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Sample records for galveston counties texas

  1. DRAFT LANDSAT DATA MOSAIC: MONTGOMERY COUNTY, TEXAS; HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS; FORT BEND COUNTY, TEXAS; BRAZORIA COUNTY, TEXAS; GALVESTON COUNTY, TEXAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a draft Landsat Data Mosaic, which contains remote sensing information for Montgomery County, Texas Harris County, Texas Fort Bend County, Texas Brazoria County, Texas Galveston County, and Texas Imagery dates on the following dates: October 6, 1999 and September 29, 200...

  2. Emergency department usage by uninsured patients in Galveston County, Texas.

    PubMed

    Baillargeon, Jacques; Paar, David; Giordano, Thomas P; Zachariah, Brian; Rudkin, Laura L; Wu, Z Helen; Raimer, Ben G

    2008-07-01

    The number of uninsured Texas residents who rely on the medical emergency department as their primary health care provider continues to increase. Unfortunately, little information about the characteristics of this group of emergency department users is available. Using an administrative billing database, we conducted a descriptive study to examine the demographic and clinical features of 17,110 consecutive patients without medical insurance who presented to the emergency department of the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston over a 12-month period. We also analyzed the risk of multiple emergency department visits or hospitalization according to demographic characteristics. Twenty percent of the study population made two or more emergency department visits during the study period; 19% of the population was admitted to the hospital via the emergency department. The risk of multiple emergency department visits was significantly elevated among African Americans and increased in a stepwise fashion according to age. The risk of being hospitalized was significantly reduced among females, African Americans, and Hispanics. There was an age-related monotonic increase in the risk of hospitalization. Abdominal pain, cellulitis, and spinal disorders were the most common primary diagnoses in patients who made multiple emergency department visits. Hospitalization occurred most frequently in patients with a primary diagnosis of chest pain, nonischemic heart disease, or an affective disorder. Additional studies of emergency department usage by uninsured patients from other regions of Texas are warranted. Such data may prove helpful in developing effective community-based alternatives to the emergency department for this growing segment of our population. Local policymakers who are responsible for the development of safety net programs throughout the state should find this information particularly useful.

  3. Avoidable hospitalizations and socio-economic status in Galveston County, Texas.

    PubMed

    Begley, C E; Slater, C H; Engel, M J; Reynolds, T F

    1994-10-01

    Population-based hospitalization rates for preventable conditions are derived for a low-income population in Galveston County, Texas using discharge data from four area hospitals and demographic data from the U.S. Census. Comparisons are made with similar rates for the general populations of two eastern states (Maryland and Massachusetts) and New York City. Results support the hypothesis that low-income persons lack access to primary care, leading to higher rates of hospitalization for preventable conditions. Alternative explanations for differences found are examined.

  4. Geology and ground-water resources of Galveston County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petitt, Ben McDowell; Winslow, Allen George

    1957-01-01

    Much additional ground water could be obtained from both the "Alta Loma" sand and the upper part of the Beaumont clay, especially in the northern and western parts of the county. Before large developments of supplies are planned, however, these areas should be explored by test drilling. The problems of well spacing and pumping rates should be thoroughly studied in order to determine the maximum development permitted by the ground-water supply. Current observations should be continued with special emphasis on the progress of salt-water encroachment.

  5. Assessment of radiation contamination at an abandoned tin smelter facility in Galveston County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelius, J.M.; Laiche, T.P.; Zehner, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    The Region 6 US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and Technical Assistant Team (TAT) contractor, Ecology and Environment, Inc. (E and E), conducted a site assessment to determine the nature and extent of radiation contamination at an abandoned tin smelter facility in Texas City, Galveston County, Texas. Rapid, field-screening, radiation surveys were conducted, and four slag storage areas were located with gamma radiation levels above background levels. Comprehensive radiation surveys were performed at these locations with Global Positioning System (GPS) assistance for accurate location determination. Approximately 1,500 data points were collected from 10 acres. Accurate contour maps of gamma radiation levels were developed using geostatistical modeling and kriging. Radiation exposure levels ranged from background [< 10 microroentgen per hour ({micro}R/hour)] to more than 500 {micro}R/hour. Gamma spectroscopic analysis was performed on soil and slag samples using a field-portable, multichannel analyzer (MCA) system. Equilibrium activities of bismuth-214 and thallium-208 were measured as high as 100 picocuries per gram. Ten percent of all samples were sent to an independent radiochemistry laboratory for confirmation analysis. Laboratory and field screening results corresponded closely. In-situ radon emanation rates were measured with large area charcoal collectors (LACCs). Measured rates were less than one picocurie per square meter per second.

  6. Sediment Management Options for Galveston Island, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-15

    the potential for long-term sustainability are presented. Galveston Island is a 47 km long sand barrier island along the upper Texas coast (Figure...1 SEDIMENT MANAGEMENT OPTIONS FOR GALVESTON ISLAND , TEXAS ASHLEY E. FREY1, ANDREW MORANG1, DAVID B. KING1, ROBERT C. THOMAS2 1. U.S. Army...Galveston Island is a major tourist and commercial center on the Gulf of Mexico at the mouth of Galveston Bay, Texas, USA. The shoreline along the

  7. Cultural resources survey and assessment of the proposed Department of Energy Freeport to Texas City pipeline, Brazoria and Galveston Counties, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Castille, G.J.; Whelan, J.P. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An intensive survey and testing program of selected segments of a proposed Department of Energy pipeline were conducted by Coastal Environments, Inc., Baton Rouge, Louisiana, during December 1985 and January 1986. The proposed pipeline runs from Texas City, Galveston County to Bryan Mound, Brazoria County. The pedestrian survey was preceded by historical records survey to locate possible historic sites within the DOE righ-of-way. Four prehistoric sites within the ROW (41BO159, 160, 161, 162) and one outside the ROW (41BO163) were located. All are Rangia cuneata middens. The survey results are discussed with particular reference to the environmental settings of the sites and the effectiveness of the survey procedure. Two of the sites located within the ROW were subjected to additional testing. The results of the backhoe testing program are included in the site descriptions, and the scientific value of the sites are presented. 52 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Lead poisoning among sandblasting workers--Galveston, Texas, March 1994.

    PubMed

    1995-01-27

    In the United States, an estimated 95% of elevated blood lead levels (BLLs) in adults are attributable to occupational exposure (1). This report summarizes the findings of an investigation by the Galveston County (Texas) Health District (GCHD) of occupational lead poisoning associated with sandblasting during February-March 1994.

  9. Combined homicide-suicide in Galveston County.

    PubMed

    Felthous, A R; Hempel, A G; Heredia, A; Freeman, E; Goodness, K; Holzer, C; Bennett, T J; Korndorffer, W E

    2001-05-01

    Combined homicide-suicides have been classified based on the psychopathology of the perpetrator and the nature of the relationship between perpetrator and victim(s). To further understand the nature of this tragic phenomenon and to test the validity and practicality of a previously suggested classification system, investigators systematically collected data on all combined homicide-suicide events that occurred in Galveston County, Texas over a continuous 18-year period (n = 20). The most common psychopathological finding for perpetrators was high serum alcohol levels that suggested intoxication. Most combined homicide-suicides fell into one of the relational categories and most of these, as predicted, were of the consortial type, possessive subtype. As expected, due to the small sample size, the less common types of combined homicide-suicide were not represented in this sample.

  10. Records of wells, drillers' logs, water-level measurements, and chemical analyses of ground water in Harris and Galveston Counties, Texas, 1984-1989

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplin, L.S.; Campodonico, Al

    1991-01-01

    Data for water wells and ground water in Harris and Galveston Counties were collected during 1984-89 by the U.S. Geological Survey. This report presents a compilation of records for 243 wells in Harris and Galveston Counties and drillers' logs for 174 of these wells. Water-level data and chemical-quality data of water for new and previously inventoried wells were also collected. Water levels in 521 wells and chemical analyses of water from 249 wells are presented in this report.

  11. Variation in biotic assemblages and stream-habitat data with sampling strategy and method in tidal segments of Highland and Marchand Bayous, Galveston County, Texas, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mabe, Jeffrey A.; Moring, J. Bruce

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Houston-Galveston Area Council and the Galveston Bay Estuary Program under the authority of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, did a study in 2007 to assess the variation in biotic assemblages (benthic macroinvertebrate and fish communities) and stream-habitat data with sampling strategy and method in tidal segments of Highland Bayou and Marchand Bayou in Galveston County. Data were collected once in spring and once in summer 2007 from four stream sites (reaches) (short names Hitchcock, Fairwood, Bayou Dr, and Texas City) of Highland Bayou and from one reach (short name Marchand) in Marchand Bayou. Only stream-habitat data from summer 2007 samples were used for this report. Additional samples were collected at the Hitchcock, Fairwood, and Bayou Dr reaches (multisample reaches) during summer 2007 to evaluate variation resulting from sampling intensity and location. Graphical analysis of benthic macroinvertebrate community data using a multidimensional scaling technique indicates there are taxonomic differences between the spring and summer samples. Seasonal differences in communities primarily were related to decreases in the abundance of chironomids and polychaetes in summer samples. Multivariate Analysis of Similarities tests of additional summer 2007 benthic macroinvertebrate samples from Hitchcock, Fairwood, and Bayou Dr indicated significant taxonomic differences between the sampling locations at all three reaches. In general, the deepwater samples had the smallest numbers for benthic macroinvertebrate taxa richness and abundance. Graphical analysis of species-level fish data indicates no consistent seasonal difference in fish taxa across reaches. Increased seining intensity at the multisample reaches did not result in a statistically significant difference in fish communities. Increased seining resulted in some changes in taxa richness and community diversity metrics. Diversity increases

  12. Houston, Galveston Bay, Texas, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Less than an hour before this photo was taken, a large explosion and fire occurred at a petrochemical plant in Mount Belvieu, just to the east of Houston, Texas (29.5N, 95.0W). The fire has just started and the smoke plume is fairly small but by the end of the day, smoke obscured most of the area east of Houston. The spider-web network of highways radiating from the center of Houston is easily seen as well as the Astrodome and other features.

  13. Reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston, Texas, USA, 2013.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Lucas S; Vohra, Rahat F; Bouyer, Donald H; Walker, David H

    2015-03-01

    Twelve patients with murine typhus were identified in Galveston, Texas, USA, in 2013. An isolate from 1 patient was confirmed to be Rickettsia typhi. Reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston emphasizes the importance of vector control and awareness of this disease by physicians and public health officials.

  14. Records of wells, drillers' logs, water-level measurements, and chemical analyses of ground water in Harris and Galveston counties, Texas, 1980-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, James F.; Coplin, L.S.; Ranzau, C.E.; Lind, W.B.; Bonnet, C.W.; Locke, Glenn L.

    1987-01-01

    Information on major new water wells in Harris and Galveston Counties was compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1980 to 1984. This report presents the results of the hydro!ogic data collection on new large-capacity and other selected wells, including well location and completion data, drillers 1 logs of the strata penetrated, water levels, and chemical quality of the produced water. These water-well data are supplementary to similar data on older wells in these counties and to descriptive evaluations of the ground-water resources which have been published previously.

  15. The Future of Economic Development on the Galveston County Mainland: A Challenge Based upon Community Perceptions of Leadership Characteristics and Responsibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Jerry L.

    A community survey conducted in Galveston County, Texas identified four attributes or characteristics of community leadership: problem-solving effectiveness; ability and willingness to accept responsibility; leadership cooperation; and leadership coordination of organizations. The leadership patterns found in Galveston County will effect the…

  16. A chronicle of organochlorine contamination in Clear Creek, Galveston and Harris Counties, Texas, 1960-2002, as recorded in sediment cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, Barbara J.; Van Metre, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Clear Creek flows through the Texas Coastal Plain from its headwaters southeast of Houston, Texas, to Clear Lake, which empties into Galveston Bay. Segments of Clear Creek were on the State of Texas 303(d) list for 1998, 1999, and 2000 as a result of a fish consumption advisory issued by the Texas Department of Health. One of the contaminants for which the fish consumption advisory was issued is the organochlorine pesticide chlordane. Chlordane is a hydrophobic (“waterfearing”) contaminant; that is, it adsorbs to sediment at concentrations much greater than those found in water. The study described here sought to answer three questions:Does chlordane occur in Clear Creek sediments at present?Is there current loading of chlordane to Clear Creek?How has occurrence of chlordane in Clear Creek changed over time?To answer these questions, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), collected and analyzed sediment cores from Clear Creek (fig. 1). Sediment cores sometimes can be used to reconstruct historical trends in concentrations of hydrophobic contaminants (Eisenreich and others, 1989; Van Metre and others, 1997). Cores were collected from five ponds connected to Clear Creek but out of the main channel (fig. 1). Cesium-137 (137Cs) was analyzed in the cores to determine if the sediments in the cores were undisturbed and if the cores reached sediment predating 1964. The two cores that appeared most undisturbed on the basis of 137Cs profiles (see sidebar, p. 2) were further subsampled and additional samples analyzed for 137Cs, organic carbon, selected organochlorine pesticides (including chlordane), and total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB).

  17. Fish, benthic macroinvertebrate, and stream habitat data from the Houston-Galveston Area Council service area, Texas, 1997-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J. Bruce; Rosendale, John C.; Ansley, Stephen P.; Brown, Dexter W.

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected fish, benthic macroinvertebrate, and stream habitat data at sampling sites in the Houston-Galveston Area Council service area, a 15-county area with a population of about 4.3 million people. The data were collected for a 1997?98 study in cooperation with the Houston-Galveston Area Council to provide data for the Texas Clean Rivers Program for watersheds near Houston, Texas. Fish community and stream habitat data were collected at all 56 sites selected, and benthic macroinvertebrate data were collected at 39 of the sites.

  18. Navigation Simulation Study, Galveston Causeway, Chocolate Bayou, Texas City Wye, Intracoastal Waterway, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-03-01

    Chocolate Bayou, and Texas City Wye was conducted. The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of proposed improvements on commercial tows navigating...the reaches. A numerical model of the existing channels at Galveston Causeway, Chocolate Bayou and Texas City Wye was developed. The model was

  19. Water-level altitudes in wells completed in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas, January-February 1992, 1993, and 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report depicts annual water-level altitudes for 3 consecutive years in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas. The report, prepared in cooperation with the city of Houston and the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, presents maps for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers showing the approximate water-level altitudes in wells in 1992 and 1994. The most recent previously published water-level-altitude maps (and water-level-change maps) for the two aquifers in the region are by Kasmarek and others (1997). The Houston-Galveston region includes Harris and Galveston Counties and adjacent parts of Brazoria, Fort Bend, Waller, Montgomery, Liberty, and Chambers Counties.

  20. Texas A & M University at Galveston: College and University Computing Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Texas A & M University at Galveston is the only marine and maritime-oriented University in the Southwest. Its computing policy/direction, academic computing, administrative computing, and library automation are described, and hurricance emergency plans are also discussed. (MLW)

  1. 78 FR 46947 - Adequacy Status of the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, Texas Reasonable Further Progress and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... Attainment Demonstration Implementation Plan for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard; Motor Vehicle Emission Budgets for Transportation Conformity Purposes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... emissions budgets (MVEBs) in the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, Texas (HGB) 1997 8-hour ozone...

  2. Lead screening among low-income children in Galveston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Javier, F C; McCormick, D P; Alcock, N W

    1999-11-01

    The objective of this study was to report results of a lead-screening program for low-income children living in Galveston, Texas. We obtained blood lead by graphite furnace spectrophotometry on 1,571 children aged 6 months to 8 years. Nineteen percent of children had blood lead levels > or = 10 mcg/dL. Risk factors included African-American ethnicity, young age, and residence in old housing. Follow-up was accomplished in only 50% of children with low-level toxicity. Lead screening is an important public health measure in communities with old houses. For screening to be successful, caregivers need to devote additional effort to follow-up.

  3. Endocotyle bushi (Trematoda: Microphallidae) from willets, Catoptrophorus semipalmatus from Galveston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Dronen, N O; Badley, J E; Tehrany, M R; Wardle, W J

    1998-12-01

    During a study of Digenea of shorebirds from Galveston, Texas, 30% (30 of 99) of willets, Catoptrophorus semipalmatus (Charadriiformes), were found to be infected with 55-405 Endocotyle bushi per infected host. Although the specimens from Texas generally agree with E. bushi from Florida, specimens from Texas are less elongated, have a more triangular to heart-shaped ovary, have slightly larger eggs, and have a smaller seminal vesicle.

  4. Groundwater withdrawals 1976, 1990, and 2000--10 and land-surface-elevation changes 2000--10 in Harris, Galveston, Fort Bend, Montgomery, and Brazoria Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    Measured land-surface-elevation changes from December 31, 2000, to December 31, 2010, ranged from an elevation increase of 0.06 feet (ft), or an average increase in elevation of 0.006 ft per year, at the Seabrook borehole extensometer located near Seabrook, Tex., to an elevation decrease of 1.28 ft, or an average decrease in elevation of 0.128 ft per year, at a PAM station north of Jersey Village, Tex. (PAM 07). Measured land-surface-elevation changes from December 31, 2005, to December 31, 2010, ranged from an elevation increase of 0.07 ft, or an average increase in elevation of 0.014 ft per year, at PAM 09 in far northeastern Harris County to an elevation decrease of 0.51 ft, or an average decrease in elevation of 0.102 ft per year, at PAM 07.

  5. 77 FR 65361 - Reorganization/Expansion of Foreign-z Under Alternative Site Framework; Galveston, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ...; Galveston, TX Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as amended (19 U... or reorganization of zones; Whereas, the Board of Trustees of the Galveston Wharves, grantee of... authority to reorganize under the ASF with a service area of Galveston County, Texas, within and adjacent...

  6. Occurrence of the Diamondback Terrapin (Malaclemys Terrapin Littoralis) at South Deer Island in Galveston Bay, Texas, April 2001-May 2002

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    TEXAS Galveston Bay GU LF OF ME XI CO In cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Occurrence of the Diamondback Terrapin (Malaclemys...Occurrence of the Diamondback Terrapin (Malaclemys Terrapin Littoralis) at South Deer Island in Galveston Bay, Texas, April 2001-May 2002 5a. CONTRACT...of Diamondback terrapin by L.S. Coplin, U.S. Geological Survey. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Occurrence of the Diamondback

  7. Boston, Galveston, Jackson County, Jefferson County, New York City, Portland--new saquinavir trial.

    PubMed

    1995-09-29

    A 90-patient trial comparing different doses of saquinavir, Hoffmann-LaRoche's new protease inhibitor, is enrolling patients in Boston, Galveston, Jackson County MO, Jefferson County AL, New York City, and Portland OR. Subjects, who will be randomized to one of four dose levels, must be eighteen or older, have a CD4 count between 100 and 500, have a viral load of more than 20,000 copies, and not have been previously treated with a protease inhibitor.

  8. Ecosystem under pressure: ballast water discharge into Galveston Bay, Texas (USA) from 2005 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Steichen, Jamie L; Windham, Rachel; Brinkmeyer, Robin; Quigg, Antonietta

    2012-04-01

    Ballast water exchange processes facilitate the dispersal and unnatural geographic expansion of phytoplankton, including harmful algal bloom species. From 2005 to 2010, over 45,000 vessels (≈ 8000 annually) travelled across Galveston Bay (Texas, USA) to the deep-water ports of Houston (10th largest in the world), Texas City and Galveston. These vessels (primarily tankers and bulkers) discharged ≈ 1.2 × 10(8) metrictons of ballast water; equivalent to ≈ 3.4% of the total volume of the Bay. Over half of the ballast water discharged had a coastwise origin, 96% being from US waters. Galveston Bay has fewer non-indigenous species but receives a higher volume of ballast water discharge, relative to the highly invaded Chesapeake and San Francisco Bays. Given the magnitude of shipping traffic, the role of Galveston Bay, both as a recipient and donor region of non-indigenous phytoplankton species is discussed here in terms of the invasibility risk to this system by way of ballast water.

  9. Hurricane Ike Deposits on the Bolivar Peninsula, Galveston Bay, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cynthia A.; Wilkinson, M. J.; Eppler, Dean

    2011-01-01

    In September 2008, Hurricane Ike made landfall on Galveston Bay, close to the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The storm flooded much of the area with a storm surge ranging from 11 -20 feet. The Bolivar peninsula, the southeastern coast of Galveston Bay, experienced the brunt of the surge. Several agencies collected excellent imagery baselines before the storm and complementary data a few days afterward that helped define the impacts of the storm. In April of 2011, a team of scientists and astronauts from JSC conducted field mapping exercises along the Bolivar Peninsula, the section of the Galveston Bay coast most impacted by the storm. Astronauts routinely observe and document coastal changes from orbit aboard the International Space Station. As part of their basic Earth Science training, scientists at the Johnson Space Center take astronauts out for field mapping exercises so that they can better recognize and understand features and processes that they will later observe from the International Space Station. Using pre -storm baseline images of the Bolivar Peninsula near Rollover Pass and Gilchrist (NOAA/Google Earth Imagery and USGS aerial imagery and lidar data), the astronauts mapped current coastline positions at defined locations, and related their findings to specific coastal characteristics, including channel, jetties, and other developments. In addition to mapping, we dug trenches along both the Gulf of Mexico coast as well as the Galveston Bay coast of the Bolivar peninsula to determine the depth of the scouring from the storm on the Gulf side, and the amount of deposition of the storm surge deposits on the Bay side of the peninsula. The storm signature was easy to identify by sharp sediment transitions and, in the case of storm deposits, a layer of storm debris (roof shingles, PVC pipes, etc) and black, organic rich layers containing buried sea grasses in areas that were marshes before the storm. The amount of deposition was generally about 20 -25 cm

  10. Hurricane Ike Deposits on the Bolivar Peninsula, Galveston Bay, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, C. A.; Wilkinson, M. J.; Eppler, D.

    2011-12-01

    In September 2008, Hurricane Ike made landfall on Galveston Bay, close to the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The storm flooded much of the area with a storm surge ranging from 11-20 feet. The Bolivar peninsula, the southeastern coast of Galveston Bay, experienced the brunt of the surge. Several agencies collected excellent imagery baselines before the storm and complementary data a few days afterward that helped define the impacts of the storm. In April of 2011, a team of scientists and astronauts from JSC conducted field mapping exercises along the Bolivar Peninsula, the section of the Galveston Bay coast most impacted by the storm. Astronauts routinely observe and document coastal changes from orbit aboard the International Space Station. As part of their basic Earth Science training, scientists at the Johnson Space Center take astronauts out for field mapping exercises so that they can better recognize and understand features and processes that they will later observe from the International Space Station. Using pre-storm baseline images of the Bolivar Peninsula near Rollover Pass and Gilchrist (NOAA/Google Earth Imagery and USGS aerial imagery and lidar data), the astronauts mapped current coastline positions at defined locations, and related their findings to specific coastal characteristics, including channel, jetties, and other developments. In addition to mapping, we dug trenches along both the Gulf of Mexico coast as well as the Galveston Bay coast of the Bolivar peninsula to determine the depth of the scouring from the storm on the Gulf side, and the amount of deposition of the storm surge deposits on the Bay side of the peninsula. The storm signature was easy to identify by sharp sediment transitions and, in the case of storm deposits, a layer of storm debris (roof shingles, PVC pipes, etc) and black, organic rich layers containing buried sea grasses in areas that were marshes before the storm. The amount of deposition was generally about 20-25 cm; the

  11. Occurrence of Vibrio vulnificus and toxigenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus on sea catfishes from Galveston Bay, Texas.

    PubMed

    Baumeister, Leslie; Hochman, Mona E; Schwarz, John R; Brinkmeyer, Robin

    2014-10-01

    Dorsal and pectoral fin spines from two species of sea catfishes (Bagre marinus and Ariopsis felis) landed at 54 sites in Galveston Bay, Texas, and its sub-bays from June to October 2005 were screened with traditional cultivation-based assays and quantitative PCR assays for Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. V. vulnificus was present on 51.2% of fish (n = 247), with an average of 403 ± 337 SD cells g(-1). V. parahaemolyticus was present on 94.2% (n = 247); 12.8% tested positive for the virulence-conferring tdh gene, having an average 2,039 ± 2,171 SD cells g(-1). The increasing trend in seafood consumption of "trash fishes" from lower trophic levels, such as sea catfishes, warrants evaluation of their life histories for association with pathogens of concern for human consumption.

  12. Water-level altitudes 1998, water-level changes 1977-98 and 1997-98, and compaction 1973-97 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplin, L.S.

    1998-01-01

    This report is one in an annual series of reports that depicts water-level altitudes and water-level changes since 1977 and compaction since 1973 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas. The report, prepared in cooperation with the City of Houston and the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, presents maps for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers showing the approximate water-level altitudes in wells in 1998 and approximate water-level changes in wells from 1977 to 1998 and from 1997 to 1998, a map showing extensometer site locations, and graphs showing measured compaction of subsurface material at selected sites from 1973 to 1997. The most recent previously published water-level-altitude maps and water-level-change maps for the two aquifers in the region are by Kasmarek and others (1997). The Houston-Galveston region comprises Harris and Galveston Counties and adjacent parts of Brazoria, Fort Bend, Waller, Montgomery, Liberty, and Chambers Counties.

  13. Water-level altitudes 2001, water-level changes 1977-2001 and 2000-2001, and compaction 1973-2000 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplin, L.S.; Houston, Natalie A.; Brown, Dexter W.

    2001-01-01

    This report is one in an annual series of reports that depicts water-level altitudes and water-level changes since 1977 and compaction since 1973 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas. The report, prepared in cooperation with the City of Houston and the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, presents maps for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers showing the approximate water-level altitudes in wells in 2001 (figs 1,4) and approximate water-level changes in wells from 1977 to 2001 and from 2000 to 2001 (figs 2,3,5,6), a map showing extensometer site locations (fig. 7), and graphs showing measured compaction of subserface material at selected sites from 1973 to 2000 (fig. 8). The most recent previously published water-level-altitude maps and water-level-change maps for the two aquifers in the region are by Coplin and Santos. (2000). The Houston-Galveston region comprises Harris and Galveston Counties and adjacent parts of Brazoria, Fort Bend, Waller, Montgomery, Liberty, and Chambers Counties.

  14. Land-surface subsidence resulting from ground-water withdrawals in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas, through 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gabrysch, R.K.; Coplin, L.S.

    1990-01-01

    The ground-water system in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas is composed of layers of sand and compressible clay. The system has been divided into two major aquifers, the Chicot and Evangeline, and the underlying Burkeville confining unit. The Chicot aquifer overlies the Evangeline aquifer. The Chicot aquifer contains the most permeable sand layers and also the more compressible clay layers.

  15. Galveston Symposium: Physical Oceanography of the Louisiana/Texas Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Thomas M.; Brown, Murray

    The Minerals Management Service (MMS), Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region sponsored a symposium on the Physical Oceanography of the Louisiana/Texas (LA/TX) Shelf in Galveston, Texas, on May 24-26, 1988. The symposium brought together a number of physical oceanographers, meteorologists, and ecologists to discuss the state of knowledge and to begin the planning process for a long-term study of shelf circulation covering the region from the mouth of the Mississippi River to approximately 24° latitude along the Mexican coast and from the shore out to a depth of approximately 500 m. The proposed study, to be a component of the ongoing MMS Environmental Studies Program, is expected to take place during the period 1989-1991. It is anticipated that the work will be done principally through contracts after a competitive procurement process. Specific charges to the participants were as follows:to assess the current state of knowledge concerning the circulation on the LA/TX shelfto identify significant gaps in that knowledgeto recommend a field measurement program to address these gapsto recommend a circulation modeling program for the LA/TX shelf that will improve MMS' oil spill risk assessmentsto identify and initiate coordination mechanisms and data-sharing arrangements with other proposed research efforts

  16. Satellite Remote Sensing of Chlorophyll-a Concentrations in the Galveston Bay, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Zheng, G.; Gao, H.; Roelke, D.

    2014-12-01

    Galveston Bay (Texas) is characterized by the unique and complex mixing of waters allowing the bay to produce more seafood than any bay in the United States with the exception of Chesapeake Bay (Maryland). The concentration of Chlorophyll-a plays a key role in ecosystem productivity. Since field measurements are complicated and expensive, satellite remote sensing provides an opportunity to observe real-time variations of Chlorophyll-a at a large spatial scale. However, because of the notable influences caused by the absorption and scattering of other substances (such as total suspended solids, dissolved organic matters and tripton), the use of ocean color remote sensing images to estimate Chlorophyll-a in coastal waters is usually limited. In order to monitor the variation of Chlorophyll-a with high accuracy (and at a high temporal resolution), an algorithm was developed using Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) reflectance data, Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images, and in-situ measurements. This approach mainly contains two steps. First, based on the relatively high spatial resolution of Landsat images (30m), an exponential regression relationship was found between the Landsat reflectance ratio (i.e., band 3/band 4) and the in-situ measured Chlorophyll-a concentrations (R2 = 0.81) during the two-year sampling period (2005- 2006). By using an automatic outlier detection technique for quality control, a Landsat Chlorophyll-a concentration product from 2000- 2011 was generated. Second, in order to improve the temporal resolution over the bay area, an 8-day MODIS product at 500 m spatial resolution from 2000 to 2013 was created. Landsat results from the first step were employed to calibrate the parameters used in NASA's existing operational product algorithm. This way, the MODIS product from this study can best represent the phytoplankton productivity in Galveston Bay. Using the remotely sensed Chlorophyll-a product, further comparisons were

  17. Ground Deformation Mapping of Houston-Galveston, Texas Using InSAR Time-Series Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    QU, F.; Lu, Z.; Bawden, G. W.; Kim, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Houston-Galveston region in Texas has been subsiding due to the combined effects of groundwater withdrawal, hydrocarbon extraction, soil compaction, and active faulting. This human- and partially nature-induced ground deformation has gradually threatened the stability of urban infrastructure and caused the loss of wetland habitat along the Gulf of Mexico. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) exploiting multiple SAR images has the capability of obtaining ground motions in high spatial resolution over large coverage. In this study, ERS-1/2 (1993-2000), ENVISAT (2004-2010), and ALOS (2007-2011) datasets are used to unravel the characteristics of ground deformation from 1993 to 2011 over the Houston-Galveston area. The persistent scatterer InSAR (PSInSAR) time-series analysis technique is employed to estimate the spatial and temporal variations of ground motions during 20 years. The ERS-1/2 PSInSAR products have measured subsidence (up to 5 cm/yr) in the northwest Houston area as well as a slight uplift (1 cm/yr) in the southeast region from 1993 to 2000. The subsidence rate (up to 2 cm/yr) between 2004 and 2011 has been obtained from ENVISAT and ALOS data. Our results indicate that the pattern of ground deformation was nearly concentric around the location of intense groundwater withdrawal and the subsiding area has been shrinking and migrating toward the northeast after 2000. In addition, an approximately 2 cm of differential subsidence across faults are observed. Presence of faults can induce localized surface displacements, aggravate localized subsidence, discontinue the integrity of ground water flow, and limit the horizontal spread of subsidence funnels. Finally, our long-term measurement of ground deformation has also been validated by GPS observations in study area.

  18. The Role of Galveston Bay Meteorology in Ozone Concentrations in Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen-Gammon, J. W.; Tobin, J.

    2007-12-01

    Galveston Bay is a body of water approximately 50 km by 30 km that opens into the Gulf of Mexico. The head of Galveston Bay is adjacent to the Houston Ship Channel, where large industrial emitters of ozone precursors are located. We consider the role of coastal circulations and mixing suppression over Galveston Bay in the location and magnitude of peak 8-h ozone values at monitors within the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria nonattainment area. Galveston Bay is found to have a salutary effect on ozone concentrations under most circumstances. Aside from boats and ships, Galveston Bay is free of ozone precursor emissions, and the onset of the sea breeze along Galveston Bay usually causes an immediate drop in ozone levels. The situation changes dramatically when the morning wind direction is from the northwest, allowing ozone precursors emitted during the night or early morning that are distributed in a shallow atmospheric layer to be carried over Galveston Bay. In morning and early afternoon, mixing is suppressed over Galveston Bay, and precursor concentrations remain high in the absence of ventilation. If winds are strong, high ozone concentrations are generally observed along the far shore of Galveston Bay. If winds are weak, a sea breeze will develop along Galveston Bay, and high levels of ozone will be carried back onshore in the vicinity of the Ship Channel. The coastal oscillation (a regular rotation of the wind vector driving by coastal heating contrasts near 30 N) can lead to wind reversals and high values of ozone by itself. We investigate peak ozone concentrations under a variety of wind conditions to infer whether the ozone concentrations are, on balance, higher due to the net effect of meteorological processes associated with Galveston Bay.

  19. Medical Humanities at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston.

    PubMed

    Jones, Anne Hudson; Carson, Ronald A

    2003-10-01

    The Institute for the Medical Humanities of the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB) was established in June 1973 to ensure that humanities teaching and research became an integral part of the education of future scientists and health-care professionals at UTMB. The multidisciplinary faculty of the Institute-who currently represent the disciplines of art, drama, history, law, literature, philosophy, and religious studies-teach in all four years of the undergraduate medical curriculum as well as in various residency programs. In addition to its focus on students and residents in the School of Medicine, the Institute has a vibrant graduate program in medical humanities with several joint degree options, including an MD/MA and an MD/PhD program, and the Institute has always included the School of Nursing, the School of Allied Health Sciences, and the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences in its activities. After 30 years, the Institute's commitment to health-professional education remains strong and enduring. Challenged by major curriculum reform in the School of Medicine and increasingly tight state budgets, Institute faculty members look forward to continued collaboration with their basic science and clinical colleagues to improve our evolving curriculum and to seek research funding from external sources.

  20. Hydrogeology of Webb County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambert, Rebecca B.

    2004-01-01

    IntroductionWebb County, in semiarid South Texas on the U.S.-Mexico border, is a region confronted by increasing stresses on natural resources. Laredo (fig. 1), the largest city in Webb County (population 193,000 in 2000), was one of the 10 fastest-growing metropolitan areas in the country during 1990-2000 (Perry and Mackun, 2001). Commercial and industrial activities have expanded throughout the region to support the maquiladora industry (manufacturing plants in Mexico) along the border and other growth as a result of the passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement. The Rio Grande currently (2002) is the primary source of public water supply for Laredo and other cities along the border in Webb County (fig. 1). Other cities, such as Bruni and Mirando City in the southeastern part of the county, rely on ground-water supplies to meet municipal demands. Increased water demand associated with development and population growth in the region has increased the need for the City of Laredo and Webb County to evaluate alternative water sources to meet future demand. Possible options include (1) supplementing the surface-water supply with ground water, and (2) applying artificial storage and recovery (ASR) technology to recharge local aquifers. These options raise issues regarding the hydraulic capability of the aquifers to store economically substantial quantities of water, current or potential uses of the resource, and possible effects on the quality of water resulting from mixing ground water with alternative source waters. To address some of these issues, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Laredo, began a study in 1996 to assess the ground-water resources of Webb County. A hydrogeologic study was conducted to review and analyze available information on the hydrogeologic units (aquifers and confining units) in Webb County, to locate available wells in the region with water-level and water-quality information from the aquifers, and to

  1. 33 CFR 117.966 - Galveston Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.966 Galveston Channel. The drawspan for the Pelican Island Causeway Drawbridge across Galveston Channel, mile 4.5 of the Galveston Channel... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Galveston Channel....

  2. 33 CFR 117.966 - Galveston Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.966 Galveston Channel. The drawspan for the Pelican Island Causeway Drawbridge across Galveston Channel, mile 4.5 of the Galveston Channel... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Galveston Channel....

  3. 33 CFR 117.966 - Galveston Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.966 Galveston Channel. The drawspan for the Pelican Island Causeway Drawbridge across Galveston Channel, mile 4.5 of the Galveston Channel... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Galveston Channel....

  4. Galveston Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Handley, Lawrence R.; Spear, Kathryn A.; Eleonor Taylor,; Thatcher, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    The Galveston Bay estuary is located on the upper Texas Gulf coast (Lester and Gonzalez, 2002). It is composed of four major sub-bays—Galveston, Trinity, East, and West Bays. It is Texas’ largest estuary on the Gulf Coast with a total area of 155,399 hectares (384,000 acres) and 1,885 km (1,171 miles) of shoreline (Burgan and Engle, 2006). The volume of the bay has increased over the past 50 years due to subsidence, dredging, and sea level rise. Outside of ship channels, the maximum depth is only 3.7 m (12 ft), with the average depth ranging from 1.2 m (4 ft) to 2.4 m (8 ft)— even shallower in areas with widespread oyster reefs (Lester and Gonzalez, 2002). The tidal range is less than 0.9 m (3 ft), but water levels and circulation are highly influenced by wind. The estuary was formed in a drowned river delta, and its bayous were once channels of the Brazos and Trinity Rivers. Today, the watersheds surrounding the Trinity and San Jacinto Rivers, along with many other smaller bayous, feed into the bay. The entire Galveston Bay watershed is 85,470 km2 (33,000 miles2 ) large (Figure 1). Galveston Island, a 5,000 year old sand bar that lies at the western edge of the bay’s opening into the Gulf of Mexico, impedes the freshwater flow of the Trinity and San Jacinto Rivers into the Gulf, the majority of which comes from the Trinity. The Bolivar Peninsula lies at the eastern edge of the bay’s opening into the Gulf. Water flows into the Gulf at Bolivar Roads, 1 U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center, 700 Cajundome Blvd., Lafayette, LA 70506 2 Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies, Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi, 6300 Ocean Drive, Unit 5869, Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 2 Galveston Pass, between Galveston Island and Bolivar Peninsula, and at San Luis Pass, between the western side of Galveston Island and Follets Island.

  5. Water-level changes 1977-87, 1987-95, and 1995-2000 in the Chicot and Evangeline Aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Lanning-Rush, Jennifer

    2002-01-01

    This report depicts long-term water-level changes in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region. The Houston-Galveston region comprises Harris, Galveston, Fort Bend, Waller, and Montgomery Counties and adjacent parts of Brazoria, Grimes, Walker, San Jacinto, Liberty, and Chambers Counties. The report was prepared in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District and the Fort Bend Subsidence District. For the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, maps show approximate water-level changes for the periods 1977 to 1987 (figs. 1 and 4), 1987 to 1995 (figs. 2 and 5), and 1995 to 2000 (figs. 3 and 6). Nineteen seventy-seven was the first year that water levels in a network of wells were measured and water-levelaltitude maps made for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers. Nineteen eighty-seven, 1995, and 2000 were years in which land-surface altitudes throughout Harris, Galveston, and Fort Bend Counties were releveled using spirit leveling (1987) and Global Positioning Satellite technology (1995 and 2000); thus the selection of those years for the maps. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has published annual reports of water-level altitudes and water-level changes for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region since 1979 and separate similar annual reports for the Fort Bend subregion since 1990. Beginning with 2002, the separate annual reports were combined into one report.

  6. Sedimentary record of storm deposits from Hurricane Ike, Galveston and San Luis Islands, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, A. D.; Horton, B. P.

    2012-10-01

    Prehistoric records of land-falling tropical cyclones further our understanding of the spatial and temporal variability of tropical cyclone activity and its relationship with global climatic changes. Here, we describe deposit stratigraphy and sedimentology resulting from overwash during Hurricane Ike, which made landfall on September 13th 2008, to provide a much needed modern analogue for paleo-hurricane deposits and evaluate the hurricane's influence on barrier stability. We compared the volume, grain size distribution, organic content and foraminiferal assemblages of washover deposits at three sites from Galveston and San Luis Islands, Texas that were up to 50 km west of Ike's landfall. Storm surge heights varied between 3.7 and 2.7 m with inland inundation extents of 330 to 113 m. At each of the study sites, Hurricane Ike eroded the shoreline and re-deposited a landward-thinning sand sheet between 0.02 and 0.28 m thick over short-grass prairie/salt-marsh soil. Shoreline erosion estimates suggest that only between 10 and 30% of eroded beach sediment is deposited on land as washover (net gain to barrier elevation), while the remainder is re-deposited subtidally or offshore, a potential net loss to the coastal sediment budget. The washover sediment was readily identifiable by abrupt changes in grain size, organic content, and buried in situ grasses. Foraminiferal assemblages within washover and short-grass prairie/salt-marsh sediments (when present) have similar assemblages, which are dominated by Ammonia spp. and Elphidium spp. These species are common to bay and nearshore environments of the Gulf of Mexico. Foraminiferal species Bolivina subaenariensis, Quinqueloculina seminulum and planktonic species are restricted to the washover deposits, which may suggest sediment provenance from inner shelf environments.

  7. Water-level altitudes 1997, water-level changes 1977-97 and 1996-97, and compaction 1973-96 in the Chicot and Evangeline Aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Coplin, L.S.; Santos, Horacio X.

    1997-01-01

    This report is one in an annual series of reports that depicts water-level altitudes and water-level changes since 1977 and compaction since 1973 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas.

  8. Water-level altitudes 1995, water-level changes 1977-95 and 1994-95, and compaction 1973-94 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Coplin, L.S.; Santos, Horacio X.

    1995-01-01

    This report is one in an annual series of reports that depicts altitudes of water levels and water-level changes since 1977 and compaction since 1973 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas.

  9. A preliminary evaluation of Trinity river sediment and nutrient loads into Galveston Bay, Texas, during two periods of high flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Suspend-sediment and water-quality data were measured during two periods o high flow, one during April 20-23, 2009 and a second during September 22-November 3, 2009. On the basis of streamflow and continuous and discrete water-quality measurements, the two periods of high flow had different flood and nutrient loading characteristics. Some differences in the nature of these two periods of high flow were evident. Preliminary results indicate that it might be possible to better understand the extent of sediment and nutrient loading in Galveston Bay using selected measurements of discrete and continuous water-quality data. An apparent correlation was observed between the concentrations of selected nutrients and suspended sediment, and an apparent correlation was observed between suspended sediment and total nutrient concentration measured with in-situ turbidity measurements during periods of high flow in Trinity River at the Wallisville, Texas gage, about 3.5 miles upstream from where the Trinity River enters Galveston Bay. Additional data are needed to confirm these preliminary results.  

  10. The ERTS-1 investigation (ER-600). Volume 2: ERTS-1 coastal/estuarine analysis. [Galveston Bay, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erb, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    The Coastal Analysis Team of the Johnson Space Center conducted a 1-year investigation of ERTS-1 MSS data to determine its usefulness in coastal zone management. Galveston Bay, Texas, was the study area for evaluating both conventional image interpretation and computer-aided techniques. There was limited success in detecting, identifying and measuring areal extent of water bodies, turbidity zones, phytoplankton blooms, salt marshes, grasslands, swamps, and low wetlands using image interpretation techniques. Computer-aided techniques were generally successful in identifying these features. Aerial measurement of salt marshes accuracies ranged from 89 to 99 percent. Overall classification accuracy of all study sites was 89 percent for Level 1 and 75 percent for Level 2.

  11. Tri-county pilot study. [Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, C. A. (Principal Investigator); Austin, T. W.; Kerber, A. G.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An area inventory was performed for three southeast Texas counties (Montgomery, Walker, and San Jacinto) totaling 0.65 million hectares. The inventory was performed using a two level hierarchy. Level 1 was divided into forestland, rangeland, and other land. Forestland was separated into Level 2 categories: pine, hardwood, and mixed; rangeland was not separated further. Results consisted of area statistics for each county and for the entire study site for pine, hardwood, mixed, rangeland, and other land. Color coded county classification maps were produced for the May data set, and procedures were developed and tested.

  12. Opossums and Cat Fleas: New Insights in the Ecology of Murine Typhus in Galveston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Lucas S; Idowu, Boluwatife M; Tatsch, Tyler N; Henderson, Joshua M; Bouyer, Donald H; Walker, David H

    2016-08-03

    Murine typhus is an acute undifferentiated febrile illness caused by Rickettsia typhi The classic reservoir (Rattus spp.) and flea vector (Xenopsylla cheopis) were once culprits of murine typhus in the United States. Vector and rodent control efforts have drastically decreased the prevalence of disease, except in a few endemic foci where opossums and cat fleas play a role in transmission. Since 2012, there has been a reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston, TX. We hypothesize that opossums and cat fleas are involved in the transmission of R. typhi in Galveston. To explore this, we sought to find the seroprevalence of typhus group antibodies from opossums. We also sought to find the prevalence of R. typhi in fleas parasitizing these animals. We collected blood from 12 opossums and found that eight (66.7%) had the presence of anti-R. typhi antibodies. All opossums were infested with fleas; a total of 250 Ctenocephalides felis fleas were collected from these animals. Seven opossums (53.8%) were infested with fleas that had molecular evidence of R. typhi infection, while six (46.2%) were infested with fleas that contained Candidatus Rickettsia senegalensis, an organism closely related to R. felis The minimum flea infection rate for R. typhi was 7.0%. The minimum infection rate for Candidatus R. senegalensis was 6.1%. Our study demonstrates that fleas infected with R. typhi parasitize opossums in Galveston. It is therefore likely that opossums and their fleas play a role in the city's recent reemergence of murine typhus.

  13. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs.

  14. Relationship between lysosomal membrane destabilization and chemical body burden in eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from Galveston Bay, Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyun-Min; Wade, Terry L; Sericano, Jose L

    2002-06-01

    Lysosomal destabilization was measured by using hemocytes of eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) collected along a chemical concentration gradient in Galveston Bay, Texas, USA. Results of the lysosomal response were compared to concentrations of organic compounds and trace elements in oyster tissue. Concentrations (on a dry-wt basis) ranged from 288 to 2,390 ng/g for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 38 to 877 ng Sn/g for tri-n-butyltin (TBT), 60 to 562 ng/g for polyclorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and 7 to 71 ng/g for total DDT. Trace element concentrations (on a dry-wt basis) ranged from 1.1 to 4.0 microg/g for Cd, 105 to 229 microg/g for Cu, 212 to 868 microg/g for Al, and 1,200 to 8,180 microg/g for Zn. The percentage of destabilized lysosomes ranged from 34 to 81%. A significant positive correlation (p < 0.05) was observed between lysosomal destabilization and body burden of organic compounds (PAHs, PCBs, TBT, and chlorinated pesticides). No significant correlation was found between metal concentrations and lysosomal destabilization. Based on lysosomal destabilization, the study sites in Galveston Bay can be placed in one of three groups: healthy (Hanna Reef and Confederate Bay), moderately damaged (Offats Bayou and Todd's Dump), and highly damaged (Yacht Club and Ship Channel). Lysosomal destabilization that is consistent with toxic chemical body burdens supports previous observations that lysosomal membranes are damaged by toxic chemicals and indicates that this method can serve as an early screening tool to assess overall ecosystem health by using oysters.

  15. Integrated ecosystem services assessment: Valuation of changes due to sea level rise in Galveston Bay, Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Yoskowitz, David; Carollo, Cristina; Pollack, Jennifer Beseres; Santos, Carlota; Welder, Kathleen

    2017-03-01

    The goal of the present study was to identify the potential changes in ecosystem service values provided by wetlands in Galveston Bay, Texas, USA, under the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) A1B max (0.69 m) sea level rise scenario. Built exclusively upon the output produced during the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model 6 (SLAMM 6) exercise for the Galveston Bay region, this study showed that fresh marsh and salt marsh present a steady decline from 2009 (initial condition) to 2100. Fresh marsh was projected to undergo the biggest changes, with the loss of approximately 21% of its extent between 2009 and 2100 under the A1B max scenario. The percentages of change for salt marsh were less prominent at approximately 12%. This trend was also shown in the values of selected ecosystem services (disturbance regulation, waste regulation, recreation, and aesthetics) provided by these habitats. An ordinary least squares regression was used to calculate the monetary value of the selected ecosystem services provided by salt marsh and fresh marsh in 2009, and in 2050 and 2100 under the A1B max scenario. The value of the selected services showed potential monetary losses in excess of US$40 million annually in 2100, compared to 2009 for fresh marsh and more than $11 million for salt marsh. The estimates provided here are only small portions of what can be lost due to the decrease in habitat extent, and they highlight the need for protecting not only built infrastructure but also natural resources from sea level rise. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:431-443. © 2016 SETAC.

  16. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  17. Determination of benzo(a)pyrene, hexachlorobenzene and pentachlorophenol in oysters from Galveston Bay, Texas. [None

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, H.E.; Neff, G.S.; Hrung, Y.; Giam, C.S.

    1980-10-01

    Intensive development of industrial plants located along the Houston Ship Channel is a major potential source of refractory organic contaminants to the Galveston Bay estuarine system. Petroleum production and shipping also contribute extensively to the pollutant load of the Bay. For example, previous workers have reported that oyster samples collected at the lower end of the Houston Ship Channel, particularly Morgan's Point, consistently revealed high levels (130 to 240 ppM) of petroleum hydrocarbons. As bivalves have been suggested as potentially valuable sentinel organisms for indicating levels of pollutants in coastal marine waters, this study was undertaken to analyze oysters from Galveston Bay for selected pollutants. Three compounds, each representing a particular class of organic pollutant, were selected for determination in oysters (Crassostrea virginica) collected near Morgan's Point. These were benzo(a)pyrene (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon), hexachlorobenzene (polycholoroaromatic hydrocarbon), and pentachlorophenol (chlorinated phenol). These compounds were selected because of their large annual production, patterns of use and disposal which favor their entry into the oceans, high toxicity, and persistence in the environment.

  18. Geospatial compilation of historical water-level changes in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers 1977-2013 and Jasper aquifer 2000-13, Gulf Coast aquifer system, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Michaela R.; Linard, Joshua I.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Subsidence District, City of Houston, Fort Bend Subsidence District, Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District, and Brazoria County Groundwater Conservation District has produced an annual series of reports that depict water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers of the Gulf Coast aquifer system in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas, from 1977 to 2013. Changes are determined from water-level measurements between December and March of each year from groundwater wells screened in one of the three aquifers. Existing published maps and unpublished geographic information system (GIS) datasets were compiled into a comprehensive geodatabase of all water-level-change maps produced as part of this multiagency effort. Annual water-level-change maps were georeferenced and digitized where existing GIS data were unavailable (1979–99). Existing GIS data available for 2000–13 were included in the geodatabase. The compilation contains 121 datasets showing water-level changes for each primary aquifer of the Gulf Coast aquifer system: 56 for the Chicot aquifer (1977; 1979–2013 and 1990; 1993–2013), 56 for the Evangeline aquifer (1977; 1979–2013 and 1990; 1993–2013), and 9 for the Jasper aquifer (2000; 2005–13).

  19. 33 CFR 110.197 - Galveston Harbor, Bolivar Roads Channel, Texas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Channel, Texas. 110.197 Section 110.197 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Roads Channel, Texas. (a)(1) Anchorage area (A). The water bounded by a line connecting the following... VHF-FM channels 12 (156.60 MHz) or 13 (156.65 MHz). (3) No vessel with a draft of less than 22...

  20. [Juniper pollen monitoring by Burkard sampler in Galveston, Texas, USA and Japanese cedar pollen counting in Fukuoka, Japan -- introduction of Pan American Aerobiology Association protocol counting technique].

    PubMed

    Kishikawa, Reiko; M-Horiuti, Terumi; Togawa, Akihisa; Kondoh, Yasuto; Janzy, Paul D; Goldblum, Randal M; Kotoh, Eiko; Shimoda, Teruhumi; Shoji, Shunsuke; Nishima, Sankei; Brooks, Edward G

    2004-06-01

    We have monitored Juniper pollen which caused winter allergy symptoms by Burkard sampler in Galveston, Texas. We identified and counted Juniper pollen grains by PAAA protocol which was a comprehensive guideline for the operation of Hirst-Type suction bioaerosol sampler, (original of Burkard sampler) in the USA. In Galveston we were able to detect the Mountain Cedar (Juniperus ashei) pollen from December to of January, and Eastern Red Cedar (Juniperus virginiana) which has cross reactivity to MC from almost middle of January to February. There is no MC vegetation in Galveston. We found the pollen grains were transported from west at Edward Plateau in West Texas where it was thickly wooded. Then, we tried to monitor Japanese Cedar (JC) pollen grains in Fukuoka, Japan according with the same method. We found the significant positive correlation between the pollen counts using one single longitudinal traverse counting technique in the PAAA protocol and the JC pollen counting on the whole of Melinex tape per 24 hours (R2=0.9212, p=0.0001), and the gravitational method that is Durham sampler's pollen counting in 2002 (R2=0.489, p=0.0001), and in 2003 (R2=0.948, p=0.0001) respectively. We suggested that we can use the PAAA protocol for airborne pollen investigation in Japan by Burkard sampler.

  1. Food habits and organochlorine contaminants in the diet of olivaceous cormorants in Galveston Bay, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    More than 1,000 food items, representing 32 species of fish and one invertebrate, were identified from olivaceous cormorants. Six species of fish comprised 79% of the diet by frequency of occurrence and 78% by weight. Almost half of the diet consisted of a single species, the sheepshead minnow. Concentrations of pp-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) in cormorant carcasses were 27 times greater than those in fish and 57 times higher in cormorant eggs than fish. Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) were 18 times higher in carcasses and 15 times higher in eggs than in fish. The biomagnification of other organochlorine contaminants through the cormorant food base in Galveston Bay is difficult to evaluate because the only compounds detected in all three tissues at greater than 50% frequency of occurrence were DDE and PCB.

  2. Fish, benthic-macroinvertebrate, and stream-habitat data from two estuaries near Galveston Bay, Texas, 2000-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hogan, Jennifer L.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents data on the status of fish, macroinvertebrates, and stream habitat collected from 10 sites in the lower (estuarine) parts of Armand and Dickinson Bayous near Galveston Bay, Texas, during summer 2000 and winter 2001. The total number of individual fish caught at the five Armand Bayou sites (2,091) was greater than at the five Dickinson Bayou sites (1,055), but the total number of fish species caught at Dickinson Bayou sites (37) was greater than at Armand Bayou sites (30). The total number of invertebrates (26,641) and the total number of invertebrate taxa (141) were both greater at Armand Bayou sites than at Dickinson Bayou sites (10,467 and 131, respectively). Among habitat data, the average sinuosity of Armand Bayou sites (1.31) was greater than that of Dickinson Bayou sites (1.14). Mean left-bank and right-bank slopes were greater at Armand Bayou sites than at Dickinson Bayou sites, although the Armand Bayou banks were lower and narrower than the Dickinson Bayou banks. The Dickinson Bayou channel was deeper at the sampling sites than the Armand Bayou channel.

  3. Occurrence of the diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin littoralis) at South Deer Island in Galveston Bay, Texas, April 2001-May 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hogan, Jennifer L.

    2003-01-01

    One-hundred thirty-five terrapins were captured (116 individuals, 19 recaptures) in occurrence and nesting and basking surveys at South Deer Island in Galveston Bay, Texas, during April 2001–May 2002. Along the southern shore of the island, terrapins were captured in crab traps placed in shallow water offshore; in the lagoon on the island, terrapins were captured by hand while walking along the shore. In the nesting and basking surveys, areas of the island with continuous patches of exposed shell typically were checked twice a day for nesting and basking terrapins, except during the last 2 months of the study, when more intensive monitoring was conducted. The occurrence surveys resulted in 119 terrapins captured in crab traps and nine captured by hand around the lagoon. The nesting and basking surveys yielded seven terrapins. Only one was nesting, although the nest is believed to be the first documented terrapin nest found in Texas. Three terrapins were captured swimming near shell beaches, and three more were captured basking on shell beaches. The most terrapins were captured during April–May 2001 and April–May 2002. Biometric data collected on terrapins captured showed size dimorphism on the basis of sex. The median female straight-line carapace length was 17.8 centimeters, 1.4 times larger than the median male carapace length, 13.1 centimeters. The median female mass was 1,021 grams, 2.9 times larger than the median male mass, 354 grams. Intra-specific variation occurred in the colorations and markings of terrapins captured. Anomalies - lesions, deformities, barnacles, and algae - were common among terrapins captured. Both lesions and deformities were more common among males than females. Dominant vegetation or substrate associated with terrapin habitat included saltwort, slender seapurslane, seabeach orache, shell, and woody debris.

  4. Persistent organochlorine pollutants in eggs of colonial waterbirds from Galveston Bay and East Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, D.S.; Mora, M.A.; Sericano, J.L.; Blankenship, Alan L.; Kannan, K.; Giesy, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Eggs of neotropic cormorants (Phalacrocorax brasilianus), black-crowned night herons (Nycticorax nycticorax), and great egrets (Ardea alba) nesting on several locations in Galveston Bay (TX, USA) and at two control sites outside the bay were collected during April-May 1996 and analyzed for chlorinated pesticides, PCBs, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and polychlorinated dibenzofurans. Additionally, concentrations of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQs) were determined by use of relative potency factors (TEQs) or the H4IIE-luc bioassay TCDD-EQs. Concentrations of 1,1,-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (DDE) were greater in eggs of neotropic cormorants from Alexander Island (mean = 1,040 ng/g wet wt) in the Houston Ship Channel (Houston, TX, USA) and in those from Telfair Island (mean = 1,460 ng/g wet wt), a reference location outside the bay, than in most locations inside the bay (mean range = 119-453 ng/g wet wt). Mean PCB concentrations were greater in eggs of neotropic cormorants from Alexander Island (mean = 5,720 ng/g wet wt) than in eggs of cormorants from areas farther away from the ship channel, including two reference sites outside the bay (mean range = 404-3,140 ng/g wet wt). The TCDD was the main dioxin congener detected in eggs from all locations within Galveston Bay. Instrumental TEQs in eggs ranged from 67 pg/g wet weight at control sites to 452 pg/g wet weight at Alexander Island. Concentrations of TCDD-EQs determined in the H4IIE assay were correlated with instrumental TEQs and were greater in eggs of cormorants from islands within the bay, although these were farther away from the ship channel. Overall, concentrations of DDE, PCBs, TCDD, and TCDD-EQs were less than the threshold levels known to affect reproduction. However, some eggs contained concentrations of total PCBs or DDE greater than what would elicit adverse effects on birds. No identifiable deformities or abnormalities were detected in embryos collected from

  5. Persistent organochlorine pollutants in eggs of colonial waterbirds from Galveston Bay and East Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Frank, D S; Mora, M A; Sericano, J L; Blankenship, A L; Kannan, K; Giesy, J P

    2001-03-01

    Eggs of neotropic cormorants (Phalacrocorax brasilianus), black-crowned night herons (Nycticorax nycticorax), and great egrets (Ardea alba) nesting on several locations in Galveston Bay (TX, USA) and at two control sites outside the bay were collected during April-May 1996 and analyzed for chlorinated pesticides, PCBs, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and polychlorinated dibenzofurans. Additionally, concentrations of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQs) were determined by use of relative potency factors (TEQs) or the H4IIE-luc bioassay TCDD-EQs. Concentrations of 1,1,-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (DDE) were greater in eggs of neotropic cormorants from Alexander Island (mean = 1,040 ng/g wet wt) in the Houston Ship Channel (Houston, TX, USA) and in those from Telfair Island (mean = 1,460 ng/g wet wt), a reference location outside the bay, than in most locations inside the bay (mean range = 119-453 ng/g wet wt). Mean PCB concentrations were greater in eggs of neotropic cormorants from Alexander Island (mean = 5,720 ng/g wet wt) than in eggs of cormorants from areas farther away from the ship channel, including two reference sites outside the bay (mean range = 404-3,140 ng/g wet wt). The TCDD was the main dioxin congener detected in eggs from all locations within Galveston Bay. Instrumental TEQs in eggs ranged from 67 pg/g wet weight at control sites to 452 pg/g wet weight at Alexander Island. Concentrations of TCDD-EQs determined in the H4IIE assay were correlated with instrumental TEQs and were greater in eggs of cormorants from islands within the bay, although these were farther away from the ship channel. Overall, concentrations of DDE, PCBs, TCDD, and TCDD-EQs were less than the threshold levels known to affect reproduction. However, some eggs contained concentrations of total PCBs or DDE greater than what would elicit adverse effects on birds. No identifiable deformities or abnormalities were detected in embryos collected from

  6. Approximate land-surface subsidence in Fort Bend County, Texas, 1943-87 and 1973-87

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gabrysch, R.K.; Coplin, L.S.

    1998-01-01

    Land-surface subsidence resulting from the lowering of water levels that accompany ground-water development in areas of the Texas Gulf Coast has been described in numerous reports, newspapers, and magazines since the 1950s. Gabrysch and Bonnet (1975), Gabrysch (1984), and Gabrysch and Coplin (1990) presented subsidence maps of the Houston-Galveston region, including Fort Bend County, for a number of time periods. Most of the subsidence has been in the Houston area. This report, prepared in cooperation with the Fort Bend Subsidence District and the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, presents contour maps of land-surface subsidence in Fort Bend County that occurred during 1943-87 and 1973-87.Fort Bend County is underlain by a thick section of unconsolidated lenticular deposits of sand and clay. The deposits include the principal aquifers in the county – the Evangeline aquifer and the overlying Chicot aquifer. Within these aquifers, the interbedded sands and clays are saturated with water almost to the land surface. The sand layers generally are connected laterally, but the clays retard the vertical movement of water, creating confined (artesian) conditions within the aquifer. The sands are fine to medium grained, and the combined layers yield large quantities of water. The clays are principally montmorillonite, the most compressible of the clay minerals.

