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Sample records for gamma aminobutyric acid

  1. Separation of gamma-aminobutyric acid from fermented broth.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Qiu, Ting; Chen, Yan; Cao, Yusheng

    2011-12-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-proteinaceous amino acid that is widely distributed in nature and acts as the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. This study aimed to find a separation method for getting high-purity GABA from a fermented broth. Firstly, a fermented broth with a high content of GABA (reaching 997 ± 51 mM) was prepared by fermentation with Lactobacillus brevis NCL912. GABA purification was conducted by successive centrifugation, filtration, decoloration, desalination, ion-exchange chromatography (IEC), and crystallization. Inorganic salt (Na₂SO₄) was removed from the both by desalination with 70% ethanol solution. A ninhydrin test strip was designed for the real-time detection of GABA during IEC. The recovery rate for the whole purification process was about 50%. The purified product was characterized by thin-layer chromatography and HPLC, and its purity reached 98.66 ± 2.36%.

  2. Pyrrolines as prodrugs of gamma-aminobutyric acid analogues.

    PubMed

    Callery, P S; Geelhaar, L A; Nayar, M S; Stogniew, M; Rao, K G

    1982-04-01

    delta 1-Pyrroline, 5-methyl-delta 1-pyrroline, and 5,5-dimethyl-delta 1-pyrroline have been identified as substances metabolized to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), 4-aminopentanoic acid (methylGABA), and 4-amino-4-methylpentanoic acid (dimethylGABA), respectively. An enzyme system residing in the soluble fraction of rabbit liver catalyzes the conversion of delta 1-pyrroline to GABA and its lactam, 2-pyrrolidinone. Acetaldehyde, allopurinol, and cyanide inhibited the reaction. Incubation of deuterium-labeled delta 1-pyrroline with mouse brain homogenates produced deuterated GABA. Mouse liver 10,000 g supernatant and mouse brain homogenates converted 5-methyl-delta 1-pyrroline to methylGABA, and 5,5-dimethyl-delta 1-pyrroline to dimethylGABA. Four hours after intraperitoneal injection of 5-methyl-delta 1-pyrroline (200 mg/kg), methylGABA was detected in mouse brain (0.27 mumol/g). DimethylGABA (1.21 mumol/g) was determined in mouse brain 30 min after intraperitoneal administration of 5,5-dimethyl-delta 1-pyrroline (200 mg/kg). Neither methylGABA nor dimethylGABA penetrated into the central nervous system when administered in the periphery. The present studies suggest that pyrrolines may represent a chemical class of brain-penetrating precursors of pharmacologically active analogues of GABA.

  3. Enzymatic synthesis of radioactive (-)-carnitine from. gamma. -butyrobetaine prepared by the methylation of. gamma. -aminobutyric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Daveluy, A.; Parvin, R.; Pande, S.V.

    1982-01-15

    Radioactive ..gamma..-butyrobetaine was prepared by quaternization of ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid with tritiated methyl iodide under conditions giving high yields with respect to both the above precursors. Part of the product was passed through a column of ion-retardation resin and gave radioactive ..gamma..-butyrobetaine of good purity. The remainder was converted to (-)-carnitine stoichiometrically by employing a 50-60% ammonium sulfate fraction of rat liver supernatant as the source of ..gamma..-butyrobetaine hydroxylase (EC 1,14,11,1) Successive column chromatographies on a cation exchanger and ion-retardation resins then gave radioactive (-)-carnitine of good purity in high yield.

  4. Production of gamma-aminobutyric acid by Lactobacillus brevis NCL912 using fed-batch fermentation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gamma-aminobutyric acid is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in mammalian brains, and has several well-known physiological functions. Lactic acid bacteria possess special physiological activities and are generally regarded as safe. Therefore, using lactic acid bacteria as cell factories for gamma-aminobutyric acid production is a fascinating project and opens up a vast range of prospects for making use of GABA and LAB. We previously screened a high GABA-producer Lactobacillus brevis NCL912 and optimized its fermentation medium composition. The results indicated that the strain showed potential in large-scale fermentation for the production of gamma-aminobutyric acid. To increase the yielding of GABA, further study on the fermentation process is needed before the industrial application in the future. In this article we investigated the impacts of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, pH, temperature and initial glutamate concentration on gamma-aminobutyric acid production by Lactobacillus brevis NCL912 in flask cultures. According to the data obtained in the above, a simple and effective fed-batch fermentation method was developed to highly efficiently convert glutamate to gamma-aminobutyric acid. Results Pyridoxal-5'-phosphate did not affect the cell growth and gamma-aminobutyric acid production of Lb. brevis NCL912. Temperature, pH and initial glutamate concentration had significant effects on the cell growth and gamma-aminobutyric acid production of Lb. brevis NCL912. The optimal temperature, pH and initial glutamate concentration were 30-35°C, 5.0 and 250-500 mM. In the following fed-batch fermentations, temperature, pH and initial glutamate concentration were fixed as 32°C, 5.0 and 400 mM. 280.70 g (1.5 mol) and 224.56 g (1.2 mol) glutamate were supplemented into the bioreactor at 12 h and 24 h, respectively. Under the selected fermentation conditions, gamma-aminobutyric acid was rapidly produced at the first 36 h and almost not produced after then. The gamma-aminobutyric

  5. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli to produce gamma-aminobutyric acid using xylose.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Anqi; Hu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2017-02-11

    Biomass-derived xylose is an economically interesting substrate for the sustainable microbial production of value-added compounds. Escherichia coli could barely use xylose to directly produce gamma-aminobutyric acid. In this study, E. coli strains that could directly produce gamma-aminobutyric acid were developed through the deletion of eight genes sucA, puuE, gabT, gabP, xylA, xylB, waaC, and waaF, and the overexpression of two E. coli genes gadB and gdhA, as well as five Caulobacter crescent genes CcxylA, CcxylB, CcxylC, CcxylD, and CcxylX. Both E. coli strains W3110 and JM109 could directly produce gamma-aminobutyric acid from xylose after either overexpression of the seven genes or deletion of the eight genes. Overexpression of the seven genes of in the multiple deletion mutants further increased gamma-aminobutyric acid production. Among the 28 recombinant E. coli strains constructed in this study, the highest gamma-aminobutyric acid was produced by JWZ08/pWZt7-g3/pWZt7-xyl. JWZ08/pWZt7-g3/pWZt7-xyl could produce 3.95 g/L gamma-aminobutyric acid in flask cultivation, using xylose as the sole carbon source.

  6. Reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration is associated with physical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cawley, Niamh; Solanky, Bhavana S; Muhlert, Nils; Tur, Carmen; Edden, Richard A E; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Miller, David H; Thompson, Alan J; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2015-09-01

    Neurodegeneration is thought to be the major cause of ongoing, irreversible disability in progressive stages of multiple sclerosis. Gamma-aminobutyric acid is the principle inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. The aims of this study were to investigate if gamma-aminobutyric acid levels (i) are abnormal in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis compared with healthy controls; and (ii) correlate with physical and cognitive performance in this patient population. Thirty patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and 17 healthy control subjects underwent single-voxel MEGA-PRESS (MEscher-GArwood Point RESolved Spectroscopy) magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T, to quantify gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the prefrontal cortex, right hippocampus and left sensorimotor cortex. All subjects were assessed clinically and underwent a cognitive assessment. Multiple linear regression models were used to compare differences in gamma-aminobutyric acid concentrations between patients and controls adjusting for age, gender and tissue fractions within each spectroscopic voxel. Regression was used to examine the relationships between the cognitive function and physical disability scores specific for these regions with gamma-aminobuytric acid levels, adjusting for age, gender, and total N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamine-glutamate complex levels. When compared with controls, patients performed significantly worse on all motor and sensory tests, and were cognitively impaired in processing speed and verbal memory. Patients had significantly lower gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the hippocampus (adjusted difference = -0.403 mM, 95% confidence intervals -0.792, -0.014, P = 0.043) and sensorimotor cortex (adjusted difference = -0.385 mM, 95% confidence intervals -0.667, -0.104, P = 0.009) compared with controls. In patients, reduced motor function in the right upper and lower limb was associated with lower gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration in the

  7. Detection of the in vivo conversion of 2-pyrrolidinone to gamma-aminobutyric acid in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Callery, P S; Stogniew, M; Geelhaar, L A

    1979-01-01

    Labeled gamma-aminobutyric acid was detected in mouse brain following intravenous injections of deuterium labeled 2-pyrrolidinone. [2H6]Pyrrolidinone was prepared by the reduction of [2H4]succinimide with lithium aluminum deuteride. Quantification was accomplished by a gas chromatography mass spectrometry assay method. gamma-Aminobutyric acid and internal standard, 5-aminovaleric acid, were converted to volatile derivatives by treatment with N,N-dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal. Quantitative estimates were derived from peak area measurements obtained from monitoring the parent ions of the gamma-aminobutyric acid and internal standard derivatives by repetitive scanning during the GC run. The conversion of pyrrolidinone to gamma-aminobutyric acid may provide a method for labeling central gamma-aminobutyric acid pools.

  8. Expression of functional receptors by the human gamma-aminobutyric acid A gamma 2 subunit.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2004-03-02

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A)) receptors are heteromeric membrane proteins formed mainly by various combinations of alpha, beta, and gamma subunits; and it is commonly thought that the gamma 2 subunit alone does not form functional receptors. In contrast, we found that cDNA encoding the gamma 2L subunit of the human GABA(A) receptor, injected alone into Xenopus oocytes, expressed functional GABA receptors whose properties were investigated by using the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. GABA elicited desensitizing membrane currents that recovered after a few minutes' wash. Repetitive applications of GABA induced a "run-up" of GABA currents that nearly doubled the amplitude of the first response. The GABA currents inverted direction at about -30 mV, indicating that they are carried mainly by Cl(-) ions. The homomeric gamma 2L receptors were also activated by beta-alanine > taurine > glycine, and, like some types of heteromeric GABA(A) receptors, the gamma 2L receptors were blocked by bicuculline and were potentiated by pentobarbital and flunitrazepam. These results indicate that the human gamma 2L subunit is capable of forming fully functional GABA receptors by itself in Xenopus oocytes and suggest that the roles proposed for the various subunits that make up the heteromeric GABA(A) receptors in situ require further clarification.

  9. The gamma-aminobutyric acid shunt contributes to closing the tricarboxylic acid cycle in Synechocystis sp PCC 6803

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, W; Brune, D; Vermaas, WFJ

    2014-07-16

    A traditional 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex is missing in the cyanobacterial tricarboxylic acid cycle. To determine pathways that convert 2-oxoglutarate into succinate in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a series of mutant strains, Delta sll1981, Delta slr0370, Delta slr1022 and combinations thereof, deficient in 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase (Sll1981), succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (Slr0370), and/or in gamma-aminobutyrate metabolism (Slr1022) were constructed. Like in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, N-acetylornithine aminotransferase, encoded by slr1022, was shown to also function as gamma-aminobutyrate aminotransferase, catalysing gamma-aminobutyrate conversion to succinic semialdehyde. As succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase converts succinic semialdehyde to succinate, an intact gamma-aminobutyrate shunt is present in Synechocystis. The Delta sll1981 strain, lacking 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase, exhibited a succinate level that was 60% of that in wild type. However, the succinate level in the Delta slr1022 and Delta slr0370 strains and the Delta sll1981/Delta slr1022 and Delta sll1981/Delta slr0370 double mutants was reduced to 20-40% of that in wild type, suggesting that the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt has a larger impact on metabolite flux to succinate than the pathway via 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase. C-13-stable isotope analysis indicated that the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt catalysed conversion of glutamate to succinate. Independent of the 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase bypass, the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt is a major contributor to flux from 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate to succinate in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

  10. Modulation of A10 dopamine neurons by gamma-aminobutyric acid agonists.

    PubMed

    Kalivas, P W; Duffy, P; Eberhardt, H

    1990-05-01

    Microinjection of the gamma-aminobutyric acidA agonist, muscimol, into the A10 region of the rat produced a dose-dependent increase in motor activity. This effect was antagonized by intra-A10 administration of the gamma-aminobutyric acidA antagonist, bicuculline, and by peripheral administration of haloperidol, and was associated with an increase in extracellular levels of dopamine metabolites in the nucleus accumbens. Although microinjection of the gamma-aminobutyric acidB agonist, baclofen, into the A10 region did not alter motor activity, it abolished the capacity of intra-A10 injection of mu opioid agonist, Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-MePhe-Gly(ol), or muscimol to increase motor activity. Baclofen also prevented the motor stimulant response to peripheral injection of cocaine or amphetamine, but was ineffective in blocking caffeine-induced behavioral activity. Pretreatment with baclofen prevented the capacity of a mu opioid agonist to elevate dopamine metabolite levels in the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex in postmortem tissue. Baclofen also prevented the elevation of extracellular dopamine content in the nucleus accumbens produced by injection of a mu opioid agonist into the A10 region, as measured in the conscious rat with in vivo dialysis. Finally, when dopamine metabolite levels were elevated in the prefrontal cortex by mild footshock, it was shown that pretreatment with baclofen in the A10 region abolished this response. These data support electrophysiological studies suggesting that activation of gamma-aminobutyric acidB receptors on dopamine perikarya inhibits dopaminergic activity, while activation of gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptors results in an indirect disinhibition of dopaminergic function.

  11. Effects of beer and hop on ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, Hitoshi; Takeda, Katsuichi; Okita, Yoichi; Hossain, Sheikh Julfikar; Koda, Hirofumi; Kiso, Yoshinobu

    2006-04-05

    Beer induced the response of the ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABA(A) receptors) expressed in Xenopus oocytes, indicating the presence of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-like activity. Furthermore, the pentane extract of the beer, hop (Humulus lupulus L.) oil, and myrcenol potentiated the GABA(A) receptor response elicited by GABA. The GABA(A) receptor responses were also potentiated by the addition of aliphatic esters, most of which are reported to be present in beer flavor. Aliphatic esters showed the tendency to decrease in the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor response with an increase in their carbon chain length. When myrcenol was injected to mice prior to intraperitoneal administration of pentobarbital, the pentobarbital-induced sleeping time of mice increased additionally. Therefore, the beer contained not only GABA-like activity but also the modulator(s) of the GABA(A) receptor response.

  12. Selective amino acid substitutions convert the creatine transporter to a gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Joanna R; Christie, David L

    2007-05-25

    The creatine transporter (CRT) is a member of a large family of sodium-dependent neurotransmitter and amino acid transporters. The CRT is closely related to the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter, GAT-1, yet GABA is not an effective substrate for the CRT. The high resolution structure of a prokaryotic homologue, LeuT has revealed precise details of the substrate binding site for leucine (Yamashita, A., Singh, S. K., Kawate, T., Jin, Y., and Gouaux, E. (2005) Nature 437, 215-223). We have now designed mutations based on sequence comparisons of the CRT with GABA transporters and the LeuT structural template in an attempt to alter the substrate specificity of the CRT. Combinations of two or three amino acid substitutions at four selected positions resulted in the loss of creatine transport activity and gain of a specific GABA transport function. GABA transport by the "gain of function" mutants was sensitive to nipecotic acid, a competitive inhibitor of GABA transporters. Our results show LeuT to be a good structural model to identify amino acid residues involved in the substrate and inhibitor selectivity of eukaryotic sodium-dependent neurotransmitter and amino acid transporters. However, modification of the binding site alone appears to be insufficient for efficient substrate translocation. Additional residues must mediate the conformational changes required for the diffusion of substrate from the binding site to the cytoplasm.

  13. Automated assay of gamma-aminobutyric acid in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Böhlen, P; Schechter, P J; van Damme, W; Coquillat, G; Dosch, J C; Koch-Weser, J

    1978-02-01

    We describe an automated amino acid analyzer with fluorescence detection (o-phthalaldehyde) which permits sensitive and rapid determinations of gamma aminobutyric acid in human cerebrospinal fluid. Concentrations as low as 50 nmol/liter can be accurately determined in 100 mul samples at the rate of one sample per hour. Concentrations in untreated cerebrospinal fluid increase rapidly after sampling by lumbar puncture. The concentration in immediately deproteinized samples from 38 patients with intervertebral disc disorders was 220 +/- 81 nmol/liter (mean +/- SD).

  14. Characterization of bicuculline/baclofen-insensitive (rho-like) gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. II. Pharmacology of gamma-aminobutyric acidA and gamma-aminobutyric acidB receptor agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Woodward, R M; Polenzani, L; Miledi, R

    1993-04-01

    Poly(A)+ RNA from mammalian retina expresses bicuculline/baclofen-insensitive gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors in Xenopus oocytes with properties similar to those of homooligomeric GABA rho 1 receptors. The pharmacological profile of these rho-like receptors was extended by measuring sensitivities to various GABAA and GABAB receptor ligands. For direct comparison the same compounds were also assayed with GABAA receptors expressed by rat brain RNA. The potency sequence for heterocyclic GABA analogues at the GABA rho-like receptors was GABA (1.3) > muscimol (2.3) > isoguvacine (100) (approximate EC50 in parentheses; all EC50 and Kb values given in microM). Both muscimol and isoguvacine were partial agonists at the rho-like receptors. 4,5,6,7-Tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (Kb congruent to 32), piperidine-4-sulfonic acid (Kb congruent to 85), and isonipecotic acid (Kb congruent to 1000) acted primarily as competitive antagonists, showing little or no activity as agonists. The sulfonic acid GABA analogue 3-aminopropanesulfonic acid was also a competitive antagonist (Kb congruent to 20). Conformationally restricted GABA analogues trans- and cis-4-aminocrotonic acid (TACA and CACA) were agonists at the rho-like receptors. TACA (EC50 congruent to 0.6) had twice the potency of GABA and was 125 times more potent than CACA (EC50 congruent to 75). Z-3-(Amidinothio)propenoic acid, an isothiouronium analogue of GABA, had little activity as an agonist but instead acted as a competitive antagonist (Kb congruent to 20). At concentrations of > 100 microM, bicuculline did have some weak competitive inhibitory effects on the GABA rho-like receptors (Kb congruent to 6000), but it was at least 5000 times more potent at GABAA receptors. Strychnine (Kb congruent to 70) and SR-95531 (Kb congruent to 35) also were competitive inhibitors of the rho-like receptors but were, respectively, 20 and 240 times more potent at GABAA receptors. The GABAB receptor ligands baclofen

  15. Effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid on the carnitine metabolism in neural cells.

    PubMed

    Wawrzeńczyk, A; Nałecz, K A; Nałecz, M J

    1995-08-15

    Isolated rat cerebral cortex cells were able to accumulate L-carnitine and this process was competitively inhibited by 1 mM gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) with a shift of Km from 7.8 +/- 1.9 mM to 14.6 +/- 4.0 mM. Addition of GABA also affected distribution of carnitine derivatives. The decrease of acetylcarnitine level by 1.6 fold was correlated with the inhibition of carnitine acetyltransferase (1.77 times). A postulated involvement of this enzyme in delivering acetyl moieties for acetylcholine synthesis would suggest a negative feedback between GABA and the level of acetylcholine.

  16. Pre-staining paper chromatography method for quantification of gamma-aminobutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Qiu, Ting; Cao, Yusheng; Yang, Jiyan; Huang, Zhibing

    2009-06-19

    The routine method of paper chromatography includes five steps: spotting, separating, drying, spraying/immersing and color development. In this paper, a pre-staining paper chromatography which only consisted of spotting, separating and color development was developed for quantitative analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acid. Compared to the routine paper chromatography, the improved method is clean, rapid, inexpensive and reproducible. The effects of ninhydrin concentration, color temperature, color time and Cu(2+) concentration on the color yield in the ninhydrin reaction were optimized. And then the pre-staining paper chromatography coupled with vis spectrophotometry was applied to gamma-aminobutyric acid quantification. The results indicated that the limit of detection was 0.05 mg mL(-1) and the linear range was from 0.5 to 20.0 mg mL(-1). Furthermore, an excellent correlation coefficient was observed with an R(2)=0.998. The method is accurate (RSD<2.64%), and has good recoveries (102.7-103.9%). The validation of the modified technique was verified by a HPLC method.

  17. Interaction of pentobarbitone and gamma-aminobutyric acid on mammalian sympathetic ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, D A; Constanti, A

    1978-05-01

    1. Interactions of bath-applied pentobarbitone and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on neurones in isolated superior cervical ganglia of the rat have been examined with intracellular microelectrodes. 2. Pentobarbitone itself (30 micrometer-1 mM) showed no clear or consistent GABA-like effects: changes in resting input conductance and membrane potential were small and variable. 3. Pentobarbitone (100 micrometer) strikingly enhanced the conductance increases produced by GABA and 3-aminopropanesulphonic acid, and reversed the depression of GABA-evoked responses by bicuculline. 4. It is concluded that reversal of bicuculline action at the membrane conductance level might be explained by augmentation of GABA-action. This augmentation cannot be attributed to 'partial agonist' properties of pentobarbitone or to interference with glial transport processes.

  18. Unsaturated phosphinic analogues of gamma-aminobutyric acid as GABA(C) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Chebib, M; Vandenberg, R J; Froestl, W; Johnston, G A

    1997-06-25

    The phosphinic and methylphosphinic analogues of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are potent GABA(C) receptor antagonists but are even more potent as GABA(B) receptor agonists. Conformationally restricted unsaturated phosphinic and methylphosphinic analogues of GABA and some potent GABA(B) receptor phosphonoamino acid antagonists were tested on GABA(C) receptors in Xenopus oocytes expressing human retinal rho1 mRNA. 3-Aminopropyl-n-butyl-phosphinic acid (CGP36742), an orally active GABA(B) receptor antagonist, was found to be a moderately potent GABA(C) receptor antagonist (IC50 = 62 microM). The unsaturated methylphosphinic and phosphinic analogues of GABA were competitive antagonists of the GABA(C) receptors, the order of potency being [(E)-3-aminopropen-1-yl]methylphosphinic acid (CGP44530, IC50 = 5.53 microM) > [(E)-3-aminopropen-1-yl]phosphinic acid (CGP38593, IC50 = 7.68 microM) > [(Z)-3-aminopropen-1-yl]methylphosphinic acid (CGP70523, IC50 = 38.94 microM) > [(Z)-3-aminopropen-1-yl]phosphinic acid (CGP70522, IC50 > 100 microM). This order of potency differs from that reported for these compounds as GABA(B) receptor agonists, where the phosphinic acids are more potent than the corresponding methylphosphinic acids.

  19. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus curieae CCTCC M 2011381T, a Novel Producer of Gamma-aminobutyric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Yu; Lang, Chong; Wei, Dongzhi; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus curieae CCTCC M 2011381T is a novel species of the genus Lactobacillus and a gamma-aminobutyric acid producer that was isolated from stinky tofu brine. Here, we present a 2.19-Mb assembly of its genome, which may provide further insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying its beneficial properties. PMID:26021929

  20. gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter-mediated current from bipolar cells in tiger salamander retinal slices.

    PubMed

    Yang, C Y

    1998-09-01

    About 10% of bipolar cells in salamander retina synthesize and take up gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and may use GABA as a neurotransmitter. As GABA uptake is electrogenic, bipolar cells expressing GABA transporters (GATs) should give transport current (IGAT) to extracellular GABA. Using whole-cell patch recording, 28 bipolar cells responded to 30-200 microM GABA puffed to the axon terminals with a picrotoxin (PTX)-sensitive chloride current (ICI) only. Another three bipolar cells had, in addition to ICI, a PTX-resistant, sodium-dependent current that was completely and reversibly blocked by NO-711, an IGAT inhibitor, indicating that this component was an IGAT. This finding provides further support for a subset of GABAergic bipolar cells in the salamander retina.

  1. Taurine activates glycine and gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptors in rat substantia gelatinosa neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Kohno, Tatsuro; Georgiev, Stefan K; Ikoma, Miho; Ishii, Hideaki; Petrenko, Andrey B; Baba, Hiroshi

    2008-02-12

    Taurine has been suggested to modulate nociceptive information at the spinal cord level. In this study, the pharmacological properties of taurine were investigated in adult rat substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons using whole-cell patch-clamp method. We found that taurine seemed to have higher efficacy than glycine on glycine receptors in SG neurons. An increase in chloride conductance was responsible for taurine-induced currents. Taurine at 0.3 mM activated glycine receptors, whereas at 3 mM activated both glycine and gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptors. The currents activated by coapplication of taurine and glycine are cross inhibitive. Altogether these results show that taurine might represent another important neurotransmitter or modulator in SG neurons, which may be involved in antinociception.

  2. Simultaneous spectral editing for gamma-aminobutyric acid and taurine using double quantum coherence transfer.

    PubMed

    Lei, H; Peeling, J

    2000-03-01

    Conventional double quantum (DQ) editing techniques recover resonances of one metabolite at a time and are thus inefficient for monitoring metabolic changes involving several metabolites. A DQ coherence transfer double editing sequence using a dual-band DQ coherence read pulse is described here. The sequence permits simultaneous spectral editing for two metabolites with similar J coupling constants in a single scan. Simultaneous editing for taurine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is demonstrated using solution phantoms and rat brain tissue. Selectivity of the double editing sequence for the target metabolites is as good as that achieved using conventional DQ editing which selects each metabolite individually. With experimental parameters of the double editing sequence chosen to optimize GABA editing, the sensitivity for GABA detection is the same as that with GABA editing only, while the sensitivity for taurine detection is decreased slightly compared to that with taurine editing only.

  3. Betulin binds to gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors and exerts anticonvulsant action in mice.

    PubMed

    Muceniece, Ruta; Saleniece, Kristine; Rumaks, Juris; Krigere, Liga; Dzirkale, Zane; Mezhapuke, Rudolfs; Zharkova, Olga; Klusa, Vija

    2008-10-01

    The lupane type pentacyclic triterpenes: lupeol, betulin, and betulinic acid are widely distributed natural compounds. Recently, pharmaceutical compositions from plant extracts (family Marcgraviaceae) containing betulinic acid, have been patented as anxiolytic remedies. To extend our knowledge of the CNS effects of the triterpenes, we suggest here that the chemically related lupeol, betulin and betulinic acid may interact with the brain neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors in vitro and in vivo. Using radioligand receptor-binding assay, we showed that only betulin bound to the GABA(A)-receptor sites in mice brain in vitro and antagonised the GABA(A)-receptor antagonist bicuculline-induced seizures in mice after intracisternal and intraperitoneal administration. Neither betulinic acid nor lupeol bound to GABA(A) receptor nor did they inhibit bicuculline-induced seizures in vivo. These findings demonstrate for the first time the CNS effects of betulin in vivo, and they also show distinct GABA(A)-receptor-related properties of lupane type triterpenes. These findings may open new avenues in understanding the central effects of betulin, and they also indicate possibilities for novel drug design on the basis of betulin structure.

  4. 1-Piperideine as an in vivo precursor of the gamma-aminobutyric acid homologue 5-aminopentanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Callery, P S; Geelhaar, L A

    1985-09-01

    Intraperitoneal injection of the cyclic imine 1-piperideine in mice resulted in measurable quantities of 5-aminopentanoic acid in brain. 5-Aminopentanoic acid is a methylene homologue of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) that is a weak GABA agonist. 5-Aminopentanoic acid formed in the periphery was ruled out as the source of brain 5-aminopentanoic acid based on the absence of detection in brain following injection of 100 mg/kg of 5-aminopentanoic acid. Deuterium-labeled 1-piperideine was prepared by exchange in deuterated phosphate buffer. Injection of [3.3-2H2]1-piperideine yielded [2.2-2H2]5-aminopentanoic acid in brain. The results are consistent with uptake of 1-piperideine into brain and oxidation of the precursor to 5-aminopentanoic acid. Inhibition of GABA catabolism by pretreatment with aminooxyacetic acid increased brain concentrations of 5-aminopentanoic acid formed from 1-piperideine, suggesting that 5-aminopentanoic acid is an in vivo substrate of 4-aminobutyrate:2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase.

  5. Active transport of. gamma. -aminobutyric acid and glycine into synaptic vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Kish, P.E.; Fischer-Bovenkerk, C.; Ueda, T. )

    1989-05-01

    Although {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine are recognized as major amino acid inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system, their storage is poorly understood. In this study the authors have characterized vesicular GABA and glycine uptakes in the cerebrum and spinal cord, respectively. They present evidence that GABA and glycine are each taken up into isolated synaptic vesicles in an ATP-dependent manner and that the uptake is driven by an electrochemical proton gradient. Uptake for both amino acids exhibited kinetics with low affinity similar to a vesicular glutamate uptake. The ATP-dependent GABA uptake was not inhibited by the putative amino acid neurotransmitters glycine, taurine, glutamate, or aspartate or by GABA analogs, agonists, and antagonists. Similarly, ATP-dependent glycine uptake was hardly affected by GABA, taurine, glutamate, or aspartate or by glycine analogs or antagonists. The GABA uptake was not affected by chloride, which is in contrast to the uptake of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, whereas the glycine uptake was slightly stimulated by low concentrations of chloride. Tissue distribution studies indicate that the vesicular uptake systems for GABA, glycine, and glutamate are distributed in different proportions in the cerebrum and spinal cord. These results suggest that the vesicular uptake systems for GABA, glycine, and glutamate are distinct from each other.

  6. Somatic and dendritic actions of gamma-aminobutyric acid agonists and uptake blockers in the hippocampus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rovira, C; Ben-Ari, Y; Cherubini, E

    1984-06-01

    In rats under urethane anaesthesia gamma-aminobutyric acid agonists and uptake blockers were microiontophoretically applied in the pyramidal layer of CA1 and in the apical dendrites using a twin set of multibarrelled micropipettes. Thus, the somatic and dendritic field potentials elicited by commissural stimulation were recorded simultaneously and the effects of iontophoretic applications at either site studied. Somatic applications of gamma-aminobutyric acid, isoguvacine or muscimol produced an inhibition of the somatic population spike; this showed rapid fade and was followed by an "off" response i.e. an enhancement of the population spike discharge and the occurrence of a second (and occasionally third) spike. The order of potency with regard to the "off" response was muscimol greater than isoguvacine much greater than gamma-aminobutyric acid. In contrast, the inhibition of the population spike produced by 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo(5,4-C) pyridin 3-OL showed little fade and no prominent "off" response. The fade and "off" response were not associated with significant changes in the dendritic field excitatory postsynaptic potential concommittantly recorded and were exclusively restricted to the immediate vicinity of the pyramidal layer. Ejection of gamma-aminobutyric acid and its agonists in the stratum radiatum produced a reduction of the field excitatory postsynaptic potential and the somatic spike, this effect however showed no fade (even during prolonged applications of high doses) and no "off" response. Somatic applications of the uptake blockers nipecotic acid or guvacine consistently produced: an increase in the effectiveness of the inhibition produced by gamma-aminobutyric acid and its analogues: a decrease in the latency to peak of the inhibition and an increase in the time to recovery; a full blockade of the fade and the "off" response. All of these effects were rapid and fully reversible without significant changes in either the field excitatory

  7. Neurons accumulating [3H]gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in supragranular layers of cat primary auditory cortex (AI)

    PubMed

    Winer, J A

    1986-11-01

    The classes of neurons accumulating exogenously injected, tritiated gamma-aminobutyric acid [( 3H]GABA) were studied in the supragranular layers in the primary auditory field of the adult cat. The size, laminar locus, and somatodendritic profiles of labeled neurons were studied light microscopically in frozen- or Vibratome-sectioned, 30 micron thick material, and in semithin, 1-2 micron thick, plastic-embedded high-resolution autoradiographic preparations. The chief goals of the study were to determine which types of cells could be identified as accumulating [3H]GABA in layers I, II and III, and to establish possible relationships between these cells and neurons described in Golgi studies of these layers, and the neurons found, in parallel investigations of the connections of the primary auditory field, to participate as ipsilateral corticocortical and commissural cells of origin. The principal findings are: that neurons in every layer in the primary auditory field take up tritiated gamma-aminobutyric acid; that their Nissl-counterstained somata have a smaller average area, and a smaller range of areas, than do the unlabeled cells; that more than one type of labeled neuron-as defined by somatic size and shape, height:width ratios, and nuclear membrane morphology-could be identified in each layer; that none of the labeled neurons had a soma with a pyramidal configuration; that the labeled cells are comparable in size, shape, and laminar distribution to some populations of non-pyramidal ipsilateral corticocortical cells of origin in layers II and III, and perhaps to certain classes of commissurally projecting, layer III non-pyramidal neurons; and finally, that only a rather small proportion-perhaps 10% or less, except in layer I-of the supragranular cells appear to accumulate labeled material. With regard to the identity of particular classes of neurons accumulating silver grains above background in the individual layers, in layer I, 2 of the 4 types of neurons

  8. Presynaptic actions of 4-aminopyridine and gamma-aminobutyric acid on rat sympathetic ganglia in vitro.

    PubMed

    Galvan, M; Grafe, P; ten Bruggencate, G

    1980-11-01

    Responses to bath-applications of 4-aminopyridine(4-AP) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were recorded intracellularly from neurones in the rat isolated superior cervical ganglion. 4-aminopyridine (0.1-1.0 mmol/l) usually induced spontaneous action potentials and excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), which were blocked by hexamethonium. Membrane potential was unchanged; spike duration was slightly increased. Vagus nerve B- and C-fibre potentials were prolonged. In 4-AP solution (0.2-0.3 mmol/l), GABA (0.1 mmol/l), 3-aminopropanesulphonic acid or muscimol evoked "bursts" of spikes and EPSPs in addition to a neuronal depolarization. These "bursts", which were not elicited by glycine, glutamate, taurine or (+/-)-baclofen, were completely antagonised by hexamethonium, tetrodotoxin or bicuculline methochloride. It is concluded that: (a) 4-AP has a potent presynaptic action on sympathetic ganglia; (b) presynaptic actions of GABA can be recorded postsynaptically in the presence of 4-AP; and (c) the presynaptic GABA-receptors revealed in this condition are similar to those on the postsynaptic membrane.

  9. Biphasic effects of baclofen on phrenic motoneurons: possible involvement of two types of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors.

    PubMed

    Lalley, P M

    1983-08-01

    Intravenous injections of baclofen have two general dose-dependent effects on phrenic motoneurons in anesthetized cats. Small doses (0.5-1.5 mg/kg) increase the frequency of action potentials recorded from single motoneurons and from the phrenic nerve, whereas large doses (2-10 mg/kg) reduce or abolish action potentials. The increase in frequency produced by small doses is accompanied by membrane depolarization and, in most experiments, by increased input resistance. Large doses hyperpolarize phrenic motoneurons and produce greater increases in input resistance. Extracellular recording during microelectrophoretic application of baclofen reveals only one effect, depression of cell firing, at all effective current strengths. The low dose stimulatory effect of i.v. baclofen is attributed to disinhibition, whereas the depression by large doses is attributed to disfacilitation. During incomplete inhibition by baclofen, CO2 administration further depresses phrenic nerve activity. Bicuculline (100-600 micrograms/kg i.v.) and picrotoxin (900 micrograms/kg i.v.) restore firing depressed by baclofen, whereas strychnine (80-1280 micrograms/kg) does not. 3-Aminopropanesulfonic acid (5-75 mg/kg i.v.) an agonist at gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor sites, depresses phrenic nerve activity. It is suggested that the low dose stimulatory effects are related to actions at gamma-aminobutyric acid-B receptors, whereas the high dose depressant effects are related, at least in part, to activation of gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptors.

  10. Effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid on neurally mediated contraction of guinea pig trachealis smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Tamaoki, J; Graf, P D; Nadel, J A

    1987-10-01

    To determine whether gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) affects the contractile properties of airway smooth muscle and, if so, what the mechanism of action is, the authors studied guinea pig tracheal rings under isometric conditions in vitro. GABA and related substances, baclofen and muscimol, had no effect on the resting tension but reversibly depressed contractions induced by electrical field stimulation in a dose-dependent fashion, IC50 values (mean +/- S.E.) being 5.6 +/- 1.4 X 10(-6) M, 6.8 +/- 0.9 X 10(-6) M and 8.5 +/- 1.5 X 10(-5) M, respectively. In contrast, GABA did not alter the response to exogenous acetylcholine or the nonadrenergic noncholinergic inhibitory component. Pretreatment of tissues with bicuculline antagonized the inhibitory effect of GABA as well as that of baclofen. This inhibitory effect was not modified by propranolol, phentolamine, hemicholinium-3 or naloxone, but it was blocked by the Cl channel blocker furosemide and by the substitution of external Cl. These results suggest that GABA decreases the contractile response of airway smooth muscle to cholinergic nerve stimulation by inhibiting the evoked release of acetylcholine and that this effect is exerted by activating Cl-dependent, bicuculline-sensitive GABA receptors.

  11. gamma-Aminobutyric acid agonists and antagonists alter chloride flux across brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Allan, A M; Harris, R A

    1986-05-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain, increases membrane chloride conductance. Previously, we reported that GABA increases 36Cl- uptake by membrane vesicles (microsacs) prepared from mouse brain. Employing this technique, we found that the GABAA agonists, muscimol, isoguvacine, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo(5,4-C)pyridine-3-ol, and 3-amino-1-propane sulfonate, all produced a concentration-dependent increase in 36Cl- influx, but baclofen, a GABAB agonist, failed to alter 36Cl- flux. Inhibition of GABA-dependent 36Cl- influx was produced by the convulsant drugs, bicuculline, picrotoxin, and pentylenetetrazole. Ion specificity was demonstrated by a failure of GABA agonists to stimulate influx of 45Ca2+, 86Rb+, 22Na+, or 35SO4(2). GABA-stimulated uptake of 36Cl- was largest in cortex and cerebellum and smaller in hippocampus and striatum. There was little difference in sensitivity to GABA among the areas. Analysis of subcellular fractions prepared from mouse brain demonstrated that the GABA-dependent 36Cl- influx was enriched in the synaptosomal fraction. The nonspecific (GABA-independent) uptake of 36Cl- was enriched in the myelin fraction. These experiments provide evidence for a functional coupling among GABA receptors and the chloride ionophore and suggest that the GABA-activated chloride channel is a site of action for several convulsant compounds.

  12. Characterization of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors in the neurointermediate lobe of the amphibian Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Verburg-van Kemenade, B M; Jenks, B G; Lenssen, F J; Vaudry, H

    1987-02-01

    The neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is involved in the regulation of secretion of MSH from the intermediate lobe of Xenopus laevis. The purpose of this study was to identify the GABA receptor(s) involved by determination of the effect of specific receptor agonists and antagonists on the release of immunoreactive MSH from superfused neurointermediate lobes of Xenopus. Exogenous GABA induces a rapid inhibition of MSH secretion. There was no evidence for a transitory stimulatory effect of GABA as reported for the rat melanotropes. Both the GABA agonists (GABAa) homotaurine and isoguvacine and the GABA agonist (GABAb) baclofen inhibited MSH release in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo, homotaurine and baclofen caused aggregation of pigment in dermal melanophores. The MSH release-inhibiting effect of homotaurine and isoguvacine could be antagonized by the specific GABAa receptor antagonist bicuculline. However, bicuculline and picrotoxin failed to block the effect of exogenous GABA. We conclude that in the neurointermediate lobe of Xenopus laevis both GABAa and GABAb receptors are present, suggesting a dual inhibitory regulation.

  13. Relaxation and immunity enhancement effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) administration in humans.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Adham M; Higashiguchi, S; Horie, K; Kim, Mujo; Hatta, H; Yokogoshi, H

    2006-01-01

    The effect of orally administrated gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on relaxation and immunity during stress has been investigated in humans. Two studies were conducted. The first evaluated the effect of GABA intake by 13 subjects on their brain waves. Electroencephalograms (EEG) were obtained after 3 tests on each volunteer as follows: intake only water, GABA, or L-theanine. After 60 minutes of administration, GABA significantly increases alpha waves and decreases beta waves compared to water or L-theanine. These findings denote that GABA not only induces relaxation but also reduces anxiety. The second study was conducted to see the role of relaxant and anxiolytic effects of GABA intake on immunity in stressed volunteers. Eight acrophobic subjects were divided into 2 groups (placebo and GABA). All subjects were crossing a suspended bridge as a stressful stimulus. Immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels in their saliva were monitored during bridge crossing. Placebo group showed marked decrease of their IgA levels, while GABA group showed significantly higher levels. In conclusion, GABA could work effectively as a natural relaxant and its effects could be seen within 1 hour of its administration to induce relaxation and diminish anxiety. Moreover, GABA administration could enhance immunity under stress conditions.

  14. Effects of white rice containing enriched gamma-aminobutyric acid on blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Mie; Yoshida, Shin-ichi; Haramoto, Masafumi; Mizuno, Hidenori; Fukuda, Tomohiko; Kagami-Katsuyama, Hiroyo; Tanaka, Aiko; Ohkawara, Tatsuya; Sato, Yuji; Nishihira, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory neurotransmitter with beneficial effects including antihypertension and antistress properties. In this study, we examined the effects of GABA-enriched white rice (GABA rice) on blood pressure (BP) in 39 mildly hypertensive adults in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. The participants were divided into a test group (n = 22) who consumed rice with 11.2 mg GABA/100 g of rice and a placebo group (n = 17) who consumed rice with 2.7 mg GABA/100 g of rice. For 8 weeks, the participants took 150 g of either the GABA rice or the placebo rice. Hematological examinations were performed on both groups at 0, 4, and 8 weeks after the start of rice consumption. Home BP was self-measured two times daily, morning and evening, from 1 weeks before to 2 weeks after the intervention. Although the hospital BP and evening BP measurements of the participants showed no significant change, consumption of the GABA rice improved the morning BP compared with the placebo rice after the 1st week and during the 6th and 8th weeks. These results showed the possibility that the GABA rice improves morning hypertension. PMID:26870683

  15. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid agonist and antagonist drugs on local cerebral glucose utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Palacios, J.M.; Kuhar, M.J.; Rapoport, S.I.; London, E.D.

    1982-07-01

    The (/sup 14/C)2-deoxy-D-glucose method of Sokoloff et al. was used to study local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) in rats treated with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist (muscimol and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo(5,4-C)pyridin-3-ol, THIP) and antagonist (bicuculline) drugs. It was of interest to determine if the pattern of LCGU responses to GABA agonists and antagonists administered systemically in vivo would reflect the known distributions of markers for central GABAergic synapses. The patterns of LCGU responses to muscimol and THIP generally were similar. Most brain regions showed dose-dependent decreases in LCGU; others showed no effects; but the red nucleus showed an increase. The GABA antagonist bicuculline produced convulsions and variable LCGU responses, depending on the time of administration. Bicuculline also partially antagonized the depressant effects of muscimol of LCGU. The magnitudes and distribution of in vivo cerebral metabolic responses to specific GABA agonists were not correlated simply with markers for GABAergic synapses. This lack of correlation indicates that additional factors, such as neural circuitry, regulate the LCGU responses to GABAergic drugs.

  16. cAMP and forskolin decrease. gamma. -aminobutyric acid-gated chloride flux in rat brain synaptoneurosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Heuschneider, G.; Schwartz, R.D. )

    1989-04-01

    The effects of the cyclic nucleotide cAMP on {gamma}-aminobutyric acid-gated chloride channel function were investigated. The membrane-permeant cAMP analog N{sup 6}, O{sup 2{prime}}-dibutyryladenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate inhibited muscimol-induced {sup 36}Cl{sup {minus}} uptake into rat cerebral cortical synaptoneurosomes in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibition was due to a decrease in the maximal effect of muscimol, with no change in potency. Similar effects were observed with 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate, 8-bromoadenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate, and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine. The effect of endogenous cAMP accumulation on the {gamma}-aminobutyric acid-gated Cl{sup {minus}} channel was studied with forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase. Under identical conditions, in the intact synaptoneurosomes, forskolin inhibited muscimol-induced {sup 36}Cl{sup {minus}} uptake and generated cAMP with similar potencies. Surprisingly, 1,9-dideoxyforskolin, which does not activate adenylate cyclase, also inhibited the muscimol response, suggesting that forskolin and its lipophilic derivatives may interact with the Cl{sup {minus}} channel directly. The data suggest that {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA{sub A}) receptor function in brain can be regulated by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation.

  17. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and neuropeptides in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damelio, F.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid and the neuropeptides substance P and Met-enkephalin in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMNV), and lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Glutamic acid decarboxylase immunoreactive (GAD-IR) terminals and fibers were observed in the AP and particularly in the ASP. A gradual decrease in the density of terminals was seen towards the solitary complex. The DMNV revealed irregularly scattered GAD-IR terminals within the neuropil or closely surrounding neuronal cell bodies. The LVN, particularly the dorsal division, showed numerous axon terminals which were mostly localize around large neurons and their proximal dendrites. Substance P immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed high density in the solitary complex, in particular within the lateral division. The ASP showed medium to low density of SP-IR fibers and terminals. The AP exhibited a small number of fibers and terminals irregularly distributed. The DMNV revealed a high density of SP-IR terminals and fibers that were mainly concentrated in the periphery. Very few terminals were detected in the LVN. Met-enkephalin immunoreactive (Met-Enk-IR) fibers and terminals showed high density and uniform distribution in the DMNV. Scattered terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, and NTS (particularly the lateral division). The very few fibers were observed in the LVN surrounded the neuronal cell bodies. The present report is part of a study designed to investigate the interaction between neuropeptides and conventional neurotransmitters under conditions producing motion sickness and in the process of sensory-motor adaptation.

  18. Postnatal changes in somatic gamma-aminobutyric acid signalling in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Tyzio, Roman; Minlebaev, Marat; Rheims, Sylvain; Ivanov, Anton; Jorquera, Isabelle; Holmes, Gregory L; Zilberter, Yuri; Ben-Ari, Yehezkiel; Khazipov, Rustem

    2008-05-01

    During postnatal development of the rat hippocampus, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) switches its action on CA3 pyramidal cells from excitatory to inhibitory. To characterize the underlying changes in the GABA reversal potential, we used somatic cell-attached recordings of GABA(A) and N-methyl-D-aspartate channels to monitor the GABA driving force and resting membrane potential, respectively. We found that the GABA driving force is strongly depolarizing during the first postnatal week. The strength of this depolarization rapidly declines with age, although GABA remains slightly depolarizing, by a few millivolts, even in adult neurons. Reduction in the depolarizing GABA driving force was due to a progressive negative shift of the reversal potential of GABA currents. Similar postnatal changes in GABA signalling were also observed using the superfused hippocampus preparation in vivo, and in the hippocampal interneurons in vitro. We also found that in adult pyramidal cells, somatic GABA reversal potential is maintained at a slightly depolarizing level by bicarbonate conductance, chloride-extrusion and chloride-loading systems. Thus, the postnatal excitatory-to-inhibitory switch in somatic GABA signalling is associated with a negative shift of the GABA reversal potential but without a hyperpolarizing switch in the polarity of GABA responses. These results also suggest that in adult CA3 pyramidal cells, somatic GABAergic inhibition takes place essentially through shunting rather than hyperpolarization. Apparent hyperpolarizing GABA responses previously reported in the soma of CA3 pyramidal cells are probably due to cell depolarization during intracellular or whole-cell recordings.

