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Sample records for gallium iodides

  1. Gallium

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    Discovered in 1875 through a study of its spectral properties, gallium was the first element to be uncovered following the publication of Mendeleev`s Periodic Table. French chemist, P.E. Lecoq de Boisbaudran, named his element discovery in honor of his native country; gallium is derived from the Latin word for France-{open_quotes}Gallia.{close_quotes}. This paper describes the properties, sources, and market for gallium.

  2. Gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    Liver gallium scan; Bony gallium scan ... You will get a radioactive material called gallium injected into your vein. The gallium travels through the bloodstream and collects in the bones and certain organs. Your health care provider will ...

  3. Potassium Iodide

    MedlinePlus

    Potassium iodide is used to protect the thyroid gland from taking in radioactive iodine that may be released during a nuclear radiation emergency. Radioactive iodine can damage the thyroid gland. You should only ...

  4. Methyl iodide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl iodide ; CASRN 74 - 88 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effe

  5. Methyl Iodide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl iodide (MeI, iodomethane, CH3I) was reported as a potential alternative to the stratospheric ozone-depleting fumigant methyl bromide (MeBr) in the mid-1990s (Sims et al., 1995; Ohr et al., 1996). It has since received significant research attention to determine its environmental fate and tran...

  6. Gallium complexes and solvent extraction of gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.P.; Graham, C.R.; Monzyk, B.F.

    1988-05-03

    This patent describes a process for recovering gallium from aqueous solutions containing gallium which comprises contacting such a solution with an organic solvent containing at least 2% by weight of a water-insoluble N-organo hydroxamic acid having at least about 8 carbon atoms to extract gallium, and separating the gallium loaded organic solvent phase from the aqueous phase.

  7. Gallium uptake in the thyroid gland in amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, M.C.; Dake, M.D.; Okerlund, M.D.

    1988-04-01

    Amiodarone is an iodinated antiarrhythmic agent that is effective in the treatment of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. A number of side effects are seen, including pulmonary toxicity and thyroid dysfunction. A patient with both amiodarone-induced pneumonitis and hyperthyroidism who exhibited abnormal gallium activity in the lungs, as well as diffuse gallium uptake in the thyroid gland is presented. The latter has not been previously reported and supports the concept of iodide-induced thyroiditis with gallium uptake reflecting the inflammatory response.

  8. Cesium iodide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Kim, H.E.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1992-12-15

    A transparent, strong CsI alloy is described having additions of monovalent iodides. Although the preferred iodide is AgI, RbI and CuI additions also contribute to an improved polycrystalline CsI alloy with outstanding multispectral infrared transmittance properties. 6 figs.

  9. Gallium nitride optoelectronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, T. L.; Chu, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    The growth of bulk gallium nitride crystals was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride. Gallium nitride single crystals up to 2.5 x 0.5 cm in size were produced. The crystals are suitable as substrates for the epitaxial growth of gallium nitride. The epitaxial growth of gallium nitride on sapphire substrates with main faces of (0001) and (1T02) orientations was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride in a gas flow system. The grown layers had electron concentrations in the range of 1 to 3 x 10 to the 19th power/cu cm and Hall mobilities in the range of 50 to 100 sq cm/v/sec at room temperature.

  10. Investigations in gallium removal

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, C.V.; Pitt, W.W.; Beard, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    Gallium present in weapons plutonium must be removed before it can be used for the production of mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear reactor fuel. The main goal of the preliminary studies conducted at Texas A and M University was to assist in the development of a thermal process to remove gallium from a gallium oxide/plutonium oxide matrix. This effort is being conducted in close consultation with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) personnel involved in the development of this process for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Simple experiments were performed on gallium oxide, and cerium-oxide/gallium-oxide mixtures, heated to temperatures ranging from 700--900 C in a reducing environment, and a method for collecting the gallium vapors under these conditions was demonstrated.

  11. Gallium nitrate revisited.

    PubMed

    Chitambar, Christopher R

    2003-04-01

    Gallium nitrate, the nitrate salt of the "near-metal" element gallium, is highly effective in the treatment of cancer-related hypercalcemia. Unlike bisphosphonates, gallium nitrate is effective in both parathyroid hormone-related protein-mediated and non-parathyroid hormone-related protein-mediated hypercalcemia. Gallium nitrate's effects on bone are clearly different from those of bisphosphonates. Gallium nitrate enhances calcium and phosphate content of bone and has direct, noncytotoxic effects on osteoclasts at markedly lower doses than those used for the treatment of cancer-related hypercalcemia. The drug may have clinical application in a variety of disorders associated with accelerated bone loss, including multiple myeloma. Gallium nitrate was originally evaluated as an antitumor agent. Its antitumor activity occurs at somewhat higher doses than those used in the treatment of cancer-related hypercalcemia. Gallium nitrate has substantial single-agent activity in the treatment of advanced lymphoma, particularly diffuse large cell lymphoma, small lymphocytic lymphoma, and follicular lymphoma. Because of its profile, including a different mechanism of action and minimal myelosuppression, the drug merits further evaluation in the treatment of advanced lymphoma. Gallium nitrate also has activity in advanced bladder cancer and may be useful in patients with metastatic or unresectable disease failing first-line chemotherapy regimens. Gallium nitrate exhibits a range of dose-dependent pharmacologic actions that provide a basis for its therapeutic potential in a variety of diseases and warrants further investigational evaluation as an antiresorptive and antitumor agent. PMID:12776253

  12. (Gallium arsenide solar cells)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    A transient liquid phase epitaxial growth system is described, including the growth procedure. Also discussed are the antireflection coating of a gallium arsenide solar cell, the metal contact pattern, and current-voltage characteristics. (LEW)

  13. Lung gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation in the lungs, most often due to sarcoidosis or a certain type of pneumonia. Normal Results ... up very little gallium. What Abnormal Results Mean Sarcoidosis Other respiratory infections, most often pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia ...

  14. Properties of gallium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Properties of Gallium Arsenide' is a handbook of evaluated numeric data and reviewed knowledge distilled by those working at the frontiers of gallium arsenide research. In addition to providing numeric data on basic physical, electronic and optical properties, the book covers many device-related aspects of gallium arsenide. Carrier attributes (ionisation coefficients, concentration, mobility, diffusion etc), deep levels and defects are surveyed and related to the various growth techniques such as MBE, VPE, and MOCVD. Sections on surface structure, oxidation, interfaces and etching are of particular relevance to integrated circuit research. Especially important in the race to achieve commercially usable samples is a state-of-the-art survey on the infra-red imaging of defects in semi-insulating gallium arsenide produced by the liquid-encapsulated Czochralski process.

  15. Preventing Supercooling Of Gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massucco, Arthur A.; Wenghoefer, Hans M.; Wilkins, Ronnie

    1994-01-01

    Principle of heterogeneous nucleation exploited to prevent gallium from supercooling, enabling its use as heat-storage material that crystallizes reproducibly at its freezing or melting temperature of 29 to 30 degrees C. In original intended application, gallium used as heat-storage material in gloves of space suits. Terrestrial application lies in preparation of freezing-temperature reference samples for laboratories. Principle of heterogeneous nucleation also exploited similarly in heat pipes filled with sodium.

  16. Hydrogen iodide decomposition

    DOEpatents

    O'Keefe, Dennis R.; Norman, John H.

    1983-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen iodide is decomposed to form hydrogen and iodine in the presence of water using a soluble catalyst. Decomposition is carried out at a temperature between about 350.degree. K. and about 525.degree. K. and at a corresponding pressure between about 25 and about 300 atmospheres in the presence of an aqueous solution which acts as a carrier for the homogeneous catalyst. Various halides of the platinum group metals, particularly Pd, Rh and Pt, are used, particularly the chlorides and iodides which exhibit good solubility. After separation of the H.sub.2, the stream from the decomposer is countercurrently extracted with nearly dry HI to remove I.sub.2. The wet phase contains most of the catalyst and is recycled directly to the decomposition step. The catalyst in the remaining almost dry HI-I.sub.2 phase is then extracted into a wet phase which is also recycled. The catalyst-free HI-I.sub.2 phase is finally distilled to separate the HI and I.sub.2. The HI is recycled to the reactor; the I.sub.2 is returned to a reactor operating in accordance with the Bunsen equation to create more HI.

  17. Frequently Asked Questions on Potassium Iodide (KI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... needs to take potassium iodide (KI) after a nuclear radiation release? What potassium iodide (KI) products are currently ... needs to take potassium iodide (KI) after a nuclear radiation release? The FDA guidance prioritizes groups based on ...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1265 - Cuprous iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1265 Cuprous iodide. (a) Cuprous iodide (copper (I) iodide, CuI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-65-4) is a pure white crystalline powder. It is prepared by the reaction of copper...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1265 - Cuprous iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1265 Cuprous iodide. (a) Cuprous iodide (copper (I) iodide, CuI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-65-4) is a pure white crystalline powder. It is prepared by the reaction of copper...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1265 - Cuprous iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1265 Cuprous iodide. (a) Cuprous iodide (copper (I) iodide, CuI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-65-4) is a pure white crystalline powder. It is prepared by the reaction of copper...

  1. Electrodeposition of gallium for photovoltaics

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.

    2016-08-09

    An electroplating solution and method for producing an electroplating solution containing a gallium salt, an ionic compound and a solvent that results in a gallium thin film that can be deposited on a substrate.

  2. Excited State Electronic Properties of Sodium Iodide and Cesium Iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Luke W.; Gao, Fei

    2013-05-01

    We compute from first principles the dielectric function, loss function, lifetime and scattering rate of quasiparticles due to electronic losses, and secondary particle spectrum due to plasmon decay in two scintillating alkali halides, sodium iodide and cesium iodide. Particular emphasis is placed on quasiparticles within several multiples of the band gap from the band edges. A theory for the decay spectra of plasmons and other electronic excitations in crystals is presented. Applications to Monte Carlo radiation transport codes are discussed.

  3. Iodide transport and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Poole, Vikki L; McCabe, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the leading cause of cancer death in women, with incidence rates that continue to rise. The heterogeneity of the disease makes breast cancer exceptionally difficult to treat, particularly for those patients with triple-negative disease. To address the therapeutic complexity of these tumours, new strategies for diagnosis and treatment are urgently required. The ability of lactating and malignant breast cells to uptake and transport iodide has led to the hypothesis that radioiodide therapy could be a potentially viable treatment for many breast cancer patients. Understanding how iodide is transported, and the factors regulating the expression and function of the proteins responsible for iodide transport, is critical for translating this hypothesis into reality. This review covers the three known iodide transporters - the sodium iodide symporter, pendrin and the sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporter - and their role in iodide transport in breast cells, along with efforts to manipulate them to increase the potential for radioiodide therapy as a treatment for breast cancer.

  4. Gallium-containing anticancer compounds.

    PubMed

    Chitambar, Christopher R

    2012-06-01

    There is an ever pressing need to develop new drugs for the treatment of cancer. Gallium nitrate, a group IIIa metal salt, inhibits the proliferation of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo and has shown activity against non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and bladder cancer in clinical trials. Gallium can function as an iron mimetic and perturb iron-dependent proliferation and other iron-related processes in tumor cells. Gallium nitrate lacks crossresistance with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs and is not myelosuppressive; it can be used when other drugs have failed or when the blood count is low. Given the therapeutic potential of gallium, newer generations of gallium compounds are now in various phases of preclinical and clinical development. These compounds hold the promise of greater anti-tumor activity against a broader spectrum of cancers. The development of gallium compounds for cancer treatment and their mechanisms of action will be discussed.

  5. Gallium interactions with Zircaloy

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, A.L.; West, M.K.

    1999-01-01

    This study focuses on the effects of gallium ion implantation into zircaloy cladding material to investigate the effects that gallium may have in a reactor. High fluence ion implantation of Ga ions was conducted on heated Zircaloy-4 in the range of 10{sup 16}--10{sup 18} Ga ions/cm2. Surface effects were studied using SEM and electron microprobe analysis. The depth profile of Ga in the Zircaloy was characterized with Rutherford backscattering and SIMS techniques. Results indicate that the Zirc-4 is little affected up to a fluence of 10{sup 17} Ga ions/cm{sup 2}. After implantation of 10{sup 18} Ga ions/cm{sup 2}, sub-grain features on the order of 2 {micro}m were observed which may be due to intermetallic compound formation between Ga and Zr. For the highest fluence implant, Ga content in the Zirc-4 reached a saturation value of between 30 and 40 atomic %; significant enhanced diffusion was observed but gallium was not seen to concentrate at grain boundaries.

  6. IODIDE DEFICIENCY, THYROID HORMONES, AND NEURODEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Iodide is an essential nutrient for thyroid hormone synthesis. Severe iodide insufficiency during early development is associated with cognitive deficits. Environmental contaminants can perturb the thyroid axis and this perturbation may be more acute under conditio...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 184.1634 Section 184.1634 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1634 Potassium iodide. (a) Potassium iodide (KI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-11-0) is the potassium salt of hydriodic acid. It occurs naturally in sea water and in...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 184.1634 Section 184.1634 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1634 Potassium iodide. (a) Potassium iodide (KI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-11-0) is the potassium salt of hydriodic acid. It occurs naturally in sea water and in...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 184.1634 Section 184.1634 Food... GRAS § 184.1634 Potassium iodide. (a) Potassium iodide (KI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-11-0) is the potassium... reacting hydriodic acid (HI) with potassium bicarbonate (KHCO3). (b) The ingredient meets...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 582.5634 Section 582.5634 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5634 Potassium iodide. (a) Product. Potassium iodide. (b) Tolerance. 0.01 percent....

  11. 21 CFR 184.1634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 184.1634 Section 184.1634 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1634 Potassium iodide. (a) Potassium iodide (KI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-11-0) is the potassium salt of hydriodic acid. It occurs naturally in sea water and in...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 582.5634 Section 582.5634 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5634 Potassium iodide. (a) Product. Potassium iodide. (b) Tolerance. 0.01 percent....

  13. 21 CFR 184.1634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium iodide. 184.1634 Section 184.1634 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1634 Potassium iodide. (a) Potassium iodide (KI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-11-0) is the potassium salt of hydriodic acid. It occurs naturally in sea water and in...

  14. 21 CFR 582.5634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 582.5634 Section 582.5634 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5634 Potassium iodide. (a) Product. Potassium iodide. (b) Tolerance. 0.01 percent....

  15. Oxidative dissolution of gallium arsenide and separation of gallium from arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.P.; Monzyk, B.F.

    1988-07-26

    The method of dissociating gallium arsenide into a gallium-containing component and an arsenic-containing component, is described which comprises contacting the gallium arsenide with an oxidizing agent and a liquid comprising hydroxamic acid to convert the gallium to a gallium-hydroxamic acid complex and to oxidize the arsenic to a positive valence state.

  16. Gallium--A smart metal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foley, Nora; Jaskula, Brian W.

    2013-01-01

    Gallium is a soft, silvery metallic element with an atomic number of 31 and the chemical symbol Ga. The French chemist Paul-Emile Lecoq de Boisbaudran discovered gallium in sphalerite (a zinc-sulfide mineral) in 1875 using spectroscopy. He named the element "gallia" after his native land of France (formerly Gaul; in Latin, Gallia). The existence of gallium had been predicted in 1871 by Dmitri Mendeleev, the Russian chemist who published the first periodic table of the elements. Mendeleev noted a gap in his table and named the missing element "eka-aluminum" because he determined that its location was one place away from aluminum in the table. Mendeleev thought that the missing element (gallium) would be very much like aluminum in its chemical properties, and he was right. Solid gallium has a low melting temperature (~29 degrees Celsius, or °C) and an unusually high boiling point (~2,204 °C). Because of these properties, the earliest uses of gallium were in high-temperature thermometers and in designing metal alloys that melt easily. The development of a gallium-based direct band-gap semiconductor in the 1960s led to what is now one of the most well-known applications for gallium-based products--the manufacture of smartphones and data-centric networks.

  17. Gallium nitride nanotube lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Hurtado, Antonio; Wright, Jeremy Benjamin; Xu, Huiwen; Luk, Ting Shan; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Brener, Igal; Brueck, Steven R. J.; Wang, George T.

    2015-01-01

    Lasing is demonstrated from gallium nitride nanotubes fabricated using a two-step top-down technique. By optically pumping, we observed characteristics of lasing: a clear threshold, a narrow spectral, and guided emission from the nanotubes. In addition, annular lasing emission from the GaN nanotube is also observed, indicating that cross-sectional shape control can be employed to manipulate the properties of nanolasers. The nanotube lasers could be of interest for optical nanofluidic applications or application benefitting from a hollow beam shape.

  18. Gallium Arsenide Domino Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Long; Long, Stephen I.

    1990-01-01

    Advantages include reduced power and high speed. Experimental gallium arsenide field-effect-transistor (FET) domino circuit replicated in large numbers for use in dynamic-logic systems. Name of circuit denotes mode of operation, which logic signals propagate from each stage to next when successive stages operated at slightly staggered clock cycles, in manner reminiscent of dominoes falling in a row. Building block of domino circuit includes input, inverter, and level-shifting substages. Combinational logic executed in input substage. During low half of clock cycle, result of logic operation transmitted to following stage.

  19. Gallium phosphide energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, P. E.; DiNetta, Louis C.; DuganCavanagh, K.; Goetz, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Betavoltaic power supplies based on gallium phosphide can supply long term low-level power with high reliability. Results are presented for GaP devices powered by Ni-63 and tritiarated phosphors. Leakage currents as low as 1.2 x 10(exp -17) A/cm(exp 2) have been measured and the temperature dependence of the reverse saturation current is found to have ideal behavior. A small demonstration system has been assembled that generates and stores enough electricity to light up an LED.

  20. Fundamental studies of the metallurgical, electrical, and optical properties of gallium phosphide and gallium phosphide alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Abstracts, bibliographic data, oral presentations, and published papers on (1) Diffusion of Sulfur in Gallium Phosphide and Gallium Arsenide, and (2) Properties of Gallium Phosphide Schottky Barrier Rectifiers for Use at High Temperature are presented.

  1. A convenient iodination method for alcohols using cesium iodide/methanesulfonic acid and its comparison using cesium iodide/p-toluenesulfonic acid or cesium iodide/aluminium chloride.

    PubMed

    Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Zia-Ullah; Perveen, Shahnaz; Hayat, Safdar; Ali, Muhammad; Voelter, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    In situ generation of hydrogen iodide from cesium iodide/methanesulfonic acid was found to be an attractive reagent combination for the conversion of alkyl, allyl, and benzyl alcohols to their corresponding iodides under mild conditions. The method is compared with that using cesium iodide/p-toluenesulfonic acid or cesium iodide/aluminium chloride.

  2. Electrodeposition of Epitaxial Lead Iodide and Conversion to Textured Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite.

    PubMed

    Hill, James C; Koza, Jakub A; Switzer, Jay A

    2015-12-01

    Applications for lead iodide, such as lasing, luminescence, radiation detection, and as a precursor for methylammonium lead iodide perovskite photovoltaic cells, require highly ordered crystalline thin films. Here, an electrochemical synthesis route is introduced that yields textured and epitaxial films of lead iodide at room temperature by reducing molecular iodine to iodide ions in the presence of lead ions. Lead iodide grows with a [0001] fiber texture on polycrystalline substrates such as fluorine-doped tin oxide. On single-crystal Au(100), Au(111), and Au(110) the out-of-plane orientation of lead iodide is also [0001], but the in-plane orientation is controlled by the single-crystal substrate. The epitaxial lead iodide on single-crystal gold is converted to textured methylammonium lead iodide perovskite with a preferred [110] orientation via methylammonium iodide vapor-assisted chemical transformation of the solid. PMID:26565593

  3. Electrospun Gallium Nitride Nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Melendez, Anamaris; Morales, Kristle; Ramos, Idalia; Campo, Eva; Santiago, Jorge J.

    2009-04-19

    The high thermal conductivity and wide bandgap of gallium nitride (GaN) are desirable characteristics in optoelectronics and sensing applications. In comparison to thin films and powders, in the nanofiber morphology the sensitivity of GaN is expected to increase as the exposed area (proportional to the length) increases. In this work we present electrospinning as a novel technique in the fabrication of GaN nanofibers. Electrospinning, invented in the 1930s, is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid technique to produce microscopically long ultrafine fibers. GaN nanofibers are produced using gallium nitrate and dimethyl-acetamide as precursors. After electrospinning, thermal decomposition under an inert atmosphere is used to pyrolyze the polymer. To complete the preparation, the nanofibers are sintered in a tube furnace under a NH{sub 3} flow. Both scanning electron microscopy and profilometry show that the process produces continuous and uniform fibers with diameters ranging from 20 to a few hundred nanometers, and lengths of up to a few centimeters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows the development of GaN nanofibers with hexagonal wurtzite structure. Future work includes additional characterization using transmission electron microscopy and XRD to understand the role of precursors and nitridation in nanofiber synthesis, and the use of single nanofibers for the construction of optical and gas sensing devices.

  4. Gallium interstitial contributions to diffusion in gallium arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schick, Joseph T.; Morgan, Caroline G.

    2011-09-01

    A new diffusion path is identified for gallium interstitials, which involves lower barriers than the barriers for previously identified diffusion paths [K. Levasseur-Smith and N. Mousseau, J. Appl. Phys. 103, 113502 (2008), P. A. Schultz and O. A. von Lilienfeld, Modelling and Simulation in Materials Science and Engineering 17, 084007 (2009)] for the charge states which dominate diffusion over most of the available range of Fermi energies. This path passes through the ⟨110⟩ gallium-gallium split interstitial configuration, and has a particularly low diffusion barrier of 0.35 eV for diffusion in the neutral charge state. As a part of this work, the character of the charge states for the gallium interstitials which are most important for diffusion is investigated, and it is shown that the last electron bound to the neutral interstitial occupies a shallow hydrogenic bound state composed of conduction band states for the hexagonal interstitial and both tetrahedral interstitials. How to properly account for the contributions of such interstitials is discussed for density-functional calculations with a k-point mesh not including the conduction band edge point. Diffusion barriers for gallium interstitials are calculated in all the charge states which can be important for a Fermi level anywhere in the gap, q = 0, +1, +2, and +3, for diffusion via the ⟨110⟩ gallium-gallium split interstitial configuration and via the hexagonal interstitial configuration. The lowest activation enthalpies over most of the available range of Fermi energies are found to correspond to diffusion in the neutral or singly positive state via the ⟨110⟩ gallium-gallium split interstitial configuration. It is shown that several different charge states and diffusion paths contribute significantly for Fermi levels within 0.2 eV above the valence band edge, which may help to explain some of the difficulties [H. Bracht and S. Brotzmann, Phys. Rev. B 71, 115216 (2005)] which have been

  5. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species.

  6. Gallium Safety in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2003-06-01

    A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002.

  7. Gallium Safety in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    2003-05-07

    A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002.

  8. The durability of iodide sodalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddrell, Ewan; Gandy, Amy; Stennett, Martin

    2014-06-01

    An iodide sodalite wasteform has been prepared by Hot Isostatic Pressing of powder produced by hydrothermal synthesis. The wasteform was free of leachable secondary phases which can mask leaching mechanisms. Leaching is by congruent dissolution and leach rates decrease as Si and Al accumulate in the leachate. Differential normalised leach rates are 0.005-0.01 g m-2 d-1 during the 7-14 day period. This indicates that sodalite dissolution in natural groundwater, already saturated in these elements, will be very low.

  9. Uptake of iodide in the marine haptophyte Isochrysis sp. (T.ISO) driven by iodide oxidation.

    PubMed

    van Bergeijk, Stef A; Hernández Javier, Laura; Heyland, Andreas; Manchado, Manuel; Pedro Cañavate, José

    2013-08-01

    Uptake of iodide was studied in the marine microalga Isochrysis sp. (isol. Haines, T.ISO) during short-term incubations with radioactive iodide ((125) I(-) ). Typical inhibitors of the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) did not inhibit iodide uptake, suggesting that iodide is not taken up through this transport protein, as is the case in most vertebrate animals. Oxidation of iodide was found to be an essential step for its uptake by T.ISO and it seemed likely that hypoiodous acid (HOI) was the form of iodine taken up. Uptake of iodide was inhibited by the addition of thiourea and of other reducing agents, like L-ascorbic acid, L-glutathione and L-cysteine and increased after the addition of oxidized forms of the transition metals Fe and Mn. The simultaneous addition of both hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) and a known iodide-oxidizing myeloperoxidase (MPO) significantly increased iodine uptake, but the addition of H2 O2 or MPO separately, had no effect on uptake. This confirms the observation that iodide is oxidized prior to uptake, but it puts into doubt the involvement of H2 O2 excretion and membrane-bound or extracellular haloperoxidase activity of T.ISO. The increase of iodide uptake by T.ISO upon Fe(III) addition suggests the nonenzymatic oxidation of iodide by Fe(III) in a redox reaction and subsequent influx of HOI. This is the first report on the mechanism of iodide uptake in a marine microalga.

  10. Refractive Index of Sodium Iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Kolopus, James A; Ramey, Lucas A; Singh, David J

    2012-01-01

    The refractive index of sodium iodide, an important scintillator material that is widely used for radiation detection, is based on a single measurement made by Spangenberg at one wavelength using the index-matching liquid immersion method (Z. Kristallogr., 57, 494-534 (1923)). In the present paper, we present new results for the refractive index of sodium iodide as measured by the minimum deviation technique at six wavelengths between 436 nm (n=1.839 0.002) and 633 nm (n=1.786 0.002). These 6 measurements can be fit to a Sellmeier model, resulting in a 2 of 1.02, indicating a good fit to the data. In addition, we report on ellipsometry measurements, which suggest that the near-surface region of the air sensitive NaI crystal seriously degrades, even in a moisture-free environment, resulting in a significantly lower value of the refractive index near the surface. First-principles theoretical calculations of the NaI refractive index that agree with the measured values within 0.025-0.045 are also presented and discussed.

  11. Neutron Detection with Mercuric Iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Z.A.

    2003-06-17

    Mercuric iodide is a high-density, high-Z semiconducting material useful for gamma ray detection. This makes it convertible to a thermal neutron detector by covering it with a boron rich material and detecting the 478 keV gamma rays resulting from the {sup 10}B(n, {alpha}){sup 7}Li* reaction. However, the 374 barn thermal capture cross section of {sup nat}Hg, makes the detector itself an attractive absorber, and this has been exploited previously. Since previous work indicates that there are no low-energy gamma rays emitted in coincidence with the 368 keV capture gamma from the dominant {sup 199}Hg(n, {gamma}){sup 200}Hg reaction, only the 368 keV capture gamma is seen with any efficiency a relatively thin (few mm) detector. In this paper we report preliminary measurements of neutrons via capture reactions in a bare mercuric iodide crystal and a crystal covered in {sup 10}B-loaded epoxy. The covered detector is an improvement over the bare detector because the presence of both the 478 and 368 keV gamma rays removes the ambiguity associated with the observation of only one of them. Pulse height spectra, obtained with and without lead and cadmium absorbers, showed the expected gamma rays and demonstrated that they were caused by neutrons.

  12. Factors affecting the retention of methyl iodide by iodide-impregnated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M.L.; Malstrom, R.A.

    1990-12-31

    Iodide-impregnated activated carbon that had been in use for up to 30 months was studied to characterize those factors that affect its interaction with and retention of methyl iodide. Humidity and competing organic sorbents were observed to decrease the residence time of the methyl iodide on the carbon bed. Additionally, changes in the effective surface area and the loss of iodide from the surface are both important in determining the effectiveness of the carbon for retaining radioactive iodine from methyl iodide. A simple model incorporating both factors gave a fairly good fit to the experimental data.

  13. Factors affecting the retention of methyl iodide by iodide-impregnated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M.L.; Malstrom, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Iodide-impregnated activated carbon that had been in use for up to 30 months was studied to characterize those factors that affect its interaction with and retention of methyl iodide. Humidity and competing organic sorbents were observed to decrease the residence time of the methyl iodide on the carbon bed. Additionally, changes in the effective surface area and the loss of iodide from the surface are both important in determining the effectiveness of the carbon for retaining radioactive iodine from methyl iodide. A simple model incorporating both factors gave a fairly good fit to the experimental data.

  14. 21 CFR 582.5634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5634 Potassium iodide. (a) Product. Potassium iodide. (b) Tolerance. 0.01 percent. (c... salt as a source of dietary iodine in accordance with good manufacturing or feeding practice....

  15. 21 CFR 582.5634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5634 Potassium iodide. (a) Product. Potassium iodide. (b) Tolerance. 0.01 percent. (c... salt as a source of dietary iodine in accordance with good manufacturing or feeding practice....

  16. Gallium phosphide energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, P. E.; Dinetta, L. C.; Goetz, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Gallium phosphide (GaP) energy converters may be successfully deployed to provide new mission capabilities for spacecraft. Betavoltaic power supplies based on the conversion of tritium beta decay to electricity using GaP energy converters can supply long term low-level power with high reliability. High temperature solar cells, also based on GaP, can be used in inward-bound missions greatly reducing the need for thermal dissipation. Results are presented for GaP direct conversion devices powered by Ni-63 and compared to the conversion of light emitted by tritiarated phosphors. Leakage currents as low as 1.2 x 10(exp -17) A/sq cm have been measured and the temperature dependence of the reverse saturation current is found to have ideal behavior. Temperature dependent IV, QE, R(sub sh), and V(sub oc) results are also presented. These data are used to predict the high-temperature solar cell and betacell performance of GaP devices and suggest appropriate applications for the deployment of this technology.

  17. Medical applications and toxicities of gallium compounds.

    PubMed

    Chitambar, Christopher R

    2010-05-01

    Over the past two to three decades, gallium compounds have gained importance in the fields of medicine and electronics. In clinical medicine, radioactive gallium and stable gallium nitrate are used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents in cancer and disorders of calcium and bone metabolism. In addition, gallium compounds have displayed anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activity in animal models of human disease while more recent studies have shown that gallium compounds may function as antimicrobial agents against certain pathogens. In a totally different realm, the chemical properties of gallium arsenide have led to its use in the semiconductor industry. Gallium compounds, whether used medically or in the electronics field, have toxicities. Patients receiving gallium nitrate for the treatment of various diseases may benefit from such therapy, but knowledge of the therapeutic index of this drug is necessary to avoid clinical toxicities. Animals exposed to gallium arsenide display toxicities in certain organ systems suggesting that environmental risks may exist for individuals exposed to this compound in the workplace. Although the arsenic moiety of gallium arsenide appears to be mainly responsible for its pulmonary toxicity, gallium may contribute to some of the detrimental effects in other organs. The use of older and newer gallium compounds in clinical medicine may be advanced by a better understanding of their mechanisms of action, drug resistance, pharmacology, and side-effects. This review will discuss the medical applications of gallium and its mechanisms of action, the newer gallium compounds and future directions for development, and the toxicities of gallium compounds in current use.

  18. Medical Applications and Toxicities of Gallium Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Chitambar, Christopher R.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past two to three decades, gallium compounds have gained importance in the fields of medicine and electronics. In clinical medicine, radioactive gallium and stable gallium nitrate are used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents in cancer and disorders of calcium and bone metabolism. In addition, gallium compounds have displayed anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activity in animal models of human disease while more recent studies have shown that gallium compounds may function as antimicrobial agents against certain pathogens. In a totally different realm, the chemical properties of gallium arsenide have led to its use in the semiconductor industry. Gallium compounds, whether used medically or in the electronics field, have toxicities. Patients receiving gallium nitrate for the treatment of various diseases may benefit from such therapy, but knowledge of the therapeutic index of this drug is necessary to avoid clinical toxicities. Animals exposed to gallium arsenide display toxicities in certain organ systems suggesting that environmental risks may exist for individuals exposed to this compound in the workplace. Although the arsenic moiety of gallium arsenide appears to be mainly responsible for its pulmonary toxicity, gallium may contribute to some of the detrimental effects in other organs. The use of older and newer gallium compounds in clinical medicine may be advanced by a better understanding of their mechanisms of action, drug resistance, pharmacology, and side-effects. This review will discuss the medical applications of gallium and its mechanisms of action, the newer gallium compounds and future directions for development, and the toxicities of gallium compounds in current use. PMID:20623028

  19. A FETISH for gallium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    An overview of the development of a new dielectric material, cubic-GaS, from the synthesis of new organometallic compounds to the fabrication of a new class of gallium arsenide based transistor is presented as a representative example of the possibility that inorganic chemistry can directly effect the development of new semiconductor devices. The gallium sulfido compound [({sup t}Bu)GaS]{sub 4}, readily prepared from tri-tert-butyl gallium, may be used as a precursor for the growth of GaS thin films by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Photoluminescence and electronic measurements indicate that this material provides a passivation coating for GaAs. Furthermore, the insulating properties of cubic-GaS make it suitable as the insulating gate layer in a new class of GaAs transistor: a field effect transistor with a sulfide heterojunction (FETISH).

  20. Predissociation dynamics of lithium iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, H.; Vangerow, J. von; Stienkemeier, F.; Mudrich, M.; Bogomolov, A. S.; Baklanov, A. V.; Reich, D. M.; Skomorowski, W.; Koch, C. P.

    2015-01-28

    The predissociation dynamics of lithium iodide (LiI) in the first excited A-state is investigated for molecules in the gas phase and embedded in helium nanodroplets, using femtosecond pump-probe photoionization spectroscopy. In the gas phase, the transient Li{sup +} and LiI{sup +} ion signals feature damped oscillations due to the excitation and decay of a vibrational wave packet. Based on high-level ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of LiI and simulations of the wave packet dynamics, the exponential signal decay is found to result from predissociation predominantly at the lowest avoided X-A potential curve crossing, for which we infer a coupling constant V{sub XA} = 650(20) cm{sup −1}. The lack of a pump-probe delay dependence for the case of LiI embedded in helium nanodroplets indicates fast droplet-induced relaxation of the vibrational excitation.

  1. Mineral resource of the month: gallium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, Brian W.

    2009-01-01

    The metal element gallium occurs in very small concentrations in rocks and ores of other metals — native gallium is not known. As society gets more and more high-tech, gallium becomes more useful. Gallium is one of only five metals that are liquid at or close to room temperature. It has one of the longest liquid ranges of any metal (29.8 degrees Celsius to 2204 degrees Celsius) and has a low vapor pressure even at high temperatures. Ultra-pure gallium has a brilliant silvery appearance, and the solid metal exhibits conchoidal fracture similar to glass.

  2. Potential effects of gallium on cladding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Besmann, T.M.; DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Gat, U.; Greene, S.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Worley, B.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper identifies and examines issues concerning the incorporation of gallium in weapons derived plutonium in light water reactor (LWR) MOX fuels. Particular attention is given to the more likely effects of the gallium on the behavior of the cladding material. The chemistry of weapons grade (WG) MOX, including possible consequences of gallium within plutonium agglomerates, was assessed. Based on the calculated oxidation potentials of MOX fuel, the effect that gallium may have on reactions involving fission products and possible impact on cladding performance were postulated. Gallium transport mechanisms are discussed. With an understanding of oxidation potentials and assumptions of mechanisms for gallium transport, possible effects of gallium on corrosion of cladding were evaluated. Potential and unresolved issues and suggested research and development (R and D) required to provide missing information are presented.

  3. Toxicity of indium arsenide, gallium arsenide, and aluminium gallium arsenide.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akiyo

    2004-08-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium arsenide (InAs), and aluminium gallium arsenide (AlGaAs) are semiconductor applications. Although the increased use of these materials has raised concerns about occupational exposure to them, there is little information regarding the adverse health effects to workers arising from exposure to these particles. However, available data indicate these semiconductor materials can be toxic in animals. Although acute and chronic toxicity of the lung, reproductive organs, and kidney are associated with exposure to these semiconductor materials, in particular, chronic toxicity should pay much attention owing to low solubility of these materials. Between InAs, GaAs, and AlGaAs, InAs was the most toxic material to the lung followed by GaAs and AlGaAs when given intratracheally. This was probably due to difference in the toxicity of the counter-element of arsenic in semiconductor materials, such as indium, gallium, or aluminium, and not arsenic itself. It appeared that indium, gallium, or aluminium was toxic when released from the particles, though the physical character of the particles also contributes to toxic effect. Although there is no evidence of the carcinogenicity of InAs or AlGaAs, GaAs and InP, which are semiconductor materials, showed the clear evidence of carcinogenic potential. It is necessary to pay much greater attention to the human exposure of semiconductor materials.

  4. Iodide Protects Heart Tissue from Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Akiko; Morrison, Michael L.; Roth, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    Iodine is an elemental nutrient that is essential for mammals. Here we provide evidence for an acute therapeutic role for iodine in ischemia reperfusion injury. Infusion of the reduced form, iodide, but not the oxidized form iodate, reduces heart damage by as much as 75% when delivered intravenously following temporary loss of blood flow but prior to reperfusion of the heart in a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction. Normal thyroid function may be required because loss of thyroid activity abrogates the iodide benefit. Given the high degree of protection and the high degree of safety, iodide should be explored further as a therapy for reperfusion injury. PMID:25379708

  5. Lithium iodide cardiac pacemakers: initial clinical experience.

    PubMed Central

    Burr, L. H.

    1976-01-01

    A new long-life cardiac pacemaker pulse generator powered by a lithium iodide fuel cell was introduced in Canada in 1973. The compact, hermetically sealed unit is easily implanted and reliable, has excellent patient acceptance and has an anticipated battery life of almost 14 years. Among 105 patients who received a lithium iodide pacemaker, complications occurred in 18. The lithium iodide pacemaker represents a significant advance in pacemaker generator technology and is recommended for long-term cardiac pacing; the manufacturer guarantees the pulse generator for 6 years. Images FIG. 1 PMID:974965

  6. Mercuric iodide light detector and related method

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Barton, Jeff B.; Dabrowski, Andrzej J.; Schnepple, Wayne F.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting light involve applying a substantially uniform electrical potential difference between first and second spaced surfaces of a body of mercuric iodide, exposing the first surface to light and measuring an electrical current passed through the body in response to the light. The mercuric iodide may be substantially monocrystalline and the potential may be applied between a substantially transparent conductive layer at the first surface and a second conductive layer at the second surface. In a preferred embodiment, the detector is coupled to a scintillator for passage of light to the mercuric iodide in response to ionizing radiation incident on the scintillator.

  7. Gallium scan in intracerebral sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Makhija, M.C.; Anayiotos, C.P.

    1981-07-01

    Sarcoidosis involving the nervous system probably occurs in about 4% of patients. The usefulness of brain scintigraphy in these cases has been suggested. In this case of cerebral sarcoid granuloma, gallium imaging demonstrated the lesion before treatment and showed disappearance of the lesion after corticosteroid treatment, which correlated with the patient's clinical improvement.

  8. Gallium scintigraphy in acute panniculitis

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, D.; Murray, I.P.C.; Ford, J.C.

    1981-11-01

    Gallium scintigraphy was performed in a 27-yr-old female in search of a possible occult focus of infection; it showed an unusual diffuse superficial accumulation in the thighs and buttocks. Biopsy of an area of abnormal uptake showed lobular panniculitis which, in the clinical context, led to the diagnosis of Weber-Christian syndrome.

  9. Liquid gallium rotary electric contract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przybyszewski, J. S.

    1969-01-01

    Due to its low vapor pressure, gallium, when substituted for mercury in a liquid slip ring system, transmits substantial amounts of electrical current to rotating components in an ultrahigh vacuum. It features low electrical loss, little or no wear, and long maintenance-free life.

  10. P-type gallium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, M.; Newman, N.; Fu, T.; Ross, J.; Chan, J.

    1997-08-12

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5{times}10{sup 11} /cm{sup 3} and hole mobilities of about 500 cm{sup 2} /V-sec, measured at 250 K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al. 9 figs.

  11. P-type gallium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Michael; Newman, Nathan; Fu, Tracy; Ross, Jennifer; Chan, James

    1997-01-01

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5.times.10.sup.11 /cm.sup.3 and hole mobilities of about 500 cm.sup.2 /V-sec, measured at 250.degree. K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al.

  12. Gallium nitride electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Siddharth; Jena, Debdeep

    2013-07-01

    In the past two decades, there has been increasing research and industrial activity in the area of gallium nitride (GaN) electronics, stimulated first by the successful demonstration of GaN LEDs. While the promise of wide band gap semiconductors for power electronics was recognized many years before this by one of the contributors to this issue (J Baliga), the success in the area of LEDs acted as a catalyst. It set the field of GaN electronics in motion, and today the technology is improving the performance of several applications including RF cell phone base stations and military radar. GaN could also play a very important role in reducing worldwide energy consumption by enabling high efficiency compact power converters operating at high voltages and lower frequencies. While GaN electronics is a rapidly evolving area with active research worldwide, this special issue provides an opportunity to capture some of the great advances that have been made in the last 15 years. The issue begins with a section on epitaxy and processing, followed by an overview of high-frequency HEMTs, which have been the most commercially successful application of III-nitride electronics to date. This is followed by review and research articles on power-switching transistors, which are currently of great interest to the III-nitride community. A section of this issue is devoted to the reliability of III-nitride devices, an area that is of increasing significance as the research focus has moved from not just high performance but also production-worthiness and long-term usage of these devices. Finally, a group of papers on new and relatively less studied ideas for III-nitride electronics, such as interband tunneling, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and high-temperature electronics is included. These areas point to new areas of research and technological innovation going beyond the state of the art into the future. We hope that the breadth and quality of articles in this issue will make it

  13. 1-Alkenylcalcium iodide: synthesis and stability.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Mathias; Görls, Helmar; Langer, Jens; Westerhausen, Matthias

    2014-04-25

    To enhance the scope of heavy calcium-based Grignard reagents, 1,2-dihydro-4-iodonaphthalene (1) was reduced with calcium in THF giving tetrakis(thf) (1,2-dihydronaphth-4-yl)calcium iodide (2). This derivative represents a 1-alkenylcalcium complex based on X-ray structure determination and NMR data. The stability of this compound is significantly reduced compared with the aromatic naphthylcalcium iodide. PMID:24677436

  14. Recovery of anhydrous hydrogen iodide

    DOEpatents

    O'Keefe, Dennis R.; McCorkle, Jr., Kenneth H.; de Graaf, Johannes D.

    1982-01-01

    Relatively dry hydrogen iodide can be recovered from a mixture of HI, I.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O. After the composition of the mixture is adjusted so that the amounts of H.sub.2 O and I.sub.2 do not exceed certain maximum limits, subjection of the mixture to superatmospheric pressure in an amount equal to about the vapor pressure of HI at the temperature in question causes distinct liquid phases to appear. One of the liquid phases contains HI and not more than about 1 weight percent water. Often the adjustment in the composition will include the step of vaporization, and the distinct layers appear following the increase in pressure of the vapor mixture. Adjustment in the composition may also include the addition of an extraction agent, such as H.sub.3 PO.sub.4, and even though the adjusted composition mixture contains a significant amount of such an agent, the creation of the distinct liquid phases is not adversely affected.

  15. Iodide transport: implications for health and disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of the thyroid gland are among the most common conditions diagnosed and managed by pediatric endocrinologists. Thyroid hormone synthesis depends on normal iodide transport and knowledge of its regulation is fundamental to understand the etiology and management of congenital and acquired thyroid conditions such as hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. The ability of the thyroid to concentrate iodine is also widely used as a tool for the diagnosis of thyroid diseases and in the management and follow up of the most common type of endocrine cancers: papillary and follicular thyroid cancer. More recently, the regulation of iodide transport has also been the center of attention to improve the management of poorly differentiated thyroid cancer. Iodine deficiency disorders (goiter, impaired mental development) due to insufficient nutritional intake remain a universal public health problem. Thyroid function can also be influenced by medications that contain iodide or interfere with iodide metabolism such as iodinated contrast agents, povidone, lithium and amiodarone. In addition, some environmental pollutants such as perchlorate, thiocyanate and nitrates may affect iodide transport. Furthermore, nuclear accidents increase the risk of developing thyroid cancer and the therapy used to prevent exposure to these isotopes relies on the ability of the thyroid to concentrate iodine. The array of disorders involving iodide transport affect individuals during the whole life span and, if undiagnosed or improperly managed, they can have a profound impact on growth, metabolism, cognitive development and quality of life. PMID:25009573

  16. Iodide transport: implications for health and disease.

    PubMed

    Pesce, Liuska; Kopp, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of the thyroid gland are among the most common conditions diagnosed and managed by pediatric endocrinologists. Thyroid hormone synthesis depends on normal iodide transport and knowledge of its regulation is fundamental to understand the etiology and management of congenital and acquired thyroid conditions such as hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. The ability of the thyroid to concentrate iodine is also widely used as a tool for the diagnosis of thyroid diseases and in the management and follow up of the most common type of endocrine cancers: papillary and follicular thyroid cancer. More recently, the regulation of iodide transport has also been the center of attention to improve the management of poorly differentiated thyroid cancer. Iodine deficiency disorders (goiter, impaired mental development) due to insufficient nutritional intake remain a universal public health problem. Thyroid function can also be influenced by medications that contain iodide or interfere with iodide metabolism such as iodinated contrast agents, povidone, lithium and amiodarone. In addition, some environmental pollutants such as perchlorate, thiocyanate and nitrates may affect iodide transport. Furthermore, nuclear accidents increase the risk of developing thyroid cancer and the therapy used to prevent exposure to these isotopes relies on the ability of the thyroid to concentrate iodine. The array of disorders involving iodide transport affect individuals during the whole life span and, if undiagnosed or improperly managed, they can have a profound impact on growth, metabolism, cognitive development and quality of life. PMID:25009573

  17. Running droplets of gallium from evaporation of gallium arsenide.

    PubMed

    Tersoff, J; Jesson, D E; Tang, W X

    2009-04-10

    High-temperature annealing of gallium arsenide in vacuum causes excess evaporation of arsenic, with accumulation of gallium as liquid droplets on the surface. Using real-time in situ surface electron microscopy, we found that these droplets spontaneously run across the crystal surface. Running droplets have been seen in many systems, but they typically require special surface preparation or gradient forces. In contrast, we show that noncongruent evaporation automatically provides a driving force for running droplets. The motion is predicted and observed to slow and stop near a characteristic temperature, with the speed increasing both below and above this temperature. The same behavior is expected to occur during the evaporation of similar III-V semiconductors such as indium arsenide.

  18. Epitaxial Deposition Of Germanium Doped With Gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Epitaxial layers of germanium doped with gallium made by chemical vapor deposition. Method involves combination of techniques and materials used in chemical vapor deposition with GeH4 or GeCl4 as source of germanium and GaCl3 as source of gallium. Resulting epitaxial layers of germanium doped with gallium expected to be highly pure, with high crystalline quality. High-quality material useful in infrared sensors.

  19. Recovering gallium from residual bayer process liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonso de Magalhães, Maria Elizabeth; Tubino, Matthieu

    1991-06-01

    Gallium is normally obtained by direct electrolysis as a by-product from Bayer process residual liquor at an aluminum processing plant. However, to permit any net accumulation of the metal, the gallium concentration must be at least about 0.3 g/l in the liquor. This article describes a continuous process of extraction with organic solvents and rhodamine-B, followed by a re-extraction step into aqueous media. The final product is a solid containing up to 18 wt.% Ga in a solid mixture of hydroxides and oxides of gallium and aluminum. This final product can then be electrolyzed to recover the gallium more efficiently.

  20. Thermal oxidation of gallium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, O.R.; Evans, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Here we present some results of transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy of thermally oxidized gallium arsenide with different types of dopants. At temperatures below 400 /sup 0/C an amorphous oxide is formed. Oxidation at temperatures between 500 and 600 /sup 0/C initially produces an epitaxial film of ..gamma..-Ga/sub 2/O/sub 3/. As the reaction proceeds, this film becomes polycrystalline and then transforms to ..beta..-Ga/sub 2/O/sub 3/. This film contains small crystallites of As/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and As/sub 2/O/sub 3/ in the case of the chromium doped samples, whereas only the former was detected in the case of silicon and tellurium doped samples. Elemental arsenic was always found at the interface between the oxide and GaAs. Chromium doped gallium also exhibited a slower oxidation kinetics than the other materials.

  1. Facile synthesis of gallium oxide hydroxide by ultrasonic irradiation of molten gallium in water.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay Bhooshan; Gedanken, Aharon; Porat, Ze'ev

    2015-09-01

    This work describes the single-step synthesis of GaO(OH) by ultrasonic irradiation of molten gallium in warm water. The ultrasonic energy causes dispersion of the liquid gallium into micrometric spheres, as-well-as decomposition of some of the water into H and OH radicals. The OH radicals and the dissolved oxygen react on the surface of the gallium spheres to form crystallites of GaO(OH). These crystallites prevent the re-coalescence of the gallium spheres, and as the reaction proceeds all the gallium is converted into crystalline GaO(OH).

  2. Glycosyl iodides. History and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Meloncelli, Peter J; Martin, Alan D; Lowary, Todd L

    2009-06-12

    The use of glycosyl iodides as an effective method for the preparation of glycosides has had a recent resurgence in carbohydrate chemistry, despite its early roots in which these species were believed to be of limited use. Renewed interest in these species as glycosylating agents has been spurred by their demonstrated utility in the stereoselective preparation of O-glycosides, and other glycosylic compounds. This review provides a brief historical account followed by an examination of the use of glycosyl iodides in the synthesis of oligosaccharides and other glycomimetics, including C-glycosylic compounds, glycosyl azides and N-glycosides.

  3. Gallium Electromagnetic (GEM) Thrustor Concept and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Markusic, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the design of a new type of two-stage pulsed electromagnetic accelerator, the gallium electromagnetic (GEM) thruster. A schematic illustration of the GEM thruster concept is given in Fig. 1. In this concept, liquid gallium propellant is pumped into the first stage through a porous metal electrode using an electromagneticpump[l]. At a designated time, a pulsed discharge (approx.10-50 J) is initiated in the first stage, ablating the liquid gallium from the porous electrode surface and ejecting a dense thermal gallium plasma into the second state. The presence of the gallium plasma in the second stage serves to trigger the high-energy (approx.500 I), send-stage puke which provides the primary electromagnetic (j x B) acceleration.

  4. Methyl Iodide Fumigation of Bacillus anthracis Spores.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Mark; Kane, Staci R; Wollard, Jessica R

    2015-09-01

    Fumigation techniques such as chlorine dioxide, vaporous hydrogen peroxide, and paraformaldehyde previously used to decontaminate items, rooms, and buildings following contamination with Bacillus anthracis spores are often incompatible with materials (e.g., porous surfaces, organics, and metals), causing damage or residue. Alternative fumigation with methyl bromide is subject to U.S. and international restrictions due to its ozone-depleting properties. Methyl iodide, however, does not pose a risk to the ozone layer and has previously been demonstrated as a fumigant for fungi, insects, and nematodes. Until now, methyl iodide has not been evaluated against Bacillus anthracis. Sterne strain Bacillus anthracis spores were subjected to methyl iodide fumigation at room temperature and at 550C. Efficacy was measured on a log-scale with a 6-log reduction in CFUs being considered successful compared to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency biocide standard. Such efficacies were obtained after just one hour at 55 °C and after 12 hours at room temperature. No detrimental effects were observed on glassware, PTFE O-rings, or stainless steel. This is the first reported efficacy of methyl iodide in the reduction of Bacillus anthracis spore contamination at ambient and elevated temperatures. PMID:26502561

  5. Scintillator handbook with emphasis on cesium iodide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidd, J. L.; Dabbs, J. R.; Levine, N.

    1973-01-01

    This report provides a background of reasonable depth and reference material on scintillators in general. Particular attention is paid to the cesium iodide scintillators as used in the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) experiments. It is intended especially for use by persons such as laboratory test personnel who need to obtain a working knowledge of these materials and their characteristics in a short time.

  6. 21 CFR 184.1265 - Cuprous iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the following specific limitations: Category of food Maximum treatment level in food Functional use... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cuprous iodide. 184.1265 Section 184.1265 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR...

  7. Methyl Iodide Fumigation of Bacillus anthracis Spores.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Mark; Kane, Staci R; Wollard, Jessica R

    2015-09-01

    Fumigation techniques such as chlorine dioxide, vaporous hydrogen peroxide, and paraformaldehyde previously used to decontaminate items, rooms, and buildings following contamination with Bacillus anthracis spores are often incompatible with materials (e.g., porous surfaces, organics, and metals), causing damage or residue. Alternative fumigation with methyl bromide is subject to U.S. and international restrictions due to its ozone-depleting properties. Methyl iodide, however, does not pose a risk to the ozone layer and has previously been demonstrated as a fumigant for fungi, insects, and nematodes. Until now, methyl iodide has not been evaluated against Bacillus anthracis. Sterne strain Bacillus anthracis spores were subjected to methyl iodide fumigation at room temperature and at 550C. Efficacy was measured on a log-scale with a 6-log reduction in CFUs being considered successful compared to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency biocide standard. Such efficacies were obtained after just one hour at 55 °C and after 12 hours at room temperature. No detrimental effects were observed on glassware, PTFE O-rings, or stainless steel. This is the first reported efficacy of methyl iodide in the reduction of Bacillus anthracis spore contamination at ambient and elevated temperatures.

  8. 21 CFR 184.1265 - Cuprous iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cuprous iodide. 184.1265 Section 184.1265 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD... accordance with § 184.1(b)(2), the ingredient is used in food only within the following specific...