  7. Houston-Galveston Bay area, Texas, from space; a new tool for mapping land subsidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stork, Sylvia V.; Sneed, Michelle

    2002-01-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a powerful new tool that uses radar signals to measure displacement (subsidence and uplift) of the Earth's crust at an unprecedented level of spatial detail and high degree of measurement resolution.The Houston-Galveston Bay area, possibly more than any other metropolitan area in the United States, has been adversely affected by land subsidence. Extensive subsidence, caused mainly by ground-water pumping but also by oil and gas extraction, has increased the frequency of flooding, caused extensive damage to industrial and transportation infrastructure, motivated major investments in levees, reservoirs, and surfacewater distribution facilities, and caused substantial loss of wetland habitat. Ongoing patterns of subsidence in the Houston area have been carefully monitored using borehole extensometers, Global Positioning System (GPS) and conventional spirit-leveling surveys, and more recently, an emerging technology—Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR)—which enables development of spatially-detailed maps of land-surface displacement over broad areas. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, briefly summarizes the history of subsidence in the area and the local consequences of subsidence and describes the use of InSAR as one of several tools in an integrated subsidence-monitoring program in the area.

  8. Sediment quality triad assessment survey of the Galveston Bay, Texas system.

    PubMed

    Carr, R S; Chapman, D C; Howard, C L; Biedenbach, J M

    1996-12-01

    To characterize the quality of sediments at key sites in the Galveston Bay Estuary, sediment samples were collected concurrently for chemical and physical analyses, toxicity testing and an assessment of benthic community structure. Significant toxicity, as determined by the sea urchin (Arbacia punetulata) pore water embryological development assay, was observed at 12 of the 24 sites investigated in this study. No toxicity was observed at any of the sites with the amphipod (Grandidierella japonica) solid-phase test. There were a number of sites with elevated levels of trace metals and petroleum hydrocarbons. The chemistry, toxicity and benthic data were ranked by station and a scaled rank sum was calculated to facilitate comparisons among the stations. Five sites exhibited strong evidence of contaminant-induced degradation, while 15 stations showed no evidence of contaminant-induced degradation. At eight additional sites the sediment quality triad (SQT) data indicated that unmeasured chemicals or conditions were stressing the system. Contaminant impacts could be reduced or eliminated by alternative regulatory and management practices, including the restriction of produced water discharges into coastal estuaries and the use of dredge material disposal practices that minimize the reintroduction of sediment-associated contaminants to the bays.

  9. Approximate changes in water levels in wells completed in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, 1977-94 and 1993-94, and measured compaction, 1973-93, in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Coplin, L.S.; Santos, Horacio X.

    1994-01-01

    This report is one in a series of reports that depict water-level changes since 1977 and compaction of subsurface material since 1973.  The report was prepared in cooperation with the City of Houston and the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, and presents maps showing the approximate changes in water levels in wells completed in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, 1977-94 and 1993-94 (figs. 1-4), extensometer site locations (fig. 5), and measured compaction, 1973-93 (fig. 6), in the Houston-Galveston region.  Water-level change maps were prepared previously by Kasmarek and others (1993).  The Houston-galveston region includes Harris and Galveston Counties and adjacent parts of Brazoria, Fort Bend, Waller, Montgomery, Liberty, and Chambers Counties.

  10. Approximate changes in water levels in wells completed in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, 1977-93 and 1992-93, and measured compaction, 1973-92, in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Coplin, L.S.; Campodonico, Al

    1993-01-01

    This report is one in a series of reports that depict water-level changes since 1977 and compaction of subsurface material since 1973.  The report was prepared in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District and the City of Houston, and presents maps showing the approximate changes in water levels in wells completed in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, 1977-93 and 1992-93 (figs. 1-4), and measured compaction, 1973-92 (figs. 5 and 6), in the Houston-Galveston region.  The Houston-Galveston region includes Harris and Galveston Counties and adjacent parts of Brazoria, Fort Bend, Waller, Montgomery, Liberty, and Chambers Counties.

  11. Approximate changes in water levels in wells completed in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, 1977-92 and 1991-92, and measured compaction, 1973-91 in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Barbie, Dana L.; Campodonico, Al

    1992-01-01

    This report is one in a series of reports that depict water-level changes since 1977 and compaction of subsurface material since 1973.  The report was prepared in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District and the City of Houston, and presents maps showing the approximate changes in water-levels in wells completed in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, 1977-92 and 1991-92 (figs. 1-4), and measured compations, 1973-91 (figs. 5 and 6), in the Houston-Galveston region.  The Houston-Galveston region includes Harris and Galveston Counties and adjacent parts of Brazoria, Fort Bend, Waller, Montgomery, Liberty, and Chambers Counties.

  12. Estuarine mixing behavior of colloidal organic carbon and colloidal mercury in Galveston Bay, Texas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seyong; Han, Seunghee; Gill, Gary A

    2011-06-01

    Mercury (Hg) in estuarine water is distributed among different physical phases (i.e. particulate, colloidal, and truly dissolved). This phase speciation influences the fate and cycling of Hg in estuarine systems. However, limited information exists on the estuarine distribution of colloidal phase Hg, mainly due to the technical difficulties involved in measuring it. In the present study, we determined Hg and organic carbon levels from unfiltered, filtered (<0.45 μm), colloidal (10 kDa-0.45 μm), and truly dissolved (<10 kDa) fractions of Galveston Bay surface water in order to understand the estuarine mixing behavior of Hg species as well as interactions of Hg with colloidal organic matter. For the riverine end-member, the colloidal fraction comprised 43 ± 11% of the total dissolved Hg pool and decreased to 17 ± 8% in brackish water. In the estuarine mixing zone, dissolved Hg and colloidal organic carbon showed non-conservative removal behavior, particularly in the low salinity (<15 ppt) region. This removal may be caused by salt-induced coagulation of colloidal matter and consequent removal of dissolved Hg. The particle-water interaction, K(d) ([particulate Hg (mol kg(-1))]/[dissolved Hg (mol L(-1))]) of Hg decreased as particle concentration increased, while the particle-water partition coefficient based on colloidal Hg and the truly dissolved Hg fraction, K(c) ([colloidal Hg (mol kg(-1))]/[truly dissolved Hg (mol L(-1))]) of Hg remained constant as particle concentration increased. This suggests that the particle concentration effect is associated with the amount of colloidal Hg, increasing in proportion to the amount of suspended particulate matter. This work demonstrates that, colloidal organic matter plays an important role in the transport, particle-water partitioning, and removal of dissolved Hg in estuarine waters.

  13. Levels of toxic PCBs, PCDDs and PCDFs in biotic and abiotic samples from Galveston Bay, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Gardinali, P.; Wade, T.

    1995-12-31

    Concentrations of di-, mono-, non-ortho PCB congeners as well as the seventeen 2,3,7,8-substituted polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) were measured in American oyster, blue crab, hardhead catfish liver and sediment samples collected from five sites in the Galveston Bay System. In general, when measuring sediments and sentinel organisms, a geographical gradient of contaminant load is observed between the heavily industrialized and the open bay sites. Although sediment concentrations are relatively low at most stations, toxic PCBs, PCDDs and PCDFs are strongly bioconcentrated in all three organisms analyzed. Levels of 2,3,7,8-TCDD ranged from 1.15 to 16.4 pg/g in the oysters, 1.10 to 138 pg/g in the blue crabs and, 11.0 to 101 pg/g in the catfish livers. 2,3,7,8-TCDD concentrations in sediments ranged from non-detected to 4.44 pg/g. Concentrations of 2,3,7,8-TCDF ranged from 2.31 to 50.6 pg/g in the oysters, 5.77 to 385 pg/g in the blue crabs and, 5.57 to 8.04 pg/g in the catfish livers, while sediment concentrations were between 0.65 to 7.46 pg/g. When the toxicity equivalent factor (TEF) approach was used to estimate the 2,3,7,8-TCDD toxic equivalents (TEQs), the non-ortho PCB congeners were the major TEQ contributors for the all organisms (29 to 74%). In contrast, the TEQ for the sediment samples were largely dominated by the contribution from PCDDs and PCDFs. The results also suggest that oysters, in spite of their lower concentrations, are more valuable for biomonitoring the availability of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon contaminants.

  14. Effects of groundwater regulation on aquifer-system compaction and subsidence in the Houston-Galveston Region, Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, M. J.; Petrov, A.

    2015-11-01

    Subsidence has been a primary concern in the Houston area for many years. Since 1906, about 4 m of subsidence has occurred in the coastal areas, with a broad area of about 2 m of subsidence existing today throughout most of the Houston Area. In 1975, as a result of area residents and local governments becoming increasingly alarmed by the continued impact of subsidence on economic growth and quality of life in the region, the Harris-Galveston Subsidence District was created by the 64th Texas Legislature as an underground water conservation district with the mission to provide for the regulation of the withdrawal of groundwater to control subsidence. Over its nearly 40 years of existence, the District has developed substantial data sets providing the foundation for its regulatory plan. The District's regulatory plan allows groundwater users an amount of annual groundwater based on a percentage of an individual permitee's total water demand. The management of the groundwater resources within the District has involved significant coordination with regional ground and surface water suppliers; ongoing interaction with other state and local regulatory bodies; analysis of accurate and up to date predictions on water usage; the enforcement of disincentives to those who rely too heavily on groundwater and a commitment to practicing and promoting water conservation. Areas nearest the Gulf of Mexico coast have completed the conversion to alternative (other than groundwater) water sources, consequently the effective stress on the aquifer has decreased and subsidence rates have been reduced. Areas within the District further inland are currently proceeding through the conversion process, and subsidence has continued in those areas as development of the groundwater resources has continued.

  15. Galveston's "Sea Aggies" Find Their Land Legs at College Station

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    More than 1,500 students who were driven off their island campus in Galveston, Texas, by Hurricane Ike resumed classes last week 150 miles inland, on the main campus of Texas A&M University at College Station. The students, who are enrolled at Texas A&M's marine-oriented branch campus, in Galveston, were hurriedly moved into spare rooms…

  16. Water-level altitudes 1996, water-level changes 1977-96 and 1995-96, and compaction 1973-95 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, M.C.; Coplin, L.S.; Santos, H.X.

    1996-01-01

    This report is one in an annual series of reports that depicts water-level altitudes and water-level changes since 1977 and compation since 1973 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers i the Houston-Galveston region, Texas.  

  17. Approximate water-level changes in wells completed in the Chichot and Evangeline aquifers, 1977-87 and 1986-87, and measured compaction, 1973-87, in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, James F.; Ranzau, C.E.; Lind, W.B.

    1987-01-01

    This report consists of: (1) four maps that present data on water level changes during 1977-87 and 1986-87 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, and in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas, and (2) one set of graphs and one map that present data on land subsidence caused by compaction of sub-surface materials for 1973-87. (USGS)

  18. Estimated land-surface subsidence in Harris County, Texas, 1915-17 to 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Gabrysch, Robert K.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2009-01-01

    Land-surface subsidence, or land subsidence, in Harris County, Texas, which encompasses much of the Houston area, has been occurring for decades. Land subsidence has increased the frequency and extent of flooding, damaged buildings and transportation infrastructure, and caused adverse environmental effects. The primary cause of land subsidence in the Houston area is withdrawal of groundwater, although extraction of oil and gas also has contributed. Throughout most of the 20th century, groundwater was the primary source of municipal, agricultural, and industrial water supply for Harris County. Currently (2009) a transition to surface water as the primary source of supply, guided by a groundwater regulatory plan developed by the Harris-Galveston Subsidence District (2001), is in effect. The aquifers in Harris County contain an abundant amount of potable groundwater, but they also contain layers of clay. Groundwater withdrawals caused compaction of the clay layers, which in turn resulted in the widespread, substantial land-surface subsidence that has occurred in the Houston area.

  19. 77 FR 1077 - Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee; Vacancies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ...The Coast Guard seeks applications for membership on the Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee (HOGANSAC). This Committee provides advice and makes recommendations to the Coast Guard on matters relating to the safe transit of vessels and products through Galveston Bay, and to and from the Ports of Galveston, Houston, Texas City, and Galveston...

  20. Characterization of streamflow, suspended sediment, and nutrients entering Galveston Bay from the Trinity River, Texas, May 2014–December 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucena, Zulimar; Lee, Michael T.

    2017-02-21

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board and the Galveston Bay Estuary Program, collected streamflow and water-quality data at USGS streamflow-gaging stations in the lower Trinity River watershed from May 2014 to December 2015 to characterize and improve the current understanding of the quantity and quality of freshwater inflow entering Galveston Bay from the Trinity River. Continuous streamflow records at four USGS streamflow-gaging stations were compared to quantify differences in streamflow magnitude between upstream and downstream reaches of the lower Trinity River. Water-quality conditions were characterized from discrete nutrient and sedi­ment samples collected over a range of hydrologic conditions at USGS streamflow-gaging station 08067252 Trinity River at Wallisville, Tex. (hereinafter referred to as the “Wallisville site”), approximately 4 river miles upstream from where the Trinity River enters Galveston Bay.Based on streamflow records, annual mean outflow from Livingston Dam into the lower Trinity River was 2,240 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) in 2014 and 22,400 ft3/s in 2015, the second lowest and the highest, respectively, during the entire period of record (1966–2015). During this study, only about 54 percent of the total volume measured at upstream sites was accounted for at the Wallisville site as the Trinity River enters Galveston Bay. This difference in water volumes between upstream sites and the Wallisville site indicates that at high flows a large part of the volume released from Lake Livingston does not reach Galveston Bay through the main channel of the Trinity River. These findings indicate that water likely flows into wetlands and water bodies surrounding the main channel of the Trinity River before reaching the Wallisville site and is being stored or discharged through other channels that flow directly into Galveston Bay.To characterize suspended-sediment concentrations and loads in

  1. The rationale for attempting to define salt marsh mosquito-breeding areas in Galveston County by remote sensing the associated vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arp, G. K.

    1975-01-01

    The rationale for attempting to define salt marsh mosquito breeding areas in Galveston County was discussed, including a botanical survey of the marsh plant communities, their relationship to flooding, and their exposure to salt water. Particular emphasis is given to Distichlis spicata, a widespread marsh grass. Evidence suggests that breeding areas of Aedes sollicitans are associated with Distichlis and that both species respond to similar ecological conditions in the salt marsh. Aspects of the remote sensing of the Distichlis are considered.

  2. Artesian water in Somervell County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fiedler, Albert George

    1934-01-01

    Somervell County is part of the Grand Prairie region of north-central Texas. An excellent supply of artesian water is available from the Trinity reservoir at no great depth. The first flowing well in Somervell County was drilled in 1880, and the first flowing well in Glen Rose, the county seat, was drilled in 1881. Since 1880 more than 500 wells have been constructed, probably more than half of them prior to 1900. Many of these early wells have been abandoned, either because the well hole caved in as a result of the absence or deterioration of casing or because the wells ceased to yield water by natural flow. The artesian water has always been used chiefly for domestic supply and for watering stock. Only a comparatively small area of farm land is now irrigated. The quantity used to supply the needs of tourist camps and outdoor swimming pools forms a relatively large percentage of the total amount withdrawn from the artesian reservoir in Somervell County. The artesian water is contained chiefly in the permeable sandstone beds--the basal sands for the Trinity group. Some shallow wells of small capacity are supplied by water in the crevices and solution channels in limestone that apparently is near the base of the Glen Rose formation and probably derives its water by leakage from the underlying Trinity reservoir. The wells encounter from one to three aquifers, the number depending upon their depth and location. At and around Glen Rose, the area in which most of the flowing wells are concentrated, the first aquifer is the creviced portion of the limestone, which is encountered at about 50 feet but does not everywhere yield water. The second and third aquifers, both of which are part of the 'basal sands' of the Trinity group, are much more uniform and persistent; the second is encountered at Glen Rose at depths of 100 to 135 feet, and the third at depths of about 275 to 330 feet. The artesian reservoir is supplied by water that falls as rain or snow upon the outcrop of

  3. Abstracts of the International Conference on Hypertonic Resuscitation (5th) Held in Galveston, Texas on 3-5 June 1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    Intracranial Hypertension: Mannitol us. Hypertonlc/Hyperoncotic Saline/ Dextran R. Harti (Munich, Germany): Hypertonic/Hyperoncotic Solutions in Traumatic...Hyperoncotic Saline Oextran (HHS: 7.2% NaCI/18% Dextran 66) Instantaneously Restores Gut Mucosal Blood Flow (BF). K. Kesel (Munich, Germany): Hypertonic...Hyperoncotic Resuscitation from Hemorrhagic Shock Effectively Improves Intramucosal Acidosis. C. Com (Galveston, U.S.A.): Hypertonic Saline- Dextran Does

  4. Water-level altitudes 2016 and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction 1973–2015 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Ramage, Jason K.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2016-10-07

    Most of the land-surface subsidence in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas, has occurred as a direct result of groundwater withdrawals for municipal supply, commercial and industrial use, and irrigation that depressured and dewatered the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, thereby causing compaction of the aquifer sediments, mostly in the fine-grained silt and clay layers. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Subsidence District, City of Houston, Fort Bend Subsidence District, Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District, and Brazoria County Groundwater Conservation District, is one in an annual series of reports depicting water-level altitudes and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and measured cumulative compaction of subsurface sediments in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region. The report contains regional-scale maps depicting approximate 2016 water-level altitudes (represented by measurements made during December 2015–March 2016) for the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers; maps depicting 1-year (2015–16) water-level changes for each aquifer; maps depicting approximate contoured 5-year (2011–16) water-level changes for each aquifer; maps depicting approximate contoured long-term (1990–2016 and 1977–2016) water-level changes for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers; a map depicting approximate contoured long-term (2000–16) water-level changes for the Jasper aquifer; a map depicting locations of borehole-extensometer sites; and graphs depicting measured long-term cumulative compaction of subsurface sediments at the extensometers during 1973–2015. Tables listing the water-level data used to construct each water-level map for each aquifer and the measured long-term cumulative compaction data for each extensometer site are included. Graphs depicting water-level measurement data also are included; these graphs can be used to approximate

  5. Water-level altitudes 2004 and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction 1973-2003 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Lanning-Rush, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    This report is one in an annual series of reports that depicts water-level altitudes and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers, and compaction in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region. The Houston-Galveston region comprises Harris, Galveston, Fort Bend, Waller, and Montgomery Counties and adjacent parts of Brazoria, Grimes, Walker, San Jacinto, Liberty, and Chambers Counties. The report was prepared in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, the City of Houston, the Fort Bend Subsidence District, and the Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District. For the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, maps show approximate water-level altitudes in 2004, water-level changes from 2003 to 2004, approximate water-level changes from 1977 to 2004, and approximate water-level changes from 1990 to 2004 (figs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8). For the Jasper aquifer, maps show approximate water-level altitudes in 2004 and water-level changes from 2003 to 2004 and 2000 to 2004 (figs. 9, 10, 11). The report also contains a map showing borehole extensometer (well equipped with compaction monitor) site locations (fig. 12) and graphs showing measured compaction of subsurface material at these sites from 1973 or later to 2003 (fig. 13). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has published annual reports of water-level altitudes and water-level changes for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region since 1979; and annual reports of same for the Fort Bend subregion (Fort Bend County and adjacent areas) since 1990. The USGS published its first water-level-altitude map for the Jasper aquifer in the greater Houston area (primarily Montgomery County) in 2001. The 2004 water-level-altitude and water-level-change maps for the three aquifers are included in this report.

  6. Water-level altitudes 2005 and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction 1973-2004 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Houston, Natalie A.

    2005-01-01

    This report is one in an annual series of reports that depicts water-level altitudes and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers, and compaction in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region. The Houston-Galveston region comprises Harris, Galveston, Fort Bend, Waller, and Montgomery Counties and adjacent parts of Brazoria, Grimes, Walker, San Jacinto, Liberty, and Chambers Counties. The report was prepared in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, the City of Houston, the Fort Bend Subsidence District, and the Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District. For the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, maps show approximate water-level altitudes in 2005, water-level changes from 2004 to 2005, and approximate water-level changes from 2000 to 2005, from 1990 to 2005, and from 1977 to 2005 (figs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10). For the Jasper aquifer, maps show approximate water-level altitudes in 2005 and water-level changes from 2004 to 2005 and 2000 to 2005 (figs. 11, 12, and 13). The report also contains a map showing borehole extensometer (well equipped with compaction monitor) site locations (fig. 14) and graphs showing measured compaction of subsurface material at these sites from 1973 or later to 2004 (fig. 15).The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has published annual reports of water-level altitudes and water-level changes for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region since 1979; and annual reports of same for the Fort Bend subregion (Fort Bend County and adjacent areas) since 1990. The USGS published its first water-level-altitude map for the Jasper aquifer in the greater Houston area (primarily Montgomery County) in 2001. The 2005 water-level-altitude and water-level-change maps for the three aquifers are included in this report.

  7. Water-level altitudes 2006 and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction 1973-2005 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Houston, Natalie A.; Brown, Dexter W.

    2006-01-01

    This report is one in an annual series of reports that depicts water-level altitudes and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers, and compaction in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region. The Houston-Galveston region comprises Harris, Galveston, Fort Bend, Waller, and Montgomery Counties and adjacent parts of Brazoria, Grimes, Walker, San Jacinto, Liberty, and Chambers Counties. The report was prepared in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, the City of Houston, the Fort Bend Subsidence District, and the Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District. For the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, maps show approximate water-level altitudes in 2006, water-level changes from 2005 to 2006, and approximate water-level changes from 2001 to 2006, from 1990 to 2006, and from 1977 to 2006 (figs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10). For the Jasper aquifer, maps show approximate water-level altitudes in 2006 and water-level changes from 2005 to 2006 and 2000 to 2006 (figs. 11, 12, 13). The report also contains a map showing borehole extensometer (well equipped with compaction monitor) site locations (fig. 14) and graphs showing measured compaction of subsurface material at these sites from 1973 or later to 2005 (fig. 15).The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has published annual reports of water-level altitudes and water-level changes for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region since 1979; and annual reports of same for the Fort Bend subregion (Fort Bend County and adjacent areas) since 1990. The USGS published its first water-level-altitude map for the Jasper aquifer in the greater Houston area (primarily Montgomery County) in 2001. The 2006 water-level-altitude and water-level-change maps for the three aquifers are included in this report.

  8. Water-level altitudes 2003 and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction 1973–2015 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, M.C.; Lanning-Rush, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    This report is one in an annual series of reports that depicts water-level altitudes and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers, and compaction in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region. The Houston-Galveston region comprises Harris, Galveston, Fort Bend, Waller, and Montgomery Counties and adjacent parts of Brazoria, Grimes, Walker, San Jacinto, Liberty, and Chambers Counties. The report was prepared in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, the City of Houston, and the Fort Bend Subsidence District. For the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, maps show approximate water-level altitudes in 2003, water-level changes from 2002 to 2003, approximate water-level changes from 1990 to 2003, approximate water-level changes from 1977 to 2003, and lines of zero water-level change for selected intervals beginning with 1977–82 (figs. 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8, 9-10). For the Jasper aquifer, maps show approximate water-level altitudes in 2003 and water-level changes from 2002 to 2003 and 2000 to 2003 (figs. 11,12, 13). The report also contains a map showing borehole extensometer (well equipped with compaction monitor) site locations (fig. 14) and graphs showing measured compaction of subsurface material at these sites from 1973 or later to 2002 (fig. 15).The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has published annual reports of water-level altitudes and water-level changes for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region since 1979; and annual reports of same for the Fort Bend subregion (Fort Bend County and adjacent areas) since 1990. The USGS published its first water-level-altitude map for the Jasper aquifer in the greater Houston area (primarily Montgomery County) in 2001. The 2003 altitude and change maps for the three aquifers are included in this report.

  9. Water-level altitudes 2002 and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction 1973-2001 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplin, L.S.; Lanning-Rush, Jennifer

    2002-01-01

    This report is one in an annual series of reports that depicts water-level altitudes and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers, and compaction in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region. The Houston-Galveston region comprises Harris, Galveston, Fort Bend, Waller, and Montgomery Counties and adjacent parts of Brazoria, Grimes, Walker, San Jacinto, Liberty, and Chambers Counties. The report was prepared in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, the City of Houston, and the Fort Bend Subsidence District. For the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, maps show approximate water-level altitudes in 2002, water-level changes from 2001 to 2002, approximate water-level changes from 1977 to 2002, lines of zero water-level change for intervals increasing in 5-year increments beginning with 1977–82, and approximate water-level changes from 1990 to 2002 (in the Fort Bend subregion [Fort Bend County and adjacent areas]) (figs. 1–10). For the Jasper aquifer, maps show approximate water-level altitudes in 2002 and water-level changes from 2001 to 2002 and 2000 to 2002 (figs. 11–13). The report also contains a map showing extensometer (well equipped with compaction monitor) site locations (fig. 14) and graphs showing measured compaction of subsurface material at selected sites from 1973 or later to 2001 (fig. 15). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has published annual reports of water-level altitudes and water-level changes for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region since 1979; and separate annual reports of same for the Fort Bend subregion since 1990. The USGS published its first water-level-altitude map for the Jasper aquifer in the greater Houston area (primarily Montgomery County) in 2001. This year (2002), the altitude and change maps for the three aquifers are in this report.

  10. Influence of water allocation and freshwater inflow on oyster production: a hydrodynamic-oyster population model for Galveston Bay, Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Powell, Eric N; Klinck, John M; Hofmann, Eileen E; McManus, Margaret A

    2003-01-01

    A hydrodynamic-oyster population model was developed to assess the effect of changes in freshwater inflow on oyster populations in Galveston Bay, Texas, USA. The population model includes the effects of environmental conditions, predators, and the oyster parasite, Perkinsus marinus, on oyster populations. The hydrodynamic model includes the effects of wind stress, river runoff, tides, and oceanic exchange on the circulation of the bay. Simulations were run for low, mean, and high freshwater inflow conditions under the present (1993) hydrology and predicted hydrologies for 2024 and 2049 that include both changes in total freshwater inflow and diversions of freshwater from one primary drainage basin to another. Freshwater diversion to supply the Houston metropolitan area is predicted to negatively impact oyster production in Galveston Bay. Fecundity and larval survivorship both decline. Mortality from Perkinsus marinus increases, but to a lesser extent. A larger negative impact in 2049 relative to 2024 originates from the larger drop in fecundity under that hydrology. Changes in recruitment and mortality, resulting in lowered oyster abundance, occur because the bay volume available for mixing freshwater input from the San Jacinto and Buffalo Bayou drainage basins that drain metropolitan Houston is small in comparison to the volume of Trinity Bay that presently receives the bulk of the bay's freshwater inflow. A smaller volume for mixing results in salinities that decline more rapidly and to a greater extent under conditions of high freshwater discharge.Thus, the decline in oyster abundance results from a disequilibrium between geography and salinity brought about by freshwater diversion. Although the bay hydrology shifts, available hard substrate does not. The simulations stress the fact that it is not just the well-appreciated reduction in freshwater inflow that can result in decreased oyster production. Changing the location of freshwater inflow can also

  11. 76 FR 65775 - Environmental Impact Statement: Harris County, Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... proposed North Houston Highway Improvement Project, in Harris County, Texas. The proposed project and study...: The North-Hardy Planning Studies: Alternative Analysis Report (Highway Component) was completed in November 2005. The report evaluated the alternatives for transportation improvements within the...

  12. Seepage investigations of Noyes Canal, Menard County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yost, Ivan Dale

    1953-01-01

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service, and the Menard Irrigation Company, a seepage investigation was made on Noyes Canal (Menard Irrigation Company Canal) in Menard County, Texas, from the headgates of the canal to where the canal empties back into the San Saba River.

  13. Reflectance of vegetation, soil, and water. [Hidalgo County, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The majority of the rangelands of Hidalgo County, Texas are used in cow-calf operations. Continuous year-long grazing is practiced on about 60% of the acreage and some type of deferred system on the rest. Mechanical brush control is used more than chemical control. Ground surveys gave representative estimates for 15 vegetable crops produced in Hidalgo County. ERTS-1 data were used to estimate the acreage of citrus in the county. Combined Kubleka Munk and regression models, that included a term for shadow areas, gave a higher correlation of composite canopy reflectance with ground truth than either model alone.

  14. Biomarker sensitivity for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in two marine fish species collected in Galveston Bay, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Willett, K.L.; Steinberg, M.A.; Safe, S.H.; McDonald, S.J.; Beatty, K.B.; Kennicutt, M.C.

    1997-07-01

    The Galveston Bay estuary exhibited a contamination gradient for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, and the comparative sensitivity of various biomarkers in fish from different bay locations were determined. Two fish species, hardhead catfish (Arius felis) and Atlantic croaker (Micropogon undulatus), were collected from four stations where sediment total PAHs ranged from 68 > 1,000 ng/g. The induction of cytochrome P4501A-(CYP1A)-dependent hepatic ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, CYPIA mRNA levels, or CYPIA immunoreactive protein in hardhead catfish was highly variable in the field-collected fish and in fish dosed with up to 15 mg/kg benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). In contrast, significant differences were seen in biliary concentrations of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and BaP metabolites in hardhead catfish from polluted versus less polluted areas. In croakers taken from the same four Galveston Bay locations, EROD and glutathione S-transferase activities, immunoreactive CYP1A protein, biliary PAH metabolites, and PAH-DNA adducts were higher at the contaminated stations compared with less polluted locations. These studies suggest that the croaker is a good species for monitoring contaminants that induce CYP1A-mediated responses. Biliary PAH metabolites and PAH-DNA adducts were also sensitive indicators of exposure to PAH contamination in both species of fish.

  15. Famous Citizens of Panola County Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, Amy; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Created by Gary (Texas) High School students, this publication presents articles about Tex Ritter and Audie Hestilow. The first article, "Tex Ritter's Early Days," provides information on the early life of Tex Ritter gathered through an interview with Earl Cariker, a biographer of Tex Ritter, and through newspaper articles. Earl Cariker…

  16. Environmental assessment overview, Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. 3 figs.

  17. Description of floodplains and wetlands, Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    Floodplains and wetlands are important features of the Texas Panhandle landscape, and are found on the Deaf Smith County site and in its vicinity. Use or disturbance of floodplains and wetlands in relation to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is subject to environmental review requirements implementing two Executive Orders. This report provides general information on playa wetlands in the Texas Panhandle, and describes and maps floodplains and wetlands on the Deaf Smith site and in its vicinity. The report is based on the published literature, with information from limited field reconnaissance included.

  18. Environmental assessment, Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 USC sections 10101-10226) requires the environmental assessment of a proposed site to include a statement of the basis for nominating a site as suitable for characterization. Volume 2 provides a detailed statement evaluating the site suitability of the Deaf Smith County Site under DOE siting guidelines, as well as a comparison of the Deaf Smith County Site to the other sites under consideration. The evaluation of the Deaf Smith County Site is based on the impacts associated with the reference repository design, but the evaluation will not change if based on the Mission Plan repository concept. The second part of this document compares the Deaf Smith County Site to Davis Canyon, Hanford, Richton Dome and Yucca Mountain. This comparison is required under DOE guidelines and is not intended to directly support subsequent recommendation of three sites for characterization as candidate sites. 259 refs., 29 figs., 66 refs. (MHB)

  19. Geology and ground-water resources of Duval County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sayre, Albert Nelson

    1937-01-01

    Duval County is situated in southern Texas, 100 to 150 miles south of San Antonio and about midway between Corpus Christi, on the Gulf of Mexico, and Laredo, on the Rio Grande. The county lies on the Coastal Plain, which for the most part is low and relatively featureless. Between the Nueces River and the Rio Grande in this part of Texas the plain is interrupted by an erosion remnant, the Reynosa Plateau, which reaches a maximum altitude of nearly 1,000 feet above sea level and stands well above the areas to the east and west. The Reynosa Plateau includes most of Duval County and parts of Webb, Zapata, Starr, Jim Hogg, Jim Wells, McMullen, and Live Oak Counties. In Duval County the plateau is bounded on the west by the westward-facing Bordas escarpment, 75 to 150 feet high, which crosses the county with a southwesterly trend from about the middle of the north boundary to about the middle of the west boundary. On the east the plateau is bounded by a low seaward-facing escarpment, which passes through San Diego, trending a little west of south.

  20. Wetland plant communities, Galveston Bay system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    White, W.A.; Paine, J.G.

    1992-03-01

    The report is the culmination of a field investigation of wetland plant communities, and is one phase of the project, Trends and Status of Wetland and Aquatic Habitats of the Galveston Bay System, Texas, sponsored by the Galveston Bay National Estuary Program. For purpose of the topical report, wetlands are defined and classified in terms of more classical definitions, for example, salt, brackish, and fresh marshes, in accordance with project requirements. More than 150 sites were examined in the Galveston Bay system.

  1. Hepatitis C Virus Genotype and Subtype Distribution in Patient Specimens Tested at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Between January 2011 and November 2014.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan; Garza, Gregorio; Dong, Jianli

    2016-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype/subtype data are routinely generated in clinical laboratories to guide treatment. Genotype data can also inform genotype distribution and molecular epidemiology of HCV infections in patient populations and geographical regions that clinics/laboratories serve. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of HCV genotypes/subtypes and their association with demographic characteristics among the patients that were routinely tested in the Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory at The University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) at Galveston. Among the 6573 patients tested between January 2011 and November 2014, the most frequent HCV genotype/subtype was 1a (65.3%), followed by 3a (11.5%), 1b (10.4%), and 2b (8.8%). Combined, genotype 4 and genotype 6 were found in less than 1% of this cohort. Approximately 1.3% of the patients presented multiple genotypes/subtypes. Factors independently associated with genotypes and subtypes were race/ethnicity, sex, and patient age.

  2. Archaeological Survey of the Lewisville Lake Shoreline, Denton County, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    within an abandoned park that has a boat ramp, sandy ridges paralleling the Elm Fork proximal to the outhouse, concrete grills, and picnic tables...County in 1851 and settled at New Al---. This town boats sporadically serviced early settlements on the was located a short distance down Hickory...Missouri, Kansas, and Texas railroad tracks. It Is Lewisville Lake Park. A boat ramp occurs 2 m west of situated at the head of a steep draw at a point

  3. Ground water geology of Edwards County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, Archie T.

    1963-01-01

    About 150,000 acre-feet of water is recharged annually to and discharged from the Edwards and associated limestones in Edwards County. Most of this water is available for additional development inasmuch as only about 900 acre-feet per year is currently being used; however, additional development of ground water will result in a reduction in streamflow.

  4. Water-level altitudes 2010 and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction 1973-2009 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Ramage, Jason K.

    2010-01-01

    Most of the subsidence in the Houston-Galveston region has occurred as a direct result of groundwater withdrawals for municipal supply, industrial use, and irrigation that depressured and dewatered the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers causing compaction of the clay layers of the aquifer sediments. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Subsidence District, City of Houston, Fort Bend Subsidence District, and Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District, is one in an annual series of reports depicting water-level altitudes and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region. The report contains maps showing 2010 water-level altitudes for the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers, respectively; maps showing 1-year (2009-10) water-level-altitude changes for each aquifer; maps showing 5-year (2005-10) water-level-altitude changes for each aquifer; maps showing long-term (1990-2010 and 1977-2010) water-level-altitude changes for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers; a map showing long-term (2000-10) water-level-altitude change for the Jasper aquifer; a map showing locations of borehole extensometer sites; and graphs showing measured compaction of subsurface material at the extensometers from 1973, or later, through 2009. Tables listing the data used to construct each aquifer-data map and the compaction graphs are included. Water levels in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers were measured during December 2009-March 2010. In 2010, water-level-altitude contours for the Chicot aquifer ranged from 200 feet below National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 or North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (hereinafter, datum) in a small area in southwestern Harris County to 200 feet above datum in central to southwestern Montgomery County. Water-level-altitude changes in the Chicot aquifer ranged from a 49-foot decline to a 67

  5. Water-level altitudes 2011 and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction 1973-2010 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Michaela R.; Ramage, Jason K.; Kasmarek, Mark C.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the subsidence in the Houston–Galveston region has occurred as a direct result of groundwater withdrawals for municipal supply, industrial use, and irrigation that depressured and dewatered the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers causing compaction of the clay layers of the aquifer sediments. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Harris–Galveston Subsidence District, City of Houston, Fort Bend Subsidence District, and Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District, is one in an annual series of reports depicting water-level altitudes and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston–Galveston region. The report contains maps showing 2011 water-level altitudes for the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers; maps showing 1-year (2010–11) water-level-altitude changes for each aquifer; maps showing 5-year (2006–11) water-level-altitude changes for each aquifer; maps showing long-term (1990–2011 and 1977–2011) water-level-altitude changes for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers; a map showing long-term (2000–11) water-level-altitude change for the Jasper aquifer; a map showing locations of borehole extensometer sites; and graphs showing measured compaction of subsurface material at the extensometers from 1973, or later, through 2010. Tables listing the data used to construct each aquifer-data map and the compaction graphs are included.Water levels in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers were measured during December 2010–February 2011. In 2011, water-level-altitude contours for the Chicot aquifer ranged from 200 feet below North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (hereinafter, datum) in a small area in southwestern Harris County to 200 feet above datum in central to southwestern Montgomery County. Water-level-altitude changes in the Chicot aquifer ranged from a 40-foot decline to a 33-foot rise (2010–11), from a 10-foot

  6. Active faults in southeastern Harris County, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clanton, U. S.; Amsbury, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Aerial color infrared photography was used to investigate active faults in a complex graben in southeastern Harris County, Tex. The graben extends east-west across an oil field and an interstate highway through Ellington Air Force Base (EAFB), into the Clear Lake oil field and on to LaPorte, Tex. It was shown that the fault pattern at EAFB indicates an appreciable horizontal component associated with the failure of buildings, streets, and runways. Another fault system appears to control the shoreline configuration of Clear Lake, with some of the faults associated with tectonic movements and the production of oil and gas, but many related to extensive ground water withdrawal.

  7. Tarrant County College District in Texas Receives EPA Job-Training Grant

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (May 27, 2015) - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that the Tarrant County College District in Tarrant County, Texas, received one of 19 grants for Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training (EWDJT) grants.

  8. A COMPARISON OF THE SALINITY REGIME ALONG THE TEXAS COAST WITH TERRESTRIAL VEGETATION GREENNESS AND WATER USE IN THE GALVESTON BAY WATERSHED USING REMOTING SENSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variability in vegetation greenness was determined for the Galveston Bay watershed using biweekly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (A VHRR) flown on NOAA satellites. NDVI variability was compared with reg...

  9. Houston area multicrop inspection trips. [Wharton County, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, E. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The phenology of crops such as corn, cotton, soybeans, sorghum, sunflowers, and rice and their observed signatures on LANDSAT imagery was studied. This was accomplished by photographing the various crops in segments 275 and 276 located in Wharton County, Texas and comparing those photographs with LANDSAT imagery of the same dates. These comparisons gave insight as to why a particular crop growth stage appeared as a definite signature on LANDSAT and how the percentage of ground cover of various crops affected the signatures on LANDSAT imagery. Numerous crop growth stages could not be directly compared due to cloud cover during several LANDSAT overpasses.

  10. Ground-water resources of Coke County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Clyde A.

    1973-01-01

    Coke County, located in semiarid west-central Texas, where large ranches, small farms, and oil production are the main bases of the economy, has a small supply of ground and surface water. Of the approximately 1,900 acre-feet of fresh to moderately saline ground water used in 1968, industry used 880 acre-feet, irrigation used 210 acre-feet, and domestic supply and livestock used 820 acre-feet. All of the water for municipal supply and some of the water for industry is obtained from surface-water reservoirs.

  11. Trends in selected streamflow statistics at 19 long-term streamflow-gaging stations indicative of outflows from Texas to Arkansas, Louisiana, Galveston Bay, and the Gulf of Mexico, 1922-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbie, Dana L.; Wehmeyer, Loren L.

    2012-01-01

    Trends in selected streamflow statistics during 1922-2009 were evaluated at 19 long-term streamflow-gaging stations considered indicative of outflows from Texas to Arkansas, Louisiana, Galveston Bay, and the Gulf of Mexico. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board, evaluated streamflow data from streamflow-gaging stations with more than 50 years of record that were active as of 2009. The outflows into Arkansas and Louisiana were represented by 3 streamflow-gaging stations, and outflows into the Gulf of Mexico, including Galveston Bay, were represented by 16 streamflow-gaging stations. Monotonic trend analyses were done using the following three streamflow statistics generated from daily mean values of streamflow: (1) annual mean daily discharge, (2) annual maximum daily discharge, and (3) annual minimum daily discharge. The trend analyses were based on the nonparametric Kendall's Tau test, which is useful for the detection of monotonic upward or downward trends with time. A total of 69 trend analyses by Kendall's Tau were computed - 19 periods of streamflow multiplied by the 3 streamflow statistics plus 12 additional trend analyses because the periods of record for 2 streamflow-gaging stations were divided into periods representing pre- and post-reservoir impoundment. Unless otherwise described, each trend analysis used the entire period of record for each streamflow-gaging station. The monotonic trend analysis detected 11 statistically significant downward trends, 37 instances of no trend, and 21 statistically significant upward trends. One general region studied, which seemingly has relatively more upward trends for many of the streamflow statistics analyzed, includes the rivers and associated creeks and bayous to Galveston Bay in the Houston metropolitan area. Lastly, the most western river basins considered (the Nueces and Rio Grande) had statistically significant downward trends for many of the streamflow statistics

  12. Geologic map of the Cienega School Quadrangle, Otero County, New Mexico and Hudspeth County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neill, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Title:Geologic map of the Cienega School quadrangle, Otero County, New Mexico, and Hudspeth County, TexasAuthor(s): O'Neill, J.M.Publishing Organization: U.S. Geological SurveySeries and Number: Miscellaneous Geologic Investigations Map I-2630Publication Date: 1998Map Scale: 1:24,000Cross Section: NoneNorth Latitude: 32° 7' 30" N (32.1250)South Latitude: 32° 0' 0" N (32.0000)East Longitude: 105° 0' 0" W (-105.0000)West Longitude: 105° 7' 30" W (-105.1250)

  13. A new genus and species of cyclocoelid from the black-necked stilt, Himantopus mexicanus (Recurvirostridae), from Galveston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Dronen, Norman O; Blend, Charles K

    2005-02-01

    Two black-necked stilts, Himantopus mexicanus (Recurvirostridae), from the Texas Gulf coast, died while in the care of bird rehabilitators and were found to be infected with Neoallopyge americanensis n. gen., n. sp. Neoallopyge n. gen. (Digenea: Cyclocoelidae) differs from Allopyge in having the testes situated some distance from the posterior extremity, 2 uterine loops on each side extensively invading the space posterior to the testes, no intertesticular uterine loops, and it is a parasite of Recurvirostridae in the western hemisphere rather than Gruidae from the Old World. The new species is unlike Allopyge antigones, Allopyge ominosus, and Allopyge undulatus in having the genital pore located anterior to the cecal bifurcation rather than posterior to it, and it is unlike A. ominosus and A. undulatus, where the uterus is entirely intercecal in having the uterine loops extending laterally, reaching the body wall on both sides. The new species further differs from A. antigones, A. ominosus, and Allopyge skrjabini in having larger eggs (148 [140-155] microm by 55 [45-63] microm compared with 95 by 55 microm, 65-80 by 40-46 microm, 119-124 by 55-66 microm, respectively), and it differs from Allopyge adolphi and A. undulatus in having narrower eggs (154 by 75 microm, 144 by 86 microm, respectively).

  14. Hydrogeologic characterization of the Brazos River Alluvium Aquifer, Bosque County to Fort Bend County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shah, Sachin D.; Houston, Natalie A.; Braun, Christopher L.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Brazos River alluvium aquifer underlies the Brazos River in Texas from Bosque County to Fort Bend County. The aquifer, one of 21 minor aquifers in the State, supplies water for irrigation, domestic, stock, and commercial use. The Brazos River alluvium aquifer likely will become more important in the future as demand for water increases statewide. A thorough understanding of the hydrogeology of the alluvium aquifer will be the foundation for future studies in the area. During October 2006-April 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board, conducted a study to delineate the altitude of the top, altitude of the base, and thickness of the Brazos River alluvium aquifer, and to compile and summarize available hydraulic property (specific capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity) data. A digital elevation model was used as the altitude of the top of the aquifer. The altitude of the base of the aquifer was generated using data from wells. The study area encompasses the Brazos River alluvium aquifer in parts of Bosque, Hill, McLennan, Falls, Robertson, Milam, Brazos, Burleson, Grimes, Washington, Waller, Austin, and Fort Bend Counties and a 1.5-mile-wide lateral buffer adjacent to the aquifer. The results of this study will be used by the Texas Water Development Board for input into a ground-water availability model.

  15. Environment of deposition of Clear Fork Formation: Yoakum County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.K.

    1987-05-01

    The Clear Fork Formation is Permian (Leonardian) in age and constitutes a major oil-bearing unit in the Permian basin of west Texas. In Yoakum County, west Texas, the upper Clear Fork carbonates record a subtidal upward-shoaling sequence of deposition. A small bryozoan-algal patch reef is situated within these carbonates near the southern edge of the North Basin platform. The reef is completely dolomitized, but paramorphic replacement has facilitated a study of the paleoecology, lateral variations, and community succession within this buildup. Build-ups of this type are scarcely known in strata of Permian age. The reef was apparently founded on a coquina horizon at the base of the buildup. The reef apparently had a low-relief, dome-shaped morphology. The trapping and binding of sediment by bryozoa appear to have been the main constructional process. A significant role was also played by encrusting forams and the early precipitation of submarine cements, both of which added rigidity to the structure. The reef also contains a low-diversity community of other invertebrates. Algal constituents predominate at the basinward edge of the buildup. The reef was formed entirely subaqueously on a broad, relatively shallow tropical marine carbonate shelf environment. An understanding of the lithofacies distribution and paragenesis within this sequence will provide information on porosity variations and the nature and distribution of permeability barriers. Such information is useful in reservoir modeling studies and for secondary recovery techniques in shelf-edge carbonate reservoirs of this type.

  16. Water-level altitudes 2008 and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper Aquifers and compaction 1973-2007 in the Chicot and Evangeline Aquifers, Houston-Galveston Region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Houston, Natalie A.

    2008-01-01

    This report, done in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Subsidence District, the City of Houston, the Fort Bend Subsidence District, and the Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District, is one in an annual series of reports that depicts water-level altitudes and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers, and compaction in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas. The report contains 17 sheets and 16 tables: 3 sheets are maps showing current-year (2008) water-level altitudes for each aquifer, respectively; 3 sheets are maps showing 1-year (2007-08) water-level changes for each aquifer, respectively; 3 sheets are maps showing 5-year (2003-08) water-level changes for each aquifer, respectively; 4 sheets are maps showing long-term (1990-2008 and 1977-2008) water-level changes for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, respectively; 1 sheet is a map showing long-term (2000-2008) water-level change for the Jasper aquifer; 1 sheet is a revision of a previously published water-level-altitude map for the Jasper aquifer for 2003; 1 sheet is a map showing site locations of borehole extensometers; and 1 sheet comprises graphs showing measured compaction of subsurface material at the sites from 1973 or later through 2007, respectively. Tables listing the data used to construct the aquifer-data maps and the compaction graphs are included.

  17. Water-level altitudes 2007 and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper Aquifers and compaction 1973-2006 in the Chicot and Evangeline Aquifers, Houston-Galveston Region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Houston, Natalie A.

    2007-01-01

    This report, done in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Subsidence District, the City of Houston, the Fort Bend Subsidence District, and the Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District, is one in an annual series of reports that depicts water-level altitudes and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers, and compaction in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston, Texas, region. The report contains 18 sheets and 17 tables: 3 sheets are maps showing current-year (2007) water-level altitudes for each aquifer, respectively; 3 sheets are maps showing 1-year (2006-07) water-level changes for each aquifer, respectively; 3 sheets are maps showing 5-year (2002-07) water-level changes for each aquifer, respectively; 4 sheets are maps showing long-term (1990-2007 and 1977-2007) water-level changes for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, respectively; 1 sheet is a map showing long-term (2000-2007) water-level change for the Jasper aquifer; 2 sheets are revisions of previously published water-level-altitude maps for the Jasper aquifer for 2000 and 2002, respectively; 1 sheet is a map showing site locations of borehole extensometers; and 1 sheet comprises graphs showing measured compaction of subsurface material at the sites from 1973 or later through 2006, respectively. Tables listing the data used to construct the aquifer-data maps and the compaction graphs also are included.

  18. Water-level altitudes 2009 and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper Aquifers and compaction 1973-2008 in the Chicot and Evangeline Aquifers, Houston-Galveston Region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Houston, Natalie A.; Ramage, Jason K.

    2009-01-01

    This report, done in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Subsidence District, the City of Houston, the Fort Bend Subsidence District, and the Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District, is one in an annual series of reports that depicts water-level altitudes and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers, and compaction in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas. The report (excluding appendixes) contains 16 sheets and 15 tables: 3 sheets are maps showing current-year (2009) water-level altitudes for each aquifer, respectively; 3 sheets are maps showing 1-year (2008-09) water-level changes for each aquifer, respectively; 3 sheets are maps showing 5-year (2004-09) water-level changes for each aquifer, respectively; 4 sheets are maps showing long-term (1990-2009 and 1977-2009) water-level changes for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, respectively; 1 sheet is a map showing long-term (2000-2009) water-level change for the Jasper aquifer; 1 sheet is a map showing site locations of borehole extensometers; and 1 sheet comprises graphs showing measured compaction of subsurface material at the sites from 1973 or later through 2008, respectively. Tables listing the data used to construct the aquifer-data maps and the compaction graphs are included.

  19. Spatial and temporal variation in carbon deposition in a Galveston, Texas salt marsh: The role of elevation and relative sea level history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulawardhana, R. W.; Feagin, R. A.; Popescu, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Coastal wetlands, including salt marshes, are considered to be large carbon sinks. Yet, there is little knowledge about how the terrain and land cover of these environments are related to carbon distribution. An understanding of the spatial and temporal patterns of carbon held in both the biomass and soil, and the factors that influence its distribution, will be necessary to allow coastal managers to initiate and verify 'Blue Carbon' projects. Through the use of extensive field sampling and remote sensing data (lidar and aerial images), we sought to map and explain how vegetation biomass and soil carbon are related to elevation and relative sea level change in a Spartina alterniflora dominated salt marsh in Galveston, Texas. The specific objectives of this study were to: 1) understand the relationship between elevation and the distribution of salt marsh vegetation percent cover, plant height, plant density, above-ground biomass, and root biomass; and 2) understand the relationship between elevation and patterns of soil carbon across different depths of the soil profile; and 3) to evaluate how relative water level governs the spatial and temporal variability of salt marsh carbon. Our results indicate a clear zonation of vegetation as a function of terrain. Plant height, culm/ stem height and the percent cover measurements showed significant differences (p=0.05) across three elevation zones defined as 0- 30cm, 30-40cm, and >40cm. Live biomass, plant height, and culm height decreased as elevation increased, while plant density followed the opposite pattern. Dead biomass accumulation increased with increasing elevation. Soil carbon was measured in the soil profile, revealing a gradual depletion of soil carbon with depth. However, both the soil bulk density and the percent carbon indicated an abrupt and significant change at a depth of 15cm (p=0.05), which we interpreted as distinct of two different environments. As evidenced by historical aerial imagery (1954, 1969

  20. Remedial Design-Stage Optimization Review Report: Sandy Beach Ground Water Plume Superfund Site, Tarrant County, Texas, EPA Region 6

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Sandy Beach Road Ground Water Plume Superfund Site, CERCLIS ID No. TXN000605649, is located within incorporated areas of Pelican Bay and Azle, Texas and an unincorporated portion of Tarrant County, Texas.

  1. Soil, water, and vegetation conditions in south Texas. [Hildago County, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. To distinguish dead from live vegetation, spectrophotometrically measured infinite reflectance of dead and live corn (Zea mays L.) leaves were compared over the 0.5 to 2.5 micron waveband. Dead leaf reflectance was reached over the entire 0.5 to 2.5 micron waveband by stacking only two to three leaves. Live leaf reflectance was attained by stacking two leaves for the 0.5 to 0.75 micron waveband (chlorophyll absorption region), eight leaves for the 0.75 to 1.35 micron waveband (near infrared region), and three leaves for the 1.35 to 2.5 micron waveband (water absorption region). LANDSAT-1 MSS digital data for 11 December 1973 overpass were used to estimate the sugar cane acreage in Hidalgo County. The computer aided estimate was 22,100 acres compared with the Texas Crop and Livestock Reporting Service estimate of 20,500 acres for the 1973-'74 crop year. Although there were errors of omission from harvested fields that were identified as bare soil and some citrus and native vegetation that were mistakenly identified as sugar cane, the mapped location of sugar cane fields in the county compared favorably with their location on the thematic map generated by the computer.

  2. Association between sudden death in infancy and co-sleeping: a look at investigative methods for Galveston County Medical Examiners Office from 1978-2002.

    PubMed

    Perrizo, Karla; Pustilnik, Stephen

    2006-06-01

    Our retrospective case review from 1978-2002, of infant deaths autopsied under the auspices of the Galveston County Medical Examiner Office, demonstrated a lack of detailed scene investigation, including sleeping circumstances and arrangements, as well as a pattern of ascribing the cause of death to SIDS even when there is evidence of a hazardous sleeping arrangement. During this period, 89/103 pediatric deaths were certified as SIDS and 39/103 of these were co-sleeping, 51/103 were sleeping alone, and 17/103 had no sleeping arrangement indicated. Upon review, there were only 6 cases where the scene visitation was documented. Only 9 cases used an Infant Death Investigation Form (IDIF), and this only started in 1999. The IDIF contains questions regarding the infants' sleep environment (bedding descriptions, co-sleeping, sleep surface) not used in the standard medical examiner death investigative forms. There has been an upward trend since the late 1990s in the number of scenes visited and detailed descriptions of the scenes, likely due to the increased awareness of hazardous infant sleeping conditions identified by American Academy of Pediatrics and U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. The association between co-sleeping and sudden infant death remains controversial among clinicians. We report a high association between these two conditions.

  3. The Galveston Approach to Health Care Education: Core Year Acts as Screening Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, J. Laurence

    1974-01-01

    The Galveston plan implemented by the University of Texas Medical Branch School of Allied Health Sciences and Galveston College provides academic and clinical experience for the health care worker. The plan utilizes the core approach in instruction for its cooperative program. (DS)

  4. Vulnerability of ground water to contamination, northern Bexar County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Amy R.

    2003-01-01

    The Trinity aquifer, composed of Lower Cretaceous carbonate rocks, largely controls the ground-water hydrology in the study area of northern Bexar County, Texas. Discharge from the Trinity aquifer recharges the downgradient, hydraulically connected Edwards aquifer one of the most permeable and productive aquifers in the Nation and the sole source of water for more than a million people in south-central Texas. The unconfined, karstic outcrop of the Edwards aquifer makes it particularly vulnerable to contamination resulting from urbanization that is spreading rapidly northward across an "environmentally sensitive" recharge zone of the Edwards aquifer and its upgradient "catchment area," composed mostly of the less permeable Trinity aquifer.A better understanding of the Trinity aquifer is needed to evaluate water-management decisions affecting the quality of water in both the Trinity and Edwards aquifers. A study was made, therefore, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System to assess northern Bexar County's vulnerability to ground-water contamination. The vulnerability of ground water to contamination in this area varies with the effects of five categories of natural features (hydrogeologic units, faults, caves and (or) sinkholes, slopes, and soils) that occur on the outcrop and in the shallow subcrop of the Glen Rose Limestone.Where faults affect the rates of recharge or discharge or the patterns of ground-water flow in the Glen Rose Limestone, they likewise affect the risk of water-quality degradation. Caves and sinkholes generally increase the vulnerability of ground water to contamination, especially where their occurrences are concentrated. The slope of land surface can affect the vulnerability of ground water by controlling where and how long a potential contaminant remains on the surface. Disregarding the exception of steep slopes which are assumed to have no soil cover the greater the slope, the less the risk of ground-water contamination. Because most

  5. Investigation of land subsidence in the Houston-Galveston region of Texas by using the Global Positioning System and interferometric synthetic aperture radar, 1993-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bawden, Gerald W.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Kasmarek, Mark C.; Brandt, Justin; Middleton, Clifton S.

    2012-01-01

    The interferograms show that the area of historical subsidence in downtown Houston along the Houston Ship Channel has stabilized and that recent subsidence occurs farther west and north of Galveston Bay. Three areas of recent subsidence were delineated along a broad arcuate (bowshaped) feature from Spring, Tex., southwest to Cypress, Tex., and south to Sugar Land, Tex., with subsidence rates ranging from 15 millimeters per year (mm/yr) to greater than 60 mm/yr. Multiyear interferograms near Seabrook, Tex., within the historical subsidence area and nearby Galveston Bay, show several fringes of subsidence (approximately 85 millimeters from January 1996 to December 1997) in the area; however it is difficult to determine the subsidence magnitude near Seabrook because many of the InSAR fringes were truncated or ill-defined. Horizontal and vertical GPS data throughout the area support the InSAR measured subsidence rates and extent. The subsidence rates for a few GPS stations northwest of Houston began to decrease in 2007, which may indicate that subsidence may be decreasing in these areas.

  6. Nutrition in burns: Galveston contributions.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Noe A; Jeschke, Marc G; Williams, Felicia N; Kamolz, Lars-Peter; Herndon, David N

    2011-11-01

    Aggressive nutrition support is recommended following severe burn injury. Initially, such injury results in a prolonged and persistent hypermetabolic response mediated by a 10- to 20-fold elevation in plasma catecholamines, cortisol, and inflammatory mediators. This response leads to twice-normal metabolic rates, whole-body catabolism, muscle wasting, and severe cachexia. Thus, it is relevant to review the literature on nutrition in burns to adjust/update treatment. Failure to meet the increased substrate requirements may result in impaired wound healing, multiorgan dysfunction, increased susceptibility to infection, and death. Therefore, aggressive nutrition support is essential to ensure adequate burn care, attenuate the hypermetabolic response, optimize wound healing, minimize devastating catabolism, and reduce morbidity and mortality. Here, the authors provide nutrition recommendations gained from prospective trials, retrospective analyses, and expert opinions based on the authors' practices in Galveston, Texas, and Vienna, Austria.

  7. Widespread Distribution of Dehalococcoides mccartyi in the Houston Ship Channel and Galveston Bay, Texas, Sediments and the Potential for Reductive Dechlorination of PCDD/F in an Estuarine Environment.

    PubMed

    Hieke, Anne-Sophie Charlotte; Brinkmeyer, Robin; Yeager, Kevin M; Schindler, Kimberly; Zhang, Saijin; Xu, Chen; Louchouarn, Patrick; Santschi, Peter H

    2016-12-01

    Sediments in the Houston Ship Channel and upper Galveston Bay, Texas, USA, are polluted with polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/F; ≤46,000 ng/kg dry weight (wt.)) with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most toxic congener, contributing >50 % of the total toxic equivalents (TEQ) at most locations. We measured PCDD/F concentrations in sediments and evaluated the potential for enhanced in situ biodegradation by surveying for Dehalococcoides mccartyi, an obligate organohalide respiring bacterium. Dehalococcoides spp. (98 % similar to D. mccartyi) and 22 other members of the class Dehalococcoidia were predominant 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) phylotypes. Dehalococcoides spp. were also present in the active fraction of the bacterial community. Presence/absence PCR screening detected D. mccartyi in sediment cores and sediment grab samples having at least 1 ng/kg dry wt. TEQ at salinities ranging from 0.6 to 19.5 PSU, indicating that they are widespread in the estuarine environment. Organic carbon-only and organic carbon + sulfate-amended sediment microcosm experiments resulted in ∼60 % reduction of ambient 2,3,7,8-TCDD in just 24 months leading to reductions in total TEQs by 38.4 and 45.0 %, respectively, indicating that 2,3,7,8-TCDD degradation is occurring at appreciable rates.

  8. Beneficial Uses of Dredged Material. Proceedings of the Gulf Coast Regional Workshop Held on 26-28 April 1988 in Galveston, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    East Africa I. Status, Morphology and Distributions," Investigation Report No. 35, South African Association for Marine Biological Research, Durban...Hanley K. Smith .......................... 143 Environmental Assessment of Dredged Material Disposal on Grazing Lands at East Matagorda Bay, Texas...Texas Environmental Coalition, PO Box 2859, South Padre Island, TX 78597 (512-761-4635) BRADLEY, Paul, USAED, Mobile District, 109 St. Joseph St., Rm

  9. Reaction of sorghum hybrids to anthracnose, grain mold and grain weathering in Burleson County, Texas, 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty commercial hybrids were evaluated for resistance against anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum sublineolum and grain mold or grain weathering caused by a number of fungal species at the Texas A&M University Agricultural Experiment Station in College Station (Burleson County). Six hybrids wer...

  10. Effect of fungicides on sorghum anthracnose and grain mold in Burleson County, Texas, 2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The experiment was conducted at the Texas A&M AgriLife Experiment Station near College Station (Burleson County), using the hybrids BH3822 and BH 5566. The seed was planted 10 Apr in a Belk clay soil. There were four replicates per treatment arranged in a randomized, blocked factorial design. Tre...

  11. Forest statistics for east Texas counties, 1992. Forest Service Resource Bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.E.; Hartsell, A.J.

    1992-12-01

    The report contains statistical tables and figures derived from data obtained during a recent inventory of east Texas. The multiresource inventory included 43 counties and two survey regions. Classification of forest-nonforest points was accomplished, each representing approximately 230 acres. The sampling methods are designed to achieve suitable sampling errors for estimates of area and volume at the State level.

  12. Forest statistics for northeast texas counties, 1992. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.F.; Miller, P.E.; Hartsell, A.J.

    1992-11-01

    Tabulated results were derived from data obtained during a 1992 forest inventory of northeast Texas counties. Core tables are compatible among Forest Inventory and Analysis units in the Eastern United States. Supplemental tables provide information beyond that provided by the core tables. Comparisons are made between results of the 1992 inventory and previous inventories conducted in 1986 and 1975.

