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Sample records for gallus gallus domesticus

  1. Diversity, in-vitro virulence traits and antifungal susceptibility pattern of gastrointestinal yeast flora of healthy poultry, Gallus gallus domesticus.

    PubMed

    Subramanya, Supram Hosuru; Sharan, Nawal Kishor; Baral, Bharat Prasad; Hamal, Deependra; Nayak, Niranjan; Prakash, Peralam Yegneswaran; Sathian, Brijesh; Bairy, Indira; Gokhale, Shishir

    2017-05-15

    Poultry farming and consumption of poultry (Gallus gallus domesticus) meat and eggs are common gastronomical practices worldwide. Till now, a detailed understanding about the gut colonisation of Gallus gallus domesticus by yeasts and their virulence properties and drug resistance patterns in available literature remain sparse. This study was undertaken to explore this prevalent issue. A total of 103 specimens of fresh droppings of broiler chickens (commercial G domesticus) and domesticated chickens (domesticated G domesticus) were collected from the breeding sites. The isolates comprised of 29 (33%) Debaryozyma hansenii (Candida famata), 12 (13.6%) Sporothrix catenata (C. ciferrii), 10 (11.4%) C. albicans, 8 (9.1%) Diutnia catenulata (C. catenulate), 6 (6.8%) C. tropicalis, 3 (3.4%) Candida acidothermophilum (C. krusei), 2 (2.3%) C. pintolopesii, 1 (1.1%) C. parapsilosis, 9 (10.2%) Trichosporon spp. (T. moniliiforme, T. asahii), 4 (4.5%) Geotrichum candidum, 3 (3.4%) Cryptococcus macerans and 1 (1%) Cystobasidium minuta (Rhodotorula minuta). Virulence factors, measured among different yeast species, showed wide variability. Biofilm cells exhibited higher Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values (μg/ml) than planktonic cells against all antifungal compounds tested: (fluconazole, 8-512 vs 0.031-16; amphotericin B, 0.5-64 vs 0.031-16; voriconazole 0.062-16 vs 0.062-8; caspofungin, 0.062-4 vs 0.031-1). The present work extends the current understanding of in vitro virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility pattern of gastrointestinal yeast flora of G domesticus. More studies with advanced techniques are needed to quantify the risk of spread of these potential pathogens to environment and human.

  2. Embryonic development of chicken (Gallus Gallus Domesticus) from 1st to 19th day-ectodermal structures.

    PubMed

    Toledo Fonseca, Erika; De Oliveira Silva, Fernanda Menezes; Alcântara, Dayane; Carvalho Cardoso, Rafael; Luís Franciolli, André; Sarmento, Carlos Alberto Palmeira; Fratini, Paula; José Piantino Ferreira, Antônio; Miglino, Maria Angélica

    2013-12-01

    Birds occupy a prominent place in the Brazilian economy not only in the poultry industry but also as an animal model in many areas of scientific research. Thus the aim of this study was to provide a description of macro and microscopic aspects of the ectoderm-derived structures in chicken embryos / fetuses poultry (Gallus gallus domesticus) from 1st to 19th day of incubation. 40 fertilized eggs, from a strain of domestic chickens, with an incubation period of 2-19 days were subjected to macroscopic description, biometrics, light, and scanning microscopy. All changes observed during the development were described. The nervous system, skin and appendages and organs related to vision and hearing began to be identified, both macro and microscopically, from the second day of incubation. The vesicles from the primitive central nervous system-forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain-were identified on the third day of incubation. On the sixth day of incubation, there was a clear vascularization of the skin. The optic vesicle was first observed fourth day of development and on the fifth day there was the beginning of the lens formation. Although embryonic development is influenced by animal line as well as external factors such as incubation temperature, this paper provides a chronological description for chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) during its embryonic development. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Experimental neosporosis in chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) with oocysts and tachyzoites of two recent isolates of Neospora caninum reveals resistance to infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The importance of birds in the biological cycle of Neospora caninum is not clear. Here, we report unsuccessful Neospora infection in Chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) using two isolates of N. caninum. In experiment #1 conducted in Brazil, 30 White Leghorn chickens were orally inoculated with viabl...

  4. Physiological and behavioural responses associated with feather removal in Gallus gallus var domesticus.

    PubMed

    Gentle, M J; Hunter, L N

    1991-01-01

    Electroencephalographic, cardiovascular and behavioural parameters were examined in Gallus gallus var domesticus in response to feather removal. The progressive removal of feathers resulted in marked changes in the bird's behaviour from an alert agitated response following the initial removals to periods of crouching immobility following successive removals. During the periods of immobility the birds showed a high amplitude low frequency EEG pattern and successive removals resulted in a progressive increase in the total duration of this activity in the two minutes after removal. The heart rate response to feather removal was variable whereas the blood pressure always increased and this increase was followed by a gradual return to pre-stimulus levels. There were no consistent cardiovascular responses related to the immobility. It was concluded that feather removal is likely to be painful to the bird and feather removal by flockmates can be categorised as a welfare problem.

  5. Teratogenic effects of the neonicotinoid thiacloprid on chick embryos (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Salvaggio, Antonio; Antoci, Francesco; Messina, Antonino; Ferrante, Margherita; Copat, Chiara; Ruberto, Claudia; Scalisi, Elena Maria; Pecoraro, Roberta; Brundo, Maria Violetta

    2018-06-19

    Thiacloprid is an insecticide belonging to the family of neonicotinoids, substances initially underestimated for their potential adverse effects, that they may manifest in the long term leading to an extensive use. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect at increasing concentrations of thiacloprid on chick embryos development. The research was carried out on 75 fertile eggs of Gallus gallus domesticus. The eggs were opened after 10, 15 and 20 days of incubation and in treated embryos were observed developmental alterations, growth retardation, limbs defects and ectopia viscerale. The histological analysis showed hepatic steatosis and haemorrhages both in the liver and in the lungs. Moreover, the immunohistochemical analysis performed on the liver sections showed a strong positivity only for the erythrocytes to the anti-CYP1A antibody. Thiacloprid exposure increases the risks of teratogenic effects especially at the higher doses tested, therefore its use should be more controlled and limited. Since the literature on the topic is lacking, then the human health impacts resulting from neonicotinoids exposure is not yet fully understood, and, our data will be helpful to allow the assessment of an oral reference dose and health risk characterization. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Production of chicken progeny (Gallus gallus domesticus) from interspecies germline chimeric duck (Anas domesticus) by primordial germ cell transfer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunhai; Khazanehdari, Kamal A; Baskar, Vijaya; Saleem, Shazia; Kinne, Joerg; Wernery, Ulrich; Chang, Il-Kuk

    2012-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the differentiation of chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) primordial germ cells (PGCs) in duck (Anas domesticus) gonads. Chimeric ducks were produced by transferring chicken PGCs into duck embryos. Transfer of 200 and 400 PGCs resulted in the detection of a total number of 63.0 ± 54.3 and 116.8 ± 47.1 chicken PGCs in the gonads of 7-day-old duck embryos, respectively. The chimeric rate of ducks prior to hatching was 52.9% and 90.9%, respectively. Chicken germ cells were assessed in the gonad of chimeric ducks with chicken-specific DNA probes. Chicken spermatogonia were detected in the seminiferous tubules of duck testis. Chicken oogonia, primitive and primary follicles, and chicken-derived oocytes were also found in the ovaries of chimeric ducks, indicating that chicken PGCs are able to migrate, proliferate, and differentiate in duck ovaries and participate in the progression of duck ovarian folliculogenesis. Chicken DNA was detected using PCR from the semen of chimeric ducks. A total number of 1057 chicken eggs were laid by Barred Rock hens after they were inseminated with chimeric duck semen, of which four chicken offspring hatched and one chicken embryo did not hatch. Female chimeric ducks were inseminated with chicken semen; however, no fertile eggs were obtained. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that chicken PGCs could interact with duck germinal epithelium and complete spermatogenesis and eventually give rise to functional sperm. The PGC-mediated germline chimera technology may provide a novel system for conserving endangered avian species.

  7. Extraction and physicochemical characterization of broiler (Gallus gallus domesticus) skin gelatin compared to commercial bovine gelatin.

    PubMed

    Aykin-Dinçer, E; Koç, A; Erbas, M

    2017-09-01

    Gelatin was extracted from broiler (Gallus gallus domesticus) skins and analyzed to compare its physicochemical properties with those of commercial bovine gelatin. The average yield of broiler skin gelatin was 6.5% on a wet weight basis. Broiler skin gelatin had more α1-and α2-chains than β-chain and contained high molecular weight (γ-chain) polymers. Glycine was the dominant amino acid in broiler skin gelatin (20.26%), followed by proline (Pro) (15.12%) then hydroxyproline (Hyp) (11.36%). Compared to commercial bovine gelatin, broiler skin gelatin had less total imino acids (Pro and Hyp) but a higher (33.65 vs. 31.38°C) melting temperature (P < 0.01). The differences in physical properties between the broiler and commercial bovine gelatins appeared to be associated with differences in their amino acid composition and molecular weight distribution. The sensory evaluation results revealed that broiler skin gelatin could be a potential alternative to commercial bovine gelatin, useful in various food products. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  8. Kinetic Study of Yellow Fever 17DD Viral Infection in Gallus gallus domesticus Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Pedro Paulo de Abreu; E. P. Dias de Oliveira, Bárbara Cristina; Carvalho de Sequeira, Patrícia; Rodrigues Maia de Souza, Yuli; dos Santos Ferro, Jessica Maria; da Silva, Igor José; Gonçalves Caputo, Luzia Fátima; Tavares Guedes, Priscila; Araujo Cunha dos Santos, Alexandre; da Silva Freire, Marcos; Bonaldo, Myrna Cristina; Pelajo Machado, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Yellow fever continues to be an important epidemiological problem in Africa and South America even though the disease can be controlled by vaccination. The vaccine has been produced since 1937 and is based on YFV 17DD chicken embryo infection. However, little is known about the histopathological background of virus infection and replication in this model. Here we show by morphological and molecular methods (brightfield and confocal microscopies, immunofluorescence, nested-PCR and sequencing) the kinetics of YFV 17DD infection in chicken embryos with 9 days of development, encompassing 24 to 96 hours post infection. Our principal findings indicate that the main cells involved in virus production are myoblasts with a mesenchymal shape, which also are the first cells to express virus proteins in Gallus gallus embryos at 48 hours after infection. At 72 hours post infection, we observed an increase of infected cells in embryos. Many sites are thus affected in the infection sequence, especially the skeletal muscle. We were also able to confirm an increase of nervous system infection at 96 hours post infection. Our data contribute to the comprehension of the pathogenesis of YF 17DD virus infection in Gallus gallus embryos. PMID:27158977

  9. Learning of Monotonic and Nonmonotonic Sequences in Domesticated Horses ("Equus Callabus") and Chickens ("Gallus Domesticus")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kundey, Shannon M. A.; Strandell, Brittany; Mathis, Heather; Rowan, James D.

    2010-01-01

    (Hulse and Dorsky, 1977) and (Hulse and Dorsky, 1979) found that rats, like humans, learn sequences following a simple rule-based structure more quickly than those lacking a rule-based structure. Through two experiments, we explored whether two additional species--domesticated horses ("Equus callabus") and chickens ("Gallus domesticus")--would…

  10. Development of otoconia in the embryonic chick (Gallus domesticus)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Igarashi, M.

    1985-01-01

    In the chick (Gallus domesticus) embryo, otoconium formation started first over the macula sacculi around the 4th day of incubation, and a day later over the macula utriculi. It was determined that each otoconium formed as a result of the segmentation of the immature otolithic membrane, and that the calcium responsible for otoconium calcification was incorporated into the organic matrix of each otoconium in the form of small electron-dense granules (20-150 nm in. diameter). The presence of calcium in these granules was confirmed by histochemical staining with osmic-potassium pyroantimonate, by EDTA chelation, and by X-ray micronanalysis under the electron microscope.

  11. Cardiovascular tolerance of intravenous bupivacaine in broiler chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) anesthetized with isoflurane.

    PubMed

    DiGeronimo, Peter M; da Cunha, Anderson F; Pypendop, Bruno; Brandão, João; Stout, Rhett; Rinaldi, Max; Tully, Thomas N

    2017-03-01

    To determine the median effective dose (ED 50 ) of intravenous (IV) bupivacaine associated with a 50% probability of causing clinically relevant cardiovascular effects [defined as 30% change in heart rate (HR) or mean arterial pressure (MAP)] in chickens anesthetized with isoflurane. Randomized up-and-down study. A total of 14 Ross-708 broiler chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) weighing 1.70-2.75 kg. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with isoflurane. Monitoring included the electrocardiogram and invasive arterial pressures. Chickens were administered bupivacaine IV over 2 minutes using a dose based on the response of the previous animal. Dose was decreased when HR and/or MAP in the previous animal increased or decreased ≥30% after bupivacaine administration, or increased when HR or MAP changed <30%. The ED 50 was defined as the dose resulting in ≥30% variation in HR or MAP in 50% of the population studied. The IV ED 50 of bupivacaine was 1.94 mg kg -1 using Dixon's up-and-down method and 1.96 mg kg -1 by logistic regression. These results suggest that 1.33 and 1.96 mg kg -1 of IV bupivacaine are associated with a respective 1 or 50% probability of a clinically significant change in MAP in isoflurane-anesthetized chickens. Identification of the cardiovascular changes associated with different doses of bupivacaine can be used as the basis for studies of therapeutic applications in the domestic chicken. Further studies are required to determine interspecies variation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Ontogeny of sex differences in the energetics and kinematics of terrestrial locomotion in leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    Rose, K. A.; Bates, K. T.; Nudds, R. L.; Codd, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Sex differences in locomotor performance may precede the onset of sexual maturity and/or arise concomitantly with secondary sex characteristics. Here, we present the first study to quantify the terrestrial locomotor morphology, energetics and kinematics in a species, either side of sexual maturation. In domestic leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) sexual maturation brings about permanent female gravidity and increased male hind limb muscle mass. We found that the sexes of a juvenile cohort of leghorns shared similar maximum sustainable speeds, while in a sexually mature cohort maximum sustainable speeds were greater by 67% (males) and 34% (females). Furthermore, relative to that in juveniles of the same sex, the absolute duration of leg swing was longer in mature males and shorter in mature females. Consequently, the proportion of a stride that each limb was in contact with the ground (duty factor) was higher in sexually mature females compared to males. Modulation of the duty factor with the development of secondary sex characteristics may act to minimize mechanical work in males; and minimise mechanical power and/or peak force in females. A greater incremental response of mass-specific metabolic power to speed in males compared to females was common to both age cohorts and, therefore, likely results from physiological sexual dimorphisms that precede sexual maturation. PMID:27068682

  13. Toxoplasma gondii: isolation, biological and molecular characterisation of samples from free-range Gallus gallus domesticus from countryside Southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Tamiris Cristine Ribeiro; Buery, Julyana Cerqueira; Moreira, Narcisa Imaculada Brant; Santos, Claudiney Biral; Costa, Júlia Gatti Ladeia; Pinto, Lorena Velozo; Baraviera, Ramon Castro de Araújo; Vitor, Ricardo Wagner Almeida; Fux, Blima

    2018-05-24

    Toxoplasma gondii presents a high prevalence worldwide, infecting several animals. Felines are considered the definitive hosts and among the intermediate hosts we highlight mammals and birds. The man can become infected by ingesting tissue cysts present in birds and mammals. Biological and molecular aspects of T. gondii allows a better understanding of the epidemiology of toxoplasmosis. This work is a serologic screening of 58 chickens grown (Gallus gallus domesticus) for human consumption in Espírito Santo State, by means of indirect haemagglutination assay (IHA). Thirteen chickens tested positive for anti-T. gondii antibodies. The heart and brain of five positive chickens were harvested, treated with pepsin and inoculated separately, in two Swiss mice, intraperitoneally. Tachyzoites were observed in the peritoneum of all the animals, between seven and 10 days after the inoculum. Ten isolates were obtained and biologically characterised in BALB/c mice inoculated with 101 to 104 tachyzoites. All isolates were classified as virulent or intermediately virulent. Isolates were genotyped by means of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis, revealing three different genotypes. None of the isolates exhibited the clonal type I, II or III genotype. No genotypic differences were observed between the isolates from the brain or heart from the same bird.

  14. Toxicity of cadmium and lead in Gallus gallus domesticus assessment of body weight and metal content in tissues after metal dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Abduljaleel, Salwa A; Shuhaimi-Othman, M

    2013-11-15

    The influence of dietary cadmium on the accumulation and effects of dietary lead, examined in chicken. This experiment was conducted to investigate the toxic effects of dietary Cd and Pb on chick's body weight and organ, content of the tissues of these two metals was also detected. One day age chicks of Gallus gallus domesticus fed diet supplemented with 25, 50, 100 ppm of Cd, second group exposure to 300, 500, 1000 ppm of Pb in feed daily during 4 weeks. The control groups were fed without supplementation of metals. The concentrations of Cd and Pb resulted in increased of Cd and Pb content in liver, gizzard and muscle. While Cd 100 ppm and Pb 1000 ppm were increased metals content in feather. Body weight of chicks was not influenced by Cd treatment. In contrary Pb treatment was significantly (p < 0.05) decreased body weight of chicks after dietary treatment. On the other hand, Liver weigh in chicks was significantly (p < 0.05) decreased after Cd and Pb treatments.

  15. [Genetic diversity of red jungle fowl in China (Gallus gallus spadiceus) and red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus gallus) in Thailand].

    PubMed

    Bao, Wen-Bin; Chen, Guo-Hong; Wu, Xin-Sheng; Xu, Qi; Wu, Sheng-Long; Shu, Jing-Ting; Weigend, Steffen

    2007-05-01

    Genetic diversity of red jungle fowl in China (Gallus gallus spadiceus) and red jungle fowl in Thailand (Gallus gallus gallus) was evaluated with 29 microstaellite loci, the genetic variability within subspecies and genetic differentiation between subspecies were estimated. The results showed that the 168 alleles were amplified with the number of alleles per locus from 2 to 13. The average expected heterozygosity and polymorphism information content (PIC) of all loci were 0.5780 and 0.53, respectively. The mean numbers of effective alleles of red jungle fowl in China and red jungle fowl in Thailand were 5.55 and 6.38. The heterozygosity and the genetic diversity of the two subspecies were high. Genetic differentiation index (FST) of these populations was 0.194 (P<0.01). Reynolds' genetic distance and gene flow between the two populations were 0.157 and 1.040, respectively. Based on these results, genetic structure and significant genetic differentiation of red jungle fowl in China were different from red jungle fowl in Thailand. The results of this study did not support to identify these red jungle fowl subspecies as the same subspecies, but supported the theory that Chinese domestic fowls have independent origin.

  16. Natural Rabies Infection in a Domestic Fowl (Gallus domesticus): A Report from India.

    PubMed

    Baby, Julie; Mani, Reeta Subramaniam; Abraham, Swapna Susan; Thankappan, Asha T; Pillai, Prasad Madhavan; Anand, Ashwini Manoor; Madhusudana, Shampur Narayan; Ramachandran, Jayachandran; Sreekumar, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    Rabies is a fatal encephalitis caused by viruses belonging to the genus Lyssavirus of the family Rhabdoviridae. It is a viral disease primarily affecting mammals, though all warm blooded animals are susceptible. Experimental rabies virus infection in birds has been reported, but naturally occurring infection of birds has been documented very rarely. The carcass of a domestic fowl (Gallus domesticus), which had been bitten by a stray dog one month back, was brought to the rabies diagnostic laboratory. A necropsy was performed and the brain tissue obtained was subjected to laboratory tests for rabies. The brain tissue was positive for rabies viral antigens by fluorescent antibody test (FAT) confirming a diagnosis of rabies. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleoprotein gene sequencing revealed that the rabies virus strain from the domestic fowl belonged to a distinct and relatively rare Indian subcontinent lineage. This case of naturally acquired rabies infection in a bird species, Gallus domesticus, being reported for the first time in India, was identified from an area which has a significant stray dog population and is highly endemic for canine rabies. It indicates that spill over of infection even to an unusual host is possible in highly endemic areas. Lack of any clinical signs, and fewer opportunities for diagnostic laboratory testing of suspected rabies in birds, may be the reason for disease in these species being undiagnosed and probably under-reported. Butchering and handling of rabies virus- infected poultry may pose a potential exposure risk.

  17. Natural Rabies Infection in a Domestic Fowl (Gallus domesticus): A Report from India

    PubMed Central

    Baby, Julie; Mani, Reeta Subramaniam; Abraham, Swapna Susan; Thankappan, Asha T.; Pillai, Prasad Madhavan; Anand, Ashwini Manoor; Madhusudana, Shampur Narayan; Ramachandran, Jayachandran; Sreekumar, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    Background Rabies is a fatal encephalitis caused by viruses belonging to the genus Lyssavirus of the family Rhabdoviridae. It is a viral disease primarily affecting mammals, though all warm blooded animals are susceptible. Experimental rabies virus infection in birds has been reported, but naturally occurring infection of birds has been documented very rarely. Principal Findings The carcass of a domestic fowl (Gallus domesticus), which had been bitten by a stray dog one month back, was brought to the rabies diagnostic laboratory. A necropsy was performed and the brain tissue obtained was subjected to laboratory tests for rabies. The brain tissue was positive for rabies viral antigens by fluorescent antibody test (FAT) confirming a diagnosis of rabies. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleoprotein gene sequencing revealed that the rabies virus strain from the domestic fowl belonged to a distinct and relatively rare Indian subcontinent lineage. Significance This case of naturally acquired rabies infection in a bird species, Gallus domesticus, being reported for the first time in India, was identified from an area which has a significant stray dog population and is highly endemic for canine rabies. It indicates that spill over of infection even to an unusual host is possible in highly endemic areas. Lack of any clinical signs, and fewer opportunities for diagnostic laboratory testing of suspected rabies in birds, may be the reason for disease in these species being undiagnosed and probably under-reported. Butchering and handling of rabies virus- infected poultry may pose a potential exposure risk. PMID:26201090

  18. DNA Content Differences Between Male and Female Chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) Nuclei and Z and W Chromosomes Resolved by Image Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, Maria Andréia Corrêa; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto; Clarindo, Wellington Ronildo

    2010-01-01

    Chicken red blood cells (CRBCs) are widely used as standards for DNA content determination. Cytogenetic data have shown that the Z sex chromosome is approximately twice as large as the W, so that the DNA content differs to some extent between male (ZZ) and female (ZW) chickens. Despite this fact, male and female CRBCs have been indiscriminately used in absolute genome size determination. Our work was conducted to verify whether the DNA content differences between male and female Gallus gallus domesticus “Leghorn” nuclei and ZZ/ZW chromosomes can be resolved by image cytometry (ICM). Air-dried smears stained by Feulgen reaction were used for nuclei analysis. Chicken metaphase spreads upon Feulgen staining were analyzed for obtaining quantitative information on the Z and W chromosomes. Before each capture session, we conducted quality control of the ICM instrumentation. Our results from nuclear measurements showed that the 2C value is 0.09 pg higher in males than in females. In chromosomes, we found that the Z chromosome shows 200% more DNA content than does the W chromosome. ICM demonstrated resolution power to discriminate low DNA content differences in genomes. We suggest prudence in the general use of CRBC 2C values as standards in comparative cytometric analysis. (J Histochem Cytochem 58:229–235, 2010) PMID:19875846

  19. Effect of microgravity on primordial germ cells (PGCs) in silk chicken offspring ( Gallus gallus domesticus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhenming; Li, Zandong

    2011-08-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs), precursors of germline cells, display a variety of antigens during their migration to target gonads. Here, we used silk chicken offspring ( Gallus gallus domesticus) embryos subjected to space microgravity to investigate the influence of microgravity on PGCs. The ShenZhou-3 unmanned spaceship carried nine fertilized silk chicken eggs, named the flight group, returned to Earth after 7 days space flight. And the control group has the same clan with the flight group. PGCs from flight and control group silk chicken offspring embryos were examined during migration by using two antibodies (2C9 and anti-SSEA-1), in combination with the horseradish peroxidase detection system, and using periodic acid-Schiff's solution (PAS) reaction. After incubation for about 30 h, SSEA-1 and 2C9 positive cells were detected in the germinal crescent of flight and control group silk chicken offspring embryos. After incubation of eggs for 2-2.5 days, SSEA-1 and 2C9 positive cells were detected in embryonic blood vessels of flight and control group silk chicken offspring embryos. After incubation of eggs for 5.5 days, PGCs in the dorsal mesentery and gonad could also be identified in flight and control group silk chicken offspring embryos by using SSEA-1 and 2C9 antibodies. Based on location and PAS staining, these cells were identified as PGCs. Meanwhile, at the stage of PGCs migration and then becoming established in the germinal ridges, no difference in SSEA-1 or 2C9 staining was detected between female and male PGCs in flight and control group silk chicken offspring embryos. Although there were differences in the profiles of PGC concentration between male and female embryos during the special circulating stage, changing profile of PGCs concentration was similar in same sex between flight and control group offspring embryos. We concluded that there is little effect on PGCs in offspring embryos of microgravity-treated chicken and that PGC development appears

  20. Characterization and discrimination of Taihe black-boned silky fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus Brisson) muscles using LC/MS-based lipidomics.

    PubMed

    Mi, Si; Shang, Ke; Jia, Wei; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Li, Xia; Fan, Yu-Qing; Wang, Hang

    2018-07-01

    Taihe black-boned silky fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus Brisson) has a history of over 2200 years of being consumed as a curative food in China. In this work, an LC/MS-based lipidomics approach was employed to investigate the characteristic lipid composition of Taihe black-boned silky fowls from different ages and genders as well as from different carcass parts. Data were processed using an orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis and one-way analysis of variance. A total of 1127 lipids were detected in Taihe black-boned silky fowl muscles. Among them, 88, 11 and 1 lipid species were found to have both a variable influence on a projection value >1 and a p-value smaller than 0.05 between different age, gender and part groups. These results illustrate that the influence of the 3 investigated factors on the lipid profiles of Taihe black-boned silky fowl decreased in the order of age > gender > part. Lipid profile differences will facilitate a better understanding of the curative properties of Taihe black-boned silky fowl. Taihe and crossbred black-boned silky fowls were compared in terms of their lipid compositions based on the same strategy. The results showed that the two groups were able to discriminate from each other effectively. 47 lipid compounds were determined to be potential markers for the authentication of Taihe black-boned silky fowl. This work demonstrates the successful application of lipidomics for lipid profiling in food raw materials. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Temporospatial study of hexose transporters and mucin in the epithelial cells of chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) small intestine.

    PubMed

    Hussar, P; Kaerner, M; Duritis, I; Plivca, A; Pendovski, L; Jaerveots, T; Popovska-Percinic, F

    2017-12-01

    The temporospatial patterns in the localization of hexose transporters as well as in the quantitative and qualitative differences of glycoprotein mucin produced by the goblet cells of broiler chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) small intestine during their first postnatal month were studied. The integral membrane proteins glucose transporter-2 and -5 (GLUT-2 and GLUT-5) that facilitate the transport of hexoses across epithelial cell layers that separate distinct compartments in organism were detected in the chicken intestinal epithelial cells using immunohistochemical labeling with polyclonal primary antibodies Rabbit anti-GLUT-2 and Rabbit anti-GLUT-5 (IHC kit, Abcam, UK). The chemical composition of mucin (neutral, acid) was carried out by applying the histochemical reactions by Alcian-Blue and periodic acid-Schiff methods. The results revealed presence of the hexose transporters GLUT-2 and -5, immunolocalized in the enterocytes of broiler's small intestine and the temporospatial pattern of the density of goblet cells of intestinal mucosa as well as the chemical composition of mucin produced by the goblet cells in chicken immediately after hatching and in 30-days-old chicken's. Simultanously, when goblet cells remained unstained with both antibodies in intestinal epithelium in chicken of both ages or some moderate staining was noticed in 30-days-old chickens' ileal epithelium, the increase of neutral and acid mucin- containing cells per area unit in both segments of the small intestine was detected from the first day after hatching to 30 day of life and the densilty of goblet cells was found to be higher in ileal than in duodenal region. Copyright© by the Polish Academy of Sciences.

  2. Ion transporters for fluid reabsorption in the rooster (Gallus domesticus) epididymal region.

    PubMed

    Bahr, J M; Dalponte, M; Janssen, S; Bunick, D; Nakai, M

    2006-10-01

    Testicular fluid is highly condensed during its passage through the epididymal region in the avian species. In the present study, major ion transporters that are responsible for condensation mainly by water resorption in the reproductive tract as identified in the mammalian epididymis were localized within the rooster (Gallus domesticus) epididymis by immunohistochemistry. The results show that the efferent ductule epithelium expressed sodium-potassium ATPase (Na(+),K(+)-ATPase), carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) and sodium hydrogen exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) and that the connecting ductule and epididymal duct epithelia expressed Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and CAII. These data suggest that a model proposed for reabsorption in mammalian efferent ductules can be applied to avian efferent ductules.

  3. Morphogenesis and calcification of the statoconia in the chick (Gallus domesticus) embryo - Implications for future studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Igarashi, M.

    1985-01-01

    The morphogenesis of the statoconia in the chick, Gallus domesticus, injected with a carbon anhydrase inhibitor is studied. The preparation of the embryo specimens for analysis is described. The early, middle, and late stages of embryonic development are examined. The data reveal that acetozolamide inhibits statoconia formation in the middle stage of development and the calcification process follows statoconia formation. The spatial relationship between the development of type 1 and type 2 hair cells and the appearance and maturation of the statoconia is investigated.

  4. Sex differences in gait utilization and energy metabolism during terrestrial locomotion in two varieties of chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) selected for different body size

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Kayleigh A.; Nudds, Robert L.; Butler, Patrick J.; Codd, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) of standard breed (large) and bantam (small) varieties, artificial selection has led to females being permanently gravid and sexual selection has led to male-biased size dimorphism. Using respirometry, videography and morphological measurements, sex and variety differences in metabolic cost of locomotion, gait utilisation and maximum sustainable speed (Umax) were investigated during treadmill locomotion. Males were capable of greater Umax than females and used a grounded running gait at high speeds, which was only observed in a few bantam females and no standard breed females. Body mass accounted for variation in the incremental increase in metabolic power with speed between the varieties, but not the sexes. For the first time in an avian species, a greater mass-specific incremental cost of locomotion, and minimum measured cost of transport (CoTmin) were found in males than in females. Furthermore, in both varieties, the female CoTmin was lower than predicted from interspecific allometry. Even when compared at equivalent speeds (using Froude number), CoT decreased more rapidly in females than in males. These trends were common to both varieties despite a more upright limb in females than in males in the standard breed, and a lack of dimorphism in posture in the bantam variety. Females may possess compensatory adaptations for metabolic efficiency during gravidity (e.g. in muscle specialization/posture/kinematics). Furthermore, the elevated power at faster speeds in males may be linked to their muscle properties being suited to inter-male aggressive combat. PMID:26405047

  5. Intraspecific scaling of the minimum metabolic cost of transport in leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus): links with limb kinematics, morphometrics and posture.

    PubMed

    Rose, Kayleigh A; Nudds, Robert L; Codd, Jonathan R

    2015-04-01

    The minimum metabolic cost of transport (CoTmin; J kg(-1) m(-1)) scales negatively with increasing body mass (∝Mb (-1/3)) across species from a wide range of taxa associated with marked differences in body plan. At the intraspecific level, or between closely related species, however, CoTmin does not always scale with Mb. Similarity in physiology, dynamics of movement, skeletal geometry and posture between closely related individuals is thought to be responsible for this phenomenon, despite the fact that energetic, kinematic and morphometric data are rarely collected together. We examined the relationship between these integrated components of locomotion in leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) selectively bred for large and bantam (miniature) varieties. Interspecific allometry predicts a CoTmin ∼16% greater in bantams compared with the larger variety. However, despite 38% and 23% differences in Mb and leg length, respectively, the two varieties shared an identical walking CoTmin, independent of speed and equal to the allometric prediction derived from interspecific data for the larger variety. Furthermore, the two varieties moved with dynamic similarity and shared geometrically similar appendicular and axial skeletons. Hip height, however, did not scale geometrically and the smaller variety had more erect limbs, contrary to interspecific scaling trends. The lower than predicted CoTmin in bantams for their Mb was associated with both the more erect posture and a lower cost per stride (J kg(-1) stride(-1)). Therefore, our findings are consistent with the notion that a more erect limb is associated with a lower CoTmin and with the previous assumption that similarity in skeletal shape, inherently linked to walking dynamics, is associated with similarity in CoTmin. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Intraspecific scaling of the minimum metabolic cost of transport in leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus): links with limb kinematics, morphometrics and posture

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Kayleigh A.; Nudds, Robert L.; Codd, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The minimum metabolic cost of transport (CoTmin; J kg−1 m−1) scales negatively with increasing body mass (∝Mb−1/3) across species from a wide range of taxa associated with marked differences in body plan. At the intraspecific level, or between closely related species, however, CoTmin does not always scale with Mb. Similarity in physiology, dynamics of movement, skeletal geometry and posture between closely related individuals is thought to be responsible for this phenomenon, despite the fact that energetic, kinematic and morphometric data are rarely collected together. We examined the relationship between these integrated components of locomotion in leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) selectively bred for large and bantam (miniature) varieties. Interspecific allometry predicts a CoTmin ∼16% greater in bantams compared with the larger variety. However, despite 38% and 23% differences in Mb and leg length, respectively, the two varieties shared an identical walking CoTmin, independent of speed and equal to the allometric prediction derived from interspecific data for the larger variety. Furthermore, the two varieties moved with dynamic similarity and shared geometrically similar appendicular and axial skeletons. Hip height, however, did not scale geometrically and the smaller variety had more erect limbs, contrary to interspecific scaling trends. The lower than predicted CoTmin in bantams for their Mb was associated with both the more erect posture and a lower cost per stride (J kg−1 stride−1). Therefore, our findings are consistent with the notion that a more erect limb is associated with a lower CoTmin and with the previous assumption that similarity in skeletal shape, inherently linked to walking dynamics, is associated with similarity in CoTmin. PMID:25657211

  7. Differences in semen freezability and intracellular ATP content between the rooster (Gallus gallus domesticus) and the Barbary partridge (Alectoris barbara).

    PubMed

    Madeddu, M; Berlinguer, F; Pasciu, V; Succu, S; Satta, V; Leoni, G G; Zinellu, A; Muzzeddu, M; Carru, C; Naitana, S

    2010-10-01

    This study aimed to compare viability, ATP content, and DNA integrity of rooster (Gallus gallus domesticus) and Barbary partridge (Alectoris barbara) fresh and frozen spermatozoa in order to identify factors possibly related to differences in semen freezability. Ejaculates were obtained from March to May by the abdominal massage method from 3 adult roosters and 12 adult Barbary partridges. Semen was frozen with different cryoprotectants using Lake's diluents as a base medium: 1) glycerol 11%; 2) glycerol 11% and trehalose 70 mmol/L; 3) dimethylacetamide (DMA) 6%; 4) DMA 6% and trehalose 70 mmol/L. Both fresh and frozen semen showed a lower viability and higher intracellular ATP concentrations in the Barbary partridge compared with the rooster (P < 0.05). In the Barbary partridge, semen viability after thawing did not differ among the 4 media used, but glycerol showed positive effects in avoiding a significant loss of ATP after thawing, compared with DMA containing media (P < 0.05). On the other hand, in the rooster a higher viability was recorded when semen was frozen in glycerol containing media compared to DMA (P < 0.0001), while ATP values significantly decreased after thawing (P < 0.05) without showing any differences among the semen frozen in the 4 different media. DNA integrity, as evaluated by the comet assay, was assessed only in frozen semen. In the Barbary partridge, mean scored parameter did not differ significantly among semen frozen in the 4 different media. In the rooster DNA fragmentation was higher in DMA ctr medium compared with the other media and with values found in Barbary partridge semen frozen in the same medium (P < 0.001). In both species, the addition of trehalose did not show any positive effects on viability, ATP levels and DNA integrity after thawing. In conclusion, species-related differences in semen features exist between the rooster and the Barbary partridge and the wide variation observed in ATP levels may account for differences

  8. Chicken (Gallus domesticus) inner ear afferents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hara, H.; Chen, X.; Hartsfield, J. F.; Hara, J.; Martin, D.; Fermin, C. D.

    1998-01-01

    Neurons from the vestibular (VG) and the statoacoustic (SAG) ganglion of the chick (Gallus domesticus) were evaluated histologically and morphometrically. Embryos at stages 34 (E8 days), 39 (E13 days) and 44 (E18 days) were sacrificed and temporal bones microdissected. Specimens were embedded in JB-4 methacrylate plastic, and stained with a mixture of 0.2% toluidine blue (TB) and 0.1% basic Fuschin in 25% ethanol or with a mixture of 2% TB and 1% paraphenylenediamine (PDA) for axon and myelin measurement study. Images of the VIIIth nerve were produced by a V150 (R) color imaging system and the contour of 200-300 neuronal bodies (perikarya) was traced directly on a video screen with a mouse in real time. The cross-sectional area of VG perikarya was 67.29 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 128.46 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 275.85 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). The cross-sectional area of SAG perikarya was 62.44 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 102.05 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 165.02 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). A significant cross-sectional area increase of the VG perikarya between stage 39 (E13) and stage 44 (E18) was determined. We randomly measured the cross-sectional area of myelin and axoplasm of hatchling afferent nerves, and found a correspondence between axoplasmic and myelin cross-sectional area in the utricular, saccular and semicircular canal nerve branches of the nerve. The results suggest that the period between stage 34 (E8) and 39 (E13) is a critical period for afferent neuronal development. Physiological and behavioral vestibular properties of developing and maturing hatchlings may change accordingly. The results compliment previous work by other investigators and provide valuable anatomical measures useful to correlate physiological data obtained from stimulation of the whole nerve or its parts.

  9. Polytetrafluoroethylene Toxicosis in Recently Hatched Chickens (Gallus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    Shuster, Katherine A; Brock, Kristie L; Dysko, Robert C; DiRita, Victor J; Bergin, Ingrid L

    2012-01-01

    Two groups of chickens (Gallus domesticus; White Leghorn; age, 4 d and 2 wk) housed in a university research vivarium were found dead or moribund without prior signs of illness. The overall mortality rates were 92.3% (60 of 65 birds) for the 4-d-old birds and 80% (8 of 10) for the 2-wk-old birds. All chicks were housed in brooders with heat lamps in a temperature- and humidity-controlled room. Primary gross findings were mild to moderate dehydration and hepatic lipidosis. The most consistent histologic findings were pulmonary hemorrhage and edema in all 7 of the 4-d-old birds evaluated and in all 4 of the 2-wk-old birds assessed. In addition, 1 of the 4-d-old birds had multifocal centrilobular hepatic necrosis. These findings suggested an inhaled toxicant and hypoxia, respectively. Inspection of the animal room revealed that approximately 50% of the heat lamp bulbs in the brooder cage were coated with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). Two published case reports detail similar experiences in birds exposed to PTFE-coated heat-lamp bulbs. Birds are highly sensitive to inhaled toxicants owing to the high efficiency of their respiratory systems, and PTFE toxicosis is known to cause pulmonary edema and hemorrhage in pet birds after exposure to overheated nonstick cookware. In the present case, the bulbs were replaced, and no similar problems subsequently have been noted. This case illustrates the sensitivity of avian species to respiratory toxicants and serves as a reminder that toxicosis can be encountered even in the controlled environment of a laboratory vivarium. PMID:22330651

  10. Comparison of the measurement of heart rate in adult free-range chickens (Gallus domesticus) by auscultation and electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    Smith, C F; Gavaghan, B J; McSweeney, D; Powell, V; Lisle, A

    2014-12-01

    To compare the heart rates of adult free-range chickens (Gallus domesticus) measured by auscultation with a stethoscope with those measured simultaneously using electrocardiography (ECG). With each bird in a standing position, estimation of the heart rate was performed by placing a mark on paper for every 4 beats for roosters and 8 beats for hens as detected by auscultation over 30 s, while simultaneous ECG was performed. Heart rates measured by auscultation showed a high correlation (r = 0.97) with those measured by ECG. There was a high correlation between the heart rates of adult free-range chickens measured by auscultation with a stethoscope and those measured simultaneously using ECG. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  11. Arsenic affects inflammatory cytokine expression in Gallus gallus brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao; He, Ying; Guo, Ying; Li, Siwen; Zhao, Hongjing; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Jingyu; Xing, Mingwei

    2017-06-05

    The heavy metal arsenic is widely distributed in nature and posses a serious threat to organism's health. However, little is known about the arsenic-induced inflammatory response in the brain tissues of birds and the relationship and mechanism of the inflammatory response. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of dietary arsenic on the expression of inflammatory cytokines in the brains of Gallus gallus. Seventy-two 1-day-old male Hy-line chickens were divided into a control group, a low arsenic trioxide (As 2 O 3 )-treated (7.5 mg/kg) group, a middle As 2 O 3 -treated (15 mg/kg) group, and a high As 2 O 3 -treated (30 mg/kg) group. Arsenic exposure caused obvious ultrastructural changes. The mRNA levels of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and prostaglandin E synthase (PTGEs), in chicken brain tissues (cerebrum, cerebellum, thalamus, brainstem and myelencephalon) on days 30, 60 and 90, respectively, were measured by real-time PCR. The protein expression of iNOS was detected by western blot. The results showed that after being treated with As 2 O 3, the levels of inflammatory-related factor NF-κB and pro-inflammatory cytokines in chicken brain tissues increased (P < 0.05). Arsenic exposure in the chickens triggered host defence and induced an inflammatory response by regulating the expression of inflammatory-related genes in the cerebrum, cerebellum, thalamus, brainstem and myelencephalon. These data form a foundation for further research on arsenic-induced neurotoxicity in Gallus gallus.

  12. Maintenance of syntenic groups between Cathartidae and Gallus gallus indicates symplesiomorphic karyotypes in new world vultures

    PubMed Central

    Tagliarini, Marcella M.; O'Brien, Patricia C.M.; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A.; de Oliveira, Edivaldo H.C.

    2011-01-01

    Similarities between New World and Old World vultures have been interpreted to reflect a close relationship and to suggest the inclusion of both in Accipitridae (Falconiformes). However, deeper analyses indicated that the placement of the New World vultures (cathartids) in this Order is uncertain. Chromosome analysis has shown that cathartids retained a karyotype similar to the putative avian ancestor. In order to verify the occurrence of intrachromosomal rearrangements in cathartids, we hybridized whole chromosome probes of two species (Gallus gallus and Leucopternis albicollis) onto metaphases of Cathartes aura. The results showed that not only were the syntenic groups conserved between Gallus and C. aura, but probably also the general gene order, suggesting that New World vultures share chromosomal symplesiomorphies with most bird lineages. PMID:21637548

  13. Alterations in the gut (Gallus gallus) microbiota following the consumption of zinc biofortified wheat (Triticum aestivum) -based diet

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The structure and function of the cecal microbiota following the consumption of a zinc (Zn) biofortified wheat diet was evaluated in a novel animal model of human nutrition (Gallus gallus) during a six-week efficacy trial. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, a significant increase in B- but not a- micro...

  14. The in ovo feeding administration (gallus gallus)-an emerging in vivo approach to assess bioactive compounds with potential nutritional benefits

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In recent years, the in ovo feeding in fertilized broiler (Gallus gallus) eggs approach was further developed and currently is widely applied in the evaluation process of the effects of functional foods (primarily plant origin compounds) on the functionality of the intestinal brush border membrane, ...

  15. Novel haemoglobin-derived antimicrobial peptides from chicken (Gallus gallus) blood: purification, structural aspects and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Vasilchenko, A S; Rogozhin, E A; Vasilchenko, A V; Kartashova, O L; Sycheva, M V

    2016-12-01

    To purify and characterize antimicrobial peptides derived from the acid extract of Gallus gallus blood cells. Two polypeptides (i.e. CHb-1 and CHb-2) with antibacterial activity were detected in the acidic extract of blood cells from chicken (G. gallus). The isolated peptides that possessed a potent antibacterial activity were purified using a two-step chromatography procedure that involved solid-phase extraction of a total protein/peptide extract followed by thin fractionation by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The molecular masses of the purified peptides were similar and were 4824·4 and 4825·2 Da, which have been measured by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS). Their amino acid sequences were determined by Edman degradation and showed that the peptides were fully identical to the two fragments of G. gallus α-haemoglobin localized into different subunits (A and D respectively). The peptides were active in micromolar concentrations against Gram-negative Escherichia coli K12 TG1. Using the 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine, the FITC-dextran labelled probes and the live/dead staining allowed to show the hemocidin mode of action and estimate the pore size. In this study, for the first time, α-haemoglobin from chicken (G. gallus) has been investigated as a donor of the two high homologous native peptide fragments that possess potent antibacterial activity in vitro. These are membrane-active peptides and their mechanism of action against E. coli involves a toroidal pore formation. The obtained results expand the perception of the role of haemoglobin in a living system, describing it as a source of multifunction substances. Additionally, the data presented in this paper may contribute to the development of new, cost-effective, antimicrobial agents. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Affiliation and aggression as related to gender in domestic chicks (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Vallortigara, G

    1992-03-01

    Social discrimination in male and female domestic chicks (Gallus gallus) was investigated by using (a) latencies of approach response, (b) simultaneous free choice, and (c) intersubject aggressive-pecking tests. In approach-response tests, females showed shorter latencies when tested with cagemates than when tested with strangers, whereas males showed shorter latencies when tested with strangers than when tested with cagemates. In simultaneous-choice tests, females spent more time near a cagemate, whereas males spent more time near a strange chick. In aggressive-pecking tests, both sexes pecked more at strangers than at cagemates; aggressive pecking at strangers, however, was higher in males than in females. It is argued that gender effects in social discrimination can be accounted for in terms of stronger social attachment in females and aggressive responses in males.

  17. Effectiveness duckweed (Lemna minor) as an alternative native chicken feed native chicken (Gallus domesticus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putra, A.; Ritonga, M. Z.

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to know the effectiveness duckweed as feed as native chicken (Gallus domesticus) on growth period (weight gain, feed intake and feed conversion). This research was conducted in Desa Telaga Jernih Kabupaten Langkat. The study was conducted in February 2017 until May 2017. This study use completely randomized design (CRD) with 4 treatments and 5 Replication, where each treatment consisting of 5 Native chickens unsexing. The treatment was used P0 = control (feed manufacturing), P1 = ration conventional with 10% duckweed, P2 = ration conventional with 20% duckweed, P3 = ration conventional with 30% duckweed. The parameters observed were weight gain, feed consumption and feed conversion. The results showed not significantly effect in body weight gain, feed consumption and feed conversion. Where the average of best weight gain on treatment P0 (control), P2 (20% duckweed), P3 (30% duckweed) and P1 (10% duckweed), average of best feed consumption in P0 (control), P2 (20% duckweed ) Of P1 (10% duckweed) and P3 (30% duckweed), P1 (10% duckweed) and P3 (30% duckweed), average of best feed conversion rate in P0 (control), P2 (20% duckweed) P1 (10% duckweed) and P3 (30% duckweed).

  18. Biochemical characterization of the selenoproteome in Gallus gallus via bioinformatics analysis: structure-function relationships and interactions of binding molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shi-Yong; Li, Xue-Nan; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Lin, Jia; Li, Wei; Zhang, Cong; Li, Jin-Long

    2017-02-22

    Knowledge about mammalian selenoproteins is increasing. However, the selenoproteome of birds remains considerably less understood, especially concerning its biochemical characterization, structure-function relationships and the interactions of binding molecules. In this work, the SECIS elements, subcellular localization, protein domains and interactions of binding molecules of the selenoproteome in Gallus gallus were analyzed using bioinformatics tools. We carried out comprehensive analyses of the structure-function relationships and interactions of the binding molecules of selenoproteins, to provide biochemical characterization of the selenoproteome in Gallus gallus. Our data provided a wealth of information on the biochemical functions of bird selenoproteins. Members of the selenoproteome were found to be involved in various biological processes in chickens, such as in antioxidants, maintenance of the redox balance, Se transport, and interactions with metals. Six membrane-bound selenoproteins (SelI, SelK, SelS, SelT, DIO1 and DIO3) played important roles in maintaining the membrane integrity. Chicken selenoproteins were classified according to their ligand binding sites as zinc-containing matrix metalloselenoproteins (Sep15, MsrB1, SelW and SelM), POP-containing selenoproteins (GPx1-4), FAD-interacting selenoproteins (TrxR1-3), secretory transport selenoproteins (GPx3 and SelPa) and other selenoproteins. The results of our study provided new evidence for the unknown biological functions of the selenoproteome in birds. Future research is required to confirm the novel biochemical functions of bird selenoproteins.

  19. Energy metabolism in isolated chick (Gallus domesticus) gastrocnemius and tilapia (Tilapia mossambica) epaxial muscle at various temperatures in vitro.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, E Y; Early, R J; Patterson, P H

    1994-09-01

    Muscle respiration experiments on inhibitor dosage (experiment 1), muscle preparation (tendons removed vs. unstretched vs. stretched muscles; chick muscle only; experiment 2) and media temperature (26.5, 32, 37, 42 degrees C; experiment 3) were conducted on chick (Gallus domesticus) gastrocnemius and tilapia (Tilapia mossambica) epaxial muscle in vitro. Experiment 1: The dosage of cycloheximide and ouabain required for maximum inhibition of protein synthesis and Na+,K+ ATPase, respectively, in chick and tilapia muscle was approximately 6 x 10(-5) M. Experiment 2: Removing the tendons of chick muscle decreased (% inhibition, P = 0.05) cycloheximide-sensitive respiration compared to stretched and unstretched muscles (tendons intact). However, muscle preparation had little influence on ouabain-sensitive respiration. Experiment 3: Cycloheximide-sensitive respiration tended to increase (microliter O2/mg DNA.hr, P = 0.054) with media temperature in tilapia muscle. Chick muscle was less responsive in this respect. Ouabain-sensitive respiration increased at lower temperature in chick muscle (% inhibition, cubic relationship, P = 0.001) and at higher temperature in tilapia muscle (% inhibition, quadratic relationship, P = 0.0002).

  20. Effects of in ovo exposure to 2,3,7,8-TCDD on F1 generation adult chickens (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Alonso, K R; Peden-Adams, M M; Liu, J Y; Charbonneau, C; Henshel, D; Dickerson, R L

    1998-01-01

    White Leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus) were used as surrogate species for the resident wild turkeys found on the Times Beach, Missouri, Superfund site. Parental chickens were injected with concentrations of 2,3,7,8-TCDD which modeled soil concentrations before (200 ppb) and after remediation (1ppb)[1]. Offspring were followed through development to assess alterations in reproductive maturity through the use of a four-way breeding study. F1 adult females exposed to a maternal dose of 8.6 ng/day began egg production approximately two weeks later than did F1 control adult females. By week eight, however, egg production between groups was equivalent. No differences were observed in eggshell gland estrogen or progesterone receptor levels.

  1. Ontogenetic development of magnetic compass orientation in domestic chickens (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Denzau, Susanne; Nießner, Christine; Rogers, Lesley J; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2013-08-15

    Domestic chickens (Gallus gallus) can be trained to search for a social stimulus in a specific magnetic direction, and cryptochrome 1a, found in the retina, has been proposed as a receptor molecule mediating magnetic directions. The present study combines immuno-histochemical and behavioural data to analyse the ontogenetic development of this ability. Newly hatched chicks already have a small amount of cryptochrome 1a in their violet cones; on day 5, the amount of cryptochrome 1a reached the same level as in adult chickens, suggesting that the physical basis for magnetoreception is present. In behavioural tests, however, young chicks 5 to 7 days old failed to show a preference of the training direction; on days 8, 9 and 12, they could be successfully trained to search along a specific magnetic axis. Trained and tested again 1 week later, the chicks that had not shown a directional preference on days 5 to 7 continued to search randomly, while the chicks tested from day 8 onward preferred the correct magnetic axis when tested 1 week later. The observation that the magnetic compass is not functional before day 8 suggests that certain maturation processes in the magnetosensitive system in the brain are not yet complete before that day. The reasons why chicks that have been trained before that day fail to learn the task later remain unclear.

  2. Ratio abstraction over discrete magnitudes by newly hatched domestic chicks (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Rugani, Rosa; McCrink, Koleen; de Hevia, Maria-Dolores; Vallortigara, Giorgio; Regolin, Lucia

    2016-07-28

    A large body of literature shows that non-human animals master a variety of numerical tasks, but studies involving proportional discrimination are sparse and primarily done with mature animals. Here we trained 4-day-old domestic chicks (Gallus gallus) to respond to stimuli depicting multiple examples of the proportion 4:1 when compared with the proportion 2:1. Stimuli were composed of green and red dot arrays; for the rewarded 4:1 proportion, 4 green dots for every red dot (e.g. ratios: 32:8, 12:3, and 44:11). The birds continued to discriminate when presented with new ratios at test (such as 20:5), characterized by new numbers of dots and new spatial configurations (Experiment 1). This indicates that chicks can extract the common proportional value shared by different ratios and apply it to new ones. In Experiment 2, chicks identified a specific proportion (2:1) from either a smaller (4:1) or a larger one (1:1), demonstrating an ability to represent the specific, and not relative, value of a particular proportion. Again, at test, chicks selectively responded to the previously reinforced proportion from new ratios. These findings provide strong evidence for very young animals' ability to extract, identify, and productively use proportion information across a range of different amounts.

  3. The In Ovo Feeding Administration (Gallus Gallus)—An Emerging In Vivo Approach to Assess Bioactive Compounds with Potential Nutritional Benefits

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, the in ovo feeding in fertilized broiler (Gallus gallus) eggs approach was further developed and currently is widely applied in the evaluation process of the effects of functional foods (primarily plant origin compounds) on the functionality of the intestinal brush border membrane, as well as potential prebiotic properties and interactions with the intestinal microbial populations. This review collates the information of potential nutrients and their effects on the mineral absorption, gut development, brush border membrane functionality, and immune system. In addition, the advantages and limitations of the in ovo feeding method in the assessment of potential prebiotic effects of plant origin compounds is discussed. PMID:29597266

  4. Holocene cultural history of Red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus) and its domestic descendant in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Joris; Lebrasseur, Ophélie; Deng, Hui; Larson, Greger

    2016-06-01

    Nearly three decades ago, zooarchaeologists postulated that chicken husbandry was practiced in Northern China by ∼8.0 ka calBP. Recently, ancient mitogenome analyses of galliform remains suggested that Red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus) was already present in the Yellow River basin several millennia earlier, shortly after the onset of the Holocene. If these conclusions are correct, the origins of chicken domestication and husbandry in the region may have been spurred by agricultural innovations in the lower Yellow River basin including millet cultivation, pig husbandry, and dog breeding. In addition, the dispersal of poultry farming from East Asia to Asia Minor and Europe could therefore date to the Neolithic along ancient trade routes across Central Asia rather than via South Asia and Mesopotamia. For this scenario to be plausible, the post-Pleistocene climatic conditions must have been favourable to allow for a northward extension of the native distribution of tropical Red jungle fowl currently not found north of ∼25°N. This study combines Holocene palaeoclimate and archaeofaunal archives with new zooarchaeological insights alongside a discussion of methodological issues and cultural aspects in order to revisit the hypothesis of an early Holocene Gallus domestication and Neolithic poultry husbandry in Northern China. Our results regarding the natural and cultural history of Red jungle fowl and domestic chickens in East Asia, and the timing of chicken dispersal across the Old World suggest that an early Holocene domestication of chickens is problematic at best. We conclude by postulating an alternative model for the early exploitation of a key domestic species in present-day East Asia.

  5. Calcium Isotope Systematics During Development of the Domestic Chicken (Gallus gallus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, P. V.

    2003-12-01

    Calcium isotope distributions have been recognized as showing systematic and predictable fractionation in nature. However, most of the observed calcium isotope fractionation to date is due to biological processes. The presence of abundant amounts of calcium in mineralized tissues makes the isotopic system of calcium particularly valuable in biological and paleobiological questions involving biomineralization. In order to apply calcium isotope systematics to paleobiological questions the changes in the calcium isotope signatures of mineralized tissue in modern animals should be studied. My study observed the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus) through embryologic ontogeny. This was accomplished by obtaining fertilized eggs staged in a growth series from day 12 to day 20. The eggs were dissected and shell, embryonic bone, albumen, and yolk were analyzed in order to characterize the calcium isotopic composition of the individual components over the course of the growth series. Several systematic changes in the isotopic signatures of various tissues were observed during the course of the development of the embryos. In general, mineralization in biological systems preferentially partitions the lighter isotopes of calcium into hard parts. As a result of this fractionation during mineralization, partitioning of light isotopes of calcium into the mineralized tissues may result in residual tissues being enriched in the heavier isotopes as ontogeny progresses. Better understanding of the behavior of calcium in modern biological systems will improve its application to fossils and expand the number of paleobiological and evolutionary questions that can be addressed using calcium isotopic data.

  6. The Combined Application of the Caco-2 Cell Bioassay Coupled with In Vivo (Gallus gallus) Feeding Trial Represents an Effective Approach to Predicting Fe Bioavailability in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Tako, Elad; Bar, Haim; Glahn, Raymond P.

    2016-01-01

    Research methods that predict Fe bioavailability for humans can be extremely useful in evaluating food fortification strategies, developing Fe-biofortified enhanced staple food crops and assessing the Fe bioavailability of meal plans that include such crops. In this review, research from four recent poultry (Gallus gallus) feeding trials coupled with in vitro analyses of Fe-biofortified crops will be compared to the parallel human efficacy studies which used the same varieties and harvests of the Fe-biofortified crops. Similar to the human studies, these trials were aimed to assess the potential effects of regular consumption of these enhanced staple crops on maintenance or improvement of iron status. The results demonstrate a strong agreement between the in vitro/in vivo screening approach and the parallel human studies. These observations therefore indicate that the in vitro/Caco-2 cell and Gallus gallus models can be integral tools to develop varieties of staple food crops and predict their effect on iron status in humans. The cost-effectiveness of this approach also means that it can be used to monitor the nutritional stability of the Fe-biofortified crop once a variety has released and integrated into the food system. These screening tools therefore represent a significant advancement to the field for crop development and can be applied to ensure the sustainability of the biofortification approach. PMID:27869705

  7. Antibiotic resistant salmonella and Escherichia coli isolated from indigenous Gallus domesticus in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Wesonga, S M; Muluvi, G M; Okemo, P O; Kariuki, S

    2010-05-01

    To characterise and investigate antimicrobial resistance of Esherichia coli and salmonella strains isolated from indigenous Gallus gallus in a leading slaughterhouse/market outlet in Nairobi-Kenya. A repeated cross sectional study and based on random sampling was used. The study was carried out in a leading market outlet in Nairobi, Kenya. A hundred and four indigenous chicken rectal swabs were analysed, of which 67.3% were contaminated with Escherichia coli and 12.5% with Salmonella typhimurium. Seventy Escherichia coli isolates showed resistance phenotypes to one, two or more antibiotics. The most common antimicrobial resistance pattern was the single resistance to Tet (21.43%), followed by Amp Cot Tet (14%), Aug Amp Cot Tet (4.29%), Aug Amp Cot Tet Kan Chl (2.86%), Amp Cot Tet Chl, Cot Tet (2.86%) and Crx Amp Cot Tet Chl, Crx Amp Cot Chi, Amp Cot, Aug Amp, (1.43%) respectively. The highest rate of resistance was against Tet (55.7%), followed by Cot (40%). Third in line of resistance was Amp 32.86%, followed by Aug (11.43%), low or moderate resistance was against Chl (8.57%), Kan (4.29%), and Crx (2.86%) (P<0.0002). Salmonella typhimurium recovered displayed single resistance pattern to Tet (16.67%), Gen Cot Tet (8.33%), Amp Cot Tet (8.33%), Aug Amp Cot Tet (8.33%) and Amp Cot Tet Chl (16.67%). The highest resistance was against Tet (58.3%), Cot (41.7%), Amp (33.3%), Chl (16.7%), Aug and Gen (8.3%) respectively (P<0.0001). 3.0kb and 5.6kb plasmids isolated were not transferable by conjugation. Routine surveillance at slaughter/market outlets of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica should be done to identify infected flocks as a regulatory procedure for food safety and security programme.

  8. High spatial resolution Mg/Al maps of the western Crisium and Sulpicius Gallus regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonfeld, E.

    1982-01-01

    High spatial resolution Mg/Al ratio maps of the western Crisium and Sulpicius Gallus regions of the moon are presented. The data is from the X-ray fluorescence experiment and the image enhancement technique in the Laplacian subtraction method using a special least-squares version of the Laplacian to reduce noise amplification. In the highlands region west of Mare Crisium several relatively small patches of smooth material have high local Mg/Al ratio similar to values found in mare sites, suggesting volcanism in the highlands. In the same highland region there were other smooth areas with no high Mg/Al local values and they are probably Cayley Formation material produced by impact mass wasting. The Sulpicius Gallus region has variable Mg/Al ratios. In this region there are several high Mg/Al ratio spots, two of which occur at the highland-mare interface. Another high Mg/Al ratio area corresponds to the Sulpicius Gallus Rima I region. The high Mg/Al ratio material in the Sulpicius Gallus region is probably pyroclastic.

  9. Phthiraptera (Arthropoda, Insecta) in Gallus gallus from isolated and mixed backyard rearing systems.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Ana Clara Gomes; Rodrigues, Albério Lopes; Dos Santos, Sandra Batista; Lima, Roberto César Araújo; Guerra, Rita de Maria Seabra Nogueira de Candanedo

    2011-01-01

    The objectives were to identify the species of chewing lice (Mallophaga) at different body sites in chickens (Gallus gallus), in isolated and mixed rearing systems, and to determine the dynamics and structure of the louse populations collected. The prevalences were 100 and 35% for chickens in the isolated and mixed systems, respectively. The species recorded were: Menopon gallinae, Menacanthus stramineus, Goniodes gigas, Goniocotes gallinae and Lipeurus caponis. The chickens in the isolated system presented more lice than did the ones in the mixed system. The most prevalent species were M. gallinae (30.58 and 62.31%) and L. caponis (29.12 and 14.49%), in the isolated and mixed systems, respectively. The preferential sites of parasitism were the dorsum, venter and wings among the chickens in the isolated system, while among the ones in the mixed system, the preferential sites were the dorsum and venter. The mean intensity of infestation in the isolated system was 111.4 for males and 19.1 for females, while in the mixed system it was 80 for males and 6.75 for females. The amplitudes of the infestation were 1-226 for males and 1-22 for females in the isolated system, while in the mixed system, the amplitudes were 1-111 and 1-8, respectively. It can be concluded that chickens reared in the isolated system harbor a greater number of lice than do chickens in the mixed system. However, the kind of rearing system does not prevent louse infestations.

  10. Red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus) as a model for studying the molecular mechanism of seasonal reproduction.

    PubMed

    Ono, Hiroko; Nakao, Nobuhiro; Yamamura, Takashi; Kinoshita, Keiji; Mizutani, Makoto; Namikawa, Takao; Iigo, Masayuki; Ebihara, Shizufumi; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2009-06-01

    Photoperiodism is an adaptation mechanism that enables animals to predict seasonal changes in the environment. Japanese quail is the best model organism for studying photoperiodism. Although the recent availability of chicken genome sequences has permitted the expansion from single gene to genome-wide transcriptional analysis in this organism, the photoperiodic response of the domestic chicken is less robust than that of the quail. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the photoperiodic response of the red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus), a predecessor of the domestic chicken, to test whether this animal could be developed as an ideal model for studying the molecular mechanisms of seasonal reproduction. When red jungle fowls were transferred from short-day- to long-day conditions, gonadal development and an increase in plasma LH concentration were observed. Furthermore, rapid induction of thyrotropin beta subunit, a master regulator of photoperiodism, was observed at 16 h after dawn on the first long day. In addition, the long-day condition induced the expression of type 2 deiodinase, the key output gene of photoperiodism. These results were consistent with the results obtained in quail and suggest that the red jungle fowl could be an ideal model animal for the genome-wide transcriptional analysis of photoperiodism.

  11. The relationship of spectral sensitivity with growth and reproductive response in avian breeders (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ye-Feng; Jiang, Jing-Song; Pan, Jin-Ming; Ying, Yi-Bin; Wang, Xiao-Shuang; Zhang, Ming-Li; Lu, Min-Si; Chen, Xian-Hui

    2016-01-01

    A previous study demonstrated that birds that are exposed to light at night develop advanced reproductive systems. However, spectrum might also affect the photoperiodic response of birds. The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of spectral composition on the growth and reproductive physiology of female breeders, using pure light-emitting diode spectra. A total of 1,000 newly hatched female avian breeders (Gallus gallus) were equally allocated to white-, red-, yellow-, green- and blue-light treated groups. We found that blue-light treated birds had a greater and faster weight gain than did red- and yellow-light treated birds (P = 0.02 and 0.05). The red light expedited the sexual maturation of the chicks, whose age at sexual maturity was 7 and 14 days earlier than that of the green- and blue-light treated birds, respectively. The accumulative egg production of the red-light treated birds was 9 and 8 eggs more than that of the blue- and green-light treated birds. The peak lay rate of the red-light treated groups was significantly greater than the blue-light treated birds (P = 0.028). In conclusion, exposure to short-wavelength light appears to promote growth of female breeder birds, whereas exposure to long-wavelength light appears to accelerate reproductive performance. PMID:26765747

  12. Egg incubation position affects toxicity of air cell administered PCB 126 (3,3?4,4?,5- pentachlorobiphenyl) in chicken (Gallus domesticus) embryos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKernan, M.A.; Rattner, B.A.; Hale, R.C.; Ottinger, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    The avian egg is used extensively for chemical screening and determining the relative sensitivity of species to environmental contaminants (e.g., metals, pesticides, polyhalogenated compounds). The effect of egg incubation position on embryonic survival, pipping, and hatching success was examined following air cell administration of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener 126 (3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl [PCB 126]; 500?2,000 pg/g egg) on day 4 of development in fertile chicken (Gallus gallus) eggs. Depending on dose, toxicity was found to be up to nine times greater in vertically versus horizontally incubated eggs. This may be due to enhanced embryonic exposure to the injection bolus in vertically incubated eggs compared to more gradual uptake in horizontally incubated eggs. Following air cell administration of PCB 126, horizontal incubation of eggs may more closely approximate uptake and toxicity that has been observed with naturally incorporated contaminants. These data have implications for chemical screening and use of laboratory data for ecological risk assessments.

  13. Sperm subpopulations in avian species: a comparative study between the rooster (Gallus domesticus) and Guinea fowl (Numida meleagris).

    PubMed

    García-Herreros, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The main aims of this research were to study possible differences in objective morphometric sperm characteristics, establish normative sperm morphometry standards, and evaluate the presumed different subpopulation distribution of avian spermatozoa from the rooster (Gallus domesticus ) and Guinea fowl (Numida meleagris ) as model avian species. Seventy-two ejaculates (36 per species studied) were obtained manually, following a training period involving gently combined dorso-abdominal and lumbo-sacral massage of the birds. Ejaculates were processed for volume, sperm concentration, viability, motility, and morphology. Moreover, samples were submitted for sperm morphometric assessment using objective Computer-Assisted Semen Analysis for Morphometry (CASA-Morph) methods, with sperm morphometric descriptors evaluated by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and multivariate clustering analyses. There were several differences observed between the avian species in values obtained for ejaculate volume and sperm concentration (P < 0.001). Irrespective of species, PCA revealed two Principal Components (PCs) explaining more than 80% of the variance. In addition, the number of subpopulations differed with species (three and five subpopulations for rooster and Guinea fowl, respectively). Moreover, the distribution of the sperm subpopulations was found to be structurally different between species. In conclusion, our findings from using CASA-Morph methods indicate pronounced sperm morphometric variation between these two avian species. Because of the strong differences observed in morphometric parameter values and their subpopulation distribution, these results suggest that application of objective analytical methods such as CASA-Morph could substantially improve the reliability of comparative studies and help establish valid normative sperm morphological values for avian species.

  14. Sperm subpopulations in avian species: a comparative study between the rooster (Gallus domesticus) and Guinea fowl (Numida meleagris)

    PubMed Central

    García-Herreros, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The main aims of this research were to study possible differences in objective morphometric sperm characteristics, establish normative sperm morphometry standards, and evaluate the presumed different subpopulation distribution of avian spermatozoa from the rooster (Gallus domesticus) and Guinea fowl (Numida meleagris) as model avian species. Seventy-two ejaculates (36 per species studied) were obtained manually, following a training period involving gently combined dorso-abdominal and lumbo-sacral massage of the birds. Ejaculates were processed for volume, sperm concentration, viability, motility, and morphology. Moreover, samples were submitted for sperm morphometric assessment using objective Computer-Assisted Semen Analysis for Morphometry (CASA-Morph) methods, with sperm morphometric descriptors evaluated by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and multivariate clustering analyses. There were several differences observed between the avian species in values obtained for ejaculate volume and sperm concentration (P < 0.001). Irrespective of species, PCA revealed two Principal Components (PCs) explaining more than 80% of the variance. In addition, the number of subpopulations differed with species (three and five subpopulations for rooster and Guinea fowl, respectively). Moreover, the distribution of the sperm subpopulations was found to be structurally different between species. In conclusion, our findings from using CASA-Morph methods indicate pronounced sperm morphometric variation between these two avian species. Because of the strong differences observed in morphometric parameter values and their subpopulation distribution, these results suggest that application of objective analytical methods such as CASA-Morph could substantially improve the reliability of comparative studies and help establish valid normative sperm morphological values for avian species. PMID:27751988

  15. Neurotoxicity induced by arsenic in Gallus Gallus: Regulation of oxidative stress and heat shock protein response.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Panpan; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Wen; Chai, Hongliang; Xing, Houjuan; Xing, Mingwei

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic, a naturally occurring heavy metal pollutant, is one of the functioning risk factors for neurological toxicity in humans. However, little is known about the effects of arsenic on the nervous system of Gallus Gallus. To investigate whether arsenic induce neurotoxicity and influence the oxidative stress and heat shock proteins (Hsps) response in chickens, seventy-two 1-day-old male Hy-line chickens were treated with different doses of arsenic trioxide (As 2 O 3 ). The histological changes, antioxidant enzyme activity, and the expressions of Hsps were detected. Results showed slightly histology changes were obvious in the brain tissues exposure to arsenic. The activities of Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT) were decreased compared to the control, whereas the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was increased gradually along with increase in diet-arsenic. The mRNA levels of Hsps and protein expressions of Hsp60 and Hsp70 were up-regulated. These results suggested that sub-chronic exposure to arsenic induced neurotoxicity in chickens. Arsenic exposure disturbed the balance of oxidants and antioxidants. Increased heat shock response tried to protect chicken brain tissues from tissues damage caused by oxidative stress. The mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced by arsenic include oxidative stress and heat shock protein response in chicken brain tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Gallus gallus orthologous to human alpha-dystroglycanopathies candidate genes: Gene expression and characterization during chicken embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo-Lahuerta, Adriana; de Luis, Oscar; Gómez-Esquer, Francisco; Cruces, Jesús; Coloma, Antonio

    2016-09-23

    Alpha-dystroglycanopathies are a heterogenic group of human rare diseases that have in common defects of α-dystroglycan O-glycosylation. These congenital disorders share common features as muscular dystrophy, malformations on central nervous system and more rarely altered ocular development, as well as mutations on a set of candidate genes involved on those syndromes. Severity of the syndromes is variable, appearing Walker-Warburg as the most severe where mutations at protein O-mannosyl transferases POMT1 and POMT2 genes are frequently described. When studying the lack of MmPomt1 in mouse embryonic development, as a murine model of Walker-Warburg syndrome, MmPomt1 null phenotype was lethal because Reitchert's membrane fails during embryonic development. Here, we report gene expression from Gallus gallus orthologous genes to human candidates on alpha-dystroglycanopathies POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1, FKTN, FKRP and LARGE, making special emphasis in expression and localization of GgPomt1. Results obtained by quantitative RT-PCR, western-blot and immunochemistry revealed close gene expression patterns among human and chicken at key tissues affected during development when suffering an alpha-dystroglycanopathy, leading us to stand chicken as a useful animal model for molecular characterization of glycosyltransferases involved in the O-glycosylation of α-Dystroglycan and its role in embryonic development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Alterations in the Gut ( Gallus gallus) Microbiota Following the Consumption of Zinc Biofortified Wheat ( Triticum aestivum)-Based Diet.

    PubMed

    Reed, Spenser; Knez, Marija; Uzan, Atara; Stangoulis, James C R; Glahn, Raymond P; Koren, Omry; Tako, Elad

    2018-06-15

    The structure and function of cecal microbiota following the consumption of a zinc (Zn) biofortified wheat diet was evaluated in a well-studied animal model of human nutrition ( Gallus gallus) during a six-week efficacy trial. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, a significant increase in β- but not α-microbial diversity was observed in the animals receiving the Zn biofortified wheat diet, relative to the control. No significant taxonomic differences were found between the two groups. Linear discriminant analysis revealed a group of metagenomic biomarkers that delineated the Zn replete versus Zn deficient phenotypes, such that enrichment of lactic acid bacteria and concomitant increases in Zn-dependent bacterial metabolic pathways were observed in the Zn biofortified group, and expansion of mucin-degraders and specific bacterial groups able to participate in maintaining host Zn homeostasis were observed in the control group. Additionally, the Ruminococcus genus appeared to be a key player in delineating the Zn replete microbiota from the control group, as it strongly predicts host Zn adequacy. Our data demonstrate that the gut microbiome associated with Zn biofortified wheat ingestion is unique and may influence host Zn status. Microbiota analysis in biofortification trials represents a crucial area for study as Zn biofortified diets are increasingly delivered on a population-wide scale.

  18. Age-specific oxidative status and the expression of pre- and postcopulatory sexually selected traits in male red junglefowl, Gallus gallus

    PubMed Central

    Noguera, Jose C; Dean, Rebecca; Isaksson, Caroline; Velando, Alberto; Pizzari, Tommaso

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress is emerging as a key factor underpinning life history and the expression of sexually selected traits. Resolving the role of oxidative stress in life history and sexual selection requires a pluralistic approach, which investigates how age affects the relationship between oxidative status (i.e., antioxidants and oxidative damage) and the multiple traits contributing to variation in reproductive success. Here, we investigate the relationship between oxidative status and the expression of multiple sexually selected traits in two-age classes of male red junglefowl, Gallus gallus, a species which displays marked male reproductive senescence. We found that, irrespective of male age, both male social status and comb size were strongly associated with plasma oxidative status, and there was a nonsignificant tendency for sperm motility to be associated with seminal oxidative status. Importantly, however, patterns of plasma and seminal antioxidant levels differed markedly in young and old males. While seminal antioxidants increased with plasma antioxidants in young males, the level of seminal antioxidants remained low and was independent of plasma levels in old males. In addition, old males also accumulated more oxidative damage in their sperm DNA. These results suggest that antioxidant allocation across different reproductive traits and somatic maintenance might change drastically as males age, leading to age-specific patterns of antioxidant investment. PMID:23139875

  19. Cryopreservation of Indian red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus murghi) semen.

    PubMed

    Rakha, B A; Ansari, M S; Akhter, S; Hussain, I; Blesbois, E

    2016-11-01

    The population of red jungle fowl is declining and needs special attention for its conservation with suitable approaches. For ex situ in vitro conservation of Indian red jungle fowl, establishment of semen cryobank is an appropriate option, for which an extender with adequate retrieval capacity for functional spermatozoa is required. Therefore, studies were designed to evaluate a wide range of extenders for cryopreservation of Indian red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus murghi) sperm to achieve maximal post-thawed semen quality and fertility. For this purpose, semen from eight mature cocks were collected, initially evaluated (percent sperm motility, volume and concentration), pooled, assessed for motility, plasma membrane integrity, viability and acrosome integrity, and divided into six aliquots for dilution (1:5; 37°C) in Beltsville poultry, red fowl extender, Lake, EK, Tselutin poultry and chicken semen extenders. Diluted semen was cooled from 37°C to 4°C @ -0.275°C/min. Glycerol (20%) was added to chilled semen, equilibrated for 10min, filled in 0.5mL French straws, kept over LN 2 vapours for 10min and plunged into LN 2 and stored at -196°C. Percentages of motility, plasma membrane integrity, viability and acrosome integrity were higher (P<0.05) in red fowl extender at 0, 2 and 4h of incubation post-thaw. After cryopreservation and post-thawing at 37°C the highest (P<0.05) recovery rates and absolute livability index was also recorded in red fowl extender that was thus used for further artificial insemination of cooled-diluted (Liquid) and cryopreserved sperm. The no. of fertilized eggs (Liquid, 20.6±0.4; Cryopreserved, 12.6±0.5), percent fertility (86.7±2.2; 57.2±3.9), no. of hatched chicks (18.2±0.8; 10.0±0.3), percent hatch (76.5±2.7; 45.3±2.2) and hatchability of fertilized eggs (88.3±3.4; 79.6±3.4) were higher with sperm respectively freshly cooled-diluted or cryopreserved in red fowl extender. However, the rates obtained with frozen-thawed sperm

  20. High-Throughput Sequencing Reveals Circulating miRNAs as Potential Biomarkers for Measuring Puberty Onset in Chicken (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Zhu, Yunfen; Su, Yijun; Li, Guohui; Qu, Liang; Zhang, Huiyong; Wang, Kehua; Zou, Jianmin; Liu, Honglin

    2016-01-01

    There are still no highly sensitive and unique biomarkers for measurement of puberty onset. Circulating miRNAs have been shown to be promising biomarkers for diagnosis of various diseases. To identify circulating miRNAs that could be served as biomarkers for measuring chicken (Gallus gallus) puberty onset, the Solexa deep sequencing was performed to analyze the miRNA expression profiles in serum and plasma of hens from two different pubertal stages, before puberty onset (BO) and after puberty onset (AO). 197 conserved and 19 novel miRNAs (reads > 10) were identified as serum/plasma-expressed miRNAs in the chicken. The common miRNA amounts and their expression changes from BO to AO between serum and plasma were very similar, indicating the different treatments to generate serum and plasma had quite small influence on the miRNAs. 130 conserved serum-miRNAs were showed to be differentially expressed (reads > 10, P < 0.05) from BO to AO, with 68 up-regulated and 62 down-regulated. 4829 putative genes were predicted as the targets of the 40 most differentially expressed miRNAs (|log2(fold-change)|>1.0, P < 0.01). Functional analysis revealed several pathways that were associated with puberty onset. Further quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) test found that a seven-miRNA panel, including miR-29c, miR-375, miR-215, miR-217, miR-19b, miR-133a and let-7a, had great potentials to serve as novel biomarkers for measuring puberty onset in chicken. Due to highly conserved nature of miRNAs, the findings could provide cues for measurement of puberty onset in other animals as well as humans.