  9. Simplest Formula of Copper Iodide: A Stoichiometry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment presented to students as a problem in determining the stoichiometry of "copper iodide" to decide whether it is cuprous iodide or cupric iodide. The experiment illustrates stoichiometry principles, providing experiences with laboratory techniques and numerical computation. Detailed outline (written for student use) is…

  10. Barium iodide and strontium iodide crystals andd scintillators implementing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Stephen A; Cherepy, Nerine J; Hull, Giulia E; Drobshoff, Alexander D; Burger, Arnold

    2013-11-12

    In one embodiment, a material comprises a crystal comprising strontium iodide providing at least 50,000 photons per MeV. A scintillator radiation detector according to another embodiment includes a scintillator optic comprising europium-doped strontium iodide providing at least 50,000 photons per MeV. A scintillator radiation detector in yet another embodiment includes a scintillator optic comprising SrI.sub.2 and BaI.sub.2, wherein a ratio of SrI.sub.2 to BaI.sub.2 is in a range of between 0:1 A method for manufacturing a crystal suitable for use in a scintillator includes mixing strontium iodide-containing crystals with a source of Eu.sup.2+, heating the mixture above a melting point of the strontium iodide-containing crystals, and cooling the heated mixture near the seed crystal for growing a crystal. Additional materials, systems, and methods are presented.

  11. Clinical applications of Gallium-68.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Pomper, Martin G

    2013-06-01

    Gallium-68 is a positron-emitting radioisotope that is produced from a (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator. As such it is conveniently used, decoupling radiopharmacies from the need for a cyclotron on site. Gallium-68-labeled peptides have been recognized as a new class of radiopharmaceuticals showing fast target localization and blood clearance. (68)Ga-DOTATOC, (8)Ga-DOTATATE, (68)Ga-DOTANOC, are the most prominent radiopharmaceuticals currently in use for imaging and differentiating lesions of various somatostatin receptor subtypes, overexpressed in many neuroendocrine tumors. There has been a tremendous increase in the number of clinical studies with (68)Ga over the past few years around the world, including within the United States. An estimated ∼10,000 scans are being performed yearly in Europe at about 100 centers utilizing (68)Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs within clinical trials. Two academic sites within the US have also begun to undertake human studies. This review will focus on the clinical experience of selected, well-established and recently applied (68)Ga-labeled imaging agents used in nuclear medicine.

  12. The surface tension of liquid gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    The surface tension of liquid gallium has been measured using the sessile drop technique in an Auger spectrometer. The experimental method is described. The surface tension in mJ/sq m is found to decrease linearly with increasing temperature and may be represented as 708-0.66(T-29.8), where T is the temperature in centigrade. This result is of interest because gallium has been suggested as a model fluid for Marangoni flow experiments. In addition, the surface tension is of technological significance in the processing of compound semiconductors involving gallium.

  13. Gallium and its competing roles with iron in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Chitambar, Christopher R

    2016-08-01

    Gallium, a group IIIa metal, shares chemical properties with iron. Studies have shown that gallium-based compounds have potential therapeutic activity against certain cancers and infectious microorganisms. By functioning as an iron mimetic, gallium perturbs iron-dependent proliferation processes in tumor cells. Gallium's action on iron homeostasis leads to disruption of ribonucleotide reductase, mitochondrial function, and the regulation of transferrin receptor and ferritin. In addition, gallium nitrate stimulates an increase in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in cells which triggers downstream upregulation of metallothionein and hemoxygenase-1. Gallium's anti-infective activity against bacteria and fungi results from disruption of microbial iron utilization through mechanisms which include gallium binding to siderophores and downregulation of bacterial iron uptake. Gallium compounds lack cross-resistance to conventional chemotherapeutic drugs and antibiotics thus making them attractive agents for drug development. This review will focus on the mechanisms of action of gallium with emphasis on its interaction with iron and iron proteins. PMID:27150508

  14. Gallium and its competing roles with iron in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Chitambar, Christopher R

    2016-08-01

    Gallium, a group IIIa metal, shares chemical properties with iron. Studies have shown that gallium-based compounds have potential therapeutic activity against certain cancers and infectious microorganisms. By functioning as an iron mimetic, gallium perturbs iron-dependent proliferation processes in tumor cells. Gallium's action on iron homeostasis leads to disruption of ribonucleotide reductase, mitochondrial function, and the regulation of transferrin receptor and ferritin. In addition, gallium nitrate stimulates an increase in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in cells which triggers downstream upregulation of metallothionein and hemoxygenase-1. Gallium's anti-infective activity against bacteria and fungi results from disruption of microbial iron utilization through mechanisms which include gallium binding to siderophores and downregulation of bacterial iron uptake. Gallium compounds lack cross-resistance to conventional chemotherapeutic drugs and antibiotics thus making them attractive agents for drug development. This review will focus on the mechanisms of action of gallium with emphasis on its interaction with iron and iron proteins.

  15. Gallium-67 activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Trauth, H.A.; Heimes, K.; Schubotz, R.; von Wichert, P.

    1986-01-01

    Roentgenograms and gallium-67 scans and gallium-67 counts of BAL fluid samples, together with differential cell counts, have proved to be useful in assessing activity and lung involvement in sarcoidosis. In active pulmonary sarcoidosis gallium-67 scans are usually positive. Quantitation of gallium-67 uptake in lung scans, however, may be difficult. Because gallium-67 uptake and cell counts in BAL fluid may be correlated, we set out to investigate gallium-67 activity in BAL fluid recovered from patient of different groups. Sixteen patients with recently diagnosed and untreated sarcoidosis, nine patients with healthy lungs, and five patients with CFA were studied. Gallium-67 uptake of the lung, gallium-67 activity in the lavage fluid, SACE and LACE levels, and alpha 1-AT activity were measured. Significantly more gallium-67 activity was found in BAL fluid from sarcoidosis patients than in that from CFA patients (alpha = .001) or patients with healthy lungs (alpha = .001). Gallium-67 activity in BAL fluid could be well correlated with the number of lymphocytes in BAL fluid, but poorly with the number of macrophages. Subjects with increased levels of SACE or serum alpha 1-AT showed higher lavage gallium-67 activity than did normals, but no correlation could be established. High gallium-67 activity in lavage fluid may be correlated with acute sarcoidosis or physiological deterioration; low activity denotes change for the better. The results show that gallium-67 counts in BAL fluid reflects the intensity of gallium-67 uptake and thus of activity of pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  16. Recovery of gallium from aluminum industry residues

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, M.S.; Neto, K.C.M.; Nobrega, A.W.; Medeiros, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    A procedure is proposed to recover gallium from flue dust aluminum residues produced in plants by using solid-phase extraction with a commercial polyether-type polyurethane foam (PUF). Gallium can be separated from high concentrations of aluminum, iron, nickel, titanium, vanadium, copper, zinc, sulfate, fluoride, and chloride by extraction with PUF from 3 M sulfuric acid and 3 M sodium chloride concentration medium with at least a 92% efficiency. Gallium backextraction was fast and quantitative with ethanol solution. In all recovery steps commercial-grade reagents could be used, including tap water. The recovered gallium was precipitated with sodium hydroxide solution, purified by dissolution and precipitation, calcinated, and the final oxide was 98.6% pure.

  17. Radiochemical separation of gallium by amalgam exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruch, R.R.

    1969-01-01

    An amalgam-exchange separation of radioactive gallium from a number of interfering radioisotopes has been developed. A dilute (ca. 0.3%) gallium amalgam is agitated with a slightly acidic solution of 72Ga3+ containing concentrations of sodium thiocyanate and either perchlorate or chloride. The amalgam is then removed and the radioactive gallium stripped by agitation with dilute nitric acid. The combined exchange yield of the perchlorate-thiocyanate system is 90??4% and that of the chloride-thiocyanate system is 75??4%. Decontamination yields of most of the 11 interfering isotopes studied were less than 0.02%. The technique is applicable for use with activation analysis for the determination of trace amounts of gallium. ?? 1969.

  18. Development of gallium arsenide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The potential of ion implantation as a means of developing gallium arsenide solar cells with high efficiency performance was investigated. Computer calculations on gallium arsenide cell characteristics are presented to show the effects of surface recombination, junction space-charge recombination, and built-in fields produced by nonuniform doping of the surface region. The fabrication technology is summarized. Electrical and optical measurements on samples of solar cells are included.

  19. Mercuric iodide X-ray camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, B. E.; del Duca, A.; Dolin, R.; Ortale, C.

    1986-02-01

    A prototype X-ray camera utilizing a 1.5- by 1.5-in., 1024-element, thin mercuric iodide detector array has been tested and evaluated. The microprocessor-based camera is portable and operates at room temperature. Events can be localized within 1-2 mm at energies below 60 keV and within 5-6 mm at energies on the order of 600 keV.

  20. Mechanical Properties Of Large Sodium Iodide Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Henry M.

    1988-01-01

    Report presents data on mechanical properties of large crystals of thallium-doped sodium iodide. Five specimens in shape of circular flat plates subjected to mechanical tests. Presents test results for each specimen as plots of differential pressure versus center displacement and differential pressure versus stress at center. Also tabulates raw data. Test program also developed procedure for screening candidate crystals for gamma-ray sensor. Procedure eliminates potentially weak crystals before installed and ensures material yielding kept to minimum.

  1. Generator for gallium-68 and compositions obtained therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Neirinckx, Rudi D.; Davis, Michael A.

    1981-01-01

    A generator for obtaining radioactive gallium-68 from germanium-68 bound in a resin containing unsubstituted phenolic hydroxyl groups. The germanium-68 is loaded into the resin from an aqueous solution of the germanium-68. A physiologically acceptable solution of gallium-68 having an activity of 0.1 to 50 millicuries per milliliter of gallium-68 solution is obtained. The solution is obtained from the bound germanium-68 which forms gallium-68 in situ by eluting the column with a hydrochloric acid solution to form an acidic solution of gallium-68. The acidic solution of gallium-68 can be neutralized.

  2. Formation of cyanogen iodide by lactoperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Schlorke, Denise; Flemmig, Jörg; Birkemeyer, Claudia; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The haem protein lactoperoxidase (LPO) is an important component of the anti-microbial immune defence in external secretions and is also applied as preservative in food, oral care and cosmetic products. Upon oxidation of SCN(-) and I(-) by the LPO-hydrogen peroxide system, oxidised species are formed with bacteriostatic and/or bactericidal activity. Here we describe the formation of the inter(pseudo)halogen cyanogen iodide (ICN) by LPO. This product is formed when both, thiocyanate and iodide, are present together in the reaction mixture. Using (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry we could identify this inter(pseudo)halogen after applying iodide in slight excess over thiocyanate. The formation of ICN is based on the reaction of oxidised iodine species with thiocyanate. Further, we could demonstrate that ICN is also formed by the related haem enzyme myeloperoxidase and, in lower amounts, in the enzyme-free system. As I(-) is not competitive for SCN(-) under physiologically relevant conditions, the formation of ICN is not expected in secretions but may be relevant for LPO-containing products. PMID:26580225

  3. Formulation and optimization of potassium iodide tablets

    PubMed Central

    Al-Achi, Antoine; Patel, Binit

    2014-01-01

    The use of potassium iodide (KI) as a protective agent against accidental radioactive exposure is well established. In this study, we aimed to prepare a KI tablet formulation using a direct compression method. We utilized Design of Experiment (DoE)/mixture design to define the best formulation with predetermined physical qualities as to its dissolution, hardness, assay, disintegration, and angle of repose. Based on the results from the DoE, the formulation had the following components (%w/w): Avicel 48.70%, silicon dioxide 0.27%, stearic acid (1.00%), magnesium stearate 2.45%, and dicalcium phosphate 18.69%, in addition to potassium iodide 28.89% (130 mg/tablet). This formulation was scaled-up using two tablet presses, a single-punch press and a rotary mini tablet press. The final scaled-up formulation was subjected to a variety of quality control tests, including photo-stability testing. The results indicate that potassium iodide tablets prepared by a rotary mini tablet press had good pharmaceutical characteristics and a shelf-life of 25 days when stored at room temperature protected from light. PMID:25685048

  4. Formation of cyanogen iodide by lactoperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Schlorke, Denise; Flemmig, Jörg; Birkemeyer, Claudia; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The haem protein lactoperoxidase (LPO) is an important component of the anti-microbial immune defence in external secretions and is also applied as preservative in food, oral care and cosmetic products. Upon oxidation of SCN(-) and I(-) by the LPO-hydrogen peroxide system, oxidised species are formed with bacteriostatic and/or bactericidal activity. Here we describe the formation of the inter(pseudo)halogen cyanogen iodide (ICN) by LPO. This product is formed when both, thiocyanate and iodide, are present together in the reaction mixture. Using (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry we could identify this inter(pseudo)halogen after applying iodide in slight excess over thiocyanate. The formation of ICN is based on the reaction of oxidised iodine species with thiocyanate. Further, we could demonstrate that ICN is also formed by the related haem enzyme myeloperoxidase and, in lower amounts, in the enzyme-free system. As I(-) is not competitive for SCN(-) under physiologically relevant conditions, the formation of ICN is not expected in secretions but may be relevant for LPO-containing products.

  5. Methyl iodide production in the open ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemmler, I.; Hense, I.; Quack, B.; Maier-Reimer, E.

    2014-08-01

    Production pathways of the prominent volatile organic halogen compound methyl iodide (CH3I) are not fully understood. Based on observations, production of CH3I via photochemical degradation of organic material or via phytoplankton production has been proposed. Additional insights could not be gained from correlations between observed biological and environmental variables or from biogeochemical modeling to identify unambiguously the source of methyl iodide. In this study, we aim to address this question of source mechanisms with a three-dimensional global ocean general circulation model including biogeochemistry (MPIOM-HAMOCC (MPIOM - Max Planck Institute Ocean Model HAMOCC - HAMburg Ocean Carbon Cycle model)) by carrying out a series of sensitivity experiments. The simulated fields are compared with a newly available global data set. Simulated distribution patterns and emissions of CH3I differ largely for the two different production pathways. The evaluation of our model results with observations shows that, on the global scale, observed surface concentrations of CH3I can be best explained by the photochemical production pathway. Our results further emphasize that correlations between CH3I and abiotic or biotic factors do not necessarily provide meaningful insights concerning the source of origin. Overall, we find a net global annual CH3I air-sea flux that ranges between 70 and 260 Gg yr-1. On the global scale, the ocean acts as a net source of methyl iodide for the atmosphere, though in some regions in boreal winter, fluxes are of the opposite direction (from the atmosphere to the ocean).

  6. Formulation and optimization of potassium iodide tablets.

    PubMed

    Al-Achi, Antoine; Patel, Binit

    2015-01-01

    The use of potassium iodide (KI) as a protective agent against accidental radioactive exposure is well established. In this study, we aimed to prepare a KI tablet formulation using a direct compression method. We utilized Design of Experiment (DoE)/mixture design to define the best formulation with predetermined physical qualities as to its dissolution, hardness, assay, disintegration, and angle of repose. Based on the results from the DoE, the formulation had the following components (%w/w): Avicel 48.70%, silicon dioxide 0.27%, stearic acid (1.00%), magnesium stearate 2.45%, and dicalcium phosphate 18.69%, in addition to potassium iodide 28.89% (130 mg/tablet). This formulation was scaled-up using two tablet presses, a single-punch press and a rotary mini tablet press. The final scaled-up formulation was subjected to a variety of quality control tests, including photo-stability testing. The results indicate that potassium iodide tablets prepared by a rotary mini tablet press had good pharmaceutical characteristics and a shelf-life of 25 days when stored at room temperature protected from light. PMID:25685048

  7. Gallium poisoning: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Ivanoff, Chris S; Ivanoff, Athena E; Hottel, Timothy L

    2012-02-01

    The authors present a case of a college student who suffered acute gallium poisoning as a result of accidental exposure to gallium halide complexes. This is extremely rare and has never been reported in the literature. Acute symptoms after the incident, which initially presented as dermatitis and appeared relatively not life-threatening, rapidly progressed to dangerous episodes of tachycardia, tremors, dyspnea, vertigo, and unexpected black-outs. Had there been effective emergency medical care protocols, diagnostic testing, treatment and antidotes, the latent manifestations of irreversible cardiomyopathy may have been prevented. Given how quickly exposure led to morbidity, this article aims to raise an awareness of the toxic potential of gallium. This has particular relevance for workers involved in the production of semiconductors where there is a potential for accidental exposure to gallium by-products during device processing. It may also have implications for dentists who use gallium alloys to replace mercury containing amalgam. In the absence of threshold limit values and exposure limits for humans, as well as emergency medical guidelines for treatment of poisoning, the case calls on the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to establish guidelines and medical management protocols specific for gallium.

  8. Ultrafast Extreme Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Lead Iodide and Methylammonium Lead Iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkamp, Max; Lin, Ming-Fu; Ryland, Elizabeth; Vura-Weis, Josh

    Methylammonium lead iodide (perovskite) is a leading candidate for use in next-generation solar cell devices. However, the photophysics of perovskite responsible for its strong photovoltaic qualities are not fully understood. Ultrafast extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectroscopy was used to investigate relaxation dynamics in perovskite and its precursor, lead iodide, with carrier-specific signals arising from transitions from a common inner-shell level (I 4d) to the valence and conduction bands. Ultrashort (30 fs) pulses of XUV radiation in a broad spectrum (40-70 eV) were obtained using high-harmonic generation in a tabletop instrument. Transient absorption measurements with visible pump (3.1 eV) and XUV probe directly observed the relaxation of charge carriers after above band excitation for both perovskite and lead iodide in the femtosecond and picosecond time ranges.

  9. Controlled Electrochemical Deformation of Liquid-Phase Gallium.

    PubMed

    Chrimes, Adam F; Berean, Kyle J; Mitchell, Arnan; Rosengarten, Gary; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-02-17

    Pure gallium is a soft metal with a low temperature melting point of 29.8 °C. This low melting temperature can potentially be employed for creating optical components with changeable configurations on demand by manipulating gallium in its liquid state. Gallium is a smooth and highly reflective metal that can be readily maneuvered using electric fields. These features allow gallium to be used as a reconfigurable optical reflector. This work demonstrates the use of gallium for creating reconfigurable optical reflectors manipulated through the use of electric fields when gallium is in a liquid state. The use of gallium allows the formed structures to be frozen and preserved as long as the temperature of the metal remains below its melting temperature. The lens can be readily reshaped by raising the temperature above the melting point and reapplying an electric field to produce a different curvature of the gallium reflector. PMID:26820807

  10. Controlled Electrochemical Deformation of Liquid-Phase Gallium.

    PubMed

    Chrimes, Adam F; Berean, Kyle J; Mitchell, Arnan; Rosengarten, Gary; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-02-17

    Pure gallium is a soft metal with a low temperature melting point of 29.8 °C. This low melting temperature can potentially be employed for creating optical components with changeable configurations on demand by manipulating gallium in its liquid state. Gallium is a smooth and highly reflective metal that can be readily maneuvered using electric fields. These features allow gallium to be used as a reconfigurable optical reflector. This work demonstrates the use of gallium for creating reconfigurable optical reflectors manipulated through the use of electric fields when gallium is in a liquid state. The use of gallium allows the formed structures to be frozen and preserved as long as the temperature of the metal remains below its melting temperature. The lens can be readily reshaped by raising the temperature above the melting point and reapplying an electric field to produce a different curvature of the gallium reflector.

  11. Window structure for passivating solar cells based on gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Allen M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Passivated gallium arsenide solar photovoltaic cells with high resistance to moisture and oxygen are provided by means of a gallium arsenide phosphide window graded through its thickness from arsenic rich to phosphorus rich.

  12. Copper-Catalyzed Carboxylation of Aryl Iodides with Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Tran-Vu, Hung; Daugulis, Olafs

    2013-10-01

    A method for carboxylation of aryl iodides with carbon dioxide has been developed. The reaction employs low loadings of copper iodide/TMEDA or DMEDA catalyst, 1 atm of CO2, DMSO or DMA solvent, and proceeds at 25-70 °C. Good functional group tolerance is observed, with ester, bromide, chloride, fluoride, ether, hydroxy, amino, and ketone functionalities tolerated. Additionally, hindered aryl iodides such as iodomesitylene can also be carboxylated. PMID:24288654

  13. Iodide transport and its regulation in the thyroid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the autoregulatory mechanism of iodide induced suppression of subsequently determined iodide transport activity in the thyroid gland. Two model systems were developed to identify the putative, transport-related, iodine-containing, inhibitory factor responsible for autoregulation. The first system was a maternal and fetal rabbit thyroid tissue slice preparation in which iodide pretreatment inhibited the maternal /sup 125/I-T/M ratio by 30% and had no significant effect on fetal iodide transport. In the second system, the role of protein synthesis in the autoregulatory phenomenon was studied. Cat thyroid slices pretreated with0.1 mM cycloheximide for 60 min prior to preexposure to excess iodide demonstrated a significant reduction in the degree of iodide included autoregulation. In both of these systems iodide induced suppression of cAMP accumulation remained intact. These findings suggest (1) fetal rabbit thyroid lacks the autoregulatory mechanism of iodide transport and (2) protein synthesis is involved in the mechanism of thyroid autoregulation of iodide transport.

  14. Phase Change of Gallium Enables Highly Reversible and Switchable Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhou; Lum, Guo Zhan; Song, Sukho; Rich, Steven; Sitti, Metin

    2016-07-01

    Gallium exhibits highly reversible and switchable adhesion when it undergoes a solid-liquid phase transition. The robustness of gallium is notable as it exhibits strong performance on a wide range of smooth and rough surfaces, under both dry and wet conditions. Gallium may therefore find numerous applications in transfer printing, robotics, electronic packaging, and biomedicine. PMID:27146217

  15. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN...

  18. Europium-doped barium bromide iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Gundiah, Gautam; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Hollander, Fredrick J.; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    2009-10-21

    Single crystals of Ba0.96Eu0.04BrI (barium europium bromide iodide) were grown by the Bridgman technique. The title compound adopts the ordered PbCl2 structure [Braekken (1932). Z. Kristallogr. 83, 222-282]. All atoms occupy the fourfold special positions (4c, site symmetry m) of the space group Pnma with a statistical distribution of Ba and Eu. They lie on the mirror planes, perpendicular to the b axis at y = +-0.25. Each cation is coordinated by nine anions in a tricapped trigonal prismatic arrangement.

  19. The addition of iodine to tetramethylammonium iodide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foote, H.W.; Fleischer, M.

    1953-01-01

    The system tetramethylammonium iodide-iodine-toluene has been studied by the solubility method at 6 and at 25??. The compounds (CH3)4NI3, (CH3)4NI5 and (CH3)4NI11 were found to be stable phases at both temperatures. In addition, the compound (CH3)4NI10 was found at 6?? and the compound (CH3)4NI9 at 25??. The dissociation pressures of the compounds at these temperatures were calculated from the solubility data.

  20. Gallium Zeolites for Light Paraffin Aromatization

    SciTech Connect

    Price, G.L.; Dooley, K.M.

    1999-02-10

    The primary original goal of this project was to investigate the active state of gallium-containing MFI catalysts for light paraffin aromatization, in particular the state of gallium in the active material. Our original hypothesis was that the most active and selective materials were those which contained gallium zeolitic cations, and that previously reported conditions for the activation of gallium-containing catalysts served to create these active centers. We believed that in high silica materials such as MFI, ion-exchange is most effectively accomplished with metals in their 1+ oxidation state, both because of the sparsity of the anionic ion-exchange sites associated with the zeolite, and because the large hydration shells associated with aqueous 3+ cations hinder transport. Metals such as Ga which commonly exist in higher oxidation states need to be reduced to promote ion-exchange and this is the reason that reduction of gallium-containing catalysts for light paraffin aromatization often yields a dramatic enhancement in catalytic activity. We have effectively combined reduction with ion-exchange and we term this combined process ''reductive solid-state ion-exchange''. Our hypothesis has largely been proven true, and a number of the papers we have published directly address this hypothesis.

  1. Chrome doped gallium arsenide evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Pocha, M.D.; Morse, J.D.; Brazes, W.F.

    1987-10-10

    We received, for free, two sets of Chrome doped Gallium Arsenide (GaAs:Cr) wafers, one from Cominco Electronic Materials, Inc., and the other from Furakawa Electric Co., for the purpose of evaluation as potential material for high speed photoconductive detectors. In return for the free material we promised to give the two manufacturers feed back on our evaluation of these wafers. The primary purpose of this report is to present the results of our evaluation of these wafers and conclusions regarding the usefulness of heavily doped GaAs:Cr for photoconductive detectors. We have found that response times of less than 100 ps (FWHM) are possible with GaAs:Cr detectors, but that there are several time constants to the decay which result in very long ''tails'' to the impulse response of these detectors. These long tails are unacceptable for most detector applications, but there may be some special cases where GaAs:Cr could be used. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Taming the Reactivity of Glycosyl Iodides To Achieve Stereoselective Glycosidation.

    PubMed

    Gervay-Hague, Jacquelyn

    2016-01-19

    Although glycosyl iodides have been known for more than 100 years, it was not until the 21st century that their full potential began to be harnessed for complex glycoconjugate synthesis. Mechanistic studies in the late 1990s probed glycosyl iodide formation by NMR spectroscopy and revealed important reactivity features embedded in protecting-group stereoelectronics. Differentially protected sugars having an anomeric acetate were reacted with trimethylsilyl iodide (TMSI) to generate the glycosyl iodides. In the absence of C-2 participation, generation of the glycosyl iodide proceeded by inversion of the starting anomeric acetate stereochemistry. Once formed, the glycosyl iodide readily underwent in situ anomerization, and in the presence of excess iodide, equilibrium concentrations of α- and β-iodides were established. Reactivity profiles depended upon the identity of the sugar and the protecting groups adorning it. Consistent with the modern idea of disarmed versus armed sugars, ester protecting groups diminished the reactivity of glycosyl iodides and ether protecting groups enhanced the reactivity. Thus, acetylated sugars were slower to form the iodide and anomerize than their benzylated analogues, and these disarmed glycosyl iodides could be isolated and purified, whereas armed ether-protected iodides could only be generated and reacted in situ. All other things being equal, the β-iodide was orders of magnitude more reactive than the thermodynamically more stable α-iodide, consistent with the idea of in situ anomerization introduced by Lemieux in the mid-20th century. Glycosyl iodides are far more reactive than the corresponding bromides, and with the increased reactivity comes increased stereocontrol, particularly when forming α-linked linear and branched oligosaccharides. Reactions with per-O-silylated glycosyl iodides are especially useful for the synthesis of α-linked glycoconjugates. Silyl ether protecting groups make the glycosyl iodide so reactive

  3. Taming the Reactivity of Glycosyl Iodides To Achieve Stereoselective Glycosidation.

    PubMed

    Gervay-Hague, Jacquelyn

    2016-01-19

    Although glycosyl iodides have been known for more than 100 years, it was not until the 21st century that their full potential began to be harnessed for complex glycoconjugate synthesis. Mechanistic studies in the late 1990s probed glycosyl iodide formation by NMR spectroscopy and revealed important reactivity features embedded in protecting-group stereoelectronics. Differentially protected sugars having an anomeric acetate were reacted with trimethylsilyl iodide (TMSI) to generate the glycosyl iodides. In the absence of C-2 participation, generation of the glycosyl iodide proceeded by inversion of the starting anomeric acetate stereochemistry. Once formed, the glycosyl iodide readily underwent in situ anomerization, and in the presence of excess iodide, equilibrium concentrations of α- and β-iodides were established. Reactivity profiles depended upon the identity of the sugar and the protecting groups adorning it. Consistent with the modern idea of disarmed versus armed sugars, ester protecting groups diminished the reactivity of glycosyl iodides and ether protecting groups enhanced the reactivity. Thus, acetylated sugars were slower to form the iodide and anomerize than their benzylated analogues, and these disarmed glycosyl iodides could be isolated and purified, whereas armed ether-protected iodides could only be generated and reacted in situ. All other things being equal, the β-iodide was orders of magnitude more reactive than the thermodynamically more stable α-iodide, consistent with the idea of in situ anomerization introduced by Lemieux in the mid-20th century. Glycosyl iodides are far more reactive than the corresponding bromides, and with the increased reactivity comes increased stereocontrol, particularly when forming α-linked linear and branched oligosaccharides. Reactions with per-O-silylated glycosyl iodides are especially useful for the synthesis of α-linked glycoconjugates. Silyl ether protecting groups make the glycosyl iodide so reactive

  4. Production of Molecular Iodine and Tri-iodide in the Frozen Solution of Iodide: Implication for Polar Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kitae; Yabushita, Akihiro; Okumura, Masanori; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Cuevas, Carlos A; Blaszczak-Boxe, Christopher S; Min, Dae Wi; Yoon, Ho-Il; Choi, Wonyong

    2016-02-01

    The chemistry of reactive halogens in the polar atmosphere plays important roles in ozone and mercury depletion events, oxidizing capacity, and dimethylsulfide oxidation to form cloud-condensation nuclei. Among halogen species, the sources and emission mechanisms of inorganic iodine compounds in the polar boundary layer remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the production of tri-iodide (I3(-)) via iodide oxidation, which is negligible in aqueous solution, is significantly accelerated in frozen solution, both in the presence and the absence of solar irradiation. Field experiments carried out in the Antarctic region (King George Island, 62°13'S, 58°47'W) also showed that the generation of tri-iodide via solar photo-oxidation was enhanced when iodide was added to various ice media. The emission of gaseous I2 from the irradiated frozen solution of iodide to the gas phase was detected by using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, which was observed both in the frozen state at 253 K and after thawing the ice at 298 K. The accelerated (photo-)oxidation of iodide and the subsequent formation of tri-iodide and I2 in ice appear to be related with the freeze concentration of iodide and dissolved O2 trapped in the ice crystal grain boundaries. We propose that an accelerated abiotic transformation of iodide to gaseous I2 in ice media provides a previously unrecognized formation pathway of active iodine species in the polar atmosphere. PMID:26745029

  5. Production of Molecular Iodine and Tri-iodide in the Frozen Solution of Iodide: Implication for Polar Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kitae; Yabushita, Akihiro; Okumura, Masanori; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Cuevas, Carlos A; Blaszczak-Boxe, Christopher S; Min, Dae Wi; Yoon, Ho-Il; Choi, Wonyong

    2016-02-01

    The chemistry of reactive halogens in the polar atmosphere plays important roles in ozone and mercury depletion events, oxidizing capacity, and dimethylsulfide oxidation to form cloud-condensation nuclei. Among halogen species, the sources and emission mechanisms of inorganic iodine compounds in the polar boundary layer remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the production of tri-iodide (I3(-)) via iodide oxidation, which is negligible in aqueous solution, is significantly accelerated in frozen solution, both in the presence and the absence of solar irradiation. Field experiments carried out in the Antarctic region (King George Island, 62°13'S, 58°47'W) also showed that the generation of tri-iodide via solar photo-oxidation was enhanced when iodide was added to various ice media. The emission of gaseous I2 from the irradiated frozen solution of iodide to the gas phase was detected by using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, which was observed both in the frozen state at 253 K and after thawing the ice at 298 K. The accelerated (photo-)oxidation of iodide and the subsequent formation of tri-iodide and I2 in ice appear to be related with the freeze concentration of iodide and dissolved O2 trapped in the ice crystal grain boundaries. We propose that an accelerated abiotic transformation of iodide to gaseous I2 in ice media provides a previously unrecognized formation pathway of active iodine species in the polar atmosphere.

  6. Ambient temperature deposition of gallium nitride/gallium oxynitride from a deep eutectic electrolyte, under potential control.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sujoy; Sampath, S

    2016-05-11

    A ternary, ionically conducting, deep eutectic solvent based on acetamide, urea and gallium nitrate is reported for the electrodeposition of gallium nitride/gallium indium nitride under ambient conditions; blue and white light emitting photoluminescent deposits are obtained under potential control. PMID:27074315

  7. Phase 2 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Nick; Watson, Tony

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear fission produces fission products (FPs) and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the second phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during the second half of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014. Test results continue to show that methyl iodide adsorption using AgZ can achieve total iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) above 1,000, until breakthrough occurred. However, mass transfer zone depths are deeper for methyl iodide adsorption compared to diatomic iodine (I2) adsorption. Methyl iodide DFs for the Ag Aerogel test adsorption efficiencies were less than 1,000, and the methyl iodide mass transfer zone depth exceeded 8 inches. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption under various conditions specified in the methyl iodide test plan, and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  8. Gallium uptake in myositis ossificans. Potential pitfalls in diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, L.; Lee, V.W.; Grant, P.

    1987-04-01

    Seven cases of gallium uptake in myositis ossificans are described. Gallium scans are done frequently in paraplegics, quadriplegics, and comatose patients to look for occult infection. It is important to be aware of possible gallium uptake in myositis ossificans, particularly in the extremities, which is frequent in these patients. Gallium uptake may be present prior to any abnormalities seen on plain films or CT scans. It is important to correlate roentgenograms with abnormal gallium scans, particularly in the extremities, to avoid potential pitfalls in diagnosis and prevent unnecessary antibiotic treatment. A bone scan should be obtained whenever possible, particularly when roentgenograms are negative, to confirm the diagnosis.

  9. Radiation damage of gallium arsenide production cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, N.; Joslin, D.; Garlick, J.; Lillington, D.; Gillanders, M.; Cavicchi, B.; Scott-Monck, J.; Kachare, R.; Anspaugh, B.

    1987-01-01

    High efficiency liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) gallium arsenide cells were irradiated with 1 Mev electrons up to fluences of 1 times 10 to the 16th power cm-2. Measurements of spectral response and dark and illuminated I-V data were made at each fluence and then, using computer codes, the experimental data was fitted to gallium arsenide cell models. In this way it was possible to determine the extent of the damage, and hence damage coefficients in both the emitter and base of the cell.

  10. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763 Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms....

  11. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763 Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms....

  12. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763 Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms....

  13. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763 Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms....

  14. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763 Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms....

  15. Routes to ultra-pure alkyls of indium and gallium and their adducts with ethers, phosphines and amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Anthony C.; Holliday, A. Kenneth; Cole-Hamilton, David J.; Ahmad, M. Munir; Gerrard, Neil D.

    1984-09-01

    Electrolysis of tetrahydrofuran (thf) solutions of dimethylmagnesium containing tetraethylammonium percholrate using a gallium anode gives [Me 3Ga·thf], but higher yields of both [Me 3Ga·thf] and [Me 3In·thf] are obtained on electrolysis of thf solutions of Grignard reagents with sacrificial metal anodes in the absence of a carrying electrolyte. The thf adducts can be converted into adducts with other Lewis bases, [ Me3M· L], M = Ga or In, L = PMe 3, PEt 3, NEt 3, by simple base exchange reactions. Base-free trimethylgallium can be prepared from: (i) reaction of methyl iodide with the intermetallic compound [Mg 5Ga 2] in a high boiling ether; (ii) electrolysis of Grignard reagents in high boiling ethers using sacrificial gallium anodes; (iii) reactions of GaCl 3 with Grignard reagents in high boiling ethers or (iv) ether exchange reaction between [Me 3Ga·OEt 2] and high boiling ethers. All of these reactions lead to adducts between trimethylgallium and the high boiling ether which, on heating, decompose to give base-free trimethylgallium. [Me 3Ga·OEt 2] can be prepared from reaction of Grignard reagents with gallium trichloride in diethylether or from electrolysis of Grignard reagents in diethyl ether using a sacrificial gallium anode. Similar reactions using an indium anode lead to [Me 3In·OEt 2] from which base-free trimethylindium can be liberated using known chemistry. The use of alkyls prepared in this way for vapour phase epitaxy as well as the purity of the alkyls are discussed.

  16. Iodide sensing via electrochemical etching of ultrathin gold films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dielacher, Bernd; Tiefenauer, Raphael F.; Junesch, Juliane; Vörös, János

    2015-01-01

    Iodide is an essential element for humans and animals and insufficient intake is still a major problem. Affordable and accurate methods are required to quantify iodide concentrations in biological and environmental fluids. A simple and low cost sensing device is presented which is based on iodide induced electrochemical etching of ultrathin gold films. The sensitivity of resistance measurements to film thickness changes is increased by using films with a thickness smaller than the electron mean free path. The underlying mechanism is demonstrated by simultaneous cyclic voltammetry experiments and resistance change measurements in a buffer solution. Iodide sensing is conducted in buffer solutions as well as in lake water with limits of detection in the range of 1 μM (127 μg L-1) and 2 μM (254 μg L-1), respectively. In addition, nanoholes embedded in the thin films are tested for suitability of optical iodide sensing based on localized surface plasmon resonance.

  17. Long-chain amine-templated synthesis of gallium sulfide and gallium selenide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seral-Ascaso, A.; Metel, S.; Pokle, A.; Backes, C.; Zhang, C. J.; Nerl, H. C.; Rode, K.; Berner, N. C.; Downing, C.; McEvoy, N.; Muñoz, E.; Harvey, A.; Gholamvand, Z.; Duesberg, G. S.; Coleman, J. N.; Nicolosi, V.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the soft chemistry synthesis of amine-templated gallium chalcogenide nanotubes through the reaction of gallium(iii) acetylacetonate and the chalcogen (sulfur, selenium) using a mixture of long-chain amines (hexadecylamine and dodecylamine) as a solvent. Beyond their role as solvent, the amines also act as a template, directing the growth of discrete units with a one-dimensional multilayer tubular nanostructure. These new materials, which broaden the family of amine-stabilized gallium chalcogenides, can be tentatively classified as direct large band gap semiconductors. Their preliminary performance as active material for electrodes in lithium ion batteries has also been tested, demonstrating great potential in energy storage field even without optimization.We describe the soft chemistry synthesis of amine-templated gallium chalcogenide nanotubes through the reaction of gallium(iii) acetylacetonate and the chalcogen (sulfur, selenium) using a mixture of long-chain amines (hexadecylamine and dodecylamine) as a solvent. Beyond their role as solvent, the amines also act as a template, directing the growth of discrete units with a one-dimensional multilayer tubular nanostructure. These new materials, which broaden the family of amine-stabilized gallium chalcogenides, can be tentatively classified as direct large band gap semiconductors. Their preliminary performance as active material for electrodes in lithium ion batteries has also been tested, demonstrating great potential in energy storage field even without optimization. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01663d

  18. In-situ Observation of Surface Graphitization of Gallium Droplet and Concentration of Carbon in Liquid Gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueki, Ryuichi; Nishijima, Takuya; Hikata, Takeshi; Ookubo, Soichiro; Utsunomiya, Risa; Matsuba, Teruaki; Fujita, Jun-ichi

    2012-06-01

    Although carbon has been recognized to be insoluble in gallium, we found that the outermost surface of gallium has unexpectedly high carbon solubility, particularly the limited region of about a few nanometers in depth. Our in-situ transmission electron microscope observations revealed that a graphene layer was precipitated at the surface of a gallium droplet simultaneously with gallium evaporation, and some of the droplets created an internal graphitic layer. On the basis of these experimental data, we evaluated a substantial carbon solubility that seemed to exceed about 50 at. %, but was realized in a very thin surface region of about 4 nm in depth. We believe that this high carbon solubility at the gallium surface is the key mechanism for the catalytic ability of gallium that was observed at the interface between liquid gallium and solid amorphous carbon.

  19. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy of gallium in bladder tissue following gallium maltolate administration during urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Ball, Katherine R; Sampieri, Francesca; Chirino, Manuel; Hamilton, Don L; Blyth, Robert I R; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Dowling, Patricia M; Thompson, Julie

    2013-11-01

    A mouse model of cystitis caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli was used to study the distribution of gallium in bladder tissue following oral administration of gallium maltolate during urinary tract infection. The median concentration of gallium in homogenized bladder tissue from infected mice was 1.93 μg/g after daily administration of gallium maltolate for 5 days. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bladder sections confirmed that gallium arrived at the transitional epithelium, a potential site of uropathogenic E. coli infection. Gallium and iron were similarly but not identically distributed in the tissues, suggesting that at least some distribution mechanisms are not common between the two elements. The results of this study indicate that gallium maltolate may be a suitable candidate for further development as a novel antimicrobial therapy for urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic E. coli.

  20. Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence Microscopy of Gallium in Bladder Tissue following Gallium Maltolate Administration during Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sampieri, Francesca; Chirino, Manuel; Hamilton, Don L.; Blyth, Robert I. R.; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Dowling, Patricia M.; Thompson, Julie

    2013-01-01

    A mouse model of cystitis caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli was used to study the distribution of gallium in bladder tissue following oral administration of gallium maltolate during urinary tract infection. The median concentration of gallium in homogenized bladder tissue from infected mice was 1.93 μg/g after daily administration of gallium maltolate for 5 days. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bladder sections confirmed that gallium arrived at the transitional epithelium, a potential site of uropathogenic E. coli infection. Gallium and iron were similarly but not identically distributed in the tissues, suggesting that at least some distribution mechanisms are not common between the two elements. The results of this study indicate that gallium maltolate may be a suitable candidate for further development as a novel antimicrobial therapy for urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic E. coli. PMID:23877680

  1. Silver iodide sodalite for 129I immobilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, E. R.; Gregg, D. J.; Grant, C.; Stopic, A.; Maddrell, E. R.

    2016-11-01

    Silver iodide sodalite was initially synthesised as a fine-grained major phase in a nominally stoichiometric composition following hot isostatic pressing at 850 °C with 100 MPa and its composition, Ag4Al3Si3O12I, was approximately verified by scanning electron microscopy. An alternative preparative method yielded a more dense and stoichiometric AgI sodalite on sintering and HIPing. As found for AgI, the I is released from AgI sodalite much more readily in reducing water than in ordinary water. Thus in normal PCT-B tests, the I release was <0.3 g/L in water, but it was ∼70 g/L under highly reducing conditions. This is an important point with regard to can material if HIPing is used for consolidation.

  2. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, John C.; Shul, Randy J.

    1999-01-01

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  3. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, J.C.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-02-02

    An ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same are disclosed. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorus co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials. 19 figs.

  4. Extrapulmonary localization of gallium in sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.; Singh, R.; Vieras, F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the spectrum of extrapulmonary localization of gallium in patients with sarcoidosis. The usefulness of Ga-67 scintiscans in detecting clinically occult lesions, in directing clinicians to accessible sites for biopsy, and in following the course of extrapulmonary sites of involvement with therapy is emphasized.

  5. Gallium Electromagnetic (GEM) Thruster Performance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Burton, Rodney L.; Polzin, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    Discharge current, terminal voltage, and mass bit measurements are performed on a coaxial gallium electromagnetic thruster at discharge currents in the range of 7-23 kA. It is found that the mass bit varies quadratically with the discharge current which yields a constant exhaust velocity of 20 km/s. Increasing the electrode radius ratio of the thruster from to 2.6 to 3.4 increases the thruster efficiency from 21% to 30%. When operating with a central gallium anode, macroparticles are ejected at all energy levels tested. A central gallium cathode ejects macroparticles when the current density exceeds 3.7 10(exp 8) A/square m . A spatially and temporally broad spectroscopic survey in the 220-520 nm range is used to determine which species are present in the plasma. The spectra show that neutral, singly, and doubly ionized gallium species are present in the discharge, as well as annular electrode species at higher energy levels. Axial Langmuir triple probe measurements yield electron temperatures in the range of 0.8-3.8 eV and electron densities in the range of 8 x 10(exp )20 to 1.6 x 10(exp 21) m(exp -3) . Triple probe measurements suggest an exhaust plume with a divergence angle of 9 , and a completely doubly ionized plasma at the ablating thruster cathode.

  6. Solar cell with a gallium nitride electrode

    DOEpatents

    Pankove, Jacques I.

    1979-01-01

    A solar cell which comprises a body of silicon having a P-N junction therein with a transparent conducting N-type gallium nitride layer as an ohmic contact on the N-type side of the semiconductor exposed to solar radiation.

  7. Anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of gallium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pankey, T.

    1960-01-01

    The bulk magnetic susceptibilities of single gallium crystals and polycrystalline gallium spheres were measured at 25??C. The following anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibilities were found: a axis (-0.119??0. 001)??10-6 emu/g, b axis (-0.416??0.002)??10 -6 emu/g, and c axis (-0.229??0.001) emu/g. The susceptibility of the polycrystalline spheres, assumed to be the average value for the bulk susceptibility of gallium, was (-0.257??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at 25??C, and (-0.299??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at -196??C. The susceptibility of liquid gallium was (0.0031??0.001) ??10-6 emu/g at 30??C and 100??C. Rotational diagrams of the susceptibilities in the three orthogonal planes of the unit cell were not sinusoidal. The anisotropy in the single crystals was presumably caused by the partial overlap of Brillouin zone boundaries by the Fermi-energy surface. The large change in susceptibility associated with the change in state was attributed to the absence of effective mass influence in the liquid state. ?? 1960 The American Institute of Physics.

  8. Development of gallium aluminum phosphide electroluminescent diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicotka, R. J.; Lorenz, M. R.; Nethercot, A. H.; Pettit, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    Work done on the development of gallium aluminum phosphide alloys for electroluminescent light sources is described. The preparation of this wide band gap semiconductor alloy, its physical properties (particularly the band structure, the electrical characteristics, and the light emitting properties) and work done on the fabrication of diode structures from these alloys are broadly covered.

  9. Gallium Nitride Crystals: Novel Supercapacitor Electrode Materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouzhi; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Changlong; Shao, Yongliang; Wu, Yongzhong; Lv, Jiaxin; Hao, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-01

    A type of single-crystal gallium nitride mesoporous membrane is fabricated and its supercapacitor properties are demonstrated for the first time. The supercapacitors exhibit high-rate capability, stable cycling life at high rates, and ultrahigh power density. This study may expand the range of crystals as high-performance electrode materials in the field of energy storage.

  10. Gallium-positive Lyme disease myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, L.I.; Welch, P.; Fisher, N.

    1985-09-01

    In the course of a work-up for fever of unknown origin associated with intermittent arrhythmias, a gallium scan was performed which revealed diffuse myocardial uptake. The diagnosis of Lyme disease myocarditis subsequently was confirmed by serologic titers. One month following recovery from the acute illness, the abnormal myocardial uptake completely resolved.

  11. Gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bakir, A.A.; Lopez-Majano, V.; Levy, P.S.; Rhee, H.L.; Dunea, G.

    1988-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease, 45 patients with various glomerulopathies, excluding lupus nephritis and renal vasculitis, were studied. Persistent renal visualization 48 hours after the gallium injection, a positive scintigram, was graded as + (less than), ++ (equal to), and +++ (greater than) the hepatic uptake. Positive scintigrams were seen in ten of 16 cases of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, six of 11 cases of proliferative glomerulonephritis, and one case of minimal change, and one of two cases of membranous nephropathy; also in three of six cases of sickle glomerulopathy, two cases of diabetic neuropathy, one of two cases of amyloidosis, and one case of mild chronic allograft rejection. The 25 patients with positive scans were younger than the 20 with negative scans (31 +/- 12 v 42 +/- 17 years; P less than 0.01), and exhibited greater proteinuria (8.19 +/- 7.96 v 2.9 +/- 2.3 S/d; P less than 0.01) and lower serum creatinine values (2 +/- 2 v 4.1 +/- 2.8 mg/dL; P less than 0.01). The amount of proteinuria correlated directly with the intensity grade of the gallium image (P less than 0.02), but there was no correlation between the biopsy diagnosis and the outcome of the gallium scan. It was concluded that gallium scintigraphy is not useful in the differential diagnosis of the glomerular diseases under discussion. Younger patients with good renal function and heavy proteinuria are likely to have a positive renal scintigram regardless of the underlying glomerulopathy.

  12. The distribution of iodide at the sea surface.

    PubMed

    Chance, Rosie; Baker, Alex R; Carpenter, Lucy; Jickells, Tim D

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the impact of sea surface iodide concentrations on the deposition of ozone to the sea surface and the sea to air flux of reactive iodine. The use of models to predict this flux demands accurate, spatially distributed sea surface iodide concentrations, but to date, the observational data required to support this is sparse and mostly arises from independent studies conducted on small geographical and temporal scales. We have compiled the available measurements of sea surface iodide to produce a data set spanning latitudes from 69°S to 66°N, which reveals a coherent, large scale distribution pattern, with highest concentrations observed in tropical waters. Relationships between iodide concentration and more readily available parameters (chlorophyll, nitrate, sea surface temperature, salinity, mixed layer depth) are evaluated as tools to predict iodide concentration. Of the variables tested, sea surface temperature is the strongest predictor of iodide concentration. Nitrate was also strongly inversely associated with iodide concentration, but chlorophyll-a was not.

  13. Formation of gallium microinclusions in GaAs single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilenko, N.D.; Gorbatyuk, A.Ya.; Maronchuk, I.E.

    1988-08-01

    In this report we analyze the causes of gallium microinclusion formation in gallium arsenide single crystals. We present a model in which microinclusions result from the decomposition of a supersaturated solid solution. From experimental data available in the literature and calculated kinetic parameters of the model we demonstrate that microinclusion formation in bulk single crystals follows the mechanism of homogeneous nucleation and Brownian coalescence of precipitated liquid gallium metal.

  14. Surface photovoltage spectroscopy applied to gallium arsenide surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bynik, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical basis for surface photovoltage spectroscopy is outlined. Results of this technique applied to gallium arsenide surfaces, are reviewed and discussed. The results suggest that in gallium arsenide the surface voltage may be due to deep bulk impurity acceptor states that are pinned at the Fermi level at the surface. Establishment of the validity of this model will indicate the direction to proceed to increase the efficiency of gallium arsenide solar cells.

  15. Survey of the market, supply and availability of gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Rosi, F.D.

    1980-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the present consumption and supply of gallium, its potential availability in the satellite power system (SPS) implementation time frame, and commercial and new processing methods for increasing the production of gallium. Findings are reported in detail. The findings strongly suggest that with proper long range planning adequate gallium would be available from free-enterprise world supplies of bauxite for SPS implementation.

  16. Reaction of N-sulfonyltellurimides with methyl iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Naddaka, V.I.; Avanesyan, K.V.; Cherkinskaya, M.L.; Minkin, V.I.

    1987-09-20

    While developing researches into the reactivity of tellurimides, the authors studied the previously unknown reaction of N-sulonyltellurimides with methyl iodide. The authors established that bis(diphenyltellurium) oxide and N-methyl-p-toluenesulfonamide are formed when the tellurimide is boiled in methyl iodide. Such a direction is evidently due to the fact that the telluronium salt produced during the reaction is readily hydrolyzed at the Te-N bond on account of the presence of traces of moisture in the methyl iodide. However, the heating of the tellurimides with an excess of anhydrous methyl iodide in a sealed tube leads to diaryltellurium diiodides and N,N-dimethylsulfonamides. The PMR spectra of solutions of the substances in deuterochloroform were recorded on a Tesla-BS-487 spectrometer at 80 MHz with HMDS as internal standard. The IR spectra were obtained on a Specord 71-IR instrument in Vaseline oil.

  17. Laboratory measurements of parameters affecting wet deposition of methyl iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Maeck, W.J.; Honkus, R.J.; Keller, J.H.; Voilleque, P.G.

    1984-09-01

    The transfer of gaseous methyl iodide (CH/sub 3/I) to raindrops and the initial retention by vegetation of CH/sub 3/I in raindrops have been studied in a laboratory experimental program. The measured air-to-drop transfer parameters and initial retention factors both affect the wet deposition of methyl iodide onto vegetation. No large effects on the air-to-drop transfer due to methyl iodide concentration, temperature, acidity, or rain type were observed. Differences between laboratory measurements and theoretical values of the mass transfer coefficient were found. Pasture grass, lettuce, and alfalfa were used to study the initial retention of methyl iodide by vegetation. Only a small fraction of the incident CH/sub 3/I in raindrops was held by any of the three vegetation types.

  18. Nanochemistry: Iron cluster reactions with methyl iodide

    SciTech Connect

    McCarter, B.E.; Bililign, S.; Feigerle, C.S.; Miller, J.C.

    1999-08-26

    Previous experiments have shown that the ionization/dissociation of iron pentacarbonyl clusters can lead to the formation of iron ions and iron cluster ions that that these species can further react with dopant molecules to yield chemically rearranged products. The present experiments characterize similar reactions with methyl iodide molecules and clusters. Heteroclusters of the form [Fe(CO){sub 5}]{sub m}(CH{sub 3}I){sub n}Ar{sub p} are created in an expanding supersonic jet of the component molecules. Following ionization by a 30 ps, 266 nm laser pulse, extensive dissociation, aggregation, and chemical rearrangement occur leading to ionic products, which are characterized by mass spectrometry. Cluster ions of the type Fe{sub m}I{sub n}{sup +}, Fe(CH{sub 3}I){sub n}{sup +} are observed as products. The stability of the binary parent ion Fe(CH{sub 3}I){sup +} is demonstrated for the first time.

  19. Chloride, bromide and iodide scintillators with europium

    DOEpatents

    Zhuravleva, Mariya; Yang, Kan

    2016-09-27

    A halide scintillator material is disclosed where the halide may comprise chloride, bromide or iodide. The material is single-crystalline and has a composition of the general formula ABX.sub.3 where A is an alkali, B is an alkali earth and X is a halide which general composition was investigated. In particular, crystals of the formula ACa.sub.1-yEu.sub.yI.sub.3 where A=K, Rb and Cs were formed as well as crystals of the formula CsA.sub.1-yEu.sub.yX.sub.3 (where A=Ca, Sr, Ba, or a combination thereof and X=Cl, Br or I or a combination thereof) with divalent Europium doping where 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, and more particularly Eu doping has been studied at one to ten mol %. The disclosed scintillator materials are suitable for making scintillation detectors used in applications such as medical imaging and homeland security.

  20. Gallium arsenide phosphide top solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    McNeely, J.B.; Barnett, A.M.

    1986-04-15

    This patent describes a tandem solar cell having a silicon solar cell for a low energy gap bottom cell and a high energy gap top cell. The improvement which a gallium arsenide phosphide top solar cell which described here is a. a transparent gallium phosphide substrate; b. a first active semiconductor layer of GaAs/sub 1-Y/P/sub Y/ and of a first conductivity type overlying the substrate; c. a second active semiconductor layer of GaAs/sub 1-X/P/sub X/ and of a second conductivity type opposite the first conductivity type overlying and forming a photovoltaic junction therewith; d. a transparent first electrical contact in ohmic contact with the substrate; and e. a transparent second electrical contact in ohmic contact with the second active semiconductor layer.