  13. 78 FR 48318 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Victoria County, 1997 8...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... attainment inventory; (b) A maintenance demonstration; (c) Ambient air quality monitoring; (d) A contingency... County, 1997 8-Hour Ozone Section 110 (a)(1) Maintenance Plan AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... Texas State Implementation Plan (SIP). The submitted revisions include a maintenance plan for...

  14. 78 FR 48373 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Victoria County; 1997 8...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Victoria... Implementation Plan (SIP). The revision consists of a maintenance plan for Victoria County developed to...

  15. Water-quality, stream-habitat, and biological data for Highland and Marchand Bayous, Galveston County, Texas, 2006-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Dexter W.; Mabe, Jeffrey A.; Turco, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Benthic macroinvertebrate and fish data were collected from the same five sites identified for habitat evaluation. Three assessments were done to account for seasonal differences in biotic distribution. Stream-habitat and aquatic biota (benthic macroinvertebrates and fish) were assessed at each site three times during the study to evaluate aquatic life use. A total of 5,126 macroinvertebrate individuals were identified at all sites. During the study, 34 species of fish representing 28 families were collected from all the sites. 

  16. Hydrologic, water-quality, and sediment-quality data for the Christmas Bay system, Brazoria County, Texas, February 1999-March 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    East, Jeffery W.

    2002-01-01

    The Christmas Bay system is a group of three small secondary bays (Christmas, Bastrop, and Drum Bays) at the southwestern end of the Galveston Bay estuarine system in Brazoria County, Texas. During February 1999-March 2000, hydrologic, water-quality, and sediment-quality data were collected from each of the three bays to establish baseline conditions. Gage-height fluctuations closely matched open-water tidal fluctuations. Rainfall during February 1999-February 2000 was about 20 percent below the annual average. Specific conductance, pH, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen monitored at 30-minute intervals in Christmas Bay for 13 months showed seasonal variations typical of monitoring stations on the Texas Gulf Coast. Prevailing winds were from the southeast. Monthly water-quality sampling for 13 months showed that in each of the three bays concentrations of major ions were small, and most nutrient concentrations were at or less than minimum reporting levels; indicator bacteria counts were consistently higher in samples collected from Drum Bay. Several trace elements (sampled twice) were detected in small concentrations. The only organochlorine pesticides (sampled once) that were greater than minimum reporting levels were atrazine, deethylatrazine, metolachlor, and simazine. During February 29-March 29, 2000, three semipermeable membrane devices were deployed at the Christmas Bay monitoring station. Seven of 77 semivolatile organic compounds analyzed in the lipids from the devices were detected in minute amounts. Analyses of surficial bed sediment sampled once in each of the three bays yielded detections of a number of semivolatile organic compounds; all concentrations were less than 10 micrograms per liter and much less than the respective benchmark concentration for those compounds that have had a benchmark concentration established for the protection of aquatic life.

  17. Groundwater environmental tracer data collected from the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers in Montgomery County and adjacent counties, Texas, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oden, Timothy D.

    2011-01-01

    The Gulf Coast aquifer system is the primary water supply for Montgomery County in southeastern Texas, including part of the Houston metropolitan area and the cities of Magnolia, Conroe, and The Woodlands Township, Texas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District, collected environmental tracer data in the Gulf Coast aquifer system, primarily in Montgomery County. Forty existing groundwater wells screened in the Gulf Coast aquifer system were selected for sampling in Montgomery County (38 wells), Waller County (1 well), and Walker County (1 well). Groundwater-quality samples, physicochemical properties, and water-level data were collected once from each of the 40 wells during March-September 2008. Groundwater-quality samples were analyzed for dissolved gases and the environmental tracers sulfur hexafluoride, chlorofluorocarbons, tritium, helium-4, and helium-3/tritium. Water samples were collected and processed onsite using methods designed to minimize changes to the water-sample chemistry or contamination from the atmosphere. Replicate samples for quality assurance and quality control were collected with each environmental sample. Well-construction information and environmental tracer data for March-September 2008 are presented.

  18. Geology and ground-water resources of Uvalde County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welder, F.A.; Reeves, R.D.

    1964-01-01

    Ground-water withdrawals from the Edwards and associated limestones in Uvalde County probably could be maintained indefinitely at a rate of about 200,000 acre-feet per year, provided that withdrawals north and west of the county were not increased. However, continued withdrawals at this rate-would cause wells in structurally high areas to go dry, and underflow into Medina County would cease. Furthermore, saline water might invade the fresh-water part of the aquifer from the south, and perennial spring flow in the Leona River valley would cease.

  19. Distribution of Igneous Rocks in Medina and Uvalde Counties, Texas, as Inferred from Aeromagnetic Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, David V.; McDougal, Robert R.; Smith, Bruce D.; Blome, Charles D.

    2008-01-01

    A high-resolution aeromagnetic survey was flown in 2001 over Medina and Uvalde Counties, Texas, as part of a multi-disciplinary investigation of the geohydrologic framework of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas. The objective of the survey was to assist in mapping structural features that influence aquifer recharge and ground-water flow. The survey revealed hundreds of magnetic anomalies associated with igneous rocks that had previously been unmapped. This report presents an interpretation of the outcrops and subcrops of igneous rocks, based upon procedures of matched-filtering and potential field modeling.

  20. Shallow ground-water conditions, Tom Green County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.N.

    1986-01-01

    Pollution from oil-field activities may affect the quality of water in some isolated wells and in some areas in the county. No historical records are available for determining any changes in pesticides, minor elements, or bacteria.

  1. 75 FR 71467 - Exelon Nuclear Texas Holdings, LLC, Early Site Permit Application for the Victoria County Station...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Exelon Nuclear Texas Holdings, LLC, Early Site Permit Application for the Victoria County Station... Contention Preparation AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission). ACTION: Notice...

  2. Keys to the species of Athesmia Loss, 1899 (Digenea: Dicrocoeliidae: Dicrocoeliinae), with the description of a new species from the clapper rail, Rallus longirostris Boddaert (Gruiformes: Rallidae), from Galveston, Texas, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Dronen, Norman O

    2014-06-16

    Eleven specimens of a previously undescribed species of Athesmia Looss, 1899 were recovered from six clapper rails, Rallus longirostris Boddaert (Rallidae), collected from November, 1984 through October, 1995 from the Galveston, Texas area of the Gulf of Mexico. Species of Athesmia can be divided into two body types based on the posterior extent of the ceca relative to the vitelline field (vitellarium): the attilae type where the ceca may be uneven, but they both extend at least to near the level of the posterior margin of the vitelline field, or more commonly surpass the vitelline field posteriorly and the heterolechithodes type where the cecum on the side of the vitelline field terminates well above the posterior margin of the vitelline field, usually near its anterior extremity, while the cecum opposite the vitelline field extends at least to the level of the posterior margin of the vitelline field, or more commonly surpasses the vitelline field posteriorly. Athesmia ralli n. sp. is assigned to the attilae type. The new species is most similar to Athesmia butensis Petri, 1942, but differs from this species by having a longer space from posterior testis to ovary (600-790 compared to less than 200), which represent a larger percentage of the total body length (7-8% compared to 2%) and a larger maximum egg size (47 by 29 compared to 42 by 25). The new species further differs from A. butensis by having a somewhat larger body, a longer forebody and the vitelline field reaches posteriorly to the posterior third of the body in the new species but is confined to the middle third of the body in A. butensis. A key to species also is provided.

  3. Soil salinity detection. [Starr and Cameron Counties, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Richardson, A. J.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Gerbermann, A. H.; Everitt, J. H.; Cuellar, J. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Growth forms and herbage biomass production varied considerably among saline and nonsaline soil range sites in Starr County. Grasses on saline soil sites were shallow-rooted and short whereas on nonsaline sites there was an intermixture of short and midgrass species. Differentiation between primarily undisturbed saline and nonsaline rangelands, in Starr County, is partially possible using film optical density readings from Skylab imagery. Differentiation among eight saline and nonsaline soil sites in Cameron County, using black and white and color film was not possible according to statistical results from both DMRT and correlation analysis. Linear analysis showed that Bendix 24-band MSS data (aircraft) collected at 1700 m and 4800 m, as well as Skylab and LANDSAT-1 MSS data, were significantly correlated to electrical conductivity readings. In Starr County, the best spectral band for detection of saline soil levels, using black and white SO-022 film, was in the 0.6 to 0.7 micron spectral region. In Cameron County, the best spectral bands for detection of saline soil levels were the 2.3 to 2.43 micron, 0.72 to 0.76 micron, 0.69 to 1.75 micron, and 0.7 to 1.1 micron spectral regions.

  4. Estimated transportation routes to a candidate salt repository site in Deaf Smith County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, D.S.; Johnson, P.E.

    1987-10-01

    This report presents a preliminary analysis of possible highway and rail transportation routes within Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico for shipments of spent fuel to the candidate repository site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Two cases are examined for highway shipments. The initial case analyzes shipments following the Department of Transportation's HM-164 regulations for shipment of spent fuel. The second case analyzes normal commercial routes. Three rail cases are also examined. Each case analyzes potential routes that would be used based for different access spurs into the repository site. Two appendices are included which examine additional scenarios generated by restricting routes from passing through various metropolitan areas. The major finding is that most shipments to the Deaf Smith site will pass through Amarillo, Texas. There are few, if any, feasible alternative routes which would significantly reduce the amount of traffic passing through Amarillo.

  5. Geology and ground-water resources of Hale County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, J.G.; Wells, Lloyd C.

    1963-01-01

    It is estimated that in 1955 about 39 million acre-feet of water was in storage in the Ogallala formation in Hale County; however, only about 16 million is theoretically available to wells, and a somewhat smaller amount is practically available. About 3 million acre-feet was removed from storage during 1938-55. Water levels in wells have declined more or less steadily since 1938, and it is apparent that the ground-water resources of the county are insufficient to support large-scale perennial irrigation such as that of 1955.

  6. Ground-water geology of Grayson County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, E.T.

    1963-01-01

    The ground-water resources of Grayson County have been only partly developed. The volume of fresh water in transient storage in the Trinity group and Woodbine formation is estimated to be about 60 and 25 million acre-feet, respectively. Most of this water is not practicably recoverable because of the depth at which it occurs, but relatively high artesian heads and large available drawdowns in much of the county are favorable to future development within economic limits of pumping lift. In the Sherma

  7. Cancer mortality in a Texas county with prior uranium mining and milling activities, 1950-2001.

    PubMed

    Boice, John D; Mumma, Michael; Schweitzer, Sarah; Blot, William J

    2003-09-01

    Uranium was discovered in Karnes County, Texas, in 1954 and the first uranium mill began operating in 1961 near Falls City. Uranium milling and surface and in situ mining continued in Karnes County until the early 1990s. Remediation of uranium tailings ponds was completed in the 1990s. There were three mills and over 40 mines operating in Karnes County over these years and potential exposure to the population was from possible environmental releases into the air and ground water. From time to time concerns have been raised in Karnes County about potential increased cancer risk from these uranium mining and milling activities. To evaluate the possibility of increased cancer deaths associated with these uranium operations, a mortality survey was conducted. The numbers and rates of cancer deaths were determined for Karnes County and for comparison for four 'control' counties in the same region with similar age, race, urbanisation and socioeconomic distributions reported in the 1990 US Census. Comparisons were also made with US and Texas general population rates. Following similar methods to those used by the National Cancer Institute, standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed as the ratio of observed numbers of cancers in the study and control counties compared to the expected number derived from general population rates for the United States. Relative risks (RRs) were computed as the ratios of the SMRs for the study and the control counties. Overall, 1223 cancer deaths occurred in the population residing in Karnes County from 1950 to 2001 compared with 1392 expected based on general population rates for the US. There were 3857 cancer deaths in the four control counties during the same 52 year period compared with 4389 expected. There was no difference between the total cancer mortality rates in Karnes County and those in the control counties (RR = 1.0; 95% confidence interval 0.9-1.1). There were no significant increases in Karnes County for any cancer when

  8. Approximate change in water levels in wells in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers 1977-88 and 1987-88, and measured compaction, 1973-88, in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gabrysch, R.K.; Ranzau, C.E.; Coplin, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    This report, which was prepared in cooperation with the city of Houston and the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, presents data on water-level changes in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers.

  9. 'Criteria' aPL tests: report of a task force and preconference workshop at the 13th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies, Galveston, Texas, April 2010.

    PubMed

    Pierangeli, S S; de Groot, P G; Dlott, J; Favaloro, E; Harris, E N; Lakos, G; Ortel, T; Meroni, P L; Otomo, K; Pengo, V; Tincani, A; Wong, R; Roubey, R

    2011-02-01

    Current classification criteria for definite antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) mandate the use of one or more of three positive 'standardized' laboratory assays to detect antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) (viz: anticardiolipin [aCL] IgG and IgM; anti-β(2)glycoprotein I [anti-β(2)GPI] antibodies IgG and IgM; and/or a lupus anticoagulant [LAC]), when at least one of the two major clinical manifestations (thrombosis or pregnancy losses) are present. Although, efforts of standardization for these 'criteria' aPL tests have been conducted over the last 27 years, reports of inconsistencies, inter-assay and inter-laboratory variation in the results of aCL, LAC, and anti-β(2)GPI, and problems with the interpretation and the clinical value of the tests still exist, which affect the consistency of the diagnosis of APS. A Task Force of scientists and pioneers in the field from different countries, subdivided in three working groups, discussed and analyzed critical questions related to 'criteria' aPL tests in an evidence-based manner, during the 13(th) International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (APLA 2010, April 13-16, 2010, Galveston, TX). These included: review of the standardization and the need for international consensus protocol for aCL and anti-β(2)GPI tests; the use of monoclonal and/or polyclonal standards in the calibration curve of those tests; and the need for establishment of international units of measurement for anti-β(2)GPI tests. The group also reviewed the recently updated guidelines for LAC testing, and analyzed and discussed the possibility of stratification of 'criteria' aPL tests as risk factors for APS, as well as the clinical value of single positive vs. multiple aPL positivity. The group members presented, discussed, analyzed data, updated and re-defined those critical questions at a preconference workshop that was open to congress attendees. This report summarizes the findings, conclusions, and recommendations of this Task Force.

  10. Influence of stream habitat and land use on benthic macroinvertebrate indicators of stream quality of selected above-tidal streams in the Houston-Galveston Area Council service area, Texas, 1997-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J. Bruce

    2001-01-01

    During 1997–98, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Houston-Galveston Area Council, collected stream-habitat and benthic macroinvertebrate data for 31 reaches on abovetidal streams in the Council service area near Houston, Texas. Stream-habitat, land-use and population, and benthic aquatic insect metrics were determined for the 31 reaches. Statistical analyses were used to determine the stream-habitat, land-use and population, and aquatic insect variables that are strongly intercorrelated and that explain the greatest amount of variation between the reaches.Comparison of stream-habitat and biological integrity scores computed for each of the 31 reaches indicated (1) reaches generally had larger stream-habitat integrity scores in drainage areas that were heavily forested and had fewer people per square mile, (2) larger biological integrity scores were significantly correlated with larger stream-habitat integrity scores, and (3) urban reaches generally had more simplified streamhabitat conditions and smaller biological integrity scores.Seven reaches in the study area were selected as reference reaches on the basis of high streamhabitat integrity and high biological integrity. The reference-reaches median biological integrity score was equaled or exceeded by three reaches (one on Spring Creek and two on Cypress Creek) that are on the State of Texas 303(d) list of threatened or impaired waters with respect to aquatic life. This indicates that direct measures of biological integrity could be used to supplement surrogatebased designations of biological integrity such as the State list.A statistically significant multipleregression model was developed that uses independent variables that can be obtained without fieldintensive studies to predict the biological integrity score for a reach. The deviation from the model’s predicted score with the score based on biological sampling can be used to interpret the degree of biological impairment in a reach

  11. The Impact of Education on Views of Homosexuality in the Senior Clergy of Hidalgo County, Texas.

    PubMed

    Park, John; Perez, Pamela R; Ramírez-Johnson, Johnny

    2016-06-01

    This study explores clergy perspectives on homosexuality and mental health. Interviews were conducted with 245 senior clergy of faith-based organizations in Hidalgo County, Texas. Analyses revealed that the less education the individual had, the more likely he or she viewed homosexuals as being more psychologically disturbed than heterosexuals. Clergy also expressed uncertainty in their views and actions regarding referral practices. A need for clergy education on views of homosexuality is documented. Suggestions are made for future research and education.

  12. Ground-water resources of Atascosa County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sundstrom, Raymond W.; Follett, C.R.

    1950-01-01

    Atascosa County, Tex., is underlain by water-bearing sands of Tertiary age that furnish water for domestic and stock supplies throughout the county, for the public supply of all except one of the towns and cities in the county, for irrigation in several localities, for drilling oil wells in the central and southern parts of the county, for washing glass sand in the northern part of the county, and for maintaining several lakes that are used for hunting and fishing. By far the most productive formation is the Carrizo sand, but supplies of considerable magnitude are also obtained from sands in the Mount Selman and Cook Mountain. formations. The rate of withdrawal from the Carrizo sand amounted to about 15,500 acre-feet a year in 1944-45 or an average of about 13.8 million gallons a day. This was about 6,000 acre-feet a year greater in 1944-45 than it was in 1929-30. Of the total amount of water withdrawn in 1944-45 about 6,500 acre-feet a year is largely wasted from uncontrolled flowing wells. If the waste of water from wells in the Carrizo sand were stopped, the consumption of water for useful purposes could be increased about 70 percent without increasing the draft on the underground reservoir. The increase in total withdrawals from the Carrizo sand has been accompanied by a general decline in the artesian head between 1929-30 and 1944 ranging from 3 to 25 feet. On the whole, the evidence shows that the artesian reservoir is not being overdrawn and that it will sustain a somewhat greater draft.

  13. Early artificial ventilation: the mystery of "Truehead of Galveston"--was he Dr Charles William Trueheart?

    PubMed

    Trubuhovich, Ronald V

    2008-12-01

    It seems strange that the medical literature from the United States has only a single original source of reference for a device (from circa 1870) for artificial ventilation in neonatal resuscitation. The invention is attributed to "Dr Truehead of Galveston, Texas". I argue that this mystery arises from two separate misspellings of the inventor's name, and propose that the correct name is Dr Charles William Trueheart (1837-1914), also of Galveston.

  14. Ground-water resources of Kleberg County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Livingston, Penn Poore; Bridges, Thomas W.

    1936-01-01

    Water obtained from the fresh-water horizon is comparatively fresh in the western and central parts of the county but contains a somewhat higher proportion of chlorides toward the Gulf. Samples obtained from about 100 wells, located for the most part in the central part of the county, showed a. higher chloride content than is normal for the freshwater beds in the area. These wells are believed in large part to be defective and to be admitting salt water. This was demonstrated and the leaks located in several wells that were tested. No evidence was found of salt-water contamination by percolation through the formations, however. The leaky wells should be repaired, If practicable, or sealed to prevent them from contaminating the fresh-water sand. The chances of leaks developing can be largely eliminated If the wells are properly drilled and provided with casing of good grade, and the casing is adequately seated.

  15. Geology and ground-water resources of Hays County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeCook, Kenneth James

    1963-01-01

    Ground water from wells in the Pearsall formation generally contains less than 500 parts per million of dissolved solids. Water from the Glen Rose limestone in some places contains more than 500 parts per million of sulfate and more than 1,000 parts per million of dissolved solids; locally it is high in nitrate also. Except in the southeastern part of the county, water from the Edwards limestone is commonly very hard but is otherwise of good quality for most uses. Analyses of two water samples from the Austin chalk indicate a high content of bicarbonate. Water from the Taylor marl and from Quaternary sediments generally is hard, and locally it contains excessive nitrate. Most wells in Hays County are used for domestic and stock supplies. About 20 wells, most of them in the Edwards limestone, yield water in relatively large amounts for industrial use, irrigation, or public supplies.

  16. Pilot Views of Montgomery County, Texas Automated FSS Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    Airlino Transport pilots with most of the services. The pilots’ perception of how the PSS weather briefers performed their jobs affected rating. of...institute services and plans In respons to major system changes are thus based on manatement’s perceptions of user satisfiction rather than an objctively...Montgolm , County AFSS speeillsis appear technically competcnt) Were sufflicknt to predict satisfiction with the hFAS. I-or airlin trAnsport pilots

  17. Recent Jurassic discoveries in southeastern Cass County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Aubrey, J.

    1984-09-01

    Southeastern Cass County had lain virtually dormant as a prospective Jurassic oil and gas province since the mid-1960s, when East Linden field was discovered and developed. Then, in 1978, Hilliard Oil and Gas drilled the 1 Johnson and discovered Kildare field (Smackover). Subsequent development thru 1982 proved additional reserves in several Cotton Valley sandstones as well, reconfirming southeastern Cass County as territory for viable Jurassic drilling. Additional drilling occurred when Marshall Exploration redrilled and expanded the old Bloomburg field and Heflin redrilled Queen City field. All of this drilling was successful in the Smackover reservoir, finding sour gas and condensate. Wildcat activity included the two Smackover completions finding South Atlanta field, as well as two completions in formations that are highly debated as to their nomenclature. Cities Service reportedly their well in the Eagle Mills. This well brought national attention to southeastern Cass County, when it was reported on the CBS Saturday evening news. The well initially flowed at rates that were as high as 1800 BOPD, 1396 MCFGD, and 32 BWPD, with pressure of 3250 psi. Just as the excitement was dying down, Primary Fuels, Inc. reentered and deepened the Highland Resources 1 Glass and completed that well in a zone correlative to the Cities Service 1-A Pruitt. The 1 glass potentialed for 200 BOPD, 570 MCFGD, and 32 BWPD, at pressure of 2900 psi. The producing zone was determined to be the Norphlet, which once again was made wildcatters of all previous upper Smackover explorers.

  18. County-level socioeconomic status and cancer rates in Texas, 2001-2005.

    PubMed

    Risser, David R; Miller, Eric A; Williams, Melanie A; Foxhall, Lewis E

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that a person's socioeconomic status (SES) (a proxy measure that can incorporate income, wealth, education, and occupation) is associated with cancer incidence and mortality. Examining variation in cancer rates by SES can help identify health disparities and target areas for cancer control activities. The Texas Cancer Registry (TCR) collects data on every newly diagnosed case of cancer in Texas, including personal and demographic data, but does not collect data related directly to SES. Using a county-level measure of SES determined by the 2000 US Census, we compared cancer incidence and mortality rates for selected cancer sites by counties categorized into Low, Intermediate, and High SES. The cancers examined in this analysis included lung, colorectal, female breast, prostate, cervical, and all cancers collected by TCR combined. Consistent with other studies, most incidence and mortality rates were lowest in the High SES counties. However, in general, the highest incidence and mortality rates were found in counties categorized as Intermediate SES, but patterns differed by cancer site and by race and ethnicity. This study provides additional evidence that geographically related SES is associated with cancer incidence and mortality.

  19. Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    In 1997, the Texas Legislature passed a comprehensive revision to the Texas Water Code. This legislation (Senate Bill 1) changed water planning in Texas from a statewide to a regional activity. By September 2001, the 16 regions created by Senate Bill 1 must produce water plans to address their water needs during drought-of-record conditions, and must identify water-management strategies for periods when streamflows, reservoir storage, and groundwater levels are 50 and 75 percent of normal.

  20. Clarksville field Red River County, Texas: Production and facies interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.H. )

    1991-03-01

    The Clarksville field was discovered in December in 1985 while targeting a deeper paleozoic horizon. Since production went on line in 1986, this field has produced over 1 million barrels of oil (MMBO) with the appearance of a considerably longer and more lucrative life. The producing horizon is a Jurassic-age lithic conglomerate sitting unconformably on the Paleozoic and Triassic structural front of the buried Ouachita range. Facies correlation out of the basin indicate this unit to be Louark age. Mapping and compositional analysis indicate the depositional environmental of this unit to be an arid climate alluvial fan deposited as a 'Bajada' complex. This fan system was laid down at the updip margin of the actively forming Mesozoic embayment where it meets the Ouachita structural front. The significance of this field is demonstrated by the production yield at a relatively shallow depth (5800 ft). At this time, production similar to Clarksville field has yet to be encountered anywhere along the Mesozoic rim of the East Texas basin but does represent a viable exploration trend, in addition to being a gateway for future paleozoic production in the basin.

  1. Spatial Analysis of County-Level Breast Cancer Mortality in Texas

    PubMed Central

    Bambhroliya, Arvind B.; Burau, Keith D.; Sexton, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The objectives of the study were to detect high-risk areas and to examine how racial and ethnic status affect the geographic distribution of female breast cancer mortality in Texas. Analyses were based on county-level data for the years from 2000 to 2008. Materials and Methods. Breast cancer mortality data were obtained from the Texas Cancer Registry, and the Spatial Scan Statistics method was used to run Purely Spatial Analyses using the Discrete Poisson, Bernoulli, and Multinomial models. Results and Conclusions. Highest rates of female breast cancer mortality in Texas have shifted over time from southeastern areas towards northern and eastern areas, and breast cancer mortality at the county level is distributed heterogeneously based on racial/ethnic status. Non-Hispanic blacks were at highest risk in the northeastern region and lowest risk in the southern region, while Hispanics were at highest risk in the southern region along the border with Mexico and lowest risk in the northeastern region. PMID:22518193

  2. Reflectance of vegetation, soil, and water. [in Hidalgo County, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A study was conducted in a 340-acre (139 hectares) field of grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) to determine if multispectral data from ERTS-1 could be used to detect differences in chlorophyll concentration between iron-deficient (chlorotic) and apparently normal (green) grain sorghum. Chlorotic sorghum areas 2.8 acres (1.1 hectares) or larger in size were identified on a computer printout of band 5 data which contains the chlorophyll absorption band at the 0.65 micron wavelength. ERTS resolution is sufficient for practical applications in detecting iron-deficient sorghum in otherwise uniform fields. The first classification map of the study county has been produced. Vegetation (crops), rangeland, bare soil, water, and an undefined (all other) category occupied 15.2, 45.0, 19.1, 0.02, and 20.6% of the land area, respectively.

  3. Geology and ground-water resources of Winkler County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garza, Sergio; Wesselman, John B.

    1963-01-01

    The chemical quality of the water in the principal aquifers is generally acceptable for industry and for public supply. About two-thirds of the samples collected from fresh-water wells had a dissolved-solids content of less than 1,000 ppm (parts per million) ; however, some samples in a few areas were hard and were high in fluoride and silica. Samples from wells in polluted areas contained dissolved solids ranging from about 1,400 to 71,100 ppm. Two comprehensive analyses of water samples from the Rustler formation showed a dissolved-solids content of 18,400 ppm. and 157,000 ppm. In most of the water produced with the oil in the Hendrick oil field, the content of dissolved solids ranged from about 4,000 to about 10,000 ppm. The water produced with the oil in the rest of the oil fields in Winkler County was mainly brine.

  4. Preliminary assessment report for Camp Swift Military Reservation, Installation 48070, Bastrop County, Texas. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, C.B.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Texas Army National Guard property in Bastrop County, Texas. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Camp Swift property, the requirement of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The review of both historical and current practices at the property indicated that the activities at Camp Swift include no operations considered to have an adverse impact to the environment. The recommendation, therefore, is that no further IRP action is necessary at this property.

  5. Groundwater recharge to the Gulf Coast aquifer system in Montgomery and Adjacent Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oden, Timothy D.; Delin, Geoffrey N.

    2013-01-01

    Simply stated, groundwater recharge is the addition of water to the groundwater system. Most of the water that is potentially available for recharging the groundwater system in Montgomery and adjacent counties in southeast Texas moves relatively rapidly from land surface to surface-water bodies and sustains streamflow, lake levels, and wetlands. Recharge in southeast Texas is generally balanced by evapotranspiration, discharge to surface waters, and the downward movement of water into deeper parts of the groundwater system; however, this balance can be altered locally by groundwater withdrawals, impervious surfaces, land use, precipitation variability, or climate, resulting in increased or decreased rates of recharge. Recharge rates were compared to the 1971–2000 normal annual precipitation measured Cooperative Weather Station 411956, Conroe, Tex.

  6. Site study plan for Playa investigations, Deaf Smith County, Texas: Salt Repository Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-02

    This plan defines the purpose and objectives of the Playa Investigation Study, presents a plan of work to provide the information necessary to resolve issues, and discusses the rationale for test method selection. The required information will be obtained from existing well drilling records, describing and testing of soil and rock samples recovered from project test holes, geophysical well logs, seismic surveys, and shallow test pits excavated at ground surface. There have been numerous, often conflicting, theories presented to explain the origin(s) of the playas of the Texas High Plains. The primary purpose of this study is to establish if existing playas and playa alignments are related to deeper subsurface structure, such as faulting or salt dissolution, the potential for future playa development, and the significance of existing and/or future playas on siting a repository in Deaf Smith County, Texas. 11 refs.

  7. Sodium azide poisoning at a restaurant - Dallas County, Texas, 2010.

    PubMed

    2012-06-29

    In April 2010, Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS) staff members investigated reports of acute-onset dizziness among patrons in a local restaurant. Symptoms, which included fainting resulting from low blood pressure, occurred within minutes of consuming food from the restaurant and were consistent with chemical poisoning. Toxicologic and epidemiologic investigations were begun to determine the cause of the poisonings and identify potentially exposed persons. This report summarizes the results of those investigations, including a case-control study that identified iced tea as the likely contaminated food or drink (odds ratio [OR] = 65; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.4-3,292). Approximately 5 months after the incident, extensive laboratory testing identified sodium azide (NaN3) and hydrazoic acid (formed when sodium azide contacts water) as the toxic agents in the iced tea. All five ill restaurant patrons recovered from their symptoms. For rapid-onset foodborne illnesses, chemical poisons should be considered as a potential cause, regardless of negative initial toxicologic screening tests. Although unusual chemicals can be challenging to detect, a multidisciplinary approach involving public health officials and forensic and medical toxicologists can lead to appropriate testing. In the absence of an identified agent, epidemiologic tools are valuable for active case-finding and confirming suspected contaminated food vehicles.

  8. Pesticide safety training and access to field sanitation among migrant farmworker mothers from Starr County, Texas.

    PubMed

    Shipp, E M; Cooper, S P; Burau, K D; Bolin, J N

    2005-02-01

    Very little published research describes employer compliance with EPA-mandated Worker Protection Standard (WPS) pesticide safety training and the OSHA Field Sanitation Standard among farmworker women in general and mothers specifically. A goal of both standards is limiting farmworkers' exposure to potentially hazardous agricultural pesticides. Data from a NIOSH-supported cohort study ("Injury and Illness Surveillance in Migrant Farmworker Families") allowed for examining these issues. The cohort included 267 migrant farmworker families who usually reside along the Texas-Mexico border (Starr County, Texas). Data were collected in Starr County during in-home interviews. Of 102 mothers who participated in migrant farm work during summer 2001, 57 (55.9%) reported having ever received training/instruction in the safe use of pesticides, while 47 (46.1%) reported having received training within the previous five years, as required by WPS. Of trained mothers, 91.5% to 93.6% reported that their training covered key WPS areas: (1) entry into a recently treated field, (2) pesticide related injuries/illnesses, and (3) where to go and who to contact for emergency care following exposure. Regarding access to field sanitation, 67.5% to 84.2% of 77 mothers who worked outside Texas reported employer-provided decontamination supplies (e.g., soap, wash water, towels, and toilet facilities). However, a strikingly smaller proportion (12% to 28%) of 25 mothers who worked within Texas reported access to the same resources, suggesting discrepancies in compliance across the U.S. Due to the low level of employer compliance with both WPS and OSHA mandated standards, increased enforcement and an alternate delivery of pesticide training is recommended.

  9. Approximate water-level changes in wells completed in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, 1977-90 and 1989-90, and measured compaction, 1973- December 1989, in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbie, Dana L.; Coplin, L.S.; Locke, Glenn L.

    1990-01-01

    This report is one in a series of reports that depict water-level changes since 1977 and compaction of subsurface material since 1973. The report was prepared in cooperation with the City of Houston and the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, and presents approximate water-level changes in wells in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, 1977-90 and 1989-90 (figs. 1-4), and measured compaction, 1973-December 1989 (figs. 5 and 6), in the Houston-Galveston region.

  10. The State of Texas Children: 2000. A County-By-County Fact Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hormuth, Pamela

    This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in the well-being of Texas' children. The statistical portrait is based on 15 indicators of children's well-being: (1) percent low birthweight babies; (2) percent mothers receiving little or no prenatal care; (3) infant mortality rate; (4) child death rate; (5) teen violent death rate; (6)…

  11. Forest statistics for southeast texas counties, 1992. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.F.; Miller, P.E.; Hartsell, A.J.

    1992-11-01

    The report includes tables derived from data obtained during a 1992 forest inventory of southeast Texas counties. The Southern Forest Experiment Station, Forest Inventory and Analysis unit (SO-FIA) uses a two-phase sample of temporary aerialphoto points and a systematic grid of permanent ground plots. The area of forested land was determined by photointerpretation of temporary points and field checks of permanent plots. Tree data were used to estimate volumes, basal area, number of trees, and other plot-level variables. Ownership information was obtained for each measurement plot using tax records and other sources.

  12. Irrigation scheduling, freeze warning and soil salinity detecting. [in Cameron County Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Correlations of multispectral scanner (MSS) digital data differences between vegetated and bare soil areas with salinity levels from the eight saline areas using MSS bands seven and ten in the infrared region were significant. Correlations were derived for Cameron County, Texas. Detection of saline soils may be possible, using either film density readings or multispectral scanner data, when the lower reflectance of vegetation on highly saline soil and the higher reflectance of vegetation on lower saline soil are considered by using film on MSS contrasts between vegetation and bare soil.

  13. Feldspar diagenesis in the Frio Formation, Brazoria County, Texas Gulf Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Lynton S.; Milliken, Kitty L.

    1981-07-01

    Tremendous quantities of detrital feldspar have been dissolved or albitized below about 14,000 ft (4,267 m) in the Frio Formation (Oligocene), Chocolate Bayou Field, Brazoria County, Texas. Some sandstones no longer contain any unmodified detrital feldspar grains. Material transfer involved in these reactions is immense, affecting at least 15% of the rock volume. Thus, albitization has important implications for several other diagenetic processes that involve feldspars or their components. These processes include formation of secondary porosity, precipitation of quartz and carbonate cements, and the evolution of Na-Ca-Cl formation water.

  14. Hydrogeologic testing plan for Deep Hydronest Test Wells, Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This report discusses methods of hydraulic testing which are recommended for use in the Deep Hydronest Test Wells at the proposed high level nuclear waste repository site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The deep hydronest wells are intended to provide geologic, geophysical and hydrologic information on the interval from the Upper San Andres Formation to the base of the Pennsylvanian system at the site. Following the period of drilling and testing, the wells will be converted into permanent monitoring installations through which fluid pressures and water quality can be monitored at various depths in the section. 19 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Water-quality, stream-habitat, and biological data for West Fork Double Bayou, Cotton Bayou, and Hackberry Gully, Chambers County, Texas, 2006-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Dexter W.; Turco, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Houston-Galveston Area Council and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, collected water-quality, stream-habitat, and biological data from two sites at West Fork Double Bayou, two sites at Cotton Bayou, and one site at Hackberry Gully in Chambers County, Texas, during July 2006-August 2007. Water-quality data-collection surveys consisted of synoptic 24-hour continuous measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductance, and dissolved oxygen at the five sites and periodically collected samples at four sites analyzed for several properties and constituents of interest. Stream-habitat data were collected at each of four sites three times during the study. At each site, a representative stream reach was selected and within this reach, five evenly spaced stream transects were determined. At each transect, stream attributes (wetted channel width, water depth, bottom material, instream cover) and riparian attributes (bank slope and erosion potential, width of natural vegetation, type of vegetation, percentage tree canopy) were measured. Benthic macroinvertebrate and fish data were collected from the same reaches identified for habitat evaluation. A total of 2,572 macroinvertebrate individuals were identified from the four reaches; insect taxa were more abundant than non-insect taxa at all reaches. A total of 1,082 fish, representing 30 species and 13 families, were collected across all reaches. Stream-habitat and aquatic biota (benthic macroinvertebrates and fish) were assessed at the four sites to evaluate aquatic life use. Habitat quality index scores generally indicated 'intermediate' aquatic life use at most reaches. Benthic macroinvertebrate metrics scores indicated generally 'intermediate' aquatic life use for the West Fork Double Bayou reaches and generally 'high' aquatic life use for the Cotton Bayou and Hackberry Gully reaches. Index of biotic integrity scores for fish indicated generally

  16. Meteorite search in the deflation basins in Lea County, New Mexico and Winkler County, Texas, USA: Discovery of Lea County 003 (H4)

    SciTech Connect

    Mikouchi, T; Buchanan, P C; Zolensky, M E; Welten, K C; Hutchison, R; Hutchison, M

    2000-01-14

    During the past few decades great numbers of meteorites have been recovered from the ice accumulation zones of Antarctica and from the vast Sahara. Although these two great deserts are the two most productive areas, the Southern High Plains in USA (New Mexico and Texas) and Nullarbor Plain, Western Australia have great potential for meteorite recovery. The number of meteorite finds from Roosevelt County, New Mexico alone exceeds 100 in only approximately 11 km{sup 2} area. Most meteorites from this area have been found on the floors of active deflation basins (blowouts) that have been excavated from a mantle of sand dunes. This area has no apparent fluvial or permafrost activity within the last 50,000 years, suggesting that only prevailing winds and natural aridity aid in the concentration and preservation of meteorites. The authors investigated these deflation surfaces in Lea County (the SE corner of New Mexico) and neighboring Winkler County, Texas following a prior search in this area which found two chondrites. They found a tiny H4 chondrite in this search and here they report its mineralogy and petrology along with preliminary data on its exposure history.

  17. Upper Strawn (Desmoinesian) carbonte and clastic depositional environments, southeastern King County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Boring, T.H. )

    1990-02-01

    The Pennsylvanian upper Strawn Group of southeastern King County, Texas, provides a unique setting to study interactions between coeval carbonate and clastic deposition during the Desmoinesian. One of the most perplexing problems is the relationship of massive Pennsylvanian platform carbonates to shallow-water terrigenous clastic sediments. Within the study area, carbonate facies were deposited along the northern edge of the Knox-Baylor trough on the Spur platform, and terrigenous clastics were carried toward the Midland basin through the Knox-Baylor trough. Based on the analysis of subsurface cores, five carbonate lithofacies and four clastic lithofacies were recognized in southeastern King County, Texas. The distribution and geometry of these lithofacies are related to variations in the rate of subsidence in the Knox-Baylor trough, Pennsylvanian tectonics, deltaic progradation, avulsion, and compaction. The platform carbonates within the northern region of southeastern King County record environments within the carbonate platform complex, including middle platform, outer platform, algal mound, and platform margin. The quartzarenitic sandstones within the southern region of southeastern King County occur in a variety of complex depositional geometries, including distributary-bar fingers, lobate deltas, and offshore bars. Cores of these sandstones represent mainly the uppermost portion of the various sandstone bodies. The upper Strawn Group provides an attractive area for exploration geology. Both carbonates and clastics provide excellent reservoirs from a depth of approximately 5,000-6,000 ft. Total production within the area is over 100 million bbl of oil since the early 1940s. Multiple pay zones within a 600-ft interval also provide an added incentive for exploration. Areas within and around the Knox-Baylor trough deserve a detailed study due to these relatively shallow, unexplored, multiple pay zones.

  18. Evaluation of hydraulic conductivity of Carson County well field, Amarillo, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, J.

    1996-11-01

    Environmental assessment, ground-water management, and aquifer remediation designs rely on comprehension of the hydraulic parameters of aquifers. Because of the heterogeneity of most aquifers, a number of pumping tests are commonly required to provide a reasonable hydraulic parameter distribution. Data for 11 pumping tests, conducted at the Carson County well field, Amarillo, Texas in the 1950s to 1970s were analyzed by the Theis solution and the Cooper and Jacob solution to provide information for optimal ground-water management. The unconfined aquifer at the well field consists of sands, sandstone, gravels, and clay. A delayed gravity response was observed in the drawdown curves from pumping tests conducted in the unconfined aquifer. Because the Theis solution and the Cooper and Jacob solution do not take this delayed response, or other unsaturated effect into account, these two solutions may overestimate hydraulic conductivity of an unconfined aquifer. Therefore, the Neuman solution which considers the delayed gravity response was used to estimate the hydraulic parameters using the software AQTESOLV. This paper presents the results of a study of the unconfined aquifer at Carson County well field, Amarillo, Texas. The analysis shows that the results obtained by the Neuman method are more reasonable than those obtained by the Theis solution and the Cooper and Jacob solution. According to results from the Neuman solution, the hydraulic conductivity of the unconfined aquifer of Carson County well field varies from 2.55 to 5.97 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} m/s (weighted average hydraulic conductivity is 4.13 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} m/s). The small difference of the estimated hydraulic conductivity between wells shows that the unconfined aquifer under Carson County well field is relatively uniform. The effects of infinitesimal borehole assumption, accuracy of individual parameters, skin effects, and spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity are discussed as well.

  19. Hydrologic and geochemical data for the Big Brown lignite mine area, Freestone County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorsey, Michael E.

    1985-01-01

    Lignite mining in east and east-central Texas is increasing in response to increased energy needs throughout the State. Associated with the increase in mining activities is a greater need to know the effects of mining activities on the water quantity and quality of near-surface aquifers. The near-surface lignite beds mined at the Big Brown Lignite Mine are from the Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group of Eocene age, which is a minor aquifer generally having water suitable for all uses, in eastern Freestone County, Texas. One of the potential hydro!ogic effects of surface-coal mining is a change in the quality of ground water associated with replacement of aquifer materials by mine spoils. The purpose of this report is to compile and categorize geologic, mineralogic, geochemical, and hydrologic data for the Big Brown Lignite Mine and surrounding area in east-central Texas. Included are results of pasteextract analyses, constituent concentrations in water from batch-mixing experiments, sulfur analyses, and minerals or mineral groups detected by X-ray diffraction in 12 spoil material samples collected from 3 locations at the mine site. Also, common-constituent and trace-constituent concentrations in water from eight selected wells, located updip and downdip from the mine, are presented. Dissolved-solids concentrations in water from batch-mixing experiments vary from 12 to 908 milligrams per liter. Water from selected wells contain dissolved-solids concentrations ranging from 75 to 510 milligrams per liter.

  20. 78 FR 55037 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Texas; Attainment Demonstration for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... for the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria 1997 8-Hour Ozone Nonattainment Area AGENCY: Environmental... Plan (SIP) submittals from the State of Texas for the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria 1997 8-hour ozone... from Texas for the HGB area: The attainment demonstration for the 1997 ozone National Ambient...

  1. Disparities of food availability and affordability within convenience stores in Bexar County, Texas.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Sunil, T S; Salazar, Camerino I; Rafique, Sadaf; Ory, Marcia G

    2013-01-01

    The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends healthful food choices; however, some geographic areas are limited in the types of foods they offer. Little is known about the role of convenience stores as viable channels to provide healthier foods in our "grab and go" society. The purposes of this study were to (1) identify foods offered within convenience stores located in two Bexar County, Texas, ZIP Codes and (2) compare the availability and cost of ADA-recommended foods including beverages, produce, grains, and oils/fats. Data were analyzed from 28 convenience store audits performed in two sociodemographically diverse ZIP Codes in Bexar County, Texas. Chi-squared tests were used to compare food availability, and t-tests were used to compare food cost in convenience stores between ZIP Codes. A significantly larger proportion of convenience stores in more affluent areas offered bananas (χ (2) = 4.17, P = 0.003), whole grain bread (χ (2) = 8.33, P = 0.004), and baked potato chips (χ (2) = 13.68, P < 0.001). On average, the price of diet cola (t = -2.12, P = 0.044) and certain produce items (e.g., bananas, oranges, tomatoes, broccoli, and cucumber) was significantly higher within convenience stores in more affluent areas. Convenience stores can play an important role to positively shape a community's food environment by stocking healthier foods at affordable prices.

  2. Disparities of Food Availability and Affordability within Convenience Stores in Bexar County, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Sunil, T. S.; Salazar, Camerino I.; Rafique, Sadaf; Ory, Marcia G.

    2013-01-01

    The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends healthful food choices; however, some geographic areas are limited in the types of foods they offer. Little is known about the role of convenience stores as viable channels to provide healthier foods in our “grab and go” society. The purposes of this study were to (1) identify foods offered within convenience stores located in two Bexar County, Texas, ZIP Codes and (2) compare the availability and cost of ADA-recommended foods including beverages, produce, grains, and oils/fats. Data were analyzed from 28 convenience store audits performed in two sociodemographically diverse ZIP Codes in Bexar County, Texas. Chi-squared tests were used to compare food availability, and t-tests were used to compare food cost in convenience stores between ZIP Codes. A significantly larger proportion of convenience stores in more affluent areas offered bananas (χ2 = 4.17, P = 0.003), whole grain bread (χ2 = 8.33, P = 0.004), and baked potato chips (χ2 = 13.68, P < 0.001). On average, the price of diet cola (t = −2.12, P = 0.044) and certain produce items (e.g., bananas, oranges, tomatoes, broccoli, and cucumber) was significantly higher within convenience stores in more affluent areas. Convenience stores can play an important role to positively shape a community's food environment by stocking healthier foods at affordable prices. PMID:23935645

  3. Environmental regulatory compliance plan, Deaf County site, Texas: Draft revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-14

    The DOE is committed to conduct its operation in an environmentally safe and sound manner and comply with the letter and spirit of applicable environmental statues and regulations. These objectives are codified in DOE order N 5400.2, ''Environmental Policy Statement.'' This document, the Deaf Smith County site (Texas) Environmental Regulatory Compliance Plam (ERCP), is one means of implementing that policy. The ERCP describes the environmental regulatory requirements applicable to the Deaf Smith County site (Texas), and presented the framework within which the Salt Repository Project Office (SRPO) will comply with the requirements. The plan also discusses how DOE will address State and local environmental requirements. To achieve this purpose the ERCP will be developed in phases. This version of the ERCP is the first phase in the delopment of the ERCP. It represents the Salt Repository Project Office's understanding of environmental requirements for the site characterization phase of repository development. After consultation with the appropriate federal and state agencies and affected Indian tribes, the ERCP will be updated to reflect the results of consultation with these agencies and affected Indian tribes. 6 refs., 38 figs.

  4. Archaeological Test Excavations of the Historic Component of 45-WT-1 Texas City/Riparia, Whitman County, Washington, 1983.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    P-x -1OO COV Fi- 0 Archaeological Test Excavations of the Historic Final Report %oponent of 45-𔃻T-I, Texas City/Riparia, 𔃻hitian -- County ... County Airport ,3. NUMBER OF PAGES Walla Walla, Washington 99362 171 14. MONITORING AGENCY NAME & ADDRESS(if differeni from Conlrolling Office) 15...Moscow. Coues, Elliott, Editor 1893 The History of the Lewis and Clark Expedition By Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, Vol. II. (Dover Reprint) New

  5. Simulation of groundwater flow in the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Jonathan V.

    2014-01-01

    The Edwards-Trinity aquifer, a major aquifer in the Pecos County region of western Texas, is a vital groundwater resource for agricultural, industrial, and public supply uses. Resource managers would like to better understand the future availability of water in the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in the Pecos County region and the effects of the possible increase or temporal redistribution of groundwater withdrawals. To that end, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Pecos County, City of Fort Stockton, Brewster County, and Pecos County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1, completed a comprehensive, integrated analysis of available hydrogeologic data to develop a groundwater-flow model of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in parts of Brewster, Jeff Davis, Pecos, and Reeves Counties. Following calibration, the model was used to evaluate the sustainability of recent (2008) and projected water-use demands on groundwater resources in the study area.

  6. A Partnership between the Dallas County Community College District and Texas Instruments: Using Total Quality Management to Reinvent Workforce Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenrich, J. William

    1994-01-01

    Describes elements of a partnership between Dallas County Community College District and Texas Instruments that draws on the concepts and processes of Total Quality Management (TQM). Suggests that such partnerships have the net effect of significantly improving and reinventing cooperative efforts to prepare students for the workforce. (MAB)

  7. Impact of Hispanic ethnic concentration and socioeconomic status on obesity prevalence in Texas counties.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Jennifer J; Rocha, Elizabeth; Abdelbary, Bassent E; Gay, Jennifer; Sexton, Ken

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether Hispanic ethnic concentration is associated with a higher prevalence of obesity and, if this relationship exists, whether it is affected by the socioeconomic environment. The study uses the Texas Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) linked to 2000 census data to access the relationship between prevalence of obesity, Hispanic ethnic concentration, poverty and level of education at a county-level. The findings suggest that the association of Hispanic ethnic concentration and obesity varies by socioeconomic environment. Although little influence was observed for % poverty, the relationship between Hispanic ethnic concentration and obesity differed by county-level educational attainment. High proportion of residents with a bachelor's degree is associated with a low prevalence of obesity; counties with both high % Hispanic and high % with Bachelor's degrees had the lowest prevalence of obesity. Our results suggest that promoting and improving education, perhaps including training on healthful living, may serve as an effective means of curbing current obesity trends and associated health problems in Hispanic and possibly other ethnic communities.

  8. Impact of Hispanic Ethnic Concentration and Socioeconomic Status on Obesity Prevalence in Texas Countie

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Jennifer J.; Rocha, Elizabeth; Abdelbary, Bassent E.; Gay, Jennifer; Sexton, Ken

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether Hispanic ethnic concentration is associated with a higher prevalence of obesity and, if this relationship exists, whether it is affected by the socioeconomic environment. The study uses the Texas Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) linked to 2000 census data to access the relationship between prevalence of obesity, Hispanic ethnic concentration, poverty and level of education at a county-level. The findings suggest that the association of Hispanic ethnic concentration and obesity varies by socioeconomic environment. Although little influence was observed for % poverty, the relationship between Hispanic ethnic concentration and obesity differed by county-level educational attainment. High proportion of residents with a bachelor’s degree is associated with a low prevalence of obesity; counties with both high % Hispanic and high % with Bachelor’s degrees had the lowest prevalence of obesity. Our results suggest that promoting and improving education, perhaps including training on healthful living, may serve as an effective means of curbing current obesity trends and associated health problems in Hispanic and possibly other ethnic communities. PMID:22690191

  9. Child and adolescent drownings in Harris County, Texas, 1983 through 1990.

    PubMed Central

    Warneke, C L; Cooper, S P

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study described childhood drowning rates and circumstances in Harris County, a large metropolitan area in Texas, and compared case ascertainment between data sources. METHODS. Drowning rates among Harris County residents newborn through 19 years of age were calculated from death certificate data (1983 through 1989), and local childhood drowning hazards were described on the basis of medical examiner data (1983 through 1990). Cases from both sources were compared to determine sensitivity of sources. RESULTS. The drowning rate among Harris County residents newborn through 19 years of age was 3.8 per 100,000 person-years. The drowning rates among Blacks and Hispanics exceeded that of Whites by 56% and 19%, respectively. The majority of the 196 unintentional drownings occurred in swimming pools. Half of the pool drownings occurred in apartment pools and 33% in private home pools. The medical examiner logbook identified a slightly higher number of drownings than did death certificates. International Classification of Diseases external cause of death codes were of limited use in describing drowning circumstances. CONCLUSIONS. Childhood drowning hazards not previously reported were identified, specifically hazards in apartment pools and those among Hispanic children. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8154562

  10. Water supply and use in Deaf Smith, Swisher, and nearby counties in the Texas Panhandle

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-02-01

    Irrigation for agriculture is the primary water use in the area of Deaf Smith and Swisher Counties, Texas, and the Ogallala Formation is the main water source. The availability of water in the 12-county area is projected to decrease markedly over the next 5 decades because of the steady depletion of ground water in recoverable storage. Water requirements in the 12-county area are projected to exceed available supplies from about 1990 through 2030. The shortage for the year 2030 is estimated to be approximately 4 million acre-feet under high-growth-rate conditions. Because of its semiarid climate, the area has little available surface water to augment the supply of the Ogallala Formation, which, despite its depletion, could be the principal source of water for the repository. There are, however, other potential sources of water: (1) Lake Mackenzie, on Tule Creek; (2) the Santa Rosa Formation, which underlies much of the Southern High Plains and locally yields moderate amounts of good-quality water; and (3) the Wolfcamp Series, which yields low amounts of highly saline water. The effluents of municipal wastewater treatment plants and municipal water systems may also be useful as supplements to the repository's primary water supply.

  11. Approximate water-level changes in wells completed in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, 1977-91 and 1990-91, and measured compaction, 1973-90, in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbie, Dana L.; Kasmarek, M.C.; Campodonico, Al

    1991-01-01

    This report is one in a series of reports that depict water-level changes and compaction of subsurface material in the Houston-Galveston region. The maps present approximate water-level changes in wells in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, 1977-91 and 1990-91 (figs. 1-4). The location of borehole extensometers is shown in figure 5, and graphs present measured compation for 1973-90 (fig. 6).

  12. Identification and Mapping of Soils, Vegetation, and Water Resources of Lynn County, Texas, by Computer Analysis of ERTS MSS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, M. F.; Kristof, S. J.; Henderson, J. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Results of the analysis and interpretation of ERTS multispectral data obtained over Lynn County, Texas, are presented. The test site was chosen because it embodies a variety of problems associated with the development and management of agricultural resources in the Southern Great Plains. Lynn County is one of ten counties in a larger test site centering around Lubbock, Texas. The purpose of this study is to examine the utility of ERTS data in identifying, characterizing, and mapping soils, vegetation, and water resources in this semiarid region. Successful application of multispectral remote sensing and machine-processing techniques to arid and seminarid land-management problems will provide valuable new tools for the more than one-third of the world's lands lying in arid-semiarid regions.

  13. Educational and Occupational Aspirations and Expectations of Galveston High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Harold B.

    The study surveyed the educational and occupational status orientations of 914 Anglo, Black, and Mexican American high school sophomores and seniors in Galveston, Texas. Responses were compared by sex, age, ethnicity, grade level, and school program in which enrolled (general, academic, or vocational). A 4-way analysis of variance procedure using…

  14. Promoting Career Opportunities in Nursing to the Minority and Male Population of Galveston.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Viola Ruth

    In 1991, a project was undertaken to increase the number of minority and male students entering and completing the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program at Galveston College (GC) in Texas. The goal of the project was achieved in three interrelated phases. The initial phase focused on establishing an outreach program within the community. The…

  15. Ground-water resources of Liberty County, Texas, with a section on Stream runoff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, Walter H.; Breeding, S. D.

    1950-01-01

    Liberty County is in the Gulf Coastal Plain of southeastern Texas in the second tier of counties back from the Gulf. The geologic formations discussed in this report in upward sequence consist of the Oakville sandstone of Miocene age and the Lagarto clay of Miocene (?) age, the Willis sand of Pliocene (?) age, and the Lissie formation and Beaumont clay of Pleistocene age. The rocks of these formations crop out in belts roughly parallel to the Gulf shore and dip southeastward. As one travels across San Jacinto and Liberty Counties from northwest to southeast the belts of outcrop are traversed in the above order, beginning with the 0akville sandstone and Lagarto clay. The land surface slopes southeastward toward the Gulf at a rate less than the dip of the rocks; consequently artesian conditions exist in all parts of the county. The valley of the Trinity River is well known for its flowing weds, which range from 100 to 808 feet in depth. Most of the ground water used in the county is obtained from wells ranging in depth from 350 to about 1,000 feet and is drawn from the Lissie formation. Wells yielding 1,000 to 3,500 gallons a minute and ranging from 740 to 1,030 feet in depth have been developed for rice irrigation in the North Dayton area, in the southwestern part of the county. These wells draw water mostly from sands in the Lissie formation, but most of them are also screened in overlying thinner sands in the Beaumont clay. The municipal water supplies of Liberty, Cleveland, Dayton, and Diasetta are obtained from wells ranging from 350 to 833 feet in depth with reported yields of 300 to 350 gallons a minute. Most of the wells in the rural areas are less than 50 feet in depth and furnish small supplies of water for domestic use and for stock. Such supplies can be obtained almost anywhere in the county from shallow wells in the Lissie and Beaumont formations or in alluvial deposits. The average daily withdrawal of ground water for irrigation, public supply, and

  16. Uranium series disequilibrium in the Bargmann property area of Karnes County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.R.

    1998-02-01

    Historical evidence is presented for natural uranium series radioactive disequilibrium in uranium bearing soils in the Bargmann property area of karnes County on the Gulf Coastal Plain of south Texas. The early history of uranium exploration in the area is recounted and records of disequilibrium before milling and mining operations began are given. The property contains an open pit uranium mine associated with a larger ore body. In 1995, the US Department of Energy (DOE) directed Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate the Bargmann tract for the presence of uranium mill tailings (ORNL 1996). There was a possibility that mill tailings had washed onto or blown onto the property from the former tailings piles in quantities that would warrant remediation under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action Project. Activity ratios illustrating disequilibrium between {sup 226}Ra and {sup 238}U in background soils during 1986 are listed and discussed. Derivations of uranium mass-to-activity conversion factors are covered in detail.

  17. Site Study Plan for laboratory soil mechanics, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This Site Study Plan for laboratory soil mechanics describes the laboratory testing to be conducted on soil samples collected as part of the characterization of the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. This study provides for measurements of index, mechanical, thermal, hydrologic, chemical, and mineral properties of soils from boring throughout the site. Samples will be taken from Playa Borings/Trenching, Transportation/Utilities Foundation Borings, Repository Surface Facilities Design Foundation Borings, and Exploratory Shaft Facilities Design Foundation Borings. Data from the laboratory tests will be used for soil strata characterization, design of foundations for surface structures, design of transportation facilities and utility structures, design of impoundments, design of shaft lining, design of the shaft freeze wall, shaft permitting, performance assessment calculations, and other program requirements. A tentative testing schedule and milestone log are given. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that appropriate documentation is maintained. 18 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Rainfall and evapotranspiration data for southwest Medina County, Texas, August 2006-December 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slattery, Richard N.; Asquith, William H.; Ockerman, Darwin J.

    2011-01-01

    During August 2006-December 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth District, collected rainfall and evapotranspiration data to help characterize the hydrology of the Nueces River Basin, Texas. The USGS installed and operated a station to collect continuous (30-minute interval) rainfall and evapotranspiration data in southwest Medina County approximately 14 miles southwest of D'Hanis, Texas, and 23 miles northwest of Pearsall, Texas. Rainfall data were collected by using an 8-inch tipping bucket raingage. Meteorological and surface-energy flux data used to calculate evapotranspiration were collected by using an extended Open Path Eddy Covariance system from Campbell Scientific, Inc. Data recorded by the system were used to calculate evapotranspiration by using the eddy covariance and Bowen ratio closure methods and to analyze the surface energy budget closure. During August 2006-December 2009 (excluding days of missing record), measured rainfall totaled 86.85 inches. In 2007, 2008, and 2009, annual rainfall totaled 40.98, 12.35, and 27.15 inches, respectively. The largest monthly rainfall total, 12.30 inches, occurred in July 2007. During August 2006-December 2009, evapotranspiration calculated by using the eddy covariance method totaled 69.91 inches. Annual evapotranspiration calculated by using the eddy covariance method totaled 34.62 inches in 2007, 15.24 inches in 2008, and 15.57 inches in 2009. During August 2006-December 2009, evapotranspiration calculated by using the Bowen ratio closure method (the more refined of the two datasets) totaled 68.33 inches. Annual evapotranspiration calculated by using the Bowen ratio closure method totaled 32.49, 15.54, and 15.80 inches in 2007, 2008, and 2009, respectively (excluding days of missing record).

  19. A theoretical model of subsidence caused by petroleum production: Big Hill Field, Jefferson County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.W.; Sharp, J.M. Jr. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-02-01

    In the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain, there is a history of oil and gas production extending over 2 to 5 decades. Concurrent with this production history, there has been unprecedented population growth accompanied by vastly increased groundwater demands. Land subsidence on both local and regional bases in this geologic province has been measured and predicted in several studies. The vast majority of these studies have addressed the problem from the standpoint of groundwater usage while only a few have considered the effects of oil and gas production. Based upon field-based computational techniques (Helm, 1984), a model has been developed to predict land subsidence caused by oil and gas production. This method is applied to the Big Hill Field in Jefferson County, Texas. Inputs include production data from a series of wells in this field and lithologic data from electric logs of these same wells. Outputs include predicted amounts of subsidence, the time frame of subsidence, and sensitivity analyses of compressibility and hydraulic conductivity estimates. Depending upon estimated compressibility, subsidence, to date, is predicted to be as high as 20 cm. Similarly, depending upon estimated vertical hydraulic conductivity, the time frame may be decades for this subsidence. These same methods can be applied to other oil/gas fields with established production histories as well as new fields when production scenarios are assumed. Where subsidence has been carefully measured above petroleum reservoir, the model may be used inversely to calculate sediment compressibilities.

  20. Site study plan for Transportation, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Preliminary draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This site study plan describes transportation field studies to be conducted during the characterization of the Deaf Smith County, Texas, site for the US Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project. The studies are needed to identify and assess potential project impacts to transportation infrastructure and systems in the project vicinity and along potential transportation routes to the site across the State of Texas. The studies are also needed to locate and design project transportation facilities, and to evaluate and design impact mitigation. After identifying the transportation information requirements needed to comply with Federal, State, and local regulations and repository program requirements, the site study plan describes the study design and rationale, the field data collection procedures and equipment, the data analysis methods and application of results, the data management strategy, the schedule of field activities, the management of the study, and the study's quality assurance program. The field data collection activities are organized into programs for the characterization of site vicinity rail corridors and highway corridors, characterization of alternative statewide transportation routes, monitoring of site characterization effects on transportation, characterization of aircraft overflight patterns and hazardous material transportation patterns, and assessment of emergency response preparedness along alternative statewide transportation routes. 34 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Assessment of manure phosphorus export through turfgrass sod production in Erath County, Texas.