  19. Gamma-aminobutyric acid aggravates nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Peysepar, Elham; Soltani, Nepton; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Eshraghi-Jazi, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ardeshir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cisplatin (CP) is a major antineoplastic drug for treatment of solid tumors. CP-induced nephrotoxicity may be gender-related. This is while gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system that has renoprotective impacts on acute renal injury. Objectives: This study was designed to investigate the protective role of GABA against CP-induced nephrotoxicity in male and female rats. Materials and Methods: Sixty Wistar male and female rats were used in eight experimental groups. Both genders received GABA (50 μg/kg/day; i. p.) for 14 days and CP (2.5 mg/kg/day; i. p.) was added from day 8 to the end of the study, and they were compared with the control groups. At the end of the study, all animals were sacrificed and the serum levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), nitrite, malondialdehyde (MDA), and magnesium (Mg) were measured. The kidney tissue damage was also determined via staining. Results: CP significantly increased the serum levels of Cr and BUN, kidney weight, and kidney tissue damage score in both genders (P<0.05). GABA did not attenuate these markers in males; even these biomarkers were intensified in females. Serum level of Mg, and testis and uterus weights did not alter in the groups. However, the groups were significantly different in terms of nitrite and MDA levels. Conclusion: It seems that GABA did not improve nephrotoxicity induced by CP-treated rats, and it exacerbated renal damage in female rats. PMID:27689121

  20. Excitatory action of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on crustacean neurosecretory cells.

    PubMed

    García, U; Onetti, C; Valdiosera, R; Aréchiga, H

    1994-02-01

    1. Intracellular and voltage-clamp recordings were obtained from a selected population of neurosecretory (ns) cells in the X organ of the crayfish isolated eyestalk. Pulses of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) elicited depolarizing responses and bursts of action potentials in a dose-dependent manner. These effects were blocked by picrotoxin (50 microM) but not by bicuculline. Picrotoxin also suppressed spontaneous synaptic activity. 2. The responses to GABA were abolished by severing the neurite of X organ cells, at about 150 microns from the cell body. Responses were larger when the application was made at the neuropil level. 3. Topical application of Cd2+ (2 mM), while suppressing synaptic activity, was incapable of affecting the responses to GABA. 4. Under whole-cell voltage-clamp, GABA elicited an inward current with a reversal potential dependent on the chloride equilibrium potential. The GABA effect was accompanied by an input resistance reduction up to 33% at a -50 mV holding potential. No effect of GABA was detected on potassium, calcium, and sodium currents present in X organ cells. 5. The effect of GABA on steady-state currents was dependent on the intracellular calcium concentration. At 10(-6) M [Ca2+]i, GABA (50 microM) increased the membrane conductance more than threefold and shifted the zero-current potential from -25 to -10 mV. At 10(-9) M [Ca2+]i, GABA induced only a 1.3-fold increase in membrane conductance, without shifting the zero-current potential. 6. These results support the notion that in the population of X organ cells sampled in this study, GABA acts as an excitatory neurotransmitter, opening chloride channels.

  1. Roles for gamma-aminobutyric acid in the development of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, Kristy M.; Stratton, Matthew S.; Tobet, Stuart A.

    2010-01-01

    The development of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) involves several factors that work together to establish a cell group that regulates neuroendocrine functions and behaviors. A number of molecular markers were noted within the developing PVN, including estrogen receptors (ER), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). By contrast, immunoreactive gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was found in cells and fibers surrounding the PVN. Two animal models were used to test the hypothesis that GABA works through GABAA and GABAB receptors to influence the development of the PVN. Treatment with bicuculline to decrease GABAA receptor signaling from embryonic day (E)10 to 17 resulted in fewer cells containing immunoreactive (ir)-ERα in the region of the PVN versus control. GABABR1 receptor subunit knockout mice were used to examine the PVN at P0 without GABAB signaling. In female but not male GABABR1 subunit knockout mice, the positions of cells containing ir-ERα shifted from medial to lateral compared to wildtype controls, while the total number of ir-ERα containing cells was unchanged. In E17 knockout mice, ir-nNOS cells and fibers were spread over a greater area. There was also a significant decrease in ir-BDNF in the knockout mice in a region dependent manner. Changes in cell position and protein expression subsequent to disruption of GABA signaling may be due, in part, to changes in nNOS and BDNF signaling. Based on the current study, the PVN can be added as another site where GABA exerts morphogenetic actions in development. PMID:20506472

  2. Roles for gamma-aminobutyric acid in the development of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    McClellan, Kristy M; Stratton, Matthew S; Tobet, Stuart A

    2010-07-15

    The development of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) involves several factors that work together to establish a cell group that regulates neuroendocrine functions and behaviors. Several molecular markers were noted within the developing PVN, including estrogen receptors (ER), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). By contrast, immunoreactive gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was found in cells and fibers surrounding the PVN. Two animal models were used to test the hypothesis that GABA works through GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors to influence the development of the PVN. Treatment with bicuculline to decrease GABA(A) receptor signaling from embryonic day (E) 10 to E17 resulted in fewer cells containing immunoreactive (ir) ERalpha in the region of the PVN vs. control. GABA(B)R1 receptor subunit knockout mice were used to examine the PVN at P0 without GABA(B) signaling. In female but not male GABA(B)R1 subunit knockout mice, the positions of cells containing ir ERalpha shifted from medial to lateral compared with wild-type controls, whereas the total number of ir ERalpha-containing cells was unchanged. In E17 knockout mice, ir nNOS cells and fibers were spread over a greater area. There was also a significant decrease in ir BDNF in the knockout mice in a region-dependent manner. Changes in cell position and protein expression subsequent to disruption of GABA signaling may be due, in part, to changes in nNOS and BDNF signaling. Based on the current study, the PVN can be added as another site where GABA exerts morphogenetic actions in development.

  3. Ultraviolet irradiation selectively disrupts the gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodiazepine receptor-linked chloride ionophore

    SciTech Connect

    Evoniuk, G.; Moody, E.J.; Skolnick, P. )

    1989-05-01

    The ability of UV light to affect radioligand binding and 36Cl-uptake at the gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor-chloride channel complex was examined. Exposure to 302 nm UV light produced a rapid (t1/2 = 4 min) reduction in (35S)t-butylbicyclo-phosphorothionate binding (assayed in the presence of 200 mM chloride) to sites associated with the GABAA receptor-coupled chloride ionophore. Saturation analysis revealed that this effect could be attributed entirely to a decrease in the maximum number of binding sites. Exposure to UV irradiation at lower (254 nm) and higher (366 nm) wavelengths also inhibited (35S)t-butylbicy-clophosphorothionate binding, but the respective rates of inactivation were 8- and 27-fold slower, compared with 302 nm. Other anion-dependent interactions at the GABAA receptor complex were disrupted in a similar manner. In the absence of permeant anion, (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptors was unaffected by 302 nm UV irradiation, whereas chloride-enhanced (3H)flunitrazepam binding was inhibited markedly. In the presence of 250-500 mM chloride, (3H)methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate binding to benzodiazepine receptors was also inhibited after UV exposure. Basal 36Cl- uptake into synaptoneurosomes was nearly doubled after 15 min of exposure to 302 nm light, whereas pentobarbital- and muscimol-stimulated 36Cl- uptake were reduced significantly. UV irradiation at 302 nm appears to disrupt selectively the anion-dependent functional interactions at the GABAA receptor complex. The apparent wavelength specificity suggests that the gating structure (channel) may contain tryptophan and/or tyrosine residues vital to the regulation of anion movement through the ionophore portion of this supramolecular receptor-ion channel complex.

  4. Activation of A-type gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors excites gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons.

    PubMed

    DeFazio, R Anthony; Heger, Sabine; Ojeda, Sergio R; Moenter, Suzanne M

    2002-12-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), acting through GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)R), is hypothesized to suppress reproduction by inhibiting GnRH secretion, but GABA actions directly on GnRH neurons are not well established. In green fluorescent protein-identified adult mouse GnRH neurons in brain slices, gramicidin-perforated-patch-clamp experiments revealed the reversal potential (E(GABA)) for current through GABA(A)Rs was depolarized relative to the resting potential. Furthermore, rapid GABA application elicited action potentials in GnRH neurons but not controls. The consequence of GABA(A)R activation depends on intracellular chloride levels, which are maintained by homeostatic mechanisms. Membrane proteins that typically extrude chloride (KCC-2 cotransporter, CLC-2 channel) were absent from the GT1-7 immortalized GnRH cell line and GnRH neurons in situ or were not localized to the proper cell compartment for function. In contrast, GT1-7 cells and some GnRH neurons expressed the chloride-accumulating cotransporter, NKCC-1. Patch-clamp experiments showed that blockade of NKCC hyperpolarized E(GABA) by lowering intracellular chloride. Regardless of reproductive state, rapid GABA application excited GnRH neurons. In contrast, bath application of the GABA(A)R agonist muscimol transiently increased then suppressed firing; suppression persisted 4-15 min. Rapid activation of GABA(A)R thus excites GnRH neurons whereas prolonged activation reduces excitability, suggesting the physiological consequence of synaptic activation of GABA(A)R in GnRH neurons is excitation.

  5. Frontal Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Concentrations Are Associated With Cognitive Performance in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Porges, Eric C.; Woods, Adam J.; Edden, Richard A.E.; Puts, Nicolaas A.J.; Harris, Ashley D.; Chen, Huaihou; Garcia, Amanda M.; Seider, Talia R.; Lamb, Damon G.; Williamson, John B.; Cohen, Ronald A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the brain’s principal inhibitory neurotransmitter, has been associated with perceptual and attentional functioning. Recent application of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides in vivo evidence for decreasing GABA concentrations during adulthood. It is unclear, however, how age-related decrements in cerebral GABA concentrations contribute to cognitive decline, or whether previously reported declines in cerebral GABA concentrations persist during healthy aging. We hypothesized that participants with higher GABA concentrations in the frontal cortex would exhibit superior cognitive function and that previously reported age-related decreases in cortical GABA concentrations continue into old age. METHODS We measured GABA concentrations in frontal and posterior midline cerebral regions using a Mescher-Garwood point-resolved spectroscopy (MEGA-PRESS) 1H-MRS approach in 94 older adults without history or clinical evidence of mild cognitive impairment or dementia (mean age, 73 years). We administered the Montreal Cognitive Assessment to assess cognitive functioning. RESULTS Greater frontal GABA concentrations were associated with superior cognitive performance. This relation remained significant after controlling for age, years of education, and brain atrophy. GABA concentrations in both frontal and posterior regions decreased as a function of age. CONCLUSIONS These novel findings from a large, healthy, older population indicate that cognitive function is sensitive to cerebral GABA concentrations in the frontal cortex, and GABA concentration in frontal and posterior regions continue to decline in later age. These effects suggest that proton MRS may provide a clinically useful method for the assessment of normal and abnormal age-related cognitive changes and the associated physiological contributors. PMID:28217759

  6. Release and effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on rat pineal melatonin production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, R E; Chuluyan, H E; Pereyra, E N; Cardinali, D P

    1989-06-01

    1. 3H-gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) release elicited by a depolarizing K+ stimulus or by noradrenergic transmitter was examined in rat pineals in vitro. 2. The release of 3H-GABA was detectable at a 20 mM K+ concentration in medium and increased steadily up to 80 mM K+. 3. In a Ca2+-free medium 3H-GABA release elicited by 30 mM K+, but not that elicited by 50 mM K+, became blunted. 4. Norepinephrine (NE; 10(-6)-10(-4) M) stimulated 3H-GABA release from rat pineal explants in a dose-dependent manner. 5. The activity of 10(-5) M NE on pineal GABA release was suppressed by equimolecular amounts of prazosin or phentolamine (alpha 1- and alpha 1/alpha 2-adrenoceptor blockers, respectively) and was unaffected by propranolol (beta-adrenoceptor blocker). 6. The alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine (10(-7)-10(-5) M) and the beta-adrenoceptor agonist isoproterenol (10(-5) M) mimicked the GABA releasing activity of NE, while 10(-7) M isoproterenol failed to affect it; the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine (10(-7)-10(-5) M) did not modify 3H-GABA release. 7. The addition of 10(-4) M GABA or of the GABA transaminase inhibitor gamma-acetylenic GABA or aminooxyacetic acid inhibited the melatonin content and/or release to the medium in rat pineal organotypic cultures. 8. GABA at concentrations of 10(-5) M or greater partially inhibited the NE-induced increase in melatonin production by pineal explants. 9. The depressant effect of GABA on melatonin production was inhibited by the GABA type A receptor antagonist bicuculline; bicuculline alone increased the pineal melatonin content. Baclofen, a GABA type B receptor agonist, did not affect the pineal melatonin content or release. 10. The decrease in serotonin (5-HT) content of rat pineal explants brought about by NE was not modified by GABA; GABA by itself increased 5-HT levels. 11. These results indicate that (a) GABA is released from rat pineals by a depolarizing stimulus of K+ through a mechanism which is partially Ca2

  7. Mechanism of action of gamma-aminobutyric acid on frog melanotrophs.

    PubMed

    Desrues, L; Vaudry, H; Lamacz, M; Tonon, M C

    1995-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a potent regulator of secretory and electrical activity in melanotrophs of the frog pituitary. The aim of the present study was to investigate the intracellular events which mediate the response of melanotrophs to GABA. We first observed that GABA (1-100 microM) inhibited both basal and forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) formation. The inhibitory effect of GABA on cAMP levels was mimicked by the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen (100 microM) and totally abolished by a 4-h pretreatment with pertussis toxin (0.1 microgram/ml). In contrast, the specific GABAA agonist 3-aminopropane sulphonic acid (3APS) did not affect cAMP production. Both GABA and 3APS (100 microM each) induced a biphasic effect on alpha-MSH release from perifused frog neurointermediate lobes, i.e. a transient stimulation followed by an inhibition of alpha-MSH secretion. Administration of forskolin (10 microM) prolonged the stimulatory phase and attenuated the inhibitory phase evoked by GABA and 3APS, indicating that cAMP modulates the response of melanotrophs to GABAA agonists. Ejection of 3APS (1 microM) in the vicinity of cultured melanotrophs caused a massive increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). The stimulatory effect of 3APS on [Ca2+]i was abolished when the cells were incubated in a chloride-free medium. The formation of inositol trisphosphate was not affected by 3APS, suggesting that the increase in [Ca2+]i cannot be ascribed to mobilization of intracellular calcium stores. omega-Conotoxin did not alter the secretory response of frog neurointermediate lobes to 3APS, while nifedipine blocked the stimulation of alpha-MSH secretion induced by 3APS. In conclusion, the present data indicate that, in frog pituitary melanotrophs, (i) the stimulatory phase evoked by GABAA agonists can be accounted for by an influx of calcium through L-type calcium channels, (ii) the inhibitory effect evoked by GABAB agonists

  8. Purification and identification of the functional sodium- and chloride-coupled gamma-aminobutyric acid transport glycoprotein from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Radian, R; Bendahan, A; Kanner, B I

    1986-11-25

    Using the reconstitution conditions developed recently (Radian, R., and Kanner, B. I. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 11859-11865) we have now purified the sodium- and chloride-coupled gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter from rat brain to apparent homogeneity. A partially purified transporter preparation was passed over wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose 6MB and non-bound proteins were washed away. The transport activity, as expressed upon reconstitution of the protein into liposomes, was eluted by a solution containing Triton X-100 and N-acetylglucosamine. The specific transport activity was increased almost 400-fold over that of the crude extract. Taking into account an approximately 2.5-fold inactivation during the lectin column chromatography, the actual purification is about 1000-fold. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis of the active fractions revealed one band of 80 kDa and small amounts of a band which ran at an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa. The ratio between the two could be experimentally changed such as, for instance, by lyophilization. Polyclonal antibodies were prepared against the 80-kDa band which also cross-reacted with the 160-kDa band, indicating that the latter apparently represents a dimer form of the first. Using Protein A-Sepharose Cl-4B and the antibody against the 80-kDa band, we were able to quantitatively immunoprecipitate the potential gamma-aminobutyric acid transport activity from a crude transporter preparation. The pure transporter preparation exhibited the same features of the transporter in synaptic plasma membrane vesicles, namely dependence on sodium and chloride, electrogeneity, affinity, and efflux and exchange properties. We conclude that the 80-kDa band represents the gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter.

  9. Antiepileptic potential of matrine via regulation the levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamic acid in the brain.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jun; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-12-05

    Our present study aimed to determine the antiepileptic activity of matrine, and explore the possible molecular mechanism. To evaluate the antiepileptic activity of matrine, seizures in mice induced by PTZ and MES were established, then the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests in mice were also carried out. For the molecular mechanism investigations, contents of aspartic acid (Asp), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid (Glu), glycine (Gly) in seizures mice were determined; then, the chronic seizures rats induced by PTZ were prepared, and western blotting was used to determine the expressions of GAD 65, GABAA and GABAB in the brains. In the results, matrine showed significant antiepileptic effects on seizures mice induced by MES and PTZ. Moreover, the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests were also demonstrated that matrine had obvious antiepileptic effects. Additionally, our results revealed that after treatment with matrine, contents of GABA can be elevated, and the contents of Glu were obviously decreased. Furthermore, western blotting revealed that the mechanism regarding the antiepileptic effect of may be related to the up-regulations of GAD 65 and GABAA in the brain. Collectively, we suggested that matrine can be developed as an effective antiseptic drug.

  10. The effect of antivitamin B6 administration on gamma-aminobutyric acid metabolism in retina and electroretinogram.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, A; Kamada, Y; Kunita, M; Matsuda, M

    1980-01-01

    The effect of several antivitamin B6 on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism was studied in the rat retina. The rat electroretinogram (ERG) was also recorded after administration of these drugs. Aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA) and hydrazine administration increased the GABA content and inhibited the GABA degrading enzyme, GABA transaminase in retina. In addition, there drugs elongated the peak latency of the oscillatory potential in the rat ERG. In contrast, 4-deoxypyridoxine (DOP) or isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INAH) administration decreased the GABA content and inhibited the GABA synthesizing enzyme, glutamic acid decarboxylase in retina, and administration of these drugs together with AOAA lessened the degrees of elevation of GABA content and of the elongation of the peak latency produced as compared with AOAA alone, though neither of the former drugs had a significant effect on ERG. The retinal GABA seems to play an important role in relation to the oscillatory potential of ERG.

  11. Inherited disorders of gamma-aminobutyric acid metabolism and advances in ALDH5A1 mutation identification.

    PubMed

    Pearl, Phillip L; Parviz, Mahsa; Vogel, Kara; Schreiber, John; Theodore, William H; Gibson, K Michael

    2014-12-29

    Inherited disorders of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism include succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) and gamma-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T) deficiencies. The clinical features, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of both, and an updated list of mutations in the ALDH5A1 gene, which cause SSADH deficiency, are discussed. A database of 112 individuals (71 children and adolescents, and 41 adults) indicates that developmental delay and hypotonia are the most common symptoms arising from SSADH deficiency. Furthermore, epilepsy is present in two-thirds of SSADH-deficient individuals by adulthood. Research with murine genetic models and human participants, using [(11) C] flumazenil positron emission tomography (FMZ-PET) and transcranial magnetic stimulation, have led to therapeutic trials, and the identification of additional disruptions to GABA metabolism. Suggestions for new therapies have arisen from findings of GABAergic effects on autophagy, with enhanced activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Details of known pathogenic mutations in the ALDH5A1 gene, three of which have not previously been reported, are summarized here. Investigations into disorders of GABA metabolism provide fundamental insights into the mechanisms underlying epilepsy, and support the importance of developing biomarkers and clinical trials. Comprehensive definition of phenotypes arising as a result of deficiencies in both SSADH and GABA-T may increase our understanding of the neurophysiological consequences of a hyper-GABAergic state.

  12. THE BIOSYNTHESIS AND CONTENT OF GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID IN THE GOLDFISH RETINA

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Dominic M. K.

    1972-01-01

    Goldfish retinas incubated with L-glutamate-14C (UL) were found to synthesize γ-aminobutyric acid-14C (GABA-14C) The accumulation of newly synthesized GABA was enhanced by physiological stimulation of the retina with flashing light; and this increase was directly proportional to the logarithm of the light intensity. The total GABA content was also higher in light-stimulated than in dark-adapted retinas, although the glutamate content remained unchanged No differences were found in the cell-free activities of glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4 1.1 15) and GABA-glutamate transaminase (EC 2.6.1.19) extracted from light-stimulated and dark-adapted retinas. These findings, together with other physiological and morphologcal evidence, suggest that GABA plays a functional role in synaptic transmission in the goldfish retina PMID:4339278

  13. Depolarizing actions of gamma-aminobutyric acid and related compounds on rat superior cervical ganglia in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bowery, N G; Brown, D A

    1974-02-01

    1 Potential changes in rat superior cervical ganglia were recorded in vitro with surface electrodes.2 gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) produced a transient, low-amplitude ganglion depolarization at rest, and a transient hyperpolarization in ganglia depolarized by carbachol. Depolarization was not prevented by preganglionic denervation. The log dose-response curve for depolarization was sigmoid with a mean ED(50) of 12.5 muM.3 The ganglion was depolarized in similar manner by the following compounds (mean molar potencies relative to GABA (=1) in brackets): 3-aminopropane sulphonic acid (3.4), gamma-amino-beta-hydroxybutyric acid (0.27), beta-guanidino-propionic acid (0.12), guanidinoacetic acid (0.057), delta-aminovaleric acid (0.048), beta-alanine (0.01), 2,4-diaminobutyric acid, gamma-guanidinobutyric acid, taurine and N-methyl-GABA (all <0.01). The following compounds did not depolarize the ganglion at 10 mM concentrations: alpha- and beta-amino-n-butyric acids, alpha-amino-iso-butyric acid, glycine and glutamic acid.4 Depolarization declined in the continued presence of GABA. Ganglia thus ;desensitized' to GABA showed a diminished response to other amino acids but not to carbachol.5 The effect of GABA was not antagonized by hyoscine and hexamethonium in combination, in concentrations sufficient to block responses to carbachol.6 Responses to GABA were blocked more readily than those to carbachol by bicuculline (IC(50), 14 muM) and picrotoxin (IC(50), 37 muM). Strychnine (IC(50), 73 muM) was a relatively weak and less selective GABA-antagonist.7 It is concluded that sympathetic ganglion cells possess receptors for GABA and related amino acids which are (a) different from the acetylcholine receptors and (b) similar to GABA receptors in the central nervous system.

  14. Cloning and functional expression of a Drosophila gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, R; Belelli, D; Lambert, J J; Peters, J A; Reyes, A; Lan, N C

    1994-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a functional gamma-aminobutyric (GABA)-activated Cl- channel has been isolated from an adult Drosophila head cDNA library. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, the subunit functions efficiently, presumably as a homooligomeric complex and is activated by GABA or muscimol. GABA-evoked currents are highly sensitive to antagonism by picrotoxin but are insensitive to bicuculline, RU 5135, or zinc. Pentobarbitone greatly enhances GABA-evoked currents, whereas the neurosteroid 5 alpha-pregnan-3 alpha-ol-20-one demonstrates a large reduction in both the potency and maximal effect when compared with its actions upon vertebrate GABA type A receptors. Although zinc-insensitive, the subunit is also insensitive to flunitrazepam. Hence, the GABA receptors formed by this subunit exhibit a unique pharmacology when compared with vertebrate GABA type A receptors or those composed of rho subunits. Because the receptor-channel complex functions as a homooligomer, this subunit may be of value in mutagenesis studies aiming to define drug-binding sites. Images PMID:8016117

  15. Structural requirements for eszopiclone and zolpidem binding to the gamma-aminobutyric acid type-A (GABAA) receptor are different.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Susan M; Morlock, Elaine V; Satyshur, Kenneth A; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2008-11-27

    The sleep-aids zolpidem and eszopiclone exert their effects by binding to and modulating gamma-aminobutyric acid type-A receptors (GABA(A)Rs), but little is known about the structural requirements for their actions. We made 24 cysteine mutations in the benzodiazepine (BZD) binding site of alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2) GABA(A)Rs and measured zolpidem, eszopiclone, and BZD-site antagonist binding. Mutations in gamma(2)loop D and alpha(1)loops A and B altered the affinity of all ligands tested, indicating that these loops are important for BZD pocket structural integrity. In contrast, gamma(2)loop E and alpha(1)loop C mutations differentially affected ligand affinity, suggesting that these loops are important for ligand selectivity. In agreement with our mutagenesis data, eszopiclone docking yielded a single model stabilized by several hydrogen bonds. Zolpidem docking yielded three equally populated orientations with few polar interactions, suggesting that unlike eszopiclone, zolpidem relies more on shape recognition of the binding pocket than on specific residue interactions and may explain why zolpidem is highly alpha(1)- and gamma(2)-subunit selective.

  16. Phenotypic consequences of deletion of the gamma 3, alpha 5, or beta 3 subunit of the type A gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor in mice.

    PubMed

    Culiat, C T; Stubbs, L J; Montgomery, C S; Russell, L B; Rinchik, E M

    1994-03-29

    Three genes (Gabrg3, Gabra5, and Gabrb3) encoding the gamma 3, alpha 5, and beta 3 subunits of the type A gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor, respectively, are known to map near the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus in mouse chromosome 7. This region shares homology with a segment of human chromosome 15 that is implicated in Angelman syndrome, an inherited neurobehavioral disorder. By mapping Gabrg3 on a panel of p-locus deletions, we have determined that the order of genes within this cluster is centromere-p(D15S12h)-Gabrg3-Gabra5-Gabrb3-telom ere. Like Gabrb3, neither the Gabra5 nor Gabrg3 gene is functionally imprinted in adult mouse brain. Mice deleted for all three subunits die at birth with a cleft palate, although there are rare survivors (approximately 5%) that do not have a cleft palate but do exhibit a neurological abnormality characterized by tremor, jerky gait, and runtiness. We have previously suggested that deficiency of the beta 3 subunit may be responsible for the clefting defect. Most notably, however, in this report we describe mice carrying two overlapping, complementing p deletions that fail to express the gamma 3 transcript, as well as mice from another line that express neither the gamma 3 nor alpha 5 transcripts. Surprisingly, mice from both of these lines are phenotypically normal and do not exhibit any of the neurological symptoms characteristic of the rare survivors that are deleted for all three (gamma 3, alpha 5, and beta 3) subunits. These mice therefore provide a whole-organism type A gamma-aminobutyric-acid receptor background that is devoid of any receptor subtypes that normally contain the gamma 3 and/or alpha 5 subunits. The absence of an overt neurological phenotype in mice lacking the gamma 3 and/or alpha 5 subunits also suggests that mutations in these genes are unlikely to provide useful animal models for Angelman syndrome in humans.

  17. A GC-ECD method for estimation of free and bound amino acids, gamma-aminobutyric acid, salicylic acid, and acetyl salicylic acid from Solanum lycopersicum (L.).

    PubMed

    Meher, Hari Charan; Gajbhiye, Vijay T; Singh, Ghanendra

    2011-01-01

    A gas chromatograph with electron capture detection method for estimation of selected metabolites--amino acids (free and bound), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), salicylic acid (SA), and acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) from tomato--is reported. The method is based on nitrophenylation of the metabolites by 1-fluoro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene under aqueous alkaline conditions to form dinitophenyl derivatives. The derivatives were stable under the operating conditions of GC. Analysis of bound amino acids comprised perchloric acid precipitation of protein, alkylation (carboxymethylation) with iodoacetic acid, vapor-phase hydrolysis, and derivatization with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene in that order. The metabolites were resolved in 35 min, using a temperature-programmed run. The method is rapid, sensitive, and precise. It easily measured the typical amino acids (aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, glutamine, alanine, leucine, lysine, and phenylalanine) used for identification and quantification of a protein, resolved amino acids of the same mass (leucine and isoleucine), satisfactorily measured sulfur amino acid (methionine, cystine, and cysteine), and quantified GABA, SA, and ASA, as well. The developed method was validated for specificity, linearity, and precision. It has been applied and recommended for estimation of 25 metabolites from Solanum lycopersicum (L.).

  18. A ketogenic diet modifies glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid and agmatine levels in the hippocampus of rats: A microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Naima; Betancourt, Luis; Hernández, Luis; Rada, Pedro

    2017-03-06

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is acknowledged as an unconventional option in the treatment of epilepsy. Several lines of investigation point to a possible role of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as main contributors in this protective effect. Other biomolecules could also be involved in the beneficial consequence of the KD, for example, the diamine agmatine has been suggested to block imidazole and glutamate NMDA receptor and serves as an endogenous anticonvulsant in different animal models of epilepsy. In the present report, we have used microdialysis coupled to capillary electrophoresis to monitor microdialysate levels of GABA, glutamate and agmatine in the hippocampus of rats submitted to a KD for 15days compared to rats on a normal rat chow diet. A significant increase in GABA and agmatine levels while no change in glutamate levels was observed. These results support the notion that the KD modifies different transmitters favoring inhibitory over excitatory neurotransmitters.

  19. Renewal and spontaneous recovery, but not latent inhibition, are mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid in appetitive conditioning.

    PubMed

    Delamater, Andrew R; Campese, Vincent; Westbrook, R Frederick

    2009-04-01

    Previous research has reported a role for the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the extinction and renewal of conditioned fear. Here, the authors examine whether GABA is involved in the acquisition, extinction, renewal, spontaneous recovery, and latent inhibition of appetitive conditioning. Using Long-Evans rats, systemic injection of the GABA A receptor inverse agonist FG 7142 was shown to eliminate ABA renewal (Experiment 1) and spontaneous recovery (Experiment 4) of appetitive responding by selectively reducing the recovery of extinguished magazine approach. Furthermore, treatment with FG 7142 had no effects on acquisition or single-session extinction (Experiment 3) or on the context-specific expression of latent inhibition (Experiment 2). These data suggest that ABA renewal and spontaneous recovery, but not latent inhibition or responding during acquisition and an initial extinction session, are mediated by GABAergic mechanisms in appetitive Pavlovian conditioning. They provide support for the view that renewal and spontaneous recovery share a common psychological mechanism.

  20. Stimulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid production in vine-ripe tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruits under modified atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Makino, Yoshio; Soga, Norikazu; Oshita, Seiichi; Kawagoe, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Atsushi

    2008-08-27

    Stimulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production under low O2 and high CO2 conditions (adjusted aerobic atmosphere) under which ethanol fermentation could be avoided was studied. Vine-ripe tomato fruits were stored under hypoxia conditions and adjusted aerobic atmospheres as well as in the air at 15 degrees C for 13 days and at 30 degrees C for 6 days. At 30 degrees C tomato fruit GABA concentration under the adjusted aerobic atmosphere (O2 11%, CO2 9%) was significantly higher by 48% than that in air after 6 days from the start of storage. Increased accumulation of alanine under the adjusted aerobic atmosphere supports the observation that this atmosphere stimulates GABA production. The results demonstrate that the concentration of GABA as a beneficial substance for antihypertensive effects and so on can be increased by storing tomato fruits under adjusted aerobic atmospheres for the first time.

  1. Quantification of gamma-aminobutyric acid in Sri Lankan tea by means of ultra performance tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Elisabete; Punyasiri, P A Nimal; Somasiri, H P P Sudarshana; Abeysinghe, I Sarath B; Martens, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    Gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), an important bioactive component of tea, acts as a major inhibitory neurotransmitter and is considered to influence other physiological processes in human as well as in planta. In the hereby presented study, the content of this valuable metabolite was investigated in two novel types of Ceylon Tea, explicitly "Silver Tips" and "White Tea", originating from minimally processed buds of the unique cultivar, "TRI 2043". The samples were subjected to hot water infusion, equivalent to the traditional beverage preparation procedure, and analyzed by means of hydrophilic interaction ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC LC-MS/MS). The registered GABA levels were compared with those obtained for the classic "Black Tea" and "Green Tea" samples from Sri Lanka. A high variation of GABA content was observed among the different tea types, especially in the case of "Silver Tips" and "White Tea", indicating the crucial influence of the manufacturing procedure (processing extent) on the final abundance of the bioactive component of interest. Furthermore, "White Tea" samples boasted the highest GABA concentration reported for this type of tea so far, reaching up to 50% of that characteristic of the high-priced "GABA Tea". Therefore, "White Tea" and "Silver Tips" were proved to be high quality tea with amounts of gamma-aminobutyric acid comparable with those described for similar types before. To our knowledge, this is the first report on HILIC LC-MS/MS application for the quantification of GABA and for in-depth characterization of teas from Sri Lanka.

  2. Potentiation of Gamma Aminobutyric Acid Receptors (GABAAR) by Ethanol: How Are Inhibitory Receptors Affected?

    PubMed Central

    Förstera, Benjamin; Castro, Patricio A.; Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Aguayo, Luis G.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increase in the understanding of ethanol actions on the type A γ-aminobutyric acid chloride channel (GABAAR), a member of the pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs). However, the mechanism by which ethanol potentiates the complex is still not fully understood and a number of publications have shown contradictory results. Thus many questions still remain unresolved requiring further studies for a better comprehension of this effect. The present review concentrates on the involvement of GABAAR in the acute actions of ethanol and specifically focuses on the immediate, direct or indirect, synaptic and extra-synaptic modulatory effects. To elaborate on the immediate, direct modulation of GABAAR by acute ethanol exposure, electrophysiological studies investigating the importance of different subunits, and data from receptor mutants will be examined. We will also discuss the nature of the putative binding sites for ethanol based on structural data obtained from other members of the pLGICs family. Finally, we will briefly highlight the glycine gated chloride channel (GlyR), another member of the pLGIC family, as a suitable target for the development of new pharmacological tools. PMID:27199667

  3. Gamma-aminobutyric acid depletion affects stomata closure and drought tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Dereje Worku; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Ludewig, Frank

    2016-04-01

    A rapid accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) during biotic and abiotic stresses is well documented. However, the specificity of the response and the primary role of GABA under such stress conditions are hardly understood. To address these questions, we investigated the response of the GABA-depleted gad1/2 mutant to drought stress. GABA is primarily synthesized from the decarboxylation of glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) which exists in five copies in the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana. However, only GAD1 and GAD2 are abundantly expressed, and knockout of these two copies dramatically reduced the GABA content. Phenotypic analysis revealed a reduced shoot growth of the gad1/2 mutant. Furthermore, the gad1/2 mutant was wilted earlier than the wild type following a prolonged drought stress treatment. The early-wilting phenotype was due to an increase in stomata aperture and a defect in stomata closure. The increase in stomata aperture contributed to higher stomatal conductance. The drought oversensitive phenotype of the gad1/2 mutant was reversed by functional complementation that increases GABA level in leaves. The functionally complemented gad1/2 x pop2 triple mutant contained more GABA than the wild type. Our findings suggest that GABA accumulation during drought is a stress-specific response and its accumulation induces the regulation of stomatal opening thereby prevents loss of water.

  4. Effect of Pressure on the Release of Radioactive Glycine and Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid from Spinal Cord Synaptosomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    include Security Classification) Effect of Pressure on the Release of Radioactive Glycine and-Aminobutyric Acid from Spinal Cord Synaptosomes 12. PERSONAL... Spinal Cord ; Synaptosomes 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) AkcoSSSiOf For @TIC NTIS GRA&I (o.pyr DTIC TAR...Neurochemistry Effect of Pressure on the Release of Radioactive Glycine and 7-Aminobutyric Acid from Spinal Cord Synaptosomes Sara C. Gilman, Joel S. Colton

  5. Formation of [b3 - 1 + cat]+ ions from metal-cationized tetrapeptides containing beta-alanine, gamma-aminobutyric acid or epsilon-aminocaproic acid residues.

    PubMed

    Osburn, Sandra M; Ochola, Sila O; Talaty, Erach R; Van Stipdonk, Michael J

    2008-11-01

    The presence and position of a single beta-alanine (betaA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (gammaABu) or epsilon-aminocaproic acid (Cap) residue has been shown to have a significant influence on the formation of b(n)+ and y(n)+ product ions from a series of model, protonated peptides. In this study, we examined the effect of the same residues on the formation of analogous [b3 - 1 + cat]+ products from metal (Li+, Na+ and Ag+)-cationized peptides. The larger amino acids suppress formation of b3+ from protonated peptides with general sequence AAXG (where X = beta-alanine, gamma-aminobutyric acid or epsilon-aminocaproic acid), presumably because of the prohibitive effect of larger cyclic intermediates in the 'oxazolone' pathway. However, abundant [b3 - 1 + cat]+ products are generated from metal-cationized versions of AAXG. Using a group of deuterium-labeled and exchanged peptides, we found that formation of [b3 - 1 + cat]+ involves transfer of either amide or alpha-carbon position H atoms, and the tendency to transfer the atom from the alpha-carbon position increases with the size of the amino acid in position X. To account for the transfer of the H atom, a mechanism involving formation of a ketene product as [b3 - 1 + cat]+ is proposed.

  6. Dynamic changes in gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate decarboxylase activity in oats (Avena nuda L.) during steeping and germination.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian Guo; Hu, Qing Ping; Duan, Jiang Lian; Tian, Cheng Rui

    2010-09-08

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and provides beneficial effects for human and other animals health. To accumulate GABA, samples from two different naked oat cultivars, Baiyan II and Bayou I, were steeped and germinated in an incubator. The content of GABA and glutamic acid as well as the activity of the glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) in oats during steeping and germination were investigated with an amino acid automatic analyzer. Compared with raw groats, an increase in GABA content of oat groats during steeping and germination was continuously observed for two oat cultivars. The activity of GAD increased greatly at the end of steeping and the second stage of germination for Baiyan II and Bayou I, respectively. Glutamic acid content of treated oat groats was significantly lower than that in raw groats until the later period of germination. GABA was correlated (p<0.01) significantly and positively with the glutamic acid rather than GAD activity in the current study. The results indicates that steeping and germination process under highly controlled conditions can effectively accumulate the GABA in oat groats for Baiyan II and Bayou I, which would greatly facilitate production of nutraceuticals or food ingredients that enable consumers to gain greater access to the health benefits of oats. However, more assays need to be further performed with more oat cultivars.

  7. Electrophoretic method for the determination of the proportion of gamma-aminobutyric acid in a mixture of labeled neurotransmitter and its catabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Cupello, A.; Rapallino, M.V.; Besio, G.; Mainardi, P.

    1987-01-01

    An electrophoretic method for the separation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from its metabolites after GABA-transaminase attack is presented. The method is based on the fact that at neutral pH GABA has no net electrical charge, whereas its major metabolites, succinic acid and Krebs cycle intermediates, are negatively charged. The method appears to be especially suitable for evaluation of true-labeled neurotransmitter within the radioactivity which is found in synaptosomes after labeled GABA-uptake studies.

  8. Inhibitory action of gamma-aminobutyric acid on the excitatory but not inhibitory innervation of the rat anococcygeus muscle.

    PubMed

    Hughes, P R; Morgan, P F; Stone, T W

    1982-12-01

    1 The effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), ethylenediamine, 3-aminopropane sulphonic acid and (+/-)-baclofen have been examined on the responses to stimulation of the adrenergic excitatory and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic inhibitory innervation of the rat anococcygeus muscle in vitro. 2 GABA produced a dose-related depression of the contractile responses to field stimulation. Ethylenediamine and baclofen also depressed the contractile responses, though they were less potent than GABA. 3-Aminopropane sulphonic acid was almost inactive. The inhibitory action of GABA was not modified by phentolamine, propranolol or bicuculline methylbromide. 3 GABA did not affect the contractile responses of the anococcygeus muscle to noradrenaline, phenylephrine or carbachol in untreated muscles or those treated with 6-hydroxydopamine in vitro. 4 In preparations in which tone was raised by continuous perfusion with carbachol in the presence of phentolamine, field stimulation relaxed the muscle. GABA had no effect on this inhibitory response, and did not itself produce any relaxation. 5 It is concluded that GABA exerts a presynaptic inhibitory action on the excitatory adrenergic but not on the inhibitory innervation of the anococcygeus muscle, and that the GABA receptor involved exhibits properties of the previously described GABAB site.

  9. Low taurine, gamma-aminobutyric acid and carnosine levels in plasma of diabetic pregnant rats: consequences for the offspring.

    PubMed

    Aerts, L; Van Assche, F A

    2001-01-01

    Gestational diabetes compromises fetal development and induces a diabetogenic effect in the offspring, including the development of gestational diabetes and the transmission of the effect to the next generation. Changes are not limited to glucose and insulin metabolism, and appear to be modulated by alterations at the hypothalamo-hypophyseal axis. In the present work, serum concentrations are given for the non-protein amino-acids taurine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), both neurotransmitters essential for normal brain development, and for the endogenous neuroprotector carnosine, a known anti-oxydans. Taurine levels are significantly below normal values in mildly diabetic mothers, in their fetal and adult offspring, virgin and pregnant, and in the fetuses of these pregnant offspring. GABA and carnosine levels are at the limit of detection in the diabetic mothers and their offspring at every stage. It is concluded that the low taurine, GABA and carnosine levels in diabetic mothers and their fetuses might compromise the normal structural and functional development of the fetal brain. When adult, these offspring present a deficiency of the circulating levels of these neurotransmitters involved in the hypothalamo-hypophyseal regulation of insulin secretion. This might contribute to the development of impaired glucose tolerance and gestational diabetes, thereby transmitting the effect to the next generation.

  10. Visualization of spatial distribution of gamma-aminobutyric acid in eggplant (Solanum melongena) by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Zaima, Nobuhiro

    2010-01-01

    We applied imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) to determine the spatial distribution of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). We found that GABA had a specific localization in seeds. We also visualized various biomolecules as well as GABA with higher spatial resolution than in the previous report. Our work suggests that IMS might be a powerful tool for exploring functional food factors, investigating the specific distribution of nutrients in unused natural resources, and evaluating the quality of functional foods.

  11. Gamma aminobutyric acid B and 5-hydroxy tryptamine 2A receptors functional regulation during enhanced liver cell proliferation by GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticles treatment.

    PubMed

    Shilpa, Joy; Pretty, Mary Abraham; Anitha, Malat; Paulose, Cheramadathikudyil Skaria

    2013-09-05

    Liver is one of the major organs in vertebrates and hepatocytes are damaged by many factors. The liver cell maintenance and multiplication after injury and treatment gained immense interest. The present study investigated the role of Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) coupled with chitosan nanoparticles in the functional regulation of Gamma aminobutyric acid B and 5-hydroxy tryptamine 2A receptors mediated cell signaling mechanisms, extend of DNA methylation and superoxide dismutase activity during enhanced liver cell proliferation. Liver injury was achieved by partial hepatectomy of male Wistar rats and the GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticles treatments were given intraperitoneally. The experimental groups were sham operated control (C), partially hepatectomised rats with no treatment (PHNT), partially hepatectomised rats with GABA chitosan nanoparticle (GCNP), 5-HT chitosan nanoparticle (SCNP) and a combination of GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticle (GSCNP) treatments. In GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticle treated group there was a significant decrease (P<0.001) in the receptor expression of Gamma aminobutyric acid B and a significant increase (P<0.001) in the receptor expression of 5-hydroxy tryptamine 2A when compared to PHNT. The cyclic adenosine monophosphate content and its regulatory protein, presence of methylated DNA and superoxide dismutase activity were decreased in GCNP, SCNP and GSCNP when compared to PHNT. The Gamma aminobutyric acid B and 5-hydroxy tryptamine 2A receptors coupled signaling elements played an important role in GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticles induced liver cell proliferation which has therapeutic significance in liver disease management.

  12. Interaction of anisatin with rat brain gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptors: allosteric modulation by competitive antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kakemoto, E; Okuyama, E; Nagata, K; Ozoe, Y

    1999-08-15

    Anisatin, a toxic sesquiterpene isolated from the Japanese star anise (Illicium anisatum L.), competitively inhibited the specific binding of [3H]4'-ethynyl-4-n-propylbicycloorthobenzoate ([3H]EBOB), a non-competitive antagonist of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors, to rat brain membranes with an IC50 value of 0.43 microM. R 5135, a competitive GABA antagonist, decreased the potency of anisatin in inhibiting [3H]EBOB binding in a negatively cooperative manner. Two other competitive antagonists, SR 95531 (gabazine) and (-)-bicuculline methiodide, had similar effects. On the other hand, R 5135 exerted little influence on the potencies of the other non-competitive antagonists tested: EBOB, picrotoxinin, isopropylbicyclophosphate, and dieldrin. Thus, anisatin was clearly different from the other non-competitive antagonists in responding to the action of competitive antagonists on (GABA)A receptors. These findings suggest that the binding region of anisatin might overlap with that of the other non-competitive antagonists, but that anisatin must interact with other specific region(s).

  13. Structure-activity relationships of seco-prezizaane terpenoids in gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors of houseflies and rats.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Tadahiko; Schmidt, Thomas J; Okuyama, Emi; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2002-06-01

    Thirteen seco-prezizaane terpenoids isolated from star anise species (Illcium floridanum, Illcium parviflorum, and Illcium verum) were investigated for their ability to inhibit the specific binding of [(3)H]4'-ethynyl-4-n-propylbicycloorthobenzoate (EBOB), a non-competitive antagonist of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, to housefly-head and rat-brain membranes. Veranisatin A was found to be the most potent inhibitor in both membranes, with an IC(50)(fly) of 78.5 nM and an IC(50)(rat) of 271 nM, followed by anisatin (IC(50)(fly)=123 nM; IC(50)(rat)=282 nM). Six of the other 11 tested compounds were effective only in housefly-head membranes. Pseudoanisatin proved to display a high (>26-fold) selectivity for housefly versus rat GABA receptors (IC(50)(fly)=376 nM; IC(50)(rat) >10,000 nM). Although pseudoanisatin does not structurally resemble EBOB, Scatchard plots indicated that the two compounds bind to the same site in housefly receptors. Anisatin and pseudoanisatin exhibited moderate insecticidal activity against German cockroaches. Comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), a method of three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) analysis, demonstrated that seco-prezizaane terpenoids can bind to the same site as do picrotoxane terpenoids such as picrotoxinin and picrodendrins, and the CoMFA maps allowed us to identify the parts of the molecules essential to high activity in housefly GABA receptors.

  14. Deficiency of the beta 3 subunit of the type A gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor causes cleft palate in mice.

    PubMed

    Culiat, C T; Stubbs, L J; Woychik, R P; Russell, L B; Johnson, D K; Rinchik, E M

    1995-11-01

    In addition to its function in the nervous system, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been implicated in mouse craniofacial development by the results of both teratological, and genetic studies. We previously reported that disruption of the cleft palate 1 (cp1) locus, closely linked to the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus on mouse chromosome 7, causes a 95% penetrant, recessive, neonatally-lethal cleft palate (CP) in mice homozygous for the p(4THO-II) deletion. We proposed that the beta 3 subunit gene (Gabrb3) of the GABAA receptor might be a candidate for cp1 (ref. 4); our earlier studies had localized cp1 to an interval beginning distal to the gene for the GABAA receptor alpha 5 subunit (Gabra5) and ending within the Gabrb3 coding region. To test the hypothesis that deletion of Gabrb3, and not another gene in the interval, causes CP, we performed an experiment to rescue the CP phenotype by introducing a Gabrb3 transgene into p(4THO-II) homozygotes. We now show that such transgenic mice are phenotypically normal, indicating that Gabrb3 is indeed the cp1 locus.

