrow Ruptured Aneurysm Trial (BRAT). Despite differences in methodology, the results were similar: in patients undergoing coiling, although rates of rebleeding and retreatment are higher, the overall rate of poor outcomes at 12 months was significantly lower. As minimally invasive procedures and devices continue to be refined, endovascular strategies are likely to increase in popularity. However, as long-term outcome studies become available, it is increasingly apparent that they are complementary treatment strategies, with patient selection of critical importance.

  10. Treatment of Giant Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Lv, X.; Jiang, C.; Li, Y.; Yang, X.; Zhang, J.; Wu, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We report on report the clinical outcome obtained in treatment of giant intracranial aneurysms (GAs). Between 2005 and 2007, 51 patients with 51 GAs presented at our hospital. Twentynine were treated with primary parent vessel occlusion without distal bypass and ten underwent treatment preserving the parent artery. Twelve patients could not be treated endovascularly. Selective embolization (including two remodeling techniques and two stent-coil embolizations) resulted in only one cure. Two patients died as a result of subarachnoid hemorrhage periprocedurely. Twenty-nine patients treated primarily with parent vessel occlusion and three patients treated with covered stent were considered cured after their treatments. Only one patient treated with parent vessel occlusion experienced ischemia during follow-up, which resulted in a mild neurological deficit. Of the twelve patients who could not be treated endovascularly, one succumbed to surgery, four died while being treated conservatively, and three were lost to follow-up. Parent artery occlusion, covered stent and coil occlusion provide effective protection against bleeding. In treatment of paraclinoid GAs of the internal carotid artery, the use of a stent, and stent-assisted coil embolization may be a pitfall. PMID:20465907

  11. Aneurysm flow characteristics in realistic carotid artery aneurysm models induced by proximal virtual stenotic plaques: a computational hemodynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Peloc, Nora L.; Chien, Aichi; Goldberg, Ezequiel; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral aneurysms may rarely coexist with a proximal artery stenosis. In that small percent of patients, such coexistence poses a challenge for interventional neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons to make the best treatment decision. According to previous studies, the incidence of cerebral aneurysms in patients with internal carotid artery stenosis is no greater than five percent, where the aneurysm is usually incidentally detected, being about two percent for aneurysms and stenoses in the same cerebral circulation. Those cases pose a difficult management decision for the physician. Case reports showed patients who died due to aneurysm rupture months after endarterectomy but before aneurysm clipping, while others did not show any change in the aneurysm after plaque removal, having optimum outcome after aneurysm coiling. The aim of this study is to investigate the intra-aneurysmal hemodynamic changes before and after treatment of stenotic plaque. Virtually created moderate stenoses in vascular models of internal carotid artery aneurysm patients were considered in a number of cases reconstructed from three dimensional rotational angiography images. The strategy to create those plaques was based on parameters analyzed in a previous work where idealized models were considered, including relative distance and stenosis grade. Ipsilateral and contralateral plaques were modeled. Wall shear stress and velocity pattern were computed from finite element pulsatile blood flow simulations. The results may suggest that wall shear stress changes depend on relative angular position between the aneurysm and the plaque.

  12. Changes in the intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics due to stent placement in sidewall and bifurcating cerebrovascular aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantón, Gádor; Levy, David I.; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2003-11-01

    We report on an in-vitro study of the alterations in the flow characteristics in saccular aneurysm resulting from very-high-porosity stenting (Neuroform^TM) across the aneurysmal neck. Two different silicone flexible models were considered representing two characteristic shapes and locations of intracranial aneurysms. A Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) system was used to measure the in-vitro pulsatile velocity field within the aneurysm, at the aneurysm neck-parent artery interface, and within the parent artery. A programmable pulsatile pump is used to supply the parent artery with the waveform corresponding to the flow in the internal carotid artery. In the case of the sidewall aneurysms, three stents were placed and measurements inside the aneurysmal pouch were taken after the deployment of each stent. Two crossing stents were placed in a Y configuration in the case of the bifurcating aneurysm and measurements were taken after deployment of both of them. Placing stents across the aneurysmal neck of sidewall and bifurcating cerebrovascular aneurysms does not modify the general features of the flow (a persistent three-dimensional swirling motion), but results in a small but measurable reduction in the magnitude of the peak velocity inside the aneurysmal pouch (7-8%). In the sidewall case, the reduction in the peak velocity is shown to be enhanced to 15-20% after placing the three stents.

  13. Azygous Vein Aneurysm (AVA): A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tujo, Charles Albert

    2017-01-01

    Azygous Vein Aneurysm (AVAs) is an uncommon cause of mediastinal mass. They are typically asymptomatic and do not commonly require treatment. They may mimic mediastinal adenopathy on chest radiographs. We present a case of AVAs found during evaluation of chest pain in a patient who was also found to have pulmonary thromboembolism. The mass was worked up with cross-sectional imaging techniques using both Computerized Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and ultimately Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Due to recurrent symptomatology, the aneurysm was coiled.

  14. Tibioperoneal Trunk Aneurysm Resulting in Compartment Syndrome with Associated Aneurysms of the Popliteal and Dorsalis Pedis Arteries.

    PubMed

    Ventarola, Daniel J; Labropoulos, Nicos N; Landau, David S; Tassiopoulos, Apostolos K; Loh, Shang A

    2016-08-01

    True aneurysms of the tibioperoneal trunk are rare. Given the scarcity of reports, the clinical presentation and treatment is not well defined. This is a case report of a 50-year-old male patient presenting with severe lower extremity swelling and compartment syndrome with neurological compromise secondary to a tibioperoneal trunk aneurysm. He was also noted to have discrete ipsilateral popliteal and dorsalis pedis artery aneurysms. Given the location and size of the aneurysm, the severe leg swelling, and venous hypertension, aneurysmorrhaphy or aneurysm sac excision with arterial reconstruction was prohibitively dangerous. Thus, following fasciotomies, a hybrid repair utilizing a saphenous vein superficial femoral to anterior tibial artery bypass along with coil embolization of the aneurysm sac was performed. The patient recovered full function of his leg and follow-up computed tomography angiogram demonstrated thrombosis and regression of the aneurysm sac with a patent bypass.

  15. Successful Endovascular Treatment of a Left Common Carotid Artery Aneurysm Following Failed Surgery of a Right Common Carotid Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Cil, Barbaros E. Ucar, Ibrahim; Ozsoy, Fatma; Arat, Anil; Yorgancioglu, Cem; Boeke, Erkmen

    2005-04-15

    Aneurysm of the common carotid artery is a rare and serious disease requiring prompt treatment in order to avoid neurologic complications. A 39-year-old man presented with voice impairment and a pulsatile mass at the right side of his neck and was found by color Doppler examination to have bilateral common carotid artery aneurysms of unknown origin. The right-sided large aneurysm was treated with placement of an 8 mm interposition Gore-Tex graft between the right common and internal carotid arteries. The surgical graft thrombosed 7 days after the surgery but the left-sided aneurysm was successfully treated by a Jostent peripheral stent-graft. Color Doppler examination showed a patent stent and no filling of the aneurysm on his first and sixth-month follow-up. Bilateral common carotid artery aneurysm is an exceptionally unusual condition and endovascular treatment of carotid artery aneurysms with covered stents may become an effective treatment alternative for these lesions.

  16. Celiac artery aneurysm repair in Behcet disease complicated by recurrent thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ullery, Brant W; Pochettino, Alberto; Wang, Grace J; Jackson, Benjamin M; Fairman, Ronald M; Woo, Edward Y

    2010-02-01

    Behçet's disease is a chronic, relapsing multisystemic inflammatory disorder characterized by recurrent orogenital aphthous ulcers, uveitis, and skin lesions. Vascular involvement occurs in up to 38% of these patients. Herein, we report a 19-year-old male who initially presented with an isolated celiac artery aneurysm that was treated with open surgical repair. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with Behçet's disease after the development of oral aphthous ulcers and multiple recurrent postoperative deep venous thromboses and thoracoabdominal arterial aneurysms. Ultimately, a hybrid approach was undertaken. This is the fifth celiac artery aneurysm ever reported in this patient group and the first to present with an isolated celiac artery aneurysm as the initial manifestation of Behçet's disease.

  17. Genetic Basis of Congenital Cardiovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Belmont, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular malformations are a singularly important class of birth defects and, due to dramatic improvements in medical and surgical care, there are now large numbers of adult survivors. The etiologies are complex, but there is strong evidence that genetic factors play a crucial role. Over the last 15 years there has been enormous progress in the discovery of causative genes for syndromic heart malformations and in rare families with Mendelian forms. The rapid characterization of genomic disorders as major contributors to congenital heart defects is also notable. The genes identified encode many transcription factors, chromatin regulators, growth factors and signal transduction pathways– all unified by their required roles in normal cardiac development. Genome-wide sequencing of the coding regions promises to elucidate genetic causation in several disorders affecting cardiac development. Such comprehensive studies evaluating both common and rare variants would be essential in characterizing gene-gene interactions, as well as in understanding the gene-environment interactions that increase the susceptibility to congenital heart defects. PMID:24793338

  18. Stenogyria - not only in Chiari II malformation.

    PubMed

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, Monika; Duczkowska, Agnieszka; Brągoszewska, Hanna; Duczkowski, Marek; Mierzewska, Hanna

    2014-12-15

    Stenogyria, meaning multiple small compacted gyri separated by shallow sulci, is reported in the literature in association with Chiari II malformation (CM II) which in turn is reported in association with myelomeningocele (MMC). The authors present five cases of stenogyria (and other abnormalities found in CM II, like callosal hypoplasia/dysplasia, agenesis of the anterior commissure, hypoplasia of the falx cerebri) in children without the history of MMC or any other form of open spinal dysraphism. In these cases stenogyria was associated with Chiari I malformation, rhombencephalosynapsis and spina bifida. Stenogyria, which is not a true neuronal migration disorder, should not be mistaken for polymicrogyria which is also present in CM II. It is histologically different from polymicrogyria because the cortex is normally organized. Also on MRI, the general sulcal pattern is preserved in stenogyria, while it is completely distorted in polymicrogyria. The authors conclude that features traditionally attributed to CM II, like stenogyria, occur not only in the population of patients with MMC as opposed to the widely accepted theory.

  19. Twin pregnancy in the congenital malformed uterus.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Pentti K

    2016-07-01

    The frequency and outcome of twin pregnancies in women with uterine malformation were studied. The cohort comprised 13 (4.9%) women with twin pregnancy found among 263 women. They had 483 deliveries, 13 of them twins (2.7%; 95% CI 1.6-4.6%). Among 38 patients with unicornuate uterus 5 (6.8%) out of 74 deliveries were twins, 39 women with didelphic uterus 2 (3.2%) out of 62 deliveries and 147 women with septate or subseptate uterus 6 (2.3%) out of 264 deliveries were twins. The mean duration of gestation was 249 days (range 190-268 days), 5 (38%) out of 13 deliveries were premature, 25 out of 26 newborns were alive. Mean durations of gestation and mean weights of newborns did not differ when 7 cases with unicornuate or didelphic uterus were compared to 6 cases with complete or partial uterine septum. A congenital malformed uterus can bear twin pregnancy without severe complications apart from prematurity.

  20. Sirenomelia and caudal malformations in two families.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Marion; Layet, Valérie; Costa, Teresa; Roumazeilles, Yves; Chenal, Pierre; Cailliez, Daniel; Gerard, Bénédicte

    2012-07-01

    We report on two families with co-occurrence of sirenomelia and caudal malformations. In the first family, the mother had undergone surgery for a short form of imperforate anus. Her first pregnancy was terminated because of bilateral renal agenesis with oligohydramnios. Her second pregnancy was interrupted because of sirenomelia. The second family was referred to us because of caudal malformation in their two children. The parents' spinal radiographs were normal. The first pregnancy resulted in a girl with imperforate anus, absence of S3-S5 and coccyx, abnormal pelvic floor, and an almost bifid anteriorly located bladder. The second pregnancy resulted in a baby girl with sirenomelia. No diabetes was present during the pregnancies in either of these two families. These families confirm the hypothesis that major genes are responsible for the embryogenesis of the caudal part of the embryo, with variable expression, as has been already described in sirenomelia mouse models (CYP26A1, BMP7/tsg). Molecular studies are underway in these families and in sporadic cases in our laboratory to explore the genetic basis of sirenomelia in humans.

  1. Pathogenesis and Cerebrospinal Fluid Hydrodynamics of the Chiari I Malformation.

    PubMed

    Buell, Thomas J; Heiss, John D; Oldfield, Edward H

    2015-10-01

    This article summarizes the current understanding of the pathophysiology of the Chiari I malformation that is based on observations of the anatomy visualized by modern imaging with MRI and prospective studies of the physiology of patients before and after surgery. The pathogenesis of a Chiari I malformation of the cerebellar tonsils is grouped into 4 general mechanisms.

  2. Glomuvenous Malformation: A Rare Periorbital Lesion of the Thermoregulatory Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Whipple, Katherine M; Godfrey, Kyle J; Solomon, James P; Lin, Jonathan H; Korn, Bobby S; Kikkawa, Don O

    Glomuvenous malformations (GVMs), previously referred to as glomus tumors or glomangiomas, are benign, mesenchymal venous malformations arising from glomus bodies. Glomus bodies are modified smooth muscle neuromyoarterial structures involved in temperature regulation via blood shunting. These classically occur in the digits but can occur in other locations. The authors present a case of a periorbital GVM presented following blunt trauma to the area.

  3. Congenital plaque-type glomuvenous malformation associated with chylous ascites.

    PubMed

    Tejedor, Maria; Martín-Santiago, Ana; Gómez, Cristina; Fiol, Miquel; Benítez-Segura, Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    Congenital plaque-type glomuvenous malformation (GVM) is caused by loss of function mutations in glomulin gene. We report a newborn with this rare vascular disorder associated with chylous ascites. The common mesenchymal origin of GVM and lymphatic vessels as well as the glomulin expression in vascular smooth muscle cells in utero could help explain this unusual prenatal complication of glomuvenous malformations.

  4. [The progress of inner ear malformation in radiological research].

    PubMed

    Kong, Dehua; Fu, Kuang; Zhao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Inner ear malformations are anomalies linking to development insults at different periods of embryogenesis,which are common causes of congenital sensorineural hearing loss. The evaluation of pediatric sensorineural hearing loss mostly depends on high-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, which can excellently depict the temporal bones and inner ear malformations.

  5. Klippel-Feil syndrome and Dandy-Walker malformation.

    PubMed

    Karaman, A; Kahveci, H

    2011-01-01

    The Klippel-Feil deformity is a complex of osseous and visceral anomalies, which include low hairline, platybasia, fused cervical vertebrae with a short neck, and deafness. Associated central nervous system abnormalities include occipital cephalocele, Chiari I malformation, syrinx, microcephaly, and hydrocephalus. Herein, we report a case with Klippel-Feil syndrome and Dandy-Walker malformation.

  6. Variations of some elements in cadmium-induced malformed fish

    SciTech Connect

    Muramoto, S.

    1981-08-01

    Reports of malformation induced by cadmium such as the appearance of vertebral anomalies in carp have been described by the present author. In this paper, the appearance of such malformed fish by exposure to cadmium was confirmed in a repeat experiment. Decalcification of the fish was studied from spinal x-ray photographs and the results of some elements analysis.

  7. Bilateral pulmonary artery aneurysms, coronary artery aneurysm, and ventricular pseudoaneurysm in Behçet disease.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ying-Rong; Hong, Jun-Mou; Liu, Zhen-Guo; Deng, Zhen-Sheng; Yeung, Sai-Ching J; Cheng, Chao

    2014-04-01

    Massive hemoptysis in Behçet disease (BD) is rare but often fatal. This report presents a 28-year-old man with recurrent massive hemoptysis. He was diagnosed with bilateral multiple pulmonary artery aneurysms (PAAs), coronary artery aneurysm, and ventricular pseudoaneurysm from BD. The patient underwent emergency right lower lobectomy with no obvious complications. No hemoptysis recurred during an 18-month follow-up. This report also reviews the occurrence of PAAs in BD, with an emphasis on the treatment approaches.