  1. Efficient water reduction with gallium phosphide nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Standing, Anthony; Assali, Simone; Gao, Lu; Verheijen, Marcel A.; van Dam, Dick; Cui, Yingchao; Notten, Peter H. L.; Haverkort, Jos E. M.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from solar energy and water offers a clean and sustainable fuel option for the future. Planar III/V material systems have shown the highest efficiencies, but are expensive. By moving to the nanowire regime the demand on material quantity is reduced, and new materials can be uncovered, such as wurtzite gallium phosphide, featuring a direct bandgap. This is one of the few materials combining large solar light absorption and (close to) ideal band-edge positions for full water splitting. Here we report the photoelectrochemical reduction of water, on a p-type wurtzite gallium phosphide nanowire photocathode. By modifying geometry to reduce electrical resistance and enhance optical absorption, and modifying the surface with a multistep platinum deposition, high current densities and open circuit potentials were achieved. Our results demonstrate the capabilities of this material, even when used in such low quantities, as in nanowires. PMID:26183949

  2. Structural diversity in hybrid organic-inorganic lead iodide materials.

    PubMed

    Weber, Oliver J; Marshall, Kayleigh L; Dyson, Lewis M; Weller, Mark T

    2015-12-01

    The structural chemistry of hybrid organic-inorganic lead iodide materials has become of increasing significance for energy applications since the discovery and development of perovskite solar cells based on methylammonium lead iodide. Seven new hybrid lead iodide compounds have been synthesized and structurally characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The lead iodide units in materials templated with bipyridyl, 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane, 1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethylene and imidazole adopt one-dimensional chain structures, while crystallization from solutions containing piperazinium cations generates a salt containing isolated [PbI6](4-) octahedral anions. Templating with 4-chlorobenzylammonium lead iodide adopts the well known two-dimensional layered perovskite structure with vertex shared sheets of composition [PbI4](2-) separated by double layers of organic cations. The relationships between the various structures determined, their compositions, stability and hydrogen bonding between the protonated amine and the iodide ions of the PbI6 octahedra are described. PMID:26634723

  3. A Gallium multiphase equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, Scott D; Greeff, Carl

    2009-01-01

    A new SESAME multiphase Gallium equation of state (EOS) has been developed. The equation of state includes three of the solid phases (Ga I, Ga II, Ga III) and a fluid phase (liquid/gas). The EOS includes consistent latent heat between the phases. We compare the results to the liquid Hugoniol data. We also explore the possibility of re-freezing via dynamic means such as isentropic and shock compression.

  4. Gallium-67 imaging in muscular sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Edan, G.; Bourguet, P.; Delaval, P.; Herry, J.Y.

    1984-07-01

    A case is presented of sarcoid myopathy in which radiogallium was seen to accumulate in the sites of muscle involvement. Uptake of the radiotracer disappeared following institution of corticosteroid therapy. The exceptional nature of this case contrasts with the high frequency of biopsy evidence of sarcoid granulomas in muscle. Gallium-67 imaging can be used to determine the extent of muscle involvement and, through evaluation of uptake intensity, the degree of disease activity before and after treatment.

  5. Gallium-67 radionuclide imaging in acute pyelonephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, G.; Morillo, G.; Alonso, M.; Isikoff, M.B.

    1980-01-01

    The symptoms and clinical course of patients with acute pyelonephritis are variable; likewise, urinalysis, blood cultures, and excretory urography may be normal or equivocal. The ability of gallium-67 to accumulate in areas of active inflammation was useful in the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis in 12 cases. A multiplane tomographic scanner was used for imaging four of these patients. Initial experience with this scanner is also discussed.

  6. Long-chain amine-templated synthesis of gallium sulfide and gallium selenide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Seral-Ascaso, A; Metel, S; Pokle, A; Backes, C; Zhang, C J; Nerl, H C; Rode, K; Berner, N C; Downing, C; McEvoy, N; Muñoz, E; Harvey, A; Gholamvand, Z; Duesberg, G S; Coleman, J N; Nicolosi, V

    2016-06-01

    We describe the soft chemistry synthesis of amine-templated gallium chalcogenide nanotubes through the reaction of gallium(iii) acetylacetonate and the chalcogen (sulfur, selenium) using a mixture of long-chain amines (hexadecylamine and dodecylamine) as a solvent. Beyond their role as solvent, the amines also act as a template, directing the growth of discrete units with a one-dimensional multilayer tubular nanostructure. These new materials, which broaden the family of amine-stabilized gallium chalcogenides, can be tentatively classified as direct large band gap semiconductors. Their preliminary performance as active material for electrodes in lithium ion batteries has also been tested, demonstrating great potential in energy storage field even without optimization. PMID:27221399

  7. Potassium Iodide ("KI"): Instructions to Make Potassium Iodide Solution for Use During a Nuclear Emergency (Liquid Form)

    MedlinePlus

    ... make Potassium Iodide Solution for Use During a Nuclear Emergency (Liquid Form) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Preparation and Dosing Instructions for Use During a Nuclear Emergency To Make KI Solution (Liquid Form), using ...

  8. Engineering and design properties of thallium-doped sodium iodide and selected properties of sodium-doped cesium iodide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, K.; Haehner, C.; Heslin, T.; Magida, M.; Uber, J.; Freiman, S.; Hicho, G.; Polvani, R.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical and thermal properties, not available in the literature but necessary to structural design, using thallium doped sodium iodide and sodium doped cesium iodide were determined to be coefficient of linear thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, thermal shock resistance, heat capacity, elastic constants, ultimate strengths, creep, hardness, susceptibility to subcritical crack growth, and ingot variation of strength. These properties were measured for single and polycrystalline materials at room temperature.

  9. Iodide iontophoresis as a treatment for dry eye syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Horwath-Winter, J; Schmut, O; Haller-Schober, E-M; Gruber, A; Rieger, G

    2005-01-01

    Background/aims: Among the causes related to the development or perpetuation and aggravation of dry eye disease, oxidative reactions may have a role in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Antioxidants, such as iodide, have shown a strong effect in preventing the oxidative damage to constituents of the anterior part of the eye. In this clinical trial the effectiveness of iodide iontophoresis and iodide application without current in moderate to severe dry eye patients was compared. Methods: 16 patients were treated with iodide iontophoresis and 12 patients with iodide application without current for 10 days. Subjective improvement, frequency of artificial tear application, tear function parameters (break up time, Schirmer test without local anaesthesia), vital staining (fluorescein and rose bengal staining) as well as impression cytology of the bulbar conjunctiva were evaluated before treatment, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after treatment. Results: A reduction in subjective symptoms, frequency of artificial tear substitute application, and an improvement in certain tear film and ocular surface factors could be observed in both groups. A stronger positive influence was seen after application of iodide with current (iontophoresis), as observed in a distinct improvement in break up time, fluorescein and rose bengal staining, and in a longer duration of this effect compared with the non-current group. No significant change in Schirmer test results and impression cytology were observed in both groups. Conclusions: Iodide iontophoresis has been demonstrated to be a safe and well tolerated method of improving subjective and objective dry eye factors in patients with ocular surface disease. PMID:15615744

  10. P-n junctions formed in gallium antimonide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clough, R.; Richman, D.; Tietjen, J.

    1970-01-01

    Vapor phase deposition process forms a heavily doped n-region on a melt-grown p-type gallium antimonide substrate. HCl transports gallium to the reaction zone, where it combines with antimony hydride and the dopant carrier, hydrogen telluride. Temperatures as low as 400 degrees C are required.

  11. Behavior of pure gallium in water and various saline solutions.

    PubMed

    Horasawa, N; Nakajima, H; Takahashi, S; Okabe, T

    1997-12-01

    This study investigated the chemical stability of pure gallium in water and saline solutions in order to obtain fundamental knowledge about the corrosion mechanism of gallium-based alloys. A pure gallium plate (99.999%) was suspended in 50 mL of deionized water, 0.01%, 0.1% or 1% NaCl solution at 24 +/- 2 degrees C for 1, 7, or 28 days. The amounts of gallium released into the solutions were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The surfaces of the specimens were examined after immersion by x-ray diffractometry (XRD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In the solutions containing 0.1% or more NaCl, the release of gallium ions into the solution was lowered when compared to deionized water after 28-day immersion. Gallium oxide monohydroxide was found by XRD on the specimens immersed in deionized water after 28-day immersion. XPS indicated the formation of gallium oxide/hydroxide on the specimens immersed in water or 0.01% NaCl solution. The chemical stability of pure solid gallium was strongly affected by the presence of Cl- ions in the aqueous solution.

  12. Gallium scintigraphy in bone infarction. Correlation with bone imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Armas, R.R.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The appearance of gallium-67 images in bone infarction was studied in nine patients with sickle cell disease and correlated with the bone scan findings. Gallium uptake in acute infarction was decreased or absent with a variable bone scan uptake, and normal in healing infarcts, which showed increased uptake on bone scan. The significance of these findings is discussed.

  13. Automated realization of the gallium melting and triple points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X.; Duan, Y.; Zhang, J. T.; Wang, W.

    2013-09-01

    In order to improve the automation and convenience of the process involved in realizing the gallium fixed points, an automated apparatus, based on thermoelectric and heat pipe technologies, was designed and developed. This paper describes the apparatus design and procedures for freezing gallium mantles and realizing gallium melting and triple points. Also, investigations on the melting behavior of a gallium melting point cell and of gallium triple point cells were carried out while controlling the temperature outside the gallium point cells at 30 °C, 30.5 °C, 31 °C, and 31.5 °C. The obtained melting plateau curves show dentate temperature oscillations on the melting plateaus for the gallium point cells when thermal couplings occurred between the outer and inner liquid-solid interfaces. The maximum amplitude of the temperature fluctuations was about 1.5 mK. Therefore, the temperature oscillations can be used to indicate the ending of the equilibrium phase transitions. The duration and amplitude of such temperature oscillations depend on the temperature difference between the setting temperature and the gallium point temperature; the smaller the temperature difference, the longer the duration of both the melting plateaus and the temperature fluctuations.

  14. Repurposing of gallium-based drugs for antibacterial therapy.

    PubMed

    Bonchi, Carlo; Imperi, Francesco; Minandri, Fabrizia; Visca, Paolo; Frangipani, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    While the occurrence and spread of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens is vanishing current anti-infective therapies, the antibiotic discovery pipeline is drying up. In the last years, the repurposing of existing drugs for new clinical applications has become a major research area in drug discovery, also in the field of anti-infectives. This review discusses the potential of repurposing previously approved gallium formulations in antibacterial chemotherapy. Gallium has no proven function in biological systems, but it can act as an iron-mimetic in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The activity of gallium mostly relies on its ability to replace iron in redox enzymes, thus impairing their function and ultimately hampering cell growth. Cancer cells and bacteria are preferential gallium targets due to their active metabolism and fast growth. The wealth of knowledge on the pharmacological properties of gallium has opened the door to the repurposing of gallium-based drugs for the treatment of infections sustained by antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens, such as Acinetobacter baumannii or Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and for suppression of Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth. The promising antibacterial activity of gallium both in vitro and in different animal models of infection raises the hope that gallium will confirm its efficacy in clinical trials, and will become a valuable therapeutic option to cure otherwise untreatable bacterial infections.

  15. Two octanuclear gallium metallamacrocycles of topologically different connectivities.

    PubMed

    Park, Mira; John, Rohith P; Moon, Dohyun; Lee, Kyungjin; Kim, Ghyung Hwa; Lah, Myoung Soo

    2007-12-14

    Two topologically different metallamacrocycles--S8 symmetric octanuclear gallium(III) metalladiazamacrocycle and pseudo-D4 symmetric octanuclear gallium(III) metalladiazamacrocycle--could be prepared using two similar heteroditopic bridging ligands having asymmetrical tridentate-bidentate binding residues.

  16. Chemical state determination of molecular gallium compounds using XPS.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Jeremy L; Biesinger, Mark C; Baines, Kim M

    2016-05-01

    A series of molecular gallium compounds were analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Specifically, the Ga 2p3/2 and Ga 3d5/2 photoelectron binding energies and the Ga L3M45M45 Auger electron kinetic energies of compounds with gallium in a range of assigned oxidation numbers and with different stabilizing ligands were measured. Auger parameters were calculated and used to generate multiple chemical speciation (or Wagner) plots that were subsequently used to characterize the novel gallium-cryptand[2.2.2] complexes that possess ambiguous oxidation numbers for gallium. The results presented demonstrate the ability of widely accessible XPS instruments to experimentally determine the chemical state of gallium centers and, as a consequence, provide deeper insights into reactivity compared to assigned oxidation and valence numbers.

  17. Nuclear microprobe imaging of gallium nitrate in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Richard; Suda, Asami; Devès, Guillaume

    2003-09-01

    Gallium nitrate is used in clinical oncology as treatment for hypercalcemia and for cancer that has spread to the bone. Its mechanism of antitumor action has not been fully elucidated yet. The knowledge of the intracellular distribution of anticancer drugs is of particular interest in oncology to better understand their cellular pharmacology. In addition, most metal-based anticancer compounds interact with endogenous trace elements in cells, altering their metabolism. The purpose of this experiment was to examine, by use of nuclear microprobe analysis, the cellular distribution of gallium and endogenous trace elements within cancer cells exposed to gallium nitrate. In a majority of cellular analyses, gallium was found homogeneously distributed in cells following the distribution of carbon. In a smaller number of cells, however, gallium appeared concentrated together with P, Ca and Fe within round structures of about 2-5 μm diameter located in the perinuclear region. These intracellular structures are typical of lysosomial material.

  18. Bismuth tri-iodide radiation detector development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhale, Sasmit S.

    Bismuth tri-iodide is an attractive material for room temperature radiation detection. BiI3 demonstrates a number of properties that are apt for semiconductor radiation detection, especially gamma ray spectroscopy. The high atomic number (ZBi = 83 and ZI = 53) and the relatively high density (5.78 g/cm3) cause the material to have good photon stopping power, while the large band-gap (1.67 eV ) allows it to function as a room temperature radiation detector without any cooling mechanism. This work presents the fabrication and characterization of BiI3 radiation detectors. For the purpose of this research detectors were fabricated by cutting BiI3 crystal boules, followed by mechanical and chemical surface treatments. Detectors with various electrode geometries enabling single polarity charge sensing were fabricated. The electrical characteristics and the radiation response of the detectors were measured. The radiation response measurement was performed at room temperature using a 241Am alpha particle source and a 241Am sealed gamma-ray source. The spectral resolutions of the detectors varied from 2.09% - 6.1% for 59.5 keV gamma-rays and between 26% - 40% for 5.48 MeV alpha particles. Charge carrier properties such as the electron and hole mobility and lifetime were also estimated. The electron mobility for an ultrapure BiI 3 detector was estimated to be approximately 433 cm 2/Vs while that for antimony doped BiI3 was estimated to be around 956 cm2/Vs and the mobility-lifetime product for electrons was estimated to be around 5.44 x 10-4 cm 2/V. Detector simulation was performed using the Monte Carlo simulation code MCNP5. A Matlab script which incorporates charge carrier trapping and statistical variation was written to generate a gamma-ray spectrum from the simulated energy deposition spectra. Measured and simulated spectra were compared to extract the charge carrier mobility-lifetime products, which for electrons and holes were estimated to be 5 x 10-3 cm2/V and 1.3 x

  19. Macrosegregation during Plane Front Solidification of Cesium Iodide wt Percent Thallium Iodide Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidawi, Ibrahim M. S.

    Macrosegregation produced during directional solidification of CsI-1 wt% TlI by vertical Bridgman technique has been examined in crucibles of varying diameter, from 0.5 to 2.0 cm. Phase diagram and temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity have been determined. The experimentally observed liquid-solid interface shape and the fluid flow behavior have been compared with that computed from the commercially available code FIDAP. Thallium iodide content of the alloy was observed to increase along the length of the directionally solidified specimens, resulting in continuously decreasing light output. The experimentally observed solutal distribution agrees with predictions from the boundary layer model of Favier. The observed macrosegregation behavior suggests that there is a significant convection in the melt even in the smallest crucible diameter of 0.5 cm.

  20. The Preparation and Structural Characterization of Three Structural Types of Gallium Compounds Derived from Gallium (II) Chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Edward M.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Duraj. Stan A.; Habash, Tuhfeh S.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Schupp, John D.; Eckles, William E.; Long, Shawn

    1997-01-01

    The three compounds Ga2Cl4(4-mepy)2 (1),[GaCl2(4-mepy)4]GaCl4x1/2(4-mepy); (2) and GaCl2(4-mepy)2(S2CNEt2); (3) (4-mepy= 4-methylpyridine) have been prepared from reactions of gallium (II) chloride in 4-methylpyridine and characterized by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Small variations in the reaction conditions for gallium(II) chloride can produce crystals with substantially different structural properties. The three compounds described here encompass a neutral gallium(II) dimer in which each gallium is four-coordinate, an ionic compound containing both anionic and cationic gallium complex ions with different coordination numbers and a neutral six-coordinate heteroleptic

  1. Gallium scintigraphic pattern in lung CMV infections

    SciTech Connect

    Ganz, W.I.; Cohen, D.; Mallin, W.

    1994-05-01

    Due to extensive use of prophylactic therapy for Pneumonitis Carinii Pneumonia (PCP), Cytomegalic Viral (CMV) infection may now be the most common lung infection in AIDS patients. This study was performed to determine Gallium-67 patterns in AIDS patients with CMV. Pathology reports were reviewed in AIDS patients who had a dose of 5 to 10 mCi of Gallium-67 citrate. Analysis of images were obtained 48-72 hours later of the entire body was performed. Gallium-67 scans in 14 AIDS patients with biopsy proven CMV, were evaluated for eye, colon, adrenal, lung and renal uptake. These were compared to 40 AIDS patients without CMV. These controls had infections including PCP, Mycobacterial infections, and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis. 100% of CMV patients had bowel uptake greater than or equal to liver. Similar bowel activity was seen in 50% of AIDS patients without CMV. 71% had intense eye uptake which was seen in only 10% of patients without CMV. 50% of CMV patients had renal uptake compared to 5% of non-CMV cases. Adrenal uptake was suggested in 50%, however, SPECT imaging is needed for confirmation. 85% had low grade lung uptake. The low grade lung had perihilar prominence. The remaining 15% had high grade lung uptake (greater than sternum) due to superimposed PCP infection. Colon uptake is very sensitive indicator for CMV infection. However, observing eye, renal, and or adrenal uptake improved the diagnostic specificity. SPECT imaging is needed to confirm renal or adrenal abnormalities due to intense bowel activity present in 100% of cases. When high grade lung uptake is seen superimposed PCP is suggested.

  2. Gallium-67 imaging in muscular sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Edan, G.; Bourguet, P.; Delaval, P.; Herry, J.Y.

    1984-07-01

    A case is presented of sarcoid myopathy in which radiogallium was seen to accumulate in the sites of muscle involvement. Uptake of the radiotracer disappeared following institution of corticosteroid therapy. The exceptional nature of this case contrasts with the high frequency of biopsy evidence of sarcoid muscle disease but is consistent with the rarity of clinical evidence of sarcoid granulomas in muscle. Gallium-67 imaging can be used to determine the extent of muscle involvement and, through evaluation of uptake intensity, the degree of disease activity before and after treatment.

  3. Thyroid effects of iodine and iodide in potable water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Richard J.; Thrall, Karla D.; Sherer, Todd T.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments are reviewed which examine the comparative toxicological effects of iodide (I) and iodine (I2) when used to disinfect drinking water. References are made to a subchronic study in rats, a comparison of the distribution of radiolabeled I and I2, and a demonstration of thyroxine formation in the gastrointestinal tract. The results of the study of the rats are examined in detail; the findings show that I and I2 have opposite effects on the concentrations of thyroid hormones in blood. Iodide slightly decreases circulating thyroxine, while I2 significantly increases the thyroxine concentrations, decreases triiodothyronine levels, and does not change the weight of the thyroid gland. The related effects of I2 ingestion are set forth in detail and are shown to be unique to I2 contamination. Iodine can counteract the effects of iodide and should therefore be used as a disinfectant in drinking water.

  4. Phase 1 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg; Tony Watson

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products (FPs) and activation products including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent [Jubin 2012b]. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the first phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 and early FY-2014. Testing has been performed to address questions posed in the test plan, and followed the testing outline in the test plan. Tests established detection limits, developed procedures for sample analysis with minimal analytical interferences, and confirmed earlier results that show that the methyl iodide reacts when in contact with the AgZ sorbent, and not significantly in the gas flow upstream of the sorbent. The reaction(s) enable separation of the iodine from the organic moiety, so that the iodine can chemisorb onto the sorbent. The organic moiety can form other compounds, some of which are organic compounds that are detected and can be tentatively identified using GC-FID and GCMS. Test results also show that other gas constituents (NOx and/or H2O) can affect the methyl iodide reactions. With NOx and H2O present in the gas stream, the majority of uncaptured iodine exiting iodine-laden sorbent beds is in the form of I2 or HI, species that

  5. Standard free energy of formation of iron iodide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandkar, A.; Tare, V. B.; Wagner, J. B., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An experiment is reported where silver iodide is used to determine the standard free energy of formation of iron iodide. By using silver iodide as a solid electrolyte, a galvanic cell, Ag/AgI/Fe-FeI2, is formulated. The standard free energy of formation of AgI is known, and hence it is possible to estimate the standard free energy of formation of FeI2 by measuring the open-circuit emf of the above cell as a function of temperature. The free standard energy of formation of FeI2 determined by this method is -38784 + 24.165T cal/mol. It is estimated that the maximum error associated with this method is plus or minus 2500 cal/mol.

  6. Enhanced Olefin Cross Metathesis Reactions: The Copper Iodide Effect

    PubMed Central

    Voigtritter, Karl; Ghorai, Subir

    2011-01-01

    Copper iodide has been shown to be an effective co-catalyst for the olefin cross metathesis reaction. In particular, it has both a catalyst stabilizing effect due to iodide ion, as well as copper(I)-based phosphine-scavenging properties that apply to use of the Grubbs-2 catalyst. A variety of Michael acceptors and olefinic partners can be cross-coupled under mild conditions in refluxing diethyl ether that avoid chlorinated solvents. This effect has also been applied to chemistry in water at room temperature using the new surfactant TPGS-750-M. PMID:21528868

  7. Assessment of gallium-67 scanning in pulmonary and extrapulmonary sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Israel, H.L.; Gushue, G.F.; Park, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    Gallium-67 scans have been widely employed in patients with sarcoidosis as a means of indicating alveolitis and the need for corticosteroid therapy. Observation of 32 patients followed 3 or more years after gallium scans showed no correlation between findings and later course: of 10 patients with pulmonary uptake, 7 recovered with minor residuals; of 18 patients with mediastinal of extrathoracic uptake, 10 had persistent or progressive disease; of 4 patients with negative initial scans, 2 had later progression. The value of gallium-67 scans as an aid to diagnosis was studied in 40 patients with extrapulmonary sarcoidosis. In 12 patients, abnormal lacrimal, nodal, or pulmonary uptake aided in selection of biopsy sites. Gallium-67 scans and serum ACE levels were compared in 97 patients as indices of clinical activity. Abnormal gallium-67 uptake was observed in 96.3% of the tests in active disease, and ACE level elevation occurred in 56.3%. In 24 patients with inactive or recovered disease, abnormal gallium-67 uptake occurred in 62.5% and ACE level elevation in 37.5%. Gallium-67 scans have a limited but valuable role in the diagnosis and management of sarcoidosis.

  8. Gallium induces the production of virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Coria-Jiménez, Rafael; Rangel-Vega, Adrián; Maeda, Toshinari; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-02-01

    The novel antimicrobial gallium is a nonredox iron III analogue with bacteriostatic and bactericidal properties, effective for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo in mouse and rabbit infection models. It interferes with iron metabolism, transport, and presumably its homeostasis. As gallium exerts its antimicrobial effects by competing with iron, we hypothesized that it ultimately will lead cells to an iron deficiency status. As iron deficiency promotes the expression of virulence factors in vitro and promotes the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa in animal models, it is anticipated that treatment with gallium will also promote the production of virulence factors. To test this hypothesis, the reference strain PA14 and two clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis were exposed to gallium, and their production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipids, elastase, alkaline protease, alginate, pyoverdine, and biofilm was determined. Gallium treatment induced the production of all the virulence factors tested in the three strains except for pyoverdine. In addition, as the Ga-induced virulence factors are quorum sensing controlled, co-administration of Ga and the quorum quencher brominated furanone C-30 was assayed, and it was found that C-30 alleviated growth inhibition from gallium. Hence, adding both C-30 and gallium may be more effective in the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections.

  9. Compatibility of ITER candidate structural materials with static gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Luebbers, P.R.; Michaud, W.F.; Chopra, O.K.

    1993-12-01

    Tests were conducted on the compatibility of gallium with candidate structural materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, e.g., Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy, as well as Armco iron, Nickel 270, and pure chromium. Type 316 stainless steel is least resistant to corrosion in static gallium and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy is most resistant. At 400{degrees}C, corrosion rates are {approx}4.0, 0.5, and 0.03 mm/yr for type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo- 1 Zr alloy, respectively. The pure metals react rapidly with gallium. In contrast to findings in earlier studies, pure iron shows greater corrosion than nickel. The corrosion rates at 400{degrees}C are {ge}88 and 18 mm/yr, respectively, for Armco iron and Nickel 270. The results indicate that at temperatures up to 400{degrees}C, corrosion occurs primarily by dissolution and is accompanied by formation of metal/gallium intermetallic compounds. The solubility data for pure metals and oxygen in gallium are reviewed. The physical, chemical, and radioactive properties of gallium are also presented. The supply and availability of gallium, as well as price predictions through the year 2020, are summarized.

  10. The effects of gallium nitrate on bone resorption.

    PubMed

    Bockman, Richard

    2003-04-01

    Gallium nitrate has been shown to be an effective treatment for patients with cancer-related hypercalcemia. Clinical studies have also suggested the drug may have considerably broader use in other diseases associated with accelerated bone loss including multiple myeloma, bone metastases, Paget's disease, and osteoporosis. The actions of gallium nitrate on bone are quite distinct from those of bisphosphonates. Preclinical studies show that gallium preferentially accumulates in trace amounts in metabolically active regions of bone. When present, gallium favorably alters the mineral properties to enhance hydroxyapatite crystallization and reduce mineral solubility. The drug also acts on the cellular components of bone to reduce bone resorption by decreasing acid secretion by osteoclasts. This effect appears to be mediated by inhibition of the ATPase-dependent proton pump of the osteoclast's ruffled membrane. Gallium does not inhibit the development or recruitment of osteoclasts to bone tissue, unlike many bisphosphonates that may induce osteoclast apoptosis. Together, these pharmacologic actions may yield a skeletal system with increased calcium and phosphate content and improved biomechanical strength. Gallium nitrate has potent antiresorptive effects on bone that can be achieved at considerably lower doses than are currently used for cancer-related hypercalcemia. Parenteral and oral formulations of gallium appear to have high activity in bone resorptive disorders, and thus development should be vigorously pursued in these diseases. PMID:12776254

  11. γ-Selective Allylation of (E)-Alkenylzinc Iodides Prepared by Reductive Coupling of Arylacetylenes with Alkyl Iodides.

    PubMed

    Zhurkin, Fedor E; Hu, Xile

    2016-07-01

    The first examples of Cu-catalyzed γ-selective allylic alkenylation using organozinc reagents are reported. (E)-Alkenylzinc iodides were prepared by Fe-catalyzed reductive coupling of terminal arylalkynes with alkyl iodides. In the presence of a copper catalyst, these reagents reacted with allylic bromides derived from Morita-Baylis-Hillman alcohols to give 1,4-dienes in high yields. The reactions are highly γ-selective (generally γ/α > 49:1) and tolerate a wide range of functional groups such as ester, cyano, keto, and nitro. PMID:27285459

  12. Limiting pump intensity for sulfur-doped gallium selenide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; Li, D.-J.; Xie, J.-J.; Zhang, L.-M.; Feng, Z.-S.; Andreev, Yu M.; Kokh, K. A.; Lanskii, G. V.; Potekaev, A. I.; Shaiduko, A. V.; Svetlichnyi, V. A.

    2014-05-01

    High optical quality undoped and sulfur-doped gallium selenide crystals were grown from melts by the modified vertical Bridgman method. Detailed study of the damage produced under femtosecond pulse exposure has shown that evaluation of the damage threshold by visual control is unfounded. Black matter spots produced on crystal surfaces do not noticeably decrease either its transparency or its frequency conversion efficiency as opposed to real damage identified as caked well-cohesive gallium structures. For the first time it was demonstrated that optimally sulfur-doped gallium selenide crystal possesses the highest resistivity to optical emission (about four times higher in comparison with undoped gallium selenide).

  13. Antitumor effect of novel gallium compounds and efficacy of nanoparticle-mediated gallium delivery in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wehrung, Daniel; Oyewumi, Moses O

    2012-02-01

    The widespread application of gallium (Ga) in cancer therapy has been greatly hampered by lack of specificity resulting in poor tumor accumulation and retention. To address the challenge, two lipophilic gallium (III) compounds (gallium hexanedione; GaH and gallium acetylacetonate; GaAcAc) were synthesized and antitumor studies were conducted in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells. Nanoparticles (NPs) containing various concentrations of the Ga compounds were prepared using a binary mixture of Gelucire 44/14 and cetyl alcohol as matrix materials. NPs were characterized based on size, morphology, stability and biocompatibility. Antitumor effects of free or NP-loaded Ga compounds were investigated based on cell viability, production of reactive oxygen species and reduction of mitochondrial potential. Compared to free Ga compounds, cytotoxicity of NP-loaded Ga (5-150 microg/ml) was less dependent on concentration and incubation time (exposure) with A549 cells. NP-mediated delivery (5-150 microg Ga/ml) enhanced antitumor effects of Ga compounds and the effect was pronounced at: (i) shorter incubation times; and (ii) at low concentrations of gallium (approximately 50 microg/ml) (p < 0.0006). Additional studies showed that NP-mediated Ga delivery was not dependent on transferrin receptor uptake mechanism (p > 0.13) suggesting the potential in overcoming gallium resistance in some tumors. In general, preparation of stable and biocompatible NPs that facilitated Ga tumor uptake and antitumor effects could be effective in gallium-based cancer therapy.

  14. Physical property measurements of doped cesium iodide crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Synder, R. S.; Clotfelter, W. N.

    1974-01-01

    Mechanical and thermal property values are reported for crystalline cesium iodide doped with sodium and thallium. Young's modulus, bulk modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson's ratio were obtained from ultrasonic measurements. Young's modulus and the samples' elastic and plastic behavior were also measured under tension and compression. Thermal expansion and thermal conductivity were the temperature dependent measurements that were made.

  15. Degradation of Methyl Iodide in Soil: Effects of Environmental Factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl iodide (MeI) is a promising alternative to the phased-out fumigant methyl bromide, and its environmental fate following soil fumigation is of great concern. Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of various environmental factors on the degradation rate of MeI in soil. The chem...

  16. DEGRADATION OF METHYL IODIDE IN SOIL: EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl iodide (MeI) is a promising alternative to the phased-out fumigant methyl bromide; however, there are concerns about its environmental fate following soil fumigation. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of various environmental factors on the degradation rate of ...

  17. 40 CFR 415.510 - Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... potassium iodide production subcategory. 415.510 Section 415.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Potassium Iodide Production Subcategory § 415.510 Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  18. 40 CFR 415.510 - Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... potassium iodide production subcategory. 415.510 Section 415.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Potassium Iodide Production Subcategory § 415.510 Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  19. 40 CFR 415.510 - Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... potassium iodide production subcategory. 415.510 Section 415.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Potassium Iodide Production Subcategory § 415.510 Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  20. 40 CFR 415.510 - Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... potassium iodide production subcategory. 415.510 Section 415.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Potassium Iodide Production Subcategory § 415.510 Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  1. Palladium-catalyzed direct C-H arylation of cyclic enaminones with aryl iodides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi-Yun; Bi, Lei; Georg, Gunda I

    2013-06-21

    A ligand-free method for the Pd-catalyzed direct arylation of cyclic enaminones using aryl iodides was developed. This method can be applied to a wide range of cyclic enaminones and aryl iodides with excellent C5-regioselectivity. Using widely available aryl iodides, the generality of this transformation provides easy access to a variety of 3-arylpiperidine structural motifs.

  2. 40 CFR 415.510 - Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... potassium iodide production subcategory. 415.510 Section 415.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Potassium Iodide Production Subcategory § 415.510 Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  3. Fabrication of Aluminum Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride MESFET And It's Applications in Biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alur, Siddharth

    Gallium Nitride has been researched extensively for the past three decades for its application in Light Emitting Diodes (LED's), power devices and UV photodetectors. With the recent developments in crystal growth technology and the ability to control the doping there has been an increased interest in heterostructures formed between Gallium nitride and it's alloy Aluminium Gallium Nitride. These heterostructures due to the combined effect of spontaneous and piezoelectric effect can form a high density and a high mobility electron gas channel without any intentional doping. This high density electron gas makes these heterostructures ideal to be used as sensors. Gallium Nitride is also chemically very stable. Detection of biomolecules in a fast and reliable manner is very important in the areas of food safety and medical research. For biomolecular detection it is paramount to have a robust binding of the probes on the sensor surface. Therefore, in this dissertation, the fabrication and application of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructures as biological sensors for the detection of DNA and Organophosphate hydrolase enzyme is discussed. In order to use these AlGaN/GaN heterostructures as biological sensors capable of working in a liquid environment photodefinable polydimethyl-siloxane is used as an encapsulant. The immobilization conditions for a robust binding of thiolated DNA and the catalytic receptor enzyme organophosphate hydrolase on gold surfaces is developed with the help of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. DNA and OPH are detected by measuring the change in the drain current of the device as a function of time.

  4. Measurement of arsenic and gallium content of gallium arsenide semiconductor waste streams by ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Torrance, Keith W; Keenan, Helen E; Hursthouse, Andrew S; Stirling, David

    2010-01-01

    The chemistry of semiconductor wafer processing liquid waste, contaminated by heavy metals, was investigated to determine arsenic content. Arsenic and gallium concentrations were determined for waste slurries collected from gallium arsenide (GaAs) wafer processing at three industrial sources and compared to slurries prepared under laboratory conditions. The arsenic and gallium content of waste slurries was analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry (ICP-MS) and it is reported that the arsenic content of the waste streams was related to the wafer thinning process, with slurries from wafer polishing having the highest dissolved arsenic content at over 1,900 mgL(-1). Lapping slurries had much lower dissolved arsenic (< 90 mgL(-1)) content, but higher particulate contents. It is demonstrated that significant percentage of GaAs becomes soluble during wafer lapping. Grinding slurries had the lowest dissolved arsenic content at 15 mgL(-1). All three waste streams are classified as hazardous waste, based on their solids content and dissolved arsenic levels and treatment is required before discharge or disposal. It is calculated that as much as 93% of material is discarded through the entire GaAs device manufacturing process, with limited recycling. Although gallium can be economically recovered from waste slurries, there is little incentive to recover arsenic, which is mostly landfilled. Options for treating GaAs processing waste streams are reviewed and some recommendations made for handling the waste. Therefore, although the quantities of hazardous waste generated are miniscule in comparison to other industries, sustainable manufacturing practices are needed to minimize the environmental impact of GaAs semiconductor device fabrication.

  5. Synthesis of conjugated polymers containing gallium atoms and evaluation of conjugation through four-coordinate gallium atoms.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Onishi, Yoshinobu; Tanaka, Kazuo; Fueno, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kazuyoshi; Chujo, Yoshiki

    2014-12-25

    The synthesis and analysis of the electronic states of the main-chain type-organogallium polymers are presented. We synthesized the polymers containing four-coordinate gallium atoms by organometal coupling reactions. The synthesized polymers showed good solubility in common organic solvents and enough stability for measuring a series of properties under ambient conditions. In the UV-vis absorption spectra, the electronic interaction through four-coordinate gallium atoms was suggested from the peak shifts of the polymer compared to the model compounds. Theoretical calculation of these molecules supports the extended electronic interaction through the polymer main-chain involving gallium atoms.

  6. FY-2015 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Nicholas Ray; Watson, Tony Leroy

    2015-09-30

    Nuclear fission produces fission and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has continued in Fiscal Year 2015 according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. Updates to the deep-bed test system have also been performed to enable the inclusion of evaporated HNO3 and increased NO2 concentrations in future tests. This report summarizes the result of those activities. Test results showed that iodine adsorption from gaseous methyl iodide using reduced silver zeolite (AgZ) resulted in initial iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) under 1,000 for the conditions of the long-duration test performed this year (45 ppm CH3I, 1,000 ppm each NO and NO2, very low H2O levels [3 ppm] in balance air). The mass transfer zone depth exceeded the cumulative 5-inch depth of 4 bed segments, which is deeper than the 2-4 inch depth estimated for the mass transfer zone for adsorbing I2 using AgZ in prior deep-bed tests. The maximum iodine adsorption capacity for the AgZ under the conditions of this test was 6.2% (6.2 g adsorbed I per 100 g sorbent). The maximum Ag utilization was 51%. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  7. Preliminary Experimental Measurements for a Gallium Electromagnetic (GEM) Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Burton, Rodney L.; Glumac, Nick G.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2007-01-01

    A low-energy gallium plasma source is used to perform a spatially and temporally broad spectroscopic survey in the 220-520 nm range. Neutral, singly, and doubly ionized gallium are present in a 20 J, 1.8 kA (peak) arc discharge operating with a central cathode. When the polarity of the inner electrode is reversed the discharge current and arc voltage waveforms remain similar. Utilizing a central anode configuration, multiple Ga lines are absent in the 270-340 nm range. In addition, neutral and singly ionized Fe spectral lines are present, indicating erosion of the outer electrode. With graphite present on the insulator to facilitate breakdown, line emission from the gallium species is further reduced and while emissions from singly and doubly ionized carbon atoms and molecular carbon (C2) radicals are observed. These data indicate that a significant fraction of energy is shifted from the gallium and deposited into the various carbon species.

  8. All-optical modulation in gallium arsenide integrated optical waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    McWright, G.; Ross, B.; Guthreau, W.; Lafaw, D.; Lowry, M.; Tindall, W.

    1988-01-27

    We have investigated all-optical modulators in gallium arsenide integrated optical waveguides; these modulators use electron-hole pair generation to alter the propagation characteristics of a guided light beam. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Computer simulation of radiation damage in gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stith, John J.; Davenport, James C.; Copeland, Randolph L.

    1989-01-01

    A version of the binary-collision simulation code MARLOWE was used to study the spatial characteristics of radiation damage in proton and electron irradiated gallium arsenide. Comparisons made with the experimental results proved to be encouraging.

  10. Reversible expansion of gallium-stabilized (delta)-plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfer, W G; Oudot, B; Baclet, N

    2006-02-27

    It is shown that the transient expansion of plutonium-gallium alloys observed both in the lattice parameter as well as in the dimension of a sample held at ambient temperature can be explained by assuming incipient precipitation of Pu{sub 3}Ga. However, this ordered {zeta}-phase is also subject to radiation-induced disordering. As a result, the gallium-stabilized {delta}-phase, being metastable at ambient temperature, is driven towards thermodynamic equilibrium by radiation-enhanced diffusion of gallium and at the same time reverted back to its metastable state by radiation-induced disordering. A steady state is reached in which only a modest fraction of the gallium present is arranged in ordered {zeta}-phase regions.

  11. Reversible expansion of gallium-stabilized delta-plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfer, W; Oudot, B; Baclet, N

    2006-01-26

    The transient expansion of plutonium-gallium alloys observed both in the lattice parameter as well as in the dimension of a sample held at ambient temperature is explained by assuming incipient precipitation of Pu{sub 3}Ga. However, this ordered {zeta}{prime}-phase is also subject to radiation-induced disordering. As a result, the gallium-stabilized {delta}-phase, being metastable at ambient temperature, is both driven towards thermodynamic equilibrium by radiation-enhanced diffusion of gallium and at the same time pushed back to its metastable state by radiation-induced disordering. A steady state is reached in which only a modest fraction of the gallium present is tied up in the {zeta}{prime}-phase.

  12. Gallium scanning in Paget's disease of bone: effect of calcitonin

    SciTech Connect

    Waxman, A.D.; McKee, D.; Siemsen, J.K.; Singer, F.R.

    1980-02-01

    Calcitonin has been used in the treatment of Paget's disease of bone, and serum alkaline phosphatase level and 24 hr urinary hydroxyproline excretion have been used to follow therapeutic response. The radionuclide bone scan has been used as a visual indicator; however, there is some uncertainty as to its value in following changes in disease activity. Four patients with both serial technetium phosphate bone scans and serial gallium studies were studied. In each case the beneficial effect of calcitonin was demonstrated more accurately with gallium than with technetium diphosphonate. Since biochemical changes in Paget's disease are believed to be mediated at the cellular level and gallium uptake depends on cellular activity, it is proposed that gallium uptake is more appropriate measure of the activity of Paget's disease than a noncellular marker such as a technetium-containing bone scan agent.

  13. Generator for ionic gallium-68 based on column chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Neirinckx, Rudi D.; Davis, Michael A.

    1981-01-01

    A physiologically acceptable solution of gallium-68 fluorides, having an activity of 0.1 to 50 millicuries per milliliter of solution is provided. The solution is obtained from a generator comprising germanium-68 hexafluoride bound to a column of an anion exchange resin which forms gallium-68 in situ by eluting the column with an acid solution to form a solution containing .sup.68 Ga-fluorides. The solution then is neutralized prior to administration.

  14. Complexometric determination of gallium with calcein blue as indicator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elsheimer, H.N.

    1967-01-01

    A metalfluorechromic indicator, Calcein Blue, has been used for the back-titration of milligram amounts of EDTA in presence of gallium complexes. The indicator was used in conjunction with an ultraviolet titration assembly equipped with a cadmium sulphide detector cell and a microammeter for enhanced end-point detection. The result is a convenient and rapid method with an accuracy approaching 0.1 % and a relative standard deviation of about 0.4% for 10 mg of gallium. ?? 1967.

  15. Detection of deep venous thrombophlebitis by gallium 67 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.

    1981-07-01

    Deep venous thrombophlebitis may escape clinical detection. Three cases are reported in which whole-body gallium 67 scintigraphy was used to detect unsuspected deep venous thrombophlebitis related to indwelling catheters in three children who were being evaluated for fevers of unknown origin. Two of these children had septicemia from Candida organisms secondary to these venous lines. Gallium 67 scintigraphy may be useful in the detection of complications of indwelling venous catheters.

  16. Gallium-68 PSMA uptake in adrenal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Law, W Phillip; Fiumara, Frank; Fong, William; Miles, Kenneth A

    2016-08-01

    Gallium-68 (Ga-68) labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) has emerged as a promising tool for staging of prostate cancer and restaging of disease in recurrence or biochemical failure after definitive treatment of prostate cancer. Ga-68 PSMA PET produces high target-to-background images of prostate cancer and its metastases which are reflective of the significant overexpression of PSMA in these cells and greatly facilitates tumour detection. However, relatively little is known about the PSMA expression of benign neoplasms and non-prostate epithelial malignancies. This is a case report of PSMA uptake in an adrenal adenoma incidentally discovered on PET performed for restaging of biochemically suspected prostate cancer recurrence. With the increasing use of PSMA PET in the management of prostate cancer - and the not infrequent occurrence of adrenal adenomas - the appearance of low- to moderate-grade PSMA uptake in adrenal adenomas should be one with which reporting clinicians are familiar.

  17. Contact formation in gallium arsenide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1988-01-01

    Gold and gold-based alloys, commonly used as solar cell contact materials, are known to react readily with gallium arsenide. Experiments were performed to identify the mechanisms involved in these GaAs-metal interactions. It is shown that the reaction of GaAs with gold takes place via a dissociative diffusion process. It is shown further that the GaAs-metal reaction rate is controlled to a very great extent by the condition of the free surface of the contact metal, an interesting example of which is the previously unexplained increase in the reaction rate that has been observed for samples annealed in a vacuum environment as compared to those annealed in a gaseous ambient. A number of other hard-to-explain observations, such as the low-temperature formation of voids in the gold lattice and crystallite growth on the gold surface, are explained by invoking this mechanism.

  18. Radiation damage of gallium arsenide production cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, N.; Garlick, G. F. J.

    1987-01-01

    High-efficiency gallium arsenide cells, made by the liquid epitaxy method (LPE), have been irradiated with 1-MeV electrons up to fluences of 10 to the 16th e/sq cm. Measurements have been made of cell spectral response and dark and light-excited current-voltage characteristics and analyzed using computer-based models to determine underlying parameters such as damage coefficients. It is possible to use spectral response to sort out damage effects in the different cell component layers. Damage coefficients are similar to other reported in the literature for the emitter and buffer (base). However, there is also a damage effect in the window layer and possibly at the window emitter interface similar to that found for proton-irradiated liquid-phase epitaxy-grown cells. Depletion layer recombination is found to be less than theoretically expected at high fluence.

  19. The interaction of gold with gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1988-01-01

    Gold and gold-based alloys, commonly used as solar-cell contact materials, are known to react readily with gallium arsenide. Experiments designed to identify the mechanisms involved in these GaAs-metal interactions have yielded several interesting results. It is shown that the reaction of GaAs with gold takes place via a dissociative diffusion process. It is shown further that the GaAs-metal reaction rate is controlled to a very great extent by the condition of the free surface of the contact metal, an interesting example of which is the previously unexplained increase in the reaction rate that has been observed for samples annealed in a vacuum environment as compared to those annealed in a gaseous ambient. A number of other hard-to-explain observations, such as the low-temperature formation of voids in the gold lattice and crystallite growth on the gold surface, are also explained by invoking this mechanism.

  20. Producing gallium arsenide crystals in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randolph, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The production of high quality crystals in space is a promising near-term application of microgravity processing. Gallium arsenide is the selected material for initial commercial production because of its inherent superior electronic properties, wide range of market applications, and broad base of on-going device development effort. Plausible product prices can absorb the high cost of space transportation for the initial flights provided by the Space Transportation System. The next step for bulk crystal growth, beyond the STS, is planned to come later with the use of free flyers or a space station, where real benefits are foreseen. The use of these vehicles, together with refinement and increasing automation of space-based crystal growth factories, will bring down costs and will support growing demands for high quality GaAs and other specialty electronic and electro-optical crystals grown in space.

  1. Gallium Arsenide solar cell radiation damage experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. H.; Kinnison, J. D.; Herbert, G. A.; Meulenberg, A.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells for space applications from three different manufactures were irradiated with 10 MeV protons or 1 MeV electrons. The electrical performance of the cells was measured at several fluence levels and compared. Silicon cells were included for reference and comparison. All the GaAs cell types performed similarly throughout the testing and showed a 36 to 56 percent power areal density advantage over the silicon cells. Thinner (8-mil versus 12-mil) GaAs cells provide a significant weight reduction. The use of germanium (Ge) substrates to improve mechanical integrity can be implemented with little impact on end of life performance in a radiation environment.

  2. Optical properties of gadolinium gallium garnet.

    PubMed

    Wood, D L; Nassau, K

    1990-09-01

    The refractive index, the temperature coefficient of the refractive index, and the optical transparency of gadolinium gallium garnet are reported as a function of wavelength from the near UV to the middle IR. The materialis transparent enough for good optical components between 0.36 and 6.0 microm, and the refractive index ranges from 2.0 at the UV end to 1.8 at the IR end of the spectrum. The wavelength dependence of index is expressed as a three-term Sellmeier formula with agreement better than two parts in the fourth decimal between calculated and experimental values. Variations in composition depending on growth from various melts (e.g., stoichiometric vs congruent) have no effect on the optical parameters at this level of precision.

  3. Cavity optomechanics in gallium phosphide microdisks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Matthew; Hryciw, Aaron C.; Barclay, Paul E.

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate gallium phosphide (GaP) microdisk optical cavities with intrinsic quality factors >2.8 × 105 and mode volumes <10(λ/n)3, and study their nonlinear and optomechanical properties. For optical intensities up to 8.0 × 104 intracavity photons, we observe optical loss in the microcavity to decrease with increasing intensity, indicating that saturable absorption sites are present in the GaP material, and that two-photon absorption is not significant. We observe optomechanical coupling between optical modes of the microdisk around 1.5 μm and several mechanical resonances, and measure an optical spring effect consistent with a theoretically predicted optomechanical coupling rate g0/2π˜30 kHz for the fundamental mechanical radial breathing mode at 488 MHz.

  4. Cathodoluminescence spectra of gallium nitride nanorods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Gallium nitride [GaN] nanorods grown on a Si(111) substrate at 720°C via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied by field-emission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence [CL]. The surface topography and optical properties of the GaN nanorod cluster and single GaN nanorod were measured and discussed. The defect-related CL spectra of GaN nanorods and their dependence on temperature were investigated. The CL spectra along the length of the individual GaN nanorod were also studied. The results reveal that the 3.2-eV peak comes from the structural defect at the interface between the GaN nanorod and Si substrate. The surface state emission of the single GaN nanorod is stronger as the diameter of the GaN nanorod becomes smaller due to an increased surface-to-volume ratio. PMID:22168896

  5. Direct band gap wurtzite gallium phosphide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Assali, S; Zardo, I; Plissard, S; Kriegner, D; Verheijen, M A; Bauer, G; Meijerink, A; Belabbes, A; Bechstedt, F; Haverkort, J E M; Bakkers, E P A M

    2013-04-10

    The main challenge for light-emitting diodes is to increase the efficiency in the green part of the spectrum. Gallium phosphide (GaP) with the normal cubic crystal structure has an indirect band gap, which severely limits the green emission efficiency. Band structure calculations have predicted a direct band gap for wurtzite GaP. Here, we report the fabrication of GaP nanowires with pure hexagonal crystal structure and demonstrate the direct nature of the band gap. We observe strong photoluminescence at a wavelength of 594 nm with short lifetime, typical for a direct band gap. Furthermore, by incorporation of aluminum or arsenic in the GaP nanowires, the emitted wavelength is tuned across an important range of the visible light spectrum (555-690 nm). This approach of crystal structure engineering enables new pathways to tailor materials properties enhancing the functionality.

  6. Gallium arsenide solar array subsystem study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, F. Q.

    1982-01-01

    The effects on life cycle costs of a number of technology areas are examined for a gallium arsenide space solar array. Four specific configurations were addressed: (1) a 250 KWe LEO mission - planer array; (2) a 250 KWe LEO mission - with concentration; (3) a 50 KWe GEO mission planer array; (4) a 50 KWe GEO mission - with concentration. For each configuration, a baseline system conceptual design was developed and the life cycle costs estimated in detail. The baseline system requirements and design technologies were then varied and their relationships to life cycle costs quantified. For example, the thermal characteristics of the baseline design are determined by the array materials and masses. The thermal characteristics in turn determine configuration, performance, and hence life cycle costs.

  7. Cavity optomechanics in gallium phosphide microdisks

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Matthew; Barclay, Paul E.; Hryciw, Aaron C.

    2014-04-07

    We demonstrate gallium phosphide (GaP) microdisk optical cavities with intrinsic quality factors >2.8 × 10{sup 5} and mode volumes <10(λ/n){sup 3}, and study their nonlinear and optomechanical properties. For optical intensities up to 8.0 × 10{sup 4} intracavity photons, we observe optical loss in the microcavity to decrease with increasing intensity, indicating that saturable absorption sites are present in the GaP material, and that two-photon absorption is not significant. We observe optomechanical coupling between optical modes of the microdisk around 1.5 μm and several mechanical resonances, and measure an optical spring effect consistent with a theoretically predicted optomechanical coupling rate g{sub 0}/2π∼30 kHz for the fundamental mechanical radial breathing mode at 488 MHz.

  8. The Soviet-American Gallium Experiment (SAGE)

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, G.T.

    1989-01-01

    It is a great pleasure for me to have been asked by Louis Rosen to tell you about the Soviet-American Gallium Experiment (SAGE). This undertaking is a multi-institutional collaboration among scientists from the Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (INR), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and several US universities. Its purpose is to measure the number of low-energy electron neutrinos emitted from the Sun that arrive at this planet. As such, it is an extremely important experiment, touching on fundamental physics issues as well as solar dynamics. In contrast to the strategic overviews, plans, and hopes for international collaboration presented earlier today, SAGE is an ongoing working effort with high hopes of producing the first measurement of the Sun's low-energy neutrino flux. This paper reviews this experiment. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Direct Band Gap Wurtzite Gallium Phosphide Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The main challenge for light-emitting diodes is to increase the efficiency in the green part of the spectrum. Gallium phosphide (GaP) with the normal cubic crystal structure has an indirect band gap, which severely limits the green emission efficiency. Band structure calculations have predicted a direct band gap for wurtzite GaP. Here, we report the fabrication of GaP nanowires with pure hexagonal crystal structure and demonstrate the direct nature of the band gap. We observe strong photoluminescence at a wavelength of 594 nm with short lifetime, typical for a direct band gap. Furthermore, by incorporation of aluminum or arsenic in the GaP nanowires, the emitted wavelength is tuned across an important range of the visible light spectrum (555–690 nm). This approach of crystal structure engineering enables new pathways to tailor materials properties enhancing the functionality. PMID:23464761

  10. THERMALLY-INDUCED GALLIUM REMOVAL FROM PLUTONIUM DIOXIDE FOR MOX FUEL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    D. KOLMAN; M. GRIEGO; ET AL

    1999-09-01

    A process for the separation of gallium oxide from plutonium dioxide using a ''dry'' process has been developed. The process uses a reducing gas to generate a volatile gallium specie which is collected downstream. The effects of temperature, duration, flow rate, and sample size have been examined. Results indicate that temperature plays a strong role in the efficacy of gallium removal. Other variables have a much smaller effect on gallium removal efficiency. Gallium removal to approximately 1 ppm (atomic) has been observed. Gallium removal to sub-ppm levels appears feasible based on results-to-date.