  15. An Agrobacterium tumefaciens Strain with Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Transaminase Activity Shows an Enhanced Genetic Transformation Ability in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Satoko; Someya, Tatsuhiko; Zhou, Sha; Takayama, Mariko; Nakamura, Kouji; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens has the unique ability to mediate inter-kingdom DNA transfer, and for this reason, it has been utilized for plant genetic engineering. To increase the transformation frequency in plant genetic engineering, we focused on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is a negative factor in the Agrobacterium-plant interaction. Recent studies have shown contradictory results regarding the effects of GABA on vir gene expression, leading to the speculation that GABA inhibits T-DNA transfer. In this study, we examined the effect of GABA on T-DNA transfer using a tomato line with a low GABA content. Compared with the control, the T-DNA transfer frequency was increased in the low-GABA tomato line, indicating that GABA inhibits T-DNA transfer. Therefore, we bred a new A. tumefaciens strain with GABA transaminase activity and the ability to degrade GABA. The A. tumefaciens strain exhibited increased T-DNA transfer in two tomato cultivars and Erianthus arundinacues and an increased frequency of stable transformation in tomato. PMID:28220841

  16. Analysis of subcomponents of the gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodiazepine receptor macromolecular complex in mammalian central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    Since the presence of endogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) may affect benzodiazepine binding to tissue sections in autoradiographic studies, a protocol designed to check for this influence has been investigated. (/sup 3/H)Flunitrazepam (1 nM) was used to label benzodiazepine receptors for autoradiographic localization. Bicuculline was added to the incubation medium of an additional set of tissue sections to antagonize any potential effect of endogenous GABA. Binding in these sections was compared to that occurring in another set in which excess GABA was added to create further GABA enhancement. Binding was also compared to adjacent sections which were treated similarly but also preincubated in distilled-deionized water to burst the cells by osmotic shock and eliminate endogenous GABA, thereby preventing any effect on benzodiazepine binding. The results indicated that endogenous GABA is indeed present in the slide-mounted tissue sections and is affecting benzodiazepine receptor binding differentially in various regions of the brain depending on the density of GABAergic innervation. Scatchard analysis of saturation data demonstrated that the alteration in BZ binding due to GABA was a result of a change in the affinity rather than number of receptors present.

  17. Gamma-Aminobutyric acid and benzodiazepine receptors in the kindling model of epilepsy: a quantitative radiohistochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, C.; Pedersen, H.B.; McNamara, J.O.

    1985-10-01

    Quantitative radiohistochemistry was utilized to study alterations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and benzodiazepine receptors in the kindling model of epilepsy. The radioligands used for GABA and benzodiazepine receptors were (TH) muscimol and (TH)flunitrazepam, respectively. GABA receptor binding was increased by 22% in fascia dentata of the hippocampal formation but not in neocortex or substantia nigra of kindled rats. Within fascia dentata, GABA receptor binding was increased to an equivalent extent in stratum granulosum and throughout stratum moleculare; no increase was found in dentate hilus or stratum lacunosummoleculare or stratum radiatum of CA1. The increased binding was present at 24 hr but not at 28 days after the last kindled seizure. The direction, anatomic distribution, and time course of the increased GABA receptor binding were paralleled by increased benzodiazepine receptor binding. The anatomic distribution of the increased GABA receptor binding is consistent with a localization to somata and dendritic trees of dentate granule cells. The authors suggest that increased GABA and benzodiazepine receptor binding may contribute to enhanced inhibition of dentate granule cells demonstrated electrophysiologically in kindled animals.

  18. Subsecond kinetics of synaptosomal sup 3 H-. gamma. -aminobutyric acid release, and the relationship to presynaptic Ca sup +2 channels

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    A subcellular preparation of rat brain enriched in nerve terminals was used to study the biochemistry and pharmacology of Ca{sup +2} entry and presynaptic neurotransmitter release. Synaptosomes maintained a membrane potential and supported a biphasic depolarization-stimulated {sup 45}Ca{sup +2} uptake. Replacing external Na{sup +} with the impermeant cation choline eliminated the slower of the two phases, leaving an uptake process that terminated within one second. A portion of the remaining rapid phase of {sup 45}Ca{sup +2} uptake is dihydropyridine-sensitive. Because synaptosomal Ca{sup +2} uptake is mediated by multiple pathways, the release of neurotransmitter was studied as a means to focus on Ca{sup +2} entry at nerve terminals important to excitation-secretion coupling. A superfusion method was developed to measure synaptosomal neurotransmitter release on a time scale approaching the real time course of synaptic events. Synaptosomes prelabeled with {sup 3}H-{gamma}-aminobutyric acid ({sup 3}H-GABA) were retained on glass fiber filters in a superfusion chamber accessed by three solenoid-driven values. The minimal dead volume of the chamber and the relatively high solution flow rate affords time resolution for release of at least 60 msec. This time resolution was necessary to observe three distinct components of GABA release.

  19. Overexpression and optimization of glutamate decarboxylase in Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 for high gamma-aminobutyric acid production

    PubMed Central

    Tajabadi, Naser; Baradaran, Ali; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Rahim, Raha A; Bakar, Fatimah A; Manap, Mohd Yazid A; Mohammed, Abdulkarim S; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bioactive compound biosynthesized by microorganisms through decarboxylation of glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). In this study, a full-length GAD gene was obtained by cloning the template deoxyribonucleic acid to pTZ57R/T vector. The open reading frame of the GAD gene showed the cloned gene was composed of 1410 nucleotides and encoded a 469 amino acids protein. To improve the GABA-production, the GAD gene was cloned into pMG36e-LbGAD, and then expressed in Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 cells. The overexpression was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and GAD activity, showing a 53 KDa protein with the enzyme activity increased by sevenfold compared with the original GAD activity. The optimal fermentation conditions for GABA production established using response surface methodology were at glutamic acid concentration of 497.973 mM, temperature 36°C, pH 5.31 and time 60 h. Under the conditions, maximum GABA concentration obtained (11.09 mM) was comparable with the predicted value by the model at 11.23 mM. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful cloning (clone-back) and overexpression of the LbGAD gene from L. plantarum to L. plantarum cells. The recombinant Lactobacillus could be used as a starter culture for direct incorporation into a food system during fermentation for production of GABA-rich products. PMID:25757029

  20. Production of yogurt with enhanced levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid and valuable nutrients using lactic acid bacteria and germinated soybean extract.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Bum; Oh, Suk-Heung

    2007-05-01

    Yogurt with high levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), free amino acids and isoflavones was developed using lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and germinated soybean extract. Fermented soya milk (GABA soya yogurt) produced with starter and substrate had the GABA concentration of 424.67 microg/gDW, whereas fermented milk produced by a conventional method had GABA less than 1.5 microg/gDW. The GABA soya yogurt also contained significantly high levels of free amino acids and isoflavones compared with other conventional yogurts. The results suggested that the Lactobacillus brevis OPY-1 and germinated soybean possessed a prospect to be applied in dairy and other health products with high nutritive values and functional properties.

  1. Possible expression of a particular gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter isoform responsive to upregulation by hyperosmolarity in rat calvarial osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Sayumi; Hinoi, Eiichi; Takarada, Takeshi; Iemata, Mika; Takahata, Yoshifumi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2006-11-21

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, but widely distributed in different peripheral organs. We have previously shown the functional expression of GABA(B) receptors required for GABAergic signal input by cultured rat calvarial osteoblasts. This study focused on the possible functional expression of the machinery required for GABAergic signal termination such as GABA transporters. In rat calvarial osteoblasts cultured for 7 days, [(3)H]GABA accumulation was observed in a temperature-, sodium- and chloride-dependent manner, consisting of a single component with a K(m) value of 789.6+/-9.0 microM and a V(max) value of 4.4+/-0.1 nmol/min/mg protein, respectively. Both nipecotic and L-2,4-diaminobutyric acids significantly inhibited [(3)H]GABA accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner. Constitutive expression was seen with mRNA for the betaine/GABA transporter-1 (BGT-1) and taurine transporter (TauT), while hyperosmotic cultivation led to significant increases in both [(3)H]GABA accumulation and BGT-1 mRNA expression without affecting TauT mRNA expression. Highly immunoreactive cells were detected for the BGT-1 isoform at the surface of trabecular bone of neonatal rat tibias. Sustained exposure to GABA significantly inhibited alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, but not cellular viability, at concentrations above 0.1 mM in osteoblasts cultured for 3 to 28 days. Nipecotic acid not only decreased ALP activity alone, but also further decreased ALP activity in osteoblasts cultured in the presence of GABA. These results suggest that the BGT-1 isoform may be functionally expressed by rat calvarial osteoblasts to play a hitherto unidentified role in mechanisms underlying hyperosmotic regulation of osteoblastogenesis.

  2. Conversion into GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) may reduce the capacity of L-glutamine as an insulin secretagogue.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pascual, Sergio; Mukala-Nsengu-Tshibangu, André; Martín Del Río, Rafael; Tamarit-Rodríguez, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    We have carried out a detailed examination of L-glutamine metabolism in rat islets in order to elucidate the paradoxical failure of L-glutamine to stimulate insulin secretion. L-Glutamine was converted by isolated islets into GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), L-aspartate and L-glutamate. Saturation of the intracellular concentrations of all of these amino acids occurred at approx. 10 mmol/l L-glutamine, and their half-maximal values were attained at progressively increasing concentrations of L-glutamine (0.3 mmol/l for GABA; 0.5 and 1.0 mmol/l for Asp and Glu respectively). GABA accumulation accounted for most of the 14CO2 produced at various L-[U-14C]glutamine concentrations. Potentiation by L-glutamine of L-leucine-induced insulin secretion in perifused islets was suppressed by malonic acid dimethyl ester, was accompanied by a significant decrease in islet GABA accumulation, and was not modified in the presence of GABA receptor antagonists [50 micromol/l saclofen or 10 micromol/l (+)-bicuculline]. L-Leucine activated islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity, but had no effect on either glutamate decarboxylase or GABA transaminase activity, in islet homogenates. We conclude that (i) L-glutamine is metabolized preferentially to GABA and L-aspartate, which accumulate in islets, thus preventing its complete oxidation in the Krebs cycle, which accounts for its failure to stimulate insulin secretion; (ii) potentiation by L-glutamine of L-leucine-induced insulin secretion involves increased metabolism of L-glutamate and GABA via the Krebs cycle (glutamate dehydrogenase activation) and the GABA shunt (2-oxoglutarate availability for GABA transaminase) respectively, and (iii) islet release of GABA does not seem to play an important role in the modulation of the islet secretory response to the combination of L-leucine and L-glutamine. PMID:14763900

  3. Conversion into GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) may reduce the capacity of L-glutamine as an insulin secretagogue.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pascual, Sergio; Mukala-Nsengu-Tshibangu, André; Martín Del Río, Rafael; Tamarit-Rodríguez, Jorge

    2004-05-01

    We have carried out a detailed examination of L-glutamine metabolism in rat islets in order to elucidate the paradoxical failure of L-glutamine to stimulate insulin secretion. L-Glutamine was converted by isolated islets into GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), L-aspartate and L-glutamate. Saturation of the intracellular concentrations of all of these amino acids occurred at approx. 10 mmol/l L-glutamine, and their half-maximal values were attained at progressively increasing concentrations of L-glutamine (0.3 mmol/l for GABA; 0.5 and 1.0 mmol/l for Asp and Glu respectively). GABA accumulation accounted for most of the 14CO2 produced at various L-[U-14C]glutamine concentrations. Potentiation by L-glutamine of L-leucine-induced insulin secretion in perifused islets was suppressed by malonic acid dimethyl ester, was accompanied by a significant decrease in islet GABA accumulation, and was not modified in the presence of GABA receptor antagonists [50 micromol/l saclofen or 10 micromol/l (+)-bicuculline]. L-Leucine activated islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity, but had no effect on either glutamate decarboxylase or GABA transaminase activity, in islet homogenates. We conclude that (i) L-glutamine is metabolized preferentially to GABA and L-aspartate, which accumulate in islets, thus preventing its complete oxidation in the Krebs cycle, which accounts for its failure to stimulate insulin secretion; (ii) potentiation by L-glutamine of L-leucine-induced insulin secretion involves increased metabolism of L-glutamate and GABA via the Krebs cycle (glutamate dehydrogenase activation) and the GABA shunt (2-oxoglutarate availability for GABA transaminase) respectively, and (iii) islet release of GABA does not seem to play an important role in the modulation of the islet secretory response to the combination of L-leucine and L-glutamine.

  4. 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), and gamma-vinyl-gamma-aminobutyric acid (gamma-vinyl GABA) alter neurotransmitter concentrations in the nervous tissue of the goldfish (Carassius auratus) but not the cockroach (Periplaneta americana).

    PubMed

    Sloley, B D; McKenna, K F

    1993-02-01

    1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium iodide (MPP+) and gamma-vinyl-gamma-aminobutyric acid (gamma-vinyl GABA) are drugs demonstrated to alter catecholamine or gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations in vertebrate nervous tissue. MPTP and MPP+, which are potent and selective vertebrate neurotoxins, are effective in depleting noradrenaline and dopamine concentrations in goldfish. However, only MPP+ depletes dopamine in the central nervous tissues of the cockroach, and only when injected directly into the nervous tissue. Systemic injection of gamma-vinyl GABA, a selective GABA transaminase inhibitor in vertebrates, increases GABA concentrations in goldfish but not cockroach nervous tissue. Incubations of both goldfish hypothalamus and cockroach nervous tissue demonstrated the presence of GABA transaminase activity in vitro. However, the GABA transaminase activity obtained from goldfish tissues was much more sensitive to inhibition by gamma-vinyl GABA than that obtained from cockroach nervous tissue. These results demonstrate that MPTP, MPP+ and gamma-vinyl GABA are useful pharmacological tools which can alter neurotransmitter concentrations in a lower vertebrate. Unfortunately, they possess limited effectiveness in the cockroach.

  5. Subunit-specific coupling between gamma-aminobutyric acid type A and P2X2 receptor channels.

    PubMed

    Boué-Grabot, Eric; Toulmé, Estelle; Emerit, Michel B; Garret, Maurice

    2004-12-10

    ATP and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are two fast neurotransmitters co-released at central synapses, where they co-activate excitatory P2X and inhibitory GABAA (GABA type A) receptors. We report here that co-activation of P2X2 and various GABAA receptors, co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, leads to a functional cross-inhibition dependent on GABAA subunit composition. Sequential applications of GABA and ATP revealed that alphabeta- or alphabetagamma-containing GABAA receptors inhibited P2X2 channels, whereas P2X2 channels failed to inhibit gamma-containing GABAA receptors. This functional cross-talk is independent of membrane potential, changes in current direction, and calcium. Non-additive responses observed between cation-selective GABAA and P2X2 receptors further indicate the chloride independence of this process. Overexpression of minigenes encoding either the C-terminal fragment of P2X2 or the intracellular loop of the beta3 subunit disrupted the functional cross-inhibition. We previously demonstrated functional and physical cross-talk between rho1 and P2X2 receptors, which induced a retargeting of rho1 channels to surface clusters when co-expressed in hippocampal neurons (Boue-Grabot, E., Emerit, M. B., Toulme, E., Seguela, P., and Garret, M. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 6967-6975). Co-expression of P2X2 and chimeric rho1 receptors with the C-terminal sequences of alpha2, beta3, or gamma2 subunits indicated that only rho1-beta3 and P2X2 channels exhibit both functional cross-inhibition in Xenopus oocytes and co-clustering/retargeting in hippocampal neurons. Therefore, the C-terminal domain of P2X2 and the intracellular loop of beta GABAA subunits are required for the functional interaction between ATP- and GABA-gated channels. This gamma subunit-dependent cross-talk may contribute to the regulation of synaptic activity.

  6. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and related molecules in the sea fan Eunicella cavolini (Cnidaria: Octocorallia): a biochemical and immunohistochemical approach.

    PubMed

    Girosi, Laura; Ferrando, Sara; Beltrame, Francesco; Ciarcia, Gaetano; Diaspro, Alberto; Fato, Marco; Magnone, Mirko; Raiteri, Luca; Ramoino, Paola; Tagliafierro, Grazia

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study has been the biochemical demonstration of the presence of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the Mediterranean sea fan Eunicella cavolini by means of high-performance liquid chromatography, and the description of the distribution pattern of GABA and its related molecules, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) and one of the GABA receptors (GABA(B) R) by immunohistochemical methods. The interrelationships of GABA, GAD and GABA receptor immunoreactivity have been established by using double-immunohistochemical methods and confocal microscopy. The immunodetection of monoclonal and/or polyclonal antibodies has revealed GABA immunoreactivity throughout the polyp tissue, both in neuronal and non-neuronal elements. GAD immunoreactivity has been mostly localized in the neuronal compartment, contacting epithelial and muscular elements. GABA(B) R immunoreactivity appears particularly intense in the nematocytes and in the oocyte envelope; its presence in GAD-immunoreactive neurons in the tentacles suggests an autocrine type of regulation. Western blot analysis has confirmed that a GABA(B) R, with a molecular weight of 142 kDa, similar to that of rat brain, is present in E. cavolini polyp tissue. The identification of the sites of the synthesis, vesicular transport, storage and reception of GABA strongly suggests the presence of an almost complete set of GABA-related molecules for the functioning of the GABAergic system in this simple nervous system. The distribution of these different immunoreactivities has allowed us to hypothesize GABA involvement in nematocyst discharge, in body wall and enteric muscular contraction, in neuronal integration and in male gametocyte differentiation.

  7. Effect of paraoxon on muscarinic, dopamine and. gamma. -aminobutyric acid receptors of brain and sensitivity to muscarinic antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, J.C.R.; Hoskins, B.; Ho, I.K.

    1986-03-05

    Several acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors decrease muscarinic cholinergic (mACh) receptors in the brain, alteration of dopamine (DA) and ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors after AChE inhibition was also reported. In view of the important interactions among DA, GABA and ACh systems, whether this is a common effect of AChE inhibitors should be established. They report the effect of the AChE inhibitor, paraoxon, on DA, GABA and mACh receptors in the rat. The binding of /sup 3/H-QNB (for mACh), /sup 3/H-spiperone (for DA) and /sup 3/H-muscimol (for GABA) to striatal and hippocampal membranes was analyzed. Also, behavioral sensitivity to atropine was studied. Twenty-four hr after a single dose (0.75 mg/kg, s.c.) of paraoxon, the density of mACh receptors in the striatum was decreased but, at 3 days, no change was seen. In the hippocampus, the mACh receptors were not affected. Repeated treatment with paraoxon (0.3 mg/kg, 48 hourly) for 2 weeks reduced the mACh receptor density in both regions. Neither single nor repeated paraoxon treatment had an effect on DA or GABA receptors. After single or repeated dosing with paraoxon, myoclonus induced by atropine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was enhanced. The results show rapid downregulation of mACh receptors by paraoxon. DA or GABA, however, appear not to be affected under these treatment regimens.

  8. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation modulates gamma-aminobutyric acid release from CA1 neurons of rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Alkondon, M; Pereira, E F; Barbosa, C T; Albuquerque, E X

    1997-12-01

    In the present study we investigated electrophysiologically the nicotinic responses of pyramidal neurons and interneurons visualized by infrared-assisted videomicroscopy and fluorescence in the CA1 field of hippocampal slices obtained from 8- to 24-day-old rats. Application of nicotinic agonists to CA1 neurons evoked at least four types of nicotinic responses. Of major interest was the ability of these agonists to induce the release of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from interneurons. Slowly decaying ACh whole-cell currents and GABA-mediated postsynaptic currents could be recorded from pyramidal neurons and interneurons, whereas fast-decaying nicotinic currents and fast current transients were recorded only from interneurons. Nicotinic responses were sensitive to blockade by d-tubocurarine (10 microM), which indicated that they were mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The slowly decaying currents, the postsynaptic currents and the fast current transients were insensitive to blockade by the alpha-7 nAChR-specific antagonist methyllycaconitine (up to 1 microM) or alpha-bungarotoxin (100 nM). On the other hand, the slowly decaying nicotinic currents recorded from the interneurons were blocked by the alpha4beta2 nAChR-specific antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine, and the fast-desensitizing nicotinic currents were evoked by the alpha-7 nAChR-specific agonist choline. In experimental conditions similar to those used to record nicotinic responses from neurons in slice (i. e., in the absence of tetrodotoxin), we observed that nicotinic agonists can also induce the release of GABA from hippocampal neurons in culture. In summary, these results provide direct evidence for more than one subtype of functional nAChR in CA1 neurons and suggest that activation of nAChRs present in GABAergic interneurons can evoke inhibitory activity in CA1 pyramidal neurons, thereby modulating processing of information in the hippocampus.

  9. Determination of theanine and gamma-aminobutyric acid in tea by high performance- liquid chromatography with precolumn derivatization.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yunfei; Yang, Xiufang; Zhang, Shikang; Zhu, Yuejin

    2012-02-01

    A method of precolumn derivatization-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for the determination of theanine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in tea was established. o-Phthalaldehyde (OPA) and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) were chosen as the derivatization reagents. The effects of teapolyphenol (Tp), proline (Pro) and Vitamin C (Vc) on derivatization yields were investigated. The results indicated that Vc not only stabilized the stock solution of OPA, but also enhanced the yield of GABA derivative. However, the yield of theanine derivative was less affected. The HPLC separation system was also optimized. The resolution of the derivatives was improved by adjusting the pH value and phosphate-citric buffer concentration of the mobile phase. The limits of detection (LODs) for GABA and theanine were 3.01 x 10(-5) mmol/L and 7.98 x 10(-5) mmol/L, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were 9.99 x 10(-5) mmol/L and 2.658 x 10(-4) mmol/L, respectively. The linear ranges of GABA and theanine were 0.01 - 0.4 mmol/L with the correlation coefficient of 0.996 and 0.05 - 0.8 mmol/L with the correlation coefficient of 0.995, respectively. The main recoveries for GABA and theanine in green tea, Oolong tea, and black tea, ranged from 99.29% to 119.60% and from 62.88% to 141.06% respectively. The method with simple procedure and efficient separation was proved to be suitable for the determination of GABA and theanine in tea.

  10. Trafficking of the plasma membrane gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter GAT1. Size and rates of an acutely recycling pool.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Quick, Michael W

    2005-05-13

    Plasma membrane neurotransmitter transporters rapidly traffic to and from the cell surface in neurons. This trafficking may be important in regulating neuronal signaling. Such regulation will be subject to the number of trafficking transporters and their trafficking rates. In the present study, we define an acutely recycling pool of endogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid transporters (GAT1) in cortical neurons that comprises approximately one-third of total cellular GAT1. Kinetic analysis of this pool estimates exocytosis and endocytosis time constants of 1.6 and 0.9 min, respectively, and thus approximately one-third of the recycling pool is plasma membrane resident in the basal state. Recent evidence shows that GAT1 substrates, second messengers, and interacting proteins regulate GAT1 trafficking. These triggers could act by altering trafficking rates or by changing the recycling pool size. In the present study we examine three GAT1 modulators. Calcium depletion decreases GAT1 surface expression by diminishing the recycling pool size. Sucrose increases GAT1 surface expression by blocking clathrin- and dynamin-dependent endocytosis, but it does not change the recycling pool size. Protein kinase C decreases surface GAT1 expression by increasing the endocytosis rate, but it does not change the exocytosis rate or the recycling pool size. Based upon estimates of GAT1 molecules in cortical boutons, the present data suggest that approximately 1000 transporters comprise the acutely recycling pool, of which 300 are on the surface in the basal state, and five transporters insert into the plasma membrane every second. This insertion could represent the fusion of one transporter-containing vesicle.

  11. Reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid is associated with emotional and behavioral problems in Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rice, Lauren J; Lagopoulos, Jim; Brammer, Michael; Einfeld, Stewart L

    2016-12-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by infantile hypotonia, hypogonadism, small hands and feet, distinct facial features and usually intellectual impairment. The disorder is associated with severe behavioral disturbances which include hyperphagia leading to morbid obesity, temper outbursts, skin-picking, and compulsive behaviors. While the brain mechanisms that underpin these disturbances are unknown these behaviors suggest a lack of inhibition and thus gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the main inhibitory neurotransmitter may be implicated. In the present study, we investigated in vivo brain GABA and its relationship with emotion and behavior in individuals with PWS. Single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) was performed on 15 individuals with PWS and 15 age- and gender-matched typically developing controls. GABA levels were measured in the parieto-occipital lobe. All other metabolite levels (N-acetyl aspartate, myo-Inositol, glutathione, glutamate, and glutamine + glutamate) were measured in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). GABA levels were significantly lower in the participants with PWS who had clinically significant emotional and behavioral problems relative to typically developing control participants and participants with PWS who did not have emotional and behavioral problems within the clinically significant range. GABA levels were negatively correlated with total behavioral problem scores as well as temper outbursts, skin-picking, depression, social relating difficulties, and a tendency to be self-absorbed. Our data suggests that alterations of the GABAergic system may play an important role in aspects of the pathophysiology of PWS. Pathological mechanism found in PWS may be relevant to understanding the control of similar behaviors in the general population. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Developmental changes in the distribution of gamma-aminobutyric acid-immunoreactive neurons in the embryonic chick lumbosacral spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Antal, M; Berki, A C; Horváth, L; O'Donovan, M J

    1994-05-08

    The development of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-immunoreactive neurons was investigated in the embryonic and posthatch chick lumbosacral spinal cord by using pre- and postembedding immunostaining with an anti-GABA antiserum. The first GABA-immunoreactive cells were detected in the ventral one-half of the spinal cord dorsal to the lateral motor column at E4. GABAergic neurons in this location sharply increased in number and, with the exception of the lateral motor column, appeared throughout the entire extent of the ventral one-half of the spinal gray matter by E6. Thereafter, GABA-immunoreactive neurons extended from ventral to dorsal regions. Stained perikarya first appeared at E8 and then progressively accumulated in the dorsal horn, while immunoreactive neurons gradually declined in the ventral horn. The general pattern of GABA immunoreactivity characteristic of mature animals had been achieved by E12 and was only slightly altered afterwards. In the dorsal horn, most of the stained neurons were observed in laminae I-III, both at the upper (LS 1-3) and at the lower (LS 5-7) segments of the lumbosacral spinal cord. In the ventral horn, the upper and lower lumbosacral segments showed marked differences in the distribution of stained perikarya. GABAergic neurons were scattered in a relatively large region dorsomedial to the lateral motor column at the level of the upper lumbosacral segments, whereas they were confined to the dorsalmost region of lamina VII at the lower segments. The early expression of GABA immunoreactivity may indicate a trophic and synaptogenetic role for GABA in early phases of spinal cord development.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Ethanol potentiation of GABAergic transmission in cultured spinal cord neurons involves gamma-aminobutyric acidA-gated chloride channels

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, A.K.; Ticku, M.K.

    1988-08-01

    The interaction of ethanol with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated 36-Cl-influx and its modulation by various drugs was investigated in C57 mice spinal cord cultured neurons. Ethanol (5-100 mM) potentiated the effect of GABA on /sup 36/Cl-influx; whereas at concentrations greater than or equal to 50 mM ethanol activated Cl- channels directly. The effect of ethanol was specific for GABAA receptor-gated Cl- channels, as ethanol did not potentiate glycine-induced /sup 36/Cl-influx in the same neurons. Both the enhancing and direct effects of ethanol on /sup 36/Cl-influx were blocked by GABA antagonists like bicuculline, picrotoxinin and inverse agonists of the benzodiazepine site like the imidazodiazepine R015-4513 (ethyl-8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo (1,5 alpha), (1,4)benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate) and N-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide (FG-7142). Ethanol potentiating effect of GABA-induced /sup 36/Cl-influx was also reversed by methyl-6,7-dimethyl-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate. The effects of the inverse agonists were blocked by the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist R015-1788. Both R015-4513 and FG-7142 reversed direct and GABA potentiating effects of ethanol effect at concentrations lower than those that exhibit inverse agonistic activity in the /sup 36/Cl-influx assay in cultured neurons. These results suggest that ethanol facilitation of GABAAergic transmission involves GABA receptor-gated Cl- channels and that this interaction may be responsible for some of the pharmacological effects of ethanol.

  14. Gamma-aminobutyric acid loaded halloysite nanotubes and in vitro-in vivo evaluation for brain delivery.

    PubMed

    Kırımlıoğlu, Gülsel Yurtdaş; Yazan, Yasemin; Erol, Kevser; Çengelli Ünel, Çiğdem

    2015-11-30

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a key neurotransmitter where it usually inhibits impulse transmission. GABA release blockage or postsynaptic reaction were determined to provoke epileptic convulsions. The aim of the present study was the development of brain-targeted, nanosized, nontoxic, biocompatible, highly specific formulations. Incorporation of GABA into halloysite nanotubes (HNT) was performed using different methods. Particle size, zeta potential and pH measurements, morphological, thermal, XRD, FTIR analyses and GABA quantification by validated HPLC method were used for the characterization of the systems prepared. Release pattern of GABA from the nanotubes was determined using a dialysis membrane. Following successful incorporation of GABA into HNTs for brain delivery, nanotube formulation coded HNT-GABA H1 was selected for in vivo studies. Smaller particle size with narrow size distribution, possible HNT-GABA interaction indicated by thermal, XRD and FTIR analyses and prolonged release were the parameters considered in this selection. Moreover, HNT-GABA H1 remained stable for 3-month storage period and showed higher cell viability values than GABA. Rats were used in in vivo studies and potential of anticonvulsant effect of GABA was determined in the pentylenetetrazole model of seizure. HNT-GABA H1 was found to increase latency of seizure, decrease ending time of the convulsion, duration of severe convulsion and mortality rate significantly compared to pure GABA. After administration of HNT-GABA H1, GABA concentration in Stratum corsatum measured by enzyme immune assay showed that it was not significantly higher than GABA administered alone. These findings suggest that GABA loaded HNTs reduces the duration of all phases of convulsion indicating efficient delivery of GABA to all brain areas to interfere with epileptic mechanism.

  15. Calcium dependent release of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Haugstad, T S; Hegstad, E; Langmoen, I A

    1992-07-06

    The release of the amino acids GABA, taurine, glycine, glutamine and leucine from human neocortex was investigated in vitro by utilizing brain tissue removed during 8 standard temporal lobectomies for epilepsy or tumor. Slices (0.5 mm thick) were cut from each biopsy and randomly placed in three different chambers. After 90 min preincubation, the three sets of slices were incubated for 60 s in wells containing, respectively, (A) regular ACSF (control), (B) ACSF with 50 mM K+ (to depolarize the cell membrane) and (C) ACSF with 50 mM K+, 0 mM Ca2+ and 4 mM Mg2+ (depolarization during blocked synaptic transmission). The content of amino acids in the wells was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography after pre-column derivatization of the amino acids with o-phthalaldehyde. Membrane depolarization (well B) increased the GABA release to 650% (620 pmol/mg) of control (well A, 95 pmol/mg). Blocking synaptic transmission (well C) reduced the evoked release by 50% (360 pmol/mg). The release of glycine, taurine, glutamine and leucine during membrane depolarization was not significantly different from the control values. The data provide evidence for a Ca(2+)-dependent release of GABA, supporting a possible role of this amino acid as a neurotransmitter in human neocortex.

  16. Effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid agonists, glycine, taurine and neuropeptides on acetylcholine release from the rabbit retina.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, J R; Neal, M J

    1983-03-01

    The light-evoked release of [3H]acetylcholine (ACh) from the rabbit retina in vivo was measured and taken as an index of cholinergic amacrine cell activity. The light-evoked release of [3H]ACh was reduced by locally applied gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), muscimol and 3-aminopropanesulphonic acid (3-APS). The concentrations of these drugs which reduced the light-evoked release of [3H]ACh by 50% (EC50) were 900, 0.3 and 5 microM respectively. In contrast, (-)-baclofen (5 mM), but not (+)-baclofen, significantly increased the light-evoked release of [3H]ACh. The GABA antagonist, bicuculline increased the resting release of [3H]ACh but abolished the inhibitory action of muscimol on the light-evoked release of [3H]ACh. Glycine and taurine also reduced the light-evoked release of [3H]ACh from the retina, their EC50 values being 1.5 and 0.3 mM respectively. This action was blocked by strychnine, but not by bicuculline. In contrast to the GABA antagonist, strychnine did not affect the spontaneous resting release of [3H]ACh. Retinal [3H]ACh release was not affected by dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) morphine, substance P, somatostatin, cholecystokinin sulphate, thyrotropin releasing hormone, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone or angiotensin. Electroretinographic changes produced by amino acids and GABA agonists involved mainly the b-wave and were not correlated with their effects on ACh release. Thus, GABA increased the b-wave amplitude, 3-APS had no effect, whilst muscimol, taurine and glycine either had no effect, or reduced the b-wave amplitude. No obvious changes in the e.r.g. were produced by baclofen, dopamine, 5-HT, morphine or any of the peptides studied with the exception of somatostatin, which reduced the amplitude of the b-wave. It is concluded that cholinergic amacrine cell activity in the rabbit retina may be affected by inputs from other amacrines using GABA or glycine (taurine) as their transmitters, but probably not by inputs from peptidergic or

  17. Structural and functional studies on the sodium- and chloride-coupled. gamma. -aminobutyric acid transporter: Deglycosylation and limited proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kanner, B.I.; Keynan, S.; Radian, R. )

    1989-05-02

    The sodium- and chloride-coupled {gamma}-aminobutyric transporter, an 80-kDa glycoprotein, has been subjected to deglycosylation and limited proteolysis. The treatment of the 80-kDa band with endoglycosidase F results in its disappearance and reveals the presence of a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of about 60 kDa, which is devoid of {sup 125}I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin binding activity but is nevertheless recognized by the antibodies against the 80-kDa band. Upon limited proteolysis with papain or Pronase, the 80-kDa band was degraded to one with an apparent molecular mass of about 60 kDa. This polypeptide still contains the {sup 125}I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin binding activity but is not recognized by the antibody. The effect of proteolysis on function is examined. The transporter was purified by use of all steps except that for the lectin chromatography. After papain treatment and lectin chromatography, {gamma}-aminobutyric transport activity was eluted with N-acetylglucosamine. The characteristics of transport were the same as those of the pure transporter, but the preparation contained instead of the 80-kDa polypeptide two fragments of about 66 and 60 kDa. The ability of the anti-80-kDa antibody to recognize these fragments was relatively low. The observations indicate that the transporter contains exposed domains which are not important for function.

  18. Selected Gamma Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Esters may Provide Analgesia for Some Central Pain Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    Central pain is an enigmatic, intractable condition, related to destruction of thalamic areas, resulting in likely loss of inhibitory synaptic transmission mediated by GABA. It is proposed that treatment of central pain, a localized process, may be treated by GABA supplementation, like Parkinson’s disease and depression. At physiologic pH, GABA exists as a zwitterion that is poorly permeable to the blood brain barrier (BBB). Because the pH of the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) is acidic relative to the plasma, ion trapping may allow a GABA ester prodrug to accumulate and be hydrolyzed within the CSF. Previous investigations with ester local anesthetics may be applicable to some GABA esters since they are weak bases, hydrolyzed by esterases and cross the BBB. Potential non-toxic GABA esters are discussed. Many GABA esters were investigated in the 1980s and it is hoped that this paper may spark renewed interest in their development. PMID:20703328

  19. Association of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid A Receptor α2 Gene (GABRA2) with Alcohol Use Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dawei; Sulovari, Arvis; Cheng, Chao; Zhao, Hongyu; Kranzler, Henry R; Gelernter, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in mammalian brain. GABA receptor are involved in a number of complex disorders, including substance abuse. No variants of the commonly studied GABA receptor genes that have been associated with substance dependence have been determined to be functional or pathogenic. To reconcile the conflicting associations with substance dependence traits, we performed a meta-analysis of variants in the GABAA receptor genes (GABRB2, GABRA6, GABRA1, and GABRG2 on chromosome 5q and GABRA2 on chromosome 4p12) using genotype data from 4739 cases of alcohol, opioid, or methamphetamine dependence and 4924 controls. Then, we combined the data from candidate gene association studies in the literature with two alcohol dependence (AD) samples, including 1691 cases and 1712 controls from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE), and 2644 cases and 494 controls from our own study. Using a Bonferroni-corrected threshold of 0.007, we found strong associations between GABRA2 and AD (P=9 × 10−6 and odds ratio (OR) 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.27 (1.15, 1.4) for rs567926, P=4 × 10−5 and OR=1.21 (1.1, 1.32) for rs279858), and between GABRG2 and both dependence on alcohol and dependence on heroin (P=0.0005 and OR=1.22 (1.09, 1.37) for rs211014). Significant association was also observed between GABRA6 rs3219151 and AD. The GABRA2 rs279858 association was observed in the SAGE data sets with a combined P of 9 × 10−6 (OR=1.17 (1.09, 1.26)). When all of these data sets, including our samples, were meta-analyzed, associations of both GABRA2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms remained (for rs567926, P=7 × 10−5 (OR=1.18 (1.09, 1.29)) in all the studies, and P=8 × 10−6 (OR=1.25 (1.13, 1.38)) in subjects of European ancestry and for rs279858, P=5 × 10−6 (OR=1.18 (1.1, 1.26)) in subjects of European ancestry. Findings from this extensive meta-analysis of five GABAA receptor genes and substance abuse support

  20. Association of gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor α2 gene (GABRA2) with alcohol use disorder.

    PubMed

    Li, Dawei; Sulovari, Arvis; Cheng, Chao; Zhao, Hongyu; Kranzler, Henry R; Gelernter, Joel

    2014-03-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in mammalian brain. GABA receptor are involved in a number of complex disorders, including substance abuse. No variants of the commonly studied GABA receptor genes that have been associated with substance dependence have been determined to be functional or pathogenic. To reconcile the conflicting associations with substance dependence traits, we performed a meta-analysis of variants in the GABAA receptor genes (GABRB2, GABRA6, GABRA1, and GABRG2 on chromosome 5q and GABRA2 on chromosome 4p12) using genotype data from 4739 cases of alcohol, opioid, or methamphetamine dependence and 4924 controls. Then, we combined the data from candidate gene association studies in the literature with two alcohol dependence (AD) samples, including 1691 cases and 1712 controls from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE), and 2644 cases and 494 controls from our own study. Using a Bonferroni-corrected threshold of 0.007, we found strong associations between GABRA2 and AD (P=9 × 10(-6) and odds ratio (OR) 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.27 (1.15, 1.4) for rs567926, P=4 × 10(-5) and OR=1.21 (1.1, 1.32) for rs279858), and between GABRG2 and both dependence on alcohol and dependence on heroin (P=0.0005 and OR=1.22 (1.09, 1.37) for rs211014). Significant association was also observed between GABRA6 rs3219151 and AD. The GABRA2 rs279858 association was observed in the SAGE data sets with a combined P of 9 × 10(-6) (OR=1.17 (1.09, 1.26)). When all of these data sets, including our samples, were meta-analyzed, associations of both GABRA2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms remained (for rs567926, P=7 × 10(-5) (OR=1.18 (1.09, 1.29)) in all the studies, and P=8 × 10(-6) (OR=1.25 (1.13, 1.38)) in subjects of European ancestry and for rs279858, P=5 × 10(-6) (OR=1.18 (1.1, 1.26)) in subjects of European ancestry. Findings from this extensive meta-analysis of five GABAA receptor genes and substance abuse support

  1. Mapping the location of functional nicotinic and gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptors on hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Alkondon, M; Pereira, E F; Albuquerque, E X

    1996-12-01

    To assess the density and distribution of functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors on hippocampal neurons, we have combined infrared videomicroscopy with a nanorobotic micromanipulator system and studied the receptor-mediated currents by using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Acetylcholine or GABA was applied by pressure ejection onto a small segment of either cell soma or dendrite, and the resulting current was measured in cultured hippocampal neurons by using a whole-cell pipette positioned at the cell soma. Type IA nicotinic currents, sensitive to blockade by methyllycaconitine (1 nM) and alpha-bungarotoxin and associated with alpha 7-subunit-containing nAChRs, type II currents, sensitive to blockade by dihydro-beta-erythroidine (100 nM) subserved by alpha 4 beta 2 nAChRs, and GABA-mediated currents were evoked when the agonists were applied to either cell soma or the dendrites. Analysis of the current amplitude with respect to the membrane area covered by the applied agonist provided an estimation of the receptor density along the somato-dendritic axis of the hippocampal neurons. Such analysis revealed: 1) a nonuniform distribution for the receptor types studied; 2) a higher density of nAChR and GABA receptors at the dendrites than at the soma; and 3) an increasing density for both nAChR subtypes with distance from the center of the cell soma, but increasing and then decreasing density for the GABA receptor. Exposure of cultured hippocampal neurons to colchicine (100 nM for 3 days) produced a dramatic reduction in the dendritic branching, and this morphological feature was associated with a significant decrease in the receptor density, such an effect being more prominent for nAChRs than for GABA receptors. Given the high Ca+2 permeability of nAChRs, the dendritic localization of nAChRs suggest that they are involved in modulating the synaptic efficacy at the level of the dendrites.

  2. Comparison of the action of baclofen with gamma-aminobutyric acid on rat hippocampal pyramidal cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, N R; Nicoll, R A

    1985-01-01

    Intracellular recordings from CA1 pyramidal cells in the hippocampal slice preparation were used to compare the action of baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogue, with GABA. Ionophoretic application of GABA or baclofen into stratum (s.) pyramidale evoked hyperpolarizations associated with reductions in the input resistance of the cell. Baclofen responses were easier to elicit in the dendrites than in the cell body layer. Blockade of synaptic transmission, with tetrodotoxin or cadmium, did not reduce baclofen responses, indicating a direct post-synaptic action. (+)-Bicuculline (10 microM) and bicuculline methiodide (100 microM) had little effect on baclofen responses but strongly antagonized somatic GABA responses of equal amplitude. The bicuculline resistance of the baclofen response was not absolute, as higher concentrations of these compounds did reduce it. Pentobarbitone (100 microM) enhanced somatic GABA responses without affecting baclofen responses. (-)-Baclofen was approximately 200 times more potent than (+)-baclofen. The reversal potentials for the somatic GABA and baclofen responses were -70 mV and -85 mV respectively. When the membrane was depolarized, the baclofen response was reduced. This apparent voltage sensitivity was not seen with somatic GABA responses. Altering the chloride gradient across the cell membrane altered the reversal potential of the somatic GABA response but not that of the baclofen response. It was extrapolated that a tenfold shift in the extracellular potassium concentration would cause a 48 mV shift in the reversal potential of the baclofen response. Barium ions reduced the baclofen response, but not the GABA response. Orthodromic stimulation produced a fast inhibitory post-synaptic potential (i.p.s.p.) and a slow i.p.s.p. The properties of the fast and slow i.p.s.p.s were remarkably similar to those of the somatic GABA and baclofen responses, respectively. Application of GABA to the pyramidal cell dendrites evoked, in

  3. Repression of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor alpha1 polypeptide biosynthesis requires chronic agonist exposure.

    PubMed

    Miranda, J D; Barnes, E M

    1997-06-27

    Although it is well established that the number of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors declines in cortical neurons exposed to GABAA receptor agonists, the mechanisms responsible for this use-dependent down-regulation remain unclear. Two hypotheses have been proposed: (i) agonist-evoked sequestration and degradation of surface GABAA receptors and (ii) repression of receptor subunit biosynthesis. We have addressed this problem using [35S]Met/Cys pulse-chase labeling of chick cortical neurons in culture and immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting with an antibody (RP4) directed against a GABAA receptor alpha1-(331-381) fusion protein. Exposure of the cells to GABA or isoguvacine for 2 h to 4 days had no effect on the initial rate of 35S incorporation into the GABAA receptor 51-kDa alpha1 polypeptide, but this rate declined by 33% after a 7-day treatment. This is consistent with a previous report (Baumgartner, B. J., Harvey, R. J., Darlison, M. G., and Barnes, E. M. (1994) Mol. Brain Res. 26, 9-17) that a 7-day GABA treatment of this preparation produced a 45% reduction in the alpha1 subunit mRNA level, while a 4-day exposure had no detectable effect. On the other hand, after a 4-day exposure to these agonists, a 30% reduction in the level of the alpha1 polypeptide was observed on immunoblots, similar to that found previously for down-regulation of GABAA receptor ligand-binding sites. Thus, the de novo synthesis of GABAA receptor alpha1 subunits is subject to a delayed use-dependent repression that was observed after, rather than before, the decline in neuronal levels of the polypeptide. Pulse-chase experiments showed a monophasic degradation of the GABAA receptor 35S-alpha1 subunit with a t1/2 = 7.7 h, a process that was unaffected by the addition of GABA to neurons during the chase period. These nascent 35S-labeled polypeptides are presumably diluted into the neuronal pool of unlabeled unassembled alpha1 subunits, which was found to exceed by a 4:1 molar

  4. Structural and functional studies on the sodium- and chloride-coupled gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter: deglycosylation and limited proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Kanner, B I; Keynan, S; Radian, R

    1989-05-02

    The sodium- and chloride-coupled gamma-aminobutyric transporter, an 80-kDa glycoprotein, has been subjected to deglycosylation and limited proteolysis. The treatment of the 80-kDa band with endoglycosidase F results in its disappearance and reveals the presence of a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of about 60 kDa, which is devoid of 125I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin binding activity but is nevertheless recognized by the antibodies against the 80-kDa band. Upon limited proteolysis with papain or Pronase, the 80-kDa band was degraded to one with an apparent molecular mass of about 60 kDa. This polypeptide still contains the 125I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin binding activity but is not recognized by the antibody. The effect of proteolysis on function was examined. The transporter was purified by use of all steps except that for the lectin chromatography [Radian, R., Bendahan, A., & Kanner, B.I. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 15437-15441]. After papain treatment and lectin chromatography, gamma-aminobutyric transport activity was eluted with N-acetylglucosamine. The characteristics of transport were the same as those of the pure transporter, but the preparation contained instead of the 80-kDa polypeptide two fragments of about 66 and 60 kDa. The ability of the anti-80-kDa antibody to recognize these fragments was relatively low. The observations indicate that the transporter contains exposed domains which are not important for function.

  5. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of beta-alanine, beta-aminoisobutyric acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid in tissue extracts and urine of normal and (aminooxy)acetate-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Abe, T; Kurozumi, Y; Yao, W B; Ubuka, T

    1998-08-07

    A method is described for the simultaneous determination of beta-alanine, beta-aminoisobutyric acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid in biological materials. Amino acids including these beta- and gamma-amino acids were derivatized with 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene-4'-sulfonyl (dabsyl) chloride and dabsyl amino acids formed were separated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Dabsyl derivatives of these beta- and gamma-amino acids were well separated from other dabsyl-amino acids. The method was applied to the determination of these beta- and gamma-amino acids in trichloroacetic acid extracts of various tissues and to the urine of normal rats and those injected with (aminooxy)acetate (AOA). AOA injection (15 mg per kg of body mass) produced remarkable increase in beta-alanine contents in liver, kidney and urine (10.2, 4.6 and 25.7 times, respectively).