  1. High-Throughput Sequencing Reveals Circulating miRNAs as Potential Biomarkers for Measuring Puberty Onset in Chicken (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yijun; Li, Guohui; Qu, Liang; Zhang, Huiyong; Wang, Kehua; Zou, Jianmin; Liu, Honglin

    2016-01-01

    There are still no highly sensitive and unique biomarkers for measurement of puberty onset. Circulating miRNAs have been shown to be promising biomarkers for diagnosis of various diseases. To identify circulating miRNAs that could be served as biomarkers for measuring chicken (Gallus gallus) puberty onset, the Solexa deep sequencing was performed to analyze the miRNA expression profiles in serum and plasma of hens from two different pubertal stages, before puberty onset (BO) and after puberty onset (AO). 197 conserved and 19 novel miRNAs (reads > 10) were identified as serum/plasma-expressed miRNAs in the chicken. The common miRNA amounts and their expression changes from BO to AO between serum and plasma were very similar, indicating the different treatments to generate serum and plasma had quite small influence on the miRNAs. 130 conserved serum-miRNAs were showed to be differentially expressed (reads > 10, P < 0.05) from BO to AO, with 68 up-regulated and 62 down-regulated. 4829 putative genes were predicted as the targets of the 40 most differentially expressed miRNAs (|log2(fold-change)|>1.0, P < 0.01). Functional analysis revealed several pathways that were associated with puberty onset. Further quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) test found that a seven-miRNA panel, including miR-29c, miR-375, miR-215, miR-217, miR-19b, miR-133a and let-7a, had great potentials to serve as novel biomarkers for measuring puberty onset in chicken. Due to highly conserved nature of miRNAs, the findings could provide cues for measurement of puberty onset in other animals as well as humans. PMID:27149515

  2. Expression of alpha-synuclein during eye development of mice (Mus musculus), chick (Gallus gallus domisticus) and fish (Ctenopharyngodon idella) in a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Seleem, Amin A

    2015-08-01

    Synucleins are small proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases, alpha-synuclein is a Parkinson's disease-linked protein of ubiquitous expression in the central nervous system. This study aimed at the localization of alpha-synuclein during eye development of mice (Mus musculus), chick (Gallus gallus domisticus) and fish (Ctenopharyngodon idella) by immunohistochemical staining in a comparison study. The results showed that alpha-synuclein expression increased gradually with the development of ciliary body, iris, retina and cornea of mice at E17, P1, P3, P7 and chick at E5, E10, E15 with unequal appearance of alpha-synuclein expression. Also, it was not detected in iridocorneal angle during eye development of mice and chick. Alpha-synuclein expression during fish eye development at P10, P15, P20 was not detected either in the ciliray body or Iris regions and it was pronounced with sharp signals in the highly specialized tissue of the iridocorneal angle at P20. Also, the expression was gradually increased from P15 to P20 in fish retina and cornea. The pattern of expression and distribution of alpha-synuclein during the development of ciliary body and iris of mice, chick and fish has not been previously characterized, The data concluded that alpha-synuclein has important cellular function during eye development of studied animals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Physiological alteration, quality of anesthesia and economy of isoflurane in domestic chickens (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Deori, Parag; Sarma, Kushal Konwar; Nath, Parsha Jyoti; Singh, Chandan Kumar; Nath, Rita

    2017-05-01

    Aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of isoflurane anesthesia on physiological parameters, assessment of anesthetic qualities, and economy of use of isoflurane in domestic chickens ( Gallus domesticus ). In this study, 18 apparently healthy adult domestic chickens were selected randomly and divided into three groups. The birds were anesthetized by masked induction with isoflurane at a dose rate of 3.5%, 4%, and 5% and were maintained with 1.5%, 2%, and 2.5% isoflurane with oxygen by endotracheal intubation in Groups I, II, and III, respectively. Physiological parameters, viz., cloacal temperature, heart rate, and respiration rate were recorded at 0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 min. The quality of anesthesia was assessed on the basis of induction time, induction behavior, quality of sedation, production of analgesia, degree of muscle relaxation, palpebral reflex, recovery time, and recovery behavior. The economy of anesthesia was calculated in terms of quantity of isoflurane utilized during 60 min of study. Statistical analysis was performed by analysis of variance, Duncan's multiple range tests. There was significant decrease (p<0.01) in physiological parameters such as in cloacal temperature, heart rate and respiration rate in the birds of all the groups from 0 to 60 min. The induction time was 5.83±0.33, 2.37±0.18, and 0.87±0.15 min, respectively, in Groups I, II, and III. Induction behavior was smooth in Group III, whereas mildly stormy in Group II and I. Quality of sedation was excellent in Group III, better in Group II as compared to Group I. Analgesia was moderate in Group III whereas poor in Group II and I. Degree of muscle relaxation was excellent in Group III, whereas good in Group I and II. Palpebral reflexes were absent in all the groups. Recovery time was 15.33±0.84, 18.83±0.94, and 26.50±0.85 in Groups I, II, and III respectively. Recovery behavior was smooth in birds of all the groups. The cost of the anesthesia was 158.22±1.04, 194

  4. Association of estradiol on expression of melanocortin receptors and their accessory proteins in the liver of chicken (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Ren, Junxiao; Li, Yanmin; Xu, Naiyi; Li, Hong; Li, Cuicui; Han, Ruili; Wang, Yanbin; Li, Zhuanjian; Kang, Xiangtao; Liu, Xiaojun; Tian, Yadong

    2017-01-01

    The melanocortin receptor accessory proteins (MRAP and MRAP2) are small single-pass transmembrane proteins that regulate the biological functions of the melanocortin receptor (MCR) family. MCRs comprise five receptors (MC1R-MC5R) with diverse physiological roles in mammals. Five MCR members and two MRAPs were also predicted in the chicken (Gallus gallus) genome. However, little is known about their expression, regulation and biological functions. In this study, we cloned the MRAP and MRAP2 genes. Sequencing analysis revealed that the functional domains of MRAP and MRAP2 were conserved among species, suggesting that the physiological roles of chicken MRAP and MRAP2 could be similar to their mammalian counterparts. Tissue expression analysis demonstrated that MRAP was expressed in the adrenal gland, liver, spleen, glandular stomach and lungs, while MRAP2 is predominantly expressed in the adrenal gland. All five MCRs were present in the adrenal gland, but showed different expression patterns in other tissues. The MC5R was the only MCR member that was expressed in the chicken liver. The expression levels of MRAP in chicken liver were significantly increased at sexual maturity stage, and were significantly up-regulated (P<0.05) when chickens and chicken primary hepatocytes were treated with 17β-estradiol in vivo and in vitro, respectively; however, expression levels of PPARγ were down-regulated, and no effect on MC5R was observed. Our results suggested that estrogen could stimulate the expression of MRAP in the liver of chicken through inhibiting the expression of transcription regulation factor PPARγ, and MRAP might play its biological role in a different way rather than forming an MRAP/MC2R complex in chicken liver during the egg-laying period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Alterations in eicosanoid composition during embryonic development in the chorioallantoic membrane of the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and domestic chicken (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, Theresa M.; Bowden, John A.; Scott, Jacob; Pérez-Viscasillas, Jimena B.; Huncik, Kevin; Guillette, Matthew P.; Guillette, Louis J.

    2017-01-01

    Eicosanoids are signaling lipids known to regulate several physiological processes in the mammalian placenta, including the initiation of parturition. Though all amniotes construct similar extraembryonic membranes during development, the composition and function of eicosanoids in extraembryonic membranes of oviparous reptiles is largely unknown. The majority of effort placed in eicosanoid investigations is typically targeted toward defining the role of specific compounds in disease etiology; however, comprehensive characterization of several pathways in eicosanoid synthesis during development is also needed to better understand the complex role of these lipids in comparative species. To this end, we have examined the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and domestic chicken (Gallus gallus) during development. Previously, our lab has demonstrated that the CAM of several oviparous species shared conserved steroidogenic activity, a feature originally attributed to mammalian amniotes. To further explore this, we have developed a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method that is used here to quantify multiple eicosanoids in the CAM of two oviparous species at different stages of development. We identified 18 eicosanoids in the alligator CAM; the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway showed the largest increase from early development to later development in the alligator CAM. Similarly, the chicken CAM had an increase in COX products and COX activity, which supports the LC-MS/MS analyses. Jointly, our findings indicate that the CAM tissue of an oviparous species is capable of eicosanoid synthesis, which expands our knowledge of placental evolution and introduces the possibility of future comparative models of placental function. PMID:27401262

  6. High-Throughput Sequencing Reveals Hypothalamic MicroRNAs as Novel Partners Involved in Timing the Rapid Development of Chicken (Gallus gallus) Gonads.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Zou, Jianmin; Wang, Kehua; Su, Yijun; Zhu, Yunfen; Song, Chi; Li, Guohui; Qu, Liang; Zhang, Huiyong; Liu, Honglin

    2015-01-01

    Onset of the rapid gonad growth is a milestone in sexual development that comprises many genes and regulatory factors. The observations in model organisms and mammals including humans have shown a potential link between miRNAs and development timing. To determine whether miRNAs play roles in this process in the chicken (Gallus gallus), the Solexa deep sequencing was performed to analyze the profiles of miRNA expression in the hypothalamus of hens from two different pubertal stages, before onset of the rapid gonad development (BO) and after onset of the rapid gonad development (AO). 374 conserved and 46 novel miRNAs were identified as hypothalamus-expressed miRNAs in the chicken. 144 conserved miRNAs were showed to be differentially expressed (reads > 10, P < 0.05) during the transition from BO to AO. Five differentially expressed miRNAs were validated by real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) method. 2013 putative genes were predicted as the targets of the 15 most differentially expressed miRNAs (fold-change > 4.0, P < 0.01). Of these genes, 7 putative circadian clock genes, Per2, Bmal1/2, Clock, Cry1/2, and Star were found to be targeted multiple times by the miRNAs. qRT-PCR revealed the basic transcription levels of these clock genes were much higher (P < 0.01) in AO than in BO. Further functional analysis suggested that these 15 miRNAs play important roles in transcriptional regulation and signal transduction pathways. The results provide new insights into miRNAs functions in timing the rapid development of chicken gonads. Considering the characteristics of miRNA functional conservation, the results will contribute to the research on puberty onset in humans.

  7. Association of Egg Mass and Egg Sex: Gene Expression Analysis from Maternal RNA in the Germinal Disc Region of Layer Hens (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Aslam, Muhammad Aamir; Schokker, Dirkjan; Groothuis, Ton G G; de Wit, Agnes A C; Smits, Mari A; Woelders, Henri

    2015-06-01

    Female birds have been shown to manipulate offspring sex ratio. However, mechanisms of sex ratio bias are not well understood. Reduced feed availability and change in body condition can affect the mass of eggs in birds that could lead to a skew in sex ratio. We employed feed restriction in laying chickens (Gallus gallus) to induce a decrease in body condition and egg mass using 45 chicken hens in treatment and control groups. Feed restriction led to an overall decline of egg mass. In the second period of treatment (Days 9-18) with more severe feed restriction and a steeper decline of egg mass, the sex ratio per hen (proportion of male eggs) had a significant negative association with mean egg mass per hen. Based on this association, two groups of hens were selected from feed restriction group, that is, hens producing male bias with low egg mass and hens producing female bias with high egg mass with overall sex ratios of 0.71 and 0.44 respectively. Genomewide transcriptome analysis on the germinal disks of F1 preovulatory follicles collected at the time of occurrence of meiosis-I was performed. We did not find significantly differentially expressed genes in these two groups of hens. However, gene set enrichment analysis showed that a number of cellular processes related to cell cycle progression, mitotic/meiotic apparatus, and chromosomal movement were enriched in female-biased hens or high mean egg mass as compared with male-biased hens or low mean egg mass. The differentially expressed gene sets may be involved in meiotic drive regulating sex ratio in the chicken. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  8. Experimental alteration of limb posture in the chicken (Gallus gallus) and its bearing on the use of birds as analogs for dinosaur locomotion.

    PubMed

    Carrano, M T; Biewener, A A

    1999-06-01

    Extant birds represent the only diverse living bipeds, and can be informative for investigations into the life-history parameters of their extinct dinosaurian relatives. However, morphological changes that occurred during early avian evolution, including the unique adoption of a nearly horizontal femoral orientation associated with a shift in center of mass (CM), suggest that caution is warranted in the use of birds as analogs for nonavian dinosaur locomotion. In this study, we fitted a group of white leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus) with a weight suspended posterior to the hip in order to examine the effects on loading and morphology. This caused a CM shift that necessitated a change in femoral posture (by 35 degrees towards the horizontal, P < 0.001), and resulted in reorientation of the ground reaction force (GRF) vector relative to the femur (from 41 degrees to 82 degrees, P < 0.001). Despite similar strain magnitudes, an overall increase in torsion relative to bending (from 1.70 to 1.95 times bending, P < 0.001) was observed, which was weakly associated with a tendency for increased femoral cross-sectional dimensions (P = 0.1). We suggest that a relative increase in torsion is consistent with a change in femoral posture towards the horizontal, since this change increases the degree to which the bone axis and the GRF vector produce mediolateral long-axis rotation of the bone. These results support the hypothesis that a postural change during early avian evolution could underlie the allometric differences seen between bird and nonavian dinosaur femora by requiring more robust femoral dimensions in birds due to an increase in torsion.

  9. Toxicity of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (de-71) in chicken (Gallus gallus), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and American kestrel (Falco sparverius) embryos and hatchlings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKernan, M.A.; Rattner, B.A.; Hale, R.C.; Ottinger, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Embryonic survival, pipping and hatching success, and sublethal biochemical, endocrine, and histological endpoints were examined in hatchling chickens (Gallus gallus), mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and American kestrels (Falco sparverius) following air cell administration of a pentabrominated diphenyl ether (penta-BDE; DE-71) mixture (0.01-20 mu g/g egg) or polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener 126 (3,3', 4,4', 5-pentachlorobiphenyl; 0.002 mu g/g egg). The penta-BDE decreased pipping and hatching success at concentrations of 10 and 20 mu g/g egg in kestrels but had no effect on survival endpoints in chickens or mallards. Sublethal effects in hatchling chickens included ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD) induction and histological changes in the bursa, but these responses were not observed in other species. Polychlorinated biphenyl congener 126 (positive control) reduced survival endpoints in chicken and kestrel embryos and caused sublethal effects (EROD induction, reduced bursal mass and follicle size) in chickens. Mallards were clearly less sensitive than the other species to administered penta-BDE and PCB 126. In a second experiment, the absorption of penta-BDE (11.1 mu g/g egg, air cell administered during early development) into the contents of chicken and kestrel eggs was determined at various intervals (24 h postinjection, midincubation, and pipping). By pipping, 29% of the penta-BDE administered dose was present in the egg contents in chickens, and 18% of the administered dose was present in kestrel egg contents. Based on uptake in kestrels, the lowest-observed-effect level on pipping and hatching success may be as low as 1.8 mu g total penta-BDE/g egg, which approaches concentrations detected in eggs of free-ranging birds. Because some penta-BDE congeners are still increasing in the environment, the toxic effects observed in the present study are cause for concern in wildlife.

  10. Effect of season and age on Indian red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus murghi) semen characteristics: A 4-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Rakha, B A; Ansari, M S; Akhter, S; Blesbois, E

    2017-09-01

    The reproductive potential of the adult males is expected to vary with age/season and largely differ not only in closely related avian species but even in subspecies, breeds and/or strains of the same species. Thus, it is pre-requisite to have knowledge of seminal parameters to achieve maximum production potential of at-risk species for ex situ in vitro conservation programs. A 4-year study was designed to evaluate the effect of age and season (spring, summer, autumn and winter) on semen characteristics of Indian red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus murghi) in a retrospective manner. Semen ejaculates (n = 1148) were regularly collected from eight adult cocks 6 to 54 months of age. Quantitative and qualitative semen parameters viz; volume (μL), concentration (1 × 10 9  mL -1 ), total sperm number per ejaculate (1 × 10 9  mL -1 ), motility (%), viability (%), plasma membrane integrity (%), acrosome integrity (%) and semen quality factor were recorded. A chronological increasing trend with age of most sperm quantitative and qualitative traits (semen volume, sperm concentration, total sperm number per ejaculate, plasma membrane integrity, viability, acrosomal integrity and semen quality factor) was observed. The highest values were observed at four years of age (P < 0.05) with the exception of sperm motility that was not affected by the age. Spring was the best season for sperm parameters viz; volume, motility, plasma membrane integrity, viability and acrosomal integrity (P < 0.05), however a remarkable sperm production was noticed all over the year. It is concluded that Indian red jungle fowl exhibits an evolution of sperm production that greatly differs in many points from other fowl sub-species. It is suggested that semen ejaculates of highest quality achieved for semen banking at the age of four year in the spring season. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Transport of dissolved trace elements in surface runoff and leachate from a coastal plain soil after poultry litter application

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The application of poultry (Gallus gallus domesticus) litter to agricultural soils may exacerbate losses of trace elements in runoff water, an emerging concern to water quality. We evaluated trace elements (arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, manganese, mercury, selenium and zinc) in surface runoff and ...

  12. Dietary Zinc Deficiency Affects Blood Linoleic Acid: Dihomo-γ-linolenic Acid (LA:DGLA) Ratio; a Sensitive Physiological Marker of Zinc Status in Vivo (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Spenser; Qin, Xia; Ran-Ressler, Rinat; Brenna, James Thomas; Glahn, Raymond P.; Tako, Elad

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is a vital micronutrient used for over 300 enzymatic reactions and multiple biochemical and structural processes in the body. To date, sensitive and specific biological markers of zinc status are still needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate Gallus gallus as an in vivo model in the context of assessing the sensitivity of a previously unexplored potential zinc biomarker, the erythrocyte linoleic acid: dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio. Diets identical in composition were formulated and two groups of birds (n = 12) were randomly separated upon hatching into two diets, Zn(+) (zinc adequate control, 42.3 μg/g zinc), and Zn(−) (zinc deficient, 2.5 μg/g zinc). Dietary zinc intake, body weight, serum zinc, and the erythrocyte fatty acid profile were measured weekly. At the conclusion of the study, tissues were collected for gene expression analysis. Body weight, feed consumption, zinc intake, and serum zinc were higher in the Zn(+) control versus Zn(−) group (p < 0.05). Hepatic TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 gene expression were higher in the Zn(+) control group (p < 0.05), and hepatic Δ6 desaturase was significantly higher in the Zn(+) group (p < 0.001). The LA:DGLA ratio was significantly elevated in the Zn(−) group compared to the Zn(+) group (22.6 ± 0.5 and 18.5 ± 0.5, % w/w, respectively, p < 0.001). This study suggests erythrocyte LA:DGLA is able to differentiate zinc status between zinc adequate and zinc deficient birds, and may be a sensitive biomarker to assess dietary zinc manipulation. PMID:24658588

  13. Characterizing the gut (Gallus gallus) microbiota following the consumption of an iron biofortified Rwandan cream seeded carioca (Phaseolus Vulgaris L.) bean-based diet.

    PubMed

    Reed, Spenser; Neuman, Hadar; Glahn, Raymond P; Koren, Omry; Tako, Elad

    2017-01-01

    Biofortification is a plant breeding method that introduces increased concentrations of minerals in staple food crops (e.g., legumes, cereal grains), and has shown success in alleviating insufficient Fe intake in various human populations. Unlike other strategies utilized to alleviate Fe deficiency, studies of the gut microbiota in the context of Fe biofortification have not yet been reported, although the consumption of Fe biofortified staple food crops has increased significantly over time. Hence, in this study, we performed a 6-week feeding trial in Gallus gallus (n = 14), aimed to investigate the alterations in the gut microbiome following administration of an Fe biofortified bean-based diet (biofortified, BFe) versus a bean based diet with poorly-bioavailable Fe (standard, SFe). Cream seeded carioca bean based diets were designed in an identical fashion to those used in a recent human clinical trial of Fe biofortified beans in Rwanda. We hypothesized that the different dietary Fe contents in the beans based diets will alter the composition and function of the intestinal microbiome. The primary outcomes were changes in the gut microbiome composition and function analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. We observed no significant changes in phylogenetic diversity between groups. There were significant differences in the composition of the microbiota between groups, with the BFe group harboring fewer taxa participating in bacterial Fe uptake, increased abundance of bacteria involved in phenolic catabolism, and increased abundance of beneficial butyrate-producing bacteria. Additionally, depletion of key bacterial pathways responsible for bacterial viability and Fe uptake suggest that improvements in Fe bioavailability, in addition to increases in Fe-polyphenol and Fe-phytate complexes due to biofortification, led to decreased concentrations of cecal Fe available for bacterial utilization. Our findings demonstrate that Fe biofortification may improve Fe status without

  14. Banding cytogenetics of the Barbary partridge Alectoris barbara and the Chukar partridge Alectoris chukar (Phasianidae): a large conservation with Domestic fowl Gallus domesticus revealed by high resolution chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ouchia-Benissad, Siham; Ladjali-Mohammedi, Kafia

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The development of avian cytogenetics is significantly behind that of mammals. In fact, since the advent of cytogenetic techniques, fewer than 1500 karyotypes have been established. The Barbary partridge Alectoris barbara Bonnaterre, 1790 is a bird of economic interest but its genome has not been studied so far. This species is endemic to North Africa and globally declining. The Chukar partridge Alectoris chukar Gray, 1830 is an introduced species which shares the same habitat area as the Barbary partridge and so there could be introgressive hybridisation. A cytogenetic study has been initiated in order to contribute to the Barbary partridge and the Chukar partridge genome analyses. The GTG, RBG and RHG-banded karyotypes of these species have been described. Primary fibroblast cell lines obtained from embryos were harvested after simple and double thymidine synchronisation. The first eight autosomal pairs and Z sex chromosome have been described at high resolution and compared to those of the domestic fowl Gallus domesticus Linnaeus, 1758. The diploid number was established as 2n = 78 for both partridges, as well as for most species belonging to the Galliformes order, underlying the stability of chromosome number in avian karyotypes. Wide homologies were observed for macrochromosomes and gonosome except for chromosome 4, 7, 8 and Z which present differences in morphology and/or banding pattern. Neocentromere occurrence was suggested for both partridges chromosome 4 with an assumed paracentric inversion in the Chukar partridge chromosome 4. Terminal inversion in the long arm of the Barbary partridge chromosome Z was also found. These rearrangements confirm that the avian karyotypes structure is conserved interchromosomally, but not at the intrachromosomal scale. PMID:29896323

  15. Banding cytogenetics of the Barbary partridge Alectoris barbara and the Chukar partridge Alectoris chukar (Phasianidae): a large conservation with Domestic fowl Gallus domesticus revealed by high resolution chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Ouchia-Benissad, Siham; Ladjali-Mohammedi, Kafia

    2018-01-01

    The development of avian cytogenetics is significantly behind that of mammals. In fact, since the advent of cytogenetic techniques, fewer than 1500 karyotypes have been established. The Barbary partridge Alectoris barbara Bonnaterre, 1790 is a bird of economic interest but its genome has not been studied so far. This species is endemic to North Africa and globally declining. The Chukar partridge Alectoris chukar Gray, 1830 is an introduced species which shares the same habitat area as the Barbary partridge and so there could be introgressive hybridisation. A cytogenetic study has been initiated in order to contribute to the Barbary partridge and the Chukar partridge genome analyses. The GTG, RBG and RHG-banded karyotypes of these species have been described. Primary fibroblast cell lines obtained from embryos were harvested after simple and double thymidine synchronisation. The first eight autosomal pairs and Z sex chromosome have been described at high resolution and compared to those of the domestic fowl Gallus domesticus Linnaeus, 1758. The diploid number was established as 2n = 78 for both partridges, as well as for most species belonging to the Galliformes order, underlying the stability of chromosome number in avian karyotypes. Wide homologies were observed for macrochromosomes and gonosome except for chromosome 4, 7, 8 and Z which present differences in morphology and/or banding pattern. Neocentromere occurrence was suggested for both partridges chromosome 4 with an assumed paracentric inversion in the Chukar partridge chromosome 4. Terminal inversion in the long arm of the Barbary partridge chromosome Z was also found. These rearrangements confirm that the avian karyotypes structure is conserved interchromosomally, but not at the intrachromosomal scale.

  16. Intra-Amniotic Administration (Gallus gallus) of Cicer arietinum and Lens culinaris Prebiotics Extracts and Duck Egg White Peptides Affects Calcium Status and Intestinal Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Tao; Glahn, Raymond P.; Tako, Elad

    2017-01-01

    Calcium (Ca) is one of the most abundant inorganic elements in the human body and has many important physiological roles. Prebiotics and bioactive peptides are two important substances used to promote calcium uptake. However, the difference in mechanisms of the calcium uptake from these two supplements is not clear. By using the Gallus gallus model and the intra-amniotic administration procedure, the aim of this study was to investigate whether Ca status, intestinal functionality, and health-promoting bacterial populations were affected by prebiotics extracted from chickpea and lentil, and duck egg white peptides (DPs). Eleven groups (non-injected; 18 MΩ H2O; 4 mmol/L CaCl2; 50 mg/mL chickpea + 4 mmol/L CaCl2; 50 mg/mL lentil + 4 mmol/L CaCl2; 40 mg/mL DPs + 4 mmol/L CaCl2; 5 mg/mL Val-Ser-Glu-Glu (VSEE) + 4 mmol/L CaCl2; 50 mg/mL chickpea; 50 mg/mL lentil; 40 mg/mL DPs; 5 mg/mL VSEE) were utilized. Upon hatch, blood, cecum, small intestine, liver and bone were collected for assessment of serum bone alkaline phosphate level (BALP), the relative abundance of intestinal microflora, expression of Ca-related genes, brush border membrane (BBM) functional genes, and liver and bone mineral levels, respectively. The BALP level increased in the presence of lentil, DPs and VSEE (p < 0.05). The relative abundance of probiotics increased significantly (p < 0.05) by VSEE + Ca and chickpea. The expression of CalbindinD9k (Ca transporter) increased (p < 0.05) in Ca, chickpea + Ca and lentil + Ca groups. In addition, the brush border membrane functionality genes expressions increased (p < 0.05) by the chickpea or lentil extracts. Prebiotics and DPs beneficially affected the intestinal microflora and duodenal villus surface area. This research expands the understanding of the prebiotics’ properties of chickpea and lentil extracts, and peptides’ effects on calcium metabolism and gut health. PMID:28754012

  17. Intra-Amniotic Administration (Gallus gallus) of Cicer arietinum and Lens culinaris Prebiotics Extracts and Duck Egg White Peptides Affects Calcium Status and Intestinal Functionality.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tao; Kolba, Nikolai; Glahn, Raymond P; Tako, Elad

    2017-07-21

    Calcium (Ca) is one of the most abundant inorganic elements in the human body and has many important physiological roles. Prebiotics and bioactive peptides are two important substances used to promote calcium uptake. However, the difference in mechanisms of the calcium uptake from these two supplements is not clear. By using the Gallus gallus model and the intra-amniotic administration procedure, the aim of this study was to investigate whether Ca status, intestinal functionality, and health-promoting bacterial populations were affected by prebiotics extracted from chickpea and lentil, and duck egg white peptides (DPs). Eleven groups (non-injected; 18 MΩ H₂O; 4 mmol/L CaCl₂; 50 mg/mL chickpea + 4 mmol/L CaCl₂; 50 mg/mL lentil + 4 mmol/L CaCl₂; 40 mg/mL DPs + 4 mmol/L CaCl₂; 5 mg/mL Val-Ser-Glu-Glu (VSEE) + 4 mmol/L CaCl₂; 50 mg/mL chickpea; 50 mg/mL lentil; 40 mg/mL DPs; 5 mg/mL VSEE) were utilized. Upon hatch, blood, cecum, small intestine, liver and bone were collected for assessment of serum bone alkaline phosphate level (BALP), the relative abundance of intestinal microflora, expression of Ca-related genes, brush border membrane (BBM) functional genes, and liver and bone mineral levels, respectively. The BALP level increased in the presence of lentil, DPs and VSEE ( p < 0.05). The relative abundance of probiotics increased significantly ( p < 0.05) by VSEE + Ca and chickpea. The expression of CalbindinD9k (Ca transporter) increased ( p < 0.05) in Ca, chickpea + Ca and lentil + Ca groups. In addition, the brush border membrane functionality genes expressions increased ( p < 0.05) by the chickpea or lentil extracts. Prebiotics and DPs beneficially affected the intestinal microflora and duodenal villus surface area. This research expands the understanding of the prebiotics' properties of chickpea and lentil extracts, and peptides' effects on calcium metabolism and gut health.

  18. Cryopreservation of Indian red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus murghi) semen with polyvinylpyrrolidone.

    PubMed

    Rakha, Bushra Allah; Ansari, Muhammad Sajjad; Akhter, Shamim; Zafar, Zartasha; Hussain, Iftikhar; Santiago-Moreno, Julian; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2017-10-01

    The Indian red jungle fowl is a sub-species of the genus Gallus native to South Asia; facing high risk of extinction in its native habitat. During cryopreservation, permeable cryoprotectants like glycerol are usually employed and we previously showed encouraging results with 20% glycerol. Because bird spermatozoa contain very little intracellular water, the possibility of replacing an internal cryoprotectant by an external one is opened. In the present study, we tested the replacement of internal cryoprotectant glycerol by the external cryoprotectant Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). PVP is a non-permeable cryoprotectant and keeps the sperm in glassy state both in cooling and warming stages without making ice crystallization within the sperm cell. We evaluated the effect of various levels of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on Indian red jungle fowl semen quality and fertility outcomes. The qualifying semen ejaculates collected from eight mature cocks were pooled, divided into five aliquots, diluted (37 °C) with red fowl semen extender having PVP [0% (control) 4% (w/v), 6% (w/v), 8% (w/v) and 10% (w/v)]. Diluted semen was cryopreserved and stored in liquid nitrogen. The whole experiment was repeated/replicated for five times independently. Sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity, viability and acrosome integrity were recorded highest (P < 0.05) with 6% PVP at post-dilution, cooling, equilibration and freeze-thawing. Higher (P < 0.05) no. of fertile eggs, fertility, no. of hatched chicks, percent hatch and hatchability was recorded with 6% PVP compared to control. It is concluded that 6% PVP maintained better post-taw quality and fertility of Indian red jungle fowl spermatozoa than glycerol and can be used in routine practice avoiding the contraceptive effects of glycerol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. High bioavailability iron maize (Zea mays L.) developed through molecular breeding provides more absorbable iron in vitro (Caco-2 model) and in vivo (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Tako, Elad; Hoekenga, Owen A; Kochian, Leon V; Glahn, Raymond P

    2013-01-04

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is the most common micronutrient deficiency worldwide. Iron biofortification is a preventative strategy that alleviates Fe deficiency by improving the amount of absorbable Fe in crops. In the present study, we used an in vitro digestion/Caco 2 cell culture model as the guiding tool for breeding and development of two maize (Zea mays L.) lines with contrasting Fe bioavailability (ie. Low and High). Our objective was to confirm and validate the in vitro results and approach. Also, to compare the capacities of our two maize hybrid varieties to deliver Fe for hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis and to improve the Fe status of Fe deficient broiler chickens. We compared the Fe-bioavailability between these two maize varieties with the presence or absence of added Fe in the maize based-diets. Diets were made with 75% (w/w) maize of either low or high Fe-bioavailability maize, with or without Fe (ferric citrate). Chicks (Gallus gallus) were fed the diets for 6 wk. Hb, liver ferritin and Fe related transporter/enzyme gene-expression were measured. Hemoglobin maintenance efficiency (HME) and total body Hb Fe values were used to estimate Fe bioavailability from the diets. DMT-1, DcytB and ferroportin expressions were higher (P<0.05) in the "Low Fe" group than in the "High Fe" group (no added Fe), indicating lower Fe status and adaptation to less Fe-bioavailability. At times, Hb concentrations (d 21,28,35), HME (d 21), Hb-Fe (as from d 14) and liver ferritin were higher in the "High Fe" than in the "Low Fe" groups (P<0.05), indicating greater Fe absorption from the diet and improved Fe status. We conclude that the High Fe-bioavailability maize contains more bioavailable Fe than the Low Fe-bioavailability maize, presumably due to a more favorable matrix for absorption. Maize shows promise for Fe biofortification; therefore, human trials should be conducted to determine the efficacy of consuming the high bioavailable Fe maize to reduce Fe deficiency.

  20. High bioavailablilty iron maize (Zea mays L.) developed through molecular breeding provides more absorbable iron in vitro (Caco-2 model) and in vivo (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron (Fe) deficiency is the most common micronutrient deficiency worldwide. Iron biofortification is a preventative strategy that alleviates Fe deficiency by improving the amount of absorbable Fe in crops. In the present study, we used an in vitro digestion/Caco 2 cell culture model as the guiding tool for breeding and development of two maize (Zea mays L.) lines with contrasting Fe bioavailability (ie. Low and High). Our objective was to confirm and validate the in vitro results and approach. Also, to compare the capacities of our two maize hybrid varieties to deliver Fe for hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis and to improve the Fe status of Fe deficient broiler chickens. Methods We compared the Fe-bioavailability between these two maize varieties with the presence or absence of added Fe in the maize based-diets. Diets were made with 75% (w/w) maize of either low or high Fe-bioavailability maize, with or without Fe (ferric citrate). Chicks (Gallus gallus) were fed the diets for 6 wk. Hb, liver ferritin and Fe related transporter/enzyme gene-expression were measured. Hemoglobin maintenance efficiency (HME) and total body Hb Fe values were used to estimate Fe bioavailability from the diets. Results DMT-1, DcytB and ferroportin expressions were higher (P < 0.05) in the "Low Fe" group than in the "High Fe" group (no added Fe), indicating lower Fe status and adaptation to less Fe-bioavailability. At times, Hb concentrations (d 21,28,35), HME (d 21), Hb-Fe (as from d 14) and liver ferritin were higher in the "High Fe" than in the "Low Fe" groups (P < 0.05), indicating greater Fe absorption from the diet and improved Fe status. Conclusions We conclude that the High Fe-bioavailability maize contains more bioavailable Fe than the Low Fe-bioavailability maize, presumably due to a more favorable matrix for absorption. Maize shows promise for Fe biofortification; therefore, human trials should be conducted to determine the efficacy of consuming the high bioavailable

  1. Effects of 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) injected into the yolks of chicken (Gallus domesticus) eggs prior to incubation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, D.C.; Aulerich, R.J.; Meadows, J.C.; Tillitt, D.E.; Giesy, J.P.; Stromborg, K.L.; Bursian, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    The yolks of White Leghorn chicken (Gallus domesticus) eggs were injected prior to incubation with either 3,3′,4,4′,5- pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126) at doses ranging from 0.1 to 12.8 μg/kg egg or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) at doses ranging from 0.04 to 0.64 μg/kg egg. Chicks were subjected to necropsy within 24 h of hatching. The brain, bursa, heart, liver, and spleen were removed and weighed. Assessment of the rate of hatching indicated an LD50±S.E. of 2.3±0.19 μg/kg egg (7.1±0.58 nmol/kg egg) for PCB 126 and 0.15±0.012 μg/kg egg (0.47±0.037 nmol/kg egg) for TCDD. No significant differences in the incidence of developmental abnormalities (structural defects and edema) were observed in TCDD-exposed embryos, while PCB 126 caused significantly more developmental abnormalities at 3.2, 6.4, and 12.8 μg/kg egg than the vehicle control. PCB 126 caused lower hatchling weights and greater relative brain, heart, and liver weights when compared to the vehicle control group at a dose of 3.2 μg/kg egg which is greater than the LD50. TCDD at 0.08 μg/kg egg caused relative bursa weights to be less than those of the vehicle control. A toxic equivalency factor (TEF) of 0.07 was determined for PCB 126 in relation to TCDD based on overt lethality.

  2. Absorption and biotransformation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers DE-71 and DE-79 in chicken (Gallus gallus), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), American kestrel (Falco sparverius) and black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKernan, Moira A.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Hatfield, Jeff S.; Hale, Robert C.; Ottinger, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    We recently reported that air cell administration of penta-brominated diphenyl ether (penta-BDE; DE-71) evokes biochemical and immunologic effects in chicken (Gallus gallus) embryos at very low doses, and impairs pipping (i.e., stage immediately prior to hatching) and hatching success at 1.8 ug g-1 egg (actual dose absorbed) in American kestrels (Falco sparverius). I n the present study, absorption of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners was measured following air cell administration of a penta-BDE mixture (11.1 ug DE-71 g-1 egg) or an octa-brominated diphenyl ether mixture (octa-BDE; DE-79; 15.4 ug DE-79 g-1 egg). Uptake of PBDE congeners was measured at 24 h post-injection, midway through incubation, and at pipping in chicken, mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and American kestrel egg contents, and at the end of incubation in black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) egg contents. Absorption of penta-BDE and octa-BDE from the air cell into egg contents occurred throughout incubation; at pipping, up to 29.6% of penta-BDE was absorbed, but only 1.40-6.48% of octa-BDE was absorbed. Higher brominated congeners appeared to be absorbed more slowly than lower brominated congeners, and uptake rate was inversely proportional to the log Kow of predominant BDE congeners. Six congeners or co-eluting pairs of congeners were detected in penta-BDE-treated eggs that were not found in the dosing solution suggesting debromination in the developing embryo, extraembryonic membranes, and possibly even in the air cell membrane. This study demonstrates the importance of determining the fraction of xenobiotic absorbed into the egg following air cell administration for estimation of the lowest-observed-effect level.

  3. 50 CFR 14.4 - What terms do I have to understand?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...; Ferret (domestic)—Mustela putorius; Goat—Capra hircus; Horse—Equus caballus; Llama—Lama glama; Pig—Sus... auratus. Birds: Chicken—Gallus domesticus; Ducks & geese—domesticated varieties; Guinea fowl—Numida...

  4. Dioxin activation of CYP1A5 promoter/enhancer regions from two avian species, common cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) and chicken (Gallus gallus): Association with aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 and 2 isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jin-Seon; Kim, Eun-Young; Iwata, Hisato

    The present study focuses on the molecular mechanism and interspecies differences in susceptibility of avian aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) signaling pathway. By the cloning of 5'-flanking regions of CYP1A5 gene from common cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) and chicken (Gallus gallus), seven putative xenobiotic response elements (XREs) were identified within 2.7 kb upstream region of common cormorant CYP1A5 (ccCYP1A5), and six XREs were found within 0.9 kb of chicken CYP1A5 (ckCYP1A5). Analysis of sequential deletion and mutagenesis of the binding sites in avian CYP1A5 genes by in vitro reporter gene assays revealed that two XREs at -613 bp and -1585more » bp in ccCYP1A5, and one XRE at -262 bp in ckCYP1A5 conferred TCDD-responsiveness. The binding of AHR1 with AHR nuclear translocator 1 (ARNT1) to the functional XRE in a TCDD-dependent manner was verified with gel shift assays, suggesting that avian CYP1A5 is induced by TCDD through AHR1/ARNT1 signaling pathway as well as mammalian CYP1A1 but through a distinct pathway from mammalian CYP1A2, an ortholog of the CYP1A5. TCDD-EC{sub 50} for the transcriptional activity in both cormorant AHR1- and AHR2-ccCYP1A5 reporter construct was 10-fold higher than that in chicken AHR1-ckCYP1A5 reporter construct. In contrast, chicken AHR2 showed no TCDD-dependent response. The TCDD-EC{sub 50} for CYP1A5 transactivation was altered by switching AHR1 between the two avian species, irrespective of the species from which the regulatory region of CYP1A5 gene originates. Therefore, the structural difference in AHR, not the CYP1A5 regulatory region may be a major factor to account for the dioxin susceptibility in avian species.« less

  5. Fusions within the mandible of the domestic fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, D A

    1983-01-01

    The articulations formed within the mandible of the domestic fowl by its constituent elements have been described and illustrated. The sutures identified were suturae angulosplenialis, angulosupra-angularis, articulare/pre-articulo-angularis, articulare/pre-articulosupra-angularis, dento-angularis, dentosplenialis, dentosupra-angularis and supra-angulosplenialis. Some degree of fusion was found to occur in all sutures except sutura supra-angulosplenialis. The range of fusion time and mean fusion time for each site was studied in a flock of Golden Comet pullets. Mean fusion times varied from 45-119 days post-hatching. PMID:6885616

  6. Fusions within the mandible of the domestic fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Hogg, D A

    1983-05-01

    The articulations formed within the mandible of the domestic fowl by its constituent elements have been described and illustrated. The sutures identified were suturae angulosplenialis, angulosupra-angularis, articulare/pre-articulo-angularis, articulare/pre-articulosupra-angularis, dento-angularis, dentosplenialis, dentosupra-angularis and supra-angulosplenialis. Some degree of fusion was found to occur in all sutures except sutura supra-angulosplenialis. The range of fusion time and mean fusion time for each site was studied in a flock of Golden Comet pullets. Mean fusion times varied from 45-119 days post-hatching.

  7. BIOACCUMULATION FACTORS AND INTAKE OF 2,3,7,8-POLYCHLORINATED DIBENZO-P-DIOXINS IN THE DOMESTIC CHICKEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the most commercially valuable farm animals in the United States is the domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus). Rapidly reared in controlled, intensive environments, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) estimated the production of these animals exceeded eight billion in ...

  8. AN EMBRYONIC CHICK PANCREAS ORGAN CULTURE MODEL: CHARACTERIZATION AND NEURAL CONTROL OF EXOCRINE RELEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An embryonic chick (Gallus domesticus) whole-organ pancreas culture system was developed for use as an in vitro model to study cholinergic regulation of exocrine pancreatic function. The culture system was examined for characteristic exocrine function and viability by measuring e...

  9. GH and IGF-I induction by passive immunization of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum using a somatostatin 14 antibody

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Inhibition of the growth axis by somatostatin was studied in juvenile rainbow trout using passive immunization with a previously isolated somatostatin antibody (antiSS-14). Upon subcutaneously injection of laying hens (Gallus domesticus) with conjugated somatostatin-14 (SS-14), the antiSS-14 was iso...

  10. EFFECT OF AMBIENT LEVELS OF POWER-LINE-FREQUENCY ELECTRIC FIELDS ON A DEVELOPING VERTEBRATE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fertilized eggs of Gallus domesticus were exposed continuously during their 21-day incubation period to either 50-Hz or 60-Hz sinusoidal electric fields at an average intensity of 10 Vrms/m. Within 1.5 days after hatching, the chickens were removed from the apparatus and tested. ...

  11. Growth enhancement of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by passive immunisation against somatostatin-14

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were passively immunised against somatostatin-14 (SS-14) using an antibody originating from egg laying chicken (Gallus domesticus). Fish were immunised weekly (0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 d) with chicken egg yolk derived immunoglobulin (IgY) against SS-14 (1:25 ...

  12. Genetic evidence from Indian red jungle fowl corroborates multiple domestication of modern day chicken.

    PubMed

    Kanginakudru, Sriramana; Metta, Muralidhar; Jakati, R D; Nagaraju, J

    2008-06-10

    Domestication of chicken is believed to have occurred in Southeast Asia, especially in Indus valley. However, non-inclusion of Indian red jungle fowl (RJF), Gallus gallus murghi in previous studies has left a big gap in understanding the relationship of this major group of birds. In the present study, we addressed this issue by analyzing 76 Indian birds that included 56 G. g. murghi (RJF), 16 G. g. domesticus (domestic chicken) and 4 G. sonneratii (Grey JF) using both microsatellite markers and mitochondrial D-loop sequences. We also compared the D-loop sequences of Indian birds with those of 779 birds obtained from GenBank. Microsatellite marker analyses of Indian birds indicated an average FST of 0.126 within G. g. murghi, and 0.154 within G. g. domesticus while it was more than 0.2 between the two groups. The microsatellite-based phylogenetic trees showed a clear separation of G. g. domesticus from G. g. murghi, and G. sonneratii. Mitochondrial DNA based mismatch distribution analyses showed a lower Harpending's raggedness index in both G. g. murghi (0.001515) and in Indian G. g. domesticus (0.0149) birds indicating population expansion. When meta analysis of global populations of 855 birds was carried out using median joining haplotype network, 43 Indian birds of G. g. domesticus (19 haplotypes) were distributed throughout the network sharing haplotypes with the RJFs of different origins. Our results suggest that the domestication of chicken has occurred independently in different locations of Asia including India. We found evidence for domestication of Indian birds from G. g. spadiceus and G. g. gallus as well as from G. g. murghi, corroborating multiple domestication of Indian and other domestic chicken. In contrast to the commonly held view that RJF and domestic birds hybridize in nature, the present study shows that G. g. murghi is relatively pure. Further, the study also suggested that the chicken populations have undergone population expansion, especially

  13. Genetic evidence from Indian red jungle fowl corroborates multiple domestication of modern day chicken

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Domestication of chicken is believed to have occurred in Southeast Asia, especially in Indus valley. However, non-inclusion of Indian red jungle fowl (RJF), Gallus gallus murghi in previous studies has left a big gap in understanding the relationship of this major group of birds. In the present study, we addressed this issue by analyzing 76 Indian birds that included 56 G. g. murghi (RJF), 16 G. g. domesticus (domestic chicken) and 4 G. sonneratii (Grey JF) using both microsatellite markers and mitochondrial D-loop sequences. We also compared the D-loop sequences of Indian birds with those of 779 birds obtained from GenBank. Results Microsatellite marker analyses of Indian birds indicated an average FST of 0.126 within G. g. murghi, and 0.154 within G. g. domesticus while it was more than 0.2 between the two groups. The microsatellite-based phylogenetic trees showed a clear separation of G. g. domesticus from G. g. murghi, and G. sonneratii. Mitochondrial DNA based mismatch distribution analyses showed a lower Harpending's raggedness index in both G. g. murghi (0.001515) and in Indian G. g. domesticus (0.0149) birds indicating population expansion. When meta analysis of global populations of 855 birds was carried out using median joining haplotype network, 43 Indian birds of G. g. domesticus (19 haplotypes) were distributed throughout the network sharing haplotypes with the RJFs of different origins. Conclusion Our results suggest that the domestication of chicken has occurred independently in different locations of Asia including India. We found evidence for domestication of Indian birds from G. g. spadiceus and G. g. gallus as well as from G. g. murghi, corroborating multiple domestication of Indian and other domestic chicken. In contrast to the commonly held view that RJF and domestic birds hybridize in nature, the present study shows that G. g. murghi is relatively pure. Further, the study also suggested that the chicken populations have undergone

  14. Effects of noxious stimuli on the electroencephalogram of anaesthetised chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    McIlhone, Amanda E; Beausoleil, Ngaio J; Kells, Nikki J; Mellor, David J; Johnson, Craig B

    2018-01-01

    The reliable assessment and management of avian pain is important in the context of animal welfare. Overtly expressed signs of pain vary substantially between and within species, strains and individuals, limiting the use of behaviour in pain studies. Similarly, physiological indices of pain can also vary and may be confounded by influence from non-painful stimuli. In mammals, changes in the frequency spectrum of the electroencephalogram (EEG) recorded under light anaesthesia (the minimal anaesthesia model; MAM) have been shown to reliably indicate cerebral responses to noxious stimuli in a range of species. The aim of the current study was to determine whether the MAM can be applied to the study of nociception in birds. Ten chickens were lightly anaesthetised with halothane and their EEG recorded using surface electrodes during the application of supramaximal mechanical, thermal and electrical noxious stimuli. Spectral analysis revealed no EEG responses to any of these stimuli. Given that birds possess the neural apparatus to detect and process pain, and that the applied noxious stimuli elicit behavioural signs of pain in conscious chickens, this lack of response probably relates to methodological limitations. Anatomical differences between the avian and mammalian brains, along with a paucity of knowledge regarding specific sites of pain processing in the avian brain, could mean that EEG recorded from the head surface is insensitive to changes in neural activity in the pain processing regions of the avian brain. Future investigations should examine alternative electrode placement sites, based on avian homologues of the mammalian brain regions involved in pain processing.

  15. Effects of noxious stimuli on the electroencephalogram of anaesthetised chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    McIlhone, Amanda E.; Beausoleil, Ngaio J.; Mellor, David J.; Johnson, Craig B.

    2018-01-01

    The reliable assessment and management of avian pain is important in the context of animal welfare. Overtly expressed signs of pain vary substantially between and within species, strains and individuals, limiting the use of behaviour in pain studies. Similarly, physiological indices of pain can also vary and may be confounded by influence from non-painful stimuli. In mammals, changes in the frequency spectrum of the electroencephalogram (EEG) recorded under light anaesthesia (the minimal anaesthesia model; MAM) have been shown to reliably indicate cerebral responses to noxious stimuli in a range of species. The aim of the current study was to determine whether the MAM can be applied to the study of nociception in birds. Ten chickens were lightly anaesthetised with halothane and their EEG recorded using surface electrodes during the application of supramaximal mechanical, thermal and electrical noxious stimuli. Spectral analysis revealed no EEG responses to any of these stimuli. Given that birds possess the neural apparatus to detect and process pain, and that the applied noxious stimuli elicit behavioural signs of pain in conscious chickens, this lack of response probably relates to methodological limitations. Anatomical differences between the avian and mammalian brains, along with a paucity of knowledge regarding specific sites of pain processing in the avian brain, could mean that EEG recorded from the head surface is insensitive to changes in neural activity in the pain processing regions of the avian brain. Future investigations should examine alternative electrode placement sites, based on avian homologues of the mammalian brain regions involved in pain processing. PMID:29698446

  16. Hyperpigmentation Results in Aberrant Immune Development in Silky Fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus Brisson)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Deping; Wang, Shuxiang; Hu, Yanxin; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Dong, Xianggui; Yang, Zu; Wang, Jiankui; Li, Junying; Deng, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    The Silky Fowl (SF) is known for its special phenotypes and atypical distribution of melanocytes among internal organs. Although the genes associated with melanocyte migration have been investigated substantially, there is little information on the postnatal distribution of melanocytes in inner organs and the effect of hyperpigmentation on the development of SF. Here, we analyzed melanocyte distribution in 26 tissues or organs on postnatal day 1 and weeks 2, 3, 4, 6, 10, and 23. Except for the liver, pancreas, pituitary gland, and adrenal gland, melanocytes were distributed throughout the body, primarily around blood vessels. Interaction between melanocytes and the tissue cells was observed, and melanin was transported by filopodia delivery through engulfed and internalized membrane-encapsulated melanosomes. SFs less than 10 weeks old have lower indices of spleen, thymus, and bursa of Fabricius than White Leghorns (WLs). The expression levels of interferon-γ and interlukin-4 genes in the spleen, and serum antibody levels against H5N1 and infectious bursal disease virus were lower in SF than in WL. We also found immune organ developmental difference between Black-boned and non-Black- boned chickens from SFs and WLs hybrid F2 population. However, degeneration of the thymus and bursa of Fabricius occurred later in SF than in WL after sexual maturity. Analysis of apoptotic cells and apoptosis-associated Bax and Bcl-2 proteins indicated that apoptosis is involved in degeneration of the thymus and bursa of Fabricius. Therefore, these results suggest that hyperpigmentation in SF may have a close relationship with immune development in SF, which can provide an important animal model to investigate the roles of melanocyte. PMID:26047316

  17. Ultradian activity rhythms in large groups of newly hatched chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Nielsen, B L; Erhard, H W; Friggens, N C; McLeod, J E

    2008-07-01

    A clutch of young chicks housed with a mother hen exhibit ultradian (within day) rhythms of activity corresponding to the brooding cycle of the hen. In the present study clear evidence was found of ultradian activity rhythms in newly hatched domestic chicks housed in groups larger than natural clutch size without a mother hen or any other obvious external time-keeper. No consistent synchrony was found between groups housed in different pens within the same room. The ultradian rhythms disappeared with time and little evidence of group rhythmicity remained by the third night. This disappearance over time suggests that the presence of a mother hen may be pivotal for the long-term maintenance of these rhythms. The ultradian rhythm of the chicks may also play an important role in the initiation of brooding cycles during the behavioural transition of the mother hen from incubation to brooding. Computer simulations of individual activity rhythms were found to reproduce the observations made on a group basis. This was achievable even when individual chick rhythms were modelled as independent of each other, thus no assumptions of social facilitation are necessary to obtain ultradian activity rhythms on a group level.

  18. Genetic diversity and population structure analysis between Indian red jungle fowl and domestic chicken using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinay; Shukla, Sanjeev K; Mathew, Jose; Sharma, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the genetic diversity, population structure, and relatedness in Indian red jungle fowl (RJF, Gallus gallus murgi) from northern India and three domestic chicken populations (gallus gallus domesticus), maintained at the institute farms, namely White Leghorn (WL), Aseel (AS) and Red Cornish (RC) using 25 microsatellite markers. All the markers were polymorphic, the number of alleles at each locus ranged from five (MCW0111) to forty-three (LEI0212) with an average number of 19 alleles per locus. Across all loci, the mean expected heterozygosity and polymorphic information content were 0.883 and 0.872, respectively. Population-specific alleles were found in each population. A UPGMA dendrogram based on shared allele distances clearly revealed two major clusters among the four populations; cluster I had genotypes from RJF and WL whereas cluster II had AS and RC genotypes. Furthermore, the estimation of population structure was performed to understand how genetic variation is partitioned within and among populations. The maximum ▵K value was observed for K = 4 with four identified clusters. Furthermore, factorial analysis clearly showed four clustering; each cluster represented the four types of population used in the study. These results clearly, demonstrate the potential of microsatellite markers in elucidating the genetic diversity, relationships, and population structure analysis in RJF and domestic chicken populations.

  19. Genomic data for 78 chickens from 14 populations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Diyan; Che, Tiandong; Chen, Binlong; Tian, Shilin; Zhou, Xuming; Zhang, Guolong; Li, Miao; Gaur, Uma; Li, Yan; Luo, Majing; Zhang, Long; Xu, Zhongxian; Zhao, Xiaoling; Yin, Huadong; Wang, Yan; Jin, Long; Tang, Qianzi; Xu, Huailiang; Yang, Mingyao; Zhou, Rongjia; Li, Ruiqiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Since the domestication of the red jungle fowls (Gallus gallus; dating back to ∼10 000 B.P.) in Asia, domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) have been subjected to the combined effects of natural selection and human-driven artificial selection; this has resulted in marked phenotypic diversity in a number of traits, including behavior, body composition, egg production, and skin color. Population genomic variations through diversifying selection have not been fully investigated. Findings: The whole genomes of 78 domestic chickens were sequenced to an average of 18-fold coverage for each bird. By combining this data with publicly available genomes of five wild red jungle fowls and eight Xishuangbanna game fowls, we conducted a comprehensive comparative genomics analysis of 91 chickens from 17 populations. After aligning ∼21.30 gigabases (Gb) of high-quality data from each individual to the reference chicken genome, we identified ∼6.44 million (M) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for each population. These SNPs included 1.10 M novel SNPs in 17 populations that were absent in the current chicken dbSNP (Build 145) entries. Conclusions: The current data is important for population genetics and further studies in chickens and will serve as a valuable resource for investigating diversifying selection and candidate genes for selective breeding in chickens. PMID:28431039

  20. Wild Birds in Romania Are More Exposed to West Nile Virus Than to Newcastle Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Paştiu, Anamaria Ioana; Pap, Péter László; Vágási, Csongor István; Niculae, Mihaela; Páll, Emőke; Domşa, Cristian; Brudaşcă, Florinel Ghe; Spînu, Marina

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the seroprevalence of West Nile virus (WNV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in wild and domestic birds from Romania. During 2011-2014, 159 plasma samples from wild birds assigned to 11 orders, 27 families, and 61 species and from 21 domestic birds (Gallus gallus domesticus, Anas platyrhynchos domesticus) were collected. The sera were assayed by two commercial competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) kits for antibodies against WNV and NDV. We found a high prevalence of WNV antibodies in both domestic (19.1%) and wild (32.1%) birds captured after the human epidemic in 2010. Moreover, the presence of anti-NDV antibodies among wild birds from Romania (5.4%) was confirmed serologically for the first time, as far as we are aware. Our findings provide evidence that wild birds, especially resident ones are involved in local West Nile and Newcastle disease enzootic and epizootic cycles. These may allow virus maintenance and spread and also enhance the chance of new outbreaks.

  1. Evaluation of quail and chicken embryos for the detection of botulinum toxin serotypes A, B, E and F activity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Comparison of quail (Coturnix japonica) and chicken (Gallus domesticus) embryos for the detection of BoNT/A activity was conducted using equal dosages of toxin/g of embryo (quail at 7 g and chickens at 48 g). Quail embryos were injected at 0, 0.5 to 50 ng adn chicken embryos at 0, 3.4 to 342 ng and...

  2. Evaluation of quail and chicken embryos for the detection of botulism toxin serotypes A, B E and F activity.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Comparison of quail (Coturnix japonica) and chicken (Gallus domesticus) embryos for the detection of BoNT/A activity was conducted using equal dosages of toxin/g of embryo (quail at 7 g and chickens at 48 g). Quail embryos were injected at 0, 0.5 to 50 ng and chicken embryos at 0, 3.4 to 342 ng and...

  3. Sleep in the domestic hen (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    van Luijtelaar, E L; van der Grinten, C P; Blokhuis, H J; Coenen, A M

    1987-01-01

    Electrophysiological recordings were made of five closely observed hens, all permanently implanted with both EEG and EMG electrodes. Five behavioural postures were distinguished and percentages of wakefulness, sleep and presumably paradoxical sleep (PS) were determined during the third and sixth hour of the dark period. Substantial agreement was generally found between behaviour and sleep with the exception of sitting or standing motionless with at least one eye open. During two thirds of this behavioural posture, the EEG showed large amplitude slow waves undistinguishable from slow wave sleep. Characteristics of PS were determined: periods were short, whereas its percentage increased during the night. Furthermore, EMG atonia was never found. An all night recording was made, and delta activity (2-5 Hz) was filtered and plotted against time for three of the hens. A significant decrease in delta activity across the night was found. Differences and similarities between sleep in hens and in mammals are discussed. Although large similarities exist it is concluded that some properties of birds' sleep make it unique and are a challenge for further study.

  4. Testosterone: from initiating change to modulating social organisation in domestic fowl ( Gallus gallus domesticus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, John P.; Murphy, Kenneth J.; Bannon, Finian J.; Hynes, Niamh M.; Hayden, Thomas J.

    2009-07-01

    Testosterone (T) concentrations in many species are sensitive to seasonal changes and to changes in social conditions. However, the effect of the natural or endogenous T increase in the juvenile on their social behaviour is not well understood. In this study, T and behaviour were measured from the pro-social juvenile to the adult stage in semi-feral domestic fowl. During the pro-social phase T levels and the distance chicks maintained between each other, i.e. inter-individual distance (IID) were low. Then, as T increased, a corresponding increase in IID occurred and continued in males until dispersal to individual adult male territories. In the new and initially stable adult social structure, T declined and IID remained high, indicating a new behavioural mechanism was in place. Males first mated as T levels were declining. They were then challenged; then T increased, and then IID increased again. Adult male T levels fluctuate, being low or declining in a socially stable environment and increasing following a challenge, suggesting a regulatory or modulating role for T. The results are consistent with T having an endogenous role: in the juvenile, driving behavioural change towards adulthood, and in adulthood, a modulating role regulating social organisation.

  5. Molecular characterization, tissue distribution and expression analysis of TRIM25 in Gallus gallus domesticus.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ze-Qing; Cheng, Yang; Yang, Hui-Ling; Zhu, Qing; Yu, Dandan; Liu, Yi-Ping

    2015-04-25

    TRIM25, a member of the tripartite motif-containing (TRIM) family of proteins, plays an important role in cell proliferation, protein modification, and the RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling pathway. However, relatively few studies have investigated the molecular characterization, tissue distribution, and potential function of TRIM25 in chickens. In this study, we cloned the full-length cDNA of chicken TRIM25 that is composed of 2706 bp. Sequence analyses revealed that TRIM25 contains a 1902-bp open-reading frame that probably encodes a 633-amino acid protein. Multiple comparisons with deduced amino acid sequences revealed that the RING finger and B30.2 domains of chicken TRIM25 share a high sequence similarity with human and murine TRIM25, indicating that these domains are critical for the function of chicken TRIM25. qPCR assays revealed that TRIM25 is highly expressed in the spleen, thymus and lungs in chickens. Furthermore, we observed that TRIM25 expression was significantly upregulated both in vitro and in vivo following infection with Newcastle disease virus. TRIM25 expression was also significantly upregulated in chicken embryo fibroblasts upon stimulation with poly(I:C) or poly(dA:dT). Taken together, these findings suggest that TRIM25 plays an important role in antiviral signaling pathways in chickens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The colour of domestication and the designer chicken

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppy, Andrew

    2011-03-01

    Colour is an important feature of most living organisms. In the wild, colour has great significance affecting the survival and reproductive success of the species. The environmental constraints which lead to the specific colours of birds and animals are very strong and individuals of novel colours tend not to survive. Under domestication, mankind has transformed all the species involved which have thus been freed from environmental pressures to a large extent. Early colour variants were mostly selected for utility reasons or religious practices. In more recent centuries colour varieties have been created purely for ornament and pleasure, fashion playing a surprisingly large part in their development. A bewildering array of colours and patterns can now be found in all our commensal species, especially the Domestic Fowl ( Gallus gallus domesticus).

  7. Gene expression profile in cerebrum in the filial imprinting of domestic chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shinji; Fujii-Taira, Ikuko; Katagiri, Sachiko; Izawa, Ei-Ichi; Fujimoto, Yasuyuki; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Takano, Tatsuya; Matsushima, Toshiya; Homma, Koichi J

    2008-06-15

    In newly hatched chicks, gene expression in the brain has previously been shown to be up-regulated following filial imprinting. By applying cDNA microarrays containing 13,007 expressed sequence tags, we examined the comprehensive gene expression profiling of the intermediate medial mesopallium in the chick cerebrum, which has been shown to play a key role in filial imprinting. We found 52 up-regulated genes and 6 down-regulated genes of at least 2.0-fold changes 3h after the training of filial imprinting, compared to the gene expression of the dark-reared chick brain. The up-regulated genes are known to be involved in a variety of pathways, including signal transduction, cytoskeletal organization, nuclear function, cell metabolism, RNA binding, endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi function, synaptic function, ion channel, and transporter. In contrast, fewer genes were down-regulated in the imprinting, coinciding with the previous data that the total RNA synthesis increased associated with filial imprinting. Our data suggests that the filial imprinting involves the modulation of multiple signaling pathways.

  8. Comparison of microsatellite variations between Red Junglefowl and a commercial chicken gene pool.

    PubMed

    Tadano, R; Kinoshita, K; Mizutani, M; Tsudzuki, M

    2014-02-01

    It is assumed that Red Junglefowl (Gallus gallus) is one of the main ancestors of domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus). Differences in microsatellite polymorphisms between Red Junglefowl and modern commercial chickens, which are used for egg and meat production, have not been fully reported. A total of 361 individuals from 1 Red Junglefowl population that has been maintained as a closed flock, 5 final cross-bred commercial layer populations (white-, tinted-, and brown-egg layers), and 2 final cross-bred commercial broiler populations were genotyped for 40 autosomal microsatellite loci. We compared microsatellite variations in Red Junglefowl with those in a commercial chicken gene pool. The contribution of each population to the genetic diversity was also estimated based on the molecular coancestry. In total, 302 distinct alleles were detected in 1 Red Junglefowl and 7 commercial chicken populations, of which 31 alleles (10.3%) were unique to Red Junglefowl, most of which occurred at a high frequency. The genetic differentiation between Red Junglefowl and commercial chickens (pairwise FST) ranged from 0.32 to 0.47. According to the neighbor-joining tree based on the modified Cavalli-Sforza chord distances and the Bayesian clustering analysis, Red Junglefowl was genetically distant from the commercial chicken gene pool tested. In all of the populations analyzed, Red Junglefowl made the highest contribution to genetic diversity. These results suggest that Red Junglefowl has a distinct distribution of microsatellite alleles and that there is a high level of genetic divergence between Red Junglefowl and commercial chickens.

  9. Analyzing the effects of co-expression of chick (Gallus gallus) melanocortin receptors with either chick MRAP1 or MRAP2 in CHO cells on sensitivity to ACTH(1-24) or ACTH(1-13)NH2: Implications for the avian HPA axis and avian melanocortin circuits in the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Alexa L; Maekawa, Fumihiko; Kawashima, Takaharu; Sakamoto, Hirotaka; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Davis, Perry; Dores, Robert M

    2018-01-15

    In order to better understand the roles that melanocortin receptors (cMCRs) and melanocortin-2 receptor accessory proteins (cMRAP1 and cMRAP2) play in the HPA axis and hypothalamus, adrenal gland and hypothalamus mRNA from 1day-old white leghorn chicks (Gallus gallus), were analyzed by real-time PCR. mRNA was also made for kidney, ovary, and liver. Mrap1 mRNA could be detected in adrenal tissue, but not in any of the other tissues, and mrap2 mRNA was also detected in the adrenal gland. Finally, all five melanocortin receptors mRNAs could be detected in the adrenal gland; mc2r and mc5r mRNAs were the most abundant. To evaluate any potential interactions between MRAP1 and the MCRs that may occur in adrenal cells, individual chick mcr cDNA constructs were transiently expressed in CHO cells either in the presence or absence of a chick mrap1 cDNA, and the transfected cells were stimulated with hACTH(1-24) at concentrations ranging from 10 -13 M to 10 -6 M. As expected, MC2R required co-expression with MRAP1 for functional expression; whereas, co-expression of cMC3R with cMRAP1 had no statistically significant effect on sensitivity to hACTH(1-24). However, co-expression of MC4R and MC5R with MRAP1, increased sensitivity for ACTH(1-24) by approximately 35 fold and 365 fold, respectively. However, co-expressing of cMRAP2 with these melanocortin receptors had no effect on sensitivity to hACTH(1-24). Since the real-time PCR analysis detected mrap2 mRNA and mc4r mRNA in the hypothalamus, the interaction between cMC4R and cMRAP2 with respect to sensitivity to ACTH(1-13)NH 2 stimulation was also evaluated. However, no effect, either positive or negative, was observed. Finally, the highest levels of mc5r mRNA were detected in liver cells. This observation raises the possibility that in one-day old chicks, activation of the HPA axis may also involve a physiological response from liver cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Coral snake antivenom produced in chickens (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Irma; Sánchez, Elda E; Girón, María E; Estrella, Amalid; Guerrero, Belsy; Rodriguez-Acosta, F Alexis

    2014-01-01

    The production of anti-snake venom from large mammal's blood has been found to be low-yielding and arduous, consequently, antivenom immunoglobulins for treatment are achieved regularly as polyvalent serum. We have standardized an undemanding technique for making purified immunoglobulin IgY antivenom consisting of polyclonal antibodies against coral snake venom in the egg yolk of immunized hens. We have adapted a reported process of antibody purification from egg yolks, and achieved 90% antibody purity. The customized technique consisted of the removal of lipids from distilled water-diluted egg yolks by a freeze-thaw sequence. The specific immunoglobulins were present in the egg yolk for up to 180 days postimmunization. Therefore, by means of small venom quantities, a significant amount of immunoglobulins were found in an adequately purified state (The obtained material contained about 90% pure IgY). The antigen binding of the immunoglobulins was detected by a double immunodiffusion test. Titers of antibodies in the yolk were estimated with a serum protection assay (Median effective dose = ED50) (ED50= 477 mg/kg). Given that breeding hens is economically feasible, egg gathering is noninvasive and the purification of IgY antibodies is quick and easy, chicken immunization is an excellent alternative for the production of polyclonal antibodies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first coral snake antivenom prepared in birds.

  11. CORAL SNAKE ANTIVENOM PRODUCED IN CHICKENS (Gallus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Irma; Sánchez, Elda E.; Girón, María E.; Estrella, Amalid; Guerrero, Belsy; Rodriguez-Acosta, F. Alexis

    2014-01-01

    The production of anti-snake venom from large mammal's blood has been found to be low-yielding and arduous, consequently, antivenom immunoglobulins for treatment are achieved regularly as polyvalent serum. We have standardized an undemanding technique for making purified immunoglobulin IgY antivenom consisting of polyclonal antibodies against coral snake venom in the egg yolk of immunized hens. We have adapted a reported process of antibody purification from egg yolks, and achieved 90% antibody purity. The customized technique consisted of the removal of lipids from distilled water-diluted egg yolks by a freeze–thaw sequence. The specific immunoglobulins were present in the egg yolk for up to 180 days postimmunization. Therefore, by means of small venom quantities, a significant amount of immunoglobulins were found in an adequately purified state (The obtained material contained about 90% pure IgY). The antigen binding of the immunoglobulins was detected by a double immunodiffusion test. Titers of antibodies in the yolk were estimated with a serum protection assay (Median effective dose = ED50) (ED50= 477 mg/kg). Given that breeding hens is economically feasible, egg gathering is noninvasive and the purification of IgY antibodies is quick and easy, chicken immunization is an excellent alternative for the production of polyclonal antibodies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first coral snake antivenom prepared in birds. PMID:24553610

  12. Thermoregulatory behavior is widespread in the embryos of reptiles and birds.

    PubMed

    Li, Teng; Zhao, Bo; Zhou, Yong-Kang; Hu, Rui; Du, Wei-Guo

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that thermoregulatory behavior occurs not only in posthatching turtles but also in turtles prior to hatching. Does thermoregulatory behavior also occur in the embryos of other reptile and bird species? Our experiments show that such behavior is widespread but not universal in reptile and bird embryos. We recorded repositioning within the egg, in response to thermal gradients, in the embryos of three species of snakes (Xenochrophis piscator, Elaphe bimaculata, and Zaocys dhumnades), two turtles (Chelydra serpentina and Ocadia sinensis), one crocodile (Alligator sinensis), and four birds (Coturnix coturnix, Gallus gallus domesticus, Columba livia domestica, and Anas platyrhynchos domestica). However, we detected no significant thermoregulation by the embryos of two lizard species (Takydromus septentrionalis and Phrynocephalus frontalis). Overall, embryonic thermoregulatory behavior is widespread in reptile as well as bird species but may be unimportant in the small eggs laid by most lizards.

  13. Sensitivity of embryos of chicken, domestic duck, and common eider duck to polychlorinated and non-halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Brunstroem, B.

    Embryos of chicken (Gallus domesticus), domestic duck (Anas platyrhynchos), and common eider duck (Somateria mollissima) were exposed in ovo to PCBs and to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Two coplanar PCBs, 3,3{prime},4,4{prime}-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB {number_sign}77) and 3,3{prime},4,4{prime},5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB {number_sign}126), were considerably more lethal and potent as inducers of 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) in chicken embryos (Gallus domesticus) than in embryos of the other two species. In chicken embryos, these compounds caused edema and eye and beak deformities. An artificial mixture of 18 PAHs which all have been detected in environmental samples, was slightly more toxic to embryos of the domestic duck and the commonmore » eider duck than to chicken embryos. The most potent compound in the mixture was benzo(k)fluoranthene. When chicken embryo livers were exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in vitro, EROD was induced by very low concentrations and the EC{sub 50} value obtained was 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} M. Livers from embryos of eider ducks and domestic ducks were 2--4 orders of magnitude less responsive to TCDD than chicken embryo livers in terms of EROD induction in vitro.« less

  14. Social predisposition dependent neuronal activity in the intermediate medial mesopallium of domestic chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Mayer, Uwe; Rosa-Salva, Orsola; Lorenzi, Elena; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2016-09-01

    Species from phylogenetically distant animal groups, such as birds and primates including humans, share early experience-independent social predispositions that cause offspring, soon after birth, to attend to and learn about conspecifics. One example of this phenomenon is provided by the behaviour of newly-hatched visually-naïve domestic chicks that preferentially approach a stimulus resembling a conspecific (a stuffed fowl) rather than a less naturalistic object (a scrambled version of the stuffed fowl). However, the neuronal mechanisms underlying this behaviour are mostly unknown. Here we analysed chicks' brain activity with immunohistochemical detection of the transcription factor c-Fos. In a spontaneous choice test we confirmed a significant preference for approaching the stuffed fowl over a texture fowl (a fowl that was cut in small pieces attached to the sides of a box in scrambled order). Comparison of brain activation of a subgroup of chicks that approached either one or the other stimulus revealed differential activation in an area relevant for imprinting (IMM, intermediate medial mesopallium), suggesting that a different level of plasticity is associated with approach to naturalistic and artificial stimuli. c-Fos immunoreactive neurons were present also in the intermediate layers of the optic tectum (a plausible candidate for processing early social predispositions) showing a trend similar to the results for the IMM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular function of microtubule-associated protein 2 for filial imprinting in domestic chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shinji; Katagiri, Sachiko; Aoki, Naoya; Iikubo, Eiji; Kitajima, Takaaki; Matsushima, Toshiya; Homma, Koichi J

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene-silencing can be a tool for elucidating the role of genes in the neural basis of behavioral plasticity. Previously, we reported that exogenous DNA could be successfully delivered into newly-hatched chick brains via electroporation. Here, we used this in vivo gene-transfer technique and showed that transfected microRNA vectors preferentially silence exogenous DNA expression in neuronal cells. Using this system, the up-regulation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) accompanying filial imprinting was suppressed in vivo, which impaired the filial imprinting in chicks. In addition, the phosphorylation of MAP2 was found to increase in parallel with filial imprinting, and lithium chloride, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), was found to impair filial imprinting. Our results suggest that the regulation of MAP2 expression and its phosphorylation are required for filial imprinting and may modify microtubule stability, thereby leading to cytoskeletal reorganization during imprinting. This in vivo RNAi-mediated gene-silencing system will facilitate the analysis of gene function in the living chick brain and provides further clues regarding the molecular mechanisms underpinning avian learning. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Early Life in a Barren Environment Adversely Affects Spatial Cognition in Laying Hens (Gallus gallus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    Tahamtani, Fernanda M.; Nordgreen, Janicke; Nordquist, Rebecca E.; Janczak, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial cognition in vertebrates is adversely affected by a lack of environmental complexity during early life. However, to our knowledge, no previous studies have tested the effect of early exposure to varying degrees of environmental complexity on specific components of spatial cognition in chickens. There are two main rearing systems for laying hens in the EU: aviaries and cages. These two systems differ from one another in environmental complexity. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that rearing in a barren cage environment relative to a complex aviary environment causes long-lasting deficits in the ability to perform spatial tasks. For this purpose, 24 white Dekalb laying hens, half of which had been reared in an aviary system and the other half in a conventional cage system, were tested in a holeboard task. Birds from both treatment groups learnt the task; however, the cage-reared hens required more time to locate rewards and had poorer levels of working memory. The latter finding supports the hypothesis that rearing in a barren environment causes long-term impairment of short-term memory in chickens. PMID:26664932

  17. The articulations of the neurocranium in the postnatal skeleton of the domestic fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Hogg, D A

    1978-09-01

    In the neurocranium of the domestic fowl the centres of ossification present at hatching and appearing susbequently have been investigated and illustrated. The controversy over centres around the orbit is reviewed and it is concluded that paired laterally placed pleurosphenoids are present by the time of hatching, while paired orbitosphenoids situated near the midline and dorsal to the optic foramen do not appear until between 70 and 91 days after hatching. No additional "presphenoid" centres were detected. The neurocranial articulations were studied: 27, many of them paired, were identified. The sequence and timing of synostosis were determined.