  11. Synthesis of (/sup 75/Se)trimethylselenonium iodide from (/sup 75/Se)selenocystine

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, S.J.; Ganther, H.E.

    1984-02-15

    The synthesis of (/sup 75/Se)trimethylselenonium iodide from (/sup 75/)selenocystine is described. The starting compound is reduced to (/sup 75/Se)selenocysteine with borohydride and reacted with methyl iodide to form (/sup 75/Se)Se-methyl-selenocysteine, then treated with methyl iodide in formic acid solution to form Se-dimethyl-selenocysteine selenonium iodide. Over a period of days, the selenonium intermediate undergoes spontaneous elimination to form alanine and dimethyl selenide, which reacts with methyl iodide to give the trimethylselenonium product in over 90% yield. 15 references.

  12. Direct vapor/solid synthesis of mercuric iodide using compounds of mercury and iodine

    DOEpatents

    Skinner, Nathan L.

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for producing high purity mercuric iodide by passing a gaseous source of a mercuric compound through a particulate bed of a low vapor pressure iodide compound which is maintained at an elevated temperature which is the lower of either: (a) just below the melting or volatilization temperature of the iodide compound (which ever is lower); or (b) just below the volatilization point of the other reaction product formed during the reaction; to cause the mercuric compound to react with the iodide compound to form mercuric iodide which then passes as a vapor out of the bed into a cooler condensation region.

  13. Method of fabricating germanium and gallium arsenide devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, Murzban (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method of semiconductor diode fabrication is disclosed which relies on the epitaxial growth of a precisely doped thickness layer of gallium arsenide or germanium on a semi-insulating or intrinsic substrate, respectively, of gallium arsenide or germanium by either molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) or by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The method involves: depositing a layer of doped or undoped silicon dioxide on a germanium or gallium arsenide wafer or substrate, selectively removing the silicon dioxide layer to define one or more surface regions for a device to be fabricated thereon, growing a matched epitaxial layer of doped germanium or gallium arsenide of an appropriate thickness using MBE or MOCVD techniques on both the silicon dioxide layer and the defined one or more regions; and etching the silicon dioxide and the epitaxial material on top of the silicon dioxide to leave a matched epitaxial layer of germanium or gallium arsenide on the germanium or gallium arsenide substrate, respectively, and upon which a field effect device can thereafter be formed.

  14. Handling characteristics of gallium alloy for dental restoration.

    PubMed

    Mash, L K; Miller, B H; Nakajima, H; Collard, S M; Guo, I Y; Okabe, T

    1993-12-01

    The handling characteristics of a gallium alloy (Gallium Alloy GF) were compared to those of a spherical high-copper amalgam (Tytin). Ten dentists each restored four identical MO preparations in acrylic typodont teeth (no. 30), two with amalgam and two with gallium alloy. Each restoration was evaluated immediately following completion by the operator for six clinically relevant criteria. Each criterion was scored between 1 and 5, where 1 = very poor, 2 = poor, 3 = fair, 4 = good, and 5 = very good. Three two-sided Mann-Whitney tests were used to compare the median scores for significant differences (P < 0.05). The first test indicated no significant difference between scores for the first- and second-placed restorations, within criteria and within alloy type (n = 10). The second test indicated a significant difference between amalgam and gallium alloy, within criteria and within restoration sequence (n = 10), for each criterion except resistance to fracture during removal of the matrix band. The third test indicated a significant difference between amalgam and gallium alloy, within each criteria, combining scores for first- and second-placed restorations (n = 20). During simulated clinical placement, amalgam was rated significantly higher than gallium alloy in each handling characteristic evaluated.

  15. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Gallium arsenide in mice and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, T.J.; Greenspan, B.J.; Dill, J.A.; Stoney, K.H.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.

    1990-12-01

    Gallium arsenide is a crystalline compound used extensively in the semiconductor industry. Workers preparing solar cells and gallium arsenide ingots and wafers are potentially at risk from the inhalation of gallium arsenide dust. The potential for gallium arsenide to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague- Dawley rats and CD-1 (Swiss) mice exposed to 0, 10, 37, or 75 mg/m{sup 3} gallium arsenide, 6 h/day, 7 days/week. Each of the four treatment groups consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and {approx}30 positively mated rats or {approx}24 positively mated mice. Mice were exposed on 4--17 days of gestation (dg), and rats on 4--19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. Gallium and arsenic concentrations were determined in the maternal blood and uterine contents of the rats (3/group) at 7, 14, and 20 dg. 37 refs., 11 figs., 30 tabs.

  16. Determination of submicrogram amounts of gallium by ion-exchanger fluorimetry Determination of gallium in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Capitan, F; Navalon, A; Vilchez, J L; Capitan-Vallvey, L F

    1990-02-01

    A method for microdetermination of gallium at ng/ml level has been developed, based on ion-exchanger fluorimetry. The gallium reacts with salicylidene-o-aminophenol to give a highly fluorescent complex, which is fixed on a dextran-type cationic resin. The fluorescence of the resin, packed in a 1-mm silica cell, is measured directly with a solid-surface attachment. The range of concentration of the method is 2.0-10.0 ng/ml, the RSD 1.3% and the detection limit 0.3 ng/ml. The method has been applied to the determination of gallium in natural waters. The gallium content found in tap water was higher than that in raw water. This is related to the use of commercial aluminium salts in the water-treatment plant. PMID:18964929

  17. Gallium Adhesion: Phase Change of Gallium Enables Highly Reversible and Switchable Adhesion (Adv. Mater. 25/2016).

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhou; Lum, Guo Zhan; Song, Sukho; Rich, Steven; Sitti, Metin

    2016-07-01

    M. Sitti and co-workers find that gallium exhibits highly reversible and switchable adhesive characteristics during the liquid-solid phase change. As described on page 5088, this reversible adhesive allows miniature capsule-like robots, which are able to easily pick-and-place objects with irregular geometries and rough surfaces, and thus assemble such objects into a complex structure. The contact interface between gallium and the rough object is illustrated in the magnified image. PMID:27372722

  18. Defective organification of iodide causing congenital goitrous hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, N; Eguchi, K; Ohmori, T; Momotani, N; Nagayama, Y; Hosoya, T; Oguchi, H; Mimura, T; Kimura, S; Nagataki, S; Ito, K

    1996-01-01

    A 26-yr-old Japanese woman with congenital goitrous hypo-thyroidism and sensorineural deafness underwent a thyroidectomy. Examination of the thyroid gland revealed characteristic features of multinodular goiter. The T3 and T4 content in thyroglobulin (Tg) were 0.03 and 0.02 mol/mol Tg, respectively. Iodide incorporation into Tg, using slices of the thyroid tissue, revealed that iodide organification of thyroid tissue from our patient was markedly lower than that of normal controls. Then, guaiacol and iodide oxidation activities of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) in our patient's thyroid tissue were lower than those of normal controls (guaiacol assay: 1.92 vs. 30.0 +/- 5.7 mGU/mg protein; iodide assay: 1.1 vs. 6.6 +/- 2.8 mIU/mg protein). Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis of the oxidation rates of guaiacol and iodide indicated that this patient's TPO had a defect in the binding of guaiacol and iodide, but the coupling activity of the patient's TPO was not decreased compared with those of two normal thyroids. In this case and in control subjects, Nothern gel analysis of TPO messenger RNA from unstimulated and TSH-stimulated thyroid cells revealed a 3.2 kilobase species in the former and four distinct messenger RNA species of 4.0, 3.2, 2.1, and 1.7 kilobases in the latter. Western blot analysis of TPOs obtained from this patient and from control subjects identified the same 107 kDa protein, using antimicrosomal antibody-positive serum. We analyzed the coding sequence in the patient's TPO gene by using polymerase chain reaction technique. A single point mutation of G-->C at 1265 base pair was detected only in the TPO gene, but this point mutation does not alter the amino acid residue. It is possible that posttranslational modification such as abnormal glycosylation may occur in the TPO molecules. Furthermore, it is possible that there are differences in the tertiary structures of the TPO molecules between our patient and normal subjects. The above abnormalities of TPO molecules

  19. Methyl iodide production in the ocean: Implications for climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smythe-Wright, Denise; Boswell, Stephen M.; Breithaupt, Petra; Davidson, Russell D.; Dimmer, Claudia H.; Eiras Diaz, Ledicia B.

    2006-09-01

    Methyl iodide concentrations of up to 45 pmol L-1, which flux into the marine boundary layer, have been found in low latitude waters of the Atlantic and Indian oceans. These high concentrations correlate well with the abundance of Prochlorococcus, and we have confirmed the release of methyl iodide by this species in laboratory culture experiments. Extrapolating, we estimate the global ocean flux of iodine to the marine boundary layer from this single source to be 5.3 × 1011 g I yr-1, which is a large fraction of the previously estimated total global flux and the implications are far reaching. Climate prediction models suggest increases in sea surface temperature and changes in biogeographical provenances in response to global warming. Such changes are likely to increase the abundance of Prochlorococcus, and we estimate a concomitant ˜15% increase in the release of iodine species to the atmosphere. Potentially, this could help mitigate global warming.

  20. A Halogen-Bond-Induced Triple Helicate Encapsulates Iodide.

    PubMed

    Massena, Casey J; Wageling, Nicholas B; Decato, Daniel A; Martin Rodriguez, Enrique; Rose, Ariana M; Berryman, Orion B

    2016-09-26

    The self-assembly of higher-order anion helicates in solution remains an elusive goal. Herein, we present the first triple helicate to encapsulate iodide in organic and aqueous media as well as the solid state. The triple helicate self-assembles from three tricationic arylethynyl strands and resembles a tubular anion channel lined with nine halogen bond donors. Eight strong iodine⋅⋅⋅iodide halogen bonds and numerous buried π-surfaces endow the triplex with remarkable stability, even at elevated temperatures. We suggest that the natural rise of a single-strand helix renders its linear halogen-bond donors non-convergent. Thus, the stringent linearity of halogen bonding is a powerful tool for the synthesis of multi-strand anion helicates. PMID:27411932

  1. Purification and deposition of silicon by an iodide disproportionation reaction

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2002-01-01

    Method and apparatus for producing purified bulk silicon from highly impure metallurgical-grade silicon source material at atmospheric pressure. Method involves: (1) initially reacting iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to create silicon tetraiodide and impurity iodide byproducts in a cold-wall reactor chamber; (2) isolating silicon tetraiodide from the impurity iodide byproducts and purifying it by distillation in a distillation chamber; and (3) transferring the purified silicon tetraiodide back to the cold-wall reactor chamber, reacting it with additional iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to produce silicon diiodide and depositing the silicon diiodide onto a substrate within the cold-wall reactor chamber. The two chambers are at atmospheric pressure and the system is open to allow the introduction of additional source material and to remove and replace finished substrates.

  2. Iodide and albumin kinetics in normal canine wrists and knees

    SciTech Connect

    Simkin, P.A.; Benedict, R.S. )

    1990-01-01

    The clearance rates of free iodide and of radioiodinated serum albumin were measured in the knee and wrist joints of 9 normal adult dogs. Iodide clearance from the knee was 3 times greater than that from the wrist. In contrast, radioiodinated serum albumin clearance from the knee was only slightly greater than that from the wrist. Interpreted as respective indices of effective synovial plasma flow and lymphatic drainage, these values indicate that the filtration fraction is normally greater in microvessels of the wrist than in those of the knee. These findings complement the results of companion studies of Starling forces that indicate a higher pressure microvascular bed in the wrist than in the knee.

  3. Structural insight into iodide uptake by AFm phases.

    PubMed

    Aimoz, Laure; Wieland, Erich; Taviot-Guého, Christine; Dähn, Rainer; Vespa, Marika; Churakov, Sergey V

    2012-04-01

    The ability of cement phases carrying positively charged surfaces to retard the mobility of (129)I, present as iodide (I(-)) in groundwater, was investigated in the context of safe disposal of radioactive waste. (125)I sorption experiments on ettringite, hydrotalcite, chloride-, carbonate- and sulfate-containing AFm phases indicated that calcium-monosulfate (AFm-SO(4)) is the only phase that takes up trace levels of iodide. The structures of AFm phases prepared by coprecipitating iodide with other anions were investigated in order to understand this preferential uptake mechanism. X-ray diffraction (XRD) investigations showed a segregation of monoiodide (AFm-I(2)) and Friedel's salt (AFm-Cl(2)) for I-Cl mixtures, whereas interstratifications of AFm-I(2) and hemicarboaluminate (AFm-OH-(CO(3))(0.5)) were observed for the I-CO(3) systems. In contrast, XRD measurements indicated the formation of a solid solution between AFm-I(2) and AFm-SO(4) for the I-SO(4) mixtures. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy showed a modification of the coordination environment of iodine in I-CO(3) and in I-SO(4) samples compared to pure AFm-I(2). This is assumed to be due to the introduction of stacking faults in I-CO(3) samples on one hand and due to the presence of sulfate and associated space-filling water molecules as close neighbors in I-SO(4) samples on the other hand. The formation of a solid solution between AFm-I(2) and AFm-SO(4), with a short-range mixing of iodide and sulfate, implies that AFm-SO(4) bears the potential to retard (129)I. PMID:22376086

  4. Growth of mercuric iodide single crystals from dimethylsulfoxide

    DOEpatents

    Carlston, Richard C.

    1976-07-13

    Dimethylsulfoxide is used as a solvent for the growth of red mercuric iodide (HgI.sub.2) crystals for use in radiation detectors. The hygroscopic property of the solvent allows controlled amounts of water to enter into the solvent phase and diminish the large solubility of HgI.sub.2 so that the precipitating solid collects as well-defined euhedral crystals which grow into a volume of several cc.

  5. Elemental impurity analysis of mercuric iodide by ICP/MS

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, E.S. . Santa Barbara Operations); Mroz, E.; Olivares, J.A. )

    1993-01-01

    A method has been developed to analyze mercuric iodide (HgI[sub 2]) for elemental contamination using Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectroscopy (ICP/MS). This paper will discuss the ICP/MS method, the effectiveness of purification schemes for removing impurities from HgI[sub 2], as well as preliminary correlations between HgI[sub 2] detector performance and elemental contamination levels.

  6. Photochemical versus biological production of methyl iodide during Meteor 55

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, U.; Wallace, D.

    2003-04-01

    The flux of methyl iodide from sea to air represents the largest flux of iodine from the ocean to the atmosphere. Surface water concentrations and hence fluxes are particularly high in tropical regions. This flux may be responsible for the enrichment of iodine in the marine aerosol and may contribute to important processes in the marine boundary layer, including particle formation. Methyl iodide is commonly referred to as a biogenic gas, with both macroalgae and phytoplankton identified as important sources. On the other hand experimental and field data have shown the importance of photochemical production that is not necessarily associated directly with biological activity. During the Meteor cruise 55 along 11°N in the tropical Atlantic Ocean, a series of experiments were conducted to examine the biological vs. photochemical production of methyl iodide. A total of eight separate experiments were conducted. Production of CH3I in quartz glass flasks during 24 hour incubations (dark and natural sunlight) was measured under three experimental treatments: untreated seawater, filtered seawater (0.1 um pore size filter to exclude most phytoplankton and bacteria), and seawater that was poisoned with mercuric chloride. There were two clear findings from these experiments: (1) methyl iodide production was significantly higher in all the incubations that were exposed to the light than in the dark incubations; (2) there was no significant difference between CH3I production under the three experimental treatments. These results argue very strongly for the primary importance of photochemical production of CH3I as opposed to biogenic production at least for the tropical open ocean surface waters. Further experiments are required to investigate the reactants involved, their sources, the wavelength and depth dependence of production, etc. as well as (possibly related) sink processes.

  7. Infrared attenuation of thallium bromo-iodide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magilavy, B.; Goebel, J.

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of attenuation measurements in the near infrared of an unclad fiber of Thallium Bromo-Iodide (Th(Br,I)), a polycrystalline thallium halide, is presented. A general overview is given of the properties of fiber optics. Two groups of attenuation measurements, for the region 1.2 to 3.4 and for 3 to 11 microns, respectively, are presented, analyzed, and compared with those of two other groups of researchers.

  8. Gallium Potentiates the Antibacterial Effect of Gentamicin against Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The reasons why aminoglycosides are bactericidal have not been not fully elucidated, and evidence indicates that the cidal effects are at least partly dependent on iron. We demonstrate that availability of iron markedly affects the susceptibility of the facultative intracellular bacterium Francisella tularensis strain SCHU S4 to the aminoglycoside gentamicin. Specifically, the intracellular depots of iron were inversely correlated to gentamicin susceptibility, whereas the extracellular iron concentrations were directly correlated to the susceptibility. Further proof of the intimate link between iron availability and antibiotic susceptibility were the findings that a ΔfslA mutant, which is defective for siderophore-dependent uptake of ferric iron, showed enhanced gentamicin susceptibility and that a ΔfeoB mutant, which is defective for uptake of ferrous iron, displayed complete growth arrest in the presence of gentamicin. Based on the aforementioned findings, it was hypothesized that gallium could potentiate the effect of gentamicin, since gallium is sequestered by iron uptake systems. The ferrozine assay demonstrated that the presence of gallium inhibited >70% of the iron uptake. Addition of gentamicin and/or gallium to infected bone marrow-derived macrophages showed that both 100 μM gallium and 10 μg/ml of gentamicin inhibited intracellular growth of SCHU S4 and that the combined treatment acted synergistically. Moreover, treatment of F. tularensis-infected mice with gentamicin and gallium showed an additive effect. Collectively, the data demonstrate that SCHU S4 is dependent on iron to minimize the effects of gentamicin and that gallium, by inhibiting the iron uptake, potentiates the bactericidal effect of gentamicin in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26503658

  9. Gallium Potentiates the Antibacterial Effect of Gentamicin against Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Helena; Sjöstedt, Anders

    2015-10-26

    The reasons why aminoglycosides are bactericidal have not been not fully elucidated, and evidence indicates that the cidal effects are at least partly dependent on iron. We demonstrate that availability of iron markedly affects the susceptibility of the facultative intracellular bacterium Francisella tularensis strain SCHU S4 to the aminoglycoside gentamicin. Specifically, the intracellular depots of iron were inversely correlated to gentamicin susceptibility, whereas the extracellular iron concentrations were directly correlated to the susceptibility. Further proof of the intimate link between iron availability and antibiotic susceptibility were the findings that a ΔfslA mutant, which is defective for siderophore-dependent uptake of ferric iron, showed enhanced gentamicin susceptibility and that a ΔfeoB mutant, which is defective for uptake of ferrous iron, displayed complete growth arrest in the presence of gentamicin. Based on the aforementioned findings, it was hypothesized that gallium could potentiate the effect of gentamicin, since gallium is sequestered by iron uptake systems. The ferrozine assay demonstrated that the presence of gallium inhibited >70% of the iron uptake. Addition of gentamicin and/or gallium to infected bone marrow-derived macrophages showed that both 100 μM gallium and 10 μg/ml of gentamicin inhibited intracellular growth of SCHU S4 and that the combined treatment acted synergistically. Moreover, treatment of F. tularensis-infected mice with gentamicin and gallium showed an additive effect. Collectively, the data demonstrate that SCHU S4 is dependent on iron to minimize the effects of gentamicin and that gallium, by inhibiting the iron uptake, potentiates the bactericidal effect of gentamicin in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Application of ultrasound in solvent extraction of nickel and gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Pesic, B.

    1996-07-01

    The effects of ultrasound on the rate of solvent extraction of nickel with Lix 65N and Lix 70, and gallium with Kelex 100 were investigated. These solvent extraction systems are noted by their sluggish nature. Low frequency (20 kHz) ultrasound increased the rates of extraction of nickel by factors of four to seven. The ultrasound had no effect on the final chemical equilibrium. Gallium extraction rates were enhanced with the use of ultrasound by as much as a factor of 15. Again, the ultrasound had no effect on extraction equilibrium. For both nickel and gallium, the enhanced rates were attributed to increased interfacial surface area associated with ultrasonically induced cavitation and microdroplet formation. The stability of the microdroplets permitted intermittent application of ultrasound with corresponding decreases in ultrasonic energy requirements. The lowest energy consumption was observed with short (0.25 to 5 s) bursts of high power (41 to 61 W) ultrasonic inputs. The study also provided insight into the factors that affect the complex extraction of gallium from sodium aluminate solutions. The rate controlling step was found to be the dehydration of the gallate ion, Ga(OH)4, and the first complex formation between gallium and Kelex 100. Sodium was found to enhance the extraction rate up to a point, beyond which increased concentration was detrimental. Increasing aluminum concentration was found to slow extraction rates. Modifiers and diluents were shown to markedly affect extraction rates even without ultrasound. Ketone modifiers, particularly 2-undecanone, when used with Kermac 470B or Escaid 200 diluents enhanced extraction rates of gallium to the point that the use of ultrasound provided no additional benefits. The positive effects of ketone modifiers for the solvent extraction of gallium had not been previously reported.

  11. Corrosion mechanism of cuprous oxide/iodide solar electrochemical cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennakone, K.; Gurunnanselage, W.; Dharmaratne, D.; Jayewardena, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    Mechanisms for cuprous oxide corrosion in an iodide solution are investigated in light of the importance of instability effects arising from semiconductor electrode corrosion in solar electrochemical cells. Experiments involved the use of a potassium iodide solution containing a trace of iodine as the redox electrolyte, with a cuprous oxide-coated copper plate as the photocathode and a copper window coated with cupric sulphide as the counterelectrode. Measurement of the time dependence of the short circuit current at constant illumination intensity reveals it to undergo a rapid decay accompanied by the formation of a cuprous iodide-cupric oxide deposit on the photocathode surface. The region surrounding a circular patch of light focussed on the photocathode is found to exhibit CuO and CuI deposits signalling corrosion in the anodic region surrounding the cathodic spot. Measurements of the time dependence of the open circuit voltage furthermore indicate that the saturation voltage decays with time, due to short circuiting in the photocathode between anodic and cathodic regions.

  12. Gold nanoelectrode ensembles for direct trace electroanalysis of iodide.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Francisco C; Moretto, Ligia M; De Leo, Manuela; Zanoni, Maria V Boldrin; Ugo, Paolo

    2006-08-01

    A procedure for the standardization of ensembles of gold nanodisk electrodes (NEE) of 30 nm diameter is presented, which is based on the analytical comparison between experimental cyclic voltammograms (CV) obtained at the NEEs in diluted solutions of redox probes and CV patterns obtained by digital simulation. Possible origins of defects sometimes found in NEEs are discussed. Selected NEEs are then employed for the study of the electrochemical oxidation of iodide in acidic solutions. CV patterns display typical quasi-reversible behavior which involves associated chemical reactions between adsorbed and solution species. The main CV characteristics at the NEE compare with those observed at millimeter sized gold disk electrodes (Au-macro), apart a slight shift in E1/2 values and slightly higher peak to peak separation at the NEE. The detection limit (DL) at NEEs is 0.3 microM, which is more than one order of magnitude lower than DL at the Au-macro (4 microM). The mechanism of the electrochemical oxidation of iodide at NEEs is discussed. Finally, NEEs are applied to the direct determination of iodide at micromolar concentration levels in real samples, namely in some ophthalmic drugs and iodized table salt.

  13. Mitigating iodomethane emissions and iodide residues in fumigated soils.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Richeng; Ashworth, Daniel J; Wu, Laosheng; Yates, Scott R

    2013-11-19

    Although long-regarded as an excellent soil fumigant for killing plant pests, methyl bromide (MeBr) was phased out in 2005 in the USA, because it can deplete the stratospheric ozone layer. Iodomethane (MeI) has been identified as an effective alternative to MeBr and is used in a number of countries for preplant pest control. However, MeI is highly volatile and potentially carcinogenic to humans if inhaled. In addition, iodide anions, a breakdown product of MeI, can build up in fumigated soils and potentially cause plant toxicity and contaminate groundwater via leaching. In order to overcome the above two obstacles in MeI application, a method is proposed to place reactive bags containing ammonium hydroxide solution (NH4OH) on the soil surface underneath an impermeable plastic film covering the fumigated area. Our research showed that using this approach, over 99% of the applied MeI was quantitatively transferred to iodide. Of all the resulting iodide, only 2.7% remained in the fumigated soil, and 97.3% was contained in the reactive bag that can be easily removed after fumigation.

  14. Development of the strontium iodide coded aperture (SICA) instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Lee J.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Grove, J. Eric; Cordes, Ryan

    2015-08-01

    The work reports on the development of a Strontium Iodide Coded Aperture (SICA) instrument for use in space-based astrophysics, solar physics, and high-energy atmospheric physics. The Naval Research Laboratory is developing a prototype coded aperture imager that will consist of an 8 x 8 array of SrI2:Eu detectors, each read out by a silicon photomultiplier. The array would be used to demonstrate SrI2:Eu detector performance for space-based missions. Europium-doped strontium iodide (SrI2:Eu) detectors have recently become available, and the material is a strong candidate to replace existing detector technology currently used for space-based gamma-ray astrophysics research. The detectors have a typical energy resolution of 3.2% at 662 keV, a significant improvement over the 6.5% energy resolution of thallium-doped sodium iodide. With a density of 4.59 g/cm and a Zeff of 49, SrI2:Eu has a high efficiency for MeV gamma-ray detection. Coupling this with recent improvements in silicon photomultiplier technology (i.e., no bulky photomultiplier tubes) creates high-density, large-area, low-power detector arrays with good energy resolution. Also, the energy resolution of SrI2:Eu makes it ideal for use as the back plane of a Compton telescope.

  15. Iodide mumps following fistulogram in a haemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Raktim K; Somasundaram, Mey; Ravakhah, Keyvan

    2016-01-01

    Iodide mumps, or contrast-induced acute sialadenitis, is characterised by rapid, painless enlargement of the salivary glands, following the use of iodinated contrast dye. The underlying mechanism of this adverse reaction is not completely understood. It could be due to an idiosyncratic reaction or related to deposition of iodide in the ductal systems of the salivary glands causing blockage and inflammation. With increasing renal dysfunction, the elimination half-life of the iodine-containing contrast dye gets prolonged. The course of iodine-induced sialadenitis is usually benign, and rapid resolution of symptoms is expected without definite treatment. The symptomatic management includes treatment with a parenteral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), steroids and dialysis. However, the role of steroids has been found to be controversial in previously published case reports. Pancreatic mumps and transient thyroid dysfunction were also reported in patients following iodinated contrast administration; the aetiology of this is thought to be similar to iodide-induced sialadenitis. PMID:26838304

  16. Gallium derivatives of tetraborane(10): can bis(digallanyl) isomers exist?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishna, V.; Duke, B. J.; McKee, M. L.

    All derivatives of tetraborane(10) with one or more boron atoms replaced by gallium have been investigated using quantum chemical methods. Particular attention is given to the relative stability of the 'butterfly' arachno-structures and the bis(diboranyl) structures. It is concluded that these two structures have very close energies if the bis(diboranyl) structures contain a central gallium-gallium bond. These gallium substituted bis(diboranyl) structures are thus a fascinating synthetic target.

  17. Gallium a unique anti-resorptive agent in bone: Preclinical studies on its mechanisms of action

    SciTech Connect

    Bockman, R.; Adelman, R.; Donnelly, R.; Brody, L.; Warrell, R. ); Jones, K.W. )

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of gallium as a new and unique agent for the treatment of metabolic bone disorders was in part fortuitous. Gallium is an exciting new therapeutic agent for the treatment of pathologic states characterized by accelerated bone resorption. Compared to other therapeutic metal compounds containing platinum or germanium, gallium affects its antiresorptive action without any evidence of a cytotoxic effect on bone cells. Gallium is unique amongst all therapeutically available antiresorptive agents in that it favors bone formation. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Laccase-catalyzed oxidation of iodide and formation of organically bound iodine in soils.

    PubMed

    Seki, Miharu; Oikawa, Jun-ichi; Taguchi, Taro; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Sakamoto, Kazunori; Amachi, Seigo

    2013-01-01

    Laccase oxidizes iodide to molecular iodine or hypoiodous acid, both of which are easily incorporated into natural soil organic matter. In this study, iodide sorption and laccase activity in 2 types of Japanese soil were determined under various experimental conditions to evaluate possible involvement of this enzyme in the sorption of iodide. Batch sorption experiment using radioactive iodide tracer ((125)I(-)) revealed that the sorption was significantly inhibited by autoclaving (121 °C, 40 min), heat treatment (80 and 100 °C, 10 min), γ-irradiation (30 kGy), N(2) gas flushing, and addition of reducing agents and general laccase inhibitors (KCN and NaN(3)). Interestingly, very similar tendency of inhibition was observed in soil laccase activity, which was determined using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) as a substrate. The partition coefficient (K(d): mL g(-1)) for iodide and specific activity of laccase in soils (Unit g(-1)) showed significant positive correlation in both soil samples. Addition of a bacterial laccase with an iodide-oxidizing activity to the soils strongly enhanced the sorption of iodide. Furthermore, the enzyme addition partially restored iodide sorption capacity of the autoclaved soil samples. These results suggest that microbial laccase is involved in iodide sorption on soils through the oxidation of iodide.

  19. Gallium based low-interaction anions

    DOEpatents

    King, Wayne A.; Kubas, Gregory J.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides: a composition of the formula M.sup.+x (Ga(Y).sub.4.sup.-).sub.x where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, cesium, calcium, strontium, thallium, and silver, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 1 or 2, each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide; a composition of the formula (R).sub.x Q.sup.+ Ga(Y).sub.4.sup.- where Q is selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus and oxygen, each R is a ligand selected from the group consisting of alkyl, aryl, and hydrogen, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 3 and 4 depending upon Q, and each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide; an ionic polymerization catalyst composition including an active cationic portion and a gallium based weakly coordinating anion; and bridged anion species of the formula M.sup.+x.sub.y [X(Ga(Y.sub.3).sub.z ].sup.-y.sub.x where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, cesium, calcium, strontium, thallium, and silver, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 1 or 2, X is a bridging group between two gallium atoms, y is an integer selected from the group consisting 1 and 2, z is an integer of at least 2, each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide.

  20. Process for forming pure silver ohmic contacts to N- and P-type gallium arsenide materials

    DOEpatents

    Hogan, S.J.

    1983-03-13

    Disclosed is an improved process for manufacturing gallium arsenide semiconductor devices having as its components a n-type gallium arsenide substrate layer and a p-type gallium arsenide diffused layer. The improved process comprises forming a pure silver ohmic contact to both the diffuse layer and the substrate layer wherein the n-type layer comprises a substantially low doping carrier concentration.

  1. Pure silver ohmic contacts to N- and P- type gallium arsenide materials

    DOEpatents

    Hogan, Stephen J.

    1986-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved process for manufacturing gallium arsenide semiconductor devices having as its components an n-type gallium arsenide substrate layer and a p-type gallium arsenide diffused layer. The improved process comprises forming a pure silver ohmic contact to both the diffused layer and the substrate layer, wherein the n-type layer comprises a substantially low doping carrier concentration.

  2. 40 CFR 421.180 - Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. 421.180 Section 421.180 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary and Secondary Germanium and Gallium Subcategory § 421.180 Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  3. 40 CFR 421.180 - Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. 421.180 Section 421.180 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary and Secondary Germanium and Gallium Subcategory § 421.180 Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  4. 40 CFR 421.180 - Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. 421.180 Section 421.180 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary and Secondary Germanium and Gallium Subcategory § 421.180 Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  5. 40 CFR 421.180 - Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. 421.180 Section 421.180 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary and Secondary Germanium and Gallium Subcategory § 421.180 Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  6. 40 CFR 421.180 - Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. 421.180 Section 421.180 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary and Secondary Germanium and Gallium Subcategory § 421.180 Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  7. Gallium scintigraphy in a case of septic cavernous sinus thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Palestro, C.J.; Malat, J.; Gladstone, A.G.; Richman, A.H.

    1986-09-01

    Septic cavernous sinus thrombosis, a relatively uncommon disease entity, frequently can be fatal. Early diagnosis is imperative in order that appropriate treatment be instituted. A 59-year-old woman who was admitted to our institution with complaints of diplopia, blurred vision and fevers that developed following a tooth extraction is presented. Initial CT and lumbar puncture on the day of admission were totally normal. A repeat CT performed 48 hours after admission, on the same day as gallium imaging, demonstrated findings consistent with cavernous sinus thrombosis. Gallium imaging demonstrated intense uptake in the left cavernous sinus and left orbit as well as moderately increased activity in the right cavernous sinus and orbit, confirming infection. The patient was treated with antibiotics, and repeat CT and gallium imaging were performed ten days later, both of which demonstrated near total resolution of the disease process. Conceivably, if gallium imaging had been initiated on the day of admission it may have been the first study to demonstrate an infectious process in the cavernous sinus. Gallium imaging should be considered as a diagnostic tool in the noninvasive workup of this entity.

  8. Preliminary Spectroscopic Measurements for a Gallium Electromagnetic (GEM) Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Burton, Rodney L.; Glumac, Nick G.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2007-01-01

    As a propellant option for electromagnetic thrusters, liquid ,gallium appears to have several advantages relative to other propellants. The merits of using gallium in an electromagnetic thruster (EMT) are discussed and estimates of discharge current levels and mass flow rates yielding efficient operation are given. The gallium atomic weight of 70 predicts high efficiency in the 1500-2000 s specific impulse range, making it ideal for higher-thrust, near-Earth missions. A spatially and temporally broad spectroscopic survey in the 220-520 nm range is used to determine which species are present in the plasma and estimate electron temperature. The spectra show that neutral, singly, and doubly ionized gallium species are present in a 20 J, 1.8 kA (peak) are discharge. With graphite present on the insulator to facilitate breakdown, singly and doubly ionized carbon atoms are also present, and emission is observed from molecular carbon (CZ) radicals. A determination of the electron temperature was attempted using relative emission line data, and while the spatially and temporally averaged, spectra don't fit well to single temperatures, the data and presence of doubly ionized gallium are consistent with distributions in the 1-3 eV range.

  9. Characterization of semi-insulating gallium arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakemore, John S.

    1993-11-01

    The project was established 18 Nov. 1992 to continue for 12 months. Its purpose has been electrical and optical characterization of samples from semi-insulating (SI) melt-grown crystals of gallium arsenide (GaAs). As a further definition of the project's purpose, the primary goal has been to assist NRL in assessing the properties of SI GaAs crystals grown at NRL by the vertical zone melt (VZM) method. A second aspect of this characterization work has involved samples from SI GaAs crystals grown by various commercial vendors including samples of pre-synthesized GaAs evaluated for its suitability as starting 'feedstock' for VZM growth. Measurements made at Western Washington University (WWU) under the terms of this project accord with a Statement of Work provided at the outset. These have included the following: (1) low-field dc electrical transport data for SI GaAs samples, as functions of temperature; (2) near-infrared (NIR) transmittance/absorption spectra of polished slabs, with data concerning the well-known EL2 defect determined from NIR absorption strength and spectral form; and (3) mid-IR data on absorption caused by carbon acceptors in SI GaAs.

  10. Gallium nitride based logpile photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Li, Qiming; Lee, Yun-Ju; Figiel, Jeffrey J; Wang, George T; Fischer, Arthur J

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate a nine-layer logpile three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) composed of single crystalline gallium nitride (GaN) nanorods, ∼100 nm in size with lattice constants of 260, 280, and 300 nm with photonic band gap in the visible region. This unique GaN structure is created through a combined approach of a layer-by-layer template fabrication technique and selective metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). These GaN 3DPC exhibit a stacking direction band gap characterized by strong optical reflectance between 380 and 500 nm. By introducing a "line-defect" cavity in the fifth (middle) layer of the 3DPC, a localized transmission mode with a quality factor of 25-30 is also observed within the photonic band gap. The realization of a group III nitride 3DPC with uniform features and a band gap at wavelengths in the visible region is an important step toward realizing complete control of the electromagnetic environment for group III nitride based optoelectronic devices.

  11. Evaluation of the carcinogenicity of gallium arsenide.

    PubMed

    Bomhard, Ernst M; Gelbke, Heinz-Peter; Schenk, Hermann; Williams, Gary M; Cohen, Samuel M

    2013-05-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is an important semiconductor material. In 2-year inhalation studies, GaAs increased the incidence of lung tumors in female rats, but not in male rats or male and female mice. Alveolar proteinosis followed by chronic active inflammation was the predominant non-neoplastic pulmonary findings. IARC classified GaAs as carcinogenic to humans (group 1) based on the assumption that As and Ga ions are bioavailable. The European Chemical Agency Risk Assessment Committee concluded that GaAs should be classified into Carcinogenicity Category 1B (presumed to have carcinogenic potential for humans; ECHA). We evaluate whether these classifications are justified. Physico-chemical properties of GaAs particles and the degree of mechanical treatment are critical in this evaluation. The available data on mode of action (MOA), genotoxicity and bioavailability do not support the contribution of As or Ga ions to the lung tumors in female rats. Most toxicological studies utilized small particles produced by strong mechanical treatment, destroying the crystalline structure. The resulting amorphous GaAs is not relevant to crystalline GaAs at production and processing sites. The likely tumorigenic MOA is lung toxicity related to particulate-induced inflammation and increased proliferation. It is concluded that there is no evidence for a primary carcinogenic effect of GaAs.

  12. Investigation on gallium ions impacting monolayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xin; Zhao, Haiyan Yan, Dong; Pei, Jiayun

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, the physical phenomena of gallium (Ga{sup +}) ion impacting monolayer graphene in the nanosculpting process are investigated experimentally, and the mechanisms are explained by using Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Firstly, the MC method is employed to clarify the phenomena happened to the monolayer graphene target under Ga{sup +} ion irradiation. It is found that substrate has strong influence on the damage mode of graphene. The mean sputtering yield of graphene under 30 keV Ga{sup +} ion irradiation is 1.77 and the least ion dose to completely remove carbon atoms in graphene is 21.6 ion/nm{sup 2}. Afterwards, the focused ion beam over 21.6 ion/nm{sup 2} is used for the irradiation on a monolayer graphene supported by SiO2 experimentally, resulting in the nanostructures, i.e., nanodot and nanowire array on the graphene. The performances of the nanostructures are characterized by atomic force microscopy and Raman spectrum. A plasma plume shielding model is put forward to explain the nanosculpting results of graphene under different irradiation parameters. In addition, two damage mechanisms are found existing in the fabrication process of the nanostructures by using empirical MD simulations. The results can help us open the possibilities for better control of nanocarbon devices.

  13. Gallium-based avalanche photodiode optical crosstalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazej, Josef; Prochazka, Ivan; Hamal, Karel; Sopko, Bruno; Chren, Dominik

    2006-11-01

    Solid-state single photon detectors based on avalanche photodiode are getting more attention in various areas of applied physics: optical sensors, quantum key distribution, optical ranging and Lidar, time-resolved spectroscopy, X-ray laser diagnostics, and turbid media imaging. Avalanche photodiodes specifically designed for single photon counting semiconductor avalanche structures have been developed on the basis of various materials: Si, Ge, GaP, GaAsP, and InGaP/InGaAs at the Czech Technical University in Prague during the last 20 years. They have been tailored for numerous applications. Trends in demand are focused on detection array construction recently. Even extremely small arrays containing a few cells are of great importance for users. Electrical crosstalk between individual gating and quenching circuits and optical crosstalk between individual detecting cells are serious limitation for array design and performance. Optical crosstalk is caused by the parasitic light emission of the avalanche which accompanies the photon detection process. We have studied in detail the optical emission of the avalanche photon counting structure in the silicon- and gallium-based photodiodes. The timing properties and spectral distribution of the emitted light have been measured for different operating conditions to quantify optical crosstalk. We conclude that optical crosstalk is an inherent property of avalanche photodiode operated in Geiger mode. The only way to minimize optical crosstalk in avalanche photodiode array is to build active quenching circuit with minimum response time.

  14. Measuring Nanoscale Heat Transfer for Gold-(Gallium Oxide)-Gallium Nitride Interfaces as a Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwejkowski, Chester; Sun, Kai; Constantin, Costel; Giri, Ashutosh; Saltonstall, Christopher; Hopkins, Patrick; NanoSynCh Team; Exsite Team

    2014-03-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) is considered the most important semiconductor after the discovery of Silicon. Understanding the properties of GaN is imperative in determining the utility and applicability of this class of materials to devices. We present results of time domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) measurements as a function of surface root mean square (RMS) roughness. We used commercially available 5mm x 5mm, single-side polished GaN (3-7 μm)/Sapphire (430 μm) substrates that have a Wurtzite crystal structure and are slightly n-type doped. The GaN substrates were annealed in the open atmosphere for 10 minutes (900-1000 °C). This high-temperature treatment produced RMS values from 1-60 nm and growth of gallium oxide (GaO) as measured with an atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy respectively. A gold film (80nm) was deposited on the GaN surface using electron beam physical vapor deposition which was verified using ellipsometry and profilometry. The TDTR measurements suggest that the thermal conductivity decays exponentially with RMS roughness and that there is a minimum value for thermal boundary conductance at a roughness of 15nm.

  15. Native gallium adatoms discovered on atomically-smooth gallium nitride surfaces at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Alam, Khan; Foley, Andrew; Smith, Arthur R

    2015-03-11

    In advanced compound semiconductor devices, such as in quantum dot and quantum well systems, detailed atomic configurations at the growth surfaces are vital in determining the structural and electronic properties. Therefore, it is important to investigate the surface reconstructions in order to make further technological advancements. Usually, conventional semiconductor surfaces (e.g., arsenides, phosphides, and antimonides) are highly reactive due to the existence of a high density of group V (anion) surface dangling bonds. However, in the case of nitrides, group III rich growth conditions in molecular beam epitaxy are usually preferred leading to group III (Ga)-rich surfaces. Here, we use low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to reveal a uniform distribution of native gallium adatoms with a density of 0.3%-0.5% of a monolayer on the clean, as-grown surface of nitrogen polar GaN(0001̅) having the centered 6 × 12 reconstruction. Unseen at room temperature, these Ga adatoms are strongly bound to the surface but move with an extremely low surface diffusion barrier and a high density saturation coverage in thermodynamic equilibrium with Ga droplets. Furthermore, the Ga adatoms reveal an intrinsic surface chirality and an asymmetric site occupation. These observations can have important impacts in the understanding of gallium nitride surfaces.

  16. Gallium plasmonics: deep subwavelength spectroscopic imaging of single and interacting gallium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Knight, Mark W; Coenen, Toon; Yang, Yang; Brenny, Benjamin J M; Losurdo, Maria; Brown, April S; Everitt, Henry O; Polman, Albert

    2015-02-24

    Gallium has recently been demonstrated as a phase-change plasmonic material offering UV tunability, facile synthesis, and a remarkable stability due to its thin, self-terminating native oxide. However, the dense irregular nanoparticle (NP) ensembles fabricated by molecular-beam epitaxy make optical measurements of individual particles challenging. Here we employ hyperspectral cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy to characterize the response of single Ga NPs of various sizes within an irregular ensemble by spatially and spectrally resolving both in-plane and out-of-plane plasmonic modes. These modes, which include hybridized dipolar and higher-order terms due to phase retardation and substrate interactions, are correlated with finite difference time domain (FDTD) electrodynamics calculations that consider the Ga NP contact angle, substrate, and native Ga/Si surface oxidation. This study experimentally confirms previous theoretical predictions of plasmonic size-tunability in single Ga NPs and demonstrates that the plasmonic modes of interacting Ga nanoparticles can hybridize to produce strong hot spots in the ultraviolet. The controlled, robust UV plasmonic resonances of gallium nanoparticles are applicable to energy- and phase-specific applications such as optical memory, environmental remediation, and simultaneous fluorescence and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopies.

  17. Electrodeposition as an alternate method for preparation of environmental samples for iodide by AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamic, M. L.; Lister, T. E.; Dufek, E. J.; Jenson, D. D.; Olson, J. E.; Vockenhuber, C.; Watrous, M. G.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of an alternate method for preparing environmental samples for 129I analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at Idaho National Laboratory. The optimal sample preparation method is characterized by ease of preparation, capability of processing very small quantities of iodide, and ease of loading into a cathode. Electrodeposition of iodide on a silver wire was evaluated using these criteria. This study indicates that the electrochemically-formed silver iodide deposits produce ion currents similar to those from precipitated silver iodide for the same sample mass. Precipitated silver iodide samples are usually mixed with niobium or silver powder prior to loading in a cathode. Using electrodeposition, the silver is already mixed with the sample and can simply be picked up with tweezers, placed in the sample die, and pressed into a cathode. The major advantage of this method is that the silver wire/electrodeposited silver iodide is much easier to load into a cathode.

  18. Electrodeposition as an alternate method for preparation of environmental samples for iodide by AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Adamic, M. L.; Lister, T. E.; Dufek, E. J.; Jenson, D. D.; Olson, J. E.; Vockenhuber, C.; Watrous, M. G.

    2015-03-25

    This paper presents an evaluation of an alternate method for preparing environmental samples for 129I analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at Idaho National Laboratory. The optimal sample preparation method is characterized by ease of preparation, capability of processing very small quantities of iodide, and ease of loading into a cathode. Electrodeposition of iodide on a silver wire was evaluated using these criteria. This study indicates that the electrochemically-formed silver iodide deposits produce ion currents similar to those from precipitated silver iodide for the same sample mass. Furthermore, precipitated silver iodide samples are usually mixed with niobium or silver powder prior to loading in a cathode. Using electrodeposition, the silver is already mixed with the sample and can simply be picked up with tweezers, placed in the sample die, and pressed into a cathode. The major advantage of this method is that the silver wire/electrodeposited silver iodide is much easier to load into a cathode.

  19. Antibacterial effect of gallium and silver on Pseudomonas aeruginosa treated with gallium-silver-phosphate-based glasses.

    PubMed

    Valappil, Sabeel P; Higham, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Gallium and silver incorporated phosphate-based glasses were evaluated for antibacterial effect on the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is a leading cause of opportunistic infections. The glasses were produced by conventional melt quenching methods at 1100°C for 1 h. Glass degradation studies were conducted by weight loss method. Disc diffusion assay and cell viability assay displayed statistically significant (p ≤ 0.0005) effect on P. aeruginosa growth which increased with decreasing calcium content in the glasses. The gallium ion release rates (1.83, 0.69 and 0.48 ppm·h(-1)) and silver ion release rates (2.97, 2.84 and 2.47 ppm·h(-1)) were found to account for this variation. Constant depth film fermentor was used to evaluate the anti-biofilm properties of the glasses. Both gallium and silver in the glass contributed to biofilm growth inhibitory effect on P. aeruginosa (up to 2.68 reduction in log 10 values of the viable counts compared with controls). The glasses were found to deliver gallium and silver in a controlled way and exerted cumulative antibacterial action on planktonic and biofilm growth of P. aeruginosa. The antibacterial, especially anti-biofilm, properties of the gallium and silver incorporated phosphate-based glasses make them a potential candidate to combat infections caused by P. aeruginosa.

  20. Determination of gallium originated from a gallium-based anticancer drug in human urine using ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Filatova, Darya G; Seregina, Irina F; Foteeva, Lidia S; Pukhov, Vladimir V; Timerbaev, Andrei R; Bolshov, Mikhail A

    2011-05-01

    Urine analysis gives an insight into the excretion of the administered drug which is related to its reactivity and toxicity. In this work, the capability of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to measure ultratrace metal levels was utilized for rapid assaying of gallium originating from the novel gallium anticancer drug, tris(8-quinolinolato)gallium(III) (GaQ(3)), in human urine. Sample dilution with 1% (v/v) HNO(3) as the only required pre-treatment was shown to prevent contamination of the sample introduction system and to reduce polyatomic interferences from sample components. The origin of the blank signal at masses of gallium isotopes, 71 and 69, was investigated using high-resolution ICP-MS and attributed, respectively, to the formation of (36)Ar(35)Cl(+) and (40)Ar(31)P(+) ions and, tentatively, to a triplet of doubly charged ions of Ba, La, and Ce. The accuracy and precision performance was tested by evaluating a set of parameters for analytical method validation. The developed assay has been applied for the determination of gallium in urine samples spiked with GaQ(3). The achieved recoveries (95-102%) and quantification limit of 0.2 μg L(-1) emphasize the practical applicability of the presented analytical approach to monitor renal elimination of GaQ(3) at all dose levels in clinical trials that are currently in progress.

  1. Antibacterial effect of gallium and silver on Pseudomonas aeruginosa treated with gallium-silver-phosphate-based glasses.

    PubMed

    Valappil, Sabeel P; Higham, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Gallium and silver incorporated phosphate-based glasses were evaluated for antibacterial effect on the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is a leading cause of opportunistic infections. The glasses were produced by conventional melt quenching methods at 1100°C for 1 h. Glass degradation studies were conducted by weight loss method. Disc diffusion assay and cell viability assay displayed statistically significant (p ≤ 0.0005) effect on P. aeruginosa growth which increased with decreasing calcium content in the glasses. The gallium ion release rates (1.83, 0.69 and 0.48 ppm·h(-1)) and silver ion release rates (2.97, 2.84 and 2.47 ppm·h(-1)) were found to account for this variation. Constant depth film fermentor was used to evaluate the anti-biofilm properties of the glasses. Both gallium and silver in the glass contributed to biofilm growth inhibitory effect on P. aeruginosa (up to 2.68 reduction in log 10 values of the viable counts compared with controls). The glasses were found to deliver gallium and silver in a controlled way and exerted cumulative antibacterial action on planktonic and biofilm growth of P. aeruginosa. The antibacterial, especially anti-biofilm, properties of the gallium and silver incorporated phosphate-based glasses make them a potential candidate to combat infections caused by P. aeruginosa. PMID:24840197

  2. Effect of bronchoscopy on localization of gallium-67 citrate

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, B.A.; Cooper, K.R.; Fratkin, M.J.

    1983-03-01

    Bronchoscopy, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and 67Ga lung scans are frequently performed for diagnosis or follow-up of patients with sarcoidosis, interstitial pneumonitis, lymphoma, infections, and bronchogenic carcinoma. Because many patients undergo all 3 of these procedures, it is important to determine what effects bronchoscopy and/or BAL may have on gallium imaging. Because 67Ga accumulates in neutrophils at the site of an inflammatory lesion as well as in those circulating in the vascular compartment, it seems reasonable to postulate that bronchoscopy could cause migration of labeled neutrophils into the lung, resulting in false positive gallium scans. To test this hypothesis, we studied 5 patients with varying chronologic relationships of 67Ga injection, gallium scanning, and bronchoscopy with BAL. In all patients, the repeat 67Ga lung scans remained normal or showed no change after bronchoscopy and BAL. We conclude that bronchoscopy with or without BAL does not cause increased 67Ga uptake by the lung.

  3. Palladium-catalyzed Heck-type cross-couplings of unactivated alkyl iodides.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Caitlin M; Alexanian, Erik J

    2014-06-01

    A palladium-catalyzed, intermolecular Heck-type coupling of alkyl iodides and alkenes is described. This process is successful with a variety of primary and secondary unactivated alkyl iodides as reaction partners, including those with hydrogen atoms in the β position. The mild catalytic conditions enable intermolecular C-C bond formations with a diverse set of alkyl iodides and alkenes, including substrates containing base- or nucleophile-sensitive functionality.

  4. Iron-catalyzed 1,2-addition of perfluoroalkyl iodides to alkynes and alkenes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Cheung, Chi Wai; Hu, Xile

    2014-05-01

    Iron catalysis has been developed for the intermolecular 1,2-addition of perfluoroalkyl iodides to alkynes and alkenes. The catalysis has a wide substrate scope and high functional-group tolerance. A variety of perfluoroalkyl iodides including CF3 I can be employed. The resulting perfluoroalkylated alkyl and alkenyl iodides can be further functionalized by cross-coupling reactions. This methodology provides a straightforward and streamlined access to perfluoroalkylated organic molecules.

  5. Extremely-efficient, miniaturized, long-lived alpha-voltaic power source using liquid gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor); Patel, Jagdishbhai (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A power source converts .alpha.-particle energy to electricity for use in electrical systems. Liquid gallium or other liquid medium is subjected to .alpha.-particle emissions. Electrons are freed by collision from neutral gallium atoms to provide gallium ions. The electrons migrate to a cathode while the gallium ions migrate to an anode. A current and/or voltage difference then arises between the cathode and anode because of the work function difference of the cathode and anode. Gallium atoms are regenerated by the receiving of electrons from the anode enabling the generation of additional electrons from additional .alpha.-particle collisions.

  6. Excess iodide decreases transcription of NIS and VEGF genes in rat FRTL-5 thyroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Koichi; Kimura, Hiroaki; Wu, Huhehasi; Kudo, Naoko; Kim, Won Bae; Suzuki, Sayuri; Yoshida, Akio; Caturegli, Patrizio; Kohn, Leonard D.