  6. Influence of cold stress on contents of soluble sugars, vitamin C and free amino acids including gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in spinach (Spinacia oleracea).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Young-Eun; Kuppusamy, Saranya; Cho, Kye Man; Kim, Pil Joo; Kwack, Yong-Bum; Lee, Yong Bok

    2017-01-15

    The contents of soluble sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, maltose and raffinose), vitamin C and free amino acids (34 compounds, essential and non-essential) were quantified in open-field and greenhouse-grown spinaches in response to cold stress using liquid chromatography. In general, greenhouse cultivation produced nutritionally high value spinach in a shorter growing period, where the soluble sugars, vitamin C and total amino acids concentrations, including essential were in larger amounts compared to those grown in open-field scenarios. Further, low temperature exposure of spinach during a shorter growth period resulted in the production of spinach with high sucrose, ascorbate, proline, gamma-aminobutyric acid, valine and leucine content, and these constitute the most important energy/nutrient sources. In conclusion, cultivation of spinach in greenhouse at a low temperature (4-7°C) and exposure for a shorter period (7-21days) before harvest is recommended. This strategy will produce a high quality product that people can eat.

  7. Effect of androgens on sexual differentiation of pituitary gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit GABA(B) expression.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, María S; Catalano, Paolo N; Bonaventura, María M; Silveyra, Patricia; Bettler, Bernhard; Libertun, Carlos; Lux-Lantos, Victoria A R

    2004-01-01

    Previous work demonstrated a sexually dimorphic ontogenic expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABA(B)R) in rat pituitary. As sex steroids determine sex-specific expression patterns, we now studied the effect of sex hormones on pituitary GABA(B)R expression. GABA(B)R subunits, measured by Western blot and by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone measured by RIA were determined in two experimental designs: First experimental design: 8- and 15-day-old females (8F, 15F); 8F and 15F treated with 100 mug testosterone propionate (TP) on day 1 of life (8F100TP, 15F100TP), 8- and 15-day-old males (8M, 15M) and 8M and 15M castrated on day 1 (8MC, 15MC). Second experimental design: 8-day-old female and male animals: 8F, 8F100TP, 8F treated with 1 mug/day TP on days 1-4 (8F1TP), 8F treated with the androgen antagonist Flutamide (Flut: 2.5 mg/100 g BW of pregnant mother on days E17-E23) (8F-Flut), 8M, 8MC, 8M treated with Flut as above (8M-Flut) and 8MC-Flut. In these animals, in addition, GABA, glutamate, aspartate and taurine were measured by HPLC in hypothalami and cortex. In the first set of experiments, GABA(B1)R mRNA/protein expression was higher in 8F than in 15F, 8M or 15M. In 8F100TP, GABA(B1)R mRNA/protein decreased to male levels. TP treatment did not alter GABA(B1)R expression in 15F. There was no difference in GABA(B1)R expression between 8M and 15M and neonatal castration did not modify its expression. In the second set of experiments, TP (1 mug) or Flut did not modify GABA(B1)R in 8F, while 100 microg TP continued to decrease GABA(B1)R expression. In 8M, Flut, alone or with castration, increased GABA(B1)R mRNA/protein expression to 8F. Hypothalamic GABA content followed the same pattern as pituitary GABA(B)R expression in 8-day-old animals, suggesting a cross-regulation. With regard to hormonal levels, 100 microg, but not 1 microg TP altered gonadotropins at 8 days, although both

  8. Buffer-free production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using an engineered glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taek Jin; Ho, Ngoc Anh Thu; Pack, Seung Pil

    2013-08-15

    Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) converts glutamate into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) through decarboxylation using proton as a co-substrate. Since GAD is active only at acidic conditions even though pH increases as the reaction proceeds, the conventional practice of using this enzyme involved the use of relatively high concentration of buffers, which might complicate the downstream purification steps. Here we show by simulation and experiments that the free acid substrate, glutamic acid, rather than its monosodium salt can act as a substrate and buffer at the same time. This yielded the buffer- and salt-free synthesis of GABA conveniently in a batch mode. Furthermore, we engineered GAD to hyper active ones by extending or reducing the length of the enzyme by just one residue at its C-terminus. Through the buffer-free reaction with engineered GAD, we could synthesize 1M GABA in 3h, which can be translated into a space-time yield of 34.3g/L/h.

  9. The taurine uptake inhibitor guanidinoethyl sulphonate is an agonist at gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) receptors in cultured murine cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Mellor, J R; Gunthorpe, M J; Randall, A D

    2000-05-26

    In patch clamp experiments the beta-amino acid uptake inhibitor guanidinoethyl sulphonate (GES) activated currents in intact cultured murine cerebellar granule neurones. These responses could be attenuated by the gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) (GABA(A)) receptor antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxin. With intracellular chloride concentrations of either 20 or 130 mM, GES-induced current responses reversed polarity near the chloride equilibrium potential. When fast applications of agonist were made to excised granule cell macropatches GES responses were dose-dependent and exhibited significant outward rectification. Like taurine (but unlike GABA and beta-alanine) responses, macroscopic desensitisation of GES-induced currents was slow. Our data indicate that care should be exercised when using GES as a taurine uptake inhibitor in systems that also contain GABA(A) receptors.

  10. A single-amino acid substitution in a gamma-aminobutyric acid subtype A receptor locus is associated with cyclodiene insecticide resistance in Drosophila populations.

    PubMed Central

    ffrench-Constant, R H; Steichen, J C; Rocheleau, T A; Aronstein, K; Roush, R T

    1993-01-01

    Resistance to cyclodiene insecticides, documented in at least 277 species, is perhaps the most common kind of resistance to any pesticide. By using cyclodiene resistance to localize the responsible gene, a gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor/chloride ion-channel gene was previously cloned and sequenced from an insecticide-susceptible Drosophila melanogaster strain. We now describe the molecular genetics of the resistance allele. A single-base-pair mutation, causing a single-amino acid substitution (Ala-->Ser) within the second membrane-spanning region of the channel, was found to be the only consistent difference between resistant and susceptible strains of D. melanogaster. Some resistant strains of Drosophila simulans show the same mutation, whereas others show an alternative single-base-pair mutation in the same codon, resulting in the substitution of a different amino acid (glycine). These constitute single-box-pair mutations in insects that confer high levels of resistance to insecticides. The presence of the resistance mutations was then tested in a much larger set of strains by the PCR and subsequent digestion with a diagnostic restriction endonuclease. Both resistance-associated mutations cause the loss of a Hae II site. This site was invariably present in 122 susceptible strains but absent in 58 resistant lines of the two species sampled from five continents. PCR/restriction endonuclease treatment was also used to examine linkage of an EcoRI polymorphism in a neighboring intron in D. melanogaster, which was found associated with resistance in all but 3 of 48 strains examined. These PCR-based techniques are widely applicable to examination of the uniqueness of different resistance alleles in widespread populations, the identification of resistance mechanisms in different species, and the determination of resistance frequencies in monitoring. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:8095336

  11. Efficient production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using Escherichia coli by co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter.

    PubMed

    Dung Pham, Van; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Si Jae; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bio-product, which is used in pharmaceutical formulations, nutritional supplements, and biopolymer monomer. The traditional GABA process involves the decarboxylation of glutamate. However, the direct production of GABA from glucose is a more efficient process. To construct the recombinant strains of Escherichia coli, a novel synthetic scaffold was introduced. By carrying out the co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter, we redirected the TCA cycle flux to GABA pathway. The genetically engineered E. coli strain produced 1.08 g/L of GABA from 10 g/L of initial glucose. Thus, with the introduction of a synthetic scaffold, we increased GABA production by 2.2-fold. The final GABA concentration was increased by 21.8% by inactivating competing pathways.

  12. [The cross desensitization and modulation of Cl currents activated by gamma-aminobutyric acid and L-glutamate in the isolated neurons of Aplysia].

    PubMed

    Karpenter, D O; King, M V; Aĭrapetian, S N

    1990-01-01

    Chlorine conductance gated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and L-glutamate in the medial pleural neurons of aplysia was studied using voltage clamp technique and a continuous microperfusion system that allowed rapid agonist application. Both GABA and glutamate elicited current responses that rapidly activated and then decayed. Glutamate response could be blocked by perfusion of aspartate or taurine and the GABA current showed voltage dependence. Thus the currents exhibited cross desensitization. It has been found that very low concentrations of acetylcholine (10(-8) to 10(-14) M) which have no electrophysiologic responses of their own, modulate the response to a constant application of GABA. During cooling the preparation blocked this effect, it is possible to suggest that the small doses of acetylcholine effect the membrane chemosensitivity through the cell biochemical mechanism.

  13. Redirection of Metabolic Flux into Novel Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Production Pathway by Introduction of Synthetic Scaffolds Strategy in Escherichia Coli.

    PubMed

    Pham, Van Dung; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Si Jae; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-04-01

    In general, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) pathway involves the decarboxylation of glutamate, which is produced from sugar by Corynebacterium fermentation. GABA can be used for the production of pharmaceuticals and functional foods. Due to the increasing demand of GABA, it is essential to create an effective alternative pathway for the GABA production. In this study, Escherichia coli were engineered to produce GABA from glucose via GABA shunt, which consists of succinate dehydrogenase, succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, and GABA aminotransferase. The three enzymes were physically attached to each other through a synthetic scaffold, and the Krebs cycle flux was redirected to the GABA pathway. By introduction of synthetic scaffold, 0.75 g/l of GABA was produced from 10 g/l of glucose at 30 °C and pH 6.5. The inactivation of competing metabolic pathways provided 15.4 % increase in the final GABA concentration.

  14. G protein activation kinetics and spillover of gamma-aminobutyric acid may account for differences between inhibitory responses in the hippocampus and thalamus.

    PubMed Central

    Destexhe, A; Sejnowski, T J

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a model of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic synaptic transmission mediated by GABAA and GABAB receptors, including cooperativity in the guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein) cascade mediating the activation of K+ channels by GABAB receptors. If the binding of several G proteins is needed to activate the K+ channels, then only a prolonged activation of GABAB receptors evoked detectable currents. This could occur if strong stimuli evoked release in adjacent terminals and the spillover resulted in prolonged activation of the receptors, leading to inhibitory responses similar to those observed in hippocampal slices. The same model also reproduced thalamic GABAB responses to high-frequency bursts of stimuli. In this case, prolonged activation of the receptors was due to high-frequency release conditions. This model provides insights into the function of GABAB receptors in normal and epileptic discharges. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7568165

  15. Paralogous chemoreceptors mediate chemotaxis towards protein amino acids and the non-protein amino acid gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA).

    PubMed

    Rico-Jiménez, Miriam; Muñoz-Martínez, Francisco; García-Fontana, Cristina; Fernandez, Matilde; Morel, Bertrand; Ortega, Alvaro; Ramos, Juan Luis; Krell, Tino

    2013-06-01

    The paralogous receptors PctA, PctB and PctC of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were reported to mediate chemotaxis to amino acids, intermediates of amino acid metabolism and chlorinated hydrocarbons. We show that the recombinant ligand binding regions (LBRs) of PctA, PctB and PctC bind 17, 5 and 2 l-amino acids respectively. In addition, PctC-LBR recognized GABA but not any other structurally related compound. l-Gln, one of the three amino acids that is not recognized by PctA-LBR, was the most tightly binding ligand to PctB suggesting that PctB has evolved to mediate chemotaxis primarily towards l-Gln. Bacteria were efficiently attracted to l-Gln and GABA, but mutation of pctB and pctC, respectively, abolished chemoattraction. The physiological relevance of taxis towards GABA is proposed to reside in an interaction with plants. LBRs were predicted to adopt double PDC (PhoQ/DcuS/CitA) like structures and site-directed mutagenesis studies showed that ligands bind to the membrane-distal module. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies have shown that PctA-LBR and PctB-LBR are monomeric in the absence and presence of ligands, which is in contrast to the enterobacterial receptors that require sensor domain dimers for ligand recognition.

  16. Co-localization of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid and Glutamate in Neurons of the Spider Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Fabian-Fine, Ruth; Meisner, Shannon; Torkkeli, Päivi H; Meinertzhagen, Ian A

    2015-12-01

    Spider sensory neurons with cell bodies close to various sensory organs are innervated by putative efferent axons from the central nervous system (CNS). Light and electronmicroscopic imaging of immunolabeled neurons has demonstrated that neurotransmitters present at peripheral synapses include γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate and octopamine. Moreover, electrophysiological studies show that these neurotransmitters modulate the sensitivity of peripheral sensory neurons. Here, we undertook immunocytochemical investigations to characterize GABA and glutamate-immunoreactive neurons in three-dimensional reconstructions of the spider CNS. We document that both neurotransmitters are abundant in morphologically distinct neurons throughout the CNS. Labeling for the vesicular transporters, VGAT for GABA and VGLUT for glutamate, showed corresponding patterns, supporting the specificity of antibody binding. Whereas some neurons displayed strong immunolabeling, others were only weakly labeled. Double labeling showed that a subpopulation of weakly labeled neurons present in all ganglia expresses both GABA and glutamate. Double labeled, strongly and weakly labeled GABA and glutamate immunoreactive axons were also observed in the periphery along muscle fibers and peripheral sensory neurons. Electron microscopic investigations showed presynaptic profiles of various diameters with mixed vesicle populations innervating muscle tissue as well as sensory neurons. Our findings provide evidence that: (1) sensory neurons and muscle fibers are innervated by morphologically distinct, centrally located GABA- and glutamate immunoreactive neurons; (2) a subpopulation of these neurons may co-release both neurotransmitters; and (3) sensory neurons and muscles are innervated by all of these neurochemically and morphologically distinct types of neurons. The biochemical diversity of presynaptic innervation may contribute to how spiders filter natural stimuli and coordinate appropriate response

  17. Cloning of the. gamma. -aminobutyric acid (GABA). rho. sub 1 cDNA: A GABA receptor subunit highly expressed in the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Cutting, G.R.; Lu, Luo; Kasch, L.M.; Montrose-Rafizadeh, C.; Antonarakis, S.E.; Guggino, W.B.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr. ); O'Hara, B.F.; Donovan, D.M.; Shimada, Shoichi ); Uhl, G.R. Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD )

    1991-04-01

    Type A {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA{sub A}) receptors are a family of ligand-gated chloride channels that are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the nervous system. Molecular cloning has revealed diversity in the subunits that compose this heterooligomeric receptor, but each previously elucidated subunit displays amino acid similarity in conserved structural elements. The authors have used these highly conserved regions to identify additional members of this family by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One PCR product was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a human retina cDNA library. The mature protein predicted from this cDNA sequence is 458 amino acids long and displays between 30 and 38% amino acid similarity to the previously identified GABA{sub A} subunits. This gene is expressed primarily in the retina but transcripts are also detected in the brain, lung, and thymus. Injection of Xenopus oocytes with RNA transcribed in vitro produces a GABA-responsive chloride conductance and expression of the cDNA in COS cells yields GABA-displaceable muscimol binding. These features are consistent with our identification of a GABA subunit, GABA {rho}{sub 1}, with prominent retinal expression that increases the diversity and tissue specificity of this ligand-gated ion-channel receptor family.

  18. Uncoupling of gamma-aminobutyric acid B receptors from GTP-binding proteins by N-ethylmaleimide: effect of N-ethylmaleimide on purified GTP-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, T.; Ogasawara, N.

    1986-03-01

    Treatment of membranes from bovine cerebral cortex with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) resulted in inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding to GABAB receptors. The binding curve for increasing concentrations of agonist was shifted to the right by NEM treatment. Guanine nucleotide had little effect on the binding of GABA to NEM-treated membranes. The addition of purified GTP-binding proteins, which were the substrates of islet-activating protein (IAP), pertussis toxin, to the NEM-treated membranes caused a shift of the binding curve to the left, suggesting modification of GTP-binding proteins rather than receptors by NEM. The effect of NEM on two purified GTP-binding proteins, Gi (composed of three subunits with molecular weight of alpha, 41,000; beta, 35,000; gamma, 10,000) and Go (alpha, 39,000; beta, 35,000; gamma, 10,000) was studied. NEM did not significantly change guanosine 5'-(3-O-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S) binding and GTPase activity of these two proteins. NEM-treated Gi and Go were not ADP-ribosylated by IAP and did not increase GABA binding to NEM-treated membranes. When alpha and beta gamma subunits were treated with NEM and then mixed with nontreated alpha and beta gamma to form Gi or Go, respectively, both oligomers with NEM-treated alpha-subunits lost their abilities to be IAP substrates and to couple to receptors. Results indicate that NEM uncoupled GTP-binding proteins from receptors by modifying alpha-subunits of GTP-binding proteins, and the site seemed to be on or near the site of ADP-ribosylation by IAP. When alpha and beta gamma subunits were treated with NEM and then mixed to form Gi or Go, GTP gamma S binding in the absence of Mg2+ and GTPase activity were changed, although they were not affected when oligomers were treated with NEM. Results suggest the existence of another sulfhydryl group which is protected from NEM by the association of subunits.

  19. Enhanced production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using rice bran extracts by Lactobacillus sakei B2-16.

    PubMed

    Kook, Moo-Chang; Seo, Myung-Ji; Cheigh, Chan-Ick; Pyun, Yu-Ryang; Cho, Seok-Cheol; Park, Hoon

    2010-04-01

    An efficient and simple fermentation process was developed for the production of gamma-amminobutyric acid (GABA) by Lactobacillus sakei B2-16. When the L. sakei B2-16 was cultivated in the rice bran extracts medium containing 4% sucrose, 1% yeast extract and 12% monosodium glutamate, the maximum GABA concentration reached 660.0 mM with 100% conversion yield, showing the 2.4-fold higher GABA concentration compared to the modified MRS medium without the rice bran extracts. The GABA production was scaled-up from a laboratory scale (5 L) to a pilot (300 L) and a plant scales (5,000 L) to investigate the application possibility of GABA production to industrial fields. The GABA production at the pilot and plant scales was similar to the laboratory scale using rice bran extracts medium which could be effective for the low-cost production of GABA.

  20. Involvement of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic systems in thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced rat cerebellar cGMP formation.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, T; Hashimoto, T; Nagai, Y

    1996-12-05

    The increase in cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) caused by subcutaneous injection of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) tartrate was observed in a region-specific manner in the rat cerebellum. TRH tartrate (TRH-T) (2.8, 7.0 and 17 mg/kg as free TRH, s.c.) produced dose-dependent increases in cGMP levels markedly in the cerebellar superior and inferior vermis, and a smaller but still significant increase in the cerebellar hemispheres and brainstem but no significant increases in other brain regions. The TRH-induced increase in the cGMP level in the cerebellum was suppressed by pretreatment with muscimol, THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3(2H)-one) or MK-801 (dizocilpine maleate) and partially suppressed by atropine but was not suppressed by chlordiazepoxide, oxazepam, phentolamine, propranolol, cyproheptadine, haloperidol, baclofen or DNQX (6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione), suggesting the possible involvement of GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)(A)-ergic, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamatergic and cholinergic systems. These results suggest that excitatory amino acids may be involved in the cGMP formation caused by TRH in the cerebellar areas, and that cGMP formation is inhibited by enhancement of GABAA receptor function.

  1. Use of sourdough fermentation and pseudo-cereals and leguminous flours for the making of a functional bread enriched of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA).

    PubMed

    Coda, Rossana; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe; Gobbetti, Marco

    2010-02-28

    Lactobacillus plantarum C48 and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis PU1, previously selected for the biosynthesis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), were used for sourdough fermentation of cereal, pseudo-cereal and leguminous flours. Chickpea, amaranth, quinoa and buckwheat were the flours most suitable to be enriched of GABA. The parameters of sourdough fermentation were optimized. Addition of 0.1mM pyridoxal phosphate, dough yield of 160, inoculum of 5 x 10(7)CFU/g of starter bacteria and fermentation for 24h at 30 degrees C were found to be the optimal conditions. A blend of buckwheat, amaranth, chickpea and quinoa flours (ratio 1:1:5.3:1) was selected and fermented with baker's yeast (non-conventional flour bread, NCB) or with Lb. plantarum C48 sourdough (non-conventional flour sourdough bread, NCSB) and compared to baker's yeast started wheat flour bread (WFB). NCSB had the highest concentration of free amino acids and GABA (ca. 4467 and 504 mg/kg, respectively). The concentration of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of NCSB bread was the highest, as well as the rate of in vitro starch hydrolysis was the lowest. Texture analysis showed that sourdough fermentation enhances several characteristics of NCSB with respect to NCB, thus approaching the features of WFB. Sensory analysis showed that sourdough fermentation allowed to get good palatability and overall taste appreciation.

  2. A functional assay to measure postsynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acidB responses in cultured spinal cord neurons: Heterologous regulation of the same K+ channel

    SciTech Connect

    Kamatchi, G.L.; Ticku, M.K. )

    1991-02-01

    The stimulation of postsynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptors leads to slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials due to the influx of K(+)-ions. This was studied biochemically, in vitro in mammalian cultured spinal cord neurons by using 86Rb as a substitute for K+. (-)-Baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, produced a concentration-dependent increase in the 86Rb-influx. This effect was stereospecific and blocked by GABAB receptor antagonists like CGP 35 348 (3-aminopropyl-diethoxymethyl-phosphonic acid) and phaclofen. Apart from the GABAB receptors, both adenosine via adenosine1 receptors and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) via 5-HT1 alpha agonists also increased the 86Rb-influx. These agonists failed to show any additivity between them when they were combined in their maximal concentration. In addition, their effect was antagonized specifically by their respective antagonists without influencing the others. These findings suggest the presence of GABAB, adenosine1 and 5-HT1 alpha receptors in the cultured spinal cord neurons, which exhibit a heterologous regulation of the same K(+)-channel. The effect of these agonists were antagonized by phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, an activator of protein kinase C, and pretreatment with pertussis toxin. This suggests that these agonists by acting on their own receptors converge on the same K(+)-channel through the Gi/Go proteins. In summary, we have developed a biochemical functional assay for studying and characterizing GABAB synaptic pharmacology in vitro, using spinal cord neurons.

  3. SNAT2 amino acid transporter is regulated by amino acids of the SLC6 gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter subfamily in neocortical neurons and may play no role in delivering glutamine for glutamatergic transmission.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Sukhjeevan; Defamie, Norah; Zhang, Xiong; De Gois, Stéphanie; Shawki, Ali; Mackenzie, Bryan; Chen, Chu; Varoqui, Hélène; Erickson, Jeffrey D

    2009-04-24

    System A transporters SNAT1 and SNAT2 mediate uptake of neutral alpha-amino acids (e.g. glutamine, alanine, and proline) and are expressed in central neurons. We tested the hypothesis that SNAT2 is required to support neurotransmitter glutamate synthesis by examining spontaneous excitatory activity after inducing or repressing SNAT2 expression for prolonged periods. We stimulated de novo synthesis of SNAT2 mRNA and increased SNAT2 mRNA stability and total SNAT2 protein and functional activity, whereas SNAT1 expression was unaffected. Increased endogenous SNAT2 expression did not affect spontaneous excitatory action-potential frequency over control. Long term glutamine exposure strongly repressed SNAT2 expression but increased excitatory action-potential frequency. Quantal size was not altered following SNAT2 induction or repression. These results suggest that spontaneous glutamatergic transmission in pyramidal neurons does not rely on SNAT2. To our surprise, repression of SNAT2 activity was not limited to System A substrates. Taurine, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and beta-alanine (substrates of the SLC6 gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter family) repressed SNAT2 expression more potently (10x) than did System A substrates; however, the responses to System A substrates were more rapid. Since ATF4 (activating transcription factor 4) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein are known to bind to an amino acid response element within the SNAT2 promoter and mediate induction of SNAT2 in peripheral cell lines, we tested whether either factor was similarly induced by amino acid deprivation in neurons. We found that glutamine and taurine repressed the induction of both transcription factors. Our data revealed that SNAT2 expression is constitutively low in neurons under physiological conditions but potently induced, together with the taurine transporter TauT, in response to depletion of neutral amino acids.

  4. [Comparative analysis of action of beta-phenyl derivatives of glutamic and gamma-aminobutyric acid on cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular endothelium after irreversible occlusion of the common carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Volotova, E V; Kurkin, D V; Mazina, N V; Berestovitskaia, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2013-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the effect of phenyl derivatives of glutamic (RGPU-135) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (Phenibut) on cerebral blood flow, vasodilatory endothelial function and the number of circulating endothelial cells desquamated in animals after irreversible occlusion of the common carotid arteries. It was found that animals treated prophylactically by RGPU-135, after occlusion of the common carotid arteries have higher cerebral blood flow and lower the severity of endothelial dysfunction than in animals treated with Phenibut.

  5. Effects of Traumatic Stress Induced in the Juvenile Period on the Expression of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor Type A Subunits in Adult Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cui Yan; Liu, De Xiang; Jiang, Hong; Ho, Cyrus S. H.; Ho, Roger C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Studies have found that early traumatic experience significantly increases the risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) deficits were proposed to be implicated in development of PTSD, but the alterations of GABA receptor A (GABAAR) subunits induced by early traumatic stress have not been fully elucidated. Furthermore, previous studies suggested that exercise could be more effective than medications in reducing severity of anxiety and depression but the mechanism is unclear. This study used inescapable foot-shock to induce PTSD in juvenile rats and examined their emotional changes using open-field test and elevated plus maze, memory changes using Morris water maze, and the expression of GABAAR subunits (γ2, α2, and α5) in subregions of the brain in the adulthood using western blotting and immunohistochemistry. We aimed to observe the role of GABAAR subunits changes induced by juvenile trauma in the pathogenesis of subsequent PTSD in adulthood. In addition, we investigated the protective effects of exercise for 6 weeks and benzodiazepine (clonazepam) for 2 weeks. This study found that juvenile traumatic stress induced chronic anxiety and spatial memory loss and reduced expression of GABAAR subunits in the adult rat brains. Furthermore, exercise led to significant improvement as compared to short-term BZ treatment. PMID:28352479

  6. Psychological stress-reducing effect of chocolate enriched with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in humans: assessment of stress using heart rate variability and salivary chromogranin A.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Takishima, T; Kometani, T; Yokogoshi, H

    2009-01-01

    We studied the psychological stress-reducing effect of chocolate enriched with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), on stress induced by an arithmetic task using changes of heart rate variability (HRV) and salivary chromogranin A (CgA). Subjects ingested 10 g chocolate enriched with 28 mg GABA (GABA chocolate); 15 min after the ingestion, subjects were assigned an arithmetic task for 15 min. After the task, an electrocardiogram was recorded and saliva samples were collected. HRV was determined from the electrocardiogram, and the activity of the autonomic nervous system was estimated through HRV. The CgA concentration of all saliva samples, an index for acute psychological stress, was measured. From HRV, those taking GABA chocolate made a quick recovery to the normal state from the stressful state. The CgA value after the task in those taking GABA chocolate did not increased in comparison with that before ingestion. From these results, GABA chocolate was considered to have a psychological stress-reducing effect.

  7. Postnatal maturation of gamma-aminobutyric acidA and B-mediated inhibition in the CA3 hippocampal region of the rat.

    PubMed

    Gaiarsa, J L; McLean, H; Congar, P; Leinekugel, X; Khazipov, R; Tseeb, V; Ben-Ari, Y

    1995-03-01

    In the adult central nervous system, GABAergic synaptic inhibition is known to play a crucial role in preventing the spread of excitatory glutamatergic activity. This inhibition is achieved by a membrane hyperpolarization through the activation of postsynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) and GABAB receptors. In addition, GABA also depress transmitter release acting through presynaptic GABAB receptors. Despite the wealth of data regarding the role of GABA in regulating the degree of synchronous activity in the adult, little is known about GABA transmission during early stages of development. In the following we report that GABA mediates most of the excitatory drive at early stages of development in the hippocampal CA3 region. Activation of GABAA receptors induces a depolarization and excitation of immature CA3 pyramidal neurons and increases intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i)] during the first postnatal week of life. During the same developmental period, the postsynaptic GABAB-mediated inhibition is poorly developed. In contrast, the presynaptic GABAB-mediated inhibition is well developed at birth and plays a crucial role in modulating the postsynaptic activity by depressing transmitter release at early postnatal stages. We have also shown that GABA plays a trophic role in the neuritic outgrowth of cultured hippocampal neurons.

  8. Effects of subcutaneous administration of the gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) receptor agonist muscimol on water intake in water-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Houston, Abigail J; Wong, John C L; Ebenezer, Ivor S

    2002-11-01

    The effects of the gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) (GABA(A)) receptor agonist muscimol were investigated on water intake in rats that had been deprived of water for 16 h. Muscimol (0.5-2.0 mg/kg sc) produced a dose-related inhibition of water consumption in both male (n=8) and female (n=8) rats, with maximal suppression of drinking occurring during the first 30 min after administration. Doses of 1 and 2 mg/kg produced significant decreases in water intake (P<.01), while a lower dose of 0.5 mg/kg was without effect. The hypodipsic effect of muscimol (1.0 mg/kg sc) was abolished by pretreatment of the animals with the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline (1 mg/kg sc). Furthermore, muscimol (2 mg/kg sc) did not produce aversion in a two-bottle conditioned taste aversion test, indicating that the suppressant effects of muscimol on water intake are not due to drug-induced malaise. The results suggest that systemic administration of muscimol produces a behaviourally specific suppression of primary drinking in rats by a GABA(A) receptor-mediated mechanism. Moreover, this action of muscimol appears to be independent of the gender of the animals.

  9. Differences in the biophysical properties of the benzodiazepine/gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor chloride channel complex in the long-sleep and short-sleep mouse lines.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, T D; Trullas, R; Skolnick, P

    1988-08-01

    Significant differences in the thermal stability of benzodiazepine receptors were found in cerebral cortical membranes prepared from the long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) selected mouse lines. Thus, benzodiazepine receptors from LS mice were heat inactivated (55 degrees C) at a significantly faster rate than those from SS mice. Although gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) reduced the rate of heat inactivation in both lines, the more rapid rate of inactivation in the LS line was maintained. Furthermore, the potency of GABA to enhance [3H]flunitrazepam binding decreased threefold in membranes from LS mice as the incubation temperature was increased from 0 degrees to 37 degrees C, but was unaltered in membranes from SS mice. These differences in the biophysical properties of the benzodiazepine/GABA receptor chloride channel complex ("supramolecular complex"), together with a higher KD for t-[35S]butylbicyclophosphorothionate in membranes from LS compared to SS mice, suggest that the supramolecular complex may modulate the differential sensitivity to some depressants and convulsants in these lines.

  10. Hypergravity exposure decreases gamma-aminobutyric acid immunoreactivity in axon terminals contacting pyramidal cells in the rat somatosensory cortex: a quantitative immunocytochemical image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amelio, F.; Wu, L. C.; Fox, R. A.; Daunton, N. G.; Corcoran, M. L.; Polyakov, I.

    1998-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of gamma-aminobutyric acid immunoreactivity (GABA-IR) in the hindlimb representation of the rat somatosensory cortex after 14 days of exposure to hypergravity (hyper-G) was conducted by using computer-assisted image processing. The area of GABA-IR axosomatic terminals apposed to pyramidal cells of cortical layer V was reduced in rats exposed to hyper-G compared with control rats, which were exposed either to rotation alone or to vivarium conditions. Based on previous immunocytochemical and behavioral studies, we suggest that this reduction is due to changes in sensory feedback information from muscle receptors. Consequently, priorities for muscle recruitment are altered at the cortical level, and a new pattern of muscle activity is thus generated. It is proposed that the reduction observed in GABA-IR of the terminal area around pyramidal neurons is the immunocytochemical expression of changes in the activity of GABAergic cells that participate in reprogramming motor outputs to achieve effective movement control in response to alterations in the afferent information.

  11. Alternate cadmium exposure differentially affects the content of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine within the hypothalamus, median eminence, striatum and prefrontal cortex of male rats.

    PubMed

    Esquifino, A I; Seara, R; Fernández-Rey, E; Lafuente, A

    2001-05-01

    This work examines changes of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine contents in the hypothalamus, striatum and prefrontal cortex of the rat after an alternate schedule of cadmium administration. Age-associated changes were also evaluated, of those before puberty and after adult age. In control rats GABA content decreased with age in the median eminence and in anterior, mediobasal and posterior hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex and the striatum. Taurine content showed similar results with the exception of mediobasal hypothalamus and striatum, where no changes were detected. In pubertal rats treated with cadmium from 30 to 60 days of life, GABA content significantly decreased in all brain regions except in the striatum. When cadmium was administered from day 60 to 90 of life, GABA content was significantly changed in prefrontal cortex only compared with the age matched controls. Taurine content showed similar results in pubertal rats, with the exception of the median eminence and the mediobasal hypothalamus, neither of which showed a change. However, when cadmium was administered to rats from day 60 to 90 of life, taurine content only changed in prefrontal cortex compared with the age matched controls. These results suggest that cadmium differentially affects GABA and taurine contents within the hypothalamus, median eminence, striatum and prefrontal cortex as a function of age.

  12. gamma-Aminobutyric acid-A receptor-mediated suppression of 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced guinea-pig basilar artery smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, J; Hosoda, K; Taniyama, K; Matsumoto, S; Tanaka, C

    1989-01-01

    The mechanism of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced suppression of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT)-induced contractility of cerebral blood vessels was studied in single smooth muscle cells isolated from the guinea-pig basilar artery. GABA reduced 5HT-induced contraction of single smooth muscle cells, and the effect of GABA was mimicked by muscimol, but not baclofen. The response of muscimol was antagonized by bicuculline, thereby indicating that GABAA receptors exist on the smooth muscle of the basilar artery. Since GABA did not change the contraction induced by the addition of Ca2+ to the Ca2+-free medium in the presence of high K+, it is unlikely that GABA inhibits the influx of extracellular Ca2+. The caffeine-induced contraction in the Ca2+-free medium was reduced by GABA, and the effect of GABA was not obtained by treatment with furosemide and in the Cl- -free medium. These results indicate that GABA acts on the GABAA receptor located on smooth muscle cells and reduces the contractility of the basilar artery by suppression of the mobilization of intracellular Ca2+.

  13. Mass transfer characterization of gamma-aminobutyric acid production by Enterococcus faecium CFR 3003: encapsulation improves its survival under simulated gastro-intestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Divyashri, Gangaraju; Prapulla, Siddalingaiya Gurudatt

    2015-03-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production by free and Ca-alginate encapsulated cells of Enterococcus faecium CFR 3003 was investigated. Mass transfer rates characterizing the GABA production process using encapsulated cells were investigated. Experiments were performed to investigate external film and internal pore diffusion mass transfer rates. The Damkohler and Thiele analysis provides a good description of external film and internal pore diffusion resistances, respectively. The experiments revealed that the external film effects could be neglected but the process is affected to the greater extent by internal mass transfer effects and was found to be the principal rate-controlling step. Protective effect of encapsulation on cell survivability was tested under digestive environment, when challenged to salivary α-amylase, simulated gastric fluid and intestinal fluid. Viability of encapsulated cells was significantly higher under simulated gastro-intestinal conditions and could produce higher GABA than those observed with free cells. The results indicate that the Ca-alginate encapsulated probiotics could effectively be delivered to the colonic site for effective inhibitory action.

  14. A comparative study of the action of gamma-aminobutyric acid and piperazine on the lobster muscle fibre and the frog spinal cord.

    PubMed Central

    Constanti, A; Nistri, A

    1976-01-01

    1 The effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and piperazine were compared on two in vitro preparations, the lobster muscle fibre and the frog spinal cord. 2 Both GABA and piperazine increased the membrane conductance of single lobster muscle fibres without changing the membrane potential; sigmoidal log dose-conductance curves for these agents were obtained and a similar model expressed the receptor interaction of both substances. 3 The actions of GABA and piperazine on lobster muscle were antagonized by picrotoxin and were Cl-dependent. 4 In the frog spinal cord GABA depolarized the dorsal roots presumably by mimicking the activity of the transmitter depolarizing the primary afferents; sigmoidal log dose-response curves for GABA were obtained. 5 On the dorsal roots piperazine produced either depolarizations or biphasic responses; these were mainly indirect effects as was shown by experiments in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX). 6 The effects of GABA on the dorsal root (in TTX-treated cords) were antagonized by picrotoxin whereas those of piperazine were more resistant to this alkaloid. The GABA-induced responses appeared to be largely Na+-dependent while both Na+ and Cl- seemed to mediate the effects of piperazine. 7 It is proposed that piperazine has GABA-agonist activity on lobster muscle but little GABA-like activity on the frog spinal cord. PMID:1086111

  15. In vivo effects of ketamine on glutamate-glutamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid in obsessive-compulsive disorder: Proof of concept

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carolyn I.; Kegeles, Lawrence S.; Levinson, Amanda; Ogden, R. Todd; Mao, Xiangling; Milak, Matthew S.; Vermes, Donna; Xie, Shan; Hunter, Liane; Flood, Pamela; Moore, Holly; Shungu, Dikoma C.; Simpson, Helen B.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the rapid and robust clinical effects of ketamine versus saline infusions in a proof-of-concept crossover trial in unmedicated adults with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This study examined the concurrent neurochemical effects of ketamine versus saline infusions using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) during the clinical proof-of-concept crossover trial. Levels of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the excitatory neurochemicals glutamate+glutamine (Glx) were acquired in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), a region implicated in OCD pathology. Seventeen unmedicated OCD adults received two intravenous infusions at least 1 week apart, one of saline and one of ketamine, while lying supine in a 3.0 T GE MR scanner. The order of each infusion pair was randomized. Levels of GABA and Glx were measured in the MPFC before, during, and after each infusion and normalized to water (W). A mixed effects model found that MPFC GABA/W significantly increased over time in the ketamine compared with the saline infusion. In contrast, there were no significant differences in Glx/W between the ketamine and saline infusions. Together with earlier evidence of low cortical GABA in OCD, our findings suggest that models of OCD pathology should consider the role of GABAergic abnormalities in OCD symptomatology. PMID:26104826

  16. Concordance between isolated cleft palate in mice and alterations within a region including the gene encoding the beta 3 subunit of the type A gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor.

    PubMed

    Culiat, C T; Stubbs, L; Nicholls, R D; Montgomery, C S; Russell, L B; Johnson, D K; Rinchik, E M

    1993-06-01

    Genetic and molecular analyses of a number of radiation-induced deletion mutations of the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus in mouse chromosome 7 have identified a specific interval on the genetic map associated with a neonatally lethal mutation that results in cleft palate. This interval, closely linked and distal to p, and bracketed by the genes encoding the alpha 5 and beta 3 subunits of the type A gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (Gabra5 and Gabrb3, respectively), contains a gene(s) (cp1; cleft palate 1) necessary for normal palate development. The cp1 interval extends from the distal breakpoint of the prenatally lethal p83FBFo deletion to the Gabrb3 locus. Among 20 p deletions tested, there was complete concordance between alterations at the Gabrb3 transcription unit and inability to complement the cleft-palate defect. These mapping data, along with previously described in vivo and in vitro teratological effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid or its agonists on palate development, suggest the possibility that a particular type A gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor that includes the beta 3 subunit may be necessary for normal palate development. The placement of the cp1 gene within a defined segment of the larger D15S12h (p)-D15S9h-1 interval in the mouse suggests that the highly homologous region of the human genome, 15q11-q13, be evaluated for a role(s) in human fetal facial development.

  17. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and taurine antagonize the central effects of angiotensin II and renin on the intake of water and salt, and on blood pressure in rats.

    PubMed

    Abe, M; Tokunaga, T; Yamada, K; Furukawa, T

    1988-03-01

    Antagonism by neuro-amino acids of the central effects of angiotensin II and renin in rats was investigated. Angiotensin II (100 ng), injected into the preoptic area, stimulated the intake of water but not salt, to a lesser extent and with a shorter duration as compared with that induced by renin (5 mU), injected into the preoptic area. This angiotensin II-induced intake of water was markedly inhibited by [Sar1, Ile8]-angiotensin II, an angiotensin II receptor antagonist, but not by captopril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, previously administered through the same cannula. The angiotensin II-induced intake of water was also inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) (50-100 micrograms), muscimol, a GABA agonist, (100-200 ng), taurine (100-200 micrograms) and hypotaurine (100-200 micrograms), administered into the cerebroventricle and by GABA (5-10 micrograms), muscimol (10-20 ng) and taurine (10-20 micrograms) injected into the preoptic area in smaller doses. Renin (5 mU), injected into the preoptic area, elicited a marked increase in the intake of water and salt, which lasted for about 3 days. The effect of renin was inhibited by [Sar1, Ile8]-angiotensin II (10 micrograms) and was eliminated by captopril (25 micrograms) injected into the preoptic area. This effect of renin was not influenced by the peripheral administration of captopril. The effect of renin was also inhibited by GABA, muscimol or taurine injected into the cerebroventricle, in larger doses, or into the preoptic area in smaller doses.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Characterization of the Production of Biogenic Amines and Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid in the Soybean Pastes Fermented by Aspergillus oryzae and Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Yeun; Ji, Geun Eog

    2015-04-01

    The production of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) using GABA-producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has been considered to be an attractive strategy. However, some LAB may produce biogenic amines (BA), which may be of concern from the safety viewpoint. The aim of the present study was to characterize the production of GABA and BA in the soybean pastes fermented by Aspergillus oryzae (A. oryzae) FMB S46471 and GABA-producing Lactobacillus brevis (L. brevis) GABA 100. After a ripening period of 90 days, the levels of BA (putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, and tyramine) and GABA in the fermented soybean were assessed by highperformance liquid chromatography. The soybean pastes fermented by A. oryzae and L. brevis showed a range of 7,130-11,592 mg/kg for GABA, 178-305 mg/kg for tyramine, 139-163 mg/kg for putrescine, 7.4-10.8 mg/kg for histamine, and 7.1-7.9 mg/kg for cadaverine, whereas the soybean pastes fermented by A. oryzae only showed a range of 30-1,671 mg/kg for GABA, 0.8-189 mg/kg for tyramine, 1.3-85 mg/kg for putrescine, up to 3.6 mg/kg for histamine, and 0.2-2.4 mg/kg for cadaverine. The results showed that the production of GABA was accompanied by the increase in the production of BA, even though the production levels of histamine and cadaverine were very low. This is the first study to simultaneously characterize the production of BA and GABA in GABA-enriched fermented soybean pastes, and warrants further study to minimize the production of BA while optimizing the production of GABA.

  19. Presynaptic inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acidB-mediated synaptic current by adenosine recorded in vitro in midbrain dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y N; Mercuri, N B; Johnson, S W

    1995-05-01

    Adenosine receptor antagonists such as caffeine cause dopamine-dependent behavioral arousal and hyperlocomotion in rodents. In the present study, we used the whole-cell recording technique in the rat brain slice to investigate effects of adenosine on dopamine neurons and their synaptic inputs in the substantia nigra zona compacta and ventral tegmental area. Adenosine was most potent for inhibiting the amplitude of the inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSC) mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptors (EC50 = 47 +/- 3 microM) compared with inhibition of the GABAA-mediated IPSC (117 +/- 51 microM) and the excitatory amino acid-mediated excitatory postsynaptic current (119 +/- 36 microM). Adenosine failed to inhibit current evoked by exogenous GABA or baclofen, suggesting that adenosine acted presynaptically to reduce GABA release from nerve terminals. Adenosine inhibited the GABAB-mediated IPSC by acting at the adenosine A1 receptor, because its effect was blocked by the selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (100 nM), as well as by the methylxanthines caffeine (1 mM) and theophylline (300 microM). The rank-order of potency of adenosine agonists [N6-cyclohexyladenosine > R-(-)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine = N6- cyclohexyladenosine > 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > 2-chloroadenosine] also was consistent with activation of the adenosine A1 receptor, whereas the selective adenosine A2A agonist CGS 21680 [2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine] had no effect on the GABAB IPSC. None of the adenosine agonists or antagonists affected holding current or membrane conductance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Activity-guided identification of (S)-malic acid 1-O-D-glucopyranoside (morelid) and gamma-aminobutyric acid as contributors to umami taste and mouth-drying oral sensation of morel mushrooms (Morchella deliciosa Fr.).

    PubMed

    Rotzoll, Nina; Dunkel, Andreas; Hofmann, Thomas

    2005-05-18

    Although morel mushrooms are widely used as tasty ingredients in savory dishes, knowledge of the key compounds evoking their attractive taste is still very fragmentary. In the present study, taste activity-guided fractionation of an aqueous morel extract by means of the recently developed taste dilution analysis (TDA) enabled the localization of several umami-like-tasting fractions as well as a fraction imparting an intense mouth-drying sensation to the oral cavity. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC), LC-MS, and amino acid analysis led to the successful identification of gamma-aminobutyric acid as the chemical inducer of the mouth-drying and mouth-coating oral sensations imparted by the morel extract. Besides the well-known umami-like taste contributors L-glutamic acid, L-aspartic acid, and succinic acid, an additional HILIC fraction was isolated and evaluated as tasting umami-like. LC-MS and NMR studies revealed that this fraction consisted of a mixture of (S)-malic acid 1-O-alpha-D-glucopyranoside and (S)-malic acid 1-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, the structure of which could be successfully confirmed by independent synthesis. To the best of our knowledge, this morel-derived glycoside, which we named (S)-morelid, has previously not been reported in any food products. Sensory analysis of aqueous solutions of the compounds identified revealed threshold concentrations of 0.02 mmol/L for the mouth-drying effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid and 6.0 mmol/L for the umami-like, slightly sour taste of (S)-morelid.

  1. Calretinin in the entorhinal cortex of the rat: distribution, morphology, ultrastructure of neurons, and co-localization with gamma-aminobutyric acid and parvalbumin.