  8. Interdisciplinary treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms: impact of intraprocedural rupture and ischemia in 563 aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Mathias; Bakhshai, Yasmin; Zausinger, Stefan; Fesl, Gunther; Janssen, Hendrik; Brückmann, Hartmut; Tonn, Jörg Christian; Schichor, Christian

    2013-05-01

    This study was conducted to determine the risk factors and the clinical impact of intraprocedural aneurysm rupture (IAR) and periprocedural ischemia in the treatment of symptomatic and asymptomatic unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs). A single-center retrospective data analysis of 563 UIAs treated between 2000 and 2010 was conducted. Treatment assignment was made on the basis of individual aneurysmal criteria in an interdisciplinary neurovascular conference with attending neurosurgeons, neuroradiologists and neurologists. In 363 microsurgical and 200 endovascular procedures, the permanent morbidity rate was 4.9 and 6 %. The overall mortality rate was 0.7 %-no procedure-related death occurred in microsurgery, and four patients had fatal outcomes after endovascular treatment. IAR occurred in 34 (9.4 %) microsurgical and 8 (4 %) endovascular procedures (p = 0.03). Risk factors for IAR were age, aneurysm diameter, symptomatic aneurysms, hypertension and smoking in microsurgery. IAR was associated with significantly worse outcome at discharge after microsurgical and at discharge and follow-up after endovascular procedures and was followed by fatal outcome in four endovascular cases. Periprocedural ischemia (12.1 vs. 9 %) resulted in significantly worse outcome in both groups. Risk factors for periprocedural ischemia were IAR during microsurgery, aneurysm diameter, symptomatic aneurysms and smoking in either group. Treatment of UIAs can be conducted with an equivalent low rate of permanent morbidity for clipping and coiling-treatment of symptomatic aneurysms elevates the procedural risk. IAR was less frequent during coiling, but was associated with relevant mortality. IAR and periprocedural ischemia represent significant treatment-associated risks, which should be taken into account in interdisciplinary treatment planning and patient counseling.

  9. Trends in the Management of Intracranial Vascular Malformations in the USA from 2000 to 2007

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae H.; Pile-Spellman, John; Brisman, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To assess prevalence, clinical characteristics, trends in treatment pattern, and outcome in patients with intracranial vascular malformations (IVMs). Methods. Nationwide inpatient sample. Patients with the diagnosis of an IVM admitted to US hospitals from 2000 to 2007. Results. In 58,051 IVM-related admissions (detection rate 2.4/100,000 person-years; mean age 49 ± 17 years; 52% women) major diagnoses were intracranial hemorrhage (ICrH) in 15%, seizure 32%, ischemia 5%, and headache 9%. Procedures included surgery (13%), embolization (13%), radiation therapy (2%), aneurysm clipping (1%), and mechanical ventilation (6%). Ventilation and ICrH were associated with death (2%), whereas ventilation, ICrH, surgery, seizure, and ischemia were associated with unfavorable outcome (20%). IVM detection rate and hospital outcome remained stable over time, whereas mean age and comorbid diagnosis of cerebral ischemia increased (ICrH and seizure decreased). Conclusion. IVMs are infrequent and present in 1/6 patients with some form of ICrH. Overall, seizure is the dominant comorbid diagnosis (1/3 patients). IVMs are equally prevalent among race-ethnic groups and are increasingly detected later in life. The inpatient care of IVM patients results in death or discharge into specialized care in 1/5 patients. PMID:22550618

  10. [Cochlear implant for malformations of the inner ear].

    PubMed

    Aschendorff, A; Laszig, R; Maier, W; Beck, R; Schild, C; Birkenhäger, R; Wesarg, T; Kröger, S; Arndt, S

    2009-06-01

    The radiologic evaluation of the temporal bone in cochlear implant candidates can detect malformations of the inner ear in up to 20% of cases. The aim of our study was to analyze and classify malformations of the inner ear in patients with cochlear implants carried out from 2001 to 2009. Malformations of the inner ear, including malformations of the internal auditory canal were detected in 12.7% of children and 3.4% of adults. Mondini dysplasia was most common and occurred in 45% of cases. The surgical procedure had to be adapted according to the individual malformation. Modification of surgical access, management of intraoperative CSF gusher, choice of electrode array, intraoperative imaging and the use of navigation were the most important factors. Rehabilitation results were generally very positive and corresponded to the expectation depending on the duration of deafness, if no additional handicaps were present.

  11. Malformations of cortical development: genetic mechanisms and diagnostic approach

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development are rare congenital anomalies of the cerebral cortex, wherein patients present with intractable epilepsy and various degrees of developmental delay. Cases show a spectrum of anomalous cortical formations with diverse anatomic and morphological abnormalities, a variety of genetic causes, and different clinical presentations. Brain magnetic resonance imaging has been of great help in determining the exact morphologies of cortical malformations. The hypothetical mechanisms of malformation include interruptions during the formation of cerebral cortex in the form of viral infection, genetic causes, and vascular events. Recent remarkable developments in genetic analysis methods have improved our understanding of these pathological mechanisms. The present review will discuss normal cortical development, the current proposed malformation classifications, and the diagnostic approach for malformations of cortical development. PMID:28203254

  12. Venous malformations: classification, development, diagnosis, and interventional radiologic management.

    PubMed

    Legiehn, Gerald M; Heran, Manraj K S

    2008-05-01

    Venous malformations are categorized as low-flow vascular malformations within the domain of vascular anomalies and are the most common vascular malformation encountered clinically. Venous malformations are by definition present at birth, undergo pari passu growth, and present clinically because of symptoms related to mass effect or stasis. Although diagnosis can usually be made by clinical history and examination, differentiation from other vascular and nonvascular entities often requires an imaging work-up that includes ultrasound, CT, MR imaging, and diagnostic phlebography. All decisions regarding imaging work-up and decision to treat must be coordinated though referral and discussions with a multidisciplinary team and be based on clearly defined clinical indications. Percutaneous image-guided sclerotherapy has become the mainstay of treatment for venous malformations and involves the introduction of any one of a number of endothelial-cidal sclerosants into the vascular spaces of the lesion, with each sclerosant possessing its own unique spectrum of advantages and disadvantages.

  13. Endovascular Aneurysm Sealing for the Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Brownrigg, Jack R. W.; Karthikesalingam, Alan; Patterson, Benjamin O.; Holt, Peter J. E.; Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Morgan, Robert A.; Loftus, Ian M.; Thompson, Matthew M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and report preliminary results of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) repair with endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS), a novel therapeutic alternative whose feasibility has not been established in rAAAs due to the unknown effects of the rupture site on the ability to achieve sealing. Case Report: Between December 2013 and April 2014, 5 patients (median age 71 years, range 57–90; 3 men) with rAAAs were treated with the Nellix EVAS system at a single institution. Median aneurysm diameter was 70 mm (range 67–91). Aneurysm morphology in 4 of the 5 patients was noncompliant with instructions for use (IFU) for both EVAS and standard stent-grafts; the remaining patient was outside the IFU for standard stent-grafts but treated with EVAS under standard IFU for the Nellix system. Median Hardman index was 2 (range 0–3). Two patients died of multiorgan failure after re-laparotomy and intraoperative cardiac arrest, respectively. Among survivors, all devices were patent with no signs of endoleak or failed aneurysm sac sealing at 6 months (median follow-up 9.2 months). Conclusion: EVAS for the management of infrarenal rAAAs appears feasible. The use of EVAS in emergency repairs may broaden the selection criteria of the current endovascular strategy to include patients with more complex aneurysm morphology. PMID:25904491

  14. Computational analysis of anterior communicating artery aneurysm shear stress before and after aneurysm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.

    2011-12-01

    It is widely accepted that complexity in the flow pattern at the anterior communicating artery (AComA) is associated with the high rate of aneurysm formation at that location observed in large studies. The purpose of this work is to study associations between hemodynamic patterns, and AComA aneurysm initiation by comparing hemodynamics in the aneurysm and the normal model where the aneurysm was computationally removed. Vascular models of both right and left circulation were independently reconstructed from three-dimensional rotational angiography images using deformable models after image registration of both images, and fused using a surface merging algorithm. The geometric models were then used to generate high-quality volumetric finite element grids of tetrahedra with an advancing front technique. For each patient, the second anatomical model was created by digitally removing the aneurysm. It was iteratively achieved by applying a Laplacian smoothing filter and remeshing the surface. Finite element blood flow numerical simulations were performed for both the pathological and normal models under the same personalized pulsatile flow conditions imposed at the inlets of both models. The Navier-Stokes equations were numerically integrated by using a finite-element formulation. It was observed that aneurysms initiated in regions of high and moderate WSS in the counterpart normal models. Adjacent or close to those regions, low WSS portions of the arterial wall were not affected by the disease. These results are in line with previous observations at other vascular locations.

  15. [The scientific revolutions in medicine XVII-XIX centuries: the disproof of Galenism and developpment of scientific foundations of medicine. Report I. The discovery of blood circulation and system of absorbtion].

    PubMed

    Stochik, A M; Zatravkin, S N

    2010-01-01

    In the process of investigation of state and development of medicine in XVII-first half of XIX centuries the authors came to the conclusion that despite the widespread opinion among the historians of medicine in that period two scientific revolutions occurred and in the area of theoretical medicine too. The actual report is devoted to the history of revision of anatomical physiological concept of Galen in the course of first scientific revolution.

  16. Hemodynamics before and after bleb formation in cerebral aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebral, Juan R.; Radaelli, Alessandro; Frangi, Alejandro; Putman, Christopher M.

    2007-03-01

    We investigate whether blebs in cerebral aneurysms form in regions of low or high wall shear stress (WSS), and how the intraaneurysmal hemodynamic pattern changes after bleb formation. Seven intracranial aneurysms harboring well defined blebs were selected from our database and subject-specific computational models were constructed from 3D rotational angiography. For each patient, a second anatomical model representing the aneurysm before bleb formation was constructed by smoothing out the bleb. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were performed under pulsatile flow conditions for both models of each aneurysm. In six of the seven aneurysms, the blebs formed in a region of elevated WSS associated to the inflow jet impaction zone. In one, the bleb formed in a region of low WSS associated to the outflow zone. In this case, the inflow jet maintained a fairly concentrated structure all the way to the outflow zone, while in the other six aneurysms it dispersed after impacting the aneurysm wall. In all aneurysms, once the blebs formed, new flow recirculation regions were formed inside the blebs and the blebs progressed to a state of low WSS. Assuming that blebs form due to a focally damaged arterial wall, these results seem to indicate that the localized injury of the vessel wall may be caused by elevated WSS associated with the inflow jet. However, the final shape of the aneurysm is probably also influenced by the peri-aneurysmal environment that can provide extra structural support via contact with structures such as bone or dura matter.

  17. Molecular basis and genetic predisposition to intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Tromp, Gerard; Weinsheimer, Shantel; Ronkainen, Antti; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2014-12-01

    Intracranial aneurysms, also called cerebral aneurysms, are dilatations in the arteries that supply blood to the brain. Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm leads to a subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is fatal in about 50% of the cases. Intracranial aneurysms can be repaired surgically or endovascularly, or by combining these two treatment modalities. They are relatively common with an estimated prevalence of unruptured aneurysms of 2%-6% in the adult population, and are considered a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Known risk factors include smoking, hypertension, increasing age, and positive family history for intracranial aneurysms. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms is complex. Genome-wide approaches such as DNA linkage and genetic association studies, as well as microarray-based mRNA expression studies, provide unbiased approaches to identify genetic risk factors and dissecting the molecular pathobiology of intracranial aneurysms. The ultimate goal of these studies is to use the information in clinical practice to predict an individual's risk for developing an aneurysm or monitor its growth or rupture risk. Another important goal is to design new therapies based on the information on mechanisms of disease processes to prevent the development or halt the progression of intracranial aneurysms.

  18. Cervical artery tortuosity is associated with intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Labeyrie, Paul-Emile; Braud, Florent; Gakuba, Clément; Gaberel, Thomas; Orset, Cyrille; Goulay, Romain; Emery, Evelyne; Courthéoux, Patrick; Touzé, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Background Intracranial aneurysms may be associated with an underlying arteriopathy, leading to arterial wall fragility. Arterial tortuosity is a major characteristic of some connective tissue disease. Aim To determine whether intracranial aneurysm is associated with an underlying arteriopathy. Methods Using a case-control design, from May 2012 to May 2013, we selected intracranial aneurysm cases and controls from consecutive patients who had conventional cerebral angiography in our center. Cases were patients with newly diagnosed intracranial aneurysm. Controls were patients who had diagnostic cerebral angiography and free of aneurysm. The prevalence of tortuosity, retrospectively assessed according to standard definitions, was compared between cases and controls and, association between tortuosity and some aneurysm characteristics was examined, in cases only. Results About 659 arteries from 233 patients (112 cases and 121 controls) were examined. Tortuosity was found in 57 (51%) cases and 31 (26%) controls (adjusted OR = 2.71; 95%CI, 1.53-4.80). The same trend was found when looking at each tortuosity subtype (simple tortuosity, coil, kink) or at carotid or vertebral territory separately. In contrast, no association between tortuosity and rupture status, aneurysm number or neck size was found. Conclusions Cervical artery tortuosity is significantly associated with intracranial aneurysm, although not related to main aneurysm characteristics. Our results support the presence of an underlying diffuse arteriopathy in intracranial aneurysm patients.

  19. Fenestrated vertebrobasilar junction aneurysm: diagnostic and therapeutic considerations.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Erminia; Russo, Antonino; Ulm, Arthur J

    2009-03-01

    Vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) aneurysms are uncommon and are often found in association with basilar artery (BA) fenestration. The complex anatomical environment of the VBJ, and the complicated geometry of the fenestration make clipping of these aneurysms difficult. Therefore, endovascular treatment of these aneurysms is now widely accepted. The authors describe the case of a 43-year-old woman with sickle cell anemia. She presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Digital subtraction angiography was performed and depicted multiple intracranial aneurysms. The patient had a left superior hypophysial artery aneurysm, a right superior cerebellar artery-posterior cerebral artery aneurysm, and a VBJ aneurysm associated with a fenestration of the BA. The VBJ aneurysm was not identified on the initial angiogram and was only revealed after 3D rotational angiography was performed. The 3D reconstruction was critical to the understanding of the complex geometry associated with the fenestrated BA. The VBJ was reconstructed using a combination endovascular technique. The dominant limb of the fenestration was stented and balloon-assisted coiling was performed, followed by sacrifice of the nondominant vertebral artery using coils and the embolic agent Onyx. Postoperative angiography demonstrated successful occlusion of the aneurysm with reconstruction of the VBJ. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a fenestrated VBJ aneurysm treated with the combination of stenting, balloon remodeling, coiling, and vessel sacrifice. Three-dimensional angiography was critical in making the correct diagnosis of the source of the subarachnoid hemorrhage and with operative planning.

  20. Flow diversion for complex intracranial aneurysms in young children.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Ramon; Brown, Benjamin L; Beier, Alexandra; Ranalli, Nathan; Aldana, Philipp; Hanel, Ricardo A

    2015-03-01

    Pediatric intracranial aneurysms are exceedingly rare and account for less than 5% of all intracranial aneurysms. Open surgery to treat such aneurysms has been shown to be more durable than endovascular techniques, and durability of treatment is particularly important in the pediatric population. Over the past 2 decades, however, a marked shift in aneurysm treatment from open surgery toward endovascular procedures has occurred for adults. The authors describe their early experience in treating 3 unruptured pediatric brain aneurysms using the Pipeline embolization device (PED). The first patient, a girl with Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism Type II who was harboring multiple intracranial aneurysms, underwent two flow diversion procedures for a vertebrobasilar aneurysm and a supraclinoid internal carotid artery aneurysm. The second patient underwent PED placement on a previously coiled but enlarging posterior communicating artery aneurysm. All procedures were uneventful, with no postsurgical complications, and led to complete angiographic obliteration of the aneurysms. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first series of flow diversion procedures in children reported in the medical literature. While flow diversion is a new and relatively untested technology in children, outcomes in adults have been promising. For challenging lesions in the pediatric population, flow diversion may have a valuable role as a well-tolerated, safe treatment with durable results. Many issues remain to be addressed, such as the durability of flow diverters over a very long follow-up and vessel response to growth in the presence of an endoluminal device.