    PubMed

    Munster, C L; Hanzlik, J E; Vietor, D M; White, R H; McFarland, A

    2004-11-01

    A best management practice (BMP) for exporting manure phosphorus (P) in turfgrass sod from the North Bosque River (NBR) watershed in central Texas was assessed using a geographic information system (GIS). The NBR watershed has a mandate to reduce the total annual P load to the NBR by 50% as a result of total maximum daily load regulation. Since dairy waste applications to fields are identified as the major nonpoint source of P to the river, innovative BMPs, such as export of manure P in turfgrass, will be needed to achieve the 50% reduction. However, methods are needed to evaluate the feasibility of these innovative management practices prior to their implementation. A geospatial database of suitable turfgrass production sites was developed for Erath County using GIS. Erath County largely encompasses the upper portion of the NBR watershed. Information from field experiments, production practices, and ground-truthing was used to search, analyze, and verify a geospatial database developed from national and regional sources. The integration and analyses of large databases supports the search by turf producers for sites suitable for turfgrass sod production in Erath County. In addition, GIS enables researchers and regulators to estimate manure P exports and reduced P loading due to implementation of the manure export BMP on a county scale. Under optimal conditions 198,000 kg manure P yr(-1) could be used and 114,840 kg manure P yr(-1) exported from the NBR watershed through implementation of a system using dairy manure to produce turfgrass sod. This is the equivalent of the manure P applied from 10,032 dairy cows yr(-1) and exported from 5808 dairy cows yr(-1). Application of GIS to large-scale planning and decision-making transcends traditional field-scale applications in precision agriculture.

  2. 33 CFR 161.35 - Vessel Traffic Service Houston/Galveston.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...′ N 94°47.0′ W Red Fish Bar 4000 29°29.8′ N 94°51.9′ W Bayport Channel 4000 29°36.7′ N 94°57.2′ W... Harbor Galveston Channel Lt. 2 29° 20.2′ N; 94° 46.6′ W Coast Guard Base. T Texas City Channel Texas...

  3. Visual assessments for Swisher County and Deaf Smith County locations, Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    The area of the Swisher and Deaf Smith County locations is characterized by vast open spaces with limited vertical relief and vegetative cover. The stream valleys and areas around the playa lakes provide the only significant topographical relief in either location, and the areas in range vegetation provide the only major contrast to the dominant land cover of agricultural crops. Tree stands occur almost exclusively in association with orchards, country clubs, farmsteads, and urban areas. Because of climatic conditions in the region, there are few permanent water bodies in either location. Grain elevators, farmsteads, and other cultural modifications (roads, utility lines, fence rows, etc.) are scattered throughout both locations, but they constitute a very small portion of the visible landscape. These features help provide scale in the landscape and also serve as visual landmarks.

  4. Birds of the Rio Grande and other riparian habitats of Western Webb County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodin, Marc C.; Skoruppa, Mary Kay; Blacklock, Gene W.; Hickman, Graham C.

    2007-01-01

    We conducted 164 diurnal morning point counts in 1997 and 89 nocturnal point counts in 1998 along the Rio Grande and at other riparian habitats on remote ranchland in northwestern Webb County. We subsequently conducted 94 diurnal morning and 37 nocturnal point counts in 1999 on public lands along the Rio Grande and at other riparian habitats at Laredo, Webb County. From these systematic surveys (n 384) and other irregular visits to sites during the length of the study, we detected a total of 209 bird species. Many species (97) are distributed widely over much of North America, but substantial numbers of species were also of primarily eastern (30), western (30), southwestern (26), and tropical (26) distributions. Fifty-five of the 209 species (26%) occur on >1 species priority lists in six bird conservation plans that we reviewed, but only four of these were tropical species. This suggests that tropical species, the driving force behind ecotourism-sustained economies in southern Texas, may not benefit directly from recent bird conservation plans, since their lists of priority species do not include many tropical birds. Thus, conservation projects designed to benefit primarily tropical species will not be ranked highly for funding if evaluated on the basis of the bird conservation plans we reviewed.

  5. Using Landsat TM to map critical erosion areas in Tarrant County Texas, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, F.; Morgan, K.; Busbey, A.

    1996-08-01

    Planning agencies throughout the country are seeking rapid, cost-effective techniques to determine land use information associated with erosion occurring in urban and rural watersheds. This is especially important for maintaining and exceeding reservoir life expectancy as premature sedimentation of reservoirs produces the need for expensive dredging operations. Tarrant County, located in North Central Texas, is particularly sensitive to erosion of clays into the numerous reservoirs in the area which serve as drinking water supplies. This study uses a GIS to develop an erosion sensitivity (ES) database with rainfall, soil erodibility and topographic information to map areas that are particularly sensitive to erosion. This ES map was then integrated with land use to determine the effects of land cover and develop an area soil loss map. Areas of high and critical ES occurred along drainage channels, streams, and lakes and made up approximately 5% of the total study area. Zones of low and moderate ES occurred along specific soil type boundaries and accounted for approximately 95% of the total area. Land cover was determined from Landsat TM. When integrated with the ES map, improper land management practices caused a 7% increase in the high and critical categories. This represents an additional 560,000 tons/year of soil loss within Tarrant County due to mismanagement.

  6. Hydrogeologic aspects of the Knippa Gap area in eastern Uvalde and western Medina counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambert, Rebecca B.; Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diana E.; Morris, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer is the primary source of potable water for the San Antonio area in south-central Texas. The Knippa Gap area is a structural low (trough) postulated to channel or restrict flow in the Edwards aquifer in eastern Uvalde and western Medina Counties, Tex. To better understand the function of the Knippa Gap, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, developed the first detailed surficial geologic map of the Knippa Gap area with data and information obtained from previous investigations and field observations. A simplified version of the detailed geologic map depicting the hydrologic units, faulting, and structural dips of the Knippa Gap area is provided in this fact sheet. The map shows that groundwater flow in the Edwards aquifer is influenced by the Balcones Fault Zone, a structurally complex area of the aquifer that contains relay ramps that have formed in extensional fault systems and allowed for deformational changes along fault blocks. Faulting in southeast Uvalde and southwest Medina Counties has produced relay-ramp structures that dip downgradient to the structural low (trough) of the Knippa Gap.

  7. Site study plan for borehole search and characterization, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-22

    This site study plan describes the Borehole Search and Characterization field activities to be conducted during the early stages of Site Characterization at the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. The field program has been designed to provide data useful in addressing information/data needs resulting from Federal/State/Local regulatory requirements and repository program requirements. Air and ground surveys, an extensive literature search, and landowner interviews will be conducted to locate wells within and adjacent to the proposed nuclear waste repository site in Deaf Smith County. Initially, the study will center around the planned Exploratory Shaft Facilities location and will expand outward from that location. Findings from this study may lead to preparation of a new site study plan to search suspected borehole locations, and excavate or reenter known boreholes for additional characterization or remedial action. The Salt Repository Project (SRP) Networks specify the schedule under which the program will operate. The Technical Field Services Contractor (TFSC) is responsible for conducting the field program. Data will be handled and reported in accordance with established SRP procedures. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that appropriate documentation is maintained. 13 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Characteristics of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems of two locations in Deaf Smith and Swisher Counties, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-01

    According to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program and the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (P.L. 97-425), a potential nuclear waste repository site must be chosen with consideration of potential impacts on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This report is a preliminary environmental characterization of two locations in the Texas Panhandle, one in Deaf Smith County and the other in Swisher County, that have been recommended for further study. A description of important natural areas is offered as a basis for comparative studies of the two locations and for the identification and screening of potential repository sites. Information on current land uses, potential habitats, and expected plant and wildlife species is provided to assist field investigators in the collection of baseline data in support of further siting activities. The results of limited field surveys are also included. The report is in two parts. Part I contains a characterization of terrestrial ecological resources based upon limited field surveys aimed at verifying the presence of plant communities and wildlife habitats. It also presents inventories of species with special status, species with recreational and economic importance, and species of ecological value to important or special-status species. Part II presents information on aquatic ecosystems and resources derived primarily from a review of the literature, interviews, and limited field surveys. 21 figures, 18 tables.

  9. 76 FR 68188 - Valero Refining-Texas, L.P. v. Port of Corpus Christi Authority of Nueces County, TX; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... of Corpus Christi Authority of Nueces County, TX; Notice of Filing of Complaint and Assignment Notice... Refining-Texas, L.P., hereinafter ``Complainant,'' against the Port of Corpus Christi Authority of...

  10. 33 CFR 117.T966 - Pelican Island Causeway, Galveston Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Island Causeway, Galveston Channel. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 32866, June 9, 2014. The draw of the Pelican Island Causeway bridge across Galveston Channel, mile 4.5 of the Galveston Channel... Causeway, Galveston Channel. The draw of the Pelican Island Causeway bridge across Galveston Channel,...

  11. Development and Implementation of Sargassum Early Advisory System (SEAS): Phase One By Brandon N. Hill Ocean and Coastal Resources bhill8901@yahoo.com Robert K. Webster Ph.D. Candidate, Marine Sciences Department captrwebster@aol.com Texas A & M University at Galveston P.O. Box 1675 Galveston, Texas 77553

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, B. N.; Webster, R.; Frazier, J.; Linton, T.

    2013-12-01

    Abstract: Sargassum is a crucial aspect of many oceanic and coastal environments. However, it can inundate a coast if the conditions permit excessive growth and landings. In nature this is not a detriment to the beaches, but actually serves to reduce erosion and provide nutrients. When beaches are relied upon to support the tourism industry abnormally excessive Sargassum landings can become an impediment. This creates a struggle between the environmental good of the beach and the economic good of the tourism industry. The Sargassum Early Advisory System (SEAS) Phase One focuses on increasing the efficiency of the current beach management practices. Phase One begins with the effort to employ NASA Landsat images as early warning devices of Sargassum's impending landfall. Oceanic currents as well as coastal wind patterns are hypothesized to be the primary drivers of Sargassum. The Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) as well as the Texas Automated Buoy System (TABS), Weatherbuoy, and beach cameras are used to receive real time data as well as future predictions to allow for the creation of accurate macroalgae forecasts. Landsat imagery has a sufficient resolution that slicks created by the Sargassum's disruption of the water surface can be differentiated. The Landsat's RGB array allows it to identify large Sargassum mats by a distinct green glow. The SEAS Team has created a 555 km X 516 km swath of monitoring that provides two to three week notices of eminent Sargasssum landfall. The remote sensing data is crosschecked with ground-truthing via mounted beach cameras and boating contacts. The SEAS Team creates advisories that are sent out to local beach managers and other stakeholders. These advisories allow for the beach managers to more efficiently allocate resources. If Sargassum is not observed in the Landsat images then beach managers are able to scale back the workforce and equipment committed to removing the Sargassum from the beach. If an excess of Sargassum is

  12. Tuberculosis in the foreign-born population of Tarrant county, Texas by immigration status.

    PubMed

    Weis, S E; Moonan, P K; Pogoda, J M; Turk, L; King, B; Freeman-Thompson, S; Burgess, G

    2001-09-15

    The epidemiology of tuberculosis is changing in the United States as a result of immigration, yet the extent to which different classes of immigrants contribute to overall morbidity is unknown. Tuberculosis in nonimmigrant visitors is of particular interest as they are currently exempt from screening requirements. We conducted a prospective survey of all culture-positive tuberculosis patients in Tarrant County, Texas from 1/98 to 12/00. Immigration status of foreign-born patients was classified as permanent residents, undocumented, or nonimmigrant visitors. Of 274 eligible participants, 114 (42%) were foreign-born; of these, 67 (59%) were permanent residents, 28 (25%) were undocumented, and 19 (17%) were nonimmigrant visitors. Among the foreign-born, we observed significant differences by immigration status in multidrug resistance (p = 0.02), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (p = 0.0007), and hospitalization (p = 0.03 for ever/never, 0.01 for duration). Compared with other immigrants, more nonimmigrant visitors were multi-drug-resistant (16 % versus 11% of undocumented residents and 1% of permanent residents), were HIV-positive (32% versus 0% of undocumented and 5% of permanent residents), were hospitalized (47% versus 36% of undocumented and 19% of permanent residents), and had lengthy hospitalizations (median [midspread] days = 87 [25 to 153] versus 8.5 [4 to 28] for undocumented and 10 [7 to 24 d] for permanent residents). We found nonimmigrant visitors to be an important source of tuberculosis morbidity in Tarrant County. Further studies in other regions of the U.S. are needed to determine if screening and treatment recommendations of persons who spend extended periods in the U.S. should be raised to the standards set for permanent residents.

  13. Technical procedures for the implementation of cultural resource site studies, Deaf Smith County, Texas: Preliminary draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-30

    Cultural resources at the Deaf Smith County site will be identified, evaluated and managed through the implementation of studies detailed in the Site Study Plan for Cultural Resources. This technical procedure outlines the conduct of pedestrian survey and the documentation of identified cultural resources. The purpose of the field surveys is to identify and document cultural resources in the areas that will be affected by site characterization activities and to record the environmental setting of identified cultural resources. Three pedestrian surveys will cover 100 percent of the on-site and off-site project areas. Survey 1 will provide coverage of the Repository Surface Facility (RSF) area, which includes the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) and two linear engineering design borehole (EDBH) seismic survey corridors. Survey 2 will provide coverage of a 39 km/sup 2/ (15 mi/sup 2/) area that includes the 23 km/sup 2/ (9 mi/sup 2/) Deaf Smith County site plus a 0.4 to 0.8 kM (1/4 to 1/2 mi) border area but excludes the area covered by Survey 1. Survey 3 will cover offsite geotechnical test areas, such as the locations of playa boreholes, deep playa wells, hydrologic tests, site foundation borings, and their access routes. The purpose of site documentation or recording is to address the project information needs for land use permits and approvals, engineering design support, and cultural resource evaluation for National Register of Historic Places eligibility. Site documentation will consist of gathering sufficient data on identified resources to complete Texas Natural Resource Information System (TNRIS). 7 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Clay mineralogy and its controls on production, Pennsylvanian upper Morrow sandstone, Farnsworth field, Ochiltree County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, T.W. )

    1989-12-01

    Farnsworth field in Ochiltree County, Texas, is the most prolific upper Morrow oil field in the Anadarko basin, producing more than 36 million bbl of oil and 27 billion ft{sup 3} of gas since its discovery in 1955. The bulk of the production comes from an upper Morrow-aged sandstone locally referred to as the Buckhaults sandstone. The Buckhaults sandstone is a coarse to very coarse-grained, arkose to arkosic wacke. Grain-size distributions, sedimentary structure analysis, and sand-body geometry indicate that the Buckhaults was deposited in a fluvial-deltaic environment as distributary channel and distributary mouth-bar sands. Depositional strike is northwest to southeast. The source area for the Buckhaults sediments was primarily a plutonic igneous terrane, with a minor contribution from volcanic and reworked sedimentary rocks. The proposed source area is the Amarillo-Wichita uplift to the south. In addition, the Cimarron arch and/or Keyes dome to the west-northwest may also have contributed sediment to the study area. The large (average) grain size, the amount of feldspar present, and the overall immaturity of the Buckhaults sediments indicate a relatively short distance of transport. Detailed scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis of cores from the productive interval coupled with comparisons of varying completion practices across the field indicate a significant correlation between individual well performance, clay mineralogy, and completion technique.

  15. Combined geological and surface geochemical methods discover Agaritta and Brady Creek fields, Concho County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, D.F.; Burson, K.R.; Thompson, C.K. ); Brown, J.J. )

    1992-04-01

    From December 1987 to March 1991, 25 prospects in the lower King Sandstone (Upper Pennsylvanian Cisco) play in Concho County, Texas, were tested by several operators. They used combinations of subsurface geology, reconnaissance airborne gas sensing, surface radiometrics, soil magnetic susceptibility, and soil gas hydrocarbon measurements to define prospects. Six new King Sandstone field discoveries or extensions and three deeper pay Goen Limestone field discoveries resulted in a 36% exploratory success rate. The total exploration and development cost was approximately $0.67 per bbl of proven producing oil reserves. As examples, the authors present the discovery of Brady Creek and Agaritta fields. Agaritta field is one of the two largest of the new field discoveries with estimated proven producing recoverable reserves of 6,000,000 BO. Its discovery was based on a combination of (1) airborne hydrocarbon sensing, (2) interstitial soil gas hydrocarbon data, (3) soil magnetic susceptibility measurements, and (4) surface potassium and uranium concentrations measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. Interstitial soil gas hydrocarbon anomalies combined with soil magnetic susceptibility anomalies provided the best detailed surface guidance to Agaritta field. These were supported locally by radiometric anomalies. The Brady Creek field is interpreted to be a possible crevasse splay deposit. The Aggaritta field is interpreted to be a point bar deposit. Both fields are stratigraphic traps.

  16. Combined geological and surface geochemical methods discovered Agaritta and Brady Creek Fields, Concho County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, D.F.; Burson, K.R.; Thompson, C.K. ); Brown, J.J. )

    1993-07-01

    From December 1987 to March 1991, 25 prospects in the lower King sand (Upper Pennsylvanian Cisco) play in Concho County, Texas, were tested by several operators. They used combinations of subsurface geology, reconnaissance airborne gas sensing, surface radiometrics, soil magnetic susceptibility, and soil-gas hydrocarbon measurements to define prospects. Six new King sand discoveries or extensions and three deeper Goen discoveries resulted in a 36% exploratory success rate. The total exploration and development cost was approximately $0.67/bbl of proven producing oil reserves. Final locations for the discovery wells on each of the nine successful prospects were selected primarily on the basis of combined subsurface geology and surface geochemical data. As examples, we present information about the discovery of Brady Creek and Agaritta fields. Agaritta field is one of the two largest of the new-field discoveries, with estimated proven producing recoverable reserves of 6 million bbl of oil. Its discovery was based on a combination of (1) regional subsurface geologic projection, (2) airborne hydrocarbon sensing, (3) interstitial soil-gas hydrocarbon data, (4) soil magnetic-susceptibility measurements, and (5) surface potassium and uranium concentrations measured by gamma-ray spectrometry.

  17. Reservoir zonation in Silurian-Devonian carbonates of Wells field, Dawson County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzullo, L.J. )

    1992-04-01

    Wells field in Dawson County, Texas, has produced over 7.5 million bbl since 1955 from Silurian-Devonian carbonates. Although originally classified as a Devonian field, production there actually is out of the Silurian Wristen and Fusselman formations. Wells field is an extremely complex system of structured and stratigraphic reservoirs not easily characterized by traditional subsurface mapping techniques. Detailed lithologic analyses of well cuttings from 29 wells in and around this field were done to evaluate reservoir zonation and potentials for either new field development wells, or recompletions from existing well bores. These analyses have shown that paleotopographic highs on the Fusselman unconformity across the field created optimum sites for Fusselman dolomite reservoir development, and collateral development of Wristen reservoirs. The Wristen reservoirs are in the form of porous carbonate mounds that grew adjacent to the paleotopographically high areas, or simple compactionally fractured cherty carbonates over these highs. The recognition of Fusselman paleotopography in most wells is implied by thickness and facies changes in the overlying Wristen section. A certain amount of structure and facies-induced reservoir separation has been documented. The results of this study have been used to identify several areas of the field where each of the three reservoirs could be exploited for underdeveloped reserves.

  18. Evaluation of waterflood operations at Iatan East Howard Field, Mitchell County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.P.; Mitchell, S.M.

    1988-02-01

    Mobil Exploration and Producing US Inc. completed a reservoir description study on Iatan East Howard field in Mitchell County, Texas, in 1984. The application of study results has improved subsequent development drilling and waterflood operations. Lease production has doubled within two years with the drilling of 40 producers and 13 injection wells. The field produces from thin (2 to 40 ft) porosity stringers in fractured Permian age San Angelo and Clearfork dolomites at 2300 to 3200 ft in depth. Reservoirs are areally discontinuous due to original depositional controls on porosity develoment and distribution. Pay zone reservoir parameters such as porosity and permeability vary from 4 to 17% and 0.1 to 120 md, respectively. The presence of a fracture orientation at N60/degree/E to N85/degree/E has caused producing wells to experience early breakthrough of injection water when in line with injectors and the fracture direction. Waterflows have also occurred in drilling wells when similarly aligned. Recognition of this fracture overprint has dictated the use of a staggered line drive injection pattern parallel to the fracture trend to improve sweep efficiency.

  19. Evaluation of waterflood operations at Iatan East Howard field, Mitchell County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.P.; Mitchell, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    Mobil Exploration and Producing U.S. Inc. completed a reservoir description study on Iatan East Howard field in Mitchell County, Texas, in 1984. The application of study results has improved subsequent development drilling and waterflood operations. Lease production has doubled within two years with the drilling of 40 producers and 13 injection wells. The field produces from thin (2 to 40 ft) porosity stringers in fractured Permian age San Angelo and Clearfork dolomites at 2,300 to 3,200 ft in depth. Reservoirs are really discontinuous due to original depositional controls on porosity development and distribution. Pay zone reservoir parameters such as porosity and permeability vary from 4 to 17% and 0.1 to 120 md, respectively. The presence of a fracture orientation at N60/sup 0/E to N85/sup 0/E has caused producing wells to experience early breakthrough of injection water when in line with injectors and the fracture direction. Waterflows have also occurred in drilling wells when similarly aligned. Recognition of this fracture overprint has dictated the use of a staggered line drive injection pattern parallel to the fracture trend to improve sweep efficiency. Reservoir matrix can be swept more uniformly as rows of injectors pressurize those aligned fractures and move oil perpendicular to the fracture trend and toward the rows of producers.

  20. B. C. Canyon field, Howard County, Texas: An ancient analogy to modern tropical tower karst terrains

    SciTech Connect

    Mozynski, D.C.; Reid, A.M. )

    1992-04-01

    Late in the early deposition of sediments in Canyon field, a series of glacio-eustatically controlled sea level lowstands resulted in a carbonate buildup seaward of the Horseshoe Atoll in Howard County, Texas. The resulting satellite reef tract consists of fringing boundstone; high-energy shelf grainstones; lower energy shelf packstones and wackestones; and thin, highstand, black shales and mudstones. The original extent and thickness of deposits were extensively modified during karstification coincident with successive sea level lowstands. The resulting paleotopographic landforms appear to be similar to tower karst features of Puerto Rico. During the beginning of each sea level highstand, the paleoterrain was modified by erosion. The basinal foreshelf conglomerates resulting from initial highstand erosion contain dipping strata that commonly can be detected by the dipmeter tool. The mechanism for the formation of these strata may be depositional or the result of diagenetic alteration of the rock fabric in the burial environment. Using dipmeter data, an uneconomic producer has been offset by one of the better producing wells in the field.

  1. Hylton northwest field's tectonic effect on Suggs Ellenburger producing area, Nolan County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffacker, B.F. Jr.

    1987-02-01

    An evaluation of the geology of Hylton Northwest field in southeastern Nolan County, Texas, indicates that the pre-Pennsylvanian tectonics associated with this field may have affected the producing zone of Suggs Ellenburger field 6 mi (9 km) west. Both fields are located along the Fort Chadbourne fault system of the Eastern shelf of the Midland basin. The study of the depositional environment of the Suggs Ellenburger field reveals some interesting aspects of the tectonostratigraphic terrane that appears to have in part influenced the development of the reservoir rock. The tectonics of the Cambrian-Ordovician (Ellenburger) period in Hylton Northwest field created a southwest-trending fault system with associated fractures. The fractures allowed percolating surface waters to leach carbonate rocks in the area, creating vuggy secondary porosity in the intercrystalline rock fabric. The faults were modified to a karst topography by periods of subaerial erosion of the Cambrian-Ordovician depositional plain. Sea level fluctuations that occurred in the area were associated with the alternating uplift and subsidence of the Hylton Northwest field's tectonic feature. As a result, environmental zones of porosity with varying vertical subaerial erosion formed within the overall Cambrian-Ordovician (Ellenburger) interval. The producing zone of the Suggs Ellenburger field occurs at approximately 6,400 ft (1,951 m).

  2. Vulnerability of ground water to contamination, Edwards Aquifer recharge zone, Bexar County, Texas, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.

    2000-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer, one of the most productive carbonate-rock aquifers in the Nation, is composed of the Kainer and Person Formations of the Edwards Group plus the overlying Georgetown Formation. Most recharge to the Edwards aquifer results from the percolation of streamflow loss and the infiltration of precipitation through porous parts of the recharge zone. Residential and commercial development is increasing, particularly in Bexar County in south-central Texas, atop the densely fractured and steeply faulted recharge zone. The increasing development has increased the vulnerability of ground water to contamination by spillage or leakage of waste materials, particularly fluids associated with urban runoff and (or) septic-tank leachate. This report describes a method of assessing the vulnerability of ground water to contamination in the Edwards aquifer recharge zone. The method is based on ratings of five natural features of the area: (1) hydraulic properties of outcropping hydrogeologic units; (2) presence or absence of faults; (3) presence or absence of caves and (or) sinkholes; (4) slope of land surface; and (5) permeability of soil. The sum of the ratings for the five natural features was used to develop a map showing the recharge zone's vulnerability to ground-water contamination.

  3. The role of diagenetic studies in flow-unit modeling: San Andres formation, Yoakum County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, S. )

    1994-03-01

    The Permian San Andres Formation represents one of the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing intervals of the Permian basin. Dolostone lithofacies intercalated with thin evaporites accommodate highly compartmentalized reservoirs resulting from complex depositional and diagenetic histories. This compartmentalization often facilitates the use of these reservoirs in flow-unit studies. Perhaps more important than the relationship of productive intervals to depositional facies is the degree to which diagenetic processes have influenced reservoir properties. Detailed petrographic evaluation of the reservoir in question, though often overlooked, should be an integral part of flow-unit studies. Once a diagenetic sequence is established, the information may be incorporated in to the facies model to better understand how to subdivide the reservoir. Such an investigation has been conducted on the San Andres Formation in Reeves field of southeastern Yoakum County, Texas. Here, multistage diagenetic overprints are superimposed on depositional facies that vary in degree of lateral extent, thereby complicating the geometries of individual productive zones within the reservoir. Analysis of the reservoir reveals that Reeves San Andres sediments were subjected to dominant diagenetic processes, including dolomitization and sulfate implacement, both of which are major factors in porosity preservation, and a variety of minor processes that have had little effect on reservoir quality. The recognition of diagenetic facies, and understanding of the processes that have created them, and identification of the implications of these processes on reservoir properties is a vital part of any flow-unit study.

  4. Site study plan for exploratory shaft monitoring wells, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Preliminary Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    As part of site characterization studies, two exploratory shafts will be constructed at the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. Twelve wells at five locations have been proposed to monitor potential impacts of shaft construction on water-bearing zones in the Ogallala Formation and the Dockum Group. In addition, tests have been proposed to determine the hydraulic properties of the water-bearing zones for use in design and construction of the shafts. Samples of the Blackwater Draw Formation, Ogallala Formation, and Dockum Group will be obtained during construction of these wells. Visual indentification, laboratory testing, and in situ testing will yield data necessary for Exploratory Shaft Facility design and construction. This activity provides the earliest data on the Blackwater Drew Formation, Ogallala Formation, and Dockum Group near the exploratory shaft locations. Drilling and hydrologic testing are scheduled prior to other subsurface activity at the Exploratory Shaft Facility to establish ground-water baseline conditions. The Technical Field Services Contractor is responsible for conducting the field program of drilling and testing. Samples and data will be handled and reported in accordance with established Salt Repository Project procedures. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that the appropriate documentation is maintained. 45 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Draft environmental assessment: Swisher County site, Texas. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112). [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Swisher County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The potentially acceptable site was subsequently narrowed to an area of 9 square miles. To determine their suitability, the Swisher site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations are reported in this draft environmental assessment (EA), which is being issued for public review and comment. The DOE findings and determinations that are based on these evaluations are preliminary and subject to public review and comment. A final EA will be prepared after considering the comments received. On the basis of the evaluations contained in this draft EA, the DOE has found that the Swisher site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The site is contained in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site - the Deaf Smith site. Although the Swisher site appears to be suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Deaf Smith site is the preferred site in the Permian Basin and is proposing to nominate the Deaf Smith site rather than the Swisher site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization.

  6. Site study plan for intermediate hydrology clusters tests wells Deaf Smith County Site, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    To characterize the geologic, geochemical, and hydrologic characteristics of intermediate-depth formations at the proposed Deaf Smith County, Texas, repository site, wells called Intermediate Hydrology clusters will test the Dewey Lake, Alibates, Salado, Yates, Upper and Lower Seven Rivers, and Queen Grayburg Formations. Sixteen wells will be installed at six locations. One location will have four wills, two locations will have three wells, and three locations will have two wells for a total of 16 wells. Testing of the formations is to proceed from the bottom up, with 2-day pumping tests at the less permeable formations. Tracer tests and tests for verticall hydraulic properties will be designed and performed after other hydrologic tests are completed. After testing, selected wells are to be completed as single or possibly dual monitoring wells to observe water-level trends. To develop a hydrogeologic testing plan, the response of each formation to potential testing procedures was evaluated using design values and an assumend range for hydraulic parameters. These evaluations indicate that hydraulic properties of a sandy zone of the Dockum, the lower Sever Rivers, and possibly the Alibates and Queen/Grayburg can be determined by pumping tests. Standard of shut-in slug tests must be conducted in the remaining formations. Tests of very long duration would be required to determine the verticla properties of less permeable formations. Tracer tests would also require weeks or months. 61 figs., 34 refs., 4 tabs.

  7. Site study plan for routine laboratory rock mechanics, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This Site Study Plan for Routine Laboratory Rock Mechanics describes routine laboratory testing to be conducted on rock samples collected as part of the characterization of the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. This study plan describes the early laboratory testing. Additional testing may be required and the type and scope of testing will be dependent upon the results of the early testing. This study provides for measurements of index, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical properties with tests which are standardized and used widely in geotechnical investigations. Another Site Study Plan for Nonroutine Laboratory Rock Mechanics describes laboratory testing of samples from the site to determine mechanical, thermomechanical, and thermal properties by less widely used methods, many of which have been developed specifically for characterization of the site. Data from laboratory tests will be used for characterization of rock strata, design of shafts and underground facilities, and modeling of repository behavior in support of resolution of both preclosure and postclosure issues. A tentative testing schedule and milestone log are given. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that appropriate documentation is maintained. 18 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Coastal Inlets of Texas, USA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Caney Creek Freeport Ship Channel San Luis Pass Galveston Pass Rollover Fish Pass Sabine Pass Texas Victoria Houston Port Arthur Corpus Christi...1960) provide design guidance for constructing fish passes along the Texas coast, it appears that an update based on more recent experiences and...Hall Pier at Corpus Christi; and bay gauges (Rawlings at Mouth of Colorado River; Lavaca, and Port Isabel in the lower Laguna Madre ) for year 1999

  9. Coal Rank and Stratigraphy of Pennsylvanian Coal and Coaly Shale Samples, Young County, North-Central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guevara, Edgar H.; Breton, Caroline; Hackley, Paul C.

    2007-01-01

    Vitrinite reflectance measurements were made to determine the rank of selected subsurface coal and coaly shale samples from Young County, north-central Texas, for the National Coal Resources Database System State Cooperative Program conducted by the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin. This research is the continuation of a pilot study that began in adjacent Archer County, and forms part of a larger investigation of the coalbed methane resource potential of Pennsylvanian coals in north-central Texas. A total of 57 samples of coal and coaly shale fragments were hand-picked from drill cuttings from depths of about 2,000 ft in five wells, and Ro determinations were made on an initial 10-sample subset. Electric-log correlation of the sampled wells indicates that the collected samples represent coal and coaly shale layers in the Strawn (Pennsylvanian), Canyon (Pennsylvanian), and Cisco (Pennsylvanian-Permian) Groups. Coal rank in the initial sample subset ranges from lignite (Ro=0.39), in a sample from the Cisco Group at a depth of 310 to 320 ft, to high volatile bituminous A coal (Ro=0.91) in a sample from the lower part of the Canyon Group at a depth of 2,030 to 2,040 ft.

  10. Structural patterns, evolution, and seismic expression of Montague County, Texas - Implications concerning past discoveries and future exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Font, R.G. )

    1990-02-01

    North Texas is a mature province that has yielded abundant hydrocarbons. Opportunities still exist for discovering large reserves by applying new technology and developing innovative concepts for frontier type plays. Montague County can be used to illustrate this point. Analysis of seismic and petrologic data reveals a fascinating scenario concerning structural patterns and tectonic evolution. The Proterozoic and early Paleozoic history is related to the development of the Wichita aulacogen. Similar structural architecture is found on the southern side of the Wichita-Amarillo uplift from the Hardeman basin to Montague County. The early history reflects rifting. Subsequent tectonism relates to the Hercynian orogeny, plate convergence, and collision. Fault patterns mapped from seismic and subsurface data may be explained through reorientation of the principal stresses. Of the major patterns mapped, the northwest-trending system is dominant. Normal faults formed during rifting were selectively reactivated as upthrusts during convergence. Past discoveries are almost invariably related to seismic expression. New Carboniferous reserves will be discovered in subtle traps. State-of-the-art seismic and seismic stratigraphy will equate to exploratory success. New play concepts involve the petroleum potential of the deep Ellenburger, similar to the deep pay found in Oklahoma. Recent deep wells drilled in the county affirm the presence of structure and reservoir, but fail to find the indigenous source potential present north of the Red River. Best opportunities for deep Ellenburger discoveries in Texas lie where faulting juxtaposes Carboniferous source rocks to the Cambrian-Ordovician reservoirs.

  11. Bibliography of Ground-Water References for All 254 Counties in Texas, 1886-2001

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    REPORT 21, 1966. GROUND WATER IN THE OGALLALA FORMATION IN THE SOUTH- ERN HIGH PLAINS OF TEXAS AND NEW MEXICO : USGS HYDRO- LOGIC INVESTIGATIONS ATLAS HA... NEW MEXICO , OKLAHOMA, SOUTH DAKOTA, TEXAS, AND WYOMING: USGS HYDROLOGIC INVESTI- GATIONS ATLAS HA–648, 1981. WATER LEVEL AND SATURATED THICKNESS...CHANGES, PREDE- VELOPMENT TO 1980, IN THE HIGH PLAINS AQUIFER IN PARTS OF COLORADO, KANSAS, NEBRASKA, NEW MEXICO , OKLA- HOMA, SOUTH DAKOTA, TEXAS, AND

  12. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Coverage Among Females Aged 11 to 17 in Texas Counties: An Application of Multilevel, Small Area Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Eberth, Jan M.; Hossain, Md Monir; Tiro, Jasmin A.; Zhang, Xingyou; Holt, James B.; Vernon, Sally W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Local data are often used to plan and evaluate public health interventions and policy. With increasingly fewer public resources to collect sufficient data to support direct estimation of local outcomes, methods for deriving small area estimates are vital. The purpose of this study is to describe the county-level geographic distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine coverage among adolescent females in Texas using multilevel small area estimation. Methods Multilevel (individual, county, public health region) random-intercept logit models were fit to HPV vaccination data (≥1 dose Gardasil) from the 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Using the parameter estimates from the final model, we simulated 10,000 data sets for each regression coefficient from the normal distribution and applied them to the logit model to estimate HPV vaccine coverage in each county. Results County-level coverage estimates ranged from 7% to 29%, compared with the state average of 18% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.59–21.88). Many Southwestern border and metropolitan counties exhibited high coverage estimates. Low coverage estimates were noted in the Panhandle, Southeastern border region, and Northeast. Significant correlations were observed between HPV vaccination and Hispanic ethnicity, county poverty, and public health region poverty. Conclusion Harnessing the flexibility of multilevel small area models to estimate HPV vaccine coverage at the county level, we have provided data that may inform the development of health education programs/policies, the provision of health services, and the planning of new research studies. Additionally, we have provided a framework for modeling other health outcomes at the county level using national survey data. PMID:23481692

  13. Helicopter Electromagnetic and Magnetic Survey Data and Maps, Seco Creek Area, Medina and Uvalade Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Bruce D.; Smith, David V.; Hill, Patricia L.; Labson, Victor F.

    2003-01-01

    A helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic (HEM) survey was completed of a 209 square kilometer (81 square miles) area of the central Edwards aquifer. This open-file report is a release of the airborne geophysical data and a summary of the hydrologic application. The survey area was centered on the Valdina Farms sinkhole along the Seco Creek drainage in western Medina County, Texas. Flight lines were flown north south with three east west tie lines to aid in leveling the magnetic data. Additional lines were flown on each side of the Seco and Little Seco Creek drainages. A five kilometer (4 mile) extension of 15 lines was flown north of the main survey block centered on Seco Creek. This digital data release contains the flight line data, grids, and maps of the HEM survey data. The Edwards aquifer in this area consists of three hydrologic zones: catchment, recharge, and confined. The Glen Rose Formation is exposed in the catchment area. The recharge zone is situated in the Balcones fault zone where the Devils River Group of the Edwards aquifer has been exposed by normal faults. The magnetic data is not discussed in depth here, but does have high amplitude closed anomalies caused by shallow igneous intrusives. The Woodard Cave Fault that separates the recharge and catchment zones is in places associated with a weak linear magnetic low. The HEM data has been processed to produce apparent resistivities for each of the six EM coil pairs and frequencies. Maps of the apparent resistivity for the five horizontal coil pairs show that the catchment, recharge, and confined zones all have numerous linear features that are likely caused by structures, many of which have not been mapped. The distribution of high resistivity areas reflects the lithologic differences within the Trinity and Edwards aquifers.

  14. A unique Austin Chalk reservoir, Van field, Van Zandt County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, J.T. )

    1990-09-01

    Significant shallow oil production from the Austin Chalk was established in the Van field, Van Zandt County, in East Texas in the late 1980s. The Van field structure is a complexly faulted domal anticline created by salt intrusion. The Woodbine sands, which underlie the Austin Chalk, have been and continue to be the predominant reservoir rocks in the field. Evidence indicates that faults provided vertical conduits for migration of Woodbine oil into the Austin Chalk where it was trapped along the structural crest. The most prolific Austin Chalk production is on the upthrown side of the main field fault, as is the Woodbine. The Austin Chalk is a soft, white to light gray limestone composed mostly of coccoliths with some pelecypods. Unlike the Austin Chalk in the Giddings and Pearsall fields, the chalk at Van was not as deeply buried and therefore did not become brittle and susceptible to tensional or cryptic fracturing. The shallow burial in the Van field was also important in that it allowed the chalk to retain primary microporosity. The production comes entirely from this primary porosity. In addition to the structural position and underlying oil source from the Woodbine, the depositional environment and associated lithofacies are also keys to the reservoir quality in the Van field as demonstrated by cores from the upthrown and downthrown (less productive) sides of the main field fault. It appears that at the time of Austin Chalk deposition, the main field fault was active and caused the upthrown side to be a structural high and a more agreeable environment for benthonic organisms such as pelecypods and worms. The resulting bioturbation enhanced the reservoir's permeability enough to allow migration and entrapment of the oil. Future success in exploration for analogous Austin Chalk reservoirs will require the combination of a favorable environment of deposition, a nearby Woodbine oil source, and a faulted trap that will provide the conduit for migration.

  15. Rail transportation corridor analysis report: Deaf Smith County location in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    An environmental data base was developed for the purpose of preliminary siting of potential rail access corridors between existing rail lines and the potential repository site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The categories of the data base were environmental conditions considered significant in rail line construction and operation. These included land cover, population areas, slope, surface hydrology, cultivated prime agricultural lands, cultural features, and utility rights-of-way. The categories were divided into avoidance, constraint, and opportunity features, and the constraint features were then weighted for environmental impact potential. An environmental screening analysis using the computerized Geographical Information System (GIS) was then performed. The analysis involved applying the GIS overlay process to the various constraint data categories to produce a composite constraint map of the study area. The composite constraint map, color coded for various levels of constraint to corridor siting, was subsequently used as a guide for the selection of a series of alternative corridors. By means of a further application of GIS procedures, the corridor alternatives were statistically analyzed for adherence to corridor selection guidelines. In addition, a supplementary analysis was performed to compare the alternatives in terms of four impact categories: road crossings, construction costs, degree of land disruption, and population impact. The statistical and supplementary impact analyses led to a preliminary selection of a preferred corridor. The corridor assessment process indicated the importance of analyzing alternative trade-offs, as well as the need for more detailed investigation of certain conditions and a detailed comparison of alternatives prior to final corridor siting.

  16. Draft environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112). [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The potentially acceptable site was subsequently narrowed to an area of 9 square miles. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations are reported in this draft environmental assessment, which is being issued for public review and comment. The DOE findings and determinations that are based on these evaluations are preliminary and subject to public review and comment. A final EA will be prepared after considering the comments received. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this draft EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site - the Swisher site. Although the Swisher site appears to be suitable for site characterization, DOE has concluded that the Deaf Smith site is the preferred site. The DOE finds that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is proposing to nominate the Deaf Smith site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. Having compared the Deaf Smith site with the other four sites proposed for nomination, the DOE has determined that the Deaf Smith site is one of the three preferred sites for recommendation to the President as candidates for characterization.

  17. Development of ground-water resources in Orange County, Texas, and adjacent areas in Texas and Louisiana, 1971-80

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonnet, C.W.; Gabrysch, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    Although saltwater encroachment is evident in parts of southern Orange County, the encroachment is not expected to be detrimental if the ground-water pumping remains stable and the projected increase in demands for water is met with surface-water supplies.

  18. Technical procedures for implementation of acoustics site studies, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    The purpose and scope of the technical procedure for processing data from the tethered meteorological system are covered. Definitions, interfaces, and concurrent data needs are also addressed. This technical procedure describes how to control, organize, verify, and archive tethered meteorological system data. These data will be received at the processing location from the field measurement location and are part of the characterization of the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas for the salt repository program. These measurements will be made in support of the sound propagation study and are a result of environmental data requirements for acoustics. 6 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Archeological Investigations in the Truscott Reservoir Area. King and Knox Counties, Texas,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-01

    Aspectos de Arqueologia e Historic del Noreste, Monterrey, Mexico, April 23-26, 1975. 1976 The Panhandle Archaic. In The Texas Archaic: A Symposium...Texas Panhandle. Actas del 41 Congreso Inter- nacional de Americanistas, Vol. 1, pp. 270-278. Institute Nacional de Antropologia e Historia

  20. Migrant Programs in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrasco, Frank, Ed.

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide information on migrant programs and services in the state of Texas. Data are gathered from 92 of the 254 counties in Texas. There is a profile for each county selected and for all migrant programs identified in each county. Descriptions of Title III-B migrant programs, the High School Equivalency program,…

  1. Data collection and compilation for a geodatabase of groundwater, surface-water, water-quality, geophysical, and geologic data, Pecos County Region, Texas, 1930-2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Daniel K.; Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Houston, Natalie A.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Teeple, Andrew; Thomas, Jonathan V.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Pecos County, City of Fort Stockton, Brewster County, and Pecos County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1, compiled groundwater, surface-water, water-quality, geophysical, and geologic data for site locations in the Pecos County region, Texas, and developed a geodatabase to facilitate use of this information. Data were compiled for an approximately 4,700 square mile area of the Pecos County region, Texas. The geodatabase contains data from 8,242 sampling locations; it was designed to organize and store field-collected geochemical and geophysical data, as well as digital database resources from the U.S. Geological Survey, Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Texas Water Development Board, Texas Commission on Environmental Quality,and numerous other State and local databases. The geodatabase combines these disparate database resources into a simple data model. Site locations are geospatially enabled and stored in a geodatabase feature class for cartographic visualization and spatial analysis within a Geographic Information System. The sampling locations are related to hydrogeologic information through the use of geodatabase relationship classes. The geodatabase relationship classes provide the ability to perform complex spatial and data-driven queries to explore data stored in the geodatabase.

  2. Approximate change in water levels in wells in the Chicot and Evangeline Aquifers 1977-86 and 1985-86, and measured compaction 1973-86, in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, James Frank; Ranzau, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    This report consists of: (1) Four maps that present data on water level changes during 1977-86 and 1985-86 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston, Texas, and (2) one set of graphs and one map that present data on land subsidence and compaction of subsurface materials for 1973-86. (USGS)

  3. Port Isabel (GIWW) Channel Improvements at the Queen Isabella Causeway. Laguna Madre, Texas, Navigation Improvement Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -0 9 -1 3 Port Isabel (GIWW) Channel Improvements at the Queen Isabella Causeway Laguna Madre , Texas, Navigation...Causeway Laguna Madre , Texas, Navigation Improvement Project Timothy W. Shelton, P.E. and Dennis Webb, P.E. Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory U.S...distribution is unlimited. Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineer District, Galveston Galveston, TX 77550 ERDC/CHL TR-09-13 ii Abstract: Laguna Madre is

  4. Summer sound-level characterization of the Deaf Smith County and Swisher County locations in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    A description of sound levels and sound sources in the Deaf Smith County and Swisher County locations in the Palo Duro Basin during a period representative of the summer season is presented. Included are data collected during the period August 4 through 8, 1982, for both locations. 3 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  5. Consultation draft: Site characterization plan overview, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing a site characterization plan for the candidate site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The DOE has provided, for information and review, a consultation draft of the plan to the State of Texas and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The site characterization plan is a lengthy document that describes in considerable detail the program that will be conducted to characterize the geologic, hydrologic, and other conditions relevant to the suitability of the site for a repository. The overview presented here consists of brief summaries of important topics covered in the consultation draft of the site characterization plan; it is not a substitute for the site characterization plan. The arrangement of the overview is similar to that of the plan itself, with brief descriptions of the repository system - the site, the repository, and the waste package - preceding the discussion of the characterization program to be carried out at the Deaf Smith County site. It is intended primarily for the management staff of organizations involved in the DOE's repository program or other persons who might wish to understand the general scope of the site-characterization program, the activities to be conducted, and the facilities to be constructed rather than the technical details of site characterization. 15 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Meteorological and air quality characterization of the Deaf Smith and Swisher County locations in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    The meteorological and air quality characteristics of the Permian Basin locations in Deaf Smith County and Swisher County, Texas, are described using data from eight climatological stations in the vicinity. Meteorological conditions are reasonably represented by these data because of the generally flat terrain over the area and the geographical proximity of the climatological stations to the locations. Information regarding atmospheric transport and dispersion conditions is derived from data for the period 1976 to 1980 provided by the National Weather Service station at Amarillo, Texas. On an annual basis, southerly winds predominate and the average wind speed is 6.1 m/s (13.7 mph). The analysis of dispersion climatology indicates that neutral atmospheric stability also predominates over the year. This, in combination with high average wind speeds, is characteristic of relatively good dispersion conditions in the area. Significant topographic features are far enough away from the locations that their effects on local dispersion conditions are negligible. The closest available air quality data were collected around population centers and may not accurately represent conditions at these rural and undeveloped locations. The area has been declared ''attaining'' for particulate and sulfur dioxide standards and ''cannot be classified as better than ambient standard'' for nitrogen oxides, ozone, and carbon monoxide. 49 references, 5 figures, 18 tables.

  7. Interpretation of Late Cretaceous Volcanic Mounds and Surrounding Gulfian Series Formations Using 3D Seismic Data in Zavala County, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Laura Claire

    The Late Cretaceous Gulfian series is a prominent and important series across the State of Texas that has been extensively studied since the nineteenth century. It is composed of series of southeast-dipping shelf carbonates and clastics deposited on the northwest margin of the Gulf of Mexico Basin. In south Texas, the Gulfian series was deposited in the Rio Grande Embayment and Maverick Basin and is comprised of the Eagle Ford Group, Austin Group, Anacacho Limestone, San Miguel Formation, Olmos Formation, and Escondido Formation that crop out and continue basinward in the subsurface. Late Cretaceous volcanism formed volcanic mounds composed of altered palagonite tuff that are clustered into two fields, including the Uvalde Field centered in Zavala County. Using the Pedernales 3D seismic survey, located in east-central Zavala County, several volcanic mounds were identified and mapped without the use of well log data by identifying structures and characteristics associated with the volcanic mounds. Isolating these mounds through mapping enabled the mapping of the tops surrounding Gulfian formations, Lower Eagle Ford, Upper Eagle Ford, Austin, Anacacho, and San Miguel, for which time-structure, amplitude, similarity/coherency attribute, and isochron maps were generated. By using 3D seismic data, the volcanic mounds and their relation to surrounding rocks can be better interpreted.

  8. Associations between two mosquito populations and West Nile virus in Harris County, Texas, 2003-06.

    PubMed

    Dennett, James A; Bala, Adilelkhidir; Wuithiranyagool, Taweesak; Randle, Yvonne; Sargent, Christopher B; Guzman, Hilda; Siirin, Marina; Hassan, Hassan K; Reyna-Nava, Martin; Unnasch, Thomas R; Tesh, Robert B; Parsons, Ray E; Bueno, Rudy

    2007-09-01

    Associations between Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes albopictus and West Nile virus (WNV) activity, temperature, and rainfall in Harris County, Texas 2003-06 are discussed. Human cases were highly correlated to Cx. quinquefasciatus (r = 0.87) and Ae. albopictus (r = 0.78) pools, blue jays (r = 0.83), and Ae. albopictus collected (r = 0.71), but not Cx. quinquefasciatus collected (r = 0.45). Human cases were associated with temperature (r = 0.71), not rainfall (r = 0.29), whereas temperature correlated with Ae. albopictus and Cx. quinquefasciatus collections (r = 0.88 and 0.70, respectively) and Cx. quinqueftsciatus pools (r = 0.75), but not Ae. albopictus pools (r = 0.55). Both species (collections and pools) and blue jays were weakly correlated (r 5 0.41) with rainfall, but blue jays were better correlated with Cx. quinquefasciatus pools (r = 0.87), compared with Ae. albopictus pools (r = 0.67), Ae. albopictus collections (r = 0.69), and Cx. quinquefasciatus collections (r = 0.46). Peak minimum infection rate for Cx. quinquefasciatus (4.55), and Ae. albopictus (4.41) was in August with highest human cases (17.87), blue jays (55.58), and temperature (29.01 degrees C). Between both species, blood meal analysis indicated 68.18% of Cx. quinquefasciatus mammalian hosts were dog, while 22.72% were human, whereas Ae. albopictus had higher human (44.44%) but fewer dog hosts (22.22%). Ten bird species were identified as hosts for Cx. quinquefasciatus, with northern cardinal and blue jay representing 26.66% and 20.00%, respectively. No bird feeding activity was observed in Ae. albopictus. The earliest and latest human blood meal occurred in May (Ae. albopictus) and November (Cx. quinquefasciatus); 66.66% of human host identifications between both species occurred in October-November, after the seasonal human case peak. Based upon our data, WNV activity in both mosquito species warrants further investigation of their individual roles in WNV ecology within this region.

  9. Evaluation of Hydraulically Significant Discontinuities in Dockum Group Mudrocks in Andrews County, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, R. M.; Kuszmaul, J. S.; Cao, S.; Powers, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    Triassic mudrocks of the Dockum Group (Cooper Canyon Formation) host four, below-grade landfills at the Waste Control Specialists (WSC) site in Andrews County, Texas, including: a hazardous waste landfill and three radioactive waste landfills. At the study site, the Dockum consists of mudrocks with sparse siltstone/sandstone interbeds that developed in a semi-arid environment from an ephemeral meandering fluvial system. Sedimentary studies reveal that the mudrocks are ancient floodplain vertisols (soils with swelling clays) and siltstone/sandstone interbeds are fluvial channel deposits that were frequently subaerially exposed. Rock discontinuities, including fractures and syndepositional slickensided surfaces, were mapped during the excavation of the WCS radioactive waste landfills along vertical faces prepared by the construction contractor. Face locations were selected to insure a sampled area with nearly complete vertical coverage for each landfill. Individual discontinuities were mapped and their strike, dip, length, roughness, curvature, staining, and evidence of displacement were described. In the three radioactive waste disposal landfills, over 1750 discontinuities across 35 excavated faces were mapped and described, where each face was nominally 8 to 10 ft tall and 50 to 100 ft long. Genetic units related to paleosol development were identified. On average, the orientation of the discontinuities was horizontal, and no other significant trends were observed. Mapping within the landfill excavations shows that most discontinuities within Dockum rocks are horizontal, concave upward, slickensided surfaces that developed in the depositional environment, as repeated wetting and drying cycles led to shrinking and swelling of floodplain vertisols. Fractures that showed staining (a possible indicator of past or present hydraulic activity) are rare, vertical to near-vertical, and occur mainly in, and adjacent to, mechanically stiff siltstone and sandstone interbeds

  10. Archeological Test Excavations at Site 41WM21 in Granger Reservoir, Williamson County, Texas. Revised.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-01

    field of palynology , yet later studies conducted by Martin (1963) have shown that fossil pollen could be recovered from southwestern United States soils...yielding samples would each generally cost at least ten times (or more) what other samples require. In addition, most palynology laboratories would not...Laboratory, Texas A&M University, College Station. 1977 A 16,000 Year Pollen Record of Vegetational Change in Central Texas. Palynology , Vol. 1:143. 1978

  11. Petroleum potential of two sites in Deaf Smith and Swisher Counties, Texas Panhandle: Volume 1: Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, P.R.

    1986-09-01

    This is the third in a series of regional geologic studies to assess the petroleum resources of two potentially acceptable sites under study for a nuclear waste disposal facility. Site 1 is in northeastern Deaf Smith County, Texas, and Site 2 is in northeastern Swisher County, Texas. Although potential reservoir zones are present under Site 1, the likelihood of hydrocarbon charge and structural or stratigraphic entrapment is low. The probability of a commercial petroleum discovery is estimated at 1:1000, and expected net present value of potential production is about $700,000. Little future industry drilling activity is foreseen around Site 1. Five potential reservoir zones are present under Site 2, and some may contain hydrocarbons. Anticlines are adjacent to Site 2, and some may contain hydrocarbons. Anticlines are adjacent to Site 2 on the northeast, southeast, and northwest, but the middle of the acreage block is synclinal, and its petroleum potential is very low. Discovery probability of the structures adjacent to Site 2 is higher, but the chance of developing commercial production is only about 2:100. Such accumulations might extend into the northeast and southeast corners of the block; expected net present value of such conjectured reserves is about $1,100,000 and $650,000, respectively. Continued industry activity pursuant to these three structures is expected, including seismic surveys and drilling. Considering the potential loss of petroleum resources through withdrawal of acreage from exploration, and the possibility of adjacent drilling, Site 1 in Deaf Smith County is clearly preferable for location of the proposed nuclear waste disposal facility.

  12. Remedial Design Optimization Review Report: East 67th Street Ground Water Plume NPL Site, Odessa, Ector County, Texas, EPA Region 6

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The East 67th Street Ground Water Plume Superfund Site (East 67th Street Site) is located in Odessa, Ector County, Texas in EPA Region 6. The site was added to the National Priorities List (NPL) on March 7, 2007, and is managed as a fund-lead site.

  13. Storm surge propagation in Galveston Bay during Hurricane Ike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rego, João L.; Li, Chunyan

    2010-09-01

    We studied Hurricane Ike's storm surge along the Texas-Louisiana coast using the fully nonlinear Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM, by Chen et al., 2003) with a high-resolution unstructured mesh. The model was validated with USGS surge data collected during Hurricane Ike. This study focused on 1) how the surge wave propagates into and within Galveston Bay and 2) the importance of the bay's barrier system. Ike's coastal surge propagated alongshore due east towards Louisiana, partly because of Bolivar Peninsula, which, together with Galveston Island, provided a barrier protecting the bay. In the upper bay, a west-east oscillation of water surface gradient of about 0.08 m/km was found and studied. We then varied Bolivar Peninsula's topography for different simulations, examining the role of barrier islands on surge propagation into the bay. Results suggest that when the Peninsula's height (or volume) was reduced to about 45% of the original, with two breaches, the bay was exposed to dangerously high water levels almost as much as those if the Peninsula was leveled to just 0.05 m above the Mean Sea Level, underlining the nonlinear nature of this bay-barrier system.

  14. How would a more resilient Galveston Island look?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraza, E.; Gibeaut, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    Coastal hazards maps have proven to be useful guiding documents for devising hazard mitigation and planning policies; however, they rarely provide an outlook of the results that their implementation may bring about. Providing a visual and quantitative representation of the probable outcomes of a plan or policy can better convey the message to all stakeholders, thus diminishing some of the initial resistance to more restrictive but environmentally-sound science-based initiatives. The presentation of outcome scenarios is common practice in the field of urban planning, and we feel that it would be equally beneficial in the case of geoscience-based proposals. The purpose of this study is to present tangible geoscience-based urban development scenarios for West Beach, Galveston Island. First, we use a geohazards map previously prepared for Galveston, Texas as a land-use suitability map to determine what areas of the island are less vulnerable to the effects of relative sea level rise, wetland migration, potential washover paths, storm surge and shoreline retreat, and therefore are more appropriate for urban development. A linear optimization model is then used to accommodate the existing number and types of units into a new low-risk development pattern. A similar model is used to create an alternative scenario where property assessed values are preserved. The result is a virtual three-dimensional representation of urban mass configurations that would reduce hazard-related losses while conserving the integrity of important barrier island features and geological processes.

  15. Water-level altitudes 2015 and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction 1973-2014 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Ramage, Jason K.; Houston, Natalie A.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Schmidt, Tiffany S.

    2015-01-01

    Compaction of subsurface sediments (mostly in the fine-grained silt and clay layers) composing the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers was recorded continuously by using analog technology at the 13 borehole extensometers at 11 sites that were either activated or installed between 1973 and 1980. For the period of record beginning in 1973 (or later depending on activation or installation date) and ending in December 2014, measured cumulative compaction at the 13 extensometers ranged from 0.101 ft at the Texas City-Moses Lake extensometer to 3.668 ft at the Addicks extensometer. During 2014, a total of 10 of the 13 extensometers recorded a slight net decrease of land-surface elevation; the extensometers at the Lake Houston and Clear Lake (shallow) sites recorded slight net increases of land-surface elevation, and the extensometer at the Texas City-Moses Lake site recorded no change in elevation. The rate of compaction varies from site to site because of differences in rates of groundwater withdrawal in the areas adjacent to each extensometer site and differences among sites in the ratios of sand, silt, and clay and compressibilities of the subsurface sediments. It is not appropriate, therefore, to extrapolate or infer a rate of compaction for an adjacent area on the basis of the rate of compaction measured at nearby extensometers.

  16. Environmental assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Big Hill facility storage of commercial crude oil project, Jefferson County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    The Big Hill SPR facility located in Jefferson County, Texas has been a permitted operating crude oil storage site since 1986 with benign environmental impacts. However, Congress has not authorized crude oil purchases for the SPR since 1990, and six storage caverns at Big Hill are underutilized with 70 million barrels of available storage capacity. On February 17, 1999, the Secretary of Energy offered the 70 million barrels of available storage at Big Hill for commercial use. Interested commercial users would enter into storage contracts with DOE, and DOE would receive crude oil in lieu of dollars as rental fees. The site could potentially began to receive commercial oil in May 1999. This Environmental Assessment identified environmental changes that potentially would affect water usage, power usage, and air emissions. However, as the assessment indicates, changes would not occur to a major degree affecting the environment and no long-term short-term, cumulative or irreversible impacts have been identified.

  17. Monocrotophpos and dicrotophos residues in birds as a result of misuse of organophosphates in Matagorda County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flickinger, Edward L.; White, D.H.; Mitchell, C.A.; Lamont, T.G.

    1984-01-01

    About 1100 birds of 12 species died from organophosphate poisoning in Matagorda County on the Texas Gulf Coast in March and May 1982. Birds died from feeding on rice seed that was illegally treated with dicrotophos or monocrotophos and placed near rice fields as bait to attract and kill birds. Brain acetylcholinesterase inhibition of affected birds averaged 87% (range 82-89%), and contents of gastrointestinal tracts contained residues of dicrotophos (5.6-14 ppm) or monocrotophos (2.1-13 ppm). Rice seed collected at mortality sites contained 210 ppm dicrotophos or 950 ppm monocrotophos. Mortality from dicrotophos poisoning continued for almost 3 weeks. The practice of illegally treating rice seed with either of these 2 organophosphates appears to be infrequent but widespread at present.

  18. Public health assessment for United Creosoting Company, Conroe, Montgomery County, Texas, Region 6. CERCLIS No. TXD980745574. Addendum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-17

    The United Creosoting National Priorities (NPL) list site is on Hilbig Road at Second Street, in Conroe, Montgomery County, Texas. The site was used for production of pressure treated creosoted wood products from 1946 until 1972. ATSDR completed a health assessment for the site in January 1986. The addendum to the health assessment evaluates the 1984 and 1985 environmental sampling data in more detail and also evaluates additional environmental sampling data collected in 1990. Contaminated soils and ground water have been detected both in industrial and residential portions of the original site vicinity. The primary contaminants of concern are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, pentachlorophenol, and chlorinated dibenzo-dioxins/dibenzofurans (CDD/CDFs). The populations at greatest risk of exposure are workers involved with remediation activities and residents of Tanglewood East subdivision. Exposures to contaminated soil through skin contact and ingestion may have occurred in the past.