    PubMed

    Wouterlood, F G; van Denderen, J C; van Haeften, T; Witter, M P

    2000-09-18

    Calretinin is a marker that differentially labels neurons in the central nervous system. We used this marker to distinguish subtypes of neurons within the general population of neurons in the entorhinal cortex of the rat. The distribution, morphology, and ultrastructure of calretinin-immunopositive neurons in this cortical area were documented. We further analyzed the co-localization of the marker with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and studied whether calretinin-positive neurons project to the hippocampal formation. Methods used included single-label immunocytochemistry at the light and electron microscopic level, retrograde tracing combined with immunocytochemistry, and double-label confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The entorhinal cortex contained calretinin-positive cells in a scattered fashion, in all layers except layer IV (lamina dissecans). Bipolar and multipolar dendritic configurations were present, displaying smooth dendrites. Bipolar cells had a uniform morphology whereas the multipolar calretinin cell population consisted of large neurons, cells with long ascending dendrites, horizontally oriented neurons, and small spherical cells. Retrograde tracing combined with immunocytochemistry showed that calretinin is not present in cells projecting to the hippocampus. Few synapic contacts between calretinin-positive axon terminals and immunopositive cell bodies and dendrites were seen. Most axon terminals of calretinin fibers formed asymmetrical synapses, and immunopositive axons were always unmyelinated. Results obtained in the CLSM indicate that calretinin co-exists in only 18-20% of the GABAergic cell population (mostly small spherical and bipolar cells). Thus, the entorhinal cortex contains two classes of calretinin interneurons: GABA positive and GABA negative. The first class is presumably a classical, GABAergic inhibitory interneuron. The finding of calretinin-immunoreactive axon terminals with asymmetrical synapses suggests that the second

  2. Twenty-four hour rhythm of plasma prolactin in female rabbit pups. Correlation with hypothalamic and adenohypophysial dopamine, serotonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid and taurine content.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M P; Cardinali, D P; Jiménez, V; Alvariño, M; Esquifino, A I

    2006-01-01

    Lactation in the rabbit is a nocturnal activity, extremely short and regular, that can be a strong synchronizer for the development of circadian rhythmicity in the pups. In the present study, 24-h rhythmicity of plasma prolactin and median eminence and anterior pituitary content of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5HT), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine were examined in 11 days old female pups kept under 16 h light:8 h dark photoperiods (lights on at 08:00 h). Groups of six to seven female rabbit pups were killed by decapitation at six different time points throughout a 24-h cycle, starting at 09:00 h. Plasma prolactin levels changed significantly throughout the day, showing two peaks, one at first half of rest span (at 13:00 h) and another one at the beginning of the scotophase (at 01:00 h), just preceding doe visit. Median eminence DA content changed in a bimodal way as a function of time of day, displaying two maxima, at the beginning of the rest span and of the activity phase. Median eminence DA and plasma prolactin correlated significantly in an inverse way. Two maxima in median eminence 5HT levels were found, about 4 h in advance to the prolactin peaks. Circulating prolactin correlated inversely with median eminence 5HT content and directly with adenohypophysial 5HT content. Median eminence GABA content reached its maximum at the beginning of the scotophase and correlated significantly with plasma prolactin concentration. A positive correlation between plasma prolactin and adenohypophysial taurine content was observed. These results show that the circadian rhythmicity in prolactin secretory mechanisms in female rabbit pups develops during the early neonatal life.

  3. Effects of yoga on the autonomic nervous system, gamma-aminobutyric-acid, and allostasis in epilepsy, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Streeter, C C; Gerbarg, P L; Saper, R B; Ciraulo, D A; Brown, R P

    2012-05-01

    A theory is proposed to explain the benefits of yoga practices in diverse, frequently comorbid medical conditions based on the concept that yoga practices reduce allostatic load in stress response systems such that optimal homeostasis is restored. It is hypothesized that stress induces (1) imbalance of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) with decreased parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) and increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity, (2) underactivity of the gamma amino-butyric acid (GABA) system, the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter system, and (3) increased allostatic load. It is further hypothesized that yoga-based practices (4) correct underactivity of the PNS and GABA systems in part through stimulation of the vagus nerves, the main peripheral pathway of the PNS, and (5) reduce allostatic load. Depression, epilepsy, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and chronic pain exemplify medical conditions that are exacerbated by stress, have low heart rate variability (HRV) and low GABAergic activity, respond to pharmacologic agents that increase activity of the GABA system, and show symptom improvement in response to yoga-based interventions. The observation that treatment resistant cases of epilepsy and depression respond to vagal nerve stimulation corroborates the need to correct PNS underactivity as part of a successful treatment plan in some cases. According to the proposed theory, the decreased PNS and GABAergic activity that underlies stress-related disorders can be corrected by yoga practices resulting in amelioration of disease symptoms. This has far-reaching implications for the integration of yoga-based practices in the treatment of a broad array of disorders exacerbated by stress.

  4. Bipotential precursors of putative fibrous astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in rat cerebellar cultures express distinct surface features and neuron-like. gamma. -aminobutyric acid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, G.; Gallo, V.; Ciotti, T.

    1986-03-01

    When postnatal rat cerebellar cells were cultured in a chemically defined, serum-free medium, the only type of astrocyte present was unable to accumulate ..gamma..-(/sup 3/H)aminobutyric acid (GABA), did not express surface antigens recognized by two monoclonal antibodies, A2B5 and LB1, and showed minimal proliferation. In these cultures, nonneuronal A2B5/sup +/, LB1/sup +/ stellate cells exhibiting neuron-like (/sup 3/H)GABA uptake formed cell colonies of increasing size and were GFAP/sup -/. After about one week of culturing, the A2B5/sup +/, LB1/sup +/, GABA-uptake positive cell groups became galactocerebroside (GalCer) positive. Immunocytolysis of the A2B5/sup +/ cells at 3 and 4 days in vitro prevented the appearance of the A2B5/sup +/, LB1/sup +/, GABA-uptake positive cell colonies, and also of the GalCer/sup +/ cell groups. If 10% (vol/vol) fetal calf serum was added to 6-day cultures, the A2B5/sup +/, LB1/sup +/, GABA-uptake positive cell groups expressed GFAP and not GalCer. If the serum was added to the cultures 2 days after lysing the A2B5/sup +/ cells, only A2B5/sup -/, LB1/sup -/, GABA-uptake negative astrocytes proliferated. It is concluded that the putative fibrous astrocytes previously described in serum-containing cultures derive from bipotential precursors that differentiate into oligodendrocytes (GalCer/sup +/) in serum-free medium or into astrocytes (GFAP/sup +/) in the presence of serum, while the epithelioid A2B5/sup -/, LB1/sup -/, GABA-uptake negative astrocytes originate from a different precursor not yet identified.

  5. Enhanced Production of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid by Optimizing Culture Conditions of Lactobacillus brevis HYE1 Isolated from Kimchi, a Korean Fermented Food.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hee Seon; Cha, In-Tae; Roh, Seong Woon; Shin, Hae-Hun; Seo, Myung-Ji

    2017-03-28

    This study evaluated the effects of culture conditions, including carbon and nitrogen sources, L-monosodium glutamate (MSG), and initial pH, on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production by Lactobacillus brevis HYE1 isolated from kimchi, a Korean traditional fermented food. L. brevis HYE1 was screened by the production analysis of GABA and genetic analysis of the glutamate decarboxylase gene, resulting in 14.64 mM GABA after 48 h of cultivation in MRS medium containing 1% (w/v) MSG. In order to increase GABA production by L. brevis HYE1, the effects of carbon and nitrogen sources on GABA production were preliminarily investigated via one-factor-at-a-time optimization strategy. As the results, 2% maltose and 3% tryptone were determined to produce 17.93 mM GABA in modified MRS medium with 1% (w/v) MSG. In addition, the optimal MSG concentration and initial pH were determined to be 1% and 5.0, respectively, resulting in production of 18.97 mM GABA. Thereafter, response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to determine the optimal conditions of the above four factors. The results indicate that pH was the most significant factor for GABA production. The optimal culture conditions for maximum GABA production were also determined to be 2.14% (w/v) maltose, 4.01% (w/v) tryptone, 2.38% (w/v) MSG, and an initial pH of 4.74. In these conditions, GABA production by L. brevis HYE1 was predicted to be 21.44 mM using the RSM model. The experiment was performed under these optimized conditions, resulting in GABA production of 18.76 mM. These results show that the predicted and experimental values of GABA production are in good agreement.

  6. Stimulation of high affinity gamma-aminobutyric acidB receptors potentiates the depolarization-induced increase of intraneuronal ionized calcium content in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    De Erausquin, G; Brooker, G; Costa, E; Wojcik, W J

    1992-09-01

    In the treatment of spasticity, the therapeutic cerebrospinal fluid levels of (+/-)-baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptor agonist, are below 1 microM. However, the mechanism of the therapeutic action of (+/-)-baclofen remains unknown, because, for the most part, the action of (+/-)-baclofen on GABAB receptors requires micromolar concentrations. Using fura-2 fluorescence microscopy, intracellular ionized calcium was measured in cerebellar granule neurons. Stimulation of a high affinity GABAB receptor potentiated by 2-3-fold the rise in intracellular calcium observed after depolarization of the cell with a Krebs Ringer's buffered solution containing 40 mM K+. Both GABA (100 nM) and (+/-)-baclofen (10-100 nM) stimulated this high affinity receptor. The potentiation of the depolarization-induced rise in intracellular calcium by (+/-)-baclofen (100 nM) was completely blocked by the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 35348 (200 microM). Also, the intracellular calcium response induced by the activation of high affinity GABAB receptors was prevented by dantrolene (10 microM). The cerebellar granule neurons contained calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) stores. Caffeine (3 mM) and ryanodine (100 microM) potentiated the depolarization-induced rise in intracellular calcium, and this response to both drugs was blocked by dantrolene (10 microM). Because dantrolene does not prevent the rise in intracellular calcium after cell depolarization (this calcium originated from the influx of extracellular calcium), (+/-)-baclofen acting via the high affinity GABAB receptor indirectly activates the CICR stores, allowing the influx of extracellular calcium to trigger the release of calcium from these dantrolene-sensitive CICR stores. Thus, this high affinity GABAB receptor might become activated during persistent depolarization caused by pathological states and could be a mechanism to be studied for the therapeutic action of (+/-)-baclofen in spasticity.

  7. Modulation of the release of norepinephrine by gamma-aminobutyric acid and morphine in the frontal cerebral cortex of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Peoples, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    Agents that enhance gamma-aminobutyric acid, or GABA, neurotransmission modulate certain effects of opioids, such as analgesia. Opioid analgesia is mediated in part by norepinephrine in the forebrain. In this study, the interactions between morphine and GABAergic agents on release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine from rat frontal cerebral cortical slices were examined. GABA, 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}-10{sup {minus}3} M, enhanced potassium stimulated ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine release and reversed the inhibitory effect of morphine in a noncompetitive manner. GABA did not enhance release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine stimulated by the calcium ionophore A23187. The effect of GABA was reduced by the GABA{sub A} receptor antagonists bicuculline methiodide or picrotoxin, and by the selective inhibitor of GABA uptake SKF 89976A, but was blocked completely only when bicuculline methiodide and SKF 89976A were used in combination. The GABA{sub A} agonist muscimol, 10{sup {minus}4} M, mimicked the effect of GABA, but the GABA{sub B} agonist ({plus minus})baclofen, 10{sup {minus}4} M, did not affect the release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine in the absence or the presence of morphine. Thus GABA appears to produce this effect by stimulating GABA uptake and GABA{sub A}, but not GABA{sub B}, receptors. In contrast to the results that would be predicted for an event involving GABA{sub A} receptors, however, the effect of GABA did not desensitize, and benzodiazepine agonists did not enhance the effect of GABA at any concentration tested between 10{sup {minus}8} and 10{sup {minus}4} M. Thus these receptors may constitute a subclass of GABA{sub A} receptors. These results support a role of GABA uptake and GABA{sub A} receptors in enhancing the release of norepinephrine and modulating its inhibition by opioids in the frontal cortex of the rat.

  8. Stoichiometry of expressed alpha(4)beta(2)delta gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors depends on the ratio of subunit cDNA transfected.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Kelly R; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2010-05-07

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) is the target of many depressants, including benzodiazepines, anesthetics, and alcohol. Although the highly prevalent alphabetagamma GABA(A)R subtype mediates the majority of fast synaptic inhibition in the brain, receptors containing delta subunits also play a key role, mediating tonic inhibition and the actions of endogenous neurosteroids and alcohol. However, the fundamental properties of delta-containing GABA(A)Rs, such as subunit stoichiometry, are not well established. To determine subunit stoichiometry of expressed delta-containing GABA(A)Rs, we inserted the alpha-bungarotoxin binding site tag in the alpha(4), beta(2), and delta subunit N termini. An enhanced green fluorescent protein tag was also inserted into the beta(2) subunit to shift its molecular weight, allowing us to separate subunits using SDS-PAGE. Tagged alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs were expressed in HEK293T cells using various ratios of subunit cDNA, and receptor subunit stoichiometry was determined by quantitating fluorescent alpha-bungarotoxin bound to each subunit on Western blots of surface immunopurified tagged GABA(A)Rs. The results demonstrate that the subunit stoichiometry of alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs is regulated by the ratio of subunit cDNAs transfected. Increasing the ratio of delta subunit cDNA transfected increased delta subunit incorporation into surface receptors with a concomitant decrease in beta(2) subunit incorporation. Because receptor subunit stoichiometry can directly influence GABA(A)R pharmacological and functional properties, considering how the transfection protocols used affect subunit stoichiometry is essential when studying heterologously expressed alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs. Successful bungarotoxin binding site tagging of GABA(A)R subunits is a novel tool with which to accurately quantitate subunit stoichiometry and will be useful for monitoring GABA(A)R trafficking in live cells.

  9. The role of gamma-aminobutyric acid/glycinergic synaptic transmission in mediating bilirubin-induced hyperexcitation in developing auditory neurons.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xin-Lu; Liang, Min; Shi, Hai-Bo; Wang, Lu-Yang; Li, Chun-Yan; Yin, Shan-Kai

    2016-01-05

    Hyperbilirubinemia is a common clinical phenomenon observed in human newborns. A high level of bilirubin can result in severe jaundice and bilirubin encephalopathy. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying bilirubin excitotoxicity are unclear. Our previous studies showed the action of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)/glycine switches from excitatory to inhibitory during development in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), one of the most sensitive auditory nuclei to bilirubin toxicity. In the present study, we investigated the roles of GABAA/glycine receptors in the induction of bilirubin hyperexcitation in early developing neurons. Using the patch clamp technique, GABAA/glycine receptor-mediated spontaneous inhibitory synaptic currents (sIPSCs) were recorded from bushy and stellate cells in acute brainstem slices from young mice (postnatal day 2-6). Bilirubin significantly increased the frequency of sIPSCs, and this effect was prevented by pretreatments of slices with either fast or slow Ca(2+) chelators BAPTA-AM and EGTA-AM suggesting that bilirubin can increase the release of GABA/glycine via Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms. Using cell-attached recording configuration, we found that antagonists of GABAA and glycine receptors strongly attenuated spontaneous spiking firings in P2-6 neurons but produced opposite effect in P15-19 neurons. Furthermore, these antagonists reversed bilirubin-evoked hyperexcitability in P2-6 neurons, indicating that excitatory action of GABA/glycinergic transmission specifically contribute to bilirubin-induced hyperexcitability in the early stage of development. Our results suggest that bilirubin-induced enhancement of presynaptic release GABA/Glycine via Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms may play a critical role in mediating neuronal hyperexcitation associated with jaundice, implicating potential new strategies for predicting, preventing, and treating bilirubin neurotoxicity.

  10. No Effect of Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Levels in Patients with Recurrent Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Skadi; List, Jonathan; Mekle, Ralf; Lindenberg, Robert; Bukowski, Martin; Ott, Stefanie; Schubert, Florian; Ittermann, Bernd; Flöel, Agnes

    2017-01-15

    In patients in the chronic phase after recurrent mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), alterations in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration and receptor activity have been reported, possibly mediating subtle but persistent cognitive deficits and increased rate of dementia in older age. We evaluated whether anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (atDCS) over the primary motor cortex reduces GABA concentration and GABAB receptor activity in patients with recurrent mTBI. Seventeen patients (mean age 25, two women) in the chronic phase after recurrent mTBI and 22 healthy control subjects (mean age 26, two women) were included. All participants received comprehensive cognitive testing and detailed questionnaires on post-concussive symptoms at baseline. Subsequently, they participated in four experimental sessions, consisting of either magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)/atDCS/MRS, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)/atDCS/TMS, MRS/sham/MRS, or TMS/sham/TMS to determine GABA concentration (from MRS) and GABAB receptor activity (from TMS) after atDCS and after sham stimulation. Patients with mTBI scored significantly lower on verbal fluency tasks compared with healthy control subjects. GABA concentration at baseline was associated with the number of mTBI, although no group differences in GABA concentration and GABAB receptor activity were found. Moreover, no effects of atDCS on GABA concentration and receptor activity were seen in patients with mTBI or healthy control subjects. GABA concentration may increase with the number of mTBI, but atDCS did not modulate GABA concentration and receptor activity, as has been reported previously. Specifics of experimental design and analysis, but also characteristics of the respective samples, may account for these differential findings, and should be addressed in future larger studies.

  11. Extracellular gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the rat caudate-putamen: monitoring the neuronal and glial contribution by intracerebral microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Campbell, K; Kalén, P; Lundberg, C; Wictorin, K; Rosengren, E; Björklund, A

    1993-06-18

    Intracerebral microdialysis with high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to electrochemical detection was employed to characterize gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release and the effects induced by a preceding neuron-depleting ibotenic acid (IBO) lesion in the rat caudate-putamen (CPu). Extracellular GABA overflow was monitored in the intact and excitotoxically lesioned CPu, either 7-10 days (acute) or more than 3 months post-lesioning (chronic), using loop type dialysis probes perfused at a rate of 2 microliters/min. In the intact CPuu, basal GABA levels were 0.97 pmol/30 microliters of dialysate in the awake animals and 0.76 pmol/30 microliters under halothane anaesthesia. In both the acute and chronic IBO lesioned CPu the extracellular GABA levels were reduced by 80% and 67%, respectively, under halothane anaesthesia. KCl added to the perfusion fluid at a concentration of 100 mM resulted in dramatic increases in GABA overflow from baseline levels in the intact CPu (60- to 70-fold), which were almost totally abolished (> 95%) in the excitotoxically lesioned CPu. Veratridine administered at 75 microM, produced a 45-fold increase in GABA overflow in the intact CPu, but failed to produce any effect in the lesioned CPu. The addition of nipecotic acid (0.5 mM), a GABA uptake blocker, increased basal extracellular GABA levels 6-15-fold in the intact CPu, while GABA overflow in either the acute or chronic lesioned CPu was not significantly altered. Although Ca(2+)-free conditions (with 20 mM Mg2+ added) or tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 microM) did not alter the basal GABA overflow in the intact CPU under halothane anaesthesia, the omission of Ca2+ resulted in a 47% reduction in basal extracellular GABA levels in awake, freely moving animals. Nipecotic acid-induced GABA overflow was reduced by 22% under Ca(2+)-free conditions, and by 33% in the presence of 1 microM TTX. Moreover, KCl-evoked GABA overflow was reduced by 86% in Ca(2+)-free conditions and by 40% when

  12. Role of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and metabotropic glutamate receptors in nicotine reinforcement: potential pharmacotherapies for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Markou, Athina; Paterson, Neil E; Semenova, Svetlana

    2004-10-01

    Previous work indicated a role for GABA and glutamate in the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse. The present studies assessed the effects of GABAergic and glutamatergic manipulations on the reinforcing effects of nicotine as assessed by intravenous nicotine self-administration. Male Wistar rats were allowed to self-administer either of two nicotine doses under a fixed ratio or a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement. The effects of a glutamatergic compound on nicotine self-administration in male DBA/2J mice were also explored. Finally, to assess for nonspecific effects of the drug manipulations, the effects of all test compounds on responding maintained by a food reinforcer were investigated. The pharmacological manipulations used were: gamma-vinyl-GABA (vigabatrin or GVG), an irreversible inhibitor of GABA transaminase, the GABAB receptor agonists (-)baclofen and CGP44532, and the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) antagonist MPEP. GVG, CGP44532, and (-)baclofen dose-dependently decreased nicotine self-administration on the fixed-ratio schedule, but also decreased food-maintained responding. Furthermore, CGP44532 decreased breakpoints for nicotine and food at identical doses under the progressive-ratio schedule. MPEP dose-dependently decreased nicotine self-administration with no effect on food-maintained responding in rats. MPEP also decreased nicotine self-administration in the mice. These results demonstrate that activation of GABAB receptors or blockade of mGluR5 decreased nicotine self-administration. Although there was some selectivity for the effects of the GABAergic manipulations, there was clear selectivity of the effects of MPEP on nicotine- versus food-maintained responding. Thus, compounds that increase GABAergic neurotransmission and antagonists at mGluR5 have potential as anti-smoking medications for humans.

  13. Chemical-exchange-saturation-transfer magnetic resonance imaging to map gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, myoinositol, glycine, and asparagine: Phantom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jang-Hoon; Kim, Hyug-Gi; Woo, Dong-Cheol; Jeong, Ha-Kyu; Lee, Soo Yeol; Jahng, Geon-Ho

    2017-03-01

    The physical and technical development of chemical-exchange-saturation-transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using clinical 3 T MRI was explored with the goal of mapping asparagine (Asn), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), glycine (Gly), and myoinositol (MI), which exist in the brain. Phantoms with nine different conditions at concentrations of 10, 30, and 50 mM and pH values of 5.6, 6.2, and 7.4 were prepared for the five target molecules to evaluate the dependence of the CEST effect in the concentration, the pH, and the amplitude of the applied radiofrequency field B1. CEST images in the offset frequency range of ±6 parts per million (ppm) were acquired using a pulsed radio-frequency saturation scheme with a clinical 3 T MRI system. A voxel-based main magnetic field B0 inhomogeneity correction, where B0 is the center frequency offset at zero ppm, was performed by using the spline interpolation method to fit the full Z-spectrum to estimate the center frequency. A voxel-based CEST asymmetry map was calculated to evaluate amide (-NH), amine (-NH2), and hydroxyl (-OH) groups for the five target molecules. The CEST effect for Glu, GABA, and Gly clearly increased with increasing concentrations. The CEST effect for MI was minimal, with no noticeable differences at different concentrations. The CEST effect for Glu and Gly increased with increasing acidity. The highest CEST asymmetry for GABA was observed at pH 6.2. The CEST effect for Glu, GABA, and Gly increased with increasing B1 amplitude. For all target molecules, the CEST effect for the human 3 T MRI system increased with increasing concentration and B1 amplitude, but varied with pH, depending on the characteristics of the molecules. The CEST effect for MI may be not suitable with clinical MRI systems. These results show that CEST imaging in the brain with the amine protons by using 3 T MRI is possible for several neuronal diseases.

  14. Transmembrane domains I and II of the gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter GAT-4 contain molecular determinants of substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Nir; Kanner, Baruch I

    2004-06-01

    The sodium- and chloride-dependent GABA transporters GABA transporter (GAT) 1 to 4 in the central nervous system enable efficient synaptic transmission by removing the neurotransmitter from the cleft. Taurine interacts only weakly with the GABA transporter GAT-4 (IC50 approximately 1.6 mM). Glutamate-61 is located in the conserved transmembrane domain I of GAT-4, whereas in the related taurine-transporter taurine transporter (TAUT), glycine occupies the equivalent position. [3H]GABA uptake by the GAT-4 E61G mutant becomes markedly more sensitive to inhibition by taurine (IC50 approximately 0.26 mM). Replacement of cysteine-94, located in the conserved transmembrane domain II of GAT-4, to its TAUT counterpart serine, results only in a modest increase in the ability of taurine to inhibit GABA uptake. However, introduction of glycine at this position decreases the IC50 for taurine by approximately 8-fold (IC50 approximately 0.20 mM). The inhibitory potency of taurine is inversely correlated with the volume of the side chain of the amino acid residue introduced at positions 61 and 94. It is striking that the IC50 for taurine of the E61G/C94G double mutant is decreased by approximately 35-fold (IC50 approximately 0.05 mM), and this inhibition of GABA transport is competitive. Changes in the inhibitory potency of the mutants described are also observed with beta-ala-nine and GABA, although they are much less pronounced. Our results suggest that determinants on transmembrane domains I and II can influence the specificity of the substrate binding pocket. The size of the side chain at positions 61 and 94 seems to determine the ability of substrate and substrate analogs to interact with the transporter.

  15. Potentiation by sevoflurane of the gamma-aminobutyric acid-induced chloride current in acutely dissociated CA1 pyramidal neurones from rat hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J.; Harata, N.; Akaike, N.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of a new kind of volatile anaesthetic, sevoflurane (Sev), on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride current (Icl) in single neurones dissociated from the rat hippocampal CA1 area were examined using the nystatin perforated patch recording configuration under the voltage-clamp condition. All drugs were applied with a rapid perfusion system, termed the "Y-tube' method. 2. When the concentrations were higher than 3 x 10(-4) M, Sev, itself, induced an inward current (ISev) at a holding potential (VH) of -40 mV. The concentration-response curve of ISev was bell-shaped, with a suppressed peak and plateau currents at high concentrations (above 2 x 10(-3) M). The reversal potential of ISev (ESev) was close to the theoretical Cl- equilibrium potential, indicating that ISev was carried mainly by Cl-. 3. ISev was reversibly blocked by bicuculline (Bic), an antagonist of the GABAA receptor, in a concentration-dependent manner with a half-inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 7.2 x 10(-7) M. But ISev was insensitive to strychnine (Str), an antagonist of the glycine receptor. 4. At low concentrations (between 3 x 10(-4) and 10(-3) M), Sev markedly enhanced the 10(-6) M GABA induced current (IGABA) but reduced the IGABA with accelerating desensitization accompanied by a "hump' current after washout at high concentrations (higher than 2 x 10(-3) M). 5. Sev, 10(-3) M potentiated the current induced by low concentrations of GABA (between 10(-7) and 3 x 10(-6) M) but reduced the current induced by high concentrations (higher than 10(-5) M) of GABA with a clear acceleration of IGABA desensitization. 6. Sev, like pentobarbitone (PB), pregnanolone (PGN) or diazepam (DZP), potentiated the 10(-6) M GABA-induced response without shifting the reversal potential of IGABA. 7. ISev was augmented by PB, PGN, or DZP at concentrations that maximally potentiated IGABA, suggesting that Sev enhanced IGABA at a binding site distinct from that for PB, PGN, or DZP. 8. It is concluded

  16. Effects of dietary glutamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid on meat colour, pH, composition, and water-holding characteristic in broilers under cyclic heat stress.

    PubMed

    Dai, S F; Gao, F; Xu, X L; Zhang, W H; Song, S X; Zhou, G H

    2012-01-01

    1. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary glutamine (Gln, 0 and 5 g/kg) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, 0 and 100 mg/kg) on raw breast meat colour, pH, composition and water-holding characteristic of broilers under cyclic heat stress (HS). 2. A total of 360 21-d-old Arbor Acres male chicks were randomly assigned to 5 treatment groups (6 replicates of 12 birds per cage). The positive control (PC) broilers were kept in a thermoneutral chamber (22-24°C) and fed on the basal diet. The other 4 groups were kept in a cyclic HS chamber (30-34°C) for 9 h (from 09:00 to 18:00). 3. A significant increase was observed in breast meat lightness at 28, 35 and 42 d; and pH values at 28, 35 and 42 d; while a significant decrease was observed in breast meat cooking loss (CL) and contents of moisture, crude protein (CP), crude fat (CF) and crude ash (CA) due to HS. 4. The supplementation with 0·5 g Gln/kg decreased lightness at 28, 35 and 42 d; while increasing redness at 28 d, yellowness at 35 d, contents of CP, CF and CA, thawing loss (TL) and drip loss (DL). The addition of 100 mg GABA/kg decreased lightness at 28 and 35 d, pH value at 28, 35 and 42 d, and TL; while increasing redness at 28 d, 35 and 42 d, contents of moisture, CP and CF. 5. The lightness, redness, and pH value; contents of moisture, CP, CF and CA; and TL, DL and CL of breast meat of broilers fed with the mixture of Gln and GABA under cyclic HS were similar to those of the broilers in the PC group. 6. Significant interactions were found between Gln and GABA for yellowness at 28 and 35 d; pH at 28, 35 and 42 d; moisture content, CP content, water-holding capacity and TL. 7. These results demonstrated that dietary Gln and GABA offer a potential nutritional strategy to prevent cyclic HS-related depression in broiler meat chemical composition and quality.

  17. Specific gamma-aminobutyrate chemotaxis in pseudomonads with different lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Darias, Jose Antonio; García, Vanina; Rico-Jiménez, Miriam; Corral-Lugo, Andrés; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Juárez-Hernández, Dalia; Yang, Yiling; Bi, Shuangyu; Feuilloley, Marc; Muñoz-Rojas, Jesús; Sourjik, Victor; Krell, Tino

    2015-08-01

    The PctC chemoreceptor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediates chemotaxis with high specificity to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). This compound is present everywhere in nature and has multiple functions, including being a human neurotransmitter or plant signaling compound. Because P. aeruginosa is ubiquitously distributed in nature and able to infect and colonize different hosts, the physiological relevance of GABA taxis is unclear, but it has been suggested that bacterial attraction to neurotransmitters may enhance virulence. We report the identification of McpG as a specific GABA chemoreceptor in non-pathogenic Pseudomonas putida KT2440. As with PctC, GABA was found to bind McpG tightly. The analysis of chimeras comprising the PctC and McpG ligand-binding domains fused to the Tar signaling domain showed very high GABA sensitivities. We also show that PctC inactivation does not alter virulence in Caenorhabditis elegans. Significant amounts of GABA were detected in tomato root exudates, and deletion of mcpG reduced root colonization that requires chemotaxis through agar. The C. elegans data and the detection of a GABA receptor in non-pathogenic species indicate that GABA taxis may not be related to virulence in animal systems but may be of importance in the context of colonization and infection of plant roots by soil-dwelling pseudomonads.

  18. Interactive effects of glutamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid on growth performance and skeletal muscle amino acid metabolism of 22-42-day-old broilers exposed to hot environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hong; Bai, Xi; Shah, Assar Ali; Dai, Sifa; Wang, Like; Hua, Jinling; Che, Chuanyan; He, Shaojun; Wen, Aiyou; Jiang, Jinpeng

    2016-06-01

    The present experiment was conducted to investigate the interactive effects between dietary glutamine (Gln, 0 and 5 g/kg) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, 0 and 100 mg/kg) on growth performance and amino acid (AA) metabolism of broilers under hot environment. A total of 360 22-day-old Arbor Acres male chickens were randomly assigned to five treatment groups under thermoneutral chamber (PC, 23 °C) and cyclic heat stress (HS, 30-34 °C cycling) conditions. Compared with the PC group, cyclic HS decreased ( P < 0.05) daily weight gain (DWG), daily feed consumption (DFC), the concentrations of Gln, glutamate (Glu), and GABA, and the activities of glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in breast muscle at 28, 35, and 42 days, while it increased ( P < 0.05) the activities of glutamine synthetase (GS) and gamma-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T) at 28, 35, and 42 days. Dietary Gln and GABA improved ( P < 0.05) DWG and DFC of broilers under cyclic HS during 28-42 days. In breast muscle, the Gln supplementation increased ( P < 0.05) the concentrations of Gln (28, 35, and 42 days), Glu (28, 35, and 42 days), and GABA (42 days) and the activities of glutaminase (28, 35, and 42 days) and GAD (28, 35, and 42 days) but decreased ( P < 0.05) GS activities at 28, 35, and 42 days and GABA-T activities at 28 days. The addition of GABA increased ( P < 0.05) the concentrations of Gln and Glu and activities of glutaminase and GAD, while it decreased ( P < 0.05) GABA-T activities at 28, 35, and 42 days. Significant interactions ( P < 0.05) between Gln and GABA were found on breast skeletal muscle Gln concentrations, glutaminase activities, GS activities at 28 and 35 days, and DWG, GABA concentrations, and GABA-T activities at 28, 35, and 42 days in broilers under cyclic HS. In conclusion, the present results indicated that the interactions of exogenous Gln and GABA could offer a potential nutritional strategy to prevent HS-related depression in skeletal muscle Gln and

  19. Interactive effects of glutamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid on growth performance and skeletal muscle amino acid metabolism of 22-42-day-old broilers exposed to hot environment.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hong; Bai, Xi; Shah, Assar Ali; Dai, Sifa; Wang, Like; Hua, Jinling; Che, Chuanyan; He, Shaojun; Wen, Aiyou; Jiang, Jinpeng

    2016-06-01

    The present experiment was conducted to investigate the interactive effects between dietary glutamine (Gln, 0 and 5 g/kg) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, 0 and 100 mg/kg) on growth performance and amino acid (AA) metabolism of broilers under hot environment. A total of 360 22-day-old Arbor Acres male chickens were randomly assigned to five treatment groups under thermoneutral chamber (PC, 23 °C) and cyclic heat stress (HS, 30-34 °C cycling) conditions. Compared with the PC group, cyclic HS decreased (P < 0.05) daily weight gain (DWG), daily feed consumption (DFC), the concentrations of Gln, glutamate (Glu), and GABA, and the activities of glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in breast muscle at 28, 35, and 42 days, while it increased (P < 0.05) the activities of glutamine synthetase (GS) and gamma-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T) at 28, 35, and 42 days. Dietary Gln and GABA improved (P < 0.05) DWG and DFC of broilers under cyclic HS during 28-42 days. In breast muscle, the Gln supplementation increased (P < 0.05) the concentrations of Gln (28, 35, and 42 days), Glu (28, 35, and 42 days), and GABA (42 days) and the activities of glutaminase (28, 35, and 42 days) and GAD (28, 35, and 42 days) but decreased (P < 0.05) GS activities at 28, 35, and 42 days and GABA-T activities at 28 days. The addition of GABA increased (P < 0.05) the concentrations of Gln and Glu and activities of glutaminase and GAD, while it decreased (P < 0.05) GABA-T activities at 28, 35, and 42 days. Significant interactions (P < 0.05) between Gln and GABA were found on breast skeletal muscle Gln concentrations, glutaminase activities, GS activities at 28 and 35 days, and DWG, GABA concentrations, and GABA-T activities at 28, 35, and 42 days in broilers under cyclic HS. In conclusion, the present results indicated that the interactions of exogenous Gln and GABA could offer a potential nutritional strategy to prevent HS

  20. Induction of c-fos mRNA expression in an in vitro hippocampal slice model of adult rats after kainate but not gamma-aminobutyric acid or bicuculline treatment.

    PubMed

    Massamiri, T; Khrestchatisky, M; Ben-Ari, Y

    1994-01-17

    Levels of gene expression following in vitro treatment of rat hippocampal slices with kainate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), or bicuculline were measured by the reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction method. Following a short-term exposure to kainate, c-fos gene expression was induced by 12-fold in the adult, but not the newborn, hippocampus. Under the same experimental conditions, zifl268 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression were unchanged. Our results also demonstrate a lack of induction of c-fos, zifl268 and BDNF after short-time treatment of either adult or newborn hippocampal slices with GABA or bicuculline. The relevance of the differential induction of gene expression in the adult and newborn in an in vitro hippocampal slice model as compared to previously described in vivo models is discussed.

  1. Dual mechanisms regulating glutamate decarboxylases and accumulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid in tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves exposed to multiple stresses

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Xin; Chen, Yiyong; Zhang, Lingyun; Fu, Xiumin; Wei, Qing; Grierson, Don; Zhou, Ying; Huang, Yahui; Dong, Fang; Yang, Ziyin

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the major inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. It has multiple positive effects on mammalian physiology and is an important bioactive component of tea (Camellia sinensis). GABA generally occurs at a very low level in plants but GABA content increases substantially after exposure to a range of stresses, especially oxygen-deficiency. During processing of tea leaves, a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage are essential for the high accumulation of GABA. This is believed to be initiated by a change in glutamate decarboxylase activity, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In the present study we characterized factors regulating the expression and activity of three tea glutamate decarboxylase genes (CsGAD1, 2, and 3), and their encoded enzymes. The results suggests that, unlike the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there are dual mechanisms regulating the accumulation of GABA in tea leaves exposed to multiple stresses, including activation of CsGAD1 enzymatic activity by calmodulin upon the onset of the stress and accumulation of high levels of CsGAD2 mRNA induced by a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage. PMID:27021285

  2. Cross-talk between P2X4 and gamma-aminobutyric acid, type A receptors determines synaptic efficacy at a central synapse.

    PubMed

    Jo, Young-Hwan; Donier, Emmanuelle; Martinez, Audrey; Garret, Maurice; Toulmé, Estelle; Boué-Grabot, Eric

    2011-06-03

    The essence of neuronal function is to generate outputs in response to synaptic potentials. Synaptic integration at postsynaptic sites determines neuronal outputs in the CNS. Using immunohistochemical and electrophysiological approaches, we first reveal that steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive neurons in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus express P2X4 subunits that are activated by exogenous ATP. Increased membrane expression of P2X4 channels by using a peptide competing with P2X4 intracellular endocytosis motif enhances neuronal excitability of SF-1 GFP-positive neurons. This increased excitability is inhibited by a P2X receptor antagonist. Furthermore, increased surface P2X4 receptor expression significantly decreases the frequency and the amplitude of GABAergic postsynaptic currents of SF-1 GFP-positive neurons. Co-immunopurification and pulldown assays reveal that P2X4 receptors complex with aminobutyric acid, type A (GABA(A)) receptors and demonstrate that two amino acids in the carboxyl tail of the P2X4 subunit are crucial for its physical association with GABA(A) receptors. Mutation of these two residues prevents the physical association, thereby blocking cross-inhibition between P2X4 and GABA(A) receptors. Moreover, disruption of the physical coupling using competitive peptides containing the identified motif abolishes current inhibition between P2X4 and GABA(A) receptors in recombinant system and P2X4 receptor-mediated GABAergic depression in SF-1 GFP-positive neurons. Our present work thus provides evidence for cross-talk between excitatory and inhibitory receptors that appears to be crucial in determining GABAergic synaptic strength at a central synapse.

  3. Positive feedback regulation between gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor signaling and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) release in developing neurons.

    PubMed

    Porcher, Christophe; Hatchett, Caroline; Longbottom, Rebecca E; McAinch, Kristina; Sihra, Talvinder S; Moss, Stephen J; Thomson, Alex M; Jovanovic, Jasmina N

    2011-06-17

    During the early development of the nervous system, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor (GABA(A)R)-mediated signaling parallels the neurotrophin/tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk)-dependent signaling in controlling a number of processes from cell proliferation and migration, via dendritic and axonal outgrowth, to synapse formation and plasticity. Here we present the first evidence that these two signaling systems regulate each other through a complex positive feedback mechanism. We first demonstrate that GABA(A)R activation leads to an increase in the cell surface expression of these receptors in cultured embryonic cerebrocortical neurons, specifically at the stage when this activity causes depolarization of the plasma membrane and Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. We further demonstrate that GABA(A)R activity triggers release of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which, in turn by activating TrkB receptors, mediates the observed increase in cell surface expression of GABA(A)Rs. This BDNF/TrkB-dependent increase in surface levels of GABA(A)Rs requires the activity of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase C (PKC) and does not involve the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activity. The increase in GABA(A)R surface levels occurs due to an inhibition of the receptor endocytosis by BDNF, whereas the receptor reinsertion into the plasma membrane remains unaltered. Thus, GABA(A)R activity is a potent regulator of the BDNF release during neuronal development, and at the same time, it is strongly enhanced by the activity of the BDNF/TrkB/PI3K/PKC signaling pathway.

  4. Rapid and sensitive step gradient assays of glutamate, glycine, taurine and gamma-aminobutyric acid by high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection with o-phthalaldehyde-mercaptoethanol derivatization with an emphasis on microdialysis samples.

    PubMed

    Piepponen, T P; Skujins, A

    2001-06-15

    We developed a rapid step-gradient HPLC method for determination of glutamate, glycine and taurine, and a separate method for determination of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in striatal microdialysates. The amino acids were pre-column derivatized with o-phthalaldehyde-2-mercaptoethanol by using an automated refrigerated autoinjector. Separation of the amino acids was established with a non-porous ODS-II HPLC column, late-eluting substances were washed out with a one-step low-pressure gradient. Concentrations of the amino acids were determined with a fixed-wavelength fluorescence detector. The detection limit for GABA was 80 fmol in a 15 microl sample, detection limits for glutamate, glycine and taurine were not determined because their concentrations in striatal perfusates were far above their detection limits. Total analysis time was less than 12 min, including the wash-out step. The methods described are relatively simple, sensitive, inexpensive, and fast enough to keep up with the microdialysis sampling.

  5. [Effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid and phenibut on the central links of the vascular reflexes with chemo- and mechanoreceptors of the aorto-carotid zone].

    PubMed

    Kovalev, G V; Morozov, I S

    1975-04-01

    Experiments were conducted on decerebrated cats. A depressive effect of gamma-aminobutyruc acid (GABA)--100--200 mg/kg and its phenyl derivative phenibut--20 mg/kg--on depressive reactions of the systemic arterial pressure and on the inhibition of spontaneous bioelectrical activity in the renal nerve occurring in stimulation of the mechanoreceptors of the carotid sinus and of the sinus and depressor nerve afferents (having a mechanoreceptor modality) was demonstrated. Pressor reactions of the systemic arterial pressure and evoked bioelectrical activity were enhanced in the renal nerve in stimulation of chemoreceptors of the carotid sinus following administration of the same GABA and phenibut doses. The data obtained are interpreted from the aspect of a deprimating action of GABA and phenibut in the area of the paramedian reticular nuclei of the medulla oblongata.

  6. Perinatal exposure to germinated brown rice and its gamma amino-butyric acid-rich extract prevents high fat diet-induced insulin resistance in first generation rat offspring

    PubMed Central

    Adamu, Hadiza Altine; Imam, Mustapha Umar; Ooi, Der-Jiun; Esa, Norhaizan Mohd; Rosli, Rozita; Ismail, Maznah

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests perinatal environments influence the risk of developing insulin resistance. Objective The present study was aimed at determining the effects of intrauterine exposure to germinated brown rice (GBR) and GBR-derived gamma (γ) aminobutyric acid (GABA) extract on epigenetically mediated high fat diet–induced insulin resistance. Design Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were fed high-fat diet (HFD), HFD+GBR, or HFD+GABA throughout pregnancy until 4 weeks postdelivery. The pups were weighed weekly and maintained on normal pellet until 8 weeks postdelivery. After sacrifice, biochemical markers of obesity and insulin resistance including oral glucose tolerance test, adiponectin, leptin, and retinol binding protein-4 (RBP4) were measured. Hepatic gene expression changes and the global methylation and histone acetylation levels were also evaluated. Results Detailed analyses revealed that mothers given GBR and GABA extract, and their offspring had increased adiponectin levels and reduced insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, leptin, oxidative stress, and RBP4 levels, while their hepatic mRNA levels of GLUT2 and IPF1 were increased. Furthermore, GBR and GABA extract lowered global DNA methylation levels and modulated H3 and H4 acetylation levels. Conclusions These results showed that intrauterine exposure to GBR-influenced metabolic outcomes in offspring of rats with underlying epigenetic changes and transcriptional implications that led to improved glucose homeostasis. PMID:26842399

  7. Changes of prolactin regulatory mechanisms in aging: 24-h rhythms of serum prolactin and median eminence and adenohypophysial concentration of dopamine, serotonin, (gamma-aminobutyric acid, taurine and somatostatin in young and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Esquifino, A I; Cano, P; Jimenez, V; Reyes Toso, C F; Cardinali, D P

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-four hour rhythmicity of serum prolactin and median eminence and anterior pituitary content of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5HT), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), taurine and somatostatin were examined in 2 months-old and 18-20 months-old Wistar male rats. The concentration of prolactin was higher in aged rats, with peaks in both groups of rats at the early phase of the activity span. Median eminence DA content of young rats attained its maximum at the middle of rest span and decreased as prolactin levels augmented while the lowest values of adenohypophysial DA were observed at the time of prolactin peak. DA rhythmicity disappeared in aged rats. GABA content of median eminence and adenohypophysis was lower in aged rats, with maximal values of median eminence GABA at light-dark transition in young rats and at the second half of activity span in aged rats. Serum prolactin correlated positively with median eminence GABA in young rats and negatively with pituitary GABA in young and aged rats. Median eminence somatostatin peaked at the beginning of the activity phase (young rats) or at the end of the rest phase (aged rats). Prolactin levels and somatostatin content correlated significantly in young rats only. Median eminence and pituitary 5HT and taurine content did not change with age. The results indicate disruption of prolactin regulatory mechanisms with aging in rats.

  8. Sperm gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor delta subunit (GABRD) and its interaction with purinergic P2X2 receptors in progesterone-induced acrosome reaction and male fertility.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenming; Wang, Ke; Chen, Yan; Liang, Xiao Tong; Yu, Mei Kuen; Yue, Huanxun; Tierney, M Louise

    2017-02-13

    The mechanism underlying the non-genomic action of progesterone in sperm functions and related Ca2+ mobilisation remains elusive. Herein we report the expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor delta subunit (GABRD) in human and rodent sperm and its involvement in mediating the progesterone-induced acrosome reaction. GABRD was localised in the sperm head/neck region. A δ(392-422)-specific inhibitory peptide against GABRD blocked the progesterone-induced acrosome reaction and the associated increase in intracellular Ca2+. Similarly, an inhibitory effect against both progesterone-induced Ca2+ influx and the acrosome reaction was observed with a P2X2 receptor antagonist. The lack of synergism between the GABRD and P2X2 inhibitors suggests that these two receptors are playing a role in the same pathway. Furthermore, a co-immunoprecipitation experiment demonstrated that GABRD could undergo protein-protein interactions with the Ca2+-conducting P2X2 receptor. This interaction between the receptors could be reduced following progesterone (10μM) inducement. Significantly reduced GABRD expression was observed in spermatozoa from infertile patients with reduced acrosome reaction capacity, suggesting that normal expression of GABRD is critical for the sperm acrosome reaction and thus male fertility. The results of the present study indicate that GABRD represents a novel progesterone receptor or modulator in spermatozoa that is responsible for the progesterone-induced Ca2+ influx required for the acrosome reaction through its interaction with the P2X2 receptor.

  9. Antagonistic properties of a natural product - Bicuculline with the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor: Studied through electrostatic potential mapping, electronic and vibrational spectra using ab initio and density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Jain, Sudha; Asthana, B. P.

    2011-12-01

    (+)-Bicuculline (hereinafter referred to as bicuculline), a phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid is of current interest as an antagonist of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Its inhibitor properties have been studied through molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) mapping of this molecule and GABA receptor. The hot site on the potential surface of bicuculline, which is also isosteric with GABA receptor, has been used to interpret the inhibitor property. A systematic quantum chemical study of the possible conformations, their relative stabilities, FT-Raman, FT-IR and UV-vis spectroscopic analysis of bicuculline has been reported. The optimized geometries, wavenumber and intensity of the vibrational bands of all the conformers of bicuculline have been calculated using ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP functional and 6-311G(d,p) basis set. Mulliken atomic charges, HOMO-LUMO gap Δ E, ionization potential, dipole moments and total energy have also been obtained for the optimized geometries of both the molecules. TD-DFT method is used to calculate the electronic absorption parameters in gas phase as well as in solvent environment using integral equation formalism-polarizable continuum model (IEF-PCM) employing 6-31G basis set and the results thus obtained are compared with the UV absorption spectra. The combination of experimental and calculated results provides an insight into the structural and vibrational spectroscopic properties of bicuculline.