  1. Coexistence of intracranial epidermoid tumor and multiple cerebral aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Pei-Sen; Lin, Zhang-Ya; Zheng, Shu-Fa; Lin, Yuan-Xiang; Yu, Liang-Hong; Jiang, Chang-Zhen; Kang, De-Zhi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: There were a few case reports concerning epidermoid tumor coexisted with multiple cerebral aneurysms. Here, we present one case of coexistence of intracranial epidermoid tumor and multiple cerebral aneurysms and performed a literature review. Patient concerns: A 42 years old male patient was admitted to our institution with complaints of headache and dizziness. Interventions: The radiological examinations showed a hypointense lesion in the right parasellar and petrous apex region and an ipsilateral saccular aneurysm originated from the M2–M3 junction of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) and a saccular aneurysm of the clinoid segment of right internal carotid artery (ICA). Interventions: The patients underwent a right frontotemporal approach for removal of the epidermoid tumor and clipping of the MCA aneurysm in one stage. The aneurysm located at the clinoid segment of ICA was invisible and untreated during operation. Outcomes: No postoperative complications were found in the patient. The patient's follow up after 5 years of surgical treatment was uneventful, and the untreated aneurysm remains stable. Lessons: The coexistence of intracranial epidermoid tumor and cerebral aneurysm is a rare event. The secondly inflammation in cerebral arterial wall may be responsible for the aneurysm formation. Surgical treatment of the intracranial epidermoid tumor and cerebral aneurysm repair may be an optimal scheme in one stage. PMID:28151901

  2. Mixed aneurysm: A new proposed nomenclature for a rare condition

    PubMed Central

    Crusius, Cassiano U.; de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique P.; Crusius, Marcelo U.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Mixed intracranial aneurysms are vascular lesions appearing in the ruptured saccular aneurysms whose blood is contained by perivascular tissues forming another cavity called pseudoaneurysm. All cases until now have been reported in the literature with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Case Description: A 65-year-old woman presented with multiple brain aneurysms with no history of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Endovascular treatment was chosen for left-sided aneurysms [lateral carotid wall (LCW) and posterior communicating (PCom)]. After the embolization of the LCW aneurysm, the patient developed a left third nerve palsy. A head computed tomography scan was immediately performed which did not show any SAH. The control angiography demonstrated PCom aneurysm with intraaneurysmal contrast retention even in the venous phase, along with modification of the aneurismal sac format, leading to diagnoses of mixed aneurysm. The PCom aneurysm was successfully coiled and an operation was performed to clip the right side aneurysms. The patient was discharged after 10 postoperative days. Conclusion: Mixed intracranial aneurysm has special radiological characteristics that should be promptly recognized to offer the best treatment. PMID:28303209

  3. Combined Endovascular and Microsurgical Management of Complex Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Choudhri, Omar; Mukerji, Nitin; Steinberg, Gary K.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysms are associated with a 50% mortality rate after rupture and patients can suffer significant morbidity during subsequent treatment. Neurosurgical management of both ruptured and unruptured aneurysms has evolved over the years. The historical practice of using microsurgical clipping to treat aneurysms has benefited in the last two decades from tremendous improvement in endovascular technology. Microsurgery and endovascular therapies are often viewed as competing treatments but it is important to recognize their individual limitations. Some aneurysms are considered complex, due to several factors such as aneurysm anatomy and a patient’s clinical condition. A complex aneurysm often cannot be completely excluded with a single approach and its successful treatment requires a combination of microsurgical and endovascular techniques. Planning such an approach relies on understanding aneurysm anatomy and thus should routinely include 3D angiographic imaging. In patients with ruptured aneurysms, endovascular coiling is a well-tolerated early treatment and residual aneurysms can be treated with intervals of definitive clipping. Microsurgical clipping also can be used to reconstruct the neck of a complex aneurysm, allowing successful placement of coils across a narrow neck. Endovascular techniques are assisted by balloons, which can be used in coiling and testing parent vessel occlusion before sacrifice. In some cases microsurgical bypasses can provide alternate flow for planned vessel sacrifice. We present current paradigms for combining endovascular and microsurgical approaches to treat complex aneurysms and share our experience in 67 such cases. A dual microsurgical–endovascular approach addresses the challenge of intracranial aneurysms. This combination can be performed safely and produces excellent rates of aneurysm obliteration. Hybrid angiographic operating-room suites can foster seamless and efficient complementary application of these two

  4. Vorticity dynamics in an intracranial aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung; Borazjani, Iman; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2008-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation is carried out to investigate the vortex dynamics of physiologic pulsatile flow in an intracranial aneurysm. The numerical solver is based on the CURVIB (curvilinear grid/immersed boundary method) approach developed by Ge and Sotiropoulos, J. Comp. Physics, 225 (2007) and is applied to simulate the blood flow in a grid with 8 million grid nodes. The aneurysm geometry is extracted from MRI images from common carotid artery (CCA) of a rabbit (courtesy Dr.Kallmes, Mayo Clinic). The simulation reveals the formation of a strong vortex ring at the proximal end during accelerated flow phase. The vortical structure advances toward the aneurysm dome forming a distinct inclined circular ring that connects with the proximal wall via two long streamwise vortical structures. During the reverse flow phase, the back flow results to the formation of another ring at the distal end that advances in the opposite direction toward the proximal end and interacts with the vortical structures that were created during the accelerated phase. The basic vortex formation mechanism is similar to that observed by Webster and Longmire (1998) for pulsed flow through inclined nozzles. The similarities between the two flows will be discussed and the vorticity dynamics of an aneurysm and inclined nozzle flows will be analyzed.This work was supported in part by the University of Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  5. Quantitative Assessment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Shum, Judy; Martufi, Giampaolo; Di Martino, Elena; Washington, Christopher B.; Grisafi, Joseph; Muluk, Satish C.; Finol, Ender A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the maximum transverse diameter of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and expansion rate are not entirely reliable indicators of rupture potential. We hypothesize that aneurysm morphology and wall thickness are more predictive of rupture risk and can be the deciding factors in the clinical management of the disease. A non-invasive, image-based evaluation of AAA shape was implemented on a retrospective study of 10 ruptured and 66 unruptured aneurysms. Three-dimensional models were generated from segmented, contrast-enhanced computed tomography images. Geometric indices and regional variations in wall thickness were estimated based on novel segmentation algorithms. A model was created using a J48 decision tree algorithm and its performance was assessed using ten-fold cross validation. Feature selection was performed using the χ2-test. The model correctly classified 65 datasets and had an average prediction accuracy of 86.6% (κ = 0.37). The highest ranked features were sac length, sac height, volume, surface area, maximum diameter, bulge height, and intra-luminal thrombus volume. Given that individual AAAs have complex shapes with local changes in surface curvature and wall thickness, the assessment of AAA rupture risk should be based on the accurate quantification of aneurysmal sac shape and size. PMID:20890661

  6. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Dredla, Brynn

    2015-01-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient’s medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis. PMID:27053985

  7. Portal vein aneurysm: What to know.

    PubMed

    Laurenzi, Andrea; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria; Lionetti, Raffaella; Meniconi, Roberto Luca; Colasanti, Marco; Vennarecci, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Portal vein aneurysm is an unusual vascular dilatation of the portal vein, which was first described by Barzilai and Kleckner in 1956 and since then less than 200 cases have been reported. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the international literature to better clarify various aspects of this rare nosological entity and provide clear evidence-based summary, when available, of the clinical and surgical management. A systematic literature search of the Pubmed database was performed for all articles related to portal vein aneurysm. All articles published from 1956 to 2014 were examined for a total of 96 reports, including 190 patients. Portal vein aneurysm is defined as a portal vein diameter exceeding 1.9 cm in cirrhotic patients and 1.5 cm in normal livers. It can be congenital or acquired and portal hypertension represents the main cause of the acquired version. Surgical indication is considered in case of rupture, thrombosis or symptomatic aneurysms. Aneurysmectomy and aneurysmorrhaphy are considered in patients with normal liver, while shunt procedures or liver transplantation are the treatment of choice in case of portal hypertension. Being such a rare vascular entity its management should be reserved to high-volume tertiary hepato-biliary centres.

  8. Endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Dominique B.; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.; Moll, Frans L.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are usually treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), which has become the standard of care in many hospitals for patients with suitable anatomy. Clinical evidence indicates that EVAR is associated with superior perioperative outcomes and similar long-term survival compared with open repair. Since the randomized, controlled trials that provided this evidence were conducted, however, the stent graft technology for infrarenal AAA has been further developed. Improvements include profile downsizing, optimization of sealing and fixation, and the use of low porosity fabrics. In addition, imaging techniques have improved, enabling better preoperative planning, stent graft placement, and postoperative surveillance. Also in the past few years, fenestrated and branched stent grafts have increasingly been used to manage anatomically challenging aneurysms, and experiments with off-label use of stent grafts have been performed to treat patients deemed unfit or unsuitable for other treatment strategies. Overall, the indications for endovascular management of AAA are expanding to include increasingly complex and anatomically challenging aneurysms. Ongoing studies and optimization of imaging, in addition to technological refinement of stent grafts, will hopefully continue to broaden the utilization of EVAR. PMID:24343568

  9. [Congenital left sinus of Valsalva aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Simões, M V; Figueira, R R; Barbato, D; Miziara, H L

    1991-01-01

    Two cases of left sinus of Valsalva congenital aneurysm (SVCA), incidentally found are described. The authors call attention on rarity of them, and present new concepts about their morphogenesis and incidence. They also suggested a higher incidence of asymptomatic and undiagnosed cases of SVCA should be considered.

  10. Pulsatile blood flow in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Lasheras, Juan C.; Singel, Soeren; Varga, Chris

    2001-11-01

    We discuss the results of combined in-vitro laboratory measurements and clinical observations aimed at determining the effect that the unsteady wall shear stresses and the pressure may have on the growth and eventual rupturing of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), a permanent bulging-like dilatation occurring near the aortic bifurcation. In recent years, new non-invasive techniques, such as stenting, have been used to treat these AAAs. However, the development of these implants, aimed at stopping the growth of the aneurysm, has been hampered by the lack of understanding of the effect that the hemodynamic forces have on the growth mechanism. Since current in-vivo measuring techniques lack the precision and the necessary resolution, we have performed measurements of the pressure and shear stresses in laboratory models. The models of the AAA were obtained from high resolution three-dimensional CAT/SCANS performed in patients at early stages of the disease. Preliminary DPIV measurements show that the pulsatile blood flow discharging into the cavity of the aneurysm leads to large spikes of pressure and wall shear stresses near and around its distal end, indicating a possible correlation between the regions of high wall shear stresses and the observed location of the growth of the aneurysm.

  11. Endovascular Treatment of Giant Splenic Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Góes Junior, Adenauer Marinho de Oliveira; Góes, Amanda Silva de Oliveira; de Albuquerque, Paloma Cals; Palácios, Renato Menezes; Abib, Simone de Campos Vieira

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Visceral artery aneurysms are uncommon. Among them, splenic artery is the most common (46–60%). Most splenic artery aneurysms are asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally, but its rupture, potentially fatal, occurs in up to 8% of cases. Presentation of Case. A female patient, 64 years old, diagnosed with a giant aneurysm of the splenic artery (approximately 6.5 cm in diameter) was successfully submitted to endovascular treatment by stent graft implantation. Discussion. Symptomatic aneurysms and those larger than 2 cm represent some of the main indications for intervention. The treatment may be by laparotomy, laparoscopy, or endovascular techniques. Among the various endovascular methods discussed in this paper, there is stent graft implantation, a method still few reported in the literature. Conclusion. Although some authors still consider the endovascular approach as an exception to the treatment of SAA, in major specialized centers these techniques have been consolidated as the preferred choice, reserving the surgical approach in cases where this cannot be used. For being a less aggressive approach, it offers an opportunity of treatment to patients considered “high risk” for surgical treatment by laparotomy/laparoscopy. PMID:23316410

  12. Endovascular Exclusion of Mycotic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Takach, Thomas J.; Kane, Peter N.; Madjarov, Jeko M.; Holleman, Jeremiah H.; Robicsek, Francis; Roush, Timothy S.

    2007-01-01

    The presence of prohibitive risk may preclude usual surgical management. Such was the case for a critically ill, 60-year-old woman who presented with concomitant, life-threatening conditions. The patient presented with acute central cord syndrome and lower-extremity paraplegia after completing a 6-week course of intravenous antibiotics for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and osteomyelitis of the thoracic spine. Radiologic examination revealed bony destruction of thoracic vertebrae T4 through T6, impingement on the spinal cord and canal by an inflammatory mass, and a separate 2.5-cm mycotic aneurysm of the infrarenal aorta. The clinical and radiologic findings warranted immediate decompression and stabilization of the spinal cord, aneurysmectomy, and vascular reconstruction. However, the severely debilitated patient could not tolerate 2 simultaneous open procedures. She underwent emergent endovascular exclusion of the mycotic aneurysm with a stent-graft, followed immediately by laminectomy and stabilization of the thoracic spine. Intraoperative microbiology specimens showed no growth. The patient was maintained on prophylactic antibiotic therapy for 6 months. Fourteen months postoperatively, her neurologic function was near full recovery, and neither surveillance blood cultures nor radiologic examinations showed a recurrence of infection or aneurysm. Although the long-term outcome of endovascular stent-grafts in the treatment of culture-negative mycotic aneurysms is unknown, the use of these grafts in severely debilitated patients can reduce operative risk and enable recovery in the short term. PMID:18172531

  13. Primary Aortic Infections and Infected Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Primary infections of the aorta and infected aortic aneurysms are rare and are life threatening. Most of them are due to bacterial infection occurring in an atheromatous plaque or a pre existing aneurysm during bacteremia. Rarely spread from a contiguous septic process may be the cause. The reported hospital mortality ranges from 16–44%. Gram positive bacteria are still the most common causative organisms. More recently, Gram negative bacilli are seen increasingly responsible. The mortality rate is higher for the Gram negative infection since they most often cause supra renal aneurysms and are more prone for rupture. Best results are achieved by appropriate antibiotics and aggressive surgical treatment. Excision of the infected aneurysm sac as well as surrounding tissue and in situ reconstruction of aorta is the preferred treatment. Pedicled omental cover also helps to reduce infection. Long term antibiotic is needed to prevent reinfection. Mortality is high for those who undergo emergency operation, with advanced age and for nonsalmonella infection. PMID:23555384

  14. Aortic aneurysm mimicking a right atrial mass.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Ahmed; Elsayed, Mahmoud; Kalra, Rajat; Bulur, Serkan; Nanda, Navin C

    2016-10-01

    We present a case of a 54-year-old female who was initially thought to have a cystic mass in the right atrium on two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography. Careful transducer angulation and off-axis imaging showed this mass-like effect was produced by an aortic root aneurysm impinging on the right atrium.

  15. The Endovascular Management of Iliac Artery Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Stroumpouli, Evangelia; Nassef, Ahmed; Loosemore, Tom; Thompson, Matt; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2007-11-15

    Background: Isolated aneurysms of the iliac arteries are uncommon. Previously treated by conventional surgery, there is increasing use of endografts to treat these lesions. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy, safety, and durability of the stent-grafts for treatment of iliac artery aneurysms (IAAs). The results of endografting for isolated IAAs over a 10-year period were analyzed retrospectively. The treatment methods differed depending on the anatomic location of the aneurysms. Twenty-one patients (1 woman, 20 men) underwent endovascular stent-graft repair, with one procedure carried out under emergency conditions after acute rupture. The mean aneurysm diameter was 4.6 cm.Results:The procedural technical success was 100%. There was zero 30-day mortality. Follow-up was by interval CT scans. At a mean follow-up of 51.2 months, the stent-graft patency rate was 100%. Reintervention was performed in four patients (19%): one patient (4.7%) with a type I endoleak and three patients (14.3%) with type II endoleaks.Conclusion:We conclude that endovascular repair of isolated IAAs is a safe, minimally invasive technique with low morbidity rates. Follow-up results up to 10 years suggest that this approach is durable and should be regarded as a first treatment option for appropriate candidates.