  19. Evaluation of geophysical techniques for identifying fractures in program wells in Deaf Smith County, Texas: Revision 1, Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, R.P.; Siminitz, P.C.

    1987-08-01

    Quantitative information about the presence and orientation of fractures is essential for the understanding of the geomechanical and geohydrological behavior of rocks. This report evaluates various borehole geophysical techniques for characterizing fractures in three Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Program test wells in the Palo Duro Basin in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Emphasis has been placed on the Schlumberger Fracture Identification Log (FIL) which detects vertical fractures and provides data for calculation of orientation. Depths of FIL anomalies were compared to available core. It was found that the application of FIL results to characterize fracture frequency or orientation is inappropriate at this time. The uncertainties associated with the FIL information render the information unreliable. No geophysical logging tool appears to unequivocally determine the location and orientation of fractures in a borehole. Geologic mapping of the exploratory shafts will ultimately provide the best data on fracture frequency and orientation at the proposed repository site. 22 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Land use/land cover in Swisher County and Deaf Smith County locations, Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Agriculture is the major land use/land cover in the Swisher and Deaf Smith County locations. Most of the agricultural land is irrigated. Furrow, center pivot, and lateral-wheel irrigation systems are in common use. Rangeland is the second most abundant land use/land cover; it is typically associated with stream valleys and playas. The rangeland supports cattle, which are an important source of income. The main urban areas in or near the locations are Tulia and Happy, in Swisher County, and Hereford and Vega, in Deaf Smith County. Most of the land within the locations is privately owned - corporate and government ownership is extremely limited - and large portions are currently under lease for oil exploration. County and regional agencies have no authority to regulate land-use patterns in the locations, although the Panhandle Regional Planning Commission can provide guidance to local jurisdictions. Land use within the corporate limits and extraterritorial jurisdictions of Tulia and Hereford is controlled by zoning ordinances and subdivision regulations. According to projections for the locations, agriculture will remain the major land use in the foreseeable future. Dryland farming and rangeland will become more prevalent as irrigation costs increase and marginal areas are taken out of production.

  1. Earthworms (Oligochaeta: Acanthodrilidae and Lumbricidae) associated with Hornsby Bend Biosolids Management Plant, Travis County, Texas, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Earthworm populations were surveyed in soils from a variety of habitats associated with the Hornsby Bend Biosolids Management Plant, Austin, Texas, from November 2009 through March 2010. Seven species of terrestrial Oligochaeta, including one species new to science, are reported from two families, ...

  2. Effect of fungicides on sorghum anthracnose and grain mold in Burleson County, Texas, 2013

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The experiment was conducted at the Texas AgriLife Experiment Station near College Station. The hybrids BH3822 and BH 5566 were planted in replicated plots and treatment arranged in a randomized, blocked factorial design. Each replicate consisted of four, 20 ft rows, with 30-in. row spacing and a ...

  3. Water-level altitudes 2012 and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction 1973-2011 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Ramage, Jason K.

    2012-01-01

    Compaction of subsurface sediments (mostly in the clay layers) composing the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers was recorded continuously at 13 borehole extensometers at 11 sites. For the period of record beginning in 1973 (or later) and ending in December 2011, cumulative compaction data collected from the 13 extensometers ranged from 0.102 ft at the Texas City–Moses Lake site to 3.621 ft at the Addicks site. The rate of compaction varies from site to site because of differences in groundwater withdrawals near each site and differences among sites in the clay-to-sand ratio in the subsurface sediments. Therefore, it is not possible to extrapolate or infer a rate of compaction for adjacent areas on the basis of the rate of compaction measured at a nearby extensometer.

  4. Water-level altitudes 2013 and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction 1973--2012 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Ramage, Jason K.

    2013-01-01

    Compaction of subsurface sediments (mostly in the clay and silt layers) of the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers was recorded continuously by 13 borehole extensometers at 11 sites that were either activated or installed between 1973 and 1980. For the period of record beginning in 1973 (or later depending on activation or installation date) and ending in December 2012, cumulative measured compaction by 12 of the 13 extensometers ranged from 0.100 ft at the Texas City-Moses Lake extensometer to 3.632 ft at the Addicks extensometer (data were used from only one of two extensometers at one site). The rate of compaction varies from site to site because of differences in groundwater withdrawals near each site and differences among sites in the clay-to-sand ratio in the subsurface sediments. Therefore, it is not possible to extrapolate or infer a rate of compaction for adjacent areas based on the rate of compaction measured at a nearby extensometer.

  5. A multiphased approach to groundwater investigations for the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Jonathan V.

    2014-01-01

    The Edwards-Trinity aquifer is a vital groundwater resource for agricultural, industrial, and public supply uses in the Pecos County region of western Texas. Resource managers would like to understand the future availability of water in the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in the Pecos County region and the effects of the possible increase or temporal redistribution of groundwater withdrawals. To provide resource managers with that information, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Pecos County, City of Fort Stockton, Brewster County, and Pecos County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1, completed a three-phase study of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in parts of Brewster, Jeff Davis, Pecos, and Reeves Counties. The first phase was to collect groundwater, surface-water, geochemical, geophysical, and geologic data in the study area and develop a geodatabase of historical and collected data. Data compiled in the first phase of the study were used to develop the conceptual model in the second phase of the study. The third phase of the study involved the development and calibration of a numerical groundwater-flow model of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer to simulate groundwater conditions based on various groundwater-withdrawal scenarios. Analysis of well, geophysical, geochemical, and hydrologic data contributed to the development of the conceptual model in phase 1. Lithologic information obtained from well reports and geophysical data was used to describe the hydrostratigraphy and structural features of the groundwater-flow system, and aquifer-test data were used to estimate aquifer hydraulic properties. Geochemical data were used to evaluate groundwater-flow paths, water-rock interaction, aquifer interaction, and the mixing of water from different sources in phase 2. Groundwater-level data also were used to evaluate aquifer interaction, as well as to develop a potentiometric-surface map

  6. Predicting diagenetic history and reservoir quality in the Frio Formation of Brazoria County, Texas and Pleasant Bayou test wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, W.R.; Richmann, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    Good-quality geothermal reservoirs displaying secondary porosity exist on the upper Texas coast (Brazoria County), site of the Pleasant Bayou No. 1 and No. 2 wells, and are attributed to a moderately stable mineral assemblage, normal geothermal gradients, and low in situ pH. Major authigenic minerals are calcite, quartz, and kaolinite. Detrital feldspar has been extensively albitized at depth. Major diagenetic events overlapped, occurring in the general order-precipitation of calcite, formation of quartz overgrowths, albitization, leaching of calcite to form secondary porosity, and precipitation of kaolinite. Seventeen Brazoria County water analyses including two from the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well were thermodynamically tested. Predictions based on equilibrium thermodynamics add new insight on mineral stabilities and are consistent with the paragenetic sequence developed from petrographic data. Early precipitation of calcite at shallow depths of burial is predicted. Low temperture and low in situ pH explain the general absence of chlorite. The use of solution-mineral equilibria as a predictor of reservoir quality is inconclusive, but well-defined clustering of waters indicates that identification of regional trends will probably be possible. Shallow waters may be the key to predicting reservoir quality at depth.

  7. M-X Environmental Technical Report. Socioeconomic Impact Estimates for Texas ROI Counties. Detailed Tables.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-22

    and identify by block number) MX Socioeconomic Impact Siting Analysis Texas Ř 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reveree aide If necessary end Identify by...block number) The detailed socioeconomic impacts reported in this volume form background information for the analysis contained in the M-X Deployment...information for the analysis contained in the M-X Deployment Area Selection and Land Withdrawal/Acquisition Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS

  8. 33 CFR 117.T966 - Pelican Island Causeway, Galveston Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Island Causeway, Galveston Channel. The draw of the Pelican Island Causeway bridge across Galveston... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pelican Island Causeway, Galveston Channel. 117.T966 Section 117.T966 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...

  9. 75 FR 18776 - Regulated Navigation Area; Galveston Channel, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area; Galveston Channel, TX AGENCY... a regulated navigation area across the entire width of the Galveston Channel in the vicinity of Sector Field Office (SFO) Galveston. This regulated navigation area would require vessels to navigate...

  10. Water-level altitudes 2014 and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction 1973-2013 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Ramage, Jason K.

    2014-01-01

    Compaction of subsurface sediments (mostly in the fine-grained clay and silt layers) composing the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers was recorded continuously by using analog technology at the 13 borehole extensometers at 11 sites that were either activated or installed between 1973 and 1980. For the period of record beginning in 1973 (or later depending on activation or installation date) and ending in December 2013, measured cumulative compaction at the 13 extensometers ranged from 0.100 ft at the Texas City-Moses Lake extensometer to 3.654 ft at the Addicks extensometer. The rate of compaction varies from site to site because of differences in rates of groundwater withdrawal in the areas adjacent to each extensometer site and differences among sites in the ratios of clay, silt, and sand and compressibility of the subsurface sediments. Therefore, it is not appropriate to extrapolate or infer a rate of compaction for an adjacent area on the basis of the rate of compaction measured at nearby extensometers.

  11. An evaluation of ²²⁶Ra and ²²⁸Ra in drinking water in several counties in Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Landsberger, S G; George, G

    2013-11-01

    Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) or Technology Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (TENORM) can be a potential health risk. It is now well known that the underlying geology in many parts of Texas has given rise to levels of (226)Ra and (228)Ra that often exceed the limits set by the US Environmental Protection Agency. A detailed literature search was undertaken to assess the levels of (226)Ra and (228)Ra in all of the Texas counties. Several statistical evaluations of the data were performed. The Hickory aquifer in the Llano Uplift region of Texas has consistently had the highest number of (226)Ra and (228)Ra concentrations above the legal limit. As well many of the affected rural communities may not have the financial resources to rectify the problem.

  12. An unusual Middle Permian flora from the Blaine Formation (Pease River Group: Leonardian-Guadalupian Series) of King County, West Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DiMichele, W.A.; Hook, R.W.; Nelson, W.J.; Chaney, D.S.

    2004-01-01

    A new Middle Permian plant assemblage from South Ash Pasture in King County, Texas, may be the youngest and is certainly the most unusual flora known from the Permian of either West Texas or adjoining north-central Texas. Found serendipitously in the evaporite-rich upper Blaine Formation (Pease River Group, Guadalupian Series), the flora is of very low diversity despite intensive collecting efforts, and the affinities of nearly all taxa are enigmatic. The most common elements are parallel-veined leaves that resemble cordaites but that could be isolated pinnules of a pinnate leaf. Gigantopterid foliage is present but not assignable to any known taxon. A single foliar conifer specimen is too incomplete for assignment. Numerous reproductive organs, however, and an abundance of axes may represent conifers. Conchostracans, palaeoniscoid fish scales, and small heteropolar coprolites also occur in the deposit, which originated as a small, claystone-dominated channel fill in a coastal plain setting.

  13. Base flow (1966-2005) and streamflow gain and loss (2006) of the Brazos River, McLennan County to Fort Bend County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turco, Michael J.; East, Jeffery W.; Milburn, Matthew S.

    2007-01-01

    During 2006?07, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board, did a study to quantify historical (water years 1966?2005) base flow and streamflow gains and losses from two streamflow-measuring surveys (March and August 2006) in the Brazos River from McLennan County to Fort Bend County, Texas. The Brazos River is hydraulically connected to the Brazos River alluvium aquifer, which in turn is hydraulically connected to several underlying aquifers, the outcrops of which occur in laterally adjacent layers generally parallel to the coast (major aquifers, Carrizo-Wilcox and Gulf Coast, and minor aquifers, Queen City, Sparta, and Yegua-Jackson). Hydrograph separation was done using the USGS computer program Hydrograph Separation and Analysis with historical streamflow from 10 USGS gaging stations, three on the Brazos River and seven on selected tributaries to the Brazos River. Streamflow data for computation of gains and losses were collected in March 2006 from 36 sites on the Brazos River and 19 sites on 19 tributaries to the Brazos River; and in August 2006 from 28 sites on the Brazos River and 16 sites on tributaries. Hydrograph separation and associated analyses indicate an appreciable increase in base flow as a percentage of streamflow in the reach of the Brazos River that crosses the outcrops of the Carrizo-Wilcox, Queen City, Sparta, and Yegua-Jackson aquifers compared to that in the adjacent upstream reach (on average from about 43 percent to about 60 percent). No increase in base flow as a percentage of streamflow in the reach of the Brazos River crossing the Gulf Coast aquifer compared to that in the adjacent upstream reach was indicated. Streamflow gains and losses computed for March 2006 for 35 reaches defined by pairs of sites on the Brazos River indicated that five reaches were verifiably gaining streamflow (computed gain exceeded potential flow measurement error) and none were verifiably losing streamflow. Four of

  14. Compliance status summaries for federal and state statutory directives that apply to the Salt Repository Project at the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    This document contains statutory summaries, checklists of compliance requirements, status summaries, and lists of information needs for the environmental and health and safety statutory directives at Federal and State levels that apply to the Salt Repository Project at the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas. Statutes that apply in general to any repository project but not specifically to the Deaf Smith are not included. The information herein supplements the Salt Repository Project Statutory Compliance Plan and the Salt Repository Project Permitting Management Plan by providing lengthy details on statutory directives, compliance requirements, information needs, and the overall status of the environmental and health and safety compliance program for the Salt Repository Project at the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas.

  15. Occurrence, distribution, and concentrations of selected contaminants in streambed- and suspended-sediment samples collected in Bexar County, Texas, 2007-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Jennifer T.

    2011-01-01

    High concentrations of sediment-associated contaminants are typically associated with urban areas such as San Antonio, Texas, in Bexar County, the seventh most populous city in the United States. U.S. Geological Survey personnel periodically collected surficial streambed-sediment samples during 2007-09 and collected suspended-sediment samples from selected streams after storms during 2008 and 2009. All sediment samples were analyzed for major and trace elements, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  16. Site specific statutory compliance planning for the salt repository project at the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Requirements, strategy, and status: Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    This document and the requirements and actions it presents are addressed to the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas. The proposed actions upon which the plan is based are those described in Chapters 4 and 5 of the final EA for the site. Similarly, the environmental and health and safety requirements covered in the plan are those identified in the EA as being potentially applicable to the salt repository project at the Deaf Smith site. 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards Aquifer outcrop, Comal County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Small, T.A.; Hanson, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    In Comal County, the Edwards aquifer is probably most vulnerable to surface contamination in the rapidly urbanizing areas on the Edwards aquifer outcrop. Possible contamination can result from spills, leakage of hazardous materials, or runoff onto the intensely faulted and fractured, karstic limestone outcrops characteristic of the recharge zone.

  18. Hydrologic interpretation of geophysical data from the southeastern Hueco Bolson, El Paso, and Hudspeth Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gates, Joseph Spencer; Stanley, W.D.

    1976-01-01

    Airborne-electromagnetic and earth-resistivity surveys were used to explore for fresh ground water in the Hueco Bolson southeast of El Paso, Texas. Aerial surveys were made along about 500 miles (800 km) of flight line, and 67 resistivity soundings were made along 110 miles (180 km) of profile. The surveys did not indicate the presence of any large bodies of fresh ground water, but several areas may be underlain by small to moderate amounts of fresh to slightly saline water.The material underlying the flood plain of the Rio Grande is predominantly clay or sand of low resistivity. Along a band on the mesa next to and parallel to the flood plain, more resistive material composed partly of deposits of an ancient river channel extends to depths of about 400 to 1,700 feet (120 to 520 m). Locally, the lower part of this more resistive material is saturated with fresh to slightly saline water. The largest body of fresh to slightly saline ground water detected in this study is between Fabens and Tornillo, Texas, mostly in the sandhill area between the flood plain and the mesa. Under assumed conditions, the total amount of water in storage may be as much as 400,000 to 800,000 acre-feet (500 million to 1 billion m ).The resistivity data indicate that the deep artesian zone southwest of Fabens extends from a depth of about 1,200 feet (365 m) to about 2,800 feet (855 m).

  19. Eustatic cycles, shoreline stacking, and stratigraphic traps: Atkinson field, Live Oak and Karnes Counties, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Bulling, T.P.; Smith, W.M.; Breyer, J.A. )

    1987-02-01

    Atkinson field in south Texas produces gas from the updip pinch-out of a shoreline sand body deposited during a stillstand or minor regression within the early middle Eocene transgression of the Texas Gulf Coast. The sand body is elongate parallel to depositional strike and pinches out downdip into marine shales of the Reklaw Formation. The sand has a maximum thickness of 60 ft, extends 9 mi along strike, and reaches a width of 2 mi. Electric log patterns indicate interfingering between sand and shale on the updip edge of the sand body and a coarsening-upward sequence from shale to sand on the downdip edge of the sand body. Most logs from wells in the central part of the sand body have blocky patterns, indicating abrupt transitions with the overlying and underlying shales and no systematic variation in grain size. Many ancient shoreline sandstones have similar characteristics. The producing sand in Atkinson field occurs in the regressive phase of a fourth-order cycle of change in relative sea level, within the transgressive phase of the third-order cycle that comprises the early middle Eocene advance and retreat of the sea in the Gulf Coast region. Other shoreline sand bodies occur at the same stratigraphic zone along depositional strike. Models of shoreline stacking patterns within third-order cycles indicate that similar sand bodies and traps should be present in younger fourth-order cycles higher on paleoslope.

  20. On Ideas as Actors: How Ideas about Yellow Fever Causality Shaped Public Health Policy Responses in 19th-Century Galveston.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Daniel S

    2012-01-01

    This article uses debates regarding yellow fever causality among leading healers in 19th-century Galveston, Texas, U.S., as a means of exploring the extent to which ideas are social actors. That is, the analysis demonstrates that ideas about yellow fever causality shaped contemporaneous public health policy responses to yellow fever outbreaks in 19th-century Galveston. The article contributes to the growing literature documenting that contagionist and anticontagionist views were often assimilated, and also supports the historiography showing that the predisposing/exciting causes dichotomy is a more robust intellectual framework for understanding 19th-century attributions of disease causality.

  1. Geologic framework and hydrostratigraphy of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers within northern Bexar and Comal Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Golab, James A.; Morris, Robert R.

    2016-11-28

    During 2014–16, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Edwards Aquifer Authority, documented the geologic framework and hydrostratigraphy of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers within northern Bexar and Comal Counties, Texas. The Edwards and Trinity aquifers are major sources of water for agriculture, industry, and urban and rural communities in south-central Texas. Both the Edwards and Trinity are classified as major aquifers by the State of Texas.The purpose of this report is to present the geologic framework and hydrostratigraphy of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers within northern Bexar and Comal Counties, Tex. The report includes a detailed 1:24,000-scale hydrostratigraphic map, names, and descriptions of the geology and hydrostratigraphic units (HSUs) in the study area.The scope of the report is focused on geologic framework and hydrostratigraphy of the outcrops and hydrostratigraphy of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers within northern Bexar and Comal Counties, Tex. In addition, parts of the adjacent upper confining unit to the Edwards aquifer are included.The study area, approximately 866 square miles, is within the outcrops of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers and overlying confining units (Washita, Eagle Ford, Austin, and Taylor Groups) in northern Bexar and Comal Counties, Tex. The rocks within the study area are sedimentary and range in age from Early to Late Cretaceous. The Miocene-age Balcones fault zone is the primary structural feature within the study area. The fault zone is an extensional system of faults that generally trends southwest to northeast in south-central Texas. The faults have normal throw, are en echelon, and are mostly downthrown to the southeast.The Early Cretaceous Edwards Group rocks were deposited in an open marine to supratidal flats environment during two marine transgressions. The Edwards Group is composed of the Kainer and Person Formations. Following tectonic uplift, subaerial exposure, and erosion near the end of

  2. Digital-model projection of saturated thickness and recoverable water in the Ogallala Aquifer, Texas County, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Robert B.

    1980-01-01

    A digital model was used to provide a quantitative description of the Ogallala aquifer in Texas County, Oklahoma, and to predict saturated thickness and water in storage from the aquifer at specified future times. The Ogallala aquifer, which consists of unconsolidated sand, gravel, and clay, is the principal source of ground water in Texas County. Saturated thickness ranged from 0 feet to over 600 feet. The estimated value used for specific yield in most of the areas was 0.15 but 0.05 was used in some places. Hydraulic conductivity ranged from 0 to more than 200 feet per day, and recharge from 0.2 to 2.2 inches per year. Irrigation pumpage was estimated using crop acreage and estimate of irrigation requirements. For projection simulations with large stress, a reasonable maximum stress using a minimum of 4 wells per square mile and 1972 pumping rate per well, if saturated thickness was more than 38 feet, was used. Four types of boundaries were used in the model. They are (1) a zero-flux (impermeable) boundary on the perimeter of the modeled area,(2) a constant-head boundary for a reach of the Cimarron River, (3) a boundary which is a constant-head boundary initially but converts to an impermeable boundary (depending on the potentiometric gradient at the boundary) for a reach of Beaver River, Palo Duro Creek, and south of Palo Duro Creek, and (4) a boundary which is a partially penetrating stream with leaky-stream bed for parts of Beaver River and Coldwater Creek. The base period for calibration was 1966. The model was calibrated by a simulation from 1966 to 1968 in which pumpage was modified until the 1968 calculated heads matched closely the 1968 observed heads. The model was verified by a simulation from 1966 to 1972, using the 1966 to 1972 pumpage stress, in order to determine the degree of conformity between 1972 calculated heads and 1972 observed heads. The agreement was acceptable.

  3. Quantifying riverine and storm-surge flood risk by single-family residence: application to Texas.

    PubMed

    Czajkowski, Jeffrey; Kunreuther, Howard; Michel-Kerjan, Erwann

    2013-12-01

    The development of catastrophe models in recent years allows for assessment of the flood hazard much more effectively than when the federally run National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) was created in 1968. We propose and then demonstrate a methodological approach to determine pure premiums based on the entire distribution of possible flood events. We apply hazard, exposure, and vulnerability analyses to a sample of 300,000 single-family residences in two counties in Texas (Travis and Galveston) using state-of-the-art flood catastrophe models. Even in zones of similar flood risk classification by FEMA there is substantial variation in exposure between coastal and inland flood risk. For instance, homes in the designated moderate-risk X500/B zones in Galveston are exposed to a flood risk on average 2.5 times greater than residences in X500/B zones in Travis. The results also show very similar average annual loss (corrected for exposure) for a number of residences despite their being in different FEMA flood zones. We also find significant storm-surge exposure outside of the FEMA designated storm-surge risk zones. Taken together these findings highlight the importance of a microanalysis of flood exposure. The process of aggregating risk at a flood zone level-as currently undertaken by FEMA-provides a false sense of uniformity. As our analysis indicates, the technology to delineate the flood risks exists today.

  4. Assessment of selected contaminants in streambed- and suspended-sediment samples collected in Bexar County, Texas, 2007-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Jennifer T.

    2011-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of sediment-associated contaminants are typically associated with urban areas such as San Antonio, Texas, in Bexar County, the seventh most populous city in the United States. This report describes an assessment of selected sediment-associated contaminants in samples collected in Bexar County from sites on the following streams: Medio Creek, Medina River, Elm Creek, Martinez Creek, Chupaderas Creek, Leon Creek, Salado Creek, and San Antonio River. During 2007-09, the U.S. Geological Survey periodically collected surficial streambed-sediment samples during base flow and suspended-sediment (large-volume suspended-sediment) samples from selected streams during stormwater runoff. All sediment samples were analyzed for major and trace elements and for organic compounds including halogenated organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Selected contaminants in streambed and suspended sediments in watersheds of the eight major streams in Bexar County were assessed by using a variety of methods—observations of occurrence and distribution, comparison to sediment-quality guidelines and data from previous studies, statistical analyses, and source indicators. Trace elements concentrations were low compared to the consensus-based sediment-quality guidelines threshold effect concentration (TEC) and probable effect concentration (PEC). Trace element concentrations were greater than the TEC in 28 percent of the samples and greater than the PEC in 1.5 percent of the samples. Chromium concentrations exceeded sediment-quality guidelines more frequently than concentrations of any other constituents analyzed in this study (greater than the TEC in 69 percent of samples and greater than the PEC in 8 percent of samples). Mean trace element concentrations generally are lower in Bexar County samples compared to concentrations in samples collected during previous studies in the Austin and Fort Worth, Texas, areas, but considering the relatively

  5. Historical Research of 401 Sites at Fort Hood, Bell and Voryell Counties, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    encompassed certificate to Walter M. Booth of Travis County in 362.67 acres in four surveys and contained eight February 1854 for $65. On April 3...Herring, their respective spouses, and the Milam District, filed field notes describing other Homesley heirs sold the land to Cecil a 320-acre tract...preemption claim on 320 acres for acres rather than 310. 3 years. J. M Perryman and J. P. Hall cor- On January 28, 1954, Cecil McComas and roborated these

  6. Geoseismic issues considered for design of the Samalayuca pipeline, El Paso County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, J.R.; Beckwith, G.H.; Medina, O.

    1995-12-31

    The Samalayuca, Pipeline is a proposed 20-inch-diameter natural gas pipeline extending approximately 21 miles from the Hueco Compressor Station on the El Paso Natural Gas main line to the International Boundary with Mexico near Clint, Texas, about 25 miles southeast of El Paso. The purpose of the project is to supply gas for power generation at a plant south of Cuidad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico. Geoseismic issues considered in the design of the Samalayuca Pipeline consisted of surface fault rupture, earthquake-induced landslides, and liquefaction-induced ground displacement.Faults represent two kinds of hazard to pipeline facilities: surface displacement and strong shaking. Earthquake-induced landslides and liquefaction require strong shaking to occur before these processes represent hazards to buried pipelines.

  7. Time-stratigraphic correlation of lower Wilcox valley-fill sequences, Colorado and Lavaca Counties, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, P.E.; Wheeler, D.M. )

    1989-09-01

    Late Paleocene and early Eocene lower Wilcox strata in southeast Texas are characterized principally by sandstone-rich deposits of fluvial and deltaic systems that prograded from a stable platform area into an unstable growth-faulted shelf margin setting. In contrast, incised valley systems, initiated during episodes of sea level lowering and filled dominantly with mud during subsequent transgressions, punctuate several lower Wilcox intervals. Further, valley-fill sequences are known to provide seals and/or reservoirs for a number of stratigraphically trapped hydrocarbon accumulations. Time-stratigraphic correlation of lower Wilcox strata provides improved differentiation of stacked valley-fill sequences and thereby more refined interpretation of depositional history and more accurate mapping for exploration purposes.

  8. Campanian ammonites from the Upper Cretaceous Gober Chalk of Lamar County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobban, W.A.; Kennedy, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    The Roxton Limestone Member at the top of the Gober Chalk in northeast Texas yields a rich fauna, dominated by Baculites haresi Reeside, 1927, and Inoceramus balticus Boehm, 1909, with sparse occurrences of pachydiscus cf. P. paulsoni (Young, 1963), Anapachydiscus sp.juv., Placenticeras placenta (DeKay, 1828), Hoplitoplacenticeras aff. H. plasticum (Paulcke, 1907), Menabites (Delawarella) delawarensis (Morton, 1830), M.(D.) danei (Young, 1963), M.(D.) aff. M.(D.) vanuxemi (Morton, 1830), Submortoniceras vandalinaense Young, 1963, Submortoniceras sp., Eubostrychoceras sp., and Scaphites hippocrepis (DeKay, 1828) III. The presence of S. hippocrepis III suggests a late early Campanian age assignment for the fauna. The assemblage includes species known from the Western Interior, Gulf Coast, Atlantic seaboard, and western Europe. -Authors

  9. A pilot study of symptoms of neurotoxicity and injury among adolescent farmworkers in Starr County, Texas.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, Kristina W; Shipp, Eva M; Cooper, Sharon P; Del Junco, Deborah J

    2010-01-01

    Little is known regarding the relationship between neurotoxicity symptoms and injury, particularly among adolescent farmworkers. This pilot study utilized logistic regression to analyze injury prevalence in relation to self-reported symptoms of neurotoxicity among adolescent farmworkers along the US-Mexico border in Texas. Respondents reporting at least five symptoms had 8.75 (95% CI, 1.89-40.54) times the prevalence of injury compared with those reporting zero or one symptom. Significant associations were observed for six items: trouble remembering things, family noticing memory loss, making notes, irritated for no reason, heart pounding, and tingling. This pilot study suggests a relationship between symptoms of neurotoxicity and injury among adolescent farmworkers, supporting the need for more rigorous investigations.

  10. Geologic and Engineering Characterization of East Ford Field, Reeves County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.; Guzman, Jose I.; Zirczy, Helena

    1999-08-16

    The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through geologically based field development. The project focused on reservoir characterization of the East Ford unit, a representative Delaware Mountain Group field that produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey Sandstone). The field, discovered in 1960, is operated by Oral Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit: it contained an estimated 18.4 million barrels (MMbbl) of original oil in place.

  11. Tracing natural gas transport into shallow groundwater using dissolved nitrogen and alkane chemistry in Parker County, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, T.; Nicot, J. P.; Mickler, P. J.; Darvari, R.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved methane in shallow groundwater drives public concern about the safety of hydraulic fracturing. We report dissolved alkane and nitrogen gas concentrations and their stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N, respectively) from 208 water wells in Parker county, Texas. These data are used to differentiate 'stray' natural gas and low temperature microbial methane, and (2) estimate the ratio of stray gas to groundwater. The ratio of (gas-phase) stray natural gas to groundwater is estimated by correlating dissolved methane and nitrogen concentrations and dissolved nitrogen δ15N values. Our hypothesis is groundwater exposed to high volumes of stray natural gas have high dissolved methane concentrations and low dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values. Alternatively, groundwater exposed to low volumes of stray gas-phase natural gas have elevated dissolved methane, but the concentration of dissolved nitrogen and its d15N value is atmospheric. A cluster of samples in Parker county have high concentrations of dissolved methane (>10mg/L) with d13Cmethane and alkane ratios (C1/C2+C3) typical of natural gas from the Barnett Shale and the Strawn Formation. Coupling dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values with these results, we suggest that few of the wells in this cluster preserve large gas to water ratios. Many samples with high dissolved methane concentrations have atmospheric dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values, providing evidence against high flux natural gas transport into shallow groundwater. These results demonstrate that dissolved nitrogen chemistry, in addition to dissolved alkane and noble gas measurements, may be useful to discern sources of dissolved methane and estimate ratios of stray natural gas-water ratios.

  12. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic features of the Glen Rose Limestone, Camp Bullis Training Site, Bexar County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.

    2003-01-01

    The Glen Rose Limestone crops out over most of the Camp Bullis Training Site in northern Bexar County, Texas, where it consists of upper and lower members and composes the upper zone and the upper part of the middle zone of the Trinity aquifer. Uncharacteristically permeable in northern Bexar County, the Glen Rose Limestone can provide avenues for recharge to and potential contamination of the downgradient Edwards aquifer, which occupies the southeastern corner of Camp Bullis.The upper member of the Glen Rose Limestone characteristically is thin-bedded and composed mostly of soft limestone and marl, and the lower Glen Rose typically is composed mostly of relatively massive, fossiliferous limestone. The upper member, about 410 to 450 feet thick at Camp Bullis, was divided in this study into five hydrogeologic subdivisions, A through E (youngest to oldest).The approximately 120-foot-thick Interval A has an abundance of caves, which is indicative of its generally well developed fracture, channel, and cavern porosity that in places provides appreciable permeability. The 120- to 150-foot-thick Interval B is similar to Interval A but with less cave development and considerably less permeability. The 10- to 20-foot-thick Interval C, a layer of partly to mostly dissolved soluble carbonate minerals, is characterized by breccia porosity, boxwork permeability, and collapse structures that typically divert ground water laterally to discharge at land surface. The 135- to 180-foot-thick Interval D generally has low porosity and little permeability with some local exceptions, most notably the caprinid biostrome just below the top of the interval, which appears to be permeable by virtue of excellent moldic, vug, fracture, and cavern porosity. The 10- to 20-foot-thick Interval E, a layer of partly to mostly dissolved evaporites similar to Interval C, has similar hydrogeologic properties and a tendency to divert ground water laterally.

  13. Geologic Map of the Edwards Aquifer In Northern Medina and Northeastern Uvalde Counties, South-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Faith, Jason R.; Blome, Charles D.; Pedraza, Diana E.

    2006-01-01

    The southern segment of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas is one of the most productive subsurface reservoirs of potable water in the world, providing water of excellent quality to more than a million people in the San Antonio region, where the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared it to be a sole-source aquifer (van der Leeden and others, 1990). Depending on the depositional province within which the associated carbonate rocks originated (Maclay and Small, 1984), the Edwards aquifer is composed of several geologic formations (primarily limestone and dolostone) of Early Cretaceous age. Most water pumped from the Edwards aquifer comes form the Person and Kainer Formations, which were deposited over the San Marcos Platform. The principal source of ground water in study area is the Devils River Formation, which was deposited in the Devils River trend. The Devils River Formation provides large quantities of irrigation water to fertile bottomland areas of Medina and Uvalde Counties, where the success of farming and ranching activities has long depended upon water from the Edwards aquifer. The study area includes all of the Edwards aquifer recharge zone between the Sabinal River (on the west) and the Medina River (on the east) plus an updip fringe of the confined zone in east-central Uvalde and central Medina Counties. Over about ninety percent of the study area--within the Devils River trend--the Edwards aquifer is composed of the Georgetown Formation plus the underlying Devils River Formation. Over the remaining area--over the southwestern margin of the San Marcos platform--the Edwards aquifer consists of the Georgetown Formation plus the underlying Edwards Group (Rose, 1972), which comprises the Kainer and Person Formations.

  14. Hydrologic and water-quality data, Honey Creek State Natural Area, Comal County, Texas, August 2001-September 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slattery, Richard N.; Furlow, Allen L.; Ockerman, Darwin J.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration, and rainfall and stormflow water-quality data from seven sites in two adjacent watersheds in the Honey Creek State Natural Area, Comal County, Texas, during August 2001–September 2003, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the San Antonio Water System. Data collected during this period represent baseline hydrologic and water-quality conditions before proposed removal of ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei) from one of the two watersheds. Juniper removal is intended as a best-management practice to increase water quantity (aquifer recharge and streamflow) and to protect water quality. Continuous (5-minute interval) rainfall data are collected at four sites; continuous (5-minute interval) streamflow data are collected at three sites. Fifteen-minute averages of meteorological and solar-energy-related data recorded at two sites are used to compute moving 30-minute evapotranspiration values on the basis of the energy-balance Bowen ratio method. Periodic rainfall water-quality data are collected at one site and stormflow water-quality data at three sites. Daily rainfall, streamflow, and evapotranspiration totals are presented in tables; detailed data are listed in an appendix. Results of analyses of the periodic rainfall and stormflow water-quality samples collected during runoff events are summarized in the appendix; not all data types were collected at all sites nor were all data types collected during the entire 26-month period.

  15. Induction conductivity and natural gamma logs collected in 15 wells at Camp Stanley Storage Activity, Bexar County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanton, Gregory P.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Camp Stanley Storage Activity conducted electromagnetic induction conductivity and natural gamma logging of 15 selected wells on the Camp Stanley Storage Activity, located in northern Bexar County, Texas, during March 28-30, 2005. In late 2004, a helicopter electromagnetic survey was flown of the Camp Stanley Storage Activity as part of a U.S. Geological Survey project to better define subsurface geologic units, the structure, and the catchment area of the Trinity aquifer. The electromagnetic induction conductivity and natural gamma log data in this report were collected to constrain the calculation of resistivity depth sections and to provide subsurface controls for interpretation of the helicopter electromagnetic data collected for the Camp Stanley Storage Activity. Logs were recorded digitally while moving the probe in an upward direction to maintain proper depth control. Logging speed was no greater than 30 feet per minute. During logging, a repeat section of at least 100 feet was recorded to check repeatability of log responses. Several of the wells logged were completed with polyvinyl chloride casing that can be penetrated by electromagnetic induction fields and allows conductivity measurement. However, some wells were constructed with steel centralizers and stainless steel screen that caused spikes on both conductivity and resulting resistivity log curves. These responses are easily recognizable and appear at regular intervals on several logs.

  16. Geodatabase and characteristics of springs within and surrounding the Trinity aquifer outcrops in northern Bexar County, Texas, 2010--11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diana E.; Morris, Robert R.; Garcia, Travis J.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Trinity Glen Rose Groundwater Conservation District, the Edwards Aquifer Authority, and the San Antonio River Authority, developed a geodatabase of springs within and surrounding the Trinity aquifer outcrops in a 331-square-mile study area in northern Bexar County, Texas. The data used to develop the geodatabase were compiled from existing reports and databases, along with spring data collected between October 2010 and September 2011. Characteristics including the location, discharge, and water-quality properties were collected for known springs and documented in the geodatabase. A total of 141 springs were located within the study area, and 46 springs were field verified. The discharge at springs with flow ranged from 0.003 to 1.46 cubic feet per second. The specific conductance of the water discharging from the springs ranged from 167 to 1,130 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius with a majority of values in the range of 500 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius.

  17. Discriminant analysis of components of El Paso Group rocks in southern Hueco Mountains, Hudspeth County, Texas - approach to depositional environments

    SciTech Connect

    Aluka, I.J.

    1987-08-01

    The El Paso Group of the Southern Hueco Mountains, Hudspeth County, Texas, crops out over an area of about 57 km/sup 2/ (22 mi/sup 2/) and is divided into three informal units - lower, middle, and upper. The lower contains the lower calcareous sandstone member and an overlying sandy limestone member; the middle is cherty limestone; and the upper unit contains two members: sandy dolomite and an upper silty dolomite. The El Paso Group rocks are classified into seven microfacies based on thin section studies of the rocks' components. These are organic allochems (peloids, gastropods, trilobite fragments, pelmatozoan ossicles, algae, and unidentifiable bioclasts); inorganic allochems (glauconite, stylolites, quartz grains, voids, lithoclasts, and ooids); matrix (micrite, microspar, recrystallized sparite, micritic size dolomite, microsparitic size dolomite, and sparitic size dolomite). Discriminant analysis of the components of the rocks tests the classification of the rocks into seven microfacies. Six discriminant functions, discriminant function scores for each sample, and probability of the sample's membership in each classification group are calculated during the study to discriminate among the groups. The eigenvalues, plots of discriminant scores, chi-square tests, Wilk's lambda, and the territorial map proved effective in classifying the components of the El Paso Group rocks; 100% of the grouped cases are correctly classified into seven microfacies. The components/microfacies indicate that the rocks of El Paso Group were deposited in shelf lagoon with open circulation, restricted circulation in shelf, subtidal, intertidal, and tidal flat environments.

  18. Environmental assessment of the brine pipeline replacement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Facility in Brazoria County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0804, for the proposed replacement of a deteriorated brine disposal pipeline from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Bryan Mound storage facility in Brazoria County, Texas, into the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, the ocean discharge outfall would be moved shoreward by locating the brine diffuser at the end of the pipeline 3.5 miles offshore at a minimum depth of 30 feet. The action would occur in a floodplain and wetlands; therefore, a floodplain/wetlands assessment has been prepared in conjunction with this EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC. 4321, et seg.). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This FONSI also includes a Floodplain Statement of Findings in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1022.

  19. Monocrotophos and dicrotophos residues in birds as a result of misuse of organophosphates in Matagorda county Texas USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flickinger, Edward L.; White, D.H.; Mitchell, C.A.; Lamont, T.G.

    1984-01-01

    About 1100 birds of 12 spp. [Red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus), great-tailed grackle (Quiscalus mexicanus), brown-headed cowbird (Molothrus ater), mourning dove (Zenaida macrours), Eastern meadowlark (Sturnella magna), vesper sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus), common snipe (Gallinago gallinago), blue-winged teal (Anas discors), mottled duck (Anas fulvigula), common moorhen (Gallinula chloropus), redhead (Aythya americana) and ruddy turnstone (Arenaria interpres)] died from organophosphate poisoning in Matagorda County on the Texas Gulf Coast in March and May 1982. Birds died from feeding on rice seed that was illegally treated with dicrotophos or monocrotophos and placed near rice fields as bait to attract and kill birds. Brain acetylcholinesterase inhibition of affected birds averaged 87% (range 82-89%), and contents of gastrointestinal tracts contained residues of dicrotophos (5.6-14 ppm) or monocrotophos (2.1-13 ppm). Rice seed collected at mortality sites contained 210 ppm dicrotophos or 950 ppm monocrotophos. Mortality from dicrotophos poisoning continued for almost 3 wk. The practice of illegally treating rice seed with either of the 2 organophosphates appears to be infrequent but widespread at present.

  20. Geologic model of San Andres reservoir, Roberts Unit CO sub 2 Phase III area, Wasson field, Yoakum County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, J.V. Jr. )

    1992-04-01

    Roberts unit is a mature San Andres waterflood project located in Wasson field, Yoakum County, Texas. Texaco, as operator, has evaluated the reservoir for CO{sub 2} flooding, and a four-phased CO{sub 2} project has been designed for the unit. A critical aspect of CO{sub 2} flood design is the development of geologic reservoir management, such as flood monitoring and evaluation of infill drilling. The geologic reservoir model established for the southeastern part of the unit (the CO{sub 2} Phase III area) is an example of this design. The reservoir consists of stacked carbonate depositional sequences. The cyclic nature of these depositional sequences is reflected in both core-defined lithofacies and porosity log character. Sequences consist of basal mudstones, restricted-shelf skeletal wackestones, open-shelf skeletal wackestones and packstones, solution and brecciated zones, and peloidal packstone caps. Intertidal mudstones and wackestones occur at the top of the reservoir and in the overlying reservoir seal. Porosity distribution is controlled by diagenetic events, but these events are closely related to depositional facies. Reservoir geometry and reservoir quality are interpreted from study of carbonate lithofacies, porosity and permeability relationships, and injection characteristics. Depositional sequences are subdivided into layers (flow units) for use in reservoir simulation. Log normalization, core description, porosity interpretation, reservoir mapping, three-dimensional modeling, and joint effort between project geologists and engineers contributed to development of the reservoir model.

  1. Site study plan for non-routine laboratory rock mechanics, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This Site Study Plan describes the non-routine rock mechanics and thermal properties laboratory testing program planned for the characterization of site-specific geologic materials for the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. The study design provides for measurements of index, mechanical, thermomechanical, thermal and special properties for the host salt, and where appropriate, for nonhost lithologies. The types of tests which will be conducted are constant stress (creep) tests, constant strain (stress relaxation) tests, constant strain-rate tests, constant stress-rate tests, cyclic loading tests, hollow cylinder tests, uniaxial and triaxial compression tests, direct tension tests, indirect (triaxial) shear tests, thermal property determinations (conductivity, specific heat, expansivity, and diffusivity), fracture healing tests, thermal decrepitation tests, moisture content determinations, and petrographic and micromechanics analyses. Tests will be conducted at confining pressures up to 30 MPa and temperatures up to 300/degree/C. These data are used to construct mathematical models for the phenomenology of salt deformation. The models are then used in finite-element codes to predict repository response. A tentative testing schedule and milestone log are given. The duration of the testing program is expected to be approximately 5 years. 44 refs., 13 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. Technical procedures for utilities and solid waste: Environmental Field Program, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Final draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    The evaluation of environmental issues and concerns and the addressing of statutory requirements are fundamental parts in the characterization of the site in Deaf Smith County, Texas for the US Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project (SRP). To ensure that the environmental field program comprehensively addresses the issues and requirements of the project, a site study plan (SSP) has been prepared for Utilities and Solid Waste considerations. This technical procedure (TP) has been developed to implement the field program described in the Utilities and Solid Waste Site Study Plan. The purpose and scope of the Utilities and Solid Waste Technical Procedure is to develop and implement a data collection procedure to fulfill the data base needs of the Utilities and Solid Waste SSP. The procedure describes a method of obtaining, assessing and verifying the capabilities of the regional service utilities and disposal contractors. This data base can be used to identify a preferred service source for the engineering contractor. The technical procedure was produced under the guidelines established in Technical Administrative Procedure No. 1.0, Preparation, Review and Approval of Technical Procedures.

  3. Site study plan for utilities and solid waste, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This site plan describes utilities and solid waste studies to be conducted during the characterization of the Deaf Smith County, Texas, site for the US Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project. After utilities and solid waste information needs derived from Federal, State, and local statutes and regulations and the project specifications are briefly described, the site study plan describes the study design and rationale, the field data collection procedures and equipment, and data analysis methods and application of results, the data management strategy, the schedule of field activities, the management of the study, and the study's quality assurance program. The field data collection activities are organized into programs to characterize electrical power, natural gas, communication, water, wastewater sludge, nonradiological solid waste, nonradiological hazardous waste, and low-level radiological waste. These programs include details for the collection of project needs, identification of utilities and solid waste disposal contractor capabilities, and verification of the obtained data. Utilities and solid waste field activities will begin approximately at the time of site access. Utilities and solid waste characterization will be completed within the first year of activity. 29 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Hydrologic and water-quality data at Government Canyon State Natural Area, Bexar County, Texas, 2002-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banta, J. Ryan; Slattery, Richard N.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Edwards Aquifer Authority, and the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, collected rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration, and stormflow water-quality data at the Laurel Canyon Creek watershed, within the Government Canyon State Natural Area, Bexar County, Tex. The purpose of the data collection was to support evaluations of the effects of brush management conservation practices on components of the hydrologic budget and water quality. One component of brush management was to take endangered wildlife into consideration, specifically the golden-cheeked warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia). Much of the area that may have been considered for brush management was left intact to protect habitat for the golden-cheeked warbler. The area identified for brush management was approximately 10 percent of the study watershed. The hydrologic data presented here (2002–10) represent pre- and post-treatment periods, with brush management treatment occurring from winter 2006–07 to spring 2008.

  5. Guiding Surge Reduction Strategies via Characterization of Coastal Surge Propagation and Internal Surge Generation within a Complex Bay/Estuary System, Galveston Bay, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, B.; Torres, J.; Irza, N.; Bedient, P. B.; Dawson, C.; Proft, J.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, Hurricane Ike (2008) and a suite of synthetic storms are simulated in order to evaluate how different hurricane landfalls, wind intensities, and radius to maximum winds influence the surge response in complex semi-enclosed bays such as Galveston Bay, located along the Texas Gulf Coast. The Advanced CIRCulation and Simulating Waves Nearshore (ADCIRC+SWAN) models are employed to quantify surge in terms of its relative coastal contributions that propagate across barrier islands and tidal inlets and subsequently into Galveston Bay, the surge generated locally within the Bay itself, and the interaction between these coastal and local components of surge. Results from this research will further the current understanding of surge interactions in bay systems and guide coastal engineering surge reduction projects that need to consider multiple lines of defense to protect complex bay/estuary systems such as Galveston Bay, TX.

  6. Geologic and engineering characterization of Geraldine Ford field, Reeves and Culberson Counties, Texas. Topical report -- 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, S.P.; Malik, M.A.; Asquith, G.B.; Barton, M.D.; Cole, A.G.; Gogas, J.; Clift, S.J.; Guzman, J.I.

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of clastic reservoirs in basinal sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover more of the original oil in place by strategic infill-well placement and geologically based field development. The study focused on Geraldine Ford field, which produces from the upper Bell Canyon formation (Ramsey sandstone). Petrophysical characterization of the Ford Geraldine unit was accomplished by integrating core and log data and quantifying petrophysical properties from wireline logs. The petrophysical data were used to map porosity, permeability, net pay, water saturation, mobile oil saturation, and other reservoir properties. Once the reservoir-characterization study was completed, a demonstration area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in the northern part of the unit was chosen for reservoir modeling/simulation. A quarter of a five-spot injection pattern in the demonstration area was selected for flow simulations, and two cases of permeability distribution were considered, one using stochastic permeability distribution generated by conditional simulation and the other using layered permeabilities. Flow simulations were performed using UTCOMP, an isothermal, three-dimensional, compositional simulator for miscible gas flooding. Results indicate that 10--30% (1 to 3 MMbbl) of remaining oil in place in the demonstration area can be produced by CO{sub 2} injection.

  7. The aquatic annelid fauna of the San Marcos River headsprings, Hays County, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Worsham, McLean L. D.; Gibson, Randy; Huffman, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The San Marcos River in Central Texas has been well studied and has been demonstrated to be remarkably specious. Prior to the present study, research on free-living invertebrates in the San Marcos River only dealt with hard bodied taxa with the exception of the report of one gastrotrich, and one subterranean platyhelminth that only incidentally occurs in the head spring outflows. The remainder of the soft-bodied metazoan fauna that inhabit the San Marcos River had never been studied. Our study surveyed the annelid fauna and some other soft-bodied invertebrates of the San Marcos River headsprings. At least four species of Hirudinida, two species of Aphanoneura, one species of Branchiobdellida, and 11 (possibly 13) species of oligochaetous clitellates were collected. Other vermiform taxa collected included at least three species of Turbellaria and one species of Nemertea. We provide the results of the first survey of the aquatic annelid fauna of the San Marcos Springs, along with a dichotomous key to these annelids that includes photos of some representative specimens, and line drawings to elucidate potentially confusing diagnostic structures. PMID:27853397

  8. The aquatic annelid fauna of the San Marcos River headsprings, Hays County, Texas.

    PubMed

    Worsham, McLean L D; Gibson, Randy; Huffman, David G

    2016-01-01

    The San Marcos River in Central Texas has been well studied and has been demonstrated to be remarkably specious. Prior to the present study, research on free-living invertebrates in the San Marcos River only dealt with hard bodied taxa with the exception of the report of one gastrotrich, and one subterranean platyhelminth that only incidentally occurs in the head spring outflows. The remainder of the soft-bodied metazoan fauna that inhabit the San Marcos River had never been studied. Our study surveyed the annelid fauna and some other soft-bodied invertebrates of the San Marcos River headsprings. At least four species of Hirudinida, two species of Aphanoneura, one species of Branchiobdellida, and 11 (possibly 13) species of oligochaetous clitellates were collected. Other vermiform taxa collected included at least three species of Turbellaria and one species of Nemertea. We provide the results of the first survey of the aquatic annelid fauna of the San Marcos Springs, along with a dichotomous key to these annelids that includes photos of some representative specimens, and line drawings to elucidate potentially confusing diagnostic structures.

  9. Ichnology and paleosubstrates of Austin Chalk (Cretaceous) outcrops: Southern Dallas and Ellis Counties, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, W.C. ); Reaser, D.F. )

    1991-03-01

    Ichnofossils are abundant in outcrops of the Austin Chalk near Waxahachie, Texas (designated site of the Super-Conducting Super Collider). The abundance and diversity of ichnofossils in Austin strata contrast with the paucity of other macrofossils, except large inoceramids. The lower Austin Chalk (Coniacian) disconformably overlies the Eagle Ford Shale (Turonian). Planolites, Thalassinoides, and Chondrites are conspicuous in the lower Austin. Some lower Austin strata contain well-preserved burrows having menicus fillings. However, most lower Austin ichnofossils are poorly preserved and have compacted. The middle Austin Marl and upper Austin Chalk (Santonain) contain Planolites, Chondrites, Thalassinoides, and Pseudobilobites. Several thin, intensely burrowed, Fe-stained, horizons within the middle Austin represent omission surfaces having postomission Thalassinoides. The upper Austin disconformably underlies the Taylor Marl (Campanian). The Austin-Taylor contact is a Rhizocorallium-infested omission surface overlain by a condensed bed of phosphatic and pyritic bioclasts. Upper Austin occurrences of Rhizocorallium and Pseudobilobites are unique for North American Cretaceous chalks. Based on cross-cutting relationships and differences in morphology, diameter, and burrow-filling sediments, numerous ichnospecies of Thalassinoides are discernable throughout the Austin. Variations in preservation quality exhibited by successive generations of ichnofossils record progressive changes in substrate consistency. Earliest formed burrows have diffuse outlines representing an initial thixotropic (softground) Austin substrate. Subsequent generations of burrows have more distinct outlines recording a gradual increase in substrate firmness. Paleo-firmgrounds are common in Austin outcrops; evidence of hardgrounds is lacking. The Thalassinoides-dominated Austin ichnoassemblage represents an inner shelf paleoenvironment.

  10. The geologic structure of part of the southern Franklin Mountains, El Paso County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.R.; Julian, F.E. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1993-02-01

    The Franklin Mountains are a west tilted fault block mountain range which extends northwards from the city of El Paso, Texas. Geologic mapping in the southern portion of the Franklin Mountains has revealed many previously unrecognized structural complexities. Three large high-angle faults define the boundaries of map. Twenty lithologic units are present in the field area, including the southernmost Precambrian meta-sedimentary rocks in the Franklin Mountains (Lanoria Quartzite and Thunderbird group conglomerates). The area is dominated by Precambrian igneous rocks and lower Paleozoic carbonates, but Cenozoic ( ) intrusions are also recognized. Thin sections and rock slabs were used to describe and identify many of the lithologic units. The Franklin Mountains are often referred to as a simple fault block mountain range related to the Rio Grande Rift. Three critical regions within the study area show that these mountains contain structural complexities. In critical area one, Precambrian granites and rhyolites are structurally juxtaposed, and several faults bisecting the area affect the Precambrian/Paleozoic fault contact. Critical area two contains multiple NNW-trending faults, three sills and a possible landslide. This area also shows depositional features related to an island of Precambrian rock exposed during deposition of the lower Paleozoic rocks. Critical area three contains numerous small faults which generally trend NNE. They appear to be splays off of one of the major faults bounding the area. Cenozoic kaolinite sills and mafic intrusion have filled many of the fault zones.

  11. Houston-Galveston Navigation Channels Texas Project. Report 1. Galveston Bay Field Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    11 (Continued) Hour ID"pU Speed Di -ton CST" I_ _ _ _ d" One,.ader (Continue*• 2139 11.5 3.0 265 2233 11.5 1.9 255 2332 11.5 1.9 290 003M 12.0 2.1 100...botom. T"~e 23 (Concluded) Haw Aq Sŝ mm~ somma (Conamwed 115 10.0 0.3 250 1221 10.5 0.4 240 1327 10.0 0.2 100 1420 11.5 0.4 75 1529 10.4 0.5 356 1622...BOTTOM 4 Z. 2 A 0 qh.d 4 b di d 3.-4 -6 I I I I I I I I 0600 0900 1200 1soo 1600 2100 0000 0300 0600 0900 19 80 TIME. CST VELOCITES AT STATION R3.OC TH

  12. Texas refinery air pollution emissions are being severely underestimated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2014-06-01

    The Houston-Galveston-Brazoria region of southeastern Texas is home to heavy industrial investment in oil refining and petrochemical production. Pollutants emanating from the factories and refineries have repeatedly caused the region to fail national and state-level tests for air quality and ground-level ozone.

  13. Feasibility of growing olives on selected sites along coastal Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five sites along the Texas coastline (Seadrift, Galveston, Brazoria, Santa Fe, and Orange) were evaluated for feasibility of growing olives in these areas. In addition, two non-coastal sites (Carrizo Springs and Weslaco) were also included in the study for comparative purposes. Flowering and fruit ...

  14. Three-dimensional geologic framework modeling of faulted hydrostratigraphic units within the Edwards Aquifer, Northern Bexar County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pantea, Michael P.; Cole, James C.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes a digital, three-dimensional faulted hydrostratigraphic model constructed to represent the geologic framework of the Edwards aquifer system in the area of San Antonio, northern Bexar County, Texas. The model is based on mapped geologic relationships that reflect the complex structures of the Balcones fault zone, detailed lithologic descriptions and interpretations of about 40 principal wells (and qualified data from numerous other wells), and a conceptual model of the gross geometry of the Edwards Group units derived from prior interpretations of depositional environments and paleogeography. The digital model depicts the complicated intersections of numerous major and minor faults in the subsurface, as well as their individual and collective impacts on the continuity of the aquifer-forming units of the Edwards Group and the Georgetown Formation. The model allows for detailed examination of the extent of fault dislocation from place to place, and thus the extent to which the effective cross-sectional area of the aquifer is reduced by faulting. The model also depicts the internal hydrostratigraphic subdivisions of the Edwards aquifer, consisting of three major and eight subsidiary hydrogeologic units. This geologic framework model is useful for visualizing the geologic structures within the Balcones fault zone and the interactions of en-echelon fault strands and flexed connecting fault-relay ramps. The model also aids in visualizing the lateral connections between hydrostratigraphic units of relatively high and low permeability across the fault strands. Introduction The Edwards aquifer is the principal source of water for municipal, agricultural, industrial, and military uses by nearly 1.5 million inhabitants of the greater San Antonio, Texas, region (Hovorka and others, 1996; Sharp and Banner, 1997). Discharges from the Edwards aquifer also support local recreation and tourism industries at Barton, Comal, and San Marcos Springs located

  15. Estimated rate of recharge in outcrops of the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers near Houston, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, John E.

    1997-01-01

    During 1989-90, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, conducted a field study to determine the depth to the water table and to estimate the rate of recharge in outcrops of the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers near Houston, Texas. The study area (fig. 1) comprises about 2,000 square miles of outcrops of the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in northwestern Harris County, Montgomery County, and southern Walker County. The depth to the water table was estimated using seismic refraction, and an estimated rate of recharge in the aquifer outcrops was computed using the tritium-interface method (Andres and Egger, 1985) in which environmental tritium is the ground-water tracer. The water table generally ranges in depth between 10 and 30 feet in the study area, and the average total recharge rate was estimated to be not larger than 6 inches per year. The rate is total recharge to the saturated zone, rather than net recharge to the deep regional flow system. The total recharge can be reduced by evapotranspiration and by local discharge, mainly to streams. These results are published in USGS Water-Resources Investigations Report 96-4018 (Noble and others, 1996). A second study of environmental tritium in the same area as the 1989-90 study, also in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, was done in 1996 to confirm the results of the original study. This fact sheet documents the estimation of an upper limit on the average total recharge rate on the basis of the vertical movement of tritium in ground water during 1953-89 and during 1953-95.

  16. Cultural resources: Deaf Smith and Swisher County locations, Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Cultural resources are prehistoric and historic sites, including archeological and paleontological sites, that are important to a group of people. They are protected by both federal and state legislation. In the area covered by the Deaf Smith and Swisher County locations, four stages of cultural development have been identified: Paleo-Indian, Archaic, Ceramic (Neo-Indian or Neo-American), and Historic. Areas where undiscovered cultural resources are most likely to be found include sources of water, playa lakes, and historic trails. Because extensive surveying has not been done in either location, the number of identified sites is low. However, the potential for finding undiscovered sites is high for significant parts of both locations.

  17. Analysis of borehole geophysical information across a uranium deposit in the Jackson Group, Karnes County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniels, Jeffrey J.; Scott, James Henry; Smith, Bruce D.

    1979-01-01

    Borehole geophysical studies across a uranium deposit in the Jackson Group, South Texas, show the three geochemical environments often associated with uranium roll-type deposits: an altered (oxidized) zone, an ore zone, and an unaltered (reduced) zone. Mineralogic analysis of the total sulfides contained in the drill core shows only slight changes in the total sulfide content among the three geochemical regimes. However, induced polarization measurements on the core samples indicate that samples obtained from the reduced side of the ore zone are more electrically polarizable than those from the oxidized side of the ore zone, and therefore probably contain more pyrite. Analysis of the clay-size fraction in core samples indicates that montmorillonite is the dominant clay mineral. High resistivity values within the ore zone indicate the presence of calcite cement concentrations that are higher than those seen outside of the ore zone. Between-hole resistivity and induced polarization measurements show the presence of an extensive zone of calcite cement within the ore zone, and electrical polarizable material (such as pyrite) within and on the reduced side of the ore zone. A quantitative analysis of the between-hole resistivity data, using a layered-earth model, and a qualitative analysis of the between-hole induced polarization measurements showed that mineralogic variations among the three geochemical environments were more pronounced than were indicated by the geophysical and geologic well logs. Uranium exploration in the South Texas Coastal Plain area has focused chiefly in three geologic units: the Oakville Sandstone, the Catahoula Tuff, and the Jackson Group. The Oakville Sandstone and the Catahoula Tuff are of Miocene age, and the Jackson Group is of Eocene age (Eargle and others, 1971). Most of the uranium mineralization in these formations is low grade (often less than 0.02 percent U3O8) and occurs in shallow deposits that are found by concentrated exploratory

  18. Reservoir heterogeneity in middle Frio fluvial sandstones: Case studies in Seeligson field, Jim Wells County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Jirik, L.A. )

    1990-09-01

    Detailed evaluation of middle Frio (Oligocene) fluvial sandstones reveals a complex architectural style potentially suited to the addition of gas reserves through recognition of poorly drained reservoir compartments and bypassed gas zones. Seeligson field is being studied as part of a Gas Research Institute/US Department of Energy/State of Texas-sponsored program, with the cooperation of Oryx Energy Company and Mobil Exploration and Producing US, Inc. Four reservoirs, Zones 15, 16D, 16E, and 19C, were studied in a 20 mi{sup 2} area within Seeligson field. Collectively, these reservoirs have produced more than 240 bcf of gas from wells within the study area. Detailed electric log correlation of individual reservoirs enabled subdivision of aggregate producing zones into component genetic units. Cross sections, net-sandstone maps, and log-facies maps were prepared to illustrate depositional style, sand-body geometry, and reservoir heterogeneity. Zones 15 and 19C are examples of laterally stacked fluvial architecture. Individual channel-fill sandstones range from 10 to 50 ft thick, and channel widths are approximately 2,500 ft. Crevasse-splay sandstones may extend a few thousand feet from the main channel system. Multiple, overlapping channel and splay deposits commonly form sand-rich belts that result in leaky reservoir compartments that may be incompletely drained. Zones 16D and 16E are examples of vertically stacked fluvial architecture, with discrete, relatively thin and narrow channel and splay sandstones generally encased within floodplain muds. This architectural style is likely to form more isolated reservoir compartments. Although all of these reservoirs are currently considered nearly depleted, low-pressure producers, recent well completions and bottomhole pressure data indicate that untapped or poorly drained compartments are being encountered.