  10. The human [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit [beta]3 and [alpha]5 gene cluster in chromosome 15q11-q13 is rich in highly polymorphic (CA)[sub n] repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Glatt, K.; Lalande, M. ); Sinnett, D. )

    1994-01-01

    The [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA[sub A]) receptor [beta]33 (GABRB3) and [alpha]5 (GABRA5) subunit genes have been localized to the Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome region of chromosome 15q11-q13. GABRB3, which encompasses 250 kb, is located 100 kb proximal of GABRA5, with the two genes arranged in head-to-head transcriptional orientation. In screening 135 kb of cloned DNA within a 260-kb interval extending from within GABRB3 to the 5[prime] end of GABRA5, 10 new (CA), repeats have been identified. Five of these have been analyzed in detail and found to be highly polymorphic, with the polymorphism information content (PIC) ranging from 0.7 to 0.85 and with heterozygosities of 67 to 94%. In the clones from GABRB3/GABRA5 region, therefore, the frequency of (CA)[sub n] with PICs [ge] 0.7 is 1 per 27 kb. Previous estimates of the density of (CA)[sub n] with PICs [ge] 0.7 in the human genome have been approximately 10-fold lower. The GABRB3/GABRA5 region appears, therefore, to be enriched for highly informative (CA)[sub n]. This set of closely spaced, short tandem repeat polymorphisms will be useful in the molecular analyses of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes and in high-resolution studies of genetic recombination within this region. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acidB receptor function in the in vitro and in vivo regulation of alpha-melanotropin-stimulating hormone secretion from melanotrope cells of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    De Koning, H P; Jenks, B G; Roubos, E W

    1993-02-01

    The activity of many endocrine cells is regulated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The effects of GABA are mediated by GABAA and/or GABAB receptors. While GABAB receptors in the central nervous system have now been extensively characterized, little is known of the function and pharmacology of GABAB receptors on endocrine cells. In the amphibian Xenopus laevis, GABA inhibits the release of alpha MSH from the endocrine melanotrope cells through both GABAA and GABAB receptors. We have investigated the following aspects of the GABAB receptor of the melanotrope cells of X. laevis: 1) the pharmacology of this receptor, using antagonists previously established to demonstrate GABAB receptors in the mammalian central nervous system; 2) the relative contribution to the regulation of hormone secretion by the GABAA and GABAB receptors on melanotrope cells in vitro; and 3) the role of the GABAB receptor with respect to the physiological function of the melanotrope cell in vivo, i.e. regulation of pigment dispersion in skin melanophores in relation to background color. Our results demonstrate that phaclofen, 2-hydroxysaclofen, and 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid dose-dependently blocked the inhibition of alpha MSH release by GABAB receptor activation, but not by GABAA receptor activation. The GABAB receptor antagonist delta-aminovaleric acid appeared to be a selective agonist on the GABAB receptor of melanotrope cells. The inhibitory secretory response to a low dose of GABA (10(-5) M) was not affected by bicuculline, but was significantly reduced by phaclofen, indicating that at a low GABA concentration, the GABAB receptor mechanism would dominate in inhibiting the melanotrope cells. Different thresholds of activation may form the basis for differential action of GABA through both GABA receptor types. The tonic inhibition of alpha MSH release in animals adapted to a white background was not affected by 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid, indicating that the GABAB receptor is not (solely

  12. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, J.; Kuriyama, K. )

    1990-05-01

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not (3H)muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-(3H)butylbicycloorthobenzoate (( 3H) TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively (3H) flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-(3H)CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated (3H)muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-(3H)CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for (3H)flunitrazepam, (3H)muscimol and (3H)TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested.

  13. Effects of NaCl Replacement with Gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) on the Quality Characteristics and Sensorial Properties of Model Meat Products

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Ji-Yeon; Cho, Hyung-Yong; Min, Sang-Gi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of γ-aminobutylic acid (GABA) on the quality and sensorial properties of both the GABA/NaCl complex and model meat products. GABA/NaCl complex was prepared by spray-drying, and the surface dimensions, morphology, rheology, and saltiness were characterized. For model meat products, pork patties were prepared by replacing NaCl with GABA. For characteristics of the complex, increasing GABA concentration increased the surface dimensions of the complex. However, GABA did not affect the rheological properties of solutions containing the complex. The addition of 2% GABA exhibited significantly higher saltiness than the control (no GABA treatment). In the case of pork patties, sensory testing indicated that the addition of GABA decreased the saltiness intensity. Both the intensity of juiciness and tenderness of patties containing GABA also scored lower than the control, based on the NaCl reduction. These results were consistent with the quality characteristics (cooking loss and texture profile analysis). Nevertheless, overall acceptability of the pork patties showed that up to 1.5%, patties containing GABA did not significantly differ from the control. Consequently, the results indicated that GABA has a potential application in meat products, but also manifested a deterioration of quality by the NaCl reduction, which warrants further exploration. PMID:26761294

  14. DNA Methylation at the Neonatal State and at the Time of Diagnosis: Preliminary Support for an Association with the Estrogen Receptor 1, Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor 1, and Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein in Female Adolescent Patients with OCD

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Judith Becker; Hansen, Christine Søholm; Starnawska, Anna; Mattheisen, Manuel; Børglum, Anders Dupont; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hollegaard, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder. Non-genetic factors and their interaction with genes have attracted increasing attention. Epigenetics is regarded an important interface between environmental signals and activation/repression of genomic responses. Epigenetic mechanisms have not previously been examined in OCD in children and adolescents. The aim of the present study was to examine the DNA methylation profile of selected genes in blood spots from neonates later diagnosed with OCD and in the same children/adolescents at the time of diagnosis compared with age- and sex-matched controls. Furthermore, we wanted to characterize the association of the differential methylation profiles with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome. Dried and new blood spot samples were obtained from 21 female children/adolescents with verified OCD and 12 female controls. The differential methylation was analyzed using a linear model and the correlation with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome was analyzed using the Pearson correlation. We evaluated selected Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip probes within and up to 100,000 bp up- and downstream of 14 genes previously associated with OCD (SLC1A1, SLC25A12, GABBR1, GAD1, DLGAP1, MOG, BDNF, OLIG2, NTRK2 and 3, ESR1, SL6A4, TPH2, and COMT). The study found no significantly differential methylation. However, preliminary support for a difference was found for the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor 1 (cg10234998, cg17099072) in blood samples at birth and for the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) (cg10939667), the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) (cg16650906), and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (cg14080521) in blood samples at the time of diagnosis. Preliminary support for an association was observed between the methylation profiles of GABBR1 and MOG and baseline severity, treatment effect, and responder status; and between the methylation profile of ESR1 and baseline

  15. Physiology-Oriented Engineering Strategy to Improve Gamma-Aminobutyrate Production in Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Chang-Jiang; Zhao, Wei-Rui; Hu, Sheng; Huang, Jun; Lu, Tao; Jin, Zhi-Hua; Mei, Le-He; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2017-02-01

    Gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA) is an important chemical in the pharmaceutical field. GABA-producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB) offer the opportunity of developing this health-oriented product. In this study, the gadA, gadB, gadC, gadCB, and gadCA gene segments of Lactobacillus brevis were cloned into pMG36e, and strain Lb. brevis/pMG36e-gadA was selected for thorough characterization in terms of GABA production after analysis of GAD activities. Subsequently, a physiology-oriented engineering strategy was adopted to construct an FoF1-ATPase deficient strain NRA6 with higher GAD activity. As expected, strain NRA6 could produce GABA at a concentration of 43.65 g/L with a 98.42% GABA conversion rate in GYP fermentation medium, which is 1.22-fold higher than that obtained by the wild-type strain in the same condition. This work demonstrates how the acid stress response mechanisms of LAB can be employed to develop cell factories with improved production efficiency and contributes to research into the development of the physiology-oriented engineering.

  16. Noni as an anxiolytic and sedative: a mechanism involving its gamma-aminobutyric acidergic effects.

    PubMed

    Deng, S; West, B J; Palu, A K; Zhou, B-N; Jensen, C J

    2007-08-01

    Noni (Morinda citrifolia) is increasing in worldwide popularity as a food or dietary supplement with versatile health benefits. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Noni fruit on anxiety symptoms in vitro. To this end, a competitive GABAa receptor-binding assay was developed. Our preliminary study indicates that the methanol crude extract of Noni fruit showed significant affinity to the gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAa) inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors, and displayed 75% binding inhibition of the agonist radioligand [3H] muscimol at a concentration of 100 microg/ml. Further experiments demonstrated that the MeOH extract, and its BuOH and H2O partitions, exhibited IC50 values of 22.8, 27.2, and 17.1 microg/ml, respectively, in the GABAa-binding assay. Experimental results with Noni fruit indicate the presence of competitive ligand(s), which may bind to the GABAa receptor as an agonist, and thus induce its anxiolytic and sedative effects. The study provides an in vitro rationale for one of Noni's versatile and traditional uses. In addition, an HPLC fingerprint profile of the methanolic extract of Noni fruit has been established for quality control purpose.

  17. Production of gaba (γ - Aminobutyric acid) by microorganisms: a review.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Radhika; Bajpai, Vivek K; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is a four carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. As a metabolic product of plants and microorganisms produced by the decarboxylation of glutamic acid, GABA functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain that directly affects the personality and the stress management. A wide range of traditional foods produced by microbial fermentation contain GABA, in which GABA is safe and eco-friendly, and also has the possibility of providing new health-benefited products enriched with GABA. Synthesis of GABA is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase, therefore, the optimal fermentation condition is mainly based on the biochemical properties of the enzyme. Major GABA producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which make food spoilage pathogens unable to grow and act as probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The major factors affecting the production of GABA by microbial fermentation are temperature, pH, fermentation time and different media additives, therefore, these factors are summarized to provide the most up-dated information for effective GABA synthesis. There has been a huge accumulation of knowledge on GABA application for human health accompanying with a demand on natural GABA supply. Only the GABA production by microorganisms can fulfill the demand with GABA-enriched health beneficial foods.

  18. Comparative proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in β-aminobutyric acid enhanced Arabidopsis thaliana tolerance to simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingwu; Jiang, Xinwu; Shi, Wuliang; Chen, Juan; Pei, Zhenming; Zheng, Hailei

    2011-05-01

    Acid rain is a worldwide environmental issue that has seriously destroyed forest ecosystems. As a highly effective and broad-spectrum plant resistance-inducing agent, β-aminobutyric acid could elevate the tolerance of Arabidopsis when subjected to simulated acid rain. Using comparative proteomic strategies, we analyzed 203 significantly varied proteins of which 175 proteins were identified responding to β-aminobutyric acid in the absence and presence of simulated acid rain. They could be divided into ten groups according to their biological functions. Among them, the majority was cell rescue, development and defense-related proteins, followed by transcription, protein synthesis, folding, modification and destination-associated proteins. Our conclusion is β-aminobutyric acid can lead to a large-scale primary metabolism change and simultaneously activate antioxidant system and salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, abscisic acid signaling pathways. In addition, β-aminobutyric acid can reinforce physical barriers to defend simulated acid rain stress.

  19. A Cysteine Substitution Probes β3H267 Interactions with Propofol and Other Potent Anesthetics in α1β3γ2L Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Type A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Alex T.; Forman, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Anesthetic contact residues in γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors have been identified using photolabels, including two propofol derivatives. O-propofol-diazirine labels H267 in β3 and α1β3 receptors, while m-azi-propofol labels other residues in intersubunit clefts of α1β3. Neither label has been studied in αβγ receptors, the most common isoform in mammalian brain. In αβγ receptors, other anesthetic derivatives photolabel m-azi-propofol labeled residues, but not βH267. Our structural homology model of α1β3γ2L receptors suggests that β3H267 may abut some of these sites. Methods Substituted cysteine modification-protection was used to test β3H267C interactions with four potent anesthetics: propofol, etomidate, alphaxalone, and R-5-allyl-1-methyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyl-diazirinylphenyl) barbituric acid (mTFD-MPAB). We expressed α1β3γ2L or α1β3H267Cγ2L GABAA receptors in Xenopus oocytes. We used voltage clamp electrophysiology to assess receptor sensitivity to GABA and anesthetics, and to compare para-chloromercuribenzenesulfonate (pCMBS) modification rates with GABA versus GABA plus anesthetics. Results Enhancement of GABA EC5 responses by equi-hypnotic concentrations of all four anesthetics was similar in α1β3γ2L and α1β3H267Cγ2L receptors (n ≥ 3). Direct activation of α1β3H267Cγ2L receptors, but not α1β3γ2L, by mTFD-MPAB and propofol was significantly greater than the other anesthetics. Modification of β3H267C by pCMBS (n ≥ 4) was rapid and accelerated by GABA. Only mTFD-MPAB slowed β3H267C modification (~2-fold; p = 0.011). Conclusions β3H267 in α1β3γ2L GABAA receptors contacts mTFD-MPAB, but not propofol. Our results suggest that β3H267 is near the periphery of one or both transmembrane inter-subunit (α+/β− and γ+/β−) pockets where both mTFD-MPAB and propofol bind. PMID:26569173

  20. PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF B-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-PRIMED DROUGHT RESISTANCE IN CRABAPPLE SEEDLINGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a variety of annual crops and some model plant species, the non-protein, amino acid, DL-B-aminobutyric acid (BABA), has been shown to enhance disease resistance and increase salt and drought tolerance, through sensitization, and not direct induction of defense genes. This process is referred to a...

  1. Abuse and therapeutic potential of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Galloway, G P; Frederick-Osborne, S L; Seymour, R; Contini, S E; Smith, D E

    2000-04-01

    Gamma-hydroxbutyric acid is a compound found in mammalian brain that is structurally related to the neurotransmitters gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamic acid. Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid effects dopaminergic systems in the brain and may be a neurotransmitter. Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid was first reported as a drug of abuse in 1990 and continues to be abused by bodybuilders, participants of "rave" dance parties, and polydrug abusers. Physical dependence can develop after prolonged, high-dose use, and overdoses have been widely reported. Its use in sexual assaults as a "date rape" drug and availability on the internet have recently emerged. Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid has established efficacy as an anesthetic agent, and preliminary evidence supports its utility in the treatment of alcohol dependence, opiate dependence, and narcolepsy.

  2. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) administration improves action selection processes: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Steenbergen, Laura; Sellaro, Roberta; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Beste, Christian; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2015-01-01

    In order to accomplish a task goal, real-life environments require us to develop different action control strategies in order to rapidly react to fast-moving visual and auditory stimuli. When engaging in complex scenarios, it is essential to prioritise and cascade different actions. Recent studies have pointed to an important role of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic system in the neuromodulation of action cascading. In this study we assessed the specific causal role of the GABA-ergic system in modulating the efficiency of action cascading by administering 800 mg of synthetic GABA or 800 mg oral of microcrystalline cellulose (placebo). In a double-blind, randomised, between-group design, 30 healthy adults performed a stop-change paradigm. Results showed that the administration of GABA, compared to placebo, increased action selection when an interruption (stop) and a change towards an alternative response were required simultaneously, and when such a change had to occur after the completion of the stop process. These findings, involving the systemic administration of synthetic GABA, provide the first evidence for a possible causal role of the GABA-ergic system in modulating performance in action cascading. PMID:26227783

  3. Proteomic analysis of drought resistance in crabapple seedlings primed by the xenobiotic Beta-aminobutyric acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a variety of annual crops and model plants, the xenobiotic DL-Beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA) has been shown to enhance disease resistance and increase salt, drought and thermotolerance. BABA does not activate stress genes directly, but sensitizes plants to respond more quickly and strongly to biot...

  4. Cationic modulation of rho 1-type gamma-aminobutyrate receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, D J; Vazquez, A E; Miledi, R

    1994-01-01

    A study was made of the effects of di- and trivalent cations on homomeric rho 1-type gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA rho 1) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes after injection of mRNA coding for the GABA rho 1 subunit. GABA elicited large currents with a Kd approximately 1 microM. The properties of these GABA rho 1 receptors were similar to those of native bicuculline-resistant GABA receptors expressed by retinal mRNA. GABA rho 1 currents showed very little desensitization, were blocked by picrotoxin but not by bicuculline, and were not modulated by barbiturates, benzodiazepines, or beta-carbolines. Zn2+ reversibly decreased GABA rho 1 responses (IC50 = 22 microM). Other divalent cations were also tested and their rank order of potency was: Zn2+ approximately Ni2+ approximately Cu2+ >> Cd2+, whereas Ba2+, Co2+, Sr2+, Mn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ showed little or no effect. In contrast, La3+ reversibly potentiated the GABA currents mediated by homomeric GABA rho 1 receptors, with an EC50 = 135 microM and a maximal potentiation of about 100% (GABA, 1 microM; La3+, 1 mM). Other lanthanides showed similar effects (Lu3+ > Eu3+ > Tb3+ > Gd3+ > Er3% > Nd3+ > La3+ > Ce3+). Thus, GABA rho 1 receptors contain sites for cationic recognition, and in particular, Zn2+ may play a role during synaptic transmission in the retina. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7809110

  5. Tandem ring-opening decarboxylation of cyclopropane hemimalonates with sodium azide: a short route to γ-aminobutyric acid esters.

    PubMed

    Emmett, Michael R; Grover, Huck K; Kerr, Michael A

    2012-08-03

    Cyclopropane hemimalonates, when treated with sodium azide, undergo a tandem ring-opening decarboxylation to produce γ-azidobutyric acids in good yields. These adducts were hydrogenated to form γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) methyl esters.

  6. Thermochemical study of the reactions of acid-base interaction in an aqueous solution of α-aminobutyric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernikov, V. V.; Krutova, O. N.; Skvortsov, I. A.; Korchagina, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    The heat effects of the interaction between a solution of α-aminobutyric acid and solutions of HNO3 and KOH are measured by means of calorimetry in different ranges of pH at 298.15 K and values of ionic strength of 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 (KNO3). The heat effects of the stepwise dissociation of the amino acid are determined. Standard thermodynamic characteristics (Δr H 0, Δr G 0, and Δr S 0) of the reactions of acid-base interaction in aqueous solutions of α-aminobutyric acid are calculated. The connection between the thermodynamic characteristics of the dissociation of the amino acid and the structure of this compound is considered.

  7. Beta-aminobutyric acid priming of plant defense: the role of ABA and other hormones.

    PubMed

    Baccelli, Ivan; Mauch-Mani, Brigitte

    2016-08-01

    Plants are exposed to recurring biotic and abiotic stresses that can, in extreme situations, lead to substantial yield losses. With the changing environment, the stress pressure is likely to increase and sustainable measures to alleviate the effect on our crops are sought. Priming plants for better stress resistance is one of the sustainable possibilities to reach this goal. Here, we report on the effects of beta-aminobutyric acid, a priming agent with an exceptionally wide range of action and describe its way of preparing plants to defend themselves against various attacks, among others through the modulation of their hormonal defense signaling, and highlight the special role of abscisic acid in this process.

  8. The effect of anaesthetics on the uptake and release of gamma-aminobutyrate and D-aspartate in rat brain slices.

    PubMed Central

    Minchin, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    1 The effect of various concentrations of thiopentone, pentobarbitone, methohexitone, hydroxydione, alphaxalone/alphadolone, ketamine, alpha-chloralose, and urethane on the transport of radiolabelled gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and D-aspartate was investigated. 2 Uptake of the amino acids was weakly inhibited, if at all, by the anaesthetics and it is unlikely that such effects contribute significantly to their physiological function. 3 The spontaneous efflux of GABA and D-aspartate was not detectably altered by any of the drugs tested. 4 Thiopentone, pentobarbitone, methohexitone and hydroxydione inhibited K+-stimulated GABA and D-aspartate release. The other anaesthetics had no effect on K+-stimulated amino acid release. 5 The rank order of potency of the inhibitors of K+-stimulated amino acid release did not correlate with their anaesthetic potency. Furthermore not all inhibitors appeared to be very effective at anaesthetic concentrations. 6 It is concluded that although it is possible that inhibition of excitatory transmitter release may be involved in the anaesthetic action of some anaesthetics, for many of the substances tested in this study such as mechanism does not appear to be implicated. PMID:6265017

  9. Effect of the treatment by slightly acidic electrolyzed water on the accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid in germinated brown millet.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingfeng; Hao, Jianxiong; Liu, Xianggui; Liu, Haijie; Ning, Yawei; Cheng, Ruhong; Tan, Bin; Jia, Yingmin

    2015-11-01

    The accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid and the microbial decontamination are concerned increasingly in the production of sprouts. In this work, the effect of the treatment by slightly acidic electrolyzed water on the accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid in the germinated brown millet was evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography during germination. The results showed that slightly acidic electrolyzed water with appropriate available chlorine (15 or 30 mg/L) could promote the accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid by up to 21% (P < 0.05). However, the treatment with slightly acidic electrolyzed water could not enhance the sprouts growth of the germinated brown millet. The catalase and peroxidase activities of the germinated brown millet during germination were in agreement with the sprouts growth. Our results suggested that the accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid was independent of the length of sprouts in germinated grains. Moreover, the treatment with slightly acidic electrolyzed water significantly reduced the microbial counts in the germinated millet (P < 0.05) and the treatment with high available chlorine concentration (15 and 30 mg/L) showed stronger anti-infection potential in the germinated brown millet than that of lower available chlorine concentration (5 mg/L). In conclusion, the treatment with slightly acidic electrolyzed water is an available approach to improve the accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid and anti-infection potential in the germinated brown millet, and it can avoid too long millet sprouts.

  10. Gaussian and linear deconvolution of LC-MS/MS chromatograms of the eight aminobutyric acid isomers.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Harika; Kitase, Yukiko; Ayon, Navid J; Bonewald, Lynda; Gutheil, William G

    2017-01-01

    Isomeric molecules present a challenge for analytical resolution and quantification, even with MS-based detection. The eight aminobutyric acid (ABA) isomers are of interest for their various biological activities, particularly γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the d- and l-isomers of β-aminoisobutyric acid (β-AIBA; BAIBA). This study aimed to investigate LC-MS/MS-based resolution of these ABA isomers as their Marfey's (Mar) reagent derivatives. HPLC was able to separate three Mar-ABA isomers l-β-ABA (l-BABA), and l- and d-α-ABA (AABA) completely, with three isomers (GABA, and d/l-BAIBA) in one chromatographic cluster, and two isomers (α-AIBA (AAIBA) and d-BABA) in a second cluster. Partially separated cluster components were deconvoluted using Gaussian peak fitting except for GABA and d-BAIBA. MS/MS detection of Marfey's derivatized ABA isomers provided six MS/MS fragments, with substantially different intensity profiles between structural isomers. This allowed linear deconvolution of ABA isomer peaks. Combining HPLC separation with linear and Gaussian deconvolution allowed resolution of all eight ABA isomers. Application to human serum found a substantial level of l-AABA (13 μM), an intermediate level of l-BAIBA (0.8 μM), and low but detectable levels (<0.2 μM) of GABA, l-BABA, AAIBA, d-BAIBA, and d-AABA. This approach should be useful for LC-MS/MS deconvolution of other challenging groups of isomeric molecules.

  11. SL 75 102 as a gama-aminobutyric acid agonist: experiments on dorsal root ganglion neurones in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Desarmenien, M.; Feltz, P.; Headley, P. M.; Santangelo, F.

    1981-01-01

    1 In anticipation that centrally active gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mimetic drugs may be clinically useful, derivatives of GABA with an imine link (Schiff base) to a lipophilic carrier have recently been prepared. The present paper concerns the actions of [alpha(4-chlorophenyl)5-fluoro, 2-hydroxy benzilidene-amino]-4-butanoate Na+, SL 75 102. 2 To test one aspect of the GABA-mimetic properties of SL 75 102, this compound was compared with GABA for activity on intracellularly-recorded neurones in rat dorsal root ganglia in vitro. On these neurones GABA, administered either by microiontophoresis or direct into the superfusion medium, causes a depolarization, due to an increased chloride conductance, followed by a period of desensitization. 3 The actions of Sl 75 102 were in nearly all respects identical to those of GABA; parameters examined were the effects on membrane potential and input conductance, desensitization, dose-response characteristics and sensitivity to the GABA antagonists, bicuculline and picrotoxin. 4 SL 75 102 was less potent than GABA (mean relative potency 0.03:1). 5 SL 75 102 therefore appears to be a weak agonist at GABA receptors of these neurones. PMID:7214101

  12. Effect of penicillin on the increase in membrane conductance induced by γ-aminobutyric acid at the crab neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Earl, Janet; Large, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of penicillin and picrotoxin on the increase in membrane conductance produced by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) at the hermit crab neuromuscular junction were investigated. Penicillin failed to block the effects of GABA, while picrotoxin proved to be a potent antagonist. PMID:4733733

  13. Simultaneous Spectral Editing for γ-Aminobutyric Acid and Taurine Using Double Quantum Coherence Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hao; Peeling, James

    2000-03-01

    Conventional double quantum (DQ) editing techniques recover resonances of one metabolite at a time and are thus inefficient for monitoring metabolic changes involving several metabolites. A DQ coherence transfer double editing sequence using a dual-band DQ coherence read pulse is described here. The sequence permits simultaneous spectral editing for two metabolites with similar J coupling constants in a single scan. Simultaneous editing for taurine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is demonstrated using solution phantoms and rat brain tissue. Selectivity of the double editing sequence for the target metabolites is as good as that achieved using conventional DQ editing which selects each metabolite individually. With experimental parameters of the double editing sequence chosen to optimize GABA editing, the sensitivity for GABA detection is the same as that with GABA editing only, while the sensitivity for taurine detection is decreased slightly compared to that with taurine editing only.

  14. Acidification and γ-aminobutyric acid independently alter kairomone-induced behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jonathan H.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high pCO2 or low pH alters sensation and behaviour in many marine animals. We show that crab larvae lose their ability to detect and/or process predator kairomones after exposure to low pH over a time scale relevant to diel pH cycles in coastal environments. Previous work suggests that acidification affects sensation and behaviour through altered neural function, specifically the action of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), because a GABA antagonist, gabazine, restores the original behaviour. Here, however, gabazine resulted in a loss of kairomone detection/processing, regardless of pH. Our results also suggest that GABAergic signalling is necessary for kairomone identification in these larvae. Hence, the mechanism for the observed pH effect varies from the original GABA hypothesis. Furthermore, we suggest that this pH effect is adaptive under diel-cycling pH. PMID:27703697

  15. Manganese toxicity in the CNS: the glutamine/glutamate-γ-aminobutyric acid cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, Marta; Aschner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element that is required for maintaining proper function and regulation of numerous biochemical and cellular reactions. Despite its essentiality, at excessive levels Mn is toxic to the CNS. Increased accumulation of Mn in specific brain regions, such as the substantia nigra, globus pallidus and striatum, triggers neurotoxicity resulting in a neurological brain disorder, termed manganism. Mn has been also implicated in the pathophysiology of several other neurodegenerative diseases. Its toxicity is associated with disruption of the glutamine (Gln)/glutamate (Glu)-γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) cycle (GGC) between astrocytes and neurons, thus leading to changes in Glu-ergic and/or GABAergic transmission and Gln metabolism. Here we discuss the common mechanisms underlying Mn-induced neurotoxicity and their relationship to CNS pathology and GGC impairment. PMID:23360507

  16. Optimization of γ-aminobutyric acid production by Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 from honeybees.

    PubMed

    Tajabadi, Naser; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Baradaran, Ali; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Mahyudin, Nor Ainy; Manap, Mohd Yazid Abdul; Bakar, Fatimah Abu; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-04-15

    Dominant strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from honey bees were evaluated for their γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing ability. Out of 24 strains, strain Taj-Apis362 showed the highest GABA-producing ability (1.76 mM) in MRS broth containing 50 mM initial glutamic acid cultured for 60 h. Effects of fermentation parameters, including initial glutamic acid level, culture temperature, initial pH and incubation time on GABA production were investigated via a single parameter optimization strategy. The optimal fermentation condition for GABA production was modeled using response surface methodology (RSM). The results showed that the culture temperature was the most significant factor for GABA production. The optimum conditions for maximum GABA production by Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 were an initial glutamic acid concentration of 497.97 mM, culture temperature of 36 °C, initial pH of 5.31 and incubation time of 60 h, which produced 7.15 mM of GABA. The value is comparable with the predicted value of 7.21 mM.

  17. Production of gaba (γ – Aminobutyric acid) by microorganisms: a review

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Radhika; Bajpai, Vivek K.; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is a four carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. As a metabolic product of plants and microorganisms produced by the decarboxylation of glutamic acid, GABA functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain that directly affects the personality and the stress management. A wide range of traditional foods produced by microbial fermentation contain GABA, in which GABA is safe and eco-friendly, and also has the possibility of providing new health-benefited products enriched with GABA. Synthesis of GABA is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase, therefore, the optimal fermentation condition is mainly based on the biochemical properties of the enzyme. Major GABA producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which make food spoilage pathogens unable to grow and act as probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The major factors affecting the production of GABA by microbial fermentation are temperature, pH, fermentation time and different media additives, therefore, these factors are summarized to provide the most up-dated information for effective GABA synthesis. There has been a huge accumulation of knowledge on GABA application for human health accompanying with a demand on natural GABA supply. Only the GABA production by microorganisms can fulfill the demand with GABA-enriched health beneficial foods. PMID:24031948

  18. gamma-Carboxyglutamic acid distribution.

    PubMed

    Zytkovicz, T H; Nelsestuen, G L

    1976-09-24

    The distribution of the vitamin K-dependent amino acid, gamma-carboxyglutamic acid was examined in proteins from a variety of sources. Proteins examined include purified rat and bovine coagulation proteins, barium citrate-adsorbing proteins from trout plasma, lamprey plasma, earthworm hemolymph, army worm hemolymph, lobster hemolymph, E. coli B/5, soybean leaf, the protein lysate from the hemolymph cell of the horseshoe crab and parathyroid extract. Other purified proteins examined included human alpha-1-antitrypsin, pepsinogen, S-100, fetuin, tropomyosin-troponin and complement protein C-3. Of these, only the blood-cotting proteins and the vertebrate plasma samples were shown to contain gamma-carboxyglutamic acid.

  19. Enzymatic production of γ-aminobutyric acid in soybeans using high hydrostatic pressure and precursor feeding.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Shigeaki; Katayama, Takumi; Watanabe, Takae; Nakajima, Kanako; Hayashi, Mayumi; Shigematsu, Toru; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    The effects were investigated of the glutamic acid (Glu) substrate concentration on the generation and kinetics of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in soybeans treated under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP; 200 MPa for 10 min at 25 °C). The conversion of Glu to GABA decreased with increasing initial Glu concentration in the soybeans. The crude glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) obtained from the HHP-treated soybeans showed substrate inhibition. The GABA production rate in the HHP-treated soybeans fitted the following substrate inhibition kinetic equation: v0=(VmaxS0)/(Km+S0+(S0)2/Ki). The Km value for the HHP-treated soybeans was significantly higher than that of the untreated soybeans. The Km values in this study show the affinity between Glu and GAD, and indicate that the HHP-treated soybeans had lower affinity between Glu and GAD than the untreated soybeans. GAD extracted from the HHP-treated soybeans showed a similar value to that in the HHP-treated soybeans. The intact biochemical system was so damaged in the HHP-treated soybeans that it showed substrate inhibition kinetics similar to that of the extracted GAD. The combination of HHP and precursor feeding proved to be a novel tool that can be used to increase the concentration of a target component.

  20. Connecting Proline and γ-Aminobutyric Acid in Stressed Plants through Non-Enzymatic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Signorelli, Santiago; Dans, Pablo D.; Coitiño, E. Laura; Borsani, Omar; Monza, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of proline (Pro) in plants exposed to biotic/abiotic stress is a well-documented and conserved response in most vegetal species. Stress conditions induce the overproduction of reactive oxygen species which can lead to cellular damage. In vitro assays have shown that enzyme inactivation by hydroxyl radicals (·OH) can be avoided in presence of Pro, suggesting that this amino acid could act as an ·OH scavenger. We applied Density Functional Theory coupled with a polarizable continuum model to elucidate how Pro reacts with ·OH. In this work we suggest that Pro reacts favourably with ·OH by H–abstraction on the amine group. This reaction produces the spontaneous decarboxylation of Pro leading to the formation of pyrrolidin-1-yl. In turn, pyrrolidin-1-yl can easily be converted to Δ1-pyrroline, the substrate of the enzyme Δ1-pyrroline dehydrogenase, which produces γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA and Pro are frequently accumulated in stressed plants and several protective roles have been assigned to these molecules. Thereby we present an alternative non-enzymatic way to synthetize GABA under oxidative stress. Finally this work sheds light on a new beneficial role of Pro accumulation in the maintenance of photosynthetic activity. PMID:25775459

  1. γ-Aminobutyric acid-ρ expression in ependymal glial cells of the mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Haro, Daniel; González-González, María Alejandra; Pétriz, Adriana; Rosas-Arellano, Abraham; Kettenmann, Helmut; Miledi, Ricardo; Martínez-Torres, Ataulfo

    2013-04-01

    The ependymal glial cells (EGCs) from the periventricular zone of the cerebellum were studied to determine their distribution and the functional properties of their γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A) ) receptors. EGCs were identified by the presence of ciliated structures on their ventricular surface and their expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Interestingly, diverse cell types, including neurons, astrocytes, and other types of glia, were identified in the subventricular zone by their current profiles. Electron microscopy showed ciliated cells and myelinated axons in this zone, but we found no collateral connections to suggest the presence of functional synapses. GABA-mediated currents were recorded from EGCs in cerebellar slices from postnatal days 13 to 35 (PN13-PN35). These currents were blocked by TPMPA (a highly specific GABA(A) ρ subunit antagonist) and bicuculline (a selective antagonist for classic GABA(A) receptors). Pentobarbital failed to modulate GABA(A)-mediated currents despite the expression of GABAα1 and GABAγ2 subunits. In situ hybridization, RT-PCR, and immunofluorescence studies confirmed GABAρ1 expression in EGCs of the cerebellum. We conclude that cerebellar EGCs express GABAρ1, which is functionally involved in GABA(A) receptor-mediated responses that are unique among glial cells of the brain.

  2. Evaluation of improved γ-aminobutyric acid production in yogurt using Lactobacillus plantarum NDC75017.

    PubMed

    Shan, Y; Man, C X; Han, X; Li, L; Guo, Y; Deng, Y; Li, T; Zhang, L W; Jiang, Y J

    2015-04-01

    Most γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB), but the yield of GABA is limited in most of these GABA-producing strains. In this study, the production of GABA was carried out by using Lactobacillus plantarum NDC75017, a strain screened from traditional fermented dairy products in China. Concentrations of substrate (l-monosodium glutamate, L-MSG) and coenzyme (pyridoxal-5-phosphate, PLP) of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and culture temperature were investigated to evaluate their effects on GABA yield of Lb. plantarum NDC75017. The results indicated that GABA production was related to GAD activity and biomass of Lb. plantarum NDC75017. Response surface methodology was used to optimize conditions of GABA production. The optimal factors for GABA production were L-MSG at 80 mM, PLP at 18 μM, and a culture temperature of 36 °C. Under these conditions, production of GABA was maximized at 314.56 mg/100 g. Addition of Lb. plantarum NDC75017 to a commercial starter culture led to higher GABA production in fermented yogurt. Flavor and texture of the prepared yogurt and the control yogurt did not differ significantly. Thus, Lb. plantarum NDC75017 has good potential for manufacture of GABA-enriched fermented milk products.

  3. Connecting proline and γ-aminobutyric acid in stressed plants through non-enzymatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Signorelli, Santiago; Dans, Pablo D; Coitiño, E Laura; Borsani, Omar; Monza, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of proline (Pro) in plants exposed to biotic/abiotic stress is a well-documented and conserved response in most vegetal species. Stress conditions induce the overproduction of reactive oxygen species which can lead to cellular damage. In vitro assays have shown that enzyme inactivation by hydroxyl radicals (·OH) can be avoided in presence of Pro, suggesting that this amino acid could act as an ·OH scavenger. We applied Density Functional Theory coupled with a polarizable continuum model to elucidate how Pro reacts with ·OH. In this work we suggest that Pro reacts favourably with ·OH by H-abstraction on the amine group. This reaction produces the spontaneous decarboxylation of Pro leading to the formation of pyrrolidin-1-yl. In turn, pyrrolidin-1-yl can easily be converted to Δ1-pyrroline, the substrate of the enzyme Δ1-pyrroline dehydrogenase, which produces γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA and Pro are frequently accumulated in stressed plants and several protective roles have been assigned to these molecules. Thereby we present an alternative non-enzymatic way to synthetize GABA under oxidative stress. Finally this work sheds light on a new beneficial role of Pro accumulation in the maintenance of photosynthetic activity.

  4. A putrescine-inducible pathway comprising PuuE-YneI in which gamma-aminobutyrate is degraded into succinate in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Shin; Kato, Kenji; Asada, Kei; Kumagai, Hidehiko; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2010-09-01

    Gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA) is metabolized to succinic semialdehyde by GABA aminotransferase (GABA-AT), and the succinic semialdehyde is subsequently oxidized to succinate by succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH). In Escherichia coli, there are duplicate GABA-ATs (GabT and PuuE) and duplicate SSADHs (GabD and YneI). While GabT and GabD have been well studied previously, the characterization and expression analysis of PuuE and YneI are yet to be investigated. By analyzing the amino acid profiles in cells of DeltapuuE and/or DeltagabT mutants, this study demonstrated that PuuE plays an important role in GABA metabolism in E. coli cells. The similarity of the amino acid sequences of PuuE and GabT is 67.4%, and it was biochemically demonstrated that the catalytic center of GabT is conserved as an amino acid residue important for the enzymatic activity in PuuE as Lys-247. However, the regulation of expression of PuuE is significantly different from that of GabT. PuuE is induced by the addition of putrescine to the medium and is repressed by succinate and low aeration conditions; in contrast, GabT is almost constitutive. Similarly, YneI is induced by putrescine, while GabD is not. For E. coli, PuuE is important for utilization of putrescine as a sole nitrogen source and both PuuE and YneI are important for utilization of putrescine as a sole carbon source. The results demonstrate that the PuuE-YneI pathway was a putrescine-inducible GABA degradation pathway for utilizing putrescine as a nutrient source.

  5. Contents of Neo-flavored Tea (GABA Kintaro) Containing γ-Aminobutyric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraki, Yoshiya

    The contents of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), catechins, theaflavins, caffeine and pheophorbide-a in neo-flavored tea (GABA Kintaro tea) were analyzed. 1)The amounts of GABA were increased over 1.5mg/g by means of infrared ray irradiation with agitation treatment. 2)There was a tendency for the amount of catechins to be decreased by this treatment, whereas the amount of theaflavins tended to increase with the same treatment. The composition of these contents in this GABA Kintaro tea was almost the same as that of black tea. 3)There was a tendency for the amount of caffeine to be decreased by this treatment. 4)There was a tendency for the amount of pheophorbide-a to be increased by this treatment. 5)The result of this study showed that the amounts of GABA and theaflavins in this GABA Kintaro tea were higher than ordinary green tea but contained few catechins.It became clear that the amount of pheophorbide-a in this GABA Kintaro tea was less than the standard value established in processed chlorella.

  6. Functionalities of conjugated compounds of γ-aminobutyric acid with salicylaldehyde or cinnamaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tai-Ti; Tseng, Yi-Wei; Yang, Tsung-Shi

    2016-01-01

    Aldehydes or ketones can react with amino compounds to form Schiff base adducts, which have been widely studied and shown to exhibit antimicrobial, antioxidant or antiviral activity. Salicylaldehyde (SA) and cinnamaldehyde (CA) are components of plant essential oils. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GA) is an important substance in the mammalian central nervous system and responsible for many bioactivities. This study aimed to synthesize functional Schiff base adducts using GA and SA or CA; to study the antimicrobial activity, antioxidant activity and tyrosinase-inhibition activity of these adducts (SA-GA and CA-GA) and their metal complexes--SA-GA-Cu (or Zn) and CA-GA-Cu (or Zn); and to find their applications in food systems. SA-GA and CA-GA both exhibited good antibacterial effects, and so did their Cu complexes. As for antioxidant activity, SA-GA and CA-GA were superior to their metal complexes in most tests. Regarding inhibition of enzymatic browning of mushrooms, both SA-GA-Cu and CA-GA-Cu could inhibit tyrosinase activity effectively.

  7. Expression of functional receptors by the human γ-aminobutyric acid A γ2 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors are heteromeric membrane proteins formed mainly by various combinations of α, β, and γ subunits; and it is commonly thought that the γ2 subunit alone does not form functional receptors. In contrast, we found that cDNA encoding the γ2L subunit of the human GABAA receptor, injected alone into Xenopus oocytes, expressed functional GABA receptors whose properties were investigated by using the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. GABA elicited desensitizing membrane currents that recovered after a few minutes' wash. Repetitive applications of GABA induced a “run-up” of GABA currents that nearly doubled the amplitude of the first response. The GABA currents inverted direction at about -30 mV, indicating that they are carried mainly by Cl- ions. The homomeric γ2L receptors were also activated by β-alanine > taurine > glycine, and, like some types of heteromeric GABAA receptors, the γ2L receptors were blocked by bicuculline and were potentiated by pentobarbital and flunitrazepam. These results indicate that the human γ2L subunit is capable of forming fully functional GABA receptors by itself in Xenopus oocytes and suggest that the roles proposed for the various subunits that make up the heteromeric GABAA receptors in situ require further clarification. PMID:14981251

  8. γ-Aminobutyric acid suppresses enhancement of hamster sperm hyperactivation by 5-hydroxytryptamine

    PubMed Central

    FUJINOKI, Masakatsu; TAKEI, Gen L.

    2016-01-01

    Sperm hyperactivation is regulated by hormones present in the oviduct. In hamsters, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) enhances hyperactivation associated with the 5HT2 receptor and 5HT4 receptor, while 17β-estradiol (E2) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) suppress the association of the estrogen receptor and GABAA receptor, respectively. In the present study, we examined the regulatory interactions among 5HT, GABA, and E2 in the regulation of hamster sperm hyperactivation. When sperm were exposed to E2 prior to 5HT exposure, E2 did not affect 5HT-enhanced hyperactivation. In contrast, GABA partially suppressed 5HT-enhanced hyperactivation when sperm were exposed to GABA prior to 5HT. GABA suppressed 5HT-enhanced hyperactivation associated with the 5HT2 receptor although it did not suppress 5HT-enhanced hyperactivation associated with the 5HT4 receptor. These results demonstrate that hamster sperm hyperactivation is regulated by an interaction between the 5HT2 receptor-mediated action of 5HT and GABA. PMID:27773888

  9. Dissecting the beta-aminobutyric acid-induced priming phenomenon in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ton, Jurriaan; Jakab, Gabor; Toquin, Valérie; Flors, Victor; Iavicoli, Annalisa; Maeder, Muriel N; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; Mauch-Mani, Brigitte

    2005-03-01

    Plants treated with the nonprotein amino acid beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA) develop an enhanced capacity to resist biotic and abiotic stresses. This BABA-induced resistance (BABA-IR) is associated with an augmented capacity to express basal defense responses, a phenomenon known as priming. Based on the observation that high amounts of BABA induce sterility in Arabidopsis thaliana, a mutagenesis screen was performed to select mutants impaired in BABA-induced sterility (ibs). Here, we report the isolation and subsequent characterization of three T-DNA-tagged ibs mutants. Mutant ibs1 is affected in a cyclin-dependent kinase-like protein, and ibs2 is defective in AtSAC1b encoding a polyphosphoinositide phosphatase. Mutant ibs3 is affected in the regulation of the ABA1 gene encoding the abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthetic enzyme zeaxanthin epoxidase. To elucidate the function of the three IBS genes in plant resistance, the mutants were tested for BABA-IR against the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato, the oomycete Hyaloperonospora parasitica, and BABA-induced tolerance to salt. All three ibs mutants were compromised in BABA-IR against H. parasitica, although to a different extent. Whereas ibs1 was reduced in priming for salicylate (SA)-dependent trailing necrosis, mutants ibs2 and ibs3 were affected in the priming for callose deposition. Only ibs1 failed to express BABA-IR against P. syringae, which coincided with a defect in priming for SA-inducible PR-1 gene expression. By contrast, ibs2 and ibs3 showed reduced BABA-induced tolerance to salt, which correlated with an affected priming for ABA-inducible gene expression. For all three ibs alleles, the defects in BABA-induced sterility and BABA-induced protection against P. syringae, H. parasitica, and salt could be confirmed in independent mutants. The data presented here introduce three novel regulatory genes involved in priming for different defense responses.

  10. Gamma Aminobutyric Acidergic and Neuronal Structural Markers in the Nucleus Accumbens Core Underlie Trait-like Impulsive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Caprioli, Daniele; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Merlo, Emiliano; Theobald, David E.H.; Spoelder, Marcia; Jupp, Bianca; Voon, Valerie; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Everitt, Barry J.; Robbins, Trevor W.; Dalley, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pathological forms of impulsivity are manifest in a number of psychiatric disorders listed in DSM-5, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and substance use disorder. However, the molecular and cellular substrates of impulsivity are poorly understood. Here, we investigated a specific form of motor impulsivity in rats, namely premature responding, on a five-choice serial reaction time task. Methods We used in vivo voxel-based magnetic resonance imaging and ex vivo Western blot analyses to investigate putative structural, neuronal, and glial protein markers in low-impulsive (LI) and high-impulsive rats. We also investigated whether messenger RNA interference targeting glutamate decarboxylase 65/67 (GAD65/67) gene expression in the nucleus accumbens core (NAcbC) is sufficient to increase impulsivity in LI rats. Results We identified structural and molecular abnormalities in the NAcbC associated with motor impulsivity in rats. We report a reduction in gray matter density in the left NAcbC of high-impulsive rats, with corresponding reductions in this region of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65/67) and markers of dendritic spines and microtubules. We further demonstrate that the experimental reduction of de novo of GAD65/67 expression bilaterally in the NAcbC is sufficient to increase impulsivity in LI rats. Conclusions These results reveal a novel mechanism of impulsivity in rats involving gamma aminobutyric acidergic and structural abnormalities in the NAcbC with potential relevance to the etiology and treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and related disorders. PMID:23973096

  11. Structural studies of the actions of anesthetic drugs on the γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor.

    PubMed

    Akk, Gustav; Steinbach, Joe Henry

    2011-12-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor is the major transmitter-gated inhibitory channel in the central nervous system. The receptor is a target for anesthetics, anticonvulsants, anxiolytics, and sedatives whose actions facilitate the flow of chloride ions through the channel and enhance the inhibitory tone in the brain. Both the kinetic and structural aspects of the actions of modulators of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor are of great importance to understanding the molecular mechanisms of general anesthesia. In this review, the structural rearrangements that take place in the γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor during channel activation and modulation are described, focusing on data obtained using voltage-clamp fluorometry. Voltage-clamp fluorometry entails the binding of an environmentally sensitive fluorophore molecule to a site of interest in the receptor, and measurement of changes in the fluorescence signal resulting from activation- or modulation-elicited structural changes. Detailed investigations can provide a map of structural changes that underlie or accompany the functional effects of modulators.