  16. Diagnosis and management of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Papagiannis, J; Apostolopoulou, S; Sarris, GE; Rammos, S

    2002-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation is a rare anomaly that presents in several different ways. It can present as an isolated finding, or more often in the context of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. It can also complicate palliative surgery such as the Glenn operation for complex congenital heart disease with single ventricle physiology. Its management includes transcatheter embolization, which is the preferred mode of therapy, surgery (including resection of the affected lobe, segment, or the fistula itself), or rarely, medical therapy. Complications of the disease itself and of various modes of treatment are relatively common, and patients require close surveillance for possible recurrence, or development of new fistulas. In cases related to the Glenn operation, redirection of hepatic venous flow or heart transplantation may cure the problem. PMID:22368610

  17. Congenital cardiovascular malformations and the fetal circulation.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, A M

    2010-03-01

    After birth, gas exchange is achieved in the lung, whereas prenatally it occurs in the placenta. This is associated with differences in blood flow patterns in the fetus as compared with the postnatal circulation. Congenital cardiovascular malformations are associated with haemodynamic changes in the fetus, which differ from those occurring postnatally. Obstruction to cardiac outflow may alter myocardial development, resulting in progressive ventricular hypoplasia. Alteration of oxygen content may profoundly influence pulmonary vascular and ductus arteriosus responses. Interference in blood flow and oxygen content may affect cerebral development as a result of inadequate oxygen or energy substrate supply. The circulatory effects may be gestational dependent, related to maturation of vascular responses in different organs. These prenatal influences of congenital cardiac defects may severely affect immediate, as well as longterm, postnatal prognosis and survival. This has stimulated the development of techniques for palliation of disturbed circulation during fetal life.

  18. Small Rho-GTPases and cortical malformations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Rho-GTPases have been found to be crucial for cytoskeleton remodelling and cell polarity, as well as key players in directed cell migration in various tissues and organs, therefore becoming good candidates for involvement in neuronal migration disorders. We recently found that genetic deletion of the small GTPase RhoA in the developing mouse cerebral cortex results in three distinct cortical malformations: a defect in the proliferation of progenitor cells during development that leads to a bigger cerebral cortex in the adult mouse, a change in the morphology of radial glial cells that results in the formation of a subcortical band heterotopia (SBH, also called Double Cortex) and an increase in the speed of migrating newborn neurons. The latter, together with the aberrant radial glial shape, is likely to be the cause of cobblestone lissencephaly, where neurons protrude beyond layer I at the pial surface of the brain. PMID:23524873

  19. Multimodal device for assessment of skin malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekina, A.; Garancis, V.; Rubins, U.; Spigulis, J.; Valeine, L.; Berzina, A.

    2013-11-01

    A variety of multi-spectral imaging devices is commercially available and used for skin diagnostics and monitoring; however, an alternative cost-efficient device can provide an advanced spectral analysis of skin. A compact multimodal device for diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions was developed and tested. A polarized LED light source illuminates the skin surface at four different wavelengths - blue (450 nm), green (545 nm), red (660 nm) and infrared (940 nm). Spectra of reflected light from the 25 mm wide skin spot are imaged by a CMOS sensor. Four spectral images are obtained for mapping of the main skin chromophores. The specific chromophore distribution differences between different skin malformations were analyzed and information of subcutaneous structures was consecutively extracted.

  20. Congenital malformations of the brain and spine.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Prashant; Zamora, Carlos; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we briefly address the most common congenital brain and spinal anomalies as well as their most salient imaging, especially magnetic resonance, findings. Some of them, such as Chiari II, and open spinal defects, have become relatively rare due to their detection in utero and repair of the spinal malformation. Regardless of the type of brain anomaly, the most common clinical symptoms are mental retardation, hydrocephalus, and seizure; the latter two may need to be surgically and medically addressed. The most commonly found spinal congenital anomalies include the filum terminale lipoma which is generally asymptomatic and incidental and the caudal regression syndrome for which no primary treatment exists. Any spinal congenital anomaly may present in adulthood as a consequence of spinal cord tethering and/or development of syringomyelia.

  1. Malformations and the Manx Syndrome in Cats

    PubMed Central

    DeForest, M. E.; Basrur, P. K.

    1979-01-01

    Breeding experiments were conducted on cats with congenital taillessness, to test the dissemination pattern of taillessness in their offspring. Clinical evaluation, radiographic analysis of the vertebral column and histological studies of the digestive tract and central nervous tissue were conducted to determine the association of malformations of these systems in cats born with different degrees of taillessness noted in the rumpy and stumpy cats. The mode of transmission of the tailless (Manx) condition assumed to be through an autosomal dominant factor (M) was confirmed by this investigation. It is hypothesized that the problems associated with the tailless condition such as spina bifida, urinary and faecal incontinence and locomotor disturbances of the pelvic limbs may all be related to a disturbance affecting the development of the central nervous system in the early embryonic life. ImagesFigure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:393376

  2. Cerebral cavernous malformation proteins at a glance.

    PubMed

    Draheim, Kyle M; Fisher, Oriana S; Boggon, Titus J; Calderwood, David A

    2014-02-15

    Loss-of-function mutations in genes encoding KRIT1 (also known as CCM1), CCM2 (also known as OSM and malcavernin) or PDCD10 (also known as CCM3) cause cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). These abnormalities are characterized by dilated leaky blood vessels, especially in the neurovasculature, that result in increased risk of stroke, focal neurological defects and seizures. The three CCM proteins can exist in a trimeric complex, and each of these essential multi-domain adaptor proteins also interacts with a range of signaling, cytoskeletal and adaptor proteins, presumably accounting for their roles in a range of basic cellular processes including cell adhesion, migration, polarity and apoptosis. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we provide an overview of current models of CCM protein function focusing on how known protein-protein interactions might contribute to cellular phenotypes and highlighting gaps in our current understanding.

  3. Endoscope-Assisted Microneurosurgery for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Galzio, Renato J.; Di Cola, Francesco; Raysi Dehcordi, Soheila; Ricci, Alessandro; De Paulis, Danilo

    2013-01-01

    Background: The endovascular techniques has widely changed the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. However surgery still represent the best therapeutic option in case of broad-based and complex lesions. The combined use of endoscopic and microsurgical techniques (EAM) may improve surgical results. Objective: The purpose of our study is to evaluate the advantages and limits of EAM for intracranial aneurysms. Methods: Between January 2002 and December 2012, 173 patients, harboring 206 aneurysms were surgically treated in our department with the EAM technique. One hundred and fifty-seven aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation and 49 were in the posterior circulation. Standard tailored approaches, based on skull base surgery principles, were chosen. The use of the endoscope included three steps: initial inspection, true operative time, and final inspection. For each procedure, an intraoperative video and an evaluation schedule were prepared, to report surgeons’ opinions about the technique itself. In the first cases, we always used the endoscope during surgical procedures in order to get an adequate surgical training. Afterwards we became aware in selecting cases in which to apply the endoscopy, as we started to become familiar with its advantages and limits. Results: After clipping, all patients were undergone postoperative cerebral angiography. No surgical mortality related to EAM were observed. Complications directly related to endoscopic procedures were rare. Conclusion: Our retrospective study suggests that endoscopic efficacy for aneurysms is only scarcely influenced by the preoperative clinical condition (Hunt–Hess grade), surgical timing, presence of blood in the cisterns (Fisher grade) and/or hydrocephalus. However the most important factors contributing to the efficacy of EAM are determined by the anatomical locations and sizes of the lesions. Furthermore, the advantages are especially evident using dedicated scopes and holders, after an

  4. Volumetric analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, Kevin M.; Kusnick, Catherine A.; Shamsolkottabi, Susanne; Lang, Elvira V.; Corson, J. D.; Stanford, William; Thompson, Brad H.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid, reliable and accurate system of measurement of abdominal aortic aneurysms, using volumetric analysis of x-ray computed tomographic data. This study evaluates illustrative cases, and compares measurements of AAA phantoms, using standard 2D versus volumetric methods. To validate the volumetric analysis, four phantom aneurysms were constructed in a range of diameters (4.5 - 7.0 cm) which presents the greatest management challenge to the clinician. These phantoms were imaged using a Toshiba Xpress SX helical CT. Separate scans were obtained at conventional (10 mm X 10 mm) and thin slice (5 mm X 5 mm) collimations. The thin slices were reconstructed at 2 mm intervals. Data from each of the 96 scans were interpreted using a standard 2D approach, then analyzed using task-oriented volumetric software. We evaluate patient assessments, and compare greatest outer diameters of phantoms, by standard versus volumetric methods. Qualitative differences between solutions based on standard versus volumetric analysis of illustrative patient cases are substantial. Expert radiologists' standard measurements of phantom aneurysms are highly reliable (r2 equals 0.901 - 0.958; p < 0.001), but biased toward significant overestimation of aneurysm diameters in the range of clinical interest. For the same phantoms, volumetric analysis was both more reliable (r2 equals 0.986 - 0.996; p < 0.001), and more accurate, with no significant bias in the range of interest. Volumetric analysis promotes selection of more valid management strategies, by providing vital information not otherwise available, and allowing more reliable and accurate assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. It is particularly valuable in the presence of aortic tortuosity, vessel eccentricity, and uncertain involvement of critical vessels.

  5. Temporary umbilical loop colostomy for anorectal malformations.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoshinori; Takada, Kohei; Nakamura, Yusuke; Sato, Masahito; Kwon, A-Hon

    2012-11-01

    Transumbilical surgical procedures have been reported to be a feasible, safe, and cosmetically excellent procedure for various pediatric surgical diseases. Umbilical loop colostomies have previously been created in patients with Hirschsprung's disease, but not in patients with anorectal malformations (ARMs). We assessed the feasibility and cosmetic results of temporal umbilical loop colostomy (TULC) in patients with ARMs. A circumferential skin incision was made at the base of the umbilical cord under general anesthesia. The skin, subcutaneous tissue, and fascia were cored out vertically, and the umbilical vessels and urachal remnant were individually ligated apart from the opening in the fascia. A loop colostomy was created in double-barreled fashion with a high chimney more than 2 cm above the level of the skin. The final size of the opening in the skin and fascia was modified according to the size of the bowel. The bowel wall was fixed separately to the peritoneum and fascia with interrupted 5-0 absorbable sutures. The bowel was opened longitudinally and everted without suturing to the skin. The loop was divided 7 days postoperatively, and diversion of the oral bowel was completed. The colostomy was closed 2-3 months after posterior saggital anorectoplasty through a peristomal skin incision followed by end-to-end anastomosis. Final wound closure was performed in a semi-opened fashion to create a deep umbilicus. TULCs were successfully created in seven infants with rectourethral bulbar fistula or rectovestibular fistula. Postoperative complications included mucosal prolapse in one case. No wound infection or spontaneous umbilical ring narrowing was observed. Skin problems were minimal, and stoma care could easily be performed by attaching stoma bag. Healing of umbilical wounds after TULC closure was excellent. The umbilicus may be an alternative stoma site for temporary loop colostomy in infants with intermediate-type anorectal malformations, who undergo radical

  6. Genetic Screening of Pediatric Cavernous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Merello, Elisa; Pavanello, Marco; Consales, Alessandro; Mascelli, Samantha; Raso, Alessandro; Accogli, Andrea; Cama, Armando; Valeria, Capra; De Marco, Patrizia

    2016-10-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations mostly located within the central nervous system. Heterozygous loss of function mutations in CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607, and CCM3/PDCD10 genes are identified in about 90 % of familial cases of CCMs and two thirds of sporadic cases with multiple lesions. In this study, we performed genetic screening of a cohort of 31 patients, mainly pediatric. We analyzed the CCM1, CCM2, and CCM3 genes by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and direct sequencing of exons and intronic boundaries. A total of 9 typical pathogenic loss-of-function mutations were identified in 10 out 31 patients (32 %). The 75 % of familial cases were mutated and the percentage reached to 85 % when we consider only pediatric cases. Detection rate in sporadic cases with multiple lesions was considerably lower (16 %). We identified a novel variant of CCM3, the c.130-131insT (p.R45Efs*8), in 1 pediatric sporadic case with multiple lesions that introduced a premature termination codon into the messenger RNA (mRNA), most likely leading to mRNA decay. Similar to other CCM pediatric series, the main symptoms associated to clinical debut consisted of cerebral hemorrhage. In conclusion, the penetrance of CCM mutations in familial pediatric cases is high (85 %). The genetic workup could improve clinical and genetic counseling in CCM patients. Moreover, we confirmed the high risk of hemorrhage in children with CCMs.

  7. Outcome of cochlear implantation in children with cochlear malformations.

    PubMed

    Bille, Jesper; Fink-Jensen, Vibeke; Ovesen, Therese

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study was the evaluation of outcomes of cochlear implantation (CI) in children with cochlear malformations. A retrospective case-control study was conducted in a tertiary referral centre. The patients were children with inner ear malformation judged by high-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging treated with uni- or bilateral CI and a follow-up period of at least 3 years. They were matched with a control group of children operated for other reasons. The patients were operated by one of two surgeons using similar techniques including a standard perimodiolar electrode in all cases. The intervention was therapeutic and rehabilitative. The main outcome measures were category of auditory performance (CAP) and speech intelligibility rating (SIR). Eighteen children were diagnosed with cochlear malformations (12 % of children receiving CI). No statistical differences regarding CAP and SIR scores were found between the two groups. Only one child was diagnosed with a common cavity and performed below average. Children with auditory neuropathy performed beyond average. Children with cochlear malformations performed equally to children without malformation in the long term. Standard perimodiolar electrodes can be used despite cochlear malformations. The most important factors determining the outcome is the age of the child at the time of implantation and duration of hearing loss before CI. Awareness towards an increased risk of complications in case of inner ear malformations is recommended.

  8. A developmental and genetic classification for midbrain-hindbrain malformations

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Kathleen J.; Dobyns, William B.

    2009-01-01

    Advances in neuroimaging, developmental biology and molecular genetics have increased the understanding of developmental disorders affecting the midbrain and hindbrain, both as isolated anomalies and as part of larger malformation syndromes. However, the understanding of these malformations and their relationships with other malformations, within the central nervous system and in the rest of the body, remains limited. A new classification system is proposed, based wherever possible, upon embryology and genetics. Proposed categories include: (i) malformations secondary to early anteroposterior and dorsoventral patterning defects, or to misspecification of mid-hindbrain germinal zones; (ii) malformations associated with later generalized developmental disorders that significantly affect the brainstem and cerebellum (and have a pathogenesis that is at least partly understood); (iii) localized brain malformations that significantly affect the brain stem and cerebellum (pathogenesis partly or largely understood, includes local proliferation, cell specification, migration and axonal guidance); and (iv) combined hypoplasia and atrophy of putative prenatal onset degenerative disorders. Pertinent embryology is discussed and the classification is justified. This classification will prove useful for both physicians who diagnose and treat patients with these disorders and for clinical scientists who wish to understand better the perturbations of developmental processes that produce them. Importantly, both the classification and its framework remain flexible enough to be easily modified when new embryologic processes are described or new malformations discovered. PMID:19933510

  9. Medieval descriptions and doctrines of stroke: preliminary analysis of select sources. Part II: between Galenism and Aristotelism - Islamic theories of apoplexy (800-1200).