  19. Radiostratigraphy and heavy mineral content of the Weches Formation (Eocene), Nacogdoches County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, K.; Ledger, E.B.; Sharp, P.; Crocker, M.C. )

    1993-09-01

    The Weches Formation of eastern Texas is a mudstone containing green sand-size clay aggregates. A vertical sequence of 43 samples was analyzed along an excavated cliff to determine radionuclide content. Samples average 5 ppm uranium and range from 2 to about 7 ppm. Thorium averages 20 ppm and ranges from 13 to almost 36 ppm. the gamma-ray spectrometer employed exhibits a certainty of about [plus minus]10% (one standard deviation) at the levels measured. Heavy mineral studies of mudstones are few, so one sample of the Weches mudstone was selected for heavy mineral separation and point counting of grain mounts. A total of 2606 grains were counted giving mineral percentages of zircon (28.8%), garnet (17.9%), tourmaline (10.5%), titanite (8.7%), apatite (7.6%), staurolite (6.4%), green hornblende (5.2%), epidote (5.1%), sillimanite (2.8%), monatite (2.2%), kyanite (1.9%), basaltic hornblende (1.5%), and biotite (1.3%). In addition, actinolite, spinel, rutile, and collophane were observed but not counted. Previous studies found a similar heavy mineral suite in the underlying Queen City Formation, but in different proportions. Differences in heavy mineral percentages probably reflect different water-flow regimes at the time of deposition. Heavy minerals in the Weches and Queen City formations are from the same general source area Measured radionuclide ratios are similar to granitic ratios and suggest that detrital heavy minerals, particularly zircon and monazite, are the main site of uranium and thorium and their decay products in the Weches Formation.

  20. Oligocene volcanism and multiple caldera formation in the Chinati Mountains, Presidio County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Cepeda, J.C.; Henry, C.D.

    1983-01-01

    The Chinati Mountains caldera, which lies in Trans-Pecos Texas in the southern Basin and Range Province, was formed by eruption of the Mitchell Mesa Rhyolite. Volcanism in the Chinati Mountains area began several million years before formation of the Chinati Mountains caldera. Rocks of the Morita Ranch Formation, Infiernito caldera, and Shely Group ring the caldera on the south, east, and north. After its collapse, the caldera was filled by rhyolitic to trachytic lava flows and an ash-flow tuff of the Chinati Mountains Group. These include, from oldest to youngest, the lower trachyte, middle trachyte, lower rhyolite, upper trachyte, and upper rhyolite (ash-flow tuff). The Chinati Mountains Group was then intruded by the West Chinati Stock, the resurgent dome of the caldera. Three cycles of rhyolitic to trachytic magmatism, all derived from a zoned magma chamber, are represented by (1) Mitchell Mesa Rhyolite to lower and middle trachytes, (2) lower rhyolite to upper trachyte, and (3) upper rhyolite to West Chinati Stock. Dominant caldera collapse followed eruption of the Mitchell Mesa Rhyolite, but collapse is also associated with rhyolitic eruptions in the second and third cycles. The entire sequence erupted between 32 and 33 mya. The Chinati Mountains area is the site of one major, inactive silver mine and numerous prospects for silver, lead, zinc, copper, molybdenum, uranium, and fluorite. The Shafter silver district produced 31 million ounces of silver from Permian dolomitic limestones just south of the southern boundary of the caldera. Major prospects are associated with a quartz-monzonite porphyry intrusion (copper-molybdenum) just west of Shafter and with the West Chinati Stock (silver, lead, zinc, copper, and fluorite). All mineralization is probably genetically related to the caldera. 74 references, 15 figures, 3 tables.

  1. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards aquifer, Uvalde County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.

    2003-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer in Uvalde County is composed of Lower Cretaceous carbonate (mostly dolomitic limestone) strata of the Devils River Formation in the Devils River trend and of the West Nueces, McKnight, and Salmon Peak Formations in the Maverick basin. Rocks in the Devils River trend are divided at the bottom of the Devils River Formation into the (informal) basal nodular unit. Maverick basin rocks are divided (informally) into the basal nodular unit of the West Nueces Formation; into lower, middle, and upper units of the McKnight Formation; and into lower and upper units of the Salmon Peak Formation. The Edwards aquifer overlies the (Lower Cretaceous) Glen Rose Limestone, which composes the lower confining unit of the Edwards aquifer. The Edwards aquifer is overlain by the (Upper Cretaceous) Del Rio Clay, the basal formation of the upper confining unit. Upper Cretaceous and (or) Lower Tertiary igneous rocks intrude all stratigraphic units that compose the Edwards aquifer, particularly in the southern part of the study area.The Balcones fault zone and the Uvalde salient are the principal structural features in the study area. The fault zone comprises mostly en echelon, high-angle, and down-to-the-southeast normal faults that trend mostly from southwest to northeast. The Uvalde salient—resulting apparently from a combination of crustal uplift, diverse faulting, and igneous activity—elevates the Edwards aquifer to the surface across the central part of Uvalde County. Downfaulted blocks associated with six primary faults—Cooks, Black Mountain, Blue Mountain, Uvalde, Agape, and Connor—juxtapose the Salmon Peak Formation (Lower Cretaceous) in central parts of the study area against Upper Cretaceous strata in the southeastern part.The carbonate rocks of the Devils River trend and the Maverick basin are products of assorted tectonic and depositional conditions that affected the depth and circulation of the Cretaceous seas. The Devils River Formation formed in a

  2. Petrographic report on samples from units 4 and 5 salt, lower San Andres formation, J. Friemel No. 1 well, Deaf Smith County, Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, L.M.; Hopping, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results of mineralogic and petrographic analyses performed on samples of salt-bearing rock from a potential repository site in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas. The samples are from Permian Units 4 and 5 salt, Lower San Andres Formation, J. Friemel No. 1 well, Deaf Smith County, Texas. The mineralogic and petrographic data were obtained from polished thin sections cut parallel to the axis of the core for each sample. The polished thin sections were examined in order to determine the abundances of soluble (halite) and insoluble components (anhydrite, clay, carbonate, quartz, gypsum, etc.). The information reported here includes mineral associations (detrital, authigenic, cement, alteration, etc.), texture, grain size, and sedimentary fabrics. The report also includes representative photomicrographs with superimposed bar scales. Photomicrographs of polished thin sections have the up-core direction designated. X-ray diffraction was also used for identification of soluble and insoluble minerals. 7 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Identifying the Sources of Methane in Shallow Groundwaters in Parker and Hood Counties, Texas through Noble Gas Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, T.; Castro, M. C.; Nicot, J. P.; Hall, C. M.; Mickler, P. J.; Darvari, R.

    2015-12-01

    With rising demands for cleaner domestic energy resources, horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing techniques in unconventional hydrocarbon exploration have been extensively developed. However, the observation that some water wells have showed elevated concentrations of dissolved methane and other light hydrocarbons has caused public concern regarding unconventional energy extraction. In this contribution, we present noble gas data of production shale gases from the Barnett and Strawn Formations, as well as nearby groundwater samples in south-central Texas. The Barnett Shale located in the Fort Worth Basin at an average depth of ~2300 m is one of the most prominent shale gas plays in the U.S. This DOE-sponsored study explores the potential of noble gases for fingerprinting shale gas and thus, for identifying the sources of gas in aquifers overlying the Barnett Shale, due either to natural hydrocarbon occurrences or potentially related to gas production from unconventional energy resources. A total of 35 groundwater samples were collected in Parker and Hood counties in areas where high amounts of methane (>10 mg/L) were detected in shallow groundwater. Two gas samples were also collected directly from groundwater wells where bubbling methane was present. Preliminary results show that He concentrations in water samples, in excess of up to three orders of magnitude higher than expected atmospheric values are directly correlated with methane concentrations. 3He/4He ratio values vary from 0.030 to 0.889 times the atmospheric ratio with the lowest, more pure radiogenic contributions being associated with highest methane levels. The presence of crustally-produced radiogenic 40Ar is also apparent in groundwater samples with 40Ar/36Ar ratios up to 316. A combined analysis of 40Ar/36Ar ratios from groundwater wells bubbling gas and that of shale gas suggests that the source of this methane is not the heavily exploited Barnett Shale, but rather, the Strawn Formation.

  4. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Glen Rose limestone, Camp Stanley Storage Activity, Bexar County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.

    2004-01-01

    The Trinity aquifer is a regional water source in the Hill Country of south-central Texas that supplies water for agriculture, commercial, domestic, and stock purposes. Rocks of the Glen Rose Limestone, which compose the upper zone and upper part of the middle zone of the Trinity aquifer, crop out at the Camp Stanley Storage Activity (CSSA), a U.S. Army weapons and munitions supply, maintenance, and storage facility in northern Bexar County (San Antonio area) (fig. 1). On its northeastern, eastern, and southern boundaries, the CSSA abuts the Camp Bullis Training Site, a U.S. Army field training site for military and Federal government agencies. During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Army, studied the outcropping Glen Rose Limestone at the CSSA and immediately adjacent area (Camp Stanley study area, fig. 1) to identify and map the hydrogeologic subdivisions and faults of the Glen Rose Limestone at the facility. The results of the study are intended to help resource managers improve their understanding of the distribution of porosity and permeability of the outcropping rocks, and thus the conditions for recharge and the potential for contaminants to enter the Glen Rose Limestone. This study followed a similar study done by the USGS at Camp Bullis (Clark, 2003). The purpose of this report is to present the geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Glen Rose Limestone in the study area. The hydrogeologic nomenclature follows that introduced by Clark (2003) for the outcropping Glen Rose Limestone at Camp Bullis in which the upper member of the Glen Rose Limestone (hereinafter, upper Glen Rose Limestone), which is coincident with the upper zone of the Trinity aquifer, is divided into five intervals on the basis of observed lithologic and hydrogeologic properties. An outcrop map, two generalized sections, related illustrations, and a table summarize the description of the framework and distribution of characteristics.

  5. Scanning electron microscope examination of shale in core from the Frio Formation, Brazoria County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Alley-McReynolds, P.D.

    1994-09-01

    Scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of additional core from shallower geopressured and nongeopressured Frio Formation wells in Brazoria County shows similar fracture patterns and clay textures to those reported earlier in the Skrabanek 1 well. The additional wells examined by SEM are 1-B Minnie Mettler, 2847 to 3254 m; Pleasant Bayou 1, 3532 to 4750 m; and Phillips Petroleum JJ 1, 4919 to 5128 m. We noted that shales occurring from 2744 to 5488 in have similar grain orientation and fracture patterns. Pleasant Bayou 1 is strikingly similar to Skrabanek 1, having coarse flakes and grains of quartz and feldspar disbursed throughout. Phillips Petroleum JJ 1 is more uniform in appearance, lacking distinct clay flakes and scattered grains. 1-B Minnie Mettler is similar in appearance to Phillips Petroleum JJ 1, having a uniform distribution of components; however, the clay flakes are less densely packed. Fractures are present in all three wells. The abundance of both horizontal and vertical fractures at varying depths could act as avenues of fluid flow within geopressured shales.

  6. Seismic imaging of producing trend of Marathon thrust belt, Terrell County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Bertagne, A.J.; Pennachioni, J.L.; Leising, T.C.

    1987-05-01

    Exploration in the Marathon thrust belt has resulted in the discovery of three fields producing from fractured Caballos novaculite of Devonian age. The relatively shallow depth of production makes Caballos anticlines attractive targets. However, seismic data in the area are generally very poor due largely to high-amplitude coherent surface noise generated within Edwards Group limestones (Lower Cretaceous) during shooting. In January 1986, a Vibroseis test line was shot southeast of McKay Creek field (Terrell County) with the objective of recording useable data from the thrusted section. Extensive field tests were conducted before selecting final acquisition parameters. The Wide Line Profiling (TM) technique was used to acquire three parallel lines spaced 220 ft apart. The lines were recorded and processed separately and later were stacked together to generate a superstack of 120 fold. The superstack shows coherent events in the shallow (thrusted) section and relatively continuous events in the deeper (subthrust) section. The productive anticlinal trend in the vicinity of McKay Creek field was found to have a distinctive seismic expression. To facilitate seismic interpretation, a geologic field study was made of McKay Creek. The field is interpreted to consist of a (Woods Hollow) shale-cored Caballos anticline overridden by a shallower thrust that carries Caballos. The seismic data are interpreted to exhibit a similar structural style. The test line appears to have successfully imaged the producing trend of the Marathon thrust belt, suggesting that it will be possible to explore this play seismically in the future.

  7. Technical procedures for implementation of aesthetics site studies, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This chapter introduces the purpose and scope of the visually affected areas determination, as well as definitions, interfaces, and concurrent data needs. This procedure provides a method for determining the extent of visibility of the project. This area is identified as the visually affected area, and becomes the area within which all visual analysis is conducted. The visually affected area analysis of the Deaf Smith County site will involve identifying and mapping the visibility of all major proposed project features. Baseline analysis will be conducted within the overall visually affected area; impact assessment will be conducted within the visually affected area of each major project feature. This procedure presents the guidelines for determining the visually affected area will be in computer data base construction; viewshed modeling, and site visit and verification of results. Computer data base construction will involve digitizing topographic and project facility data from available data source. The extent of the visible area from each major project feature will then be plotted. Finally, these computer-generated visibility plots will be verified in the field.

  8. Site study plan for Deep Hydronest Test Wells, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Preliminary draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-05-01

    Wells called Deep Hydronest Wells will be installed at six locations at the Deaf Smith County Site to characterize hydraulic parameters in the geologic column between the top of the San Andres Formation and the base of Pennsylvanian System. Three hydronests will be drilled during early stages of site characterization to provide data for performance assessment modeling. Four wells are proposed for each of these 3 nests. Results of drilling, testing, and preliminary modeling will direct drilling and testing activities at the last 3 nests. Two wells are proposed at each of the last 3 nests for a total of 18 wells. The Salt Repository Project (SRP) Networks specify the schedule under which this program will operate. Drilling and hydrologic testing of the first Deep Hydronest will begin early in the Surface Investigation Program. Drilling and testing of the first three Deep Hydronests will require about 18 months. After 12 months of evaluating and analyzing data from the first three hydronests, the remaining three hydronests will be drilled during a 12-month period. The Technical Field Services Contractor is responsible for conducting the field program. Samples and data will be handled and reported in accordance with established SRP procedures. A quality assurance program will be used to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that the appropriate documentation is maintained. 36 refs., 20 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Subsidence Rates in Southeast Texas as Determined by RTK GNSS Measurements of Preexisting Survey Markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    This study determines the rates of subsidence or uplift in coastal areas of SE Texas by comparing recent GNSS measurements to the original orthometric heights of previously installed National Geodetic Survey (NGS) benchmarks. Understanding subsidence rates in coastal areas of SE Texas is critical when determining its vulnerability to local sea level rise and flooding, as well as for accurate survey control. The counties covered are Chambers, Galveston, Hardin, Jefferson, Liberty, Orange, and parts of Jasper and Newton counties. These counties lie between an earlier subsidence study conducted in Louisiana and an ongoing subsidence study of several counties around the Houston metropolitan area. The resurveying methods used in this RTK GNSS study allow a large area to be covered relatively quickly with enough detail to determine subsidence rates that are averaged over several decades. This information can be used to place more targeted GNSS observation stations in areas that appear to be rapidly subsiding. By continuously, or periodically, measuring the elevations at these targeted stations, current subsidence rates can be determined more accurately and at lower cost than by scattering a large number of GNSS stations over a wide area. This study was conducted using a Trimble R8 GNSS system on all NGS benchmarks that were found in the study area. Differential corrections were applied in real time using a VRS network of base stations. This system yields a nominal vertical accuracy of 1.5 to 2.0 cm for each 2 to 5 minute reading. Usually three of these readings were measured on each benchmark and averaged for the final result. A total of 367 benchmarks were resurveyed, most of which were suitable for vertical change rate calculations. Original NGS elevations were subtracted from the new elevations and divided by the time between the two elevation measurements to determine the average subsidence or uplift rate of the benchmark. Benchmarks used for determining the vertical

  10. Quantitative geophysical investigations at the Diamond M field, Scurry County, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davogustto Cataldo, Oswaldo Ernesto

    The Diamond M field over the Horseshoe Atoll reservoir of west Texas has produced oil since 1942. Even with some 210 well penetrations, complex reservoir compartmentalization has justified an ongoing drilling program with three wells drilled within the last three years. Accurate reservoir characterization requires accurate description of the geometry, geological facies, and petrophysical property distribution ranging from core, through log to the seismic scale. The operator has conducted a careful logging and coring process including dipole sonic logs in addition to acquiring a modern 3D vertical phone - vertical vibrator "P-wave" seismic data volume and an equivalent size 2-component by 2-componet "S-wave" seismic data volume. I analyze these data at different scales, integrating them into a whole. I begin with core analysis of the petrophysical properties of the Horseshoe Atoll reservoir. Measuring porosity, permeability, NMR T2 relaxation and velocities (Vp and Vs) as a function of pressure and find that porosity measurements are consistent when measured with different techniques. When upscaled, these measurements are in excellent agreement with properties measured at the log scale. Together, these measurements provide a lithology-porosity template against which I correlate my seismic P- and S-impedance measurements. Careful examination of P- and S-impedances as well as density from prestack inversion of the P-wave survey of the original time migrated gathers showed lower vertical resolution for S-impedance and density. These latter two parameters are controlled by the far-offset data, which suffers from migration stretch. I address this shortcoming by applying a recently developed non-stretch NMO technique which not only improved the bandwidth of the data but also resulted in inversions that better match the S-impedance and density well log data. The operator hypothesized that 2C by 2C S-wave data would better delineate lithology than conventional P

  11. Public health assessment for Alcoa (Point Comfort)/Lavaca Bay, Point Comfort, Calhoun County, Texas, Region 6. Cerclis No. TXD008123168. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-24

    The ALCOA (Point Comfort)/Lavaco Bay National Priorities List (NPL) site is in Calhoun County, Texas, approximately 1.5 miles south of Point Comfort and four miles northeast of Port Lavaca. Fish sampling data indicate that levels of mercury in fish are elevated. Mercury has been detected throughout the site in surface soil, shallow groundwater, air, bay sediments, fish and crabs. Other contaminants, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and lead, have been detected in shallow groundwater. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been detected in a limited number of sediment, fish, and oyster samples.

  12. Historical streamflows of Double Mountain Fork of Brazos River and water-surface elevations of Lake Alan Henry, Garza County, Texas, water years 1962-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Vrabel, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Lubbock, Texas, operates two surface-water stations in Garza County, Tex.: USGS streamflow-gaging station 08079600 Double Mountain Fork Brazos River at Justiceburg, Tex., and 08079700 Lake Alan Henry Reservoir, a water-supply reservoir about 60 miles southeast of Lubbock, Tex., and about 10 miles east of Justiceburg, Tex. The streamflow and water-surface elevation data from the two stations are useful to water-resource managers and planners in support of forecasting and water-resource infrastructure operations and are used in regional hydrologic studies.

  13. Public health assessment for Odessa Superfund Site (a/k/a Sprague Road Groundwater Plume) Ector, Ector County, Texas, Region 6: CERCLIS number TX0001407444. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-28

    The Sprague Road Groundwater Plume National Priorities List site, consists of three plumes of chromium contaminated water just outside the northern city limits of Odessa, Ector County, Texas. The chromium in the groundwater is a public health hazard to people who continue to use the chromium-contaminated water wells for drinking. Chromium in soil at Leigh Metal Plating Inc. presents a potential public health hazard. Although this facility is surrounded by a fence, access to the site is not entirely restricted. There is a five-foot pit on the National Chromium Corporation site that could present a physical hazard to children trespassing on the site.

  14. Development of a geodatabase for springs within and surrounding outcrops of the Trinity aquifer in northern Bexar County, Texas, 2010-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diane E.

    2013-01-01

    Data for 141 springs within and surrounding the Trinity aquifer outcrops in northern Bexar County were compiled from existing reports and databases. These data were augmented with selected data collected onsite, including the location, discharge, and water-quality characteristics of selected springs, and were entered into the geodatabase. The Trinity aquifer in central Texas is commonly divided into the upper, middle, and lower Trinity aquifers; all of the information that was compiled pertaining to the aquifer is for the upper and middle Trinity aquifers.

  15. Geodatabase design and characteristics of geologic information for a geodatabase of selected wells penetrating the Austin Group in central Bexar County, Texas, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pedraza, Diana E.; Shah, Sachin D.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, developed a geodatabase of geologic and hydrogeologic information for selected wells penetrating the Austin Group in central Bexar County, Texas. The Austin Group functions as an upper confining unit to the Edwards aquifer and is the thickest and most permeable of the Edwards aquifer confining units. The geologic and hydrogeologic information pertains to a 377-square-mile study area that encompasses central Bexar County. Data were compiled primarily from drillers' and borehole geophysical logs from federal, State, and local agencies and published reports. Austin Group characteristics compiled for 523 unique wells are documented (if known), including year drilled, well depth, altitude of top and base of the Austin Group, and thickness of the Austin Group.

  16. 78 FR 20451 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Pelican Island Causeway, Galveston, Channel, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... the island through the Galveston Channel, an additional distance of up to three miles. B. Basis and Purpose The Pelican Island Causeway bridge, Galveston Channel mile 4.5 (GIWW mile 356.1), at Galveston... with 33 CFR 117.966, the draw of the Pelican Island Causeway bridge across Galveston Channel, mile...

  17. Huminite reflectance measurements of Paleocene and Upper Cretaceous coals from borehole cuttings, Zavala and Dimmit counties, South Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Paul C.; Hook, Robert W.; Warwick, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    The reflectance of huminite in 19 cuttings samples was determined in support of ongoing investigations into the coal bed methane potential of subsurface Paleocene and Upper Cretaceous coals of South Texas. Coal cuttings were obtained from the Core Research Center of the Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin. Geophysical logs, mud-gas logs, driller's logs, completion cards, and scout tickets were used to select potentially coal-bearing sample suites and to identify specific sample depths. Reflectance measurements indicate coals of subbituminous rank are present in a wider area in South Texas than previously recognized.

  18. Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Composition of Soil and Shell from an Archeological Site in Kimble County, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, K. K.; Paul, D.; Skrzypek, G.; Tomka, S. A.

    2007-12-01

    We report stable carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) isotopic composition of inorganic carbonates, soil organic matter (SOM), and terrestrial gastropod shells present in a 130cm soil profile (radiocarbon date of 2340-2120 B.P) recovered from archeological site 41KM69, Kimble County, Texas. Prior to soil carbonate and SOM analyses, samples were treated with 5% sodium hypochlorite to remove organic matter and treated with 4% HCl to remove inorganic carbonate, respectively. Isotopic compositions of samples were obtained utilizing a Gasbench II (for carbonate-acid reaction technique) and a CHNS Elemental Analyzer (for SOM) coupled with a DeltaPlus XP Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer in continuous-flow. δ13C of carbonates in the soil profile varies in the range -2.15 to -4.63 ‰. δ18O of carbonates (ranging from -3.22 to -3.92‰) show little variation within the profile. δ13C of SOM (-25.61‰ to -22.83‰) suggests that C3 plants were predominant in the study area. There is ~3‰ enrichment in 13C of SOM at the bottom of profile relative to the top. Previous studies have shown that δ13C of modern soil carbonates are higher by 14-16‰ than SOM, whereas our results show about 20‰ difference. δ13C of land snail shells ( Rabdotus, Polygyra, Helicina) recovered from the soil show strong linear correlation with depth (R2= 0.88): -9.46‰ at 60cm to -5.4‰ at 112cm. δ18O of shells show no correlation with depth and range from - 3.34‰ to 0.62‰. Excluding one shell analysis, δ13C of shells and SOM exhibit good correlation (R2= 0.80). Previous studies of variation in δ13C in land snail shell document that carbon isotopic composition in shell are primarily a function of snail diet. Balakrishnan et al. (2005) have shown that δ13C of shells in C3 vegetation regimes range from -10.0‰ to -8.8‰, which is consistent with our results. Although, the interpretation of δ18O values in land snails is not straightforward, values are probably related to several different

  19. 33 CFR 117.977 - Pelican Island Causeway, Galveston Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Island Causeway, Galveston Channel. The drawspan for the Pelican Island Causeway Drawbridge across... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pelican Island Causeway, Galveston Channel. 117.977 Section 117.977 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...

  20. 75 FR 23793 - Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee... improvements, aids to navigation, area projects impacting safety on the Houston Ship Channel, and...

  1. 76 FR 27337 - Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety... navigation, area projects impacting safety on the Houston Ship Channel, and various other navigation...

  2. 75 FR 47713 - Regulated Navigation Area; Galveston Channel, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area; Galveston Channel, TX AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a regulated navigation... Navigation Area; Galveston Channel'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 18766). We received no comments on...

  3. 75 FR 6215 - Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee... improvements, aids to navigation, area projects impacting safety on the Houston Ship Channel, and various...

  4. 75 FR 51473 - Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee (HOGANSAC... navigation, area projects impacting safety on the Houston Ship Channel, and various other navigation...

  5. 33 CFR 80.845 - Galveston, TX to Freeport, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... (a) A line drawn from Galveston North Jetty Light 6A to Galveston South Jetty Light 5A. (b) A line formed by the centerline of the highway bridge over San Luis Pass. (c) Lines formed by the centerlines of... the seaward extremity of the Freeport North Jetty to Freeport Entrance Light 6; thence...

  6. 33 CFR 80.845 - Galveston, TX to Freeport, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (a) A line drawn from Galveston North Jetty Light 6A to Galveston South Jetty Light 5A. (b) A line formed by the centerline of the highway bridge over San Luis Pass. (c) Lines formed by the centerlines of... the seaward extremity of the Freeport North Jetty to Freeport Entrance Light 6; thence...

  7. Historical contamination of Mississippi River Delta, Tampa Bay, and Galveston Bay sediments. National status and trends program for marine environmental quality: Technical memo (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Presley, B.J.; Wade, T.L.; Santschi, P.; Baskaran, M.

    1998-03-01

    In order to obtain sediment which has accumulated over the past 100 years or so, 50--80 cm long sediment cores were collected from the submarine Mississippi River Delta, Galveston Bay, Texas and Tampa Bay, Florida. The cores were extruded and sliced into 1 cm thick sections which were then radiometrically age dated and analyzed for those organic compounds and trace metals suspected of being contaminants in the sampling areas.

  8. 78 FR 60826 - Foreign-Trade Zone 155-Calhoun/Victoria Counties, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... Production Activity; Caterpillar, Inc. (Excavator and Frame Assembly Production); Victoria, Texas On May 29... proposed production activity to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of Caterpillar, Inc.,...

  9. Experience-Based Lessons From Rural Texas Graduate Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Nash, Lisa R; Elliott, Tricia C; Duchicela, Jorge

    2016-02-01

    The University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston (UTMB) family medicine residency program established a rural training track (RTT) in Weimar, Texas, in 2000. The UTMB-RTT provided a training environment designed specifically to prepare family physicians for rural practice in Texas. From 2000 to 2015, 17 family medicine residents completed their training and graduated from the UTMB-RTT. Despite successes with graduate training, rural placement after program completion, and recruitment of underrepresented minorities, the UTMB-RTT closed in June 2015. This paper describes the strengths of and challenges experienced by the program, as well as lessons learned to inform future endeavors.

  10. Simulation of streamflow and water quality in the Leon Creek watershed, Bexar County, Texas, 1997-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ockerman, Darwin J.; Roussel, Meghan C.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the San Antonio River Authority, configured, calibrated, and tested a Hydrological Simulation Program ? FORTRAN watershed model for the approximately 238-square-mile Leon Creek watershed in Bexar County, Texas, and used the model to simulate streamflow and water quality (focusing on loads and yields of selected constituents). Streamflow in the model was calibrated and tested with available data from five U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations for 1997-2004. Simulated streamflow volumes closely matched measured streamflow volumes at all streamflow-gaging stations. Total simulated streamflow volumes were within 10 percent of measured values. Streamflow volumes are greatly influenced by large storms. Two months that included major floods accounted for about 50 percent of all the streamflow measured at the most downstream gaging station during 1997-2004. Water-quality properties and constituents (water temperature, dissolved oxygen, suspended sediment, dissolved ammonia nitrogen, dissolved nitrate nitrogen, and dissolved and total lead and zinc) in the model were calibrated using available data from 13 sites in and near the Leon Creek watershed for varying periods of record during 1992-2005. Average simulated daily mean water temperature and dissolved oxygen at the most downstream gaging station during 1997-2000 were within 1 percent of average measured daily mean water temperature and dissolved oxygen. Simulated suspended-sediment load at the most downstream gaging station during 2001-04 (excluding July 2002 because of major storms) was 77,700 tons compared with 74,600 tons estimated from a streamflow-load regression relation (coefficient of determination = .869). Simulated concentrations of dissolved ammonia nitrogen and dissolved nitrate nitrogen closely matched measured concentrations after calibration. At the most downstream gaging station, average simulated monthly

  11. Hydrologic conditions and water quality in an agricultural area in Kleberg and Nueces Counties, Texas, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ockerman, Darwin J.; Petri, Brian L.

    2001-01-01

    During 1996?98, rainfall and runoff were monitored on a 49,680-acre agricultural watershed in Kleberg and Nueces Counties in South Texas. Nineteen rainfall samples were analyzed for selected nutrients, and runoff samples from 29 storms were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, and pesticides. Loads of nutrients in rainfall and loads of nutrients and pesticides in runoff were computed. For a 40,540-acre part of the watershed (lower study area), constituent loads entering the watershed in rainfall, in runoff from the upper study area, and from agricultural chemical applications to the lower study area were compared with runoff loads exiting the lower study area. Total rainfall for 1996?98 averaged 25.86 inches per year, which is less than the long-term annual average rainfall of 29.80 inches for the area. Rainfall and runoff during 1996?98 were typical of historical patterns, with periods of below average rainfall and runoff interspersed with extreme events. Five individual storms accounted for about 38 percent of the total rainfall and 94 percent of the total runoff. During the 3-year study, the total nitrogen runoff yield from the lower study area was 1.3 pounds per acre per year, compared with 49 pounds per acre per year applied as fertilizer and 3.1 pounds per acre per year from rainfall. While almost all of the fertilizer and rainfall nitrogen was ammonia and nitrate, most of the nitrogen in runoff was particulate organic nitrogen, associated with crop residue. Total nitrogen exiting the lower study area in surface-water runoff was about 2.5 percent of the nitrogen inputs (fertilizer and rainfall nitrogen). Annual deposition of total nitrogen entering the lower study area in rainfall exceeded net yields of total nitrogen exiting the watershed in runoff because most of the rainfall does not contribute to runoff. During the study, the total phosphorus runoff yield from the lower study area was 0.48 pound per acre per year compared with 4.2 pounds per acre per year

  12. Detection of waterborne mutagens and characterization of chemicals in selected Galveston sites after an oil spill

    SciTech Connect

    Kira, S.; Taketa, K.; Itoh, T.; Hayatsu, H. ); Zheng, Y.; Li, R.; Holliday, T.L.; Giam, C.S. )

    1994-08-01

    In our previous study, we proposed a unique sampling technique for mutagens in marine environment by suspending an absorbent, blue rayon, selective to polycyclic mutagens with three or more fused rings. By using this technique, we were able to bring back a small amount of adsorbent, weighing less than 10 g, from remote sampling sites, rather than large volumes of water. In the summer of 1990, a collision of barge tankers occurred in Galveston Bay and approximately 500,000 gal of oil were spilled into the Bay. Several sites in Galveston Bay were sampled 5-7 d after the oil sill. We characterized the pollutants chemically and detected the mutagenicity. We designed the present study to examine the applicability of our technique from two points of view. One was to determine if there was a correlation between mutagenicity of blue rayon-adsorbed compounds and the level of known mutagens detected in water samples from the same site. The other was to certify if the sampling technique provided a convenient method for handling water samples collected at remote sites. The chemical analysis was carried out in Texas (U.S.A.) an the mutagenicity testing was done in Okayama (Japan). 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Houston KIDS COUNT: A Snapshot of Children Living in Houston and Harris County. 2005 Texas KIDS COUNT Special Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Public Policy Priorities, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Houston KIDS COUNT data book examines the status of children in Houston and Harris County and identifies trends in their general welfare. These data provide a portrait of Harris County's children that can be used for developing sound and effective local policy. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) Children in Families; (2)…

  14. Petrographic report on clay-rich samples from Permian Unit 4 salt, G. Friemel No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin, Deaf Smith County, Texas: unanalyzed data

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, L M

    1983-09-01

    This report presents the results of mineralogic and petrographic analyses performed on five samples of clay-rich rock from salt-bearing Permian strata sampled by drill core from G. Friemel No. 1 Well, Deaf Smith County, Texas. Five samples of clay-rich rock from depths of about 2457, 2458, 2521, 2548, and 2568 feet were analyzed to determine the amounts of soluble phase (halite) and the amounts and mineralogy of the insoluble phases. The amounts of halite found were 59, 79, 47, 40, and 4 weight percent, respectively, for the samples. The insoluble minerals are predominately clay (20 to 60 volume percent) and anhydrite (up to 17 volume percent), with minor (about 1.0%) and trace amounts of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, and gypsum. The clays include illite, chlorite, and interstratified chlorite-smectite. The results presented in this petrographic report are descriptive, uninterpreted data. 2 references, 7 tables.

  15. Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Development through High-Resolution 3C3D Seismic and Horizontal Drilling: Eva South Marrow Sand Unit, Texas County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler,David M.; Miller, William A.; Wilson, Travis C.

    2002-03-11

    The Eva South Morrow Sand Unit is located in western Texas County, Oklahoma. The field produces from an upper Morrow sandstone, termed the Eva sandstone, deposited in a transgressive valley-fill sequence. The field is defined as a combination structural stratigraphic trap; the reservoir lies in a convex up -dip bend in the valley and is truncated on the west side by the Teepee Creek fault. Although the field has been a successful waterflood since 1993, reservoir heterogeneity and compartmentalization has impeded overall sweep efficiency. A 4.25 square mile high-resolution, three component three-dimensional (3C3D) seismic survey was acquired in order to improve reservoir characterization and pinpoint the optimal location of a new horizontal producing well, the ESU 13-H.

  16. Educational Status Orientations of Mexican American and Anglo American Youth in Selected Low-Income Counties of Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juarez, Rumaldo Z.

    Research was conducted to determine the educational status orientations of a sample of Mexican American boys and girls living in low-income rural areas of Texas, and to compare the results by sex with educational status orientations of a similar sample of Anglo American boys and girls. Informational responses from a sample of 290 male and 306…

  17. Laughlin Air Force Base, Groundwater and Reclaimed Water Irrigation Project, Laughlin AFB, Val Verde County, Texas. Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    streambeds. • Texas Hornshell (Popenaias Popei) ( Invertebrate - Mollusk- Clam)- Listed by USFWS as a candidate taxon (proposed for protection), very...CATEGORICAL EXCLUSIOI’I (OATEX) • ; OR PAOPOS£0 ACTION DOES NOT OUALIFY FOR A CAT£X: FUR’rHt R ENVIRO ,’.<ENTAL ANALYSIS IS REOUiilED. 18. REMAR.I(S The

  18. 78 FR 35604 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 155-Calhoun/Victoria Counties, Texas; Notification of Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... Proposed Production Activity; Caterpillar, Inc.; (Excavator and Frame Assembly Production), Victoria, Texas... proposed production activity to the FTZ Board on behalf of Caterpillar, Inc. (Caterpillar), located in... CFR 400.22) was received on May 29, 2013. The Caterpillar facility is located within FTZ 155, Site...

  19. Seasonal detection of atrazine and atzA in man-made waterways receiving agricultural runoff in a subtropical, semi-arid environment (Hidalgo County, Texas, USA).

    PubMed

    Cortez, Ibdanelo; Vitek, Christopher J; Persans, Michael W; Lowe, Kristine L

    2017-02-01

    Atrazine is a widely-used herbicide that can impact non-target organisms in the environment but can be biologically degraded by several types of microorganisms. In this study, the gene atzA, which encodes for the initial step in bacterially-mediated atrazine degradation, was used as an indicator of atrazine pollution in agricultural canals located in Hidalgo County, Texas, USA. The concentration of atrazine and atzA were monitored once per month for 12 months during 2010-2011. Atrazine was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; atzA abundance was monitored using Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (Q-PCR) analyses. Abundance of atrazine and atzA were compared with rainy versus dry months and during planting versus non-planting months. Results showed that atrazine levels varied from below detection to 0.43 ppb and were not influenced by precipitation or planting season. Concentrations of the gene atzA were significantly different in rainy versus dry months; during planting versus non-planting times of the year; and in the interaction of precipitation and planting season. The highest concentration of atzA, approx. 4.57 × 10(8) gene copies ml(-1), was detected in July 2010-a rainy, planting month in Hidalgo County, South Texas. However, atrazine was below detection during that month. We conclude that Q-PCR using atzA as an indicator gene is a potential method for monitoring low levels of atrazine pollution in environmental samples.

  20. Alternative methods to manage waste salt from repository excavation in the Deaf Smith County and Swisher County locations, Texas: A scoping study: Technical report. [Salt and salt-laden material

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This report describes and qualitatively evaluates eight options for managing the large volumes of salt and salt-laden rock that would result from the excavation of a high-level radioactive waste repository in Deaf Smith County or Swisher County, Texas. The options are: distribution for commercial use; ocean disposal; deep-well injection; disposal in multilevel mines on the site; disposal in abandoned salt mines off the site; disposal off the site in abandoned mines developed for minerals other than salt; disposal in excavated landfills; and surface disposal on alkali flats. The main features of each option are described, as well as the associated environmental and economic impacts, and regulatory constraints. The options are evaluated in terms of 11 factors that jointly constitute a test of relative suitability. The results of the evaluation and implications for further study are indicated. This document does not consider or include the actual numbers, findings, or conclusions contained in the final Deaf Smith County Environmental Assessment (DOE, 1986). 43 refs., 8 tabs.

  1. Use of landsat thematic mapper data to identify crop types and estimate irrigated acreage, Uvalde and Medina counties, Texas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raymond, L.H.; McFarlane, S.I.

    1994-01-01

    The total number of acres of irrigated crops estimated using Landsat TM data was about 9 percent lower in Uvalde County and about 13 percent lower in Medina County than the number of acres calculated from data reported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service (ASCS). The total quantity of water pumped from the Edwards aquifer for irrigation in the two counties in 1991, about 83,000 acre-feet, was about 5 percent greater than the quantity calculated from data reported by the ASCS.

  2. 40 CFR 52.2285 - Control of evaporative losses from the filling of gasoline storage vessels in the Houston and San...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... containers and delivery vessels. (b) This section is applicable to the following counties in Texas: Harris... terminals) in Bexar, Brazoria, Galveston and Harris Counties, any gasoline bulk plants in Harris County, and... Bexar, Brazoria, Galveston, and Harris Counties which is subject to Texas Air Control Board Regulation...

  3. 40 CFR 52.2285 - Control of evaporative losses from the filling of gasoline storage vessels in the Houston and San...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... containers and delivery vessels. (b) This section is applicable to the following counties in Texas: Harris... terminals) in Bexar, Brazoria, Galveston and Harris Counties, any gasoline bulk plants in Harris County, and... Bexar, Brazoria, Galveston, and Harris Counties which is subject to Texas Air Control Board Regulation...

  4. Section 22 Planning Assistance to States Program: Inlets Along the Texas Gulf Coast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    purpose was to control the high salinities in Corpus Christi Bay and the Laguna Madre and to allow for greater fish migration. The inlet ~as 150 to...Rollover Pass Rollover Pass is located 22 miles northeast of Galveston and was constructed by the Texas Game and Fish Commission, now the Texas ...Initial dredging of Yarborough Pass, also called Murdoch’s Landing Pass, was completed in 1941 to improve water circulation in the Laguna Madre . It

  5. Geology and hydrostratigraphy of Guadalupe River State Park and Honey Creek State Natural Area, Kendall and Comal Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Blome, Charles D.; Morris, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    The faulting and fracturing in the study area are part of the Miocene Balcones Fault Zone, which is an extensional system of faults that generally trend southwest to northeast in south-central Texas. An igneous dike, containing aphanitic texture, cuts through the center of the study area near the confluence of Honey Creek and the Guadalupe River. The dike penetrates the Cow Creek Limestone and the lower part of the Hensell Sand, which outcrops at three locations.

  6. Port of Galveston Solar Energy Project

    SciTech Connect

    Falcioni, Diane; Cuclis, Alex; Freundlich, Alex

    2014-03-31

    This study on the performance characteristics of existing solar technologies in a maritime environment was funded by an award given to The Port of Galveston (POG) from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The study includes research performed by The Center for Advanced Materials at the University of Houston (UH). The UH researchers examined how solar cell efficiencies and life spans can be improved by examining the performance of a variety of antireflective (AR) coatings mounted on the top of one of the POG’s Cruise Terminals. Supplemental supporting research was performed at the UH laboratories. An educational Kiosk was constructed with a 55” display screen providing information about solar energy, the research work UH performed at POG and real time data from the solar panels located on the roof of the Cruise Terminal. The Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) managed the project.

  7. Cultural Resources Survey of 245 Acres at the White Oak Creek Wildlife Managment Area, Cass, Morris, and Titus Counties, Texas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    archeological research in Northeast Texas has a relatively long history, going as far back as 1911 with Clarence B. Moore’s river boat survey of sites...1991, 1993, 1994; Gadus, Fields, and Bousman 1992; Gadus, Fields, Bousman, Tomka, and Howard 6 1992; Gadus et al. 1991; Green et al. 1996; Jurney and...Bohlin 1993; Jurney et al. 1993; Lebo 1988; McGregor et al. 1996; Perttula 1988a, 1988b, 1989, 1990; Perttula, ed. 1989; Winchell et al. 1992). In the

  8. Quality of surface-water runoff in selected streams in the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer recharge zone, Bexar County, Texas, 1997-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Opsahl, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    During 1997–2012, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, collected and analyzed water-quality constituents in surface-water runoff from five ephemeral stream sites near San Antonio in northern Bexar County, Texas. The data were collected to assess the quality of surface water that recharges the Edwards aquifer. Samples were collected from four stream basins that had small amounts of developed land at the onset of the study but were predicted to undergo substantial development over a period of several decades. Water-quality samples also were collected from a fifth stream basin located on land protected from development to provide reference data by representing undeveloped land cover. Water-quality data included pH, specific conductance, chemical oxygen demand, dissolved solids (filtered residue on evaporation in milligrams per liter, dried at 180 degrees Celsius), suspended solids, major ions, nutrients, trace metals, and pesticides. Trace metal concentration data were compared to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality established surface water quality standards for human health protection (water and fish). Among all constituents in all samples for which criteria were available for comparison, only one sample had one constituent which exceeded the surface water criteria on one occasion. A single lead concentration (2.76 micrograms per liter) measured in a filtered water sample exceeded the surface water criteria of 1.15 micrograms per liter. The average number of pesticide detections per sample in stream basins undergoing development ranged from 1.8 to 6.0. In contrast, the average number of pesticide detections per sample in the reference stream basin was 0.6. Among all constituents examined in this study, pesticides, dissolved orthophosphate phosphorus, and dissolved total phosphorus demonstrated the largest differences between the four stream basins undergoing development and the reference stream basin with

  9. 3-D seismic delineation and geologic explanation of channelization in the Frio Formation of Javelina/East McCook Field, Hidalgo County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J.L.

    1994-09-01

    Sinuous, channel-form features were recognized on seismic amplitude time-slice maps of the shallow Oligocene Frio Formation on several Shell proprietary 3-D seismic surveys in west-central Hidalgo County, Texas. A case study of channel morphologies observed in the Frio Formation within the 50 mi{sup 2} 3-D seismic survey over Javelina/East McCook field was undertaken to better understand the distribution, lithology, origin, and hydrocarbon potential of these features. Ten separate channel-like amplitude features are observed in flattened time slices within a 200 m (approximately 1100 ft) interval on 3-D seismic. The channels have various azimuthal orientations and varying degrees of sinuosity. Several of the features have lengths that span the 3-D survey area (10 mi); apparent channel widths range from 200 to 2000 ft. The channelized seismic events tie to an interval of interbedded mudstones and claystones with siltstones. Two of the channels seen on seismic, and which were penetrated by wells, correlate to siftstone and mudstone intervals that have gross thicknesses of 30 to 60 ft. The lithologies and dimensions of the two channels indicate that they are probably small mudstone/siltstone-filled tributary/distributary channels deposited in a coastal floodplain environment; a comparison of the apparent channel dimensions to the dimensions of small channels/bayous of the modern-day Texas Gulf Coast supports this interpretation. Correlation of wells adjacent to the channels indicates that sandy point-bar facies are not present in association with the channel fill, which discounts the idea that high-quality reservoirs are flanking these particular mud-filled channels.

  10. Winter sound-level characterization of the Deaf Smith County location in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    A description of sound levels and sound sources in the Deaf Smith County location in the Palo Duro Basin during a period representative of the winter season is presented. Data were collected during the period February 26 through March 1, 1983. 4 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  11. Environmental Assessment Addressing the 301st Fighter Wing Managed Airspace, Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base, Fort Worth, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    decisionmaking process. Copies of the EA and proposed FONSI were available for review at the Fort Worth Central Public Library , Texas; Brownwood Public Library ...Texas; F.M. Richards Memorial Library , Texas; Tom Green County Main Library , Texas; Killeen City Main Library , Texas; and Lawton Library , Oklahoma...through the defined areas. EA for 301 FW Managed Airspace NAS JRB Fort Worth May 2009 2-3 20 Ballinger Callahan County Haskell County Jones County

  12. Selected hydrologic data for the Mesilla ground-water basin, 1987 through 1992 water years, Dona Ana County, New Mexico, and El Paso County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nickerson, Edward L.

    1995-01-01

    The Mesilla ground-water basin monitoring program was established in 1987 to document hydrologic conditions and establish a long-term, continuous data base to permit future quantitative evaluation of the ground-water flow system and stream/aquifer relations. Data collection is divided into three program elements. These are the (1) Mesilla ground- water basin observation-well program; (2) Mesilla Valley hydrologic sections; and (3) Rio Grande seepage investigations. This report is a compilation of hydrologic data collected for the Mesilla ground- water basin monitoring program during the 1987 through 1992 water years. Hydrologic data presented in the report include well records and water levels for 181 wells; mean daily river stage and ground- water levels at 37 sites; seepage investigations of the Rio Grande from Radium Springs, New Mexico, to El Paso, Texas; and chemical analyses of 29 water samples collected from the Rio Grande.

  13. The Texas Childhood Hunger Identification Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Public Policy Priorities, Austin, TX.

    The final report of the Texas Childhood Hunger Identification Project (Texas CHIP), this document describes the most comprehensive study of childhood hunger undertaken in Texas. Through enumeration and interviewing methods, low-income families from 27 counties in Texas were analyzed in the areas of income allocation, food frequency, homelessness,…

  14. Texas: Houston

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... across Galveston Bay can be identified by the presence of light blue and green pixels, and places where clouds or other factors precluded ... as part of the Houston regional air quality study. Airborne pollution particles that contribute to the poor air quality come in part from ...

  15. Texas Irrigation Situation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The irrigation situation in Texas is an interaction between hydrology and water policies. In 2012, according to National Agricultural Statistical Service (NASS) four High Plains counties, Gainesville, Yoakum, Terry and Cochran, accounted for approximately 60% of the 150,000 acres of peanut productio...

  16. Approximate altitude of water levels in wells in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston area, Texas, spring 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, James Frank; Ranzau, C.E.; Coplin, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this report, which was prepared in cooperation with the City of Houston and the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, is to show the altitudes of water levels in wells in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston, Texas, metropolitan areas.  The maps are based on water-level measurements in spring of 1986 in about 400 wells.

  17. Geologic framework, structure, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Knippa Gap area in eastern Uvalde and western Medina Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diana E.; Morris, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    By using data that were compiled and collected for this study and previous studies, a revised map was constructed depicting the geologic framework, structure, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Knippa Gap area in eastern Uvalde and western Medina Counties, Tex. The map also shows the interpreted structural dip directions and interpreted location of a structural low (trough) in the area known as the Knippa Gap.

  18. An interpretation of a geologic map of Fannin County, Texas, prepared by ADP techniques from ERTS MSS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, J. A., Jr.; Gardner, J. J.; Cipra, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Multispectral scanner data, collected by ERTS-1 from an area in northeast Texas underlain by structurally simple cretaceous sedimentary rocks, were analyzed using several automatic data processing techniques. Training areas for the computer analysis were selected in three ways using: (1) an unsupervised classifier, (2) the unsupervised classifier to further refine training areas, and (3) available ground information. The first two methods utilize the capability of the unsupervised classifier to the unsupervised classifier to group resolution elements with similar spectral properties. With the imagery produced by these procedures, several geologic features can be identified. The most easily recognizable features are streams and other water bodies. The approximate location of contacts between several rock units can be mapped.

  19. An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres reservoir, Foster and South Cowden fields, Ector County, Texas, Class II

    SciTech Connect

    Trentham, DGS, Robert C.; Robinson, M.S., William C.; Wider, Kevin; Weinbrandt, Ph.D.,PE, Richard

    2000-04-14

    A project to recover economic amounts of oil from a very mature oil field is being conducted by Laguna Petroleum Corporation of Midland, Texas, with partial funding from a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant to study shallow carbonate rock reservoirs. The objectives of the project are to use modern engineering methods to optimize oil field management and to use geological and geophysical data to recover untapped potential within the petroleum reservoirs. The integration of data and techniques from these disciplines has yielded results greater than those achievable without their cooperation. The cost of successfully accomplishing these goals is to be low enough for even small independent operators to afford. This article is a report describing accomplishments for the fiscal year 1998-1999.

  20. Fluvial architecture and reservoir heterogeneity of middle Frio sandstones, Seeligson field, Jim Wells and Kleberg Counties, south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Jirik, L.A.; Kerr, D.R.; Zinke, S.G.; Finley, R.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Evaluation of fluvial Frio reservoirs in south Texas reveals a complex architectural style potentially suited to the addition of incremental gas reserves through recognition of untapped compartments or bypassed gas zones. Seeligson field is being studied as part of a GRI/DOE/Texas-sponsored program, in cooperation with Oryx Energy Company and Mobil Exploration and Production U.S., Inc., and is designed to develop technologies and methodologies for increasing gas reserves from conventional reservoirs in mature fields. Seeligson field, discovered in 1937, has produced 2.2 tcf of gas from more than 50 middle Frio reservoirs. Cross sections as well as net sand and log facies maps illustrate depositional style, sandstone geometry, and reservoir heterogeneities. Far-offset vertical seismic profiles show laterally discontinuous reflections corresponding to the reservoirs. Lenticular lateral-bar sandstones dominate channel-fill deposits that together are commonly less than 50 ft thick, forming belts of sandstone approximately 2,500 ft wide. Crevasse-splay deposits commonly extend a few thousand feet beyond the channel system. Sand-rich channel-fill deposits are flanked by levee and overbank mudstones, isolating the reservoirs in narrow, dip-elongate trends. Deposition on an aggrading coastal plain resulted in a pattern of laterally stacked sandstone bodies that are widespread across the study area. Alternating periods of more rapid aggradation resulted in deposition of vertically stacked sandstones with limited areal distribution. Facies architecture of both depositional styles has implications for reservoir compartmentalization. Reservoir compartments within a laterally stacked system may be leaky, resulting from sandstone contact from producing wells along depositional axes. This effect is a major factor controlling incremental recovery. Reservoirs in vertically stacked systems should be better isolated.

  1. Effects of brush management on the hydrologic budget and water quality in and adjacent to Honey Creek State Natural Area, Comal County, Texas, 2001--10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banta, J. Ryan; Slattery, Richard N.

    2012-01-01

    Woody vegetation, including ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei), has encroached on some areas in central Texas that were historically oak grassland savannah. Encroachment of woody vegetation is generally attributed to overgrazing and fire suppression. Removing the ashe juniper and allowing native grasses to reestablish in the area as a brush management conservation practice (hereinafter referred to as "brush management") might change the hydrology in the watershed. These hydrologic changes might include changes to surface-water runoff, evapotranspiration, or groundwater recharge. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Federal, State, and local partners, examined the hydrologic effects of brush management in two adjacent watersheds in Comal County, Tex. Hydrologic data were collected in the watersheds for 3-4 years (pre-treatment) depending on the type of data, after which brush management occurred on one watershed (treatment watershed) and the other was left in its original condition (reference watershed). Hydrologic data were collected in the study area for another 6 years (post-treatment). These hydrologic data included rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration, and water quality. Groundwater recharge was not directly measured, but potential groundwater recharge was calculated by using a simplified mass balance approach. This fact sheet summarizes highlights of the study from the USGS Scientific Investigations Report on which it is based.

  2. Impacts from above-ground activities in the eagle ford shale play on landscapes and hydrologic flows, La Salle County, Texas.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Jon Paul; Abolt, Charles J; Young, Michael H

    2015-06-01

    We assess the spatial and geomorphic fragmentation from the recent Eagle Ford Shale play in La Salle County, Texas, USA. Wells and pipelines were overlaid onto base maps of land cover, soil properties, vegetation assemblages, and hydrologic units. Changes to continuity of different ecoregions and supporting landscapes were assessed using the Landscape Fragmentation Tool (a third-party ArcGIS extension) as quantified by land area and continuity of core landscape areas (i.e., those degraded by "edge effects"). Results show decreases in core areas (8.7%; ~33,290 ha) and increases in landscape patches (0.2%; ~640 ha), edges (1.8%; ~6940 ha), and perforated areas (4.2%; ~16230 ha). Pipeline construction dominates landscape disturbance, followed by drilling and injection pads (85, 15, and 0.03% of disturbed area, respectively). An increased potential for soil loss is indicated, with 51% (~5790 ha) of all disturbance regimes occurring on soils with low water-transmission rates (depth to impermeable layer less than 50 cm) and a high surface runoff potential (hydrologic soil group D). Additionally, 88% (~10,020 ha) of all disturbances occurred on soils with a wind erodibility index of approximately 19 kt/km(2)/year (0.19 kt/ha/year) or higher, resulting in an estimated potential of 2 million tons of soil loss per year. Results demonstrate that infrastructure placement is occurring on soils susceptible to erosion while reducing and splitting core areas potentially vital to ecosystem services.

  3. Impacts from Above-Ground Activities in the Eagle Ford Shale Play on Landscapes and Hydrologic Flows, La Salle County, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Jon Paul; Abolt, Charles J.; Young, Michael H.

    2015-06-01

    We assess the spatial and geomorphic fragmentation from the recent Eagle Ford Shale play in La Salle County, Texas, USA. Wells and pipelines were overlaid onto base maps of land cover, soil properties, vegetation assemblages, and hydrologic units. Changes to continuity of different ecoregions and supporting landscapes were assessed using the Landscape Fragmentation Tool (a third-party ArcGIS extension) as quantified by land area and continuity of core landscape areas (i.e., those degraded by "edge effects"). Results show decreases in core areas (8.7 %; ~33,290 ha) and increases in landscape patches (0.2 %; ~640 ha), edges (1.8 %; ~6940 ha), and perforated areas (4.2 %; ~16230 ha). Pipeline construction dominates landscape disturbance, followed by drilling and injection pads (85, 15, and 0.03 % of disturbed area, respectively). An increased potential for soil loss is indicated, with 51 % (~5790 ha) of all disturbance regimes occurring on soils with low water-transmission rates (depth to impermeable layer less than 50 cm) and a high surface runoff potential (hydrologic soil group D). Additionally, 88 % (~10,020 ha) of all disturbances occurred on soils with a wind erodibility index of approximately 19 kt/km2/year (0.19 kt/ha/year) or higher, resulting in an estimated potential of 2 million tons of soil loss per year. Results demonstrate that infrastructure placement is occurring on soils susceptible to erosion while reducing and splitting core areas potentially vital to ecosystem services.

  4. Genome-Wide Association Study of Staphylococcus aureus Carriage in a Community-Based Sample of Mexican-Americans in Starr County, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Eric L.; Below, Jennifer E.; Fischer, Rebecca S. B.; Essigmann, Heather T.; Hu, Hao; Huff, Chad; Robinson, D. Ashley; Petty, Lauren E.; Aguilar, David; Bell, Graeme I.; Hanis, Craig L.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the number one cause of hospital-acquired infections. Understanding host pathogen interactions is paramount to the development of more effective treatment and prevention strategies. Therefore, whole exome sequence and chip-based genotype data were used to conduct rare variant and genome-wide association analyses in a Mexican-American cohort from Starr County, Texas to identify genes and variants associated with S. aureus nasal carriage. Unlike most studies of S. aureus that are based on hospitalized populations, this study used a representative community sample. Two nasal swabs were collected from participants (n = 858) 11–17 days apart between October 2009 and December 2013, screened for the presence of S. aureus, and then classified as either persistent, intermittent, or non-carriers. The chip-based and exome sequence-based single variant association analyses identified 1 genome-wide significant region (KAT2B) for intermittent and 11 regions suggestively associated with persistent or intermittent S. aureus carriage. We also report top findings from gene-based burden analyses of rare functional variation. Notably, we observed marked differences between signals associated with persistent and intermittent carriage. In single variant analyses of persistent carriage, 7 of 9 genes in suggestively associated regions and all 5 top gene-based findings are associated with cell growth or tight junction integrity or are structural constituents of the cytoskeleton, suggesting that variation in genes associated with persistent carriage impact cellular integrity and morphology. PMID:26569114

  5. APPLICATION OF WATER-JET HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNOLOGY TO DRILL AND ACIDIZE HORIZONTAL DRAIN HOLES, TEDBIT (SAN ANDRES) FIELD, GAINES COUNTY, TEXAS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael W. Rose

    2005-09-22

    The San Andres Formation is one of the major hydrocarbon-producing units in the Permian Basin, with multiple reservoirs contained within the dolomitized subtidal portions of upward shoaling carbonate shelf cycles. The test well is located in Tedbit (San Andres) Field in northeastern Gaines County, Texas, in an area of scattered San Andres production associated with local structural highs. Selected on the basis of geological and historical data, the Oil and Gas Properties Wood No. 1 well is considered to be typical of a large number of San Andres stripper wells in the Permian Basin. Thus, successful completion of horizontal drain holes in this well would demonstrate a widely applicable enhanced recovery technology. Water-jet horizontal drilling is an emerging technology with the potential to provide significant economic benefits in marginal wells. Forecast benefits include lower recompletion costs and improved hydrocarbon recoveries. The technology utilizes water under high pressure, conveyed through small-diameter coiled tubing, to jet horizontal drain holes into producing formations. Testing of this technology was conducted with inconclusive results. Paraffin sludge and mechanical problems were encountered in the wellbore, initially preventing the water-jet tool from reaching the kick-off point. After correcting these problems and attempting to cut a casing window with the water-jet milling assembly, lateral jetting was attempted without success.

  6. Environmental analysis of geopressured-geothermal prospect areas, De Witt and Colorado counties, Texas. Final report, March 1 - August 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavson, T.C.; Reeder, F.S.; Badger, E.A.

    1980-02-01

    Information collected and analyzed for a preliminary environmental analysis of geopressured geothermal prospect areas in Colorado and DeWitt Counties, Texas is presented. Specific environmental concerns for each geopressured geothermal prospect area are identified and discussed. Approximately 218 km/sup 2/(85 mi/sup 2/) were studied in the vicinity of each prospect area to: (1) conduct an environmental analysis to identify more and less suited areas for geopressured test wells; and (2) provide an environmental data base for future development of geopressured geothermal energy resources. A series of maps and tables are included to illustrate environmental characteristics including: geology, water resources, soils, current land use, vegetation, wildlife, and meteorological characteristics, and additional relevant information on cultural resources, power- and pipelines, and regulatory agencies. A series of transparent overlays at the scale of the original mapping has also been produced for the purposes of identifying and ranking areas of potential conflict between geopressured geothermal development and environmental characteristics. The methodology for ranking suitability of areas within the two prospect areas is discussed in the appendix. (MHR)

  7. Reconstruction of the subsurface structure of the Marquez impact crater in Leon County, Texas, based on well-log and gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Alan M.; Reid, Arch M.; Hall, Stuart A.; Sharpton, Virgil L.

    2001-11-01

    In Leon County, Texas the Marquez Dome, an approximately circular 1.2 km diameter zone of disturbed Cretaceous rocks surrounded by shallow dipping Tertiary sediments, has been interpreted by Gibson and Sharpton (1989) and Sharpton and Gibson (1990) as the surface expression of a buried complex impact crater. New gravity and magnetic anomaly data collected over the Marquez Dome have been combined with well log and seismic reflection information to develop a better estimate of the overall geometry of the structure. A three dimensional model constructed to a depth of 2000 m from all available information indicates a complex crater 13 km in diameter with an uplift in the center of at least 1120 m. The zone of deformation associated with the cratering event is limited to a depth of less than 1720 m. No impact breccias were recovered in drilling at two locations, 1.1 and 2 km from the center of the structure, and the central uplift may be the only prominent remnant of this impact into unconsolidated, water-rich sediments. The magnetic anomaly field shows no correlation with the location and extent of the structure.