  18. The articulations of the neurocranium in the postnatal skeleton of the domestic fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, D A

    1978-01-01

    In the neurocranium of the domestic fowl the centres of ossification present at hatching and appearing susbequently have been investigated and illustrated. The controversy over centres around the orbit is reviewed and it is concluded that paired laterally placed pleurosphenoids are present by the time of hatching, while paired orbitosphenoids situated near the midline and dorsal to the optic foramen do not appear until between 70 and 91 days after hatching. No additional "presphenoid" centres were detected. The neurocranial articulations were studied: 27, many of them paired, were identified. The sequence and timing of synostosis were determined. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:568132

  19. Characteristics of MHC class I genes in house sparrows Passer domesticus as revealed by long cDNA transcripts and amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Maria; Westerdahl, Helena

    2013-08-01

    In birds the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) organization differs both among and within orders; chickens Gallus gallus of the order Galliformes have a simple arrangement, while many songbirds of the order Passeriformes have a more complex arrangement with larger numbers of MHC class I and II genes. Chicken MHC genes are found at two independent loci, classical MHC-B and non-classical MHC-Y, whereas non-classical MHC genes are yet to be verified in passerines. Here we characterize MHC class I transcripts (α1 to α3 domain) and perform amplicon sequencing using a next-generation sequencing technique on exon 3 from house sparrow Passer domesticus (a passerine) families. Then we use phylogenetic, selection, and segregation analyses to gain a better understanding of the MHC class I organization. Trees based on the α1 and α2 domain revealed a distinct cluster with short terminal branches for transcripts with a 6-bp deletion. Interestingly, this cluster was not seen in the tree based on the α3 domain. 21 exon 3 sequences were verified in a single individual and the average numbers within an individual were nine and five for sequences with and without a 6-bp deletion, respectively. All individuals had exon 3 sequences with and without a 6-bp deletion. The sequences with a 6-bp deletion have many characteristics in common with non-classical MHC, e.g., highly conserved amino acid positions were substituted compared with the other alleles, low nucleotide diversity and just a single site was subject to positive selection. However, these alleles also have characteristics that suggest they could be classical, e.g., complete linkage and absence of a distinct cluster in a tree based on the α3 domain. Thus, we cannot determine for certain whether or not the alleles with a 6-bp deletion are non-classical based on our present data. Further analyses on segregation patterns of these alleles in combination with dating the 6-bp deletion through MHC characterization across the

  20. Neuronal plasticity and multisensory integration in filial imprinting.

    PubMed

    Town, Stephen Michael; McCabe, Brian John

    2011-03-10

    Many organisms sample their environment through multiple sensory systems and the integration of multisensory information enhances learning. However, the mechanisms underlying multisensory memory formation and their similarity to unisensory mechanisms remain unclear. Filial imprinting is one example in which experience is multisensory, and the mechanisms of unisensory neuronal plasticity are well established. We investigated the storage of audiovisual information through experience by comparing the activity of neurons in the intermediate and medial mesopallium of imprinted and naïve domestic chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus) in response to an audiovisual imprinting stimulus and novel object and their auditory and visual components. We find that imprinting enhanced the mean response magnitude of neurons to unisensory but not multisensory stimuli. Furthermore, imprinting enhanced responses to incongruent audiovisual stimuli comprised of mismatched auditory and visual components. Our results suggest that the effects of imprinting on the unisensory and multisensory responsiveness of IMM neurons differ and that IMM neurons may function to detect unexpected deviations from the audiovisual imprinting stimulus.

  1. Neuronal Plasticity and Multisensory Integration in Filial Imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Town, Stephen Michael; McCabe, Brian John

    2011-01-01

    Many organisms sample their environment through multiple sensory systems and the integration of multisensory information enhances learning. However, the mechanisms underlying multisensory memory formation and their similarity to unisensory mechanisms remain unclear. Filial imprinting is one example in which experience is multisensory, and the mechanisms of unisensory neuronal plasticity are well established. We investigated the storage of audiovisual information through experience by comparing the activity of neurons in the intermediate and medial mesopallium of imprinted and naïve domestic chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus) in response to an audiovisual imprinting stimulus and novel object and their auditory and visual components. We find that imprinting enhanced the mean response magnitude of neurons to unisensory but not multisensory stimuli. Furthermore, imprinting enhanced responses to incongruent audiovisual stimuli comprised of mismatched auditory and visual components. Our results suggest that the effects of imprinting on the unisensory and multisensory responsiveness of IMM neurons differ and that IMM neurons may function to detect unexpected deviations from the audiovisual imprinting stimulus. PMID:21423770

  2. Genetic evidence from mitochondrial DNA corroborates the origin of Tibetan chickens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long; Zhang, Pu; Li, Qingqing; Gaur, Uma; Liu, Yiping; Zhu, Qing; Zhao, Xiaoling; Wang, Yan; Yin, Huadong; Hu, Yaodong; Liu, Aiping; Li, Diyan

    2017-01-01

    Chicken is the most common poultry species and is important to human societies. Tibetan chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) is a breed endemic to China that is distributed mainly on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. However, its origin has not been well characterized. In the present study, we sequenced partial mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of 239 and 283 samples from Tibetan and Sichuan indigenous chickens, respectively. Incorporating 1091 published sequences, we constructed the matrilineal genealogy of Tibetan chickens to further document their domestication history. We found that the genetic structure of the mtDNA haplotypes of Tibetan chickens are dominated by seven major haplogroups (A-G). In addition, phylogenetic and network analyses showed that Tibetan chickens are not distinguishable from the indigenous chickens in surrounding areas. Furthermore, some clades of Tibetan chickens may have originated from game fowls. In summary, our results collectively indicated that Tibetan chickens may have diverged from indigenous chickens in the adjacent regions and hybridized with various chickens.

  3. Species identification in meat products: A new screening method based on high resolution melting analysis of cyt b gene.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Oceja, A; Nuñez, C; Baeta, M; Gamarra, D; de Pancorbo, M M

    2017-12-15

    Meat adulteration by substitution with lower value products and/or mislabeling involves economic, health, quality and socio-religious issues. Therefore, identification and traceability of meat species has become an important subject to detect possible fraudulent practices. In the present study the development of a high resolution melt (HRM) screening method for the identification of eight common meat species is reported. Samples from Bos taurus, Ovis aries, Sus scrofa domestica, Equus caballus, Oryctolagus cuniculus, Gallus gallus domesticus, Meleagris gallopavo and Coturnix coturnix were analyzed through the amplification of a 148 bp fragment from the cyt b gene with a universal primer pair in HRM analyses. Melting profiles from each species, as well as from several DNA mixtures of these species and blind samples, allowed a successful species differentiation. The results demonstrated that the HRM method here proposed is a fast, reliable, and low-cost screening technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Skin temperature reveals the intensity of acute stress

    PubMed Central

    Herborn, Katherine A.; Graves, James L.; Jerem, Paul; Evans, Neil P.; Nager, Ruedi; McCafferty, Dominic J.; McKeegan, Dorothy E.F.

    2015-01-01

    Acute stress triggers peripheral vasoconstriction, causing a rapid, short-term drop in skin temperature in homeotherms. We tested, for the first time, whether this response has the potential to quantify stress, by exhibiting proportionality with stressor intensity. We used established behavioural and hormonal markers: activity level and corticosterone level, to validate a mild and more severe form of an acute restraint stressor in hens (Gallus gallus domesticus). We then used infrared thermography (IRT) to non-invasively collect continuous temperature measurements following exposure to these two intensities of acute handling stress. In the comb and wattle, two skin regions with a known thermoregulatory role, stressor intensity predicted the extent of initial skin cooling, and also the occurrence of a more delayed skin warming, providing two opportunities to quantify stress. With the present, cost-effective availability of IRT technology, this non-invasive and continuous method of stress assessment in unrestrained animals has the potential to become common practice in pure and applied research. PMID:26434785

  5. Genetic evidence from mitochondrial DNA corroborates the origin of Tibetan chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing; Zhao, Xiaoling; Wang, Yan; Yin, Huadong; Hu, Yaodong; Liu, Aiping; Li, Diyan

    2017-01-01

    Chicken is the most common poultry species and is important to human societies. Tibetan chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) is a breed endemic to China that is distributed mainly on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. However, its origin has not been well characterized. In the present study, we sequenced partial mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of 239 and 283 samples from Tibetan and Sichuan indigenous chickens, respectively. Incorporating 1091 published sequences, we constructed the matrilineal genealogy of Tibetan chickens to further document their domestication history. We found that the genetic structure of the mtDNA haplotypes of Tibetan chickens are dominated by seven major haplogroups (A-G). In addition, phylogenetic and network analyses showed that Tibetan chickens are not distinguishable from the indigenous chickens in surrounding areas. Furthermore, some clades of Tibetan chickens may have originated from game fowls. In summary, our results collectively indicated that Tibetan chickens may have diverged from indigenous chickens in the adjacent regions and hybridized with various chickens. PMID:28241078

  6. Insights into the chicken IgY with emphasis on the generation and applications of chicken recombinant monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Warren; Syed Atif, Ali; Tan, Soo Choon; Leow, Chiuan Herng

    2017-08-01

    The advantages of chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) antibodies as immunodiagnostic and immunotherapeutic biomolecules has only been recently recognized. Even so, chicken antibodies remain less-well characterized than their mammalian counterparts. This review aims at providing a current overview of the structure, function, development and generation of chicken antibodies. Additionally, brief but comprehensive insights into current knowledge pertaining to the immunogenetic framework and diversity-generation of the chicken immunoglobulin repertoire which have contributed to the establishment of recombinant chicken mAb-generating methods are discussed. Focus is provided on the current methods used to generate antibodies from chickens with added emphasis on the generation of recombinant chicken mAbs and its derivative formats. The advantages and limitations of established protocols for the generation of chicken mAbs are highlighted. The various applications of recombinant chicken mAbs and its derivative formats in immunodiagnostics and immunotherapy are further detailed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Morphological and molecular genetic characterization of three Capillaria spp. (Capillaria anatis, Capillaria pudendotecta, and Capillaria madseni) and Baruscapillaria obsignata (Nematoda: Trichuridae: Capillariinae) in avians.

    PubMed

    Tamaru, Masae; Yamaki, Seiya; Jimenez, Lea Angsinco; Sato, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Morphological and genetic analyses were performed on four avian species of the subfamily Capillariinae (Nematoda: Trichuridae), i.e., Capillaria anatis from chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) in Japan and the Philippines, Baruscapillaria obsignata from chickens and captive swans (Cygnus olor and Cygnus atratus) in Japan, Capillaria pudendotecta from captive swans in Japan, and Capillaria madseni from carrion and jungle crows (Corvus corone and Corvus macrorhynchos) in Japan. Although morphometric variations of male and female worms from different hosts and/or localities made the species identification difficult, the 18S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) sequences clarified their taxonomic position and phylogenetic relationships. Species of the same genus clustered robustly into a single clade in the phylogenetic tree based on the 18S rDNA, demonstrating to the extent possible the validity of the latest classification of the subfamily following Moravec's rearrangement in 1982. Male worms of C. pudendotecta are described here for the first time.

  8. Intact EAV-HP Endogenous Retrovirus in Sonnerat's Jungle Fowl

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, M. A.; Howes, K.; Venugopal, K.

    2001-01-01

    The EAV-HP group of chicken endogenous retrovirus elements was previously shown to be defective, with large deletions of the pol gene. In this report, we demonstrate that genomes of other Gallus species also maintain EAV-HP elements with similar deletions. The chicken EAV-HP1 locus was detected in both red (Gallus gallus gallus) and Sonnerat's (Gallus sonneratii) jungle fowl with identical integration sites, indicating that these elements had integrated before separation of the Gallus species. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that the G. sonneratii genome carries EAV-HP elements with intact pol regions. PMID:11160706

  9. A new chicken genome assembly provides insight into avian genome structure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The importance of the Gallus gallus (chicken) as a model organism and agricultural animal merits a continuation of sequence assembly improvement efforts. We present a new version of the chicken genome assembly (Gallus_gallus-5.0; GCA_000002315.3) built from combined long single molecule sequencing t...

  10. Molecular phylogeny of some avian species using Cytochrome b gene sequence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Awad, A; Khalil, S. R; Abd-Elhakim, Y. M

    2015-01-01

    Veritable identification and differentiation of avian species is a vital step in conservative, taxonomic, forensic, legal and other ornithological interventions. Therefore, this study involved the application of molecular approach to identify some avian species i.e. Chicken (Gallus gallus), Muskovy duck (Cairina moschata), Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), Laughing dove (Streptopelia senegalensis), and Rock pigeon (Columba livia). Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples and partial sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (358 bp) was amplified and sequenced using universal primers. Sequences alignment and phylogenetic analyses were performed by CLC main workbench program. The obtained five sequences were deposited in GenBank and compared with those previously registered in GenBank. The similarity percentage was 88.60% between Gallus gallus and Coturnix japonica and 80.46% between Gallus gallus and Columba livia. The percentage of identity between the studied species and GenBank species ranged from 77.20% (Columba oenas and Anas platyrhynchos) to 100% (Gallus gallus and Gallus sonneratii, Coturnix coturnix and Coturnix japonica, Meleagris gallopavo and Columba livia). Amplification of the partial sequence of mitochondrial cytochrome b gene proved to be practical for identification of an avian species unambiguously. PMID:27175180

  11. Estimating the Public Health Impact of Setting Targets at the European Level for the Reduction of Zoonotic Salmonella in Certain Poultry Populations

    PubMed Central

    Messens, Winy; Vivas-Alegre, Luis; Bashir, Saghir; Amore, Giusi; Romero-Barrios, Pablo; Hugas, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In the European Union (EU), targets are being set for the reduction of certain zoonotic Salmonella serovars in different animal populations, including poultry populations, within the framework of Regulation (EC) No. 2160/2003 on the control of zoonoses. For a three-year transitional period, the EU targets were to cover only Salmonella Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium (and in addition S. Hadar, S. Infantis and S. Virchow for breeding flocks of Gallus gallus). Before the end of that transitional period, the revision of the EU targets was to be considered, including the potentially addition of other serovars with public health significance to the permanent EU targets. This review article aims at providing an overview of the assessments carried out by the Scientific Panel on Biological Hazards of the European Food Safety Authority in the field of setting targets for Salmonella in poultry populations (breeding flocks of Gallus gallus, laying flocks of Gallus gallus, broiler flocks of Gallus gallus and flocks of breeding and fattening turkeys) and their impact in subsequent changes in EU legislation. PMID:24157508

  12. Up-regulation of microtubule-associated protein 2 accompanying the filial imprinting of domestic chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shinji; Fujii-Taira, Ikuko; Murakami, Akio; Hirose, Naoki; Aoki, Naoya; Izawa, Ei-Ichi; Fujimoto, Yasuyuki; Takano, Tatsuya; Matsushima, Toshiya; Homma, Koichi J

    2008-06-15

    Using cDNA microarrays, we have identified elsewhere the genes of microtubule-associated proteins as a group up-regulated in newly hatched chick brains after filial imprinting training. Here we show by in situ hybridization that the mRNA for the microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) gene was enriched in the mesopallium and the hippocampus in the trained chick brain. The regionally specific enrichments of MAP2 mRNA were not observed in the brain of dark-reared or light-exposed chick as controls, implying an association between the degree of expression and the strength of the learned preference. In agreement with the gene expression, MAP2 protein was accumulated in the mesopallium of the trained chick brain, but not in the brains of the controls. The accumulation of MAP2 was found in the cytosol of neurons and co-localized with beta-tubulin, suggesting a change in microtubule assembly. Our results suggest a postnatal reorganization of cytoskeleton following filial imprinting.

  13. Sound attenuation in the ear of domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) as a result of beak opening

    PubMed Central

    Claes, Raf; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2017-01-01

    Because the quadrate and the eardrum are connected, the hypothesis was tested that birds attenuate the transmission of sound through their ears by opening the bill, which potentially serves as an additional protective mechanism for self-generated vocalizations. In domestic chickens, it was examined if a difference exists between hens and roosters, given the difference in vocalization capacity between the sexes. To test the hypothesis, vibrations of the columellar footplate were measured ex vivo with laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) for closed and maximally opened beak conditions, with sounds introduced at the ear canal. The average attenuation was 3.5 dB in roosters and only 0.5 dB in hens. To demonstrate the importance of a putative protective mechanism, audio recordings were performed of a crowing rooster. Sound pressures levels of 133.5 dB were recorded near the ears. The frequency content of the vocalizations was in accordance with the range of highest hearing sensitivity in chickens. The results indicate a small but significant difference in sound attenuation between hens and roosters. However, the amount of attenuation as measured in the experiments on both hens and roosters is small and will provide little effective protection in addition to other mechanisms such as stapedius muscle activity. PMID:29291112

  14. Analysis of genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among red jungle fowls and Chinese domestic fowls.

    PubMed

    Bao, WenBin; Chen, GuoHong; Li, BiChun; Wu, XinSheng; Shu, JingTing; Wu, ShengLong; Xu, Qi; Weigend, Steffen

    2008-06-01

    Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among 568 individuals of two red jungle fowl subspecies (Gallus gallus spadiceus in China and Gallus gallus gallus in Thailand) and 14 Chinese domestic chicken breeds were evaluated with 29 microstaellite loci, the genetic variability within population and genetic differentiation among population were estimated, and then genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships were analyzed among red jungle fowls and Chinese domestic fowls. A total of 286 alleles were detected in 16 population with 29 microsatellite markers and the average number of the alleles observed in 29 microsatellite loci was 9.86+/-6.36. The overall expected heterozygosity of all population was 0.6708+/-0.0251, and the number of population deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium per locus ranged from 0 to 7. In the whole population, the average of genetic differentiation among population, measured as FST value, was 16.7% (P<0.001), and all loci contributed significantly (P<0.001) to this differentiation. It can also be seen that the deficit of heterozygotes was very high (0.015) (P<0.01). Reynolds' distance values varied between 0.036 (Xiaoshan chicken-Luyuan chicken pair) and 0.330 (G. gallus gallus-Gushi chicken pair). The Nm value ranged from 0.533 (between G. gallus gallus and Gushi chicken) to 5.833 (between Xiaoshan chicken and Luyuan chicken). An unrooted consensus tree was constructed using the neighbour-joining method and the Reynolds' genetic distance. The heavy-body sized chicken breeds, Luyuan chicken, Xiaoshan chicken, Beijing Fatty chicken, Henan Game chicken, Huainan Partridge and Langshan chicken formed one branch, and it had a close genetic relationship between Xiaoshan chicken-Luyuan chicken pair and Chahua chicken-Tibetan chicken pair. Chahua chicken and Tibetan chicken had closer genetic relationship with these two subspecies of red jungle fowl than other domestic chicken breeds. G. gallus spadiceus showed closer phylogenetic

  15. The effects of social rearing on preferences formed during filial imprinting and their neural correlates.

    PubMed

    Town, Stephen Michael

    2011-08-01

    Filial imprinting was originally proposed to be an irreversible process by which a young animal forms a preference for an object experienced early in life. The present study examined the effects of experience after imprinting on the stability of preferences of domestic chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus) for an imprinting stimulus by rearing imprinted chicks socially or in isolation. Chicks reared socially or in isolation retained preferences for the imprinting stimulus; however, social rearing weakened the strength of preferences. The responses of neurons within the intermediate and medial mesopallium--a forebrain region necessary for imprinting were also recorded in socially reared and isolated chicks when presented with the visual component of the imprinting stimulus and novel object. Consistent with existing findings, neurons recorded from isolated chicks responded more strongly to the imprinting stimulus than novel object. However, social rearing diminished the disparity between responses to stimuli such that neurons recorded from socially reared chicks responded similarly to the imprinting stimulus and novel object. These findings suggest that social rearing may impair the retention of preferences formed during imprinting through mechanisms involving the IMM.

  16. Extensive homology of chicken macrochromosomes in the karyotypes of Trachemys scripta elegans and Crocodylus niloticus revealed by chromosome painting despite long divergence times.

    PubMed

    Kasai, F; O'Brien, P C M; Martin, S; Ferguson-Smith, M A

    2012-01-01

    We report extensive chromosome homology revealed by chromosome painting between chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus, GGA, 2n = 78) macrochromosomes (representing 70% of the chicken genome) and the chromosomes of a turtle, the red-eared slider (Trachemys scripta elegans, TSC, 2n = 50), and the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus, CNI, 2n = 32). Our data show that GGA1-8 arms seem to be conserved in the arms of TSC chromosomes, GGA1-2 arms are separated and homologous to CNI1p, 3q, 4q and 5q. In addition to GGAZ homologues in our previous study, large-scale GGA autosome syntenies have been conserved in turtle and crocodile despite hundreds of millions of years divergence time. Based on phylogenetic hypotheses that crocodiles diverged after the divergence of birds and turtles, our results in CNI suggest that GGA1-2 and TSC1-2 represent the ancestral state and that chromosome fissions followed by fusions have been the mechanisms responsible for the reduction of chromosome number in crocodiles. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Yellow Fever 17DD Vaccine Virus Infection Causes Detectable Changes in Chicken Embryos.

    PubMed

    Manso, Pedro Paulo de Abreu; Dias de Oliveira, Barbara C E P; de Sequeira, Patrícia Carvalho; Maia de Souza, Yuli Rodrigues; Ferro, Jessica Maria dos Santos; da Silva, Igor José; Caputo, Luzia Fátima Gonçalves; Guedes, Priscila Tavares; dos Santos, Alexandre Araujo Cunha; Freire, Marcos da Silva; Bonaldo, Myrna Cristina; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine is one of the most effective human vaccines ever created. The YF vaccine has been produced since 1937 in embryonated chicken eggs inoculated with the YF 17D virus. Yet, little information is available about the infection mechanism of YF 17DD virus in this biological model. To better understand this mechanism, we infected embryos of Gallus gallus domesticus and analyzed their histopathology after 72 hours of YF infection. Some embryos showed few apoptotic bodies in infected tissues, suggesting mild focal infection processes. Confocal and super-resolution microscopic analysis allowed us to identify as targets of viral infection: skeletal muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, nervous system cells, renal tubular epithelium, lung parenchyma, and fibroblasts associated with connective tissue in the perichondrium and dermis. The virus replication was heaviest in muscle tissues. In all of these specimens, RT-PCR methods confirmed the presence of replicative intermediate and genomic YF RNA. This clearer characterization of cell targets in chicken embryos paves the way for future development of a new YF vaccine based on a new cell culture system.

  18. Yellow Fever 17DD Vaccine Virus Infection Causes Detectable Changes in Chicken Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Pedro Paulo de Abreu; Dias de Oliveira, Barbara C. E. P.; de Sequeira, Patrícia Carvalho; Maia de Souza, Yuli Rodrigues; Ferro, Jessica Maria dos Santos; da Silva, Igor José; Caputo, Luzia Fátima Gonçalves; Guedes, Priscila Tavares; dos Santos, Alexandre Araujo Cunha; Freire, Marcos da Silva; Bonaldo, Myrna Cristina; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine is one of the most effective human vaccines ever created. The YF vaccine has been produced since 1937 in embryonated chicken eggs inoculated with the YF 17D virus. Yet, little information is available about the infection mechanism of YF 17DD virus in this biological model. To better understand this mechanism, we infected embryos of Gallus gallus domesticus and analyzed their histopathology after 72 hours of YF infection. Some embryos showed few apoptotic bodies in infected tissues, suggesting mild focal infection processes. Confocal and super-resolution microscopic analysis allowed us to identify as targets of viral infection: skeletal muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, nervous system cells, renal tubular epithelium, lung parenchyma, and fibroblasts associated with connective tissue in the perichondrium and dermis. The virus replication was heaviest in muscle tissues. In all of these specimens, RT-PCR methods confirmed the presence of replicative intermediate and genomic YF RNA. This clearer characterization of cell targets in chicken embryos paves the way for future development of a new YF vaccine based on a new cell culture system. PMID:26371874

  19. Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium found in raptors exposed to infected domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Kriz, Petr; Kaevska, Marija; Bartejsova, Iva; Pavlik, Ivo

    2013-09-01

    We report a case of a falcon breeding facility, where raptors (both diurnal and nocturnal) were raised in contact with domestic fowl (Gallus gallus f. domesticus) infected by Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. Fecal and environmental samples from 20 raptors and four common ravens (Corvus corax) were collected. Mycobacterium a. avium DNA was detected in feces of four raptors (bald eagle [Haliaeetus leucocephalus], eagle owl [Bubo bubo], barn owl [Tyto alba], and little owl [Athene noctua]) using triplex quantitative real-time PCR. As both the flock of domestic fowl and one of the infected raptors had the same origin (zoological collection), they might have had a common source of colonization/infection. However, the detection of M. a. avium in feces of three other raptors may point at transmission of the agent between the birds in the facility. Contact of raptors with domestic fowl infected by M. a. avium may pose a risk for transmission of the infection for them; however, raptors from the falcon breeding facility seemed to be relatively resistant to the infection.

  20. Skin temperature reveals the intensity of acute stress.

    PubMed

    Herborn, Katherine A; Graves, James L; Jerem, Paul; Evans, Neil P; Nager, Ruedi; McCafferty, Dominic J; McKeegan, Dorothy E F

    2015-12-01

    Acute stress triggers peripheral vasoconstriction, causing a rapid, short-term drop in skin temperature in homeotherms. We tested, for the first time, whether this response has the potential to quantify stress, by exhibiting proportionality with stressor intensity. We used established behavioural and hormonal markers: activity level and corticosterone level, to validate a mild and more severe form of an acute restraint stressor in hens (Gallus gallus domesticus). We then used infrared thermography (IRT) to non-invasively collect continuous temperature measurements following exposure to these two intensities of acute handling stress. In the comb and wattle, two skin regions with a known thermoregulatory role, stressor intensity predicted the extent of initial skin cooling, and also the occurrence of a more delayed skin warming, providing two opportunities to quantify stress. With the present, cost-effective availability of IRT technology, this non-invasive and continuous method of stress assessment in unrestrained animals has the potential to become common practice in pure and applied research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Limited transmission of emergent H7N9 influenza A virus in a simulated live animal market: Do chickens pose the principal transmission threat?

    PubMed

    Bosco-Lauth, Angela M; Bowen, Richard A; Root, J Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Emergent H7N9 influenza A virus has caused multiple public health and financial hardships. While some epidemiological studies have recognized infected chickens as an important bridge for human infections, the generality of this observation, the minimum infectious dose, and the shedding potential of chickens have received conflicting results. We experimentally tested the ability of domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) to transmit H7N9 to co-housed chickens and to several other animal species in an experimental live animal market. Results indicated that an infected chicken failed to initiate viral shedding of H7N9 to naïve co-housed chickens. The infected chicken did, however, successfully transmit the virus to quail (Coturnix sp.) located directly below the infected chicken cage. Oral shedding by indirectly infected quail was, on average, greater than ten-fold that of directly inoculated chickens. Best management practices in live animal market systems should consider the position of quail in stacked-cage settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A New Chicken Genome Assembly Provides Insight into Avian Genome Structure.

    PubMed

    Warren, Wesley C; Hillier, LaDeana W; Tomlinson, Chad; Minx, Patrick; Kremitzki, Milinn; Graves, Tina; Markovic, Chris; Bouk, Nathan; Pruitt, Kim D; Thibaud-Nissen, Francoise; Schneider, Valerie; Mansour, Tamer A; Brown, C Titus; Zimin, Aleksey; Hawken, Rachel; Abrahamsen, Mitch; Pyrkosz, Alexis B; Morisson, Mireille; Fillon, Valerie; Vignal, Alain; Chow, William; Howe, Kerstin; Fulton, Janet E; Miller, Marcia M; Lovell, Peter; Mello, Claudio V; Wirthlin, Morgan; Mason, Andrew S; Kuo, Richard; Burt, David W; Dodgson, Jerry B; Cheng, Hans H

    2017-01-05

    The importance of the Gallus gallus (chicken) as a model organism and agricultural animal merits a continuation of sequence assembly improvement efforts. We present a new version of the chicken genome assembly (Gallus_gallus-5.0; GCA_000002315.3), built from combined long single molecule sequencing technology, finished BACs, and improved physical maps. In overall assembled bases, we see a gain of 183 Mb, including 16.4 Mb in placed chromosomes with a corresponding gain in the percentage of intact repeat elements characterized. Of the 1.21 Gb genome, we include three previously missing autosomes, GGA30, 31, and 33, and improve sequence contig length 10-fold over the previous Gallus_gallus-4.0. Despite the significant base representation improvements made, 138 Mb of sequence is not yet located to chromosomes. When annotated for gene content, Gallus_gallus-5.0 shows an increase of 4679 annotated genes (2768 noncoding and 1911 protein-coding) over those in Gallus_gallus-4.0. We also revisited the question of what genes are missing in the avian lineage, as assessed by the highest quality avian genome assembly to date, and found that a large fraction of the original set of missing genes are still absent in sequenced bird species. Finally, our new data support a detailed map of MHC-B, encompassing two segments: one with a highly stable gene copy number and another in which the gene copy number is highly variable. The chicken model has been a critical resource for many other fields of study, and this new reference assembly will substantially further these efforts. Copyright © 2017 Warren et al.

  3. Dexamethasone alters the expression of genes related to the growth of skeletal muscle in chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Song, Z G; Zhang, X H; Zhu, L X; Jiao, H C; Lin, H

    2011-06-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are involved in the muscle wasting caused by trauma, inactivity, and stress. In the present study, three experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of GCs on the expression of genes related to muscle development in chickens. Broilers at 7 or 35 days of age were subjected to dexamethasone (DEX) treatment (2 mg/kg body mass (BM)) for 3 or 7 days. The expression levels of genes such as IGF1, IGF1 receptor, MSTN, WW domain containing E3 ubiquitin (UB) protein ligase 1, myogenic determining factor, and myogenic factor 5 were measured. The results showed that BM gain was significantly suppressed by DEX treatment. The plasma level of insulin was increased (P<0.05) by DEX treatment at feeding, whereas IGF1 was decreased (P<0.05). The expression of genes in the IGF1, myostatin, and UB-proteasome (UBP) pathways were altered by DEX treatment in age- and exposure time-related ways. These results suggest that GCs suppress IGF1 and upregulate myostatin and/or activated myostatin and the UBP pathway, which might be the source of the effect of GCs on muscle development.

  4. Incubation relative humidity induces renal morphological and physiological remodeling in the embryo of the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Bolin, Greta; Dubansky, Benjamin; Burggren, Warren W

    2017-02-01

    The metanephric kidneys of the chicken embryo, along with the chorioallantoic membrane, process water and ions to maintain osmoregulatory homeostasis. We hypothesized that changes in relative humidity (RH) and thus osmotic conditions during embryogenesis would alter the developmental trajectory of embryonic kidney function. White leghorn chicken eggs were incubated at one of 25-30% relative humidity, 55-60% relative humidity, and 85-90% relative humidity. Embryos were sampled at days 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18 to examine embryo and kidney mass, glomerular characteristics, body fluid osmolalities, hematological properties, and whole embryo oxygen consumption. Low and especially high RH elevated mortality, which was reflected in a 10-20% lower embryo mass on D18. Low RH altered several glomerular characteristics by day 18, including increased numbers of glomeruli per kidney, increased glomerular perfusion, and increased total glomerular volume, all indicating potentially increased functional kidney capacity. Hematological variables and plasma and amniotic fluid osmolalities remained within normal physiological values. However, the allantoic, amniotic and cloacal fluids had a significant increase in osmolality at most developmental points sampled. Embryonic oxygen consumption increased relative to control at both low and high relative humidities on Day 18, reflecting the increased metabolic costs of osmotic stress. Major differences in both renal structure and performance associated with changes in incubation humidity occurred after establishment of the metanephric kidney and persisted into late development, and likely into the postnatal period. These data indicate that the avian embryo deserves to be further investigated as a promising model for fetal programming of osmoregulatory function, and renal remodeling during osmotic stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bioavailability and biochemical effects of diclofenac sodium 0.1% ophthalmic solution in the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Griggs, Angela N; Yaw, Taylor J; Haynes, Joseph S; Ben-Shlomo, Gil; Tofflemire, Kyle L; Allbaugh, Rachel A

    2017-03-01

    To determine if topical ophthalmic diclofenac sodium 0.1% solution alters renal parameters in the domestic chicken, and to determine if the drug is detectable in plasma after topical ophthalmic administration. Thirty healthy domestic chickens. Over 7 days, six birds were treated unilaterally with one drop of artificial tear solution (group 1), 12 birds were treated unilaterally (group 2) and 12 bilaterally (group 3) with diclofenac sodium 0.1% ophthalmic solution. Treatments were provided every 12 h in all groups. Pre- and post-treatment plasma samples from all birds were evaluated for changes in albumin, total protein, and uric acid. Post-treatment samples of all birds, collected 15 min post-administration, were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry for diclofenac sodium detection. A randomly selected renal sample from each group was submitted for histopathologic review. Changes in pre- and post-treatment plasma albumin were significant (P < 0.05) in groups 2 and 3, but not for group 1. Pre- and post-treatment changes in total protein and uric acid were not significant for any group. Diclofenac sodium was not detectable (limit of detection = 0.10 ng/mL) in plasma samples from birds in group 1. Post-treatment concentration of diclofenac in group 3 was statistically greater than group 2 (P = 0.0008). Histopathologic changes did not identify diclofenac-induced acute renal tubular necrosis. Ophthalmic diclofenac sodium 0.1% administered topically every 12 h in one or both eyes for 7 days is detectable in systemic circulation in the domestic chicken, but does not cause overt significant changes in plasma uric acid or total protein. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  6. Domestic chickens defy Rensch's rule: sexual size dimorphism in chicken breeds.

    PubMed

    Remeš, V; Székely, T

    2010-12-01

    Sexual size dimorphism (SSD), i.e. the difference in sizes of males and females, is a key evolutionary feature that is related to ecology, behaviour and life histories of organisms. Although the basic patterns of SSD are well documented for several major taxa, the processes generating SSD are poorly understood. Domesticated animals offer excellent opportunities for testing predictions of functional explanations of SSD theory because domestic stocks were often selected by humans for particular desirable traits. Here, we analyse SSD in 139 breeds of domestic chickens Gallus gallus domesticus and compare them to their wild relatives (pheasants, partridges and grouse; Phasianidae, 53 species). SSD was male-biased in all chicken breeds, because males were 21.5 ± 0.55% (mean ± SE) heavier than females. The extent of SSD did not differ among breed categories (cock fighting, ornamental and breeds selected for egg and meat production). SSD of chicken breeds was not different from wild pheasants and allies (23.5 ± 3.43%), although the wild ancestor of chickens, the red jungle fowl G. gallus, had more extreme SSD (male 68.8% heavier) than any domesticated breed. Male mass and female mass exhibited positive allometry among pheasants and allies, consistently with the Rensch's rule reported from various taxa. However, body mass scaled isometrically across chicken breeds. The latter results suggest that sex-specific selection on males vs. females is necessary to generate positive allometry, i.e. the Rensch's rule, in wild populations. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  7. Documentation and quantitative analysis of local ethnozoological knowledge among traditional healers of Theni district, Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Chellappandian, M; Pandikumar, P; Mutheeswaran, S; Gabriel Paulraj, M; Prabakaran, S; Duraipandiyan, V; Ignacimuthu, S; Al-Dhabi, N A

    2014-05-28

    This study investigated the use of animals among the traditional healers in Theni district of Tamil Nadu, India. The data regarding the medicinal animals/animal products were documented and their usages were analyzed quantitatively. Based on free list interviews with the traditional healers, we documented the medicinal usage of animals/animal products and calculated the indices such as informant consensus factor (Fic) to determine the consensus over the species for an illness category, as well as the Index Agreement on Remedies (IAR) to determine the extent of potential utilization of each species. In this study, 69 medicinal animals/animal products were documented with the help of standardized questionnaires among the local healers. The results were tabulated and Fic value for each illness category was calculated. Three illness categories viz., jaundice (milk of Capra aegagrus hircus), orthopedics (egg white and meat of Gallus gallus domesticus) and pediatrics (milk of Equus africanus asinus) had got high Fic values. Fifteen illness categories had moderate Fic values. Highly cited animals in these illness categories were: Rusa unicolor (antiemetic), Reticulitermes spp. (diabetes), flesh of Varanus benghalensis (oral ailments), milk (eye ailments, fever) and urine (antidote) of Homo sepians, meat of Trachypithecus johnii (respiratory ailments), various parts of C. aegagrus hircus (blood ailments, coolants, diarrhea, pulmonary and urinary ailments), flesh of Chamaeleon zeyalnica (neural ailments), meat of Passer domesticus (aphrodisiac), curd and dung of Bos primigenius taurus (dermatological ailments), meat of G. domesticus (musculo-skeletal disorders, analgesic), meat of Lissemys punctata (hemorrhoids), and Pherthima posthuma (psychological ailments). Six illness categories had low Fic values. This study indicated that the animals are still being used by the local healers of Theni district, to treat various illnesses. Cross-disciplinary approaches to explore the

  8. Ethnomedicinal and cultural practices of mammals and birds in the vicinity of river Chenab, Punjab-Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Altaf, Muhammad; Javid, Arshad; Umair, Muhammad; Iqbal, Khalid Javed; Rasheed, Zahid; Abbasi, Arshad Mehmood

    2017-07-12

    Although, use of animal species in disease treatment and culture practices is as ancient as that of plant species; however ethnomedicinal uses and cultural values of animal species have rarely been reported. Present study is the first report on the medicinal uses of mammals and bird species in Pakistan. Questionnaires and semi-structured interviews were applied to collect qualitative and quantitative data from local informants (N = 109). Relative frequency of mention (RFM), fidelity level (FL), relative popularity level (RPL), similarity index (SI) and rank order priority (ROP) indices were used to analyzed the data. One hundred and eight species of animals, which include: 83% birds and 17% mammals were documented. In total 30 mammalian and 28 birds' species were used to treat various diseases such as rheumatic disorders, skin infections and sexual weakness among several others. Fats, flesh, blood, milk and eggs were the most commonly utilized body parts. Bos taurus, Bubalus bubalis, Capra aegagrus hircus, Felis domesticus, Lepus nigricollis dayanus and Ovis aries (mammals) and Anas platyrhynchos domesticus, Columba livia, Coturnix coturnix, Gallus gallus and Passer domesticus (birds) were the highly utilized species. Medicinal and cultural uses of 30% mammals and 46% birds were reported for the first time, whereas 33% mammals and 79% birds depicted zero similarity with previous reports. Present study exhibits significant ethnozoological knowledge of local inhabitants and their strong association with animal species, which could be helpful in sustainable use of biodiversity of the region. Additionally, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of biological activities in the mammalian and birds' species with maximum fidelity level and frequency of mention could be important to discover animal based novel drugs. Some commonly used mammals and birds species of the study area.

  9. Occurrence of keratinophilic fungi on Indian birds.

    PubMed

    Dixit, A K; Kushwaha, R K

    1991-01-01

    Keratinophilic fungi were isolated from feathers of most common Indian birds, viz. domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus), domestic pigeon (Columba livia), house sparrow (Passer domesticus), house crow (Corvus splendens), duck (Anas sp.), rose-ringed parakeet (Psittacula krameri). Out of 87 birds, 58 yielded 4 keratinophilic fungal genera representing 13 fungal species and one sterile mycelium. The isolated fungi were cultured on Sabouraud's dextrose agar at 28 +/- 2 degrees C. Chrysosporium species were isolated on most of the birds. Chrysosporium lucknowense and Chrysosporium tropicum were the most common fungal species associated with these Indian birds. Maximum occurrence of fungi (47%) was recorded on domestic chickens and the least number of keratinophilic fungi was isolated from the domestic pigeon and duck. The average number of fungi per bird was found to be the 0.44.

  10. Utilization of pyrosequencing to monitor the microbiome dynamics of probiotic treated poultry (Gallus gallus domesticus) during downstream poultry processing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotic growth promoters that have been historically employed to control pathogens and increase the rate of animal development for human consumption are currently banned in many countries. Probiotics have been proposed as an alternative to control pathogenic bacteria. Traditional culture method...

  11. Reassessment of genome size in turtle and crocodile based on chromosome measurement by flow karyotyping: close similarity to chicken

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Fumio; O'Brien, Patricia C. M.; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A.

    2012-01-01

    The genome size in turtles and crocodiles is thought to be much larger than the 1.2 Gb of the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus, GGA), according to the animal genome size database. However, GGA macrochromosomes show extensive homology in the karyotypes of the red eared slider (Trachemys scripta elegans, TSC) and the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus, CNI), and bird and reptile genomes have been highly conserved during evolution. In this study, size and GC content of all chromosomes are measured from the flow karyotypes of GGA, TSC and CNI. Genome sizes estimated from the total chromosome size demonstrate that TSC and CNI are 1.21 Gb and 1.29 Gb, respectively. This refines previous overestimations and reveals similar genome sizes in chicken, turtle and crocodile. Analysis of chromosome GC content in each of these three species shows a higher GC content in smaller chromosomes than in larger chromosomes. This contrasts with mammals and squamates in which GC content does not correlate with chromosome size. These data suggest that a common ancestor of birds, turtles and crocodiles had a small genome size and a chromosomal size-dependent GC bias, distinct from the squamate lineage. PMID:22491763

  12. COMPLETE GENOMIC SEQUENCE OF VIRULENT PIGEON PARAMYXOVIRUS IN LAUGHING DOVES (STREPTOPELIA SENEGALENSIS) IN KENYA.

    PubMed

    Obanda, Vincent; Michuki, George; Jowers, Michael J; Rumberia, Cecilia; Mutinda, Mathew; Lwande, Olivia Wesula; Wangoru, Kihara; Kasiiti-Orengo, Jacquiline; Yongo, Moses; Angelone-Alasaad, Samer

    2016-07-01

    Following mass deaths of Laughing Doves (Streptopelia senegalensis) in different localities throughout Kenya, internal organs obtained during necropsy of two moribund birds were sampled and analyzed by next generation sequencing. We isolated the virulent strain of pigeon paramyxovirus type-1 (PPMV-1), PPMV1/Laughing Dove/Kenya/Isiolo/B2/2012, which had a characteristic fusion gene motif (110)GGRRQKRF(117). We obtained a partial full genome of 15,114 nucleotides. The phylogenetic relationship based on the fusion gene and genomic sequence grouped our isolate as class II genotype VI, a group of viruses commonly isolated from wild birds but potentially lethal to Chickens ( Gallus gallus domesticus ). The fusion gene isolate clustered with PPMV-I strains from pigeons (Columbidae) in Nigeria. The complete genome showed a basal and highly divergent lineage to American, European, and Asian strains, indicating a divergent evolutionary pathway. The isolated strain is highly virulent and apparently species-specific to Laughing Doves in Kenya. Risk of transmission of such a strain to poultry is potentially high whereas the cyclic epizootic in doves is a threat to conservation of wild Columbidae in Kenya.

  13. Origin and timing of New Zealand's earliest domestic chickens: Polynesian commensals or European introductions?

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jamie R.; Herrera, Michael J. B.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    Human settlers transported chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) to most East Polynesian archipelagos between AD 1000 and 1300; however, it has long been assumed that New Zealand was an exception. Despite the fact that chicken bones have been recovered from localities of early archaeological middens in New Zealand, their age and genetic relationships have never been critically assessed. Here, we test the assumption that chickens were not introduced to New Zealand during prehistory through ancient DNA and radiocarbon analyses of chicken bones from sites of Māori middens containing prehistoric material. The chickens belong to the widespread mitochondrial control region haplogroup E. Radiocarbon dating reveals that the bones are not prehistoric, but are still the earliest chicken remains known from New Zealand. Two of the bones pre-date permanent European settlement (ca 1803s onwards) but overlap with the arrival of James Cook's second voyage (1773–1774), and, therefore, they are likely to be chickens, or progeny thereof, liberated during that voyage. Our results support the idea that chickens were first introduced to New Zealand by Europeans, and provide new insights into Māori uptake and integration of resources introduced during the early post-European period. PMID:27853601

  14. Origin and timing of New Zealand's earliest domestic chickens: Polynesian commensals or European introductions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Jamie R.; Herrera, Michael J. B.; Scofield, R. Paul; Wilmshurst, Janet M.

    2016-08-01

    Human settlers transported chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) to most East Polynesian archipelagos between AD 1000 and 1300; however, it has long been assumed that New Zealand was an exception. Despite the fact that chicken bones have been recovered from localities of early archaeological middens in New Zealand, their age and genetic relationships have never been critically assessed. Here, we test the assumption that chickens were not introduced to New Zealand during prehistory through ancient DNA and radiocarbon analyses of chicken bones from sites of Māori middens containing prehistoric material. The chickens belong to the widespread mitochondrial control region haplogroup E. Radiocarbon dating reveals that the bones are not prehistoric, but are still the earliest chicken remains known from New Zealand. Two of the bones pre-date permanent European settlement (ca 1803s onwards) but overlap with the arrival of James Cook's second voyage (1773-1774), and, therefore, they are likely to be chickens, or progeny thereof, liberated during that voyage. Our results support the idea that chickens were first introduced to New Zealand by Europeans, and provide new insights into Māori uptake and integration of resources introduced during the early post-European period.

  15. Pyrazine odour makes visually conspicuous prey aversive.

    PubMed

    Lindström, L; Rowe, C; Guilford, T

    2001-01-22

    Unpalatable insects frequently adopt multimodal signals to ward off predators, incorporating sounds and odours into their colourful displays. Pyrazine is an odour commonly used in insect warning displays, and has previously been shown to elicit unlearned biases against common warning colours, e.g. yellow and red in naive predators. We designed two experiments to test for similar effects of pyrazine on the conspicuousness of prey, perhaps the most ubiquitous aspect of aposematic coloration. In the first experiment, we offered predators (Gallus gallus domesticus) a choice between conspicuous crumbs and cryptic crumbs in the presence or absence of pyrazine. In the second experiment, we manipulated the birds' experience of conspicuous prey during an initial training phase. Only in the presence of pyrazine did birds show a bias against conspicuously coloured food, and this occurred whether or not they had previously experienced food that contrasted with the background. This emergent behaviour relied upon the visual and odorous signal components being presented together. These unlearned, yet hidden, responses against conspicuousness demonstrate that there are initial benefits to prey being conspicuous when the multimodal nature of warning signals is accounted for.

  16. Activation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor/tropomyosin-related kinase B signaling accompanying filial imprinting in domestic chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shinji; Aoki, Naoya; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kitajima, Takaaki; Iikubo, Eiji; Katagiri, Sachiko; Matsushima, Toshiya; Homma, Koichi J

    2011-12-07

    Newly hatched domestic chicks serve as an important model for experimental studies of neural and behavioral plasticity. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to play a critical role in synaptic plasticity, including long-term potentiation, which underlies learning and memory in rodents. Here we show that BDNF mRNA levels increased in the intermediate medial hyperpallium apicale (IMHA), which is the caudal area of the visual Wulst, of imprinted chick brains, and the upregulation of gene expression correlated with the strength of the learned preference to the training object. In addition, activation of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling was associated with filial imprinting. However, pharmacological deprivation of TrkB phosphorylation in IMHA did not impair memory formation, suggesting that activation of BDNF/TrkB signaling in IMHA is not involved in memory acquisition in filial imprinting.

  17. Effects of heat stress on the gene expression of nutrient transporters in the jejunum of broiler chickens ( Gallus gallus domesticus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaolei; Zhang, Haichao; Sheikhahmadi, Ardashir; Wang, Yufeng; Jiao, Hongchao; Lin, Hai; Song, Zhigang

    2015-02-01

    In broiler chickens, heat stress disrupts nutrient digestion and absorption. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is not clearly understood. Hence, to investigate the effects of high ambient temperatures on the expression levels of nutrient transporters in the jejunum of broiler chickens, seventy-two 35-day-old male broiler chickens with similar body weights were randomly allocated into two groups: control (24 ± 1 °C) and heat-stressed (32 ± 1 °C). The chickens in the heat-stressed group were exposed to 10 h of heat daily from 08:00 to 18:00 and then raised at 24 ± 1 °C. The rectal temperature and feed intake of the chickens were recorded daily. After 7 days, nine chickens per group were sacrificed by exsanguination, and the jejunum was collected. The results show that heat exposure significantly decreased the feed intake and increased the rectal temperature of the broiler chickens. The plasma concentrations of uric acid and triglyceride significantly increased and decreased, respectively, in the heat-stressed group. No significant differences in the levels of plasma glucose, total amino acids, and very low-density lipoprotein were observed between the heat-stressed and control groups. However, the plasma concentration of glucose tended to be higher ( P = 0.09) in the heat-stressed group than in the control group. Heat exposure did not significantly affect the mRNA levels of Na+-dependent glucose transporter 1 and amino acid transporters y + LAT1, CAT1, r-BAT, and PePT-1. However, the expression levels of GLUT-2, FABP1, and CD36 were significantly decreased by heat exposure. The results of this study provide new insights into the mechanisms by which heat stress affects nutrient absorption in broiler chickens. Our findings suggest that periodic heat exposure might alter the jejunal glucose and lipid transport rather than amino acid transport. However, intestinal epithelial damage and cell loss should be considered when interpreting the effects of heat stress on the expression of intestinal transporters.

  18. The first study of molecular prevalence and species characterization of Cryptosporidium in free-range chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Maria Paula de Carvalho; Martins, Felippe Danyel Cardoso; Caldart, Eloiza Teles; Vieira, Fernando Emmanuel Gonçalves; Yamamura, Milton Hissashi; Sasse, João Pedro; Barros, Luiz Daniel de; Freire, Roberta Lemos; Navarro, Italmar Teodorico; Garcia, João Luis

    2017-01-01

    Rearing free-range chicken is based on grazing feeding patterns, and these animals could be potential environmental contaminants of Cryptosporidium oocysts for humans and other animals. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the molecular prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. in free-range chickens from Brazil. A total of 351 fecal samples from chickens were examined from 20 farms. For detection of Cryptosporidium spp., 18S rRNA gene fragments were amplified using a nested PCR reaction. Positive samples were sent for sequencing. The overall prevalence of Cryptosporidium was 25.6% (95% CI = 21.2% - 30.6%). Sequencing of the amplified fragments allowed for the identification of three species: C. meleagridis in 57 (62.6%), C. baileyi in 15 (16.4%), C. parvum in 3 (3.2%) samples, and a new Cryptosporidium genotype (C. genotype BrPR1) in 3 (3.2%) samples. Cryptosporidium genotype BrPR1 has not yet been classified as a species, and its host spectrum is not known. Cryptosporidium, including zoonotic species, exists at a high prevalence in free-range chickens within the region studied.

  19. Kinetic study of chlordecone orally given to laying hens (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Jondreville, Catherine; Fournier, Agnès; Mahieu, Maurice; Feidt, Cyril; Archimède, Harry; Rychen, Guido

    2014-11-01

    The former use of chlordecone (CLD) in the French West Indies has resulted in long-term pollution of soils. In this area, CLD may be transferred into eggs of hens reared outdoors, through soil ingestion. In order to assess this risk, a kinetic study involving the contamination of laying hens (22 weeks of age) with a diet containing 500 μg CLD kg(-1) during 42 d, followed by a depuration period of 35 d was carried out. Forty-four hens were sequentially slaughtered all over the experimental period and their liver, egg, abdominal fat and serum were collected. Two additional edible tissues, pectoral and leg muscles, were collected in hens slaughtered at the end of the contamination period. The depuration half-life of CLD in liver, egg, abdominal fat and serum was estimated at 5.0 ± 0.38 (mean ± SE), 5.5 ± 0.29, 5.3 ± 0.37 and 5.1 ± 0.66 d, respectively. CLD concentration at the end of the contamination period reached 1640 ± 274, 460 ± 41, 331 ± 23, and 213 ± 8.5 μg kg(-1) fresh matter (FM), respectively. The corresponding concentrations in pectoral and leg muscles were 119 ± 8.4, 127 ± 11 μg kg(-1) FM, respectively. The steady state carry over rate of CLD in eggs reached 43 ± 7.6%. This experiment demonstrates the preferential accumulation of CLD in liver, its significant transfer to eggs and its quite short half-life. It is concluded that raising hens on even mildly contaminated areas would lead to products exceeding the regulatory maximum residue limit of 20 μg CLD kg(-1). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pharmacological extension of the sensitive period for imprinting in Gallus domesticus.

    PubMed

    Parsons, C H; Rogers, L J

    1997-12-01

    Precocial animals, such as the chick, exhibit a form of learning termed filial imprinting. The chick's sensitive period for filial imprinting is restricted to the first few days after hatching. The neural mechanism that terminates the sensitive period is not fully understood. It is thought to be an experience-dependent event because once a chick has imprinted, it will not readily imprint on another stimulus. However, even dark-reared chicks eventually lose the ability to imprint, which suggests that the ending of the sensitive period may not be entirely experience-dependent. The present study investigates factors that may contribute to the ending of the sensitive period. In our experiments, dark-reared chicks were unable to imprint after Day 2 posthatching, but chicks treated 10 h after hatching with an intramuscular injection of the noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine (55 mg/kg) and the alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist xylazine (6 mg/kg) (KX) imprinted on a stuffed hen 8 days after hatching. Similarly treated chicks did not imprint on a red and black box, although the box was an effective imprinting stimulus for Day 2 chicks. Chicks treated with KX at 20 or 40 h posthatching or on Day 4 or 7 as well as controls treated with pyrogen-free saline were unable to imprint on Day 8.

  1. Morphological and molecular characterization of Eimeria haematodi, coccidian parasite (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) in a rainbow lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus).

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Brice, Belinda; Ryan, Una

    2015-06-01

    Eimeria haematodi was first described in 1977 from the rainbow lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) in Papua New Guinea. In the present study, we re-describe this coccidian species morphologically and molecularly from a rainbow lorikeet bird in Western Australia (WA). The oocysts were ovoid to slightly piriform and measured 28.5-37.8 by 25.8-33.0 µm (33.3 by 28.1 µm). Oocyst wall was approximately 1.5 µm thick and bilayered. Micropyle (5-7 µm) and oocyst residuum (8.0-10.0 µm) present; polar granule was absent. Sporocysts ellipsoidal, 11.8-13.6 by 8.0-9.6 µm (12.2 by 8.3 µm), with thin convex Stieda body and granular sporocyst residuum (4.0-5.0 µm). Molecular characterization of E. haematodi was conducted at 18S ribosomal RNA and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase gene (COI) loci. At the 18S ribosomal RNA locus, E. haematodi shared 98.1% genetic similarity to E. alabamensis from cattle in New South Wales, Australia. At COI locus, E. haematodi was closest (92.3% similarity) to E. praecox from domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) from Canada and China. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. IgY: a promising antibody for use in immunodiagnostic and in immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dias da Silva, Wilmar; Tambourgi, Denise V

    2010-06-15

    Immunoglobulin IgY is the major antibody produced by chickens (Gallus domesticus). After their V-C gene is rearranged in B cells, IgY is continually synthesized, excreted into the blood and transferred to the egg yolk, where it is accumulated. IgY is produced by hens to provide their offspring with an effective humoral immunity against the commonest avian pathogens until full maturation of their own immune system. In this review we aim to give an overview about the generation, structure, properties of IgY, as well as the advantages of chicken antibodies use over mammalian antibodies in immunodiagnostics and immunotherapy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Geographical variation in the skeletal morphology of red jungle fowl.

    PubMed

    Endo, H; Tsunekawa, N; Sonoe, M; Sasaki, Tї; Ogawa, H; Amano, T; Nguyen, T S; Phimphachanhvongsod, V; Kudo, K; Yonezawa, T; Akishinonomiya, F

    2017-08-01

    1. The skulls and postcranial skeletons of the red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus) were compared osteometrically between the populations from North and South Vietnam, North and Central Laos and Southeast Bangladesh. The populations include the three subspecies of G. g. spadiceus, G. g. gallus and G. g. murghi and were sampled to reveal the geographical morphological variations among populations in G. gallus. 2. The morphometric characteristics of subspecies murghi could be clearly distinguished from those of the other subspecies using a canonical discriminant analysis. However, the size and shape of the skull of the gallus population from South Vietnam were not statistically different from that of the subspecies spadiceus from North Laos. The canonical discriminant scores also clearly indicated that there were morphological similarities in the skulls of the populations from North Laos and South Vietnam. 3. From the results, therefore, it is concluded that red jungle fowls do not exhibit high levels of osteometric variation between geographical localities at least within the Indochinese Peninsula. 4. This contrasts with previous studies which have described these subspecies as having various external morphological differences and have argued that zoogeographical barriers exist between the north and south areas of the Indochinese Peninsula.

  4. Nutrient losses from manure and fertilizer applications as impacted by time to first runoff event.

    PubMed

    Smith, D R; Owens, P R; Leytem, A B; Warnemuende, E A

    2007-05-01

    Nutrient losses to surface waters following fertilization contribute to eutrophication. This study was conducted to compare the impacts of fertilization with inorganic fertilizer, swine (Sus scrofa domesticus) manure or poultry (Gallus domesticus) litter on runoff water quality, and how the duration between application and the first runoff event affects resulting water quality. Fertilizers were applied at 35 kg P ha-1, and the duration between application and the first runoff event varied between 1 and 29 days. Swine manure was the greatest risk to water quality 1 day after fertilization due to elevated phosphorus (8.4 mg P L-1) and ammonium (10.3 mg NH4-N L-1) concentrations; however, this risk decreased rapidly. Phosphorus concentrations were 2.6 mg L-1 29 days after fertilization with inorganic fertilizer. This research demonstrates that manures might be more environmentally sustainable than inorganic fertilizers, provided runoff events do not occur soon after application.

  5. Attenuation of Marek's disease virus by codon pair deoptimization of a core gene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is an oncogenic alphaherpesvirus of Gallus gallus, the domesticated chicken. Control strategies rely upon comprehensive vaccination in ovo with live attenuated virus vaccines consisting of antigenically similar avian herpesviruses or attenuated strains of MDV. Recent stud...

  6. Fatty acyl-CoA reductases of birds

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Birds clean and lubricate their feathers with waxes that are produced in the uropygial gland, a holocrine gland located on their back above the tail. The type and the composition of the secreted wax esters are dependent on the bird species, for instance the wax ester secretion of goose contains branched-chain fatty acids and unbranched fatty alcohols, whereas that of barn owl contains fatty acids and alcohols both of which are branched. Alcohol-forming fatty acyl-CoA reductases (FAR) catalyze the reduction of activated acyl groups to fatty alcohols that can be esterified with acyl-CoA thioesters forming wax esters. Results cDNA sequences encoding fatty acyl-CoA reductases were cloned from the uropygial glands of barn owl (Tyto alba), domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) and domestic goose (Anser anser domesticus). Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that they encode membrane associated enzymes which catalyze a NADPH dependent reduction of acyl-CoA thioesters to fatty alcohols. By feeding studies of transgenic yeast cultures and in vitro enzyme assays with membrane fractions of transgenic yeast cells two groups of isozymes with different properties were identified, termed FAR1 and FAR2. The FAR1 group mainly synthesized 1-hexadecanol and accepted substrates in the range between 14 and 18 carbon atoms, whereas the FAR2 group preferred stearoyl-CoA and accepted substrates between 16 and 20 carbon atoms. Expression studies with tissues of domestic chicken indicated that FAR transcripts were not restricted to the uropygial gland. Conclusion The data of our study suggest that the identified and characterized avian FAR isozymes, FAR1 and FAR2, can be involved in wax ester biosynthesis and in other pathways like ether lipid synthesis. PMID:22151413

  7. Morphology and Molecular Phylogeny of Raillietina spp. (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea: Davaineidae) from Domestic Chickens in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Butboonchoo, Preeyaporn; Wongsawad, Chalobol; Rojanapaibul, Amnat; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2016-12-01

    Raillietina species are prevalent in domestic chickens ( Gallus gallus domesticus ) in Phayao province, northern Thailand. Their infection may cause disease and death, which affects the public health and economic situation in chicken farms. The identification of Raillietina has been based on morphology and molecular analysis. In this study, morphological observations using light (LM) and scanning electron microscopies (SEM) coupled with molecular analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1) gene were employed for precise identification and phylogenetic relationship studies of Raillietina spp. Four Raillietina species, including R. echinobothrida, R. tetragona, R. cesticillus , and Raillietina sp., were recovered in domestic chickens from 4 districts in Phayao province, Thailand. LM and SEM observations revealed differences in the morphology of the scolex, position of the genital pore, number of eggs per egg capsule, and rostellar opening surface structures in all 4 species. Phylogenetic relationships were found among the phylogenetic trees obtained by the maximum likelihood and distance-based neighbor-joining methods. ITS2 and ND1 sequence data recorded from Raillietina sp. appeared to be monophyletic. The query sequences of R. echinobothrida, R. tetragona, R. cesticillus , and Raillietina sp. were separated according to the different morphological characters. This study confirmed that morphological studies combined with molecular analyses can differentiate related species within the genus Raillietina in Thailand.

  8. Sperm competition dynamics: ejaculate fertilising efficiency changes differentially with time.

    PubMed

    Pizzari, Tommaso; Worley, Kirsty; Burke, Terry; Froman, David P

    2008-12-16

    A fundamental challenge in evolutionary biology is to resolve the mechanisms that maintain paternity a hypervariable fitness component. Because females are often sexually promiscuous, this challenge hinges on establishing the mechanisms through which the ejaculates of different males compete for fertilisation (sperm competition). The competitive quality of an ejaculate is mediated by the relative number of live sperm and their motile performance. The differential rate at which rival ejaculates lose their fertilising efficiency over time is therefore expected to influence the outcome of sperm competition. Here, we artificially inseminated into sets of replicate domestic hens, Gallus gallus domesticus, experimentally engineered heterospermic ejaculates containing a large number of low-quality sperm from one male, and a lower number of high-quality sperm from another male. Large, low-quality ejaculates fertilised the first eggs produced after insemination, but small, high-quality ejaculates prevailed in the long run despite their numerical disadvantage. Together, these results provide the first experimental demonstration that the relative competitive value of an ejaculate changes drastically over the time during which competing ejaculates are stored within the reproductive tract of a female, resulting in a marked temporal pattern of variation in paternity. A high level of replication makes these results robust. However, our study was restricted to few males of a well characterised study population, and future work should explore the generality of these results.

  9. Sperm competition dynamics: ejaculate fertilising efficiency changes differentially with time

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background A fundamental challenge in evolutionary biology is to resolve the mechanisms that maintain paternity a hypervariable fitness component. Because females are often sexually promiscuous, this challenge hinges on establishing the mechanisms through which the ejaculates of different males compete for fertilisation (sperm competition). The competitive quality of an ejaculate is mediated by the relative number of live sperm and their motile performance. The differential rate at which rival ejaculates lose their fertilising efficiency over time is therefore expected to influence the outcome of sperm competition. Results Here, we artificially inseminated into sets of replicate domestic hens, Gallus gallus domesticus, experimentally engineered heterospermic ejaculates containing a large number of low-quality sperm from one male, and a lower number of high-quality sperm from another male. Large, low-quality ejaculates fertilised the first eggs produced after insemination, but small, high-quality ejaculates prevailed in the long run despite their numerical disadvantage. Conclusion Together, these results provide the first experimental demonstration that the relative competitive value of an ejaculate changes drastically over the time during which competing ejaculates are stored within the reproductive tract of a female, resulting in a marked temporal pattern of variation in paternity. A high level of replication makes these results robust. However, our study was restricted to few males of a well characterised study population, and future work should explore the generality of these results. PMID:19087292

  10. Morphology and Molecular Phylogeny of Raillietina spp. (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea: Davaineidae) from Domestic Chickens in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Butboonchoo, Preeyaporn; Wongsawad, Chalobol; Rojanapaibul, Amnat; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2016-01-01

    Raillietina species are prevalent in domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) in Phayao province, northern Thailand. Their infection may cause disease and death, which affects the public health and economic situation in chicken farms. The identification of Raillietina has been based on morphology and molecular analysis. In this study, morphological observations using light (LM) and scanning electron microscopies (SEM) coupled with molecular analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1) gene were employed for precise identification and phylogenetic relationship studies of Raillietina spp. Four Raillietina species, including R. echinobothrida, R. tetragona, R. cesticillus, and Raillietina sp., were recovered in domestic chickens from 4 districts in Phayao province, Thailand. LM and SEM observations revealed differences in the morphology of the scolex, position of the genital pore, number of eggs per egg capsule, and rostellar opening surface structures in all 4 species. Phylogenetic relationships were found among the phylogenetic trees obtained by the maximum likelihood and distance-based neighbor-joining methods. ITS2 and ND1 sequence data recorded from Raillietina sp. appeared to be monophyletic. The query sequences of R. echinobothrida, R. tetragona, R. cesticillus, and Raillietina sp. were separated according to the different morphological characters. This study confirmed that morphological studies combined with molecular analyses can differentiate related species within the genus Raillietina in Thailand. PMID:28095663

  11. Diclofenac-induced biochemical and histopathological changes in white leghorn birds (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Jain, Teenu; Koley, K M; Vadlamudi, V P; Ghosh, R C; Roy, S; Tiwari, Sandhya; Sahu, Upasana

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate diclofenac-induced biochemical and histopathological changes in White Leghorn birds. Six-week-old birds were equally divided into three groups of six birds each. Group I served as control and received vehicle orally. The birds of Group II and III were orally administered with a single low (2 mg/kg) and high dose (20 mg/kg) of diclofenac sodium, respectively, and were observed for 7 days. The acute toxicity was assessed by observing the clinical signs and symptoms, mortality, alterations in blood biochemistry, and necropsy findings. The birds of Group II showed only mild symptoms of diarrhea. In Group III, 50% of birds died in between 24 and 36 h post-treatment showing the symptoms of segregatory behavior, lethargy, terminal anorexia, and severe bloody diarrhea. The birds of Group II and the surviving birds of Group III showed a significantly (P<0.05) increased plasma uric acid, creatinine and plasma glutamic pyruvic transaminase (PGPT), and decreased total protein and albumin at 12 and 24 h post-treatment which returned to the normal levels at 36 h post-treatment. The dead birds of the high-dose group also showed similar pattern of biochemical changes at 12 and 24 h post-treatment and revealed extensive visceral gout with characteristic histopathological lesions in liver, kidney, heart, spleen, and intestine on post-mortem. The results indicate that diclofenac sodium has hepatotoxic, nephrotoxic, and visceral gout inducing potentials in White Leghorn birds, especially at higher dose.

  12. Involvement of nucleotide diphosphate kinase 2 in the reopening of the sensitive period of filial imprinting of domestic chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shinji; Aoki, Naoya; Takehara, Akihiko; Mori, Masaru; Kanai, Akio; Matsushima, Toshiya; Homma, Koichi J

    2016-01-26

    Filial imprinting is a behavior characterized by the sensitive or critical period restricted to the first few days after hatching. Once the sensitive period is closed, it is widely believed that chicks can never be imprinted under natural conditions. Previously, we showed that the exogenous injection of T3 reopened the sensitive period which was already closed. That study suggested that T3 functioned by way of a rapid non-genomic action; however, the molecular mechanism of how T3 reopens the sensitive period remains unknown. Here, we show that the phosphorylation level of nucleotide diphosphate kinase 2 (NDPK2) was upregulated following T3 injection. Pharmacological deprivation of the kinase activity of NDPK hampered the molecular process prerequisite for the reopening of the sensitive period of filial imprinting. Moreover, it is shown that the kinase activity of NDPK2 participates in the priming process by T3 signaling which endows the potential for learning. Our data indicate that NDPK2 plays a crucial role downstream of T3 action and that its phosphorylation is involved in the non-genomic signaling during imprinting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. In silico study of protein to protein interaction analysis of AMP-activated protein kinase and mitochondrial activity in three different farm animal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prastowo, S.; Widyas, N.

    2018-03-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is cellular energy censor which works based on ATP and AMP concentration. This protein interacts with mitochondria in determine its activity to generate energy for cell metabolism purposes. For that, this paper aims to compare the protein to protein interaction of AMPK and mitochondrial activity genes in the metabolism of known animal farm (domesticated) that are cattle (Bos taurus), pig (Sus scrofa) and chicken (Gallus gallus). In silico study was done using STRING V.10 as prominent protein interaction database, followed with biological function comparison in KEGG PATHWAY database. Set of genes (12 in total) were used as input analysis that are PRKAA1, PRKAA2, PRKAB1, PRKAB2, PRKAG1, PRKAG2, PRKAG3, PPARGC1, ACC, CPT1B, NRF2 and SOD. The first 7 genes belong to gene in AMPK family, while the last 5 belong to mitochondrial activity genes. The protein interaction result shows 11, 8 and 5 metabolism pathways in Bos taurus, Sus scrofa and Gallus gallus, respectively. The top pathway in Bos taurus is AMPK signaling pathway (10 genes), Sus scrofa is Adipocytokine signaling pathway (8 genes) and Gallus gallus is FoxO signaling pathway (5 genes). Moreover, the common pathways found in those 3 species are Adipocytokine signaling pathway, Insulin signaling pathway and FoxO signaling pathway. Genes clustered in Adipocytokine and Insulin signaling pathway are PRKAA2, PPARGC1A, PRKAB1 and PRKAG2. While, in FoxO signaling pathway are PRKAA2, PRKAB1, PRKAG2. According to that, we found PRKAA2, PRKAB1 and PRKAG2 are the common genes. Based on the bioinformatics analysis, we can demonstrate that protein to protein interaction shows distinct different of metabolism in different species. However, further validation is needed to give a clear explanation.

  14. Epitope mapping of salmonella flagellar hook-associated protein, FlgK, with mass spectrometry-based immuno-capture proteomics using chicken (gallus gallus domesticus] sera

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella, a Gram-negative rod, is the leading foodborne pathogen associated with human acute bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. The Salmonella flagellum is responsible for bacterial movement, colonization and invasion in the host gastrointestinal tract. The flagellum has a complex structure, c...

  15. The complementarity-determining region sequences in IgY antivenom hypervariable regions.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, David Gitirana; Fernandez, Jorge Hernandez; de Almeida, Claudia Maria Costa; da Silva, Claudia Letícia; Magnoli, Fabio Carlos; da Silva, Osmair Élder; da Silva, Wilmar Dias

    2017-08-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Development of IgY antibodies against anti-snake toxins endowed with highly lethal neutralizing activity" (da Rocha et al., 2017) [1]. Complementarity-determining region (CDR) sequences are variable antibody (Ab) sequences that respond with specificity, duration and strength to identify and bind to antigen (Ag) epitopes. B lymphocytes isolated from hens immunized with Bitis arietans (Ba) and anti- Crotalus durissus terrificus (Cdt) venoms and expressing high specificity, affinity and toxicity neutralizing antibody titers were used as DNA sources. The VLF1, CDR1, CDR2, VLR1 and CDR3 sequences were validated by BLASTp, and values corresponding to IgY V L and V H anti-Ba or anti-Cdt venoms were identified, registered [ Gallus gallus IgY Fv Light chain (GU815099)/ Gallus gallus IgY Fv Heavy chain (GU815098)] and used for molecular modeling of IgY scFv anti-Ba. The resulting CDR1, CDR2 and CDR3 sequences were combined to construct the three - dimensional structure of the Ab paratope.

  16. Comparative analysis of Campylobacter isolates from wild birds and chickens using MALDI-TOF MS, biochemical testing, and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Samantha J; Weis, Allison M; Byrne, Barbara A; Fritz, Heather; Taff, Conor C; Townsend, Andrea K; Weimer, Bart C; Mete, Aslı; Wheeler, Sarah; Boyce, Walter M

    2018-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was compared to conventional biochemical testing methods and nucleic acid analyses (16S rDNA sequencing, hippurate hydrolysis gene testing, whole genome sequencing [WGS]) for species identification of Campylobacter isolates obtained from chickens ( Gallus gallus domesticus, n = 8), American crows ( Corvus brachyrhynchos, n = 17), a mallard duck ( Anas platyrhynchos, n = 1), and a western scrub-jay ( Aphelocoma californica, n = 1). The test results for all 27 isolates were in 100% agreement between MALDI-TOF MS, the combined results of 16S rDNA sequencing, and the hippurate hydrolysis gene PCR ( p = 0.0027, kappa = 1). Likewise, the identifications derived from WGS from a subset of 14 isolates were in 100% agreement with the MALDI-TOF MS identification. In contrast, biochemical testing misclassified 5 isolates of C. jejuni as C. coli, and 16S rDNA sequencing alone was not able to differentiate between C. coli and C. jejuni for 11 sequences ( p = 0.1573, kappa = 0.0857) when compared to MALDI-TOF MS and WGS. No agreement was observed between MALDI-TOF MS dendrograms and the phylogenetic relationships revealed by rDNA sequencing or WGS. Our results confirm that MALDI-TOF MS is a fast and reliable method for identifying Campylobacter isolates to the species level from wild birds and chickens, but not for elucidating phylogenetic relationships among Campylobacter isolates.

  17. Yolk formation in some Charadriiform birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roudybush, T.E.; Grau, C.R.; Petersen, M.R.; Ainley, D.G.; Hirsch, K.V.; Gilman, A.P.; Patten, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    By counting and measuring the major ova of breeding birds at autopsy and combining these data with time intervals between ovipositions, rough estimates have been made of the time required to form yolk in some non-captive birds (King 1973). Direct studies have been made in domestic fowl (Gallus gallus var. domesticus; Gilbert 1972), turkeys (Meleagris galloparvo; Bacon and Cherms 1968), and Common quail (Coturnix coturnix; Bacon and Koontz 1971), by feeding the birds a capsule containing dye each day, and counting dye rings in the yolks after the eggs have been hardcooked. Recently developed methods of fixing and staining eggs have revealed differences in yolk deposited during day and night, thus permitting another estimation of the number of days during which yolk was deposited, and without direct contact with the female (Grau 1976). In eggs from chickens and quail that have been fed dyes, yolk that stained darkly with dichromate was shown to be deposited during the active daytime feeding periods, while pale-staining yolk was deposited during the night. Thus, pairs of light and dark rings, which together take a day to be deposited, may be counted to estimate time of yolk formation.In the present study we have applied the yolk ring method of estimating the number of days during which the bulk of the yolk is deposited around the central white core (Grau 1976) to the eggs of some shorebirds, gulls, terns and alcids.

  18. Eyespot display in the peacock butterfly triggers antipredator behaviors in naïve adult fowl

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Large conspicuous eyespots have evolved in multiple taxa and presumably function to thwart predator attacks. Traditionally, large eyespots were thought to discourage predator attacks because they mimicked eyes of the predators’ own predators. However, this idea is controversial and the intimidating properties of eyespots have recently been suggested to simply be a consequence of their conspicuousness. Some lepidopteran species include large eyespots in their antipredation repertoire. In the peacock butterfly, Inachis io, eyespots are typically hidden during rest and suddenly exposed by the butterfly when disturbed. Previous experiments have shown that small wild passerines are intimidated by this display. Here, we test whether eyespots also intimidate a considerably larger bird, domestic fowl, Gallus gallus domesticus, by staging interactions between birds and peacock butterflies that were sham-painted or had their eyespots painted over. Our results show that birds typically fled when peacock butterflies performed their display regardless of whether eyespots were visible or painted over. However, birds confronting butterflies with visible eyespots delayed their return to the butterfly, were more vigilant, and more likely to utter alarm calls associated with detection of ground-based predators, compared with birds confronting butterflies with eyespots painted over. Because production of alarm calls and increased vigilance are antipredation behaviors in the fowl, their reaction suggests that eyespots may elicit fear rather than just an aversion to conspicuous patterns. Our results, therefore, suggest that predators perceive large lepidopteran eyespots as belonging to the eyes of a potential predator. PMID:23243378

  19. Morphological and molecular characterization of Choleoeimeria pogonae n. sp. coccidian parasite (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae, 1989, Paperna and Landsberg) in a western bearded dragon (Pogona minor minor).

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Brice, Belinda; Ryan, Una

    2016-01-01

    A new species, Choleoeimeria pogonae n. sp. is described from a Western bearded dragon (Pogona minor minor) in Western Australia. Sporulated oocysts (n = 48) were cylindroidal in shape. Oocyst length, 27.0 (26.0-28.3) μm, oocyst width, 15.2 (14.0-16.5) μm, oocyst length/width ratio (L/W) 1.8 (1.6-1.9), each with 4 sporocysts (Eimeria-like) and a polar granule, but lacking a micropyle and oocyst residuum. Sporocysts are ovoidal in shape, sporocyst length, 10.0 (9.0-11.0) μm, sporocyst width 8.5 (7.0-9.5) μm, sporocyst L/W ratio, 1.2 (1.1-1.3). Stieda, substieda and parasubstieda bodies were all absent. Molecular analysis was conducted at the 18S rRNA and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) loci. Phylogenetic analysis of 18S sequences revealed that C. pogonae n. sp. grouped together with another four Choleoeimeria spp. and exhibited 99.1%-99.4% genetic similarity. At the COI locus, C. pogonae n. sp. was in an independent clade and had the highest similarity (80.4%) to Eimeria cf. mivati from a chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). According to the morphological and molecular data, this isolate is a new species of coccidian parasite. This study further supports the taxonomy of Choleoeimeria spp. as a new genus based on molecular phylogenetic analysis. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermal fluctuations of haemoglobin from different species: adaptation to temperature via conformational dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, A. M.; Garvey, C. J.; Bocahut, A.; Sacquin-Mora, S.; Digel, I.; Schneider, G. J.; Natali, F.; Artmann, G. M.; Zaccai, G.