    PubMed

    Karenberg, A; Hort, I

    1998-12-01

    This second paper on medieval descriptions and doctrines of stroke reviews concepts outlined by famous Muslim physicians of the Middle Ages such as Rhazes, Haly Abbas, Avicenna, and Averroes. Contrary to a popular belief, Islamic neurological texts represent not only a bridge between ancient and western medieval medical knowledge, but also document remarkable advancements. Whereas statements on diagnosis and prognosis lack originality, the endeavors of physician-philosophers and medical authors led to substantial additions and important changes in theory. Such modifications include the integration of ventricular doctrine and particularly the attempt to unify Aristotelian and Galenic tenets which resulted in a complex discussion about the seats and causes of apoplexy. The fairly simple model handed down by Galenists of the Byzantine period was replaced by more detailed classifications, which proposed "cerebral" as well as "vascular" origins of the disease without suggesting a "cerebrovascular" etiology. Islamic therapeutic strategies included dietetic, pharmacological and surgical elements. The use of the cautery in "chronic apoplexy" was a special feature of Arabic surgery.

  10. From Tonic-cups to Bitter-cups: Kwasi bita beker from Suriname Determination, past and present use of an ancient galenic artefact.

    PubMed

    Odonne, G; Bourdy, G; Beauchêne, J; Houël, E; Stien, D; Chevolot, L; Deharo, E

    2007-03-21

    In the main markets of Paramaribo (Suriname), many stands offer what is locally called "Bitter-cups", or "Kwasi bita beker", small footed-cups, roughly carved from a whitish wood. The use of these cups is strictly medicinal and it seems to be restricted to Suriname, as they are not found in neighbouring countries (Guyana, French Guiana). The aim of this study was to identify the botanical origin of Bitter-cups still in use in the Saramaka traditional medicine (as information from field people was controversial), and document the ethnopharmacology of this original galenical artefact. Microscopic and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses were carried out on Bitter-cup, and anatomical criteria (marginal parenchyma band, size of intervessel and vessel-ray pits, rays width and rays composition, vessels clustering, frequency and size of parenchyma pits) together with HPLC profiles of the macerates showed that the wood cup was similar to Quassia amara L. (Simaroubaceae) wood. Ethnopharmacological investigation indicates that the use of these cups is simply due to the pharmacological properties attributed to "bitters", and is strongly linked to tradition and cultural attitudes. This study also emphasizes the long lasting use of these cups, now restricted to Suriname only, with almost no variation over one century.

  11. Virtual coiling of intracranial aneurysms based on dynamic path planning.

    PubMed

    Morales, Hernán G; Larrabide, Ignacio; Kim, Minsuok; Villa-Uriol, Maria-Cruz; Macho, Juan M; Blasco, Jordi; San Roman, Luis; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2011-01-01

    Coiling is possibly the most widespread endovascular treatment for intracranial aneurysms. It consists in the placement of metal wires inside the aneurysm to promote blood coagulation. This work presents a virtual coiling technique for pre-interventional planning and post-operative assessment of coil embolization procedure of aneurysms. The technique uses a dynamic path planning algorithm to mimic coil insertion inside a 3D aneurysm model, which allows to obtain a plausible distribution of coils within a patient-specific anatomy. The technique was tested on two idealized geometries: an sphere and a hexahedron. Subsequently, the proposed technique was applied in 10 realistic aneurysm geometries to show its reliability in anatomical models. The results of the technique was compared to digital substraction angiography images of two aneurysms.

  12. Novel Molecular Imaging Approaches to Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Risk Stratification.

    PubMed

    Toczek, Jakub; Meadows, Judith L; Sadeghi, Mehran M

    2016-01-01

    Selection of patients for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is currently based on aneurysm size, growth rate, and symptoms. Molecular imaging of biological processes associated with aneurysm growth and rupture, for example, inflammation and matrix remodeling, could improve patient risk stratification and lead to a reduction in abdominal aortic aneurysm morbidity and mortality. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide magnetic resonance imaging are 2 novel approaches to abdominal aortic aneurysm imaging evaluated in clinical trials. A variety of other tracers, including those that target inflammatory cells and proteolytic enzymes (eg, integrin αvβ3 and matrix metalloproteinases), have proven effective in preclinical models of abdominal aortic aneurysm and show great potential for clinical translation.

  13. Thrombus Volume Change Visualization after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiora, Josu; García, Guillermo; Macía, Iván; Legarreta, Jon Haitz; Boto, Fernando; Paloc, Céline; Graña, Manuel; Abuín, Javier Sanchez

    A surgical technique currently used in the treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA) is the Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR). This minimally invasive procedure involves inserting a prosthesis in the aortic vessel that excludes the aneurysm from the bloodstream. The stent, once in place acts as a false lumen for the blood current to travel down, and not into the surrounding aneurysm sac. This procedure, therefore, immediately takes the pressure off the aneurysm, which thromboses itself after some time. Nevertheless, in a long term perspective, different complications such as prosthesis displacement or bloodstream leaks into or from the aneurysmatic bulge (endoleaks) could appear causing a pressure elevation and, as a result, increasing the danger of rupture. The purpose of this work is to explore the application of image registration techniques to the visual detection of changes in the thrombus in order to assess the evolution of the aneurysm. Prior to registration, both the lumen and the thrombus are segmented

  14. Treatment strategies for aneurysms associated with moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Xu, Kan; Zhang, Yandong; Wang, Xin; Yu, Jinlu

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of aneurysms associated with moyamoya disease (MMD) is difficult for neurosurgeons, and little is known of strategy options. This report constitutes a comprehensive review of the literature. We summarize the known treatments and their clinical outcomes according to the site of the aneurysm: in major arteries, peripheral arteries, moyamoya vessels, meningeal arteries, or at the site of anastomosis. The literature review indicates that the treatment of MMD-associated aneurysms varies according to the site of the aneurysm and its hemodynamic characteristics. In particular, the treatment for basilar tip aneurysms remains challenging, since both endovascular embolization and direct clipping are difficult. The potential risk for ischemia should be considered in selecting endovascular or surgical approaches. Revascularization surgery, which is important for the treatment of MMD, also determines the clinical treatment outcome of aneurysms associated with MMD.

  15. Ruptured gastric artery aneurysm: an uncommon manifestation of microscopic polyangiitis.

    PubMed

    Ikura, Yoshihiro; Kadota, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Shuhei; Arimoto, Akira; Nishioka, Eiko

    2014-09-21

    Gastric artery aneurysm is a rare and lethal condition, and is caused by inflammatory or degenerative vasculopathies. We describe herein the clinical course of a patient with a ruptured gastric artery aneurysm associated with microscopic polyangiitis. Absence of vasculitic changes in the aneurysm resected and negative results of autoantibodies interfered with our diagnostic process. We should have adopted an interventional radiology and initiated steroid therapy promptly to rescue the patient.

  16. Ruptured gastric artery aneurysm: An uncommon manifestation of microscopic polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Ikura, Yoshihiro; Kadota, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Shuhei; Arimoto, Akira; Nishioka, Eiko

    2014-01-01

    Gastric artery aneurysm is a rare and lethal condition, and is caused by inflammatory or degenerative vasculopathies. We describe herein the clinical course of a patient with a ruptured gastric artery aneurysm associated with microscopic polyangiitis. Absence of vasculitic changes in the aneurysm resected and negative results of autoantibodies interfered with our diagnostic process. We should have adopted an interventional radiology and initiated steroid therapy promptly to rescue the patient. PMID:25253973

  17. Endovascular Treatment of Basilar Artery Aneurysms Associated with Distal Fenestration

    PubMed Central

    Juszkat, R.; Nowak, S.; Moskal, J.; Kociemba, W.; Zarzecka, A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Segmental non-fusion of the basilar artery results from failed fusion of the neural arteries and from regression of the bridging arteries that connect the longitudinal arteries. This condition is associated with aneurysm formation in 7% of cases. Distally unfused arteries with associated aneurysms are very rare. We report on a case of successful endovascular treatment of an aneurysm of the distally unfused basilar trunk. PMID:20465939

  18. Recurrent Giant Cell Tumor of Skull Combined with Multiple Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumors are benign but locally invasive and frequently recur. Giant cell tumors of the skull are extremely rare. A patient underwent a surgery to remove a tumor, but the tumor recurred. Additionally, the patient developed multiple aneurysms. The patient underwent total tumor resection and trapping for the aneurysms, followed by radiotherapy. We report this rare case and suggest some possibilities for treating tumor growth combined with aneurysm development. PMID:27195256

  19. Endovascular Treatment of Extracranial Internal Carotid Aneurysms Using Endografts

    SciTech Connect

    Baldi, Sebastian Rostagno, Roman D.; Zander, Tobias; Llorens, Rafael; Schonholz, Claudio; Maynar, Manuel

    2008-03-15

    Aneurysms of the extracranial internal carotid artery (EICA) are infrequent. They are difficult to treat with conventional surgery because of their distal extension into the skull base. We report three cases of EICA aneurysms in two symptomatic patients successfully treated with polytetrafluoroethylene self-expanding endografts using an endovascular approach. The aneurysms were located distal to the carotid bifurcation and extended to the subpetrous portion of the internal carotid artery.

  20. Interposition vein graft for giant coronary aneurysm repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Azoury, F.; Lytle, B. W.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Coronary aneurysms in adults are rare. Surgical treatment is often concomitant to treating obstructing coronary lesions. However, the ideal treatment strategy is poorly defined. We present a case of successful treatment of a large coronary artery aneurysm with a reverse saphenous interposition vein graft. This modality offers important benefits over other current surgical and percutaneous techniques and should be considered as an option for patients requiring treatment for coronary aneurysms.

  1. Surgical management of an ACM aneurysm eight years after coiling.

    PubMed

    Pogády, P; Fellner, F; Trenkler, J; Wurm, G

    2007-04-01

    The authors present a case report on rebleeding of a medial cerebral aneurysm (MCA) eight years after complete endovascular coiling. The primarily successfully coiled MCA aneurysm showed a local regrowth which, however, was not the source of the rebleeding. The angiogram demonstrated no evidence of contrast filling of the coiled segment, but according to intraoperative findings (haematoma location, displacement of coils, evident place of rupture) there is no doubt that the coiled segment of the aneurysm was responsible for the haemorrhage.

  2. Coincidental vascular anomalies at the foramen magnum: dural arteriovenous fistula and high flow aneurysm on perimedullary fistula.

    PubMed

    Gilard, V; Curey, S; Tollard, E; Proust, F

    2013-12-01

    We report the case of a 59-year-old woman admitted for a sudden headache due to a subarachnoid haemorrhage. On CT scan, the clots predominated into the posterior fossa without high-density in the sylvian or interhemispheric fissures. The vertebral angiography revealed a dural arteriovenous fistula at the foramen magnum associated to an aneurysm of the cervical anterior spinal artery. Due to the high rebleeding risk of a dural shunt, we proposed curative treatment using microsurgical interruption of the intradural draining vein. On the postoperative angiography at 15-day follow-up, the 2 malformations were corrected and the outcome at 6 months was excellent. Based on the literature, we assess this exceptional association and suggest its possible management.

  3. Anthelmintic induced congenital malformations in sheep embryos using netobimin.

    PubMed

    Navarro, M; Cristofol, C; Carretero, A; Arboix, M; Ruberte, J

    1998-01-24

    Benzimidazole compounds have teratogenic effects in domestic and experimental animals. In this study, 14 Manchega ewes were treated orally, under controlled conditions, with 20 mg netobimin (a prodrug of a benzimidazole compound) per/kg bodyweight on the 17th day of pregnancy. Congenital malformations and abortions affected 60 per cent of the lambs. The main malformations were skeletal and renal, but vascular malformations were observed for the first time. The abnormalities were investigated using radiological, dissection and vascular injection techniques, and associations among them were recorded. The anomalies are discussed in terms of embryological considerations.

  4. Congenital malformations of the spinal cord without early symptoms.

    PubMed

    Moffie, D; Stefanko, S Z; Makkink, B

    1986-01-01

    Description of 11 patients with congenital malformations of the spinal cord. Six of them were males, five females and the age varied from 7 to 70 years. Most of these cases produced clinical neurological signs indicating spinal cord disease in later life during an intercurrent disease. It was thought that changes in the bloodvessels and/or perfusion of the area of the spinal cord malformation was the ultimate cause of the neurological symptoms. An exact explanation of the origin of these developmental disturbances of the spinal cord remains unknown. Different hypotheses proposed in the literature, concerning these malformations, are not satisfactory.

  5. Congenital inner ear malformations without sensorineural hearing loss in children.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Michio; Kato, Zenichiro; Sasai, Hideo; Kubota, Kazuo; Funato, Michinori; Orii, Kenji; Kaneko, Hideo; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Naomi

    2009-10-01

    Inner ear malformations are frequently found in patients with congenital hearing loss. It has been reported that normal hearing is rare in patients with severe inner ear vestibular malformations. A 9-year-old boy had had complained of recurrent dizziness and disequilibrium for 2 months. Clinical and neuro-otological examinations showed peripheral involvement of the vestibular system, while audiological investigation was normal. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, with three-dimensional reconstruction, showed dysplasia of the bilateral lateral semicircular canals (LSCCs). Isolated vestibular malformation might not be as rare as previously thought, and should be examined by imaging of the temporal bone.

  6. Otosclerosis associated with type B-1 inner ear malformation.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, A; Dispenza, F; Aggarwal, N; Russo, A

    2010-06-01

    Malformations of bony inner ear are rare anomalies occurring in approximately 20% of patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss. Conductive hearing loss is usually associated with abnormalities of the external and middle ear. Recent reports of patients with lateral semicircular canal malformations indicate inner ear malformations to be associated with sensorineural or conductive hearing loss. Differential diagnosis of conductive hearing loss should include otosclerosis, isolated ossicular deformities, inner ear anomalies or a combination of these. In this report, a case is described with right vestibule-lateral semicircular canal dysplasia presenting at our centre with bilateral otosclerosis.

  7. [Arteriovenous malformation-glioma association: study of four cases].

    PubMed

    Borges, Lia Raquel R; Malheiros, Suzana M F; Pelaez, Maria Paula; Stávale, João Norberto; Santos, Adrialdo J; Carrete, Henrique; Nogueira, Roberto Gomes; Ferraz, Fernando A P; Gabbai, Alberto A

    2003-06-01

    We reviewed the clinical presentation, imaging and histopathologic findings in 4 patients with the diagnosis of arteriovenous malformation associated with glioma that were operated on from 1991 to 2000 in our institution. Four patients (2 males; age between 15 and 52 years) presented with progressive headache with clinical evidence of intracranial hypertension (in 3) and partial seizures (in 1). CT scan showed a brain tumor without any detectable pathologic vessels. Histologic examination revealed astrocytic tumors associated with arteriovenous malformation. No patient presented the vascular component intermixed with the tumor. The arteriovenous-glioma association is rare and must be identified by a clear demarcation between the malformation and the tumor.

  8. Update on aneurysm disease: current insights and controversies: peripheral aneurysms: when to intervene - is rupture really a danger?

    PubMed

    Dawson, Joe; Fitridge, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral artery aneurysms are rarer than abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), although the true prevalence is not well known. They often coexist with aortic and other peripheral artery aneurysms. In contrast to AAA, where the principal risk is that of rupture, thromboembolism is more common, contributing a bigger risk in the more common lesions. Although rupture does occur, with incidence related to anatomical site, aneurysm diameter cannot be used to guide management with the same confidence as in AAA. In addition, the rarity of these lesions results in a paucity of evidence with which to guide intervention. Consequently they are difficult lesions to manage, and numerous aneurysm and patient factors must be considered to provide treatment individualised for each case. We discuss popliteal, femoral, carotid, subclavian, upper limb, visceral and false aneurysms, focussing on the risk of rupture and thromboembolism, and current thresholds for intervention, based on the available published literature.