  8. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): United Creosoting Company, Conroe, Montgomery County, Texas (Second remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-29

    The 100-acre United Creosoting site is in Conroe, Montgomery County, Texas. The site currently is occupied by a distributing company, a construction company, and a residential subdivision. From 1946 to 1972, the United Creosoting Company operated a wood preserving facility at the site which used PCPs and creosote in the wood preservation process. PCP and creosote wastes were stored in two waste ponds on the property of the distributing company. In 1983, due to the contaminated stormwater runoff from the former waste pond areas, the property owner was directed under terms of an EPA Administrative Order to regrade contaminated soil, divert surface water drainage away from the residential portion of the site, and cap contaminated soil. The Record of Decision (ROD) specifies a final remedy for the contaminated soil and complements a 1986 ROD which determined that no action is necessary to remediate shallow ground water. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil are organics including PAHs, PCPs, and dioxins. The selected remedial action for this site are included.

  9. Site study plan for Upper Aquifer Hydrology Clusters, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Surface-based geotechnical field program: Preliminary draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    As part of site characterization studies, at the Deaf Smith County site, Texas, 15 wells at 5 locations will be completed in the Ogallala Formation and Dockum Group. The purposes of the wells, which are called Upper Aquifer (2) establish background hydrologic and water quality conditions, (3) provide analysis, (4) monitor responses of the shallow hydrologic system to site activities and nearby pumpage for irrigation, (5) collect water samples from both saturated and unsaturated materials to help define recharge rates and ground-water flow patterns, (6) monitor variations on water quality, and (7) define ground-water resources near the site. The test wells will be installed during a 14-month period starting about 1-1/2 years after site characterization activities begin. The Technical Field Services Contractor is responsible for conducting the field program of drilling and testing. Samples and data will be handled and reported in accordance with established Salt Repository Project procedures. A quality assurance program will assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that the appropriate documentation is maintained. 44 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Three-Dimensional Geologic Model of Complex Fault Structures in the Upper Seco Creek Area, Medina and Uvalde Counties, South-Central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pantea, Michael P.; Cole, James C.; Smith, Bruce D.; Faith, Jason R.; Blome, Charles D.; Smith, David V.

    2008-01-01

    This multimedia report shows and describes digital three-dimensional faulted geologic surfaces and volumes of the lithologic units of the Edwards aquifer in the upper Seco Creek area of Medina and Uvalde Counties in south-central Texas. This geologic framework model was produced using (1) geologic maps and interpretations of depositional environments and paleogeography; (2) lithologic descriptions, interpretations, and geophysical logs from 31 drill holes; (3) rock core and detailed lithologic descriptions from one drill hole; (4) helicopter electromagnetic geophysical data; and (5) known major and minor faults in the study area. These faults were used because of their individual and collective effects on the continuity of the aquifer-forming units in the Edwards Group. Data and information were compared and validated with each other and reflect the complex relationships of structures in the Seco Creek area of the Balcones fault zone. This geologic framework model can be used as a tool to visually explore and study geologic structures within the Seco Creek area of the Balcones fault zone and to show the connectivity of hydrologic units of high and low permeability between and across faults. The software can be used to display other data and information, such as drill-hole data, on this geologic framework model in three-dimensional space.

  11. Geologic framework, hydrostratigraphy, and ichnology of the Blanco, Payton, and Rough Hollow 7.5-minute quadrangles, Blanco, Comal, Hays, and Kendall Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Golab, James A.; Morris, Robert E.

    2016-09-13

    This report presents the geologic framework, hydro­stratigraphy, and ichnology of the Trinity and Edwards Groups in the Blanco, Payton, and Rough Hollow 7.5-minute quad­rangles in Blanco, Comal, Hays, and Kendall Counties, Texas. Rocks exposed in the study area are of the Lower Cretaceous Trinity Group and lower part of the Fort Terrett Formation of the Lower Cretaceous Edwards Group. The mapped units in the study area are the Hammett Shale, Cow Creek Limestone, Hensell Sand, and Glen Rose Limestone of the Trinity Group and the lower portion of the Fort Terrett Formation of the Edwards Group. The Glen Rose Limestone is composed of the Lower and Upper Members. These Trinity Group rocks con­tain the upper and middle Trinity aquifers. The only remaining outcrops of the Edwards Group are the basal nodular member of the Fort Terrett Formation, which caps several hills in the northern portion of the study area. These rocks were deposited in an open marine to supratidal flats environment. The faulting and fracturing in the study area are part of the Balcones fault zone, an extensional system of faults that generally trends southwest to northeast in south-central Texas.The hydrostratigraphic units of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers were mapped and described using a classification system based on fabric-selective or not-fabric-selective poros­ity types. The only hydrostratigraphic unit of the Edwards aquifer present in the study area is hydrostratigraphic unit VIII. The mapped hydrostratigraphic units of the upper Trinity aquifer are (from top to bottom) the Camp Bullis, upper evaporite, fossiliferous, and lower evaporite which are interval equivalent to the Upper Member of the Glen Rose Limestone. The middle Trinity aquifer encompasses (from top to bottom) the Lower Member of the Glen Rose Limestone, the Hensell Sand Member, and the Cow Creek Limestone Member of the Pearsall Formation. The Lower Member of the Glen Rose Limestone is subdivided into six informal hydro

  12. Contributions of local and regional sources of NO x to ozone concentrations in Southeast Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Ying, Qi

    2011-06-01

    The Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model with a modified SAPRC-99 photochemical mechanism was used to investigate the contributions of local and upwind NO x sources to O 3 concentrations in Southeast Texas during the 2000 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS 2000) from August 25 to September 5, 2000. Contributions from eight different local NO x source types and eight different source regions to the 8-h average daytime O 3 concentrations from 1100 to 1800 CST (referred to as AD O 3 hereafter) are determined. Both diesel engines and highway gasoline vehicles account for 25 ppb of AD O 3 in the urban Houston area. NO x from natural gas combustion produces 35 ppb of AD O 3 in the industrial area of Houston. Contributions from industrial sources and coal combustion to AD O 3 have comparatively less broad spatial distribution with maximum values of 14 ppb and 20 ppb, respectively. Although the local sources are the most important sources, upwind sources have non-negligible influences (20-50%) on AD O 3 in the entire domain, with a maximum of 50 ppb in rural and coastal areas and 20 ppb in urban and industrial areas. To probe the origins of upwind sources contributions, NO x emissions in the entire eastern United States are divided into eight different regions and their contributions to O 3 concentrations in the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria (HGB) and Beaumont-Port Arthur (BPA) areas are determined. Among the various NO x source regions resolved in this study, other Texas counties near the HGB and BPA areas and southeastern states are the most important non-local sources of O 3. Under favorable transport conditions, emissions from neighbor states and northeastern states could also contribute to non-negligible O 3 concentrations (7-15%) in the HGB and BPA areas. This indicates that in addition to reduce local emissions, regional NO x emission controls, especially from the neighbor counties and states, are also necessary to improve O 3 air quality in Southeast Texas.

  13. Modeling and mapping regional land use/land cover change in South Central Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranatunga, T.; Messen, D.

    2014-12-01

    Houston-Galveston Area Council (H-GAC) conducted a land use/land cover (LULC) change detection study to generate information about the LULC changes in a 15-county area of South Central Texas. Such information is essential in regional planning, natural resource management, monitoring and modeling of environmental characteristics. The objectives of this study are (1) Identification of regional spatial patterns of each LULC conversion, (2) Estimation of the area coverage of each LULC conversion, and (3) Estimation of the net gain and losses of each LULC classes. To achieve these objectives, ArcGIS Spatial analysis functions and data management tools were employed in python environment. Change detection was estimated from 1992 to 2011 using datasets from NLCD (National Land Cover Database) 1992, NLCD 2001 and NOAA C-CAP (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Coastal Change Analysis Program) 2011. Through visual analysis and comparisons with aerial imagery, we established that NLCD 1992 and 2001 datasets contained more classification inaccuracies than the NOAA 2011 dataset. The misclassified cells in the 1992 and 2001 NLCD datasets were corrected to be consistent with the 2011 C-CAP dataset. The NLCD 2001 dataset was first corrected using a logical evaluation with 2011 classes in each pixel. Then the NLCD 1992 dataset was corrected using the correct 2001 dataset. After correcting 1992 dataset, a cell by cell comparison was conducted with the NOAA 2011 dataset, and individual changes were recorded.

  14. Geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical identification of flow paths in the Edwards Aquifer, northeastern Bexar and southern Comal Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otero, Cassi L.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, conducted a 4-year study during 2002?06 to identify major flow paths in the Edwards aquifer in northeastern Bexar and southern Comal Counties (study area). In the study area, faulting directs ground water into three hypothesized flow paths that move water, generally, from the southwest to the northeast. These flow paths are identified as the southern Comal flow path, the central Comal flow path, and the northern Comal flow path. Statistical correlations between water levels for six observation wells and between the water levels and discharges from Comal Springs and Hueco Springs yielded evidence for the hypothesized flow paths. Strong linear correlations were evident between the datasets from wells and springs within the same flow path and the datasets from wells in areas where flow between flow paths was suspected. Geochemical data (major ions, stable isotopes, sulfur hexafluoride, and tritium and helium) were used in graphical analyses to obtain evidence of the flow path from which wells or springs derive water. Major-ion geochemistry in samples from selected wells and springs showed relatively little variation. Samples from the southern Comal flow path were characterized by relatively high sulfate and chloride concentrations, possibly indicating that the water in the flow path was mixing with small amounts of saline water from the freshwater/saline-water transition zone. Samples from the central Comal flow path yielded the most varied major-ion geochemistry of the three hypothesized flow paths. Central Comal flow path samples were characterized, in general, by high calcium concentrations and low magnesium concentrations. Samples from the northern Comal flow path were characterized by relatively low sulfate and chloride concentrations and high magnesium concentrations. The high magnesium concentrations characteristic of northern Comal flow path samples from the recharge zone in Comal

  15. A Unique Yttrofluorite-Hosted Giant Heavy Rare Earth Deposit: Round Top Mountain, Hudspeth County, Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingitore, N. E.; Clague, J. W.; Gorski, D.

    2013-12-01

    Round Top Mountain is a surface-exposed peraluminous rhyolite laccolith, enriched in heavy rare earth elements, as well as niobium-tantalum, beryllium, lithium, fluorine, tin, rubidium, thorium, and uranium. The extreme extent of the deposit (diameter one mile) makes it a target for recovery of valuable yttrium and HREEs, and possibly other scarce elements. The Texas Bureau of Economic Geology estimated the laccolith mass as at least 1.6 billion tons. A Preliminary Economic Assessment for Texas Rare Earth Resources listed an inferred mineral resource of 430,598,000 kg REOs (rare earth oxides), with over 70% Y+HREEs (YHREE). Put in global perspective, China is thought to produce ~25,000 tons YHREE per year, and exports but a small fraction of that. Because of the extremely fine grain size of the late-phase fluorine-carried critical fluid mineralization, it has not been clear which minerals host the YHREEs. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy experiments at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource revealed that virtually all of the YHREE content resides in yttrofluorite, rather than in the other reported REE minerals in the deposit, bastnaesite and xenotime. The extended x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra of the sample suite were all quite similar, and proved a close match to known model compound specimens of yttrofluorite from two locations, in Sweden and New Mexico. Small spectral variation between the two model compounds and among the samples is attributable to the variable elemental composition and altervalent substitutional nature of yttrofluorite (Ca [1-x] Y,REE [x])F[2+x]. We found no other reported deposit in the world in which yttrofluorite is the exclusive, or even more than a minor, YHREE host mineral. Leaching experiments show that the YHREEs are easily liberated by dissolution with dilute sulfuric acid, due to the solubility of yttrofluorite. Flotation separation of the yttrofluorite had been demonstrated, but was rendered inefficient by the

  16. Remote Sensing Analysis of the Sierra Blanca (Faskin Ranch) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Site, Hudspeth County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    LeMone, D. V.; Dodge, R.; Xie, H.; Langford, R. P.; Keller, G. R.

    2002-02-26

    Remote sensing images provide useful physical information, revealing such features as geological structure, vegetation, drainage patterns, and variations in consolidated and unconsolidated lithologies. That technology has been applied to the failed Sierra Blanca (Faskin Ranch) shallow burial low-level radioactive waste disposal site selected by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority. It has been re-examined using data from LANDSAT satellite series. The comparison of the earlier LANDSAT V (5/20/86) (30-m resolution) with the later new, higher resolution ETM imagery (10/23/99) LANDSAT VII data (15-m resolution) clearly shows the superiority of the LANDSAT VII data. The search for surficial indications of evidence of fatal flaws at the Sierra Blanca site utilizing was not successful, as it had been in the case of the earlier remote sensing analysis of the failed Fort Hancock site utilizing LANDSAT V data. The authors conclude that the tectonic activity at the Sierra Blanca site is much less recent and active than in the previously studied Fort Hancock site. The Sierra Blanca site failed primarily on the further needed documentation concerning a subsurface fault underneath the site and environmental justice issues. The presence of this fault was not revealed using the newer LANDSAT VII data. Despite this fact, it must be remembered that remote sensing provides baseline documentation for determining future physical and financial remediation responsibilities. On the basis of the two sites examined by LANDSAT remote sensing imaging, it is concluded that it is an essential, cost-effective tool that should be utilized not only in site examination but also in all nuclear-related facilities.

  17. Strategic Petroleum Reserve Texoma Complex distribution enhancements: Orange and Jefferson Counties, Texas; Calcasieu and Cameron Parishes, Louisiana: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    The Department of Energy is proposing to construct and operate two buried crude oil pipelines to provide for unconstrained drawdown of three Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) crude oil storage facilities of the Texoma Complex located in portions of Louisiana and Texas. The project is required to provide a crude oil distribution system capable of meeting a planned increase in the Texoma Complex drawdown rate to 2,340,000 barrels-per-day (bpd). The EA addresses a no-action alternative and alternative pipeline routes. Potential impacts from pipeline construction concern disturbances to prime farmlands, floodplains and wetlands. A very small acreage of prime farmlands is involved; the total is not considered significant. The Floodplain/Wetlands Assessment states that the effects of pipeline construction and operation on floodplains and associated wetlands will be temporary and localized. DOE determined in a Floodplain Statement of Findings that for the project as a whole there is no practicable alternative to locating in a floodplain, and that the proposal conforms to appropriate state and local floodplain protection standards. Potential impacts from pipeline operation are primarily concerned with accidental releases of crude oil to the environment. Because the pipelines will be buried, the probability of a major pipeline break releasing large quantities of crude oil is small and pipeline testing and the development of an oil spill contingency plan will reduce the seriousness of any oil spill. The proposed pipelines are expected to involve no other environmental concerns. It is the determination of DOE that the proposed Texoma Complex Distribution Enhancements do not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment; therefore an environmental impact statement will not be prepared. 27 refs., 3 tabs.

  18. Reservoir heterogeneity in the middle Frio Formation: Case studies in Stratton and Agua Dulce fields, Nueces County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, D.R. )

    1990-09-01

    Selected middle Frio (Oligocene) reservoirs of Stratton field and the contiguous Agua Dulce field are being studied as part of a Gas Research Institute/Department of Energy/State of Texas cosponsored program designed to improve reserve growth in mature gas fields. Over the past four decades, Stratton has produced 2.0 tcf of gas from 113 middle Frio reservoirs, and Agua Dulce has produced 1.6 tcf from 116 reservoirs. Recent drilling and workover activities, however, suggest the presence of additional untapped or bypassed middle Frio reservoirs. Four reservoirs, the E18/6,020-ft, E21/6,050-ft, E31/6,100-ft, and E41/Bertram, were evaluated over a 13,000-acre tract that includes areas adjacent to both fields. The middle Frio is composed of sand-rich channel-fill and splay deposits interstratified with floodplain mudstones, all forming part of the Gueydan fluvial system. Channel-fill deposits are 30 ({plus minus}15) ft thick and 2,500 ({plus minus}500) ft wide. Splay deposits are up to 30 ft thick proximal to channels and extend as much as 2 mi from channels. Channel-fill and associated splay sandstones are reservoir facies (porosity 20%; permeability = 10s to 100s md); floodplain mudstones and levee sandy mudstones are barriers to flow facies separating individual reservoirs vertically and laterally. The E41/Bertram reservoir is an example of a laterally stacked channel system deposited during relatively slow aggradation. This reservoir includes sand-on-sand contacts and is composed of mostly leaky compartments. The E 18/6,020-ft, E21/6,050-ft, and E31/6,100ft reservoirs are examples of vertically stacked channel systems reflecting higher rates of aggradation. Vertically stacked architectures are more favorable for isolated compartments and therefore are better candidates for infield reserve growth.

  19. Red Tide off Texas Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Red tides (algae) bloomed late this summer along a 300-mile stretch of Texas' Gulf Coast, killing millions of fish and shellfish as well as making some people sick. State officials are calling this the worst red tide bloom in 14 years. The algae produces a poison that paralyzes fish and prevents them from breathing. There is concern that the deadly algae could impact or even wipe out this year's oyster harvest in Texas, which usually peaks during the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. The red tides were first observed off the Texas coast in mid-August and have been growing steadily in size ever since. Red tides tend to bloom and subside rapidly, depending upon changes in wind speed and direction, water temperature, salinity, and rainfall patterns (as the algae doesn't do as well in fresher water). This true-color image of the Texas Gulf Coast was acquired on September 29, 2000, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The red tide can be seen as the dark reddish discoloration in the ocean running southwest to northeast along the coast. In this scene, the bloom appears to be concentrated north and east of Corpus Christi, just off Matagorda Island. The image was made at 500-meter resolution using a combination of MODIS' visible bands 1 (red), 4 (green), and 3 (blue). The city of Houston can be seen clearly as the large, greyish cluster of pixels to the north and west of Galveston Bay, which is about mid-way up the coastline in this image. Also visible in this image are plumes of smoke, perhaps wildfires, both to the north and northeast of Houston. For more information about red tides, refer to the Texas Red Tide Web site. Image courtesy Andrey Savtchenko, MODIS Data Support Team, and the MODIS Ocean Team, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

  20. 75 FR 15391 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Revision to Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... tanks, transport vessels and marine vessels in the Houston/Galveston/Brazoria (HGB) 1997 8-hour ozone... and Waller counties. Specifically, this revision subjects owners or operators of VOC storage tanks... the revision pursuant to section 110 and part D of the Clean Air Act (CAA). DATES: Written...

  1. Hydrologic conditions and water quality of rainfall and storm runoff for two agricultural areas of the Oso Creek watershed, Nueces County, Texas, 2005-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ockerman, Darwin J.; Fernandez, Carlos J.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program, and Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Corpus Christi, studied hydrologic conditions and water quality of rainfall and storm runoff of two primarily agricultural subwatersheds of the Oso Creek watershed in Nueces County, Texas. One area, the upper West Oso Creek subwatershed, is about 5,145 acres. The other area, a subwatershed drained by an unnamed tributary to Oso Creek (hereinafter, Oso Creek tributary), is about 5,287 acres. Rainfall and runoff (streamflow) were continuously monitored at the outlets of the two subwatersheds during the study period October 2005-September 2008. Seventeen rainfall samples were collected and analyzed for nutrients and major inorganic ions. Twenty-four composite runoff water-quality samples (12 at West Oso Creek, 12 at Oso Creek tributary) were collected and analyzed for nutrients, major inorganic ions, and pesticides. Twenty-six discrete suspended-sediment samples (12 West Oso Creek, 14 Oso Creek tributary) and 17 bacteria samples (10 West Oso Creek, 7 Oso Creek tributary) were collected and analyzed. These data were used to estimate, for selected constituents, rainfall deposition to and runoff loads and yields from the two subwatersheds. Quantities of fertilizers and pesticides applied in the two subwatersheds were compared with quantities of nutrients and pesticides in rainfall and runoff. For the study period, total rainfall was greater than average. Most of the runoff from the two subwatersheds occurred in response to a few specific storm periods. The West Oso Creek subwatershed produced more runoff during the study period than the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed, 13.95 inches compared with 9.45 inches. Runoff response was quicker and peak flows were higher in the West Oso Creek subwatershed than in the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. Total nitrogen runoff yield for the 3

  2. Hydrologic conditions and quality of rainfall and storm runoff for two agricultural areas of the Oso Creek Watershed, Nueces County, Texas, 2005-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ockerman, Darwin J.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program, and Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Corpus Christi, studied hydrologic conditions and quality of rainfall and storm runoff of two (primarily) agricultural areas (subwatersheds) of the Oso Creek watershed in Nueces County, Texas. One area, the upper West Oso Creek subwatershed, is 5,145 acres. The other area, a subwatershed drained by an unnamed Oso Creek tributary (hereinafter, Oso Creek tributary), is 5,287 acres. Rainfall and runoff (streamflow) were continuously monitored at the outlets of the two subwatersheds during October 2005-September 2007. Fourteen rainfall samples were collected and analyzed for nutrients and major inorganic ions. Nineteen composite runoff samples (10 West Oso Creek, nine Oso Creek tributary) were collected and analyzed for nutrients, major inorganic ions, and pesticides. Twenty-two discrete suspended-sediment samples (10 West Oso Creek, 12 Oso Creek tributary) and 13 bacteria samples (eight West Oso Creek, five Oso Creek tributary) were collected and analyzed. These data were used to estimate, for selected constituents, rainfall deposition to and runoff loads and yields from the study subwatersheds. Quantities of fertilizers and pesticides applied in the subwatersheds were compared with quantities of nutrients and pesticides in rainfall and runoff. For the study period, total rainfall was greater than average. Most of the runoff at both subwatershed outlet sites occurred in response to a few specific storm periods. The West Oso Creek subwatershed produced more runoff during the study period than the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed, 10.83 inches compared with 7.28 inches. Runoff response was quicker and peak flows were higher in the West Oso Creek subwatershed than in the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. Total nitrogen runoff yield for the 2-year study period averaged 2.61 pounds

  3. The Galveston technique using Luque or Cotrel-Dubousset rods.

    PubMed

    Lonstein, J E

    1994-04-01

    The Galveston technique for pelvic fixation in long fusions to the sacrum in neuromuscular and adult scoliosis is an effective technique to help obtain a solid fusion. With careful technique and accurate rod bending, rod insertion, rod contouring, and wire tightening, excellent fixation is obtained that maximizes the fusion rate.

  4. Physicochemical and analytical data for tributary water, lake water, and lake sediment, Lake Arrowhead, Clay and Archer Counties, Texas, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Jennifer T.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Haynie, Monti M.; Van Metre, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Lake Arrowhead is a reservoir about 24 kilometers southeast of Wichita Falls, Texas, that provides drinking water for the city of Wichita Falls and surrounding areas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Wichita Falls, did a study in 2006 to assess conditions contributing to elevated arsenic concentrations in Lake Arrowhead. This report describes the sampling and analytical methods, quality assurance, and physicochemical and analytical data. Physiochemical properties were measured in and water samples were collected from five tributaries to Lake Arrowhead (Little Wichita River, West Little Post Oak Creek, East Little Post Oak Creek, Deer Creek, and an unnamed tributary) immediately after storms. Lake water measuring and sampling were done approximately monthly from January through September 2006 at three deep-water sites and seasonally, in January and August 2006, at three shallow-water sites. Cores of lake bottom sediment were collected from five sites on August 30, 2006. Arsenic concentrations in tributary water samples ranged from 1.5 to 6.3 and 0.5 to 4.8 micrograms per liter for unfiltered and filtered samples, respectively. The highest arsenic concentrations were in samples collected from the West Little Post Oak Creek sampling site. Physicochemical properties in lake water varied with depth and season. Dissolved arsenite plus arsenate concentrations in lake water samples generally were between 3 and 5 micrograms per liter. Arsenite concentrations typically were below the laboratory reporting level of 0.6 microgram per liter. There were no detections of monomethylarsonate or dimethylarsinate. The concentration of arsenic in lake sediment samples ranged from 4.4 to 11.2 milligrams per kilogram, with a median of 6.4 milligrams per kilogram. The median arsenic concentration of the five top-interval sediment samples was 8.8 milligrams per kilogram, which generally is higher than the concentrations estimated to be on suspended sediment in

  5. Geophysical delineation of the freshwater/saline-water transition zone in the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards Aquifer, Travis and Hays Counties, Texas, September 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, J.D.; Kress, W.H.; Shah, S.D.; Stefanov, J.E.; Smith, B.A.; Hunt, B.B.

    2007-01-01

    During September 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Barton Springs/Edwards Aquifer Conservation District, conducted a geophysical pilot study to determine whether time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) sounding could be used to delineate the freshwater/saline-water transition zone in the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer in Travis and Hays Counties, Texas. There was uncertainty regarding the application of TDEM sounding for this purpose because of the depth of the aquifer (200-500 feet to the top of the aquifer) and the relatively low-resistivity clayey units in the upper confining unit. Twenty-five TDEM soundings were made along four 2-3-mile-long profiles in a study area overlying the transition zone near the Travis-Hays County boundary. The soundings yield measurements of subsurface electrical resistivity, the variations in which were correlated with hydrogeologic and stratigraphic units, and then with dissolved solids concentrations in the aquifer. Geonics Protem 47 and 57 systems with 492-foot and 328-foot transmitter-loop sizes were used to collect the TDEM soundings. A smooth model (vertical delineation of calculated apparent resistivity that represents an estimate [non-unique] of the true resistivity) for each sounding site was created using an iterative software program for inverse modeling. The effectiveness of using TDEM soundings to delineate the transition zone was indicated by comparing the distribution of resistivity in the aquifer with the distribution of dissolved solids concentrations in the aquifer along the profiles. TDEM sounding data show that, in general, the Edwards aquifer in the study area is characterized by a sharp change in resistivity from west to east. The western part of the Edwards aquifer in the study area shows higher resistivity than the eastern part. The higher resistivity regions correspond to lower dissolved solids concentrations (freshwater), and the lower resistivity regions correspond to

  6. Principal faults in the Houston, Texas, metropolitan area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shah, Sachin D.; Lanning-Rush, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Summary -- This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, documents and refines the locations of principal faults mapped in the Houston, Texas, metropolitan area in previous studies. Numerous subsurface faults have been documented beneath the Houston metropolitan area at depths of 3,200 to 13,000 feet. Some of these subsurface faults have affected shallower sediments, offset the present land surface (which has resulted in substantial, costly damage), and produced recognizable fault scarps. Evidence from previous studies indicates that these faults are natural geologic features with histories of movement spanning tens of thousands to millions of years. Present-day scarps reflect only the most recent displacements of faults that were active long before the present land surface of the area was formed. The precision of previously mapped fault locations was enhanced by overlaying mapped faults on a digital elevation model (DEM) of Harris County derived using light detection and ranging (Lidar). Lidar is a high-precision, laser-based system that enables collection of high-resolution topographic data. Previously mapped faults were adjusted to coincide with surface features that clearly indicate faults, which were made visible by the high-resolution topography depicted on the Lidar-derived DEM. Results of a previous study, supported by this study, indicate that faults in the southeastern part of the metropolitan area primarily occur in well-defined groups of high fault density. Faults in northern and western parts of the metropolitan area tend to occur either individually or in pairs with little tendency to cluster in high-density groups.

  7. Geologic and hydrologic data for the municipal solid waste landfill facility, U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abeyta, Cynthia G.; Frenzel, P.F.

    1999-01-01

    Geologic and hydrologic data for the Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Facility on the U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss in El Paso County, Texas, were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Army. The 106.03-acre landfill has been in operation since January 1974. The landfill contains household refuse, Post solid wastes, bulky items, grass and tree trimmings from family housing, refuse from litter cans, construction debris, classified waste (dry), dead animals, asbestos, and empty oil cans. The depth of the filled areas is about 30 feet and the cover, consisting of locally derived material, is 2 to 3 feet thick. Geologic and hydrologic data were collected at or adjacent to the landfill during (1) drilling of 10 30- to 31-foot boreholes that were completed with gas-monitoring probes, (2) drilling of a 59-foot borehole, (3) drilling of a 355-foot borehole that was completed as a ground-water monitoring well, and (4) in situ measurements made on the landfill cover. After completion, the gas- monitoring probes were monitored on a quarterly basis (1 year total) for gases generated by the landfill. Water samples were collected from the ground-water monitoring well for chemical analysis. Data collection is divided into two elements: geologic data and hydrologic data. Geologic data include lithologic descriptions of cores and cuttings, geophysical logs, soil- gas and ambient-air analyses, and chemical analyses of soil. Hydrologic data include physical properties, total organic carbon, and pH of soil and sediment samples; soil-water chloride and soil-moisture analyses; physical properties of the landfill cover; measurements of depth to ground water; and ground-water chemical analyses. Interpretation of data is not included in this report.

  8. The subsurface character of the Marquez impact crater in Leon County, Texas, as determined from gravity and well-log data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, A. M.; Reid, A. M.; Hall, S. A.; Sharpton, V. L.

    1994-07-01

    The Marquez Dome in northwest Leon County, Texas is a shallow buried complex impact crater. Exposure of Cretaceous sediments in a 1.2 km diameter disturbed zone, surrounded by shallow dipping Tertiary sediments, led early investigators to interpret the structure as the uplift overlying a salt dome. Subsequent drilling and seismic reflection data within the area have ruled out a salt diapiric origin. Gibson and Sharpton and Sharpton and Gibson reinterpreted the disturbed zone as the central uplift of a complex crater. Shatter cones were found associated with the uplift and planar deformation features occur in quartz grains collected at the Marquez Dome. Sharpton and Gibson estimated the age of the structure at 58 m.y., and that age has recently been confirmed by apatite fission-track dating. In an attempt to understand the geometry of the Marquez Dome, we have combined limited surface mapping with available geophysical well logs, and with gravity data that combine a new detailed survey with earlier regional gravity data. Structure maps were constructed by well-log correlation for five stratigraphic horizons that were disrupted by the impact. Subsurface structure maps show decreasing deformation with depth, consistent with an impact origin. From the well-log and gravity data we have constructed a three-dimensional model of the central uplift to a depth of around 2000 m. The predictions of this model, at least for the shallow horizons, will be tested with the completion of two shallow drill holes, sited just off the central uplift and midway to the proposed crater rim. Core will be recovered selectively from both these holes.

  9. Influence of structural evolution on reservoir development and distribution in the Silurian Fusselman: Vermejo-Moore Hopper field, Loving and Ward Counties, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Colleary, W.M.; Hulme, J.R. ); Crafton, J.W. Gas Research Institute, Chicago, IL )

    1992-04-01

    The Vermejo-Moore Hooper field lies in the deep Delaware basin adjacent to the Pecos River in Loving and Ward counties, Texas. Discovered in 1973, the field produces dry gas from the Fusselman and Ellenburger formations. The Fusselman reservoir has produced over 400 bcf of gas from depths between 18,500 and 19,200 ft. The field primarily is a structural trap, but the distribution of reserves in the reservoir suggests a strong stratigraphic component. The reservoir is composed of fractured dolomites and cherts of the Silurian Fusselman and overlying Wristen formations. Unconformities and their accompanying diagenetic processes play a major role in the reservoir. The occurrence of pervasive dolomitization and nodular cherts are interpreted to indicate diagenesis associated with subaerial exposure and karsting. Thick sections also may be absent due to erosion over paleostructures, and preserved in flanking positions. Detailed paleostructural interpretation of the Vermejo-Moore Hooper field reveals a history of recurrent movement of the basement and demonstrates the influence of structural growth on the development and distribution of porosity and permeability in the Fusselman reservoir. Early structural growth can influence the distribution of both depositional facies and erosional processes. Paleostructure maps in the Silurian-Devonian indicate that a series of northwest-southeast-trending, low-relief structures existed during the Silurian. Growth of these structures through the Devonian can be documented and the presence of fault-bounded basement blocks can be inferred. The influence of this structural growth on the development of the reservoir is also demonstrated.

  10. An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres Reservoir, Foster and South Cowden Fields, Ector County, Texas. Annual report, August 1, 1996--July 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Trentham, R.C.; Weinbrandt, R.; Robinson, W.

    1997-12-01

    The objective of this two-phase study is to demonstrate an integrated methodology for reservoir characterization of shallow shelf carbonate reservoir that is feasible, and cost effective for the independent operator. Furthermore, it will provide one of the first public demonstrations of the enhancement of reservoir characterization using high-resolution three dimensional (3D) seismic data. This particular project is evaluating the Grayburg and San Andres reservoirs in the Foster and South Cowden Fields, Ector County, Texas. This 68 year old field was approaching its economic limit and the leases evaluated would have been abandoned in 10 years. A multidisciplinary approach to waterflood design and implementation, along with the addition of reserves by selective infill drilling and deepening, is being applied to this field. This approach in reservoir development will be applicable to a wide range of shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs throughout the US. The first phase of the project included the design, acquisition, and interpretation of the 3D seismic survey, the collection and evaluation of geologic (core and log) data, and engineering (historical production, well test, injection) data from a variety of sources. From this work, a geologically based production history model was simulated. Based on the recommendations made at the end of Phase One, three new wells were drilled, one existing well was deepened, two wells were worked over, one TA`d well was re-entered, and one well was converted to injection. In addition, the quality of the injection water was greatly improved, a step necessary prior to increasing injection in the project area. The realignment of the waterflood and all additional well work await the completion of the seismic based history match and engineering simulation.

  11. Site study plan for Exploratory shaft facilities design foundation boreholes (shaft surface facility foundation borings), Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Surface-based geotechnical field program: Preliminary draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This site study plan describes the Exploratory Shaft Facilities (ESF) Design Foundation Boreholes field activities to be conducted during early stages of Site Characterization at the Deaf Smith County, Texas, site. The field program has been designed to provide data useful in addressing information/data needs resulting from federal/state/local regulations, and repository program requirements. Approximately 50 foundation boreholes will be drilled within the ESP location to provide data necessary for design of the ESF and to satisfy applicable shaft permitting requirements. Soils and subsurface rock will be sampled as the foundation boreholes are advanced. Soil samples or rock core will be taken through the Blackwater Draw and Ogallala Formations and the Dockum Group. Hydrologic testing will be performed in boreholes that penetrates the water table. In-situ elastic properties will be determined from both the soil strata and rock units along the length of the boreholes. Field methods/tests are chosen that provide the best or only means of obtaining the required data. The Salt Repository Project (SRP) Networks specify the schedule under which the program will operate. Drilling will not begin until after site ground water baseline conditions have been established. The Technical Field Services Contractor is responsible for conducting the field program of drilling and testing. Samples and data will be handled and reported in accordance with established SRP procedures. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that the appropriate documentation is maintained. 25 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Hydrologic and geologic data for the Edwards Aquifer Recharge Zone near Georgetown, Williamson County, Texas, 1986-87

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorsey, M.E.; Slagle, Diana L.

    1987-01-01

    This report presents a compilation and summary of data related to the interchange of water between the Edwards aquifer and streams, and to the hydraulics of vertical movement of water in the Georgetown Limestone in the Georgetown area of Williamson County. It presents hydrologic, geologic, hydraulic, physical, geophysical, and water-quality data collected from selected wells and stream sites in the study area from January 1986 to June 1987. Included are the results from six streamflow gain and loss surveys, two ground-water-level surveys representing low and high water-level conditions, inorganic chemical analyses of water from selected wells and streams, and bulk specific gravity and permeability tests of cores taken at three test-well sites. Water-level altitudes differed by an average of 38 feet between low and high water-level conditions in the confined zone, and by an average of 13 feet in the unconfined zone. Dissolved solids of water from selected wells ranged from 320 to 1,300 milligrams per liter and from 251 to 290 milligrams per liter in water from selected streams.

  13. Site study plan for EDBH (Engineering Design Boreholes) seismic surveys, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hume, H.

    1987-12-01

    This site study plan describes seismic reflection surveys to run north-south and east-west across the Deaf Smith County site, and intersecting near the Engineering Design Boreholes (EDBH). Both conventional and shallow high-resolution surveys will be run. The field program has been designed to acquire subsurface geologic and stratigraphic data to address information/data needs resulting from Federal and State regulations and Repository program requirements. The data acquired by the conventional surveys will be common-depth- point, seismic reflection data optimized for reflection events that indicate geologic structure near the repository horizon. The data will also resolve the basement structure and shallow reflection events up to about the top of the evaporite sequence. Field acquisition includes a testing phase to check/select parameters and a production phase. The field data will be subjected immediately to conventional data processing and interpretation to determine if there are any anamolous structural for stratigraphic conditions that could affect the choice of the EDBH sites. After the EDBH's have been drilled and logged, including vertical seismic profiling, the data will be reprocessed and reinterpreted for detailed structural and stratigraphic information to guide shaft development. The shallow high-resulition seismic reflection lines will be run along the same alignments, but the lines will be shorter and limited to immediate vicinity of the EDBH sites. These lines are planned to detect faults or thick channel sands that may be present at the EDBH sites. 23 refs. , 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Chagas Disease Risk in Texas

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sahotra; Strutz, Stavana E.; Frank, David M.; Rivaldi, Chissa–Louise; Sissel, Blake; Sánchez–Cordero, Victor

    2010-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, remains a serious public health concern in many areas of Latin America, including México. It is also endemic in Texas with an autochthonous canine cycle, abundant vectors (Triatoma species) in many counties, and established domestic and peridomestic cycles which make competent reservoirs available throughout the state. Yet, Chagas disease is not reportable in Texas, blood donor screening is not mandatory, and the serological profiles of human and canine populations remain unknown. The purpose of this analysis was to provide a formal risk assessment, including risk maps, which recommends the removal of these lacunae. Methods and Findings The spatial relative risk of the establishment of autochthonous Chagas disease cycles in Texas was assessed using a five–stage analysis. 1. Ecological risk for Chagas disease was established at a fine spatial resolution using a maximum entropy algorithm that takes as input occurrence points of vectors and environmental layers. The analysis was restricted to triatomine vector species for which new data were generated through field collection and through collation of post–1960 museum records in both México and the United States with sufficiently low georeferenced error to be admissible given the spatial resolution of the analysis (1 arc–minute). The new data extended the distribution of vector species to 10 new Texas counties. The models predicted that Triatoma gerstaeckeri has a large region of contiguous suitable habitat in the southern United States and México, T. lecticularia has a diffuse suitable habitat distribution along both coasts of the same region, and T. sanguisuga has a disjoint suitable habitat distribution along the coasts of the United States. The ecological risk is highest in south Texas. 2. Incidence–based relative risk was computed at the county level using the Bayesian Besag–York–Mollié model and post–1960 T. cruzi incidence data. This risk

  15. Texas Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Wind-Whipped Fires in East Texas     View Larger Image ... one-year drought on record and the warmest month in Texas history. The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on ...

  16. Catalogue of Texas spiders

    PubMed Central

    Dean, David Allen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This catalogue lists 1,084 species of spiders (three identified to genus only) in 311 genera from 53 families currently recorded from Texas and is based on the “Bibliography of Texas Spiders” published by Bea Vogel in 1970. The online list of species can be found at http://pecanspiders.tamu.edu/spidersoftexas.htm. Many taxonomic revisions have since been published, particularly in the families Araneidae, Gnaphosidae and Leptonetidae. Many genera in other families have been revised. The Anyphaenidae, Ctenidae, Hahniidae, Nesticidae, Sicariidae and Tetragnathidae were also revised. Several families have been added and others split up. Several genera of Corinnidae were transferred to Phrurolithidae and Trachelidae. Two genera from Miturgidae were transferred to Eutichuridae. Zoridae was synonymized under Miturgidae. A single species formerly in Amaurobiidae is now in the Family Amphinectidae. Some trapdoor spiders in the family Ctenizidae have been transferred to Euctenizidae. Gertsch and Mulaik started a list of Texas spiders in 1940. In a letter from Willis J. Gertsch dated October 20, 1982, he stated “Years ago a first listing of the Texas fauna was published by me based largely on Stanley Mulaik material, but it had to be abandoned because of other tasks.” This paper is a compendium of the spiders of Texas with distribution, habitat, collecting method and other data available from revisions and collections. This includes many records and unpublished data (including data from three unpublished studies). One of these studies included 16,000 adult spiders belonging to 177 species in 29 families. All specimens in that study were measured and results are in the appendix. Hidalgo County has 340 species recorded with Brazos County at 323 and Travis County at 314 species. These reflect the amount of collecting in the area. PMID:27103878

  17. Water-level altitudes in the Jasper Aquifer, greater Houston area, Texas, January-February 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplin, L.S.; Lanning-Rush, Jennifer

    2002-01-01

    This report, prepared in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, is the second annual report that depicts water-level altitudes in the Jasper aquifer in the greater Houston area (Montgomery County and parts of Harris, Grimes, Walker, and Waller Counties). The first water-level-altitude map for the Jasper aquifer in the area published by the U.S. Geological Survey (Coplin, 2001) depicts water levels in wells measured in spring 2000.

  18. Effects of brush management on the hydrologic budget and water quality in and adjacent to Honey Creek State Natural Area, Comal County, Texas, 2001-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banta, J. Ryan; Slattery, Richard N.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Edwards Region Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative, the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, the San Antonio River Authority, the Edwards Aquifer Authority, Texas Parks and Wildlife, the Guadalupe Blanco River Authority, and the San Antonio Water System, evaluated the hydrologic effects of ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei) removal as a brush management conservation practice in and adjacent to the Honey Creek State Natural Area in Comal County, Tex. By removing the ashe juniper and allowing native grasses to reestablish in the area as a brush management conservation practice, the hydrology in the watershed might change. Using a simplified mass balance approach of the hydrologic cycle, the incoming rainfall was distributed to surface water runoff, evapotranspiration, or groundwater recharge. After hydrologic data were collected in adjacent watersheds for 3 years, brush management occurred on the treatment watershed while the reference watershed was left in its original condition. Hydrologic data were collected for another 6 years. Hydrologic data include rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration, and water quality. Groundwater recharge was not directly measured but potential groundwater recharge was calculated using a simplified mass balance approach. The resulting hydrologic datasets were examined for differences between the watersheds and between pre- and post-treatment periods to assess the effects of brush management. The streamflow to rainfall relation (expressed as event unit runoff to event rainfall relation) did not change between the watersheds during pre- and post-treatment periods. The daily evapotranspiration rates at the reference watershed and treatment watershed sites exhibited a seasonal cycle during the pre- and post-treatment periods, with intra- and interannual variability. Statistical analyses indicate the mean

  19. Impact of Large-scale Circulation Patterns on Surface Ozone Variability in Houston-Galveston-Brazoria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Jia, B.; Xie, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Bermuda High (BH) is a key driver of large-scale circulation patterns for Southeastern Texas and other Gulf coast states in summer, with the expected influence on surface ozone through its modulation of marine air inflow with lower ozone background from the Gulf of Mexico. We develop a statistical relationship through multiple linear regression (MLR) to quantify the impact of the BH variations on surface ozone variability during the ozone season in the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria (HGB) area, a major ozone nonattainment region on the Gulf Coast. We find that the variability in BH location, represented by a longitude index of the BH west edge (BH-Lon) in the MLR, explains 50-60% of the year-to-year variability in monthly mean ozone over HGB for Jun and July during 1998-2013, and the corresponding figure for Aug and Sep is 20%. Additional 30%-40% of the ozone variability for Aug and Sep can be explained by the variability in BH strength, represented by two BH intensity indices (BHI) in the MLR, but its contribution is only 5% for June and not significant for July. Including a maximum Through stepwise regression based on Akaike Information Criterion (AIC), the MLR model captures 58~72% of monthly ozone variability during Jun-Sep with a cross-validation R2 of 0.5. This observation-derived statistical relationship will be valuable to constrain model simulations of ozone variability attributable to large-scale circulation patterns.

  20. Assessment of potential for natural attenuation of chlorinated ethenes and ethanes in ground water at a petrochemical reclamation site, Harris County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huff, Glenn F.; Braun, Christopher L.; Lee, Roger W.

    2000-01-01

    Redox conditions in the Numerous Sand Channels Zone beneath a petrochemical reclamation site in Harris County, Texas, range from sulfate reducing to methanogenic as indicated by the presence of methane in ground water and the range of molecular hydrogen concentrations. Assessment of the potential for reductive dechlorination using BIOCHLOR as a screening tool indicated conditions favoring anaerobic degradation of chlorinated organic compounds in the Numerous Sand Channels Zone. Evidence supporting reductive dechlorination includes apparently biogenic cis-1,2-dichloroethene; an increased ratio of 1,2-dichloroethane to 1,1,2-trichloroethane downgradient from the assumed contaminant source area; ethene and methane concentrations greater than background concentrations within the area of the contaminant plume; and a positive correlation of the ratio of ethene to vinyl chloride as a function of methane concentrations. The body of evidence presented in this report argues for hydrogenolysis of trichloroethene to cis-1,2-dichloroethene; of 1,1,2-trichloroethane to 1,2-dichloroethane; and of vinyl chloride to ethene within the Numerous Sand Channels Zone. Simulations using BIOCHLOR yielded apparent first-order decay constants for reductive dechlorination in the sequence Tetrachloroethene --> trichloroethene --> cis-1,2-dichloroethene --> vinyl chloride --> ethene within the range of literature values reported for each compound and apparent first-order decay constants for reductive dechlorination in the sequence 1,1,2-trichloroethane --> 1,2-dichloroethane slightly greater than literature values reported for each compound along the upgradient segment of a simulated ground-water flowpath. Except for vinyl chloride, apparent rates of reductive dechlorination for all simulated species show a marked decrease along the downgradient segment of the simulated ground-water flowpath. Evidence for reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes within the Numerous Sand Channels Zone

  1. An Integrated Hydrogeologic and Geophysical Investigation to Characterize the Hydrostratigraphy of the Edwards Aquifer in an Area of Northeastern Bexar County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shah, Sachin D.; Smith, Bruce D.; Clark, Allan K.; Payne, Jason

    2008-01-01

    In August 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, did a hydrogeologic and geophysical investigation to characterize the hydrostratigraphy (hydrostratigraphic zones) and also the hydrogeologic features (karst features such as sinkholes and caves) of the Edwards aquifer in a 16-square-kilometer area of northeastern Bexar County, Texas, undergoing urban development. Existing hydrostratigraphic information, enhanced by local-scale geologic mapping in the area, and surface geophysics were used to associate ranges of electrical resistivities obtained from capacitively coupled (CC) resistivity surveys, frequency-domain electromagnetic (FDEM) surveys, time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) soundings, and two-dimensional direct-current (2D-DC) resistivity surveys with each of seven hydrostratigraphic zones (equivalent to members of the Kainer and Person Formations) of the Edwards aquifer. The principal finding of this investigation is the relation between electrical resistivity and the contacts between the hydrostratigraphic zones of the Edwards aquifer and the underlying Trinity aquifer in the area. In general, the TDEM data indicate a two-layer model in which an electrical conductor underlies an electrical resistor, which is consistent with the Trinity aquifer (conductor) underlying the Edwards aquifer (resistor). TDEM data also show the plane of Bat Cave fault, a well-known fault in the area, to be associated with a local, nearly vertical zone of low resistivity that provides evidence, although not definitive, for Bat Cave fault functioning as a flow barrier, at least locally. In general, the CC resistivity, FDEM survey, and 2D-DC resistivity survey data show a sharp electrical contrast from north to south, changing from high resistivity to low resistivity across Bat Cave fault as well as possible karst features in the study area. Interpreted karst features that show relatively low resistivity within a relatively high

  2. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics in the southern part of the Rancho Diana Natural Area, northern Bexar County, Texas, 2008-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Morris, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    The area designated by the city of San Antonio as the Rancho Diana Natural Area is in northern Bexar County, near San Antonio, Texas. During 2008-10, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of San Antonio, documented the geologic framework and mapped the hydrogeologic characteristics for the southern part of the Rancho Diana Natural Area. The geologic framework of the study area and its hydrogeologic characteristics were documented using field observations and information from previously published reports. Many of the geologic and hydrogeologic features were found by making field observations through the dense vegetation along gridlines spaced approximately 25 feet apart and documenting the features as they were located. Surface geologic features were identified and hydrogeologic features such as caves, sinkholes, and areas of solutionally enlarged porosity were located using hand-held Global Positioning System units. The location data were used to create a map of the hydrogeologic subdivisions and the location of karst features. The outcrops of the Edwards and Trinity aquifer recharge zones were mapped by using hydrogeologic subdivisions modified from previous reports. All rocks exposed within the study area are of sedimentary origin and Lower Cretaceous in age. The valley floor is formed in the cavernous member of the upper Glen Rose Limestone of the Trinity Group. The hills are composed of the basal nodular member, dolomitic member, Kirschberg evaporite member, and grainstone member of the Kainer Formation of the Edwards Group. Field observations made during this study of the exposed formations and members indicate that the formations and members typically are composed of mudstones, wackestones, packstones, grainstones, and argillaceous limestones, along with marls. The upper Glen Rose Limestone is approximately 410 to 450 feet thick but only the upper 70 feet is exposed in the study area. The Kainer Formation is approximately 255 feet thick in

  3. Effects of Thalassinoides ichnofabrics on the petrophysical properties of the Lower Cretaceous Lower Glen Rose Limestone, Middle Trinity Aquifer, Northern Bexar County, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golab, James A.; Smith, Jon J.; Clark, Allan K.; Blome, Charles D.

    2017-04-01

    The combined Edwards and Trinity aquifer system is the primary source of freshwater for the rapidly growing San Antonio and Austin metropolitan areas. The karstic Lower Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian) Lower Glen Rose Limestone (GRL) contains the middle Trinity aquifer and has been subdivided into six hydrostratigraphic units (HSUs) with distinct hydrologic characteristics. These HSUs were first identified in the subsurface via core examination at the Camp Stanley Storage Activity (CSSA) in northern Bexar County, Texas and were then correlated to associated gamma-ray and resistivity logs. The Trinity aquifer system is a telogenetic karst and fluid flow is directed primarily through solution-enhanced faults, fractures, and pervasive Thalassinoides networks because matrix porosity of both transmissive and confining HSUs is very low. Meteoric water infiltrates the Trinity aquifer through vertically-oriented faults and likely moves laterally through biogenic pores. Two 7.62 cm diameter GRL cores and well logs from monitoring wells CS-MW9-CC and CS-MW5-LGR recovered from the CSSA were used to characterize the effect such large-scale Thalassinoides networks have on the petrophysical properties (resistivity and natural gamma-ray) of four HSUs (Honey Creek, Rust, Doeppenschmidt, and Twin Sisters HSUs). Resistivity logs show that resistance values > 300 Ω-m correlate with well-developed biogenic porosity and values of 650 Ω-m are associated with solution enhancement of the Thalassinoides networks. These high resistivity zones are cyclical and are identified in muddy confining units, even when no changes in lithology or karstic development are identified. Pervasive Thalassinoides networks act as starting points for wide spread dissolution and lead to advanced karst development in transmissive HSUs. Natural gamma-ray logs do not reflect hydrologic characteristics directly, but are inversely correlated to resistivity logs and display m-scale cyclicity. Resistivity logs suggest

  4. The State of Texas Children: Texas KIDS COUNT Annual Data Book--The Importance of Investing in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deviney, Frances; Phillips, Pace; Dickerson, Carrie; Tibbitt, Laura

    2011-01-01

    On February 4, the Center for Public Policy Priorities (CPPP) released the 18th annual Texas KIDS COUNT data book, "The State of Texas Children 2011." The annual data book and free data warehouse provide the latest look at more than 80 different measures of child well-being in Texas and every county in the state. This year, the opening…

  5. Terlinguacreekite, Hg32+O2 Cl2, a new mineral species from the Perry pit, Mariposa mine, Terlingua mining district, Brewster County, Texas, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Andrew C.; Gault, Robert A.; Paar, W.H.; Cooper, M.A.; Hawthorne, F.C.; Burns, P.C.; Cisneros, S.; Foord, E.E.

    2005-01-01

    Terlinguacreekite, ideally Hg32+O2 Cl2, has a very pronounced subcell that is orthorhombic, space-group choices Imam, Imcm, Ima2 and 12cm, with unit-cell parameters refined from powder data: a 6.737(3), b 25.528(10), c 5.533(2) A??, V951.6(6) A??3, a:b:c 0.2639:1:0.2167, Z=8. The true symmetry, supercell unit-cell parameters, and details regarding the crystal structure are unknown. The strongest nine lines of the X-ray powder-diffraction pattern [d in A?? (I)(subcell hkl)] are: 5.413(30)(011), 4.063(80)(121), 3.201(50)(080), 3.023(50)(161), 2.983(60)(240), 2.858(30)(211), 2.765(50)(002), 2.518(100b)(091, 251) and 2.026(30)(242). The mineral is found in an isolated area measuring approximately 1 ?? 0.5 m in the lower level of the Perry pit, Mariposa mine, Terlingua mining district, Brewster County, Texas (type locality), as mm-sized anhedral dark orange to reddish orange crusts of variable thickness on calcite, and rarely as 0.5 mm-sized aggregates of crystals of the same color. It has also been identified at the McDermitt mine, Humboldt County, Nevada, U.S.A., where it occurs with kleinite and calomel in silicified volcanic rocks and sediments. Terlinguacreekite is a secondary phase, most probably formed from the alteration of primary cinnabar or native mercury. At Terlingua, most crusts are thin, almost cryptocrystalline, with no discernable forms, and are resinous and translucent to opaque. Crystals are up to 0.2 mm in length, subhedral, acicular to prismatic, elongation [001], with a maximum length-to-width ratio of 4:1. They are vitreous, transparent, and some crystals have brightly reflecting faces, which may be {010} and {110}. The streak is yellow, and the mineral is brittle with an uneven fracture, no observable cleavage, and is soft, nonfluorescent under both long- and short-wave ultraviolet light. D (calc.) is 9.899 g/cm3 (empirical formula). Material from the McDermitt mine is reversibly photosensitive, and turns from vivid orange to black in strong

  6. 77 FR 31308 - Foreign-Trade Zone 36-Galveston, TX; Application for Reorganization/Expansion Under Alternative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 36--Galveston, TX; Application for Reorganization/Expansion...) Board (the Board) by the Board of Trustees of the Galveston Wharves, grantee of FTZ 36, requesting... of Trustees of the Galveston Wharves (Board Order 1080, 65 FR 11548-11549, 3/3/00). The current...

  7. Air quality modeling for Houston-Galveston-Brazoria area.

    PubMed

    Aloyan, A E; Arutyunyan, V; Haymet, A D; He, J W; Kuznetsov, Y; Lubertino, G

    2003-06-01

    A coupled numerical model of the atmospheric thermo-hydrodynamics and pollutant photochemical transport is described. This model can be used to study the complex relationships between the chemical and thermo-hydrodynamic processes in the atmosphere of urban areas with an emphasis on photochemical ozone formation. Preliminary numerical results of ozone and other key chemical atmospheric pollutant concentrations and distribution across the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria area using virtual emission data from area and mobile sources are presented.

  8. 33 CFR 165.T08-0698 - Safety Zone; Port of Galveston, Pelican Island Bridge Repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Pelican Island Bridge Repair. 165.T08-0698 Section 165.T08-0698 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Guard District § 165.T08-0698 Safety Zone; Port of Galveston, Pelican Island Bridge Repair. (a...) Safety Zone. This area includes all waters of Galveston Channel enclosed within an area extending 50...

  9. 78 FR 61937 - Safety Zone; Port of Galveston, Pelican Island Bridge Repair

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-07

    ... CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Port of Galveston, Pelican Island Bridge Repair AGENCY: Coast... zone in Galveston to maintain public safety during the Pelican Island Bridge Repair Project. This... this zone is prohibited unless specifically authorized by the Captain of the Port of...

  10. 33 CFR 80.840 - Sabine Pass, TX to Galveston, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sabine Pass, TX to Galveston, TX... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Eighth District § 80.840 Sabine Pass, TX to Galveston, TX. (a) A line drawn from the Sabine Pass East Jetty Light to the seaward end of the Sabine Pass...

  11. 76 FR 2916 - Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee; Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee; Meetings AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Meetings. SUMMARY: The Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee... to discuss waterway improvements, aids to navigation, area projects impacting safety on the...

  12. Flow paths in the Edwards aquifer, northern Medina and northeastern Uvalde counties, Texas, based on hydrologic identification and geochemical characterization and simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Journey, Celeste

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, conducted a 4-year study during 2001– 04 to identify major ground-water flow paths in the Edwards aquifer in northern Medina and northeastern Uvalde Counties, Texas. The study involved use of geologic structure, surfacewater and ground-water data, and geochemistry to identify ground-water flow paths. Relay ramps and associated faulting in northern Medina County appear to channel ground-water flow along four distinct flow paths that move water toward the southwest. The northwestern Medina flow path is bounded on the north by the Woodard Cave fault and on the south by the Parkers Creek fault. Water moves downdip toward the southwest until the flow encounters a cross fault along Seco Creek. This barrier to flow might force part or most of the flow to the south. Departure hydrographs for two wells and discharge departure for a streamflow-gaging station provide evidence for flow in the northwestern Medina flow path. The north-central Medina flow path (northern part) is bounded by the Parkers Creek fault on the north and the Medina Lake fault on the south. The adjacent north-central Medina flow path (southern part) is bounded on the north by the Medina Lake fault and on the south by the Diversion Lake fault. The north-central Medina flow path is separated into a northern and southern part because of water-level differences. Ground water in both parts of the northcentral Medina flow path moves downgradient (and down relay ramp) from eastern Medina County toward the southwest. The north-central Medina flow path is hypothesized to turn south in the vicinity of Seco Creek as it begins to be influenced by structural features. Departure hydrographs for four wells and Medina Lake and discharge departure for a streamflow-gaging station provide evidence for flow in the north-central Medina flow path. The south-central Medina flow path is bounded on the north by the Seco Creek and Diversion Lake faults

  13. Hispanic Children in Texas: A Special Report of the Texas Kids Count Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Kids Count Project, Austin.

    This report presents information on the status of Hispanic children in Texas, with special emphasis on the comparative status of Hispanic children in counties along the Texas-Mexico border. Information was gathered from a literature review, state agencies, the 1990 decennial U.S. census, focus groups, and interviews. A demographic overview shows…

  14. 78 FR 72140 - Texas Disaster # TX-00417

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00417 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration ACTION: Notice SUMMARY: This is... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Caldwell, Hays, Travis. Contiguous Counties:...

  15. Implementation of a Postpartum HPV Vaccination Program in a Southeast Texas Hospital: A Qualitative Study Evaluating Health Care Provider Acceptance.

    PubMed

    Gross, Tyra T; Rahman, Mahbubur; M Wright, Abigail; M Hirth, Jacqueline; Sarpong, Kwabena O; Rupp, Richard E; D Barrett, Alan; Berenson, Abbey B

    2016-11-01

    Introduction The objective of this qualitative study was to assess healthcare providers' acceptability of an ongoing postpartum human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program in Southeast Texas and its integration into everyday clinical care. Methods In 2012, the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) began offering HPV vaccination as part of standard postpartum care to increase vaccination rates among young women in Galveston County. Initial vaccine doses were offered on the postpartum unit while subsequent doses were coordinated with postpartum and well-baby visits. Thirty months after project initiation, semi-structured interviews of physicians (n = 12) and nurses (n = 6) involved in postpartum and pediatric care at UTMB were conducted. Interview transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis in Nvivo10. Results Overall, providers demonstrated "pro-vaccine" attitudes and stated the program was an effective strategy for vaccinating hard-to-reach women. Cancer prevention was the main perceived benefit while follow-up compliance was the primary perceived patient barrier. The initial challenges with integrating postpartum HPV vaccination included miscommunication between providers regarding vaccine orders and coordination issues with well-baby visits for follow-up doses. One novel finding was providers' beliefs that women's personal HPV vaccine practices may positively impact their decisions about later vaccinating their children against HPV. Providers' suggestions to improve the program included: enhancing postpartum HPV vaccine education for patients, offering more continuing education for providers, and increasing community awareness of HPV vaccination. Discussion These findings can help providers of postpartum care understand how to integrate postpartum HPV vaccination into their current practices and how to overcome perceived vaccination barriers.

  16. Evaluation of the use of remote-sensing data to identify crop types and estimate irrigated acreage, Uvalde and Medina counties, Texas, 1989

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raymond, L.H.; Nalley, G.M.; Rettman, P.L.

    1992-01-01

    Results were verified using crop acreages reported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service (ASCS). The total areas for all irrigated crops estimated using remote-sensing data were about 8 percent higher for Uvalde County and about 4 percent higher for Medina County than the areas reported by the ASCS. Irrigated-crop areas subsequently were multiplied by the respective duties of water to calculate the total quantity of water pumped from the aquifer for irrigation. Pumpage did not differ for the two estimates of crop areas for Uvalde County and differed by about 3 percent for Medina County.