    2012-01-01

    Thermodynamic stability, configurational motions and internal forces of haemoglobin (Hb) of three endotherms (platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus; domestic chicken, Gallus gallus domesticus and human, Homo sapiens) and an ectotherm (salt water crocodile, Crocodylus porosus) were investigated using circular dichroism, incoherent elastic neutron scattering and coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations. The experimental results from Hb solutions revealed a direct correlation between protein resilience, melting temperature and average body temperature of the different species on the 0.1 ns time scale. Molecular forces appeared to be adapted to permit conformational fluctuations with a root mean square displacement close to 1.2 Å at the corresponding average body temperature of the endotherms. Strong forces within crocodile Hb maintain the amplitudes of motion within a narrow limit over the entire temperature range in which the animal lives. In fully hydrated powder samples of human and chicken, Hb mean square displacements and effective force constants on the 1 ns time scale showed no differences over the whole temperature range from 10 to 300 K, in contrast to the solution case. A complementary result of the study, therefore, is that one hydration layer is not sufficient to activate all conformational fluctuations of Hb in the pico- to nanosecond time scale which might be relevant for biological function. Coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations permitted to explore residue-specific effects. They indicated that temperature sensing of human and chicken Hb occurs mainly at residues lining internal cavities in the β-subunits. PMID:22696485

  1. An integrated analysis of social stress in laying hens: The interaction between physiology, behaviour, and hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Renata Rezende; Palme, Rupert; da Silva Vasconcellos, Angélica

    2018-04-01

    Livestock is the category of animals that suffers the most severe welfare problems. Among these, physical, physiological, and behavioural distress caused by artificial grouping are some of the challenges faced by these animals. Groups whose members are frequently changed have been reported as socially unstable, which could jeopardise the welfare of animals. Here, we assessed the effect of social instability on aggression, stress, and productivity in groups of laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus). We studied 36 females, distributed into three stable groups (without group membership change) and three unstable groups (where the dominant member was rotated every week) over the course of 10 weeks. We evaluated the frequency of agonistic interactions, glucocorticoid metabolites (GCM) concentrations, and egg production. In both treatments, dominant hens produced more eggs compared to intermediate and subordinates, and intermediate hens had the highest GCM concentrations. Socially unstable groups had lower productivity and higher frequencies of agonistic interactions than stable groups. Social instability also affected GCM of the animals: in stable groups, subordinate hens had higher concentrations than dominants; in unstable groups, this pattern was reversed. Our results point to a social destabilisation in groups whose members were alternated, and suggest the welfare of individuals in unstable groups was compromised. Our results pointed to a complex relationship between hierarchy, productivity, physiological stress and aggression in laying hens, and have implications for their husbandry and management and, consequently, for their welfare levels. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Human‐Aided Movement of Viral Disease and the Archaeology of Avian Osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The term avian osteopetrosis is used to describe alterations to the skeletal elements of several species of domestic bird, most typically the chicken, Gallus gallus domesticus (L. 1758). Such lesions are routinely identified in animal bones from archaeological sites due to their distinctive appearance, which is characterised by proliferative diaphyseal thickening. These lesions are relatively uncomplicated for specialists to differentially diagnose and are caused by a range of avian leucosis viruses in a series of subgroups. Only some avian leucosis viruses cause the development of such characteristic lesions in osteological tissue. Viraemia is necessary for the formation of skeletal pathology, and avian osteopetrosis lesions affect skeletal elements at different rates. Lesion expression differs by the age and sex of the infected individual, and environmental conditions have an impact on the prevalence of avian leucosis viruses in poultry flocks. These factors have implications for the ways in which diagnosed instances of avian osteopetrosis in archaeological assemblages are interpreted. By integrating veterinary research with archaeological evidence for the presence of avian leucosis viruses across Western Europe, this paper discusses the nature of these pathogens, outlines criteria for differential diagnosis, and offers a fresh perspective on the human‐aided movement of animal disease in the past through investigation of the incidence and geographic distribution of avian osteopetrosis lesions from the first century BC to the post‐medieval period. © 2017 The Authors International Journal of Osteoarchaeology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:29104410

  3. Locomotor Behavior of Chickens Anticipating Incline Walking

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Chantal; Tobalske, Bret; Szkotnicki, Bill; Harlander-Matauschek, Alexandra

    2018-01-01

    Keel bone damage (KBD) is prevalent in hens raised for egg production, and ramps between different tiers in aviaries have potential to reduce the frequency of falls resulting in KBD. Effective use of ramps requires modulation of locomotion in anticipation of the incline. Inadequate adaptive locomotion may be one explanation why domestic layer hens (Gallus gallus domesticus) exhibit high rates of KBD. To improve understanding of the capacity of hens to modulate their locomotion in anticipation of climbing, we measured the effects of incline angle upon the mechanics of the preparatory step before ascending a ramp. Because the energetic challenge of climbing increases with slope, we predicted that as angle of incline increased, birds during foot contact with the ground before starting to climb would increase their peak force and duration of contact and reduce variation in center of pressure (COP) under their foot. We tested 20 female domestic chickens on ramp inclines at slopes of +0°, +40°, and +70° when birds were 17, 21, 26, 31, and 36 weeks of age. There were significantly higher vertical peak ground reaction forces in preparation at the steepest slope, and ground contact time increased significantly with each increase in ramp angle. Effects upon variation in COP were not apparent; likewise, effects of limb length, age, body mass were not significant. Our results reveal that domestic chickens are capable of modulating their locomotion in response to incline angle. PMID:29376060

  4. Thermal fluctuations of haemoglobin from different species: adaptation to temperature via conformational dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stadler, A M; Garvey, C J; Bocahut, A; Sacquin-Mora, S; Digel, I; Schneider, G J; Natali, F; Artmann, G M; Zaccai, G

    2012-11-07

    Thermodynamic stability, configurational motions and internal forces of haemoglobin (Hb) of three endotherms (platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus; domestic chicken, Gallus gallus domesticus and human, Homo sapiens) and an ectotherm (salt water crocodile, Crocodylus porosus) were investigated using circular dichroism, incoherent elastic neutron scattering and coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations. The experimental results from Hb solutions revealed a direct correlation between protein resilience, melting temperature and average body temperature of the different species on the 0.1 ns time scale. Molecular forces appeared to be adapted to permit conformational fluctuations with a root mean square displacement close to 1.2 Å at the corresponding average body temperature of the endotherms. Strong forces within crocodile Hb maintain the amplitudes of motion within a narrow limit over the entire temperature range in which the animal lives. In fully hydrated powder samples of human and chicken, Hb mean square displacements and effective force constants on the 1 ns time scale showed no differences over the whole temperature range from 10 to 300 K, in contrast to the solution case. A complementary result of the study, therefore, is that one hydration layer is not sufficient to activate all conformational fluctuations of Hb in the pico- to nanosecond time scale which might be relevant for biological function. Coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations permitted to explore residue-specific effects. They indicated that temperature sensing of human and chicken Hb occurs mainly at residues lining internal cavities in the β-subunits.

  5. Eggshell permeability: a standard technique for determining interspecific rates of water vapor conductance.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Steven J; Maurer, Golo; Cassey, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Typically, eggshell water vapor conductance is measured on whole eggs, freshly collected at the commencement of a study. At times, however, it may not be possible to obtain whole fresh eggs but rather egg fragments or previously blown eggs. Here we evaluate and describe in detail a technique for modern laboratory analysis of eggshell conductance that uses fragments from fresh and museum eggs to determine eggshell water vapor conductance. We used fresh unincubated eggs of domesticated chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus), ducks (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus), and guinea fowl (Numida meleagris) to investigate the reliability, validity, and repeatability of the technique. To assess the suitability of museum samples, museum and freshly collected black-headed gull eggs (Larus ridibundus) were used. Fragments were cut out of the eggshell from the blunt end (B), equator (E), and pointy end (P). Eggshell fragments were glued to the top of a 0.25-mL micro test tube (Eppendorf) filled with 200 μL of distilled water and placed in a desiccator at 25°C. Eppendorfs were weighed three times at 24-h intervals, and mass loss was assumed to be a result of water evaporation. We report the following results: (1) mass loss between weighing sessions was highly repeatable and consistent in all species; (2) the majority of intraspecific variability in eggshell water vapor conductance between different eggs of the same species was explained through the differences in water vapor conductance between the three eggshell parts of the same egg (B, E, and P); (3) the technique was sensitive enough to detect significant differences between the three domestic species; (4) there was no overall significant difference between water vapor conductance of museum and fresh black-headed gull eggs; (5) there was no significant difference in water vapor conductance for egg fragments taken from the same egg both between different trials and within the same trial. We conclude, therefore, that this technique

  6. Effect of Microgravity on Afferent Innervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Presentations and publications are: (1) an audiovisual summary web presentation on results from SLM-MIR avian experiments. A color presentation summarizing results from the SLM-MIR and STS-29 avian experiments; (2) color threshold and ratio of S 100B MAP5, NF68/200, GABA and GAD; (3) chicken (Gallus domesticus) inner ear afferents; (4) microgravity in the STS-29 Space Shuttle Discovery affected the vestibular system of chick embryos; (5) expression of S 100B in sensory and secretory cells of the vertebrate inner ear; (6) otoconia biogenesis, phylogeny, composition and functional attributes;(7) the glycan keratin sulfate in inner ear crystals; (8) elliptical-P cells in the avian perilymphatic interface of the tegmentum vasculosum; and (9) LAMP2c and S100B upregulation in brain stem after VIIIth nerve deafferentation.

  7. Insights into the Folding and Unfolding Processes of Wild-Type and Mutated SH3 Domain by Molecular Dynamics and Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Zhang, Ji-Long; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2013-01-01

    Src-homology regions 3 (SH3) domain is essential for the down-regulation of tyrosine kinase activity. Mutation A39V/N53P/V55L of SH3 is found to be relative to the urgent misfolding diseases. To gain insight, the human and gallus SH3 domains (PDB ID: 1NYG and 2LP5), including 58 amino acids in each protein, were selected for MD simulations (Amber11, ff99SB force field) and cluster analysis to investigate the influence of mutations on the spatial structure of the SH3 domain. It is found that the large conformational change of mutations mainly exists in three areas in the vicinity of protein core: RT loop, N-src loop, distal β-hairpin to 310 helix. The C-terminus of the mutated gallus SH3 is disordered after simulation, which represents the intermediate state of aggregation. The disappeared strong Hbond net in the mutated human and gallus systems will make these mutated proteins looser than the wild-type proteins. Additionally, by performing the REMD simulations on the gallus SH3 domain, the mutated domain is found to have an obvious effect on the unfolding process. These studies will be helpful for further aggregation mechanisms investigations on SH3 family. PMID:23734224

  8. Insights into the folding and unfolding processes of wild-type and mutated SH3 domain by molecular dynamics and replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Zhang, Ji-Long; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2013-01-01

    Src-homology regions 3 (SH3) domain is essential for the down-regulation of tyrosine kinase activity. Mutation A39V/N53P/V55L of SH3 is found to be relative to the urgent misfolding diseases. To gain insight, the human and gallus SH3 domains (PDB ID: 1NYG and 2LP5), including 58 amino acids in each protein, were selected for MD simulations (Amber11, ff99SB force field) and cluster analysis to investigate the influence of mutations on the spatial structure of the SH3 domain. It is found that the large conformational change of mutations mainly exists in three areas in the vicinity of protein core: RT loop, N-src loop, distal β-hairpin to 310 helix. The C-terminus of the mutated gallus SH3 is disordered after simulation, which represents the intermediate state of aggregation. The disappeared strong Hbond net in the mutated human and gallus systems will make these mutated proteins looser than the wild-type proteins. Additionally, by performing the REMD simulations on the gallus SH3 domain, the mutated domain is found to have an obvious effect on the unfolding process. These studies will be helpful for further aggregation mechanisms investigations on SH3 family.

  9. Mercury speciation and subcellular distribution in experimentally dosed and wild birds.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Marie; Barst, Benjamin D; Hadrava, Justine; Basu, Niladri

    2017-12-01

    Many bird species are exposed to methylmercury (MeHg) at levels shown to cause sublethal effects. Although MeHg sensitivity and assimilation can vary among species and developmental stages, the underlying reasons (such as MeHg toxicokinetics) are poorly understood. We investigated Hg distribution at the tissue and cellular levels in birds by examining Hg speciation in blood, brain, and liver and Hg subcellular distribution in liver. We used MeHg egg injection of white leghorn chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus), sampled at 3 early developmental stages, and embryonic ring-billed gulls (Larus delawarensis) exposed to maternally deposited MeHg. The percentage of MeHg (relative to total Hg [THg]) in blood, brain, and liver ranged from 94 to 121%, indicating little MeHg demethylation. A liver subcellular partitioning procedure was used to determine how THg was distributed between potentially sensitive and detoxified compartments. The distributions of THg among subcellular fractions were similar among chicken time points, and between embryonic chicken and ring-billed gulls. A greater proportion of THg was associated with metal-sensitive fractions than detoxified fractions. Within the sensitive compartment, THg was found predominately in heat-denatured proteins (∼42-46%), followed by mitochondria (∼15-18%). A low rate of MeHg demethylation and high proportion of THg in metal-sensitive subcellular fractions further indicates that embryonic and hatchling time points are Hg-sensitive developmental stages, although further work is needed across a range of additional species and life stages. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:3289-3298. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  10. Geographic variability of Escherichia coli ribotypes from animals in Idaho and Georgia.

    PubMed

    Hartel, Peter G; Summer, Jacob D; Hill, Jennifer L; Collins, J Victoria; Entry, James A; Segars, William I

    2002-01-01

    Several genotypic methods have been developed for determining the host origin of fecal bacteria in contaminated waters. Some of these methods rely on a host origin database to identify environmental isolates. It is not well understood to what degree these host origin isolates are geographically variable (i.e., cosmopolitan or endemic). This is important because a geographically limited host origin database may or may not be universally applicable. The objective of our study was to use one genotypic method, ribotyping, to determine the geographic variability of the fecal bacterium, Escherichia coli, from one location in Idaho and three locations in Georgia for cattle (Bos taurus), horse (Equus caballus), swine (Sus scrofa), and chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). A total of 568 fecal E. coli isolates from Kimberly, ID (125 isolates), Athens, GA (210 isolates), Brunswick, GA (102 isolates), and Tifton, GA (131 isolates), yielded 213 ribotypes. The percentage of ribotype sharing within an animal species increased with decreased distance between geographic locations for cattle and horses, but not for swine and chicken. When the E. coli ribotypes among the four host species were compared at one location, the percent of unshared ribotypes was 86, 89, 81, and 79% for Kimberly, Athens, Brunswick, and Tifton, respectively. These data suggest that there is good ribotype separation among host animal species at each location. The ability to match environmental isolates to a host origin database may depend on a large number of environmental and host origin isolates that ideally are not geographically separated.

  11. Effects of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) and poly(vinyl-pyrrolidone) hydrogel implants on myopic and normal chick sclera

    PubMed Central

    Su, James; Iomdina, Elena; Tarutta, Elena; Ward, Brian; Song, Jie; Wildsoet, Christine F.

    2008-01-01

    There has been generally little attention paid to the utilization of biomaterials as an anti-myopia treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether polymeric hydrogels, either implanted or injected adjacent to the outer scleral surface, slow ocular elongation. White Leghorn (gallus gallus domesticus) chicks were used at 2 weeks of age. Chicks had either (1) strip of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) implanted monocularly against the outer sclera at the posterior pole, or (2) an in situ polymerizing gel [main ingredient: poly(vinyl-pyrrolidone) (PVP)] injected monocularly at the same location. Some of the eyes injected with the polymer were fitted with a diffuser or a −10D lens. In each experiment, ocular lengths were measured at regular intervals by high frequency A-scan ultrasonography, and chicks were sacrificed for histology at staged intervals. No in vivo signs of either orbital or ocular inflammation were observed. The pHEMA implant significantly increased scleral thickness by the third week, and the implant became encapsulated with fibrous tissue. The PVP-injected eyes left otherwise untreated, showed a significant increase in scleral thickness, due to increased chondrocyte proliferation and extracellular matrix deposition. However, there was no effect of the PVP injection on ocular elongation. In eyes wearing optical devices, there was no effect on either scleral thickness or ocular elongation. These results represent “proof of principle” that scleral growth can be manipulated without adverse inflammatory responses. However, since neither approach slowed ocular elongation, additional factors must influence scleral surface area expansion in the avian eye. PMID:19109950

  12. Earliest economic exploitation of chicken outside East Asia: Evidence from the Hellenistic Southern Levant

    PubMed Central

    Perry-Gal, Lee; Erlich, Adi; Gilboa, Ayelet; Bar-Oz, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) is today one of the most widespread domesticated species and is a main source of protein in the human diet. However, for thousands of years exploitation of chickens was confined to symbolic and social domains such as cockfighting. The question of when and where chickens were first used for economic purposes remains unresolved. The results of our faunal analysis demonstrate that the Hellenistic (fourth–second centuries B.C.E.) site of Maresha, Israel, is the earliest site known today where economic exploitation of chickens was widely practiced. We base our claim on the exceptionally high frequency of chicken bones at that site, the majority of which belong to adult individuals, and on the observed 2:1 ratio of female to male bones. These results are supported further by an extensive survey of faunal remains from 234 sites in the Southern Levant, spanning more than three millennia, which shows a sharp increase in the frequency of chicken during the Hellenistic period. We further argue that the earliest secure evidence for economic exploitation of chickens in Europe dates to the first century B.C.E. and therefore is predated by the finds in the Southern Levant by at least a century. We suggest that the gradual acclimatization of chickens in the Southern Levant and its gradual integration into the local economy, the latter fully accomplished in the Hellenistic period, was a crucial step in the adoption of this species in European husbandry some 100 y later. PMID:26195775

  13. Role of sediment size and biostratinomy on the development of biofilms in recent avian vertebrate remains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Joseph E.; Lenczewski, Melissa E.; Clawson, Steven R.; Warnock, Jonathan P.

    2017-04-01

    Microscopic soft tissues have been identified in fossil vertebrate remains collected from various lithologies. However, the diagenetic mechanisms to preserve such tissues have remained elusive. While previous studies have described infiltration of biofilms in Haversian and Volkmann’s canals, biostratinomic alteration (e.g., trampling), and iron derived from hemoglobin as playing roles in the preservation processes, the influence of sediment texture has not previously been investigated. This study uses a Kolmogorov Smirnov Goodness-of-Fit test to explore the influence of biostratinomic variability and burial media against the infiltration of biofilms in bone samples. Controlled columns of sediment with bone samples were used to simulate burial and subsequent groundwater flow. Sediments used in this study include clay-, silt-, and sand-sized particles modeled after various fluvial facies commonly associated with fossil vertebrates. Extant limb bone samples obtained from Gallus gallus domesticus (Domestic Chicken) buried in clay-rich sediment exhibit heavy biofilm infiltration, while bones buried in sands and silts exhibit moderate levels. Crushed bones exhibit significantly lower biofilm infiltration than whole bone samples. Strong interactions between biostratinomic alteration and sediment size are also identified with respect to biofilm development. Sediments modeling crevasse splay deposits exhibit considerable variability; whole-bone crevasse splay samples exhibit higher frequencies of high-level biofilm infiltration, and crushed-bone samples in modeled crevasse splay deposits display relatively high frequencies of low-level biofilm infiltration. These results suggest that sediment size, depositional setting, and biostratinomic condition play key roles in biofilm infiltration in vertebrate remains, and may influence soft tissue preservation in fossil vertebrates.

  14. Critical role of the neural pathway from the intermediate medial mesopallium to the intermediate hyperpallium apicale in filial imprinting of domestic chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Aoki, N; Yamaguchi, S; Kitajima, T; Takehara, A; Katagiri-Nakagawa, S; Matsui, R; Watanabe, D; Matsushima, T; Homma, K J

    2015-11-12

    Filial imprinting in precocial birds is a useful model for studying early learning and cognitive development, as it is characterized by a well-defined sensitive or critical period. We recently showed that the thyroid hormone 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) determines the onset of the sensitive period. Moreover, exogenous injection of T3 into the intermediate medial mesopallium (IMM) region (analogous to the associative cortex in mammals) enables imprinting even on post-hatch day 4 or 6 when the sensitive period has been terminated. However, the neural mechanisms downstream from T3 action in the IMM region remain elusive. Here, we analyzed the functional involvement of the intermediate hyperpallium apicale (IMHA) in T3 action. Bilateral excitotoxic ablation of the IMHA prevented imprinting in newly hatched chicks, and also suppressed the recovery of the sensitive period by systemic intra-venous or localized intra-IMM injection of T3 in day-4 chicks. In contrast to the effect in the IMM, direct injection of T3 into the IMHA did not enable imprinting in day-4 chicks. Moreover, bilateral ablation of IMHA after imprinting training impaired recall. These results suggest that the IMHA is critical for memory acquisition downstream following T3 action in the IMM and further, that it receives and retains information stored in the IMM for recall. Furthermore, both an avian adeno-associated viral construct containing an anterograde tracer (wheat-germ agglutinin) and a retrograde tracer (cholera toxin subunit B) revealed neural connections from the IMM to the IMHA. Taken together, our findings suggest that hierarchical processes from the primary area (IMM) to the secondary area (IMHA) are required for imprinting. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Pathology and distribution of velogenic viscerotropic newcastle disease virus in the reproductive system of vaccinated and unvaccinated laying hens (gallus gallus domesticus) by immunohistochemical labelling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study investigated the pathological changes in the reproductive system of laying hens that lead to the poor egg production and quality in Newcastle disease (ND) and the distribution of the virus in the system. Two hundred and forty Isa-Brown pullets were divided randomly into vaccinated and unv...

  16. Recovery of vestibular function following hair cell destruction by streptomycin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Nelson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Can the vestibular periphery of warm-blooded vertebrates recover functionally from severe sensory hair cell loss? Recent findings in birds suggest a mechanism for recovery but in fact no direct functional evidence has been reported. We produced vestibular hair cell lesions using the ototoxic agent streptomycin sulfate (600 mg/kg/day, 8 days, chicks, Gallus domesticus). Compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve were used as a direct measure of peripheral vestibular function. Vestibular thresholds, neural activation latencies and amplitudes were documented. Eight days of drug treatment elevated thresholds significantly (P < 0.001) and eliminated all but remnants of vestibular activity. Virtually complete physiological recovery occurred in all animals studied over a period of 70 days following treatment. Thresholds recovered within two weeks of drug treatment whereas the return of response morphologies including activation latencies and amplitudes required an additional 6-8 weeks.

  17. DNA AND THE FINE STRUCTURE OF SYNAPTIC CHROMOSOMES IN THE DOMESTIC ROOSTER (GALLUS DOMESTICUS)

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, James R.; Moses, Montrose J.

    1964-01-01

    The indium trichloride method of Watson and Aldridge (38) for staining nucleic acids for electron microscopy was employed to study the relationship of DNA to the structure of the synaptinemal complex in meiotic prophase chromosomes of the domestic rooster. The selectivity of the method was demonstrated in untreated and DNase-digested testis material by comparing the distribution of indium staining in the electron microscope to Feulgen staining and ultraviolet absorption in thicker sections seen with the light microscope. Following staining by indium, DNA was found mainly in the microfibril component of the synaptinemal complex. When DNA was known to have been removed from aldehyde-fixed material by digestion with DNase, indium stainability was also lost. However, staining of the digested material with non-selective heavy metal techniques demonstrated the presence of material other than DNA in the microfibrils and showed that little alteration in appearance of the chromosome resulted from DNA removal. The two dense lateral axial elements of the synaptinemal complex, but not the central one to any extent, also contained DNA, together with non-DNA material. PMID:14228519

  18. Spatiotemporal mapping of the muscular activity of the gizzard of the chicken (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Lentle, R G; Reynolds, G; de Loubens, C; Hulls, C; Janssen, P W M; Ravindran, V

    2013-02-01

    We report the results of spatiotemporal mapping of the spontaneous actions of component muscles of the gizzard and associated structures in ex vivo preparations with combined superfusion and vascular perfusion. Ongoing spontaneous contraction of cranial and caudal thin muscles occurred at a frequency of 2.2 ± 0.1 cycles per minute. Contractions of M. tenuis craniodorsalis with mean duration of 2.8 ± 0.2 s commenced ventrally adjacent to the distal limit of the proventriculus and progressed dorsally at 2.02 ± 0.03 mm•s(-1) in a concerted front. Near simultaneous contraction of M. tenuis caudoventralis of mean duration of contraction of 4.7 ± 0.7 s commenced dorsally and progressed ventrally at a similar rate (2.1 ± 0.1 mm•s(-1)) and in a similar manner. Contraction of the caudoventralis preceded that of craniodorsalis (mean 1.1 ± 0.15 s). Contraction of the 2 tenuis muscles was synchronous with the first component peak of the cyclic increase in lumen pressure and with distension of the crassus musculature. Contraction of the M. crassus caudodorsalis muscle coincided with the second component peak and was followed by distension of the tenuis musculature. The latter commenced before the relaxation of the tenuis muscles. Contractions of the crassus muscle propagated rapidly at right angles to the orientation of the muscle fibers at a faster velocity than that of the tenuis musculature. The durations of the component peaks in lumen pressure indicated that the duration of crassus contraction was similar to that of the tenuis musculature.

  19. Transcriptomic changes throughout post-hatch development in Gallus gallus pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Susan J; Schmidt, Carl J

    2016-01-01

    The pituitary gland is a neuroendocrine organ that works closely with the hypothalamus to affect multiple processes within the body including the stress response, metabolism, growth and immune function. Relative tissue expression (rEx) is a transcriptome analysis method that compares the genes expressed in a particular tissue to the genes expressed in all other tissues with available data. Using rEx, the aim of this study was to identify genes that are uniquely or more abundantly expressed in the pituitary when compared to all other collected chicken tissues. We applied rEx to define genes enriched in the chicken pituitaries at days 21, 22 and 42 post-hatch. rEx analysis identified 25 genes shared between all time points, 295 genes shared between days 21 and 22 and 407 genes unique to day 42. The 25 genes shared by all time points are involved in morphogenesis and general nervous tissue development. The 295 shared genes between days 21 and 22 are involved in neurogenesis and nervous system development and differentiation. The 407 unique day 42 genes are involved in pituitary development, endocrine system development and other hormonally related gene ontology terms. Overall, rEx analysis indicates a focus on nervous system/tissue development at days 21 and 22. By day 42, in addition to nervous tissue development, there is expression of genes involved in the endocrine system, possibly for maturation and preparation for reproduction. This study defines the transcriptome of the chicken pituitary gland and aids in understanding the expressed genes critical to its function and maturation. PMID:27856505

  20. Feeding profile of Mepraia spinolai, a sylvatic vector of Chagas disease in Chile.

    PubMed

    Chacón, F; Bacigalupo, A; Quiroga, J F; Ferreira, A; Cattan, P E; Ramírez-Toloza, G

    2016-10-01

    American trypanosomiasis is a chronic disease transmitted mainly by vectors. The hematophagous triatomine vectors transmit Trypanosoma cruzi to a wide variety of mammals, which usually are their food source. This study determined the feeding profile of Mepraia spinolai, a sylvatic triatomine vector, present in endemic areas of Chile. Vectors were captured in the north-central area of Chile. Samples of intestinal contents were analyzed by an Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that identifies and discriminates the presence of serum antigens from Homo sapiens and nine animal species (Canis familiaris, Felis catus, Capra hircus, Mus musculus, Gallus gallus, Octodon degus, Thylamys elegans, Phyllotis darwini and Oryctolagus cuniculus). Our data indicate the most frequent feeding source in this area was P. darwini, followed by O. degus, O. cuniculus, M. musculus, G. gallus, T. elegans, C. familiaris, F. catus and C. hircus. Mixed food sources were also identified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of a myosin light chain kinase inhibitor on the optics and accommodation of the avian crystalline lens.

    PubMed

    Luck, Sara; Choh, Vivian

    2011-01-01

    While many studies investigate the cytoskeletal properties of the lens with respect to cataract development, examinations of how these molecular structures interact are few. Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), actin, and myosin are present on the crystalline lenses of chickens. The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether contractile proteins found on the lens play a role in the optical functions of the lens at rest, and during accommodation. Eyes of 6-day old white Leghorn chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus) were enucleated, with the ciliary nerve intact. One eye was treated with the MLCK inhibitor 1-(5-iodonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl)-1H-hexahydro-1,4-diazepine hydrochloride (ML-7) and the other eye with vehicle only. Three concentrations of ML-7 were used: 1 µM, 10 µM, and 100 µM. The back vertex focal lengths (BVFLs) were measured before, during, and after accommodation using an optical laser scanning monitor (Scantox™). To further confirm ML-7 activity, western blotting was performed to detect whether MLCK was inhibited. Western blots confirmed that MLCK was inhibited at all three ML-7 concentrations. Ten µM ML-7 treatments led to longer BVFLs at rest (p=0.0338), while 100 µM treatments led to opposite changes, resulting in shorter BVFLs (p=0.0220). While 1 µM treatments did not lead to significant optical changes (p=0.4416), BVFLs were similar in pattern to those of the 10 µM group. ML-7 had no effects on accommodative amplitudes (p=0.7848). Inhibition of MLCK by ML-7 led to differential changes in BVFLs that presumably affected lenticular integrity. No apparent effect on accommodative amplitudes was observed.

  2. Association between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of the Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Gene and Newcastle Disease Virus Titre and Body Weight in Leung Hang Khao Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Molee, A.; Kongroi, K.; Kuadsantia, P.; Poompramun, C.; Likitdecharote, B.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II gene on resistance to Newcastle disease virus and body weight of the Thai indigenous chicken, Leung Hang Khao (Gallus gallus domesticus). Blood samples were collected for single nucleotide polymorphism analysis from 485 chickens. Polymerase chain reaction sequencing was used to classify single nucleotide polymorphisms of class II MHC. Body weights were measured at the ages of 3, 4, 5, and 7 months. Titres of Newcastle disease virus at 2 weeks to 7 months were determined and the correlation between body weight and titre was analysed. The association between single nucleotide polymorphisms and body weight and titre were analysed by a generalized linear model. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified: C125T, A126T, C209G, C242T, A243T, C244T, and A254T. Significant correlations between log titre and body weight were found at 2 and 4 weeks. Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms and titre were found for C209G and A254T, and between all single nucleotide polymorphisms (except A243T) and body weight. The results showed that class II MHC is associated with both titre of Newcastle disease virus and body weight in Leung Hang Khao chickens. This is of concern because improved growth traits are the main goal of breeding selection. Moreover, the results suggested that MHC has a pleiotropic effect on the titre and growth performance. This mechanism should be investigated in a future study. PMID:26732325

  3. Comparison of the effects of glycerol, dimethyl sulfoxide, and hydroxyethyl starch solutions for cryopreservation of avian red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Graham, Jennifer E; Meola, Dawn M; Kini, Nisha R; Hoffman, Andrew M

    2015-06-01

    To compare effectiveness of glycerol, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solutions for cryopreservation of avian RBCs. RBCs from 12 healthy Ameraucana hens (Gallus gallus domesticus). RBCs were stored in 20% (wt/vol) glycerol, 10% (wt/vol) DMSO freezing medium, or various concentrations of HES solution (7.5%, 11.5%, and 20% [wt/vol]) and frozen for 2 months in liquid nitrogen. Cells were then thawed and evaluated by use of cell recovery and saline stability tests, cell staining (7-aminoactinomycin D and annexin V) and flow cytometry, and scanning electron microscopy. Percentage of RBCs recovered was highest for 20% glycerol solution (mean ± SE, 99.71 ± 0.04%) and did not differ significantly from the value for 7.5% HES solution (99.57 ± 0.04%). Mean saline stability of RBCs was highest for 10% DMSO (96.11 ± 0.25%) and did not differ significantly from the value for 20% HES solution (95.74 ± 0.25%). Percentages of cells with 7-aminoactinomycin D staining but without annexin V staining (indicating necrosis or late apoptosis) were lowest for 10% DMSO freezing medium (3%) and 20% glycerol solution (1%) and highest for all HES concentrations (60% to 80%). Scanning electron microscopy revealed severe membrane changes in RBCs cryopreserved in 20% HES solution, compared with membrane appearance in freshly harvested RBCs and RBCs cryopreserved in 10% DMSO freezing medium. Cryopreservation of avian RBCs with HES solution, regardless of HES concentration, resulted in greater degrees of apoptosis and cell death than did cryopreservation with other media. Transfusion with RBCs cryopreserved in HES solution may result in posttransfusion hemolysis in birds.

  4. Runoff water quality from broiler litter-amended tall fescue in response to natural precipitation in the Ozark Highlands.

    PubMed

    Menjoulet, B C; Brye, K R; Pirani, A L; Haggard, B E; Gbur, E E

    2009-01-01

    The Arkansas poultry industry produced more than 1.2 billion broiler chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) and generated approximately 1.3 million Mg of broiler litter in 2002. High transportation costs of relocating broiler litter have led to annual land applications near poultry houses, increasing concern for potential surface water contamination from runoff. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of broiler litter application rate on runoff water quality in response to natural precipitation. Six plots (1.5 by 6.0 m), located on a Captina silt loam (finesilty, siliceous, active, mesic Typic Fragiudult), were amended with fresh broiler litter at 0, 5.6, and 11.2 Mg ha(-1) (control, low, and high litter treatments, respectively) once annually for 4 yr (May 2003 through April 2007). Runoff collected after each runoff-producing event was analyzed for soluble nutrients and metals. Cumulative runoff did not differ among litter treatments over the 4-yr study. At times, flow-weighted mean (FWM) concentrations of As from all litter treatments exceeded the maximum contaminant level for drinking water (0.01 mg As L(-1)). Four-year FWM Fe concentrations and runoff losses were greater (P < 0.05) from the high than from the low litter treatment and unamended control, and the 4-yr FWM P concentration from the low litter treatment (3.0 mg L(-1)) was greater than that from the unamended control (1.8 mg L(-1)). Since precipitation is temporally variable, evaluating runoff water quality in response to natural precipitation over several years is key to ascertaining the long-term impacts of surface-applied soil amendments like broiler litter.

  5. Lectin histochemistry of goblet cell sugar residues in the gut of the chick embryo and of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Bryk, S G; Sgambati, E; Gheri Bryk, G

    1999-04-01

    The anlage of duodenum, ileum and colon were removed from chick embryos of day 8-21 of incubation and from 1-day-old chicks. A battery of seven different horseradish peroxidase-conjugated lectins (PNA, SBA, DBA, Con A, WGA, LTA and UEAI) was used to study the carbohydrate residues of the glycoconjugates in the goblet cells of the three parts of the intestine. The main results can be summarized as follows: differences in lectin binding were absent in the proximal and distal parts of the duodenum, ileum and colon. Lectin histochemistry showed differences among the three intestinal segments for the time of appearance of the oligosaccharides in the goblet mucus. In the colonic goblet cells of 1-day-old chicks, LTA and UEAI lectins showed two different types of linkage of alpha-L-fucose. This is the first demonstration of UEAI reactive sites in Gallus domesticus.

  6. Perfluorinated compounds and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in great blue heron eggs from Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Kannan, K.; Tao, L.; Saxena, A.R.; Route, B.

    2009-01-01

    In 2007 archived great blue heron (Ardea herodias) eggs collected from Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, IN, (Indiana Dunes) in 1993 were analyzed for 11 perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) and 7 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate, the major contributor to total PFC concentrations, were below the toxicity thresholds estimated for bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), but within the toxicity threshold estimated for white leghorn chickens (Gallus domesticus). The ranking of PBDE congener concentrations by percent concentration (PBDE-47 > -99 > -100 > -153 > -154 > -28 > -183) was consistent with the Penta-PBDE formulation. Total PBDE concentrations in great blue heron eggs from Indiana Dunes were elevated and probably reflect local contamination from highly urbanized and industrialized inputs into Lake Michigan. Polybrominated diphenyl ether concentrations were within levels associated with altered reproductive behavior in other avian species and based on trends in other Great Lakes birds are probably higher today.

  7. Characteristics of expression and regulation of sirtuins in chicken (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Ren, Junxiao; Xu, Naiyi; Ma, Zheng; Li, Yanmin; Li, Cuicui; Wang, Yanbin; Tian, Yadong; Liu, Xiaojun; Kang, Xiangtao

    2017-05-01

    Sirtuins (SIRT1-SIRT7) are a family of NAD + -dependent protein deacetylases that are linked to post-translational regulation of many metabolic processes. There are few reports available for chicken sirtuins (designated cSIRT1-cSIRT7), whose expression and regulation in the liver have yet to be explored. In the present study, we characterized the expression and regulation of sirtuin family members in chicken liver. The results showed that the sirtuin family members in chicken share the same conserved functional SIR2 domains. All the sirtuin family members were expressed extensively in all tissues examined, and the expression levels of cSIRT1, cSIRT2, cSIRT4, cSIRT6, and cSIRT7 in the liver increased significantly with sexual maturity. However, all sirtuin family members were downregulated (P < 0.05) in chicken livers and cultured primary hepatocytes treated with 17β-estradiol. We concluded that the expression levels of some chicken sirtuin family members in the liver were upregulated with sexual maturation, but might not be regulated directly by estrogen. Whereas estrogen could be used as an inhibitor of all sirtuins, both in vivo and in vitro.

  8. Re-evaluation of the life cycle of Eimeria maxima Tyzzer, 1929 in chickens (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Jenkins, M C

    2017-12-14

    A time-course study was conducted to resolve discrepancies in the literature and better define aspects of the Eimeria maxima life cycle such, as sites of development and both morphology and number of asexual stages. Broiler chickens were inoculated orally with five million E. maxima oocysts (APU1), and were necropsied at regular intervals from 12 to 120 h p.i. Small intestine tissue sections and smears were examined for developmental stages. The jejunum contained the highest numbers of developmental stages. At 12 h p.i., sporozoites were observed inside a parasitophorous vacuole (PV) in the epithelial villi and the lamina propria. By 24 h, sporozoites enclosed by a PV were observed in enterocytes of the glands of Lieberkühn. At 48 h p.i., sporozoites, elongated immature and mature schizonts, were all seen in the glands with merozoites budding off from a residual body. By 60 h, second-generation, sausage-shaped schizonts containing up to 12 merozoites were observed around a residual body in the villar tip of invaded enterocytes. At 72 and 96 h, profuse schizogony associated with third- and fourth-generation schizonts was observed throughout the villus. At 120 h, another generation (fifth) of schizonts were seen in villar tips as well as in subepithelium where gamonts and oocysts were also present; a few gamonts were in epithelium. Our finding of maximum parasitization of E. maxima in jejunum is important because this region is critical for nutrient absorption and weight gain.

  9. Re-evaluation of the life cycle of Eimeria maxima Tyzzer, 1929 in chickens (Gallus domesticus)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is uncertainty concerning the developmental stages of the poultry coccidium, Eimeria maxima. To resolve this, broiler chickens were inoculated orally with 5 million E. maxima oocysts and were necropsied 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 96 or120 h p.i. Small intestine tissue sections and smears were exa...

  10. Novel function of the skin in calcium metabolism in female and male chickens (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Peltonen, Liisa M; Sankari, Satu; Kivimäki, Anneli; Autio, Pekka

    2006-08-01

    To study the role of the skin in differential calcium metabolism in White Leghorn chickens, we compared the composition of suction blister fluid (SBF) collected from cutaneous blisters with blood and serum in female and male animals in various physiological states. As an estimate for interstitial fluid (IF), SBF was used as a determinant of local cutaneous metabolism. Sample collection was carried out under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. Eight chickens of both sexes were raised freely in similar environmental conditions and fed with similar food during their growth from juvenile to sexually mature and fully adult state. SBF, blood and serum were examined for concentrations of ionized Ca2+, Na+ and K+ with ion-selective electrodes (ISEs), and osmolalities by freezing point osmometry. pH and total protein content were also assessed. Our results showed that SBF of chickens is calcium-poor at the juvenile state and that it draws more Ca2+ in adult males than laying females of the same age. Interestingly, Ca2+ accumulation was observed also in females after laying had ceased. There was a positive correlation between blood and SBF Ca2+ in females but a negative one in males. In general, it was found that SBF of chickens was rich in Na+ and K+, was hypertonic compared to serum at the juvenile state and had a protein content of 36-47% of that in serum. Different from mammals, SBF in adult chickens was alkaline with the mean values of 8.7+/-0.14 in females and 8.8+/-0.06 in males. Age- and sex-related variability in cutaneous Ca2+ concentrations in chickens, and the differences of SBF composition between that of mammals point to a novel role of skin functions in avians. Possible functions of the skin as a dynamic calcium source balancing the free circulating Ca2+ levels and, also, as an excretory organ for Ca2+ are discussed.

  11. High resolution 1H NMR-based metabonomic study of the auditory cortex analogue of developing chick (Gallus gallus domesticus) following prenatal chronic loud music and noise exposure.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vivek; Nag, Tapas Chandra; Sharma, Uma; Mewar, Sujeet; Jagannathan, Naranamangalam R; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2014-10-01

    Proper functional development of the auditory cortex (ACx) critically depends on early relevant sensory experiences. Exposure to high intensity noise (industrial/traffic) and music, a current public health concern, may disrupt the proper development of the ACx and associated behavior. The biochemical mechanisms associated with such activity dependent changes during development are poorly understood. Here we report the effects of prenatal chronic (last 10 days of incubation), 110dB sound pressure level (SPL) music and noise exposure on metabolic profile of the auditory cortex analogue/field L (AuL) in domestic chicks. Perchloric acid extracts of AuL of post hatch day 1 chicks from control, music and noise groups were subjected to high resolution (700MHz) (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Multivariate regression analysis of the concentration data of 18 metabolites revealed a significant class separation between control and loud sound exposed groups, indicating a metabolic perturbation. Comparison of absolute concentration of metabolites showed that overstimulation with loud sound, independent of spectral characteristics (music or noise) led to extensive usage of major energy metabolites, e.g., glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate and ATP. On the other hand, high glutamine levels and sustained levels of neuromodulators and alternate energy sources, e.g., creatine, ascorbate and lactate indicated a systems restorative measure in a condition of neuronal hyperactivity. At the same time, decreased aspartate and taurine levels in the noise group suggested a differential impact of prenatal chronic loud noise over music exposure. Thus prenatal exposure to loud sound especially noise alters the metabolic activity in the AuL which in turn can affect the functional development and later auditory associated behaviour. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The comparative toxicity of a reduced, crude comfrey (Symphytum officinale) alkaloid extract and the pure, comfrey-derived pyrrolizidine alkaloids, lycopsamine and intermedine in chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Comfrey (Symphytum officinale), a commonly used herb, contains dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids (DHPAs) that, as a group of bioactive metabolites, are potentially hepatotoxic, pneumotoxic, genotoxic and carcinogenic. Consequently, regulatory agencies and international health organizations have recomm...

  13. Effects of divergent selection for 8-week body weight on postnatal enzyme activity pattern of 3 fiber types in fast muscles of male broilers (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Dahmane Gosnak, R; Erzen, I; Holcman, A; Skorjanc, D

    2010-12-01

    A divergent selection experiment was conducted for 8-wk BW in chickens. At 3, 6, 9, and 12 wk of age, samples of pectoralis profundus (PP) and biceps femoris (BF) muscles from fast-growing and slow-growing lines were used to estimate the enzyme activities and muscle fiber diameter. Microphotometric measurements made in situ of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, EC 1.3.99.1) and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH, EC 1.1.99.5) were completed on serial sections of PP and BF muscles from male chickens, in order to examine the ratio of SDH:GPDH activity in single fibers. On the basis of the SDH:GPDH activity ratios, muscle fibers were divided using cluster analysis into 3 populations of different fiber types (O = oxidative, OG = oxidative-glycolytic, and G = glycolytic). Cockerels of the SGL attained an 8.1-fold increase and those of the FGL a 6.8-fold increase in BW at 12 wk compared with that at 3 wk of age. The O, OG, and G type fibers of the BF muscles of the SGL had significantly (P ≤ 0.001) lower SDH:GPDH activity ratios than those of the FGL. A step decrease in the SDH:GPDH activity of O, OG, and G fibers in the PP of both lines occurred, and this differed significantly between SGL and FGL (P ≤ 0.001). Age and line effects influenced the diameter of the 3 fiber types in the BF muscle only. In contrast to this response, all 3 fiber types of the PP muscles reached similar diameters in both lines during the growth process from wk 3 to 12. From the results of this study, we concluded that the activities of metabolic enzymes in skeletal muscle fibers are under the influence of muscle type, age, and selection pressure. Microphotometry is a suitable method for the evaluation of enzyme activity measured in a single muscle fiber. The method enables precise estimation of enzyme activities, especially in muscles composed of populations of different metabolic fiber types.

  14. Radiocarbon and DNA evidence for a pre-Columbian introduction of Polynesian chickens to Chile

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Alice A.; Ramírez, José Miguel; Quiroz, Daniel; Burley, David V.; Addison, David J.; Walter, Richard; Anderson, Atholl J.; Hunt, Terry L.; Athens, J. Stephen; Huynen, Leon; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    Two issues long debated among Pacific and American prehistorians are (i) whether there was a pre-Columbian introduction of chicken (Gallus gallus) to the Americas and (ii) whether Polynesian contact with South America might be identified archaeologically, through the recovery of remains of unquestionable Polynesian origin. We present a radiocarbon date and an ancient DNA sequence from a single chicken bone recovered from the archaeological site of El Arenal-1, on the Arauco Peninsula, Chile. These results not only provide firm evidence for the pre-Columbian introduction of chickens to the Americas, but strongly suggest that it was a Polynesian introduction. PMID:17556540

  15. Superoxide activates a GDP-sensitive proton conductance in skeletal muscle mitochondria from king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus).

    PubMed

    Talbot, Darren A; Hanuise, Nicolas; Rey, Benjamin; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Duchamp, Claude; Brand, Martin D

    2003-12-26

    We present the partial nucleotide sequence of the avian uncoupling protein (avUCP) gene from king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus), showing that the protein is 88-92% identical to chicken (Gallus gallus), turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), and hummingbird (Eupetomena macroura). We show that superoxide activates the proton conductance of mitochondria isolated from king penguin skeletal muscle. GDP abolishes the superoxide-activated proton conductance, indicating that it is mediated via avUCP. In the absence of superoxide there is no GDP-sensitive component of the proton conductance from penguin muscle mitochondria demonstrating that avUCP plays no role in the basal proton leak.

  16. Radiocarbon and DNA evidence for a pre-Columbian introduction of Polynesian chickens to Chile.

    PubMed

    Storey, Alice A; Ramírez, José Miguel; Quiroz, Daniel; Burley, David V; Addison, David J; Walter, Richard; Anderson, Atholl J; Hunt, Terry L; Athens, J Stephen; Huynen, Leon; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth A

    2007-06-19

    Two issues long debated among Pacific and American prehistorians are (i) whether there was a pre-Columbian introduction of chicken (Gallus gallus) to the Americas and (ii) whether Polynesian contact with South America might be identified archaeologically, through the recovery of remains of unquestionable Polynesian origin. We present a radiocarbon date and an ancient DNA sequence from a single chicken bone recovered from the archaeological site of El Arenal-1, on the Arauco Peninsula, Chile. These results not only provide firm evidence for the pre-Columbian introduction of chickens to the Americas, but strongly suggest that it was a Polynesian introduction.

  17. Interspecific Germline Transmission of Cultured Primordial Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    van de Lavoir, Marie-Cecile; Collarini, Ellen J.; Leighton, Philip A.; Fesler, Jeffrey; Lu, Daniel R.; Harriman, William D.; Thiyagasundaram, T. S.; Etches, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    In birds, the primordial germ cell (PGC) lineage separates from the soma within 24 h following fertilization. Here we show that the endogenous population of about 200 PGCs from a single chicken embryo can be expanded one million fold in culture. When cultured PGCs are injected into a xenogeneic embryo at an equivalent stage of development, they colonize the testis. At sexual maturity, these donor PGCs undergo spermatogenesis in the xenogeneic host and become functional sperm. Insemination of semen from the xenogeneic host into females from the donor species produces normal offspring from the donor species. In our model system, the donor species is chicken (Gallus domesticus) and the recipient species is guinea fowl (Numida meleagris), a member of a different avian family, suggesting that the mechanisms controlling proliferation of the germline are highly conserved within birds. From a pragmatic perspective, these data are the basis of a novel strategy to produce endangered species of birds using domesticated hosts that are both tractable and fecund. PMID:22629301

  18. Investigating tendon mineralisation in the avian hindlimb: a model for tendon ageing, injury and disease

    PubMed Central

    Agabalyan, Natacha A; Evans, Darrell J R; Stanley, Rachael L

    2013-01-01

    Mineralisation of the tendon tissue has been described in various models of injury, ageing and disease. Often resulting in painful and debilitating conditions, the processes underlying this mechanism are poorly understood. To elucidate the progression from healthy tendon to mineralised tendon, an appropriate model is required. In this study, we describe the spontaneous and non-pathological ossification and calcification of tendons of the hindlimb of the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). The appearance of the ossified avian tendon has been described previously, although there have been no studies investigating the developmental processes and underlying mechanisms leading to the ossified avian tendon. The tissue and cells from three tendons – the ossifying extensor and flexor digitorum longus tendons and the non-ossifying Achilles tendon – were analysed for markers of ageing and mineralisation using histology, immunohistochemistry, cytochemistry and molecular analysis. Histologically, the adult tissue showed a loss of healthy tendon crimp morphology as well as markers of calcium deposits and mineralisation. The tissue showed a lowered expression of collagens inherent to the tendon extracellular matrix and presented proteins expressed by bone. The cells from the ossified tendons showed a chondrogenic and osteogenic phenotype as well as tenogenic phenotype and expressed the same markers of ossification and calcification as the tissue. A molecular analysis of the gene expression of the cells confirmed these results. Tendon ossification within the ossified avian tendon seems to be the result of an endochondral process driven by its cells, although the roles of the different cell populations have yet to be elucidated. Understanding the role of the tenocyte within this tissue and the process behind tendon ossification may help us prevent or treat ossification that occurs in injured, ageing or diseased tendon. PMID:23826786

  19. Primordial germ cell-mediated chimera technology produces viable pure-line Houbara bustard offspring: potential for repopulating an endangered species.

    PubMed

    Wernery, Ulrich; Liu, Chunhai; Baskar, Vijay; Guerineche, Zhor; Khazanehdari, Kamal A; Saleem, Shazia; Kinne, Jörg; Wernery, Renate; Griffin, Darren K; Chang, Il-Kuk

    2010-12-29

    The Houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata) is a wild seasonal breeding bird populating arid sandy semi-desert habitats in North Africa and the Middle East. Its population has declined drastically during the last two decades and it is classified as vulnerable. Captive breeding programmes have, hitherto, been unsuccessful in reviving population numbers and thus radical technological solutions are essential for the long term survival of this species. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of primordial germ cell-mediated chimera technology to produce viable Houbara bustard offspring. Embryonic gonadal tissue was dissected from Houbara bustard embryos at eight days post-incubation. Subsequently, Houbara tissue containing gonadal primordial germ cells (gPGCs) was injected into White Leghorn chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) embryos, producing 83/138 surviving male chimeric embryos, of which 35 chimeric roosters reached sexual maturity after 5 months. The incorporation and differentiation of Houbara gPGCs in chimeric chicken testis were assessed by PCR with Houbara-specific primers and 31.3% (5/16) gonads collected from the injected chicken embryos showed the presence of donor Houbara cells. A total of 302 semen samples from 34 chimeric roosters were analyzed and eight were confirmed as germline chimeras. Semen samples from these eight roosters were used to artificially inseminate three female Houbara bustards. Subsequently, 45 Houbara eggs were obtained and incubated, two of which were fertile. One egg hatched as a male live born Houbara; the other was female but died before hatching. Genotyping confirmed that the male chick was a pure-line Houbara derived from a chimeric rooster. This study demonstrates for the first time that Houbara gPGCs can migrate, differentiate and eventually give rise to functional sperm in the chimeric chicken testis. This approach may provide a promising tool for propagation and conservation of endangered avian species that

  20. Ground scratching and preferred leg use in domestic chicks: changes in motor control in the first two weeks post-hatching.

    PubMed

    Dharmaretnam, Meena; Vijitha, V; Priyadharshini, K; Jashini, T; Vathany, K

    2002-10-01

    Lateralisation of a variety of visual functions: food discrimination, fear response, copulation, and performance of topographical and other tasks, such as olfactory and auditory functions, have been described in the domestic chick, Gallus gallus domesticus. A bias to left hemisphere control on day 8 and to the right on day 11 has also been demonstrated in the domestic chick. In this study we show that motor control as to foot preference in initiating a scratching bout and a tape-removing task is lateralised in both adults and chicks. There was a preference for the right leg to initiate a bout of ground scratching in both male and female adult birds. Second, foot preference is also affected by the changes in shifts of bias on day 8 and day 11. The right leg preference in initiating a ground scratching bout observed on day 5 is reversed to a left leg preference on day 8. This then reverts to the right leg preference after day 11. Hence it is postulated that the hemisphere that is not activated due to the bias of age controls the first leg to be used in initiating routine movements such as ground scratching. For the tape-removing task the right leg was used to remove a tape adhered to the beak of the chick for the trained group on day 8; but there was no preference in the naive group. Similarly, on day 11 a left foot bias was observed for the trained group and right foot bias for the naive group. To remove a tape the activated hemisphere on days of bias is used; whereas in a novel situation the foot use is reversed. Thus, footedness is affected by age, type of task, and changing hemispheric dominance.

  1. Single cell imaging of the chick retina with adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Headington, Kenneth; Choi, Stacey S; Nickla, Debora; Doble, Nathan

    2011-10-01

    The chick eye is extensively used as a model in the study of myopia and its progression; however, analysis of the photoreceptor mosaic has required the use of excised retina due to the uncorrected optical aberrations in the lens and cornea. This study implemented high resolution adaptive optics (AO) retinal imaging to visualize the chick cone mosaic in vivo. The New England College of Optometry (NECO) AO fundus camera was modified to allow high resolution in vivo imaging on two 6-week-old White Leghorn chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus)-labeled chick A and chick B. Multiple, adjacent images, each with a 2.5(o) field of view, were taken and subsequently montaged together. This process was repeated at varying retinal locations measured from the tip of the pecten. Automated software was used to determine the cone spacing and density at each location. Voronoi analysis was applied to determine the packing arrangement of the cones. In both chicks, cone photoreceptors were clearly visible at all retinal locations imaged. Cone densities measured at 36(o) nasal-12(o) superior retina from the pecten tip for chick A and 40(o) nasal-12(o) superior retina for chick B were 21,714 ± 543 and 26,105 ± 653 cones/mm(2) respectively. For chick B, a further 11 locations immediately surrounding the pecten were imaged, with cone densities ranging from 20,980 ± 524 to 25,148 ± 629 cones/mm(2). In vivo analysis of the cone density and its packing characteristics are now possible in the chick eye through AO imaging, which has important implications for future studies of myopia and ocular disease research.

  2. Effects of a myosin light chain kinase inhibitor on the optics and accommodation of the avian crystalline lens

    PubMed Central

    Luck, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Purpose While many studies investigate the cytoskeletal properties of the lens with respect to cataract development, examinations of how these molecular structures interact are few. Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), actin, and myosin are present on the crystalline lenses of chickens. The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether contractile proteins found on the lens play a role in the optical functions of the lens at rest, and during accommodation. Methods Eyes of 6-day old white Leghorn chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus) were enucleated, with the ciliary nerve intact. One eye was treated with the MLCK inhibitor 1-(5-iodonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl)-1H-hexahydro-1,4-diazepine hydrochloride (ML-7) and the other eye with vehicle only. Three concentrations of ML-7 were used: 1 µM, 10 µM, and 100 µM. The back vertex focal lengths (BVFLs) were measured before, during, and after accommodation using an optical laser scanning monitor (Scantox™). To further confirm ML-7 activity, western blotting was performed to detect whether MLCK was inhibited. Results Western blots confirmed that MLCK was inhibited at all three ML-7 concentrations. Ten µM ML-7 treatments led to longer BVFLs at rest (p=0.0338), while 100 µM treatments led to opposite changes, resulting in shorter BVFLs (p=0.0220). While 1 µM treatments did not lead to significant optical changes (p=0.4416), BVFLs were similar in pattern to those of the 10 µM group. ML-7 had no effects on accommodative amplitudes (p=0.7848). Conclusions Inhibition of MLCK by ML-7 led to differential changes in BVFLs that presumably affected lenticular integrity. No apparent effect on accommodative amplitudes was observed. PMID:22065929

  3. Genetic diversity of Guangxi chicken breeds assessed with microsatellites and the mitochondrial DNA D-loop region.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yuying; Mo, Guodong; Sun, Junli; Wei, Fengying; Liao, Dezhong Joshua

    2016-05-01

    The domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) is an excellent model for genetic studies of phenotypic diversity. The Guangxi Region of China possesses several native chicken breeds displaying a broad range of phenotypes well adapted to the extreme hot-and-wet environments in the region. We thus evaluated the genetic diversity and relationships among six native chicken populations of the Guangxi region and also evaluated two commercial breeds (Arbor Acres and Roman chickens). We analyzed the sequences of the D-loop region of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and 18 microsatellite loci of 280 blood samples from six Guangxi native chicken breeds and from Arbor Acres and Roman chickens, and used the neighbor-joining method to construct the phylogenetic tree of these eight breeds. Our results showed that the genetic diversity of Guangxi native breeds was relatively rich. The phylogenetic tree using the unweighed pair-group method with arithmetic means (UPGAM) on microsatellite marks revealed two main clusters. Arbor Acres chicken and Roman chicken were in one cluster, while the Guangxi breeds were in the other cluster. Moreover, the UPGAM tree of Guangxi native breeds based on microsatellite loci was more consistent with the genesis, breeding history, differentiation and location than the mtDNA D-loop region. STRUCTURE analysis further confirmed the genetic structure of Guangxi native breeds in the Neighbor-Net dendrogram. The nomenclature of mtDNA sequence polymorphisms suggests that the Guangxi native chickens are distributed across four clades, but most of them are clustered in two main clades (B and E), with the other haplotypes within the clades A and C. The Guangxi native breeds revealed abundant genetic diversity not only on microsatellite loci but also on mtDNA D-loop region, and contained multiple maternal lineages, including one from China and another from Europe or the Middle East.

  4. Outdoor stocking density in free-range laying hens: radio-frequency identification of impacts on range use.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D L M; Hinch, G N; Dyall, T R; Warin, L; Little, B A; Lee, C

    2017-01-01

    The number and size of free-range laying hen (Gallus gallus domesticus) production systems are increasing within Australia in response to consumer demand for perceived improvement in hen welfare. However, variation in outdoor stocking density has generated consumer dissatisfaction leading to the development of a national information standard on free-range egg labelling by the Australian Consumer Affairs Ministers. The current Australian Model Code of Practice for Domestic Poultry states a guideline of 1500 hens/ha, but no maximum density is set. Radio-frequency identification (RFID) tracking technology was used to measure daily range usage by individual ISA Brown hens housed in six small flocks (150 hens/flock - 50% of hens tagged), each with access to one of three outdoor stocking density treatments (two replicates per treatment: 2000, 10 000, 20 000 hens/ha), from 22 to 26, 27 to 31 and 32 to 36 weeks of age. There was some variation in range usage across the sampling periods and by weeks 32 to 36 individual hens from the lowest stocking density on average used the range for longer each day (P<0.001), with fewer visits and longer maximum durations per visit (P<0.001). Individual hens within all stocking densities varied in the percentage of days they accessed the range with 2% of tagged hens in each treatment never venturing outdoors and a large proportion that accessed the range daily (2000 hens/ha: 80.5%; 10 000 hens/ha: 66.5%; 20 000 hens/ha: 71.4%). On average, 38% to 48% of hens were seen on the range simultaneously and used all available areas of all ranges. These results of experimental-sized flocks have implications for determining optimal outdoor stocking densities for commercial free-range laying hens but further research would be needed to determine the effects of increased range usage on hen welfare.

  5. Experimental Feeding of Hydrilla verticillata Colonized by Stigonematales Cyanobacteria Induces Vacuolar Myelinopathy in Painted Turtles (Chrysemys picta)

    PubMed Central

    Mercurio, Albert D.; Hernandez, Sonia M.; Maerz, John C.; Yabsley, Michael J.; Ellis, Angela E.; Coleman, Amanda L.; Shelnutt, Leslie M.; Fischer, John R.; Wilde, Susan B.

    2014-01-01

    Vacuolar myelinopathy (VM) is a neurologic disease primarily found in birds that occurs when wildlife ingest submerged aquatic vegetation colonized by an uncharacterized toxin-producing cyanobacterium (hereafter “UCB” for “uncharacterized cyanobacterium”). Turtles are among the closest extant relatives of birds and many species directly and/or indirectly consume aquatic vegetation. However, it is unknown whether turtles can develop VM. We conducted a feeding trial to determine whether painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) would develop VM after feeding on Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata), colonized by the UCB (Hydrilla is the most common “host” of UCB). We hypothesized turtles fed Hydrilla colonized by the UCB would exhibit neurologic impairment and vacuolation of nervous tissues, whereas turtles fed Hydrilla free of the UCB would not. The ability of Hydrilla colonized by the UCB to cause VM (hereafter, “toxicity”) was verified by feeding it to domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) or necropsy of field collected American coots (Fulica americana) captured at the site of Hydrilla collections. We randomly assigned ten wild-caught turtles into toxic or non-toxic Hydrilla feeding groups and delivered the diets for up to 97 days. Between days 82 and 89, all turtles fed toxic Hydrilla displayed physical and/or neurologic impairment. Histologic examination of the brain and spinal cord revealed vacuolations in all treatment turtles. None of the control turtles exhibited neurologic impairment or had detectable brain or spinal cord vacuolations. This is the first evidence that freshwater turtles can become neurologically impaired and develop vacuolations after consuming toxic Hydrilla colonized with the UCB. The southeastern United States, where outbreaks of VM occur regularly and where vegetation colonized by the UCB is common, is also a global hotspot of freshwater turtle diversity. Our results suggest that further investigations into the effect of the

  6. Meat Species Identification using Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay Targeting Species-specific Mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ae-Ri; Dong, Hee-Jin; Cho, Seongbeom

    2014-01-01

    Meat source fraud and adulteration scandals have led to consumer demands for accurate meat identification methods. Nucleotide amplification assays have been proposed as an alternative method to protein-based assays for meat identification. In this study, we designed Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays targeting species-specific mitochondrial DNA to identify and discriminate eight meat species; cattle, pig, horse, goat, sheep, chicken, duck, and turkey. The LAMP primer sets were designed and the target genes were discriminated according to their unique annealing temperature generated by annealing curve analysis. Their unique annealing temperatures were found to be 85.56±0.07℃ for cattle, 84.96±0.08℃ for pig, and 85.99±0.05℃ for horse in the BSE-LAMP set (Bos taurus, Sus scrofa domesticus and Equus caballus); 84.91±0.11℃ for goat and 83.90±0.11℃ for sheep in the CO-LAMP set (Capra hircus and Ovis aries); and 86.31±0.23℃ for chicken, 88.66±0.12℃ for duck, and 84.49±0.08℃ for turkey in the GAM-LAMP set (Gallus gallus, Anas platyrhynchos and Meleagris gallopavo). No cross-reactivity was observed in each set. The limits of detection (LODs) of the LAMP assays in raw and cooked meat were determined from 10 pg/μL to 100 fg/μL levels, and LODs in raw and cooked meat admixtures were determined from 0.01% to 0.0001% levels. The assays were performed within 30 min and showed greater sensitivity than that of the PCR assays. These novel LAMP assays provide a simple, rapid, accurate, and sensitive technology for discrimination of eight meat species.

  7. Sorption-desorption equilibrium and diffusion of tetracycline in poultry litter and municipal biosolids soil amendments.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, E

    2017-12-01

    Tetracycline (TET) is commonly used to treat bacterial diseases in humans and chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus), is largely excreted, and is found at elevated concentrations in treated sewage sludge (biosolids) and poultry litter (excrement plus bedding materials). Routine application of these nutrient-and carbon-enriched materials to soils improves fertility and other characteristics, but the presence of antibiotics (and other pharmaceuticals) in amendments raises questions about potential adverse effects on biota and development of antibiotic resistance in the environment. Hazard risks are largely dictated by sorption-desorption and diffusion behavior in amendments, so these processes were evaluated from sorption-desorption equilibrium isotherm and diffusion cell experiments with four types amendments (biosolids, poultry manure, wood chip litter, and rice hull litter) at three temperatures (8 °C, 20 °C and 32 °C). Linear sorption-desorption equilibrium distribution constants (Kd) in native amendments ranged between 124-2418 L kg -1 . TET sorption was significantly increased after treatment with alum, and there was a strong exponential relationship between Kd and the concentration of bound Al 3+ in amendments (R 2  = 0.94), which indicated that amendments contained functional groups capable of chelating Al 3+ and forming metal bridges with TET. Effective diffusion coefficients of TET in amendments ranged between 0.1 and 5.2 × 10 -6  cm 2  s -1 , which were positively related to temperature and inversely related to Kd by a multiple regression model (R 2  = 0.86). Treatment of organic amendments with alum greatly increased Kd, would decrease D s , and so would greatly reduce hazard risks of applying these organic amendments with this antibiotic to soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence of newcastle disease virus in broiler chickens (Gallus gallus) in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Orsi, M.A.; Doretto Jr, L.; Camillo, S.C.A.; Reischak, D.; Ribeiro, S.A.M.; Ramazzoti, A.; Mendonça, A.O.; Spilki, F.R.; Buzinaro, M.G.; Ferreira, H.L.; Arns, C.W.

    2010-01-01

    This study was carried out during 2002/2003, aiming to determine the prevalence of virulent Newcastle disease virus strains (NDV) in Brazilian commercial poultry farms. Clinical samples were obtained from the Southeastern, Southern and Central-Western regions, which comprise the main area of the Brazilian poultry production. Serum samples and tracheal and cloacal swabs of 23,745 broiler chickens from 1,583 flocks, including both vaccinated chickens and those with no vaccination information, were tested for NDV using a diagnostic ELISA kit. The seropositivity was 39.1%, and the isolation percentage by flock varied from 1.0 to 7.6%, and by region from 6.5 to 58.4%. Higher isolation rates (74.3-83.3%) were obtained after three passages in embryonated chicken eggs. All isolates preliminarily identified as NDV were characterized as nonpathogenic strains, as their Intracerebral Pathogenicity Index (ICPI) was below 0.7. Based on results of this study, Brazil can claim a virulent NDV-free status for commercial flocks. PMID:24031503

  9. Microconnectomics of the pretectum and ventral thalamus in the chicken (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Vega-Zuniga, Tomas; Marín, Gonzalo; González-Cabrera, Cristian; Planitscher, Eva; Hartmann, Anja; Marks, Vanessa; Mpodozis, Jorge; Luksch, Harald

    2016-08-01

    The avian pretectal and ventrothalamic nuclei, encompassing the griseum tectale (GT), n. lentiformis mesencephali (LM), and n. geniculatus lateralis pars ventralis (GLv), are prominent retinorecipient structures related to optic flow operations and visuomotor control. Hence, a close coordination of these neural circuits is to be expected. Yet the connectivity among these nuclei is poorly known. Here, using intracellular labeling and in situ hybridization, we investigated the detailed morphology, connectivity, and neurochemical identity of neurons in these nuclei. Two different cell types exist in the GT: one that generates an axonal projection to the optic tectum (TeO), LM, GLv, and n. intercalatus thalami (ICT), and a second population that only projects to the LM and GLv. In situ hybridization revealed that most neurons in the GT express the vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT2) mRNA, indicating a glutamatergic identity. In the LM, three morphological cell types were defined, two of which project axons towards dorsal targets. The LM neurons showed strong VGluT2 expression. Finally, the cells located in the GLv project to the TeO, LM, GT, n. principalis precommisuralis (PPC), and ICT. All neurons in the GLv showed strong expression of the vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter (VIAAT) mRNA, suggesting a GABAergic identity. Our results show that the pretectal and ventrothalamic nuclei are highly interconnected, especially by glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons from the GT and GLv, respectively. This complex morphology and connectivity might be required to organize orienting visuomotor behaviors and coordinate the specific optic flow patterns that they induce. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2208-2229, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Fine structure of the middle ear epithelium in the chicken (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed Central

    Giannessi, F; Ruffoli, R

    1993-01-01

    The epithelium lining the tympanic cavity of the chicken possesses distinct morphological characteristics. Its ultrastructure was studied using 2 preparative techniques. (1) After fixation in Karnovsky's solution, postfixation in osmium tetroxide and embedding in Epon, the epithelium was observed to contain 2 kinds of cell: secretory and basal. The secretory cells (which we refer to as mixed granulated cells) showed numerous secretory vesicles that varied in appearance, some containing paracrystalline formations. The basal cells, located close to the basement membrane, showed no evidence of secretory activity. (2) Other specimens were immersed in Karnovsky fixative and subsequently in a mixture of glutaraldehyde and tannic acid. They were then osmicated and embedded in polar Epon mix. With this method, the epithelium was seen to be covered by electron-dense material made up of thin intertwined tubules. In addition, the secretory cells contained vesicles with concentrically arranged lamellae; such vesicles resembled the multilamellar bodies of mammalian type II pneumocytes. The hypothesis is advanced that tubules and lamellar vesicles are related to the presence of surfactant substances. Images Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 PMID:8270465

  11. Involvement of circadian clock in crowing of red jungle fowls (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Ito, Shuichi; Hori, Shuho; Hirose, Makiko; Iwahara, Mari; Yatsushiro, Azusa; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Okamoto, Chinobu; Yayou, Ken-Ichi; Shimmura, Tsuyoshi

    2017-04-01

    The rhythmic locomotor behavior of flies and mice provides a phenotype for the identification of clock genes, and the underlying molecular mechanism is well studied. However, interestingly, when examining locomotor rhythm in the wild, several key laboratory-based assumptions on circadian behavior are not supported in natural conditions. The rooster crowing 'cock-a-doodle-doo' is a symbol of the break of dawn in many countries. Previously, we used domestic inbred roosters and showed that the timing of roosters' crowing is regulated by the circadian clock under laboratory conditions. However, it is still unknown whether the regulation of crowing by circadian clock is observed under natural conditions. Therefore, here we used red jungle fowls and first confirmed that similar crowing rhythms with domesticated chickens are observed in red jungle fowls under the laboratory conditions. Red jungle fowls show predawn crowing before light onset under 12:12 light : dim light conditions and the free-running rhythm of crowing under total dim light conditions. We next examined the crowing rhythms under semi-wild conditions. Although the crowing of red jungle fowls changed seasonally under semi-wild conditions, predawn crowing was observed before sunrise in all seasons. This evidence suggests that seasonally changed crowing of red jungle fowls is under the control of a circadian clock. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  12. Tick fauna of Malaysian red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus) in Bangi, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Konto, M; Fufa, G I; Zakaria, A; Tukur, S M; Watanabe, M; Ola-Fadunsin, S D; Khan, M S; Shettima, Y M; Babjee, S M A

    2015-10-01

    The red jungle fowl is generally considered as one of the endangered Asian wild Galleopheasants due to man-made encroachment of their habitats, coupled with the effect of disease and disease causing organisms like ticks and tick-borne infections. This study aimed to determine the tick fauna of the red jungle fowl and their predilection sites based on developmental stages. A total of 33 jungle fowls were sampled for this study from Bangi area of Selangor State, Peninsular Malaysian. The birds were captured using a locally made trap made-up of loops and bites. Ticks present on their bodies were detached using fine forceps and identified morphologically under a dissecting microscope. 91% of the jungle fowls were infested with ticks, all of which belongs to the species Haemaphysalis wellingtoni. The ear region appeared to be the most common predilection site (63%) for all the developmental stages in which the larval stages are solely restricted to that region. Nymphal and adult stages were distributed on the comb, wattle, and facial region in addition to the ear region. This study was the first in its kind and showed a high prevalence of tick infestation among jungle fowls. H. wellingtoni was known to be a vector in transmission of many tick-borne pathogens. Therefore, there is the need for further investigation to identify the various pathogens associated with this tick.

  13. Tick fauna of Malaysian red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus) in Bangi, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Konto, M.; Fufa, G. I.; Zakaria, A.; Tukur, S. M.; Watanabe, M.; Ola-Fadunsin, S. D.; Khan, M. S.; Shettima, Y. M.; Babjee, S. M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The red jungle fowl is generally considered as one of the endangered Asian wild Galleopheasants due to man-made encroachment of their habitats, coupled with the effect of disease and disease causing organisms like ticks and tick-borne infections. This study aimed to determine the tick fauna of the red jungle fowl and their predilection sites based on developmental stages. Materials and Methods: A total of 33 jungle fowls were sampled for this study from Bangi area of Selangor State, Peninsular Malaysian. The birds were captured using a locally made trap made-up of loops and bites. Ticks present on their bodies were detached using fine forceps and identified morphologically under a dissecting microscope. Results: 91% of the jungle fowls were infested with ticks, all of which belongs to the species Haemaphysalis wellingtoni. The ear region appeared to be the most common predilection site (63%) for all the developmental stages in which the larval stages are solely restricted to that region. Nymphal and adult stages were distributed on the comb, wattle, and facial region in addition to the ear region. Conclusion: This study was the first in its kind and showed a high prevalence of tick infestation among jungle fowls. H. wellingtoni was known to be a vector in transmission of many tick-borne pathogens. Therefore, there is the need for further investigation to identify the various pathogens associated with this tick. PMID:27047012

  14. Effects of Methadone on the Minimum Anesthetic Concentration of Isoflurane, and Its Effects on Heart Rate, Blood Pressure and Ventilation during Isoflurane Anesthesia in Hens (Gallus gallus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    Pypendop, Bruno Henri; Zangirolami Filho, Darcio; Sousa, Samuel Santos; Valadão, Carlos Augusto Araújo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the temporal effects of intramuscular methadone administration on the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) of isoflurane in hens, and to evaluate the effects of the isoflurane-methadone combination on heart rate and rhythm, blood pressure and ventilation. Thirteen healthy adult hens weighing 1.7 ± 0.2 kg were used. The MAC of isoflurane was determined in each individual using the bracketing method. Subsequently, the reduction in isoflurane MAC produced by methadone (3 or 6 mg kg-1, IM) was determined by the up-and-down method. Stimulation was applied at 15 and 30 minutes, and at 45 minutes if the bird had not moved at 30 minutes. Isoflurane MAC reduction was calculated at each time point using logistic regression. After a washout period, birds were anesthetized with isoflurane and methadone, 6 mg kg-1 IM was administered. Heart rate and rhythm, respiratory rate, blood gas values and invasive blood pressure were measured at 1.0 and 0.7 isoflurane MAC, and during 45 minutes after administration of methadone once birds were anesthetized with 0.7 isoflurane MAC. Fifteen minutes after administration of 3 mg kg-1 of methadone, isoflurane MAC was reduced by 2 (-9 to 13)% [logistic regression estimate (95% Wald confidence interval)]. Administration of 6 mg kg-1 of methadone decreased isoflurane MAC by 29 (11 to 46)%, 27 (-3 to 56)% and 10 (-8 to 28)% after 15, 30 and 45 minutes, respectively. Methadone (6 mg kg-1) induced atrioventricular block in three animals and ventricular premature contractions in two. Methadone caused an increase in arterial blood pressure and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, while heart rate and pH decreased. Methadone, 6 mg kg-1 IM significantly reduced isoflurane MAC by 30% in hens 15 minutes after administration. At this dose, methadone caused mild respiratory acidosis and increase in systemic blood pressure. PMID:27018890

  15. [The specificity of blastocysts (Rhizopoda: Lobosea)].

    PubMed

    Belova, L M; Krylov, M V

    1994-01-01

    The analysis of specificity of blastocysts was based on the data on host association and on experimental data. In experiments we failed to infect the geese (Anser anser) with Blastocystis galli taken from the fowl (Gallus gallus) and also failed to infect the fowl with B. suis taken from the pigs (Sus scrofa domestica). Experimental data and field observations of blastocysts distribution among different groups of hosts point out that the same species of blastocysts can not parasitize in hosts belonging to different classes and orders. The examination of 89 fish specimens belonging to 14 species of Osteichthyes taken from the Neman delta did not discover any blastocysts.

  16. Integrating Allergen Analysis Within a Risk Assessment Framework: Approaches to Development of Targeted Mass Spectrometry Methods for Allergen Detection and Quantification in the iFAAM Project.

    PubMed

    Nitride, Chiara; Lee, Victoria; Baricevic-Jones, Ivona; Adel-Patient, Karine; Baumgartner, Sabine; Mills, E N Clare

    2018-01-01

    Allergen analysis is central to implementing and monitoring food allergen risk assessment and management processes by the food industry, but current methods for the determination of allergens in foods give highly variable results. The European Union-funded "Integrated Approaches to Food Allergen and Allergy Risk Management" (iFAAM) project has been working to address gaps in knowledge regarding food allergen management and analysis, including the development of novel MS and immuno-based allergen determination methods. Common allergenic food ingredients (peanut, hazelnut, walnut, cow's milk [Bos domesticus], and hen's egg [Gallus domesticus]) and common food matrixes (chocolate dessert and cookie) have been used for both clinical studies and analytical method development to ensure that the new methods are clinically relevant. Allergen molecules have been used as analytical targets and allergenic ingredients incurred into matrixes at levels close to reference doses that may trigger the use of precautionary allergen labeling. An interlaboratory method comparison has been undertaken for the determination of peanut in chocolate dessert using MS and immuno-based methods. The iFAAM approach has highlighted the need for methods to report test results in allergenic protein. This will allow food business operators to use them in risk assessments that are founded on clinical study data in which protein has been used as a measure of allergenic potency.