  9. Characterization of cerebral aneurysms using 3D moment invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan, Raul D.; Hernandez, Monica; Gallardo, Daniel; Cebral, Juan R.; Putman, Christopher; Dempere-Marco, Laura; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2005-04-01

    The rupture mechanism of intracranial aneurysms is still not fully understood. Although the size of the aneurysm is the shape index most commonly used to predict rupture, some controversy still exists about its adequateness as an aneurysm rupture predictor. In this work, an automatic method to geometrically characterize the shape of cerebral saccular aneurysms using 3D moment invariants is proposed. Geometric moments are efficiently computed via application of the Divergence Theorem over the aneurysm surface using a non-structured mesh. 3D models of the aneurysm and its connected parent vessels have been reconstructed from segmentations of both 3DRA and CTA images. Two alternative approaches have been used for segmentation, the first one based on isosurface deformable models, and the second one based on the level set method. Several experiments were also conducted to both assess the influence of pre-processing steps in the stability of the aneurysm shape descriptors, and to know the robustness of the proposed method. Moment invariants have proved to be a robust technique while providing a reliable way to discriminate between ruptured and unruptured aneurysms (Sensitivity=0.83, Specificity=0.74) on a data set containing 55 aneurysms. Further investigation over larger databases is necessary to establish their adequateness as reliable predictors of rupture risk.

  10. Thrombosis modeling in intracranial aneurysms: a lattice Boltzmann numerical algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouared, R.; Chopard, B.; Stahl, B.; Rüfenacht, D. A.; Yilmaz, H.; Courbebaisse, G.

    2008-07-01

    The lattice Boltzmann numerical method is applied to model blood flow (plasma and platelets) and clotting in intracranial aneurysms at a mesoscopic level. The dynamics of blood clotting (thrombosis) is governed by mechanical variations of shear stress near wall that influence platelets-wall interactions. Thrombosis starts and grows below a shear rate threshold, and stops above it. Within this assumption, it is possible to account qualitatively well for partial, full or no occlusion of the aneurysm, and to explain why spontaneous thrombosis is more likely to occur in giant aneurysms than in small or medium sized aneurysms.

  11. Progressive intracranial fusiform aneurysms and T-cell immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Piantino, Juan A; Goldenberg, Fernando D; Pytel, Peter; Wagner-Weiner, Linda; Ansari, Sameer A

    2013-02-01

    In the pediatric population, intracranial fusiform aneurysms have been associated with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and rarely with opportunistic infections related to other immunodeficiencies. The HIV virus and other infectious organisms have been implicated in the pathophysiology of these aneurysms. We present a child with T-cell immunodeficiency but no evidence of human immunodeficiency virus or opportunistic intracranial infections that developed progressive bilateral fusiform intracranial aneurysms. Our findings suggest a role of immunodeficiency or inflammation in the formation of some intracranial aneurysms.

  12. Unusual complications in an inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, K; Hirota, J; Taniyasu, N; Asano, S

    1999-11-01

    An unusual case of an inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) associated with coronary aneurysms and pathological fracture of the adjacent lumbar vertebrae. The associated coronary lesions in cases of IAAA are usually occlusions. In the present case, it was concluded that a possible cause of the coronary aneurysm was coronary arteritis and the etiology of the pathological fracture of the lumbar vertebrae was occlusion of the lumbar penetrating arteries due to vasculitis resulting in aseptic necrosis. Inflammatory AAA can be associated with aneurysms in addition to occlusive disease in systemic arteries. The preoperative evaluation of systemic arterial lesions and the function of systemic organs is essential.

  13. [False traumatic aneurysm of the ulnar artery in a teenager].

    PubMed

    Nour, M; Talha, H; El Idrissi, R; Lahraoui, Y; Ouazzani, L; Oubejja, H; Erraji, M; Zerhouni, H; Ettayebi, F

    2014-12-01

    Most aneurysms of hand arteries are traumatic. It is a generally rare unrecognized pathology. Complications are serious (embolism and thromboses of interdigital arteries). Two main causes can be recalled: acute trauma, with development of a false aneurysm; repeated microtrauma (hand hammer syndrome), with occurrence of an arterial dysplasic aneurysm. The diagnosis is based on the presence of a pulsatile mass, with finger dysesthesia, unilateral Raynaud's phenomenon. It is confirmed by duplex Doppler. Arteriography is necessary but can be replaced by an angio-MR. We report a case of false traumatic aneurysm of the ulnar artery in a teenager. This case illustrates this rare condition and opens discussion on therapeutic options.

  14. Suggested connections between risk factors of intracranial aneurysms: a review.

    PubMed

    Cebral, Juan R; Raschi, Marcelo

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to review studies of aneurysm risk factors and the suggested hypotheses that connect the different risk factors and the underlying mechanisms governing the aneurysm natural history. The result of this work suggests that at the center of aneurysm evolution there is a cycle of wall degeneration and weakening in response to changing hemodynamic loading and biomechanic stress. This progressive wall degradation drives the geometrical evolution of the aneurysm until it stabilizes or ruptures. Risk factors such as location, genetics, smoking, co-morbidities, and hypertension seem to affect different components of this cycle. However, details of these interactions or their relative importance are still not clearly understood.

  15. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: how can we improve their treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Scobie, T K

    1980-01-01

    Arteriosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms are present in a least 2% of the elderly population of the Western world and their number is increasing. Without treatment 30% of patients with asymptomatic aneurysms live for 5 years, although the risk of rupture becomes greater as the size of the aneurysm increases. Of those with untreated symptomatic aneurysms 80% are dead within a year. Elective repair of aneurysms has a low mortality, and 50% of the patients live for at least 5 years. Symptomatic aneurysms all cause pain and may produce other symptoms from pressure on adjacent structures, distal embolism, acute thrombosis or rupture. In 88% of cases an aneurysm can be diagnosed by physical examination alone; confirmatory tests include soft-tissue roentgenography of the abdomen, ultrasonography, computer-assisted tomography and aortography. Repair is indicated for symptomatic or ruptured aortic aneurysms and for asymptomatic aneurysms over 5 cm in diameter. Early diagnosis and referral for repair is essential for optimum treatment of this common condition. PMID:7004617

  16. Congenital left ventricular aneurysm diagnosed by spiral CT angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Beregi, J.P.; Coulette, J.M.; Ducloux, G.

    1996-05-01

    We report a rare case of congenital left ventricular aneurysm, diagnosed by spiral CT angiography. Despite 1 s time acquisition, spiral CT, with adequate acquisition parameters and bolus injection of contrast medium, produced sufficiently good images to permit visualization of the aneurysm. Subsequently, reconstructions (shaded surface display and multiplanar reformation) were performed to demonstrate the relationship of the aneurysm with the remainder of the left ventricle, the wide neck of the aneurysm, and the absence of contractility, therein permitting differentiation from a congenital diverticulum. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a HIV-positive Patient

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Márcio Luís; Binotto, Ívia; Behar, Paulo; Erling Jr., Nilon; Lichtenfels, Eduardo; Aerts, Newton

    2017-01-01

    Advent of antiretroviral therapy has increased survival of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, with the result that some of these patients now develop degenerative diseases, such as atherosclerotic aneurysms. Degenerative thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm is rare in HIV patients. In this report, a 63-year-old male patient with HIV submitted to open repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm. The patient did not suffer any type of complication in the perioperative period and remained well in a 28-month follow-up period. In summary, open repair still remains a good alternative for aortic complex aneurysms even in HIV patients.

  18. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-03-03

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes.

  19. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-02-29

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes.

  20. Superior mesenteric aneurysm and arteriovenous fistula: angiographic and CT features

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, M.; Chuang, V.P.; Stewart, M.T.

    1985-08-01

    Of all splanchnic artery aneurysms, the superior mesenteric aneurysm is the least common type, and most of the reported cases are in the surgical literature. Reports of radiographic findings of superior mesenteric aneurysms and their complications are scarce. The authors present the first case of spontaneous rupture of an atherosclerotic aneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) with resultant arteriovenous fistula (AVF). Not only are the angiographic features diagnostic, but the CT scan also shows an interesting and suggestive finding that will be useful for the future diagnosis of similar cases.

  1. A New Murine Model of Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rouer, Martin; Meilhac, Olivier; Delbosc, Sandrine; Louedec, Liliane; Pavon-Djavid, Graciela; Cross, Jane; Legagneux, Josette; Bouilliant-Linet, Maxime; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Alsac, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm exclusion is a validated technique to prevent aneurysm rupture. Long-term results highlight technique limitations and new aspects of Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) pathophysiology. There is no abdominal aortic aneurysm endograft exclusion model cheap and reproducible, which would allow deep investigations of AAA before and after treatment. We hereby describe how to induce, and then to exclude with a covered coronary stentgraft an abdominal aortic aneurysm in a rat. The well known elastase induced AAA model was first reported in 19901 in a rat, then described in mice2. Elastin degradation leads to dilation of the aorta with inflammatory infiltration of the abdominal wall and intra luminal thrombus, matching with human AAA. Endovascular exclusion with small covered stentgraft is then performed, excluding any interactions between circulating blood and the aneurysm thrombus. Appropriate exclusion and stentgraft patency is confirmed before euthanasia by an angiography thought the left carotid artery. Partial control of elastase diffusion makes aneurysm shape different for each animal. It is difficult to create an aneurysm, which will allow an appropriate length of aorta below the aneurysm for an easy stentgraft introduction, and with adequate proximal and distal neck to prevent endoleaks. Lots of failure can result to stentgraft introduction which sometimes lead to aorta tear with pain and troubles to stitch it, and endothelial damage with post op aorta thrombosis. Giving aspirin to rats before stentgraft implantation decreases failure rate without major hemorrhage. Clamping time activates neutrophils, endothelium and platelets, and may interfere with biological analysis. PMID:23851958

  2. Sac Angiography and Glue Embolization in Emergency Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Yuya Nishimura, Jun-ichi Hase, Soichiro Yamasaki, Motoshige

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to demonstrate a sac angiography technique and evaluate the feasibility of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac in emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in hemodynamically unstable patients.MethodsA retrospective case series of three patients in whom sac angiography was performed during emergency EVAR for ruptured AAA was reviewed. After stent graft deployment, angiography within the sac of aneurysm (sac angiography) was performed by manually injecting 10 ml of contrast material through a catheter to identify the presence and site of active bleeding. In two patients, sac angiography revealed active extravasation of the contrast material, and NBCA embolization with a coaxial catheter system was performed to achieve prompt sealing.ResultsSac angiography was successful in all three patients. In the two patients who underwent NBCA embolization for aneurysm sac bleeding, follow-up computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated the accumulation of NBCA consistent with the bleeding site in preprocedural CT images.ConclusionsEVAR is associated with a potential risk of ongoing bleeding from type II or IV endoleaks into the disrupted aneurysm sac in patients with severe coagulopathy. Therefore, sac angiography and NBCA embolization during emergency EVAR may represent a possible technical improvement in the treatment of ruptured AAA in hemodynamically unstable patients.

  3. Multiple Pancreatoduodenal Artery Arcade Aneurysms Associated with Celiac Axis Root Segmental Stenosis Presenting as Aneurysm Rupture.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Francesco; Bruni, Antonio; Da Ros, Valerio; Chaves Brait, Cristina Margot; Scevola, Germano; Di Cintio, Vincenzo

    2015-11-01

    A 57-year-old woman was admitted to our unit suffering from hemorrhagic shock and upper abdominal pain. An enhanced computerized tomography (CT) scan evidenced a large retroperitoneal hematoma due to visceral arteries aneurysm rupture and a significant celiac axis root segmental stenosis due to median arcuate ligament compression. A selective splanchnic arteries angiography showed 3 saccular pancreaticoduodenal artery arcade aneurysm (PDAAs), 2 in the inferior posterior pancreaticoduodenal artery, and 1 smaller in the superior anterior pancreaticoduodenal artery. The largest aneurysm showed evident rupture signs. Both inferior PDAAs were successfully treated via endovascular coil embolization. The celiac trunk stenosis and small inferior PDAA did not require treatment. A CT scan control at 1-year follow-up did not reveal any new PDAAs. In cases of celiac artery trunk (CAT) steno-occlusive lesions, multiple aneurysms can develop in the pancreaticoduodenal arcade. PDAAs should be treated because of high rupture risk, regardless of diameter. Although endovascular treatment via coil embolization represents the treatment of choice nowadays, a simultaneous treatment of the associated CAT lesions is still debated. However, in cases of aneurysm embolization alone, one cannot exclude that other PDAAs might develop in these patients in the future. Close monitoring and accurate long-term follow-up is highly recommended in these cases.

  4. [An inflammatory aortic aneurysm ruptured into the retroperitoneum and an extensive communication of the aneurysm with the vena cava inferior].

    PubMed

    Tovar Martín, E; Acea Nebril, B; Díaz Pardeiro, P

    1993-01-01

    Aortocaval fistula is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysms that occurs with a frequency of 1% of operative cases or less. In this report we present a case of aortocaval fistula associated with ruptured and inflammatory aortic aneurysm that became apparent after evacuation of the thrombus. The inferior cava was ligated. We discuss the clinical syndrome and the management of patients with aortocaval fistula secondary to an abdominal aortic aneurysm and the results of surgical repair.

  5. The association of simple renal cysts with abdominal aortic aneurysms and their impact on renal function after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Spanos, Konstantinos; Rountas, Christos; Saleptsis, Vasileios; Athanasoulas, Athanasios; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Giannoukas, Athanasios D

    2016-04-01

    We validated the association of simple renal cysts with abdominal aortic aneurysm and other cardiovascular factors and assessed simple renal cysts' impact on renal function before and after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data was conducted. Computed tomography angiograms of 100 consecutive male patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm who underwent endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (Group 1) were reviewed and compared with 100 computed tomography angiogram of aged-matched male patients without abdominal aortic aneurysm (Group 2). Patients' demographic data, risk factors, abdominal aortic aneurysm diameter, the presence of simple renal cyst and laboratory tests were recorded. No difference was observed between the two groups in respect to other cardiovascular risk factors except hyperlipidemia with higher prevalence in Group 1 (p < 0.05). Presence of simple renal cysts was independently associated with age (p < 0.05) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (p = 0.0157). There was no correlation between simple renal cysts and abdominal aortic aneurysm size or pre-operative creatinine and urea levels. No difference was observed in post-operative creatinine and urea levels either immediately after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair or in 12-month follow-up. In male patients, the presence of simple renal cysts is associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm and is increasing with age. However, their presence is neither associated with impaired renal function pre-endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and post-endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair nor after 12-month follow-up.

  6. Progression of perianeurysmal inflammation after endovascular aneurysm repair for inflammatory abdominal aortic and bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Igari, Kimihiro; Kudo, Toshifumi; Uchiyama, Hidetoshi; Toyofuku, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2015-02-01

    The use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) to treat inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAAs) has been reported, and this procedure appears to be preferable to open surgical repair because of intraoperative difficulties related to inflammation. We herein report a case of IAAA and bilateral inflammatory common iliac artery aneurysms that was successfully treated with bifurcated stent grafting. The perianeurysmal inflammation worsened postoperatively, requiring the placement of a ureteric stent. EVAR is feasible in cases of inflammatory aneurysms; however, the potential for an inflammatory response should be taken into account when considering the application of EVAR in patients with IAAA.