  12. Vesicular γ-Aminobutyric Acid Transporter Expression in Amacrine and Horizontal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cueva, Juan G.; Haverkamp, Silke; Reimer, Richard J.; Edwards, Robert; Wässle, Heinz; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2010-01-01

    The vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter (VGAT), which transports the inhibitory amino acid transmitters GABA and glycine, is localized to synaptic vesicles in axon terminals. The localization of VGAT immunoreactivity to mouse and rat retina was evaluated with light and electron microscopy by using well-characterized VGAT antibodies. Specific VGAT immunoreactivity was localized to numerous varicose processes in all laminae of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and to the outer plexiform layer (OPL). Amacrine cell somata characterized by weak VGAT immunoreactivity in the cytoplasm were located in the ganglion cell layer and proximal inner nuclear layer (INL) adjacent to the IPL. In rat retina, VGAT-immunoreactive cell bodies also contained GABA, glycine, or parvalbumin (PV) immunoreactivity, suggesting vesicular uptake of GABA or glycine by these cells. A few varicose VGAT-immunoreactive processes entered the OPL from the IPL. VGAT immunoreactivity in the OPL was predominantly localized to horizontal cell processes. VGAT and calcium binding protein-28K immunoreactivities (CaBP; a marker for horizontal cells) were colocalized in processes and terminals distributed to the OPL. Furthermore, VGAT immunoreactivity overlapped or was immediately adjacent to postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) immunoreactivity, which is prominent in photoreceptor terminals. Preem-bedding immunoelectron microscopy of mouse and rat retinae showed that VGAT immunoreactivity was localized to horizontal cell processes and their terminals. Immunoreactivity was distributed throughout the cytoplasm of the horizontal cell processes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate VGAT immunoreactivity in both amacrine and horizontal cell processes, suggesting these cells contain vesicles that accumulate GABA and glycine, possibly for vesicular release. PMID:11920703

  13. Soil Drench Treatment with ß-Aminobutyric Acid Increases Drought Tolerance of Potato

    PubMed Central

    Sós-Hegedűs, Anita; Juhász, Zsófia; Poór, Péter; Kondrák, Mihály; Antal, Ferenc; Tari, Irma; Mauch-Mani, Brigitte; Bánfalvi, Zsófia

    2014-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) is known to be a priming agent for a more efficient activation of cellular defence responses and a potent inducer of resistance against biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. Nevertheless, most of the studies on priming have been carried out in Arabidopsis. In potato, the effect of BABA was demonstrated only on biotic stress tolerance. We investigated the effect of BABA on the drought tolerance of potato and found that soil drenched with BABA at a final concentration of 0.3 mM improves the drought tolerance of potato. Water loss from the leaves of the primed plants is attenuated and the yield is increased compared to the unprimed drought-stressed plants. The metabolite composition of the tubers of the BABA-treated plants is less affected by drought than the tuber composition of the non-treated plants. Nitric oxide and ROS (reactive oxygen species) production is increased in the BABA-treated roots but not in the leaves. In the leaves of the BABA-treated plants, the expression of the drought-inducible gene StDS2 is delayed, but the expression of ETR1, encoding an ethylene receptor, is maintained for a longer period under the drought conditions than in the leaves of the non-treated, drought-stressed control plants. This result suggests that the ethylene-inducible gene expression remains suppressed in primed plants leading to a longer leaf life and increased tuber yield compared to the non-treated, drought-stressed plants. The priming effect of BABA in potato, however, is transient and reverts to an unprimed state within a few weeks. PMID:25489951

  14. DL-beta-aminobutyric acid-induced resistance of potato against Phytophthora infestans requires salicylic acid but not oxylipins.

    PubMed

    Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Altmann, Simone; Rosahl, Sabine

    2010-05-01

    Inducing systemic resistance responses in crop plants is a promising alternative way of disease management. To understand the underlying signaling events leading to induced resistance, functional analyses of plants defective in defined signaling pathway steps are required. We used potato, one of the economically most-important crop plants worldwide, to examine systemic resistance against the devastating late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans, induced by treatment with dl-beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA). Transgenic plants impaired in either the 9-lipoxygenase pathway, which produces defense-related compounds, or the 13-lipoxygenase pathway, which generates jasmonic acid-derived signals, expressed wild-type levels of BABA-induced resistance. Plants incapable of accumulating salicylic acid (SA), on the other hand, failed to mount this type of induced resistance. Consistently, treatment of these plants with the SA analog 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid restored BABA-induced resistance. Together, these results demonstrate the indispensability of a functional SA pathway for systemic resistance in potato induced by BABA.

  15. Efficient Modulation of γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type A Receptors by Piperine Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Piperine activates TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptor) receptors and modulates γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAAR). We have synthesized a library of 76 piperine analogues and analyzed their effects on GABAAR by means of a two-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. GABAAR were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Structure–activity relationships (SARs) were established to identify structural elements essential for efficiency and potency. Efficiency of piperine derivatives was significantly increased by exchanging the piperidine moiety with either N,N-dipropyl, N,N-diisopropyl, N,N-dibutyl, p-methylpiperidine, or N,N-bis(trifluoroethyl) groups. Potency was enhanced by replacing the piperidine moiety by N,N-dibutyl, N,N-diisobutyl, or N,N-bistrifluoroethyl groups. Linker modifications did not substantially enhance the effect on GABAAR. Compound 23 [(2E,4E)-5-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-N,N-dipropyl-2,4-pentadienamide] induced the strongest modulation of GABAA (maximal GABA-induced chloride current modulation (IGABA-max = 1673% ± 146%, EC50 = 51.7 ± 9.5 μM), while 25 [(2E,4E)-5-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-N,N-dibutyl-2,4-pentadienamide] displayed the highest potency (EC50 = 13.8 ± 1.8 μM, IGABA-max = 760% ± 47%). Compound 23 induced significantly stronger anxiolysis in mice than piperine and thus may serve as a starting point for developing novel GABAAR modulators. PMID:24905252

  16. Conformational preferences of γ-aminobutyric acid in the gas phase and in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Il Keun; Kang, Young Kee

    2012-09-01

    The conformational study of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been carried out at the M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory in the gas phase and the SMD M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory in water. In the gas phase, the folded conformation gG1 with gauche- and gauche+ conformations for the Cβsbnd Cα and Cγsbnd Cβ bonds, respectively, is found to be lowest in energy and enthalpy, which can be ascribed to the favored hyperconjugative n → π* interaction between the lone electron pair of the amine nitrogen atom and the Cdbnd O bond of the carboxylic group and the favored antiparallel dipole-dipole interaction between the Nsbnd H bond and the Cdbnd O bond. In addition, the intramolecular hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic group and the amine Nsbnd H group have contributed to stabilize some low-energy conformers. However, the most preferred conformation is found to be tG1 and more stable by 0.4 kcal/mol in ΔG than the conformer gG1, in which the favored entropic term due to the conformational flexibility and the other favored n → σ*, σ → σ*, and π → σ* interactions seem to play a role. The conformational preferences of the neutral GABA calculated by ΔG's are reasonably consistent with the populations deduced from FT microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets combined with laser ablation. In water, the two folded conformers Gg and gG of the zwitterionic GABA are dominantly populated, each of which has the population of 47%, and the hydrogen bond between the ammonium Nsbnd H group and the lone electron pair of the Csbnd O- group seems to be crucial in stabilizing these conformers. Our calculated result that the folded conformers preferentially exist in water is consistent with the 1H NMR experiments in D2O.

  17. Simultaneous detection of resolved glutamate, glutamine, and γ-aminobutyric acid at 4 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiani; Yang, Shaolin; Xuan, Yang; Jiang, Quan; Yang, Yihong; Haacke, E. Mark

    2007-04-01

    A new approach is introduced to simultaneously detect resolved glutamate (Glu), glutamine (Gln), and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) using a standard STEAM localization pulse sequence with the optimized sequence timing parameters. This approach exploits the dependence of the STEAM spectra of the strongly coupled spin systems of Glu, Gln, and GABA on the echo time TE and the mixing time TM at 4 T to find an optimized sequence parameter set, i.e., {TE, TM}, where the outer-wings of the Glu C4 multiplet resonances around 2.35 ppm, the Gln C4 multiplet resonances around 2.45 ppm, and the GABA C2 multiplet resonance around 2.28 ppm are significantly suppressed and the three resonances become virtual singlets simultaneously and thus resolved. Spectral simulation and optimization were conducted to find the optimized sequence parameters, and phantom and in vivo experiments (on normal human brains, one patient with traumatic brain injury, and one patient with brain tumor) were carried out for verification. The results have demonstrated that the Gln, Glu, and GABA signals at 2.2-2.5 ppm can be well resolved using a standard STEAM sequence with the optimized sequence timing parameters around {82 ms, 48 ms} at 4 T, while the other main metabolites, such as N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (tCho), and creatine (tCr), are still preserved in the same spectrum. The technique can be easily implemented and should prove to be a useful tool for the basic and clinical studies associated with metabolism of Glu, Gln, and/or GABA.

  18. Plasmalemmal and Vesicular γ-Aminobutyric Acid Transporter Expression in the Developing Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    GUO, CHENYING; STELLA, SALVATORE L.; HIRANO, ARLENE A.; BRECHA, NICHOLAS C.

    2009-01-01

    Plasmalemmal and vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters influence neurotransmission by regulating high-affinity GABA uptake and GABA release into the synaptic cleft and extracellular space. Postnatal expression of the plasmalemmal GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1), GAT-3, and the vesicular GABA/glycine transporter (VGAT) were evaluated in the developing mouse retina by using immunohistochemistry with affinity-purified antibodies. Weak transporter immunoreactivity was observed in the inner retina at postnatal day 0 (P0). GAT-1 immunostaining at P0 and at older ages was in amacrine and displaced amacrine cells in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and ganglion cell layer (GCL), respectively, and in their processes in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). At P10, weak GAT-1 immunostaining was in Müller cell processes. GAT-3 immunostaining at P0 and older ages was in amacrine cells and their processes, as well as in Müller cells and their processes that extended radially across the retina. At P10, Müller cell somata were observed in the middle of the INL. VGAT immunostaining was present at P0 and older ages in amacrine cells in the INL as well as processes in the IPL. At P5, weak VGAT immunostaining was also observed in horizontal cell somata and processes. By P15, the GAT and VGAT immunostaining patterns appear similar to the adult immunostaining patterns; they reached adult levels by about P20. These findings demonstrate that GABA uptake and release are initially established in the inner retina during the first postnatal week and that these systems subsequently mature in the outer retina during the second postnatal week. PMID:18975268

  19. β-aminobutyric acid mediated drought stress alleviation in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Shaw, Arun K; Bhardwaj, Pardeep K; Ghosh, Supriya; Roy, Sankhajit; Saha, Suman; Sherpa, Ang R; Saha, Samir K; Hossain, Zahed

    2016-02-01

    The present study highlights the role of β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) in alleviating drought stress effects in maize (Zea mays L.). Chemical priming was imposed by pretreating 1-week-old plants with 600 μM BABA prior to applying drought stress. Specific activities of key antioxidant enzymes and metabolites (ascorbate and glutathione) levels of ascorbate-glutathione cycle were studied to unravel the priming-induced modulation of plant defense system. Furthermore, changes in endogenous ABA and JA concentrations as well as mRNA expressions of key genes involved in their respective biosynthesis pathways were monitored in BABA-primed (BABA+) and non-primed (BABA-) leaves of drought-challenged plants to better understand the mechanistic insights into the BABA-induced hormonal regulation of plant response to water-deficit stress. Accelerated stomatal closure, high relative water content, and less membrane damage were observed in BABA-primed leaves under water-deficit condition. Elevated APX and SOD activity in non-primed leaves found to be insufficient to scavenge all H2O2 and O2 (·-) resulting in oxidative burst as evident after histochemical staining with NBT and DAB. A higher proline accumulation in non-primed leaves also does not give much protection against drought stress. Increased GR activity supported with the enhanced mRNA and protein expressions might help the BABA-primed plants to maintain a high GSH pool essential for sustaining balanced redox status to counter drought-induced oxidative stress damages. Hormonal analysis suggests that in maize, BABA-potentiated drought tolerance is primarily mediated through JA-dependent pathway by the activation of antioxidant defense systems while ABA biosynthesis pathway also plays an important role in fine-tuning of drought stress response.

  20. High γ-aminobutyric acid production from lactic acid bacteria: emphasis on Lactobacillus brevis as a functional dairy starter.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinglong; Shah, Nagendra P

    2016-03-15

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABA-rich foods have shown anti-hypertensive and anti-depressant activities as the major functions in humans and animals. Hence, high GABA-producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB) could be used as functional starters for manufacturing novel fermented dairy foods. Glutamic acid decarboxylases (GADs) from LAB are highly conserved at the species level based on the phylogenetic tree of GADs from LAB. Moreover, two functionally distinct GADs and one intact gad operon were observed in all the completely sequenced Lactobacillus brevis strains suggesting its common capability to synthesize GABA. Difficulties and strategies for the manufacture of GABA-rich fermented dairy foods have been discussed and proposed, respectively. In addition, a genetic survey on the sequenced LAB strains demonstrated the absence of cell envelope proteinases in the majority of LAB including Lb. brevis, which diminishes their cell viabilities in milk environments due to their non-proteolytic nature. Thus, several strategies have been proposed to overcome the non-proteolytic nature of Lb. brevis in order to produce GABA-rich dairy foods.

  1. Role of a gamma-aminobutryic acid (GABA) receptor mutation in the evolution and spread of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera resistance to cyclodiene insecticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An alanine to serine amino acid substitution within the Rdl subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor confers resistance to cyclodiene insecticides in many species. The corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is a damaging pest of cultivated corn that was partially controlled by ...

  2. Biodiversity and γ-aminobutyric acid production by lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional alpine raw cow's milk cheeses.

    PubMed

    Franciosi, Elena; Carafa, Ilaria; Nardin, Tiziana; Schiavon, Silvia; Poznanski, Elisa; Cavazza, Agostino; Larcher, Roberto; Tuohy, Kieran M

    2015-01-01

    "Nostrano-cheeses" are traditional alpine cheeses made from raw cow's milk in Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy. This study identified lactic acid bacteria (LAB) developing during maturation of "Nostrano-cheeses" and evaluated their potential to produce γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an immunologically active compound and neurotransmitter. Cheese samples were collected on six cheese-making days, in three dairy factories located in different areas of Trentino and at different stages of cheese ripening (24 h, 15 days, and 1, 2, 3, 6, and 8 months). A total of 1,059 LAB isolates were screened using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD-PCR) and differentiated into 583 clusters. LAB strains from dominant clusters (n = 97) were genetically identified to species level by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. LAB species most frequently isolated were Lactobacillus paracasei, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The 97 dominant clusters were also characterized for their ability in producing GABA by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). About 71% of the dominant bacteria clusters evolving during cheeses ripening were able to produce GABA. Most GABA producers were Lactobacillus paracasei but other GABA producing species included Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and Streptococcus thermophilus. No Enterococcus faecalis or Sc. macedonicus isolates produced GABA. The isolate producing the highest amount of GABA (80.0±2.7 mg/kg) was a Sc. thermophilus.

  3. Biodiversity and γ-Aminobutyric Acid Production by Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Traditional Alpine Raw Cow's Milk Cheeses

    PubMed Central

    Nardin, Tiziana; Schiavon, Silvia; Cavazza, Agostino; Larcher, Roberto; Tuohy, Kieran M.

    2015-01-01

    “Nostrano-cheeses” are traditional alpine cheeses made from raw cow's milk in Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy. This study identified lactic acid bacteria (LAB) developing during maturation of “Nostrano-cheeses” and evaluated their potential to produce γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an immunologically active compound and neurotransmitter. Cheese samples were collected on six cheese-making days, in three dairy factories located in different areas of Trentino and at different stages of cheese ripening (24 h, 15 days, and 1, 2, 3, 6, and 8 months). A total of 1,059 LAB isolates were screened using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD-PCR) and differentiated into 583 clusters. LAB strains from dominant clusters (n = 97) were genetically identified to species level by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. LAB species most frequently isolated were Lactobacillus paracasei, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The 97 dominant clusters were also characterized for their ability in producing GABA by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). About 71% of the dominant bacteria clusters evolving during cheeses ripening were able to produce GABA. Most GABA producers were Lactobacillus paracasei but other GABA producing species included Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and Streptococcus thermophilus. No Enterococcus faecalis or Sc. macedonicus isolates produced GABA. The isolate producing the highest amount of GABA (80.0±2.7 mg/kg) was a Sc. thermophilus. PMID:25802859

  4. Lactic Acid Bacterial Starter Culture with Antioxidant and γ-Aminobutyric Acid Biosynthetic Activities Isolated from Flatfish-Sikhae Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Won, Yeong Geol; Yu, Hyun-Hee; Chang, Young-Hyo; Hwang, Han-Joon

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to select a lactic acid bacterial strain as a starter culture for flatfish-Sikhae fermentation and to evaluate its suitability for application in a food system. Four strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from commercial flatfish-Sikhae were identified and selected as starter culture candidates through investigation of growth rates, salt tolerance, food safety, and functional properties such as antioxidative and antimicrobial activities. The fermentation properties of the starter candidates were also examined in food systems prepared with these strains (candidate batch) in comparison with a spontaneous fermentation process without starter culture (control batch) at 15°C. The results showed that the candidate YG331 batch had better fermentation properties such as viable cell count, pH, and acidity than the other experimental batches, including the control batch. The results are expressed according to selection criteria based on a preliminary sensory evaluation and physiochemical investigation. Also, only a small amount of histamine was detected with the candidate YG331 batch. The radical scavenging activity of the candidate batches was better compared with the control batch, and especially candidate YG331 batch showed the best radical scavenging activity. Also, we isolated another starter candidate (identified as Lactobacillus brevis PM03) with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing activity from commercial flatfish-Sikhae products. The sensory scores of the candidate YG331 batch were better than those of the other experimental batches in terms of flavor, color, and overall acceptance. In this study, we established selection criteria for the lactic acid bacterial starter for the flatfish-Sikhae production and finally selected candidate YG331 as the most suitable starter.

  5. Synthesis of γ-Aminobutyric Acid by Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from a Variety of Italian Cheeses▿

    PubMed Central

    Siragusa, S.; De Angelis, M.; Di Cagno, R.; Rizzello, C. G.; Coda, R.; Gobbetti, M.

    2007-01-01

    The concentrations of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in 22 Italian cheese varieties that differ in several technological traits markedly varied from 0.26 to 391 mg kg−1. Presumptive lactic acid bacteria were isolated from each cheese variety (total of 440 isolates) and screened for the capacity to synthesize GABA. Only 61 isolates showed this activity and were identified by partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Twelve species were found. Lactobacillus paracasei PF6, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus PR1, Lactococcus lactis PU1, Lactobacillus plantarum C48, and Lactobacillus brevis PM17 were the best GABA-producing strains during fermentation of reconstituted skimmed milk. Except for L. plantarum C48, all these strains were isolated from cheeses with the highest concentrations of GABA. A core fragment of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) DNA was isolated from L. paracasei PF6, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus PR1, L. lactis PU1, and L. plantarum C48 by using primers based on two highly conserved regions of GAD. A PCR product of ca. 540 bp was found for all the strains. The amino acid sequences deduced from nucleotide sequence analysis showed 98, 99, 90, and 85% identity to GadB of L. plantarum WCFS1 for L. paracasei PF6, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus PR1, L. lactis PU1, and L. plantarum C48, respectively. Except for L. lactis PU1, the three lactobacillus strains survived and synthesized GABA under simulated gastrointestinal conditions. The findings of this study provide a potential basis for exploiting selected cheese-related lactobacilli to develop health-promoting dairy products enriched in GABA. PMID:17890341

  6. Metabolic pathways regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contributing to heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid is a non-protein amino acid involved in various metabolic processes. The objectives of this study were to examine whether increased GABA could improve heat tolerance in cool-season creeping bentgrass through physiological analysis, and to determine major metabolic pathways regulated by GABA through metabolic profiling. Plants were pretreated with 0.5 mM GABA or water before exposed to non-stressed condition (21/19 °C) or heat stress (35/30 °C) in controlled growth chambers for 35 d. The growth and physiological analysis demonstrated that exogenous GABA application significantly improved heat tolerance of creeping bentgrass. Metabolic profiling found that exogenous application of GABA led to increases in accumulations of amino acids (glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, threonine, serine, and valine), organic acids (aconitic acid, malic acid, succinic acid, oxalic acid, and threonic acid), sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, galactose, and maltose), and sugar alcohols (mannitol and myo-inositol). These findings suggest that GABA-induced heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass could involve the enhancement of photosynthesis and ascorbate-glutathione cycle, the maintenance of osmotic adjustment, and the increase in GABA shunt. The increased GABA shunt could be the supply of intermediates to feed the tricarboxylic acid cycle of respiration metabolism during a long-term heat stress, thereby maintaining metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27455877

  7. Metabolic pathways regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contributing to heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera).

    PubMed

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2016-07-26

    γ-Aminobutyric acid is a non-protein amino acid involved in various metabolic processes. The objectives of this study were to examine whether increased GABA could improve heat tolerance in cool-season creeping bentgrass through physiological analysis, and to determine major metabolic pathways regulated by GABA through metabolic profiling. Plants were pretreated with 0.5 mM GABA or water before exposed to non-stressed condition (21/19 °C) or heat stress (35/30 °C) in controlled growth chambers for 35 d. The growth and physiological analysis demonstrated that exogenous GABA application significantly improved heat tolerance of creeping bentgrass. Metabolic profiling found that exogenous application of GABA led to increases in accumulations of amino acids (glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, threonine, serine, and valine), organic acids (aconitic acid, malic acid, succinic acid, oxalic acid, and threonic acid), sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, galactose, and maltose), and sugar alcohols (mannitol and myo-inositol). These findings suggest that GABA-induced heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass could involve the enhancement of photosynthesis and ascorbate-glutathione cycle, the maintenance of osmotic adjustment, and the increase in GABA shunt. The increased GABA shunt could be the supply of intermediates to feed the tricarboxylic acid cycle of respiration metabolism during a long-term heat stress, thereby maintaining metabolic homeostasis.

  8. Metabolic pathways regulated by abscisic acid, salicylic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid in association with improved drought tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera).

    PubMed

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2017-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are known to play roles in regulating plant stress responses. This study was conducted to determine metabolites and associated pathways regulated by ABA, SA and GABA that could contribute to drought tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera). Plants were foliar sprayed with ABA (5 μM), GABA (0.5 mM) and SA (10 μM) or water (untreated control) prior to 25 days drought stress in controlled growth chambers. Application of ABA, GABA or SA had similar positive effects on alleviating drought damages, as manifested by the maintenance of lower electrolyte leakage and greater relative water content in leaves of treated plants relative to the untreated control. Metabolic profiling showed that ABA, GABA and SA induced differential metabolic changes under drought stress. ABA mainly promoted the accumulation of organic acids associated with tricarboxylic acid cycle (aconitic acid, succinic acid, lactic acid and malic acid). SA strongly stimulated the accumulation of amino acids (proline, serine, threonine and alanine) and carbohydrates (glucose, mannose, fructose and cellobiose). GABA enhanced the accumulation of amino acids (GABA, glycine, valine, proline, 5-oxoproline, serine, threonine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid) and organic acids (malic acid, lactic acid, gluconic acid, malonic acid and ribonic acid). The enhanced drought tolerance could be mainly due to the enhanced respiration metabolism by ABA, amino acids and carbohydrates involved in osmotic adjustment (OA) and energy metabolism by SA, and amino acid metabolism related to OA and stress-defense secondary metabolism by GABA.

  9. Lack of kainic acid-induced gamma oscillations predicts subsequent CA1 excitotoxic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Jinde, Seiichiro; Belforte, Juan E.; Yamamoto, Jun; Wilson, Matthew A.; Tonegawa, Susumu; Nakazawa, Kazu

    2009-01-01

    Gamma oscillations are a prominent feature of hippocampal network activity, but their functional role remains debated, ranging from mere epiphenomenon to crucial for information processing. Similarly, persistent gamma oscillations sometimes appear prior to epileptic discharges in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis. However, the significance of this activity in hippocampal excitotoxicity is unclear. We assessed the relationship between kainic acid (KA)-induced gamma oscillations and excitotoxicity in genetically-engineered mice in which N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor deletion was confined to CA3 pyramidal cells. Mutants showed reduced CA3 pyramidal cell firing and augmented sharp wave-ripple activity, resulting in higher susceptibility to KA-induced seizures, and leading to strikingly selective neurodegeneration in the CA1 subfield. Interestingly, the KA-induced gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) level increases and persistent 30-50 Hz gamma oscillations observed in control mice prior to the first seizure discharge was abolished in the mutants. Consequently, on subsequent days, mutants manifested prolonged epileptiform activity and massive neurodegeneration of CA1 cells, including local GABAergic neurons. Remarkably, pretreatment with the potassium channel blocker α-dendrotoxin (DTX) increased GABA levels, restored gamma oscillations, and prevented CA1 degeneration in the mutants. These results demonstrate that emergence of low frequency gamma oscillations predicts increased resistance to KA-induced excitotoxicity, raising the possibility that gamma oscillations may have potential prognostic value for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:19735292

  10. Exogenous γ-Aminobutyric Acid Improves the Structure and Function of Photosystem II in Muskmelon Seedlings Exposed to Salinity-Alkalinity Stress

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weinan; Zhen, Ai; Zhang, Liang; Hu, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is important in plant responses to environmental stresses. We wished to clarify the role of GABA in maintenance of photosynthesis in muskmelon seedlings (Cucumis melo L., cv. Yipintianxia) during saline-alkaline stress. To this end, we assessed the effect of GABA on the structure and function of the photosynthetic apparatus in muskmelon seedlings grown under saline-alkaline stress. These stresses in combination reduced net photosynthetic rate, gas-exchange, and inhibited photosystem II (PSII) electron transport as measured by the JIP-test. They also reduced the activity of chloroplast ATPases and disrupted the internal lamellar system of the thylakoids. Exogenous GABA alleviated the stress-induced reduction of net photosynthesis, the activity of chloroplast ATPases, and overcame some of the damaging effects of stress on the chloroplast structure. Based on interpretation of the JIP-test, we conclude that exogenous GABA alleviated stress-related damage on the acceptor side of PSII. It also restored energy distribution, the reaction center status, and enhanced the ability of PSII to repair reaction centers in stressed seedlings. GABA may play a crucial role in protecting the chloroplast structure and function of PSII against the deleterious effects of salinity-alkalinity stress. PMID:27764179

  11. Oligomerization of L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Hill, A R; Orgel, L E

    1999-03-01

    Unlike glutamic acid, L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid does not oligomerize efficiently when treated with carbonyldiimidazole in aqueous solution. However, divalent ions such as Mg2+ catalyze the reaction, and lead to the formation of oligomers in good yield. In the presence of hydroxylapatite, L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid oligomerizes efficiently in a reaction that proceeds in the absence of divalent ions but is further catalyzed when they are present. After 'feeding' 50 times with activated amino acid in the presence of the Mg2+ ion, oligomers longer than the 20-mer could be detected. The effect of hydroxylapatite on peptide elongation is very sensitive to the nature of the activated amino acid and the acceptor peptide. Glutamic acid oligomerizes more efficiently than L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid on hydroxylapatite and adds more efficiently to decaglutamic acid in solution. One might, therefore, expect that glutamic acid would add more efficiently than L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid to decaglutamic acid on hydroxylapatite. The contrary is true--the addition of L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid is substantially more efficient. This suggests that oligomerization on the surface of hydroxylapatite depends on the detailed match between the structure of the surface of the mineral and the structure of the oligomer.

  12. Oligomerization of L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, A. R. Jr; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Unlike glutamic acid, L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid does not oligomerize efficiently when treated with carbonyldiimidazole in aqueous solution. However, divalent ions such as Mg2+ catalyze the reaction, and lead to the formation of oligomers in good yield. In the presence of hydroxylapatite, L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid oligomerizes efficiently in a reaction that proceeds in the absence of divalent ions but is further catalyzed when they are present. After 'feeding' 50 times with activated amino acid in the presence of the Mg2+ ion, oligomers longer than the 20-mer could be detected. The effect of hydroxylapatite on peptide elongation is very sensitive to the nature of the activated amino acid and the acceptor peptide. Glutamic acid oligomerizes more efficiently than L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid on hydroxylapatite and adds more efficiently to decaglutamic acid in solution. One might, therefore, expect that glutamic acid would add more efficiently than L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid to decaglutamic acid on hydroxylapatite. The contrary is true--the addition of L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid is substantially more efficient. This suggests that oligomerization on the surface of hydroxylapatite depends on the detailed match between the structure of the surface of the mineral and the structure of the oligomer.

  13. γ-Aminobutyric acid induces resistance against Penicillium expansum by priming of defence responses in pear fruit.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chen; Zeng, Lizhen; Sheng, Kuang; Chen, Fangxia; Zhou, Tao; Zheng, Xiaodong; Yu, Ting

    2014-09-15

    The results from this study showed that treatment with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), at 100-1000 μg/ml, induced strong resistance against blue mould rot caused by Penicillium expansum in pear fruit. Moreover, the activities of five defence-related enzymes (including chitinase, β-1,3-glucanase, phenylalnine ammonialyase, peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase) and the expression of these corresponding genes were markedly and/or promptly enhanced in the treatment with GABA and inoculation with P. expansum compared with those that were treated with GABA or inoculated with pathogen alone. In addition, the treatment of pear with GABA had little adverse effect on the edible quality of the fruit. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that GABA can effectively reduce fungal disease of harvested fruit. Its mechanisms may be closely correlated with the induction of fruit resistance by priming activation and expression of defence-related enzymes and genes upon challenge with pathogen.

  14. Bicyclic γ-amino acids as inhibitors of γ-aminobutyrate aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Andrea; Tamborini, Lucia; Pennacchietti, Eugenia; Coluccia, Antonio; Silvestri, Romano; Cullia, Gregorio; De Micheli, Carlo; Conti, Paola; De Biase, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The γ-aminobutyrate (GABA)-degradative enzyme GABA aminotransferase (GABA-AT) is regarded as an attractive target to control GABA levels in the central nervous system: this has important implications in the treatment of several neurological disorders and drug dependencies. We have investigated the ability of newly synthesized compounds to act as GABA-AT inhibitors. These compounds have a unique bicyclic structure: the carbocyclic ring bears the GABA skeleton, while the fused 3-Br-isoxazoline ring contains an electrophilic warhead susceptible of nucleophilic attack by an active site residue of the target enzyme. Out of the four compounds tested, only the one named (+)-3 was found to significantly inhibit mammalian GABA-AT in vitro. Docking studies, performed on the available structures of GABA-AT, support the experimental findings: out of the four tested compounds, only (+)-3 suitably orients the electrophilic 3-Br-isoxazoline warhead towards the active site nucleophilic residue Lys329, thereby explaining the irreversible inhibition of GABA-AT observed experimentally.

  15. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid treatment affects citrate and amino acid accumulation to improve fruit quality and storage performance of postharvest citrus fruit.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ling; Shen, Dandan; Luo, Yi; Sun, Xiaohua; Wang, Jinqiu; Luo, Tao; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Juan; Deng, Xiuxin; Cheng, Yunjiang

    2017-02-01

    The loss of organic acids during postharvest storage is one of the major factors that reduces the fruit quality and economic value of citrus. Citrate is the most important organic acid in citrus fruits. Molecular evidence has proved that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt plays a key role in citrate metabolism. Here, we investigated the effects of exogenous GABA treatment on citrate metabolism and storage quality of postharvest citrus fruit. The content of citrate was significantly increased, which was primarily attributed to the inhibition of the expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). Amino acids, including glutamate, alanine, serine, aspartate and proline, were also increased. Moreover, GABA treatment decreased the fruit rot rate. The activities of antioxidant enzymes and the content of energy source ATP were affected by the treatment. Our results indicate that GABA treatment is a very effective approach for postharvest quality maintenance and improvement of storage performance in citrus production.

  16. Carrier-mediated γ-aminobutyric acid transport across the basolateral membrane of human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Carstensen, Mette; Brodin, Birger

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the transport of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) across the basolateral membrane of intestinal cells. The proton-coupled amino acid transporter, hPAT1, mediates the influx of GABA and GABA mimetic drug substances such as vigabatrin and gaboxadol and the anticancer prodrug δ-aminolevulinic acid across the apical membrane of small intestinal enterocytes. Little is however known about the basolateral transport of these substances. We investigated basolateral transport of GABA in mature Caco-2 cell monolayers using isotope studies. Here we report that, at least two transporters seem to be involved in the basolateral transport of GABA. The basolateral uptake consisted of a high-affinity system with a K(m) of 290 μM and V(max) of 75 pmol cm(-2) min(-1) and a low affinity system with a K(m) of approximately 64 mM and V(max) of 1.6 nmol cm(-2) min(-1). The high-affinity transporter is Na(+) and Cl(-) dependent. The substrate specificity of the high-affinity transporter was further studied and Gly-Sar, Leucine, gaboxadol, sarcosine, lysine, betaine, 5-hydroxythryptophan, proline and glycine reduced the GABA uptake to approximately 44-70% of the GABA uptake in the absence of inhibitor. Other substances such as β-alanine, GABA, 5-aminovaleric acid, taurine and δ-aminolevulinic acid reduced the basolateral GABA uptake to 6-25% of the uptake in the absence of inhibitor. Our results indicate that the distance between the charged amino- and acid-groups is particular important for inhibition of basolateral GABA uptake. Thus, there seems to be a partial substrate overlap between the basolateral GABA transporter and hPAT1, which may prove important for understanding drug interactions at the level of intestinal transport.

  17. Thermodynamics of DL-α-aminobutyric acid induced solvation mechanism in aqueous KCl solutions at 288.15-308.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, S.; Ghosh, S.; Hossain, A.; Mahali, K.; Roy, S.; Dolui, B. K.

    2016-09-01

    The solubilities of DL-α-aminobutyric acid in KCl solutions of different concentrations are measured at 288.15-308.15 K. Gibbs energies and entropies have been determined for transfer of α-aminobutyric acid form water to aqueous KCl solution at 298.15 K. The cavity, dipole-dipole and other interactions affecting the solubility, as well as stability of the amino acid in solution are also evaluated. Gibbs energy and entropy of transfer due to interactions are computed to create the model of the complex solute-solvent and solventsolvent interactions. Molar volume, densities, dipole moment of solvent and diameter of co-solvent in aqueous potassium chloride are also evaluated.

  18. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid γ-aminobutyric acid by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Casado, Mercedes; Molero, Marta; Sierra, Cristina; García-Cazorla, Angels; Ormazabal, Aida; Artuch, Rafael

    2014-04-01

    The measurement of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is suitable for investigating various neurological disorders. In this study, a sensitive and selective method for free GABA quantification in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been standardised. This method is based on CE with LIF detection using 4-fluoro-7-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-F) as a derivatisating agent. The reaction conditions (NBD-F concentration, pH, temperature and reaction time) and the electrophoretic parameters (run buffer composition and pH and separation voltage) were optimised to obtain the maximum derivatisation efficiency and electrophoretic resolution. The best resolution was obtained using 200 mM sodium borate, 10 mM SDS, 8.5 mM β-CD, pH 10 and 20 kV voltage. The method was linear in the concentration range of 2.5-1000 nM with good inter- and intra-assay precision values. The effects of CSF handling on free GABA concentrations were also evaluated. Our results show that the time delay between CSF collection and freezing strongly increases the CSF GABA values. Age-related reference values were established in 55 paediatric controls. The influence of antiepileptic therapy on free CSF GABA was studied in 38 neuropaediatric patients. Significantly, higher GABA values were obtained in patients taking valproic acid or vigabatrin therapy, which are antiepileptic drugs that modulate GABA metabolism.

  19. Novel fermented chickpea milk with enhanced level of γ-aminobutyric acid and neuroprotective effect on PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen; Wei, Mingming; Wu, Junjun; Rui, Xin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, novel fermented chickpea milk with high γ -aminobutyric acid (GABA) content and potential neuroprotective activity was developed. Fermentation starter that can produce GABA was selected from 377 strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional Chinese fermented foods. Among the screened strains, strain M-6 showed the highest GABA-producing capacity in De Man–Rogosa and Sharp (MRS) broth and chickpea milk. M-6 was identified as Lactobacillus plantarum based on Gram staining, API carbohydrate fermentation pattern testing, and 16s rDNA sequencing. The complete gene encoding glutamate decarboxylase was cloned to confirm the presence of the gene in L. plantarum M-6. The fermentation condition was optimized by response surface methodology. Results demonstrated that L. plantarum M-6 produced the highest GABA content of 537.23 mg/L. The optimal condition included an inoculum concentration of 7%, presence of 0.2% (m/v) monosodium glutamate and 55 µ M pyridoxal-5-phosphate, incubation temperature of 39 °C and fermentation time of 48 h . GABA-enriched chickpea milk exerted protective effects on PC12 cells against MnCl2 -induced injury. GABA-enriched chickpea milk improved cell viability and markedly attenuated the release of lactate dehydrogenase compared with the impaired cells. PMID:27602272

  20. Methyl-inositol, γ-aminobutyric acid and other health benefit compounds in the aril of litchi.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zi-Chen; Yang, Zhuan-Ying; Li, Jian-Guo; Chen, Hou-Bin; Huang, Xu-Ming; Wang, Hui-Cong

    2016-11-01

    The available components in the flesh of litchi seem insufficient to interpret its wide and significant physiological effects. Some unusual compounds, including myo-inositol, inositol methyl derivatives and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were identified as main constituents in the flesh of litchi. Their concentrations varied among cultivars but remain relatively constant during development. Litchi flesh was shown to contain moderate myo-inositol (0.28-0.78 mg g(-1) FW), ascorbic acid (0.08-0.39 mg g(-1) FW) and phenolics (0.47-1.60 mg g(-1) FW), but abundant l-quebrachitol (1.6-6.4 mg g(-1) FW) and GABA (1.7-3.5 mg g(-1) FW). The concentration of GABA in the flesh of litchi was about 100 times higher than in other fruits. And l-quebrachitol is not a common component in fruits. The biological and physiological activities of inositols, inositol derivatives and GABA have been extensively documented. These compounds are probably important compositional characteristic contributing to the widely shown health benefits of litchi.

  1. Inorganic Nitrate Mimics Exercise-Stimulated Muscular Fiber-Type Switching and Myokine and γ-Aminobutyric Acid Release.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lee D; Ashmore, Tom; McNally, Ben D; Murfitt, Steven A; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Feelisch, Martin; Lindsay, Ross; Siervo, Mario; Williams, Elizabeth A; Murray, Andrew J; Griffin, Julian L

    2017-03-01

    Exercise is an effective intervention for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. Skeletal muscle combines multiple signals that contribute to the beneficial effects of exercise on cardiometabolic health. Inorganic nitrate increases exercise efficiency, tolerance, and performance. The transcriptional regulator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC1α) coordinates the exercise-stimulated skeletal muscle fiber-type switch from glycolytic fast-twitch (type IIb) to oxidative slow-twitch (type I) and intermediate (type IIa) fibers, an effect reversed in insulin resistance and diabetes. We found that nitrate induces PGC1α expression and a switch toward type I and IIa fibers in rat muscle and myotubes in vitro. Nitrate induces the release of exercise/PGC1α-dependent myokine FNDC5/irisin and β-aminoisobutyric acid from myotubes and muscle in rats and humans. Both exercise and nitrate stimulated PGC1α-mediated γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) secretion from muscle. Circulating GABA concentrations were increased in exercising mice and nitrate-treated rats and humans; thus, GABA may function as an exercise/PGC1α-mediated myokine-like small molecule. Moreover, nitrate increased circulating growth hormone levels in humans and rodents. Nitrate induces physiological responses that mimic exercise training and may underlie the beneficial effects of this metabolite on exercise and cardiometabolic health.

  2. Distribution of 5-HT2A receptor immunoreactivity in the rat amygdaloid complex and colocalization with γ-aminobutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Bombardi, Cristiano

    2011-01-25

    The 5-HT2A receptor (5-HT2Ar) is located in a variety of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in many regions of the central nervous system and is a major target for atypical antipsychotic drugs. In the present study, an immunoperoxidase experiment was used to investigate the distribution of 5-HT2Ar immunoreactivity in the rat amygdaloid complex. In the basolateral amygdala, the colocalization of 5-HT2Ar with inhibitory transmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was studied using double-immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. The staining pattern obtained was colchicine-sensitive. In fact, pretreatment with colchicine increased the number of 5-HT2Ar-immunoreactive somata. Accordingly, with the exception of the intercalated nuclei, the amygdaloid complex of colchicine-injected rats exhibited a high density of 5-HT2Ar-IR somata. Morphological analyses indicated that 5-HT2Ar was located on both excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the rat amygdaloid complex. In addition, double-immunofluorescence observations revealed that the great majority of GABA-immunoreactive neurons in the basolateral amygdala exhibited 5-HT2Ar immunoreactivity (66.3%-70.6% depending on the nucleus). These data help to clarify the complex role of the 5-HT2Ar in the amygdaloid complex suggesting that this receptor can regulate amygdaloid activity by acting on different neuronal populations.

  3. γ-Aminobutyric acid addition alleviates ammonium toxicity by limiting ammonium accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoling; Zhu, Changhua; Yang, Na; Gan, Lijun; Xia, Kai

    2016-12-01

    Excessive use of nitrogen (N) fertilizer has increased ammonium (NH4(+) ) accumulation in many paddy soils to levels that reduce rice vegetative biomass and yield. Based on studies of NH4(+) toxicity in rice (Oryza sativa, Nanjing 44) seedlings cultured in agar medium, we found that NH4(+) concentrations above 0.75 mM inhibited the growth of rice and caused NH4(+) accumulation in both shoots and roots. Use of excessive NH4(+) also induced rhizosphere acidification and inhibited the absorption of K, Ca, Mg, Fe and Zn in rice seedlings. Under excessive NH4(+) conditions, exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) treatment limited NH4(+) accumulation in rice seedlings, reduced NH4(+) toxicity symptoms and promoted plant growth. GABA addition also reduced rhizosphere acidification and alleviated the inhibition of Ca, Mg, Fe and Zn absorption caused by excessive NH4(+) . Furthermore, we found that the activity of glutamine synthetase/NADH-glutamate synthase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2/NADH-GOGAT; EC1.4.1.14) in root increased gradually as the NH4(+) concentration increased. However, when the concentration of NH4(+) is more than 3 mM, GABA treatment inhibited NH4(+) -induced increases in GS/NADH-GOGAT activity. The inhibition of ammonium assimilation may restore the elongation of seminal rice roots repressed by high NH4(+) . These results suggest that mitigation of ammonium accumulation and assimilation is essential for GABA-dependent alleviation of ammonium toxicity in rice seedlings.

  4. Pyridoxine Supplementation Improves the Activity of Recombinant Glutamate Decarboxylase and the Enzymatic Production of Gama-Aminobutyric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Su, Lingqia; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of L-glutamate to the valuable food supplement γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, GAD from Escherichia coli K12, a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, was overexpressed in E. coli. The GAD produced in media supplemented with 0.05 mM soluble vitamin B6 analog pyridoxine hydrochloride (GAD-V) activity was 154.8 U mL-1, 1.8-fold higher than that of GAD obtained without supplementation (GAD-C). Purified GAD-V exhibited increased activity (193.4 U mg-1, 1.5-fold higher than that of GAD-C), superior thermostability (2.8-fold greater than that of GAD-C), and higher kcat/Km (1.6-fold higher than that of GAD-C). Under optimal conditions in reactions mixtures lacking added PLP, crude GAD-V converted 500 g L-1 monosodium glutamate (MSG) to GABA with a yield of 100%, and 750 g L-1 MSG with a yield of 88.7%. These results establish the utility of pyridoxine supplementation and lay the foundation for large-scale enzymatic production of GABA. PMID:27438707

  5. Effect of γ-aminobutyric acid on growth performance and immune function in chicks under beak trimming stress.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wan-ying; Hou, Xin-yan; Yan, Feng-bin; Sun, Gui-rong; Han, Rui-li; Kang, Xiang-tao

    2013-02-01

    This experiment was undertaken to examine the effect of beak trimming stress on the growth performance and immune system, and to consider possible roles of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in this stress response. Results showed that body weight, feed intake and relative spleen weight were significantly increased by GABA at 80 mg/kg (P < 0.05) under beak trimming stress, whereas the relative organ weights of the bursa of fabricius and thymus were not significantly affected (P > 0.05). Adrenocorticotropic hormone concentration in serum was highest for chicks fed the GABA-deficient water and was significantly decreased by the supplement of GABA at days 1, 3 and 5 after beak trimming (P < 0.05). The supplement of GABA significantly increased the proportions of CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes, especially at the dose of 60 mg/kg (P < 0.05). The levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-6 in serum were significantly decreased by GABA at 80 mg/kg (P < 0.05). All the three cytokines expressed in the spleen were significantly decreased by GABA at 80 mg/kg when birds were under beak trimming stress (P < 0.05). It is concluded that beak trimming suppressed the immune response of chicks, whereas the immune response of chicks could be improved by GABA supplementation.

  6. Extraction, purification and anti-fatigue activity of γ-aminobutyric acid from mulberry (Morus alba L.) leaves

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hengwen; He, Xuanhui; Liu, Yan; Li, Jun; He, Qingyong; Zhang, Cuiying; Wei, Benjun; Zhang, Ye; Wang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Mulberry (Morus alba L.) is a tree species of Moraceae widely distributed in Southern China. In the present study, the white crystal of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was purified from mulberry leaves, and its bioactivity was also investigated. The main results were as follows: first, the crude GABA was extracted from mulberry leaves by using biochemical methods. Then, the crude was purified by chromatography over an S-8 macroporous resin, Sephadex G-10, and 732 cation exchange resin to yield a white crystal. Lavage administration and exposure of GABA to male NIH mice showed no adverse effects on their growth and development. In an endurance capacity test, the average loaded-swimming time of medium dose was 111.60% longer than the control (P < 0.01). Further investigations showed that relative to that of model control, the respective blood lactate (BL) concentrations of low- and medium-dose were 28.52% and 28.81% lower (P < 0.05), whereas the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were 36.83% and 40.54% lower (P < 0.05), and that of liver glycogen (LG) levels were 12.81% and 17.22% lower (P < 0.05). The results indicated that GABA has an advantage over taurine of anti-fatigue effect. These findings were indicative of the anti-fatigue activity of GABA. PMID:26743028

  7. Factors influencing diamine oxidase activity and γ-aminobutyric acid content of fava bean (Vicia faba L.) during germination.

    PubMed

    Yang, Runqiang; Chen, Hui; Gu, Zhenxin

    2011-11-09

    Factors (germination time, spectra, temperature, pH, and chemical inhibitors) influencing diamine oxidase (DAO, EC 1.4.3.6) activity and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content of fava bean (Vicia faba L.) during germination were investigated in this study. DAO activity significantly increased in germinating seeds but varied with different organs. The enzyme activity was higher in shoot than that in cotyledon, hypocotyl, and radicle. When seeds were germinated in the dark, DAO activity was 2.35-, 2.00-, 2.36-, 4.40-, and 1.67-fold of that under white, red, blue, green, and yellow spectra, respectively. The optimum germination temperature and pH value for increasing DAO activity were 30 °C and 3.0, respectively. The DAO activity was inhibited significantly by aminoguanidine and sodium ethylenediamine tetracetate, while it was activated by CuCl(2) and CaCl(2). Germinating at an appropriate temperature and pH, 30% of GABA formation was supplied by DAO. Calcium was related to the regulation of DAO activity and GABA accumulation.