  17. Identification of polymorphisms associated with production traits on chicken (Gallus gallus) chromosome 4.

    PubMed

    Pértille, F; Zanella, R; Felício, A M; Ledur, M C; Peixoto, J O; Coutinho, L L

    2015-09-09

    Genetic selection for production traits has resulted in a rapid improvement in animal performance and development. Previous studies have mapped quantitative trait loci for body weight at 35 and 41 days, and drum and thigh yield, onto chicken chromosome 4. We investigated this region for single nucleotide polymorphisms and their associations with important economic traits. Three positional candidate genes were studied: KLF3 (Krüeppel-like factor 3), SLIT2 (Slit homolog 2), and PPARGC1A (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1 alpha). Fragment sequencing of these genes was conducted in 11 F1 animals, and one polymorphism in each gene was selected and genotyped in an F2 population (N = 276) and a paternal broiler line TT (N = 840). Associations were identified with growth, carcass, and fat traits in the F2 and the paternal line (P < 0.05). Using single markers in both the F2 and the TT line, KLF3 was associated with weight gain (P < 0.05), PPPARGC1A was associated with liver and wing-parts weights and yields (P < 0.05), and SLIT2 was associated with back yield (P < 0.05) and fat traits (P < 0.05). Using multiple markers, KLF3 lost its significance in both populations, and SLIT2 was associated with feed conversion only in the TT population (P < 0.05). The QTLs mapped in the F2 population could be partly explained by PPARGC1A and SLIT2, which were associated with body weight at 35 and 41 days, respectively, and with drum and thigh yield in the same population. The results of this study indicate the importance of these genes for production traits.

  18. Dimethyleacetamide improves the cryosurvivability of Indian red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus murghi) sperm.

    PubMed

    Rakha, B A; Ansari, M S; Akhter, S; Zafar, Z; Naseer, A; Hussain, I; Santiago-Moreno, J; Blesbois, E

    2017-11-01

    It was hypothesized that dimethyleacetamide (DMA) can be used as an alternate to glycerol for cryopreservation of Indian red jungle fowl semen. Four concentrations of DMA (4%, 6%, 8% and 10%) in extender were compared with previously optimized cryopreservation protocol based on 20% glycerol (control) for Indian red jungle fowl. Sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity, viability, and acrosome integrity were assessed at the stage of post-dilution, cooling, equilibration, and freeze-thawing. The whole experiment was repeated/replicated for five times independently. Sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity, viability and acrosome integrity were recorded highest (P < 0.05) at post-dilution, cooling, equilibration, and freeze-thawing in extender having 6% DMA compared to control and other experimental extenders. The highest (P < 0.05) recovery rates of all aforementioned parameters were also recorded in extender having 6% DMA; thus, 6% DMA was further compared with control (20% glycerol) for fertility after artificial insemination. Eggs were collected for five days after artificial insemination with semen cryopreserved in extender containing 6% DMA and control. The higher no. of fertilized eggs, fertility, no. of hatched eggs, hatch (%) and hatchability were recorded with semen cryopreserved in extender having 6% DMA compared to control. It is concluded that 6% DMA maintained higher post-thaw quality and fertility of Indian red jungle fowl semen and is a better replacement of glycerol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. DNA methylation analysis of the gene CDKN2B in Gallus gallus (chicken).

    PubMed

    Gryzińska, Magdalena; Andraszek, Katarzyna; Jocek, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Methylation is an epigenetic modification of DNA affecting gene expression without changing the structure of nucleotides. It plays a crucial role in the embryonic and post-embryonic development of living organisms. Methylation level is tissue and species-specific and changes with age. The study was aimed at identifying the methylation of the CDKN2B gene situated at locus bar in Polbar chickens on the 6th and 18th day of embryonic development using the MSP (methylation-specific PCR) method. Methylation was not detected in the promoter region of gene CDKN2B on the 6th and 18th day of embryonic development. As one of the five genes responsible for melanine activity in melanocytes and highly active, it can contribute to the production of this pigment. The present research broadens the current knowledge of the chicken epigenome and the mechanism of autosexing in birds.

  20. runt Homology Domain Transcription Factors (Runx, Cbfa, and AML) Mediate Repression of the Bone Sialoprotein Promoter: Evidence for Promoter Context-Dependent Activity of Cbfa Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Amjad; Barnes, George L.; Jasanya, B. O.; Stein, Janet L.; Gerstenfeld, Louis; Lian, Jane B.; Stein, Gary S.

    2001-01-01

    Expression of the bone sialoprotein (BSP) gene, a marker of bone formation, is largely restricted to cells in mineralized tissues. Recent studies have shown that the Cbfa1 (also known as Runx2, AML-3, and PEBP2αA) transcription factor supports commitment and differentiation of progenitor cells to hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteoblasts. This study addresses the functional involvement of Cbfa sites in expression of the Gallus BSP gene. Gel mobility shift analyses with nuclear extracts from ROS 17/2.8 osteoblastic cells revealed that multiple Cbfa consensus sequences are functional Cbfa DNA binding sites. Responsiveness of the 1.2-kb Gallus BSP promoter to Cbfa factors Cbfa1, Cbfa2, and Cbfa3 was assayed in osseous and nonosseous cells. Each of the Cbfa factors mediated repression of the wild-type BSP promoter, in contrast to their well known activation of various hematopoietic and skeletal phenotypic genes. Suppression of BSP by Cbfa factors was not observed in BSP promoters in which Cbfa sites were deleted or mutated. Expression of the endogenous BSP gene in Gallus osteoblasts was similarly downregulated by forced expression of Cbfa factors. Our data indicate that Cbfa repression of the BSP promoter does not involve the transducin-like enhancer (TLE) proteins. Neither coexpression of TLE1 or TLE2 nor the absence of the TLE interaction motif of Cbfa1 (amino acids 501 to 513) influenced repressor activity. However, removal of the C terminus of Cbfa1 (amino acids 362 to 513) relieved suppression of the BSP promoter. Our results, together with the evolutionary conservation of the seven Cbfa sites in the Gallus and human BSP promoters, suggest that suppressor activity by Cbfa is of significant physiologic consequence and may contribute to spatiotemporal expression of BSP during bone development. PMID:11283267

  1. Nitric oxide rescues thalidomide mediated teratogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Siamwala, Jamila H.; Veeriah, Vimal; Priya, M. Krishna; Rajendran, Saranya; Saran, Uttara; Sinha, Swaraj; Nagarajan, Shunmugam; T, Pradeep; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2012-01-01

    Thalidomide, a sedative drug given to pregnant women, unfortunately caused limb deformities in thousands of babies. Recently the drug was revived because of its therapeutic potential; however the search is still ongoing for an antidote against thalidomide induced limb deformities. In the current study we found that nitric oxide (NO) rescues thalidomide affected chick (Gallus gallus) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. This study confirms that NO reduced the number of thalidomide mediated limb deformities by 94% and 80% in chick and zebrafish embryos respectively. NO prevents limb deformities by promoting angiogenesis, reducing oxidative stress and inactivating caspase-3 dependent apoptosis. We conclude that NO secures angiogenesis in the thalidomide treated embryos to protect them from deformities. PMID:22997553

  2. Meat species identification and Halal authentication analysis using mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Murugaiah, Chandrika; Noor, Zainon Mohd; Mastakim, Maimunah; Bilung, Lesley Maurice; Selamat, Jinap; Radu, Son

    2009-09-01

    A method utilizing PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in the mitochondrial genes was developed for beef (Bos taurus), pork (Sus scrofa), buffalo (Bubalus bubali), quail (Coturnix coturnix), chicken (Gallus gallus), goat (Capra hircus), rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) species identification and Halal authentication. PCR products of 359-bp were successfully obtained from the cyt b gene of these six meats. AluI, BsaJI, RsaI, MseI, and BstUI enzymes were identified as potential restriction endonucleases to differentiate the meats. The genetic differences within the cyt b gene among the meat were successfully confirmed by PCR-RFLP. A reliable typing scheme of species which revealed the genetic differences among the species was developed.

  3. [Peculiarities of secondary structure of serum albumin of some representatives of the animal kingdom].

    PubMed

    Pekhymenko, G V; Kuchmerovskaia, T M

    2011-01-01

    Methods of infrared (IR) spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) are suitable techniques for detection of proteins structural changes. These methods were used for determinating peculiarities of the secondary structure of serum albumins in some representatives of two classes of reptiles: Horsfield's tortoise (Testudo horsfieldi), water snake (Natrix tessellata) and grass snake (Natrix natrix) and birds: domestic goose (Anser anser), domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus), domestic duck (Anas platyrhyncha) and dove colored (Columba livia). An analysis of IR spectra and spectra obtained by the method of CD of serum albumins of both classes representatives revealed that beta-folding structure and alpha-helical sections that form the alpha-conformation play an important role in conformational structure formation of polypeptide chain and also disordered sites of molecules of these proteins. It was observed that certain redistribution depending on animals species exists, in the formation of secondary structure of serum albumins of the investigated representatives of reptiles and birds classes between the content of beta-folding structure, alpha-helical sections and disordered sites in molecules of these proteins.

  4. Application of an anti-HQIgY antibody for the measurement of IgY concentrations of hen's and quail's serum and yolk.

    PubMed

    Losonczy, S; Szabó, C; Kiss, Z; Bárdos, L

    1999-01-01

    The development of a sensitive ELISA for the measurement of quail IgY (QIgY) was the main purpose of our study. The suitable antibody (AB) was prepared in rabbits. Both quail IgY (QIgY) and hen IgY (HIgY) were precipitated by this developed AB. For this reason it was marked as anti-hen-quail-IgY (a-HQIgY). The purified AB was conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (aHQIgY-HRP) and a sensitive direct ELISA was developed, based on this labeled AB. The prepared aHQIgY AB which was used in this developed ELISA method was suitable for the measurement of total and specific IgY concentration in domestic hen (Gallus domesticus) and Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) either. As a result of our experiments it is very likely that there are identical sequences of IgYs of both species. This part of IgY has good antigen character at the same time. Probably, this phenomenon has occurrence in other Galliform species, too. Further investigations will be carried out in this field.

  5. The chronic infusion of nicotine into the developing chick embryo does not alter the density of (-)-[3H]nicotine-binding sites or vestibular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roll, R. L.; Jones, T. A.; Benowitz, N. L.; Morley, B. J.

    1993-01-01

    (-)-Nicotine (1.2 mg/day) or saline was infused into chick embryos (Gallus domesticus) for 10 days beginning 12 h beyond the eight day of incubation (E8 + 12 h). Twelve h beyond the eighteenth day of incubation (E18 + 12 h), the eggs were opened to access the embryos and subcutaneous skull electrodes placed. Short latency vestibular response thresholds and input/output functions were determined to assess neurophysiological consequences of chronic nicotine administration. Samples of serum and extraembryonic (amniotic and albumen) fluid were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to determine the levels of nicotine and its major metabolite, cotinine. The brains were removed and divided into diencephalon and mesencephalon and the density of (-)-[3H]nicotine binding sites in each brain area was measured. Nicotine and cotinine were found in the serum and extraembryonic fluid, but nicotinic receptors were not up-regulated in the brains of animals infused with nicotine in comparison to controls. Vestibular response thresholds also did not differ between nicotine-treated and control animals.

  6. Acute oral toxicity of sodium cyanide in birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Hill, E.F.; Carpenter, J.W.; Krynitsky, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    Sensitivities of six avian species, black vulture (Coragyps atratus), American kestrel (Falco sparverius), Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus), eastern screech-owl (Otus asio), and European starling (Sturnus vulgaris), to acute poisoning by sodium cyanide (NaCN) were compared by single dose LD50's. Three species, domestic chickens, black vultures, and turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), were dosed with NaCN to determine cyanide residues in those that died and also in survivors, in addition to postmortem fate. Three flesh-eating species (black vulture, American kestrel, and eastern screech-owl; LD50's 4.0-8.6 mg/kg) were more sensitive to NaCN than three species (Japanese quail, domestic chicken, and European starling; LD50's 9.4-21 mg/kg) that fed predominantly on plant material. Elevated concentrations of cyanide were found in the blood of birds that died of cyanide poisoning; however, concentrations in birds that died overlapped those in survivors. Blood was superior to liver as the tissue of choice for detecting cyanide exposure. No gross pathological changes related to dosing were observed at necropsy.

  7. Morphometric study of the avian adrenal gland.

    PubMed Central

    Aire, T A

    1980-01-01

    The interrenal and medullary cords as well as the blood vessels and connective tissue proportions in the adrenal glands of the male Nigerian fowl (Gallus domesticus) and guinea-fowl (Numida meleagris) were studied by microstereological techniques. Laying domestic fowl of the Rhode Island Red breed were entirely defeathered and maintained in a hot, humid pen for a period of three months, after which the adrenal glands were also studied microstereologically. Interrenal cord width was also measured in all the birds studied. The interrenal cords of the subscapular zone were consistently wider than those cords in the inner zone of the adrenal glands. This clearly suggested morphological zoning. The proportion of interrenal tissue was significantly greater in the guinea-fowl than in the Nigerian fowl, but the medullary tissue and the blood vessels and connective tissue were not significantly different. Interrenal hypoplasia or medullary hyperplasia occurred in the defeathered Rhode Island Red fowl as compared to the control birds of the same breed and sex. The significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:7440402

  8. Keratinase from newly isolated strain of thermophilic Bacillus for chicken feed modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larasati, Ditya; Tsurayya, Nur; Koentjoro, Maharani Pertiwi; Prasetyo, Endry Nugroho

    2017-06-01

    Keratinase producing bacteria were isolated from Dieng crater and Mojokerto chicken farm. The screening was done by clear zone method. The strains were selected as they produced clear zones suggesting the presence of keratinolytic activity. The clear zone on FM media depended on both the source and activity of keratinase produced by keratinolytic bacteria. Based on keratinase production and activity, Bacillus sp. SLII-1 was selected for further studies. Keratinase produced by Bacillus sp. SLII-1 capable of producing crude keratinase with 2.08 (mg/second)/ml enzyme activity which able to increase digestibility of feather meal until 22.06% based on soluble protein level. Broiler chicken (Gallus domesticus) that consumed feed containing 5% feather meal indicated production performance of 1194.8 gram/head of feed consumption, 567 gram/head of addition of weight, and 2.1 of feed conversion ratio. An enzymatic engineered chicken feathers waste showed the performance of broiler chicken that is better than soybean meal as conventional sources of protein but could not yet substitute the use of conventional protein sources of fishmeal.

  9. Toxoplasma Gondii Infection of Chicken Embryos Causes Retinal Changes and Modulates HSP90B1 Gene Expression: A Promising Ocular Toxoplasmosis Model.

    PubMed

    Nasaré, Alex M; Tedesco, Roberto C; Cristovam, Priscila C; Cenedese, Marcos A; Galisteo, Andrés J; Andrade, Heitor F; Gomes, José Álvaro P; Guimarães, Érik V; Barbosa, Helene S; Alonso, Luis G

    2015-12-01

    HSP90B1 is a gene that codifies heat shock protein 108 (HSP108) that belongs to a group of proteins induced under stress situation, and it has close relation with the nervous system, especially in the retina. Toxoplasma gondii causes ocular toxoplasmosis that has been associated with a late manifestation of the congenital toxoplasmosis although experimental models show that morphological alterations are already present during embryological development. Here, we used 18 eyes of Gallus domesticus embryos in 7th and 20th embryonic days to establish a model of congenital ocular toxoplasmosis, experimentally infected in its fifth day correlating with HSP90B1 gene expression. Embryos' eyes were histologically evaluated, and gene expression was performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Our data showed parasite present in the choroid, unusual migration of retinal pigment epithelium, and chorioretinal scars, and a tendency to a lower expression of the HSP90B1 gene upon experimental infection. This is a promising model to better understand T. gondii etiopathogeny.

  10. Molecular Identification of Food Sources in Triatomines in the Brazilian Northeast: Roles of Goats and Rodents in Chagas Disease Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Valença-Barbosa, Carolina; Fernandes, Fabiano Araújo; Santos, Helena Lucia Carneiro; Sarquis, Otília; Harry, Myriam; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo; Lima, Marli Maria

    2015-01-01

    We used the gut contents of triatomines collected from rural areas of Ceará State, northeastern Brazil, to identify their putative hosts via vertebrate cytb gene sequencing. Successful direct sequencing was obtained for 48% of insects, comprising 50 Triatoma brasiliensis, 7 Triatoma pseudomaculata, and 1 Rhodnius nasutus. Basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) procedure revealed that domestic animals, such as chickens (Gallus gallus) and goats (Capra hircus), are the main food source, including in sylvatic environment. Native hosts were also detected in peridomestic environment such as reptiles (Tropidurus sp. and Iguana iguana) and the Galea spixii (Rodentia: Caviidae). The role of goats and Galea spixii in Chagas disease epidemiology calls for further studies, because these mammals likely link the sylvatic and domestic Trypanosoma cruzi cycles. PMID:26350453

  11. [Fleas from the nests of Passer domesticus and Passer montanus].

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek, S

    1991-01-01

    In the years 1986-1988 102 nests of Passer domesticus and 113 nests of P. montanus were collected from Słupsk, Warszawa and its surrounding. Ceratophyllus gallinae was found in 55 nests of P. domesticus and in 74 nests of P. montanus: C. fringillae in 13 nests of P. domesticus. The highest mean number of C. gallinae per nest was recorded in nest of P. domesticus (11.9), lower in nest of P. montanus (5.9). The highest percentage of nests with fleas and the highest mean number of fleas per nest were recorded in September in P. domesticus and in June, July and September in P. montanus. The highest (111) nests to be inhabited by 1-10 specimens. Number of specimens in nests was not depending on the weight nests.

  12. Chlamydia gallinacea, not C. psittaci, is the endemic chlamydial species in chicken (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Guo, Weina; Li, Jing; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard; Gong, Jiansen; Fan, Weixing; Wang, Chengming

    2016-01-18

    To investigate the prevalence and diversity of Chlamydia spp. in domestic birds in China, oral and cloacal swabs of healthy chickens, ducks, geese and pigeons were collected nationwide from live-animal markets and examined by Chlamydia spp. 23 S rRNA gene FRET-PCR followed by high-resolution melting curve analysis and confirmatory sequencing. Overall, 26.2% of the birds (602/2,300) were positive for Chlamydia spp. and five Chlamydia spp. were identified. While occasional detection of C. suis and C. muridarum in poultry is reported here for the first time, the predominant chlamydial agent was C. gallinacea representing 63.8% of all positives (384/602) and 81.2% of positive chickens (359/442). Analysis of the C. gallinacea ompA phylogeny revealed at least 13 well segregated variants (serovars). Seven-month monitoring of C. gallinacea-infected chickens indicated that the infection was persistent. C. gallinacea-infected chickens remained without overt clinical disease, but showed body weight gains significantly reduced by 6.5-11.4% beginning in week 3 post-infection. This study indicates that C. gallinacea is the endemic chlamydial species in chickens, whereas C. psittaci dominates only in pigeons. Further studies are required to address the specific conditions under which C. gallinacea could act as an avian pathogen and possibly also a zoonotic agent.

  13. Chlamydia gallinacea, not C. psittaci, is the endemic chlamydial species in chicken (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Weina; Li, Jing; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard; Gong, Jiansen; Fan, Weixing; Wang, Chengming

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence and diversity of Chlamydia spp. in domestic birds in China, oral and cloacal swabs of healthy chickens, ducks, geese and pigeons were collected nationwide from live-animal markets and examined by Chlamydia spp. 23 S rRNA gene FRET-PCR followed by high-resolution melting curve analysis and confirmatory sequencing. Overall, 26.2% of the birds (602/2,300) were positive for Chlamydia spp. and five Chlamydia spp. were identified. While occasional detection of C. suis and C. muridarum in poultry is reported here for the first time, the predominant chlamydial agent was C. gallinacea representing 63.8% of all positives (384/602) and 81.2% of positive chickens (359/442). Analysis of the C. gallinacea ompA phylogeny revealed at least 13 well segregated variants (serovars). Seven-month monitoring of C. gallinacea-infected chickens indicated that the infection was persistent. C. gallinacea-infected chickens remained without overt clinical disease, but showed body weight gains significantly reduced by 6.5–11.4% beginning in week 3 post-infection. This study indicates that C. gallinacea is the endemic chlamydial species in chickens, whereas C. psittaci dominates only in pigeons. Further studies are required to address the specific conditions under which C. gallinacea could act as an avian pathogen and possibly also a zoonotic agent. PMID:26778053

  14. Using the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus) as an in vivo model for iron bioavailability

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Iron fortification of foods and biofortification of staple food crops are strategies that can help to alleviate Fe deficiency. The broiler chicken may be a useful model for initial in vivo screening of Fe bioavailability in foods due to its growth rate, anatomy, size and low cost. In this study, we ...

  15. The chicken immediate-early gene ZENK is expressed in the medio-rostral neostriatum/hyperstriatum ventrale, a brain region involved in acoustic imprinting, and is up-regulated after exposure to an auditory stimulus.

    PubMed

    Thode, C; Bock, J; Braun, K; Darlison, M G

    2005-01-01

    The immediate-early gene zenk (an acronym for the avian orthologue of the mammalian genes zif-268, egr-1, ngfi-a and krox-24) has been extensively employed, in studies on oscine birds, as a marker of neuronal activity to reveal forebrain structures that are involved in the memory processes associated with the acquisition, perception and production of song. Audition-induced expression of this gene, in brain, has also recently been reported for the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) and the Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica). Whilst the anatomical distribution of zenk expression was described for the quail, corresponding data for the chicken were not reported. We have, therefore, used in situ hybridisation to localise the mRNA that encodes the product of the zenk gene (which we call ZENK) within the brain of the 1-day-old chick. We demonstrate that this transcript is present in a number of forebrain structures including the medio-rostral neostriatum/hyperstriatum ventrale (MNH), a region that has been strongly implicated in auditory imprinting (which is a form of recognition memory), and Field L, the avian analog of the mammalian auditory cortex. Because of this pattern of gene expression, we have compared the level of the ZENK mRNA in chicks that have been subjected to a 30-min acoustic imprinting paradigm and in untrained controls. Our results reveal a significant increase (P< or =0.05) in the level of the ZENK mRNA in MNH and Field L, and in the two forebrain hemispheres; no increase was seen in the ectostriatum, which is a visual projection area. The data obtained implicate the immediate-early gene, zenk, in auditory imprinting, which is an established model of juvenile learning. In addition, our results indicate that the ZENK mRNA may be used as a molecular marker for MNH, a region that is difficult to anatomically and histochemically delineate.

  16. Changes in thyroid parameters of hatchling American kestrels (Falco sparverius) following embryonic exposure to technical short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs; C10-13, 55.5% CL)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernie, Kimberly J; Henry, Paula F.; Letcher, Robert J; Palace, Vince; Peters, Lisa; Rattner, Barnett A.; Sverko, Edward; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K.

    2015-01-01

    Chlorinated paraffins (CPs) are complex mixtures of polychlorinated n-alkanes categorized according to their carbon chain length: short chain (SCCPs, C10 – C13), medium (C14 - C17), and long chain (C>17), chlorinated paraffins. SCCPs are primarily used in metalworking applications, as flame retardants, and in paints, adhesives, sealants, textiles, plastics and rubber (UNEP 2012). In 2012, the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP 2012) reported in the Revised Draft Risk Profile for SCCPs, that CPs were produced in the United States, the European Union (EU), Slovakia, Brazil, India, Japan and China. While annual global consumption of SCCPs is large (>25 tonnes/year), it has sharply declined over the past 20 years. SCCPs are released through wastewater, landfills, and air emissions (UNEP 2012). Concentrations of SCCPs have been reported in fish and marine mammals in North and South America, Europe, Japan, Greenland and the Arctic (UNEP 2012 and references therein). Characterization of SCCP concentrations and exposure in terrestrial wildlife is limited. In 2010, SCCP concentrations were reported in the eggs of yellow-legged gulls (Larus michahellis) (4536 ± 40 pg/g wet weight (ww)) and Audouin’s gulls (Larus audouinii) (6364 ± 20 pg/g ww) in Spain (Morales et al. 2012), and little auks (Alle alle) (5 - 88 ng/g ww) and kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) (5 - 44 ng/g ww) in the European Arctic (Reth et al. 2006). In Sweden, muscle of ospreys contained CPs of unspecified chain length (Jansson et al. 1993). Although the toxicity of SCCPs has been demonstrated in aquatic invertebrates, fish, frogs, and laboratory rats, there are limited avian studies and these reported no effects of SCCPs on egg parameters of domestic hens (Gallus gallus domesticus) and ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) (UNEP 2012). Despite reported accumulation of SCCPs in wild birds, to our knowledge, exposure-related toxicities and effects with respect to avian wildlife remain unknown.

  17. Neurotoxicological effects of nicotine on the embryonic development of cerebellar cortex of chick embryo during various stages of incubation.

    PubMed

    El-Beltagy, Abd El-Fattah B M; Abou-El-Naga, Amoura M; Sabry, Dalia M

    2015-10-01

    Long-acting nicotine is known to exert pathological effects on almost all tissues including the cerebellar cortex. The present work was designed to elucidate the effect of nicotine on the development of cerebellar cortex of chick embryo during incubation period. The fertilized eggs of hen (Gallus gallus domesticus) were injected into the air space by a single dose of long acting nicotine (1.6 mg/kg/egg) at the 4th day of incubation. The embryos were taken out of the eggs on days 8, 12 and 16 of incubation. The cerebellum of the control and treated embryos at above ages were processed for histopathological examination. The TEM were examined at 16th day of incubation. The results of the present study revealed that, exposure to long-acting nicotine markedly influence the histogenesis of cerebellar cortex of chick embryo during the incubation period. At 8th day of incubation, nicotine delayed the differentiation of the cerebellar analge; especially the external granular layer (EGL) and inner cortical layer (ICL). Furthermore, at 12th day of incubation, the cerebellar foliation was irregular and the Purkinje cells not recognized. By 16th day of incubation, the cerebellar foliations were irregular with interrupted cerebellar cortex and irregular arrangement of Purkinje cells. Immunohistochemical analysis for antibody P53 protein revealed that the cerebellar cortex in all stages of nicotine treated groups possessed a moderate to weak reaction for P53 protein however; this reaction was markedly stronger in the cerebellar cortex of control groups. Moreover, the flow cytometric analysis confirmed that the percentage of apoptosis in control group was significantly higher compared with that of nicotine treated group. At the TEM level, the cerebellar Purkinje cells of 16th day of treated groups showed multiple subcellular alterations in compared with those of the corresponding control group. Such changes represented by appearing of vacuolated mitochondria, cisternal

  18. Effects of Corticosterone and Dietary Energy on Immune Function of Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhahmadi, Ardashir; Wang, Yufeng; Li, Congcong; Jiao, Hongchao; Lin, Hai; Song, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary energy level on the performance and immune function of stressed broiler chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus). A total of 96 three-day-old male broiler chickens (Ross × Ross) were divided into two groups. One group received a high energy (HE) diet and the other group received a low energy (LE) diet for 7 days. At 5 days of age, the chickens from each group were further divided into two sub-groups and received one of the following two treatments for 3 days: (1) subcutaneous injection of corticosterone, twice per day (CORT group; 2 mg of CORT/kg BW in corn oil) and (2) subcutaneous injection of corn oil, twice per day (Control/Sham treatment group). At 10 days of age, samples of blood, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were obtained. Compared with the other three groups, the LE group treated with CORT had the lowest average daily gain (ADG) and the poorest feed conversion ratio (FCR, P < 0.05). Furthermore, CORT treatment decreased the relative weight (RW) of the bursa independent of the dietary energy level, but it decreased the RW of the thymus only in the chickens fed the LE diet. By contrast, CORT administration decreased the RW of the spleen only in the chickens fed the HE diet (P < 0.05). The plasma total protein, albumin, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 2 and immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels were affected by the CORT treatment (P < 0.05); however, these factors were not significantly affected by the dietary energy level. Toll-like receptor-5 mRNA level was down-regulated by CORT injection in the duodenum and ileum (P < 0.05) and showed a trend of down-regulation in the jejunum (P=0.0846). The present study showed that CORT treatment induced immunosuppressive effects on the innate immune system of broiler chickens, which were ameliorated by consumption of higher dietary energy. PMID:25803644

  19. Relationships between range access as monitored by radio frequency identification technology, fearfulness, and plumage damage in free-range laying hens.

    PubMed

    Hartcher, K M; Hickey, K A; Hemsworth, P H; Cronin, G M; Wilkinson, S J; Singh, M

    2016-05-01

    Severe feather-pecking (SFP), a particularly injurious behaviour in laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus), is thought to be negatively correlated with range use in free-range systems. In turn, range use is thought to be inversely associated with fearfulness, where fearful birds may be less likely to venture outside. However, very few experiments have investigated the proposed association between range use and fearfulness. This experiment investigated associations between range use (time spent outside), fearfulness, plumage damage, and BW. Two pens of 50 ISA Brown laying hens (n=100) were fitted with radio frequency identification (RFID) transponders (contained within silicone leg rings) at 26 weeks of age. Data were then collected over 13 days. A total of 95% of birds accessed the outdoor run more than once per day. Birds spent an average duration of 6.1 h outside each day over 11 visits per bird per day (51.5 min per visit). The top 15 and bottom 15 range users (n=30), as determined by the total time spent on the range over 13 days, were selected for study. These birds were tonic immobility (TI) tested at the end of the trial and were feather-scored and weighed after TI testing. Birds with longer TI durations spent less time outside (P=0.01). Plumage damage was not associated with range use (P=0.68). The small group sizes used in this experiment may have been conducive to the high numbers of birds utilising the outdoor range area. The RFID technology collected a large amount of data on range access in the tagged birds, and provides a potential means for quantitatively assessing range access in laying hens. The present findings indicate a negative association between fearfulness and range use. However, the proposed negative association between plumage damage and range use was not supported. The relationships between range use, fearfulness, and SFP warrant further research.

  20. Chicks change their pecking behaviour towards stationary and mobile food sources over the first 12 weeks of life: improvement and discontinuities.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kenneth J; Hayden, Thomas J; Kent, John P

    2014-01-01

    Chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus) learn to peck soon after hatching and then peck in rapid bursts or bouts with intervals of non-pecking activity. The food sources may be static such as seeds and chick crumb, or mobile such as a mealworm. Here, changes with age in pecking toward chick crumb and a mealworm were measured. Chicks were reared in pairs and their pecking of crumb food was video recorded in their pair housed environment, from food presentation, every third day from day 8 (wk 2) to day 65 (wk 10). Peck rate at crumb food reached maximum levels at day 32 (wk 5), and then declined, fitting a quadratic model, with no sex, sex of cagemate, or box order effects. Within bouts the peck rate was higher and it increased to day 41 (wk 6) and then declined, and here males pecked faster than females. A change in dietary protein concentration from 22% to 18% at day 28 (wk 4) had no effect on subsequent peck rate. Pecking at and consumption of a mealworm in pair housed chicks were measured weekly from wks [5 to 12]. The latency to first worm peck and latency to swallow decreased to wk 8 and increased thereafter. The peck rate to first wormpeck and number of pecks to swallow increased to wk 8 and then declined paralleling the changes with crumb food. The increase in peck rate is coupled with an increase in efficiency in worm catching. The results are consistent with the view that the improvement in pecking ability and accuracy compliments change in nutritional requirement best served by an invertebrate food (IF) source requiring speed to achieve feeding success, especially with live prey. When this food source is no longer crucial these associated skill levels decline. An appreciation of the role of domestic fowl in controlling insect populations, at farm level, that are often vectors in disease spread is lacking.

  1. Primordial Germ Cell-Mediated Chimera Technology Produces Viable Pure-Line Houbara Bustard Offspring: Potential for Repopulating an Endangered Species

    PubMed Central

    Wernery, Ulrich; Liu, Chunhai; Baskar, Vijay; Guerineche, Zhor; Khazanehdari, Kamal A.; Saleem, Shazia; Kinne, Jörg; Wernery, Renate

    2010-01-01

    Background The Houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata) is a wild seasonal breeding bird populating arid sandy semi-desert habitats in North Africa and the Middle East. Its population has declined drastically during the last two decades and it is classified as vulnerable. Captive breeding programmes have, hitherto, been unsuccessful in reviving population numbers and thus radical technological solutions are essential for the long term survival of this species. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of primordial germ cell-mediated chimera technology to produce viable Houbara bustard offspring. Methodology/Principal Findings Embryonic gonadal tissue was dissected from Houbara bustard embryos at eight days post-incubation. Subsequently, Houbara tissue containing gonadal primordial germ cells (gPGCs) was injected into White Leghorn chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) embryos, producing 83/138 surviving male chimeric embryos, of which 35 chimeric roosters reached sexual maturity after 5 months. The incorporation and differentiation of Houbara gPGCs in chimeric chicken testis were assessed by PCR with Houbara-specific primers and 31.3% (5/16) gonads collected from the injected chicken embryos showed the presence of donor Houbara cells. A total of 302 semen samples from 34 chimeric roosters were analyzed and eight were confirmed as germline chimeras. Semen samples from these eight roosters were used to artificially inseminate three female Houbara bustards. Subsequently, 45 Houbara eggs were obtained and incubated, two of which were fertile. One egg hatched as a male live born Houbara; the other was female but died before hatching. Genotyping confirmed that the male chick was a pure-line Houbara derived from a chimeric rooster. Conclusion This study demonstrates for the first time that Houbara gPGCs can migrate, differentiate and eventually give rise to functional sperm in the chimeric chicken testis. This approach may provide a promising tool for propagation

  2. Measuring the electric activity of chick embryos heart through 16 bit audio card monitored by the Goldwavetm software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Dilson; Cortez, Celia Martins

    2015-12-01

    In the present work we used a high-resolution, low-cost apparatus capable of detecting waves fit inside the sound bandwidth, and the software package GoldwaveTM for graphical display, processing and monitoring the signals, to study aspects of the electric heart activity of early avian embryos, specifically at the 18th Hamburger & Hamilton stage of the embryo development. The species used was the domestic chick (Gallus gallus), and we carried out 23 experiments in which cardiographic spectra of QRS complex waves representing the propagation of depolarization waves through ventricles was recorded using microprobes and reference electrodes directly on the embryos. The results show that technique using 16 bit audio card monitored by the GoldwaveTM software was efficient to study signal aspects of heart electric activity of early avian embryos.

  3. Diversity and activity pattern of wildlife inhabiting catchment of Hulu Terengganu Hydroelectric Dam, Terengganu, Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adyla, M. N. Nurul; Ikhwan, Z.; Zuhairi, M.; Ngah, Shukor, M. N.

    2016-11-01

    A series of camera trapping surveys were conducted to study the diversity and distribution of wildlife within the catchment of Hulu Terengganu Hydroelectric Dam. A total of 124 camera traps were deployed at nine study sites, continuously from June 2014 until December 2015. The total effort of camera trap surveys from all the study sites during the 18-month sampling period was 29,128 night traps, from which a total of 32 species of wildlife representing nine Orders were recorded. The most common species were Eurasian Wild Pig (Sus scrofa), Barking Deer (Munticus muntjak), and Malayan Tapir (Tapirus indicus). Camera trap data on activity patterns show that Gallus gallus, Muntiacus muntjak and Sus scrofa are diurnal animals, whereas Tapirus indicus, Elephas maximus and Helarctos malayanus are nocturnal animals.

  4. The Mhc class II of the Black grouse (Tetrao tetrix) consists of low numbers of B and Y genes with variable diversity and expression.

    PubMed

    Strand, Tanja; Westerdahl, Helena; Höglund, Jacob; V Alatalo, Rauno; Siitari, Heli

    2007-09-01

    We found that the Black grouse (Tetrao tetrix) possess low numbers of Mhc class II B (BLB) and Y (YLB) genes with variable diversity and expression. We have therefore shown, for the first time, that another bird species (in this case, a wild lek-breeding galliform) shares several features of the simple Mhc of the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus). The Black grouse BLB genes showed the same level of polymorphism that has been reported in chicken, and we also found indications of balancing selection in the peptide-binding regions. The YLB genes were less variable than the BLB genes, also in accordance with earlier studies in chicken, although their functional significance still remains obscure. We hypothesize that the YLB genes could have been under purifying selection, just as the mammal Mhc-E gene cluster.

  5. Characterization of the Two CART Genes (CART1 and CART2) in Chickens (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Long; Li, Juan; Wang, Yajun

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide is implicated in the control of avian energy balance, however, the structure and expression of CART gene(s) remains largely unknown in birds. Here, we cloned and characterized two CART genes (named cCART1 and cCART2) in chickens. The cloned cCART1 is predicted to generate two bioactive peptides, cCART1(42-89) and cCART1(49-89), which share high amino acid sequence identity (94-98%) with their mammalian counterparts, while the novel cCART2 may produce a bioactive peptide cCART2(51-91) with 59% identity to cCART1. Interestingly, quantitative RT-PCR revealed that cCART1 is predominantly expressed in the anterior pituitary and less abundantly in the hypothalamus. In accordance with this finding, cCART1 peptide was easily detected in the anterior pituitary by Western blot, and its secretion from chick pituitaries incubated in vitro was enhanced by ionomycin and forskolin treatment, indicating that cCART1 is a novel peptide hormone produced by the anterior pituitary. Moreover, cCART1 mRNA expression in both the pituitary and hypothalamus is down-regulated by 48-h fasting, suggesting its expression is affected by energy status. Unlike cCART1, cCART2 is only weakly expressed in most tissues examined by RT-PCR, implying a less significant role of cCART2 in chickens. As in chickens, 2 or more CART genes, likely generated by gene and genome duplication event(s), were also identified in other non-mammalian vertebrate species including coelacanth. Collectively, the identification and characterization of CART genes in birds helps to uncover the roles of CART peptide(s) in vertebrates and provides clues to the evolutionary history of vertebrate CART genes. PMID:25992897

  6. Concentrations of pituitary, gonadal and adrenal hormones in serum of laying and broody white rock hens (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Bedrak, E; Harvey, S; Chadwick, A

    1981-05-01

    Diurnal variations in circulating concentrations of LH, GH, prolactin, corticosterone, oestradiol, progesterone and testosterone were followed in laying and broody White Rock domestic fowl. Throughout the 24 h study prolactin concentrations in serum were consistently (two- to fourfold) higher in broody than in laying birds, in which the prolactin level varied with the light:darkness or ovulatory cycles. Concentrations of GH in serum tended to be lower in broody birds but in both groups were very variable and showed no obvious relationship with either the lighting or ovulatory cycles. Broodiness was also characterized by low LH and gonadal steroid levels and by the absence of preovulatory peaks in the serum concentrations of these hormones. A diurnal rhythm in corticosterone was observed in both the laying and broody birds, with high levels during the period of darkness. Corticosterone concentrations were markedly higher in the broody birds than in laying birds during most of the 24 h study. No diurnal rhythm in the blood haematocrit level was observed in either group, although the level was generally lower in broody birds. This difference, however, was insufficient to account for the lower LH and gonadal steroid levels in the broody birds. The results suggest that prolactin is involved in the initiation or maintenance of broodiness in the fowl and the possibility of an antigonadal role for the hormone is discussed.

  7. Reduced heart rate and cardiac output differentially affect angiogenesis, growth, and development in early chicken embryos (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Branum, Sylvia R; Yamada-Fisher, Miho; Burggren, Warren

    2013-01-01

    An increase in both vascular circumferential tension and shear stress in the developing vasculature of the chicken embryo has been hypothesized to stimulate angiogenesis in the developing peripheral circulation chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). To test this hypothesis, angiogenesis in the CAM, development, and growth were measured in the early chicken embryo, following acute and chronic topical application of the purely bradycardic drug ZD7288. At hour 56, ZD7288 reduced heart rate (f(H)) by ~30% but had no significant effect on stroke volume (~0.19 ± 0.2 μL), collectively resulting in a significant fall in cardiac output (CO) from ~27 ± 3 to 18 ± 2 μL min(-1). Mean f(H) at 72 h of development was similarly significantly lowered by acute ZD7288 treatment (250 μM) to 128 ± 0.3 beats min(-1), compared with 174.5 ± 0.3 and 174.7 ± 0.8 beats min(-1) in control and Pannett-Compton (P-C) saline-treated embryos, respectively. Chronic dosing with ZD7288-and the attendant decreases in f(H) and CO-did not change eye diameter or cervical flexion (key indicators of development rate) at 120 h but significantly reduced overall growth (wet and dry body mass decreased by 20%). CAM vessel density index (reflecting angiogenesis) measured 200-400 μm from the umbilical stalk was not altered, but ZD7288 reduced vessel numbers-and therefore vessel density-by 13%-16% more distally (500-600 μm from umbilical stalk) in the CAM. In the ZD7288-treated embryos, a decrease in vessel length was found within the second branch order (~300-400 μm from the umbilical stock), while a decrease in vessel diameter was found closer to the umbilical stock, beginning in the first branch order (~200-300 μm). Paradoxically, chronic application of P-C saline also reduced peripheral CAM vessel density index at 500 and 600 μm by 13% and 7%, respectively, likely from washout of local angiogenic factors. In summary, decreased f(H) with reduced CO did not slow development rate but reduced embryonic growth rate and angiogenesis in the CAM periphery. This study demonstrates for the first time that different processes in the ontogeny of the early vertebrate embryo (i.e., hypertrophic growth vs. development) have differential sensitivities to altered convective blood flow.

  8. A real time quality control application for animal production by image processing.

    PubMed

    Sungur, Cemil; Özkan, Halil

    2015-11-01

    Standards of hygiene and health are of major importance in food production, and quality control has become obligatory in this field. Thanks to rapidly developing technologies, it is now possible for automatic and safe quality control of food production. For this purpose, image-processing-based quality control systems used in industrial applications are being employed to analyze the quality of food products. In this study, quality control of chicken (Gallus domesticus) eggs was achieved using a real time image-processing technique. In order to execute the quality control processes, a conveying mechanism was used. Eggs passing on a conveyor belt were continuously photographed in real time by cameras located above the belt. The images obtained were processed by various methods and techniques. Using digital instrumentation, the volume of the eggs was measured, broken/cracked eggs were separated and dirty eggs were determined. In accordance with international standards for classifying the quality of eggs, the class of separated eggs was determined through a fuzzy implication model. According to tests carried out on thousands of eggs, a quality control process with an accuracy of 98% was possible. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. The Mitochondrial Genome Sequence and Molecular Phylogeny of the Turkey, Meleagris gallopavo

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xiaojing; Silva, Pradeepa; Gyenai, Kwaku B.; Xu, Jun; Geng, Tuoyu; Tu, Zhijian; Samuels, David C.; Smith, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The mitochondrial genome (mtGenome) has been very little studied in the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), for which there is no publicly available whole genome mitochondrial sequence. Here, we used PCR-based methods with 19 pairs of primers designed from the chicken and other species to develop a complete turkey mtGenome sequence. A total length of 16, 717 bp of the whole turkey mtGenome was obtained, with 85% similarity to chicken mtGenome. There were 13 genes and 24 RNA (22 tRNA and 2 rRNA) annotated. The mtGenome-based phylogenetic analysis suggests that the turkey is most closely related to the chicken, Gallus gallus, and quail, Corturnix japonica. Given the importance of the mitochondria genome, the present work adds to the growing genomic resources needed to define the genetic mechanisms that underlie some economic traits in the turkey. PMID:19067672

  10. Deep-brain photoreceptors (DBPs) involved in the photoperiodic gonadal response in an avian species, Gallus gallus.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seong W; Kuenzel, Wayne J

    2015-01-15

    Three primitive photoreceptors [melanopsin (Opn4), neuropsin/opsin5 (Opn5) and vertebrate ancient opsin (VAOpn)] were reported as possible avian deep-brain photoreceptors (DBPs) involved in the perception of photoperiodic information affecting the onset and development of reproduction. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of long-day photostimulation and/or sulfamethazine treatment (SMZ, a compound known to advance light-induced testes development) on gene expression of DBPs and key hypothalamic and pituitary genes involved in avian reproductive function. Two-week old chicks were randomly selected into four experimental groups: short-day control (SC, LD8:16), short-day+SMZ (SS, LD8:16, 0.2% diet SMZ), long-day control (LC, LD16:8), and long-day+SMZ (LS, LD16:8, 0.2% diet SMZ). Birds were sampled on days 3, 7, and 28 after initiation of a long-day photoperiod and/or SMZ dietary treatments. Three brain regions [septal-preoptic, anterior hypothalamic (SepPre/Ant-Hypo) region, mid-hypothalamic (Mid-Hypo) region, posterior-hypothalamic (Post-Hypo) region], and anterior pituitary gland were dissected. Using quantitative real-time RT-PCR, we determined changes of expression levels of genes in distinct brain regions; Opn4 and Opn5 in SepPre/Ant-Hypo and Post-Hypo regions and, VAOpn in the Mid-Hypo region. Long-day treatment resulted in a significantly elevated testes weight on days 7 and 28 compared to controls, and SMZ augmented testes weight in both short- and long-day treatment after day 7 (P<0.05). Long-day photoperiodic treatment on the third day unexpectedly induced a large 8.4-fold increase of VAOpn expression in the Mid-Hypo region, a 15.4-fold increase of Opn4 and a 97.8-fold increase of Opn5 gene expression in the Post-Hypo region compared to SC birds (P<0.01). In contrast, on days 7 and 28, gene expression of the three DBPs was barely detectable. LC group showed a significant increase in GnRH-1 and TRH mRNA in the Mid-Hypo compared to SC on day 3. Pituitary LHβ and FSHβ mRNA were significantly elevated in LC and LS groups compared to SC on days 3 and 7 (P<0.05). On days 3 and 7, TSHβ mRNA level was significantly elevated by long-day treatment compared to the SC groups (P<0.05). Results suggest that long-day photoperiodic activation of DBPs is robust, transient, and temporally related with neuroendocrine genes involved in reproductive function. Additionally, results indicate that two subsets of GnRH-1 neurons exist based upon significantly different gene expression from long-day photostimulation and long-day plus SMZ administration. Taken together, the data indicate that within 3 days of a long-day photoperiod, an eminent activation of all three types of DBPs might be involved in priming the neuroendocrine system to activate reproductive function in birds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Tissue-Specific Expression of DNA Methyltransferases Involved in Early-Life Nutritional Stress of Chicken, Gallus gallus

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seong W.; Madkour, Mahmoud; Kuenzel, Wayne J.

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation was reported as a possible stress-adaptation mechanism involved in the transcriptional regulation of stress responsive genes. Limited data are available on effects of psychological stress and early-life nutritional stress on DNA methylation regulators [DNMTs: DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), DNMT1 associated protein (DMAP1), DNMT 3 alpha (DNMT3A) and beta (DNMT3B)] in avian species. The objectives of this study were to: (1) investigate changes in expression of DNMT1, DMAP1, DNMT3A, and DNMT3B following acute (AS) or chronic immobilization stress (CS); (2) test immediate effect of early-life nutritional stress [food deprivation (FD) for 12 h (12hFD) or 36 h (36hFD) at the post-hatching period] on expression of DNA methylation regulators and glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and the long-term effect of early-life nutritional stress at 6 weeks of age. Expression of DNMTs and plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentration decreased by CS compared to AS (p < 0.05), indicating differential roles of DNA methylation regulators in the stress response. Plasma CORT at 12hFD and 36hFD birds increased compared to control birds (12hF and 36hF), but there were no significant differences in plasma CORT of 12hFD and 36hFD birds at 6 weeks of age compared to 6 week controls. DNMT1, DMAP1, and DNMT3B expression in the anterior pituitary increased by 12hFD, but decreased at 36hFD compared to their controls (P < 0.05). In liver, DNMT1, DNMT3A, and DNMT3B expression decreased by 12hFD, however, no significant changes occurred at 36hFD. Expression of DMAP1, DNMT3A, and DNMT3B in anterior pituitary and DMAP1 and DNMT3A expression in liver at 6 weeks of age were higher in 36hFD stressed birds compared to controls as well as 12hFD stressed birds. Hepatic GR expression decreased by 12hFD and increased by 36hFD (p < 0.05). Expression patterns of GR in the liver of FD stress-induced birds persisted until 6 weeks of age, suggesting the possible lifelong involvement of liver GR in early-life nutritional stress response of birds. Taken together, results suggest that DNA methylation regulator genes are tissue-specifically responsive to acute and chronic stress, and hepatic GR may play a critical role in regulating the early-life nutritional stress response of birds. In addition, the downregulation of DNMT1 and DMAP1 may be one of the adaptive mechanisms to chronic early-life nutritional stress via passive demethylation. PMID:29270191

  12. Identification of a chicken (Gallus gallus) endogenous reference gene (Actb) and its application in meat adulteration.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Wenjin; Shang, Ying; Wang, Qin; Xu, Yuancong; Zhu, Pengyu; Huang, Kunlun; Xu, Wentao

    2017-11-01

    The genes commonly used to determine meat species are mainly mitochondrial, but the copy numbers of such genes are high, meaning they cannot be accurately quantified. In this paper, for the first time, the chromosomal gene Actb was selected as an endogenous reference gene for chicken species. It was assayed in four different chicken varieties and 16 other species using both qualitative and quantitative PCR. No amplification of the Actb gene was found in species other than chicken and no allelic variations were detected in chicken. Southern blot and digital-PCR confirmed the Actb gene was present as a single copy in the chicken genome. The quantitative detection limit was 10pg of DNA, which is equivalent to eight copies. All experiments indicated that the Actb gene is a useful endogenous reference gene for chicken, and provides a convenient and accurate approach for detection of chicken in feed and food. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of clustering on perceived quantity in humans (Homo sapiens) and in chicks (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Bertamini, Marco; Guest, Martin; Vallortigara, Giorgio; Rugani, Rosa; Regolin, Lucia

    2018-04-30

    Animals can perceive the numerosity of sets of visual elements. Qualitative and quantitative similarities in different species suggest the existence of a shared system (approximate number system). Biases associated with sensory properties are informative about the underlying mechanisms. In humans, regular spacing increases perceived numerosity (regular-random numerosity illusion). This has led to a model that predicts numerosity based on occupancy (a measure that decreases when elements are close together). We used a procedure in which observers selected one of two stimuli and were given feedback with respect to whether the choice was correct. One configuration had 20 elements and the other 40, randomly placed inside a circular region. Participants had to discover the rule based on feedback. Because density and clustering covaried with numerosity, different dimensions could be used. After reaching a criterion, test trials presented two types of configurations with 30 elements. One type had a larger interelement distance than the other (high or low clustering). If observers had adopted a numerosity strategy, they would choose low clustering (if reinforced with 40) and high clustering (if reinforced with 20). A clustering or density strategy predicts the opposite. Human adults used a numerosity strategy. Chicks were tested using a similar procedure. There were two behavioral measures: first approach response and final circumnavigation (walking behind the screen). The prediction based on numerosity was confirmed by the first approach data. For chicks, one clear pattern from both responses was a preference for the configurations with higher clustering. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Role of the Domestic Chicken (Gallus gallus)in the Epidemiology of Urban Visceral Leishmaniasis in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Lopes de Carvalho, Renata; McCallum, Hamish; Pereira, Marcos Horácio

    2002-01-01

    Zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL) is a serious public health problem in several Brazilian cities. Although the proximity of chicken houses is often cited as a risk factor in studies of urban ZVL, the role chickens play in the epidemiology of the disease has not been defined. Chickens attract both male and female sand flies (Lutzomyia longipalpis), but are unable to sustain Leishmania infections, and their presence may exert a zooprophylactic effect. We discuss environmental, physiologic, socioeconomic, and cultural factors related to chicken raising that could influence Le. infantum transmission in Brazilian cities and evaluate whether this practice significantly affects the risk of acquiring ZVL. PMID:12498667

  15. Oral and parenteral immunization of chickens (Gallus gallus) against West Nile virus with recombinant envelope protein

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fassbinder-Orth, C. A.; Hofmeister, Erik K.; Weeks-Levy, C.; Karasov, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes morbidity and mortality in humans, horses, and in more than 315 bird species in North America. Currently approved WNV vaccines are designed for parenteral administration and, as yet, no effective oral WNV vaccines have been developed. WNV envelope (E) protein is a highly antigenic protein that elicits the majority of virus-neutralizing antibodies during a WNV immune response. Leghorn chickens were given three vaccinations (each 2 wk apart) of E protein orally (20 ??g or 100 ??g/dose), of E protein intramuscularly (IM, 20 ??g/dose), or of adjuvant only (control group) followed by a WNV challenge. Viremias were measured post-WNV infection, and three new enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were developed for quantifying IgM, IgY, and IgA-mediated immune response of birds following WNV infection. WNV viremia levels were significantly lower in the IM group than in both oral groups and the control group. Total WNV E protein-specific IgY production was significantly greater, and WNV nonstructural 1-specific IgY was significantly less, in the IM group compared to all other treatment groups. The results of this study indicate that IM vaccination of chickens with E protein is protective against WNV infection and results in a significantly different antibody production profile as compared to both orally vaccinated and nonvaccinated birds. ?? 2009 American Association of Avian Pathologists.

  16. Ethnopharmacological implications of quantitative and network analysis for traditional knowledge regarding the medicinal use of animals by indigenous people in Wolchulsan National Park, Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geun; Kim, Hyun; Song, Mi-Jang

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to record, analyze, and identify ethnopharmacological implications for oral traditional knowledge regarding the medicinal use of animals by indigenous people living in Wolchulsan National Park, Korea. Data were collected through interviews, informal meetings, open and group discussions, and observations guided by semi-structured questionnaires. Data were analyzed via quantitative analysis of informant consensus factor and fidelity level, and network analysis, including centrality and clustering analysis. A total of 46 families, 59 genera, and 60 species of animals, as well as 373 methods of usage, were recorded. Fish comprised 31.7% of the total animal species recorded, followed by mammals at 20.0%, arthropods at 18.3%, and mollusks at 11.7%. Of these animals, 48.0% were utilized as food and 46.1% for medicinal use. Quantitative analysis showed that the category with the highest degree of consensus from informants was veterinary ailments (informant consensus factor value, 0.96). This was followed by poisonings (0.93), pains (0.92), genitourinary system disorders (0.91), cuts and wounds (0.89), and other medical conditions. The lowest degree of consensus was for skin diseases and disorders (0.57). There were 8 species of animals with a fidelity level of 100%, after eliminating from the animals analyzed that were mentioned only once. Finally, using network analysis, Gallus gallus domesticus and Gloydius brevicaudus were defined as species with meaningful medicinal use, while lack of vigor and lung diseases were defined as significant ailments in the study area. This study validates that local communities use animals not only for food but also for medicinal purposes as crucial therapeutic measures. Therefore, the conservation of fauna and preservation of traditional knowledge need to be seriously considered to maintain the health and well-being of the local communities. Network analysis clarified the series of ailments for which each

  17. Sequence and comparative analysis of the chicken genome provide unique perspectives on vertebrate evolution.

    PubMed

    2004-12-09

    We present here a draft genome sequence of the red jungle fowl, Gallus gallus. Because the chicken is a modern descendant of the dinosaurs and the first non-mammalian amniote to have its genome sequenced, the draft sequence of its genome--composed of approximately one billion base pairs of sequence and an estimated 20,000-23,000 genes--provides a new perspective on vertebrate genome evolution, while also improving the annotation of mammalian genomes. For example, the evolutionary distance between chicken and human provides high specificity in detecting functional elements, both non-coding and coding. Notably, many conserved non-coding sequences are far from genes and cannot be assigned to defined functional classes. In coding regions the evolutionary dynamics of protein domains and orthologous groups illustrate processes that distinguish the lineages leading to birds and mammals. The distinctive properties of avian microchromosomes, together with the inferred patterns of conserved synteny, provide additional insights into vertebrate chromosome architecture.

  18. Molecular cloning and sequencing analysis of the interferon receptor (IFNAR-1) from Columba livia.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Chang, Wei Shan

    2014-01-01

    Partial sequence cloning of interferon receptor (IFNAR-1) of Columba livia. In order to obtain a certain length (630 bp) of gene, a pair of primers was designed according to the conserved nucleotide sequence of Gallus (EU477527.1) and Taeniopygia guttata (XM_002189232.1) IFNAR-1 gene fragment that was published by GenBank. Special primers were designed by the Race method to amplify the 3'terminal cDNA. The Columba livia IFNAR-1 displayed 88.5%, 80.5% and 73.8% nucleotide identity to Falco peregrinus, Gallus and Taeniopygia guttata, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the IFNAR1 gene showed that the relationship of Columba livia, Falco peregrinus and chicken had high homology. We successfully obtained a Columba livia IFNAR-1 gene partial sequence. Analysis of the genetic tree showed that the relationship of Columba livia and Falco peregrinus IFNAR-1 had high homology. This result can be used as reference for further research and practical application.

  19. Molecular cloning and sequencing analysis of the interferon receptor (IFNAR-1) from Columba livia

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei Shan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Partial sequence cloning of interferon receptor (IFNAR-1) of Columba livia. Material and methods In order to obtain a certain length (630 bp) of gene, a pair of primers was designed according to the conserved nucleotide sequence of Gallus (EU477527.1) and Taeniopygia guttata (XM_002189232.1) IFNAR-1 gene fragment that was published by GenBank. Special primers were designed by the Race method to amplify the 3'terminal cDNA. Results The Columba livia IFNAR-1 displayed 88.5%, 80.5% and 73.8% nucleotide identity to Falco peregrinus, Gallus and Taeniopygia guttata, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the IFNAR1 gene showed that the relationship of Columba livia, Falco peregrinus and chicken had high homology. Conclusions We successfully obtained a Columba livia IFNAR-1 gene partial sequence. Analysis of the genetic tree showed that the relationship of Columba livia and Falco peregrinus IFNAR-1 had high homology. This result can be used as reference for further research and practical application. PMID:26155117

  20. Microstructure characteristics of the cornea in birds and mammals.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Naoki; Tani, Yuri; Lee, Eunok; Kikuchi, Hideyuki; Endoh, Kentaroh; Ichikawa, Masumi; Sugita, Shoei

    2010-09-01

    In this study, the microstructure of the cornea was compared among chickens (Gallus gallus), jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos), rats (Rattus norvegicus) and rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). The density of keratocytes in the mammals was over 3 times that in the birds. The size of the keratocytes in the birds and rat were significantly lower than those in the rabbit. Using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, the bundles of collagen fibers in the birds were found to be well arranged, while those in the mammals were arranged randomly. The collagen lamellae of the birds were significantly thicker than those of the mammals, and the numbers of collagen lamellae in the birds were significantly smaller than in the mammals. The center-to-center distances between the collagen fibrils of the chicken and rabbit were significantly larger than those of the crow and rat. The densities of collagen fibrils in the chicken and rabbit were significantly less than those of the crow and rat.

  1. Multiple components in restriction enzyme digests of mammalian (insectivore), avian and reptilian genomic DNA hybridize with murine immunoglobulin VH probes.

    PubMed

    Litman, G W; Berger, L; Jahn, C L

    1982-06-11

    High molecular weight genomic DNAs isolated from an insectivore, Tupaia, and a representative reptilian, Caiman, and avian, Gallus, were digested with restriction endonucleases transferred to nitrocellulose and hybridized with nick-translated probes of murine VH genes. The derivations of the probes designated S107V (1) and mu 107V (2,3) have been described previously. Under conditions of reduced stringency, multiple hybridizing components were observed with Tupaia and Caiman; only mu mu 107V exhibited significant hybridization with the separated fragments of Gallus DNA. The nick-translated S107V probe was digested with Fnu4H1 and subinserts corresponding to the 5' and 3' regions both detected multiple hybridizing components in Tupaia and Caiman DNA. A 5' probe lacking the leader sequence identified the same components as the intact 5' probe, suggesting that VH coding regions distant as the reptilians may possess multiple genetic components which exhibit significant homology with murine immunoglobulin in VH regions.

  2. Multiple components in restriction enzyme digests of mammalian (insectivore), avian and reptilian genomic DNA hybridize with murine immunoglobulin VH probes.

    PubMed Central

    Litman, G W; Berger, L; Jahn, C L

    1982-01-01

    High molecular weight genomic DNAs isolated from an insectivore, Tupaia, and a representative reptilian, Caiman, and avian, Gallus, were digested with restriction endonucleases transferred to nitrocellulose and hybridized with nick-translated probes of murine VH genes. The derivations of the probes designated S107V (1) and mu 107V (2,3) have been described previously. Under conditions of reduced stringency, multiple hybridizing components were observed with Tupaia and Caiman; only mu mu 107V exhibited significant hybridization with the separated fragments of Gallus DNA. The nick-translated S107V probe was digested with Fnu4H1 and subinserts corresponding to the 5' and 3' regions both detected multiple hybridizing components in Tupaia and Caiman DNA. A 5' probe lacking the leader sequence identified the same components as the intact 5' probe, suggesting that VH coding regions distant as the reptilians may possess multiple genetic components which exhibit significant homology with murine immunoglobulin in VH regions. Images PMID:6285298

  3. DNA methylation and expression of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) gene in the hypothalamus of three-week-old chickens show sex-specific differences.

    PubMed

    Rancourt, Rebecca C; Schellong, Karen; Tzschentke, Barbara; Henrich, Wolfgang; Plagemann, Andreas

    2018-06-01

    Increased availability and improved sequence annotation of the chicken ( Gallus gallus f.  domestica ) genome have sparked interest in the bird as a model system to investigate translational embryonic development and health/disease outcomes. However, the epigenetics of this bird genome remain unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the levels of gene expression and DNA methylation at the proopiomelanocortin ( POMC ) gene in the hypothalamus of 3-week-old chickens. POMC is a key player in the control of the stress response, food intake, and metabolism. DNA methylation of the promoter, CpG island, and gene body regions of POMC were measured. Our data illustrate the pattern, variability, and functionality of DNA methylation for POMC expression in the chicken. Our findings show correlation of methylation pattern and gene expression along with sex-specific differences in POMC . Overall, these novel data highlight the promising potential of the chicken as a model and also the need for breeders and researchers to consider sex ratios in their studies.

  4. Partial purification and characterization of cysteine proteinase inhibitor from chicken plasma.

    PubMed

    Rawdkuen, Saroat; Benjakul, Soottawat; Visessanguan, Wonnop; Lanier, Tyre C

    2006-08-01

    A high-molecular-weight cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI) was purified from chicken (Gallus gallus) plasma using polyethylene glycol (PEG) fractionation and affinity chromatography on carboxymethyl-papain-Sepharose-4B. The CPI was purified 96.8-fold with a yield of 28.9%. Based on inhibitory activity staining for papain, CPI was shown to have an apparent molecular mass of 122 kDa. No inhibitory activity was obtained under reducing condition, indicating that CPI from chicken plasma was stabilized by disulfide bonds. CPI was stable in temperature ranges from 40 to 70 degrees C for 10 min; however, more than 50% of the inhibitory activity towards papain was lost within 30 min of heating at 90 degrees C. CPI was stable in the presence of salt up to 3%. The purified CPI exhibited the inhibitory activity toward autolysis of arrowtooth flounder (Atheresthes stomias) and Pacific whiting (Merluccius productus) natural actomyosin (NAM) in a concentration-dependent manner.

  5. A simplified method for correcting contaminant concentrations in eggs for moisture loss.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, Gary H.; Stebbins, Katherine R.; Klimstra, Jon D.; Hoffman, David J.

    2009-01-01

    We developed a simplified and highly accurate method for correcting contaminant concentrations in eggs for the moisture that is lost from an egg during incubation. To make the correction, one injects water into the air cell of the egg until overflowing. The amount of water injected corrects almost perfectly for the amount of water lost during incubation or when an egg is left in the nest and dehydrates and deteriorates over time. To validate the new method we weighed freshly laid chicken (Gallus gallus) eggs and then incubated sets of fertile and dead eggs for either 12 or 19 d. We then injected water into the air cells of these eggs and verified that the weights after water injection were almost identical to the weights of the eggs when they were fresh. The advantages of the new method are its speed, accuracy, and simplicity: It does not require the calculation of a correction factor that has to be applied to each contaminant residue.

  6. Karyotype Evolution in Birds: From Conventional Staining to Chromosome Painting.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Rafael; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano Correa

    2018-03-27

    In the last few decades, there have been great efforts to reconstruct the phylogeny of Neoaves based mainly on DNA sequencing. Despite the importance of karyotype data in phylogenetic studies, especially with the advent of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques using different types of probes, the use of chromosomal data to clarify phylogenetic proposals is still minimal. Additionally, comparative chromosome painting in birds is restricted to a few orders, while in mammals, for example, virtually all orders have already been analyzed using this method. Most reports are based on comparisons using Gallus gallus probes, and only a small number of species have been analyzed with more informative sets of probes, such as those from Leucopternis albicollis and Gyps fulvus , which show ancestral macrochromosomes rearranged in alternative patterns. Despite this, it is appropriate to review the available cytogenetic information and possible phylogenetic conclusions. In this report, the authors gather both classical and molecular cytogenetic data and describe some interesting and unique characteristics of karyotype evolution in birds.

  7. Genetic and phylogenetic analysis of a novel parvovirus isolated from chickens in Guangxi, China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bin; Xie, Zhixun; Deng, Xianwen; Xie, Liji; Xie, Zhiqin; Huang, Li; Fan, Qin; Luo, Sisi; Huang, Jiaoling; Zhang, Yanfang; Zeng, Tingting; Wang, Sheng; Wang, Leyi

    2016-11-01

    A previously unidentified chicken parvovirus (ChPV) strain, associated with runting-stunting syndrome (RSS), is now endemic among chickens in China. To explore the genetic diversity of ChPV strains, we determined the first complete genome sequence of a novel ChPV isolate (GX-CH-PV-7) identified in chickens in Guang Xi, China, and showed moderate genome sequence similarity to reference strains. Analysis showed that the viral genome sequence is 86.4 %-93.9 % identical to those of other ChPVs. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses showed that this newly emergent GX-CH-PV-7 is closely related to Gallus gallus enteric parvovirus isolate ChPV 798 from the USA, indicating that they may share a common ancestor. The complete DNA sequence is 4612 bp long with an A+T content of 56.66 %. We determined the first complete genome sequence of a previously unidentified ChPV strain to elucidate its origin and evolutionary status.

  8. Measurement of the filtration coefficient (Kfc) in the lung of Gallus domesticus and the effects of increased microvascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Weidner, W Jeffrey; Waddell, David S; Furlow, J David

    2006-08-01

    The filtration coefficient (Kfc) is a sensitive measure of microvascular hydraulic conductivity and has been reported for the alveolar lungs of many mammalian species, but not for the parabronchial avian lung. This study reports the Kfc in the isolated lungs of normal chickens and in the lungs of chickens given the edemogenic agents oleic acid (OA) or dimethyl amiloride (DMA). The control Kfc =0.04+/-0.01 ml min(-1) kPa(-1) g(-1). This parameter increased significantly following the administration of both OA (0.12+/-0.02 ml min(-1) kPa(-1) g(-1)) and DMA (0.07+/-0.01 ml min kPa(-1) g(-1)). As endothelial cadherins are thought to play a role in the dynamic response to acute lung injury, we utilized Western blot analysis to assess lung cadherin content and Northern blot analysis to assess pulmonary vascular endothelial (VE) cadherin expression following drug administration. Lung cadherin content decreases markedly following DMA, but not OA administration. VE cadherin expression increases as a result of DMA treatment, but is unchanged following OA. Our results suggest that the permeability characteristics of the avian lung are more closely consistent with those of the mammalian rather than the reptilian lung, and, that cadherins may play a significant role in the response to acute increases in avian pulmonary microvascular permeability.

  9. Peripheral temperature drop in response to anticipation and consumption of a signaled palatable reward in laying hens (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Moe, Randi Oppermann; Stubsjøen, Solveig Marie; Bohlin, Jon; Flø, Andreas; Bakken, Morten

    2012-06-25

    The present study describes effects of anticipation and consumption of a palatable reward on comb surface temperature. The purpose was to investigate temperature responses as a potential physiological indicator of positive emotional states in laying hens. A rise in body temperature in response to stimuli predictive of or during exposure to unpleasant events has been interpreted as evidence of emotions in mammals and avians. However, this phenomenon has so far only been studied during anticipation of or exposure to negative events; i.e., emotions of a negative valence. Infrared thermography was used to record potential alterations in comb surface temperature to a conditioned cue signaling a reward (mealworms) and during reward delivery. On average, comb temperature dropped 1.5 °C (95% CI: +/-1.2 °C) after exposure to CS and consumption of reward (p~0.0014) when initial comb temperature was above 30 °C. Such temperature drop indicates a peripheral vasoconstriction and has clear resemblances to emotional fever as seen during negative emotional states. Thus, we propose that a drop in peripheral temperature reflects emotional arousal more than emotional valence. Substantial temperature responses due to diet-induced thermogenesis were found, further emphasizing a cautious interpretation of altered comb temperature in studies of animal welfare. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Three subdivisions of the auditory midbrain in chicks (Gallus gallus) identified by their afferent and commissural projections

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Karten, Harvey J.

    2010-01-01

    The auditory midbrain is a site of convergence of multiple auditory channels from the brainstem. In birds, two separate ascending channels have been identified, through which time and intensity information is sent to nucleus mesencephalicus lateralis, pars dorsalis (MLd), the homologue of the central nucleus of mammalian inferior colliculus. Using in vivo anterograde and retrograde tracing techniques, the current study provides two lines of anatomical evidence supporting the presence of a third ascending channel to the chick MLd. First, three non-overlapping zones of MLd receive inputs from three distinct cell groups in the caudodorsal brainstem. The projections from nucleus angularis (NA) and nucleus laminaris (NL) are predominately contralateral and may correspond to the time and intensity channels. A rostromedial portion of MLd receives bilateral projections mainly from the Regio Intermedius, an interposed region of cells lying at a caudal level between NL and NA, as well as scattered neurons embedded in 8th nerve tract, and probably a very ventral region of NA. Second, the bilateral zones of MLd on two sides of the brain are reciprocally connected and do not interact with other zones of MLd via commissural connections. In contrast, the NL-recipient zone projects contralaterally upon the NA-recipient zone. The structural separation of the third pathway from the NA and NL projections suggests a third information-processing channel, in parallel with the time and intensity channels. Neurons in the third channel appear to process very low frequency information including infrasound, probably utilizing different mechanisms than that underlying higher frequency processing. PMID:20148439

  11. Lateralized mechanisms for encoding of object. Behavioral evidence from an animal model: the domestic chick (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Rugani, Rosa; Rosa Salva, Orsola; Regolin, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    In our previous research we reported a leftward-asymmetry in domestic chicks required to identify a target element, on the basis of its ordinal position, in a series of identical elements. Here we re-coded behavioral data collected in previous studies from chicks tested in a task involving a different kind of numerical ability, to study lateralization in dealing with an arithmetic task. Chicks were reared with a set of identical objects representing artificial social companions. On day 4, chicks underwent a free-choice test in which two sets, each composed of a different number of identical objects (5 vs.10 or 6 vs. 9, Experiment 1), were hidden behind two opaque screens placed in front of the chick, one on the left and one on the right side. Objects disappeared, one by one, behind either screen, so that, for example, one screen occluded 5 objects and the other 10 objects. The left-right position of the larger set was counterbalanced between trials. Results show that chicks, in the attempt to rejoin the set with the higher number of social companions, performed better when this was located to the right. However, when the number of elements in the two sets was identical (2 vs. 2, in Experiment 2) and they differed only in the coloration of the objects, this bias was not observed, suggesting a predisposition to map the numerical magnitude from left to right. Future studies should be devoted to the direct investigation of this phenomenon, possibly employing an identical number of mono-chromatic imprinting stimuli in both conditions involving a numerical discrimination and conditions not involving any numerosity difference. PMID:24605106

  12. A novel relay nucleus between the inferior colliculus and the optic tectum in the chicken (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Niederleitner, Bertram; Gutierrez-Ibanez, Cristian; Krabichler, Quirin; Weigel, Stefan; Luksch, Harald

    2017-02-15

    Processing multimodal sensory information is vital for behaving animals in many contexts. The barn owl, an auditory specialist, is a classic model for studying multisensory integration. In the barn owl, spatial auditory information is conveyed to the optic tectum (TeO) by a direct projection from the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX). In contrast, evidence of an integration of visual and auditory information in auditory generalist avian species is completely lacking. In particular, it is not known whether in auditory generalist species the ICX projects to the TeO at all. Here we use various retrograde and anterograde tracing techniques both in vivo and in vitro, intracellular fillings of neurons in vitro, and whole-cell patch recordings to characterize the connectivity between ICX and TeO in the chicken. We found that there is a direct projection from ICX to the TeO in the chicken, although this is small and only to the deeper layers (layers 13-15) of the TeO. However, we found a relay area interposed among the IC, the TeO, and the isthmic complex that receives strong synaptic input from the ICX and projects broadly upon the intermediate and deep layers of the TeO. This area is an external portion of the formatio reticularis lateralis (FRLx). In addition to the projection to the TeO, cells in FRLx send, via collaterals, descending projections through tectopontine-tectoreticular pathways. This newly described connection from the inferior colliculus to the TeO provides a solid basis for visual-auditory integration in an auditory generalist bird. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:513-534, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Safer trocar insertion for closed laparoscopic access: ex vivo assessment of an improved Veress needle.

    PubMed

    Nevler, Avinoam; Har-Zahav, Gil; Rosin, Danny; Gutman, Mordechai

    2016-02-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is widely practiced surgical technique in the modern surgical toolbox. The Veress needle insertion technique, while faster and easier, is associated with higher rates of iatrogenic complications (injury to internal organs, major blood vessels, etc.), morbidity and even mortality with a reported overall risk of 0.32% during surgical interventions. In order to increase the safety and ease of closed insertion technique, we designed and tested an improved prototype of the Veress needle. The new Veress needle includes a distal expandable portion that allows elevation of the abdominal wall and safe insertion of the first trocar over it. The needle was assessed by measurement of ease of insertion, ease of trocar advancement, associated tissue damage, device integrity and weight-bearing capacity on an ex vivo Gallus domesticus animal model: The prototype was tested over 20 times using different traction forces. The experiment was qualitatively repeated on an ex vivo porcine model. In the G. domesticus model, the improved needle supported forces of up to 5.75 kg F. No damage or mechanical malfunction was seen at any stage of the experiment. Needle penetration, ease of trocar insertion, system anchoring and weight-bearing capacity were rated (1-5) by four raters--mean 4.9 ± 0.31. Inter-rater agreement was high (free marginal κ 0.75). The porcine experiment revealed similar ease of use with neither complication nor damage to the abdominal wall. We believe that the new Veress system is easy to use, requires no additional training, non-inferior in its capabilities compared to the traditional Veress needle, with the advantage of improving the safety of the first trocar insertion phase of the operation.

  14. Organochlorine contaminants in double-crested cormorants from Green Bay, Wisconsin: II. Effects of an extract derived from cormorant eggs on the chicken embryo

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, D.C.; Aulerich, R.J.; Meadows, J.C.; Tillitt, D.E.; Stromborg, K.L.; Kubiak, T.J.; Giesy, J.P.; Bursian, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    White Leghorn chicken (Gallus domesticus) eggs were injected prior to incubation with one of four concentrations (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 egg-equivalent) of an extract derived from 1,000 double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) eggs collected at Spider Island adjacent to Green Bay in Lake Michigan. One egg-equivalent corresponded to the concentration of contaminants present in an average cormorant egg. This was approximately 322 pg toxic equivalents (TEQs)/g, ww egg with polychlorinatedbiphenyl congener 126 (3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl) accounting for over 70% of the TEQs. Injection of 1.0 egg-equivalent resulted in 77% mortality at hatch. The incidence of developmental abnormalities (structural defects or edema) was not affected by injection of the extract. Body weight gain of chicks was reduced in the 1.0 egg-equivalent dose group in the first, second, and third week's post-hatch. Relative brain weights were greater and relative bursa weights were less in the 1.0 egg-equivalent dose group than in the vehicle control at three weeks of age. There were no significant differences in the relative weights of the heart, liver, spleen, testes, or comb among treated and control birds.

  15. Pilot study of long-term anaesthesia in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    O'Kane, Peter M; Connerton, Ian F; White, Kate L

    2016-01-01

    To provide stable anaesthesia of long duration in broiler chickens in order to perform a terminal caecal ligated loop procedure. Prospective experimental study. Seven clinically healthy broiler chickens (Gallus domesticus) aged 27-36 days, weighing 884-2000 g. Anaesthesia was induced and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. All birds underwent intermittent positive pressure ventilation for the duration. End-tidal carbon dioxide, peripheral haemoglobin oxygen saturation, heart rate and oesophageal temperature were monitored continuously. All birds received intraosseous fluids. Butorphanol (2 mg kg(-1)) was administered intramuscularly at two hourly intervals. Euthanasia by parenteral pentobarbitone was performed at the end of procedure. Stable anaesthesia was maintained in four chickens for durations ranging from 435 to 510 minutes. One bird died and one was euthanized after 130 and 330 minutes, respectively, owing to surgical complications and another died from anaesthetic complication after 285 minutes. Long-term, stable anaesthesia is possible in clinically healthy chickens, provided complications such as hypothermia and hypoventilation are addressed and vital signs are carefully monitored. There are no known previous reports describing monitored, controlled anaesthesia of this duration in chickens. © 2015 The Authors Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  16. A comparative study on the cryogenic preservation of semen from the sandhill crane and the domestic fowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexton, T.J.; Gee, G.F.; Watson, P.F.