  7. Ultrasound Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness of ultrasound screening for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Clinical Need Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a localized abnormal dilatation of the aorta greater than 3 cm. In community surveys, the prevalence of AAA is reported to be between 2% and 5.4%. Abdominal aortic aneurysms are found in 4% to 8% of older men and in 0.5% to 1.5% of women aged 65 years and older. Abdominal aortic aneurysms are largely asymptomatic. If left untreated, the continuing extension and thinning of the vessel wall may eventually result in rupture of the AAA. Often rupture may occur without warning, causing acute pain. Rupture is always life threatening and requires emergency surgical repair of the ruptured aorta. The risk of death from ruptured AAA is 80% to 90%. Over one-half of all deaths attributed to a ruptured aneurysm take place before the patient reaches hospital. In comparison, the rate of death in people undergoing elective surgery is 5% to 7%; however, symptoms of AAA rarely occur before rupture. Given that ultrasound can reliably visualize the aorta in 99% of the population, and its sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing AAA approaches 100%, screening for aneurysms is worth considering as it may reduce the incidence of ruptured aneurysms and hence reduce unnecessary deaths caused by AAA-attributable mortality. Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat used its standard search strategy to retrieve international health technology assessments and English-language journal articles from selected databases to determine the effectiveness of ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Case reports, letters, editorials, nonsystematic reviews, non-human studies, and comments were excluded. Questions asked: Is population-based AAA screening effective in improving health outcomes in asymptomatic populations? Is AAA screening acceptable to the population? Does this affect the

  8. Type I Chiari malformation presenting central sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Takuro; Miyazaki, Soichiro; Kadotani, Hiroshi; Kanemura, Takashi; Okawa, Masako; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Komada, Ichiro; Hatano, Taketo; Suzuki, Hideaki

    2014-04-01

    Sleep apnea is a rare but a well-known clinical feature of type I Chiari malformation. It may be obstructive or central in nature. Sleep apnea in patients with type I Chiari malformation rarely presents without accompanying neurological signs or symptoms. We here report a case of a 10-year-old girl who presented with central sleep apnea without any other neurological signs but was ultimately diagnosed with type I Chiari malformation. The patient initially showed mild improvement in symptoms after administration of an acetazolamide. Finally, posterior fossa decompression dramatically improved her respiratory status during sleep, both clinically and on polysomnography. This case suggests that type I Chiari malformation should be considered in the differential diagnoses of central apneas in children, even if there are no other neurological signs and symptoms. Furthermore, sagittal craniocervical magnetic resonance imaging may be necessary for a definitive diagnosis.

  9. Dural arteriovenous malformation: a rare cause of epilepsy in childhood.

    PubMed

    Caksen, H; Unal, O; Tombul, T; Cesur, Y; Abuhandan, M

    2001-09-01

    A 3 year and 6 month old girl with epilepsy associated with dural arteriovenous malformation (DAVM), diagnosed on the MRI, is presented to emphasise the importance of DAVM in the aetiology of childhood epilepsy.

  10. [Cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung. Importance of prenatal diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Beatriz; Oñoro, Gonzalo; Cantarín Extremera, Verónica; Sanz Santiago, Verónica; Sequeiros, Adolfo

    2011-04-01

    Cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung is a rare malformation of the lung airway which often performed diagnosed in the prenatal period by ultrasound. Ultrasound monitoring should be performed during pregnancy to assess lung development. We report the case of a 4-year-old patient with prenatal diagnosis of cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung, not confirmed by chest radiograph at birth. The patient underwent surgery at 4 years of age after diagnosis was made for presenting recurrent pneumonia. A normal chest radiograph at birth does not exclude this malformation and a computerized tomography at 4 weeks of birth must be done to confirm or rule out this anomaly. Once the diagnosis is made, surgical treatment should be prompted to avoid complications.

  11. Glioma coexisting with angiographically occult cerebrovascular malformation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junhui; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Chunlei; He, Jianqing; Li, Peipei; Zhou, Jingxu; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Yuhai

    2016-01-01

    Angiographically occult cerebrovascular malformation (AOVM) is a type of complex cerebrovascular malformation that is not visible on digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Vascular malformation coexisting with glioma is clinically rare, and glioma coexisting with AOVM is even more rare. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to report glioma coexisting with AOVM in the literature. The present study reports a rare case of glioma coexisting with AOVM in a 30-year-old male patient. Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed calcification, hemorrhage and edema in the right frontal lobe. CT angiography revealed a vascular malformation in the right frontal lobe, which was not observed on DSA. Finally, glioma coexisting with AOVM was confirmed by 2.0T magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative pathological examination. The present patient had a positive outcome and no neurological dysfunctions during the 6-month follow-up subsequent to surgery. PMID:27698825

  12. Chiari-I malformation in two fighter pilots.

    PubMed

    Akin, Ahmet; Canakci, Zafer; Sen, Ahmet; Tore, Hasan F

    2003-07-01

    This report describes two cases of Chiari Malformation Type I (Chiari-I) in fighter pilots of the Turkish Air Force. Chiari-I is a congenital malformation characterized by herniation of cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum. Patients have symptoms and signs related to dysfunction of the brainstem, spinal cord, and cerebellum. They generally are symptomatic in the earlier years of life. However, asymptomatic cases can eventually become symptomatic in later years. Symptoms can be provoked by increasing intracranial pressure (Valsalva or straining). We report on two pilots with Chiari-I malformation who had no symptoms or signs in their daily activities. Furthermore, these pilots had successfully completed physiological training, including centrifuge training, without any symptoms. However, they suffered from headache, neck spasms, and/or disequilibrium under +Gz during flight training sorties. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, possibility of acquired cases, and aeromedical disposition of Chiari malformations are discussed.

  13. Optic chiasmal cavernous angioma: A rare suprasellar vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Al-Shaar, Hussam; Bahatheq, Ayman; Takroni, Radwan; Al-Thubaiti, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Suprasellar cavernous malformation in the optic pathway is not commonly encountered. To date, there are only few reports present in the literature. Case Description: The authors report a rare case of suprasellar optic pathway cavernous malformation in a 33-year-old female who presented with progressive visual loss. Her imaging revealed a large heterogeneous, hyperintense, hemorrhagic right suprasellar extra-axial complex cystic structure, causing mass effect on the adjacent hypothalamus and third ventricle displacing these structures. Gross total resection of the lesion was achieved utilizing a right frontal craniotomy approach. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of suprasellar chiasmal cavernous malformation. Conclusion: Although visual pathway cavernous malformation is a rare event, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of lesions occurring suprasellarly in the visual pathway and hypothalamus. PMID:27583178

  14. Prolonged expiratory apnoea with cyanosis in Arnold Chiari II malformation

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Nahin

    2017-01-01

    Apnoea associated with Arnold Chiari malformation is a known entity and can be obstructive or central. Differentiating between two types is vital to deciding management pathway and prognosticating disease process. PMID:28321315

  15. Variants in CUL4B are Associated with Cerebral Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Haas, Stefan A.; Hu, Hao; Bienek, Melanie; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Gilissen, Christian; Tzschach, Andreas; Busche, Andreas; Müsebeck, Jörg; Rump, Patrick; Mathijssen, Inge B.; Avela, Kristiina; Somer, Mirja; Doagu, Fatma; Philips, Anju K.; Rauch, Anita; Baumer, Alessandra; Voesenek, Krysta; Poirier, Karine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Amram, Daniel; Odent, Sylvie; Nawara, Magdalena; Obersztyn, Ewa; Lenart, Jacek; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Lebrun, Nicolas; Fischer, Ute; Nillesen, Willy M.; Yntema, Helger G.; Järvelä, Irma; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Brunner, Han G.; van Bokhoven, Hans; Raymond, F. Lucy; Willemsen, Michèl A.A.P.; Chelly, Jamel; Xiong, Yue; Barkovich, A. James; Kalscheuer, Vera M.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; de Brouwer, Arjan P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Variants in cullin 4B (CUL4B) are a known cause of syndromic X-linked intellectual disability. Here, we describe an additional 25 patients from 11 families with variants in CUL4B. We identified nine different novel variants in these families and confirmed the pathogenicity of all nontruncating variants. Neuroimaging data, available for 15 patients, showed the presence of cerebral malformations in ten patients. The cerebral anomalies comprised malformations of cortical development (MCD), ventriculomegaly, and diminished white matter volume. The phenotypic heterogeneity of the cerebral malformations might result from the involvement of CUL-4B in various cellular pathways essential for normal brain development. Accordingly, we show that CUL-4B interacts with WDR62, a protein in which variants were previously identified in patients with microcephaly and a wide range of MCD. This interaction might contribute to the development of cerebral malformations in patients with variants in CUL4B. PMID:25385192

  16. Variants in CUL4B are associated with cerebral malformations.

    PubMed

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Haas, Stefan A; Hu, Hao; Bienek, Melanie; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Gilissen, Christian; Tzschach, Andreas; Busche, Andreas; Müsebeck, Jörg; Rump, Patrick; Mathijssen, Inge B; Avela, Kristiina; Somer, Mirja; Doagu, Fatma; Philips, Anju K; Rauch, Anita; Baumer, Alessandra; Voesenek, Krysta; Poirier, Karine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Amram, Daniel; Odent, Sylvie; Nawara, Magdalena; Obersztyn, Ewa; Lenart, Jacek; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Lebrun, Nicolas; Fischer, Ute; Nillesen, Willy M; Yntema, Helger G; Järvelä, Irma; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; de Vries, Bert B A; Brunner, Han G; van Bokhoven, Hans; Raymond, F Lucy; Willemsen, Michèl A A P; Chelly, Jamel; Xiong, Yue; Barkovich, A James; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Kleefstra, Tjitske; de Brouwer, Arjan P M

    2015-01-01

    Variants in cullin 4B (CUL4B) are a known cause of syndromic X-linked intellectual disability. Here, we describe an additional 25 patients from 11 families with variants in CUL4B. We identified nine different novel variants in these families and confirmed the pathogenicity of all nontruncating variants. Neuroimaging data, available for 15 patients, showed the presence of cerebral malformations in ten patients. The cerebral anomalies comprised malformations of cortical development (MCD), ventriculomegaly, and diminished white matter volume. The phenotypic heterogeneity of the cerebral malformations might result from the involvement of CUL-4B in various cellular pathways essential for normal brain development. Accordingly, we show that CUL-4B interacts with WDR62, a protein in which variants were previously identified in patients with microcephaly and a wide range of MCD. This interaction might contribute to the development of cerebral malformations in patients with variants in CUL4B.

  17. Glomuvenous Malformation: A Rare Periorbital Lesion of the Thermoregulatory Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Whipple, Katherine M.; Godfrey, Kyle J; Solomon, James P.; Lin, Jonathan H.; Korn, Bobby S.; Kikkawa, Don O.

    2016-01-01

    Glomuvenous malformations (GVMs), previously referred to as glomus tumors or glomangiomas, are benign, mesenchymal venous malformations arising from glomus bodies. Glomus bodies are modified smooth muscle neuromyoarterial structures involved in temperature regulation via blood shunting. These classically occur in the digits but can occur in other locations. The authors present a case of a periorbital GVM presented following blunt trauma to the area. PMID:27065433

  18. Multiple medullary venous malformations decreasing cerebral blood flow: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tomura, N.; Inugami, A.; Uemura, K.; Hadeishi, H.; Yasui, N. )

    1991-02-01

    A rare case of multiple medullary venous malformations in the right cerebral hemisphere is reported. The literature review yielded only one case of multiple medullary venous malformations. Computed tomography scan showed multiple calcified lesions with linear contrast enhancement representing abnormal dilated vessels and mild atrophic change of the right cerebral hemisphere. Single-photon emission computed tomography using N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I) iodoamphetamine demonstrated decreased cerebral blood flow in the right cerebral hemisphere.

  19. Supernumerary nipples and renal malformations: a family study.

    PubMed

    Brown, Justin; Schwartz, Robert A

    2004-01-01

    We describe a family with supernumerary nipples and kidney and urinary tract malformations. The proband is a 59-year-old man with a supernumerary nipple and recently identified hypoplastic kidney, bladder diverticulum, and hypotonic bladder. His mother also has a supernumerary nipple and a recently identified hypoplastic kidney. Of his three children, all male, one has a supernumerary nipple but has not been evaluated for a kidney or urinary tract malformation. This familial disorder is discussed.

  20. Diffuse pulmonary arteriovenous malformation in a child with polysplenia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kapur, S; Rome, J; Chandra, R S

    1995-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) is usually seen as a well-circumscribed cystic mass. In this communication we describe a diffuse arteriovenous malformation in a 5-month-old infant. The lesion was seen only at the microscopic level and was associated with abdominal heterotaxy, atrial situs solitus, polysplenia, interrupted inferior vena cava, atrial septal defect, and atrioventricular canal. This uncommon association may be within the spectrum of polysplenia syndrome.

  1. Split cord malformation type I distal to segmental myelomeningocele

    PubMed Central

    Addas, Bassam M.

    2014-01-01

    The coexistence of myelomeningocele (MMC) and split cord malformation (SCM) is a well-known phenomenon. The SCM is usually above or at the level of the MMC. Split cord malformation distal to the MMC is considered to be the rarest form of such a combination. We report a case of SCM (type I) distal to the MMC diagnosed pre-operatively. Repair of the MMC and the SCM were carried out in the same setting. PMID:25551117

  2. Contemporary Themes: Congenital Malformations and the Problem of their Control*

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, C. R.

    1972-01-01

    The possibility of preventing or reducing the prevalence of human congenital malformations is discussed in the light of current knowledge about their aetiology. The original data presented are derived from an epidemiological study of all the infants (92,982) born in the three years 1964-6 to women resident in a defined area of South Wales and all the congenital malformations (3,242) discovered in those infants by the second anniversary of their birth. PMID:4262651

  3. Management of Giant Splenic Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Akbulut, Sami; Otan, Emrah

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To provide an overview of the medical literature on giant splenic artery aneurysm (SAA). The PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, and Google databases were searched using keywords to identify articles related to SAA. Keywords used were splenic artery aneurysm, giant splenic artery aneuryms, huge splenic artery aneurysm, splenic artery aneurysm rupture, and visceral artery aneurysm. SAAs with a diameter ≥5 cm are considered as giant and included in this study. The language of the publication was not a limitation criterion, and publications dated before January 15, 2015 were considered. The literature review included 69 papers (62 fulltext, 6 abstract, 1 nonavailable) on giant SAA. A sum of 78 patients (50 males, 28 females) involved in the study with an age range of 27–87 years (mean ± SD: 55.8 ± 14.0 years). Age range for male was 30–87 (mean ± SD: 57.5 ± 12.0 years) and for female was 27–84 (mean ± SD: 52.7 ± 16.6 years). Most frequent predisposing factors were acute or chronic pancreatitis, atherosclerosis, hypertension, and cirrhosis. Aneurysm dimensions were obtained for 77 patients with a range of 50–300 mm (mean ± SD: 97.1 ± 46.0 mm). Aneurysm dimension range for females was 50–210 mm (mean ± SD: 97.5 ± 40.2 mm) and for males was 50–300 mm (mean ± SD: 96.9 ± 48.9 mm). Intraperitoneal/retroperitoneal rupture was present in 15, among which with a lesion dimension range of 50–180 mm (mean ± SD; 100 ± 49.3 mm) which was range of 50–300 mm (mean ± SD: 96.3 ± 45.2 mm) in cases without rupture. Mortality for rupture patients was 33.3%. Other frequent complications were gastrosplenic fistula (n = 3), colosplenic fistula (n = 1), pancreatic fistula (n = 1), splenic arteriovenous fistula (n = 3), and portosplenic fistula (n = 1). Eight of the patients died in early postoperative period while 67 survived. Survival status of the

  4. Contralateral Intraparenchymal Hemorrhage Following Aneurysmal Clipping

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2008-01-01

    Post-clipping intraparenchymal hemorrhage of the contralateral hemisphere is a very unusual phenomenon in a patient with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, unless there is an underlying condition. We report a complicated case of 47-year-old man, who underwent uneventful clipping of ruptured aneurysm and experienced vasospasm two weeks later. Vasospasm was treated by intra-arterial nimodipine and systemic hyperdynamic therapy. One week thereafter, he became unconscious due to intraparenchymal hemorrhage on the anterior border-zone of contalateral hemisphere, but intraoperative and pathologic findings failed to disclose any vascular anomaly. We suggest that the anti-spastic regimens cause local hemodynamic redistribution through the vasodilatory effect and in turn, resulted in such an unexpected bleeding. PMID:19096626

  5. Acute Aortic Syndromes and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Oh, Jae K.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Eagle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic aortic diseases have been diagnosed and studied by physicians for centuries. Both the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases have been steadily improving over time, largely because of increased physician awareness and improvements in diagnostic modalities. This comprehensive review discusses the pathophysiology and risk factors, classification schemes, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, management options, and outcomes of various aortic conditions, including acute aortic dissection (and its variants intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcers) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Literature searches of the PubMed database were conducted using the following keywords: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, aortic ulcer, and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Retrospective and prospective studies performed within the past 20 years were included in the review; however, most data are from the past 15 years. PMID:19411444

  6. [Surgical correction of infrarenal abdominal aorta aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Khamitov, F F; Matochkin, E A; Vertkina, N V; Kizyma, A G; Lisitskiĭ, D A

    2008-01-01

    The authors compare various surgical strategies of infrarenal abdominal aorta aneurysm (IAAA) repair based on the experience of the Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Urban Clinical Hospital No.81. Total 198 patients underwent aneurysm resection and grafting through conventional (90) or minilaparotomy (108) approaches. Mini-approach was shown to improve significantly both perioperative course and outcomes of IAAA correction. The main advantage of this approach comprised limited invasiveness together with sufficient exposure of abdominal aorta and its branches. Abandoning small bowel evisceration helps to preserve ther-moregulation and achieve volemic homeostasis with less fluid volume. Postoperative period after surgical mini-approach was characterized by shorter period of mechanical ventilation and ICU stay, earlier restoration of bowel motility, conversion to usual nutrition, patient mobilization and discharge. Minimally invasive technology significantly broadens feasibility of radical aortic reconstructions for patients with serious cardio-vascular comorbidities.