    2010-01-01

    Although it is well known that an excess of iodide suppresses thyroid function and blood flow in vivo, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully known. The functional effect of iodide occurs at multiple steps, which include inhibition of sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) expression, transient block of organification, and inhibition of hormonal release. The vascular effect likely involves suppression of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene. In this report, we show that excess iodide coordinately suppresses the expression of the NIS and VEGF genes in FRTL-5 thyroid cells. We also demonstrate that the mechanism of iodide suppression of NIS gene expression is transcriptional, which is synergized by the addition of thyroglobulin. Based on the findings of reporter gene assays and electrophoretic gel mobility shift analysis, we also report two novel DNA binding proteins that responded specifically to iodide and modulated NIS promoter activity. The results suggest that excess iodide affects thyroid vascular function in addition to iodide uptake. This study provides additional insights into the mechanism of action of excess iodide on thyroid function. PMID:20132794

  7. Microfluidic platforms for gallium-based liquid metal alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daeyoung

    As an alternative to toxic mercury, non-toxic gallium-based liquid metal alloy has been gaining popularity due to its higher thermal and electrical conductivities, and low toxicity along with liquid property. However, it is difficult to handle as the alloy becomes readily oxidized in atmospheric air environment. This instant oxidation causes the gallium-based liquid metal alloy to wet almost any solid surface. Therefore, it has been primarily limited to applications which rely only on its deformability, not on its mobility. In this research, various approaches to mobilize gallium-based liquid metal alloy were investigated. Multi-scale surface patterned with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro pillar array showed super-lyophobic property against gallium-based liquid metal alloy by minimizing the contact area between the solid surface and the liquid metal, and it was expanded to a three-dimensional tunnel shaped microfluidic channel. Vertically-aligned carbon nanotube forest leads to another promising super-lyophobic surface due to its hierarchical micro/nano scale combined structures and chemical inertness. When the carbon nanotubes were transferred onto flexible PDMS by imprinting, the super-lyophobic property was still maintained even under the mechanical deformation such as stretching and bending. Alternatively, the gallium-based liquid metal can be manipulated by modifying the surface of liquid metal itself. With chemical reaction with HCl 'vapor', the oxidized surface (mainly Ga2O3/Ga2O) of gallium-based liquid metal was converted to GaCl3/InCl 3 resulting in the recovery of non-wetting characteristics. Paper which is intrinsically porous is attractive as a super-lyophobic surface and it was found that hydrochloric acid (HCl) impregnation enhanced the anti-wetting property by the chemical reaction. As another alternative method, by coating the viscoelastic oxidized surface of liquid metal with ferromagnetic materials (CoNiMnP or Fe), it showed non

  8. On-chip superconductivity via gallium overdoping of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Skrotzki, R.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Heera, V.; Voelskow, M.; Muecklich, A.; Schmidt, B.; Skorupa, W.; Helm, M.; Wosnitza, J.; Fiedler, J.; Gobsch, G.

    2010-11-08

    We report on superconducting properties of gallium-enriched silicon layers in commercial (100) oriented silicon wafers. Ion implantation and subsequent rapid thermal annealing have been applied for realizing gallium precipitation beneath a silicon-dioxide cover layer. Depending on the preparation parameters, we observe a sharp drop to zero resistance at 7 K. The critical-field anisotropy proofs the thin-film character of superconductivity. In addition, out-of-plane critical fields of above 9 T and critical current densities exceeding 2 kA/cm{sup 2} promote these structures to be possible playgrounds for future microelectronic technology.

  9. Carbon aging mechanisms and effects on retention of organic iodides

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The activated carbon used to treat the off-gas from the Savannah River Plant prodution reactor building was studied to determine the chemical changes occurring in this carbon during its service life. The carbon is a coconut-shell charcoal impregnated with 1% triethylenediamine (TEDA) and 2% KI. It was known that during its 30-month service life the carbon becomes more acidic and less effective for retaining iodine in organic form. The study showed that the most important change occurring in the carbon is the reaction of KI to give other chemical forms of iodine. The reacted iodine is unavailable for exchange with alkyl iodides. The results suggest that the carbon reacts with KI to form organic compounds, but small amounts of oxidized iodine may also be presnt. There is also evidence that some iodide is lost from the carbon altogether. The TEDA impregnant is lost from the carbon very quickly, and has no importance after a few months. The specific reactions by which the impregnant is lost have not been identified. However, mathematical analysis shows that the carbon performance data are consistent with the reaction of iodide impregnant with impurities in the air flowing through the carbon bed. Additional mathematical analysis, based on electron microscopic observation of the carbon particles, indicates that the external surfaces of the carbon are mainly responsible for their effectiveness in retaining iodine. Consequently, the condition of the impregnants on a relatively small fraction of the carbon surface can have a large effect on its performance. 4 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Construction of an electrode modified with gallium(III) for voltammetric detection of ovalbumin.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Kazuharu; Okusawa, Makoto; Takano, Yusaku; Kadoya, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Electrodes modified with gallium(III) complexes were constructed to detect ovalbumin (OVA). For immobilization of a gallium(III)-nitrilotriacetate (NTA) complex, the electrode was first covered with collagen film. After the amino groups of the film had reacted with isothiocyanobenzyl-NTA, the gallium(III) was then able to combine with the NTA moieties. Another design featured an electrode cast with a gallium(III)-acetylacetonate (AA) complex. The amount of gallium(III) in the NTA complex was equivalent to one-quarter of the gallium(III) that could be utilized from an AA complex. However, the calibration curves of OVA using gallium(III)-NTA and gallium(III)-AA complexes were linear in the ranges of 7.0 × 10(-11) - 3.0 × 10(-9) M and 5.0 × 10(-10) - 8.0 × 10(-9) M, respectively. The gallium(III) on the electrode with NTA complex had high flexibility due to the existence of a spacer between the NTA and the collagen film, and, therefore, the reactivity of the gallium(III) to OVA was superior to that of the gallium(III)-AA complex with no spacer.

  11. Gallium-based anti-infectives: targeting microbial iron-uptake mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kelson, Andrew B; Carnevali, Maia; Truong-Le, Vu

    2013-10-01

    Microbes have evolved elaborate iron-acquisition systems to sequester iron from the host environment using siderophores and heme uptake systems. Gallium(III) is structurally similar to iron(III), except that it cannot be reduced under physiological conditions, therefore gallium has the potential to serve as an iron analog, and thus an anti-microbial. Because Ga(III) can bind to virtually any complex that binds Fe(III), simple gallium salts as well as more complex siderophores and hemes are potential carriers to deliver Ga(III) to the microbes. These gallium complexes represent a new class of anti-infectives that is different in mechanism of action from conventional antibiotics. Simple gallium salts such as gallium nitrate, maltolate, and simple gallium siderophore complexes such as gallium citrate have shown good antibacterial activities. The most studied complex has been gallium citrate, which exhibits broad activity against many Gram negative bacteria at ∼1-5μg/ml MICs, strong biofilm activity, low drug resistance, and efficacy in vivo. Using the structural features of specific siderophore and heme made by pathogenic bacteria and fungi, researchers have begun to evaluate new gallium complexes to target key pathogens. This review will summarize potential iron-acquisition system targets and recent research on gallium-based anti-infectives.

  12. Stochastic dynamics of the chlorite-iodide reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagués, F.; Ramírez-Piscina, L.; Sancho, J. M.

    1990-04-01

    A recently proposed theoretical framework appropriate to the study of the stochastic behavior of several chemical systems is used to analyze the irreproducibility of the observed reaction times in the chlorite-iodide clock reaction. Noise terms are incorporated through the kinetic constants and their intensity is further correlated with the inverse of the stirring rate. Analytical and simulation results are obtained for the first moments of the reaction time distribution. These results are compared with recent experimental data obtained by Nagypál and Epstein.

  13. Optical transmission measurements on monocrystalline and polycrystalline cesium iodide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W.; Arens, J. F.; Simon, M.

    1973-01-01

    A summary is presented of optical measurements performed on a variety of cesium iodide samples to characterize quantitatively the optical quality of the materials, and to define and measure parameters which determine its suitability as a detector material for high energy cosmic ray experiments on HEAO-A. The general case of light transmission through a long rectangular slab under multiple internal reflections is discussed along with transmission and scattering as a function of wavelength at normal incidence. Scattering parameters are tabulated for encapsulated single crystal CsI and polyscin.

  14. Measuring Cell Death by Propidium Iodide Uptake and Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Scott, Adrian P; Marfell, Brooke J; Boughaba, Jeanne A; Chojnowski, Grace; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Propidium iodide (PI) is a small fluorescent molecule that binds to DNA but cannot passively traverse into cells that possess an intact plasma membrane. PI uptake versus exclusion can be used to discriminate dead cells, in which plasma membranes become permeable regardless of the mechanism of death, from live cells with intact membranes. PI is excited by wavelengths between 400 and 600 nm and emits light between 600 and 700 nm, and is therefore compatible with lasers and photodetectors commonly available in flow cytometers. This protocol for PI staining can be used to quantitate cell death in most modern research facilities and universities. PMID:27371595

  15. Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Benjamin J.; Marlowe, Daniel L.; Choi, Joshua J. E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu; Sun, Keye; Gupta, Mool C. E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu; Saidi, Wissam A.; Scudiero, Louis E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu

    2015-06-15

    Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide are investigated using a combination of ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy. Our results show that the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum shift down in energy by 110 meV and 77 meV as temperature increases from 28 °C to 85 °C. Density functional theory calculations using slab structures show that the decreased orbital splitting due to thermal expansion is a major contribution to the experimentally observed shift in energy levels. Our results have implications for solar cell performance under operating conditions with continued sunlight exposure and increased temperature.

  16. Low-temperature photoluminescence studies of mercuric-iodide photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R. B.; Bao, X. J.; Schlesinger, T. E.; Markakis, J. M.; Cheng, A. Y.; Ortale, C.

    1989-09-01

    Mercuric-iodide (HgI2 ) photodetectors with sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) entrance electrodes were studied using low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence spectrum obtained on each photodetector was found to differ for points beneath the ITO contact and points adjacent to it, indicating that the contact fabrication process introduces new carrier traps and radiative recombination centers within the ITO-HgI2 interfacial region. In particular, a new broad band was observed in the spectra taken from points beneath the ITO electrode. Photocurrent-versus-position measurements showed that the intensity of this broad band was enhanced in regions having relatively poor photoresponse.

  17. Polarized spectral complexes of optical functions of monovalent mercury iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, V. V.; Sobolev, V. Val.; Anisimov, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral complexes of optical functions of monovalent mercury iodide Hg2I2 were determined for E ⊥ c and E || c polarizations in the range from 2 to 5.5 eV at 4.2 K. The permittivity and characteristic electron energy loss spectra were expanded in simple components with the determination of their main parameters, including the energy of the maximum and the oscillator strength. The calculations were performed based on known reflectance spectra. Computer programs based on Kramers-Kronig relations and the improved parameter-free method of Argand diagrams were used.

  18. Copper-catalyzed selective arylations of benzoxazoles with aryl iodides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghae; Yoo, Kwangho; Kim, Se Eun; Cho, Hee Jin; Lee, Junseong; Kim, Youngjo; Kim, Min

    2015-04-01

    A copper-catalyzed direct ring-opening double N-arylation of benzoxazoles with aryl iodides has been developed. The present system exhibits high selectivity despite competition from C-arylation. The selectivity between ring-opening N-arylation and C-arylation was controlled by the choice of reaction vessel. The nitrile bound bis(triphenylphosphine)copper cyanide was identified as the active catalytic species for both reactions, and when combined with a nitrile-containing solvent, enhanced the reaction efficiency.

  19. Mechanical testing of large thallium doped sodium iodide single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. M.

    1985-01-01

    The findings of mechanical tests performed on five thallium-doped sodium iodide NaI(Tl) crystals are presented. These crystals are all in the shape of circular flat plates, 20.0 in. in diameter an d0.5 in. thick. The test setup, testing procedure, and the test data are presented. Large crystals exhibit a high degree of material plasticity, as well as a much higher strength than previously anticipated, on the order of 500 psi. Also revealed from the testing is the fact that crystal with a large number of grain boundaries developed less plasticity, and therefore less permanent deformation, than those with fewer grain boundaries.

  20. Au25(SG)18 as a fluorescent iodide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Man; Wu, Zhikun; Yang, Jiao; Wang, Guozhong; Wang, Hongzhi; Cai, Weiping

    2012-06-01

    The recently emerging gold nanoclusters (GNC) are of major importance for both basic science studies and practical applications. Based on its surface-induced fluorescence properties, we investigated the potential use of Au25(SG)18 (GSH: glutathione) as a fluorescent iodide sensor. The current detection limit of 400 nM, which can possibly be further enhanced by optimizing the conditions, and excellent selectivity among 12 types of anion (F-, Cl-, Br-, I-, NO3-, ClO4-, HCO3-, IO3-, SO42-, SO32-, CH3COO- and C6H5O73-) make Au25(SG)18 a good candidate for iodide sensing. Furthermore, our work has revealed the particular sensing mechanism, which was found to be affinity-induced ratiometric and enhanced fluorescence (abbreviated to AIREF), which has rarely been reported previously and may provide an alternative strategy for devising nanoparticle-based sensors.The recently emerging gold nanoclusters (GNC) are of major importance for both basic science studies and practical applications. Based on its surface-induced fluorescence properties, we investigated the potential use of Au25(SG)18 (GSH: glutathione) as a fluorescent iodide sensor. The current detection limit of 400 nM, which can possibly be further enhanced by optimizing the conditions, and excellent selectivity among 12 types of anion (F-, Cl-, Br-, I-, NO3-, ClO4-, HCO3-, IO3-, SO42-, SO32-, CH3COO- and C6H5O73-) make Au25(SG)18 a good candidate for iodide sensing. Furthermore, our work has revealed the particular sensing mechanism, which was found to be affinity-induced ratiometric and enhanced fluorescence (abbreviated to AIREF), which has rarely been reported previously and may provide an alternative strategy for devising nanoparticle-based sensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: fluorescence spectra of Au25(SG)18 (1.6 μM in H2O) with successive titration of I- and the time-dependent fluorescence of Au25(SG)18. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30169e.

  1. Development of mercuric iodide uncooled x ray detectors and spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    1990-01-01

    The results obtained in the development of miniature, lowpower, light weight mercuric iodide, HgI2, x ray spectrometers for future space missions are summarized. It was demonstrated that HgI2 detectors can be employed in a high resolution x ray spectrometer, operating in a scanning electron microscope. Also, the development of HgI2 x ray detectors to augment alpha backscattering spectrometers is discussed. These combination instruments allow for the identification of all chemical elements, with the possible exception of hydrogen, and their respective concentrations. Additionally, further investigations of questions regarding radiation damage effects in the HgI2 x ray detectors are reported.

  2. Gallium arsenide processing for gate array logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Eric D.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a reliable and reproducible GaAs process was initiated for applications in gate array logic. Gallium Arsenide is an extremely important material for high speed electronic applications in both digital and analog circuits since its electron mobility is 3 to 5 times that of silicon, this allows for faster switching times for devices fabricated with it. Unfortunately GaAs is an extremely difficult material to process with respect to silicon and since it includes the arsenic component GaAs can be quite dangerous (toxic) especially during some heating steps. The first stage of the research was directed at developing a simple process to produce GaAs MESFETs. The MESFET (MEtal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor) is the most useful, practical and simple active device which can be fabricated in GaAs. It utilizes an ohmic source and drain contact separated by a Schottky gate. The gate width is typically a few microns. Several process steps were required to produce a good working device including ion implantation, photolithography, thermal annealing, and metal deposition. A process was designed to reduce the total number of steps to a minimum so as to reduce possible errors. The first run produced no good devices. The problem occurred during an aluminum etch step while defining the gate contacts. It was found that the chemical etchant attacked the GaAs causing trenching and subsequent severing of the active gate region from the rest of the device. Thus all devices appeared as open circuits. This problem is being corrected and since it was the last step in the process correction should be successful. The second planned stage involves the circuit assembly of the discrete MESFETs into logic gates for test and analysis. Finally the third stage is to incorporate the designed process with the tested circuit in a layout that would produce the gate array as a GaAs integrated circuit.

  3. Method for improving the growth of cadmium telluride on a gallium arsenide substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, J.L.

    1990-12-31

    A method for preparing a gallium arsenide substrate, prior to growing a layer of cadmium telluride on a support surface thereof. The preparation includes the steps of cleaning the gallium arsenide substrate and thereafter forming prepatterned shapes on the support surface of the gallium arsenide substrate. The layer of cadmium telluride then grown on the prepared substrate results in dislocation densities of approximately 1{times}10{sup 6}/cm{sup 2} or less. The prepatterned shapes on the support surface of the gallium arsenide substrate are formed by reactive ion etching an original outer surface of the gallium arsenide substrate and into the body of the gallium arsenide substrate to a depth of at least two microns. The prepatterned shapes have the appearance of cylindrical mesas each having a diameter of at lease twelve microns. After the mesas are formed on the support surface of the gallium arsenide substrate, the substrate is again cleaned.

  4. Gallium-67 uptake by the thyroid associated with progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoberg, R.J.; Blue, P.W.; Kidd, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Although thyroidal uptake of gallium-67 has been described in several thyroid disorders, gallium-67 scanning is not commonly used in the evaluation of thyroid disease. Thyroidal gallium-67 uptake has been reported to occur frequently with subacute thyroiditis, anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, and thyroid lymphoma, and occasionally with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and follicular thyroid carcinoma. A patient is described with progressive systemic sclerosis who, while being scanned for possible active pulmonary involvement, was found incidentally to have abnormal gallium-67 uptake only in the thyroid gland. Fine needle aspiration cytology of the thyroid revealed Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Although Hashimoto's thyroiditis occurs with increased frequency in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis, thyroidal uptake of gallium-67 associated with progressive systemic sclerosis has not, to our knowledge, been previously described. Since aggressive thyroid malignancies frequently are imaged by gallium-67 scintigraphy, fine needle aspiration cytology of the thyroid often is essential in the evaluation of thyroidal gallium-67 uptake.

  5. Relationship of dietary iodide and drinking water disinfectants to thyroid function in experimental animals

    SciTech Connect

    Revis, N.W.; McCauley, P.; Holdsworth, G.

    1986-11-01

    The importance of dietary iodide on the reported hypothyroid effect of drinking water disinfectants on thyroid function was investigated. Previous studies have also showed differences in the relative sensitivity of pigeons and rabbits to chlorinated water. Pigeons and rabbits were exposed for 3 months to diets containing high (950 ppb) or low (300 ppb) levels of iodide and to drinking water containing two levels of chlorine. Results showed that the high-iodide diet prevented the hypothyroid effect observed in pigeons given the low-iodide diet and chlorinated drinking water. Similar trends were observed in rabbits exposed to the same treatment; however, significant hypothyroid effects were not observed in this animal model. The factor associated with the observed effect of dietary iodide on the chlorine-induced change in thyroid function is unknown, as is the relative sensitivity of rabbits and pigeons to the effect of chlorine. Several factors may explain the importance of dietary iodide and the relative sensitivity of these species. For example, the iodine formed by the known reaction of chlorine with iodide could result in a decrease in the plasma level of iodide because of the relative absorption rates of iodide and iodine in the intestinal tract, and the various types and concentrations of chloroorganics (metabolites) formed in the diet following the exposure of various dietary constituents to chlorine could affect the thyroid function. The former factor was investigated in the present studies. Results do not confirm a consistent, significant reduction in the plasma level of iodide in rabbits and pigeons exposed to chlorinated water and the low-iodide diet. The latter factor is being investigated.

  6. Electrooptic Waveguide Directional Coupler Modulator in Aluminum Gallium Arsenide-Gallium Arsenide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mujibun Nisa

    A novel optical waveguide intensity modulator in aluminum gallium arsenide and gallium arsenide material system is modeled, designed, and experimentally demonstrated at 0.83 μm wavelength. The modulator utilizes the linear electrooptic effect in a coupled waveguide structure to achieve high extinction ratio at low drive voltage. The device structure consists of a differentially -etched ridge directional coupler, where the ridge height in the gap is smaller that that of the outer sides. The effective index and semivectorial finite difference modeling techniques are developed to analyze the single ridge guides and directional coupler structures. The mode structure results from the two models are compared and the limitations of the effective index method are determined. The differential -etch design is employed to reduce the length as well as the drive voltage of the modulator. A modulation voltage of 2 volts for a 3.5-mm-long device is achieved, which is the lowest reported in literature. These results are compared with those obtained from the simplified analytical expressions for conventional couplers, and higher performance expected from the differential-etch design is verified. The modulator extinction ratio is measured to be 13 dB at 2 volts. The measured optical propagation loss of approximately 3.4 dB/cm for the modulator is speculated to be primarily due to the surface morphology of the epitaxially-grown material, and the light scattering from rough ridge walls produced during the anisotropic dry etching process. The high microwave loss of 15 dB/cm calculated for the modulator electrode design suggests a trade-off between the modulation voltage and the bandwidth, which is expected to be limited to 500 MHz. The measurement of the modulator frequency response up to 100 KHz is presented, because of the test limitations at higher frequencies due to the weak modulated intensity signals.

  7. Ionic transport in hybrid lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eames, Christopher; Frost, Jarvist M.; Barnes, Piers R. F.; O'Regan, Brian C.; Walsh, Aron; Islam, M. Saiful

    2015-06-01

    Solar cells based on organic-inorganic halide perovskites have recently shown rapidly rising power conversion efficiencies, but exhibit unusual behaviour such as current-voltage hysteresis and a low-frequency giant dielectric response. Ionic transport has been suggested to be an important factor contributing to these effects; however, the chemical origin of this transport and the mobile species are unclear. Here, the activation energies for ionic migration in methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) are derived from first principles, and are compared with kinetic data extracted from the current-voltage response of a perovskite-based solar cell. We identify the microscopic transport mechanisms, and find facile vacancy-assisted migration of iodide ions with an activation energy of 0.6 eV, in good agreement with the kinetic measurements. The results of this combined computational and experimental study suggest that hybrid halide perovskites are mixed ionic-electronic conductors, a finding that has major implications for solar cell device architectures.

  8. Ionic transport in hybrid lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Eames, Christopher; Frost, Jarvist M.; Barnes, Piers R. F.; O'Regan, Brian C.; Walsh, Aron; Islam, M. Saiful

    2015-01-01

    Solar cells based on organic–inorganic halide perovskites have recently shown rapidly rising power conversion efficiencies, but exhibit unusual behaviour such as current–voltage hysteresis and a low-frequency giant dielectric response. Ionic transport has been suggested to be an important factor contributing to these effects; however, the chemical origin of this transport and the mobile species are unclear. Here, the activation energies for ionic migration in methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) are derived from first principles, and are compared with kinetic data extracted from the current–voltage response of a perovskite-based solar cell. We identify the microscopic transport mechanisms, and find facile vacancy-assisted migration of iodide ions with an activation energy of 0.6 eV, in good agreement with the kinetic measurements. The results of this combined computational and experimental study suggest that hybrid halide perovskites are mixed ionic–electronic conductors, a finding that has major implications for solar cell device architectures. PMID:26105623

  9. Crystal growth and scintillation properties of strontium iodide scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    van Loef, Edgar; Wilson, Cody; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Steven; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.; Shah, Kanai

    2009-06-01

    Single crystals of SrI{sub 2}:Eu and SrI{sub 2}:Ce/Na were grown from anhydrous iodides by the vertical Bridgman technique in evacuated silica ampoules. Growth rates were of the order of 5-30 mm/day. Radioluminescence spectra of SrI{sub 2}:Eu and SrI{sub 2}:Ce/Na exhibit a broad band due to Eu{sup 2+} and Ce{sup 3+} emission, respectively. The maximum in the luminescence spectrum of SrI{sub 2}:Eu is found at 435 nm. The spectrum of SrI{sub 2}:Ce/Na exhibits a doublet peaking at 404 and 435 nm attributed to Ce{sup 3+} emission, while additional impurity - or defected - related emission is present at approximately 525 nm. The strontium iodide scintillators show very high light yields of up to 120,000 photons/MeV, have energy resolutions down to 3% at 662 keV (Full Width Half Maximum) and exhibit excellent light yield proportionality with a standard deviation of less than 5% between 6 and 460 keV.

  10. 9-O-Ethyl­berberrubinium iodide monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Grundt, Peter; Pernat, Jennifer; Krivogorsky, Bogdana; Halverson, Melanie A.; Berry, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    In the title compound (systematic name: 9-eth­oxy-10-meth­oxy-5,6-dihydro-1,3-dioxolo[4,5-g]isoquinolino­[3,2-a]isoquin­olin-7-ium iodide monohydrate), 2C21H20NO4 +·2I−·H2O, two independent mol­ecules pack in the unit cell, where interactions between the molecules are stabilized by weak inter­molecular π–π stacking inter­actions [centroid–centroid distances in the range 3.571 (4) to 3.815 (4)Å]. Inter­molecular C—H⋯O inter­actions are also observed. The iodide anions are disordered with occupancy ratios of 0.94 (1):0.06 (1) and 0.91 (1):0.09 (1). The cationic molecule is planar in structure with a small torsion resulting from the dihydropyridine ring. PMID:21587567

  11. Iodide-catalyzed ozonation of terpenes on aqueous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enami, S.; Hayase, S.; Kawasaki, M.; Hoffmann, M. R.; Colussi, A. J.

    2011-12-01

    Biogenic terpenes are the dominant global source of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Their atmospheric chemistry has therefore major direct and indirect impacts on global climate change. At the same time, it has become apparent that organic and inorganic iodine species of marine origin are ubiquitous in the troposphere. They are found over the open ocean (even in the absence of biogenic sources), the Antarctic coast, in rain, aerosols, ice, and snow, and participate in HOx/NOx cycles in the troposphere. Here we report that iodide catalyzes the ozonation of alpha-pinene on aqueous surfaces. Nebulizer-assisted online electrospray mass spectrometry of alpha-pinene solutions briefly exposed to gaseous ozone reveals that alpha-pinene, which is unreactive during 10 microsecond contact times, is converted into acids (e.g., pinonic acid) and previously unreported iodine-containing species in the presence of millimolar iodide. These newly found products were characterized by MS/MS in conjunction with isotope and kinetic studies, and may account for unidentified organoiodine species observed in recent field measurements.

  12. Peptide quantitation with methyl iodide isotopic tags and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Blagojevic, Voislav; Zhidkov, Nickholas; Tharmaratnam, Samuel; Pham, Van Thong; Kaplan, Harvey; Bohme, Diethard K

    2010-06-01

    A novel method is presented for the quantitation of peptides based on their methylation by in vacuo chemical reaction with methyl iodide. Samples of two small peptides, hexaglycine and pentaalanine, were labeled with CH(3)I and CD(3)I, representing the "unknown" and "standard" respectively, and then subjected to a series of tests using mass spectrometry to ascertain the suitability of the isotopic labels for peptide quantitation. The experiments show methyl iodide to be a very quantitative label, exhibiting a linear relationship in concentration over the dynamic range of the mass spectrometer used in the analysis (up to 4 orders of magnitude) both as pure samples and in a complex mixture of peptides. The tendency of trimethylated peptides to preferentially form a(2) fragment ions in MS(2) produces a significant increase in sensitivity, especially when the mass spectrometer is used in the MRM mode. Tests were also performed to verify the stability of the label against H/D exchange and its suitability for long-term storage, showing little degradation while in solution and during subsequent chemical processing.

  13. Strontium Iodide Instrument Development for Gamma Spectroscopy and Radioisotope Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, P; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.; Swanberg, E.; Nelson, K.; Thelin, P; Fisher, S E; Hunter, Steve; Wihl, B; Shah, Kanai; Hawrami, Rastgo; Burger, Arnold; Boatner, Lynn A; Momayezi, M; Stevens, K; Randles, M H; Solodovnikov, D

    2014-01-01

    Development of the Europium-doped Strontium Iodide scintillator, SrI2(Eu), has progressed significantly in recent years. SrI2(Eu) has excellent material properties for gamma ray spectroscopy: high light yield (>80,000 ph/MeV), excellent light yield proportionality, and high effective atomic number (Z=49) for high photoelectric cross-section. High quality 1.5 and 2 diameter boules are now available due to rapid advances in SrI2(Eu) crystal growth. In these large SrI2(Eu) crystals, optical self-absorption by Eu2+ degrades the energy resolution as measured by analog electronics, but we mitigate this effect through on-the-fly correction of the scintillation pulses by digital readout electronics. Using this digital correction technique we have demonstrated energy resolution of 2.9% FWHM at 662 keV for a 4 in3 SrI2(Eu) crystal, over 2.6 inches long. Based on this digital readout technology, we have developed a detector prototype with greatly improved radioisotope identification capability compared to Sodium Iodide, NaI(Tl). The higher resolution of SrI2(Eu) yields a factor of 2 to 5 improvement in radioisotope identification (RIID) error rate compared to NaI(Tl).

  14. Discovery of gallium, germanium, lutetium, and hafnium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, J.L.; Thoennessen, M.

    2012-09-15

    Currently, twenty-eight gallium, thirty-one germanium, thirty-five lutetium, and thirty-six hafnium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  15. [Dimensional changes of silver and gallium-based alloy].

    PubMed

    Ballester, R Y; Markarian, R A; Loguercio, A D

    2001-01-01

    Gallium-based dental alloys were created with the aim of solving the problem of toxicity of mercury. The material shows mechanical properties similar to those of dental amalgam, but researches point out two unfavorable characteristics: great corrosion and excessive post-setting expansion, and the latter is capable of cracking dental structures. The aim of this study was to evaluate, during 7 days, the in vitro dimensional alteration of a gallium dental alloy (Galloy, SDI, Australia), in comparison with a dental amalgam containing zinc (F400, SDI, Australia), as a function of the contact with saline solution (0.9% NaCl) during the setting period. The storage experimental conditions were: storage in dry environment, immersion in saline solution and contamination during condensation. Additionally, the effects of contamination during the trituration of dental amalgam and the effects of protecting the surface of the gallium alloy with a fluid resin were studied. Specimens were stored at 37 degrees C +/- 1 degree C, and measuring was carried out, sequentially, every 24 h during 7 days. When the gallium alloy was either contaminated or immersed, an expansion significantly greater than that observed in the other experimental conditions was noticed after 7 days. The application of a fluid resin to protect the surface of the cylinders was able to avoid the increase in expansion caused by superficial moisture. The amalgam alloy did not show significant dimensional alterations, except when it was contaminated during trituration.

  16. Modeling of Copper Indium/Gallium Diselenide Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scurlock, Steven

    2005-03-01

    The copper indium/gallium diselenide superlattice is investigated numerically for different layer lengths of this particular lattice matched crystal. The main emphasis is on applying the Kronig-Penny model for the relevant band gap energies. By varying the sizes of the layers, the region where superlattice behavior should exist is determined.

  17. Cellular uptake and anticancer activity of carboxylated gallium corroles.

    PubMed

    Pribisko, Melanie; Palmer, Joshua; Grubbs, Robert H; Gray, Harry B; Termini, John; Lim, Punnajit

    2016-04-19

    We report derivatives of gallium(III) tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole, 1 [Ga(tpfc)], with either sulfonic (2) or carboxylic acids (3, 4) as macrocyclic ring substituents: the aminocaproate derivative, 3 [Ga(ACtpfc)], demonstrated high cytotoxic activity against all NCI60 cell lines derived from nine tumor types and confirmed very high toxicity against melanoma cells, specifically the LOX IMVI and SK-MEL-28 cell lines. The toxicities of 1, 2, 3, and 4 [Ga(3-ctpfc)] toward prostate (DU-145), melanoma (SK-MEL-28), breast (MDA-MB-231), and ovarian (OVCAR-3) cancer cells revealed a dependence on the ring substituent: IC50values ranged from 4.8 to >200 µM; and they correlated with the rates of uptake, extent of intracellular accumulation, and lipophilicity. Carboxylated corroles 3 and 4, which exhibited about 10-fold lower IC50values (<20 µM) relative to previous analogs against all four cancer cell lines, displayed high efficacy (Emax= 0). Confocal fluorescence imaging revealed facile uptake of functionalized gallium corroles by all human cancer cells that followed the order: 4 > 3 > 2 > 1 (intracellular accumulation of gallium corroles was fastest in melanoma cells). We conclude that carboxylated gallium corroles are promising chemotherapeutics with the advantage that they also can be used for tumor imaging.

  18. The 100 micron detector development program. [gallium doped germanium photoconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    An effort to optimize gallium-doped germanium photoconductors (Ge:Ga) for use in space for sensitive detection of far infrared radiation in the 100 micron region is described as well as the development of cryogenic apparatus capable of calibrating detectors under low background conditions.

  19. Visible light electroluminescent diodes of indium-gallium phosphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clough, R.; Richman, D.; Tietjen, J.

    1970-01-01

    Vapor deposition and acceptor impurity diffusion techniques are used to prepare indium-gallium phosphide junctions. Certain problems in preparation are overcome by altering gas flow conditions and by increasing the concentration of phosphine in the gas. A general formula is given for the alloy's composition.

  20. Mechanical retention versus bonding of amalgam and gallium alloy restorations.

    PubMed

    Eakle, W S; Staninec, M; Yip, R L; Chavez, M A

    1994-10-01

    The retention of amalgam and gallium alloy restorations in proximal box forms was measured in vitro, and three different adhesives to conventional undercuts were compared. For control, restorations were placed without undercuts or adhesives. No significant difference was found between amalgam and gallium alloys with each of the five methods of retention used. Alloys placed without retention or adhesives were significantly less retentive than all other groups. When Tytin alloy was used, no difference was found in retention among the restorations retained with Panavia or All-Bond adhesive or an occlusal dovetail and retention grooves, but Amalgambond adhesive was less retentive than all three of these methods. When gallium alloy was used, both Panavia and All-Bond adhesive were more retentive than undercuts, but the effect of Amalgambond adhesive was more retentive than undercuts, but the effect of Amalgambond adhesive was comparable to that of undercuts. The results of this study indicate that adhesives could be used in place of traditional undercuts to retain amalgam and gallium alloys, thus saving a considerable amount of tooth structure. PMID:7990038

  1. Oxygen-hydrogen fuel cell with an iodine-iodide cathode - A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javet, P.

    1970-01-01

    Fuel cell uses a porous cathode through which is fed a solution of iodine in aqueous iodide solution, the anode is a hydrogen electrode. No activation polarization appears on the cathode because of the high exchange-current density of the iodine-iodide electrode.

  2. Effects of radiation and temperature on iodide sorption by surfactant-modified bentonite.

    PubMed

    Choung, Sungwook; Kim, Minkyung; Yang, Jung-Seok; Kim, Min-Gyu; Um, Wooyong

    2014-08-19

    Bentonite, which is used as an engineered barrier in geological repositories, is ineffective for sorbing anionic radionuclides because of its negatively charged surface. This study modified raw bentonite using a cationic surfactant (i.e., hexadecyltrimethylammonium [HDTMA]-Br) to improve its sorption capability for radioactive iodide. The effects of temperature and radiation on the iodide sorption of surfactant-modified bentonite (SMB) were also evaluated under alkaline pH condition similar to that found in repository environments. Different amounts of surfactant, equivalent to the 50, 100, and 200% cation-exchange capacity of the bentonite, were used to produce the HDTMA-SMB for iodide sorption. The sorption reaction of the SMB with iodide reached equilibrium rapidly within 10 min regardless of temperature and radiation conditions. The rate of iodide sorption increased as the amount of the added surfactant was increased and nonlinear sorption behavior was exhibited. However, high temperature and γ-irradiation ((60)Co) resulted in significantly (∼2-10 times) lower iodide Kd values for the SMB. The results of FTIR, NMR, and XANES spectroscopy analysis suggested that the decrease in iodide sorption may be caused by weakened physical electrostatic force between the HDTMA and iodide, and by the surfactant becoming detached from the SMB during the heating and irradiation processes.

  3. Effects of Radiation and Temperature on Iodide Sorption by Surfactant-Modified Bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Choung, Sungwook; Kim, Min Kyung; Yang, Jungseok; Kim, Min-Gyu; Um, Wooyong

    2014-08-04

    Bentonite, which is used as an engineered barrier in geological repositories, is ineffective for sorbing anionic radionuclides because of its negatively charged surface. This study modified raw bentonite using a cationic surfactant (i.e., hexadecyltrimethylammonium [HDTMA]-Br) to improve its sorption capability for radioactive iodide. The effects of temperature and radiation on the iodide sorption of surfactant-modified bentonite (SMB) were evaluated under alkaline pH condition similar to that found in repository environments. Different amounts of surfactant, equivalent to the 50, 100, and 200% cation-exchange capacity of the bentonite, were used to produce the HDTMA-SMB for iodide sorption. The sorption reaction of the SMB with iodide reached equilibrium rapidly within 10 min regardless of temperature and radiation conditions. The rate of iodide sorption increased as the amount of the added surfactant was increased and nonlinear sorption behavior was exhibited. However, high temperature and γ-irradiation (60Co) resulted in significantly (~2–10 times) lower iodide Kd values for the SMB. The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis suggested that the decrease in iodide sorption may be caused by weakened physical electrostatic force between the HDTMA and iodide, and by the surfactant becoming detached from the SMB during the heating and irradiation processes.

  4. 21 CFR 520.763c - Dithiazanine iodide and piperazine citrate suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide and piperazine citrate... § 520.763c Dithiazanine iodide and piperazine citrate suspension. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of... piperazine citrate). (b) Sponsor. See 000010 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) NAS/NRC status....

  5. 21 CFR 520.763c - Dithiazanine iodide and piperazine citrate suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide and piperazine citrate... § 520.763c Dithiazanine iodide and piperazine citrate suspension. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of... piperazine citrate). (b) Sponsor. See 000010 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) NAS/NRC status....

  6. Efficient copper-catalyzed trifluoromethylation of aromatic and heteroaromatic iodides: the beneficial anchoring effect of borates.

    PubMed

    Gonda, Zsombor; Kovács, Szabolcs; Wéber, Csaba; Gáti, Tamás; Mészáros, Attila; Kotschy, András; Novák, Zoltán

    2014-08-15

    Efficient copper-catalyzed trifluoromethylation of aromatic iodides was achieved with TMSCF3 in the presence of trimethylborate. The Lewis acid was used to anchor the in situ generated trifluoromethyl anion and suppress its rapid decomposition. Broad applicability of the new trifluoromethylating reaction was demonstrated in the functionalization of different aromatic and heteroaromatic iodides. PMID:25068681

  7. Abiotic formation of methyl iodide on synthetic birnessite: a mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Allard, Sébastien; Gallard, Hervé

    2013-10-01

    Methyl iodide is a well-known volatile halogenated organic compound that contributes to the iodine content in the troposphere, potentially resulting in damage to the ozone layer. Most methyl iodide sources derive from biological activity in oceans and soils with very few abiotic mechanisms proposed in the literature. In this study we report that synthetic manganese oxide (birnessite δ-MnO2) can catalyze the formation of methyl iodide in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) and iodide. Methyl iodide formation was only observed at acidic pH (4-5) where iodide is oxidized to iodine and NOM is adsorbed on δ-MnO2. The effect of δ-MnO2, iodide and NOM concentrations, nature of NOM and ionic strength was investigated. High concentrations of methyl iodide were formed in experiments conducted with the model compound pyruvate. The Lewis acid property of δ-MnO2 leads to a polarization of the iodine molecule, and catalyzes the reaction with natural organic matter. As manganese oxides are strong oxidants and are ubiquitous in the environment, this mechanism could significantly contribute to the global atmospheric input of iodine.

  8. Metal Insulator Semiconductor Structures on Gallium Arsenide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Sean Denis

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The compound semiconductor gallium arsenide and its associated aluminium alloys have been the subject of intensive research in recent years. These materials offer the advantage of high electron mobilities coupled with the ability to be 'barrier engineered' leading to high injection efficiencies in bipolar devices. From a technological viewpoint however these materials are difficult to work with and device realisation is a major problem. Both thermal and anodic oxidation of these materials fail to produce a dielectric of sufficient quality for device applications and as a result devices tend to be complex non planar, mesa structures. A technique is proposed whereby the electrical interface is separated from the dielectric by means of a thin layer of AlGaAs, carrier confinement in the active GaAs region being maintained by the potential barriers to holes and electrons formed by the GaAs-AlGaAs junction. The integrity of these barriers is maintained by the provision of a suitable 'capping' dielectric. The electrical characteristics of various dielectric systems on GaAs have been investigated by means of current -voltage, capacitance-voltage and electronic breakdown measurements. Transport mechanisms for leakage current through these systems are identified and the interface properties (viz Fermi level pinning etc.) assessed by means of a direct comparison between experimental capacitance-voltage curves and theoretical data obtained from classical theory. As a technique for producing a convenient, in house 'capping' dielectric with good electrical and mechanical properties, the plasma anodisation of deposited aluminium films has been investigated. The anodisation parameters have been optimised for oxidation of these films in a microwave sustained oxygen plasma to give alumina films of around 500 A. A qualitative model for the anodisation process, involving linear and parabolic growth kinetics is proposed and

  9. Self- and zinc diffusion in gallium antimonide

    SciTech Connect

    Nicols, Samuel Piers

    2002-03-26

    The technological age has in large part been driven by the applications of semiconductors, and most notably by silicon. Our lives have been thoroughly changed by devices using the broad range of semiconductor technology developed over the past forty years. Much of the technological development has its foundation in research carried out on the different semiconductors whose properties can be exploited to make transistors, lasers, and many other devices. While the technological focus has largely been on silicon, many other semiconductor systems have applications in industry and offer formidable academic challenges. Diffusion studies belong to the most basic studies in semiconductors, important from both an application as well as research standpoint. Diffusion processes govern the junctions formed for device applications. As the device dimensions are decreased and the dopant concentrations increased, keeping pace with Moore's Law, a deeper understanding of diffusion is necessary to establish and maintain the sharp dopant profiles engineered for optimal device performance. From an academic viewpoint, diffusion in semiconductors allows for the study of point defects. Very few techniques exist which allow for the extraction of as much information of their properties. This study focuses on diffusion in the semiconductor gallium antimonide (GaSb). As will become clear, this compound semiconductor proves to be a powerful one for investigating both self- and foreign atom diffusion. While the results have direct applications for work on GaSb devices, the results should also be taken in the broader context of III-V semiconductors. Results here can be compared and contrasted to results in systems such as GaAs and even GaN, indicating trends within this common group of semiconductors. The results also have direct importance for ternary and quaternary semiconductor systems used in devices such as high speed InP/GaAsSb/InP double heterojunction bipolar transistors (DHBT) [Dvorak

  10. Gallium Oxide Nanostructures for High Temperature Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Chintalapalle, Ramana V.

    2015-04-30

    Gallium oxide (Ga2O3) thin films were produced by sputter deposition by varying the substrate temperature (Ts) in a wide range (Ts=25-800 °C). The structural characteristics and electronic properties of Ga2O3 films were evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and spectrophotometric measurements. The effect of growth temperature is significant on the chemistry, crystal structure and morphology of Ga2O3 films. XRD and SEM analyses indicate that the Ga2O3 films grown at lower temperatures were amorphous while those grown at Ts≥500 oC were nanocrystalline. RBS measurements indicate the well-maintained stoichiometry of Ga2O3 films at Ts=300-800 °C. The electronic structure determination indicated that the nanocrystalline Ga2O3films exhibit a band gap of ~5 eV. Tungsten (W) incorporated Ga2O3 films were produced by co-sputter deposition. W-concentration was varied by the applied sputtering-power. No secondary phase formation was observed in W-incorporated Ga2O3 films. W-induced effects were significant on the structure and electronic properties of Ga2O3 films. The band gap of Ga2O3 films without W-incorporation was ~5 eV. Oxygen sensor characteristics evaluated using optical and electrical methods indicate a faster response in W-doped Ga2O3 films compared to intrinsic Ga2O3 films. The results demonstrate the applicability of both intrinsic and W-doped Ga-oxide films for oxygen sensor application at temperatures ≥700 °C.

  11. Pair distribution function study on compression of liquid gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shengnian; Yu, Tony; Chen, Jiuhua; Ehm, Lars; Guo, Quanzhong; Parise, John

    2008-01-01

    Integrating a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) and focused high energy x-ray beam from the superconductor wiggler X17 beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we have successfully collected high quality total x-ray scattering data of liquid gallium. The experiments were conducted at a pressure range from 0.1GPa up to 2GPa at ambient temperature. For the first time, pair distribution functions (PDF) for liquid gallium at high pressure were derived up to 10 {angstrom}. Liquid gallium structure has been studied by x-ray absorption (Di Cicco & Filipponi, 1993; Wei et al., 2000; Comez et al., 2001), x-ray diffraction studies (Waseda & Suzuki, 1972), and molecular dynamics simulation (Tsay, 1993; Hui et al., 2002). These previous reports have focused on the 1st nearest neighbor structure, which tells us little about the atomic arrangement outside the first shell in non- crystalline materials. This study focuses on the structure of liquid gallium and the atomic structure change due to compression. The PDF results show that the observed atomic distance of the first nearest neighbor at 2.78 {angstrom} (first G(r) peak and its shoulder at the higher Q position) is consistent with previous studies by x-ray absorption (2.76 {angstrom}, Comez et al., 2001). We have also observed that the first nearest neighbor peak position did not change with pressure increasing, while the farther peaks positions in the intermediate distance range decreased with pressure increasing. This leads to a conclusion of the possible existence of 'locally rigid units' in the liquid. With the addition of reverse Monte Carlo modeling, we have observed that the coordination number in the local rigit unit increases with pressure. The bulk modulus of liquid gallium derived from the volume compression curve at ambient temperature (300K) is 12.1(6) GPa.

  12. Adsorption of primary substituted hydrocarbons onto solid gallium substrates.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Chrishani M; Pandey, Bipin; Li, Feng; Ito, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    Adsorption of a series of primary substituted hydrocarbons (RX; C18H37PO(OH)2 (ODPA), C17H35COOH, C18H37OH, C18H37NH2, and C18H37SH) onto solid gallium substrates with and without UV/ozone treatment was studied using contact angle goniometry, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and cyclic voltammetry (CV). UV/ozone treatment offered a hydrophilic surface (water contact angle (θ(water)) less than 10°), reflecting the formation of a surface oxide layer with the maximum thickness of ca. 1 nm and possibly the removal of surface contaminants. Upon immersion in a toluene solution of a RX, θ(water) increased due to adsorption of the RX onto gallium substrates. In particular, UV/ozone-treated gallium substrates (UV-Ga) immersed in an ODPA solution exhibited θ(water) close to 105°. The ellipsometric thickness of the adsorbed ODPA layer was ca. 2.4 nm, and CV data measured in an acetonitrile solution showed significant inhibition of redox reaction on the substrate surface. These results indicate the formation of a densely packed ODPA monolayer on UV-Ga. The coverage of a C17H35COOH layer adsorbed onto UV-Ga was lower, as shown by smaller θ(water) (ca. 99°), smaller ellipsometric thickness (ca. 1.3 nm), and smaller electrode reaction inhibition. Adsorption of the other RX onto UV-Ga was weaker, as indicated by smaller θ(water) (82°-92°). ODPA did not strongly adsorb onto UV-untreated gallium substrates, suggesting that the ODPA adsorption mainly originates from hydrogen bond interaction of a phosphonate group with surface oxide. These results will provide a means for controlling the surface properties of oxide-coated gallium that play an essential role in monolayer conductivity measurements and electroanalytical applications.

  13. Sputtering of tin and gallium-tin clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Lill, T.; Calaway, W.F.; Ma, Z.; Pellin, M.J.

    1994-08-01

    Tin and gallium-tin clusters have been produced by 4 keV Ar{sup +} ion bombardment of polycrystalline tin and the gallium-tin eutectic alloy and analyzed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The sputtered neutral species were photoionized with 193 nm (6.4 eV) excimer laser light. Neutral tin clusters containing up to 10 atoms and mixed gallium-tin clusters Ga{sub (n-m)}Sn{sub m} with n {<=} 4 for the neutrals and N {<=} 3 for the sputtered ionic species have been detected. Laser power density dependent intensity measurements, relative yields, and kinetic energy distributions have been measured. The abundance distributions of the mixed clusters have been found to be nonstatistical due to significant differences in the ionization efficiencies for clusters with equal nuclearity but different number of tin atoms. The results indicate that Ga{sub 2}Sn and Ga{sub 3}Sn like the all-gallium clusters have ionization potentials below 6.4 eV. In the case of Sn{sub 5}, Sn{sub 6}, GaSn and Ga{sub (n-m)}Sn{sub m} clusters with n=2 to 4 and m>1, the authors detect species that have sufficient internal energy to be one photon ionized despite ionization potentials that are higher 6.4 eV. The tin atom signal that is detected can be attributed to photofragmentation of dimers for both sputtering from polycrystalline tin and from the gallium-tin eutectic alloy.

  14. Fabrication of Efficient Low-Bandgap Perovskite Solar Cells by Combining Formamidinium Tin Iodide with Methylammonium Lead Iodide.

    PubMed

    Liao, Weiqiang; Zhao, Dewei; Yu, Yue; Shrestha, Niraj; Ghimire, Kiran; Grice, Corey R; Wang, Changlei; Xiao, Yuqing; Cimaroli, Alexander J; Ellingson, Randy J; Podraza, Nikolas J; Zhu, Kai; Xiong, Ren-Gen; Yan, Yanfa

    2016-09-28

    Mixed tin (Sn)-lead (Pb) perovskites with high Sn content exhibit low bandgaps suitable for fabricating the bottom cell of perovskite-based tandem solar cells. In this work, we report on the fabrication of efficient mixed Sn-Pb perovskite solar cells using precursors combining formamidinium tin iodide (FASnI3) and methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3). The best-performing cell fabricated using a (FASnI3)0.6(MAPbI3)0.4 absorber with an absorption edge of ∼1.2 eV achieved a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 15.08 (15.00)% with an open-circuit voltage of 0.795 (0.799) V, a short-circuit current density of 26.86(26.82) mA/cm(2), and a fill factor of 70.6(70.0)% when measured under forward (reverse) voltage scan. The average PCE of 50 cells we have fabricated is 14.39 ± 0.33%, indicating good reproducibility. PMID:27622903

  15. Dose-Response Analysis of Developmental Iodide Deficiency: Reductions in Thyroid Hormones and Impaired Hippocampal Synaptic Transmission

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iodide is an essential nutrient for thyroid hormone synthesis and severe iodide deficiency (ID) during early development is associated with neurological impairments. Several environmental contaminants can perturb the thyroid axis and this perturbation may be more acute under cond...

  16. Gallium nitrate ameliorates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hyeog; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Roh, Kug-Hwan; Seo, Su-Kil; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Sae-Gwang; Lim, Jun-Goo; Lee, Won-Jin; Kim, Myoung-Hun; Cho, Kwang-rae; Kim, Young-Jae

    2014-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease. Gallium nitrate has been reported to reserve immunosuppressive activities. Therefore, we assessed the therapeutic effects of gallium nitrate in the mouse model of developed type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced by bovine type II collagen with Complete Freund's adjuvant. CIA mice were intraperitoneally treated from day 36 to day 49 after immunization with 3.5mg/kg/day, 7mg/kg/day gallium nitrate or vehicle. Gallium nitrate ameliorated the progression of mice with CIA. The clinical symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis did not progress after treatment with gallium nitrate. Gallium nitrate inhibited the increase of CD4(+) T cell populations (p<0.05) and also inhibited the type II collagen-specific IgG2a-isotype autoantibodies (p<0.05). Gallium nitrate reduced the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ (p<0.05) and the mRNA expression levels of these cytokine and MMPs (MMP2 and MMP9) in joint tissues. Western blotting of members of the NF-κB signaling pathway revealed that gallium nitrate inhibits the activation of NF-κB by blocking IκB degradation. These data suggest that gallium nitrate is a potential therapeutic agent for autoimmune inflammatory arthritis through its inhibition of the NF-κB pathway, and these results may help to elucidate gallium nitrate-mediated mechanisms of immunosuppression in patients with RA.