    1978-01-01

    SYNOPSIS: Recent findings on the cryogenic preservation of semen from the crane, Grus canadensis pratensis and the domestic fowl, Gallus domesticus, are compared. Highest levels of post-thaw motility for crane semen (55%) were obtained when semen was diluted 1:1 with the Beltsville Poultry Semen Extender (BPSE) and held for 30 min at 5 C before it was equilibrated with 4% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for 15 min. In contrast, post-thaw motility for fowl spermatozoa was highest (80%) when semen was diluted 1:3 with BPSE and held for 60 min at 5 C before it was equilibrated with 4% DMSO for 60 min. Post-thaw motility of spermatozoa of both species was highest when the following freezing rates were used: l C per min from +5 to -20 C, 50 C per min from -20 to -80 C, then plunging into liquid nitrogen which resulted in a rate of 160 C per min from -80 to -196 C. One of four crane eggs resulting from insemination with frozen-thawed semen was fertile, whereas 27 of 55 fowl eggs were fertile, but this difference may have been due largely to fewer spermatozoa being inseminated into the female crane than into the fowl.

  17. Chemical hazard information profile of triphenyl phosphite

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, R.A.; Wiedow, M.A.; Daugherty, M.W.

    1986-12-01

    The only human study located showed that triphenyl phosphite applied to the skin in a 1:3 dilution with cold cream for 48 h caused slight irritation, and challenge with the compound 14 days later produced a moderate sensitization reaction. The most significant health effects described in experimental animals are those affecting the nervous system. In adult rats, subacute exposure to the chemical produced gross ataxia and spinal cord neuropathy which predominantly affected the lateral and ventral columns of the lumber and sacral regions. Other symptoms included hyperexcitability and agitation after several days, muscle wasting, asymmetric gait, and hind-limb paralysis. Allmore » animals developed tail rigidity with a kinky appearance, and some animals displayed a circling behavior. The compound appeared to only weakly inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity. Single oral doses of triphenyl phosphite Gallus domesticus produced ataxia, and spinal cord and peripheral nerve histopathology. Neurotoxicity in rats, cats, and chickens indicated that triphenyl phosphite caused two distinct stages of action. Rats given s.c. injections of the chemical exhibit rapidly-developing stage or fine or coarse tremors which disappeared after a few hours. The later stage, occurring several days after treatment, caused hyperexcitability, spasticity and incoordination, followed by partial flaccid paralysis of the extremities. 135 refs., 2 tabs.« less

  18. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in chickens in Durango State, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Esquivel, C; González-Salazar, A M; Alvarado-Esquivel, D; Ontiveros-Vázquez, F; Vitela-Corrales, J; Villena, I; Dubey, J P

    2012-04-01

    Little is known concerning the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in chickens (Gallus domesticus) in Mexico. Antibodies to T. gondii were determined in 519 chickens in Durango, Mexico using the modified agglutination test (MAT). Two groups (A, B) of chickens were sampled. Group A chickens (n  =  51) were raised in backyards in 7 municipalities in 3 geographical regions in Durango State. Group B chickens were raised in farms in the Mexican States of Sinaloa (n  =  289) and Nayarit (n  =  179) but slaughtered in 2 abattoirs in Durango City. Overall, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 36 (6.9%) of 519 chickens, with MAT titers of 1∶25 in 22, 1∶50 in 8, 1∶100 in 2, 1∶200 in 3, and 1∶400 in 1. Seroprevalence of T. gondii increased significantly with age and was significantly higher in Group A chickens than in Group B chickens. In Group A chickens, a 25.5% seroprevalence of T. gondii infection was found. Seropositive chickens were found in all 7 municipalities sampled. In Group B chickens, the seroprevalence of T. gondii infection was 4.9%. This is the first report of T. gondii infection in chickens in Durango State, Mexico.

  19. Embryo toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin to the wood duck (Aix sponsa)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Augspurger, T.P.; Tillitt, D.E.; Bursian, S.J.; Fitzgerald, S.D.; Hinton, D.E.; Di Giulio, R.T.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the sensitivity of the wood duck (Aix sponsa) embryo to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) by injecting the toxicant into their eggs. Six groups of wood duck eggs (n = 35 to 211 per trial) were injected with 0 to 4600 pg TCDD/g egg between 2003 and 2005. Injections were made into yolk prior to incubation, and eggs were subsequently incubated and assessed weekly for mortality. Significant TCDD-induced mortality was not observed through day 25 (90% of incubation). Liver, heart, eye, and brain histology were generally unremarkable. Hepatic ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity, a biomarker of dioxin-like compound exposure, was induced by 12-fold in the 4600 pg/g treatment relative to controls. The median lethal dose for chicken (Gallus domesticus) eggs we dosed identically to wood duck eggs was about 100 pg/g, similar to other assessments of chickens. Among dioxin-like compound embryo lethality data for 15 avian genera, the wood duck 4600 pg/g no-observed-effect level ranks near the middle. Because no higher doses were tested, wood ducks may be like other waterfowl (order Anseriformes), which are comparatively tolerant to embryo mortality from polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans when exposed by egg injection. ?? 2008 US Government.

  20. Diclofenac toxicity in Gyps vulture is associated with decreased uric acid excretion and not renal portal vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, V; Swan, G E

    2009-04-01

    Diclofenac (DF), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is largely regarded as one of the most devastating environmental toxicant in recent times, after accidental exposure via their food-chain lead to massive mortalities in three vulture species on the Asian subcontinent. Although the use of diclofenac was recently banned on the Indian subcontinent, following the favourable safety profile of meloxicam, its mechanism of toxicity remains unknown. In an attempt to establish this mechanism, we test three hypotheses using models established from either the domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus) or the African White-backed vulture (Gyps africanus). We demonstrate that both DF and meloxicam are toxic to renal tubular epithelial (RTE) cells following 12 h of exposure, due to an increase in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which could be temporarily ameliorated by pre-incubation with uric acid (UA). When cultures were incubated with either drug for only 2 h, meloxicam showed no toxicity in contrast to diclofenac. In both cases no increase in ROS production was evident. In addition, diclofenac decreased the transport of uric acid, by interfering with the p-amino-hippuric acid (PAH) channel. We conclude that vulture susceptibility to diclofenac results from a combination of an increased ROS, interference with UA transport and the duration of exposure.

  1. Modelling inhibition of avian aromatase by azole pesticides.

    PubMed

    Saxena, A K; Devillers, J; Bhunia, S S; Bro, E

    2015-01-01

    The potential effects of pesticides and their metabolites on the endocrine system are of major concern to wildlife and human health. In this context, the azole pesticides have earned special attention due to their cytochrome P450 aromatase inhibition potential. Cytochrome P450 aromatase (CYP19) catalyses the conversion of androstenedione and testosterone into oestrone and oestradiol, respectively. Thus, aromatase modulates the oestrogenic balance essential not only for females, but also for male physiology, including gonadal function. Its inhibition affects reproductive organs, fertility and sexual behaviour in humans and wildlife species. Several studies have shown that azole pesticides are able to inhibit human and fish aromatases but the information on birds is lacking. Consequently, it appeared to be of interest to estimate the aromatase inhibition of azoles in three different avian species, namely Gallus gallus, Coturnix coturnix japonica and Taeniopygia guttata. In the absence of the crystal structure of the aromatase enzyme in these bird species, homology models for the individual avian species were constructed using the crystal structure of human aromatase (hAr) (pdb: 3EQM) that showed high sequence similarity for G. gallus (82.0%), T. guttata (81.9%) and C. japonica (81.2%). A homology model with Oncorhynchus mykiss (81.9%) was also designed for comparison purpose. The homology-modelled aromatase for each avian and fish species and crystal structure of human aromatase were selected for docking 46 structurally diverse azoles and related compounds. We showed that the docking behaviour of the chemicals on the different aromatases was broadly the same. We also demonstrated that there was an acceptable level of correlation between the binding score values and the available aromatase inhibition data. This means that the homology models derived on bird and fish species can be used to approximate the potential inhibitory effects of azoles on their aromatase.

  2. Fertility and hatchability in RIR and WL breeds as functionally modified by crossing them in alternate sex combinations (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Zelleke, G; Moudgal, R P; Asmare, A

    2005-02-01

    (1) Four breeding groups of Rhode Island Red and White Leghorn domestic fowl (RIR (female) x RIR (male), RIR (female) x WL (male), WL (female) x RIR (male) and WL (female) x WL (male)) were compared for fertility, hatchability, and their post-insemination sustainability, egg weight loss during incubation and uncovered yolk in abdominal cavity of dead in shell in order to understand the problems associated with the RIR breed in these respects. (2) Crossing RIR (female) with WL (male) or in reverse sex combinations did not improve fertility in comparison to pure RIR chickens and all these groups were less fertile than the pure WL. (3) Unlike fertility, hatchability in RIR improved with the change to either sex partner of the WL breed but the WL (female) x RIR (male) combination was similar to the pure WL (97.72 and 97.12%, respectively). In contrast, crossing RIR (female) with WL (male) resulted in an improvement (86.67%) as compared to pure RIR (76.67%) but still lower than the pure WL and WL (female) x RIR (male) cross. (4) Egg weight loss during incubation was more (20.16%) in pure RIR as compared to RIR (female) x WL (male) (17.13%), followed by WL (female) x RIR (male) (10.28%) and pure WL (9.57%). (5) There were more dead-in-shell embryos with yolks outside their abdominal cavity in pure RIR and their crosses as compared to pure WL breeds. (6) Fertility was sustained for longer in WL than other combinations with post-artificial insemination using constant number of spermatozoa. Fertility after a week of insemination tended to decrease more rapidly than hatchability on a fertile egg basis. (7) It is concluded that both sexes are responsible for the poor fertility in RIR but the female is responsible for poor hatchability and this poor performance is mainly due to greater egg weight loss during incubation.

  3. Subcellular distribution of delta 5-3 beta-hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase in the granulosa cells of the domestic fowl (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, D G

    1979-01-01

    1. The distribution of 3 beta-hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase was examined in the subcellular fractions of granulosa cells collected from the ovary of the domestic fowl. 2. 3 beta-hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase activity was observed in the mitochondrial (4000g for 20min) and microsomal (105 000g for 120min) fractions. 3. Approximately three times more 3 beta-hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase activity was associated with the cytochrome oxidase activity (a mitochondrial marker enzyme) in anteovulatory-follicle granulosa cells than with that of the postovulatory follicle. 4. Comparison of the latent properties of mitochondrial 3 beta-hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase with those of cytochrome oxidase and isocitrate dehydrogenase indicated that 3 beta-hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase is located extramitochondrially. 5. This apparent distribution of 3 beta-hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase is explained on the basis that the mitochondrial activity is either an artefact caused by a redistribution in the subcellular location of the enzyme, occurring during homogenization, or by the existence of a functionally heterogeneous endoplasmic reticulum that yields particles of widely differing sedimentation properties. PMID:518548

  4. Prenatal sensory experience affects hatching behavior in domestic chicks (Gallus gallus) and Japanese quail chicks (Coturnix coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Sleigh, Merry J; Casey, Michael B

    2014-07-01

    Species-typical developmental outcomes result from organismic and environmental constraints and experiences shared by members of a species. We examined the effects of enhanced prenatal sensory experience on hatching behaviors by exposing domestic chicks (n = 95) and Japanese quail (n = 125) to one of four prenatal conditions: enhanced visual stimulation, enhanced auditory stimulation, enhanced auditory and visual stimulation, or no enhanced sensory experience (control condition). In general, across species, control embryos had slower hatching behaviors than all other embryos. Embryos in the auditory condition had faster hatching behaviors than embryos in the visual and control conditions. Auditory-visual condition embryos showed similarities to embryos exposed to either auditory or visual stimulation. These results suggest that prenatal sensory experience can influence hatching behavior of precocial birds, with the type of stimulation being a critical variable. These results also provide further evidence that species-typical outcomes are the result of species-typical prenatal experiences. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Social interactions in Red Junglefowl (Gallus gallus) and White Leghorn layers in stable groups and after re-grouping.

    PubMed

    Väisänen, J; Håkansson, J; Jensen, P

    2005-04-01

    Although social behaviour is a major factor affecting the coping of poultry in production environments little is known about how it has been affected by intensive selection processes in fowl. We attempted to clarify selection effects on overall repertoire and occurrence of different social behaviours as well as on aggressive responses to re-grouping with unfamiliar birds by comparing high-producing White Leghorn layers to wild type Red Junglefowl. In the first experiment we observed 8 stable mixed sex groups/breed each consisting of four 24-week-old birds previously familiar to each other. During 9 consecutive days, a wide range of social signals, sexual and aggressive interactions as well as spacing behaviour and activity were recorded over a 12-h photoperiod. In the second experiment, starting at 19 weeks of age, 16 single sex groups of three birds from each breed were formed by mixing unfamiliar individuals. Aggressive behaviours were recorded 0, 5, 24 and 48 h after re-grouping. Results from the stable groups indicated that the repertoire of social behaviours has been preserved during selection with few changes in frequencies and intensities. However, Leghorns showed a more cohesive spacing pattern than junglefowl. In the second experiment, aggressive activity was higher immediately and after 24 h following re-grouping in Leghorns, but there was a drop in the aggressiveness at 5 h to the same level as junglefowl. We suggest that this may indicate poorer social learning capacity with a weaker ability to cope with group disruptions compared to the ancestral breed.

  6. Biochemical responses and accumulation properties of long-chain perfluorinated compounds (PFOS/PFDA/PFOA) in juvenile chickens (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Yeung, Leo W Y; Loi, Eva I H; Wong, Vicky Y Y; Guruge, Keerthi S; Yamanaka, Noriko; Tanimura, Nobuhiko; Hasegawa, Jun; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Miyazaki, Shigeru; Lam, Paul K S

    2009-08-01

    One-day-old male chickens were exposed via oral gavage to mixtures of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), and perfluorodecanoate (PFDA) at either a low dose (0.1 mg/kg body weight [b.w.]) or a high dose (1.0 mg/kg b.w.), or a saline/ethanol vehicle control, three times a week for 3 weeks. After 3 weeks of exposure, half of the chicks were sacrificed and the other half were allowed to depurate for a further 3 weeks. No dose-dependent statistically significant differences in body/organ weights were observed among treatment and control groups after 3 weeks of exposure or after three 3 of depuration. Neither 15 histological nor 14 measured plasma biochemical parameters were significantly different in chicks from the exposed groups and vehicle controls. PFOS, PFDA, and PFOA concentrations in blood/liver/kidney samples were measured throughout the exposure and depuration periods at different time intervals. PFOS and PFDA accumulated at much higher concentrations than PFOA during the experimental periods. Interestingly, PFOS and PFDA accumulation patterns in the blood were similar during the exposure and depuration periods. The half-lives for each PFC at the 0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg doses were, respectively, approximately 15 and 17 days for PFOS, 11 and 16 days for PFDA, and 3.9 and 3.9 days for PFOA. PFDA accumulation in organs was greater than or similar to that of PFOS: the liver was the main target during exposure and the blood was the main reservoir during depuration. These results indicate that exposure to a 1.0-mg mixture of PFOS/PFDA/PFOA/kg b.w. has no adverse effect on juvenile chickens.

  7. [Cloning and characterization of Caveolin-1 gene in pigeon, Columba livia domestica].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Yu, Jian-Feng; Yang, Li; Wang, Xing-Guo; Gu, Zhi-Liang

    2010-10-01

    Caveolins, a class of principal proteins forming the structure of caveolae in plasmalemma, were encoded by caveolins gene family. Caveolin-1 gene is a member of caveolins gene family. In the present study, a full-length of 2605 bp caveolin-1 cDNA sequence in Columba livia domestica, which included a 537 bp complete ORF encoding a 178 amino acids long putative peptide, were obtained by using RT-PCR and RACE technique. The Columba livia domestica caveolin-1 CDS shared 80.1% - 93.4% homology with Bos taurus, Canis lupus familiaris, Gallus gallus and Rattus norvegicus. Meanwhile, the putative amino acid sequence of Columba livia domestica caveolin-1 shared 85.4% - 97.2% homology with the above species. The semi-quantity RT-PCR revealed that Caveolin-1 expressions were detectable in all the Columba livia domestica tissues and the expressional level of caveolin-1 gene was high in adipose, medium in various muscles, low in liver. These results demonstrated that Caveolin-1 gene was potentially involved in some metabolic pathways in adipose and muscle.

  8. Bacteria-killing ability of fresh blood plasma compared to frozen blood plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Jacobs, Anne C.; Fair, Jeanne Marie

    2015-10-09

    In recent years, the bacteria-killing assay (BKA) has become a popular technique among ecoimmunologists. New variations of that assay allow researchers to use smaller volumes of blood, an important consideration for those working on small-bodied animals. However, this version of the assay requires access to a lab with a nanodrop spectrophotometer, something that may not be available in the field. One possible solution is to freeze plasma for transport; however, this assumes that frozen plasma samples will give comparable results to fresh ones. Here, we tested this assumption using plasma samples from three species of birds: chickens (Gallus gallus), ash-throatedmore » flycatchers (Myiarchus cinerascens), and western bluebirds (Sialia mexicana). Chicken plasma samples lost most or all of their bacterial killing ability after freezing. This did not happen in flycatchers and bluebirds; however, frozen plasma did not produce results comparable to those obtained using fresh plasma. Finally, we caution researchers using the BKA to use fresh samples whenever possible, and to validate the use of frozen samples on a species-by-species basis.« less

  9. Karyotype Evolution in Birds: From Conventional Staining to Chromosome Painting

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A.

    2018-01-01

    In the last few decades, there have been great efforts to reconstruct the phylogeny of Neoaves based mainly on DNA sequencing. Despite the importance of karyotype data in phylogenetic studies, especially with the advent of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques using different types of probes, the use of chromosomal data to clarify phylogenetic proposals is still minimal. Additionally, comparative chromosome painting in birds is restricted to a few orders, while in mammals, for example, virtually all orders have already been analyzed using this method. Most reports are based on comparisons using Gallus gallus probes, and only a small number of species have been analyzed with more informative sets of probes, such as those from Leucopternis albicollis and Gyps fulvus, which show ancestral macrochromosomes rearranged in alternative patterns. Despite this, it is appropriate to review the available cytogenetic information and possible phylogenetic conclusions. In this report, the authors gather both classical and molecular cytogenetic data and describe some interesting and unique characteristics of karyotype evolution in birds. PMID:29584697

  10. In silico cloning, expression of Rieske-like apoprotein gene and protein subcellular localization in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaocui; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Ziniu

    2010-10-01

    Rieske protein gene in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas was obtained by in silico cloning for the first time, and its expression profiles and subcellular localization were determined, respectively. The full-length cDNA of Cgisp is 985 bp in length and contains a 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions of 35 and 161 bp, respectively, with an open reading frame of 786 bp encoding a protein of 262 amino acids. The predicted molecular weight of 30 kDa of Cgisp protein was verified by prokaryotic expression. Conserved Rieske [2Fe-2S] cluster binding sites and highly matched-pair tertiary structure with 3CWB_E (Gallus gallus) were revealed by homologous analysis and molecular modeling. Eleven putative SNP sites and two conserved hexapeptide sequences, box I (THLGC) and II (PCHGS), were detected by multiple alignments. Real-time PCR analysis showed that Cgisp is expressed in a wide range of tissues, with adductor muscle exhibiting the top expression level, suggesting its biological function of energy transduction. The GFP tagging Cgisp indicated a mitochondrial localization, further confirming its physiological function.

  11. Structural imbalance promotes behavior analogous to aesthetic preference in domestic chicks.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Mark A; Salva, Orsola Rosa; Mulcahy, Paul; Regolin, Lucia

    2012-01-01

    Visual images may be judged 'aesthetic' when their positioning appears imbalanced. An apparent imbalance may signify an as yet incomplete action or event requiring more detailed processing. As such it may refer to phylogenetically ancient stimulus-response mechanisms such as those mediating attentional deployment. We studied preferences for structural balance or imbalance in week-old domestic chicks (Gallus gallus), using a conditioning procedure to reinforce pecking at either "aligned" (balanced) or "misaligned" (imbalanced) training stimuli. A testing phase with novel balanced and imbalanced stimuli established whether chicks would retain their conditioned behavior or revert to chance responding. Whereas those trained on aligned stimuli were equally likely to choose aligned or misaligned stimuli, chicks trained on misaligned stimuli maintained the trained preference. Our results are consistent with the idea that the coding of structural imbalance is primary and even overrides classical conditioning. Generalized to the humans, these results suggest aesthetic judgments based upon structural imbalance may be based on evolutionarily ancient mechanisms, which are shared by different vertebrate species.

  12. Whole transcriptome analysis of the fasting and fed Burmese python heart: insights into extreme physiological cardiac adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wall, Christopher E; Cozza, Steven; Riquelme, Cecilia A; McCombie, W Richard; Heimiller, Joseph K; Marr, Thomas G; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2011-01-01

    The infrequently feeding Burmese python (Python molurus) experiences significant and rapid postprandial cardiac hypertrophy followed by regression as digestion is completed. To begin to explore the molecular mechanisms of this response, we have sequenced and assembled the fasted and postfed Burmese python heart transcriptomes with Illumina technology using the chicken (Gallus gallus) genome as a reference. In addition, we have used RNA-seq analysis to identify differences in the expression of biological processes and signaling pathways between fasted, 1 day postfed (DPF), and 3 DPF hearts. Out of a combined transcriptome of ∼2,800 mRNAs, 464 genes were differentially expressed. Genes showing differential expression at 1 DPF compared with fasted were enriched for biological processes involved in metabolism and energetics, while genes showing differential expression at 3 DPF compared with fasted were enriched for processes involved in biogenesis, structural remodeling, and organization. Moreover, we present evidence for the activation of physiological and not pathological signaling pathways in this rapid, novel model of cardiac growth in pythons. Together, our data provide the first comprehensive gene expression profile for a reptile heart.

  13. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Wild Boars, Wild Rabbits, and Wild Chickens in Hubei Province, China.

    PubMed

    Luo, Houqiang; Li, Kun; Shahzad, Muhammad; Zhang, Hui; Lan, Yanfang; Xiong, Xiong

    2017-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii causes serious infection worldwide in humans and animals. In this study, the seroepidemiology of toxoplasmosis was investigated in wild boars ( Sus scrofa ) (n=377), wild rabbits (cape hare, Lapus capensis ) (n=331), and wild chickens (red junglefwol, Gallus gallus ) (n=571) in 4 forested and country sided area of Hubei province of China. For this, blood samples were collected and tested by indirect hemagglutination test (IHA). The seroprevalence was found to be 7.2%, 5.1%, and 12.6% in wild boars, rabbits, and chickens, respectively, with significant differences among these species. The prevalence of T. gondii infection in male and female wild boars was found to be 7.9% and 6.5% ( P <0.01), in male and female rabbits was 5.6% and 4.9% ( P <0.01), and in male and female chickens was 17.1% and 7.7% ( P <0.01), respectively, with significant differences between 2 genders of chickens ( P <0.01). The findings of this study may help in planning of the prevention measures against T. gondii infection in wild animals in this area.

  14. Bacteria-killing ability of fresh blood plasma compared to frozen blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Anne C; Fair, Jeanne M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the bacteria-killing assay (BKA) has become a popular technique among ecoimmunologists. New variations of that assay allow researchers to use smaller volumes of blood, an important consideration for those working on small-bodied animals. However, this version of the assay requires access to a lab with a nanodrop spectrophotometer, something that may not be available in the field. One possible solution is to freeze plasma for transport; however, this assumes that frozen plasma samples will give comparable results to fresh ones. We tested this assumption using plasma samples from three species of birds: chickens (Gallus gallus), ash-throated flycatchers (Myiarchus cinerascens), and western bluebirds (Sialia mexicana). Chicken plasma samples lost most or all of their bacterial killing ability after freezing. This did not happen in flycatchers and bluebirds; however, frozen plasma did not produce results comparable to those obtained using fresh plasma. We caution researchers using the BKA to use fresh samples whenever possible, and to validate the use of frozen samples on a species-by-species basis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide reduces food passage rate from the crop by a prostaglandin-independent mechanism in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, T.; Ogino, M.; Makino, R.; Khan, M. S. I.; Cline, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT 1. We examined the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of Gram-negative bacteria, on food passage in the digestive tract of chickens (Gallus gallus) in order to clarify whether bacterial infection affects food passage in birds. 2. Food passage in the crop was significantly reduced by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of LPS while it did not affect the number of defecations, suggesting that LPS may affect food passage only in the upper digestive tract. 3. Similar to LPS, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), one of the mediators of LPS, also reduced crop-emptying rate in chickens while it had no effect on the number of defecations. 4. Pretreatment with indomethacin, which is an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX), a prostaglandin synthase, had no effect on LPS-induced inhibition of crop emptying. 5. IP injection of LPS did not affect the mRNA expression of COX2 in the upper digestive tract of chickens. 6. It is therefore likely that LPS and PGE2 reduced food passage rate in the crop by a prostaglandin-independent pathway in chickens. PMID:27871194

  16. Lipopolysaccharide reduces food passage rate from the crop by a prostaglandin-independent mechanism in chickens.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, T; Ogino, M; Makino, R; Khan, M S I; Cline, M A

    2017-02-01

    1. We examined the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of Gram-negative bacteria, on food passage in the digestive tract of chickens (Gallus gallus) in order to clarify whether bacterial infection affects food passage in birds. 2. Food passage in the crop was significantly reduced by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of LPS while it did not affect the number of defecations, suggesting that LPS may affect food passage only in the upper digestive tract. 3. Similar to LPS, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), one of the mediators of LPS, also reduced crop-emptying rate in chickens while it had no effect on the number of defecations. 4. Pretreatment with indomethacin, which is an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX), a prostaglandin synthase, had no effect on LPS-induced inhibition of crop emptying. 5. IP injection of LPS did not affect the mRNA expression of COX2 in the upper digestive tract of chickens. 6. It is therefore likely that LPS and PGE2 reduced food passage rate in the crop by a prostaglandin-independent pathway in chickens.

  17. Enhanced learning of natural visual sequences in newborn chicks.

    PubMed

    Wood, Justin N; Prasad, Aditya; Goldman, Jason G; Wood, Samantha M W

    2016-07-01

    To what extent are newborn brains designed to operate over natural visual input? To address this question, we used a high-throughput controlled-rearing method to examine whether newborn chicks (Gallus gallus) show enhanced learning of natural visual sequences at the onset of vision. We took the same set of images and grouped them into either natural sequences (i.e., sequences showing different viewpoints of the same real-world object) or unnatural sequences (i.e., sequences showing different images of different real-world objects). When raised in virtual worlds containing natural sequences, newborn chicks developed the ability to recognize familiar images of objects. Conversely, when raised in virtual worlds containing unnatural sequences, newborn chicks' object recognition abilities were severely impaired. In fact, the majority of the chicks raised with the unnatural sequences failed to recognize familiar images of objects despite acquiring over 100 h of visual experience with those images. Thus, newborn chicks show enhanced learning of natural visual sequences at the onset of vision. These results indicate that newborn brains are designed to operate over natural visual input.

  18. Bacteria-killing ability of fresh blood plasma compared to frozen blood plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Anne C.; Fair, Jeanne Marie

    In recent years, the bacteria-killing assay (BKA) has become a popular technique among ecoimmunologists. New variations of that assay allow researchers to use smaller volumes of blood, an important consideration for those working on small-bodied animals. However, this version of the assay requires access to a lab with a nanodrop spectrophotometer, something that may not be available in the field. One possible solution is to freeze plasma for transport; however, this assumes that frozen plasma samples will give comparable results to fresh ones. Here, we tested this assumption using plasma samples from three species of birds: chickens (Gallus gallus), ash-throatedmore » flycatchers (Myiarchus cinerascens), and western bluebirds (Sialia mexicana). Chicken plasma samples lost most or all of their bacterial killing ability after freezing. This did not happen in flycatchers and bluebirds; however, frozen plasma did not produce results comparable to those obtained using fresh plasma. Finally, we caution researchers using the BKA to use fresh samples whenever possible, and to validate the use of frozen samples on a species-by-species basis.« less

  19. Methodology for exposing avian embryos to quantified levels of airborne aromatic compounds associated with crude oil spills.

    PubMed

    Dubansky, Benjamin; Verbeck, Guido; Mach, Phillip; Burggren, Warren

    2018-03-01

    Oil spills on birds and other organisms have focused primarily on direct effects of oil exposure through ingestion or direct body fouling. Little is known of indirect effects of airborne volatiles from spilled oil, especially on vulnerable developing embryos within the bird egg. Here a technique is described for exposing bird embryos in the egg to quantifiable amounts of airborne volatile toxicants from Deepwater Horizon crude oil. A novel membrane inlet mass spectrometry system was used to measure major classes of airborne oil-derived toxicants and correlate these exposures with biological endpoints. Exposure induced a reduction in platelet number and increase in osmolality of the blood of embryos of the chicken (Gallus gallus). Additionally, expression of cytochrome P4501A, a protein biomarker of oil exposure, occurred in renal, pulmonary, hepatic and vascular tissues. These data confirm that this system for generating and measuring airborne volatiles can be used for future in-depth analysis of the toxicity of volatile organic compounds in birds and potentially other terrestrial organisms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Studies of Cream Seeded Carioca Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from a Rwandan Efficacy Trial: In Vitro and In Vivo Screening Tools Reflect Human Studies and Predict Beneficial Results from Iron Biofortified Beans

    PubMed Central

    Tako, Elad; Reed, Spenser; Anandaraman, Amrutha; Beebe, Steve E.; Hart, Jonathan J.; Glahn, Raymond P.

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a highly prevalent micronutrient insufficiency predominantly caused by a lack of bioavailable Fe from the diet. The consumption of beans as a major food crop in some populations suffering from Fe deficiency is relatively high. Therefore, our objective was to determine whether a biofortified variety of cream seeded carioca bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) could provide more bioavailable-Fe than a standard variety using in-vivo (broiler chicken, Gallus gallus) and in-vitro (Caco-2 cell) models. Studies were conducted under conditions designed to mimic the actual human feeding protocol. Two carioca-beans, a standard (G4825; 58μg Fe/g) and a biofortified (SMC; 106μg Fe/g), were utilized. Diets were formulated to meet the nutrient requirements of Gallus gallus except for Fe (33.7 and 48.7μg Fe/g, standard and biofortified diets, respectively). In-vitro observations indicated that more bioavailable-Fe was present in the biofortified beans and diet (P<0.05). In-vivo, improvements in Fe-status were observed in the biofortified bean treatment, as indicated by the increased total-body-Hemoglobin-Fe, and hepatic Fe-concentration (P<0.05). Also, DMT-1 mRNA-expression was increased in the standard bean treatment (P<0.05), indicating an upregulation of absorption to compensate for less bioavailable-Fe. These results demonstrate that the biofortified beans provided more bioavailable Fe; however, the in vitro results revealed that ferritin formation values were relatively low. Such observations are indicative of the presence of high levels of polyphenols and phytate that inhibit Fe absorption. Indeed, we identified higher levels of phytate and quercetin 3–glucoside in the Fe biofortified bean variety. Our results indicate that the biofortified bean line was able to moderately improve Fe-status, and that concurrent increase in the concentration of phytate and polyphenols in beans may limit the benefit of increased Fe-concentration. Therefore, specific

  1. Studies of Cream Seeded Carioca Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from a Rwandan Efficacy Trial: In Vitro and In Vivo Screening Tools Reflect Human Studies and Predict Beneficial Results from Iron Biofortified Beans.

    PubMed

    Tako, Elad; Reed, Spenser; Anandaraman, Amrutha; Beebe, Steve E; Hart, Jonathan J; Glahn, Raymond P

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a highly prevalent micronutrient insufficiency predominantly caused by a lack of bioavailable Fe from the diet. The consumption of beans as a major food crop in some populations suffering from Fe deficiency is relatively high. Therefore, our objective was to determine whether a biofortified variety of cream seeded carioca bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) could provide more bioavailable-Fe than a standard variety using in-vivo (broiler chicken, Gallus gallus) and in-vitro (Caco-2 cell) models. Studies were conducted under conditions designed to mimic the actual human feeding protocol. Two carioca-beans, a standard (G4825; 58 μg Fe/g) and a biofortified (SMC; 106 μg Fe/g), were utilized. Diets were formulated to meet the nutrient requirements of Gallus gallus except for Fe (33.7 and 48.7 μg Fe/g, standard and biofortified diets, respectively). In-vitro observations indicated that more bioavailable-Fe was present in the biofortified beans and diet (P<0.05). In-vivo, improvements in Fe-status were observed in the biofortified bean treatment, as indicated by the increased total-body-Hemoglobin-Fe, and hepatic Fe-concentration (P<0.05). Also, DMT-1 mRNA-expression was increased in the standard bean treatment (P<0.05), indicating an upregulation of absorption to compensate for less bioavailable-Fe. These results demonstrate that the biofortified beans provided more bioavailable Fe; however, the in vitro results revealed that ferritin formation values were relatively low. Such observations are indicative of the presence of high levels of polyphenols and phytate that inhibit Fe absorption. Indeed, we identified higher levels of phytate and quercetin 3-glucoside in the Fe biofortified bean variety. Our results indicate that the biofortified bean line was able to moderately improve Fe-status, and that concurrent increase in the concentration of phytate and polyphenols in beans may limit the benefit of increased Fe-concentration. Therefore, specific

  2. Transcriptional analysis of abdominal fat in chickens divergently selected on bodyweight at two ages reveals novel mechanisms controlling adiposity: validating visceral adipose tissue as a dynamic endocrine and metabolic organ.

    PubMed

    Resnyk, C W; Carré, W; Wang, X; Porter, T E; Simon, J; Le Bihan-Duval, E; Duclos, M J; Aggrey, S E; Cogburn, L A

    2017-08-16

    Decades of intensive genetic selection in the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) have enabled the remarkable rapid growth of today's broiler (meat-type) chickens. However, this enhanced growth rate was accompanied by several unfavorable traits (i.e., increased visceral fatness, leg weakness, and disorders of metabolism and reproduction). The present descriptive analysis of the abdominal fat transcriptome aimed to identify functional genes and biological pathways that likely contribute to an extreme difference in visceral fatness of divergently selected broiler chickens. We used the Del-Mar 14 K Chicken Integrated Systems microarray to take time-course snapshots of global gene transcription in abdominal fat of juvenile [1-11 weeks of age (wk)] chickens divergently selected on bodyweight at two ages (8 and 36 wk). Further, a RNA sequencing analysis was completed on the same abdominal fat samples taken from high-growth (HG) and low-growth (LG) cockerels at 7 wk, the age with the greatest divergence in body weight (3.2-fold) and visceral fatness (19.6-fold). Time-course microarray analysis revealed 312 differentially expressed genes (FDR ≤ 0.05) as the main effect of genotype (HG versus LG), 718 genes in the interaction of age and genotype, and 2918 genes as the main effect of age. The RNA sequencing analysis identified 2410 differentially expressed genes in abdominal fat of HG versus LG chickens at 7 wk. The HG chickens are fatter and over-express numerous genes that support higher rates of visceral adipogenesis and lipogenesis. In abdominal fat of LG chickens, we found higher expression of many genes involved in hemostasis, energy catabolism and endocrine signaling, which likely contribute to their leaner phenotype and slower growth. Many transcription factors and their direct target genes identified in HG and LG chickens could be involved in their divergence in adiposity and growth rate. The present analyses of the visceral fat transcriptome in

  3. Characterizing early embryonic development of Brown Tsaiya Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) in comparison with Taiwan Country Chicken (Gallus gallus domestics)

    PubMed Central

    Lumsangkul, Chompunut; Fan, Yang-Kwang; Chang, Shen-Chang; Ju, Jyh-Cherng

    2018-01-01

    Avian embryos are among the most convenient and the primary representatives for the study of classical embryology. It is well-known that the hatching time of duck embryos is approximately one week longer than that of chicken embryos. However, the key features associated with the slower embryonic development in ducks have not been adequately described. This study aimed to characterize the pattern and the speed of early embryogenesis in Brown Tsaiya Ducks (BTD) compared with those in Taiwan Country Chicken (TCC) by using growth parameters including embryonic crown-tail length (ECTL), primitive streak formation, somitogenesis, and other development-related parameters, during the first 72 h of incubation. Three hundred and sixty eggs from BTD and TCC, respectively, were incubated at 37.2°C, and were then dissected hourly to evaluate their developmental stages. We found that morphological changes of TCC embryos shared a major similarity with that of the Hamburger and Hamilton staging system during early chick embryogenesis. The initial primitive streak in TCC emerged between 6 and 7 h post-incubation, but its emergence was delayed until 10 to 13 h post-incubation in BTD. Similarly, the limb primordia (wing and limb buds) were observed at 51 h post-incubation in TCC embryos compared to 64 h post-incubation in BTD embryos. The allantois first appeared around 65 to 68 h in TCC embryos, but it was not observed in BTD embryos. At the 72 h post-incubation, 40 somites were clearly formed in TCC embryos while only 32 somites in BTD embryos. Overall, the BTD embryos developed approximately 16 h slower than the chicken embryo during the first 72 h of development. To our best knowledge, this is the first study to describe two distinct developmental time courses between TCC and BTD, which would facilitate future embryogenesis-related studies of the two important avian species in Taiwan. PMID:29742160

  4. Transcriptome Profile Analysis of Breast Muscle Tissues from High or Low Levels of Atmospheric Ammonia Exposed Broilers (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Renna; Zhong, Ruqing; Xing, Huan; Zhang, Hongfu

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric ammonia is a common problem in poultry industry. High concentrations of aerial ammonia cause great harm to broilers' health and production. For the consideration of human health, the limit exposure concentration of ammonia in houses is set at 25 ppm. Previous reports have shown that 25 ppm is still detrimental to livestock, especially the gastrointestinal tract and respiratory tract, but the negative relationship between ammonia exposure and the tissue of breast muscle of broilers is still unknown. In the present study, 25 ppm ammonia in poultry houses was found to lower slaughter performance and breast yield. Then, high-throughput RNA sequencing was utilized to identify differentially expressed genes in breast muscle of broiler chickens exposed to high (25 ppm) or low (3 ppm) levels of atmospheric ammonia. The transcriptome analysis showed that 163 genes (fold change ≥ 2 or ≤ 0.5; P-value < 0.05) were differentially expressed between Ammonia25 (treatment group) and Ammonia3 (control group), including 96 down-regulated and 67 up-regulated genes. qRT-PCR analysis validated the transcriptomic results of RNA sequencing. Gene Ontology (GO) functional annotation analysis revealed potential genes, processes and pathways with putative involvement in growth and development inhibition of breast muscle in broilers caused by aerial ammonia exposure. This study facilitates understanding of the genetic architecture of the chicken breast muscle transcriptome, and has identified candidate genes for breast muscle response to atmospheric ammonia exposure. PMID:27611572

  5. The structure and innervation of the saccopleural membrane of the domestic fowl, Gallus gallus: an ultrastructural and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, R D; Vaillant, C; King, A S

    1987-01-01

    Microscopic studies have shown the saccopleural membrane in the respiratory system of the domestic fowl to consist of a sheet of three dense layers of collagen fibres covered dorsally and ventrally by mainly simple squamous epithelium. On the ventral surface, which faces into the caudal thoracic air sac, there are occasional ridges of pseudostratified ciliated epithelium. Many nerve bundles are present throughout the membrane, the larger bundles of myelinated and unmyelinated axons being confined to the lamina propria under the dorsal epithelium (parietal pleura). In addition to axonal profiles with the ultrastructural appearance of cholinergic or adrenergic axons, peptidergic-type axons were identified. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated VIP-, substance P-, somatostatin- and enkephalin-immunoreactive fibres in the membrane. Although it has been suggested that receptors may be present in this region of the respiratory system, none of the axons have features suggestive of sensory terminals, although many axonal profiles are closely associated with the epithelia where no obvious effector cells are present. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:3654325

  6. Spatial Probability Dynamically Modulates Visual Target Detection in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Devarajan; Ramamurthy, Deepa L.; Knudsen, Eric I.

    2013-01-01

    The natural world contains a rich and ever-changing landscape of sensory information. To survive, an organism must be able to flexibly and rapidly locate the most relevant sources of information at any time. Humans and non-human primates exploit regularities in the spatial distribution of relevant stimuli (targets) to improve detection at locations of high target probability. Is the ability to flexibly modify behavior based on visual experience unique to primates? Chickens (Gallus domesticus) were trained on a multiple alternative Go/NoGo task to detect a small, briefly-flashed dot (target) in each of the quadrants of the visual field. When targets were presented with equal probability (25%) in each quadrant, chickens exhibited a distinct advantage for detecting targets at lower, relative to upper, hemifield locations. Increasing the probability of presentation in the upper hemifield locations (to 80%) dramatically improved detection performance at these locations to be on par with lower hemifield performance. Finally, detection performance in the upper hemifield changed on a rapid timescale, improving with successive target detections, and declining with successive detections at the diagonally opposite location in the lower hemifield. These data indicate the action of a process that in chickens, as in primates, flexibly and dynamically modulates detection performance based on the spatial probabilities of sensory stimuli as well as on recent performance history. PMID:23734188

  7. Effects of 3,3{prime},4,4{prime},5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), or an extract derived from field-collected cormorant eggs injected into double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) eggs

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, D.C.; Aulerich, R.J.; Powell, J.F.

    1997-07-01

    Double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) eggs were injected with either 3,3{prime},4,4{prime},5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), or an extract derived from field-collected double-crested cormorant eggs. These compounds were injected into the yolks of cormorant eggs from an isolated colony on Lake Winnipegosis, Manitoba, Canada. Upon hatching, chicks were necropsied. The brain, bursa, heart, liver, and spleen were removed and weighed. An approximate median lethal dose (LD50) of 158 {micro}g/kg egg was determined for PCB 126, which is 69 times greater than the LD50 determined for the chicken (Gallus domesticus) in a previous study. A significantly greater mortality occurred at the highest dosemore » of TCDD when compared to the vehicle control. However, the mortality data did not provide sufficient information for the determination of an LD50. The cormorant egg extract did not adversely affect hatchability. No significant increases were observed in the incidence of developmental abnormalities, including pronounced edema, in any of the treatment groups, nor were there any relevant effects on body and organ weights. Based on the results from this study, the cormorant appears to be considerably less sensitive to polyhalogenated diaromatic hydrocarbons than the chicken, which has been the typical species used for egg injection studies.« less

  8. Effects of 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), or an extract derived from field-collected cormorant eggs injected into double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Debra C.; Aulerich, Richard J.; Meadows, John C.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Powell, Jon F.; Restum, Janelle C.; Stromborg, Kenneth L.; Giesy, John P.; Bursian, Steven J.

    1997-01-01

    Double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) eggs were injected with either 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), or an extract derived from field-collected double-crested cormorant eggs. These compounds were injected into the yolks of cormorant eggs from an isolated colony on Lake Winnipegosis, Manitoba, Canada. Upon hatching, chicks were necropsied. The brain, bursa, heart, liver, and spleen were removed and weighed. An approximate median lethal dose (LD50) of 158 μg/kg egg was determined for PCB 126, which is 69 times greater than the LD50 determined for the chicken (Gallus domesticus) in a previous study. A significantly greater mortality occurred at the highest dose of TCDD (4.0 μg/kg egg) when compared to the vehicle control. However, the mortality data did not provide sufficient information for the determination of an LD50. The cormorant egg extract did not adversely affect hatchability. No significant increases were observed in the incidence of developmental abnormalities, including pronounced edema, in any of the treatment groups, nor were there any relevant effects on body and organ weights. Based on the results from this study, the cormorant appears to be considerably less sensitive to polyhalogenated diaromatic hydrocarbons than the chicken, which has been the typical species used for egg injection studies.

  9. Immune cells in the normal ovary and spontaneous ovarian tumors in the laying hen (Gallus domesticus) model of human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bradaric, Michael J; Penumatsa, Krishna; Barua, Animesh; Edassery, Seby L; Yu, Yi; Abramowicz, Jacques S; Bahr, Janice M; Luborsky, Judith L

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous ovarian cancer in chickens resembles human tumors both histologically and biochemically. The goal was to determine if there are differences in lymphocyte content between normal ovaries and ovarian tumors in chickens as a basis for further studies to understand the role of immunity in human ovarian cancer progression. Hens were selected using grey scale and color Doppler ultrasound to determine if they had normal or tumor morphology. Cells were isolated from ovaries (n = 6 hens) and lymphocyte numbers were determined by flow cytometry using antibodies to avian CD4 and CD8 T and B (Bu1a) cells. Ovarian sections from another set of hens (n = 26) were assessed to verify tumor type and stage and to count CD4, CD8 and Bu1a immunostained cells by morphometric analysis. T and B cells were more numerous in ovarian tumors than in normal ovaries by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. There were less CD4+ cells than CD8+ and Bu1a+ cells in normal ovaries or ovarian tumors. CD8+ cells were the dominant T cell sub-type in both ovarian stroma and in ovarian follicles compared to CD4+ cells. Bu1a+ cells were consistently found in the stroma of normal ovaries and ovarian tumors but were not associated with follicles. The number of immune cells was highest in late stage serous tumors compared to endometrioid and mucinous tumors. The results suggest that similar to human ovarian cancer there are comparatively more immune cells in chicken ovarian tumors than in normal ovaries, and the highest immune cell content occurs in serous tumors. Thus, this study establishes a foundation for further study of tumor immune responses in a spontaneous model of ovarian cancer which will facilitate studies of the role of immunity in early ovarian cancer progression and use of the hen in pre-clinical vaccine trials.

  10. Immune Cells in the Normal Ovary and Spontaneous Ovarian Tumors in the Laying Hen (Gallus domesticus) Model of Human Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bradaric, Michael J.; Penumatsa, Krishna; Barua, Animesh; Edassery, Seby L.; Yu, Yi; Abramowicz, Jacques S.; Bahr, Janice M.; Luborsky, Judith L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Spontaneous ovarian cancer in chickens resembles human tumors both histologically and biochemically. The goal was to determine if there are differences in lymphocyte content between normal ovaries and ovarian tumors in chickens as a basis for further studies to understand the role of immunity in human ovarian cancer progression. Methods Hens were selected using grey scale and color Doppler ultrasound to determine if they had normal or tumor morphology. Cells were isolated from ovaries (n = 6 hens) and lymphocyte numbers were determined by flow cytometry using antibodies to avian CD4 and CD8 T and B (Bu1a) cells. Ovarian sections from another set of hens (n = 26) were assessed to verify tumor type and stage and to count CD4, CD8 and Bu1a immunostained cells by morphometric analysis. Results T and B cells were more numerous in ovarian tumors than in normal ovaries by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. There were less CD4+ cells than CD8+ and Bu1a+ cells in normal ovaries or ovarian tumors. CD8+ cells were the dominant T cell sub-type in both ovarian stroma and in ovarian follicles compared to CD4+ cells. Bu1a+ cells were consistently found in the stroma of normal ovaries and ovarian tumors but were not associated with follicles. The number of immune cells was highest in late stage serous tumors compared to endometrioid and mucinous tumors. Conclusions The results suggest that similar to human ovarian cancer there are comparatively more immune cells in chicken ovarian tumors than in normal ovaries, and the highest immune cell content occurs in serous tumors. Thus, this study establishes a foundation for further study of tumor immune responses in a spontaneous model of ovarian cancer which will facilitate studies of the role of immunity in early ovarian cancer progression and use of the hen in pre-clinical vaccine trials. PMID:24040191

  11. Shapes of Differential Pulse Voltammograms and Level of Metallothionein at Different Animal Species.

    PubMed

    Adam, Vojtech; Beklova, Miroslava; Pikula, Jiri; Hubalek, Jaromir; Trnkova, Libuse; Kizek, Rene

    2007-10-19

    Metallothioneins play a key role in maintaining homeostasis of essential metalsand in protecting of cells against metal toxicity as well as oxidative damaging. Exceptinghumans, blood levels of metallothionein have not yet been reported from any animalspecies. Blood plasma samples of 9 animal species were analysed by the adsorptive transferstripping technique to obtain species specific voltammograms. Quite distinct records wereobtained from the Takin (Budorcas taxicolor), while other interesting records were observedin samples from the European Bison (Bison bonasus bonasus) and the Red-eared Slider(Trachemys scripta elegans). To quantify metallothionein the catalytic peak Cat2 was used,well developed in the Domestic Fowl (Gallus gallus f. domestica) and showing a very lowsignal in the Red Deer (Cervus elaphus). The highest levels of metallothionein reachingover 20 μM were found in the Domestic Fowl. High levels of MT were also found in theBearded Dragon (Pogona vitticeps) and the Grey Wolf (Canis lupus lupus). The lowestvalues of about 1-3 μM were determined in the Red-eared Slider, Takin and Red Deer. Employing a simple electrochemical detection it was possible to examine variation in blood metallothionein in different species of vertebrates.

  12. Cloning, tissue expression and polymorphisms of chicken Krüppel-like factor 7 gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Zhi-Peng; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Ning; Li, Hui

    2013-07-01

    Krüppel-like factor 7 (KLF7) has been extensively studied in mammalian species, but its role in birds is still unclear. In the current study, cloning and sequencing showed that the full-length coding region of chicken KLF7 (Gallus gallus KLF7, gKLF7) was 891 bp long, encoding 296 amino acids. In addition, real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that gKLF7 was broadly expressed in all 15 chicken tissues selected, and its expression was significantly different in spleen, proventriculus, abdominal fat, brain, leg muscle, gizzard and heart between fat and lean broilers at 7 weeks of age. Additionally, one novel single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), XM_426569.3: c. A141G, was identified in the second exon of gKLF7. Association analysis showed that this locus was significantly associated with fatness traits in Arbor Acres broiler random population and the eighth generation of Northeast Agricultural University broiler lines divergently selected for abdominal fat content (NEAUHLF) population (P < 0.05). These results suggest that gKLF7 might be a candidate gene for chicken fatness traits. © 2013 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  13. The Seminal fluid proteome of the polyandrous Red junglefowl offers insights into the molecular basis of fertility, reproductive ageing and domestication.

    PubMed

    Borziak, Kirill; Álvarez-Fernández, Aitor; L Karr, Timothy; Pizzari, Tommaso; Dorus, Steve

    2016-11-02

    Seminal fluid proteins (SFPs) are emerging as fundamental contributors to sexual selection given their role in post-mating reproductive events, particularly in polyandrous species where the ejaculates of different males compete for fertilisation. SFP identification however remains taxonomically limited and little is known about avian SFPs, despite extensive work on sexual selection in birds. We characterize the SF proteome of the polyandrous Red junglefowl, Gallus gallus, the wild species that gave rise to the domestic chicken. We identify 1,141 SFPs, including proteins involved in immunity and antimicrobial defences, sperm maturation, and fertilisation, revealing a functionally complex SF proteome. This includes a predominant contribution of blood plasma proteins that is conserved with human SF. By comparing the proteome of young and old males with fast or slow sperm velocity in a balanced design, we identify proteins associated with ageing and sperm velocity, and show that old males that retain high sperm velocity have distinct proteome characteristics. SFP comparisons with domestic chickens revealed both qualitative and quantitative differences likely associated with domestication and artificial selection. Collectively, these results shed light onto the functional complexity of avian SF, and provide a platform for molecular studies of fertility, reproductive ageing, and domestication.

  14. Stephanoprora chasanensis n. sp. (Digenea: Echinochasmidae): Morphology, life cycle, and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Besprozvannykh, Vladimir V; Rozhkovan, Konstantin V; Ermolenko, Alexey V

    2017-02-01

    Echinostomatoidea is a large, globally distributed and heterogeneous group of hermaphroditic digeneans that parasite, as adults, vertebrate hosts of all classes. Species of this group have received attention from researchers as they can cause diseases in wildlife and humans. Here we describe the biological and molecular phylogenetic characteristics of Stephanoprora chasanensis n. sp. (Digenea: Echinochasmidae). The life cycle of this fluke was experimentally completed by the use of hosts, i.e. Stenothyra recondite Lindholm, 1929 snail (the 1st intermediate), Rhynchocypris percnurus mantschuricus (Berg, 1907) freshwater fish (the 2nd intermediate) and Gallus gallus chicken (the definitive host). In the adult worms, vitelline follicles were distributed anteriorly to the mid-level of the ventral sucker in our specimens whereas they did not reach the level of anterior testis in other species of Stephanoprora previously reported. Phylogenetic analysis based on 28S rDNA revealed that Stephanoprora and Echinochasmus with 20-22 collar spines grouped together in a single cluster. In addition, we showed that Stephanoprora chasanensis n. sp. was closely related to Echinochasmus milvi Yamaguti, 1939. Cercariae of these two echinostomes commonly have a long tail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Whole genome sequencing of Gyeongbuk Araucana, a newly developed blue-egg laying chicken breed, reveals its origin and genetic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeonsoo; Kim, Kwondo; Caetano-Anollés, Kelsey; Kim, Heebal; Kim, Byung-Ki; Yi, Jun-Koo; Ha, Jae-Jung; Cho, Seoae; Oh, Dong Yep

    2016-05-24

    Chicken, Gallus gallus, is a valuable species both as a food source and as a model organism for scientific research. Here, we sequenced the genome of Gyeongbuk Araucana, a rare chicken breed with unique phenotypic characteristics including flight ability, large body size, and laying blue-shelled eggs, to identify its genomic features. We generated genomes of Gyeongbuk Araucana, Leghorn, and Korean Native Chicken at a total of 33.5, 35.82, and 33.23 coverage depth, respectively. Along with the genomes of 12 Chinese breeds, we identified genomic variants of 16.3 million SNVs and 2.3 million InDels in mapped regions. Additionally, through assembly of unmapped reads and selective sweep, we identified candidate genes that fall into heart, vasculature and muscle development and body growth categories, which provided insight into Gyeongbuk Araucana's phenotypic traits. Finally, genetic variation based on the transposable element insertion pattern was investigated to elucidate the features of transposable elements related to blue egg shell formation. This study presents results of the first genomic study on the Gyeongbuk Araucana breed; it has potential to serve as an invaluable resource for future research on the genomic characteristics of this chicken breed as well as others.

  16. Avian magnetoreception: elaborate iron mineral containing dendrites in the upper beak seem to be a common feature of birds.

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, Gerald; Fleissner, Gerta; Schuchardt, Kirsten; Kuehbacher, Markus; Thalau, Peter; Mouritsen, Henrik; Heyers, Dominik; Wellenreuther, Gerd; Fleissner, Guenther

    2010-02-16

    The magnetic field sensors enabling birds to extract orientational information from the Earth's magnetic field have remained enigmatic. Our previously published results from homing pigeons have made us suggest that the iron containing sensory dendrites in the inner dermal lining of the upper beak are a candidate structure for such an avian magnetometer system. Here we show that similar structures occur in two species of migratory birds (garden warbler, Sylvia borin and European robin, Erithacus rubecula) and a non-migratory bird, the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus). In all these bird species, histological data have revealed dendrites of similar shape and size, all containing iron minerals within distinct subcellular compartments of nervous terminals of the median branch of the Nervus ophthalmicus. We also used microscopic X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyses to identify the involved iron minerals to be almost completely Fe III-oxides. Magnetite (Fe II/III) may also occur in these structures, but not as a major Fe constituent. Our data suggest that this complex dendritic system in the beak is a common feature of birds, and that it may form an essential sensory basis for the evolution of at least certain types of magnetic field guided behavior.

  17. Genome-wide identification and analysis of the chicken basic helix-loop-helix factors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wu-Yi; Zhao, Chun-Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Members of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors play important roles in a wide range of developmental processes. In this study, we conducted a genome-wide survey using the chicken (Gallus gallus) genomic database, and identified 104 bHLH sequences belonging to 42 gene families in an effort to characterize the chicken bHLH transcription factor family. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that chicken has 50, 21, 15, 4, 8, and 3 bHLH members in groups A, B, C, D, E, and F, respectively, while three members belonging to none of these groups were classified as ''orphans". A comparison between chicken and human bHLH repertoires suggested that both organisms have a number of lineage-specific bHLH members in the proteomes. Chromosome distribution patterns and phylogenetic analyses strongly suggest that the bHLH members should have arisen through gene duplication at an early date. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment statistics showed 51 top GO annotations of biological processes counted in the frequency. The present study deepens our understanding of the chicken bHLH transcription factor family and provides much useful information for further studies using chicken as a model system.

  18. Face recognition in newly hatched chicks at the onset of vision.

    PubMed

    Wood, Samantha M W; Wood, Justin N

    2015-04-01

    How does face recognition emerge in the newborn brain? To address this question, we used an automated controlled-rearing method with a newborn animal model: the domestic chick (Gallus gallus). This automated method allowed us to examine chicks' face recognition abilities at the onset of both face experience and object experience. In the first week of life, newly hatched chicks were raised in controlled-rearing chambers that contained no objects other than a single virtual human face. In the second week of life, we used an automated forced-choice testing procedure to examine whether chicks could distinguish that familiar face from a variety of unfamiliar faces. Chicks successfully distinguished the familiar face from most of the unfamiliar faces-for example, chicks were sensitive to changes in the face's age, gender, and orientation (upright vs. inverted). Thus, chicks can build an accurate representation of the first face they see in their life. These results show that the initial state of face recognition is surprisingly powerful: Newborn visual systems can begin encoding and recognizing faces at the onset of vision. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Sexing of chicken eggs by fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy through the shell membrane

    PubMed Central

    Preusse, Grit; Schnabel, Christian; Bartels, Thomas; Cramer, Kerstin; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Koch, Edmund; Steiner, Gerald

    2018-01-01

    In order to provide an alternative to day-old chick culling in the layer hatcheries, a noninvasive method for egg sexing is required at an early stage of incubation before onset of embryo sensitivity. Fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy of blood offers the potential for precise and contactless in ovo sex determination of the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus f. dom.) eggs already during the fourth incubation day. However, such kind of optical spectroscopy requires a window in the egg shell, is thus invasive to the embryo and leads to decreased hatching rates. Here, we show that near infrared Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy can be performed on perfused extraembryonic vessels while leaving the inner egg shell membrane intact. Sparing the shell membrane makes the measurement minimally invasive, so that the sexing procedure does not affect hatching rates. We analyze the effect of the membrane above the vessels on fluorescence signal intensity and on Raman spectrum of blood, and propose a correction method to compensate for it. After compensation, we attain a correct sexing rate above 90% by applying supervised classification of spectra. Therefore, this approach offers the best premises towards practical deployment in the hatcheries. PMID:29474445

  20. Chromosome Painting in Three Species of Buteoninae: A Cytogenetic Signature Reinforces the Monophyly of South American Species

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano C.; Tagliarini, Marcella Mergulhão; dos Santos, Michelly S.; O'Brien, Patricia C. M.; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A.

    2013-01-01

    Buteoninae (Falconiformes, Accipitridae) consist of the widely distributed genus Buteo, and several closely related species in a group called “sub-buteonine hawks”, such as Buteogallus, Parabuteo, Asturina, Leucopternis and Busarellus, with unsolved phylogenetic relationships. Diploid number ranges between 2n = 66 and 2n = 68. Only one species, L. albicollis had its karyotype analyzed by molecular cytogenetics. The aim of this study was to present chromosomal analysis of three species of Buteoninae: Rupornis magnirostris, Asturina nitida and Buteogallus meridionallis using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments with telomeric and rDNA probes, as well as whole chromosome probes derived from Gallus gallus and Leucopternis albicollis. The three species analyzed herein showed similar karyotypes, with 2n = 68. Telomeric probes showed some interstitial telomeric sequences, which could be resulted by fusion processes occurred in the chromosomal evolution of the group, including the one found in the tassociation GGA1p/GGA6. In fact, this association was observed in all the three species analyzed in this paper, and also in L. albicollis, suggesting that it represents a cytogenetic signature which reinforces the monophyly of Neotropical buteoninae species. PMID:23922908

  1. East African origins for Madagascan chickens as indicated by mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Michael B.; Thomson, Vicki A.; Wadley, Jessica J.; Piper, Philip J.; Sulandari, Sri; Dharmayanthi, Anik Budhi; Kraitsek, Spiridoula; Gongora, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    The colonization of Madagascar by Austronesian-speaking people during AD 50–500 represents the most westerly point of the greatest diaspora in prehistory. A range of economically important plants and animals may have accompanied the Austronesians. Domestic chickens (Gallus gallus) are found in Madagascar, but it is unclear how they arrived there. Did they accompany the initial Austronesian-speaking populations that reached Madagascar via the Indian Ocean or were they late arrivals with Arabian and African sea-farers? To address this question, we investigated the mitochondrial DNA control region diversity of modern chickens sampled from around the Indian Ocean rim (Southeast Asia, South Asia, the Arabian Peninsula, East Africa and Madagascar). In contrast to the linguistic and human genetic evidence indicating dual African and Southeast Asian ancestry of the Malagasy people, we find that chickens in Madagascar only share a common ancestor with East Africa, which together are genetically closer to South Asian chickens than to those in Southeast Asia. This suggests that the earliest expansion of Austronesian-speaking people across the Indian Ocean did not successfully introduce chickens to Madagascar. Our results further demonstrate the complexity of the translocation history of introduced domesticates in Madagascar. PMID:28405364

  2. A Novel in Vivo Model for Assessing the Impact of Geophagic Earth on Iron Status

    PubMed Central

    Seim, Gretchen L.; Tako, Elad; Ahn, Cedric; Glahn, Raymond P.; Young, Sera L.

    2016-01-01

    The causes and consequences of geophagy, the craving and consumption of earth, remain enigmatic, despite its recognition as a behavior with public health implications. Iron deficiency has been proposed as both a cause and consequence of geophagy, but methodological limitations have precluded a decisive investigation into this relationship. Here we present a novel in vivo model for assessing the impact of geophagic earth on iron status: Gallus gallus (broiler chicken). For four weeks, animals were gavaged daily with varying dosages of geophagic material or pure clay mineral. Differences in haemoglobin (Hb) across treatment groups were assessed weekly and differences in liver ferritin, liver iron, and gene expression of the iron transporters divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), duodenal cytochrome B (DcytB) and ferroportin were assessed at the end of the study. Minimal impact on iron status indicators was observed in all non-control groups, suggesting dosing of geophagic materials may need refining in future studies. However, this model shows clear advantages over prior methods used both in vitro and in humans, and represents an important step in explaining the public health impact of geophagy on iron status. PMID:27304966

  3. Is domestication driven by reduced fear of humans? Boldness, metabolism and serotonin levels in divergently selected red junglefowl (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Agnvall, Beatrix; Katajamaa, Rebecca; Altimiras, Jordi; Jensen, Per

    2015-09-01

    Domesticated animals tend to develop a coherent set of phenotypic traits. Tameness could be a central underlying factor driving this, and we therefore selected red junglefowl, ancestors of all domestic chickens, for high or low fear of humans during six generations. We measured basal metabolic rate (BMR), feed efficiency, boldness in a novel object (NO) test, corticosterone reactivity and basal serotonin levels (related to fearfulness) in birds from the fifth and sixth generation of the high- and low-fear lines, respectively (44-48 individuals). Corticosterone response to physical restraint did not differ between selection lines. However, BMR was higher in low-fear birds, as was feed efficiency. Low-fear males had higher plasma levels of serotonin and both low-fear males and females were bolder in an NO test. The results show that many aspects of the domesticated phenotype may have developed as correlated responses to reduced fear of humans, an essential trait for successful domestication. © 2015 The Author(s).

  4. A comparative physical map reveals the pattern of chromosomal evolution between the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) and chicken (Gallus gallus) genomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A robust bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based physical map is essential for many aspects of genomics research, including an understanding of chromosome evolution, high-resolution genome mapping, marker-assisted breeding, positional cloning of genes, and quantitative trait analysis. To facilitate turkey genetics research and better understand avian genome evolution, a BAC-based integrated physical, genetic, and comparative map was developed for this important agricultural species. Results The turkey genome physical map was constructed based on 74,013 BAC fingerprints (11.9 × coverage) from two independent libraries, and it was integrated with the turkey genetic map and chicken genome sequence using over 41,400 BAC assignments identified by 3,499 overgo hybridization probes along with > 43,000 BAC end sequences. The physical-comparative map consists of 74 BAC contigs, with an average contig size of 13.6 Mb. All but four of the turkey chromosomes were spanned on this map by three or fewer contigs, with 14 chromosomes spanned by a single contig and nine chromosomes spanned by two contigs. This map predicts 20 to 27 major rearrangements distinguishing turkey and chicken chromosomes, despite up to 40 million years of separate evolution between the two species. These data elucidate the chromosomal evolutionary pattern within the Phasianidae that led to the modern turkey and chicken karyotypes. The predominant rearrangement mode involves intra-chromosomal inversions, and there is a clear bias for these to result in centromere locations at or near telomeres in turkey chromosomes, in comparison to interstitial centromeres in the orthologous chicken chromosomes. Conclusion The BAC-based turkey-chicken comparative map provides novel insights into the evolution of avian genomes, a framework for assembly of turkey whole genome shotgun sequencing data, and tools for enhanced genetic improvement of these important agricultural and model species. PMID:21906286

  5. Cumulative Index to Chemicals and to Common and Scientific Names of Species Listed in Contaminant Hazard Reviews 1 Through 34.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-03-01

    5 21. Anemone Plumose, Metridium senile Sea, Anemonia viridis , Anthopleura xanihogrammica Anemonia viridis : 33 49, 69. Anguilla anguilla: 8 12... Fragaria vesca: 3 4. Gallinule, purple, Porphyrula martinica Fratercula spp.: 2 15; 21 19, 20. Gallus spp.: 1 5, 9, 15,19; 2 iii, 24, 31; 3 11,23, 24...zibethicus Mussel Brown, Perna indica Common, Mytilus edulis Duck, Anodonta anatina, A. nuttalliana Green-lipped, Perna viridis Hooked, Ischadium

  6. The development of newborn object recognition in fast and slow visual worlds

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Justin N.; Wood, Samantha M. W.

    2016-01-01

    Object recognition is central to perception and cognition. Yet relatively little is known about the environmental factors that cause invariant object recognition to emerge in the newborn brain. Is this ability a hardwired property of vision? Or does the development of invariant object recognition require experience with a particular kind of visual environment? Here, we used a high-throughput controlled-rearing method to examine whether newborn chicks (Gallus gallus) require visual experience with slowly changing objects to develop invariant object recognition abilities. When newborn chicks were raised with a slowly rotating virtual object, the chicks built invariant object representations that generalized across novel viewpoints and rotation speeds. In contrast, when newborn chicks were raised with a virtual object that rotated more quickly, the chicks built viewpoint-specific object representations that failed to generalize to novel viewpoints and rotation speeds. Moreover, there was a direct relationship between the speed of the object and the amount of invariance in the chick's object representation. Thus, visual experience with slowly changing objects plays a critical role in the development of invariant object recognition. These results indicate that invariant object recognition is not a hardwired property of vision, but is learned rapidly when newborns encounter a slowly changing visual world. PMID:27097925

  7. Spontaneous generalization of abstract multimodal patterns in young domestic chicks.

    PubMed

    Versace, Elisabetta; Spierings, Michelle J; Caffini, Matteo; Ten Cate, Carel; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2017-05-01

    From the early stages of life, learning the regularities associated with specific objects is crucial for making sense of experiences. Through filial imprinting, young precocial birds quickly learn the features of their social partners by mere exposure. It is not clear though to what extent chicks can extract abstract patterns of the visual and acoustic stimuli present in the imprinting object, and how they combine them. To investigate this issue, we exposed chicks (Gallus gallus) to three days of visual and acoustic imprinting, using either patterns with two identical items or patterns with two different items, presented visually, acoustically or in both modalities. Next, chicks were given a choice between the familiar and the unfamiliar pattern, present in either the multimodal, visual or acoustic modality. The responses to the novel stimuli were affected by their imprinting experience, and the effect was stronger for chicks imprinted with multimodal patterns than for the other groups. Interestingly, males and females adopted a different strategy, with males more attracted by unfamiliar patterns and females more attracted by familiar patterns. Our data show that chicks can generalize abstract patterns by mere exposure through filial imprinting and that multimodal stimulation is more effective than unimodal stimulation for pattern learning.

  8. Intuitive physical reasoning about occluded objects by inexperienced chicks

    PubMed Central

    Chiandetti, Cinzia; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Questions concerning the role of nature and nurture in higher cognition appear to be intractable if one restricts one's attention to development in humans. However, in other domains, such as sensory development, much information has been gained from controlled rearing studies with animals. Here, we used a similar experimental strategy to investigate intuitive reasoning about occluded objects. Newborn domestic chicks (Gallus gallus) were reared singly with a small object that became their social partner. They were then accustomed to rejoin such an imprinting object when it was made to move and disappear behind either one of two identical opaque screens. After disappearance of the imprinting object, chicks were faced with two screens of different slants, or of different height or different width, which may or may not have been compatible with the presence of the imprinting object hidden beneath/behind them. Chicks consistently chose the screen of slant/height/width compatible with the presence of the object beneath/behind it. Preventing chicks from touching and pecking at the imprinting object before testing did not affect the results, suggesting that intuitive reasoning about physical objects is largely independent of specific experience of interaction with objects and of objects' occluding events. PMID:21270036

  9. The Seminal fluid proteome of the polyandrous Red junglefowl offers insights into the molecular basis of fertility, reproductive ageing and domestication

    PubMed Central

    Borziak, Kirill; Álvarez-Fernández, Aitor; L. Karr, Timothy; Pizzari, Tommaso; Dorus, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Seminal fluid proteins (SFPs) are emerging as fundamental contributors to sexual selection given their role in post-mating reproductive events, particularly in polyandrous species where the ejaculates of different males compete for fertilisation. SFP identification however remains taxonomically limited and little is known about avian SFPs, despite extensive work on sexual selection in birds. We characterize the SF proteome of the polyandrous Red junglefowl, Gallus gallus, the wild species that gave rise to the domestic chicken. We identify 1,141 SFPs, including proteins involved in immunity and antimicrobial defences, sperm maturation, and fertilisation, revealing a functionally complex SF proteome. This includes a predominant contribution of blood plasma proteins that is conserved with human SF. By comparing the proteome of young and old males with fast or slow sperm velocity in a balanced design, we identify proteins associated with ageing and sperm velocity, and show that old males that retain high sperm velocity have distinct proteome characteristics. SFP comparisons with domestic chickens revealed both qualitative and quantitative differences likely associated with domestication and artificial selection. Collectively, these results shed light onto the functional complexity of avian SF, and provide a platform for molecular studies of fertility, reproductive ageing, and domestication. PMID:27804984

  10. Teratogenic efects of injected methylmercury on avian embryos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, Gary H.; Hoffman, David J.; Klimstra, Jon D.; Stebbins, Katherine R.; Kondrad, Shannon L.; Erwin, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Controlled laboratory studies with game farm mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and chickens (Gallus gallus) have demonstrated that methylmercury can cause teratogenic effects in birds, but studies with wild species of birds are lacking. To address this need, doses of methylmercury chloride were injected into the eggs of 25 species of birds, and the dead embryos and hatched chicks were examined for external deformities. When data for controls were summed across all 25 species tested and across all types of deformities, 24 individuals out of a total of 1,533 (a rate of 1.57%) exhibited at least one deformity. In contrast, when data for all of the mercury treatments and all 25 species were summed, 188 deformed individuals out of a total of 2,292 (8.20%) were found. Some deformities, such as lordosis and scoliosis (twisting of the spine), misshapen heads, shortening or twisting of the neck, and deformities of the wings, were seldom observed in controls but occurred in much greater frequency in Hg-treated individuals. Only 0.59% of individual control dead embryos and hatchlings exhibited multiple deformities versus 3.18% for Hg-dosed dead embryos and hatchlings. Methylmercury seems to have a widespread teratogenic potential across many species of birds.

  11. Fostering efficacy and toxicity evaluation of traditional Chinese medicine and natural products: Chick embryo as a high throughput model bridging in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tong; Yu, Gui-Yuan; Xiao, Jia; Yan, Chang; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Li, Yi-Fang; So, Kwok-Fai; He, Rong-Rong

    2018-04-19

    Efficacy and safety assessments are essential thresholds for drug candidates from preclinical to clinical research. Conventional mammalian in vivo models cannot offer rapid pharmacological and toxicological screening, whereas cell-based or cell-free in vitro systems often lead to inaccurate results because of the lack of physiological environment. Within the avian species, gallus gallus is the first bird to have its genome sequencing. Meantime, chick embryo is an easily operating, relatively transparent and extensively accessible model, whose physiological and pathological alterations can be visualized by egg candler, staining and image technologies. These features facilitate chick embryo as a high-throughput screening platform bridging in vivo and in vitro gaps in the pharmaceutical research. Due to the complicated ingredients and multiple-targets natures of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), testing the efficacy and safety of TCM by in vitro methods are laborious and inaccurate, while testing in mammalian models consume massive cost and time. As such, the productive living organism chick embryo serves as an ideal biological system for pharmacodynamics studies of TCM. Herein, we comprehensively update recent progresses on the specialty of chick embryo in evaluation of efficacy and toxicity of drugs, with special concerns of TCM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The contrasting role of male relatedness in different mechanisms of sexual selection in red junglefowl

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cedric Kai Wei; Doyle, Philippa; Bagshaw, Emma; Richardson, David S.; Wigby, Stuart; Pizzari, Tommaso

    2017-01-01

    In structured populations, competition for reproductive opportunities should be relaxed among related males. The few tests of this prediction often neglect the fact that sexual selection acts through multiple mechanisms, both before and after mating. We performed experiments to study the role of within‐group male relatedness across pre‐ and postcopulatory mechanisms of sexual selection in social groups of red junglefowl, Gallus gallus, in which two related males and one unrelated male competed over females unrelated to all the males. We confirm theoretical expectations that, after controlling for male social status, competition over mating was reduced among related males. However, this effect was contrasted by other sexual selection mechanisms. First, females biased male mating in favor of the unrelated male, and might also favor his inseminations after mating. Second, males invested more—rather than fewer—sperm in postcopulatory competition with relatives. A number of factors may contribute to explain this counterintuitive pattern of sperm allocation, including trade‐offs between male investment in pre‐ versus postcopulatory competition, differences in the relative relatedness of pre‐ versus postcopulatory competitors, and female bias in sperm utilization in response to male relatedness. Collectively, these results reveal that within‐group male relatedness may have contrasting effects in different mechanisms of sexual selection. PMID:27925168

  13. Expression, purification and characterization of soluble red rooster laforin as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Brewer, M Kathryn; Husodo, Satrio; Dukhande, Vikas V; Johnson, Mary Beth; Gentry, Matthew S

    2014-04-02

    The gene that encodes laforin, a dual-specificity phosphatase with a carbohydrate-binding module, is mutated in Lafora disease (LD). LD is an autosomal recessive, fatal progressive myoclonus epilepsy characterized by the intracellular buildup of insoluble, hyperphosphorylated glycogen-like particles, called Lafora bodies. Laforin dephosphorylates glycogen and other glucans in vitro, but the structural basis of its activity remains unknown. Recombinant human laforin when expressed in and purified from E. coli is largely insoluble and prone to aggregation and precipitation. Identification of a laforin ortholog that is more soluble and stable in vitro would circumvent this issue. In this study, we cloned multiple laforin orthologs, established a purification scheme for each, and tested their solubility and stability. Gallus gallus (Gg) laforin is more stable in vitro than human laforin, Gg-laforin is largely monomeric, and it possesses carbohydrate binding and phosphatase activity similar to human laforin. Gg-laforin is more soluble and stable than human laforin in vitro, and possesses similar activity as a glucan phosphatase. Therefore, it can be used to model human laforin in structure-function studies. We have established a protocol for purifying recombinant Gg-laforin in sufficient quantity for crystallographic and other biophysical analyses, in order to better understand the function of laforin and define the molecular mechanisms of Lafora disease.