  7. Understanding the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kuivaniemi, Helena; Ryer, Evan J.; Elmore, James R.; Tromp, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Summary An aortic aneurysm is a dilatation in which the aortic diameter is ≥ 3.0 cm. If left untreated, the aortic wall continues to weaken and becomes unable to withstand the forces of the luminal blood pressure resulting in progressive dilatation and rupture, a catastrophic event associated with a mortality of 50 – 80%. Smoking and positive family history are important risk factors for the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Several genetic risk factors have also been identified. On the histological level, visible hallmarks of AAA pathogenesis include inflammation, smooth muscle cell apoptosis, extracellular matrix degradation, and oxidative stress. We expect that large genetic, genomic, epigenetic, proteomic and metabolomic studies will be undertaken by international consortia to identify additional risk factors and biomarkers, and to enhance our understanding of the pathobiology of AAA. Collaboration between different research groups will be important in overcoming the challenges to develop pharmacological treatments for AAA. PMID:26308600

  8. Wall motion estimation in intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Oubel, E; Cebral, J R; De Craene, M; Blanc, R; Blasco, J; Macho, J; Putman, C M; Frangi, A F

    2010-09-01

    The quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms is becoming important owing to its potential connection to rupture, and as a way to incorporate the effects of vascular compliance in computational fluid dynamics simulations. Most of papers report values obtained with experimental phantoms, simulated images or animal models, but the information for real patients is limited. In this paper, we have combined non-rigid registration with signal processing techniques to measure pulsation in real patients from high frame rate digital subtraction angiography. We have obtained physiological meaningful waveforms with amplitudes in the range 0 mm-0.3 mm for a population of 18 patients including ruptured and unruptured aneurysms. Statistically significant differences in pulsation were found according to the rupture status, in agreement with differences in biomechanical properties reported in the literature.

  9. Aneurysm of the sinus of valsalva.

    PubMed

    Ott, David A

    2006-01-01

    Aneurysms of the sinus of Valsalva (ASVs) are rare. They can be congenital or acquired through infection, trauma, or degenerative diseases. They frequently co-occur with ventricular septal defects, aortic valve dysfunction, or other cardiac abnormalities. Although unruptured ASVs are usually asymptomatic, ruptured ASVs often cause symptoms similar to those of heart failure and produce a continuous, mechanical-sounding murmur. Transsternal or transesophageal echocardiography is usually effective in detecting ASVs. Because symptomatic ASVs pose significant risks for the patient, and because the repair of asymptomatic ASVs generally produces excellent outcomes, surgery is indicated in most cases. The primary goals of surgical repair are to close the ASV securely, remove or obliterate the aneurysmal sac, and repair any associated defects. Operative mortality is generally low except in patients with concomitant bacterial endocarditis or other infections. Late events are uncommon and tend to be related to aortic valve prothesis or Marfan syndrome.

  10. [Nursing care of endovascular aneurysm repair patients].

    PubMed

    Fan, Ya-Fen; Chien, Chen-Yen; Yang, Hui-Yuan; Tsai, Jung-Mei

    2014-04-01

    The treatment of aortic disease previously used conventional open surgery to replace the aorta with artificial vascular prosthesis after resecting the lesioned segment. The recently developed technique of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) uses a stent graft to reinforce the diseased aortic wall while allowing blood flow continuity and preventing further aortic expansion, dissection and aortic rupture. Taiwan's National Health Insurance now covers payment for authorized EVAR procedures, making treatments safer for patients who are elderly, have congestive heart failure, have multiple comorbidities, or have other high-risk factors. EVAR is gradually replacing previous methods to become the primary treatment approach for aortic disease. This article discusses the development of EVAR, indications, operative procedures, complications, postoperative risk factors, and clinical nursing problems. We hope that this article provides new information on nursing care for patients undergoing endovascular aneurysm repair surgery.

  11. Surgical Procedures for Renal Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yoshinori; Kudo, Toshifumi; Toyofuku, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the strategy and surgical procedures for treating a renal artery aneurysm (RAA). Patients and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the surgical strategy for 21 cases with RAA between 2001 and 2010 at this institution. Treatment was indicated for patients with an RAA larger than 2 cm and/or symptoms. Surgical treatment was the initial strategy, and coil embolization was indicated in the case of narrow-necked, saccular, extraparenchymal aneurysms. Results: Fifteen patients in 21 cases received an aneurysmectomy and renal artery reconstruction with an in-situ repair. One patient underwent an unplanned nephrectomy, and coil embolization was performed in 5 patients. Conclusion: In-situ repair was safe and minimally invasive. RAA, even in the second bifurcation, could be exposed by a subcostal incision, and the transperitoneal approach permitted the safe treatment of an RAA with acceptable results, in our simple preservation of renal function. PMID:23555504

  12. Rapid Virtual Stenting for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Danyang; Chen, Zihe; Wang, Xiangyu; Paliwal, Nikhil; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Corso, Jason J.; Xu, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    The rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms is the most severe form of stroke with high rates of mortality and disability. One of its primary treatments is to use stent or Flow Diverter to divert the blood flow away from the IA in a minimal invasive manner. To optimize such treatments, it is desirable to provide an automatic tool for virtual stenting before its actual implantation. In this paper, we propose a novel method, called ball-sweeping, for rapid virtual stenting. Our method sweeps a maximum inscribed sphere through the aneurysmal region of the vessel and directly generates a stent surface touching the vessel wall without needing to iteratively grow a deformable stent surface. Our resulting stent mesh has guaranteed smoothness and variable pore density to achieve an enhanced occlusion performance. Comparing to existing methods, our technique is computationally much more efficient. PMID:27346910

  13. [Giant vertebro-basilar aneurysm. Frontal syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rosa, A; Mizon, J P; Sevestre, H

    1991-01-01

    A 72-year-old man presented with an apparent frontal syndrome. He also had bilateral trigeminal neuralgia, a pyramidal syndrome of all 4 limbs, balance disturbances, a horizontal nystagmus when looking to the left and a right velopalatine paralysis. CT scan with contrast showed a hyperdense rounded lesion in the left cerebello-pontine angle. Cerebral angiography showed this to be a large aneurysm of the end of the vertebral arteries. The patient died suddenly. Autopsy confirmed the site and presence of the aneurysm. Balance disturbances, the pyramidal syndrome and velopalatine paralysis could all be explained by brain stem compression and the bilateral nature of the trigeminal neuralgia by compression of the trigemino-thalamic tract. The apparent frontal syndrome, the authors suggest could have resulted from subacute raised intracranial pressure.

  14. Rapid virtual stenting for intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Danyang; Chen, Zihe; Wang, Xiangyu; Paliwal, Nikhil; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Corso, Jason J.; Xu, Jinhui

    2016-03-01

    The rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms is the most severe form of stroke with high rates of mortality and disability. One of its primary treatments is to use stent or Flow Diverter to divert the blood flow away from the IA in a minimal invasive manner. To optimize such treatments, it is desirable to provide an automatic tool for virtual stenting before its actual implantation. In this paper, we propose a novel method, called ball-sweeping, for rapid virtual stenting. Our method sweeps a maximum inscribed sphere through the aneurysmal region of the vessel and directly generates a stent surface touching the vessel wall without needing to iteratively grow a deformable stent surface. Our resulting stent mesh has guaranteed smoothness and variable pore density to achieve an enhanced occlusion performance. Comparing to existing methods, our technique is computationally much more efficient.

  15. Aneurysm of the Left Atrial Appendage

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Solomon; Nayak, Vijaya M.

    2001-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman underwent excision of an aneurysm of the left atrial appendage, which had been causing cerebrovascular embolic episodes. We attribute the aneurysm to congenital dysplasia of the musculi pectinati in the left atrial appendage and of the bands of atrial muscle from which they arise. In Appendix I, we draw attention to the morphologically similar arrangements of inner and outer bands that emanate from a common transverse interatrial band and yield morphologically similar medial, descending, and ascending palm-leaf arrangements of musculi pectinati. In addition, we observe that the strap-like arrangements of musculi in both atria connect the outer band with the para-annular segment of the inner band. In Appendix II, we briefly review the literature concerning musculi pectinati and related bands. PMID:11453121

  16. Identification of Reference Genes for Quantitative RT-PCR in Ascending Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Dominic; Bandner-Risch, Doris; Perttunen, Hilja; Schmied, Wolfram; Porras, Carlos; Ceballos, Francisco; Rodriguez-Losada, Noela; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension and congenital aortic valve malformations are frequent causes of ascending aortic aneurysms. The molecular mechanisms of aneurysm formation under these circumstances are not well understood. Reference genes for gene activity studies in aortic tissue that are not influenced by aortic valve morphology and its hemodynamic consequences, aortic dilatation, hypertension, or antihypertensive medication are not available so far. This study determines genes in ascending aortic tissue that are independent of these parameters. Tissue specimens from dilated and undilated ascending aortas were obtained from 60 patients (age ≤70 years) with different morphologies of the aortic valve (tricuspid undilated n = 24, dilated n = 11; bicuspid undilated n = 6, dilated n = 15; unicuspid dilated n = 4). Of the studied individuals, 36 had hypertension, and 31 received ACE inhibitors or AT1 receptor antagonists. The specimens were obtained intraoperatively from the wall of the ascending aorta. We analyzed the expression levels of 32 candidate reference genes by quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Differential expression levels were assessed by parametric statistics. The expression analysis of these 32 genes by RT-qPCR showed that EIF2B1, ELF1, and PPIA remained constant in their expression levels in the different specimen groups, thus being insensitive to aortic valve morphology, aortic dilatation, hypertension, and medication with ACE inhibitors or AT1 receptor antagonists. Unlike many other commonly used reference genes, the genes EIF2B1, ELF1, and PPIA are neither confounded by aortic comorbidities nor by antihypertensive medication and therefore are most suitable for gene expression analysis of ascending aortic tissue. PMID:23326585

  17. Wall shear stress at the initiation site of cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Geers, A J; Morales, H G; Larrabide, I; Butakoff, C; Bijlenga, P; Frangi, A F

    2017-02-01

    Hemodynamics are believed to play an important role in the initiation of cerebral aneurysms. In particular, studies have focused on wall shear stress (WSS), which is a key regulator of vascular biology and pathology. In line with the observation that aneurysms predominantly occur at regions of high WSS, such as bifurcation apices or outer walls of vascular bends, correlations have been found between the aneurysm initiation site and high WSS. The aim of our study was to analyze the WSS field at an aneurysm initiation site that was neither a bifurcation apex nor the outer wall of a vascular bend. Ten cases with aneurysms on the A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery were analyzed and compared with ten controls. Aneurysms were virtually removed from the vascular models of the cases to mimic the pre-aneurysm geometry. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were created to assess the magnitude, gradient, multidirectionality, and pulsatility of the WSS. To aid the inter-subject comparison of hemodynamic variables, we mapped the branch surfaces onto a two-dimensional parametric space. This approach made it possible to view the whole branch at once for qualitative evaluation. It also allowed us to empirically define a patch for quantitative analysis, which was consistent among subjects and encapsulated the aneurysm initiation sites in our dataset. To test the sensitivity of our results, CFD simulations were repeated with a second independent observer virtually removing the aneurysms and with a 20 % higher flow rate at the inlet. We found that branches harboring aneurysms were characterized by high WSS and high WSS gradients. Among all assessed variables, the aneurysm initiation site most consistently coincided with peaks of temporal variation in the WSS magnitude.

  18. Limb malformations and abnormal sex hormone concentrations in frogs.

    PubMed Central

    Sower, S A; Reed, K L; Babbitt, K J

    2000-01-01

    Declines in amphibian populations, and amphibians with gross malformations, have prompted concern regarding the biological status of many anuran species. A survey of bullfrogs, Rana catesbeiana, and green frogs, Rana clamitans, conducted in central and southern New Hampshire showed malformed frogs at 81% of the sites sampled (13 of 16 sites). Brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and the synthesis of androgens and estradiol, hormones essential to reproductive processes, were measured from limb-malformed and normal (no limb malformation) frogs. Normal frogs had significantly higher concentrations (nearly 3-fold) of in vitro produced androgens and of brain GnRH than malformed frogs. Because most malformations are thought to occur during development, we propose that environmental factors or endocrine-disrupting chemicals that may cause developmental abnormalities also act during early development to ultimately cause abnormally reduced GnRH and androgen production in adult frogs. The consequences of reduced GnRH and androgens on anuran reproductive behavior and population dynamics are unknown but certainly may be profound and warrant further research. PMID:11102301

  19. Parallel multiscale simulations of a brain aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Leopold; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-07-01

    Cardiovascular pathologies, such as a brain aneurysm, are affected by the global blood circulation as well as by the local microrheology. Hence, developing computational models for such cases requires the coupling of disparate spatial and temporal scales often governed by diverse mathematical descriptions, e.g., by partial differential equations (continuum) and ordinary differential equations for discrete particles (atomistic). However, interfacing atomistic-based with continuum-based domain discretizations is a challenging problem that requires both mathematical and computational advances. We present here a hybrid methodology that enabled us to perform the first multiscale simulations of platelet depositions on the wall of a brain aneurysm. The large scale flow features in the intracranial network are accurately resolved by using the high-order spectral element Navier-Stokes solver NɛκTαr. The blood rheology inside the aneurysm is modeled using a coarse-grained stochastic molecular dynamics approach (the dissipative particle dynamics method) implemented in the parallel code LAMMPS. The continuum and atomistic domains overlap with interface conditions provided by effective forces computed adaptively to ensure continuity of states across the interface boundary. A two-way interaction is allowed with the time-evolving boundary of the (deposited) platelet clusters tracked by an immersed boundary method. The corresponding heterogeneous solvers (NɛκTαr and LAMMPS) are linked together by a computational multilevel message passing interface that facilitates modularity and high parallel efficiency. Results of multiscale simulations of clot formation inside the aneurysm in a patient-specific arterial tree are presented. We also discuss the computational challenges involved and present scalability results of our coupled solver on up to 300 K computer processors. Validation of such coupled atomistic-continuum models is a main open issue that has to be addressed in future

  20. Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm from Chronic Antiestrogen Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Rishi; Sainathan, Sandeep; Ziganshin, Bulat A; Elefteriades, John A

    2017-03-01

    Aortic aneurysms are a common but often undetected pathology prevalent in the population. They are often detected as incidental findings on imaging studies performed for unrelated pathologies. Estrogens have been shown to exert a protective influence on aortic tissue. Pharmacological agents blocking the actions of estrogens may thus be implicated in causing aortic pathologies. We present the case of an elderly woman with breast carcinoma treated for 18 years with antiestrogen therapy who subsequently developed acute thoracic aortic deterioration (enlargement and wall disruption).