  17. Solvent-free synthesis of alkylbenzimidazolium iodides and their applications in dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Mei; Shi, Chengwu; Sun, Renjie; Liu, Zhaokun; Cai, Molang

    2010-10-15

    In this paper, the synthesis of 1-hexyl-3-methylbenzimidazolium iodide (HMBI) and 1-hexyl-3-propylbenzimidazolium iodide (HPBI) was developed by quaternization reaction of 1-hexylbenzimidazole and alkyl iodide under solvent-free condition using Teflon-lined, stainless autoclaves. Their thermal properties were measured on the thermo gravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimeter. The influence of HMBI, HPBI and 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide (MPII) on redox behavior of I{sub 3}{sup -} and I{sup -} was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It was found that the resulting HMBI and HPBI had high purity and the reaction time was shortened to 3 h. The thermal stability of HMBI and HPBI was better than that of alkylimidazolium iodides, and HMBI and HPBI were prone to exhibit the supercooling phenomena. The DSCs with HMBI, HPBI and MPII gave photoelectric conversion efficiency of 5.49%, 5.34% and 5.54%, respectively. (author)

  18. Comparison of the therapeutic effects of yeast-incorporated gallium with those of inorganic gallium on ovariectomized osteopenic rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhaoji; Fu, Qin

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect and toxicity of yeast-incorporated gallium (YG) with inorganic gallium (gallium nitrate, IG) in preventing osteoporosis in ovariectomized (OVX) Wistar female rats. After the rats were treated orally with YG and IG respectively, the urine calcium, plasma calcium, plasma phosphorus, bone mineral content, mechanical testing, and the mass of uterus, thymus, and body were examined. Treatments were performed over an 8-week period. Both YG and IG have a positive effect on mechanical strength and mineral content of OVX osteopenic rats. However, treatment with YG only caused a 24.3% and 41.4% decrease in plasma calcium and inorganic phosphate concentrations, whereas IG decreased plasma calcium and inorganic phosphate concentrations by up to 39.9% and 49.0%, respectively. It was different significantly. At the same time, YG significantly increased weights of atrophic uteri, weights of body, and also decreased the thymus mass in OVX animals, while IG did not exhibit any such effects. Our experiments have demonstrated that YG may reduce gallium-associated toxicity, hypocalcemia, and maintain its effect, while IG maintains both of its effect on osteoporosis and side effect of hypocalcemia. PMID:19652924

  19. Superoxide Production by a Manganese-Oxidizing Bacterium Facilitates Iodide Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hsiu-Ping; Daniel, Benjamin; Creeley, Danielle; Grandbois, Russell; Zhang, Saijin; Xu, Chen; Ho, Yi-Fang; Schwehr, Kathy A.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Santschi, Peter H.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    The release of radioactive iodine (i.e., iodine-129 and iodine-131) from nuclear reprocessing facilities is a potential threat to human health. The fate and transport of iodine are determined primarily by its redox status, but processes that affect iodine oxidation states in the environment are poorly characterized. Given the difficulty in removing electrons from iodide (I−), naturally occurring iodide oxidation processes require strong oxidants, such as Mn oxides or microbial enzymes. In this study, we examine iodide oxidation by a marine bacterium, Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b, which promotes Mn(II) oxidation by catalyzing the production of extracellular superoxide (O2−). In the absence of Mn2+, Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b cultures oxidized ∼90% of the provided iodide (10 μM) within 6 days, whereas in the presence of Mn(II), iodide oxidation occurred only after Mn(IV) formation ceased. Iodide oxidation was not observed during incubations in spent medium or with whole cells under anaerobic conditions or following heat treatment (boiling). Furthermore, iodide oxidation was significantly inhibited in the presence of superoxide dismutase and diphenylene iodonium (a general inhibitor of NADH oxidoreductases). In contrast, the addition of exogenous NADH enhanced iodide oxidation. Taken together, the results indicate that iodide oxidation was mediated primarily by extracellular superoxide generated by Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b and not by the Mn oxides formed by this organism. Considering that extracellular superoxide formation is a widespread phenomenon among marine and terrestrial bacteria, this could represent an important pathway for iodide oxidation in some environments. PMID:24561582

  20. Transport of Iodide Ion in Compacted Bentonite Containing Ag{sub 2}O - 12111

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, Sung Paal; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Choi, Heui-Joo; Choi, Jong-Won; Lee, Cheo Kyung

    2012-07-01

    Observations of the transport of iodide through compacted bentonite containing Ag{sub 2}O as additive and that without additive were made. Compacted bentonite samples with densities of 1.41 g/cm{sup 3} and 1.60 g/cm{sup 3} were used in the experiment. The amount of Ag{sub 2}O added to the compacted bentonite was in the range of 0.0064 ∼ 0.0468 wt/wt%. Two diffusion solutions were used: one in which iodide ion was dissolved in demineralized water (pure iodide solution), and one in which iodide ion was dissolved in 0.1 M NaCl solution (0.1 M NaCl-iodide solution). Experimental results confirmed that iodide ion was transported by the diffusion process in the compacted bentonite containing Ag{sub 2}O as well as in the compacted bentonite without Ag{sub 2}O. The time-lag of diffusion of iodide ion in the compacted bentonite containing Ag{sub 2}O is larger than that in the compacted bentonite without Ag{sub 2}O. The increase of the time-lag of diffusion was observed in pure iodide ion solution as well as in 0.1 M NaCl-iodide solution. The apparent diffusion coefficient of iodide ion in the compacted bentonite containing Ag{sub 2}O was smaller than in the compacted bentonite without Ag{sub 2}O. The effective diffusion coefficient decreased as the amount of Ag{sub 2}O in the compacted bentonite increased. (authors)

  1. Electrochemical quantification of iodide ions in synthetic urine using silver nanoparticles: a proof-of-concept.

    PubMed

    Toh, Her Shuang; Tschulik, Kristina; Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Compton, Richard G

    2014-08-21

    Typical urinary iodide concentrations range from 0.3 μM to 6.0 μM. The conventional analytical method is based on the Sandell-Kolthoff reaction. It involves the toxic reagent, arsenic acid, and a waiting time of 30 minutes for the iodide ions to reduce the cerium(iv) ions. In the presented work, an alternative fast electrochemical method based on a silver nanoparticle modified electrode is proposed. Cyclic voltammetry was performed with a freshly modified electrode in presence of iodide ions and the voltammetric peaks corresponding to the oxidation of silver to silver iodide and the reverse reaction were recorded. The peak height of the reduction signal of silver iodide was used to plot a calibration line for the iodide ions. Two calibration plots for the iodide ions were obtained, one in 0.1 M sodium nitrate (a chloride-ion free environment to circumvent any interference from the other halides) and another in synthetic urine (which contains 0.2 M KCl). In both of the calibration plots, linear relationships were found between the reduction peak height and the iodide ion concentration of 0.3 μM to 6.0 μM. A slope of 1.46 × 10(-2) A M(-1) and a R(2) value of 0.999 were obtained for the iodide detection in sodium nitrate. For the synthetic urine experiments, a slope of 3.58 × 10(-3) A M(-1) and a R(2) value of 0.942 were measured. A robust iodide sensor with the potential to be developed into a point-of-care system has been validated.

  2. Project Overview: Inhibition of the Sodium-Iodide Symporter by Perchlorate: Evaluation of Lifestage Sensitivity Using PBPK Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) competitively inhibits uptake of iodide by the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) in laboratory animals and humans. NIS is found in many tissues, but is primarily responsible for sequestering iodide into the thyroid, enabling biosynthesis of thyroid hormones. The N...

  3. Horizontal Ampoule Growth and Characterization of Mercuric Iodide at Controlled Gas Pressures for X-Ray and Gamma Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Ariesanti, Elsa; Corcoran, Bridget

    2004-04-30

    The project developed a new method for producing high quality mercuric iodide crystals of x-ray and gamma spectrometers. Included are characterization of mercuric iodide crystal properties as a function of growth environment and fabrication and demonstration of room-temperature-operated high-resolution mercuric iodide spectrometers.

  4. VLSI readout for imaging with polycrystalline mercuric iodide detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, Renato; Dulinski, Wojtek; Husson, D.; Klein, N.; Riester, J. L.; Schieber, Michael M.; Zuck, A.; Braiman, M.; Melekhov, L.; Nissenbaum, J.; Sanguinetti, S.

    1998-11-01

    Recently polycrystalline mercuric iodide have become available, for room temperature radiation detectors over large areas at low cost. Though the quality of this material is still under improvement, ceramic detectors have been already been successfully tested with dedicated low-noise, low-power mixed signal VLSI electronics which can be used for compact, imaging solutions. The detectors used are of different kinds: microstrips and pixels; of different sizes, up to about 1 square inch; and of different thickness, up to 600 microns. The properties of this first-generation detectors are quite uniform from one detector to another. Also for each single detector the response is quite uniform and no charge loss in the inter-electrode space have been detected. Because of the low cost and of the polycrystallinity, detectors can be potentially fabricated in any size and shape, using standard ceramic technology equipment, which is an attractive feature where low cost and large area applications are needed.

  5. Elemental impurity analysis of mercuric iodide by ICP/MS

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, E.S.; Mroz, E.; Olivares, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    A method has been developed to analyze mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) for elemental contamination using Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectroscopy (ICP/MS). This paper discusses the ICP/MS method, the effectiveness of purification schemes for removing impurities from HgI{sub 2}, as well as preliminary correlations between HgI{sub 2} detector performance and elemental contamination levels. The purified HgI{sub 2} is grown into a single crystal by physical vapor transport. The crystal are cut into slices and they are fabricated into room temperature radiation detectors and photocells. Crystals that produce good resolution gamma detector do not necessarily make good resolution photocells or x-ray detectors. Many factors other than elemental impurities may contribute to these differences in performance.

  6. Photon recycling in lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazos-Outón, Luis M.; Szumilo, Monika; Lamboll, Robin; Richter, Johannes M.; Crespo-Quesada, Micaela; Abdi-Jalebi, Mojtaba; Beeson, Harry J.; Vrućinić, Milan; Alsari, Mejd; Snaith, Henry J.; Ehrler, Bruno; Friend, Richard H.; Deschler, Felix

    2016-03-01

    Lead-halide perovskites have emerged as high-performance photovoltaic materials. We mapped the propagation of photogenerated luminescence and charges from a local photoexcitation spot in thin films of lead tri-iodide perovskites. We observed light emission at distances of ≥50 micrometers and found that the peak of the internal photon spectrum red-shifts from 765 to ≥800 nanometers. We used a lateral-contact solar cell with selective electron- and hole-collecting contacts and observed that charge extraction for photoexcitation >50 micrometers away from the contacts arose from repeated recycling between photons and electron-hole pairs. Thus, energy transport is not limited by diffusive charge transport but can occur over long distances through multiple absorption-diffusion-emission events. This process creates high excitation densities within the perovskite layer and allows high open-circuit voltages.

  7. Ultrafast Extreme Ultraviolet Absorption Spectroscopy of Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkamp, Max A.; Lin, Ming-Fu; Ryland, Elizabeth S.; Vura-Weis, Josh

    2016-06-01

    Methylammonium lead iodide (perovskite) is a leading candidate for use in next-generation solar cell devices. However, the photophysics responsible for its strong photovoltaic qualities are not fully understood. Ultrafast extreme ultraviolet (XUV) absorption was used to investigate electron and hole dynamics in perovskite by observing transitions from a common inner-shell level (I 4d) to the valence and conduction bands. Ultrashort (30 fs) pulses of XUV radiation with a broad spectrum (40-70 eV) were generated via high-harmonic generation using a tabletop instrument. Transient absorption measurements with visible pump and XUV probe directly observed the relaxation of charge carriers in perovskite after above-band excitation in the femtosecond and picosecond time ranges.

  8. Photon recycling in lead iodide perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Pazos-Outón, Luis M; Szumilo, Monika; Lamboll, Robin; Richter, Johannes M; Crespo-Quesada, Micaela; Abdi-Jalebi, Mojtaba; Beeson, Harry J; Vrućinić, Milan; Alsari, Mejd; Snaith, Henry J; Ehrler, Bruno; Friend, Richard H; Deschler, Felix

    2016-03-25

    Lead-halide perovskites have emerged as high-performance photovoltaic materials. We mapped the propagation of photogenerated luminescence and charges from a local photoexcitation spot in thin films of lead tri-iodide perovskites. We observed light emission at distances of ≥50 micrometers and found that the peak of the internal photon spectrum red-shifts from 765 to ≥800 nanometers. We used a lateral-contact solar cell with selective electron- and hole-collecting contacts and observed that charge extraction for photoexcitation >50 micrometers away from the contacts arose from repeated recycling between photons and electron-hole pairs. Thus, energy transport is not limited by diffusive charge transport but can occur over long distances through multiple absorption-diffusion-emission events. This process creates high excitation densities within the perovskite layer and allows high open-circuit voltages.

  9. High temperature infrared spectrum of sodium iodide (NaI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Arthur G.

    2014-09-01

    The absorption spectrum of sodium iodide vapor between 200 and 275 cm-1 has been measured with a resolution of 0.006 cm-1 at a temperature of 1096 K. The Δv = 1 transitions from v = 1 ← 0 to v = 13 ← 12 have been measured. Dunham constants are given from an least-squares analysis of 1285 fairly well resolved transitions. The band center for the fundamental band is ν0 = 257.2837 ± 0.0002 cm-1. The relative intensities of the Δv = 1 transitions from different vibrational states are studied and it is shown that the intensity is roughly proportional to v″ + 1 as expected from the harmonic oscillator approximation. From measurements of the Herman-Wallis constant, α1,0 = -0.0054 ± 0.0008, it is estimated that the transition moment must be μ1,0 ≈ 0.135 ± 0.020 debye.

  10. Photodissociation of alkyl iodides in helium nanodroplets. III. Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Andreas; Drabbels, Marcel

    2007-09-21

    The recombination of fragments resulting from the photodissociation of (fluorinated) alkyl iodides in helium nanodroplets at a wavelength of 266 nm has been investigated by means of ion imaging techniques. It is found that in the case of CH{sub 3}I an appreciable fraction of the fragments recombine in the aftermath of the photolysis. The proposed mechanism involves a complete translational relaxation of both photofragments inside the nanodroplets followed by geminate recombination of the fragments. In contrast with CH{sub 3}I, no recombination is observed for CF{sub 3}I. This is attributed to the larger masses and the different initial kinetic energies of the fragments produced by the photolysis of CF{sub 3}I, which strongly diminishes the fragment thermalization efficiency.

  11. Coulomb Screening and Coherent Phonon in Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Wang, He; Valkunas, Leonas; Cao, Thu; Whittaker-Brooks, Luisa; Fleming, Graham R

    2016-08-18

    Methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) hybrid perovskite in the tetragonal and orthorhombic phases have different exciton binding energies and demonstrate different excitation kinetics. Here, we explore the role that crystal structure plays in the kinetics via fluence dependent transient absorption spectroscopy. We observe stronger saturation of the free carrier concentration under high pump energy density in the orthorhombic phase relative to the tetragonal phase. We attribute this phenomenon to small dielectric constant, large exciton binding energy, and weak Coulomb screening, which results in difficult exciton dissociation under high light intensity in the orthorhombic phase. At higher excitation intensities, we observe a coherent phonon with an oscillation frequency of 23.4 cm(-1) at 77 K, whose amplitude tracks the increase of the first-order lifetime. PMID:27485190

  12. Mercuric Iodide Photocell Technology for Room Temperature Readout of Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Warnick Kernan et al.

    2007-08-31

    Mercuric iodide (HgI2) is a well known material for the direct detection of gamma rays; however, the largest volume achievable is limited by thickness of the detector, which needs to be a small fraction of the average trapping length for electrons. We are reporting here preliminary results in using HgI2 crystals to fabricate photocells used in the readout of various scintillators. The optical spectral response and efficiency of these photocells were measured and will be reported. Preliminary nuclear response from a HgI2 photocell that was optically matched to a Ce3+ :LaBr3 scintillator will also be presented and discussed. Further improvements will be sought by optimizing the transparent contact technology.

  13. Synthesis of gallium nitride nanostructures by nitridation of electrochemically deposited gallium oxide on silicon substrate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanostructures were successfully synthesized by the nitridation of the electrochemically deposited gallium oxide (Ga2O3) through the utilization of a so-called ammoniating process. Ga2O3 nanostructures were firstly deposited on Si substrate by a simple two-terminal electrochemical technique at a constant current density of 0.15 A/cm2 using a mixture of Ga2O3, HCl, NH4OH and H2O for 2 h. Then, the deposited Ga2O3 sample was ammoniated in a horizontal quartz tube single zone furnace at various ammoniating times and temperatures. The complete nitridation of Ga2O3 nanostructures at temperatures of 850°C and below was not observed even the ammoniating time was kept up to 45 min. After the ammoniating process at temperature of 900°C for 15 min, several prominent diffraction peaks correspond to hexagonal GaN (h-GaN) planes were detected, while no diffraction peak of Ga2O3 structure was detected, suggesting a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN. Thus, temperature seems to be a key parameter in a nitridation process where the deoxidization rate of Ga2O3 to generate gaseous Ga2O increase with temperature. The growth mechanism for the transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN was proposed and discussed. It was found that a complete transformation can not be realized without a complete deoxidization of Ga2O3. A significant change of morphological structures takes place after a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN where the original nanorod structures of Ga2O3 diminish, and a new nanowire-like GaN structures appear. These results show that the presented method seems to be promising in producing high-quality h-GaN nanostructures on Si. PMID:25593562

  14. Rapid sonochemical preparation of shape-selective lead iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Baojun; He, Qin; Fa, Wenjun; Li, Pinjiang; Zhang, Yange; Zheng, Zhi

    2012-09-15

    Graphical abstract: SEM morphologies of various PbI2 products obtained with the iodine concentration of 6.7 g/L and irradiation time of 1 minute at the reaction temperatures of 35 °C (a), 25 °C (b), and 15 °C (c). Highlights: ► PbI{sub 2} with various morphologies were rapidly formed at room temperature. ► We could well control the morphologies of PbI{sub 2} by changing reaction conditions. ► The PbI{sub 2} films could better resist rolling in a liquid media. -- Abstract: Lead iodide (PbI{sub 2}) films/crystals with various nano/micro morphologies (e.g., Nanoflake, block and microrod) were rapidly synthesized by taking advantage of a simple sonochemical method. The PbI{sub 2} crystals with uniform nanoflake structures could be fabricated directly on lead foils with the irradiation time as short as 36 s via interfacial reaction between lead foils and elemental iodine in ethanol at ambient temperature. It was found experimentally that the morphologies of the resulting thin films/crystals could be well controlled by the adjustment of several parameters including irradiation time, reaction solvents, iodine concentration, ultrasonic power, and reaction temperature. Most importantly, the resultant PbI{sub 2} films are stable enough to resist rolling under the drastic ultrasound irradiation in a liquid media. This method is believed to be the fastest way for in situ fabrication of morphology-controlled semiconductor films on various metal substrates for subsequent applications related to the other metal iodide or metal sulfide semiconductor films.

  15. Improvement in thallium hydride generation using iodide and Rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Picón, David; Carrero, Pablo; Valero, Maribel; de Peña, Yaneira Petit; Gutiérrez, Luís

    2015-05-01

    A continuous flow hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (CF-HG-AAS) system was used to study the enhancement effect of different substances for conventional chemical HG of thallium. At room temperature, the acidified sample solution containing the respective enhancement reagent merged with the aqueous NaBH4 solution. The generated thallium hydride was stripped from the eluent solution by the addition of a nitrogen flow and thereafter the bulk phases were separated in a gas-liquid separator. The main factors under study were concentration and type of enhancement reagent (Te, iodide added as KI, Rhodamine B, malachite green and crystal violet) and acid (HCl, H2SO4 or HNO3). Other parameters affecting the thallium hydride generation, such as: NaBH4 concentration, carrier gas flow rate, length of reaction-mixing coil and reagents flow rates, were studied and optimized. Among the enhancement reagents tested, the combination of Rhodamine B and iodide produced the best results. A linear response was obtained between the detection limit (LOD (3σ)) of 1.5μg L(-1) and 1000μg L(-1). The RSD% (n=10) for a solution containing 15μg L(-1) of Tl was 2.9%. The recoveries of thallium in environmental water samples by spiking the samples with 10 and 20µg L(-1) of Tl were in the 97.0-102.5% range. The accuracy for Tl determination was further confirmed by the analysis of a water standard reference material (1643e form NIST, USA). Finally, it was demonstrated that malachite green and crystal violet showed similar enhancement effect like Rhodamine B for thallium HG.

  16. Improvement in thallium hydride generation using iodide and Rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Picón, David; Carrero, Pablo; Valero, Maribel; de Peña, Yaneira Petit; Gutiérrez, Luís

    2015-05-01

    A continuous flow hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (CF-HG-AAS) system was used to study the enhancement effect of different substances for conventional chemical HG of thallium. At room temperature, the acidified sample solution containing the respective enhancement reagent merged with the aqueous NaBH4 solution. The generated thallium hydride was stripped from the eluent solution by the addition of a nitrogen flow and thereafter the bulk phases were separated in a gas-liquid separator. The main factors under study were concentration and type of enhancement reagent (Te, iodide added as KI, Rhodamine B, malachite green and crystal violet) and acid (HCl, H2SO4 or HNO3). Other parameters affecting the thallium hydride generation, such as: NaBH4 concentration, carrier gas flow rate, length of reaction-mixing coil and reagents flow rates, were studied and optimized. Among the enhancement reagents tested, the combination of Rhodamine B and iodide produced the best results. A linear response was obtained between the detection limit (LOD (3σ)) of 1.5μg L(-1) and 1000μg L(-1). The RSD% (n=10) for a solution containing 15μg L(-1) of Tl was 2.9%. The recoveries of thallium in environmental water samples by spiking the samples with 10 and 20µg L(-1) of Tl were in the 97.0-102.5% range. The accuracy for Tl determination was further confirmed by the analysis of a water standard reference material (1643e form NIST, USA). Finally, it was demonstrated that malachite green and crystal violet showed similar enhancement effect like Rhodamine B for thallium HG. PMID:25702995

  17. A passive ozone sampler based on a reaction with iodide.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Y

    1994-02-01

    A new passive sampler for ozone and its simple analytical system have been developed. Because it is small and sensitive, the sampler can be used for determining personal exposures to ozone and oxidants and for multilocation measurements. The sampler consists of an electrode, a spacer, and several layers of membrane filters and Teflon meshes. The electrode is a carbon paper disk coated with nylon-6 polymer and potassium iodide. The membrane filters are used to remove interferences. A sampling rate of ozone is controlled by the spacer and Teflon meshes. Iodine is liberated by an oxidation reaction of potassium iodide with ozone. The iodine is stabilized by forming a charge transfer complex with nylon-6 and is accumulated in the nylon-6 layer. The amount of iodine, which is proportional to the level of ozone exposure, is quantified by constant current coulometry. The discharge time of a galvanic battery is measured using the electrode as a positive electrode and a zinc plate as a counter electrode. A time-weighted average concentration of ozone is derived from the discharge time after exposing the electrode to ozone. The effects of various environmental conditions on the sampler's performance were investigated. The results indicated that the sampler showed a linear response to ozone exposure up to 1,450 parts per billion for every hour of use (ppb.hour). The minimum detectable exposure was about 400 ppb.hour. The effects of surface wind velocity, temperature, and humidity were small. However, a relative humidity below 20% resulted in an underestimation of the ozone concentration. Because the electrode requires no pretreatment and the analytical method is very simple, this method is suitable for large-scale studies of personal exposures to ozone and oxidants using multilocation measurements.

  18. REMOVAL OF IODIDE FROM GROUNDWATER USING SILVER CHLORIDE WHITE PAPER

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, M

    2008-11-26

    Releases from the F and H Area Seepage Basins on the Savannah River Site (SRS) have caused groundwater plumes that contain a variety of contaminants. These plumes are releasing contaminants into Fourmile Branch, which is a small tributary of the Savannah River. The metallic contaminant releases to the branch are being controlled by base injection. The base injection targets cationic contaminants and was not intended to reduce the concentration of I-129 in groundwater. SRS and the regulatory agencies believe it is appropriate to investigate remedial alternatives that could reduce the I-129. The Savannah River Site Area Closures Projects (ACP) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are developing an innovative in situ treatment for I-129 using silver chloride (AgCl). The proposed AgCl amendment has a very small particle size and is designed to be injected into the contaminated aquifer to capture I-129. The solubility of AgI is several orders of magnitude lower than the solubility of AgCl. Thus, when I-129 comes in contact with AgCl it forms silver iodide (AgI), which is very stable and essentially insoluble in water. SRNL has been performing bench-scale column tests on the effectiveness of silver chloride to capture iodine in an aqueous solution. These initial tests evaluate silver chloride in four different particle sizes; 4-5 millimeters (standard reagent silver chloride), approximately 1 millimeters (sieved reagent silver chloride), approximately 2 micrometers (ultra fine grind without a grinding agent), and <1 micrometer (ultra fine grind with a grinding agent). The first two experiments with macro-sized particles were proof of principle tests. In these the AgCl was mechanically mixed into a portion of the soil filling the columns. The last two were to test the effectiveness of injecting particles suspended in an aqueous solution--the ability to inject the particles, their retention in the column and their effectiveness at removing dissolved iodide

  19. In vitro and in vivo biological activities of iron chelators and gallium nitrate against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    de Léséleuc, Louis; Harris, Greg; KuoLee, Rhonda; Chen, Wangxue

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the ability of compounds interfering with iron metabolism to inhibit the growth of Acinetobacter baumannii. Iron restriction with transferrin or 2,2-bipyridyl significantly inhibited A. baumannii growth in vitro. Gallium nitrate alone was moderately effective at reducing A. baumannii growth but became bacteriostatic in the presence of serum or transferrin. More importantly, gallium nitrate treatment reduced lung bacterial burdens in mice. The use of gallium-based therapies shows promise for the control of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii.

  20. Testing iodized activated carbon filters with non-radioactive methyl iodide. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Deitz, V.R.; Romans, J.B.

    1980-05-30

    Iodized carbons, impregnated with KIx(KI + xI2), were evaluated for trapping methyl iodide-127. In this method the complete effluent of the carbon is sampled and analyzed continuously. In contrast, the RDT-M16 test procedure counts the carbon and the back-up beds for the accumulated 131 species and no information is obtained for the interaction of the large amount of carrier methyl iodide-127 with the iodized charcoal. The test apparatus to measure the penetration of methyl iodide-127 is described and the calibration procedures are detailed. Results are given for the penetration of methyl iodide-127 through new activated carbons, carbons in service, and exhausted carbons withdrawn from service. The reduction in trapping efficiency with service is accompanied by the development of a maximum in the concentration of methyl iodide-127 during the air purge after the dose period. This behavior has escaped notice with methyl iodide-131 due to the way that test is made. The chromatographic holdup of methyl iodide-127 by carbons in service, together with the subsequent slow desorption step, could result in a dilution of the penetration iodine to acceptable levels under some conditions encountered in plant filter operations.

  1. Vapor-phase epitaxy of gallium nitride by gallium arc discharge evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikman, S.; Keller, S.; Mishra, U. K.

    2006-08-01

    Vapor-phase epitaxy of GaN was performed by combining ammonia with gallium evaporated into an inert gas stream by a DC arc discharge, and letting the mixture pass through a pair of heated graphite susceptors. Growth rates as high as 30 μm/h were achieved. The growth on the top sample was specular in a large area, and was of high quality as characterized by atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The bottom sample had a high density of macroscopic defects, presumably caused by Ga droplets in the gas phase resulting from the arc evaporation process. The experimental growth rate was found to be less than {1}/{3} of values predicted in a computer flow dynamic model of the growth system, and Ga-NH 3 pre-reactions were implicated as the likely cause of the discrepancy. The growth efficiency, calculated to 2%, could arguably be improved by reducing the reactor growth pressure, and by changing the reactor geometry to avoid Ga condensation on walls. Potential advantages of the described growth technique are cheap source materials of high purity and low equipment costs. Furthermore, since no corrosive gasses were used, hardware corrosion and gas-phase impurities can be reduced.

  2. Cutaneous gallium uptake in patients with AIDS with mycobacterium avium-intracellulare septicemia

    SciTech Connect

    Allwright, S.J.; Chapman, P.R.; Antico, V.F.; Gruenewald, S.M.

    1988-07-01

    Gallium imaging is increasingly being used for the early detection of complications in patients with AIDS. A 26-year-old homosexual man who was HIV antibody positive underwent gallium imaging for investigation of possible Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Widespread cutaneous focal uptake was seen, which was subsequently shown to be due to mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) septicemia. This case demonstrates the importance of whole body imaging rather than imaging target areas only, the utility of gallium imaging in aiding the early detection of clinically unsuspected disease, and shows a new pattern of gallium uptake in disseminated MAI infection.

  3. Modeling the effect of iodide distribution on ozone deposition to seawater surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, In-Bo; Byun, Daewon W.; Kim, Hyun-Cheol; Kim, Soontae; Cameron, Bob

    Spatial changes in the dry deposition of ozone to the sea surface associated with ozone uptake by the dissolved iodide ions were analyzed in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico using the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ). The dry deposition module in CMAQ was modified using a formula developed by Chang et al. [2004. Ozone deposition to the sea surface: chemical enhancement and wind speed dependence. Atmospheric Environment 38, 1053-1059], which accounts for chemical enhancement by iodide reacting with ozone in seawater. In addition, an attempt was made to incorporate iodide concentrations from the satellite-derived estimates of near-surface chlorophyll a concentrations into the CMAQ gridded fields. One-month CMAQ simulations conducted with the modified module including iodide reaction showed a significant increase in the dry deposition velocity of ozone onto the sea surface, especially Texas and Louisiana Coast corresponding to the area with high iodide concentrations. On average, about 70% enhancement of ozone dry deposition velocity over the seawater was attributed to the iodide effect alone and the rest is mostly due to the effects of wind. The enhanced deposition velocity by iodide effect led to the marked increase in dry deposition amounts mostly near the coast, resulting in some changes in ambient ozone concentration. Interestingly, a small decrease in deposition amounts was found just inland from the shoreline, indicating that the iodide interaction can also affect ozone concentration in the inland coastal area. An in-depth analysis of a 2-day simulation showed the iodide effects on changes in the spatiotemporal distributions of the ozone deposition and concentration, which are highly dependent on coastal winds.

  4. Vapor-Phase Synthesis of Gallium Phosphide Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Dr Zhanjun; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Pan, Zhengwei

    2009-01-01

    Gallium phosphide (GaP) nanowires were synthesized in a high yield by vapor-phase reaction of gallium vapor and phosphorus vapor at 1150 C in a tube furnace system. The nanowires have diameters in the range of 25-100 nm and lengths of up to tens of micrometers. Twinning growth occurs in GaP nanowires, and as a result most nanowires contain a high density of twinning faults. Novel necklacelike GaP nanostructures that were formed by stringing tens of amorphous Ga-P-O microbeads upon one crystalline GaP nanowires were also found in some synthesis runs. This simple vapor-phase approach may be applied to synthesize other important group III-V compound nanowires.

  5. Preparation Of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Films For Solar Cells

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Contreras, Miguel A.; Keane, James; Tennant, Andrew L. , Tuttle, John R.; Ramanathan, Kannan; Noufi, Rommel

    1998-08-08

    High quality thin films of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide useful in the production of solar cells are prepared by electrodepositing at least one of the constituent metals onto a glass/Mo substrate, followed by physical vapor deposition of copper and selenium or indium and selenium to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film to approximately Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2. Using an AC voltage of 1-100 KHz in combination with a DC voltage for electrodeposition improves the morphology and growth rate of the deposited thin film. An electrodeposition solution comprising at least in part an organic solvent may be used in conjunction with an increased cathodic potential to increase the gallium content of the electrodeposited thin film.

  6. Ultra-low threshold gallium nitride photonic crystal nanobeam laser

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Nan Woolf, Alexander; Wang, Danqing; Hu, Evelyn L.; Zhu, Tongtong; Oliver, Rachel A.; Quan, Qimin

    2015-06-08

    We report exceptionally low thresholds (9.1 μJ/cm{sup 2}) for room temperature lasing at ∼450 nm in optically pumped Gallium Nitride (GaN) nanobeam cavity structures. The nanobeam cavity geometry provides high theoretical Q (>100 000) with small modal volume, leading to a high spontaneous emission factor, β = 0.94. The active layer materials are Indium Gallium Nitride (InGaN) fragmented quantum wells (fQWs), a critical factor in achieving the low thresholds, which are an order-of-magnitude lower than obtainable with continuous QW active layers. We suggest that the extra confinement of photo-generated carriers for fQWs (compared to QWs) is responsible for the excellent performance.

  7. Thermodynamic properties of liquid gallium from picosecond acoustic velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Ayrinhac, S; Gauthier, M; Le Marchand, G; Morand, M; Bergame, F; Decremps, F

    2015-07-15

    Due to discrepancies in the literature data the thermodynamic properties of liquid gallium are still in debate. Accurate measurements of adiabatic sound velocities as a function of pressure and temperature have been obtained by the combination of laser picosecond acoustics and surface imaging on sample loaded in diamond anvil cell. From these results the thermodynamic parameters of gallium have been extracted by a numerical procedure up to 10 GPa and 570 K. It is demonstrated that a Murnaghan equation of state accounts well for the whole data set since the isothermal bulk modulus BT has been shown to vary linearly with pressure in the whole temperature range. No evidence for a previously reported liquid-liquid transition has been found in the whole pressure and temperature range explored.

  8. Neutron detection using boron gallium nitride semiconductor material

    SciTech Connect

    Atsumi, Katsuhiro; Inoue, Yoku; Nakano, Takayuki; Mimura, Hidenori; Aoki, Toru

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we developed a new neutron-detection device using a boron gallium nitride (BGaN) semiconductor in which the B atom acts as a neutron converter. BGaN and gallium nitride (GaN) samples were grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy, and their radiation detection properties were evaluated. GaN exhibited good sensitivity to α-rays but poor sensitivity to γ-rays. Moreover, we confirmed that electrons were generated in the depletion layer under neutron irradiation. This resulted in a neutron-detection signal after α-rays were generated by the capture of neutrons by the B atoms. These results prove that BGaN is useful as a neutron-detecting semiconductor material.

  9. Mesoporous gallium oxide structurally stabilized by yttrium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Yada, Mitsunori; Ohya, Masahumi; Machida, Masato; Kijima, Tsuyoshi

    2000-05-16

    Since the synthesis of mesoporous silicas such as MCM-41 and FSM-16 with large internal surface areas and uniform pore sizes, the surfactant templating method has been used to synthesize mesoporous metal oxides, including titanium, aluminum, niobium, and tantalum oxides. The mesostructured metal oxides are taken to be useful not only as catalysts and separating or adsorbing agents but also as functional host materials with optically, electrically, or magnetically unique properties, owing to the shape-specific and/or quantum effects of their thin inorganic skeletons. Mesoporous zirconium oxide and phosphate and hafnium oxide are promising as acid catalysts. Layered and hexagonal mesostructured titanium oxides, for example, were observed to be photocatalytically active. Aluminum and gallium oxides with a mesoporous structure are also expected to serve as a catalytic of other functional material. In this paper, the authors report the synthesis and characterization of mesoporous gallium oxide stabilized by yttrium oxide.

  10. Problem of the sorption trapping of radioactive iodine in the form of methyl iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhutin, I.E.; Smirnova, N.M.; Poluektov, P.P.; Tret'yak, S.A.

    1987-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to study possibilities for raising the efficiency of the removal of methyl iodide from gases. The authors investigated the sorption trapping of methyl iodide in a chromatographic column with activated carbon of the SKT type with different bulk density without impregnants and after impregnation, and in addition the moisture content of the air was varied in different experiments. We studied the effect of the gas velocity in the column on the purification process. A scheme is proposed for processing the experimental data, and recommendations are given for selecting the carbon for removing methyl iodide from gases.

  11. Two-photon photovoltaic effect in gallium arsenide.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jichi; Chiles, Jeff; Sharma, Yagya D; Krishna, Sanjay; Fathpour, Sasan

    2014-09-15

    The two-photon photovoltaic effect is demonstrated in gallium arsenide at 976 and 1550 nm wavelengths. A waveguide-photodiode biased in its fourth quadrant harvests electrical power from the optical energy lost to two-photon absorption. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulations based on nonlinear wave propagation in waveguides and the drift-diffusion model of carrier transport in semiconductors. Power efficiency of up to 8% is theoretically predicted in optimized devices.

  12. Thermodynamic properties of uranium in gallium-aluminium based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkovich, V. A.; Maltsev, D. S.; Yamshchikov, L. F.; Chukin, A. V.; Smolenski, V. V.; Novoselova, A. V.; Osipenko, A. G.

    2015-10-01

    Activity, activity coefficients and solubility of uranium was determined in gallium-aluminium alloys containing 1.6 (eutectic), 5 and 20 wt.% aluminium. Additionally, activity of uranium was determined in aluminium and Ga-Al alloys containing 0.014-20 wt.% Al. Experiments were performed up to 1073 K. Intermetallic compounds formed in the alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction. Partial and excess thermodynamic functions of U in the studied alloys were calculated.

  13. Trap influence on the performance of gallium arsenide radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Castaldini, A.; Cavallini, A.; Polenta, L.; Canali, C.; Nava, F.; Papa, C. del

    1996-12-31

    Ohmic contacts play an important role in the performance of LEC gallium arsenide particle detectors since they possibly control the injection of charge carriers. Contact characteristics have been compared and related to electrically active defects induced during contact preparation and to the detector efficiency. The electric field distribution has also been analyzed. Spectroscopic investigations have put into evidence that the contact fabrication process significantly influences the trap density whilst it does not change their signatures.

  14. Thermodynamic properties of lanthanum in gallium-zinc alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedyukhin, A. S.; Shepin, I. E.; Kharina, E. A.; Shchetinskiy, A. V.; Volkovich, V. A.; Yamshchikov, L. F.

    2016-09-01

    Thermodynamic properties of lanthanum were determined in gallium-zinc alloys of the eutectic and over-eutectic compositions. The electromotive force measurements were used to determine thermodynamic activity and sedimentation technique to measure solubility of lanthanum in liquid metal alloys. Temperature dependencies of lanthanum activity, solubility and activity coefficients in alloys with Ga-Zn mixtures containing 3.64, 15 and 50 wt. % zinc were obtained.

  15. Pyochelin potentiates the inhibitory activity of gallium on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Frangipani, Emanuela; Bonchi, Carlo; Minandri, Fabrizia; Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    Gallium (Ga) is an iron mimetic that has successfully been repurposed for antibacterial chemotherapy. To improve the antibacterial potency of Ga on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the effect of complexation with a variety of siderophores and synthetic chelators was tested. Ga complexed with the pyochelin siderophore (at a 1:2 ratio) was more efficient than Ga(NO3)3 in inhibiting P. aeruginosa growth, and its activity was dependent on increased Ga entrance into the cell through the pyochelin translocon.

  16. Pyochelin potentiates the inhibitory activity of gallium on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Frangipani, Emanuela; Bonchi, Carlo; Minandri, Fabrizia; Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    Gallium (Ga) is an iron mimetic that has successfully been repurposed for antibacterial chemotherapy. To improve the antibacterial potency of Ga on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the effect of complexation with a variety of siderophores and synthetic chelators was tested. Ga complexed with the pyochelin siderophore (at a 1:2 ratio) was more efficient than Ga(NO3)3 in inhibiting P. aeruginosa growth, and its activity was dependent on increased Ga entrance into the cell through the pyochelin translocon. PMID:24957826

  17. Two-photon photovoltaic effect in gallium arsenide.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jichi; Chiles, Jeff; Sharma, Yagya D; Krishna, Sanjay; Fathpour, Sasan

    2014-09-15

    The two-photon photovoltaic effect is demonstrated in gallium arsenide at 976 and 1550 nm wavelengths. A waveguide-photodiode biased in its fourth quadrant harvests electrical power from the optical energy lost to two-photon absorption. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulations based on nonlinear wave propagation in waveguides and the drift-diffusion model of carrier transport in semiconductors. Power efficiency of up to 8% is theoretically predicted in optimized devices. PMID:26466255

  18. Appraisal of lupus nephritis by renal imaging with gallium-67

    SciTech Connect

    Bakir, A.A.; Lopez-Majano, V.; Hryhorczuk, D.O.; Rhee, H.L.; Dunea, G.

    1985-08-01

    To assess the activity of lupus nephritis, 43 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were studied by gallium imaging. Delayed renal visualization 48 hours after the gallium injection, a positive result, was noted in 25 of 48 scans. Active renal disease was defined by the presence of hematuria, pyuria (10 or more red blood cells or white blood cells per high-power field), proteinuria (1 g or more per 24 hours), a rising serum creatinine level, or a recent biopsy specimen showing proliferative and/or necrotizing lesions involving more than 20 percent of glomeruli. Renal disease was active in 18 instances, inactive in 23, and undetermined in seven (a total of 48 scans). Sixteen of the 18 scans (89 percent) in patients with active renal disease showed positive findings, as compared with only four of 23 scans (17 percent) in patients with inactive renal disease (p less than 0.001). Patients with positive scanning results had a higher rate of hypertension (p = 0.02), nephrotic proteinuria (p = 0.01), and progressive renal failure (p = 0.02). Mild mesangial nephritis (World Health Organization classes I and II) was noted only in the patients with negative scanning results (p = 0.02) who, however, showed a higher incidence of severe extrarenal SLE (p = 0.04). It is concluded that gallium imaging is a useful tool in evaluating the activity of lupus nephritis.

  19. Evaluation of the male reproductive toxicity of gallium arsenide.

    PubMed

    Bomhard, Ernst M; Cohen, Samuel M; Gelbke, Heinz-Peter; Williams, Gary M

    2012-10-01

    Gallium arsenide is an important semiconductor material marketed in the shape of wafers and thus is not hazardous to the end user. Exposure to GaAs particles may, however, occur during manufacture and processing. Potential hazards require evaluation. In 14-week inhalation studies with small GaAs particles, testicular effects have been reported in rats and mice. These effects occurred only in animals whose lungs showed marked inflammation and also had hematologic changes indicating anemia and hemolysis. The time- and concentration-dependent progressive nature of the lung and blood effects together with bioavailability data on gallium and arsenic lead us to conclude that the testicular/sperm effects are secondary to hypoxemia resulting from lung damage rather than due to a direct chemical effect of gallium or arsenide. Conditions leading to such primary effects are not expected to occur in humans at production and processing sites. This has to be taken into consideration for any classification decision for reproductive toxicity; especially a category 1 according to the EU CLP system is not warranted.

  20. Aqueous stability of Ga- and N-polar gallium nitride.

    PubMed

    Foster, Corey M; Collazo, Ramon; Sitar, Zlatko; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2013-01-01

    The stability of III-nitride semiconductors in various solutions becomes important as researchers begin to integrate them into sensing platforms. This study quantitatively compares the stability of GaN surfaces with different polarities. This type of quantification is important because it represents the first step toward designing semiconductor material interfaces compatible with solution conditions. A stability study of Ga- and N-polar GaN was conducted by immersion of the surfaces in deionized H(2)O, pH 5, pH 9, and H(2)O(2) solutions for 7 days. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry of the solutions was conducted to determine the amount of gallium leached from the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to compare the treated surfaces to untreated surfaces. The results show that both gallium nitride surface types exhibit the greatest stability in acidic and neutral solutions. Gallium polar surfaces were found to exhibit superior stability to nitrogen polar surfaces in the solutions studied. Our findings highlight the need for further research on surface passivation and functionalization techniques for polar III-nitride semiconductors.

  1. POLLUTION PREVENTION IN THE SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY THROUGH RECOVERY AND RECYCLING OF GALLIUM AND ARSENIC FROM GAAS POLISHING WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A process was developed for the recovery of both arsenic and gallium from gallium arsenide polishing wastes. The economics associated with the current disposal techniques utilizing ferric hydroxide precipitation dictate that sequential recovery of toxic arsenic and valuble galliu...

  2. Comparison of the antimicrobial activities of gallium nitrate and gallium maltolate against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fecteau, Marie-Eve; Aceto, Helen W; Bernstein, Lawrence R; Sweeney, Raymond W

    2014-10-01

    Johne's disease (JD) is an enteric infection of cattle and other ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). This study compared the antimicrobial activities of gallium nitrate (GaN) and gallium maltolate (GaM) against two field MAP isolates by use of broth culture. The concentrations that resulted in 99% growth inhibition of isolates 1 and 2 were, respectively, 636 µM and 183 µM for GaN, and 251 µM and 142 µM for GaM. For both isolates, time to detection was significantly higher for GaM than GaN. These results suggest that GaM is more efficient than GaN in inhibiting MAP growth in vitro.

  3. Elastic properties of crystalline and liquid gallium at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Lyapin, A. G.; Gromnitskaya, E. L.; Yagafarov, O. F. Stal'gorova, O. V.; Brazhkin, V. V.

    2008-11-15

    The elastic properties of gallium, such as the bulk modulus B, the shear modulus G, and the Poisson's ratio {sigma}, are investigated and the relative change in the volume is determined in the stability regions of the Ga I, Ga II, and liquid phases at pressures of up to 1.7 GPa. The observed lines of the Ga I-Ga II phase transition and the melting curves of the Ga I and Ga II phases are in good agreement with the known phase diagram of gallium; in this case, the coordinates of the Ga I-Ga II-melt triple point are determined to be 1.24 {+-} 0.40 GPa and 277 {+-} 2 K. It is shown that the Ga I-Ga II phase transition is accompanied by a considerable decrease in the moduli B (by 30%) and G (by 55%) and an increase in the density by 5.7%. The Poisson's ratio exhibits a jump from typically covalent values of approximately 0.22-0.25 to values of approximately 0.32-0.33, which are characteristic of metals. The observed behavior of the elastic characteristics is described in the framework of the model of the phase transition from a 'quasi-molecular' (partially covalent) metal state to a 'normal' metal state. An increase in the Poisson's ratio in the Ga I phase from 0.22 to 0.25 with an increase in the pressure can be interpreted as a decrease in the degree of covalence, i.e., the degree of spatial anisotropy of the electron density along the bonds, whereas the large value of the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus (equal to approximately 8) observed up to the transition to the Ga II phase or the melt is associated not only with the quasicovalent nature of the Ga I phase but also with the structural features. In view of the presence of seven neighbors for each gallium atom in the Ga I phase, the gallium lattice can be treated as a structure intermediate between typical open-packed and close-packed structures. Premelting effects, such as a flattening of the isothermal dependence of the shear modulus G(p) with increasing pressure and an increase in the slope of the

  4. Bone tissue incorporates in vitro gallium with a local structure similar to gallium-doped brushite.

    PubMed

    Korbas, M; Rokita, E; Meyer-Klaucke, W; Ryczek, J

    2004-01-01

    During mineral growth in rat bone-marrow stromal cell cultures, gallium follows calcium pathways. The dominant phase of the cell culture mineral constitutes the poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP). This model system mimics bone mineralization in vivo. The structural characterization of the Ga environment was performed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Ga K-edge. These data were compared with Ga-doped synthetic compounds (poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite, amorphous calcium phosphate and brushite) and with strontium-treated bone tissue, obtained from the same culture model. It was found that Sr(2+) substitutes for Ca(2+) in the HAP crystal lattice. In contrast, the replacement by Ga(3+) yielded a much more disordered local environment of the probe atom in all investigated cell culture samples. The coordination of Ga ions in the cell culture minerals was similar to that of Ga(3+), substituted for Ca(2+), in the Ga-doped synthetic brushite (Ga-DCPD). The Ga atoms in the Ga-DCPD were coordinated by four oxygen atoms (1.90 A) of the four phosphate groups and two oxygen atoms at 2.02 A. Interestingly, the local environment of Ga in the cell culture minerals was not dependent on the onset of Ga treatment, the Ga concentration in the medium or the age of the mineral. Thus, it was concluded that Ga ions were incorporated into the precursor phase to the HAP mineral. Substitution for Ca(2+ )with Ga(3+) distorted locally this brushite-like environment, which prevented the transformation of the initially deposited phase into the poorly crystalline HAP. PMID:14648284

  5. An organic redox electrolyte to rival triiodide/iodide in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingkui; Chamberland, Nathalie; Breau, Livain; Moser, Jacques-E; Humphry-Baker, Robin; Marsan, Benoît; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) have achieved impressive conversion efficiencies for solar energy of over 11% with an electrolyte that contains triiodide/iodide as a redox couple. Although triiodide/iodide redox couples work efficiently in DSCs, they suffer from two major disadvantages: electrolytes that contain triiodide/iodide corrode electrical contacts made of silver (which reduces the options for the scale up of DSCs to module size) and triiodide partially absorbs visible light. Here, we present a new disulfide/thiolate redox couple that has negligible absorption in the visible spectral range, a very attractive feature for flexible DSCs that use transparent conductors as current collectors. Using this novel, iodide-free redox electrolyte in conjunction with a sensitized heterojunction, we achieved an unprecedented efficiency of 6.4% under standard illumination test conditions. This novel redox couple offers a viable pathway to develop efficient DSCs with attractive properties for scale up and practical applications.

  6. Moisture proof columnar Cesium Iodide (CsI) layers for gas avalanche microdetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Park, I.J.; Cho, H.S.; Hong, W.S.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kadyk, J.

    1999-05-05

    Cesium iodide columnar layers having a diameter of 3 {micro}m, and wall spacing of {approx} 1 {micro}m act as secondary electron emitters and can be used for detection of radiation: charged particles, X-rays and gamma rays. With a large enough electric field across the columnar layers, {approx} 400 {micro}m in thickness, gas avalanche gain is evident when placed in a suitable gas, such as P10 or argon-ethane mixtures. The cesium iodide columns are damaged by ambient moisture. This damage can be prevented by evaporating protective layers of insoluble, low boiling point inorganic materials, such as mercuric iodide. Columnar layers with 20 nm coatings of mercuric iodide yield more than 30,000 electrons on average when traversed by electrons from a {sup 90}Sr beta source.

  7. Kinetics and mechanism of the mercury(II)-assisted hydrolysis of methyl iodide.

    PubMed

    Celo, Valbona; Scott, Susannah L

    2005-04-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of aqueous Hg(II) with methyl iodide have been investigated. The overall reaction is best described as Hg(II)-assisted hydrolysis, resulting in quantitative formation of methanol and, in the presence of excess methyl iodide, ultimately, HgI2 via the intermediate HgI+. The kinetics are biexponential when methyl iodide is in excess. At 25 degrees C, the acceleration provided by Hg2+ is 7.5 times greater than that caused by HgI+, while assistance of hydrolysis was not observed for HgI2. Thus, the reactions are not catalytic in Hg(II). The kinetics are consistent with an SN2-M+ mechanism involving electrophilic attack at iodide. As expected, methylation of mercury is not a reaction pathway; traces of methylmercury(II) are artifacts of the extraction/preconcentration procedure used for methylmercury analysis.

  8. Fluorescence characteristics of 5-amino salicylic acid: An iodide recognition study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Priyanka; Suyal, Kanchan; Joshi, Neeraj K.; Joshi, Hem Chandra; Pant, Sanjay

    In this paper we report the effect of iodide on the fluorescence of 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA). In the absence of iodide, prominent blue green (BG) emission band at ˜465 nm (broad) is observed in aprotic solvents whereas violet (V) emission at ˜408 nm, blue green (BG) at ˜480 nm and green (G) at ˜500 nm are observed in case of protic solvents. On the addition of iodide ion (I-), the intensity of BG fluorescence is enhanced in case of aprotic solvents. On the other hand the G band is enhanced in protic solvents and decrease in the intensity of the V band is observed. The effect of hydrogen bonding as well as the interplay of neutral and ionic species is invoked to explain the observed results. The study projects the application of this system in iodide recognition in protic/aprotic environments.

  9. Horseradish Peroxidase-Mediated, Iodide-Catalyzed Cascade Reaction for Plasmonic Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Xianyu, Yunlei; Chen, Yiping; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-11-01

    This report outlines an enzymatic cascade reaction for signal transduction and amplification for plasmonic immunoassays by using horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mediated aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). HRP-catalyzed oxidation of iodide and iodide-catalyzed oxidation of cysteine is employed to modulate the plasmonic signals of AuNPs. It agrees well with the current immunoassay platforms and allows naked-eye readout with enhanced sensitivity, which holds great promise for applications in resource-constrained settings. PMID:26460152

  10. Permeation of iodide from iodine-enriched yeast through porcine intestine.

    PubMed

    Ryszka, Florian; Dolińska, Barbara; Zieliński, Michał; Chyra, Dagmara; Dobrzański, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Iodine deficiency is a common phenomenon, threatening the whole global human population. Recommended daily intake of iodine is 150 μg for adults and 250 μg for pregnant and breastfeeding women. About 50% of human population can be at risk of moderate iodine deficiency. Due to this fact, increased iodine supplementation is recommended, through intake of iodized mineral water and salt iodization. The aim of this study was to investigate permeation and absorption of iodide from iodine bioplex (experimental group) in comparison with potassium iodide (controls). Permeation and absorption processes were investigated in vitro using a porcine intestine. The experimental model was based on a standard Franz diffusion cell (FD-Cell). The iodine bioplex was produced using Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and whey powder: iodine content - 388 μg/g, total protein - 28.5%, total fat - 0.9%., glutamic acid - 41.2%, asparaginic acid - 29.4%, lysine - 24.8%; purchased from: F.Z.N.P. Biochefa, Sosnowiec, Poland. Potassium iodide was used as controls, at 388 μg iodine concentration, which was the same as in iodine-enriched yeast bioplex. A statistically significant increase in iodide permeation was observed for iodine-enriched yeast bioplex in comparison with controls - potassium iodide. After 5h the total amount of permeated iodide from iodine-enriched yeast bioplex was 85%, which is ~ 2-fold higher than controls - 37%. Iodide absorption was by contrast statistically significantly higher in controls - 7.3%, in comparison with 4.5% in experimental group with iodine-enriched yeast bioplex. Presented results show that iodide permeation process dominates over absorption in case of iodine-enriched yeast bioplex.

  11. Determination of iodide in ground water and soil by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tucker, H L; Flack, R W

    1998-04-24

    Comprehensive elemental analysis of samples from the Bear Creek Valley near the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, and its floodplain have been performed in order to allow an unclassified assessment of possible elemental contamination within this area. A rapid ion Chromatographic method, with isocratic separation and micromembrane suppression is discussed within this paper for the analysis of iodide in soils, and floodplain ground waters. This developmental method will be used for future routine iodide analysis.

  12. Horseradish Peroxidase-Mediated, Iodide-Catalyzed Cascade Reaction for Plasmonic Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Xianyu, Yunlei; Chen, Yiping; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-11-01

    This report outlines an enzymatic cascade reaction for signal transduction and amplification for plasmonic immunoassays by using horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mediated aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). HRP-catalyzed oxidation of iodide and iodide-catalyzed oxidation of cysteine is employed to modulate the plasmonic signals of AuNPs. It agrees well with the current immunoassay platforms and allows naked-eye readout with enhanced sensitivity, which holds great promise for applications in resource-constrained settings.

  13. Chlorine-free pyrotechnics: copper(I) iodide as a "green" blue-light emitter.

    PubMed

    Klapötke, Thomas M; Rusan, Magdalena; Sabatini, Jesse J

    2014-09-01

    The generation of blue-light-emitting pyrotechnic formulations without the use of chlorine-containing compounds is reported. Suitable blue-light emission has been achieved through the generation of molecular emitting copper(I) iodide. The most optimal copper(I) iodide based blue-light-emitting formulation was found to have performances exceeding those of chlorine-containing compositions, and was found to be insensitive to various ignition stimuli.