  14. The measure and significance of Bateman's principles

    PubMed Central

    Collet, Julie M.; Dean, Rebecca F.; Worley, Kirsty; Richardson, David S.; Pizzari, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    Bateman's principles explain sex roles and sexual dimorphism through sex-specific variance in mating success, reproductive success and their relationships within sexes (Bateman gradients). Empirical tests of these principles, however, have come under intense scrutiny. Here, we experimentally show that in replicate groups of red junglefowl, Gallus gallus, mating and reproductive successes were more variable in males than in females, resulting in a steeper male Bateman gradient, consistent with Bateman's principles. However, we use novel quantitative techniques to reveal that current methods typically overestimate Bateman's principles because they (i) infer mating success indirectly from offspring parentage, and thus miss matings that fail to result in fertilization, and (ii) measure Bateman gradients through the univariate regression of reproductive over mating success, without considering the substantial influence of other components of male reproductive success, namely female fecundity and paternity share. We also find a significant female Bateman gradient but show that this likely emerges as spurious consequences of male preference for fecund females, emphasizing the need for experimental approaches to establish the causal relationship between reproductive and mating success. While providing qualitative support for Bateman's principles, our study demonstrates how current approaches can generate a misleading view of sex differences and roles. PMID:24648220

  15. Shapes of Differential Pulse Voltammograms and Level of Metallothionein at Different Animal Species

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Vojtech; Beklova, Miroslava; Pikula, Jiri; Hubalek, Jaromir; Trnkova, Libuse; Kizek, Rene

    2007-01-01

    Metallothioneins play a key role in maintaining homeostasis of essential metals and in protecting of cells against metal toxicity as well as oxidative damaging. Excepting humans, blood levels of metallothionein have not yet been reported from any animal species. Blood plasma samples of 9 animal species were analysed by the adsorptive transfer stripping technique to obtain species specific voltammograms. Quite distinct records were obtained from the Takin (Budorcas taxicolor), while other interesting records were observed in samples from the European Bison (Bison bonasus bonasus) and the Red-eared Slider (Trachemys scripta elegans). To quantify metallothionein the catalytic peak Cat2 was used, well developed in the Domestic Fowl (Gallus gallus f. domestica) and showing a very low signal in the Red Deer (Cervus elaphus). The highest levels of metallothionein reaching over 20 µM were found in the Domestic Fowl. High levels of MT were also found in the Bearded Dragon (Pogona vitticeps) and the Grey Wolf (Canis lupus lupus). The lowest values of about 1-3 µM were determined in the Red-eared Slider, Takin and Red Deer. Employing a simple electrochemical detection it was possible to examine variation in blood metallothionein in different species of vertebrates. PMID:28903235

  16. Evolutionary Analysis and Expression Profiling of Zebra Finch Immune Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ekblom, Robert; French, Lisa; Slate, Jon; Burke, Terry

    2010-01-01

    Genes of the immune system are generally considered to evolve rapidly due to host–parasite coevolution. They are therefore of great interest in evolutionary biology and molecular ecology. In this study, we manually annotated 144 avian immune genes from the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) genome and conducted evolutionary analyses of these by comparing them with their orthologs in the chicken (Gallus gallus). Genes classified as immune receptors showed elevated dN/dS ratios compared with other classes of immune genes. Immune genes in general also appear to be evolving more rapidly than other genes, as inferred from a higher dN/dS ratio compared with the rest of the genome. Furthermore, ten genes (of 27) for which sequence data were available from at least three bird species showed evidence of positive selection acting on specific codons. From transcriptome data of eight different tissues, we found evidence for expression of 106 of the studied immune genes, with primary expression of most of these in bursa, blood, and spleen. These immune-related genes showed a more tissue-specific expression pattern than other genes in the zebra finch genome. Several of the avian immune genes investigated here provide strong candidates for in-depth studies of molecular adaptation in birds. PMID:20884724

  17. Colour preferences and colour vision in poultry chicks.

    PubMed

    Ham, A D; Osorio, D

    2007-08-22

    The dramatic colours of biological communication signals raise questions about how animals perceive suprathreshold colour differences, and there are long-standing questions about colour preferences and colour categorization by non-human species. This study investigates preferences of foraging poultry chicks (Gallus gallus) as they peck at coloured objects. Work on colour recognition often deals with responses to monochromatic lights and how animals divide the spectrum. We used complementary colours, where the intermediate is grey, and related the chicks' choices to three models of the factors that may affect the attractiveness. Two models assume that attractiveness is determined by a metric based on the colour discrimination threshold either (i) by chromatic contrast against the background or (ii) relative to an internal standard. An alternative third model is that categorization is important. We tested newly hatched and 9-day-old chicks with four pairs of (avian) complementary colours, which were orange, blue, red and green for humans. Chromatic contrast was more relevant to newly hatched chicks than to 9-day-old birds, but in neither case could contrast alone account for preferences; especially for orange over blue. For older chicks, there is evidence for categorization of complementary colours, with a boundary at grey.

  18. An argument for the chicken embryo as a model for the developmental toxicological effects of the polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs)

    SciTech Connect

    Henshel, D.S.

    1996-12-31

    This article will present the argument that the chicken embryo is especially appropriate as an animal model for studying the mechanism of the developmental toxicological effects of the polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs). The PHAHs are a group of toxicologically related compounds including, in part, the polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, dibenzofurans and biphenyls. The chicken (Gallus gallus) embryo is relatively sensitive to the toxicological effects of the PHAHs being approximately two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the mature bird. The chicken embryo has been used to demonstrate general toxicological teratogeneicity, hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity. Many of these effects, or analogous effects, have alsomore » been observed in mammals and fish. Thus, most animals appear to respond to the PHAHs with a similar toxicological profile, indicating that many of the biomarkers used for the PHAHs are valid across a number of species, including the chicken. Furthermore, the chicken embryo is relatively inexpensive to use for toxicity testing. In addition, all effects detected are due to direct effects on the embryo and are not complicated by maternal interactions. In short, for sensitivity, ease of use, cost and applicability of results to other animals, the chicken embryo is an excellent animal model for evaluation of the mechanism underlying the developmental toxicological effects of the PHAHs.« less

  19. Reconstructing Asian faunal introductions to eastern Africa from multi-proxy biomolecular and archaeological datasets

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Michael; Crowther, Alison; Frantz, Laurent; Eager, Heidi; Lebrasseur, Ophélie; Hutterer, Rainer; Hulme-Beaman, Ardern; Van Neer, Wim; Douka, Katerina; Veall, Margaret-Ashley; Quintana Morales, Eriéndira M.; Schuenemann, Verena J.; Reiter, Ella; Allen, Richard; Dimopoulos, Evangelos A.; Helm, Richard M.; Shipton, Ceri; Mwebi, Ogeto; Denys, Christiane; Horton, Mark; Wynne-Jones, Stephanie; Fleisher, Jeffrey; Radimilahy, Chantal; Wright, Henry; Searle, Jeremy B.; Krause, Johannes; Larson, Greger; Boivin, Nicole L.

    2017-01-01

    Human-mediated biological exchange has had global social and ecological impacts. In sub-Saharan Africa, several domestic and commensal animals were introduced from Asia in the pre-modern period; however, the timing and nature of these introductions remain contentious. One model supports introduction to the eastern African coast after the mid-first millennium CE, while another posits introduction dating back to 3000 BCE. These distinct scenarios have implications for understanding the emergence of long-distance maritime connectivity, and the ecological and economic impacts of introduced species. Resolution of this longstanding debate requires new efforts, given the lack of well-dated fauna from high-precision excavations, and ambiguous osteomorphological identifications. We analysed faunal remains from 22 eastern African sites spanning a wide geographic and chronological range, and applied biomolecular techniques to confirm identifications of two Asian taxa: domestic chicken (Gallus gallus) and black rat (Rattus rattus). Our approach included ancient DNA (aDNA) analysis aided by BLAST-based bioinformatics, Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry (ZooMS) collagen fingerprinting, and direct AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) radiocarbon dating. Our results support a late, mid-first millennium CE introduction of these species. We discuss the implications of our findings for models of biological exchange, and emphasize the applicability of our approach to tropical areas with poor bone preservation. PMID:28817590

  20. Intestinal and haematic parasitism in the birds of the Almuñecar (Granada, Spain) ornithological garden.

    PubMed

    Cordón, G Pérez; Prados, A Hitos; Romero, D; Moreno, M Sánchez; Pontes, A; Osuna, A; Rosales, M J

    2009-11-12

    Birds from the Almuñecar ornithological garden (Granada, Spain) were surveyed from June 2006 to May 2007 to establish programmes to prevent, control, and treat intestinal and haematic parasites. A total of 984 faecal samples and 41 samples of blood were collected from Psittacidae, Cacatuidae, Phasianidae, and Anatidae. One or more intestinal parasites were identified in 51.6% of the samples. Blood parasites were found in 26.8% of the birds examined. The most frequent pathogenic endoparasites were coccidians, such as Cyclospora sp. (4.5%), Eimeria sp. (4.1%) and Isospora sp. (2%) and helminths such as Capillaria sp. (10. 1%), Ascaridia sp. (4.9%) and Heterakis gallinarum (4.9%). All the parasites varied with season but the most were found year round. Multiple parasitic infections by intestinal parasites were common, with 196 of 984 faecal samples having 2-5 intestinal parasites. The most frequent cases of multiple parasitism were Blastocystis plus Entamoeba sp. and Blastocystis plus Cyclospora sp. The haematic protozoa detected were Haemoproteus sp. (17%) and Plasmodium sp. (7.3%). Multiple parasitism by Haemoproteus sp. and Plasmodium sp. was detected in 1 sample of Gallus gallus. After each sampling, some of the affected animals were treated according to our results, and the corresponding programmes of prevention and control were designed.

  1. Multidirectional chromosome painting in Synallaxis frontalis (Passeriformes, Furnariidae) reveals high chromosomal reorganization, involving fissions and inversions.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Rafael; de Lima, Vanusa Lilian Camargo; de Souza, Marcelo Santos; Costa, Alice Lemos; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano Corrêa; Gunski, Ricardo José; Garnero, Analía Del Valle

    2018-01-01

    In this work we performed comparative chromosome painting using probes from Gallus gallus (GGA) Linnaeus, 1758 and Leucopternis albicollis (LAL) Latham, 1790 in Synallaxis frontalis Pelzeln, 1859 (Passeriformes, Furnariidae), an exclusively Neotropical species, in order to analyze whether the complex pattern of intrachromosomal rearrangements (paracentric and pericentric inversions) proposed for Oscines and Suboscines is shared with more basal species. S. frontalis has 82 chromosomes, similar to most Avian species, with a large number of microchromosomes and a few pairs of macrochromosomes. We found polymorphisms in pairs 1 and 3, where homologues were submetacentric and acrocentric. Hybridization of GGA probes showed syntenies in the majority of ancestral macrochromosomes, except for GGA1 and GGA2, which hybridized to more than one pair of chromosomes each. LAL probes confirmed the occurrence of intrachromosomal rearrangements in the chromosomes corresponding to GGA1q, as previously proposed for species from the order Passeriformes. In addition, LAL probes suggest that pericentric inversions or centromere repositioning were responsible for variations in the morphology of the heteromorphic pairs 1 and 3. Altogether, the analysis of our data on chromosome painting and the data published in other Passeriformes highlights chromosomal changes that have occurred during the evolution of Passeriformes.

  2. Identifying artificial selection signals in the chicken genome.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yunlong; Gu, Lantao; Yang, Liubin; Sun, Chenghao; Xie, Shengsong; Fang, Chengchi; Gong, Yangzhang; Li, Shijun

    2018-01-01

    Identifying the signals of artificial selection can contribute to further shaping economically important traits. Here, a chicken 600k SNP-array was employed to detect the signals of artificial selection using 331 individuals from 9 breeds, including Jingfen (JF), Jinghong (JH), Araucanas (AR), White Leghorn (WL), Pekin-Bantam (PB), Shamo (SH), Gallus-Gallus-Spadiceus (GA), Rheinlander (RH) and Vorwerkhuhn (VO). Per the population genetic structure, 9 breeds were combined into 5 breed-pools, and a 'two-step' strategy was used to reveal the signals of artificial selection. GA, which has little artificial selection, was defined as the reference population, and a total of 204, 155, 305 and 323 potential artificial selection signals were identified in AR_VO, PB, RH_WL and JH_JF, respectively. We also found signals derived from standing and de-novo genetic variations have contributed to adaptive evolution during artificial selection. Further enrichment analysis suggests that the genomic regions of artificial selection signals harbour genes, including THSR, PTHLH and PMCH, responsible for economic traits, such as fertility, growth and immunization. Overall, this study found a series of genes that contribute to the improvement of chicken breeds and revealed the genetic mechanisms of adaptive evolution, which can be used as fundamental information in future chicken functional genomics study.

  3. Multidirectional chromosome painting in Synallaxis frontalis (Passeriformes, Furnariidae) reveals high chromosomal reorganization, involving fissions and inversions

    PubMed Central

    Kretschmer, Rafael; de Lima, Vanusa Lilian Camargo; de Souza, Marcelo Santos; Costa, Alice Lemos; O’Brien, Patricia C. M.; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A.; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano Corrêa; Gunski, Ricardo José; Garnero, Analía Del Valle

    2018-01-01

    Abstract In this work we performed comparative chromosome painting using probes from Gallus gallus (GGA) Linnaeus, 1758 and Leucopternis albicollis (LAL) Latham, 1790 in Synallaxis frontalis Pelzeln, 1859 (Passeriformes, Furnariidae), an exclusively Neotropical species, in order to analyze whether the complex pattern of intrachromosomal rearrangements (paracentric and pericentric inversions) proposed for Oscines and Suboscines is shared with more basal species. S. frontalis has 82 chromosomes, similar to most Avian species, with a large number of microchromosomes and a few pairs of macrochromosomes. We found polymorphisms in pairs 1 and 3, where homologues were submetacentric and acrocentric. Hybridization of GGA probes showed syntenies in the majority of ancestral macrochromosomes, except for GGA1 and GGA2, which hybridized to more than one pair of chromosomes each. LAL probes confirmed the occurrence of intrachromosomal rearrangements in the chromosomes corresponding to GGA1q, as previously proposed for species from the order Passeriformes. In addition, LAL probes suggest that pericentric inversions or centromere repositioning were responsible for variations in the morphology of the heteromorphic pairs 1 and 3. Altogether, the analysis of our data on chromosome painting and the data published in other Passeriformes highlights chromosomal changes that have occurred during the evolution of Passeriformes. PMID:29675139

  4. Differential expression analysis of the broiler tracheal proteins responsible for the immune response and muscle contraction induced by high concentration of ammonia using iTRAQ-coupled 2D LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Tang, Xiangfang; Meng, Qingshi; Zhang, Hongfu

    2016-11-01

    Ammonia has been considered the contaminant primarily responsible for respiratory disease in poultry. Even though it can cause tracheal lesions, its adverse effects on the trachea have not been sufficiently studied. The present study investigated tracheal changes in Arbor Acres broilers (Gallus gallus) induced by high concentration of ammonia using isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based proteome analysis. In total, 3,706 proteins within false discovery rate of 1% were identified, including 119 significantly differentially expressed proteins. Functional analysis revealed that proteins related to immune response and muscle contraction were significantly enriched. With respect to the immune response, up-regulated proteins (like FGA) were pro-inflammatory, while down-regulated proteins participated in antigen processing and antigen presenting (like MYO1G), immunoglobulin and cathelicidin production (like fowlicidin-2), and immunodeficiency (like PTPRC). Regarding muscle contraction, all differentially expressed proteins (like TPM1) were up-regulated. An over-expression of mucin, which is a common feature of airway disease, was also observed. Additionally, the transcriptional alterations of 6 selected proteins were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Overall, proteomic changes suggested the onset of airway obstruction and diminished host defense in trachea after ammonia exposure. These results may serve as a valuable reference for future interventions against ammonia toxicity.

  5. The Modes of Evolutionary Emergence of Primal and Late Pandemic Influenza Virus Strains from Viral Reservoir in Animals: An Interdisciplinary Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shoham, Dany

    2011-01-01

    Based on a wealth of recent findings, in conjunction with earliest chronologies pertaining to evolutionary emergences of ancestral RNA viruses, ducks, Influenzavirus A (assumingly within ducks), and hominids, as well as to the initial domestication of mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos), jungle fowl (Gallus gallus), wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), wild boar (Sus scrofa), and wild horse (Equus ferus), presumed genesis modes of primordial pandemic influenza strains have multidisciplinarily been configured. The virological fundamentality of domestication and farming of those various avian and mammalian species has thereby been demonstrated and broadly elucidated, within distinctive coevolutionary paradigms. The mentioned viral genesis modes were then analyzed, compatibly with common denominators and flexibility that mark the geographic profile of the last 18 pandemic strains, which reputedly emerged since 1510, the antigenic profile of the last 10 pandemic strains since 1847, and the genomic profile of the last 5 pandemic strains since 1918, until present. Related ecophylogenetic and biogeographic aspects have been enlightened, alongside with the crucial role of spatial virus gene dissemination by avian hosts. A fairly coherent picture of primary and late evolutionary and genomic courses of pandemic strains has thus been attained, tentatively. Specific patterns underlying complexes prone to generate past and future pandemic strains from viral reservoir in animals are consequentially derived. PMID:23074663

  6. Maternal dietary zinc supplementation enhances the epigenetic-activated antioxidant ability of chick embryos from maternal normal and high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongwen; Liao, Xiudong; Lu, Lin; Li, Wenxiang; Zhang, Liyang; Ji, Cheng; Lin, Xi; Liu, Hsiao-Ching; Odle, Jack; Luo, Xugang

    2017-03-21

    The role of maternal dietary zinc supplementation in protecting the embryos from maternal hyperthermia-induced negative effects via epigenetic mechanisms was examined using an avian model (Gallus gallus). Broiler breeder hens were exposed to two maternal temperatures (21°C and 32°C) × three maternal dietary zinc treatments (zinc-unsupplemented control diet, the control diet + 110 mg zinc/kg inorganic or organic zinc) for 8 weeks. Maternal hyperthermia increased the embryonic mortality and induced oxidative damage evidenced by the elevated mRNA expressions of heat shock protein genes. Maternal dietary zinc deficiency damaged the embryonic development associated with the global DNA hypomethylation and histone 3 lysine 9 hyperacetylation in the embryonic liver. Supplementation of zinc in maternal diets effectively eliminated the embryonic mortality induced by maternal hyperthermia and enhanced antioxidant ability with the increased mRNA and protein expressions of metallothionein IV in the embryonic liver. The increased metallothionein IV mRNA expression was due to the reduced DNA methylation and increased histone 3 lysine 9 acetylation of the metallothionein IV promoter regardless of zinc source. These data demonstrate that maternal dietary zinc addition as an epigenetic modifier could protect the offspring embryonic development against maternal heat stress via enhancing the epigenetic-activated antioxidant ability.

  7. Individual recognition based on communication behaviour of male fowl.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carolynn L; Taubert, Jessica; Weldon, Kimberly; Evans, Christopher S

    2016-04-01

    Correctly directing social behaviour towards a specific individual requires an ability to discriminate between conspecifics. The mechanisms of individual recognition include phenotype matching and familiarity-based recognition. Communication-based recognition is a subset of familiarity-based recognition wherein the classification is based on behavioural or distinctive signalling properties. Male fowl (Gallus gallus) produce a visual display (tidbitting) upon finding food in the presence of a female. Females typically approach displaying males. However, males may tidbit without food. We used the distinctiveness of the visual display and the unreliability of some males to test for communication-based recognition in female fowl. We manipulated the prior experience of the hens with the males to create two classes of males: S(+) wherein the tidbitting signal was paired with a food reward to the female, and S (-) wherein the tidbitting signal occurred without food reward. We then conducted a sequential discrimination test with hens using a live video feed of a familiar male. The results of the discrimination tests revealed that hens discriminated between categories of males based on their signalling behaviour. These results suggest that fowl possess a communication-based recognition system. This is the first demonstration of live-to-video transfer of recognition in any species of bird. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of l-tryptophan and its metabolites on food passage from the crop in chicks.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, T; Kadomoto, Y; Khan, M S I; Makino, R; Cline, M A

    2018-07-01

    l-tryptophan (l-Trp), an essential amino acid, is well known as a precursor of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and melatonin. In mammals, l-Trp itself has been reported to suppress gastric emptying in mammals. In addition, 5-HT and melatonin are found in the gastrointestinal tract and affect food passage from the digestive tract in mammals. While the function of these factors in mammals is documented, there is little knowledge on their function in the digestive tract of birds. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to determine if l-Trp and its metabolites affect the crop emptying rate in chicks (Gallus gallus). We also investigated the effects of kynurenic acid (KYNA) and quinolinic acid (QA), which are metabolites of the kynurenine pathway for l-Trp. Oral administration of l-Trp significantly reduced the crop emptying rate in chicks. Among the metabolites, intraperitoneal injection of 5-HT and melatonin significantly reduced the crop emptying rate, whereas KYNA and QA had no effect. The present study suggests that l-Trp, 5-HT, and melatonin inhibit the movement of food in the digestive tract and thereby affect the utilization of nutrients in the diet of chicks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Rainfall simulation in greenhouse microcosms to assess bacterial-associated runoff from land-applied poultry litter.

    PubMed

    Brooks, John P; Adeli, Ardeshir; Read, John J; McLaughlin, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    Runoff water following a rain event is one possible source of environmental contamination after a manure application. This greenhouse study used a rainfall simulator to determine bacterial-associated runoff from troughs of common bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] that were treated with P-based, N-based, and N plus lime rates of poultry (Gallus gallus) litter, recommended inorganic fertilizer, and control. Total heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria, total and thermotolerant coliforms, enterococci, staphylococci, Clostridium perfringens, Salmonella, and Campylobacter, as well as antibiotic resistance profiles for the staphylococci and enterococci isolates were all monitored in runoff waters. Analysis following five rainfall events indicated that staphylococci, enterococci, and clostridia levels were related to manure application rate. Runoff release of staphylococci, enterococci, and C. perfringens were approximately 3 to 6 log10 greater in litter vs. control treatment. In addition, traditional indicators such as thermotolerant and total coliforms performed poorly as fecal indicators. Some isolated enterococci demonstrated increased antibiotic resistance to polymixin b and/or select aminoglyocosides, while many staphylococci were susceptible to most antimicrobials tested. Results indicated poultry litter application can lead to microbial runoff following simulated rain events. Future studies should focus on the use of staphylococci, enterococci, and C. perfringens as indicators.

  10. ExDom: an integrated database for comparative analysis of the exon–intron structures of protein domains in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Bhasi, Ashwini; Philip, Philge; Manikandan, Vinu; Senapathy, Periannan

    2009-01-01

    We have developed ExDom, a unique database for the comparative analysis of the exon–intron structures of 96 680 protein domains from seven eukaryotic organisms (Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Bos taurus, Rattus norvegicus, Danio rerio, Gallus gallus and Arabidopsis thaliana). ExDom provides integrated access to exon-domain data through a sophisticated web interface which has the following analytical capabilities: (i) intergenomic and intragenomic comparative analysis of exon–intron structure of domains; (ii) color-coded graphical display of the domain architecture of proteins correlated with their corresponding exon-intron structures; (iii) graphical analysis of multiple sequence alignments of amino acid and coding nucleotide sequences of homologous protein domains from seven organisms; (iv) comparative graphical display of exon distributions within the tertiary structures of protein domains; and (v) visualization of exon–intron structures of alternative transcripts of a gene correlated to variations in the domain architecture of corresponding protein isoforms. These novel analytical features are highly suited for detailed investigations on the exon–intron structure of domains and make ExDom a powerful tool for exploring several key questions concerning the function, origin and evolution of genes and proteins. ExDom database is freely accessible at: http://66.170.16.154/ExDom/. PMID:18984624

  11. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Deletion of C1EIS Inhibits Chicken Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation Into Male Germ Cells (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Zuo, Qisheng; Jin, Kai; Wang, Yingjie; Song, Jiuzhou; Zhang, Yani; Li, Bichun

    2017-08-01

    We previously found that C1EIS is preferentially expressed in Chicken spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), so our current study focused on C1EIS's role in Chicken embryonic stem cells (ESCs) differentiation into male germ cells. We constructed a CRISPR/Cas9 vector targeting C1EIS. T7 endonuclease I (T7EI) digestion method and sequencing of TA cloning were used to detect the knock-out efficiency of the Single guide RNA (sgRNA) after the cas9/gRNA vector transfected into D fibroblasts 1(DF-1), ESCs, and Chicken embryos. The results showed that CRISPR/Cas9 gene knockout efficiency is about 40%. Differentiation of the targeted ESCs into SSCs was inhibited at the embryoid body stage due to C1EIS deficiency. Immunofluorescent staining revealed that the mutagenized ESCs (RA (Retinoic Acid) with C1EIS Knock out) expressed lower levels of integrin α6 and integrin β1 compared to wild type cells. Quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR) revealed Oct4 and Sox2 expression significantly increased, contrarily integrin β1 and Stra8 expression significantly decreased than RA induced group and RA with C1EIS Overexpression. During retinoic acid-induced differentiation, knockout of C1EIS in ESCs inhibited formation of SSC-like cells, suggesting C1EIS plays a vital role in promoting differentiation of avian ESCs to SSCs by regulating expression of multiple pluripotency-related genes. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 2380-2386, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Literature Mining of Pathogenesis-Related Proteins in Human Pathogens for Database Annotation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Salmonella , and Shigella. In most cases the host is human, but may also include other mammal species. 2. Negative literature set of PH-PPIs. Of...cis.udel.edu The objective of Gallus Reactome is to provide a curated set of metabolic and signaling pathways for the chicken . To assist annotators...interested in papers that document pathways in the chicken , abstracts are classified according to the species that were the source of the experimental

  13. Relationship between polychlorinated biphenyl 126 treatment and cytochrome P4501A activity in chickens, as measured by in vivo caffeine and ex vivo ethoxyresorufin metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Feyk, L.A.; Giesy, J.P.; Lambert, G.H.

    1999-09-01

    Cytochrome P4501A (CYPIA) activity is often used as a biomarker of exposure of wildlife to polyhalogenated diaromatic hydrocarbons (PHDHs) and is usually measured ex vivo in liver tissue. A caffeine breath test with radiolabeled substrate ({sup 14}C-CBT) has been developed to measure in vivo avian CYPIA activity. Research goals were to develop stable isotope methods ({sup 13}C-CBT), determine dose-response relationships between caffeine N-demethylation (CNDM) and PHDH exposure, and assess the relative utility of the CBT and ex vivo ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) assay. The {sup 13}C-CBT methods were developed with 20 chickens (Gallus domesticus). Chickens received three intraperitoneal injections of 0, 1,more » 5, or 50 {micro}g 3,3{prime},4,4{prime},5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126)/kg body weight, and CNDM was quantified by measurement of {sup 13}CO{sub 2}/{sup 12}CO{sub 2} in expired breath. The {sup 13}C-CBT was not as sensitive or specific as the EROD assay as an indicator of PHDH exposure and effect in birds. Constitutive CNDM of great interindividual variability was observed, and the magnitude of induction was greater for EROD activity than for CNDM (approximately 1,000- and 2-fold, respectively). Variability associated with baseline {sup 13}CO{sub 2}/{sup 12}CO{sub 2} ratios in expired breath reduced the sensitivity of the {sup 13}C-CBT method.« less

  14. Elliptical-P cells in the avian perilymphatic interface of the Tegmentum vasculosum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Lee, D. H.; Martin, D. S.

    1995-01-01

    Elliptical cells (E-P) are present at the perilymphatic interface lumen (PIL) of the lagena. The E-P cells often separate from the tegmentum vasculosum (TV) and have touching processes that form a monolayer between the K+ rich perilymph and the Na+ rich endolymph, similar to the mammalian Reissner's membrane. We examined the TV of chicks (Gallus domesticus) and quantitated the expression of anti-S100 alphaalphabetabeta and S100 beta. There was a 30% increase of S100 beta saturation in the light cells facing the PIL when compared to other TV light cells. We show that: (1) the dimer anti- S100 alphaalphabetabeta and the monomer anti-S100 beta are expressed preferentially in the light cells and the E-P cells of TV; (2) expression of S100 beta is higher in light cells facing the PIL than in adjacent cells; (3) the expression of the dimer S100 alphaalphabetabeta and monomer S100 beta overlaps in most inner ear cell types, including the cells of the TV, most S100 alphaalphabetabeta positive cells express S 100 beta, but S100 beta positive cells do not always express S100 alphaalphabetabeta; and (4) the S100 beta expression in light cells, the abundant Na+-K+ ATPase on dark cells of the TV, and previously demonstrated co-localization of S100 beta/GABA in sensory cells suggest that S100 beta could have, in the inner ear, a dual neurotrophic-ionic modulating function.

  15. Automatic detection of animals in mowing operations using thermal cameras.

    PubMed

    Steen, Kim Arild; Villa-Henriksen, Andrés; Therkildsen, Ole Roland; Green, Ole

    2012-01-01

    During the last decades, high-efficiency farming equipment has been developed in the agricultural sector. This has also included efficiency improvement of moving techniques, which include increased working speeds and widths. Therefore, the risk of wild animals being accidentally injured or killed during routine farming operations has increased dramatically over the years. In particular, the nests of ground nesting bird species like grey partridge (Perdix perdix) or pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) are vulnerable to farming operations in their breeding habitat, whereas in mammals, the natural instinct of e.g., leverets of brown hare (Lepus europaeus) and fawns of roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) to lay low and still in the vegetation to avoid predators increase their risk of being killed or injured in farming operations. Various methods and approaches have been used to reduce wildlife mortality resulting from farming operations. However, since wildlife-friendly farming often results in lower efficiency, attempts have been made to develop automatic systems capable of detecting wild animals in the crop. Here we assessed the suitability of thermal imaging in combination with digital image processing to automatically detect a chicken (Gallus domesticus) and a rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in a grassland habitat. Throughout the different test scenarios, our study animals were detected with a high precision, although the most dense grass cover reduced the detection rate. We conclude that thermal imaging and digital imaging processing may be an important tool for the improvement of wildlife-friendly farming practices in the future.

  16. Species variation in osmotic, cryoprotectant, and cooling rate tolerance in poultry, eagle, and Peregrine Falcon spermatozoa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanco, J.M.; Gee, G.; Wildt, D.E.; Donoghue, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Potential factors influencing spermatozoa survival to cryopreservation and thawing were analyzed across a range of the following avian species: domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus), domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), Bonelli's eagle (Hieraaetus fasciatus), imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti), and peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus). Studies focused on spermatozoa tolerance to the following: 1) osmotic stress, 2) different extracellular concentrations of the cryoprotectant dimethylacetamide (DMA), 3) equilibration times of 1 versus 4 h, 4) equilibration temperature of 4 versus 21 degrees C, and 5) rapid versus slow cooling before cryopreservation and standard thawing. Sperm viability was assessed with the live/dead stain (SYBR14/ propidium iodine). Sperm viability at osmolalities >/=800 mOsm was higher (P: /=2.06 M), experienced decreased (P: < 0.05) spermatozoa survival in all species, except the golden eagle and peregrine falcon. Number of surviving spermatozoa diminished progressively with increasing DMA concentrations in all species. Increased equilibration temperature (from 4 to 21 degrees C) markedly reduced (P: < 0.05) spermatozoa survival in all species except the Bonelli's eagle and turkey. Rapid cooling was detrimental (P: < 0.05) to spermatozoa from all species except the imperial eagle and the chicken. These results demonstrate that avian spermatozoa differ remarkably in response to osmotic changes, DMA concentrations, equilibration time, temperature, and survival after fast or slow freezing. These differences emphasize the need for species-specific studies in the development and enhancement of assisted breeding for poultry and endangered species.

  17. Effect of increasing levels of apparent metabolizable energy on laying hens in barn system.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hwan Ku; Park, Seong Bok; Jeon, Jin Joo; Kim, Hyun Soo; Park, Ki Tae; Kim, Sang Ho; Hong, Eui Chul; Kim, Chan Ho

    2018-04-12

    This experiment was to investigate the effect of increasing levels of apparent metabolizable energy (AMEn) on the laying performance, egg quality, blood parameter, blood biochemistry, intestinal morphology, and apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of energy and nutrients in diets fed to laying hens. A total of three-hundred twenty 33-week-old Hy-Line Brown laying hens (Gallus domesticus) were evenly assigned to four experimental diets of 2,750, 2,850, 2,950, and 3,050 kcal AMEn/kg in floor with deep litter of rice hulls. There were four replicates of each treatment, each consisting of 20 birds in a pen. AMEn intake was increased (linear, p < 0.05) with inclusion level of AMEn in diets increased. Feed intake and feed conversion ratio were improved (linear, p < 0.01), but hen-day egg production tended to be increased as increasing level of AMEn in diets increased. During the experiment, leukocyte concentration and blood biochemistry (total cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, total protein, calcium, asparate aminotransferase (AST), and alanine transferase (ALT) were not influenced by increasing level of AMEn in diets. Gross energy and ether extract were increased (linear, p < 0.01) with inclusion level of AMEn in diets increased. Laying hens fed high AMEn diet (i.e., 3,050 kcal/kg in the current experiment) tended to overconsume energy with a positive effect on feed intake, feed conversion ratio, nutrient digestibility, and intestinal morphology but not in egg production and egg mass.

  18. High resolution and image processing of otoconia matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.

    1993-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate patterns of fibrils organization in histochemically stained otoconia. Transmission electron microscope and video imaging were used. These data indicate that otoconia of the chick (Gallus domesticus) inner ear may have central cores in vivo. The data also show that the ultrastructural organization of fibrils fixed with aldehydes and histochemical stains follows trajectories that conform to the hexagonal shape of otoconia. These changes in direction may contribute to the formation of a central core. The existence of central cores is important for the in vivo buoyancy of otoconia. Packing of fibrils is tighter after phosphotungstic acid (PTA) stained otoconia than with other histochemical stains, which usually produce looser packing of fibrils and seemingly larger central core. TEM of tilted and untilted material showed that turning of fibrils occurs at the points where the face angles of otoconia form and where central cores exist. Video image processing of the images allowed reconstructing a template which, if assumed to repeat and change trajectories, would fit the pattern of fibrils seen in fixed otoconia. Since it is highly unlikely that aldehyde primary fixation or PTA stain caused such drastic change in the direction of fibrils, the template derived from these results may closely approximate patterns of otoconia fibrils packing in vivo. However, if the above is correct, the perfect crystallographic diffraction pattern of unfixed otoconia do not correspond to patterns of fixed fibrils.

  19. Differential expression of heat shock transcription factors and heat shock proteins after acute and chronic heat stress in laying chickens (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingjing; Tang, Li; Lu, Lin; Zhang, Liyang; Xi, Lin; Liu, Hsiao-Ching; Odle, Jack; Luo, Xugang

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress due to high environmental temperature negatively influences animal performances. To better understand the biological impact of heat stress, laying broiler breeder chickens were subjected either to acute (step-wisely increasing temperature from 21 to 35°C within 24 hours) or chronic (32°C for 8 weeks) high temperature exposure. High temperature challenges significantly elevated body temperature of experimental birds (P<0.05). However, oxidation status of lipid and protein and expression of heat shock transcription factors (HSFs) and heat shock proteins (HSPs) 70 and 90 were differently affected by acute and chronic treatment. Tissue-specific responses to thermal challenge were also found among heart, liver and muscle. In the heart, acute heat challenge affected lipid oxidation (P = 0.05) and gene expression of all 4 HSF gene expression was upregulated (P<0.05). During chronic heat treatment, the HSP 70 mRNA level was increased (P<0.05) and HSP 90 mRNA (P<0.05) was decreased. In the liver, oxidation of protein was alleviated during acute heat challenge (P<0.05), however, gene expression HSF2, 3 and 4 and HSP 70 were highly induced (P<0.05). HSP90 expression was increased by chronic thermal treatment (P<0.05). In the muscle, both types of heat stress increased protein oxidation, but HSFs and HSPs gene expression remained unaltered. Only tendencies to increase were observed in HSP 70 (P = 0.052) and 90 (P = 0.054) gene expression after acute heat stress. The differential expressions of HSF and HSP genes in different tissues of laying broiler breeder chickens suggested that anti-heat stress mechanisms might be provoked more profoundly in the heart, by which the muscle was least protected during heat stress. In addition to HSP, HSFs gene expression could be used as a marker during acute heat stress.

  20. Assessment of 28 trace elements and 17 amino acid levels in muscular tissues of broiler chicken (Gallus gallus) suffering from arsenic trioxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Si-Wen; He, Ying; Zhao, Hong-Jing; Wang, Yu; Liu, Juan-Juan; Shao, Yi-Zhi; Li, Jing-Lun; Sun, Xiao; Zhang, Li-Na; Xing, Ming-Wei

    2017-10-01

    The contents of 28 trace elements, 17 amino acid were evaluated in muscular tissues (wings, crureus and pectoralis) of chickens in response to arsenic trioxide (As 2 O 3 ). A total of 200 one-day-old male Hy-line chickens were fed either a commercial diet (C-group) or an As 2 O 3 supplement diet containing 7.5mg/kg (L-group), 15mg/kg (M-group) or 30mg/kg (H-group) As 2 O 3 for 90 days. The elements content was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Under As 2 O 3 exposure, the concentration of As were elevated 8.87-15.76 fold, 7.93-15.63 fold and 5.94-12.45 fold in wings, crureus and pectoralis compared to the corresponding C-group, respectively. 19 element levels (lithium (Li), magnesium (Mg), aluminum (Al), silicon (Si), kalium (K), vanadium (V), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), selenium (Se), strontium (Sr), molybdenum (Mo), cadmium (Cd), tin (Sn), antimony (Sb), barium (Ba), mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb), 9 element levels (K, Co, Ni, Cu, As, Se, Sr, Sn, Ba and Hg) and 4 element levels (Mn, cobalt (Co), As, Sr and Ba) were significantly increased (P < 0.05) in wing, crureus and pectoralis, respectively. 2 element levels (sodium (Na) and zinc (Zn)), 5 element levels (Li, Na, Si, titanium (Ti and Cr), 13 element levels (Li, Na, Mg, K, V, Cr, iron (Fe), Cu, Zn, Mo, Sn, Hg and Pb) were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) in wing muscle, crureus and pectoralis, respectively. Additionally, in crureus and pectoralis, the content of total amino acids (TAA) was no significant alterations in L and M-group and then increased approximately 10.2% and 7.6% in H-group, respectively (P < 0.05). In wings, the level of total amino acids increased approximately 10% in L-group, whereas it showed unchanged in M and H-group compared to the corresponding C-group. We also observed that significantly increased levels of proline, cysteine, aspartic acid, methionine along with decrease in the tyrosine levels in muscular tissues compared to the corresponding C-group. In conclusion, the residual of As in the muscular tissues of chickens were dose-dependent and disrupts trace element homeostasis, amino acids level in muscular tissues of chickens under As 2 O 3 exposure. Additionally, the response (trace elements and amino acids) were different in wing, thigh and pectoral of chick under As 2 O 3 exposure. This study provided references for further study of heavy metal poisoning and may be helpful to understanding the toxicological mechanism of As 2 O 3 exposure in muscular tissues of chickens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. High Concentrations of Atmospheric Ammonia Induce Alterations in the Hepatic Proteome of Broilers (Gallus gallus): An iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jize; Li, Cong; Tang, Xiangfang; Lu, Qingping; Sa, Renna; Zhang, Hongfu

    2015-01-01

    With the development of the poultry industry, ammonia, as a main contaminant in the air, is causing increasing problems with broiler health. To date, most studies of ammonia toxicity have focused on the nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract in mammals. However, few detailed studies have been conducted on the hepatic response to ammonia toxicity in poultry. The molecular mechanisms that underlie these effects remain unclear. In the present study, our group applied isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomic analysis to investigate changes in the protein profile change in hepatic tissue of broilers exposed to high concentrations of atmospheric ammonia, with the goal of characterizing the molecular mechanisms of chronic liver injury from exposure to high ambient levels of ammonia. Overall, 30 differentially expressed proteins that are involved in nutrient metabolism (energy, lipid, and amino acid), immune response, transcriptional and translational regulation, stress response, and detoxification were identified. In particular, two of these proteins, beta-1 galactosidase (GLB1) and a kinase (PRKA) anchor protein 8-like (AKAP8 L), were previously suggested to be potential biomarkers of chronic liver injury. In addition to the changes in the protein profile, serum parameters and histochemical analyses of hepatic tissue also showed extensive hepatic damage in ammonia-exposed broilers. Altogether, these findings suggest that longtime exposure to high concentrations of atmospheric ammonia can trigger chronic hepatic injury in broilers via different mechanisms, providing new information that can be used for intervention using nutritional strategies in the future. PMID:25901992

  2. High concentrations of atmospheric ammonia induce alterations of gene expression in the breast muscle of broilers (Gallus gallus) based on RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Yi, Bao; Chen, Liang; Sa, Renna; Zhong, Ruqing; Xing, Huan; Zhang, Hongfu

    2016-08-11

    High concentrations of atmospheric ammonia are one of the key environmental stressors affecting broiler production performance, which causes remarkable economic losses as well as potential welfare problems of the broiler industry. Previous reports demonstrated that high levels of ammonia altered body fat distribution and meat quality of broilers. However, the molecular mechanisms and metabolic pathways in breast muscle altered by high concentrations of ambient ammonia exposure on broilers are still unknown. This study utilized RNA-Seq to compare the transcriptomes of breast muscles to identify differentially enriched genes in broilers exposed to high and low concentrations of atmospheric ammonia. A total of 267 promising candidate genes were identified by differential expression analysis, among which 67 genes were up-regulated and 189 genes were down-regulated. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that the up and down-regulation of these genes were involved in the following two categories of cellular pathways and metabolisms: Steroid biosynthesis (gga00100) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) signaling pathway (gga03320), which both participated in the lipid metabolism processes. This study suggests that longtime exposure to high concentrations of aerial ammonia can change fat content in breast muscle, meat quality and palatability via altering expression level of genes participating in important lipid metabolism pathways. These findings have provided novel insights into our understanding of molecular mechanisms of breast muscles exposed to ammonia in broilers. This study provides new information that could be used for genetic breeding and nutritional intervention in production practice of broilers industry in the future.

  3. The health impact of selective breeding in poultry: A probable case of 'creeper' chicken (Gallus gallus) from 16th-century Chester, England.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Rebecca; Thomas, Richard; Foster, Alison

    2015-06-01

    Two articulating chicken bones from a feast deposit, dated to the 16th century, from Chester, exhibit lesions consistent with the skeletal disorder chondrodystrophy. While this form of dwarfism has many potential causes, it is also consistent with the presentation of the 'creeper' mutation. In this paper we describe and undertake a differential diagnosis of the two articulating chicken bones, and consider the wider significance of this find in 16th-century Britain. The appearance of these lesions, along with the widespread size increase in chickens, the rise of early modern publications concerning chicken husbandry, and contemporary observations that dwarf fowl were luxury foods, provide indirect support for this diagnosis and adds to the growing body of knowledge regarding the unintended health impact of selective breeding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Transfer and detection of freshly isolated or cultured chicken (Gallus gallus) and exotic species' embryonic gonadal germ stem cells in host embryos.

    PubMed

    Imus, Nastassja; Roe, Mandi; Charter, Suellen; Durrant, Barbara; Jensen, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    The management of captive avian breeding programs increasingly utilizes various artificial reproductive technologies, including in ovo sexing of embryos to adjust population sex ratios. Currently, however, no attention has been given to the loss of genetic diversity following sex-selective incubation, even with respect to individuals from critically endangered species. This project evaluated the possibility of using xenotransfer of embryonic gonadal germline stem cells (GGCs) for future reintroduction of their germplasm into the gene pool. We examined and compared the host gonad colonization of freshly isolated and 3 day (3d) cultured donor GGCs from chicken and 13 species of exotic embryos. Following 3d-culture of GGCs, there was a significant increase in the percentage of stem cell marker (SSEA-1, -3, -4) positive cells. However, the percentage of positive host gonads with chicken donor-derived cells decreased from 68% (fresh) to 22% (3d), while the percentage of exotic species donor-cells positive host gonads decreased from 61% (fresh) to 49% (3d-cultured). Donor GGCs from both chicken and exotic species were localized within the caudal endoderm, including the region encompassing the gonadal ridge by 16 hours post-injection. Furthermore, donor-derived cells isolated from stage 36 host embryos were antigenic for anti SSEA-1, VASA/DDX4 and EMA-1 antibodies, presumably indicating maintenance of stem cell identity. This study demonstrates that GGCs from multiple species can migrate to the gonadal region and maintain presumed stemness following xenotransfer into a chicken host embryo, suggesting that germline stem cell migration is highly conserved in birds.

  5. White beans provide more bioavailable iron than red beans: studies in poultry (Gallus gallus) and an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Iron-biofortification of crops is a strategy that alleviates iron deficiency. The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is an attractive candidate for biofortification. However, beans are high in poly-phenols that may inhibit iron absorption. In vitro studies have shown that iron bioavailability from ...

  6. INTERACTION OF ESTROGEN AND 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-BENZENE WITH PLASMA FATTY ACID CONCENTRATIONS OF MALE CHICKENS (GALLUS DOMESTICUS). (R826298)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  7. Ovarian teratoma displaying a wide variety of tissue components in a broiler chicken (Gallus Domesticus): morphological heterogeneity of pluripotential germ cell during tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Ohfuji, S

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous ovarian teratoma was found in a seven-week-old female Chunky broiler chicken that was slaughtered for food. On post-mortem inspection, a spherical tumor mass attaching to a juvenile ovary was found in the abdominal cavity. Histopathologically, the tumor was comprised of immature mesenchymal stroma and a variety of mature tissue elements of mesodermal and ectodermal origin. In addition, there were multiple indistinguishable tissue elements, which showed no malignant cytological features but were unidentifiable as to corresponding embryological layer of origin. These heterogeneous teratoma tissues consisted of a variety of glandular, cystic, duct-like, and tubular structures, some of which exhibited a lining by a mixture of both keratinizing/non-keratinizing stratified squamous epithelial cells and cuboidal/columnar epithelial cells. The ovarian tetatoma was considered a benign and congenital one. The highly diverse differentiation of the teratoma might have manifested a morphological aspect of intrinsic character of the pluripotential germ cells during tumorigenesis.

  8. Quantifying the effects of genetic selection and genetic variation for body size, carcass composition, and meat quality in the domestic fowl (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Sandercock, D A; Nute, G R; Hocking, P M

    2009-05-01

    A multistrain experiment was conducted to quantify the extent of genetic differences in carcass and muscle yields, muscle quality, support organs, and taste panel assessments of cooked breast muscle of 296 birds from 37 lines of commercial broiler, layer, and traditional chickens. The birds were reared as broilers and 4 males from each line were slaughtered at 6 and 10 wk of age. The extent of genetic variation was measured as the intraclass correlation. The intraclass correlation for live weight; carcass yields; breast, drum, and wing portions; and associated muscle yields were high, whereas those for the thigh portion and yield were low. Broilers had more breast and thigh muscle but similar drum muscle as a proportion of carcass weight compared with layer and traditional lines. Genetic variation for muscle quality (plasma creatine kinase activity) was high; that for muscle color (L, a, and b) and hemorrhage score were moderate in size and were greater at 10 than at 6 wk of age. Broiler lines had greater creatine kinase activity indicative of greater muscle pathology; breast muscle was lighter, less red and yellow in color, and had a greater hemorrhage score than muscle from layer and traditional lines, which were similar. Intraclass correlations for taste panel scores were low and generally not significant except for texture, chicken flavor intensity, flavor liking, and overall liking at 6 wk of age. Significantly greater scores from broiler compared with layer and traditional lines for texture, chicken flavor intensity, and overall liking were observed. At 10 wk of age, chicken flavor intensity did not differ between broiler or layer birds but was significantly greater in both groups than traditional birds. Genetic variation for relative weight of abdominal fat, spleen, and heart was moderately high and greater at 10 than at 6 wk of age. Broiler carcasses had a relatively high proportion of abdominal fat and smaller spleen and heart weights.

  9. TRIM25 Identification in the Chinese Goose: Gene Structure, Tissue Expression Profiles, and Antiviral Immune Responses In Vivo and In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yunan; Zhou, Hao; Wang, Anqi; Sun, Lipei; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Sun, Kunfeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun; Chen, Shun

    2016-01-01

    The retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) protein play a critical role in the interferon (IFN) response during RNA virus infection. The tripartite motif containing 25 proteins (TRIM25) was reported to modify caspase activation and RIG-I recruitment domains (CARDs) via ubiquitin. These modifications allow TRIM25 to interact with mitochondrial antiviral signaling molecules (MAVs) and form CARD-CARD tetramers. Goose TRIM25 was cloned from gosling lungs, which possess a 1662 bp open reading flame (ORF). This ORF encodes a predicted 554 amino acid protein consisting of a B-box domain, a coiled-coil domain, and a PRY/SPRY domain. The protein sequence has 89.25% sequence identity with Anas platyrhynchos TRIM25, 78.57% with Gallus gallus TRIM25, and 46.92% with Homo sapiens TRIM25. TRIM25 is expressed in all gosling and adult goose tissues examined. QRT-PCR revealed that goose TRIM25 transcription could be induced by goose IFN- α , goose IFN- γ , and goose IFN- λ , as well as a35 s polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)), oligodeoxynucleotides 2006 (ODN 2006), and resiquimod (R848) in vitro; however, it is inhibited in H9N2 infected goslings for unknown reasons. These data suggest that goose TRIM25 might play a positive role in the regulation of the antiviral immune response.

  10. TRIM25 Identification in the Chinese Goose: Gene Structure, Tissue Expression Profiles, and Antiviral Immune Responses In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao; Wang, Anqi; Sun, Lipei; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Sun, Kunfeng; Chen, Xiaoyue

    2016-01-01

    The retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) protein play a critical role in the interferon (IFN) response during RNA virus infection. The tripartite motif containing 25 proteins (TRIM25) was reported to modify caspase activation and RIG-I recruitment domains (CARDs) via ubiquitin. These modifications allow TRIM25 to interact with mitochondrial antiviral signaling molecules (MAVs) and form CARD-CARD tetramers. Goose TRIM25 was cloned from gosling lungs, which possess a 1662 bp open reading flame (ORF). This ORF encodes a predicted 554 amino acid protein consisting of a B-box domain, a coiled-coil domain, and a PRY/SPRY domain. The protein sequence has 89.25% sequence identity with Anas platyrhynchos TRIM25, 78.57% with Gallus gallus TRIM25, and 46.92% with Homo sapiens TRIM25. TRIM25 is expressed in all gosling and adult goose tissues examined. QRT-PCR revealed that goose TRIM25 transcription could be induced by goose IFN-α, goose IFN-γ, and goose IFN-λ, as well as a35 s polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)), oligodeoxynucleotides 2006 (ODN 2006), and resiquimod (R848) in vitro; however, it is inhibited in H9N2 infected goslings for unknown reasons. These data suggest that goose TRIM25 might play a positive role in the regulation of the antiviral immune response. PMID:27995135

  11. Effects of quercetin and menadione on intestinal calcium absorption and the underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Marchionatti, Ana M; Pacciaroni, Adriana; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori G

    2013-01-01

    Quercetin (QT) could be considered as a potential therapeutic agent for different diseases due to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral and anticancer properties. This study was designed to investigate the ability of QT to protect the chick intestine against menadione (MEN) induced injury in vivo and in vitro. Four-week old chicks (Gallus gallus) were treated i.p. with 2.5μmol of MEN/kg b.w. or with i.l. 50μM QT or both. QT protected the intestinal Ca(2+) absorption against the inhibition caused by MEN, but QT alone did not modify. Glutathione (GSH) depletion provoked by MEN in chick enterocytes was abolished by QT treatment, whereas QT alone did not modify the intestinal GSH content. The enhancement of GSH peroxidase activity produced by MEN was blocked by QT treatment. In contrast, superoxide dismutase activity remained high after simultaneous treatment of enterocytes with MEN and QT. The flavonol also avoided changes in the mitochondrial membrane permeability (swelling) produced by MEN. The FasL/Fas/caspase-3 pathway was activated by MEN, effect that was abrogated by QT. In conclusion, QT may be useful in preventing inhibition of chick intestinal Ca(2+) absorption caused by MEN or other substances that deplete GSH, by blocking the oxidative stress and the FasL/Fas/caspase-3 pathway activation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Chromosome Painting in Trogon s. surrucura (Aves, Trogoniformes) Reveals a Karyotype Derived by Chromosomal Fissions, Fusions, and Inversions.

    PubMed

    Degrandi, Tiago M; Del Valle Garnero, Analía; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Kretschmer, Rafael; de Oliveira, Edivaldo H C; Gunski, Ricardo J

    2017-01-01

    Trogons are forest birds with a wide distribution, being found in Africa, Asia, and America, and are included in the order Trogoniformes, family Trogonidae. Phylogenetic studies using molecular data have not been able to determine the phylogenetic relationship among the different genera of trogons. So far, no cytogenetic data for these birds exist. Hence, the aim of this study was to characterize the karyotype of Trogon surrucura surrucura by means of classical and molecular cytogenetics. We found a diploid chromosome number of 2n = 82, similar to most birds, with several derived features compared to chicken and the putative ancestral avian karyotype. T. s. surrucura showed 3 pairs of microchromosomes bearing 18S rDNA clusters. The Z and W sex chromosomes were of similar size but could readily be identified by morphological differences. Using chromosome painting with whole chromosome probes from Gallus gallus and Leucopternis albicollis, we found that the chromosomes homologous to chicken chromosomes 2 and 5 correspond to 2 different pairs in T. s. surrucura and L. albicollis, due to the occurrence of centric fissions. Paracentric inversions were detected in the segment homologous to chicken chromosome 1q, and we confirmed the recurrence of breakpoints when our results were compared to other species of birds already analyzed by FISH or by in silico genome assembly. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Traditional uses of medicinal animals in the semi-arid region of northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The present work presents an inventory of the traditional medicinal uses of animals in the municipality of Bom Sucesso in Paraíba State (PB) in the semiarid northeastern region of Brazil. Information was obtained through the use of semi-structured interviews with 50 people who use zootherapeutic products. A total of 25 animal species used for medicinal purposes were identified (18 vertebrates and seven invertebrates) distributed among five taxonomic categories; the groups with the largest numbers of citations were: mammals (8 citations), insects (7), and reptiles (5). The most cited animal species were: Tubinambis merianae “teju” lizards (44 citations); Apis mellifera Italian honeybees (318 citations); Gallus gallus chickens (31 citations); Ovis aries sheep (31 citations); Crotalus durissus rattlesnakes (14 citations); Boa constrictor (12 citations); and Bos taurus cattle (12 citations). A significant number of illnesses and conditions treated with animal-based medicines were cited, and the category with the greatest number of citations was “problems affecting the respiratory system”. Our results suggest that the use of zootherapeutics in the region is persistent, and that knowledge about these curative practices is an integral part of the regional culture. As such, studies concerning the uses of zootherapeutics are important windows to understanding human/environmental/cultural interactions and a pathway to conciliating regional cultures with efforts to conserve the native fauna. PMID:23050756

  14. Survey for antibodies to infectious bursal disease virus serotype 2 in wild turkeys and Sandhill Cranes of Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Candelora, Kristen L; Spalding, Marilyn G; Sellers, Holly S

    2010-07-01

    Captive-reared Whooping Cranes (Grus americana) released into Florida for the resident reintroduction project experienced unusually high mortality and morbidity during the 1997-98 and 2001-02 release seasons. Exposure to infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) serotype 2 as evidenced by seroconversion was suspected to be the factor that precipitated these mortality events. Very little is known about the incidence of IBD in wild bird populations. Before this study, natural exposure had not been documented in wild birds of North America having no contact with captive-reared cranes, and the prevalence and transmission mechanisms of the virus in wild birds were unknown. Sentinel chickens (Gallus gallus) monitored on two Whooping Crane release sites in central Florida, USA, during the 2003-04 and 2004-05 release seasons seroconverted, demonstrating natural exposure to IBDV serotype 2. Blood samples collected from Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) and Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) in eight of 21 counties in Florida, USA, and one of two counties in southern Georgia, USA, were antibody-positive for IBDV serotype 2, indicating that exposure from wild birds sharing habitat with Whooping Cranes is possible. The presence of this virus in wild birds in these areas is a concern for the resident flock of Whooping Cranes because they nest and raise their chicks in Florida, USA. However, passively transferred antibodies may protect them at this otherwise vulnerable period in their lives.

  15. Associations between variants of bone morphogenetic protein 7 gene and growth traits in chickens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Guo, Fuyou; Qu, Hao; Luo, Chenglong; Wang, Jie; Shu, Dingming

    2018-04-18

    1. Enhancing bone strength to solve leg disorders in poultry has become an important goal in broiler production. 2. Bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7), a member of the BMP family, represents an attractive therapeutic target for bone regeneration in humans and plays critical roles in skeletal development. 3. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between BMP7 gene expression, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and growth traits in chickens. Here, a SNP (c.1995T>C) in the chicken (Gallus gallus) BMP7 gene was identified, that was associated with growth and carcass traits. 4. Genotyping revealed that the T allele occurred more frequently in breeds with high growth rates, whereas the C allele was predominant in those with low growth rates. The expression level of BMP7 in the thigh bone of birds with the TT genotype was significantly higher than in those with the CC genotype at 21, 42 and 91 days of age. 5. These findings suggest that selecting the birds with the TT genotype of SNP c.1995T>C could improve bone growth, could reduce leg disorders in fast-growing birds. The SNP c.1995T>C may serve as a selective marker for improving bone growth and increasing the consistency of body weights in poultry breeding.

  16. The contrasting role of male relatedness in different mechanisms of sexual selection in red junglefowl.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cedric Kai Wei; Doyle, Philippa; Bagshaw, Emma; Richardson, David S; Wigby, Stuart; Pizzari, Tommaso

    2017-02-01

    In structured populations, competition for reproductive opportunities should be relaxed among related males. The few tests of this prediction often neglect the fact that sexual selection acts through multiple mechanisms, both before and after mating. We performed experiments to study the role of within-group male relatedness across pre- and postcopulatory mechanisms of sexual selection in social groups of red junglefowl, Gallus gallus, in which two related males and one unrelated male competed over females unrelated to all the males. We confirm theoretical expectations that, after controlling for male social status, competition over mating was reduced among related males. However, this effect was contrasted by other sexual selection mechanisms. First, females biased male mating in favor of the unrelated male, and might also favor his inseminations after mating. Second, males invested more-rather than fewer-sperm in postcopulatory competition with relatives. A number of factors may contribute to explain this counterintuitive pattern of sperm allocation, including trade-offs between male investment in pre- versus postcopulatory competition, differences in the relative relatedness of pre- versus postcopulatory competitors, and female bias in sperm utilization in response to male relatedness. Collectively, these results reveal that within-group male relatedness may have contrasting effects in different mechanisms of sexual selection. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  17. Intronic Deletions That Disrupt mRNA Splicing of the tva Receptor Gene Result in Decreased Susceptibility to Infection by Avian Sarcoma and Leukosis Virus Subgroup A

    PubMed Central

    Reinišová, Markéta; Plachý, Jiří; Trejbalová, Kateřina; Šenigl, Filip; Kučerová, Dana; Geryk, Josef; Svoboda, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The group of closely related avian sarcoma and leukosis viruses (ASLVs) evolved from a common ancestor into multiple subgroups, A to J, with differential host range among galliform species and chicken lines. These subgroups differ in variable parts of their envelope glycoproteins, the major determinants of virus interaction with specific receptor molecules. Three genetic loci, tva, tvb, and tvc, code for single membrane-spanning receptors from diverse protein families that confer susceptibility to the ASLV subgroups. The host range expansion of the ancestral virus might have been driven by gradual evolution of resistance in host cells, and the resistance alleles in all three receptor loci have been identified. Here, we characterized two alleles of the tva receptor gene with similar intronic deletions comprising the deduced branch-point signal within the first intron and leading to inefficient splicing of tva mRNA. As a result, we observed decreased susceptibility to subgroup A ASLV in vitro and in vivo. These alleles were independently found in a close-bred line of domestic chicken and Indian red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus murghi), suggesting that their prevalence might be much wider in outbred chicken breeds. We identified defective splicing to be a mechanism of resistance to ASLV and conclude that such a type of mutation could play an important role in virus-host coevolution. PMID:22171251

  18. Comparative chromosome painting in Columbidae (Columbiformes) reinforces divergence in Passerea and Columbea.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Rafael; de Oliveira Furo, Ivanete; Gunski, Ricardo José; Del Valle Garnero, Analía; Pereira, Jorge C; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano Corrêa; de Freitas, Thales Renato Ochotorena

    2018-06-07

    Pigeons and doves (Columbiformes) are one of the oldest and most diverse extant lineages of birds. However, the karyotype evolution within Columbiformes remains unclear. To delineate the synteny-conserved segments and karyotypic differences among four Columbidae species, we used chromosome painting from Gallus gallus (GGA, 2n = 78) and Leucopternis albicollis (LAL, 2n = 68). Besides that, a set of painting probes for the eared dove, Zenaida auriculata (ZAU, 2n = 76), was generated from flow-sorted chromosomes. Chromosome painting with GGA and ZAU probes showed conservation of the first ten ancestral pairs in Z. auriculata, Columba livia, and Columbina picui, while in Leptotila verreauxi, fusion of the ancestral chromosomes 6 and 7 was observed. However, LAL probes revealed a complex reorganization of ancestral chromosome 1, involving paracentric and pericentric inversions. Because of the presence of similar intrachromosomal rearrangements in the chromosomes corresponding to GGA1q in the Columbidae and Passeriformes species but without a common origin, these results are consistent with the recent proposal of divergence within Neoaves (Passerea and Columbea). In addition, inversions in chromosome 2 were identified in C. picui and L. verreauxi. Thus, in four species of distinct genera of the Columbidae family, unique chromosomal rearrangements have occurred during karyotype evolution, confirming that despite conservation of the ancestral syntenic groups, these chromosomes have been modified by the occurrence of intrachromosomal rearrangements.

  19. Host specificity of turkey and chicken Eimeria: controlled cross-transmission studies and a phylogenetic view.

    PubMed

    Vrba, Vladimir; Pakandl, Michal

    2015-03-15

    Protozoan parasites of the Eimeria genus have undergone extensive speciation and are now represented by a myriad of species that are specialised to different hosts. These species are highly host-specific and usually parasitise single host species, with only few reported exceptions. Doubts regarding the strict host specificity were frequent in the original literature describing coccidia parasitising domestic turkeys. The availability of pure characterised lines of turkey and chicken Eimeria species along with the recently developed quantitative PCR identification of these species allowed to investigate the issue of host specificity using well-controlled cross-transmission experiments. Seven species of gallinaceous birds (Gallus gallus, Meleagris gallopavo, Alectoris rufa, Perdix perdix, Phasianus colchicus, Numida meleagris and Colinus virginianus) were inoculated with six species and strains of turkey Eimeria and six species of chicken coccidia and production of oocysts was monitored. Turkey Eimeria species E. dispersa, E. innocua and E. meleagridis could complete their development in the hosts from different genera or even different families. Comparison of phylogenetic positions of these Eimeria species according to 18S rDNA and COI showed that the phylogeny cannot explain the observed patterns of host specificity. These findings suggest that the adaptation of Eimeria parasites to foreign hosts is possible and might play a significant role in the evolution and diversification of this genus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Embryotoxic effects of crude oil in mallard ducks and chicks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, David J.

    1978-01-01

    Recent studies in this laboratory have revealed that surface applications of microliter amounts of some crude and fuel oils that coat less than 10% of the egg surface reduce hatching considerably in different avian species. Applications of paraffin compounds that coat equal areas of the egg surface do not reduce hatching suggesting that toxicity is due to causes other than asphyxia. In the present study, 1–10 μl of South Louisiana crude oil, an API reference oil, were applied to the surface of fertile mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and chicken (Gallus gallus) eggs. Early embryolethality was greater in mallard embryos than in chick embryos, but later embryolethality that coincided with the time of rapid outgrowth of the chorioallantoic membrane was more prevalent in chick embryos. The overall incidence of embryolethality was similar in both species. Retardation of growth as reflected by embryonic body weight, crown-rump length, beak length, and general appearance was more pronounced in chick than mallard embryos. Teratogenic defects were more frequent in chick embryos, and incomplete or abnormal ossification of the skull was the most common. External application of equivalent amounts of a mixture of paraffin compounds present in crude oil had virtually no embryotoxic effects in either species, suggesting that other components including aromatic hydrocarbons and organometallics may cause the embryotoxicity.

  1. Molecular Cytogenetic Characterization of Multiple Intrachromosomal Rearrangements in Two Representatives of the Genus Turdus (Turdidae, Passeriformes)

    PubMed Central

    Kretschmer, Rafael; Gunski, Ricardo José; Garnero, Analía Del Valle; Furo, Ivanete de Oliveira; O'Brien, Patricia C. M.; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A.; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano Corrêa

    2014-01-01

    Turdus rufiventris and Turdus albicollis, two songbirds belonging to the family Turdidae (Aves, Passeriformes) were studied by C-banding, 18S rDNA, as well as the use of whole chromosome probes derived from Gallus gallus (GGA) and Leucopternis albicollis (LAL). They showed very similar karyotypes, with 2n = 78 and the same pattern of distribution of heterochromatic blocks and hybridization patterns. However, the analysis of 18/28S rDNA has shown differences in the number of NOR-bearing chromosomes and ribosomal clusters. The hybridization pattern of GGA macrochromosomes was similar to the one found in songbirds studied by Fluorescent in situ hybridization, with fission of GGA 1 and GGA 4 chromosomes. In contrast, LAL chromosome paintings revealed a complex pattern of intrachromosomal rearrangements (paracentric and pericentric inversions) on chromosome 2, which corresponds to GGA1q. The first inversion changed the chromosomal morphology and the second and third inversions changed the order of chromosome segments. Karyotype analysis in Turdus revealed that this genus has derived characteristics in relation to the putative avian ancestral karyotype, highlighting the importance of using new tools for analysis of chromosomal evolution in birds, such as the probes derived from L. albicollis, which make it possible to identify intrachromosomal rearrangements not visible with the use of GGA chromosome painting solely. PMID:25058578

  2. Bone protein “extractomics”: comparing the efficiency of bone protein extractions of Gallus gallus in tandem mass spectrometry, with an eye towards paleoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    DeHart, Caroline J.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Thomas, Paul M.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic studies of bone require specialized extraction protocols to demineralize and solubilize proteins from within the bone matrix. Although various protocols exist for bone protein recovery, little is known about how discrete steps in each protocol affect the subset of the bone proteome recovered by mass spectrometry (MS) analyses. Characterizing these different “extractomes” will provide critical data for development of novel and more efficient protein extraction methodologies for fossils. Here, we analyze 22 unique sub-extractions of chicken bone and directly compare individual extraction components for their total protein yield and diversity and coverage of bone proteins identified by MS. We extracted proteins using different combinations and ratios of demineralizing reagents, protein-solubilizing reagents, and post-extraction buffer removal methods, then evaluated tryptic digests from 20 µg aliquots of each fraction by tandem MS/MS on a 12T FT-ICR mass spectrometer. We compared total numbers of peptide spectral matches, peptides, and proteins identified from each fraction, the redundancy of protein identifications between discrete steps of extraction methods, and the sequence coverage obtained for select, abundant proteins. Although both alpha chains of collagen I (the most abundant protein in bone) were found in all fractions, other collagenous and non-collagenous proteins (e.g., apolipoprotein, osteonectin, hemoglobin) were differentially identified. We found that when a standardized amount of extracted proteins was analyzed, extraction steps that yielded the most protein (by weight) from bone were often not the ones that produced the greatest diversity of bone proteins, or the highest degree of protein coverage. Generally, the highest degrees of diversity and coverage were obtained from demineralization fractions, and the proteins found in the subsequent solubilization fractions were highly redundant with those in the previous fraction. Based on these data, we identify future directions and parameters to consider (e.g., proteins targeted, amount of sample required) when applying discrete parts of these protocols to fossils. PMID:27812413

  3. Characterizing the gut (Gallus gallus) microbiota following the consumption of an iron biofortified Rwandan cream seeded carioca (Phaseolus Vulgaris L.) bean-based diet

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biofortification is a plant breeding method that introduces increased concentrations of minerals in staple food crops (e.g., legumes, cereal grains), and has shown success in alleviating insufficient iron (Fe) intake in various human populations. Unlike other strategies utilized to alleviate Fe defi...

  4. Neural tuning characteristics of auditory primary afferents in the chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Jones, S M; Jones, T A

    1995-02-01

    Primary afferent activity was recorded from the cochlear ganglion in chicken embryos (Gallus domesticus) at 19 days of incubation (E19). The ganglion was accessed via the recessus scala tympani and impaled with glass micropipettes. Frequency tuning curves were obtained using a computerized threshold tracking procedure. Tuning curves were evaluated to determine characteristics frequencies (CFs), CF thresholds, slopes of low and high frequency flanks, and tip sharpness (Q10dB). The majority of tuning curves exhibited the typical 'V' shape described for older birds and, on average, appeared relatively mature based on mean values for CF thresholds (59.6 +/- 20.3 dBSPL) and tip sharpness (Q10dB = 5.2 +/- 3). The mean slopes of low (61.9 +/- 37 dB/octave) and high (64.6 +/- 33 dB/octave) frequency flanks although comparable were somewhat less than those reported for 21-day-old chickens. Approximately 14% of the tuning curves displayed an unusual 'saw-tooth' pattern. CFs ranged from 188 to 1623 Hz. The highest CF was well below those reported for post-hatch birds. In addition, a broader range of Q10dB values (1.2 to 16.9) may related to a greater variability in embryonic tuning curves. Overall, these data suggest that an impressive functional maturity exists in the embryo at E19. The most significant sign of immaturity was the limited expression of high frequencies. It is argued that the limited high CF in part may be due to the developing middle ear transfer function and/or to a functionally immature cochlear base.

  5. Expression of S100 beta in sensory and secretory cells of the vertebrate inner ear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Martin, D. S.

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated anti-S100 beta expression in the chick (Gallus domesticus) inner ear and determined that: 1) the monomer anti-S100 beta is expressed differentially in the vestibular and auditory perikarya; 2) expression of S100 beta in the afferent nerve terminals is time-related to synapse and myelin formation; 3) the expression of the dimer anti-S100 alpha alpha beta beta and monomer anti-S100 beta overlaps in most inner ear cell types. Most S100 alpha alpha beta beta positive cells express S100 beta, but S100 beta positive cells do not always express S100 alpha alpha beta beta. 4) the expression of S100 beta is diffused over the perikaryal cytoplasm and nuclei of the acoustic ganglia but is concentrated over the nuclei of the vestibular perikarya. 6) S100 beta is expressed in secretory cells, and it is co-localized with GABA in sensory cells. 7) Color thresholding objective quantitation indicates that the amount of S100 beta was higher (mean 22, SD +/- 4) at E19 than at E9 (mean 34, SD +/- 3) in afferent axons. 8) Moreover, S100 beta was unchanged between E11-E19 in the perikaryal cytoplasm, but did change over the nuclei. At E9, 74%, and at E21, 5% of vestibular perikarya were positive. The data suggest that S100 beta may be physically associated with neuronal and ionic controlling cells of the vertebrate inner ear, where it could provide a dual ionic and neurotrophic modulatory function.

  6. Maturational changes in the survivability and fertility of fowl sperm during their passage through the male reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Ahammad, Muslah U; Nishino, C; Tatemoto, H; Okura, N; Kawamoto, Y; Okamoto, S; Nakada, T

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether domestic fowl (Gallus domesticus) sperm undergo maturation in their capacity for survival and fertilization in the male reproductive tract. Sperm collected from the testis, epididymis and the proximal, middle and distal vas deferens were simultaneously stored in vitro in minimum essential medium (MEM) at 39°C for 0, 3 and 6h, and at 4°C for 24 and 48h. Sperm membrane integrity was measured using the dual fluorescent stain SYBR-14/propidium iodide (PI). Aliquots of sperm from the various sites were subjected to artificial insemination (AI) into the uteri of hens to assess the duration of sperm survival in the oviduct and to determine the fertility status of the sperm. Testicular sperm exhibited a very low capacity to survive under in vitro liquid storage conditions, irrespective of the storage temperature used, and in the oviduct, and they had a low ability to fertilize the ovum. On the contrary, sperm from the distal vas deferens had a higher survival rate during in vitro storage periods, a longer life span in the oviduct, and high fertility. Survival and fertilizing capacity of the sperm recovered from the testes increased gradually (P<0.05) from the testes to the distal vas deferens. In conclusion, we suggest that fowl sperm may undergo functional maturation through a process of gradual changes in their survival and fertilization capacities during their passage through the successive parts of the male reproductive tract. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Vestibular short latency responses to pulsed linear acceleration in unanesthetized animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    Linear acceleration transients were used to elicit vestibular compound action potentials in non-invasively prepared, unanesthetized animals for the first time (chicks, Gallus domesticus, n = 33). Responses were composed of a series of up to 8 dominant peaks occurring within 8 msec of the stimulus. Response amplitudes for 1.0 g stimulus ranged from 1 to 10 microV. A late, slow, triphasic, anesthesia-labile component was identified as a dominant response feature in unanesthetized animals. Amplitudes increased and latencies decreased as stimulus intensity was increased (MANOVA P less than 0.05). Linear regression slope ranges were: amplitudes = 1.0-5.0 microV/g; latencies = -300 to -1100 microseconds/g. Thresholds for single polarity stimuli (0.035 +/- 0.022 g, n = 11) were significantly lower than those of alternating polarity (0.074 +/- 0.028 g, n = 18, P less than 0.001). Bilateral labyrinthectomy eliminated responses whereas bilateral extirpation of cochleae did not significantly change response thresholds. Intense acoustic masking (100/104 dB SL) produced no effect in 2 animals, but did produce small to moderate effects on response amplitudes in 7 others. Changes were attributed to effects on vestibular end organs. Results of unilateral labyrinth blockade (tetrodotoxin) suggest that P1 and N1 preferentially reflect ipsilateral eighth nerve compound action potentials whereas components beyond approximately 2 msec reflect activity from vestibular neurons that depend on both labyrinths. The results demonstrate that short latency vestibular compound action potentials can be measured in unanesthetized, non-invasively prepared animals.

  8. Color threshold and ratio of S100 beta, MAP5, NF68/200, GABA & GAD. I. Distribution in inner ear afferents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Martin, D. S.; Hara, H.

    1997-01-01

    Afferents of chick embryos (Gallus domesticus) VIIIth nerve were examined at E3, E6, E9, E13, El7, and hatching (NH) for anti-S100 beta, anti-MAP5, anti-GABA, anti-GAD and anti-NF68/200 stain. Different ages were processed together to determine if the distribution of these antibodies changed during synaptogenesis and myelination. Color thresholding showed that saturation of pixels changed for S100 beta only 5%, for NF68/200 10%, and for MAP5, 10%, between E9-NH. Color ratio of NF68/200 over MAP5 was 1.00 at E13 and 0.25 at E16 and NH. S100 beta, GABA and GAD were co-expressed on nerve endings at the edge of the maculae and center of the cristae, whereas hair cells in the center of the maculae expressed either S100 beta or GABA, but not both. S100 beta/NF68/200 shared antigenic sites on the chalices, but NF68/200 expression was higher than S100 beta in the chalices at hatching. MAP5 was expressed in more neurons than NF68/200 at E11, whereas NF68/200 was more abundant than MAP5 at hatching. The results suggest that: 1) the immunoexpression of these neuronal proteins is modulated concomitantly with the establishment of afferent synapses and myelination; 2) S100 beta may serve a neurotrophic function in the chalices where it is co-expressed with the neurotransmitter GABA and its synthesizing enzyme GAD.

  9. Perfluorinated Compounds and Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in Great Blue Heron Eggs from Three Colonies on the Mississippi River, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Kannan, K.; Tao, L.; Yun, S.-H.; Trowbridge, A.

    2010-01-01

    Archived Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) eggs (N = 16) collected in 1993 from three colonies on the Mississippi River in Minnesota were analyzed in 2007 for perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). One of the three colonies, Pig's Eye, was located near a presumed source of PFCs. Based on a multivariate analysis, the pattern of nine PFC concentrations differed significantly between Pig's Eye and the upriver (P = 0.002) and downriver (P = 0.02) colonies; but not between the upriver and downriver colonies (P = 0.25). Mean concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), a major PFC compound, were significantly higher at the Pig's Eye colony (geometric mean = 940 ng/g wet weight) than at upriver (60 ng/g wet weight) and downriver (131 ng/g wet weight) colonies. Perfluorooctane sulfonate concentrations from the Pig's Eye colony are among the highest reported in bird eggs. Concentrations of PFOS in Great Blue Heron eggs from Pig's Eye were well below the toxicity thresholds estimated for Bobwhite Quail (Colinus virginianus) and Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), but within the toxicity threshold estimated for White Leghorn Chickens (Gallus domesticus). The pattern of six PBDE congener concentrations did not differ among the three colonies (P = 0.08). Total PBDE concentrations, however, were significantly greater (P = 0.03) at Pig's Eye (geometric mean = 142 ng/g wet weight) than the upriver colony (13 ng/g wet weight). Polybrominated diphenyl ether concentrations in two of six Great Blue Heron eggs from the Pig's Eye colony were within levels associated with altered reproductive behavior in American Kestrels (Falco sparverius).

  10. Neural tuning characteristics of auditory primary afferents in the chicken embryo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. M.; Jones, T. A.

    1995-01-01

    Primary afferent activity was recorded from the cochlear ganglion in chicken embryos (Gallus domesticus) at 19 days of incubation (E19). The ganglion was accessed via the recessus scala tympani and impaled with glass micropipettes. Frequency tuning curves were obtained using a computerized threshold tracking procedure. Tuning curves were evaluated to determine characteristics frequencies (CFs), CF thresholds, slopes of low and high frequency flanks, and tip sharpness (Q10dB). The majority of tuning curves exhibited the typical 'V' shape described for older birds and, on average, appeared relatively mature based on mean values for CF thresholds (59.6 +/- 20.3 dBSPL) and tip sharpness (Q10dB = 5.2 +/- 3). The mean slopes of low (61.9 +/- 37 dB/octave) and high (64.6 +/- 33 dB/octave) frequency flanks although comparable were somewhat less than those reported for 21-day-old chickens. Approximately 14% of the tuning curves displayed an unusual 'saw-tooth' pattern. CFs ranged from 188 to 1623 Hz. The highest CF was well below those reported for post-hatch birds. In addition, a broader range of Q10dB values (1.2 to 16.9) may related to a greater variability in embryonic tuning curves. Overall, these data suggest that an impressive functional maturity exists in the embryo at E19. The most significant sign of immaturity was the limited expression of high frequencies. It is argued that the limited high CF in part may be due to the developing middle ear transfer function and/or to a functionally immature cochlear base.