  17. A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Teeple, Andrew; Thomas, Jonathan V.; Houston, Natalie A.; Payne, Jason; Musgrove, MaryLynn

    2012-01-01

    A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers, which include the Pecos Valley, Igneous, Dockum, Rustler, and Capitan Reef aquifers, was developed as the second phase of a groundwater availability study in the Pecos County region in west Texas. The first phase of the study was to collect and compile groundwater, surface-water, water-quality, geophysical, and geologic data in the area. The third phase of the study involves a numerical groundwater-flow model of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in order to simulate groundwater conditions based on various groundwater-withdrawal scenarios. Resource managers plan to use the results of the study to establish management strategies for the groundwater system. The hydrogeologic framework is composed of the hydrostratigraphy, structural features, and hydraulic properties of the groundwater system. Well and geophysical logs were interpreted to define the top and base surfaces of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer units. Elevations of the top and base of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer generally decrease from the southwestern part of the study area to the northeast. The thicknesses of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer units were calculated using the interpolated top and base surfaces of the hydrostratigraphic units. Some of the thinnest sections of the aquifer were in the eastern part of the study area and some of the thickest sections were in the Pecos, Monument Draw, and Belding-Coyanosa trough areas. Normal-fault zones, which formed as growth and collapse features as sediments were deposited along the margins of more resistant rocks and as overlying sediments collapsed into the voids created by the dissolution of Permian-age evaporite deposits, were delineated based on the interpretation of hydrostratigraphic cross sections. The lowest aquifer transmissivity values were measured in the eastern part of the study area; the highest transmissivity values were

  18. Quality of groundwater at and near an aquifer storage and recovery site, Bexar, Atascosa, and Wilson Counties, Texas, June 2004-August 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otero, Cassi L.; Petri, Brian L.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, did a study during 2004-08 to characterize the quality of native groundwater from the Edwards aquifer and pre- and post-injection water from the Carrizo aquifer at and near an aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) site in Bexar, Atascosa, and Wilson Counties, Texas. Groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for selected physical properties and constituents to characterize the quality of native groundwater from the Edwards aquifer and pre- and post-injection water from the Carrizo aquifer at and near the ASR site. Geochemical and isotope data indicated no substantial changes in major-ion, trace-element, and isotope chemistry occurred as the water from the Edwards aquifer was transferred through a 38-mile pipeline to the aquifer storage and recovery site. The samples collected from the four ASR recovery wells were similar in major-ion and stable isotope chemistry compared to the samples collected from the Edwards aquifer source wells and the ASR injection well. The similarity could indicate that as Edwards aquifer water was injected, it displaced native Carrizo aquifer water, or, alternatively, if mixing of Edwards and Carrizo aquifer waters was occurring, the major-ion and stable isotope signatures for the Carrizo aquifer water might have been obscured by the signatures of the injected Edwards aquifer water. Differences in the dissolved iron and dissolved manganese concentrations indicate that either minor amounts of mixing occurred between the waters from the two aquifers, or as Edwards aquifer water displaced Carrizo aquifer water it dissolved the iron and manganese directly from the Carrizo Sand. Concentrations of radium-226 in the samples collected at the ASR recovery wells were smaller than the concentrations in samples collected from the Edwards aquifer source wells and from the ASR injection well. The smaller radium-226 concentrations in the samples collected from the ASR

  19. Organic geochemistry and petrology of subsurface Paleocene-Eocene Wilcox and Claiborne Group coal beds, Zavala County, Maverick Basin, Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Paul C.; Warwick, Peter; Hook, Robert W.; Alimi, Hossein; Mastalerz, Maria; Swanson, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    Coal samples from a coalbed methane exploration well in northern Zavala County, Maverick Basin, Texas, were characterized through an integrated analytical program. The well was drilled in February, 2006 and shut in after coal core desorption indicated negligible gas content. Cuttings samples from two levels in the Eocene Claiborne Group were evaluated by way of petrographic techniques and Rock–Eval pyrolysis. Core samples from the Paleocene–Eocene Indio Formation (Wilcox Group) were characterized via proximate–ultimate analysis in addition to petrography and pyrolysis. Two Indio Formation coal samples were selected for detailed evaluation via gas chromatography, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. Samples are subbituminous rank as determined from multiple thermal maturity parameters. Elevated rank (relative to similar age coal beds elsewhere in the Gulf Coast Basin) in the study area is interpreted to be a result of stratigraphic and/or structural thickening related to Laramide compression and construction of the Sierra Madre Oriental to the southwest. Vitrinite reflectance data, along with extant data, suggest the presence of an erosional unconformity or change in regional heat flow between the Cretaceous and Tertiary sections and erosion of up to >5 km over the Cretaceous. The presence of liptinite-rich coals in the Claiborne at the well site may indicate moderately persistent or recurring coal-forming paleoenvironments, interpreted as perennially submerged peat in shallow ephemeral lakes with herbaceous and/or flotant vegetation. However, significant continuity of individual Eocene coal beds in the subsurface is not suggested. Indio Formation coal samples contain abundant telovitrinite interpreted to be preserved from arborescent, above-ground woody vegetation that developed during the middle portion of mire development in forested swamps. Other petrographic criteria suggest enhanced biological, chemical and physical

  20. Geophysical analysis of the Salmon Peak Formation near Amistad Reservoir Dam, Val Verde County, Texas, and Coahuila, Mexico, March 2006, to aid in piezometer placement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanton, Gregory P.; Kress, Wade H.; Teeple, Andrew; Greenslate, Michael L.; Clark, Allan K.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1992, numerous sinkholes have developed northwest of the Amistad Reservoir dam on the Rio Grande. Increases in the discharge of springs south of the dam, on the western side of the Rio Grande, in Coahuila, Mexico, have been documented. In 1995 the Mexico Section of the International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC) completed a study of the western embankment (Coahuila, Mexico) of the dam that included surface geophysics, borehole geophysics, and installation of piezometers to learn more about subsurface conditions. As part of a 5-year safety inspection in 2005, technical advisors recommended that one line of similarly constructed piezometers be installed on the eastern embankment (Val Verde County, Texas) of the dam for comparison of water levels (potentiometric head) on both the western and eastern embankments of Amistad Reservoir dam. To provide technical assistance for the horizontal and vertical placement of piezometers on the eastern embankment of Amistad Reservoir dam, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Section of the IBWC, conducted a study along both the western and eastern embankments of Amistad Reservoir dam. The study involved an integrated approach using surface and borehole geophysical methods. In the western embankment investigation, geological and geophysical characteristics that indicate relatively large water-yielding properties of the Salmon Peak Formation were identified. The direct-current (DC) resistivity method was selected as the surface geophysical reconnaissance technique to correlate relatively large water-yielding properties of the Salmon Peak Formation, identified from analysis of borehole geophysical logs, with variations in subsurface resistivity. The dipole-dipole array and the reciprocal Schlumberger array were selected as the most applicable DC resistivity arrays. Two resistivity units were identified in both the dipole-dipole array data and the reciprocal Schlumberger array data along DC resistivity

  1. Hydrology of the Texas Gulf Coast aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, P.D.; Ardis, A.F.

    1991-01-01

    A complex, multilayered ground-water flow system exists in the Coastal Plain sediments of Texas. The Tertiary and Quaternary clastic deposits have an areal extent of 114,000 square miles onshore and in the Gulf of Mexico. Two distinct aquifer systems are recognized within the sediments, which range in thickness from a few feet to more than 12,000 feet The older system--the Texas coastal uplands aquifer system-consists of four aquifers and two confining units in the Claiborne and Wilcox Groups. It is underlain by the practically impermeable Midway confining unit or by the top of the geopressured zone. It is overlain by the nearly impermeable Vicksburg-Jackson confining unit, which separates it from the younger coastal lowlands aquifer system. The coastal lowlands aquifer system consists of five permeable zones and two confining units that range in age from Oligocene to Holocene. The hydrogeologic units of both systems are exposed in bands that parallel the coastline. The units dip and thicken toward the Gulf. Quality of water in the aquifer systems is highly variable, with dissolved solids ranging from less than 500 to 150,000 milligrams per liter. Substantial withdrawal from the aquifer systems began in the early 1900's and increased nearly continuously into the 1970's. The increase in withdrawal was relatively rapid from about 1940 to 1970. Adverse hydrologic effects, such as saltwater encroachment in coastal areas, land-surface subsidence in the HoustonGalveston area, and long-term dewatering in the Whiter Garden area, were among some of the factors that caused pumping increases to slow or to cease in the 1970's and 1980's. Ground-water withdrawals in the study area in 1980 were about 1.7 billion gallons per day. Nearly all of the withdrawal was from four units: Permeable zones A, B, and C of Miocene age and younger, and the lower Claiborae-upper Wilcox aquifer. Ground-water levels have declined hundreds of feet in the intensively pumped areas of Houston-Galveston

  2. Early College High Schools Established from 2006 through 2008 in El Paso County, Texas: Discovering Factors Contributing to Hispanic Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Maluka Dorotea

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (a) identify factors contributing to the success of Hispanic students in four Early College High Schools (ECHSs) in El Paso County, (b) identify components of the ECHSs that can be realistically considered for implementation by administrators of larger public high schools in El Paso County, and (c) determine…

  3. Water-level altitudes in wells completed in the Jasper aquifer, greater Houston area, Texas, Spring 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplin, L.S.

    2001-01-01

    This report, prepared in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, presents a map showing the approximate water-level altitudes in spring 2000 in wells completed in the Jasper aquifer (back of page). The most recent previously published water-level-altitude map for the Jasper aquifer in the region is by Popkin (1971). The study area includes Montgomery County and parts of Harris, Waller, Grimes, and Walker Counties.

  4. Potential for bed-material entrainment in selected streams of the Edwards Plateau - Edwards, Kimble, and Real Counties, Texas, and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Asquith, William H.

    2008-01-01

    The Texas Department of Transportation spends considerable money for maintenance and replacement of low-water crossings of streams in the Edwards Plateau in Central Texas as a result of damages caused in part by the transport of cobble- and gravel-sized bed material. An investigation of the problem at low-water crossings was made by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation, and in collaboration with Texas Tech University, Lamar University, and the University of Houston. The bed-material entrainment problem for low-water crossings occurs at two spatial scales - watershed scale and channel-reach scale. First, the relative abundance and activity of cobble- and gravel-sized bed material along a given channel reach becomes greater with increasingly steeper watershed slopes. Second, the stresses required to mobilize bed material at a location can be attributed to reach-scale hydraulic factors, including channel geometry and particle size. The frequency of entrainment generally increases with downstream distance, as a result of decreasing particle size and increased flood magnitudes. An average of 1 year occurs between flows that initially entrain bed material as large as the median particle size, and an average of 1.5 years occurs between flows that completely entrain bed material as large as the median particle size. The Froude numbers associated with initial and complete entrainment of bed material up to the median particle size approximately are 0.40 and 0.45, respectively.

  5. [Galveston technique in treatment of paralytic spine deformities].

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Jacek; Nowakowski, Andrzej; Balcerkiewicz, Karol; Szulc, Paweł

    2003-01-01

    The author's present their own experiences with the Galveston technique in treatment of paralytic spine deformities. Nineteen patients (6 boys and 13 girls) were treated (between 1996 and 2002) at the Swiebodzin Spine Centre and the Special Spine Surgery Unit in Poznań. All patients were unable to sit straight without external support, due to neurologic muscle weakness and pelvic obliquity. Surgical treatment lead to a marked improvement of the spinal deformity and also allowed the patients to sit-straight, without need of any support.

  6. Approximate altitude of water levels in wells in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston area, Texas, spring 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, James Frank; Lind, W.B.; Coplin, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this report, which was prepared in cooperation with the City of Houston and the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, is to show the altitudes of water levels in wells in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston, Texas, metropolitan area.  The maps are based on water-level measurements in the Spring of 1987 in about 400 wells.

  7. The cycling and oxidation pathways of organic carbon in a shallow estuary along the Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Warnken, Kent W.; Santschi, Peter H.; Roberts, Kimberly A.; Gill, Gary A.

    2007-08-08

    The cycling and oxidation pathways of organic carbon were investigated at a single shallow water estuarine site in Trinity Bay, Texas, the uppermost lobe of Galveston Bay, during November 2000. Radio-isotopes were used to estimate sediment mixing and accumulation rates, and benthic chamber and pore water measurements were used to determine sediment-water exchange fluxes of oxygen, nutrients and metals, and infer carbon oxidation rates.

  8. Health insurance coverage in the Houston-Galveston area under the patient protection and affordable care act.

    PubMed

    Begley, Charles; Deshmukh, Ashish; Eschbach, Karl; Fouladi, Negin; Liu, Qian June; Reynolds, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    This study projects the number of nonelderly people who could gain coverage under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) for the period from 2014 through 2020 in the 13-county Houston-Galveston area region. The major PPACA provisions aimed at expanding coverage as well as the populations targeted by those provisions are described. Projections of the impact of PPACA on coverage in the area are based on estimates of growth in the size of targeted populations in each county and the anticipated responses of those populations to the major provisions of PPACA. The projections indicate that, if fully implemented, PPACA could cut the uninsurance rate in the region by half, from 26% in 2010 to 13% in 2020. This change translates into health insurance coverage for approximately 2 million additional people, from the current 4.2 million to a projected 5.9 million. The number of Medicaid enrollees could increase by an estimated 600,000 (a 79% increase), although private insurance coverage, which could increase by as much as 1 million enrollees (a 30% increase), will remain the primary source of coverage for most people. Coverage gains from PPACA will vary considerably by county, depending on the age-income-citizenship characteristics of the population, current uninsurance rates, and the rate of population growth.

  9. Estimated depth to the water table and estimated rate of recharge in outcrops of the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers near Houston, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, J.E.; Bush, P.W.; Kasmarek, M.C.; Barbie, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    In 1989, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, began a field study to determine the depth to the water table and to estimate the rate of recharge in outcrops of the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers near Houston, Texas. The study area comprises about 2,000 square miles of outcrops of the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in northwest Harris County, Montgomery County, and southern Walker County. Because of the scarcity of measurable water-table wells, depth to the water table below land surface was estimated using a surface geophysical technique, seismic refraction. The water table in the study area generally ranges from about 10 to 30 foot below land surface and typically is deeper in areas of relatively high land-surface altitude than in areas of relatively low land- surface altitude. The water table has demonstrated no long-term trends since ground-water development began, with the probable exception of the water table in the Katy area: There the water table is more than 75 feet deep, probably due to ground-water pumpage from deeper zones. An estimated rate of recharge in the aquifer outcrops was computed using the interface method in which environmental tritium is a ground-water tracer. The estimated average total recharge rate in the study area is 6 inches per year. This rate is an upper bound on the average recharge rate during the 37 years 1953-90 because it is based on the deepest penetration (about 80 feet) of postnuclear-testing tritium concentrations. The rate, which represents one of several components of a complex regional hydrologic budget, is considered reasonable but is not definitive because of uncertainty regarding the assumptions and parameters used in its computation.

  10. Texas and Louisiana coastal vulnerability and shelf connectivity.

    PubMed

    Thyng, Kristen M; Hetland, Robert D

    2017-03-15

    A numerical study of connectivity between the continental shelf and coast in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico using a circulation model and surface-limited numerical drifters shows that despite seasonal changes in winds, the overall connectivity of the shelf with the coastline is similar in the winter and summer, though it extends more offshore in Texas in summer. However, there is a spatial pattern to the connectivity: more of the inner shelf is connected with the coast in Texas as compared with Louisiana. Subsets of the coast do have seasonal variability: the coast near both Galveston and Port Aransas has more connectivity from upcoast in the winter and from offshore and downcoast in the summer. In both seasons, we find drifters reach the Port Aransas coast most frequently, with a stronger trend in the summer. These results are important for assessing likely pathways for spilled oil and other potentially hazardous material.

  11. Environmental Assessment for Central Power and Light Company`s proposed Military Highway-CFE tie 138/69-kV transmission line project Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Central Power and Light Company (CPL) intends to upgrade its existing transmission line ties with the Commision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) system in Mexico. CPL currently has a single 69-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in the Brownsville area which connects CPL`s system with the system of CFE. This existing line runs between the Brownsville Switching Station, located on Laredo Road in Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas, and an existing CFE 69-kV line at the Rusteberg Bend of the Rio Grande in Cameron County. Under current conditions of need, the existing 69-kV line does not possess sufficient capability to engage in appropriate power exchanges. Therefore, CPL is proposing to build a new line to link up with CFE. This proposed line would be a double-circuit line, which would (1) continue (on a slightly relocated route) the existing 69-kV tie from CPL`s Brownsville Switching Station to CFE`s facilities, and (2) add a 138-kV tie from the Military Highway Substation, located on Military Highway (US Highway 281), to CFE`s facilities. The proposed 138/69-kV line, which will be constructed and operated by CPL, will be built primarily on steel single-pole structures within an average 60-foot (ft) wide right-of-way (ROW). It will be approximately 6900--9200 ft (1.3--1.7 miles) in length, depending on the alternative route constructed.

  12. Geohydrologic site characterization of the municipal solid waste landfill facility, US Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abeyta, Cynthia G.

    1996-01-01

    Geohydrologic conditions of the Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Facility (MSWLF) on the U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso County, Texas, were evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army. The 106.03-acre MSWLF has been in operation since January 1974. The landfill contains household refuse, Post solid wastes, bulky items, grass and tree trimmings from family housing, refuse from litter cans, construction debris, classified waste (dry), dead animals, asbestos, and empty oil cans. The MSWLF, located about 1,200 feet east of the nearest occupied structure, is estimated to receive an average of approximately 56 tons of municipal solid waste per day and, at a fill rate of 1-4 acres per year, is expected to reach its capacity by the year 2004. The MSWLF is located in the Hueco Bolson, 4 miles east of the Franklin Mountains. Elevations at the MSWLF range from 3,907 to 3,937 feet above sea level. The climate at the MSWLF and vicinity is arid continental, characterized by an abundance of sunny days, high summer temperatures, relatively cool winters typical of arid areas, scanty rainfall, and very low humidity throughout the year. Average annual temperature near the MSWLF and vicinity is 63.3 degrees Fahrenheit and annual precipitation is 7.8 inches. Potential evaporation in the El Paso area was estimated to be 65 inches per year. Soils at and adjacent to the MSWLF are nearly level to gently sloping, have a fine sandy loam subsoil, and are moderately deep over caliche. The MSWLF is underlain by Hueco Bolson deposits of Tertiary age and typically are composed of unconsolidated to slightly consolidated interbedded sands, clay, silt, gravel, and caliche. Individual beds are not well defined and range in thickness from a fraction of an inch to about 100 feet. The primary source of ground water in the MSWLF area is in the deposits of the Hueco Bolson. A relatively thick vadose zone of approximately 300 feet overlies the

  13. Geologic framework of the Edwards Aquifer and upper confining unit, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards Aquifer, south-central Uvalde County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Small, Ted A.

    1997-01-01

    The stratigraphic units of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County generally are porous and permeable. The stratigraphic units that compose the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County are the Devils River Formation in the Devils River trend; and the West Nueces, McKnight, and Salmon Peak Formations in the Maverick Basin. The Balcones fault zone is the principal structural feature in Uvalde County; however, the displacement along the fault zone is less in Uvalde County than in adjacent Medina and Bexar Counties to the east. The Uvalde Salient is a structural high in south-central Uvalde County, and consists of several closely connected crustal uplifts that bring Edwards aquifer strata to the surface generally forming prominent hills. The crustal uplifts forming this structural high are the remnants of intrusive and extrusive magnatic activity. Six primary faults—Cooks, Black Mountain, Blue Mountain, Uvalde, Agape, and Connor—cross the length of the study area from the southwest to the northeast juxtaposing the Lower Cretaceous Salmon Peak Formation at the surface in the northwestern part of the study area against Upper Cretaceous formations in the central part of the study area. In the study area, the porosity of the rocks in the Edwards aquifer is related to depositional or diagenetic elements along specific stratigraphic horizons (fabric selective) and to dissolution and structural elements that can occur in any lithostratigraphic horizon (not fabric selective). Permeability depends on the physical properties of the rock such as size, shape, distribution of pores, and fissuring and dissolution. The middle 185 feet of the lower part of the Devils River Formation, the upper part of the Devils River Formation, and the upper unit of the Salmon Peak Formation probably are the most porous and permeable stratigraphic zones of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County.

  14. Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential. Texas Pacific Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310, Wasson (San Andres) Field, Yoakum County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, T.E.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.; McCoy, R.L.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Glascock, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    The coring, logging and testing of Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310 was a cooperative effort between Texas Pacific, owner of the well, and Gruy Federal, Inc. The requirements of the contract, which are summarized in Enclosure 1, Appendix A, include drilling and coring activities. The pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs in selected wells are intended to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report presents detailed information on the first such project. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood. The engineering of tests and analysis of such experimental data requires original thinking, but the reliability of the results is higher than data derived from conventional tests.

  15. Development of ground water from the Carrizo sand and Wilcox group in Dimmit, Zavala, Maverick, Frio, Atacosa, Median, Bexar, Live Oak, McMullen, La Salle, and Webb Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moulder, E.A.

    1957-01-01

    The development of ground water for irrigation from the Carrizo sand south and southwest of San Antonio, Tex., has increased rapidly during the past few years. Declining pumping water levels in irrigation wells, caused by increased withdrawals, have caused considerable concern among the residents of the area. In response, the Nueces River Conservation and Reclamation District entered into a cooperative agreement with the Texas Board of Water Engineers and the United States Geological Survey to determine the extent of development and the rate of withdrawal that has cause the decline. All wells that discharged more than 150 gallons per minute for extended periods of time in 1955 from either the Carrizo sand or sands of the Wilcox group were studied and are shown on [late 1. Estimates were made of the total withdrawals by county and are given in table 2. Similar estimates of withdrawals in some of the counties for the irrigation years 1929-30, 1938-39, 1944-45, and 1947-48 are presented for comparison in table 3. Although the Carrizo sand is the principal source of ground water pumped in the area, estimate of withdrawals of water from the Wilcox were included in this inventory because (1) the formation appears to be hydraulically connected to the Carrizo sand, (2) the quality of water generally is good in the outcrop area of the Wilcox, and (3) appreciable withdrawals are being made from the Wilcox for irrigation in a few areas. The investigation covered an area of about 7,500 square miles and included all or parts of the following counties: Dimmit, Zavala, Maverick, Frio, Atascosa, Medina, Bexar, Live Oak, McMullen, La Salle, and Webb (fig. 1).

  16. Texas Greenup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    June 2007 was one of the wettest Junes on record for the state of Texas. Starting in late May, a string of low-pressure systems settled in over the U.S. Southern Plains and unleashed weeks of heavy to torrential rain. During the final week of June, much of Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas received more than 330 percent of their average rainfall, said the National Climatic Data Center. The widespread heavy rain brought deadly floods to the entire region. On July 6, the Associated Press reported that every major river basin in Texas was at flood stage, an event that had not occurred since 1957. In addition to causing floods, the rains stimulated plant growth. The grassy, often arid, plains and plateaus of northern Mexico (bottom left), Texas (center), and New Mexico (top, left of center) burst to life with dense vegetation as this vegetation anomaly image shows. Regions where plants were growing more quickly or fuller than average are green, while areas where growth is below average are brown. Most of Texas is green, with a concentrated deep green, almost black, spot where vegetation growth was greatest. This area of western Texas is where the Pecos River flows out of New Mexico and heads southeast to the Rio Grande. In the darkest areas, vegetation was more than 100 percent above average. The brown spots in northeastern Texas and Oklahoma (top, right of center) may be areas where persistent clouds or water on the ground are hiding the plants from the satellite's view. Plants may also be growing less than average if swamped by too much rain. The image was made with data collected by the SPOT satellite between June 11 and June 20, 2007. NASA imagery created by Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory, using SPOT data provided courtesy of the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service and processed by Jennifer Small and Assaf Anyamba of the GIMMS Group at NASA GSFC.

  17. Abandoned Texas oil fields

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    Data for Texas abandoned oil fields were primarily derived from two sources: (1) Texas Railroad Commission (TRRC), and (2) Dwight's ENERGYDATA. For purposes of this report, abandoned oil fields are defined as those fields that had no production during 1977. The TRRC OILMASTER computer tapes were used to identify these abandoned oil fields. The tapes also provided data on formation depth, gravity of oil production, location (both district and county), discovery date, and the cumulative production of the field since its discovery. In all, the computer tapes identified 9211 abandoned fields, most of which had less than 250,000 barrel cumulative production. This report focuses on the 676 abandoned onshore Texas oil fields that had cumulative production of over 250,000 barrels. The Dwight's ENERGYDATA computer tapes provided production histories for approximately two-thirds of the larger fields abandoned in 1966 and thereafter. Fields which ceased production prior to 1966 will show no production history nor abandonment date in this report. The Department of Energy hopes the general availability of these data will catalyze the private sector recovery of this unproduced resource.

  18. 76 FR 6837 - Exelon Nuclear Texas Holdings, LLC; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... over the following proceeding: Exelon Nuclear Texas Holdings, LLC (Victoria County Station Site) This... pursuant to Subpart A of 10 CFR part 52 for the Victoria County Station Site, to be located in...

  19. Strategies for reservoir characterization and identification of incremental recovery opportunities in mature reservoirs in Frio Fluvial-Deltaic sandstones, south Texas: An example from Rincon Field, Starr County. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    McRae, L.; Holtz, M.; Hentz, T.

    1995-11-01

    Fluvial-deltaic sandstone reservoirs in the United States are being abandoned at high rates, yet they still contain more than 34 billion barrels of unrecovered oil. The mature Oligocene-age fluvial-deltaic reservoirs of the Frio Formation along the Vicksburg Fault Zone in South Texas are typical of this class in that, after more than three decades of production, they still contain 61 percent of the original mobile oil in place, or 1.6 billion barrels. This resource represents a tremendous target for advanced reservoir characterization studies that integrate geological and engineering analysis to locate untapped and incompletely drained reservoir compartments isolated by stratigraphic heterogeneities. The D and E reservoir intervals of Rincon field, Starr County, South Texas, were selected for detailed study to demonstrate the ability of advanced characterization techniques to identify reservoir compartmentalization and locate specific infield reserve-growth opportunities. Reservoir architecture, determined through high-frequency genetic stratigraphy and facies analysis, was integrated with production history and facies-based petrophysical analysis of individual flow units to identify recompletion and geologically targeted infill drilling opportunities. Estimates of original oil in place versus cumulative production in D and E reservoirs suggest that potential reserve growth exceeds 4.5 million barrels. Comparison of reservoir architecture and the distribution of completions in each flow unit indicates a large number of reserve-growth opportunities. Potential reserves can be assigned to each opportunity by constructing an Sooh map of remaining mobile oil, which is the difference between original oil in place and the volumes drained by past completions.

  20. Houston-Galveston Navigation Channels, Texas Project. Navigation Channel Sedimentation Study, Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    settling velocity values. Since the Trinity Bay area and locations upstream of Red Fish Reef experience very little bed erosion, the model is not...peak deposition occurs around Red Fish Reef . There is much less shoaling along Atkinson Island. The shoaling that is occurring in this upstream...Red Fish Reef and Smith and Eagle Points. Once in the channel, the sediment will tend to drift upstream because of the upland direction of the

  1. Marketing Education National Research Conference Report (Galveston, Texas, April 16-18, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norwood, Marcella M., Ed.

    This conference provided a forum for presenting research findings to educators and other audiences interested in marketing education. The following papers were presented: "Issues and Trends in Wisconsin Marketing Education" (Searle); "Competencies Necessary for Student Teachers" (Littman); "A Report of a Study of More than…

  2. Houston-Galveston Navigation Channels, Texas Project: Navigation Channel Sedimentation Study, Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    Sediment Pycno. Sample Sample Tare Bottle wt. + sed. of Pycno. Density bottle # Date ID Temp. C wt. g + sed. g + water g water bottle g/cm3...25/04 8/22/04 074151 10.5 ft. Salinity ~15 ppt Gross wt. Shear Time Sample Tare wt. (g) Net wt. Conc. Bottle # Voltage Stress (min...Gross wt. Shear Time Sample Tare wt. (g) Net wt. Conc. Bottle # Voltage Stress (min.) Volume (g) filter + sed (g) (g/l) 1 3 0.35 10 97

  3. 33 CFR 110.197 - Galveston Harbor, Bolivar Roads Channel, Texas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... anchorage area is for the temporary use of vessels of all types, but especially for vessels awaiting weather and other conditions favorable to the resumption of their voyages. (2) Except when stress of...

  4. 76 FR 4342 - Adequacy Status of the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, Texas Reasonable Further Progress and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... Attainment Demonstration 8-Hour Ozone Motor Vehicle Emission Budgets for Transportation Conformity Purposes... Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) are adequate for transportation conformity purposes. As a result of EPA's finding, the HGB area must use these budgets for future conformity determinations for...

  5. Food habits and organochlorine contaminants in the diet of black skimmers, Galveston Bay, Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    More than 500 food items of nestling Black Skimmers were identified representing 18 species of fish and 2 invertebrates. DDE and poly-chlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were the only contaminants consistently detected in the black skimmer diet, carcass, and egg samples. Eggs contained 14 times the level of PCBs detected in the fish diet.

  6. Wave and Beach Processes Modeling for Sabine Pass to Galveston Bay, Texas, Shoreline Erosion Feasibility Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    above) the beach. These STWAVE output stations approximately follow the 6-m depth contour. For the High Island grid, only wave data from STWAVE... Shemdin . 1980. Bottom dissipation in finite-depth water waves . Proceedings of the 16th Coastal Engineering Conference. Hamburg, Germany, 434-448...directed energy) is discarded. Examples of these STWAVE spectra are given in Figures 37 and 38. The following wave height, period, and angle calculations

  7. Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico - petrophysical characterization of the South Cowden Grayburg Reservoir, Ector County, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia, F.J.

    1997-06-01

    Reservoir performance of the South Cowden Grayburg field suggests that only 21 percent of the original oil in place has been recovered. The purpose of this study is to construct a realistic reservoir model to be used to predict the location of the remaining mobile oil. Construction of reservoir models for fluid-flow simulation of carbonate reservoirs is difficult because they typically have complicated and unpredictable permeability patterns. Much of the difficulty results from the degree to which diagenetic overprinting masks depositional textures and patterns. For example, the task of constructing a reservoir model of a limestone reservoir that has undergone only cementation and compaction is easier than constructing a model of a karsted reservoir that has undergone cavern formation and collapse as well as cementation and compaction. The Permian-age carbonate-ramp reservoirs in the Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico, are typically anhydritic dolomitized limestone. Because the dolomitization occurred soon after deposition, depositional fabrics and patterns are often retained, and a reservoir model can be constructed using depositional concepts. Recent studies of the San Andres outcrop in the Guadalupe Mountains and the Seminole San Andres reservoir in the Permian Basin illustrate how depositional fabrics and patterns can be used to construct a reservoir model when depositional features are retained.

  8. PLANS AND SECTIONS. WEIR SPILLWAY. TEXAS HILL CANAL STA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PLANS AND SECTIONS. WEIR SPILLWAY. TEXAS HILL CANAL - STA. 132+82.15. TEXAS HILL CANAL AND DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM. United States Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation; Gila Project, Arizona, Wellton-Mohawk Division. Drawing No. 50-D-3200, dated February 7, 1955, Denver, Colorado - Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation System, Relift Station, Texas Hill Canal 2.5, Northern Terminus of Avenue 51 East, approximately .5 mile south of Union Pacific Railroad, Wellton, Yuma County, AZ

  9. Usage and administration manual for a geodatabase compendium of water-resources data-Rio Grande Basin from the Rio Arriba-Sandoval County line, New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas, 1889-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burley, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission, developed a geodatabase compendium (hereinafter referred to as the 'geodatabase') of available water-resources data for the reach of the Rio Grande from Rio Arriba-Sandoval County line, New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas. Since 1889, a wealth of water-resources data has been collected in the Rio Grande Basin from Rio Arriba-Sandoval County line, New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas, for a variety of purposes. Collecting agencies, researchers, and organizations have included the U.S. Geological Survey, Bureau of Reclamation, International Boundary and Water Commission, State agencies, irrigation districts, municipal water utilities, universities, and other entities. About 1,750 data records were recently (2010) evaluated to enhance their usability by compiling them into a single geospatial relational database (geodatabase). This report is intended as a user's manual and administration guide for the geodatabase. All data available, including water quality, water level, and discharge data (both instantaneous and daily) from January 1, 1889, through December 17, 2009, were compiled for the study area. A flexible and efficient geodatabase design was used, enhancing the ability of the geodatabase to handle data from diverse sources and helping to ensure sustainability of the geodatabase with long-term maintenance. Geodatabase tables include daily data values, site locations and information, sample event information, and parameters, as well as data sources and collecting agencies. The end products of this effort are a comprehensive water-resources geodatabase that enables the visualization of primary sampling sites for surface discharges, groundwater elevations, and water-quality and associated data for the study area. In addition, repeatable data processing scripts, Structured Query Language queries for loading prepared data sources, and a detailed process for refreshing all data in the

  10. Computers in Schools of Southeast Texas in 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, David L.; Renfrow, Raylene

    This study examined computer use in southeast Texas schools in 1997. The study population included 110 school districts in Education Service Center Regions IV and VI. These centers serve 22 counties of southeast Texas in the Houston area. Using questionnaires, researchers collected data on brands of computers presently in use, percent of computer…

  11. Mixing heights and surface fluxes over Galveston Bay and the Gulf of Mexico: Implications for modeling of pollution episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angevine, W. M.; Tucker, S. C.; Fairall, C.; Bariteau, L.; Wolfe, D.; Zagar, M.; Brewer, A.

    2007-12-01

    During the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study, boundary layer measurements were made by in-situ instruments, lidars, and rawinsondes on the NOAA RV Ronald H. Brown as well as by radar wind profilers on land. Brown also carried instruments to measure surface heat and momentum fluxes. This presentation will emphasize measurements made in Galveston Bay and in the Gulf of Mexico near the Houston area. Details of boundary layer depth and turbulence intensity over these waters have not been well known previously, but are quite important to the understanding of high ozone episodes in Houston. One somewhat surprising result is that the boundary layer over water was almost always slightly unstable, with positive surface heat flux. Mixing depths were moderate, although mixing was generally weak compared to that over land. Boundary layer heights over the water were substantially shallower than daytime heights over land. Experiments in modeling ozone episodes with WRF at 1.5-km grid spacing will be shown and compared with the measurements.

  12. 77 FR 58058 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Texas; Beaumont/Port Arthur Ozone Maintenance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... ozone maintenance area consists of Hardin, Jefferson, and Orange Counties in Texas. Texas submitted this... instructions for submitting comments. U.S. EPA Region 6 ``Contact Us'' Web site: http://epa.gov/region6... Region 6 reception area at 1445 Ross Avenue, Suite 700, Dallas, Texas 75202. The State submittal is...

  13. Approximate altitude of water levels in wells in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston area, Texas, January-February 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbie, Dana L.; Coplin, L.S.; Locke, Glenn L.

    1991-01-01

    This report is one in a series of reports that depict altitudes of water levels since 1977, the most recent of which (Barbie and other, 1989) presented maps of the altitudes of water levels for 1989.  This report was prepared in cooperation with the City of Houston and the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, and presents approximate altitudes of water levels in wells in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston area, Texas, January-February 1990.

  14. Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico--waterflood performance analysis for the South Cowden Grayburg Reservoir, Ector County, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, J.W. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    A reservoir engineering study was conducted of waterflood performance in the South Cowden field, an Upper Permian Grayburg reservoir on the Central Basin Platform in West Texas. The study was undertaken to understand the historically poor waterflood performance, evaluate three techniques for incorporating petrophysical measurements and geological interpretation into heterogeneous reservoir models, and identify issues in heterogeneity modeling and fluid-flow scaleup that require further research. The approach included analysis of relative permeability data, analysis of injection and production data, heterogeneity modeling, and waterflood simulation. The poor South Cowden waterflood recovery is due, in part, to completion of wells in only the top half of the formation. Recompletion of wells through the entire formation is estimated to improve recovery in ten years by 6 percent of the original oil in place in some areas of the field. A direct three-dimensional stochastic approach to heterogeneity modeling produced the best fit to waterflood performance and injectivity, but a more conventional model based on smooth mapping of layer-averaged properties was almost as good. The results reaffirm the importance of large-scale heterogeneities in waterflood modeling but demonstrate only a slight advantage for stochastic modeling at this scale. All the flow simulations required a reduction to the measured whole-core k{sub v}/k{sub h} to explain waterflood behavior, suggesting the presence of barriers to vertical flow not explicitly accounted for in any of the heterogeneity models. They also required modifications to the measured steady-state relative permeabilities, suggesting the importance of small-scale heterogeneities and scaleup. Vertical flow barriers, small-scale heterogeneity modeling, and relative permeability scaleup require additional research for waterflood performance prediction in reservoirs like South Cowden.

  15. Ground-water withdrawals, water-level changes, land-surface subsidence, and ground-water quality in Fort Bend County, Texas, 1969-87

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Locke, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    The concentrations of dissolved solids in water from wells in Fort Bend County have not changed appreciably from 1969 to 1987. The median concentrations of dissolved solids are 475 milligrams in water from wells in Fort Bend per liter in water from the upper unit of the Chicot aquifer, 337 milligrams per liter in water from the lower unit of the Chicot aquifer, and 307 milligrams per liter in water from the Evangeline aquifer.

  16. Final report for the geothermal well site restoration and plug and abandonment of wells: DOE Pleasant Bayou test site, Brazoria County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, Ben N.; Seigel, Ben H.

    1994-03-13

    For a variety of reasons, thousands of oil and gas wells have been abandoned in the Gulf Coast Region of the United States. Many of these wells penetrated geopressured zones whose resource potential for power generation was undervalued or ignored. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program was chartered to improve geothermal technology to the point where electricity could be commercially produced from a substantial number of geopressured resource sites. This research program focused on relatively narrow technical issues that are unique to geopressured resources such as the ability to predict reservoir production capacity based on preliminary flow tests. Three well sites were selected for the research program. These are the Willis Hulin and Gladys McCall sites in Louisiana, and the Pleasant Bayou site in Texas. The final phase of this research project consists of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and site restoration.

  17. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Saldana well No. 2, Zapata County, Texas. Volume I. Completion and testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-07

    The Saldana Well No. 2, approximately 35 miles Southeast of the city of Laredo, Texas, was the sixth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the DOE Wells of Opportunity Program. The well was tested through the annulus between 7-inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. The interval tested was from 9745 to 9820 feet. The geological section was the 1st Hinnant Sand, an upper member of the Wilcox Group. Produced water was injected into the Saldana Well No. 1, which was also acquired from Riddle Oil Company and converted to a disposal well. A Miocene salt water sand was perforated from 3005 to 3100 feet for disposal. One pressure drawdown flow test and one pressure buildup test were conducted during a 10-day period. A total of 9328 barrels of water was produced. The highest sustained flow rate was 1950 BWPD.

  18. Origin and characteristics of discharge at San Marcos Springs based on hydrologic and geochemical data (2008-10), Bexar, Comal, and Hays Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musgrove, MaryLynn; Crow, Cassi L.

    2012-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas is a productive and important water resource. Several large springs issuing from the aquifer are major discharge points, popular locations for recreational activities, and habitat for threatened and endangered species. Discharges from Comal and San Marcos Springs, the first and second largest spring complexes in Texas, are used as thresholds in groundwater management strategies for the Edwards aquifer. Comal Springs is generally understood to be supplied by predominantly regional groundwater flow paths; the hydrologic connection of San Marcos Springs with the regional flow system, however, is less understood. During November 2008–December 2010, a hydrologic and geochemical investigation of San Marcos Springs was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System. The primary objective of this study was to define and characterize sources of discharge from San Marcos Springs. During this study, hydrologic conditions transitioned from exceptional drought (the dry period, November 1, 2008 to September 8, 2009) to wetter than normal (the wet period, September 9, 2009 to December 31, 2010), which provided the opportunity to investigate the hydrogeology of San Marcos Springs under a wide range of hydrologic conditions. Water samples were collected from streams, groundwater wells, and springs at and in the vicinity of San Marcos Springs, including periodic (routine) sampling (every 3–7 weeks) and sampling in response to storms. Samples were analyzed for major ions, trace elements, nutrients, and selected stable and radiogenic isotopes (deuterium, oxygen, carbon, strontium). Additionally, selected physicochemical properties were measured continuously at several sites, and hydrologic data were compiled from other USGS efforts (stream and spring discharge). Potential aquifer recharge was evaluated from local streams, and daily recharge or gain/loss estimates were computed for several

  19. Design and Compilation of a Geodatabase of Existing Salinity Information for the Rio Grande Basin, from the Rio Arriba-Sandoval County Line, New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shah, Sachin D.; Maltby, David R.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, compiled salinity-related water-quality data and information in a geodatabase containing more than 6,000 sampling sites. The geodatabase was designed as a tool for water-resource management and includes readily available digital data sources from the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission, Sustainability of semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas, Paso del Norte Watershed Council, numerous other State and local databases, and selected databases maintained by the University of Arizona and New Mexico State University. Salinity information was compiled for an approximately 26,000-square-mile area of the Rio Grande Basin from the Rio Arriba-Sandoval County line, New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas. The geodatabase relates the spatial location of sampling sites with salinity-related water-quality data reported by multiple agencies. The sampling sites are stored in a geodatabase feature class; each site is linked by a relationship class to the corresponding sample and results stored in data tables.

  20. Petrography, geochemistry, and depositional setting of the San Pedro and Santo Tomas coal zones: anomalous algae-rich coals in the middle part of the Claiborne Group (Eocene) of Webb County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warwick, P.D.; Hook, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Two coal zones, the San Pedro and the overlying Santo Tomas, are presented for nearly 35 km in outcrop, surface and underground mines, and shallow drill holes along the strike of the middle part of the Claiborne Group (Eocene) in Webb County, Texas. A sandstone-dominated interval of 25 to 35 m separates the two coal zones, which range up to 3 m in thickness. The coal-bearing portion of the middle Claiborne Group in the Rio Grande area represents a fining-upward transition from sandstone-dominated, marine-influenced, lower delta plain depositional environments to more inland, mudstone-rich, predominantly freshwater deltaic settings. The less variable nature of the Santo Tomas coal zone reflects its origin in the upper part of an interlobe basin that received only minor clastic influx. Petrographic attributes of the nonbanded coals indicate that they formed subaqueously in fresh to possibly brackish waters. Petrographic study of polished blocks indicates that approximately 10% of the nonbanded coal from both coal zones is composed of green algae fructifications. -from Authors

  1. 33 CFR 167.350 - In the approaches to Galveston Bay Traffic Separation Scheme and precautionary areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In the approaches to Galveston Bay Traffic Separation Scheme and precautionary areas. 167.350 Section 167.350 Navigation and... Atlantic Gulf Coast § 167.350 In the approaches to Galveston Bay Traffic Separation Scheme...

  2. Archaeological Survey at Fort Hood, Texas. Fiscal Year 1990: The Northeastern Perimeter Area

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    Fort Hood. Texas. Fields, Ross C. (editor) 1988 Cultural Resources Investigat•ons Along Whiteoak Bayou, Harris County, Texas. Reports of...H. Blame Ensor, and Harold Drollinger 1989 Llthic Analysis. In Alaosn Road. Adattion to the Inland Coastal Pratrie Zone, Harris Count, Southeast... Harris County, Texas, by H.B. Ensor, J.E. Dockall, and F. Winchell. Archaeological Research Laboratory, Reports of Investigations No. 12. Ensor. H

  3. 40 CFR 81.344 - Texas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... County, Jasper County, Jefferson County, Nacogdoches County, Newton County, Orange County, Polk County... Angelina County, Houston County, Jasper County, Nacogdoches County, Newton County, Polk County, Sabine... Unclassifiable/Attainment. Jackson County Unclassifiable/Attainment. Jasper County...

  4. Micro-distribution of heavy rare earth elements in Round Top Mountain rhyolite deposit (Hudspeth County, Texas, USA) by EPMA mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingitore, N. E., Jr.; Piranian, M.; Amaya, M. A.; Negron, L. M.; Gorski, D.

    2015-12-01

    Round Top Mountain, west Texas, USA, is composed almost entirely of peraluminous rhyolite, with pervasive low-grade enrichment in yttrium and heavy rare earth elements (Y+HREEs). The exposed rhyolite laccolith also contains Li, Be, U, Th, Nb, Ta, Ga, Rb, Cs, Sn, and F. The valuable Y+HREEs are hosted in yttrofluorite, which is soluble in dilute sulfuric acid. Texas Rare Earth Resources, Inc. proposes to surface mine, crush, and heap leach the massive, 109ton deposit. The distribution of Y+HREEs, and that of other trace elements, is remarkably homogeneous at outcrop drill hole scale (Pingitore et al., FM14-V23D-4827: Uniform Distribution of Yttrium…). Here we document that Y+HREE mineralization appears pervasive through the rhyolite at a sub-millimeter scale. We examined 15 thin sections of rhyolite fragments randomly selected from a composite sample produced by mixing several hundred kg of aliquot material recovered from >100 reverse circulation drill holes scattered across much of the mountain. A total of 16 elements (Y, Dy, Yb, F, U, Th, Nb, Sn, Zr, Rb, Ca, Na, K, Fe, Al, Si) plus back scattered electron image were mapped in WDS mode by stage raster across a 2 x 2 mm field at 516 x 516 pixel resolution on a Cameca SX-100 class EPMA. Typical maps revealed 5-10 grains that contained Y + Dy + Yb; most also contained F and Ca, indicating yttrofluorite mineralogy. Most grains were under 10 μm in 2-D size. We view this 5-10 grain figure of merit as a minimum number of target grains since we employed a conservative approach to their identification. This finding suggests that a 1 mm cube of the rhyolite contains 250-500 target grains (assuming that the EPMA sampled to a depth of 5 μm and that sampled grains did not extend below that depth in size). Viewed from a mining processing standpoint, each particle for the anticipated heap leach, with a nominal crush size of ½ to 1 inch (13-26 mm), would contain on the order of 250,000 to 500,000 target microscopic mineral

  5. Houston, Texas and Gulf Coast area as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    The Houston, Texas and Gulf Coast area, looking southeast, as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft during its 91st revolution of the earth. Photographed from an altitude of 101 nautical miles, at ground elapsed time of 144 hours and 26 minutes. The morning sun causes a reflection on the water surfaces such as the Gulf of Mexico, Galveston Bay, Buffalo Bayou and the Brazos River and causes a unique reflection in the canals and fields west of Alvin. Some of the landmarks visible in this picture include highways and freeways, the Astrodome, the Intercontinental Airport and the Manned Spacecraft Center.

  6. Depositional and diagenetic controls on porosity permeability and oil production in McFarland/Magutex (Queen) reservoirs, Andrews County, west Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Holtz, M.H. )

    1991-03-01

    The McFarland/Magutex Queen reservoir complex lies along the northeastern edge of the Central basin platform in the west Texas Permian basin and produces oil from the Permian Queen Formation. Current production from this complex totals 42 million stock-tank barrels (MMSTB) of an estimated 219 MMSTB of original oil in place, with an estimated 90 MMSTB of remaining mobile oil (RMO). The gross pay interval contains two parasequences consisting of progradational, 30-ft-thick, upward-shoaling facies packages. Facies include shoreface, mixed tidal channel and intertidal flat, and supratidal. Elongate shoreface facies are characterized by poorly consolidated, massive to thinly laminated sandstones. The supratidal facies, which act as permeability barriers, are characterized by algal-laminated dolostone and nodular, laminated, and massive anhydrite containing halite and gypsum pseudomorphs. Highest production and the largest amount of the 90 MMSTB of RMO is associated with the shoreface and tidal-channel facies. Bulk pore volume storage capacity and permeability are also highest within these two facies. Sandstones are arkosic, containing anhydrite and dolomite cements. Accessory minerals are clays, authigenic feldspar, and dolomite. Three main pore types are recognized: interparticle, moldic and intraconstituent, and micropores. Moldic and intraconstituent porosity is associated with leached feldspars and anhydrite cement dissolution. Microporosity is associated with syndepositional, grain-coating corrensite, dissolution-enhanced feldspar cleavage planes, and authigenic multifaceted dolomite. Microporosity derived from clays and dolomite is formed preferentially in tidal-channel and intertidal flat facies.

  7. Lidar based vegetation height models to quantify carbon stocks in Galveston saltmarshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulawardhana, R. W.; Popescu, S. C.; Feagin, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    Concern over global climate change has stimulated much interest in identifying existing and potential carbon sinks. Wetland ecosystems are highly recognized for their high productivity and thus as major terrestrial carbon (C) sinks. The rapid decline in the extent and health of these wetland ecosystems has created a need for non-destructive methods for the study of their C dynamics. However, these biomass estimates are mostly based on vegetation structural properties, particularly based on vegetation height models. Hence, for better quantification of vegetation biomass and C estimates, the accuracy of vegetation height models derived using lidar data is of paramount importance. Yet, unlike in woody vegetation dominated ecosystems, the use of lidar in saltmarshes is limited due to several reasons: 1) relatively dense vegetation cover limits laser penetration affecting the accuracy of terrain and thus vegetation height estimates; and 2) relatively shorter vegetation demands high point density data with high vertical accuracy to capture relatively smaller differences between terrain and vegetation canopy surfaces. Thus, the use of lidar data to characterize saltmarsh vegetation community demands appropriate methodologies. Our overall objective in this study was to develop a methodology for deriving salt marsh vegetation height models using airborne lidar data. More specific objectives involved: (1) understanding the interaction between discrete-return airborne lidar data and marsh vegetation; (2) finding appropriate grid sizes for deriving terrain and vegetation height models; and (3) analyze lidar-derived surface accuracies by comparing estimates to field measurements. In this study, we used 1m point spacing airborne lidar data from Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) program to derive vegetation height models (VHM) for Spartina alterniflora saltmarshes in Galveston, Texas. We first derived digital terrain models (DEMs) and verified their vertical accuracy

  8. Mexican-Americans of South Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madsen, William

    The Hogg Foundation for Mental Health sponsored and financed the Hidalgo Project on Differential Culture Change and Mental Health during the 4-year period from 1957 to 1961; this document is an abbreviated report of that study of Mexican-American culture in Hidalgo County, Texas. Acculturation levels of various classes of the Mexican-American…

  9. Texas Heart Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Texas Heart Institute, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, MD Anderson Cancer Center, and The University of Houston. Held most ... for Physicians Fellowships & Residencies School ...

  10. 76 FR 61135 - Environmental Impact Statement: El Paso County, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: El Paso County, TX AGENCY: Federal Highway... proposed ] improvements to Loop 375 Border Highway West, in El Paso County, Texas, is being rescinded. FOR... Loop 375 C sar Ch vez Highway (Border Highway West Extension) in El Paso, Texas, to include the...

  11. 75 FR 22434 - Exelon Nuclear Texas Holdings, LLC; Notice of Receipt and Availability of Application for an...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... Nuclear Power Plants,'' an application for an early site permit (ESP) for the Victoria County Station Site (VCS) located in Victoria County, Texas. An applicant may seek an ESP in accordance with Subpart A...

  12. Study of near surface layers in Coastal Texas and their correlation with PBL heights using LIDAR during the NASA 2013 Discover AQ Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caicedo, V.; Lefer, B. L.; Scarino, A. J.; Hostetler, C. A.; Wisthaler, A.; Barrick, J. D. W.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates aerosol layers obtained from a ground LIDAR (Vaisala CL31) situated in Galveston Island during the September 2013 NASA Discover-AQ Texas campaign. Initial data reduction has shown two recurring non-connecting aerosol layers between 50 and 500 m. Changes in the vertical profiles of relative humidity, and potential temperature collected from the NASA P-3 Aircraft were correlated with these recurring layers identified by the CL31. Aerosol backscatter profiles from the High Spectral Resolution LIDAR (HSRL) aboard the NASA King Air Aircraft also indicate the presence of multiple near surface layers. While the planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights inferred from the P-3 aircraft profiles generally agreed with the CL31 LIDAR measurements, the initial PBL heights retrieved from the NASA HSRL Galveston Island over flights did not agree with the CL31 ground LIDAR measurements. However, preliminary unprocessed aerosol backscatter data displayed aerosol layers, which appear to match the two layers seen by the Galveston CL31 LIDAR. Variations in the vertical profiles of VOC trace gases, as measured by the P-3 airborne PTR-MS, also confirmed the presence of the two layers observed by the CL31 at Galveston. Further data analysis aims to determine the significance of these aerosol backscatter signals and their correlation to the PBL.

  13. Time scales in Galveston Bay: An unsteady estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayson, Matthew D.; Gross, Edward S.; Hetland, Robert D.; Fringer, Oliver B.

    2016-04-01

    Estuarine time scales including the turnover, particle e-folding time, the age (calculated with a passive tracer), and residence time (calculated with Lagrangian particles) were computed using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model of Galveston Bay, a low-flow, partially stratified estuary. Time scales were computed during a time period when river flow varied by several orders of magnitude and all time scales therefore exhibited significant temporal variability because of the unsteadiness of the system. The spatial distributions of age and residence time were qualitatively similar and increased from 15 days in a shipping channel to >45 days in the upper estuary. Volume-averaged age and residence time decreased during high-flow conditions. Bulk time scales, including the freshwater and salinity turnover times, were far more variable due to the changing river discharge and salt flux through the estuary mouth. A criterion for calculating a suitable averaging time is discussed to satisfy a steady state assumption and to estimate a more representative bulk time scale. When scaled with a freshwater advective time, all time scales were approximately equal to the advective time scale during high-flow conditions and many times higher during low-flow conditions. The mean age, Lagrangian residence, and flushing times exhibited a relationship that was weakly dependent on the freshwater advective time scale demonstrating predictability even in an unsteady, realistic estuary.

  14. Fluorescein Dye Penetration in Round Top Rhyolite (Hudspeth County, Texas, USA) to Reveal Micro-permeability and Optimize Grain Size for Heavy REE Heap Leach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negron, L. M.; Clague, J. W.; Gorski, D.; Amaya, M. A.; Pingitore, N. E.

    2013-12-01

    Millimeter- and micrometer-scale permeability of fine-grained igneous rocks has generated limited research interest. Nonetheless, the scale and distribution of such micro-permeability determines fluid penetration and pathways, parameters that define both the ability to heap leach a rock and the optimal grain size for such an operation. Texas Rare Earth Resources is evaluating the possibility of heap leaching of yttrium and heavy rare earth elements (YHREE) from the peraluminous rhyolite laccolith that forms one-mile-diameter Round Top Mountain. The YHREEs in this immense, surface-exposed deposit (minimum 1.6 billion tons, Texas Bureau Economic Geology) are dilute and diffuse, suggesting leaching as the best option for recovery. The REE grade is 0.05% and YHREEs comprise more than 70% of the total REE content. The YHREEs are hosted exclusively in micron-scale yttrofluorite grains, which proved soluble in dilute sulfuric acid. Laboratory experiments showed YHREE recoveries of up to 90%. Within limits, recoveries decrease with larger grain sizes, and increase with acid strength and exposure time. Our research question centers on dissolution effectiveness: Is YHREE recovery, relative to grain size, limited by (1) diffusion time of acid into, and dissolved solids, including YHREEs, out of the micro-permeability paths inherent in the rock particles; (2) the effective lengths of the natural micro-permeability paths in the rock; or (3) the putative role of the acid in dissolving new micro-paths into the grains? The maximum grain size should not exceed twice the typical path length (unless acid creates new paths), lest YHREEs in the core of a larger grain than that not be reached by acid. If instead diffusion time is limiting, longer leach time may prove effective. Rather than perform an extensive and expensive series of laboratory leaching experiments--some of which would be several months in duration--to determine optimal grain size, we developed a technique to

  15. Application of high resolution land use and land cover data for atmospheric modeling in the Houston-Galveston metropolitan area, Part I: Meteorological simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Fang-Yi; Byun, Daewon W.

    To predict atmospheric conditions in an urban environment, the land surface processes must be accurately described through the use of detailed land use (LU) and land cover (LC) data. Use of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 25-category data, currently in the Fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5), with the Noah land surface model (LSM) and MRF (medium-range forecast) planetary boundary layer (PBL) schemes resulted in the over-prediction of daytime temperatures in the Houston downtown area due to the inaccurate representation as a completely impervious surface. This bias could be corrected with the addition of canopy water in the urban areas from the evapotranspiration effects of urban vegetation. A more fundamental approach would be to utilize an LULC dataset that represents land surface features accurately. The Texas Forest Service (TFS) LULC dataset established with the LANDSAT satellite imagery correctly represents the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria (HGB) area as mixtures of urban, residential, grass, and forest LULC types. This paper describes how the Noah LSM and PBL schemes in the MM5 were modified to accommodate the TFS-LULC data. Comparisons with various meteorological measurements show that the MM5 simulation made with the high resolution LULC data improves the boundary layer mixing conditions and local wind patterns in the Houston Ship Channel, which is a critically important anthropogenic emission area affecting the HGB air pollution problems. In particular, when the synoptic flows are weak, the improved LULC data simulates the asymmetrically elongated Houston heat island convergence zone influencing the location of the afternoon Gulf of Mexico sea-breeze front and the Galveston Bay breeze flows. This paper is part I of a two-part study and focuses on the meteorological simulation. In part II, effects of using the different meteorological inputs on air quality simulations are discussed.

  16. Genetic evidence of enzootic leishmaniasis in a stray canine and Texas mouse from sites in west and central Texas

    PubMed Central

    Kipp, Evan J; Mariscal, Jacqueline; Armijos, Rodrigo X; Weigel, Margaret; Waldrup, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We detected Leishmania mexicana in skin biopsies taken from a stray canine (Canis familiaris) and Texas mouse (Peromyscus attwateri) at two ecologically disparate sites in west and central Texas using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A single PCR-positive dog was identified from a sample of 96 stray canines and was collected in a peri-urban area in El Paso County, Texas. The PCR-positive P. attwateri was trapped at a wildlife reserve in Mason County, Texas, from a convenience sample of 20 sylvatic mammals of different species. To our knowledge, this represents the first description of L. mexicana in west Texas and extends the known geographic range of the parasite to an area that includes the arid Chihuahuan Desert. Our finding of L. mexicana in P. attwateri represents a new host record and is the first description of the parasite in a wild peromyscid rodent in the United States. PMID:27759765

  17. Freshwater withdrawals in Texas, 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lurry, Dee L.; Barber, Nancy L.

    1990-01-01

    Since 1950, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has estimated water use in the United States at 5-year intervals.  Resulting reports tabulate water use by State and by water-resources region (major river basins) for a number of categories, such as irrigation, water supply, and industrial.  In 1977, the USGS began the National Water-Use Information Program, designed to be a National source of accurate, consistent water-use data.  The water-use project in Texas is part of the National Water-Use Information Program.  The Texas District of the USGS compiles water-use information by county and by hydrologic unit using data collected by States agencies.  A hydrologic unit is a geographic area representing part or all of a surface drainage basin, a combination of drainage basins, or a distinct hydrologic feature.

  18. Effects of stratal architecture and diagenesis on reservoir development in the Grayburg formation: SSouth Cowden field, Ector County, Texas. Annual report, 1 October 1994--30 September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, S.; Bebout, D.

    1996-02-01

    This report presents the results of geological characterization studies in a typical Grayburg reservior in the Permian Basin. The work applies geological models developed in outcrop studies to better constrain the geological reservoir framework and heterogeneity in a typical Grayburg reservoir, The South Cowden Grayburg reservoir. This framework provides a strong basis for defining petrophysical and flow unit properties in the reservior and serves as a prototype model for other Grayburg reservoir characterization studies. The Grayburg Formation in the South Cowden field of eastern Ector County displays an internal stratal architecture that typifies Grayburg shallow-water platform successions throughout the Permian Basin. Study of core and wireline logs in South Cowden field documents three orders of cyclicity in the Grayburg. The entire Grayburg constitutes a single long-duration accommodation cycle that commenced with a major sea-level rise. Two major diagenetic events strongly affect reservoir character in some parts of the field. Recrystallized dolomite is developed along vertical burrows in highly cyclic mud-dominated packstones and wackestones of the HFS 4 Grayburg highstand succussion. Later alteration and removal of anhydrite are focused in structurally low sections along the eastern and southern margins of the field.

  19. Screening practices and knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about cancer among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women 35 years old or older in Nueces County, Texas.

    PubMed

    Tortolero-Luna, G; Glober, G A; Villarreal, R; Palos, G; Linares, A

    1995-01-01

    A telephone survey was conducted among women 35 years old or older in Nueces County, Tex., to assess ethnic differences between Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women in self-reported cancer-screening practices and knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about cancer and to evaluate the effect of ethnicity as a predictor for screening practices. A total of 233 Hispanic and 332 non-Hispanic white women participated in the survey. Hispanics were younger and had lower educational and income levels. Overall, Hispanics had lower rates than did non-Hispanics of lifetime mammography (65% versus 79%), clinical breast examination (86% versus 96%), monthly performance of breast self-examination (37% versus 49%), and lifetime fecal occult blood testing (36% versus 69%). After control for confounding factors, Hispanics were still less likely to have ever had a clinical breast examination and fecal occult blood test. Our results suggest the need for more culturally sensitive health promotion efforts to improve knowledge about cancer and early detection practices among Hispanic women.

  20. An Investigation of the Mass Balance of Oil and Gas Produced Versus Estimated Reserves Remaining within the A.W.P. Field, McMullen County, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Scott Murphy

    The A.W.P. Field is located in McMullen County, approximately 4 to 6 miles southeast of the town of Tilden in the Rio Grande Embayment. The study area was believed to be near depletion of all hydrocarbons; however, a recent well drilled (fall 2014) just to the west of the study area has produced significant hydrocarbons. This prompted Milagro Exploration to launch an effort to reevaluate the potential within the field in order to investigate whether the field is, in fact, entirely depleted. My approach to solving this problem began with researching the area to develop an understanding of the geological setting, depositional systems, and productive intervals, then acquiring the proper data, as this data was the foundation of the project. I completed a detailed correlation framework of key formations with the acquired well logs. I interpreted an extensive 3D seismic data set to map my areas of interest and faults. With all relevant information, I completed structure maps, isopach maps, production maps, and calculated volumetrics, concluding with my recommendation, and determined whether the field is ultimately depleted or not. I concluded that there are two relevant intervals within the study area. First, the Wilcox-Wales Formation (Wales; Early Tertiary) was a random stratigraphic accumulation that had sporadic hydrocarbon production, and would be essentially high risk to drill. Second, the Olmos Formation (Olmos; Late Cretaceous) had significant potential for 2 horizontal wells on the western side of the lease area.