  14. Chlorine-free pyrotechnics: copper(I) iodide as a "green" blue-light emitter.

    PubMed

    Klapötke, Thomas M; Rusan, Magdalena; Sabatini, Jesse J

    2014-09-01

    The generation of blue-light-emitting pyrotechnic formulations without the use of chlorine-containing compounds is reported. Suitable blue-light emission has been achieved through the generation of molecular emitting copper(I) iodide. The most optimal copper(I) iodide based blue-light-emitting formulation was found to have performances exceeding those of chlorine-containing compositions, and was found to be insensitive to various ignition stimuli. PMID:25044436

  15. Physical mechanisms for anisotropic plasma etching of cesium iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xiaoji; Hopwood, Jeffrey A.

    2004-11-01

    The physical mechanisms for the interaction between a reactive plasma and a cesium iodide surface are investigated. Under conditions of ion bombardment and elevated substrate temperature, CsI is found to sputter etch slowly (15 nm/min). If atomic fluorine, fluorocarbon radicals, of SF{sub x} radicals are present in the discharge, however, CsI is reactively etched at substantially higher rates (up to 200 nm/min). The roles of plasma radicals and energetic ion bombardment are investigated by first exposing the surface to plasma radicals and then bombarding the surface with argon ions. The optical emission from Cs and I atoms is found to correlate with the etch rate of CsI and is used as an in situ monitor of radical-enhanced etching. Small surface exposures to CF{sub x}, SF{sub x}, and F radicals are shown to enhance the etch rate of CsI. If the exposure of the CsI surface is increased, however, these same radical species act as etch inhibitors. A simple model for reactive etching of CsI is proposed, and this model is shown to compare reasonably well with experimental etch rates.

  16. Lead iodide perovskite light-emitting field-effect transistor

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Xin Yu; Cortecchia, Daniele; Yin, Jun; Bruno, Annalisa; Soci, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of solution-processable hybrid organic–inorganic perovskites in photovoltaic and light-emitting applications, determination of their intrinsic charge transport parameters has been elusive due to the variability of film preparation and history-dependent device performance. Here we show that screening effects associated to ionic transport can be effectively eliminated by lowering the operating temperature of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) field-effect transistors. Field-effect carrier mobility is found to increase by almost two orders of magnitude below 200 K, consistent with phonon scattering-limited transport. Under balanced ambipolar carrier injection, gate-dependent electroluminescence is also observed from the transistor channel, with spectra revealing the tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transition. This demonstration of CH3NH3PbI3 light-emitting field-effect transistors provides intrinsic transport parameters to guide materials and solar cell optimization, and will drive the development of new electro-optic device concepts, such as gated light-emitting diodes and lasers operating at room temperature. PMID:26108967

  17. Polarization Effects in Methylammonium Lead Iodide Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labram, John; Fabini, Douglas; Perry, Erin; Lehner, Anna; Wang, Hengbin; Glaudell, Anne; Wu, Guang; Evans, Hayden; Buck, David; Cotta, Robert; Echegoyen, Luis; Wudl, Fred; Seshadri, Ram; Chabinyc, Michael

    The immense success of group IV and III-V semiconductors has resulted in disruptive new photovoltaic (PV) cell technologies emerging extremely infrequently. For this reason, the recent progress in Methylammonium Lead Iodide (MAPbI3) solar cells can be viewed as a highly significant historic event. Despite the staggering recent progress made in reported power conversion efficiency (PCE), debate remains intense on the nature of the various instabilities synonymous with these devices. Using various electronic device measurements, we here present a body of experimental evidence consistent with the existence of a mobile ionic species within the MAPbI3 perovskite. Temperature-dependent transistor measurements reveal operating FET devices only below approximately 210K. This is attributed to ionic screening of the (otherwise charge-neutral) semiconductor-dielectric interface. Temperature-dependent pulsed-gate and impedance spectroscopy experiments also reveal behavior consistent with this interpretation. MAPbI3 PV cells were found to possess a PCE which decreases significantly below 210K. Combined, these set of measurements provide an interesting and consistent description of the internal processes at play within the MAPbI3 perovskite structure.

  18. Lead iodide perovskite light-emitting field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Xin Yu; Cortecchia, Daniele; Yin, Jun; Bruno, Annalisa; Soci, Cesare

    2015-06-01

    Despite the widespread use of solution-processable hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites in photovoltaic and light-emitting applications, determination of their intrinsic charge transport parameters has been elusive due to the variability of film preparation and history-dependent device performance. Here we show that screening effects associated to ionic transport can be effectively eliminated by lowering the operating temperature of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) field-effect transistors. Field-effect carrier mobility is found to increase by almost two orders of magnitude below 200 K, consistent with phonon scattering-limited transport. Under balanced ambipolar carrier injection, gate-dependent electroluminescence is also observed from the transistor channel, with spectra revealing the tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transition. This demonstration of CH3NH3PbI3 light-emitting field-effect transistors provides intrinsic transport parameters to guide materials and solar cell optimization, and will drive the development of new electro-optic device concepts, such as gated light-emitting diodes and lasers operating at room temperature.

  19. Structural Effects on the Bandstructure of Methylammonium Lead Iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, Marco; Barker, Bradford A.; Vigil-Fowler, Derek; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Louie, Steven G.; Louie Team

    Metal-organic halide perovskites possess peculiar physical properties. The carrier diffusion length in methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI) exceeds 1 μm, but this unusually high value for a solution-processed material is poorly understood. We developed first-principles calculations of carrier lifetimes and diffusion lengths in semiconductors, which require accurate knowledge of the bandstructure. In this talk, we show that in MAPbI the structure strongly affects the bandstructure and band edges, and that density functional theory (DFT) is unable to predict the room temperature tetragonal structure due to the polymorphism of MAPbI. The Rashba splitting induced by the spin-orbit interaction, and the DFT band gap and effective masses, all depend strongly on the chosen structure, a point that previous work failed to address. Working with multiple stochastic realizations of large unit cells with random methylammonium orientations, we compute average effective masses and show that the effective mass depends linearly on the band gap. The average Rashba coefficient we find is an order of magnitude smaller than previously reported, and the band edges are almost parabolic. Our structures possess the correct symmetry and are free of the spurious Pb off-centering assumed in previous work. We identify the correct starting point for GW bandstructure calculations and to compute the carrier lifetime and diffusion length.

  20. Interfacial Charge Transfer Anisotropy in Polycrystalline Lead Iodide Perovskite Films.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Cortecchia, Daniele; Krishna, Anurag; Chen, Shi; Mathews, Nripan; Grimsdale, Andrew C; Soci, Cesare

    2015-04-16

    Solar cells based on organic-inorganic lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) exhibit remarkably high power conversion efficiency (PCE). One of the key issues in solution-processed films is that often the polycrystalline domain orientation is not well-defined, which makes it difficult to predict energy alignment and charge transfer efficiency. Here we combine ab initio calculations and photoelectron spectroscopy to unravel the electronic structure and charge redistribution at the interface between different surfaces of CH3NH3PbI3 and typical organic hole acceptor Spiro-OMeTAD and electron acceptor PCBM. We find that both hole and electron interfacial transfer depend strongly on the CH3NH3PbI3 surface orientation: while the (001) and (110) surfaces tend to favor hole injection to Spiro-OMeTAD, the (100) surface facilitates electron transfer to PCBM due to surface delocalized charges and hole/electron accumulation at the CH3NH3PbI3/organic interfaces. Molecular dynamic simulations indicate that this is due to strong orbital interactions under thermal fluctuations at room temperature, suggesting the possibility to further improve charge separation and extraction in perovskite-based solar cells by controlling perovskite film crystallization and surface orientation.

  1. Chloride, bromide and iodide scintillators with europium doping

    DOEpatents

    Zhuravleva, Mariya; Yang, Kan

    2014-08-26

    A halide scintillator material is disclosed where the halide may comprise chloride, bromide or iodide. The material is single-crystalline and has a composition of the general formula ABX.sub.3 where A is an alkali, B is an alkali earth and X is a halide which general composition was investigated. In particular, crystals of the formula ACa.sub.1-yEu.sub.yI.sub.3 where A=K, Rb and Cs were formed as well as crystals of the formula CsA.sub.1-yEu.sub.yX.sub.3 (where A=Ca, Sr, Ba, or a combination thereof and X=Cl, Br or I or a combination thereof) with divalent Europium doping where 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, and more particularly Eu doping has been studied at one to ten mol %. The disclosed scintillator materials are suitable for making scintillation detectors used in applications such as medical imaging and homeland security.

  2. A simple sperm nuclear vacuole assay with propidium iodide.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W-J; Li, J

    2015-09-01

    Our aim was to develop a new simple sperm nuclear vacuole assay (SNVA) with propidium iodide (PI) to determine the status of nuclear vacuole (NV) of individual spermatozoa. After PI staining, sperm nuclei were classified into the 14 categories according to both nuclear morphology and the status of NV. The incidence was 57.8% (range 28-84%) in fertile controls (n = 40), and 85.1% (range 67-99%) in men with varicocele (n = 40). In the fertile group, normal nuclear-shaped spermatozoa without NV or with one small NV located in the ante-nuclear region were significantly more in comparison with the varicocele group. In the varicocele group, abnormal nuclear-shaped spermatozoa with one large NV and with multiple NVs located in the ante-nuclear region were most frequent findings. Besides, spermatozoa with NVs in both ante- and post-nuclear regions in the varicocele group were significantly more than those in the fertile group. In both fertile and varicocele groups, normal or abnormal nuclear-shaped spermatozoa with one or more vacuoles only located in the post-nuclear region occurred sparingly. The SNVA provides a useful additional approach to identify the status of NV in human spermatozoa for diagnostic purposes. A good sperm sample would have more spermatozoa without NV or with one small NV located in the ante-nuclear region.

  3. Mechanistic aspects of ingested chlorine dioxide on thyroid function: impact of oxidants on iodide metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Bercz, J.P.; Jones, L.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Bawa, R.; Condie, L.

    1986-11-01

    Toxicological studies dealing with recent findings of health effects of drinking water disinfectants are reviewed. Experiments with monkeys and rodents indicate that the biological activity of ingested disinfectants is expressed via their chemical interaction with the mucosal epithelia, secretory products, and nutritional contents of the alimentary tract. Evidence exists that a principal partner of this redox interaction is the iodide of nutritional origin that is ubiquitous in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus the observation that subchronic exposure to chlorine dioxide (ClO/sub 2/) in drinking water decreases serum thyroxine levels in mammalian species can be best explained with changes produced in the chemical form of the bioavailable iodide. Ongoing and previously reported mechanistic studies indicate that oxidizing agents such as chlorine-based disinfectants oxidize the basal iodide content of the gastrointestinal tract. The resulting reactive iodine species readily attaches to organic matter by covalent bonding. Evidence suggests that the extent to which such iodinated organics are formed is proportional to the magnitude of the electromotive force and stoichiometry of the redox couple between iodide and the disinfectant. Because the extent of thyroid uptake of the bioavailable iodide does not decrease during ClO/sub 2/ ingestion, it seems that ClO/sub 2/ does not cause iodide deficiency of sufficient magnitude to account for the decease in hormonogenesis. Absorption of one or more of iodinated molecules, e.g., nutrient, hormones, or cellular constituents of the alimentary tract having thyromimetic or thyroid inhibitory properties, is a better hypothesis for the effects seen.

  4. Electrodeposition as an alternate method for preparation of environmental samples for iodide by AMS

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adamic, M. L.; Lister, T. E.; Dufek, E. J.; Jenson, D. D.; Olson, J. E.; Vockenhuber, C.; Watrous, M. G.

    2015-03-25

    This paper presents an evaluation of an alternate method for preparing environmental samples for 129I analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at Idaho National Laboratory. The optimal sample preparation method is characterized by ease of preparation, capability of processing very small quantities of iodide, and ease of loading into a cathode. Electrodeposition of iodide on a silver wire was evaluated using these criteria. This study indicates that the electrochemically-formed silver iodide deposits produce ion currents similar to those from precipitated silver iodide for the same sample mass. Furthermore, precipitated silver iodide samples are usually mixed with niobium or silver powdermore » prior to loading in a cathode. Using electrodeposition, the silver is already mixed with the sample and can simply be picked up with tweezers, placed in the sample die, and pressed into a cathode. The major advantage of this method is that the silver wire/electrodeposited silver iodide is much easier to load into a cathode.« less

  5. The effect of hydrogen coadsorption on the thermal chemistry of methyl iodide on Ni(100) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tjandra, S.; Zaera, F. )

    1993-12-01

    A detailed investigation of the surface chemistry of methyl iodide with preadsorbed hydrogen on Ni(100) is reported here. TPD data indicate that, in general, the presence of hydrogen on the surface induces a yield increase in methane formation and a reduction of the extent of which methyl species decompose as compared with the case where the methyl iodide is adsorbed by itself on a clean surface. Furthermore, two very different methane desorption regimes are observed at 150 and 220 K. By using both isotopically labelled methyl iodide and deuterium (D[sub 2] + CH[sub 3]I and H[sub 2] + CD[sub 3]I) it was determined that while the high-temperature methane is formed via the reductive elimination of surface methyl species produced by decomposition of methyl iodide with coadsorbed hydrogen atoms, the lower temperature methane TPD peak may be the result of a direct attack of the surface hydrogen on adsorbed methyl iodide molecules in a concerted fashion instead. The TPD data also indicate that neither methylene nor methylidyne intermediates form during the decomposition of methyl iodide on nickel below 200 K, and experiments with CH[sub 2]I[sub 2] clearly show that methylene species can be easily hydrogenated to methane in the presence of D[sub 2] coadsorption at quite low temperatures. Finally, no H-D exchange between methyl species and coadsorbed hydrogen (H[sub 2]) was observed. 44 refs., 20 figs.

  6. Lead iodide X-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers for room and high temperature operation

    SciTech Connect

    Hermon, H.; James, R.B.; Cross, E.

    1997-02-01

    In this study, we report on the results of the investigation of lead iodide material properties. The effectiveness of zone refining purification methods on the material purity is determined by ICP-MS and ICP-OES and correlated to the electrical and physical material properties. We show that this zone refining method is very efficient in removing impurities from lead iodide and we also determine the segregation coefficient for some of these impurities. Triple axis x- ray diffraction (TAD) analysis has been used to determine the crystalline perfection of the lead iodide after applying various cutting, etching, and fabrication methods. The soft lead iodide crystal was found to be damaged when cleaved by a razor blade, but by using a diamond wheel saw, followed by etching, the crystallinity of the material was improved, as observed by TAD. Low temperature photoluminescence also indicates an improvement in the material properties of the purified lead iodide. Electrical properties of lead iodide such as carrier mobility, were calculated based on carrier- phonon scattering. The results for the electrical properties were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  7. The effect of elemental and hydrocarbon impurities on mercuric iodide gamma ray detector performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Eilene S.; Buffleben, George; Soria, Ed; James, Ralph; Schieber, Michael; Natarajan, Raj; Gerrish, Vern

    Mercuric iodide is a room temperature semiconductor material that is used for gamma ray and x-ray radiation detection. Mercuric iodide is synthesized from mercuric chloride and potassium iodide and is then purified by a series of melts and sublimation steps and by zone refining. The mercuric iodide is grown into crystals and platelets and then fabricated into detectors. Elemental contamination may be a determining factor in the performance of these detectors. These contaminates may be present in the starting material or may be introduced during, or be unaffected by, the purification, growth or fabrication steps. Methods have been developed for the analysis of trace levels of elemental contamination. Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectroscopy (ICP/MS), Inductively Coupled Plasma/Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP/OES) and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy (GC/MS) are used to determine sub ppm levels of many trace elemental impurities. Trace levels of many elemental impurities in the raw mercuric iodide are significantly reduced during the purification and zone refining processes. Though the levels of impurities are reduced, poor performing mercuric iodide detectors have contamination levels remaining or reintroduced which are higher for Ag, Al, Ca, Cu, Mg, Mn, Na, Pb and Zn than detectors with good gamma ray response. This paper will discuss the analytical methodology, the effects of purification on impurity levels, and the correlation between detector performance and impurity levels.

  8. Unexpected gallium uptake in benign pulmonary pathology. Report of two cases

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, R.G.; Choy, D.; Murray, I.P.

    1984-12-01

    Two cases in which pulmonary gallium uptake was demonstrated in benign conditions are reported. In one, the abnormality permitted localization of a benign mesothelioma, while in the other patient it was associated with pulmonary fibrosis resulting from therapeutic irradiation. These cases extend the causes of gallium accumulation in which neither malignancy nor infection is responsible.

  9. Synthesis and use of (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium and indium

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Chen, You-Xian

    2000-01-01

    Salts of (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are described. The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions have the formula [ER'R"R'"F].sup..crclbar. wherein E is aluminum, gallium, or indium, wherein F is fluorine, and wherein R', R", and R'" is each a fluorinated phenyl, fluorinated biphenyl, or fluorinated polycyclic group.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of functional multicomponent nanosized gallium chelated gold crystals.

    PubMed

    Zambre, Ajit; Silva, Francisco; Upendran, Anandhi; Afrasiabi, Zahra; Xin, Yan; Paulo, António; Kannan, Raghuraman

    2014-03-28

    In this communication, we describe a novel synthetic method for fabricating multicomponent gold nanoparticles containing both gallium ions and biomolecules on the surface. Detailed compositional analysis, using STEM-HAADF and EELS spectroscopy, confirmed the crystalline nature of gold and chelation of gallium ions. The presence of the biomolecule was validated using conventional ELISA.

  11. Low temperature recombination and trapping analysis in high purity gallium arsenide by microwave photodielectric techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khambaty, M. B.; Hartwig, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    Some physical theories pertinent to the measurement properties of gallium arsenide are presented and experimental data are analyzed. A model for explaining recombination and trapping high purity gallium arsenide, valid below 77 K is assembled from points made at various places and an appraisal is given of photodielectric techniques for material property studies.

  12. The influence of framework-gallium in zeolites: Electronegativity and infrared spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Dompas, D.H.; Mortier, W.J. ); Kenter, O.C.H. ); Janssen, M.J.G.; Verduijn, J.P. )

    1991-05-01

    Based on the influence of the composition (Si/Al and Si/Ga ratio) on the framework vibrations of zeolites with different structure types (FAU, LTL, BETA, MOR, MEL, MFI, TON, and MTW), an electronegativity value for gallium substituted into zeolite frameworks is proposed (Sanderson electronegativity scale). The present electronegativity value agrees with the known physicochemical properties of gallium substituted zeolites.

  13. Investigation of the variations in the crystallization front shape during growth of gadolinium gallium and terbium gallium crystals by the Czochralski method

    SciTech Connect

    Budenkova, O. N. Vasiliev, M. G.; Yuferev, V. S.; Ivanov, I. A.; Bul'kanov, A. M.; Kalaev, V. V.

    2008-12-15

    Numerical investigation of the variations in the crystallization front shape during growth of gadolinium gallium and terbium gallium garnet crystals in the same thermal zone and comparison of the obtained results with the experimental data have been performed. It is shown that the difference in the behavior of the crystallization front during growth of the crystals is related to their different transparency in the IR region. In gadolinium gallium garnet crystals, which are transparent to thermal radiation, a crystallization front, strongly convex toward the melt, is formed in the growth stage, which extremely rapidly melts under forced convection. Numerical analysis of this process has been performed within the quasistationary and nonstationary models. At the same time, in terbium gallium garnet crystals, which are characterized by strong absorption of thermal radiation, the phase boundary shape changes fairly smoothly and with a small amplitude. In this case, as the crystal is pulled, the crystallization front tends to become convex toward the crystal bulk.

  14. Gallium arsenide differentially affects processing of phagolysosomal targeted antigen by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lewis, T A; Hartmann, C B; McCoy, K L

    1998-03-01

    Gallium arsenide, a semiconductor utilized in the electronics industry, causes immunosuppression in animals. The chemical's effect on macrophages to process antigen for activating pigeon cytochrome-specific helper T cell hybridoma was investigated. Mice were administered 200 mg/kg gallium arsenide or vehicle intraperitoneally. Five-day exposure suppressed processing by splenic macrophages but augmented processing by thioglycollate-elicited and resident peritoneal macrophages. Cytochrome coupled to latex beads was targeted to phagolysosomes to examine processing in lysosomes. Cytochrome beads required phagocytosis for processing and were located in phagolysosomes. Gallium arsenide did not alter the phagocytic ability of macrophages. Peritoneal macrophages normally processed the targeted antigen, indicating that gallium arsenide influenced compartment(s) preceding lysosomes. However, the processing efficiency of exposed splenic macrophages depended on the size of particulate cytochrome, suggesting that processing varied in phagolysosomes of different sizes. Gallium arsenide impacted different intracellular compartments in these macrophages, perhaps contributing to systemic immunotoxicity and local inflammation caused by exposure.

  15. The Inhibition of Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation by Gallium Nitrate-Modified Titanium.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanyuan; Qiu, Yan; Chen, Ruiqi; Liao, Lianming

    2015-08-01

    Periprosthetic infections are notoriously difficult to treat due to biofilm formation. Previously, we reported that gallium-EDTA attached to PVC (polyvinyl chloride) surface could prevent bacterial colonization. Herein we examined the effect of this gallium-EDTA complex on Escherichia coli biofilm formation on titanium. It was clearly demonstrated that gallium nitrate significantly inhibited the growth and auto-aggregation of Escherichia coli. Furthermore, titanium with gallium-EDTA coating resisted bacterial colonization as indicated by crystal violet staining. When the chips were immersed in human serum and incubated at 37 °C, they demonstrated significant antimicrobial activity after more than 28 days of incubation. These findings indicate that gallium-EDTA coating of implants can result in a surface that can resist bacterial colonization. This technology holds great promise for the prevention and treatment of periprosthetic infections.

  16. Extraction of gallium(III) from hydrochloric acid solutions by trioctylammonium-based mixed ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Katsuta, Shoichi; Okai, Miho; Yoshimoto, Yuki; Kudo, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    The extractabilities of aluminium(III), gallium(III), and indium(III) from hydrochloric acid solutions were investigated using a mixture of two protic ionic liquids, trioctylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ([TOAH][NTf(2)]) and trioctylammonium nitrate ([TOAH][NO(3)]). At a HCl concentration of 4 mol L(-1) or more, gallium(III) was nearly quantitatively extracted and the extractability order was Ga > Al > In. The extractability of gallium(III) increased with increasing [TOAH][NO(3)] content in the mixed ionic liquid. The extracted gallium(III) was quantitatively stripped with aqueous nitric acid solutions. The separation and recovery of gallium(III) from hydrochloric acid solutions containing excess indium(III) was demonstrated using the mixed ionic liquid.

  17. Relation between size and phase structure of gallium: Differential scanning calorimeter experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hao; Fei, Guang Tao; Cui, Ping; Zheng, Kang; Liang, Li Min; Li, Yong; de Zhang, Li

    2005-08-01

    The relation between sizes and phase structures of gallium has been studied. Gallium droplets with different sizes dispersed in poly(methyl methacrylate) and silicone oil were studied by differential scanning calorimeter and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that particles with different sizes corresponded to stable or metastable phases of gallium. The stable phase α -gallium is dominantly formed when the average size of particles is no less than 0.8 micron, and the metastable phases β -, γ - and δ -gallium are mainly formed when the average particle size is 0.8-0.6 micron, 0.6-0.3 micron, and below 0.3 micron, respectively. The phase selection in the solidification process under undercooling is used to explain the results.

  18. Activity of gallium on prevention of fatal cage-layer osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiuxia; Wang, Chao

    2009-12-01

    The prevention of fatal cage-layer osteoporosis of gallium was studied in this paper. One-day-old hens were fed up to 68 weeks on a control diet and diets containing gallium. Plasma variables were measured during lay. End-of-lay trabecular and medullary bone volumes in the proximal tarsometatarsus and free thoracic vertebra were measured by histomorphometry. Medullary and trabecular bone volumes were increased significantly by supplementation with gallium. The experiment confirmed that dietary gallium supplementation was an effective way to enhance the egg production and reduce mortality percentage. The beneficial effects of gallium supplementation over the lifetime of the hens were attributable mainly to improved cage-layer osteoporosis. PMID:19444387

  19. Auto-ionization in lutetium iodide complexes: effect of the Iioic radius on lanthanide-iodide binding.

    PubMed

    Giesbrecht, Garth R; Gordon, John C; Clark, David L; Scott, Brian L

    2004-02-01

    Reaction of lutetium metal with 1.5 equiv of elemental iodine in 2-propanol leads to the isolation of LuI(3)(HO(i)Pr)(4) (1). An X-ray crystal structure reveals an ionic structure with well-separated [LuI(2)(HO(i)Pr)(4)] cations and [I] anions. Dissolution of 1 in pyridine generates the unusual alkoxide species [LuI(O(i)Pr)(py)(5)][I] (2) with the elimination of HI. An X-ray crystal structure of 2 confirmed the ionic nature of the compound, with the cationic portion of the complex exhibiting a seven-coordinated lutetium center with trans-disposed iodo and alkoxide ligands and five pyridine molecules equally displaced within the equatorial plane. Exposure of 2 to iodotrimethylsilane yields the expected triiodide species [LuI(2)(py)(5)][I] (3), which may also be prepared by refluxing commercially available LuI(3) in THF, followed by crystallization from a THF/pyridine mixture. The solid-state structure of 3 is similar to that of 2, with the alkoxide ligand having been replaced by an iodide. The formation of ionic structures 1-3 as opposed to the higher-coordinated neutral species may be traced to the small lutetium center and the presence of relatively strong Lewis bases within the coordination sphere of the metal. PMID:14753829

  20. Potential use of gallium-doped phosphate-based glass material for periodontitis treatment.

    PubMed

    Sahdev, Rohan; Ansari, Tahera I; Higham, Susan M; Valappil, Sabeel P

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the potential effect of gallium-incorporated phosphate-based glasses towards periodontitis-associated bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and matrix metalloproteinase-13. Periodontitis describes a group of inflammatory diseases of the gingiva and supporting structures of the periodontium. They are initiated by the accumulation of plaque bacteria, such as the putative periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, but the host immune response such as elevated matrix metalloproteinases are the major contributing factor for destruction of periodontal tissues. Antibacterial assays of gallium-incorporated phosphate-based glasses were conducted on Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 using disc diffusion assay on fastidious anaerobe agar and liquid broth assay in a modified tryptic soy broth. In vitro study investigated the effect of gallium on purified recombinant human matrix metalloproteinase-13 activity using matrix metalloproteinase assay kit. In vivo biocompatibility of gallium-incorporated phosphate-based glass was evaluated in rats as subcutaneous implants. Antibacterial assay of gallium displayed activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis (inhibition zone of 22 ± 0.5 mm compared with 0 mm for control glass, c-PBG). Gallium in the glass contributed to growth inhibitory effect on Porphyromonas gingivalis (up to 1.30 reductions in log 10 values of the viable counts compared with control) in a modified tryptic soy broth. In vitro study showed gallium-incorporated phosphate-based glasses inhibited matrix metalloproteinase activity significantly (p ≤ 0.01) compared with c-PBG. Evaluation of in vivo biocompatibility of gallium-incorporated phosphate-based glasses in rats showed a non-toxic and foreign body response after 2 weeks of implantation. The results indicate that gallium ions might act on multiple targets of biological mechanisms underlying periodontal disease. Moreover, gallium-incorporated phosphate-based glasses

  1. Measurement of achievable plutonium decontamination from gallium by means of PUREX solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.D.; Campbell, D.O.; Felker, L.K.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the work described herein was to measure, experimentally, the achievable decontamination of plutonium from gallium by means of the PUREX solvent extraction process. Gallium is present in surplus weapons-grade plutonium (WG-Pu) at a concentration of approximately 1 wt%. Plans are to dispose of surplus WG-Pu by converting it to UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiating it in commercial power reactors. However, the presence of high concentrations of gallium in plutonium is a potential corrosion problem during the process of MOX fuel irradiation. The batch experiments performed in this study were designed to measure the capability of the PUREX solvent extraction process to separate gallium from plutonium under idealized conditions. Radioactive tracing of the gallium with {sup 72}Ga enabled the accurate measurement of low concentrations of extractable gallium. The experiments approximated the proposed flowsheet for WG-Pu purification, except that only one stage was used for each process: extraction, scrubbing, and stripping. With realistic multistage countercurrent systems, much more efficient separations are generally obtained. The gallium decontamination factor (DF) obtained after one extraction stage was about 3 x 10{sup 6}. After one scrub stage, all gallium measurements were less than the detection limit, which corresponded to DFs >5 x 10{sup 6}. All these values exceed a 10{sup 6} DF needed to meet a hypothetical 10-ppb gallium impurity limit in MOX fuel. The results of this study showed no inherent or fundamental problem with regard to removing gallium from plutonium.

  2. Potential use of gallium-doped phosphate-based glass material for periodontitis treatment.

    PubMed

    Sahdev, Rohan; Ansari, Tahera I; Higham, Susan M; Valappil, Sabeel P

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the potential effect of gallium-incorporated phosphate-based glasses towards periodontitis-associated bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and matrix metalloproteinase-13. Periodontitis describes a group of inflammatory diseases of the gingiva and supporting structures of the periodontium. They are initiated by the accumulation of plaque bacteria, such as the putative periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, but the host immune response such as elevated matrix metalloproteinases are the major contributing factor for destruction of periodontal tissues. Antibacterial assays of gallium-incorporated phosphate-based glasses were conducted on Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 using disc diffusion assay on fastidious anaerobe agar and liquid broth assay in a modified tryptic soy broth. In vitro study investigated the effect of gallium on purified recombinant human matrix metalloproteinase-13 activity using matrix metalloproteinase assay kit. In vivo biocompatibility of gallium-incorporated phosphate-based glass was evaluated in rats as subcutaneous implants. Antibacterial assay of gallium displayed activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis (inhibition zone of 22 ± 0.5 mm compared with 0 mm for control glass, c-PBG). Gallium in the glass contributed to growth inhibitory effect on Porphyromonas gingivalis (up to 1.30 reductions in log 10 values of the viable counts compared with control) in a modified tryptic soy broth. In vitro study showed gallium-incorporated phosphate-based glasses inhibited matrix metalloproteinase activity significantly (p ≤ 0.01) compared with c-PBG. Evaluation of in vivo biocompatibility of gallium-incorporated phosphate-based glasses in rats showed a non-toxic and foreign body response after 2 weeks of implantation. The results indicate that gallium ions might act on multiple targets of biological mechanisms underlying periodontal disease. Moreover, gallium-incorporated phosphate-based glasses

  3. Alternative substrates for gallium nitride epitaxy and devices: Laterally overgrown gallium nitride and silicon(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Hugues

    Gallium nitride films grown on sapphire or silicon carbide using the conventional 'two-step' technique typically exhibit threading dislocations on the order of ˜109 cm-2, which are detrimental to device performance. In addition, sapphire and silicon carbide substrates are expensive and available only in limited size (2-3 inch diameter). This work addresses both issues by evaluating the properties of GaN films synthesized by lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO) and conventional growth on sapphire and Si(111) substrates. LEO consists of partially masking a previously-grown seed layer and performing a subsequent regrowth such that the regrown features extend over the masked areas. Under favorable conditions the threading dislocations originating from the seed material are blocked by the mask material or redirected by the growing facets. In this work dislocation densities as low as ˜106 cm-2 were observed in the laterally-overgrown areas. The overgrown features exhibited well-defined facets ((0001), {11¯01}, {112¯0}, {112¯1}, {112¯2}), the persistence of which depended on the orientation of the mask as well as on the growth conditions. The relationship between the morphology of the LEO stripes and the growth conditions (temperature, pressure, ammonia and trimethylgallium partial pressures) was characterized for LEO on GaN/sapphire substrates. A qualitative model of the growth mechanisms was presented based on the microscopic structure of the growing surfaces. Microstructural characterization revealed a crystallographic tilt between the seed and the LEO region, which resulted in the formation of dislocations above the mask edge and at the junction plane of adjacent stripes. GaN stripes laterally overgrown on AlN/Si(111) exhibited similar properties. However, chemical interactions between the substrate and the precursors caused morphological degradation, which could be avoided by using a thick (≥180 nm) AlN buffer layer. In addition, thermal expansion mismatch

  4. A glucose bio-battery prototype based on a GDH/poly(methylene blue) bioanode and a graphite cathode with an iodide/tri-iodide redox couple.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jen-Yuan; Nien, Po-Chin; Chen, Chien-Hsiao; Chen, Lin-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2012-07-01

    A glucose bio-battery prototype independent of oxygen is proposed based on a glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) bioanode and a graphite cathode with an iodide/tri-iodide redox couple. At the bioanode, a NADH electrocatalyst, poly(methylene blue) (PMB), which can be easily grown on the electrode (screen-printed carbon paste electrode, SPCE) by electrodeposition, is harnessed and engineered. We find that carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are capable of significantly increasing the deposition amount of PMB and thus enhancing the PMB's electrocatalysis of NADH oxidation and the glucose bio-battery's performance. The choice of the iodide/tri-iodide redox couple eliminates the dependence of oxygen for this bio-battery, thus enabling the bio-battery with a constant current-output feature similar to that of the solar cells. The present glucose bio-battery prototype can attain a maximum power density of 2.4 μW/cm(2) at 25 °C.

  5. Degradation of methyl iodide in soil: effects of environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingxin; Gao, Suduan

    2009-01-01

    Methyl iodide (MeI) is a promising alternative to the phased-out fumigant methyl bromide (MeBr); however, there are concerns about its environmental fate following soil fumigation. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of various environmental factors on the rate of MeI degradation in soil. The chemical was added to soil at 48.6 mg kg(-1) and incubated under different conditions. The MeI degradation rate in soil was determined by extracting and measuring residual concentrations over a 15 d incubation period. In soil, MeI degradation followed availability-adjusted first-order kinetics. At 20 degrees C MeI had a calculated half-life of 32 d in a sandy loam containing 4.3 g kg(-1) of organic carbon. It degraded more rapidly as temperature increased, exhibiting a half-life of 23 d at 30 degrees C. Amendment with 10% cattle manure shortened the half-life to 4 d at 20 degrees C. In both unamended and manure-amended soils, the half-life of MeI greatly increased as the organic matter (OM) was removed and it only slightly increased in soils that were sterilized, indicating predominance of chemical reactions in MeI degradation. Soil texture, mineralogy, and moderate moisture content had little influence on MeI degradation. The degradation slowed as the chemical application rate increased. The results suggest that environmental factors, especially soil temperature and organic amendments, should be considered in combination with the minimum effective MeI application rate for achieving satisfactory pest-control efficacy, reducing atmospheric volatilization, and minimizing groundwater contamination.

  6. Vapor growth of mercuric iodide tetragonal prismatic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariesanti, Elsa

    The effect of polyethylene addition on the growth of mercuric iodide (HgI2) tetragonal prismatic crystals is examined. Three types of polyethylene powder are utilized: low molecular weight (Mw ˜ 4 x 103), ultra high molecular weight (Mw ˜ 3-6 x 1066), and spectrophotometric grade polyethylenes. Among these types of polyethylene, the low molecular weight polyethylene produces the most significant change in HgI2 morphology, with {110} being the most prominent crystal faces. Thermal desorption - gas chromatography/ mass spectroscopy (TD-GC/MS) studies show that thermal desorption of the low molecular weight polyethylene at 100°C and 150°C produce isomers of alkynes, odd nalkanes, and methyl (even-n) alkyl ketones. HgI2 growth runs with n-alkanes, with either neicosane, n-tetracosane, or n-hexatriacontane, cannot replicate the crystal shapes produced during growth with the low molecular weight polyethylene, whereas HgI2 growth runs with ketones, with either 3-hexadecanone or 14-heptacosanone, produce HgI2 tetragonal prismatic crystals, similar to the crystals grown with the low molecular weight polyethylene. C-O double bond contained in any ketone is a polar bond and this polar bond may be attracted to the mercury atoms on the top-most layer of the {110} faces through dipoledipole interaction. As a result, the growth of the {110} faces is impeded, with the crystals elongated in the [001] direction and bounded by the {001} faces along with large, prismatic {110} faces.

  7. Characterization of strontium iodide scintillators with silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Lee J.; Phlips, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    This work characterizes a commercially available europium-doped strontium iodide detector recently developed by Radiation Monitoring Devices (RMD). The detector has been chosen for a space-based mission scheduled to launch in early 2017. The primary goal of this work was to characterize the detector's response over the expected operational range of -10 °C to 30 °C as well as the expected operational voltage range of +26.5-+28.5 V and identify background interferences that may develop due to neutron activation produced by cosmic-ray interactions. The 8 mm×8 mm×20 mm detectors use KETEK silicon photomultipliers (SiPM), with an active area of 6 mmx6 mm (KETEK PM6660). Our results show substantial integral nonlinearity due to the SiPM ranging from 0% to 25% at room temperature over the energy range of 80-2614 keV. The nonlinearity, a function of temperature and overvoltage, leads to an underestimate of the full width at half max (FWHM), which is 2.6% uncorrected at 662 keV and 3.8% corrected at 662 keV. The temperature dependence of the detector results in a noise threshold that increases substantially above 30 °C due to the SiPM dark rate. In an effort to simulate the harsh environment of space, neutron activation of the detector was also explored. Gamma-ray lines at 127 keV and 164 keV were observed in the detector along with Kα x-rays associated with europium. Beta decay from europium- and iodine-activation products were also observed within the detector.

  8. Convenient synthesis of aluminum and gallium phosphonate cages.

    PubMed

    Samanamu, Christian R; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Montchamp, Jean-Luc; Richards, Anne F

    2008-05-01

    The reactions of AlCl 3.6H 2O and GaCl 3 with 2-pyridylphosphonic acid (2PypoH 2) and 4-pyridylphosphonic acid (4PypoH 2) afford cyclic aluminum and gallium phosphonate structures of [(2PypoH) 4Al 4(OH 2) 12]Cl 8.6H 2O ( 1), [(4PypoH) 4Al 4(OH 2) 12]Cl 8.11H 2O ( 2), [(2PypoH) 4Al 4(OH 2) 12](NO 3) 8.7H 2O ( 3), [(2PypoH) 2(2Pypo) 4Ga 8Cl 12(OH 2) 4(thf) 2](GaCl 4) 2..8thf ( 4), and [(2PypoH) 2(2Pypo) 4Ga 8Cl 12(OH 2) 4(thf) 2](NO 3) 2.9thf ( 5). Structures 1- 3 feature four aluminum atoms bridged by oxygen atoms from the phosphonate moiety and show structural resemblance to the secondary building units found in zeolites and aluminum phosphates. The gallium complexes, 4 and 5, have eight gallium atoms bridged by phosphonate moieties with two GaCl 4 (-) counterions present in 4 and nitrate ions in 5. The cage structures 1- 3 are interlinked by strong hydrogen bonds, forming polymeric chains that, for aluminum, are thermally robust. Exchange of the phosphonic acid for the more flexible 4PyCH 2PO 3H 2 afforded a coordination polymer with a 1:1 Ga:P ratio, {[(4PyCH 2PO 3H)Ga(OH 2) 3](NO 3) 2.0.5H 2O} x ( 6). Complexes 1- 6 were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, NMR, and mass spectrometry and studied by TGA. PMID:18366160

  9. Gallium-doped germanium, evaluation of photoconductors, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Gallium-doped germanium far infrared detectors were evaluated at low temperatures and low background simulating the space environment. Signal and noise characteristics were determined for detector temperatures in the 2K to 4K range. Optimum performance occurs at about 2.5K for all devices tested. The minimum average NEP in the 40-130 micron region was found to be approximately 4 x 10 to the minus 17th power watt Hz(-1/2) at a frequency of 1 Hz.

  10. Testing of gallium arsenide solar cells on the CRRES vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trumble, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    A flight experiment was designed to determine the optimum design for gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cell panels in a radiation environment. Elements of the experiment design include, different coverglass material and thicknesses, welded and soldered interconnects, different solar cell efficiencies, different solar cell types, and measurement of annealing properties. This experiment is scheduled to fly on the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). This satellite will simultaneously measure the radiation environment and provide engineering data on solar cell degradation that can be directly related to radiation damage.

  11. Improved performance design of gallium arsenide solar cells for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parekh, R. H.; Barnett, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    An improved design, shallow junction heteroface, n-p, gallium arsenide solar cell for space applications is reported, with a predicted AM0 efficiency in the 21.9 to 23.0 percent range. The optimized n-p structure, while slightly more efficient, has the added advantage of being less susceptible to radiation-induced degradation by virtue of this thin top junction layer. Detailed spectral response curves and an analysis of the loss mechanisms are reported. The details of the design are readily measurable. The optimized designs were reached by quantifying the dominant loss mechanisms and then minimizing them by using computer simulations.

  12. Gallium uptake in tryptophan-related pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.M.; Park, C.H.; Intenzo, C.M.; Patel, R. )

    1991-02-01

    We describe a patient who developed fever, fatigue, muscle weakness, dyspnea, skin rash, and eosinophilia after taking high doses of tryptophan for insomnia for two years. A gallium-67 scan revealed diffuse increased uptake in the lung and no abnormal uptake in the muscular distribution. Bronchoscopy and biopsy confirmed inflammatory reactions with infiltration by eosinophils, mast cells, and lymphocytes. CT scan showed an interstitial alveolar pattern without fibrosis. EMG demonstrated diffuse myopathy. Muscle biopsy from the right thigh showed an inflammatory myositis with eosinophilic and lymphocytic infiltrations.

  13. Microwave dielectric constants of silicon, gallium arsenide, and quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, K.

    1988-06-01

    For a determination of the dielectric constants epsilon of semiconductors, a microwave transmission interference method has been applied. For the first time, a calculation is presented which yields the full interference spectrum, not only the position of the extremal points. A comparison of the theoretical and experimental spectra results in a higher precision than previously obtained. A metal evaporation of the sample faces which are in contact with the waveguide walls turns out to be very important. Relative dielectric constants of 11.6 for silicon, 12.8 for gallium arsenide, and 4.6 for crystalline quartz, all +- 0.05, have been obtained.

  14. Visible light metasurfaces based on gallium nitride high contrast gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenhai; He, Shumin; Liu, Qifa; Wang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    We propose visible-light metasurfaces (VLMs) capable of serving as lens and beam deflecting element based on gallium nitride (GaN) high contrast gratings (HCGs). By precisely manipulating the wavefront of the transmitted light, we theoretically demonstrate an HCG focusing lens with transmissivity of 86.3%, and a VLM with beam deflection angle of 6.09° and transmissivity as high as 91.4%. The proposed all-dielectric metasurfaces are promising for GaN-based visible light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which would be robust and versatile for controlling the output light propagation and polarization, as well as enhancing the extraction efficiency of the LEDs.

  15. Ultrafast Electronic Dynamics in Solid and Liquid Gallium Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisoli, M.; Stagira, S.; de Silvestri, S.; Stella, A.; Tognini, P.; Cheyssac, P.; Kofman, R.

    1997-05-01

    The electron thermalization process both in solid and liquid metallic gallium nanoparticles with radii in the range 50-90 Å is investigated by femtosecond pump-probe measurements. The results show that the temporal behavior of the electron energy relaxation is similar in both phases, with a time constant varying from ~0.6 to ~1.6 ps by increasing the nanoparticle size. We interpret the experimental data in terms of a size-dependent electron-surface interaction model and show the importance of the energy exchange with surface phonons in the electronic thermalization.

  16. Electronic structure and properties of layered gallium telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, U. Sandhya; Gupta, Uttam; Narang, Deepa S.; Late, Dattatray J.; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2016-05-01

    Layer-dependent electronic structure and properties of gallium monochalcogenides, GaX where X = S, Se, Te, have been investigated using first-principles calculations based on various functionals, with a motivation to assess their use in photocatalytic water splitting. Since hydrogen evolution by water splitting using visible light provides a promising way for solar energy conversion, both theoretical and experimental studies have been carried out on the photochemical hydrogen evolution by GaTe. We also present the Raman spectra of GaTe examined by both theory and experiment.

  17. A gallium phosphide high-temperature bipolar junction transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zipperian, T. E.; Dawson, L. R.; Chaffin, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported on the development of a high temperature (350 C) gallium phosphide bipolar junction transistor (BJT) for geothermal and other energy applications. This four-layer p(+)n(-)pp(+) structure was formed by liquid phase epitaxy using a supercooling technique to insure uniform nucleation of the thin layers. Magnesium was used as the p-type dopant to avoid excessive out-diffusion into the lightly doped base. By appropriate choice of electrodes, the device may also be driven as an n-channel junction field-effect transistor. The initial design suffers from a series resistance problem which limits the transistor's usefulness at high temperatures.

  18. Gallium as a potential candidate for treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Verron, E; Bouler, J M; Scimeca, J C

    2012-10-01

    Gallium (Ga) is a semi-metallic element that displays antitumor, antiresorptive, anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. Among all these properties, antitumor properties were the most extensively applied and have shown efficacy in treatment of Paget's disease, myeloma and hypercalcemia in cases of malignancy. By contrast, no clinical trials have been conducted in prevention and/or treatment of osteoporosis. In this article I focus on Ga effects on bone tissue and cells, as well as on molecular mechanisms governing Ga internalization into cells. Eventually, the potential of Ga as an antiosteoporotic agent is discussed.

  19. Anomalous tensoelectric effects in gallium arsenide tunnel diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseeva, Z.M.; Vyatkin, A.P.; Krivorotov, N.P.; Shchegol', A.A.

    1988-02-01

    Anomalous tensoelectric phenomena induced in a tunnel p-n junction by a concentrated load and by hydrostatic compression were studied. The anomalous tensoelectric effects are caused by the action of concentrators of mechanical stresses in the vicinity of the p-n junction, giving rise to local microplastic strain. Under the conditions of hydrostatic compression prolate inclusions approx.100-200 A long play the role of concentrators. Analysis of irreversible changes in the current-voltage characteristics of tunnel p-n junctions made it possible to separate the energy levels of the defects produced with plastic strain of gallium arsenide.

  20. Amination of aryl halides with aqueous ammonia catalyzed by green recyclable poly(4-vinylpyridine)-supported copper iodide nanoparticles catalyst.

    PubMed

    Albadi, Jalal; Shiran, Jafar Abbasi; Mansournezhad, Azam

    2014-01-01

    In this research efficient procedure for the amination of aryl halides with aqueous ammonia in the presence of poly(4-vinylpyridine)-supported copper iodide nanoparticles catalyst is reported. A wide range of aryl halides including aryl iodides and aryl bromides are converted into the corresponding aniline derivatives. The experimental procedure with poly(4-vinylpyridine)-supported copper iodide nanoparticles catalyst is quite straightforward and it is recycled up to 3 consecutive runs by simple filtration. PMID:25551733

  1. Byproduct Metal Availability Constrained by Dynamics of Carrier Metal Cycle: The Gallium-Aluminum Example.

    PubMed

    Løvik, Amund N; Restrepo, Eliette; Müller, Daniel B

    2016-08-16

    Future availability of byproduct metals is not limited by geological stocks, but by the rate of primary production of their carrier metals, which in turn depends on the development of their in-use stocks, the product lifetimes, and the recycling rates. This linkage, while recognized conceptually in past studies, has not been adequately taken into account in resource availability estimates. Here, we determine the global supply potential for gallium up to 2050 based on scenarios for the global aluminum cycle, and compare it with scenarios for gallium demand derived from a dynamic model of the gallium cycle. We found that the gallium supply potential is heavily influenced by the development of the in-use stocks and recycling rates of aluminum. With current applications, a shortage of gallium is unlikely by 2050. However, the gallium industry may need to introduce ambitious recycling- and material efficiency strategies to meet its demand. If in-use stocks of aluminum saturate or decline, a shift to other gallium sources such as zinc or coal fly ash may be required. PMID:27400378

  2. Gallium-containing phospho-silicate glasses: synthesis and in vitro bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Mirco; Lusvardi, Gigliola; Malavasi, Gianluca; Menabue, Ledi

    2012-08-01

    A series of Ga-containing phospho-silicate glasses based on Bioglass 45S5, having molar formula 46.2SiO2·24.3Na2O·26.9CaO·2.6P2O5·xGa2O3 (x=1.0, 1.6, 3.5), were prepared by fusion method. The reference Bioglass 45S5 without gallium was also prepared. The synthesized glasses were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 30 days in order to observe ion release and hydroxyapatite (HA) formation. All Ga-containing glasses maintain the ability of HA formation as indicated by main X-ray diffractometric peaks and/or electronic scanning microscopy results. HA layer was formed after 1 day of SBF soaking in 45S5 glass containing up to 1.6% Ga2O3 content. Moreover, gallium released by the glasses was found to be partially precipitated on the glass surface as gallium phosphate. Further increase in gallium content reduced the ion release in SBF. The maximum of Ga(3+) concentration measured in solution is ~6 ppm determined for 3.5% Ga2O3 content. This amount is about half of the toxic level (14 ppm) of gallium and the glasses release gallium till 30 days of immersion in SBF. Considering the above results, the studied materials can be proposed as bioactive glasses with additional antimicrobial effect of gallium having no toxic outcome.

  3. Study on natural convection capability of liquid gallium for passive decay heat removal system (PDHRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.; Ha, K. S.; Lee, S. W.; Park, S. D.; Kim, S. M.; Seo, H.; Kim, J. H.; Bang, I. C.

    2012-07-01

    The safety issues of the SFRs are important due to the fact that it uses sodium as a nuclear coolant, reacting vigorously with water and air. For that reason, there are efforts to seek for alternative candidates of liquid metal coolants having excellent heat transfer property and to adopt improved safety features to the SFR concepts. This study considers gallium as alternative liquid metal coolant applicable to safety features in terms of chemical activity issue of the sodium and aims to experimentally investigate the natural convection capability of gallium as a feasibility study for the development of gallium-based passive safety features in SFRs. In this paper, the design and construction of the liquid gallium natural convection loop were carried out. The experimental results of heat transfer coefficient of liquid gallium resulting in heat removal {approx}2.53 kW were compared with existing correlations and they were much lower than the correlations. To comparison of the experimental data with computer code analysis, gallium property code was developed for employing MARS-LMR (Korea version of RELAP) based on liquid gallium as working fluid. (authors)

  4. Byproduct Metal Availability Constrained by Dynamics of Carrier Metal Cycle: The Gallium-Aluminum Example.

    PubMed

    Løvik, Amund N; Restrepo, Eliette; Müller, Daniel B

    2016-08-16

    Future availability of byproduct metals is not limited by geological stocks, but by the rate of primary production of their carrier metals, which in turn depends on the development of their in-use stocks, the product lifetimes, and the recycling rates. This linkage, while recognized conceptually in past studies, has not been adequately taken into account in resource availability estimates. Here, we determine the global supply potential for gallium up to 2050 based on scenarios for the global aluminum cycle, and compare it with scenarios for gallium demand derived from a dynamic model of the gallium cycle. We found that the gallium supply potential is heavily influenced by the development of the in-use stocks and recycling rates of aluminum. With current applications, a shortage of gallium is unlikely by 2050. However, the gallium industry may need to introduce ambitious recycling- and material efficiency strategies to meet its demand. If in-use stocks of aluminum saturate or decline, a shift to other gallium sources such as zinc or coal fly ash may be required.

  5. [Determination of iodide, thiocyanate and perchlorate ions in environmental water by two-dimensional ion chromatography].

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Wang, Haibo; Shi, Yali

    2013-03-01

    A procedure for the determination of iodide, thiocyanate and perchlorate ions in environmental water by two-dimensional ion chromatography has been developed. At first the iodide, thiocyanate and perchlorate ions were separated from interfering ions by a column (IonPac AS16, 250 mm x 4 mm). The iodide ion, thiocyanate and perchlorate ions were then enriched with an enrichment column (MAC-200, 80 mm x 0.75 mm). In the 2nd-dimensional chromatography, iodide thiocyanate and perchlorate ions were separated and quantified by a capillary column (IonPac AS20 Capillary, 250 mm x 0.4 mm). The linear ranges were 0.05 -100 pg/L with correlation coefficients of 0. 999 9, and the detection limits were 0. 02 - 0.05 micro gg/L. The spiked recoveries of iodide, thiocyanate and perchlorate ions were in the range of 85.1% to 100.1%. The relative standard deviations of the recoveries were 1.7% to 4.9%.

  6. The sodium iodide symporter (NIS): regulation and approaches to targeting for cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kogai, Takahiko; Brent, Gregory A

    2012-09-01

    Expression of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) is required for efficient iodide uptake in thyroid and lactating breast. Since most differentiated thyroid cancer expresses NIS, β-emitting radioactive iodide is routinely utilized to target remnant thyroid cancer and metastasis after total thyroidectomy. Stimulation of NIS expression by high levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone is necessary to achieve radioiodide uptake into thyroid cancer that is sufficient for therapy. The majority of breast cancer also expresses NIS, but at a low level insufficient for radioiodine therapy. Retinoic acid is a potent NIS inducer in some breast cancer cells. NIS is also modestly expressed in some non-thyroidal tissues, including salivary glands, lacrimal glands and stomach. Selective induction of iodide uptake is required to target tumors with radioiodide. Iodide uptake in mammalian cells is dependent on the level of NIS gene expression, but also successful translocation of NIS to the cell membrane and correct insertion. The regulatory mechanisms of NIS expression and membrane insertion are regulated by signal transduction pathways that differ by tissue. Differential regulation of NIS confers selective induction of functional NIS in thyroid cancer cells, as well as some breast cancer cells, leading to more efficient radioiodide therapy for thyroid cancer and a new strategy for breast cancer therapy. The potential for systemic radioiodide treatment of a range of other cancers, that do not express endogenous NIS, has been demonstrated in models with tumor-selective introduction of exogenous NIS.