  11. Avian dark cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hara, J.; Plymale, D. R.; Shepard, D. L.; Hara, H.; Garry, Robert F.; Yoshihara, T.; Zenner, Hans-Peter; Bolton, M.; Kalkeri, R.; Fermin, Cesar D.

    2002-01-01

    Dark cells (DCs) of mammalian and non-mammalian species help to maintain the homeostasis of the inner ear fluids in vivo. Although the avian cochlea is straight and the mammalian cochlea is coiled, no significant difference in the morphology and/or function of mammalian and avian DCs has been reported. The mammalian equivalent of avian DCs are marginal cells and are located in the stria vascularis along a bony sheet. Avian DCs hang free from the tegmentum vasculosum (TV) of the avian lagena between the perilymph and endolymph. Frame averaging was used to image the fluorescence emitted by several fluorochromes applied to freshly isolated dark cells (iDCs) from chickens (Gallus domesticus) inner ears. The viability of iDCs was monitored via trypan blue exclusion at each isolation step. Sodium Green, BCECF-AM, Rhodamine 123 and 9-anthroyl ouabain molecules were used to test iDC function. These fluorochromes label iDCs ionic transmembrane trafficking function, membrane electrogenic potentials and Na+/K+ ATPase pump's activity. Na+/K+ ATPase pump sites, were also evaluated by the p-nitrophenyl phosphatase reaction. These results suggest that iDCs remain viable for several hours after isolation without special culturing requirements and that the number and functional activity of Na+/K+ ATPase pumps in the iDCs were indistinguishable from in vivo DCs. Primary cultures of freshly iDCs were successfully maintained for 28 days in plastic dishes with RPMI 1640 culture medium. The preparation of iDCs overcomes the difficulty of DCs accessability in vivo and the unavoidable contamination that rupturing the inner ear microenvironments induces.

  12. In Ovo Vaccination with Turkey Herpesvirus Hastens Maturation of Chicken Embryo Immune Responses in Specific-Pathogen-Free Chickens.

    PubMed

    Gimeno, Isabel M; Faiz, Nik M; Cortes, Aneg L; Barbosa, Taylor; Villalobos, Tarsicio; Pandiri, Arun R

    2015-09-01

    Administration of Marek's disease (MD) vaccines in ovo has become a common practice for the poultry industry. Efficacy of MD vaccines is very high, even though they are administered to chicken embryos that are immunologically immature. We have recently demonstrated that in ovo vaccination with turkey herpesvirus (HVT) results in increased activation of T cells at hatch. Our previous results suggested that in ovo vaccination with HVT might have a positive impact not only on MD protection but also on the overall maturity of the developing immune system of the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of administration of HVT at 18 days of embryonation (ED) on the maturation of the embryo immune system. Four experiments were conducted in Specific-Pathogen-Free Avian Supplies (SPAFAS) chickens to evaluate the effect of administration of HVT at 18 ED on the splenic cell phenotypes at day of age (experiment 1) and on the ability of 1-day-old chickens to respond to various antigens compared with older birds (experiments 2 and 3). In addition, a fourth experiment was conducted to elucidate whether administration of other serotype's MD vaccines (CVI988 and SB-1) at 18 ED had the same effect as HVT on the spleen cell phenotypes at day of age. Our results demonstrated that 1-day-old chickens that had received HVT in ovo (1-day HVT) had higher percentages of CD45+, MHC-I+, CD45+MHC-I+, CD3+, MHC-II+, CD3+MHC-II+, CD4+, CD8+, and CD4+CD8+ cells in the spleen than 1-day-old sham-inoculated chickens (1-day sham). Moreover, spleens of 1-day HVT chickens had greater percentages of CD45+MHC-I+ cells and equal or greater numbers of CD4+CD8- and CD4-CD8+ cells than older unvaccinated chickens. In addition, administration of HVT at 18 ED rendered chicks at hatch more responsive to unrelated antigens such as concavalin A, phytohemagglutinin-L, and keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Administration of MD vaccines of other serotypes had an effect

  13. Mitochondrial DNA Variation and the Evolution of Robertsonian Chromosomal Races of House Mice, Mus Domesticus

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, M. W.; Boyer, S. N.; Searle, J. B.; Aquadro, C. F.

    1994-01-01

    The house mouse, Mus domesticus, includes many distinct Robertsonian (Rb) chromosomal races with diploid numbers from 2n = 22 to 2n = 38. Although these races are highly differentiated karyotypically, they are otherwise indistinguishable from standard karyotype (i.e., 2n = 40) mice, and consequently their evolutionary histories are not well understood. We have examined mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variation from the control region and the ND3 gene region among 56 M. domesticus from Western Europe, including 15 Rb populations and 13 standard karyotype populations, and two individuals of the sister species, Mus musculus. mtDNA exhibited an average sequence divergence of 0.84% within M. domesticus and 3.4% between M. domesticus and M. musculus. The transition/transversion bias for the regions sequenced is 5.7:1, and the overall rate of sequence evolution is approximately 10% divergence per million years. The amount of mtDNA variation was as great among different Rb races as among different populations of standard karyotype mice, suggesting that different Rb races do not derive from a single recent maternal lineage. Phylogenetic analysis of the mtDNA sequences resulted in a parsimony tree which contained six major clades. Each of these clades contained both Rb and standard karyotype mice, consistent with the hypothesis that Rb races have arisen independently multiple times. Discordance between phylogeny and geography was attributable to ancestral polymorphism as a consequence of the recent colonization of Western Europe by mice. Two major mtDNA lineages were geographically localized and contained both Rb and standard karyotype mice. The age of these lineages suggests that mice have moved into Europe only within the last 10,000 years and that Rb populations in different geographic regions arose during this time. PMID:8005418

  14. EFFECT OF ESTROGEN AND 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD) ON PLASMA FATTY ACIDS OF IMMATURE MALE CHICKENS (GALLUS DOMESTICUS). (R826298)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  15. Testosterone stimulates progesterone production and STAR, P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage and LH receptor mRNAs expression in hen (Gallus domesticus) granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Rangel, P L; Rodríguez, A; Rojas, S; Sharp, P J; Gutierrez, C G

    2009-12-01

    The chicken ovary is organized into a hierarchy of yellow yolky follicles that ovulate on successive days. Active or passive immunization of laying hens against testosterone blocks ovulation without affecting follicle development. Testosterone may play a role in pre-ovulatory follicle maturation by stimulating granulosa progesterone production. We assessed whether this stimulus is dose-related and depends on the maturity of the donor follicle, and if it does so by stimulating granulosa cell STAR, P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage (P450scc), and LH receptor (LHCGR) mRNAs expression. Progesterone production by granulosa cells from F1, F3, and F4 follicles, cultured for 3 h without testosterone was greater in cells collected 11-14 h than 1-4 h after ovulation. These differences in progesterone production were less pronounced after granulosa cells had been cultured for 24 h. Culture of granulosa cells for 3 or 24 h with testosterone (1-100 ng/ml) stimulated progesterone production in cells collected from F4, F3, or F1 follicles 1-4, or 11-14 h after ovulation. Testosterone (0-4000 ng/ml) alone or in combination with LH (0-100 ng/ml) increased progesterone production by F1 granulosa cells, collected 1-4 and 11-14 h after ovulation and cultured for 3 h. Finally, testosterone (10 or 100 ng/ml) increased STAR, P450scc, and LHCGR mRNAs, when added to 3 h cultures of F1 granulosa cells. In conclusion, testosterone stimulates granulosa cell progesterone production in hen pre-ovulatory hierarchical follicles irrespective of maturational state, acting alone or additively with LH. We propose that testosterone promotes granulosa cell maturation to facilitate the pre-ovulatory release of LH.

  16. Differentiated evolutionary relationships among chordates from comparative alignments of multiple sequences of MyoD and MyoG myogenic regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Oliani, L C; Lidani, K C F; Gabriel, J E

    2015-10-16

    MyoD and MyoG are transcription factors that have essential roles in myogenic lineage determination and muscle differentiation. The purpose of this study was to compare multiple amino acid sequences of myogenic regulatory proteins to infer evolutionary relationships among chordates. Protein sequences from Mus musculus (P10085 and P12979), human Homo sapiens (P15172 and P15173), bovine Bos taurus (Q7YS82 and Q7YS81), wild pig Sus scrofa (P49811 and P49812), quail Coturnix coturnix (P21572 and P34060), chicken Gallus gallus (P16075 and P17920), rat Rattus norvegicus (Q02346 and P20428), domestic water buffalo Bubalus bubalis (D2SP11 and A7L034), and sheep Ovis aries (Q90477 and D3YKV7) were searched from a non-redundant protein sequence database UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, and subsequently analyzed using the Mega6.0 software. MyoD evolutionary analyses revealed the presence of three main clusters with all mammals branched in one cluster, members of the order Rodentia (mouse and rat) in a second branch linked to the first, and birds of the order Galliformes (chicken and quail) remaining isolated in a third. MyoG evolutionary analyses aligned sequences in two main clusters, all mammalian specimens grouped in different sub-branches, and birds clustered in a second branch. These analyses suggest that the evolution of MyoD and MyoG was driven by different pathways.

  17. Mutation/SNP analysis in EF-hand calcium binding domain of mitochondrial Ca[Formula: see text] uptake 1 gene in bipolar disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Safari, Roghaiyeh; Salimi, Reza; Tunca, Zeliha; Ozerdem, Aysegul; Ceylan, Deniz; Sakizli, Meral

    2016-06-01

    Calcium signaling is important for synaptic plasticity, generation of brain rhythms, regulating neuronal excitability, data processing and cognition. Impairment in calcium homeostasis contributed to the development of psychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorder (BP). MCU is the most important calcium transporter in mitochondria inner membrane responsible for influx of Ca[Formula: see text]. MICU1 is linked with MCU and has two canonical EF hands that are vital for its activity and regulates MCU-mediated Ca[Formula: see text] influx. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the role of genetic alteration of EF hand calcium binding motifs of MICU1 on the development of BP. We examined patients with BP, first degree relatives of these patients and healthy volunteers for mutations and polymorphisms in EF hand calcium binding motifs of MICU1. The result showed no SNP/mutation in BP patients, in healthy subjects and in first degree relatives. Additionally, alignment of the EF hand calcium binding regions among species (Gallus-gallus, Canis-lupus-familiaris, Bos-taurus, Mus-musculus, Rattus-norvegicus, Pan-troglodytes, Homosapiens and Danio-rerio) showed exactly the same amino acids (DLNGDGEVDMEE and DCDGNGELSNKE) except in one of the calcium binding domain of Danio-rerio that there was only one difference; leucine instead of Methionine. Our results showed that the SNP on EF-hand Ca[Formula: see text] binding domains of MICU1 gene had no effect in phenotypic characters of BP patients.

  18. Optimization of an experimental model for the recovery of adult Haplorchis pumilio (Heterophyidae: Digenea).

    PubMed

    Kay, Helle; Murrell, K Darwin; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Madsen, Henry; Trang, Nguyen Thi Thu; Hung, Nguyen Manh; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2009-06-01

    Recent studies in Vietnam and other Asian countries have shown that fish-borne zoonotic intestinal trematodes (FZT) occur very frequently in humans. The dominant intestinal FZT in Vietnamese fish are species of Haplorchis, in particular H. pumilio. However, basic studies on the biology and pathology of adult H. pumilio are difficult because of the lack of a standardized experimental animal model. The objective of this study was to establish and optimize such an animal-infection model for H. pumilio. Using metacercariae isolated from naturally infected fish, experiments were conducted to identify a suitable experimental animal host species, as well as the optimum metacercariae infection dose, and to determine the post-infection interval for patency. In a series of experiments, mice (Mus musculus) and chickens (Gallus gallus dom.) were infected with different numbers of metacercariae, and worm recoveries were made at varying intervals post-infection (PI). Based on the mean number of adult flukes recovered/number of metacercariae inoculated and the percent of hosts infected, mice were significantly more susceptible to infection than were chickens. The proportion of metacercariae developing to the adult stage increased with dose size. The peak worm recovery (geometric mean) was found to be day 7, although not all recovered flukes were gravid until day 9 PI. These results describe a mouse infection model with good predictability for intestinal flukes, such as H. pumilio, results which could facilitate investigations on important biological and pathological aspects of intestinal fluke infections.

  19. Genetic differentiation and phylogeny relationships of functional ApoVLDL-II gene in red jungle fowl and domestic chicken populations.

    PubMed

    Musa, Hassan H; Cheng, Jin H; Bao, Wen B; Li, Bi C; Mekki, Dafaalla M; Chen, Guo H

    2007-08-01

    A total of 243 individuals from Red Jungle Fowl (Gallus gallus spadiceus), Rugao, Anka, Wenchang and Silikes chicken populations were used for polymorphism analysis in functional apoVLDL-II gene by Restriction fragment length polymorphism and single strand conformation polymorphism markers. The results show that Anka population has highest gene diversity and Shannon information index, while Red jungle fowl shows highest effective number of allele. In addition, the higher coefficient of genetic differentiation (Gst) across all loci in apoVLDL-II was indicating that high variation is proportioned among populations. As expected total gene diversity (Ht) has upper estimate compared with within population genetic diversity (Hs) across all loci. The mean Gst value across all loci was (0.194) indicating about 19.4% of total genetic variation could be explained by breeds differences, while the remaining 80.6% was accounted for differences among individuals. The average apoVLDL-II gene flow across all loci in five chicken populations was 1.189. The estimates of genetic identity and distance confirm that these genes are significantly different between genetically fat and lean population, because fat type breed Anka shows highest distance with the other Silikes and Rugao whish are genetically lean. In addition, Wenchang and Red jungle fowl were found more closely and genetically related than the other breeds with 49.4% bootstrapping percentages, then they were related to Silikes by 100% bootstrapping percentages followed by Rugao and finally all of them are related with exotic fat breed Anka.

  20. Apoptosis in response to heat stress is positively associated with heat-shock protein 90 expression in chicken myocardial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Wu, Hong; Tang, Shu; Li, Qiao-Ning; Xu, Jiao; Zhang, Miao; Su, Ya-Nan; Yin, Bin; Zhao, Qi-Ling; Kemper, Nicole; Hartung, Joerg; Bao, En-Dong

    2017-06-30

    To determine heat-shock protein (Hsp)90 expression is connected with cellular apoptotic response to heat stress and its mechanism, chicken ( Gallus gallus ) primary myocardial cells were treated with the Hsp90 promoter, aspirin, and its inhibitor, geldanamycin (GA), before heat stress. Cellular viability, heat-stressed apoptosis and reactive oxygen species level under different treatments were measured, and the expression of key proteins of the signaling pathway related to Hsp90 and their colocalization with Hsp90 were detected. The results showed that aspirin treatment increased the expression of protein kinase B (Akt), the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 and p-IKKα/β and the colocalization of Akt and STAT-3 with Hsp90 during heat stress, which was accompanied by improved viability and low apoptosis. GA significantly inhibited Akt expression and p-IKKα/β level, but not STAT-3 quantity, while the colocalization of Akt and STAT-3 with Hsp90 was weakened, followed by lower cell viability and higher apoptosis. Aspirin after GA treatment partially improved the stress response and apoptosis rate of tested cells caused by the recovery of Akt expression and colocalization, rather than the level of STAT-3 (including its co-localization with Hsp90) and p-IKKα/β. Therefore, Hsp90 expression has a positive effect on cellular capacity to resist heat-stressed injury and apoptosis. Moreover, inhibition of Hsp90 before stress partially attenuated its positive effects.

  1. Sources of Blood Meals of Sylvatic Triatoma guasayana near Zurima, Bolivia, Assayed with qPCR and 12S Cloning

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, David E.; Ribera, Wilma; Pizarro, Juan Carlos; Plaza, Carlos; Gordon, Levi W.; Peña, Reynaldo; Morrissey, Leslie A.; Rizzo, Donna M.; Stevens, Lori

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study we compared the utility of two molecular biology techniques, cloning of the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA gene and hydrolysis probe-based qPCR, to identify blood meal sources of sylvatic Chagas disease insect vectors collected with live-bait mouse traps (also known as Noireau traps). Fourteen T. guasayana were collected from six georeferenced trap locations in the Andean highlands of the department of Chuquisaca, Bolivia. Methodology/Principal Findings We detected four blood meals sources with the cloning assay: seven samples were positive for human (Homo sapiens), five for chicken (Gallus gallus) and unicolored blackbird (Agelasticus cyanopus), and one for opossum (Monodelphis domestica). Using the qPCR assay we detected chicken (13 vectors), and human (14 vectors) blood meals as well as an additional blood meal source, Canis sp. (4 vectors). Conclusions/Significance We show that cloning of 12S PCR products, which avoids bias associated with developing primers based on a priori knowledge, detected blood meal sources not previously considered and that species-specific qPCR is more sensitive. All samples identified as positive for a specific blood meal source by the cloning assay were also positive by qPCR. However, not all samples positive by qPCR were positive by cloning. We show the power of combining the cloning assay with the highly sensitive hydrolysis probe-based qPCR assay provides a more complete picture of blood meal sources for insect disease vectors. PMID:25474154

  2. Development of the pulmonary surfactant system in two oviparous vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S D; Orgeig, S; Lopatko, O V; Daniels, C B

    2000-02-01

    In birds and oviparous reptiles, hatching is often a lengthy and exhausting process, which commences with pipping followed by lung clearance and pulmonary ventilation. We examined the composition of pulmonary surfactant in the developing lungs of the chicken, Gallus gallus, and of the bearded dragon, Pogona vitticeps. Lung tissue was collected from chicken embryos at days 14, 16, 18 (prepipped), and 20 (postpipped) of incubation and from 1 day and 3 wk posthatch and adult animals. In chickens, surfactant protein A mRNA was detected using Northern blot analysis in lung tissue at all stages sampled, appearing relatively earlier in development compared with placental mammals. Chickens were lavaged at days 16, 18, and 20 of incubation and 1 day posthatch, whereas bearded dragons were lavaged at day 55, days 57-60 (postpipped), and days 58-61 (posthatched). In both species, total phospholipid (PL) from the lavage increased throughout incubation. Disaturated PL (DSP) was not measurable before 16 days of incubation in the chick embryo nor before 55 days in bearded dragons. However, the percentage of DSP/PL increased markedly throughout late development in both species. Because cholesterol (Chol) remained unchanged, the Chol/PL and Chol/DSP ratios decreased in both species. Thus the Chol and PL components are differentially regulated. The lizard surfactant system develops and matures over a relatively shorter time than that of birds and mammals. This probably reflects the highly precocial nature of hatchling reptiles.

  3. A Genome-Wide Screen Indicates Correlation between Differentiation and Expression of Metabolism Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shende, Akhilesh; Singh, Anupama; Meena, Anil; Ghosal, Ritika; Ranganathan, Madhav; Bandyopadhyay, Amitabha

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated tissues may be considered as materials with distinct properties. The differentiation program of a given tissue ensures that it acquires material properties commensurate with its function. It may be hypothesized that some of these properties are acquired through production of tissue-specific metabolites synthesized by metabolic enzymes. To establish correlation between metabolism and organogenesis we have carried out a genome-wide expression study of metabolism related genes by RNA in-situ hybridization. 23% of the metabolism related genes studied are expressed in a tissue-restricted but not tissue-exclusive manner. We have conducted the screen on whole mount chicken (Gallus gallus) embryos from four distinct developmental stages to correlate dynamic changes in expression patterns of metabolic enzymes with spatio-temporally unique developmental events. Our data strongly suggests that unique combinations of metabolism related genes, and not specific metabolic pathways, are upregulated during differentiation. Further, expression of metabolism related genes in well established signaling centers that regulate different aspects of morphogenesis indicates developmental roles of some of the metabolism related genes. The database of tissue-restricted expression patterns of metabolism related genes, generated in this study, should serve as a resource for systematic identification of these genes with tissue-specific functions during development. Finally, comprehensive understanding of differentiation is not possible unless the downstream genes of a differentiation cascade are identified. We propose, metabolic enzymes constitute a significant portion of these downstream target genes. Thus our study should help elucidate different aspects of tissue differentiation. PMID:23717462

  4. Structure and antigenicity analysis of the IgG gene for Nyctereutes procyonoides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cui; Guo, Shuyuan; Pang, Xiaoru; Song, Daozhen; Fu, Shijun; Chang, Weishan

    2015-01-01

    Nyctereutes procyonoides immunoglobulin G (IgG) gene is partially cloned. In order to obtain a certain length (966bp) of Nyctereutes procyonoides immunoglobulin G (IgG), two pairs of primers are designed according to the conserved nucleotide sequence of canine (GenBank:AF354265, AF354265, AF354266, AF354267) and mink (GenBank: L07789). Using Bioinformatics technology and Western-blot to analyze antigenicity of Nyctereutes procyonoides IgG-B gene. The homology for nucleotide sequence of IgG between Nyctereutes procyonoides and canine (IgG A, IgG B, IgG C, IgG D), mink, Homo sapiens, Oryctolagus cuniculus, Mus musculus, Anas platyrhynchos and gallus were respectively (88.1%, 93.6%, 85.4%, 87.2%), 83.7%, 74.8%, 71.8%, 69.2%, 51.6%, 48.4%. It can be seen that there was high homology of aminoacid sequence between IgG of Nyctereutes procyonoides and IgG (A, B, C, D) of canine. And the serum antibody of Nyctereutes procyonoides had obviously cross-reaction with HRP conjugated rabbit anti-dog IgG, compared with those of canine, oryctolagus cuniculus, mus musculus, mink, gallus. We successfully got Nyctereutes procyonoides immuneglobulin G (IgG) gene (Gen- Bank: KM010191). There is the closest ties of consanguinity of IgG exist between Nyctereutes procyonoides and canine among the mammal through the genetic evolution. The detection and treament of canine distemper can be used on Nyctereutes procyonoides.

  5. Discovery of the youngest sex chromosomes reveals first case of convergent co-option of ancestral autosomes in turtles.

    PubMed

    Montiel, E E; Badenhorst, D; Tamplin, J; Burke, R L; Valenzuela, N

    2017-02-01

    Most turtle species possess temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), but genotypic sex determination (GSD) has evolved multiple times independently from the TSD ancestral condition. GSD in animals typically involves sex chromosomes, yet the sex chromosome system of only 9 out of 18 known GSD turtles has been characterized. Here, we combine comparative genome hybridization (CGH) and BAC clone fluorescent in situ hybridization (BAC FISH) to identify a macro-chromosome XX/XY system in the GSD wood turtle Glyptemys insculpta (GIN), the youngest known sex chromosomes in chelonians (8-20 My old). Comparative analyses show that GIN-X/Y is homologous to chromosome 4 of Chrysemys picta (CPI) painted turtles, chromosome 5 of Gallus gallus chicken, and thus to the X/Y sex chromosomes of Siebenrockiella crassicollis black marsh turtles. We tentatively assign the gene content of the mapped BACs from CPI chromosome 4 (CPI-4) to GIN-X/Y. Chromosomal rearrangements were detected in G. insculpta sex chromosome pair that co-localize with the male-specific region of GIN-Y and encompass a gene involved in sexual development (Wt1-a putative master gene in TSD turtles). Such inversions may have mediated the divergence of G. insculpta sex chromosome pair and facilitated GSD evolution in this turtle. Our results illuminate the structure, origin, and evolution of sex chromosomes in G. insculpta and reveal the first case of convergent co-option of an autosomal pair as sex chromosomes within chelonians.

  6. Single locus typing of MHC class I and class II B loci in a population of red jungle fowl.

    PubMed

    Worley, K; Gillingham, M; Jensen, P; Kennedy, L J; Pizzari, T; Kaufman, J; Richardson, D S

    2008-05-01

    In species with duplicated major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, estimates of genetic variation often rely on multilocus measures of diversity. It is possible that such measures might not always detect more detailed patterns of selection at individual loci. Here, we describe a method that allows us to investigate classical MHC diversity in red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus), the wild ancestor of the domestic chicken, using a single locus approach. This is possible due to the well-characterised gene organisation of the 'minimal essential' MHC (BF/BL region) of the domestic chicken, which comprises two differentially expressed duplicated class I (BF) and two class II B (BLB) genes. Using a combination of reference strand-mediated conformation analysis, cloning and sequencing, we identify nine BF and ten BLB alleles in a captive population of jungle fowl. We show that six BF and five BLB alleles are from the more highly expressed locus of each gene, BF2 and BLB2, respectively. An excess of non-synonymous substitutions across the jungle fowl BF/BL region suggests that diversifying selection has acted on this population. Importantly, single locus screening reveals that the strength of selection is greatest on the highly expressed BF2 locus. This is the first time that a population of red jungle fowl has been typed at the MHC region, laying the basis for further research into the underlying processes acting to maintain MHC diversity in this and other species.

  7. Regulatory capacities of a broiler and layer strain exposed to high CO2 levels during the second half of incubation.

    PubMed

    Everaert, Nadia; Willemsen, Hilke; Kamers, Bram; Decuypere, Eddy; Bruggeman, Veerle

    2011-02-01

    It has been shown that during embryonic chicken (Gallus gallus) development, the metabolism of broiler embryos differs from that of layers in terms of embryonic growth, pCO2/pO2 blood levels, heat production, and heart rate. Therefore, these strains might adapt differently on extreme environmental factors such as exposure to high CO2. The aim of this study was to compare broiler and layer embryos in their adaptation to 4% CO2 from embryonic days (ED) 12 to 18. Due to hypercapnia, blood pCO2 increased in both strains. Blood bicarbonate concentration was ~10 mmol/L higher in embryos exposed to high CO2 of both strains, while the bicarbonates of broilers had ~5 mmol/L higher values than layer embryos. In addition, the pH increased when embryos of both strains were exposed to CO2. Moreover, under CO2 conditions, the blood potassium concentration increased in both strains significantly, reaching a plateau at ED14. At ED12, the layer strain had a higher increase in CAII protein in red blood cells due to incubation under high CO2 compared to the broiler strain, whereas at ED14, the broiler strain had the highest increase. In conclusion, the most striking observation was the similar mechanism of broiler and layer embryos to cope with high CO2 levels. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative genomics in chicken and Pekin duck using FISH mapping and microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The availability of the complete chicken (Gallus gallus) genome sequence as well as a large number of chicken probes for fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) and microarray resources facilitate comparative genomic studies between chicken and other bird species. In a previous study, we provided a comprehensive cytogenetic map for the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) and the first analysis of copy number variants (CNVs) in birds. Here, we extend this approach to the Pekin duck (Anas platyrhynchos), an obvious target for comparative genomic studies due to its agricultural importance and resistance to avian flu. Results We provide a detailed molecular cytogenetic map of the duck genome through FISH assignment of 155 chicken clones. We identified one inter- and six intrachromosomal rearrangements between chicken and duck macrochromosomes and demonstrated conserved synteny among all microchromosomes analysed. Array comparative genomic hybridisation revealed 32 CNVs, of which 5 overlap previously designated "hotspot" regions between chicken and turkey. Conclusion Our results suggest extensive conservation of avian genomes across 90 million years of evolution in both macro- and microchromosomes. The data on CNVs between chicken and duck extends previous analyses in chicken and turkey and supports the hypotheses that avian genomes contain fewer CNVs than mammalian genomes and that genomes of evolutionarily distant species share regions of copy number variation ("CNV hotspots"). Our results will expedite duck genomics, assist marker development and highlight areas of interest for future evolutionary and functional studies. PMID:19656363

  9. Integrating transcriptome and genome re-sequencing data to identify key genes and mutations affecting chicken eggshell qualities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan; Zhu, Feng; Liu, Long; Zheng, Chuan Wei; Wang, De He; Hou, Zhuo Cheng; Ning, Zhong Hua

    2015-01-01

    Eggshell damages lead to economic losses in the egg production industry and are a threat to human health. We examined 49-wk-old Rhode Island White hens (Gallus gallus) that laid eggs having shells with significantly different strengths and thicknesses. We used HiSeq 2000 (Illumina) sequencing to characterize the chicken transcriptome and whole genome to identify the key genes and genetic mutations associated with eggshell calcification. We identified a total of 14,234 genes expressed in the chicken uterus, representing 89% of all annotated chicken genes. A total of 889 differentially expressed genes were identified by comparing low eggshell strength (LES) and normal eggshell strength (NES) genomes. The DEGs are enriched in calcification-related processes, including calcium ion transport and calcium signaling pathways as revealed by gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis. Some important matrix proteins, such as OC-116, LTF and SPP1, were also expressed differentially between two groups. A total of 3,671,919 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 508,035 Indels were detected in protein coding genes by whole-genome re-sequencing, including 1775 non-synonymous variations and 19 frame-shift Indels in DEGs. SNPs and Indels found in this study could be further investigated for eggshell traits. This is the first report to integrate the transcriptome and genome re-sequencing to target the genetic variations which decreased the eggshell qualities. These findings further advance our understanding of eggshell calcification in the chicken uterus.

  10. A genome-wide screen indicates correlation between differentiation and expression of metabolism related genes.

    PubMed

    Roy, Priti; Kumar, Brijesh; Shende, Akhilesh; Singh, Anupama; Meena, Anil; Ghosal, Ritika; Ranganathan, Madhav; Bandyopadhyay, Amitabha

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated tissues may be considered as materials with distinct properties. The differentiation program of a given tissue ensures that it acquires material properties commensurate with its function. It may be hypothesized that some of these properties are acquired through production of tissue-specific metabolites synthesized by metabolic enzymes. To establish correlation between metabolism and organogenesis we have carried out a genome-wide expression study of metabolism related genes by RNA in-situ hybridization. 23% of the metabolism related genes studied are expressed in a tissue-restricted but not tissue-exclusive manner. We have conducted the screen on whole mount chicken (Gallus gallus) embryos from four distinct developmental stages to correlate dynamic changes in expression patterns of metabolic enzymes with spatio-temporally unique developmental events. Our data strongly suggests that unique combinations of metabolism related genes, and not specific metabolic pathways, are upregulated during differentiation. Further, expression of metabolism related genes in well established signaling centers that regulate different aspects of morphogenesis indicates developmental roles of some of the metabolism related genes. The database of tissue-restricted expression patterns of metabolism related genes, generated in this study, should serve as a resource for systematic identification of these genes with tissue-specific functions during development. Finally, comprehensive understanding of differentiation is not possible unless the downstream genes of a differentiation cascade are identified. We propose, metabolic enzymes constitute a significant portion of these downstream target genes. Thus our study should help elucidate different aspects of tissue differentiation.

  11. Intra-amniotic administration (Gallus gallus) of cicer arietinum and lens culinaris prebiotics extracts and duck egg white peptides affects calcium status and intestinal functionality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Calcium (Ca) is one of the most abundant inorganic elements in the human body and has many important physiological roles. Prebiotics and bioactive peptides are two important substances used to promote calcium uptake. However, the difference in mechanisms of the calcium uptake from these two suppleme...

  12. Second-hand smoke in Italy.

    PubMed

    Gallus, S

    2015-12-01

    Second-hand smoke (SHS) has been classified as carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) of the World Health Organization (WHO) [IARC, 2004]. Of the 5.7 million deaths attributable each year to tobacco smoking, more than 600,000 (i.e., around 1% of all deaths worldwide) refer to subjects who never smoked and that prematurely die due to their lifetime exposure to SHS [WHO, 2012]. Italy has been one of the pioneering countries - and the first large country worldwide - to enact a comprehensive smoke-free legislation in 2005. The law, introduced in order to reduce SHS exposure, banned smoking in indoor public places, including restaurants and bars, and in all workplaces [Gallus et al., 2006]. This legislation has had an undisputed success from a public health perspective: it was widely supported and strongly observed, restaurant and bar owners did not experience any dreaded decline in their business, and tobacco smoking (and its detrimental health effects) substantially decreased [Gallus et al., 2006; Gorini et al., 2007]. More importantly, the regulation has been effective in dramatically reducing SHS exposure [Gorini et al., 2007; Martinez-Sanchez et al., 2012]. Most high- income countries followed Italy in the adoption of similar comprehensive smoking ban legislations over the last decade [IARC, 2009]. These regulations and the information campaigns conducted for their enforcement had also the effect to increase the social unacceptability of SHS and consequently the adoption of voluntary home smoking bans [Ferketich et al., 2014; Martinez-Sanchez et al., 2014]. This notwithstanding, in 2010 specific Italian subpopulations were still frequently exposed to SHS, both in public and private places. In particular, 54% of the young (i.e., age 15-24 years) were still exposed to SHS in any settings, 27% in private houses, and 33% in private cars [Martinez-Sanchez et al., 2012]. The relatively high SHS exposure in private cars is of

  13. Preferential predation of cool season grass seed by the common cricket (Acheta domesticus)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To determine if there might be a seed predation preference among forage grasses a laboratory study was conducted using the common cricket (Acheta domesticus L.). Six cool-season grasses were selected and feeding studies were conducted over a three day period. The study was designed as a randomized ...

  14. Biochars impact on water infiltration and water quality through a compacted subsoil layer.

    PubMed

    Novak, Jeff; Sigua, Gilbert; Watts, Don; Cantrell, Keri; Shumaker, Paul; Szogi, Ariel; Johnson, Mark G; Spokas, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Soils in the SE USA Coastal Plain region frequently have a compacted subsoil layer (E horizon), which is a barrier for water infiltration. Four different biochars were evaluated to increase water infiltration through a compacted horizon from a Norfolk soil (fine-loamy, kaolinitic, thermic, Typic Kandiudult). In addition, we also evaluated biochars effect on water quality. Biochars were produced by pyrolysis at 500 °C from pine chips (Pinus taeda), poultry litter (Gallus domesticus) feedstocks, and as blends (50:50 and 80:20) of pine chip:poultry litter. Prior to pyrolysis, the feedstocks were pelletized and sieved to >2-mm pellets. Each biochar was mixed with the subsoil at 20 g/kg (w/w) and the mixture was placed in columns. The columns were leached four times with Milli-Q water over 128 d of incubation. Except for the biochar produced from poultry litter, all other applied biochars resulted in significant water infiltration increases (0.157-0.219 mL min(-1); p<0.05) compared to the control (0.095 mL min(-1)). However, water infiltration in each treatment were influenced by additional water leaching. Leachates were enriched in PO4, SO4, Cl, Na, and K after addition of poultry litter biochar, however, their concentrations declined in pine chip blended biochar treatments and after multiple leaching. Adding biochars (except 100% poultry litter biochar) to a compacted subsoil layer can initially improve water infiltration, but, additional leaching revealed that the effect remained only for the 50:50 pine chip:poultry litter blended biochar while it declined in other biochar treatments. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Boundary conditions for heat transfer and evaporative cooling in the trachea and air sac system of the domestic fowl: a two-dimensional CFD analysis.

    PubMed

    Sverdlova, Nina S; Lambertz, Markus; Witzel, Ulrich; Perry, Steven F

    2012-01-01

    Various parts of the respiratory system play an important role in temperature control in birds. We create a simplified computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of heat exchange in the trachea and air sacs of the domestic fowl (Gallus domesticus) in order to investigate the boundary conditions for the convective and evaporative cooling in these parts of the respiratory system. The model is based upon published values for respiratory times, pressures and volumes and upon anatomical data for this species, and the calculated heat exchange is compared with experimentally determined values for the domestic fowl and a closely related, wild species. In addition, we studied the trachea histologically to estimate the thickness of the heat transfer barrier and determine the structure and function of moisture-producing glands. In the transient CFD simulation, the airflow in the trachea of a 2-dimensional model is evoked by changing the volume of the simplified air sac. The heat exchange between the respiratory system and the environment is simulated for different ambient temperatures and humidities, and using two different models of evaporation: constant water vapour concentration model and the droplet injection model. According to the histological results, small mucous glands are numerous but discrete serous glands are lacking on the tracheal surface. The amount of water and heat loss in the simulation is comparable with measured respiratory values previously reported. Tracheal temperature control in the avian respiratory system may be used as a model for extinct or rare animals and could have high relevance for explaining how gigantic, long-necked dinosaurs such as sauropoda might have maintained a high metabolic rate.

  16. Alteration of Diastereoisomeric and Enantiomeric Profiles of Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) in Adult Chicken Tissues, Eggs, and Hatchling Chickens.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaobo; Qiao, Lin; Sun, Runxia; Luo, Xiaojun; Zheng, Jing; Xie, Qilai; Sun, Yuxin; Mai, Bixian

    2017-05-16

    The concentrations and enantiomer fractions (EFs) of α-, β-, and γ-hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) were measured in chicken diet sources (soil and chicken feed), home-raised adult chicken (Gallus domesticus) tissues, eggs during incubation, and hatchling chicken tissues. HBCD concentrations were not detected-0.69 ng/g dry weight (dw) and 25.6-48.4 ng/g dw in chicken feed and soil, respectively. HBCDs were detected in all adult chicken tissues, except the brain, at median levels of 13.1-44.0 ng/g lipid weight (lw). The proportions of α-HBCD in total HBCDs increased from 51% in soil to more than 87% in adult chicken tissues. The accumulation ratios (ARs) of α-HBCD from diet to adult chicken tissues were 4.27 for liver, 11.2 for fat, and 7.64-12.9 for other tissues, respectively. The AR and carry-over rate (COR) of α-HBCD from diet to eggs were 22.4 and 0.226, respectively. The concentrations of α-HBCD in hatchling chicken liver (median: 35.4 ng/g lw) were significantly lower than those in hatchling chicken pectoral muscle (median: 130 ng/g lw). The EFs of α-HBCD decreased from soil to adult chicken tissues and from eggs to hatchling chicken liver. Meanwhile, the EFs of γ-HBCD increased from soil to adult chicken tissues. These results indicate the preferential enrichment of (-)-α-HBCD and (+)-γ-HBCD in chickens. The alteration of diastereoisomeric and enantiomeric patterns of HBCDs might be influenced by the different absorption and elimination rates of the six HBCD enantiomers as well as variations in HBCD metabolism in chickens.

  17. The adequate stimulus for avian short latency vestibular responses to linear translation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Jones, S. M.; Colbert, S.

    1998-01-01

    Transient linear acceleration stimuli have been shown to elicit eighth nerve vestibular compound action potentials in birds and mammals. The present study was undertaken to better define the nature of the adequate stimulus for neurons generating the response in the chicken (Gallus domesticus). In particular, the study evaluated the question of whether the neurons studied are most sensitive to the maximum level of linear acceleration achieved or to the rate of change in acceleration (da/dt, or jerk). To do this, vestibular response thresholds were measured as a function of stimulus onset slope. Traditional computer signal averaging was used to record responses to pulsed linear acceleration stimuli. Stimulus onset slope was systematically varied. Acceleration thresholds decreased with increasing stimulus onset slope (decreasing stimulus rise time). When stimuli were expressed in units of jerk (g/ms), thresholds were virtually constant for all stimulus rise times. Moreover, stimuli having identical jerk magnitudes but widely varying peak acceleration levels produced virtually identical responses. Vestibular response thresholds, latencies and amplitudes appear to be determined strictly by stimulus jerk magnitudes. Stimulus attributes such as peak acceleration or rise time alone do not provide sufficient information to predict response parameter quantities. Indeed, the major response parameters were shown to be virtually independent of peak acceleration levels or rise time when these stimulus features were isolated and considered separately. It is concluded that the neurons generating short latency vestibular evoked potentials do so as "jerk encoders" in the chicken. Primary afferents classified as "irregular", and which traditionally fall into the broad category of "dynamic" or "phasic" neurons, would seem to be the most likely candidates for the neural generators of short latency vestibular compound action potentials.

  18. Proteomic comparison by iTRAQ combined with mass spectrometry of egg white proteins in laying hens (Gallus gallus) fed with soybean meal and cottonseed meal

    PubMed Central

    He, Tao; Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Jing; Wu, Shugeng; Yue, Hongyuan; Qi, Guanghai

    2017-01-01

    Cottonseed meal (CSM) is commonly used in hens’ diets to replace soybean meal (SBM). However, the molecular consequences of this substitution remains unclear. To investigate the impact of this substitution at the molecular level, iTRAQ combined with biochemical analysis was performed in Hy-Line W-36 hens supplemented with a mixed diet of CSM and SBM. Egg weight, albumen height, and Haugh unit were significantly reduced in the CSM100 group (100% crude protein of SBM replaced by CSM) compared with the SBM group (P<0.05). A total of 15 proteins, accounting for 75% of egg white proteins with various biological functions of egg whites, were found to be reduced. This finding may relate to the decrease of albumen quality in the CSM100 group. Oviduct magnum morphology and hormone analysis indicated that a reduced level of plasma progesterone caused reduced growth of the tubular gland and epithelial cells in the magnum, further decreasing egg white protein synthesis in the magnum. These findings help demonstrate the molecular mechanisms of a CSM diet that cause adverse effects on albumen quality, while also showing that SBM should not be totally replaced with CSM in a hen diet. PMID:28813468

  19. Galliscardovia ingluviei gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic bacterium of the family Bifidobacteriaceae isolated from the crop of a laying hen (Gallus gallus f. domestica).

    PubMed

    Pechar, R; Killer, J; Švejstil, R; Salmonová, H; Geigerová, M; Bunešová, V; Rada, V; Benada, O

    2017-07-01

    Bacteria with potential probiotic applications are not yet sufficiently explored, even for animals with economic importance. Therefore, we decided to isolate and identify representatives of the family Bifidobacteriaceae, which inhabit the crop of laying hens. During the study, a fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase-positive strain, RP51T, with a regular/slightly irregular and sometimes an S-shaped slightly curved rod-like shape, was isolated from the crop of a 13 -month-old Hisex Brown hybrid laying hen. The best growth of the Gram-stain-positive bacterium, which was isolated using Bifidobacterium-selective mTPY agar, was found out to be under strictly anaerobic conditions, however an ability to grow under microaerophilic and aerobic conditions was also observed. Sequencing of the almost complete 16S rRNA gene (1444 bp) showed Alloscardovia omnicolens CCUG 31649T and Bombiscardovia coagulans BLAPIII/AGVT to be the most closely related species with similarities of 93.4 and 93.1 %, respectively. Lower sequence similarities were determined with other scardovial genera and other representatives of the genus Bifidobacterium. Taxonomic relationships with A. omnicolens and other members of the family Bifidobacteriaceaewere also demonstrated, based on the sequences of dnaK, fusA, hsp60 and rplB gene fragments. Low sequence similarities of phylogenetic markers to related scardovial genera and bifidobacteria along with unique features of the bacterial strain investigated within the family Bifidobacteriaceae(including the lowest DNA G+C value (44.3 mol%), a unique spectrum of cellular fatty acids and polar lipids, cellular morphology, the wide temperature range for growth (15-49 °C) and habitat) clearly indicate that strain RP51T is a representative of a novel genus within the family Bifidobacteriaceae for which the name Galliscardovia ingluviei gen. nov., sp. nov. (RP51T=DSM 100235T=LMG 28778T=CCM 8606T) is proposed.

  20. Chromosome reshuffling in birds of prey: the karyotype of the world's largest eagle (Harpy eagle, Harpia harpyja) compared to that of the chicken (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Edivaldo H C; Habermann, Felix A; Lacerda, Oneida; Sbalqueiro, Ives J; Wienberg, Johannes; Müller, Stefan

    2005-11-01

    Like various other diurnal birds of prey, the world's largest eagle, the Harpy (Harpia harpyja), presents an atypical bird karyotype with 2n=58 chromosomes. There is little knowledge about the dramatic changes in the genomic reorganization of these species compared to other birds. Since recently, the chicken provides a "default map" for various birds including the first genomic DNA sequence of a bird species. Obviously, the gross division of the chicken genome into relatively gene-poor macrochromosomes and predominantly gene-rich microchromosomes has been conserved for more than 150 million years in most bird species. Here, we present classical features of the Harpy eagle karyotype but also chromosomal homologies between H. harpyja and the chicken by chromosome painting and comparison to the chicken genome map. We used two different sets of painting probes: (1) chicken chromosomes were divided into three size categories: (a) macrochromosomes 1-5 and Z, (b) medium-sized chromosomes 6-10, and (c) 19 microchromosomes; (2) combinatorially labeled chicken chromosome paints 1-6 and Z. Both probe sets were visualized on H. harpyja chromosomes by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Our data show how the organization into micro- and macrochromosomes has been lost in the Harpy eagle, seemingly without any preference or constraints.

  1. Naïve Chicks Prefer Hollow Objects

    PubMed Central

    Schill, Jana; Nencini, Andrea Maria; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Biological predispositions influence approach and avoid responses from the time of birth or hatching. Neonates of species that require parental care (e.g. human babies and chicks of the domestic fowl) are attracted by stimuli associated with animate social partners, such as face-like configurations, biological motion and self-propulsion. The property of being filled is used as a cue of animacy by 8-month-old human infants but it is not known whether this reflects the effect of previous experience. We used chicks of the domestic fowl (Gallus gallus) to investigate whether the property of being filled vs. hollow elicits spontaneous or learned preferences. To this aim we tested preferences of naïve and imprinted chicks for hollow and closed cylinders. Contrary to our expectations, we documented an unlearned attraction for hollow stimuli. The preference for hollow stimuli decreased when chicks were imprinted on filled stimuli but did not increase when chicks were imprinted on hollow stimuli, suggesting that hollowness is not crucial to determine affiliative responses for imprinting objects. When chicks were imprinted on occluded stimuli that could be either filled or hollow, the preference for hollow stimuli emerged again, showing that imprinting does not disrupt the spontaneous preference for hollow objects. Further experiments revealed that hollow objects were mainly attractive by means of depth cues such as darker innards, more than as places to hide or as objects with high contrast. Our findings point to predisposed preferences for hollow objects, and suggest that early predispositions might be driven by factors different from animacy cues. PMID:27851773

  2. Comparative developmental toxicity of planar polychlorinated biphenyl congeners in chickens, American kestrels, and common terns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Melancon, M.J.; Klein, P.N.; Eisemann, J.D.; Spann, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of PCB congeners, PCB 126 (3,3',4,4',5-pentaCB) and PCB 77 (3,3'4,4'-tetraCB), were examined in chicken (Gallus gallus), American kestrel (Falco sparverius), and common tern (Sterna hirundo) embryos through hatching, following air cell injections on day 4. PCB 126 caused malformations and edema in chickens starting at 0.3 ppb, in kestrels at 2.3 ppb, but in terns only at levels affecting hatching success (44 ppb). Extent of edema was most severe in chickens and least in terns. Defects of the beak were common in all species, but with crossed beak most prevalent in terns. Effects on embryo growth were most apparent for PCB 126 in chickens and kestrels. The approximate LD50 for PCB 126 in chickens was 0.4 ppb, in kestrels was 65 ppb, and in terns was 104 ppb. The approximate LD50 for PCB 77 in chickens was 2.6 ppb and in kestrels was 316 ppb. Induction of cytochrome P450 associated monooxygenase activity (EROD activity) by PCB 126 in chick embryo liver was about 800 times more responsive than in tern and at least 1000 times more responsive than in kestrel. High concentrations of PCB 126 found in bald eagle eggs are nearly 20-fold higher than the lowest toxic concentration tested in kestrels. Concentrations of PCB 126 causing low level toxic effects in common tern eggs are comparable to highest levels in common terns and Forster's terns in the field, suggesting additional involvement of other compounds in the Great Lakes.

  3. A homologue of the defender against the apoptotic death gene (dad1 )in UV-exposed Chlamydomonas cells is downregulated with the onset of programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Moharikar, Swati; D'Souza, Jacinta S; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2007-03-01

    We report here the isolation of a homologue of the potential anti-apoptotic gene, defender against apoptotic death (dad1 )from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells.Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR),we investigated its expression in the execution process of programmed cell death (PCD)in UV-C exposed dying C.reinhardtii cells.Reverse- transcriptase (RT)-PCR showed that C.reinhardtii dad1 amplification was drastically reduced in UV-C exposed dying C.reinhardtii cells.We connect the downregulation of dad1 with the upregulation of apoptosis protease activating factor-1 (APAF-1)and the physiological changes that occur in C.reinhardtii cells upon exposure to 12 J/m 2 UV-C in order to show a reciprocal relationship between proapoptotic and inhibitor of apoptosis factors.The temporal changes indicate a correlation between the onset of cell death and dad1 downregulation.The sequence of the PCR product of the cDNA encoding the dad1 homologue was aligned with the annotated dad1 (C_20215)from the Chlamydomonas database (http://genome.jgi-psf.org:8080/annotator/servlet/jgi.annotation.Annotation?pDb=chlre2); Annotation?pDb=chlre2 );this sequence was found to show 100% identity,both at the nucleotide and amino acid level. The 327 bp transcript showed an open reading frame of 87 amino acid residues.The deduced amino acid sequence of the putative C.reinhardtii DAD1 homologue showed 54% identity with Oryza sativa, 56 identity with Drosophila melanogaster, 66% identity with Xenopus laevis, and 64% identity with Homo sapiens,Sus scrofa,Gallus gallus,Rattus norvegicus and Mus musculus.

  4. Domestic, peridomestic and wild hosts in the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in the Caatinga area colonised by Triatoma brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Claudia Mendonça; Cavalcanti, Luciano Pamplona de Góes; Souza, Rita de Cássia Moreira de; Barbosa, Silvia Ermelinda; Xavier, Samanta Cristina das Chagas; Jansen, Ana Maria; Ramalho, Relrison Dias; Diotaiut, Liléia

    2014-08-22

    The role played by different mammal species in the maintenance of Trypanosoma cruzi is not constant and varies in time and place. This study aimed to characterise the importance of domestic, wild and peridomestic hosts in the transmission of T. cruzi in Tauá, state of Ceará, Caatinga area, Brazil, with an emphasis on those environments colonised by Triatoma brasiliensis. Direct parasitological examinations were performed on insects and mammals, serologic tests were performed on household and outdoor mammals and multiplex polymerase chain reaction was used on wild mammals. Cytochrome b was used as a food source for wild insects. The serum prevalence in dogs was 38% (20/53), while in pigs it was 6% (2/34). The percentages of the most abundantly infected wild animals were as follows: Thrichomys laurentius 74% (83/112) and Kerodon rupestris 10% (11/112). Of the 749 triatomines collected in the household research, 49.3% (369/749) were positive for T. brasiliensis, while 6.8% were infected with T. cruzi (25/369). In captured animals, T. brasiliensis shares a natural environment with T. laurentius, K. rupestris, Didelphis albiventris, Monodelphis domestica, Galea spixii, Wiedomys pyrrhorhinos, Conepatus semistriatus and Mus musculus. In animals identified via their food source, T. brasiliensis shares a natural environment with G. spixii, K. rupestris, Capra hircus, Gallus gallus, Tropidurus oreadicus and Tupinambis merianae. The high prevalence of T. cruzi in household and peridomiciliar animals reinforces the narrow relationship between the enzootic cycle and humans in environments with T. brasiliensis and characterises it as ubiquitous.

  5. Domestic, peridomestic and wild hosts in the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in the Caatinga area colonised by Triatoma brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Claudia Mendonça; Cavalcanti, Luciano Pamplona de Góes; de Souza, Rita de Cássia Moreira; Barbosa, Silvia Ermelinda; Xavier, Samanta Cristina das Chagas; Jansen, Ana Maria; Ramalho, Relrison Dias; Diotaiut, Liléia

    2014-01-01

    The role played by different mammal species in the maintenance of Trypanosoma cruzi is not constant and varies in time and place. This study aimed to characterise the importance of domestic, wild and peridomestic hosts in the transmission of T. cruzi in Tauá, state of Ceará, Caatinga area, Brazil, with an emphasis on those environments colonised by Triatoma brasiliensis. Direct parasitological examinations were performed on insects and mammals, serologic tests were performed on household and outdoor mammals and multiplex polymerase chain reaction was used on wild mammals. Cytochrome b was used as a food source for wild insects. The serum prevalence in dogs was 38% (20/53), while in pigs it was 6% (2/34). The percentages of the most abundantly infected wild animals were as follows: Thrichomys laurentius 74% (83/112) and Kerodon rupestris 10% (11/112). Of the 749 triatomines collected in the household research, 49.3% (369/749) were positive for T. brasiliensis, while 6.8% were infected with T. cruzi (25/369). In captured animals, T. brasiliensis shares a natural environment with T. laurentius, K. rupestris, Didelphis albiventris, Monodelphis domestica, Galea spixii, Wiedomys pyrrhorhinos, Conepatus semistriatus and Mus musculus. In animals identified via their food source, T. brasiliensis shares a natural environment with G. spixii, K. rupestris, Capra hircus, Gallus gallus, Tropidurus oreadicus and Tupinambis merianae. The high prevalence of T. cruzi in household and peridomiciliar animals reinforces the narrow relationship between the enzootic cycle and humans in environments with T. brasiliensis and characterises it as ubiquitous. PMID:25410992

  6. Domestic, peridomestic and wild hosts in the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in the Caatinga area colonised by Triatoma brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Claudia Mendonça; Cavalcanti, Luciano Pamplona de Góes; Souza, Rita de Cássia Moreira de; Barbosa, Silvia Ermelinda; Xavier, Samanta Cristina das Chagas; Jansen, Ana Maria; Ramalho, Relrison Dias; Diotaiut, Liléia

    2014-11-01

    The role played by different mammal species in the maintenance of Trypanosoma cruzi is not constant and varies in time and place. This study aimed to characterise the importance of domestic, wild and peridomestic hosts in the transmission of T. cruzi in Tauá, state of Ceará, Caatinga area, Brazil, with an emphasis on those environments colonised by Triatoma brasiliensis. Direct parasitological examinations were performed on insects and mammals, serologic tests were performed on household and outdoor mammals and multiplex polymerase chain reaction was used on wild mammals. Cytochrome b was used as a food source for wild insects. The serum prevalence in dogs was 38% (20/53), while in pigs it was 6% (2/34). The percentages of the most abundantly infected wild animals were as follows: Thrichomys laurentius 74% (83/112) and Kerodon rupestris 10% (11/112). Of the 749 triatomines collected in the household research, 49.3% (369/749) were positive for T. brasiliensis, while 6.8% were infected with T. cruzi (25/369). In captured animals, T. brasiliensis shares a natural environment with T. laurentius, K. rupestris, Didelphis albiventris, Monodelphis domestica, Galea spixii, Wiedomys pyrrhorhinos, Conepatus semistriatus and Mus musculus. In animals identified via their food source, T. brasiliensis shares a natural environment with G. spixii, K. rupestris, Capra hircus, Gallus gallus, Tropidurus oreadicus and Tupinambis merianae. The high prevalence of T. cruzi in household and peridomiciliar animals reinforces the narrow relationship between the enzootic cycle and humans in environments with T. brasiliensis and characterises it as ubiquitous.

  7. Cryptosporidium avium n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in birds

    PubMed Central

    Holubová, Nikola; Sak, Bohumil; Horčičková, Michaela; Hlásková, Lenka; Květoňová, Dana; Menchaca, Sarah; McEvoy, John; Kváč, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium avian genotype V are described, and the species name Cryptosporidium avium is proposed to reflect its specificity for birds under natural and experimental conditions. Oocysts of C. avium measured 5.30–6.90 μm (mean = 6.26 μm) × 4.30–5.50 μm (mean = 4.86 μm) with a length to width ratio of 1.29 (1.14–1.47). Oocysts of C. avium obtained from four naturally infected red-crowned parakeets (Cyanoramphus novaezealandiae) were infectious for 6-month-old budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) and hens (Gallus gallus f. domestica). The prepatent periods in both susceptible bird species was 11 days post infection (DPI). The infection intensity of C. avium in budgerigars and hens was low, with a maximum intensity of 5,000 oocysts per gram of faeces. Oocysts of C. avium were microscopically detected at only 12–16 DPI in hens and 12 DPI in budgerigars, while PCR analyses revealed the presence of specific DNA in faecal samples from 11 to 30 DPI (the conclusion of the experiment). Cryptosporidium avium was not infectious for 8-week-old SCID and BALB/c mice (Mus musculus). Naturally or experimentally infected birds showed no clinical signs of cryptosporidiosis and no pathology was detected. Developmental stages of C. avium were detected in the ileum and caecum using scanning electron microscopy. Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit rRNA, actin, and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences revealed that C. avium is genetically distinct from previously described Cryptosporidium species. PMID:26905074

  8. Distinct Neural Properties in the Low-Frequency Region of the Chicken Cochlear Nucleus Magnocellularis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Topography in the avian cochlear nucleus magnocellularis (NM) is represented as gradually increasing characteristic frequency (CF) along the caudolateral-to-rostromedial axis. In this study, we characterized the organization and cell biophysics of the caudolateral NM (NMc) in chickens (Gallus gallus). Examination of cellular and dendritic architecture first revealed that NMc contains small neurons and extensive dendritic processes, in contrast to adendritic, large neurons located more rostromedially. Individual dye-filling study further demonstrated that NMc is divided into two subregions, with NMc2 neurons having larger and more complex dendritic fields than NMc1. Axonal tract tracing studies confirmed that NMc1 and NMc2 neurons receive afferent inputs from the auditory nerve and the superior olivary nucleus, similar to the adendritic NM. However, the auditory axons synapse with NMc neurons via small bouton-like terminals, unlike the large end bulb synapses on adendritic NM neurons. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated that most NMc2 neurons express cholecystokinin but not calretinin, distinct from NMc1 and adendritic NM neurons that are cholecystokinin negative and mostly calretinin positive. Finally, whole-cell current clamp recordings revealed that NMc neurons require significantly lower threshold current for action potential generation than adendritic NM neurons. Moreover, in contrast to adendritic NM neurons that generate a single-onset action potential, NMc neurons generate multiple action potentials to suprathreshold sustained depolarization. Taken together, our data indicate that NMc contains multiple neuron types that are structurally, connectively, molecularly, and physiologically different from traditionally defined NM neurons, emphasizing specialized neural properties for processing low-frequency sounds. PMID:28413822

  9. Mycoplasma synoviae infection on Newcastle disease vaccination of chickens

    PubMed Central

    de Cássia Figueira Silva, Rita; do Nascimento, Elmiro Rosendo; de Almeida Pereira, Virgínia Léo; Barreto, Maria Lúcia; do Nascimento, Maria da Graça Fichel

    2008-01-01

    Newcastle disease is characterized by respiratory manifestations in association with nervous and/or digestive symptoms. Its prevention is done by vaccination with live attenuated (lentogenic strains) and/or killed vaccines. The lentogenic strains can lead to strong post-vaccination reaction, principally due to the presence of other pathogenic agents. Among them, Mycoplasma synoviae is worldwide important, mainly in Brazil. The dissemination of this agent in poultry flocks has been achieved due to difficulties in diagnosis and disease reproduction, virulence variations among different M.synoviae strains, and attribution of typical M.synoviae disease manifestation to other disease agents. This experimental study in SPF chicks (Gallus gallus), previously infected by M.synoviae and thereafter vaccinated against Newcastle disease, was done with the objective of evaluating M.synoviae pathogenicity through assessment of post-vaccinal respiratory reactions and serologic responses to Newcastle disease virus vaccine in the absence of environmental factors. A total of 86 three days old chicks were used, being 57 infected by eye and nostril drop, with chicken activated M. synoviae strain WVU 1853. Seven days later, 21 mycoplasma infected birds plus 29 not mycoplasma infected ones were vaccinated against Newcastle disease. As results, the not infected and vaccinated birds yielded, significantly, higher and longer lasting serologic responses to Newcastle disease vaccine virus than those infected and vaccinated. Similarly, the infected and vaccinated birds yielded lower serologic reactions to M.synoviae than those only mycoplasma infected. No post-vaccinal respiratory reaction was observed in the vaccinated birds. PMID:24031234

  10. The Veiled Chameleon (Chamaeleo calyptratus Duméril and Duméril 1851): A Model for Studying Reptile Body Plan Development and Evolution.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Raul E; Anderson, Christopher V; Baumann, Diana P; Kupronis, Richard; Jewell, David; Piraquive, Christina; Kupronis, Jill; Winter, Kristy; Bertocchini, Federica; Trainor, Paul A

    2015-08-26

    Vertebrate model organisms have facilitated the discovery and exploration of morphogenetic events and developmental pathways that underpin normal and pathological embryological events. In contrast to amniotes such as Mus musculus (Mammalia) and Gallus gallus (Aves), our understanding of early patterning and developmental events in reptiles (particularly nonavians) remains weak. Squamate reptiles (lizards, snakes, and amphisbaenians) comprise approximately one-third of all living amniotes. But studies of early squamate development have been limited because, in most members of this lineage, embryo development at the time of oviposition is very advanced (limb bud stages and older). In many cases, squamates give birth to fully developed offspring. However, in the veiled chameleon (Chamaeleo calyptratus), embryos have progressed only to a primitive pregastrula stage at the time of oviposition. Furthermore, the body plan of the veiled chameleon is highly specialized for climbing in an arboreal environment. It possesses an entire suite of skeletal and soft anatomical modifications, including cranioskeletal ornamentation, lingual anatomy and biomechanics for projection, autopodial clefting for grasping, adaptations for rapid integumental color changes, a prehensile tail with a lack of caudal autotomy, the loss of the tympanum in the middle ear, and the acquisition of turreted eyes. Thus, C. calyptratus is an important model organism for studying the role of ecological niche specialization, as well as genetic and morphological evolution within an adaptive framework. More importantly, this species is easily bred in captivity, with only a small colony (<10 individuals) needed to obtain hundreds of embryos every year. © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  11. Genomic insights into natural selection in the common loon (Gavia immer): evidence for aquatic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Gayk, Zach G; Le Duc, Diana; Horn, Jeffrey; Lindsay, Alec R

    2018-04-27

    The common loon (Gavia immer) is one of five species that comprise the avian order Gaviiformes. Loons are specialized divers, reaching depths up to 60 m while staying submerged for intervals up to three minutes. In this study we used comparative genomics to investigate the genetic basis of the common loon adaptations to its ecological niche. We used Illumina short read DNA sequence data from a female bird to produce a draft assembly of the common loon (Gavia immer) genome. We identified 14,169 common loon genes, which based on well-resolved avian genomes, represent approximately 80.7% of common loon genes. Evolutionary analyses between common loon and Adelie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae), red-throated loon (Gavia stellata), chicken (Gallus gallus), northern fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis), and rock pigeon (Columba livia) show 164 positively selected genes in common and red-throated loons. These genes were enriched for a number of protein classes, including those involved in muscle tissue development, immunoglobulin function, hemoglobin iron binding, G-protein coupled receptors, and ATP metabolism. Signatures of positive selection in these areas suggest the genus Gavia may have adapted for underwater diving by modulating their oxidative and metabolic pathways. While more research is required, these adaptations likely result in (1) compensations in oxygen respiration and energetic metabolism, (2) low-light visual acuity, and (3) elevated solute exchange. This work represents the first effort to understand the genomic adaptations of the common loon as well as other Gavia and may have implications for subsequent studies that target particular genes for loon population genetic, ecological or conservation studies.

  12. A complex carotenoid palette tunes avian color vision.

    SciTech Connect

    Timlin, Jerilyn A.; Toomey, Matthew B.; Collins, Aaron M.

    The brilliantly coloured cone oil droplets of the avian retina function as long-pass cut-off filters that tune the spectral sensitivity of the photoreceptors and are hypothesized to enhance colour discrimination and improve colour constancy. Although it has long been known that these droplets are pigmented with carotenoids, their precise composition has remained uncertain owing to the technical challenges of measuring these very small, dense and highly refractile optical organelles. In this study, we integrated results from high-performance liquid chromatography, hyperspectral microscopy and microspectrophotometry to obtain a comprehensive understanding of oil droplet carotenoid pigmentation in the chicken ( Gallus gallus). Wemore » find that each of the four carotenoid-containing droplet types consists of a complex mixture of carotenoids, with a single predominant carotenoid determining the wavelength of the spectral filtering cut-off. Consistent with previous reports, we find that the predominant carotenoid type in the oil droplets of long-wavelength-sensitive, medium-wavelength-sensitive and short-wavelength-sensitive type 2 cones are astaxanthin, zeaxanthin and galloxanthin, respectively. In addition, the oil droplet of the principal member of the double cone contains a mixture of galloxanthin and two hydroxycarotenoids (lutein and zeaxanthin). Short-wavelength-absorbing apocarotenoids are present in all of the droplet types, providing filtering of light in a region of the spectrum where filtering by hydroxy- and ketocarotenoids may be incomplete. Furthermore, birds rely on a complex palette of carotenoid pigments within their cone oil droplets to achieve finely tuned spectral filtering.« less

  13. A complex carotenoid palette tunes avian color vision.

    DOE PAGES

    Timlin, Jerilyn A.; Toomey, Matthew B.; Collins, Aaron M.; ...

    2015-10-07

    The brilliantly coloured cone oil droplets of the avian retina function as long-pass cut-off filters that tune the spectral sensitivity of the photoreceptors and are hypothesized to enhance colour discrimination and improve colour constancy. Although it has long been known that these droplets are pigmented with carotenoids, their precise composition has remained uncertain owing to the technical challenges of measuring these very small, dense and highly refractile optical organelles. In this study, we integrated results from high-performance liquid chromatography, hyperspectral microscopy and microspectrophotometry to obtain a comprehensive understanding of oil droplet carotenoid pigmentation in the chicken ( Gallus gallus). Wemore » find that each of the four carotenoid-containing droplet types consists of a complex mixture of carotenoids, with a single predominant carotenoid determining the wavelength of the spectral filtering cut-off. Consistent with previous reports, we find that the predominant carotenoid type in the oil droplets of long-wavelength-sensitive, medium-wavelength-sensitive and short-wavelength-sensitive type 2 cones are astaxanthin, zeaxanthin and galloxanthin, respectively. In addition, the oil droplet of the principal member of the double cone contains a mixture of galloxanthin and two hydroxycarotenoids (lutein and zeaxanthin). Short-wavelength-absorbing apocarotenoids are present in all of the droplet types, providing filtering of light in a region of the spectrum where filtering by hydroxy- and ketocarotenoids may be incomplete. Furthermore, birds rely on a complex palette of carotenoid pigments within their cone oil droplets to achieve finely tuned spectral filtering.« less

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of Korean native chickens using next generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong-Won; Oh, Jae-Don; Jin, Shil; Song, Ki-Duk; Park, Hee-Bok; Heo, Kang-Nyeong; Shin, Younhee; Jung, Myunghee; Park, Junhyung; Jo, Cheorun; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Lee, Jun-Heon

    2015-02-01

    There are five native chicken lines in Korea, which are mainly classified by plumage colors (black, white, red, yellow, gray). These five lines are very important genetic resources in the Korean poultry industry. Based on a next generation sequencing technology, whole genome sequence and reference assemblies were performed using Gallus_gallus_4.0 (NCBI) with whole genome sequences from these lines to identify common and novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We obtained 36,660,731,136 ± 1,257,159,120 bp of raw sequence and average 26.6-fold of 25-29 billion reference assembly sequences representing 97.288 % coverage. Also, 4,006,068 ± 97,534 SNPs were observed from 29 autosomes and the Z chromosome and, of these, 752,309 SNPs are the common SNPs across lines. Among the identified SNPs, the number of novel- and known-location assigned SNPs was 1,047,951 ± 14,956 and 2,948,648 ± 81,414, respectively. The number of unassigned known SNPs was 1,181 ± 150 and unassigned novel SNPs was 8,238 ± 1,019. Synonymous SNPs, non-synonymous SNPs, and SNPs having character changes were 26,266 ± 1,456, 11,467 ± 604, 8,180 ± 458, respectively. Overall, 443,048 ± 26,389 SNPs in each bird were identified by comparing with dbSNP in NCBI. The presently obtained genome sequence and SNP information in Korean native chickens have wide applications for further genome studies such as genetic diversity studies to detect causative mutations for economic and disease related traits.

  15. Toxicity of methylmercury injected into eggs when dissolved in water versus corn oil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Klimstra, J.D.; Stebbins, K.R.; Kondrad, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study, the embryotoxicity of methylmercury dissolved in corn oil was compared among 26 species of birds. Corn oil is not soluble in the water-based matrix that constitutes the albumen of an egg. To determine whether the use of corn oil limited the usefulness of this earlier study, a comparison was made of the embryotoxicity of methylmercury dissolved in corn oil versus water. Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and chicken (Gallus gallus) eggs were injected with methylmercury chloride dissolved in corn oil or water to achieve concentrations of 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 1.6??g/g mercury in the egg on a wet weight basis. Hatching success at each dose of mercury was compared between the two solvents. For mallards, 16.4% of the eggs injected with 1.6??g/g mercury dissolved in water hatched, which was statistically lower than the 37.6% hatch rate of eggs injected with 1.6??g/g mercury dissolved in corn oil, but no differences in hatching success were observed between corn oil and water at any of the other doses. With chicken eggs, no significant differences occurred in percentage hatch of eggs between corn oil and water at any of the mercury doses. Methylmercury dissolved in corn oil seems to have a toxicity to avian embryos similar to that of does methylmercury dissolved in water. Consequently, the results from the earlier study that described the toxicity of methylmercury dissolved in corn oil to avian embryos were probably not compromised by the use of corn oil as a solvent. ?? 2011 SETAC.

  16. A nonlethal microsampling technique to monitor the effects of mercury on wild bird eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stebbins, Katherine R.; Klimstra, Jon D.; ,; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Heinz, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Methylmercury is the predominant chemical form of mercury reported in the eggs of wild birds, and the embryo is the most sensitive life stage to methylmercury toxicity. Protective guidelines have been based mainly on captive-breeding studies with chickens (Gallus gallus), mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) or on field studies where whole eggs were collected and analyzed and the effects of the mercury were measured based on the reproductive success of the remaining eggs. However, both of these methods have limitations. As an alternative, we developed a technique that involves extracting a small sample of albumen from a live egg, sealing the egg, returning the egg to its nest to be naturally incubated by the parents, and then relating the hatching success of this microsampled egg to its mercury concentration. After first developing this technique in the laboratory using chicken and mallard eggs, we selected the laughing gull (Larus atricilla) and black-necked stilt (Himantopus mexicanus) as test subjects in the field. We found that 92% of the microsampled laughing gull eggs met our reproductive endpoint of survival to the beginning of hatching compared to 100% for the paired control eggs within the same nests. Microsampled black-necked stilt eggs exhibited 100% hatching success compared to 93% for the paired control eggs. Our results indicate that microsampling is an effective tool for nonlethally sampling mercury concentrations in eggs and, as such, can be used for monitoring sensitive species, as well as for improving studies that examine the effects of mercury on avian reproduction.

  17. Olive oil-supplemented diet alleviates acute heat stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production in chicken skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Mujahid, Ahmad; Akiba, Yukio; Toyomizu, Masaaki

    2009-09-01

    We have previously shown that avian uncoupling protein (avUCP) is downregulated on exposure to acute heat stress, stimulating mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and oxidative damage. In this study, we investigated whether upregulation of avUCP could attenuate oxidative damage caused by acute heat stress. Broiler chickens (Gallus gallus) were fed either a control diet or an olive oil-supplemented diet (6.7%), which has been shown to increase the expression of UCP3 in mammals, for 8 days and then exposed either to heat stress (34 degrees C, 12 h) or kept at a thermoneutral temperature (25 degrees C). Skeletal muscle mitochondrial ROS (measured as H(2)O(2)) production, avUCP expression, oxidative damage, mitochondrial membrane potential, and oxygen consumption were studied. We confirmed that heat stress increased mitochondrial ROS production and malondialdehyde levels and decreased the amount of avUCP. As expected, feeding birds an olive oil-supplemented diet increased the expression of avUCP in skeletal muscle mitochondria and decreased ROS production and oxidative damage. Studies on mitochondrial function showed that heat stress increased membrane potential in state 4, which was reversed by feeding birds an olive oil-supplemented diet, although no differences in basal proton leak were observed between control and heat-stressed groups. These results show that under heat stress, mitochondrial ROS production and olive oil-induced reduction of ROS production may occur due to changes in respiratory chain activity as well as avUCP expression in skeletal muscle mitochondria.

  18. Reptiles and mammals have differentially retained long conserved noncoding sequences from the amniote ancestor.

    PubMed

    Janes, D E; Chapus, C; Gondo, Y; Clayton, D F; Sinha, S; Blatti, C A; Organ, C L; Fujita, M K; Balakrishnan, C N; Edwards, S V

    2011-01-01

    Many noncoding regions of genomes appear to be essential to genome function. Conservation of large numbers of noncoding sequences has been reported repeatedly among mammals but not thus far among birds and reptiles. By searching genomes of chicken (Gallus gallus), zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), and green anole (Anolis carolinensis), we quantified the conservation among birds and reptiles and across amniotes of long, conserved noncoding sequences (LCNS), which we define as sequences ≥500 bp in length and exhibiting ≥95% similarity between species. We found 4,294 LCNS shared between chicken and zebra finch and 574 LCNS shared by the two birds and Anolis. The percent of genomes comprised by LCNS in the two birds (0.0024%) is notably higher than the percent in mammals (<0.0003% to <0.001%), differences that we show may be explained in part by differences in genome-wide substitution rates. We reconstruct a large number of LCNS for the amniote ancestor (ca. 8,630) and hypothesize differential loss and substantial turnover of these sites in descendent lineages. By contrast, we estimated a small role for recruitment of LCNS via acquisition of novel functions over time. Across amniotes, LCNS are significantly enriched with transcription factor binding sites for many developmental genes, and 2.9% of LCNS shared between the two birds show evidence of expression in brain expressed sequence tag databases. These results show that the rate of retention of LCNS from the amniote ancestor differs between mammals and Reptilia (including birds) and that this may reflect differing roles and constraints in gene regulation.

  19. Reptiles and Mammals Have Differentially Retained Long Conserved Noncoding Sequences from the Amniote Ancestor

    PubMed Central

    Janes, D.E.; Chapus, C.; Gondo, Y.; Clayton, D.F.; Sinha, S.; Blatti, C.A.; Organ, C.L.; Fujita, M.K.; Balakrishnan, C.N.; Edwards, S.V.

    2010-01-01

    Many noncoding regions of genomes appear to be essential to genome function. Conservation of large numbers of noncoding sequences has been reported repeatedly among mammals but not thus far among birds and reptiles. By searching genomes of chicken (Gallus gallus), zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), and green anole (Anolis carolinensis), we quantified the conservation among birds and reptiles and across amniotes of long, conserved noncoding sequences (LCNS), which we define as sequences ≥500 bp in length and exhibiting ≥95% similarity between species. We found 4,294 LCNS shared between chicken and zebra finch and 574 LCNS shared by the two birds and Anolis. The percent of genomes comprised by LCNS in the two birds (0.0024%) is notably higher than the percent in mammals (<0.0003% to <0.001%), differences that we show may be explained in part by differences in genome-wide substitution rates. We reconstruct a large number of LCNS for the amniote ancestor (ca. 8,630) and hypothesize differential loss and substantial turnover of these sites in descendent lineages. By contrast, we estimated a small role for recruitment of LCNS via acquisition of novel functions over time. Across amniotes, LCNS are significantly enriched with transcription factor binding sites for many developmental genes, and 2.9% of LCNS shared between the two birds show evidence of expression in brain expressed sequence tag databases. These results show that the rate of retention of LCNS from the amniote ancestor differs between mammals and Reptilia (including birds) and that this may reflect differing roles and constraints in gene regulation. PMID:21183607

  20. Identifying the Evolutionary Building Blocks of the Cardiac Conduction System

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Bjarke; Boukens, Bastiaan J. D.; Postma, Alex V.; Gunst, Quinn D.; van den Hoff, Maurice J. B.; Moorman, Antoon F. M.; Wang, Tobias; Christoffels, Vincent M.

    2012-01-01

    The endothermic state of mammals and birds requires high heart rates to accommodate the high rates of oxygen consumption. These high heart rates are driven by very similar conduction systems consisting of an atrioventricular node that slows the electrical impulse and a His-Purkinje system that efficiently activates the ventricular chambers. While ectothermic vertebrates have similar contraction patterns, they do not possess anatomical evidence for a conduction system. This lack amongst extant ectotherms is surprising because mammals and birds evolved independently from reptile-like ancestors. Using conserved genetic markers, we found that the conduction system design of lizard (Anolis carolinensis and A. sagrei), frog (Xenopus laevis) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) adults is strikingly similar to that of embryos of mammals (mouse Mus musculus, and man) and chicken (Gallus gallus). Thus, in ectothermic adults, the slow conducting atrioventricular canal muscle is present, no fibrous insulating plane is formed, and the spongy ventricle serves the dual purpose of conduction and contraction. Optical mapping showed base-to-apex activation of the ventricles of the ectothermic animals, similar to the activation pattern of mammalian and avian embryonic ventricles and to the His-Purkinje systems of the formed hearts. Mammalian and avian ventricles uniquely develop thick compact walls and septum and, hence, form a discrete ventricular conduction system from the embryonic spongy ventricle. Our study uncovers the evolutionary building plan of heart and indicates that the building blocks of the conduction system of adult ectothermic vertebrates and embryos of endotherms are similar. PMID:22984480