  7. One-Step Deposition of Photovoltaic Layers Using Iodide Terminated PbS Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungwoo; Noh, Jaehong; Choi, Hyekyoung; Ha, Heonseok; Song, Jung Hoon; Shim, Hyung Cheoul; Jang, Jihoon; Beard, Matthew C; Jeong, Sohee

    2014-11-20

    We present a one-step layer deposition procedure employing ammonium iodide (NH4I) to achieve photovoltaic quality PbS quantum dot (QD) layers. Ammonium iodide is used to replace the long alkyl organic native ligands binding to the QD surface resulting in iodide terminated QDs that are stabilized in polar solvents such as N,N-dimethylformamide without particle aggregation. We extensively characterized the iodide terminated PbS QD via UV-vis absorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), FT-IR transmission spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Finally, we fabricated PbS QD photovoltaic cells that employ the iodide terminated PbS QDs. The resulting QD-PV devices achieved a best power conversion efficiency of 2.36% under ambient conditions that is limited by the layer thickness. The PV characteristics compare favorably to similar devices that were prepared using the standard layer-by-layer ethandithiol (EDT) treatment that had a similar layer thickness.

  8. Catalytic spectrophotometric determination of iodide in pharmaceutical preparations and edible salt.

    PubMed

    El-Ries, M A; Khaled, Elmorsy; Zidane, F I; Ibrahim, S A; Abd-Elmonem, M S

    2012-02-01

    The catalytic effect of iodide on the oxidation of four dyes: viz. variamine blue (VB), methylene blue (MB), rhodamine B (RB), and malachite green (MG) with different oxidizing agents was investigated for the kinetic spectrophotometric determination of iodide. The above catalyzed reactions were monitored spectrophotometrically by following the change in dye absorbances at 544, 558, 660, or 617 nm for the VB, RB, MB, or MG catalyzed reactions, respectively. Under optimum conditions, iodide can be determined within the concentration levels 0.064-1.27 µg mL(-1) for VB method, 3.20-9.54 µg mL(-1) for RB method, 5.00-19.00 µg mL(-1) for the MB method, and 6.4-19.0 µg mL(-1) for the MG one, with detection limit reaching 0.004 µg mL(-1) iodide. The reported methods were highly sensitive, selective, and free from most interference. Applying the proposed procedures, trace amounts of iodide in pharmaceutical and edible salt samples were successfully determined without separation or pretreatment steps.

  9. Trapping radiodine, in the form of methyl iodide, on nuclear carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Nacapricha, D.; Taylor, C.

    1996-12-31

    Studies have been performed on potassium-iodide-impregnated charcoals of the type used in the nuclear industry for trapping radioiodine released during nuclear fission. The effects of various parameters on the trapping efficiency of methyl iodide have been investigated. A variation in particle size within a bulk charcoal caused poor precision in K value measurements because of differences in surface area, pore volume, and bed density, leading to differences in the deposition of the impregnant. Precision is improved by sieving the charcoal to a narrower size because smaller particles have a higher porosity. This finding is supported by surface area and pore measurements. Two methods of impregnation are compared by measuring K values and the deposition of potassium iodide. Charcoal impregnated by rotary evaporation exhibits both higher K values and higher potassium iodide contents than sprayed charcoal. Two designs of spraying drum are compared: a drum with helical vanes allows more efficient deposition and more uniform distribution of impregnant than a drum with axial vanes. A decrease in the K value with increasing humidity correlates with the available surface area. A similar correlation exists between water content and available pore volume. Aging of potassium-iodide-impregnated charcoal, caused by the formation of oxygen complexes on the surface, is associated with significant falls in K value. K values of charcoals also can be restored to at least their original values by heat treatment in the absence of air. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Energy Loss and Stopping Cross Section Factors for Alphas in Lead Iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magness, B.

    2005-03-01

    Lead Iodide is a candidate for use as a room temperature gamma ray sensitive semiconductor similar to mercuric iodide. We report here on values for the energy loss factor and the stopping cross section factor in lead iodide thin films. Vapor diffused purified lead iodide was used to make thick film and thin film samples evaporated on amorphic glass substrates. Thin films were used to take advantage of the surface energy approximation. In addition, separate lead and iodide backscattering peaks from the films are well resolved. Film thickness ranged from 50nm to 1000nm as determined by optical interference methods. The high energy singly ionized helium beam was provided by the CSULA 4 MeV Van de Graff accelerator. Rutherford backscattering was detected at 170^o. Both the input and output energy losses were calculated from the FWHM of the corresponding peaks. The typical energy loss factor was found to be 20.2 eV/angstrom with a 3% uncertainty for a 2.4 MeV input beam. As expected, this value is about one third that of the pure elements.

  11. Gallium nitride microcavities formed by photoenhanced wet oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, L.-H.; Lu, C.-Y.; Wu, W.-H.; Wang, S.-L.

    2005-10-17

    We report the formation of gallium nitride (GaN) microcavities by manipulating a photoenhanced oxidation rate difference between the polar and nonpolar crystallographic planes of GaN. When immersed in a buffered acetic (CH{sub 3}COOH) electrolyte of pH{approx}6.2 at room temperature, it is shown that the photo-oxidation can proceed at a rate that is one order of magnitude slower on the nonpolar plane of {l_brace}1100{r_brace}{sub GaN} than on the polar plane of {l_brace}0001{r_brace}{sub GaN} due to the reduced surface field action. Gallium nitride microcavities bounded by optically smooth {l_brace}1100{r_brace} and {l_brace}1103{r_brace} facets can thus be preferentially formed on the c-plane sapphire substrate after dissolving the oxide layer. The optical properties of these GaN hexagonal cavities reveal characteristic peaks of whispering gallery modes in resonance with the GaN band edge emission spectrum. A typical cavity Q factor of 10{sup 3} is observed in these GaN microcavities due to a reduced optical scattering loss in the wet chemical reaction process.

  12. Low temperature solid-state synthesis of nanocrystalline gallium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Liangbiao; Shi, Liang; Li, Qianwen; Si, Lulu; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► GaN nanocrystalline was prepared via a solid-state reacion at relatively low temperature. ► The sizes and crystallinities of the GaN samples obtained at the different temperatures are investigated. ► The GaN sample has oxidation resistance and good thermal stability below 1000 °C. -- Abstract: Nanocrystalline gallium nitride was synthesized by a solid-state reaction of metallic magnesium powder, gallium sesquioxide and sodium amide in a stainless steel autoclave at a relatively low temperature (400–550 °C). The structures and morphologies of the obtained products were derived from X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD patterns indicated that the products were hexagonal GaN (JCPDS card no. 76-0703). The influence of reaction temperature on size of the products was studied by XRD and TEM. Furthermore, the thermal stability and oxidation resistance of the nanocrystalline GaN were also investigated. It had good thermal stability and oxidation resistance below 800 °C in air.

  13. Gallium-67 citrate imaging in underground coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Kanner, R.E.; Barkman, H.W. Jr.; Rom, W.N.; Taylor, A.T. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-two underground coal workers with 27 or more years of coal dust exposure were studied with gallium-67 citrate (Ga-67) imaging. Radiographic evidence of coal workers indicates that pneumoconiosis (CWP) was present in 12 subjects. The Ga-67 scan was abnormal in 11 of 12 with, and 9 of 10 without, CWP. The Ga-67 uptake index was significantly correlated with total dust exposure (p less than 0.01) and approached significant correlation with the radiographic profusion of the nodules (0.10 greater than p greater than 0.05). There was no correlation between Ga-67 uptake and spirometric function, which was normal in this group of patients; furthermore, increased lung uptake of gallium did not indicate a poor prognosis in subjects no longer exposed to coal dust. While coal dust exposure may be associated with positive Ga-67 lung scan in coal miners with many years of coal dust exposure, the scan provided no information not already available from a careful exposure history and a chest radiograph. Since Ga-67 scanning is a relatively expensive procedure the authors would recommend that its use in subjects with asymptomatic CWP be limited to an investigative role and not be made part of a routine evaluation.

  14. Gold and Gallium Nanoparticle Growth on Silicon (100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Rees; Brown, Hunter L.; Ames, Sadie; Rasmussen, J. Leland; Tobler, Samuel

    2014-03-01

    Nanoparticles are used for various applications in today's research. Some researcher's interests involve using the nanoparticles to grow silicon nanowires on a silicon substrate. Before growing nanowires can be accomplished a study must be made of the formation of nanoparticles. Most often the metal used to make the nanoparticles is gold. In this study both gold and gallium were used to make the nanoparticles, by thermal evaporation. The gold and gallium nanoparticles were grown on silicon (100). Between one to three monolayers of material was added to the substrate, with the particle sizes ranging from 0.5 microns to 3 microns in diameter. Densities of nanoparticles varied based on the time of growth and on the intensity of the source. The variable sizes were seen with sample temperatures between 700 C and 900 C measured using a disappearing filament optical pyrometer. The growth process occurred at pressures below 3e-7 Torr. This presentation will summarize the growth process and show the similarities and differences between the two metals.

  15. Manganese Atom Ordered Monolayer on Wurtzite Gallium Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinchore, Abhijit; Wang, Kangkang; Lin, Wenzhi; Pak, Jeongihm; Liu, Yinghao; Smith, Arthur

    2009-03-01

    While transition-metal-doped gallium nitride (GaN) thin films have been explored as potential dilute magnetic semiconductor bulk layers, the structural and magnetic effects of various transition metal adatoms on GaN surfaces are not even well understood. In this work, we investigate the sub-monolayer deposition of manganese (Mn) onto the N-polar wurtzite GaN (000-1) 1x1 surface. The growth is monitored in-situ using reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). A fresh GaN(000-1) 1x1 surface is prepared by rf nitrogen plasma-assisted MBE followed by annealing to remove excess gallium adatoms. The atomically flat GaN surface, held at 200^o C, is then exposed to submonolayer doses of Mn. The deposition rate is maintained at 0.007 ML per second, and a 3x pattern develops along [10-10]; whereas, only 1x is seen along [11-20]. Analysis of the RHEED pattern and subsequent modeling indicates a 3 x3 R 30^o structure consisting of 2/3 ML Mn atoms in a row-like arrangement having spacing 3a/2 along rows and 3a/2 between rows. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy studies are currently underway to explore this surface further. This work is supported by DOE (Grant No.DE-FG02-06ER46317) and NSF (Grant No. 0730257).

  16. Experimental investigation of electron transport properties of gallium nitride nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motayed, Abhishek; Davydov, Albert V.; Mohammad, S. N.; Melngailis, John

    2008-07-01

    We report transport properties of gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires grown using direct reaction of ammonia and gallium vapor. Reliable devices, such as four-terminal resistivity measuring structures and field-effect transistors, were realized by dielectrophoretically aligning the nanowires on an oxidized silicon substrate and subsequently applying standard microfabrication techniques. Room-temperature resistivity in the range of (1.0-6.2)×10-2 Ω cm was obtained for the nanowires with diameters ranging from 200 to 90 nm. Temperature-dependent resistivity and mobility measurements indicated the possible sources for the n-type conductivity and high background charge carrier concentration in these nanowires. Specific contact resistance in the range of 5.0×10-5 Ω cm2 was extracted for Ti/Al/Ti/Au metal contacts to GaN nanowires. Significant reduction in the activation energy of the dopants at low temperatures (<200 K) was observed in the temperature-dependent resistivity measurement of these nanowires, which is linked to the onset of degeneracy. Temperature-dependent field-effect mobility measurements indicated that the ionized impurity scattering is the dominant mechanism in these nanowires at all temperatures.

  17. High-surface Thermally Stable Mesoporous Gallium Phosphates Constituted by Nanoparticles as Primary Building Blocks

    SciTech Connect

    V Parvulescu; V Parvulescu; D Ciuparu; C Hardacre; H Garcia

    2011-12-31

    In constant, search for micro/mesoporous materials, gallium phosphates, have attracted continued interest due to the large pore size reported for some of these solids in comparison with analogous aluminum phosphates. However up to now, the porosity of gallium phosphates collapsed upon template removal or exposure to the ambient moisture. In the present work, we describe high-surface thermally stable mesoporous gallium phosphates synthesized from gallium propoxide and PCl{sub 3} and different templating agents such as amines (dipropylamine, piperidine and aminopiperidine) and quaternary ammonium salts (C{sub 16}H{sub 33}(CH{sub 3})3NBr and C{sub 16}PyCl). These highly reactive precursors have so far not been used as gallium and phosphate sources for the synthesis of gallophosphates. Conceptually, our present synthetic procedure is based on the fast formation of gallium phosphate nanoparticles via the reaction of gallium propoxide with PCl{sub 3} and subsequent construction of the porous material with nanoparticles as building blocks. The organization of the gallophosphate nanoparticles in stable porous structures is effected by the templates. Different experimental procedures varying the molar composition of the sol-gel, pH and the pretreatment of gallium precursor were assayed, most of them leading to satisfactory materials in terms of thermal stability and porosity. In this way, a series of gallium phosphates with surface are above 200 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, and narrow pore size from 3 to 6 nm and remarkable thermal stability (up to 550 C) have been prepared. In some cases, the structure tends to show some periodicity and regularity as determined by XRD. The remarkable stability has allowed us to test the catalytic activity of gallophosphates for the aerobic oxidation of alkylaromatics with notable good results. Our report reopens the interest for gallophosphates in heterogeneous catalysis.

  18. A hypothesis for anti-nanobacteria effects of gallium with observations from treating kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Eby, George A

    2008-10-01

    Nanobacteria, 100-fold smaller than common bacteria, have been purported to exist in urine, and by precipitating calcium and other minerals into carbonate apatite around themselves, induce the formation of surrounding kidney stones. Nanobacteria-like structures have also been shown in blood, within arteries, aortic aneurysms, and cardiac valves. Gallium has antibiotic properties to iron-dependent bacteria and has potent anti-inflammatory, anticancer and anti-hypercalcemic properties, and it readily reverses osteoporosis. It was hypothesized that gallium nitrate might have benefit in treating kidney stones. Gallium nitrate (120mg gallium) was mixed with water making two liters of a gallium mineral water drink to treat chronic, treatment-resistant kidney stone pain and urinary tract bleeding in a 110 pound woman. On the third day of gallium mineral water treatment, the urine appeared snow white, thick (rope-like) and suggestive of a calcific crystalline nature. After release of the white urine, the urine returned to normal in color, viscosity and pH, kidney pain was no longer present, and there was no further evidence of blood in the urine. There were no treatment side effects or sequela. For a one year observation period thereafter, no kidney stones, white urine, kidney or urinary tract pain or blood in the urine was noted. The hypothetical susceptibility of nanobacteria to gallium treatment also suggests application to atherosclerosis and other diseases. Although some support for gallium in treating kidney stones is presented, this hypothesis is built upon another hypothesis, is extremely speculative, and alternative explanations for the white urine exist. Further research into gallium's effects on kidney disease and other nanobacteria-induced diseases such as cardiovascular diseases is suggested. PMID:18579317

  19. The contribution of oceanic methyl iodide to stratospheric iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegtmeier, S.; Krüger, K.; Quack, B.; Atlas, E.; Blake, D. R.; Boenisch, H.; Engel, A.; Hepach, H.; Hossaini, R.; Navarro, M. A.; Raimund, S.; Sala, S.; Shi, Q.; Ziska, F.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the contribution of oceanic methyl iodide (CH3I) to the stratospheric iodine budget. Based on CH3I measurements from three tropical ship campaigns and the Lagrangian transport model FLEXPART, we provide a detailed analysis of CH3I transport from the ocean surface to the cold point in the upper tropical tropopause layer (TTL). While average oceanic emissions differ by less than 50% from campaign to campaign, the measurements show much stronger variations within each campaign. A positive correlation between the oceanic CH3I emissions and the efficiency of CH3I troposphere-stratosphere transport has been identified for some cruise sections. The mechanism of strong horizontal surface winds triggering large emissions on the one hand and being associated with tropical convective systems, such as developing typhoons, on the other hand, could explain the identified correlations. As a result of the simultaneous occurrence of large CH3I emissions and strong vertical uplift, localized maximum mixing ratios of 0.6 ppt CH3I at the cold point have been determined for observed peak emissions during the SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere)-Sonne research vessel campaign in the coastal western Pacific. The other two campaigns give considerably smaller maxima of 0.1 ppt CH3I in the open western Pacific and 0.03 ppt in the coastal eastern Atlantic. In order to assess the representativeness of the large local mixing ratios, we use climatological emission scenarios to derive global upper air estimates of CH3I abundances. The model results are compared with available upper air measurements, including data from the recent ATTREX and HIPPO2 aircraft campaigns. In the eastern Pacific region, the location of the available measurement campaigns in the upper TTL, the comparisons give a good agreement, indicating that around 0.01 to 0.02 ppt of CH3I enter the stratosphere. However, other tropical regions that are subject to stronger convective

  20. The contribution of oceanic methyl iodide to stratospheric iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegtmeier, S.; Krüger, K.; Quack, B.; Atlas, E.; Blake, D. R.; Boenisch, H.; Engel, A.; Hepach, H.; Hossaini, R.; Navarro, M. A.; Raimund, S.; Sala, S.; Shi, Q.; Ziska, F.

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the contribution of oceanic methyl iodide (CH3I) to the stratospheric iodine budget. Based on CH3I measurements during three tropical ship campaigns and the Lagrangian transport model FLEXPART we provide a detailed analysis of CH3I transport from the ocean surface to the cold point in the upper tropical tropopause layer (TTL). While average oceanic emissions differ by less than 50% from campaign to campaign, the measurements show much stronger variations within each campaign. A positive correlation between the oceanic CH3I emissions and the efficiency of CH3I troposphere-stratosphere transport has been identified for some cruise sections. The mechanism of strong horizontal surface winds triggering large emissions on the one hand and being associated with tropical convective systems, such as developing typhoons, on the other hand, could explain the identified correlations. As a result of the simultaneous occurrence of large CH3I emissions and strong vertical uplift, localized maximum mixing ratios of 0.6 ppt CH3I at the cold point have been determined for observed peak emissions during the SHIVA-Sonne campaign in the coastal West Pacific. The other two campaigns give considerable smaller maxima of 0.1 ppt CH3I for the TransBrom campaign in the open West Pacific and 0.03 ppt for emissions from the coastal East Atlantic during the DRIVE campaign. In order to assess the representativeness of the large local mixing ratios we use climatological emission scenarios to derive global upper air estimates of CH3I abundances. The model results are compared to available upper air measurements including data from the recent ATTREX and HIPPO2 aircraft campaigns. In the East Pacific region, the location of the available measurement campaigns in the upper TTL, the comparisons give a good agreement indicating that around 0.01 to 0.02 ppt of CH3I enter the stratosphere. However, other tropical regions, which are subject to stronger convective activity show larger CH3I

  1. Electron transport in zinc-blende wurtzite biphasic gallium nitride nanowires and GaNFETs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Ayres, Virginia M.; Stallcup, Richard E.; Hartman, Alan; Tupta, Mary Ann; Baczewski, Andrew David; Crimp, Martin A.; Halpern, Joshua B.; He, Maoqi; Shaw, Harry C.

    2007-10-19

    Two-point and four-point probe electrical measurements of a biphasic gallium nitride nanowire and current–voltage characteristics of a gallium nitride nanowire based field effect transistor are reported. The biphasic gallium nitride nanowires have a crystalline homostructure consisting of wurtzite and zinc-blende phases that grow simultaneously in the longitudinal direction. There is a sharp transition of one to a few atomic layers between each phase. Here, all measurements showed high current densities. Evidence of single-phase current transport in the biphasic nanowire structure is discussed.

  2. Lysosomal accumulation of gallium-67 in Morris hepatoma-7316A and Shionogi mammary carcinoma-115.

    PubMed

    Takeda, S; Okuyama, S; Takusagawa, K; Matsuzawa, T

    1978-04-01

    Intracellular localization of gallium-67 was investigated in Morris hepatoma-7316A and Shionogi mammary carcinoma-115 cells by the cell fractionation method 48 hr after an intraperitoneal injection of the nuclide. When lysosomes were purified from both tumors by discontinuous sucrose density gradient centrifugation, they had a strikingly high relative specific activity of the nuclide. From these results it was confirmed that gallium-67 is concentrated most specifically in the lysosomes of both tumor cells, which consist chiefly of phagolysosomes and can engulf only limited amount of foreign materials such as Triton and gallium-67. PMID:210077

  3. Wurtzite Gallium Nitride as a scintillator detector for alpha particles (a Geant4 simulation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, A.; Sheidaiy, M.

    2015-05-01

    Gallium Nitride has become a very popular material in electronics and optoelectronics. Because of its interesting properties, it is suitable for a large range of applications. This material also shows very good scintillation properties that make it a possible candidate for use as a charged particles scintillator detector. In this work, we simulated the scintillation and optical properties of the gallium nitride in the presence of alpha particles using Geant4. The results show that gallium nitride can be an appropriate choice for this purpose.

  4. Biochemical mechanism of gallium on prevention of fatal cage-layer osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunxiang; Jiang, Zheng; Liu, Xinghan

    2010-05-01

    The possible biochemical mechanism of gallium was studied in this paper. One-day-old hens were fed to up to 68 weeks on a control diet and diets containing gallium. Serum calcium and phosphorus, serum alkaline phosphatase, tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), serum osteocalcin, homocysteine, C-terminal crosslinked telopeptides of collagen type I, and bone mineral content were measured, respectively. The beneficial effects of gallium supplementation on improvement of cage layer osteoporosis were attributable mainly to decrease TRAP activity, C-terminal crosslinked telopeptides of collagen type I level, plasma calcium and phosphate concentrations, and increase the mineral content in the bones and osteocalcin level in plasma. PMID:19639269

  5. A theoretical study on the reaction of ozone with aqueous iodide.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Óscar; Baeza-Romero, M Teresa; Sanz, Mikel; Pacios, Luis F

    2016-03-21

    Atmospheric iodine chemistry plays a key role in tropospheric ozone catalytic destruction, new particle formation, and as one of the possible sinks of gaseous polar elemental mercury. Moreover, it has been recently proposed that reaction of ozone with iodide on the sea surface could be the major contributor to the chemical loss of atmospheric ozone. However, the mechanism of the reaction between aqueous iodide and ozone is not well known. The aim of this paper is to improve the understanding of such a mechanism. In this paper, an ab initio study of the reaction of aqueous iodide and ozone is presented, evaluating thermodynamic data of the different reactions proposed in previous experimental studies. In addition, the structures, energetics and possible evolution of the key IOOO(-) intermediate are discussed for the first time.

  6. Fundamental studies of methyl iodide adsorption in DABCO impregnated activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Herdes, Carmelo; Prosenjak, Claudia; Román, Silvia; Müller, Erich A

    2013-06-11

    Methyl iodide capture from a water vapor stream using 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO)-impregnated activated carbons is, for the first time, fundamentally described here on the atomic level by means of both molecular dynamics and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. A molecular dynamics annealing strategy was adopted to mimic the DABCO experimental impregnation procedure in a selected slitlike carbon pore. Predictions, restricted to the micropore region, are made about the adsorption isotherms of methyl iodide, water, and nitrogen on both impregnated and bare activated carbon models. Experimental and simulated nitrogen adsorption isotherms are compared for the validation of the impregnation strategy. Selectivity analyses of the preferential adsorption toward methyl iodide over water are also reported. These simulated adsorption isotherms sum up to previous experimental studies to provide an enhanced picture for this adsorption system of widespread use at nuclear plant HVAC facilities for the capture of radioactive iodine compounds. PMID:23679202

  7. Simultaneous detection of iodine and iodide on boron doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Fierro, Stéphane; Comninellis, Christos; Einaga, Yasuaki

    2013-01-15

    Individual and simultaneous electrochemical detection of iodide and iodine has been performed via cyclic voltammetry on boron doped diamond (BDD) electrodes in a 1M NaClO(4) (pH 8) solution, representative of typical environmental water conditions. It is feasible to compute accurate calibration curve for both compounds using cyclic voltammetry measurements by determining the peak current intensities as a function of the concentration. A lower detection limit of about 20 μM was obtained for iodide and 10 μM for iodine. Based on the comparison between the peak current intensities reported during the oxidation of KI, it is probable that iodide (I(-)) is first oxidized in a single step to yield iodine (I(2)). The latter is further oxidized to obtain IO(3)(-). This technique, however, did not allow for a reasonably accurate detection of iodate (IO(3)(-)) on a BDD electrode.

  8. A theoretical study on the reaction of ozone with aqueous iodide.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Óscar; Baeza-Romero, M Teresa; Sanz, Mikel; Pacios, Luis F

    2016-03-21

    Atmospheric iodine chemistry plays a key role in tropospheric ozone catalytic destruction, new particle formation, and as one of the possible sinks of gaseous polar elemental mercury. Moreover, it has been recently proposed that reaction of ozone with iodide on the sea surface could be the major contributor to the chemical loss of atmospheric ozone. However, the mechanism of the reaction between aqueous iodide and ozone is not well known. The aim of this paper is to improve the understanding of such a mechanism. In this paper, an ab initio study of the reaction of aqueous iodide and ozone is presented, evaluating thermodynamic data of the different reactions proposed in previous experimental studies. In addition, the structures, energetics and possible evolution of the key IOOO(-) intermediate are discussed for the first time. PMID:26906609

  9. A new route towards the synthesis of multi-tritiomethyl iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Saljoughian, M.; Morimoto, H.; Rapoport, H.

    1988-06-01

    A new procedure for the synthesis of multi-tritiated methyl iodide is reported. In this procedure trichloromethylphenyl sulfide was prepared and the trichloromethyl group was hydrogenolysed in the presence of 10% Pd/C and an organic base with deuterium gas to give the corresponding deuterated sulfide as the precursor. Upon heating a mixture of the latter with excess of benzyl iodide in a special apparatus benzylphenyl sulfide remained as a solid by-product and liberated deuteriated methyl iodide was directly reacted with several simple amines to be N-deuteriomethylated. This new synthetic method can be extended to the tritiomethyl labeling of a variety of organic compounds having a methyl group attached to a heteroatom such as N, O and S. 12 refs.

  10. Salty glycerol versus salty water surface organization: bromide and iodide surface propensities.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zishuai; Hua, Wei; Verreault, Dominique; Allen, Heather C

    2013-07-25

    Salty NaBr and NaI glycerol solution interfaces are examined in the OH stretching region using broadband vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. Raman and infrared (IR) spectroscopy are used to further understand the VSFG spectroscopic signature. The VSFG spectra of salty glycerol solutions reveal that bromide and iodide anions perturb the interfacial glycerol organization in a manner similar as that found in aqueous halide salt solutions, thus confirming the presence of bromide and iodide anions at the glycerol surface. Surface tension measurements are consistent with the surface propensity suggested by the VSFG data and also show that the surface excess increases with increasing salt concentration, similar to that of water. In addition, iodide is shown to have more surface prevalence than bromide, as has also been determined from aqueous solutions. These results suggest that glycerol behaves similarly to water with respect to surface activity and solvation of halide anions at its air/liquid interface. PMID:23663033

  11. Photocharging of thin films of silver iodide and its relevance to the Daguerre photographic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, I.; Thackray, M.

    1984-12-01

    In the Daguerre photographic process1-3, a polished silver-coated plate is exposed to iodine vapour, thereby forming a very thin film of silver iodide, usually about 30-nm thick4. After exposure, the image is developed by mercury vapour, which condenses preferentially where light has fallen, amalgamating with silver liberated from the silver iodide (and possibly with the substrate). The remaining silver iodide is dissolved with an aqueous photographic fixing solution (sodium thiosulphate). When viewed at most angles, a positive image of the scene is seen as areas of amalagam (diffusely reflecting), which appear white, on areas of polished silver (specularly reflecting), which appear black. The sharpness with which edges were reproduced in several old daguerreotypes led us to suspect that electrostatic processes might be involved, and we now report two experiments which confirm that.

  12. Synthesis and Decomposition of Zinc Iodide: Model Reactions for Investigating Chemical Change in the Introductory Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demeo, Stephen

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss two colorful reactions not widely used by chemical educators in high schools or college chemistry laboratories: The synthesis of zinc iodide from its elements, zinc and iodine, and the subsequent decomposition of zinc iodide back into its elements. These reactions are important for chemistry teachers to know about because they can be performed by introductory students to understand different aspects of chemical change such as the concepts of reaction, compound, bonding, excess and limiting reactants, an empirical formula, balanced chemical equation, the conservation of matter and energy, the Law of the Conservation of Mass, and the Law of Constant Composition. These concepts, in turn, are important because they are fundamental to chemistry, are widely taught by chemistry teachers, and are deceptively difficult for introductory chemistry students to understand. The synthesis of zinc iodide has many scientific advantages over current syntheses of binary compounds from elements such as the syntheses of copper sulfide and magnesium oxide. For example, zinc iodide can be synthesized to 1% of theoretical mass in less than a half an hour and can be readily analyzed qualitatively as well as quantitatively by two different titrations. As a set of reactions, the synthesis and decomposition of zinc iodide is safe to perform, reliable, inexpensive, and does not pose a threat to the environment. The author has developed a small collection of teacher activities describing the synthesis and decomposition of zinc iodide. The activities are innovative because they contain improvements not found in the existing literature. Appropriate for high school and first year college chemistry teachers, all of the activities contain detailed procedures and discussions as well as safety and disposal requirements.

  13. Multicompartmental model for iodide, thyroxine, and triiodothyronine metabolism in normal and spontaneously hyperthyroid cats

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, M.T.; Broome, M.R.; Turrel, J.M.

    1988-06-01

    A comprehensive multicompartmental kinetic model was developed to account for the distribution and metabolism of simultaneously injected radioactive iodide (iodide*), T3 (T3*), and T4 (T4*) in six normal and seven spontaneously hyperthyroid cats. Data from plasma samples (analyzed by HPLC), urine, feces, and thyroid accumulation were incorporated into the model. The submodels for iodide*, T3*, and T4* all included both a fast and a slow exchange compartment connecting with the plasma compartment. The best-fit iodide* model also included a delay compartment, presumed to be pooling of gastrosalivary secretions. This delay was 62% longer in the hyperthyroid cats than in the euthyroid cats. Unexpectedly, all of the exchange parameters for both T4 and T3 were significantly slowed in hyperthyroidism, possibly because the hyperthyroid cats were older. None of the plasma equivalent volumes of the exchange compartments of iodide*, T3*, or T4* was significantly different in the hyperthyroid cats, although the plasma equivalent volume of the fast T4 exchange compartments were reduced. Secretion of recycled T4* from the thyroid into the plasma T4* compartment was essential to model fit, but its quantity could not be uniquely identified in the absence of multiple thyroid data points. Thyroid secretion of T3* was not detectable. Comparing the fast and slow compartments, there was a shift of T4* deiodination into the fast exchange compartment in hyperthyroidism. Total body mean residence times (MRTs) of iodide* and T3* were not affected by hyperthyroidism, but mean T4* MRT was decreased 23%. Total fractional T4 to T3 conversion was unchanged in hyperthyroidism, although the amount of T3 produced by this route was increased nearly 5-fold because of higher concentrations of donor stable T4.

  14. Synthesis, optical properties and ultrafast electronic relaxation of layered semiconductor nanoparticles: Lead iodide, bismuth iodide, bismuth sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Archita

    The first direct observation of the electronic relaxation dynamics in PbI2, BiI3 and Bi2S3 nanoparticles using femtosecond transient spectroscopy has been reported. The nanoparticles were synthesized in polar and nonpolar solvents, polymer matrices and inverse micelles using colloidal chemistry methods and in thin films. The particle sizes were determined using TEM which provided direct evidence of photodegradation of nanoparticles. The ground state electronic absorption spectra of PbI 2 and BiI3 colloidal nanoparticles show well-resolved peaks in the near UV and visible region. Using a particle in an anisotropic box model the blue shift and increase in absorption of these peaks with simultaneous decrease in particle size have been explained. The UV-visible absorption spectra of Bi2S3 colloidal nanoparticles have very different features compared to those of PbI2 and BiI3 nanoparticles. Similarities and differences found among these nanoparticle systems, PbI 2, BiI3 and Bi2S3, in terms of optical properties and femtosecond electronic relaxation dynamics have been discussed. For PbI2, BiI3 and Bi2S3 with excitation at 390 nm and probing in the near infrared, the electronic relaxation dynamics were directly monitored and found to be sensitive to solvent and insensitive to particle size. For both PbI2 and BiI3 there appeared to be an oscillatory feature at early times with a period changing with solvent but not with particle size. However, for BiI3, the oscillation periods were slightly shorter and overall relaxation was somewhat faster than that in PbI2. The possibilities of the origin of this feature have been addressed. For Bi2S3 system, the early time dynamics did not show any resolvable oscillation. It could be due to the fact that the origin of oscillations in PbI2 and BiI3 nanoparticle system is connected to layered iodide structure and thus is not found in layered sulfide structure or the feature was not observed due to overall fast relaxation in Bi2S3

  15. Modeling of Turing Structures in the Chlorite-Iodide-Malonic Acid-Starch Reaction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengyel, Istivan; Epstein, Irving R.

    1991-02-01

    Recent experiments on the chlorite-iodide-malonic acid-starch reaction in a gel reactor give the first evidence of the existence of the symmetry breaking, reaction-diffusion structures predicted by Turing in 1952. A five-variable model that describes the temporal behavior of the system is reduced to a two-variable model, and its spatial behavior is analyzed. Structures have been found with wavelengths that are in good agreement with those observed experimentally. The gel plays a key role by binding key iodine species, thereby creating the necessary difference in the effective diffusion coefficients of the activator and inhibitor species, iodide and chlorite ions, respectively.

  16. Air-Driven Potassium Iodide-Mediated Oxidative Photocyclization of Stilbene Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Tomoya; Kobayashi, Sayaka; Watanabe, Soichiro

    2016-09-01

    A new method has been developed for the potassium iodide-mediated oxidative photocyclization of stilbene derivatives. Compared with conventional iodine-mediated oxidative photocyclization reactions, this new method requires shorter reaction times and affords cyclized products in yields of 45-97%. This reaction proceeds with a catalytic amount of potassium iodide and works in an air-driven manner without the addition of an external scavenger. The radical-mediated oxidative photocyclization of stilbene derivatives using TEMPO was also investigated. PMID:27508401

  17. Nitrosyl iodide, INO: A combined ab initio and high-resolution spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailleux, S.; Duflot, D.; Aiba, S.; Nakahama, S.; Ozeki, H.

    2016-04-01

    In the nitrosyl halides series (XNO, where X = F, Cl, Br, I), INO is the only chemical species whose rotational spectrum has not been reported. Nitrosyl iodide, together with the nitryl (INO2), nitrite (IONO) and nitrate (IONO2) iodides, is believed to impact tropospheric ozone levels. Guided by our quantum chemical calculations, we report the detection of INO in the gas phase by high-resolution spectroscopy for the first time. INO was generated by mixing continuously I2 and NO. The measurement and least-squares analysis of 173 a-type rotational transitions resulted in the accurate determination of molecular parameters.

  18. Photoemission and optical constant measurements of a Cesium Iodide thin film photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triloki; Rai, R.; Gupta, Nikita; Jammal, Nabeel F. A.; Singh, B. K.

    2015-07-01

    The performance of cesium iodide as a reflective photocathode is presented. The absolute quantum efficiency of a 500 nm thick film of cesium iodide has been measured in the wavelength range 150 nm-200 nm. The optical absorbance has been analyzed in the wavelength range 190 nm-900 nm and the optical band gap energy has been calculated. The dispersion properties were determined from the refractive index using an envelope plot of the transmittance data. The morphological and elemental film composition have been investigated by atomic force microscopy and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy techniques.

  19. Efficiency enhancement in dye sensitized solar cells using gel polymer electrolytes based on a tetrahexylammonium iodide and MgI2 binary iodide system.

    PubMed

    Bandara, T M W J; Dissanayake, M A K L; Jayasundara, W J M J S R; Albinsson, I; Mellander, B-E

    2012-06-28

    Quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells have drawn the attention of scientists and technologists as a potential candidate to supplement future energy needs. The conduction of iodide ions in quasi-solid-state polymer electrolytes and the performance of dye sensitized solar cells containing such electrolytes can be enhanced by incorporating iodides having appropriate cations. Gel-type electrolytes, based on PAN host polymers and mixture of salts tetrahexylammonium iodide (Hex4N(+)I(-)) and MgI2, were prepared by incorporating ethylene carbonate and propylene carbonate as plasticizers. The salt composition in the binary mixture was varied in order to optimize the performance of solar cells. The electrolyte containing 120% Hex4N(+)I(-) with respect to weight of PAN and without MgI2 showed the highest conductivity out of the compositions studied, 2.5 × 10(-3) S cm(-1) at 25 °C, and a glass transition at -102.4 °C. However, the electrolyte containing 100% Hex4N(+)I(-) and 20% MgI2 showed the best solar cell performance highlighting the influence of the cation on the performance of the cell. The predominantly ionic behaviour of the electrolytes was established from the dc polarization data and all the electrolytes exhibit iodide ion transport. Seven different solar cells were fabricated employing different electrolyte compositions. The best cell using the electrolyte with 100% Hex4N(+)I(-) and 20% MgI2 with respect to PAN weight showed 3.5% energy conversion efficiency and 8.6 mA cm(-2) short circuit current density.

  20. Studying Equilibrium in the Chemical Reaction between Ferric and Iodide Ions in Solution Using a Simple and Inexpensive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolaychuk, Pavel Anatolyevich; Kuvaeva, Alyona Olegovna

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory experiment on the study of the chemical equilibrium based on the reaction between ferric and iodide ions in solution with the formation of ferrous ions, free iodine, and triiodide ions is developed. The total concentration of iodide and triiodide ions in the reaction mixture during the reaction is determined by the argentometric…

  1. The BLI-3/TSP-15/DOXA-1 dual oxidase complex is required for iodide toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaofa; Luo, Jintao; Li, Yu; Ma, Long

    2015-02-01

    Iodine is an essential trace element for life. Iodide deficiency can lead to defective biosynthesis of thyroid hormones and is a major cause of hypothyroidism and mental retardation. Excess iodide intake, however, has been linked to different thyroidal diseases. How excess iodide causes harmful effects is not well understood. Here, we found that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits developmental arrest and other pleiotropic defects when exposed to excess iodide. To identify the responsible genes, we performed a forward genetic screen and isolated 12 mutants that can survive in excess iodide. These mutants define at least four genes, two of which we identified as bli-3 and tsp-15. bli-3 encodes the C. elegans ortholog of the mammalian dual oxidase DUOX1 and tsp-15 encodes the tetraspanin protein TSP-15, which was previously shown to interact with BLI-3. The C. elegans dual oxidase maturation factor DOXA-1 is also required for the arresting effect of excess iodide. Finally, we detected a dramatically increased biogenesis of reactive oxygen species in animals treated with excess iodide, and this effect can be partially suppressed by bli-3 and tsp-15 mutations. We propose that the BLI-3/TSP-15/DOXA-1 dual oxidase complex is required for the toxic pleiotropic effects of excess iodide. PMID:25480962

  2. Gallium-67 scintigraphy, bronchoalveolar lavage, and pathologic changes in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, S.; Munakata, M.; Nishimura, M.; Tsuneta, Y.; Terai, T.; Nakano, I.; Ohsaki, Y.; Kawakami, Y.

    1984-05-01

    The intensity of gallium-67 scintiscans, lymphocyte counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and pathologic changes were studied in 26 patients with untreated pulmonary sarcoidosis. Noncaseating granulomas were recognized with significantly greater frequency in stage 2 (80 percent; 8/10 cases) than in stage 1 (43 percent; 6/14 cases). Alveolitis showed little relation to the roentgenographic stage. There was a strong correlation between the intensity of gallium uptake in pulmonary parenchyma and the detection rate of granuloma; however, the detection rate of alveolitis was not statistically different from the intensity of gallium uptake. A highly significant correlation was revealed between the lymphocyte counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and the intensity of alveolitis. These observations suggest that the gallium uptake reflects mainly the presence of granuloma, and the lymphocyte count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid reflects the intensity of alveolitis in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  3. Selenium effects on gallium arsenide induced biochemical and immunotoxicological changes in rats.

    PubMed

    Flora, S J; Kannan, G M; Kumar, P

    1999-08-30

    The influence of selenium (6.3 and 12.6 micromol/kg, intraperitoneally) on the disposition of gallium and arsenic and a few gallium arsenide (GaAs) sensitive biochemical variables was studied in male rats. Concomitant administration of Se and GaAs (70 micromol/kg, orally, 5 days a week for 4 weeks) significantly prevented the accumulation of arsenic while, the gallium concentration reduced moderately in the soft organs. The biochemical (haematopoietic and liver) and immunological variables however, responded less favorably to selenium administration. Most of the protection was however observed with the dose of 12.6 micromol rather than at 6.3 micromol. The results thus suggest a few beneficial effects of selenium in preventing the appearance of signs of GaAs toxicity like preventing inhibition of blood delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) formation and the accumulation of gallium and arsenic concentration.

  4. Process for producing gallium-containing solution from the aluminum smelting dust

    SciTech Connect

    Era, A.; Matsui, S.; Ikeda, H.

    1988-03-01

    A process is described for producing a gallium-containing solution from aluminum smelting dust comprising leaching aluminum smelting dust with a mineral acid selected from the group consisting of sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid and nitric acid, and adding an oxidizing agent to the aluminum smelting dust at the time of leaching to preferentially leach and extract gallium from the aluminum smelting dust without extracting aluminum from the aluminum smelting dust. The oxidizing agent is selected from the group consisting of potassium permanganate, manganese dioxide, hydrogen peroxide, ozone, potassium chromate, potassium dichromate, ammonium persulfate, sodium hydrochlorite, sodium chlorite and sodium chlorate. The leached aluminum smelting dust is filtered to obtain a gallium-containing solution of dissolved gallium.

  5. The clinical value of bone and gallium scintigraphy for soft-tissue sarcomas of the extremities

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, P.T.; Simon, M.A.

    1984-03-01

    In a prospective study of forty-five patients, we evaluated the usefulness of bone and gallium scintigraphy prior to definitive surgery for a soft-tissue sarcoma in an extremity. Bone scintigraphy provides a baseline for staging and often reveals periosteal invasion that is not detected by routine radiographs. Blood-pool scintigraphy with bone tracers is very sensitive for a diagnosis of malignant disease. Gallium scintigraphy appeared to be a reliable preoperative indicator of malignant disease of soft tissue (sensitivity, 85 per cent; specificity, 92 per cent) and was useful for detecting the infrequent occult, non-pulmonary metastasis. Combined gallium and bone scintigraphy with blood-pool imaging provided a reliable prediction of the presence or absence of a malignant lesion in patients with a soft-tissue mass in an extremity. We recommend that bone and gallium scintigraphy be routinely used in the initial clinical staging of soft-tissue sarcomas.

  6. Gallium(iii) and iron(iii) complexes of quinolone antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Mjos, Katja Dralle; Cawthray, Jacqueline F; Polishchuk, Elena; Abrams, Michael J; Orvig, Chris

    2016-08-16

    Iron is an essential nutrient for many microbes. According to the "Trojan Horse Hypothesis", biological systems have difficulties distinguishing between Fe(3+) and Ga(3+), which constitutes the antimicrobial efficacy of the gallium(iii) ion. Nine novel tris(quinolono)gallium(iii) complexes and their corresponding iron(iii) analogs have been synthesized and fully characterized. Quinolone antimicrobial agents from three drug generations were used in this study: ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, fleroxacin, levofloxacin, lomefloxacin, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, oxolinic acid, and pipemidic acid. The antimicrobial efficacy of the tris(quinolono)gallium(iii) complexes was studied against E. faecalis and S. aureus (both Gram-positive), as well as E. coli, K. pneumonia, and P. aeruginosa (all Gram-negative) in direct comparison to the tris(quinolono)iron(iii) complexes and the corresponding free quinolone ligands at various concentrations. For the tris(quinolono)gallium(iii) complexes, no combinational antimicrobial effects between Ga(3+) and the quinolone antimicrobial agents were observed. PMID:27315225

  7. Gallium Content in PuO{sub 2} Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.A.; Martinez, M.A.; Veirs, D.K.

    1999-08-29

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the semi-quantitative analysis of gallium in plutonium oxide at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The oxide samples were generated by the Thermally Induced Gallium Removal (TIGR) process, a pretreatment step prior to MOX fuel processing. The TIGR process uses PuO{sub 2} containing 1 wt% gallium (nominal) as feed material. Following the TIGR process, gallium content was analyzed by LIBS and also by conventional wet chemical analysis (ICP-MS). Although the data range was insufficient to obtain an adequate calibration, general agreement between the two techniques was good. LIBS was found to have a useful analytical range of 34-400 ppm for Ga in PuO{sub 2}.

  8. Influence of neodymium concentration on excitation and emission properties of Nd doped gallium oxide nanocrystalline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podhorodecki, A.; Banski, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Lecerf, C.; Marie, P.; Cardin, J.; Portier, X.

    2010-09-01

    Gallium oxide and more particularly β-Ga2O3 matrix is an excellent material for new generation of devices electrically or optically driven as it is known as the widest band gap transparent conductive oxide. In this paper, the optical properties of neodymium doped gallium oxide films grown by magnetron sputtering have been analyzed. The influence of the Nd ions concentration on the excitation/emission mechanisms of Nd ions and the role of gallium oxide matrix have been investigated. The grain size reduction into gallium oxide films have been observed when concentration of Nd increases. It has been found for all samples that the charge transfer is the main excitation mechanism for Nd ions where defect states play an important role as intermediate states. As a consequence Nd emission efficiency increases with temperature giving rise to most intensive emission at 1087 nm at room temperature.

  9. Gallium-67 detection of intramammary injection sites secondary to intravenous drug abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Swayne, L.C. )

    1989-09-01

    A case of gallium localization within the breast occurred secondary to intravenous drug abuse. In the appropriate clinical setting, prior self-administered injections should be considered as a cause of Ga-67 accumulation at unusual sites.

  10. Morphology, mechanical stability, and protective properties of ultrathin gallium oxide coatings.

    PubMed

    Lawrenz, Frank; Lange, Philipp; Severin, Nikolai; Rabe, Jürgen P; Helm, Christiane A; Block, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    Ultrathin gallium oxide layers with a thickness of 2.8 ± 0.2 nm were transferred from the surface of liquid gallium onto solid substrates, including conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). The gallium oxide exhibits high mechanical stability, withstanding normal pressures of up to 1 GPa in contact mode scanning force microscopy imaging. Moreover, it lowers the rate of photodegradation of P3HT by 4 orders of magnitude, as compared to uncovered P3HT. This allows us to estimate the upper limits for oxygen and water vapor transmission rates of 0.08 cm(3) m(-2) day(-1) and 0.06 mg m(-2) day(-1), respectively. Hence, similar to other highly functional coatings such as graphene, ultrathin gallium oxide layers can be regarded as promising candidates for protective layers in flexible organic (opto-)electronics and photovoltaics because they offer permeation barrier functionalities in conjunction with high optical transparency.

  11. Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information.

  12. Preliminary survey report: control technology for gallium arsenide processing at Hewlett Packard, San Jose, California

    SciTech Connect

    Lenihan, K.L.

    1987-04-01

    A walk-through survey of the Hewlett Packard Company facility in San Jose, California, was prompted by an interest in the use of gallium arsenide as an alternative to silicon for the semiconductor industry. This facility produced gallium-arsenide and gallium phosphide Potential hazards existed from solvents, acids, and gases employed in wafer production. Some of the solvents included fluorocarbon compounds, xylene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane Arsine, phosphine, hydrogen, and silane gases were used in the production processes. Worker exposures to gallium arsenide or arsenic dust were lower during the cleaning operation than they had been in other similar facilities, perhaps due to the small size of the crystal pullers used at this particular facility. According to the author, this facility is a possible candidate for an in-depth industry survey, but may not be representative of the entire industry.

  13. Empyema of the gallbladder detected by gallium scan and abdominal ultrasonography

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, O.M.; Kovac, A.; Plauche, W.E.

    1981-08-01

    A case history of patient with a abnormal gallium uptake and sonogram in the region of the gallbladder is described. The abnormality was interpreted as empyema of the gallbladder and later proven surgically. A liver-spleen scan was normal except for slight prominence of the hilar structures. Gallium citrate Ga-67 scans done at 24 and 48 hours showed a persistent area of increased tracer localization around the gallbladder with a central clear zone in the latter scan. Ultrasonography revealed poor definition and slight thickening of the gallbladder wall. Because of the lack of specificity of gallium scans, the combination of ultrasonic imaging and gallium uptake scans appears much superior in diagnostic efficiency than either of the two alone. The sequence of performing these two examinations does not seem to be critical though it was prefered that the scintigraphy precede the sonography.

  14. Influence of neodymium concentration on excitation and emission properties of Nd doped gallium oxide nanocrystalline films

    SciTech Connect

    Podhorodecki, A.; Banski, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Lecerf, C.; Marie, P.; Cardin, J.; Portier, X.

    2010-09-15

    Gallium oxide and more particularly {beta}-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix is an excellent material for new generation of devices electrically or optically driven as it is known as the widest band gap transparent conductive oxide. In this paper, the optical properties of neodymium doped gallium oxide films grown by magnetron sputtering have been analyzed. The influence of the Nd ions concentration on the excitation/emission mechanisms of Nd ions and the role of gallium oxide matrix have been investigated. The grain size reduction into gallium oxide films have been observed when concentration of Nd increases. It has been found for all samples that the charge transfer is the main excitation mechanism for Nd ions where defect states play an important role as intermediate states. As a consequence Nd emission efficiency increases with temperature giving rise to most intensive emission at 1087 nm at room temperature.

  15. Tumoral calcinosis associated with sarcoidosis and positive bone and gallium imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wolpe, F.M.; Khedkar, N.Y.; Gordon, D.; Werner, P.; Shirazi, P.; Al-Sabban, M.H.

    1987-07-01

    A 63-year-old female with biopsy proven tumoral calcinosis presented with progressive and recurrent swelling and tenderness of the right hip, thigh, elbow, and wrist. Both gallium and bone imaging demonstrated intense, congruent uptake in these areas. This is the third case of tumoral calcinosis with sarcoidosis documented in the literature. However, these are the first published bone and gallium scans in a patient with a history of sarcoidosis and tumoral calcinosis.

  16. Gallium compounds in solar cells. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of gallium compounds in solar cells to increase solar cell efficiency. Computer models, theories, and performance tests are included. Gallium compounds used in thin film cells, cascade solar cells, large area solar cells, cells designed for industrial and space applications, and as antireflection coatings are discussed. Resistance to radiation damage, cooling to improve efficiency, grain boundary behavior, and economic considerations are also covered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Bit-systolic arithmetic arrays using dynamic differential gallium arsenide circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beagles, Grant; Winters, Kel; Eldin, A. G.

    1992-01-01

    A new family of gallium arsenide circuits for fine grained bit-systolic arithmetic arrays is introduced. This scheme combines features of two recent techniques of dynamic gallium arsenide FET logic and differential dynamic single-clock CMOS logic. The resulting circuits are fast and compact, with tightly constrained series FET propagation paths, low fanout, no dc power dissipation, and depletion FET implementation without level shifting diodes.

  18. Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire localized by gallium scan

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, G.S.; Calubiran, O.; Cunha, B.A. )

    1990-05-01

    A young woman with a history of sick sinus syndrome and placement of a permanent pacemaker 6 months before admission had fever and Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia. A gallium scan localized the infection to the site of the pacemaker wire. Echocardiograms were negative for any vegetations. The patient responded to cefotaxime and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole therapy. We believe that this is the first case of H. parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire and localized by gallium scan.

  19. Heterotopic ossification (myositis ossificans) in acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Detection by gallium scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Drane, W E; Tipler, B M

    1987-06-01

    A case of heterotopic ossification (myositis ossificans) secondary to the central nervous system complications of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is reported. Because of the overwhelming suspicion of infection in this patient, this diagnosis was not considered until a gallium scan revealed the typical findings of heterotopic ossification. Because of the increasing utilization of gallium imaging in the AIDS population, every imaging specialist should be aware of this potential disorder.

  20. Controlled delivery of antimicrobial gallium ions from phosphate-based glasses.

    PubMed

    Valappil, S P; Ready, D; Abou Neel, E A; Pickup, D M; O'Dell, L A; Chrzanowski, W; Pratten, J; Newport, R J; Smith, M E; Wilson, M; Knowles, J C

    2009-05-01

    Gallium-doped phosphate-based glasses (PBGs) have been recently shown to have antibacterial activity. However, the delivery of gallium ions from these glasses can be improved by altering the calcium ion concentration to control the degradation rate of the glasses. In the present study, the effect of increasing calcium content in novel gallium (Ga2O3)-doped PBGs on the susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is examined. The lack of new antibiotics in development makes gallium-doped PBG potentially a highly promising new therapeutic agent. The results show that an increase in calcium content (14, 15 and 16 mol.% CaO) cause a decrease in degradation rate (17.6, 13.5 and 7.3 microg mm(-2) h(-1)), gallium ion release and antimicrobial activity against planktonic P. aeruginosa. The most potent glass composition (containing 14 mol.% CaO) was then evaluated for its ability to prevent the growth of biofilms of P. aeruginosa. Gallium release was found to reduce biofilm growth of P. aeruginosa with a maximum effect (0.86 log(10) CFU reduction compared to Ga2O3-free glasses) after 48 h. Analysis of the biofilms by confocal microscopy confirmed the anti-biofilm effect of these glasses as it showed both viable and non-viable bacteria on the glass surface. Results of the solubility and ion release studies show that this glass system is suitable for controlled delivery of Ga3+. 71Ga NMR and Ga K-edge XANES measurements indicate that the gallium is octahedrally coordinated by oxygen atoms in all samples. The results presented here suggest that PBGs may be useful in controlled drug delivery applications, to deliver gallium ions in order to prevent infections due to P. aeruginosa biofilms. PMID:18974026