  8. Zinc inhibition of γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 4 (GAT4) reveals a link between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Kfir, Einav; Lee, William; Eskandari, Sepehr; Nelson, Nathan

    2005-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters (GATs) play an important role in inhibitory neurotransmission by clearing synaptically released GABA and by maintaining low resting levels of GABA in synaptic and extrasynaptic regions. In certain brain regions, vesicular zinc is colocalized and coreleased with glutamate and modulates the behavior of a number of channels, receptors, and transporters. We examined the effect of zinc on expressed GATs (GAT1, GAT2, GAT3, and GAT4) in Xenopus laevis oocytes by using tracer flux and electrophysiological methods. We show that zinc is a potent inhibitor of GAT4 (Ki of 3 μM). Immunolocalization of GAT4 in the hippocampus revealed dense localization in the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus, regions which are known to be heavily populated by zinc-containing glutamatergic neurons. The results suggest a physiological role of synaptically released zinc in the hippocampus, because zinc released from hyperactive glutamatergic neurons may simultaneously bring about elevated GABAergic inhibition. Therefore, this mode of zinc function signifies a link between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission and may play a neuroprotective role against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. PMID:15829583

  9. Extraction, purification and anti-fatigue activity of γ-aminobutyric acid from mulberry (Morus alba L.) leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hengwen; He, Xuanhui; Liu, Yan; Li, Jun; He, Qingyong; Zhang, Cuiying; Wei, Benjun; Zhang, Ye; Wang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Mulberry (Morus alba L.) is a tree species of Moraceae widely distributed in Southern China. In the present study, the white crystal of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was purified from mulberry leaves, and its bioactivity was also investigated. The main results were as follows: first, the crude GABA was extracted from mulberry leaves by using biochemical methods. Then, the crude was purified by chromatography over an S-8 macroporous resin, Sephadex G-10, and 732 cation exchange resin to yield a white crystal. Lavage administration and exposure of GABA to male NIH mice showed no adverse effects on their growth and development. In an endurance capacity test, the average loaded-swimming time of medium dose was 111.60% longer than the control (P < 0.01). Further investigations showed that relative to that of model control, the respective blood lactate (BL) concentrations of low- and medium-dose were 28.52% and 28.81% lower (P < 0.05), whereas the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were 36.83% and 40.54% lower (P < 0.05), and that of liver glycogen (LG) levels were 12.81% and 17.22% lower (P < 0.05). The results indicated that GABA has an advantage over taurine of anti-fatigue effect. These findings were indicative of the anti-fatigue activity of GABA.

  10. Extraction, purification and anti-fatigue activity of γ-aminobutyric acid from mulberry (Morus alba L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hengwen; He, Xuanhui; Liu, Yan; Li, Jun; He, Qingyong; Zhang, Cuiying; Wei, Benjun; Zhang, Ye; Wang, Jie

    2016-01-08

    Mulberry (Morus alba L.) is a tree species of Moraceae widely distributed in Southern China. In the present study, the white crystal of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was purified from mulberry leaves, and its bioactivity was also investigated. The main results were as follows: first, the crude GABA was extracted from mulberry leaves by using biochemical methods. Then, the crude was purified by chromatography over an S-8 macroporous resin, Sephadex G-10, and 732 cation exchange resin to yield a white crystal. Lavage administration and exposure of GABA to male NIH mice showed no adverse effects on their growth and development. In an endurance capacity test, the average loaded-swimming time of medium dose was 111.60% longer than the control (P < 0.01). Further investigations showed that relative to that of model control, the respective blood lactate (BL) concentrations of low- and medium-dose were 28.52% and 28.81% lower (P < 0.05), whereas the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were 36.83% and 40.54% lower (P < 0.05), and that of liver glycogen (LG) levels were 12.81% and 17.22% lower (P < 0.05). The results indicated that GABA has an advantage over taurine of anti-fatigue effect. These findings were indicative of the anti-fatigue activity of GABA.

  11. Postsynaptic clustering of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors by the γ3 subunit in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Kristin; Essrich, Christian; Benson, Jack A.; Benke, Dietmar; Bluethmann, Horst; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Lüscher, Bernhard

    1999-01-01

    Synaptic localization of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors is a prerequisite for synaptic inhibitory function, but the mechanism by which different receptor subtypes are localized to postsynaptic sites is poorly understood. The γ2 subunit and the postsynaptic clustering protein gephyrin are required for synaptic localization and function of major GABAA receptor subtypes. We now show that transgenic overexpression of the γ3 subunit in γ2 subunit-deficient mice restores benzodiazepine binding sites, benzodiazepine-modulated whole cell currents, and postsynaptic miniature currents, suggesting the formation of functional, postsynaptic receptors. Moreover, the γ3 subunit can substitute for γ2 in the formation of GABAA receptors that are synaptically clustered and colocalized with gephyrin in vivo. These clusters were formed even in brain regions devoid of endogenous γ3 subunit, indicating that the factors present for clustering of γ2 subunit-containing receptors are sufficient to cluster γ3 subunit-containing receptors. The GABAA receptor and gephyrin-clustering properties of the ectopic γ3 subunit were also observed for the endogenous γ3 subunit, but only in the absence of the γ2 subunit, suggesting that the γ3 subunit is at a competitive disadvantage with the γ2 subunit for clustering of postsynaptic GABAA receptors in wild-type mice. PMID:10536013

  12. On the pharmacology of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptors on the cuneo-thalamic relay cells of the cat

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, J. S.; Renaud, L. P.

    1973-01-01

    1. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine applied by iontophoresis were equipotent depressants of cuneo-thalamic relay neurones isolated from the middle third of the cuneate nucleus of cats either decerebrated or anaesthetized with sodium pentobarbitone. 2. Glycine 13±2 nA and GABA 20±2 nA were equipotent depressors of hair cells (n=22) and, bicuculline applied by iontophoresis caused a parallel shift to the right of the GABA but not the glycine log-current response curves. The GABA equipotent dose-ratio was 2·0±0·2 for bicuculline currents of approximately 144 nA lasting about 11 min in cells excited either transynaptically by peripheral stimulation or postsynaptically by glutamate. 3. Although a maximal bicuculline current seldom caused a significant shift of the glycine-log current response curve, many of our records show the onset of the glycine response to be slowed by doses in excess of 84 nA. 4. Bicuculline also antagonized depressions by β-guanidinopropionic acid, and δ-aminovaleric acid which mimicked the action of GABA. 5. When tested on the same neurone, bicuculline and picrotoxin applied by iontophoresis were equipotent and their effects appear to be additive. 6. The GABA sensitivity was not modified by repetitive (5 or 6) doses of i.v. bicuculline (0·2 mg/kg). 7. The antagonism of GABA by bicuculline and picrotoxin appears to be of sufficient specificity to enable the separate roles of GABA and glycine as putative inhibitory transmitters of cuneo-thalamic relay cells to be determined. PMID:4764287

  13. Effects of rumen-protected γ-aminobutyric acid on performance and nutrient digestibility in heat-stressed dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J B; Bu, D P; Wang, J Q; Sun, X Z; Pan, L; Zhou, L Y; Liu, W

    2014-09-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of rumen-protected γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on performance and nutrient digestibility in heat-stressed dairy cows. Sixty Holstein dairy cows (141±15 d in milk, 35.9±4.3kg of milk/d, and parity 2.0±1.1) were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments according to a completely randomized block design. Treatments consisted of 0 (control), 40, 80, or 120mg of true GABA/kg of dry matter (DM). The trial lasted 10wk. The average temperature-humidity indices at 0700, 1400, and 2200h were 78.4, 80.2, and 78.7, respectively. Rectal temperatures decreased linearly at 0700, 1400, and 2200h with increasing GABA concentration. Supplementation of GABA had no effect on respiration rates at any time point. Dry matter intake, energy-corrected milk, 4% fat-corrected milk, and milk fat yield tended to increase linearly with increasing GABA concentration. Supplementation of GABA affected, in a quadratic manner, milk protein and lactose concentrations, and milk protein yield, and the peak values were reached at a dose of 40mg of GABA/kg. Milk urea nitrogen concentration responded quadratically. Total solids content increased linearly with increasing GABA concentration. Supplementation of GABA had no effect on milk yield, lactose production, total solids, milk fat concentration, somatic cell score, or feed efficiency. Apparent total-tract digestibilities of DM, organic matter, crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber were similar among treatments. These results indicate that rumen-protected GABA supplementation to dairy cows can alleviate heat stress by reducing rectal temperature, increase DM intake and milk production, and improve milk composition. The appropriate supplemental GABA level for heat-stressed dairy cows is 40mg/kg of DM.

  14. Phosphatase inhibitors remove the run-down of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors in the human epileptic brain

    PubMed Central

    Palma, E.; Ragozzino, D. A.; Di Angelantonio, S.; Spinelli, G.; Trettel, F.; Martinez-Torres, A.; Torchia, G.; Arcella, A.; Di Gennaro, G.; Quarato, P. P.; Esposito, V.; Cantore, G.; Miledi, R.; Eusebi, F.

    2004-01-01

    The properties of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors (GABAA receptors) microtransplanted from the human epileptic brain to the plasma membrane of Xenopus oocytes were compared with those recorded directly from neurons, or glial cells, in human brains slices. Cell membranes isolated from brain specimens, surgically obtained from six patients afflicted with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) were injected into frog oocytes. Within a few hours, these oocytes acquired GABAA receptors that generated GABA currents with an unusual run-down, which was inhibited by orthovanadate and okadaic acid. In contrast, receptors derived from membranes of a nonepileptic hippocampal uncus, membranes from mouse brain, or recombinant rat α1β2γ2-GABA receptors exhibited a much less pronounced GABA-current run-down. Moreover, the GABAA receptors of pyramidal neurons in temporal neocortex slices from the same six epileptic patients exhibited a stronger run-down than the receptors of rat pyramidal neurons. Interestingly, the GABAA receptors of neighboring glial cells remained substantially stable after repetitive activation. Therefore, the excessive GABA-current run-down observed in the membrane-injected oocytes recapitulates essentially what occurs in neurons, rather than in glial cells. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses from the same TLE neocortex specimens revealed that GABAA-receptor β1, β2, β3, and γ2 subunit mRNAs were significantly overexpressed (8- to 33-fold) compared with control autopsy tissues. Our results suggest that an abnormal GABA-receptor subunit transcription in the TLE brain leads to the expression of run-down-enhanced GABAA receptors. Blockage of phosphatases stabilizes the TLE GABAA receptors and strengthens GABAergic inhibition. It may be that this process can be targeted to develop new treatments for intractable epilepsy. PMID:15218107

  15. Molecular recognition of nitrated fatty acids by PPAR[gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yong; Zhang, Jifeng; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Martynowski, Dariusz; Garcia-Barrio, Minerva T.; Kovach, Amanda; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Baker, Paul R.S.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Chen, Y. Eugene; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-03-08

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) regulates metabolic homeostasis and adipocyte differentiation, and it is activated by oxidized and nitrated fatty acids. Here we report the crystal structure of the PPAR{gamma} ligand binding domain bound to nitrated linoleic acid, a potent endogenous ligand of PPAR{gamma}. Structural and functional studies of receptor-ligand interactions reveal the molecular basis of PPAR{gamma} discrimination of various naturally occurring fatty acid derivatives.

  16. Effect of centrally acting drugs on the uptake of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by slices of rat cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Harris, M.; Hopkin, Judy M.; Neal, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    1. The effects of centrally acting drugs on the uptake of 3H-γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by slices of rat cerebral cortex have been studied. 2. Many centrally acting drugs at concentrations of 0·1-1·0 mM significantly inhibited the uptake of 3H-GABA by cortical slices, but the only classes of drugs in which all members consistently produced inhibition of uptake were the phenothiazines, tricyclic antidepressants, and butyrophenones. 3. The receptor blocking drugs; phentolamine, propranolol, thymoxamine, mepyramine, and diphenhydramine at concentrations of 0·5-1 mM also significantly reduced the uptake of 3H-GABA. However, atropine, hexamethonium and (+)-tubocurarine had little effect on the uptake of 3H-GABA by cortical slices. 4. Centrally acting drugs, which did not significantly inhibit 3H-GABA uptake, included barbiturates, local anaesthetics, hallucinogens, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, anticonvulsants, and convulsants (except picrotoxin). 5. Chlorpromazine, prochlorperazine, L-2,4,diaminobutyric acid, desmethylimipramine, and iprindole inhibited the uptake of 3H-GABA by 50% (IC50) at concentrations of 30-100 μM. The most potent inhibitor of 3H-GABA uptake was p-chloromercuriphenylsulphonate (IC50 = 18 μM). 6. With the exception of L-2,4,diaminobutyric acid, an outstanding characteristic of these drugs was their complete lack of specificity. Thus at the IC50 for GABA, p-chloromercuriphenylsulphonate, chlorpromazine, prochlorperazine, iprindole, desmethylimipramine, apomorphine and diphenylhydramine also inhibited the uptake of radioactive glycine, alanine, noradrenaline, and 5-hydroxytryptamine. The uptake of the latter two compounds was often inhibited to a greater extent than GABA, glycine and alanine. 7. Kinetic analysis indicated that the inhibition of 3H-GABA by p-chloromercuriphenylsulphonate, chlorpromazine, and desmethylimipramine was noncompetitive. L-2,4,Diaminobutyric acid reduced the uptake of 3H-GABA by a `mixed' type of inhibition. 8. The

  17. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 Inhibits γ-Aminobutyric Acid-Activated Current in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhiwen; Tian, Yujing; Qi, Mengwen; Li, Yingchun; Du, Yimei; Chen, Lei; Liu, Wentao; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is crucial for the modulation of neuronal excitability in the central nervous system (CNS). The activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is reported to enhance the response of hippocampal glutamate receptors, but whether the inhibitory neurotransmitter system can be regulated by TRPV4 remains unknown. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Here, we show that application of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) synthetic (GSK1016790A or 4α-PDD) or endogenous agonist (5,6-EET) inhibited GABA-activated current (IGABA) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was blocked by specific antagonists of TRPV4 and of GABAA receptors. GSK1016790A increased the phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK) and decreased the phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt) protein levels, which was attenuated by removing extracellular calcium or by a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β antagonist. GSK1016790A-induced decrease of p-Akt protein level was sensitive to an AMPK antagonist. GSK1016790A-inhibited IGABA was blocked by an AMPK antagonist or a phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K) agonist. GSK1016790A-induced inhibition of IGABA was also significantly attenuated by a protein kinase C (PKC) antagonist but was unaffected by protein kinase A or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II antagonist. We conclude that activation of TRPV4 inhibits GABAA receptor, which may be mediated by activation of AMPK and subsequent down-regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling and activation of PKC signaling. Inhibition of GABAA receptors may account for the neuronal hyperexcitability caused by TRPV4 activation. PMID:27616980

  18. [High-frequency electro-acupuncture stimulation modulates intracerebral γ-aminobutyric acid content in rat model of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Du, Jing; Sun, Zuo-Li; Jia, Jun; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2011-08-25

    The purpose of the present study is to observe the effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) stimulation on intracerebral neurotransmitters in a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD), and explore the possible mechanism. We used 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection in medial forebrain bundle (MFB) in the right brain of Sprague Dawley (SD) rat to establish the parkinsonian rat model, and randomly divided the PD rats into model and 100 Hz EA stimulation groups (n =10 in each group). EA stimulation group received 4 courses of EA stimulation on Baihui (GV-20) and Dazhui (GV-14) acupuncture points. Moreover, ten rats were randomly selected as sham operation group, only receiving normal saline (NS) injection in MFB. Then apomorphine (APO)-induced rotational behavior in different groups was recorded, and the contents of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain were analyzed with high pressure/performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). The results showed that model group exhibited abnormal rotational behavior with APO treatment, suggesting the successful establishment of PD model. Compared with sham operation group, model group showed increased GABA contents in cortex and striatum, as well as decreased GABA content in ventral midbrain, on the lesioned side. EA stimulation could effectively ameliorate the abnormal rotational behavior of PD rat. Compared with the model group, EA stimulation decreased the ratio of GABA content on the lesioned side to that on unlesioned side in the cortex, while increased the ratios in the striatum and cerebellum. However, there was no difference of the ratio in the ventral midbrain among three groups. These results suggest high-frequency EA stimulation significantly improves the abnormal behavior of PD rats, which may exert through enhancing the inhibitory effect of cerebellum-basal ganglia-cortical loop on motor center.

  19. Expression of the γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Plasma Membrane Transporter-1 in Monkey and Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Casini, Giovanni; Rickman, Dennis W.; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the expression pattern of the predominant γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) plasma membrane transporter GAT-1 in Old World monkey (Macaca mulatta) and human retina. Methods GAT-1 was localized in retinal sections by using immunohistochemical techniques with fluorescence and confocal microscopy. Double-labeling studies were performed with the GAT-1 antibody using antibodies to GABA, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and the bipolar cell marker Mab115A10. Results The pattern of GAT-1 immunostaining was similar in human and monkey retinas. Numerous small immunoreactive somata were in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and were present rarely in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) of all retinal regions. Medium GAT-1 somata were in the ganglion cell layer in the parafoveal and peripheral retinal regions. GAT-1 fibers were densely distributed throughout the IPL. Varicose processes, originating from both the IPL and somata in the INL, arborized in the outer plexiform layer (OPL), forming a sparse network in all retinal regions, except the fovea. Sparsely occurring GAT-1 processes were in the nerve fiber layer in parafoveal regions and near the optic nerve head but not in the optic nerve. In the INL, 99% of the GAT-1 somata contained GABA, and 66% of the GABA immunoreactive somata expressed GAT-1. GAT-1 immunoreactivity was in all VIP-containing cells, but it was absent in TH-immunoreactive amacrine cells and in Mab115A10 immunoreactive bipolar cells. Conclusions GAT-1 in primate retinas is expressed by amacrine and displaced amacrine cells. The predominant expression of GAT-1 in the inner retina is consistent with the idea that GABA transporters influence neurotransmission and thus participate in visual information processing in the retina. PMID:16565409

  20. α-Thujone (the active component of absinthe): γ-Aminobutyric acid type A receptor modulation and metabolic detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Höld, Karin M.; Sirisoma, Nilantha S.; Ikeda, Tomoko; Narahashi, Toshio; Casida, John E.

    2000-01-01

    α-Thujone is the toxic agent in absinthe, a liqueur popular in the 19th and early 20th centuries that has adverse health effects. It is also the active ingredient of wormwood oil and some other herbal medicines and is reported to have antinociceptive, insecticidal, and anthelmintic activity. This study elucidates the mechanism of α-thujone neurotoxicity and identifies its major metabolites and their role in the poisoning process. Four observations establish that α-thujone is a modulator of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor. First, the poisoning signs (and their alleviation by diazepam and phenobarbital) in mice are similar to those of the classical antagonist picrotoxinin. Second, a strain of Drosophila specifically resistant to chloride channel blockers is also tolerant to α-thujone. Third, α-thujone is a competitive inhibitor of [3H]ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate binding to mouse brain membranes. Most definitively, GABA-induced peak currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons are suppressed by α-thujone with complete reversal after washout. α-Thujone is quickly metabolized in vitro by mouse liver microsomes with NADPH (cytochrome P450) forming 7-hydroxy-α-thujone as the major product plus five minor ones (4-hydroxy-α-thujone, 4-hydroxy-β-thujone, two other hydroxythujones, and 7,8-dehydro-α-thujone), several of which also are detected in the brain of mice treated i.p. with α-thujone. The major 7-hydroxy metabolite attains much higher brain levels than α-thujone but is less toxic to mice and Drosophila and less potent in the binding assay. The other metabolites assayed are also detoxification products. Thus, α-thujone in absinthe and herbal medicines is a rapid-acting and readily detoxified modulator of the GABA-gated chloride channel. PMID:10725394

  1. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Application Improved Early Growth, Net Photosynthesis, and Associated Physio-Biochemical Events in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wu; Liu, Jianhua; Ashraf, Umair; Li, Gaoke; Li, Yuliang; Lu, Wenjia; Gao, Lei; Han, Fuguang; Hu, Jianguang

    2016-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an endogenous signaling molecule and involved in growth regulations and plant development, however, a little information is available on the consequences of exogenous GABA application on growth, development, and associated physio-biochemical processes in maize. The present study examined the GABA-induced regulations in early growth, net photosynthetic rate, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and enzymatic activities in three maize cultivars, i.e., Yuecainuo 6, Zhengtian 68, and Yuecainuo 2. Two levels of GABA, i.e., 0 mg L-1 and 50 mg L-1, in solution form, with total application volume of 100 ml per pot containing 15 maize seedlings were exogenously applied. Results revealed that exogenous GABA application improved seedling growth in terms of seedling length and biomass accumulation in all maize cultivars at both 3 and 7 days after treatment (DAT). It also promoted net photosynthesis and variably affected gas exchange attributes, i.e., stomatal conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), and transpiration rate (Tr), as well as leaves SPAD value. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation [in terms of malondialdehyde (MDA)] under GABA treated maize seedlings were also remained variable; however, osmolyte accumulation (protein and proline) and activities of anti-oxidants enzymes, i.e., super-oxide dismutase and peroxidase were also affected differently at both 3 and 7 DAT in all maize cultivars. Furthermore, enzymes involved in nitrogen metabolism, e.g., nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase were improved. These results suggest the involvement of GABA in various physio-metablical mechanisms which might lead to improvement in morphological growth of maize. In future, research is still needed at molecular and genetic levels to unravel the involvement of GABA-mediated regulations in growth and its associated physio-biochemical mechanisms. PMID:27446149

  2. Development of early-born γ-Aminobutyric acid hub neurons in mouse hippocampus from embryogenesis to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Villette, Vincent; Guigue, Philippe; Picardo, Michel Aimé; Sousa, Vitor Hugo; Leprince, Erwan; Lachamp, Philippe; Malvache, Arnaud; Tressard, Thomas; Cossart, Rosa; Baude, Agnès

    2016-08-15

    Early-born γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons (EBGNs) are major components of the hippocampal circuit because at early postnatal stages they form a subpopulation of "hub cells" transiently supporting CA3 network synchronization (Picardo et al. [2011] Neuron 71:695-709). It is therefore essential to determine when these cells acquire the remarkable morphofunctional attributes supporting their network function and whether they develop into a specific subtype of interneuron into adulthood. Inducible genetic fate mapping conveniently allows for the labeling of EBGNs throughout their life. EBGNs were first analyzed during the perinatal week. We observed that EBGNs acquired mature characteristics at the time when the first synapse-driven synchronous activities appeared in the form of giant depolarizing potentials. The fate of EBGNs was next analyzed in the adult hippocampus by using anatomical characterization. Adult EBGNs included a significant proportion of cells projecting selectively to the septum; in turn, EBGNs were targeted by septal and entorhinal inputs. In addition, most EBGNs were strongly targeted by cholinergic and monoaminergic terminals, suggesting significant subcortical innervation. Finally, we found that some EBGNs located in the septum or the entorhinal cortex also displayed a long-range projection that we traced to the hippocampus. Therefore, this study shows that the maturation of the morphophysiological properties of EBGNs mirrors the evolution of early network dynamics, suggesting that both phenomena may be causally linked. We propose that a subpopulation of EBGNs forms into adulthood a scaffold of GABAergic projection neurons linking the hippocampus to distant structures. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2440-2461, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Development of early‐born γ‐Aminobutyric acid hub neurons in mouse hippocampus from embryogenesis to adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Villette, Vincent; Guigue, Philippe; Picardo, Michel Aimé; Sousa, Vitor Hugo; Leprince, Erwan; Lachamp, Philippe; Malvache, Arnaud; Tressard, Thomas; Cossart, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Early‐born γ‐aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons (EBGNs) are major components of the hippocampal circuit because at early postnatal stages they form a subpopulation of “hub cells” transiently supporting CA3 network synchronization (Picardo et al. [2011] Neuron 71:695–709). It is therefore essential to determine when these cells acquire the remarkable morphofunctional attributes supporting their network function and whether they develop into a specific subtype of interneuron into adulthood. Inducible genetic fate mapping conveniently allows for the labeling of EBGNs throughout their life. EBGNs were first analyzed during the perinatal week. We observed that EBGNs acquired mature characteristics at the time when the first synapse‐driven synchronous activities appeared in the form of giant depolarizing potentials. The fate of EBGNs was next analyzed in the adult hippocampus by using anatomical characterization. Adult EBGNs included a significant proportion of cells projecting selectively to the septum; in turn, EBGNs were targeted by septal and entorhinal inputs. In addition, most EBGNs were strongly targeted by cholinergic and monoaminergic terminals, suggesting significant subcortical innervation. Finally, we found that some EBGNs located in the septum or the entorhinal cortex also displayed a long‐range projection that we traced to the hippocampus. Therefore, this study shows that the maturation of the morphophysiological properties of EBGNs mirrors the evolution of early network dynamics, suggesting that both phenomena may be causally linked. We propose that a subpopulation of EBGNs forms into adulthood a scaffold of GABAergic projection neurons linking the hippocampus to distant structures. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2440–2461, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26779909

  4. Quantification of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in (1) H MRS volumes composed heterogeneously of grey and white matter.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Mark; Singh, Krish D; Brealy, Jennifer A; Linden, David E J; Evans, C John

    2016-11-01

    The quantification of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration using localised MRS suffers from partial volume effects related to differences in the intrinsic concentration of GABA in grey (GM) and white (WM) matter. These differences can be represented as a ratio between intrinsic GABA in GM and WM: rM . Individual differences in GM tissue volume can therefore potentially drive apparent concentration differences. Here, a quantification method that corrects for these effects is formulated and empirically validated. Quantification using tissue water as an internal concentration reference has been described previously. Partial volume effects attributed to rM can be accounted for by incorporating into this established method an additional multiplicative correction factor based on measured or literature values of rM weighted by the proportion of GM and WM within tissue-segmented MRS volumes. Simulations were performed to test the sensitivity of this correction using different assumptions of rM taken from previous studies. The tissue correction method was then validated by applying it to an independent dataset of in vivo GABA measurements using an empirically measured value of rM . It was shown that incorrect assumptions of rM can lead to overcorrection and inflation of GABA concentration measurements quantified in volumes composed predominantly of WM. For the independent dataset, GABA concentration was linearly related to GM tissue volume when only the water signal was corrected for partial volume effects. Performing a full correction that additionally accounts for partial volume effects ascribed to rM successfully removed this dependence. With an appropriate assumption of the ratio of intrinsic GABA concentration in GM and WM, GABA measurements can be corrected for partial volume effects, potentially leading to a reduction in between-participant variance, increased power in statistical tests and better discriminability of true effects.

  5. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Application Improved Early Growth, Net Photosynthesis, and Associated Physio-Biochemical Events in Maize.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu; Liu, Jianhua; Ashraf, Umair; Li, Gaoke; Li, Yuliang; Lu, Wenjia; Gao, Lei; Han, Fuguang; Hu, Jianguang

    2016-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an endogenous signaling molecule and involved in growth regulations and plant development, however, a little information is available on the consequences of exogenous GABA application on growth, development, and associated physio-biochemical processes in maize. The present study examined the GABA-induced regulations in early growth, net photosynthetic rate, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and enzymatic activities in three maize cultivars, i.e., Yuecainuo 6, Zhengtian 68, and Yuecainuo 2. Two levels of GABA, i.e., 0 mg L(-1) and 50 mg L(-1), in solution form, with total application volume of 100 ml per pot containing 15 maize seedlings were exogenously applied. Results revealed that exogenous GABA application improved seedling growth in terms of seedling length and biomass accumulation in all maize cultivars at both 3 and 7 days after treatment (DAT). It also promoted net photosynthesis and variably affected gas exchange attributes, i.e., stomatal conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), and transpiration rate (Tr), as well as leaves SPAD value. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation [in terms of malondialdehyde (MDA)] under GABA treated maize seedlings were also remained variable; however, osmolyte accumulation (protein and proline) and activities of anti-oxidants enzymes, i.e., super-oxide dismutase and peroxidase were also affected differently at both 3 and 7 DAT in all maize cultivars. Furthermore, enzymes involved in nitrogen metabolism, e.g., nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase were improved. These results suggest the involvement of GABA in various physio-metablical mechanisms which might lead to improvement in morphological growth of maize. In future, research is still needed at molecular and genetic levels to unravel the involvement of GABA-mediated regulations in growth and its associated physio-biochemical mechanisms.

  6. Involvement of γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 2 in the hepatic uptake of taurine in rats.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Saori; Tachikawa, Masanori; Akanuma, Shin-ichi; Fujinawa, Jun; Hosoya, Ken-ichi

    2012-08-01

    Taurine is essential for the hepatic synthesis of bile salts and, although taurine is synthesized mainly in pericentral hepatocytes, taurine and taurine-conjugated bile acids are abundant in periportal hepatocytes. One possible explanation for this discrepancy is that the active supply of taurine to hepatocytes from the blood stream is a key regulatory factor. The purpose of the present study is to investigate and identify the transporter responsible for taurine uptake by periportal hepatocytes. An in vivo bolus injection of [(3)H]taurine into the rat portal vein demonstrated that 25% of the injected [(3)H]taurine was taken up by the liver on a single pass. The in vivo uptake was significantly inhibited by GABA, taurine, β-alanine, and nipecotic acid, a GABA transporter (GAT) inhibitor, each at a concentration of 10 mM. The characteristics of Na(+)- and Cl(-)-dependent [(3)H]taurine uptake by freshly isolated rat hepatocytes were consistent with those of GAT2 (solute carrier SLC6A13). Indeed, the K(m) value of the saturable uptake (594 μM) was close to that of mouse SLC6A13-mediated taurine transport. Although GABA, taurine, and β-alanine inhibited the [(3)H]taurine uptake by > 50%, each at a concentration of 10 mM, GABA caused a marked inhibition with an IC(50) value of 95 μM. The [(3)H]taurine uptake exhibited a significant reduction when the GAT2 gene was silenced. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that GAT2 was localized on the sinusoidal membrane of the hepatocytes predominantly in the periportal region. These results suggest that GAT2 is responsible for taurine transport from the circulating blood to hepatocytes predominantly in the periportal region.

  7. Efficient bioconversion of L-glutamate to γ-aminobutyric acid by Lactobacillus brevis resting cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiufeng; Chang, Chuanyou; Ma, Shenxi; Cheng, Yibing; Zhang, Jun; Gao, Qiang

    2016-05-07

    This work investigated the efficient bioconversion process of L-glutamate to GABA by Lactobacillus brevis TCCC 13007 resting cells. The optimal bioconversion system was composed of 50 g/L 48 h cultivated wet resting cells, 0.1 mM pyridoxal phosphate in glutamate-containing 0.6 M citrate buffer (pH 4.5) and performed at 45 °C and 180 rpm. By 10 h bioconversion at the ratio of 80 g/L L-glutamic acid to 240 g/L monosodium glutamate, the final titer of GABA reached 201.18 g/L at the molar bioconversion ratio of 99.4 %. This process presents a potential for industrial and commercial applications and also offers a promising feasibility of continuous GABA production coupled with fermentation. Besides, the built kinetics model revealed that the optimum operating conditions were 45 °C and pH 4.5, and the bioconversion kinetics at low ranges of substrate concentration (0 < S < 80 g/L) was assumed to follow the classical Michaelis-Menten equation.

  8. DL-β-Aminobutyric Acid-Induced Resistance in Soybean against Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yunpeng; Wang, Biao; Yan, Junhui; Cheng, Linjing; Yao, Luming; Xiao, Liang; Wu, Tianlong

    2014-01-01

    Priming can improve plant innate capability to deal with the stresses caused by both biotic and abiotic factors. In this study, the effect of DL-β-amino-n-butyric acid (BABA) against Aphis glycines Matsumura, the soybean aphid (SA) was evaluated. We found that 25 mM BABA as a root drench had minimal adverse impact on plant growth and also efficiently protected soybean from SA infestation. In both choice and non-choice tests, SA number was significantly decreased to a low level in soybean seedlings drenched with 25 mM BABA compared to the control counterparts. BABA treatment resulted in a significant increase in the activities of several defense enzymes, such as phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), peroxidase (POX), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), chitinase (CHI), and β-1, 3-glucanase (GLU) in soybean seedlings attacked by aphid. Meanwhile, the induction of 15 defense-related genes by aphid, such as AOS, CHS, MMP2, NPR1-1, NPR1-2, and PR genes, were significantly augmented in BABA-treated soybean seedlings. Our study suggest that BABA application is a promising way to enhance soybean resistance against SA. PMID:24454805

  9. Responses to Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid of Rat Visual Cortical Neurons in Tissue Slices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    14 Criteria Used to Classify Cells •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• l5 Electrophysiological Recording ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• l6 Term.inol...inhibitory interneurons , which act as local circuit neurons, controlling the activity of other neurons in the same area of the brain (Rakic, 1975...the visual cortex. However, several studies have provided strong indications that it is an inhibitory neurotransmitter released from interneurons

  10. Comparison of Nootropic and Neuroprotective Features of Aryl-Substituted Analogs of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid.

    PubMed

    Tyurenkov, I N; Borodkina, L E; Bagmetova, V V; Berestovitskaya, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2016-02-01

    GABA analogs containing phenyl (phenibut) or para-chlorophenyl (baclofen) substituents demonstrated nootropic activity in a dose of 20 mg/kg: they improved passive avoidance conditioning, decelerated its natural extinction, and exerted antiamnestic effect on the models of amnesia provoked by scopolamine or electroshock. Tolyl-containing GABA analog (tolibut, 20 mg/kg) exhibited antiamnestic activity only on the model of electroshock-induced amnesia. Baclofen and, to a lesser extent, tolibut alleviated seizures provoked by electroshock, i.e. both agents exerted anticonvulsant effect. All examined GABA aryl derivatives demonstrated neuroprotective properties on the maximum electroshock model: they shortened the duration of coma and shortened the period of spontaneous motor activity recovery. In addition, these agents decreased the severity of passive avoidance amnesia and behavioral deficit in the open field test in rats exposed to electroshock. The greatest neuroprotective properties were exhibited by phenyl-containing GABA analog phenibut.

  11. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-modulated benzodiazepine binding sites in bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Lummis, S.C.R.; Johnston, G.A.R. ); Nicoletti, G. ); Holan, G. )

    1991-01-01

    Benzodiazepine binding sites, which were once considered to exist only in higher vertebrates, are here demonstrated in the bacteria E. coli. The bacterial ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding sites are modulated by GABA; the modulation is dose dependent and is reduced at high concentrations. The most potent competitors of E.Coli ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding are those that are active in displacing ({sup 3}H)benzodiazepines from vertebrate peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. These vertebrate sites are not modulated by GABA, in contrast to vertebrate neuronal benzodiazepine binding sites. The E.coli benzodiazepine binding sites therefore differ from both classes of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites; however the ligand spectrum and GABA-modulatory properties of the E.coli sites are similar to those found in insects. This intermediate type of receptor in lower species suggests a precursor for at least one class of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites may have existed.

  12. High-affinity uptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid in cultured glial and neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Balcar, V J; Mark, J; Borg, J; Mandel, P

    1979-06-01

    Both glial and neuronal cells maintained in primary culture were found to accumulate [3H]GABA by an efficient "high-affinity" uptake system (apparent Km = 9 muM, Vmax = 0.018 and 0.584 nmol/mg/min, respectively) which required sodium ions and was inhibited by 1 mM ouabain. Strychnine and parachloromercuriphenylsulfonate (pCS) (both at 1mM) also strongly inhibited uptake of [3H]GABA, but metabolic inhibitors (2,4-dinitrophenol, potassium cyanide, and malonate) were without effect. Only three structural analogs of GABA (nipecotate, beta-alanine, and 2,4-diaminobutyrate) inhibited uptake of [3H]GABA, while several other compounds with structural similarities to GABA (e.g. glycine, L-proline, and taurine) did not interact with the system. The kinetic studies indicated presence of a second uptake (Km = 92 muM, Vmax = 0.124 nmol/mg/min) in the primary cultures containing predominantly glioblasts. On the other hand, only one of the neuronal cell lines transformed by simian virus SV40 appeared to accumulate [3H]GABA against a concentration gradient. Apparent Km of this uptake was relatively high (819 muM), and it was only weakly inhibited by 1 mM ouabain and 1 mM pCS. The structural specificity also differed from that of the uptake observed in the primary cultures. Significantly, non of the nontransformed continuous cell lines of either tumoral (glioma, C6; neuroblastoma, M1; M1NN) or normal (NN;I6) origin actively accumulated [3H]GABA. It is suggested that for the neurochemical studies related to GABA and requiring homogeneous cell populations, the primary cultures offer a better experimental model than the continuous cell lines.

  13. Basal Ganglia Dopamine-gamma-Aminobutyric Acid-Acetylcholine Interaction in Organophosphate-Induced Neurotoxicity. Appendices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    chollnerglc (excitatory) mechanisms Interact In a delicate way to maintain the normal function of strlatum ( Anden et a1_., 1966). The strlatal...Acad. Sd_ 100, 314-320. Anden N. E., Oahlstrom A. L., Fuxe K. and Larsson K. (1966) Functional role of the n1gro-neostr1atal dopamlne neurons. Acta

  14. Dual effects of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) treatment on the accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and rutin in germinated buckwheat.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jianxiong; Wu, Tongjiao; Li, Huiying; Wang, Wei; Liu, Haijie

    2016-06-15

    In the present study, the dual effects of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) treatment on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and rutin accumulation of germinated buckwheat were evaluated during germination. The results showed that SAEW treatment (pH 5.83, ACC of 20.3 mg/L) could promote the accumulation of GABA and rutin in germinated buckwheat. The GABA and rutin contents of SAEW-germinated buckwheat reached 143.20 and 739.9 mg/100 g respectively, which is significantly higher than those of control (P<0.05). Moreover, SAEW treatment could increase the activity of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL) and thus result in the GABA and rutin accumulation of germinated buckwheat. The results suggested that SAEW treatment could promote the rutin accumulation of germinated buckwheat by influencing phenylpropanoid secondary metabolic pathway instead of the inhibition of rutin degrading enzyme (RDE) activity. In addition, SAEW treatment had no adverse impact on the sprouts growth and could reduce the microbial populations of germinated buckwheat during germination.

  15. Vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) chiral assignment of atropisomers: application to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) modulators designed as potential anxiolytic drugs.

    PubMed

    Pivonka, Don E; Wesolowski, Steven S

    2013-04-01

    Atropisomers exist when axial chirality is present as a result of conformationally restricted rotation around a single bond. The interconversion rate of the individual atropisomers is critical to the assessment of chiral stability of a drug throughout scale-up, development, production, and storage as well as in vivo pharmacokinetics. We describe the application of vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy coupled with quantum mechanics simulations to assign the absolute axial chirality and measure the racemization half-life of a series of potential anxiolytic drugs that act as γ-aminobutyric acid modulators.

  16. Reproducibility and effect of tissue composition on cerebellar γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) MRS in an elderly population.

    PubMed

    Long, Zaiyang; Dyke, Jonathan P; Ma, Ruoyun; Huang, Chaorui C; Louis, Elan D; Dydak, Ulrike

    2015-10-01

    MRS provides a valuable tool for the non-invasive detection of brain γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in vivo. GABAergic dysfunction has been observed in the aging cerebellum. The study of cerebellar GABA changes is of considerable interest in understanding certain age-related motor disorders. However, little is known about the reproducibility of GABA MRS in an aged population. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the feasibility and reproducibility of GABA MRS in the aged cerebellum at 3.0 T and to examine the effect of differing tissue composition on GABA measurements. MRI and (1)H MRS examinations were performed on 10 healthy elderly volunteers (mean age, 75.2 ± 6.5 years) using a 3.0-T Siemens Tim Trio scanner. Among them, five subjects were scanned twice to assess the short-term reproducibility. The MEGA-PRESS (Mescher-Garwood point-resolved spectroscopy) J-editing sequence was used for GABA detection in two volumes of interest (VOIs) in the left and right cerebellar dentate. MRS data processing and quantification were performed with LCModel 6.3-0L using two separate basis sets, generated from density matrix simulations using published values for chemical shifts and J couplings. Raw metabolite levels from LCModel outputs were corrected for cerebrospinal fluid contamination and relaxation. GABA-edited spectra yielded robust and stable GABA measurements with averaged intra-individual coefficients of variation for corrected GABA+ between 4.0 ± 2.8% and 13.4 ± 6.3%, and inter-individual coefficients of variation between 12.6% and 24.2%. In addition, there was a significant correlation between GABA+ obtained with the two LCModel basis sets. Overall, our results demonstrated the feasibility and reproducibility of cerebellar GABA-edited MRS at 3.0 T in an elderly population. This information might be helpful for studies using this technique to study GABA changes in normal or diseased aging brain, e.g. for power calculations and the interpretation of longitudinal

  17. Gas release-based prescreening combined with reversed-phase HPLC quantitation for efficient selection of high-γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinglong; Shah, Nagendra P

    2015-02-01

    High γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing lactobacilli are promising for the manufacture of GABA-rich foods and to synthesize GRAS (generally recognized as safe)-grade GABA. However, common chromatography-based screening is time-consuming and inefficient. In the present study, Korean kimchi was used as a model of lactic acid-based fermented foods, and a gas release-based prescreening of potential GABA producers was developed. The ability to produce GABA by potential GABA producers in de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe medium supplemented with or without monosodium glutamate was further determined by HPLC. Based on the results, 9 isolates were regarded as high GABA producers, and were further genetically identified as Lactobacillus brevis based on the sequences of 16S rRNA gene. Gas release-based prescreening combined with reversed-phase HPLC confirmation was an efficient and cost-effective method to identify high-GABA-producing LAB, which could be good candidates for probiotics. The GABA that is naturally produced by these high-GABA-producing LAB could be used as a food additive.

  18. Mechanism of Inactivation of γ-Aminobutyric Acid Aminotransferase by (1S ,3S)-3-Amino-4-difluoromethylene-1-cyclopentanoic Acid (CPP-115)

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Hyunbeom; Doud, Emma H.; Wu, Rui; ...

    2015-01-23

    γ-Aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that degrades GABA, the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in mammalian cells. When the concentration of GABA falls below a threshold level, convulsions can occur. Inhibition of GABA-AT raises GABA levels in the brain, which can terminate seizures as well as have potential therapeutic applications in treating other neurological disorders, including drug addiction. Among the analogues that we previously developed, (1S,3S)-3-amino-4-difluoromethylene-1-cyclopentanoic acid (CPP-115) showed 187 times greater potency than that of vigabatrin, a known inactivator of GABA-AT and approved drug (Sabril) for the treatment of infantile spasms and refractory adult epilepsy. Recently,more » CPP-115 was shown to have no adverse effects in a Phase I clinical trial. Here we report a novel inactivation mechanism for CPP-115, a mechanism-based inactivator that undergoes GABA-AT-catalyzed hydrolysis of the difluoromethylene group to a carboxylic acid with concomitant loss of two fluoride ions and coenzyme conversion to pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP). The partition ratio for CPP-115 with GABA-AT is about 2000, releasing cyclopentanone-2,4-dicarboxylate (22) and two other precursors of this compound (20 and 21). Time-dependent inactivation occurs by a conformational change induced by the formation of the aldimine of 4-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid and PMP (20), which disrupts an electrostatic interaction between Glu270 and Arg445 to form an electrostatic interaction between Arg445 and the newly formed carboxylate produced by hydrolysis of the difluoromethylene group in CPP-115, resulting in a noncovalent, tightly bound complex. Ultimately, this represents a novel mechanism for inactivation of GABA-AT and a new approach for the design of mechanism-based inactivators in general.« less

  19. Straightforward and effective synthesis of γ-aminobutyric acid transporter subtype 2-selective acyl-substituted azaspiro[4.5]decanes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaofeng; Lubin, Hodney; Ioja, Enikő; Kékesi, Orsolya; Simon, Ágnes; Apáti, Ágota; Orbán, Tamás I; Héja, László; Kardos, Julianna; Markó, István E

    2016-01-15

    Supply of major metabolites such as γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), β-alanine and taurine is an essential instrument that shapes signalling, proper cell functioning and survival in the brain and peripheral organs. This background motivates the synthesis of novel classes of compounds regulating their selective transport through various fluid-organ barriers via the low-affinity γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter subtype 2 (GAT2). Natural and synthetic spirocyclic compounds or therapeutics with a range of structures and biological activity are increasingly recognised in this regard. Based on pre-validated GABA transport activity, straightforward and efficient synthesis method was developed to provide an azaspiro[4.5]decane scaffold, holding a variety of charge, substituent and 3D constrain of spirocyclic amine. Investigation of the azaspiro[4.5]decane scaffold in cell lines expressing the four GABA transporter subtypes led to the discovery of a subclass of a GAT2-selective compounds with acyl-substituted azaspiro[4.5]decane core.

  20. Amino acid residues involved in the substrate specificity of TauT/SLC6A6 for taurine and γ-aminobutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Yahara, Tohru; Tachikawa, Masanori; Akanuma, Shin-ichi; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Hosoya, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Taurine transporter (TauT/SLC6A6) is an "honorary" γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter because of its low affinity for GABA. The sequence analysis of TauT implied the role of Gly57, Phe58, Leu306 and Glu406 in the substrate recognition of TauT, and amino acid-substitutions were performed. Immunocytochemistry supported no marked effect of mutations on the expression of TauT. TauT-expressing oocytes showed a reduction in [(3)H]taurine uptake by G57E, F58I, L306Q and E406C, and change in [(3)H]GABA uptake by G57E and E406C, suggesting their significant roles in the function of TauT. G57E lost the activity of [(3)H]taurine and [(3)H]GABA uptake, suggesting that Gly57 is involved in the determination of substrate pocket volume and in the interaction with substrates. E406C exhibited a decrease and an increase in the affinity for taurine and GABA, respectively, suggesting the involvement of Glu406 in the substrate specificity of TauT. The inhibition study supported the role of Glu406 in the substrate specificity since [(3)H]taurine and [(3)H]GABA uptake by E406C was less sensitive to taurine and β-alanine, and more sensitive to GABA and nipecotic acid than was the case with wild type of TauT. F58I had an increased affinity for GABA, suggesting the involvement of Phe58 in the substrate accessibility. The kinetic parameters showed the decreased and increased affinities of L306Q for taurine and GABA, respectively, supporting that substrate recognition of TauT is conformationally regulated by the branched-side chain of Leu306. In conclusion, the present results suggest that these residues play important roles in the transport function and substrate specificity of TauT.

  1. Proteomic analysis of B-aminobutyric acid priming and aba-induction of drought resistance in crabapple (Malus pumila): effect on general metabolism, the phenylpropanoid pathway and cell wall enzymes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a variety of annual crops and model plants, the xenobiotic compound, DL-beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA), has been shown to enhance disease resistance and increase salt, drought, and thermotolerance. BABA does not activate stress genes directly but rather sensitizes plants to respond more quickly a...

  2. GABA shunt and polyamine degradation pathway on γ-aminobutyric acid accumulation in germinating fava bean (Vicia faba L.) under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Runqiang; Guo, Qianghui; Gu, Zhenxin

    2013-01-01

    GABA shunt and polyamine degradation pathway on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulation in germinating fava bean under hypoxia was investigated. GABA content, GAD and DAO activity were significantly increased under hypoxia treatment. Glu and polyamine contents enhanced largely and thus supplied as sufficient substrates for GABA formation. In contrast, GABA content decreased, mainly in the embryo, after removing the hypoxia stress. DAO activity, Glu and polyamines contents decreased, while an increment of GAD activity was observed. This indicated that GAD activity can be not only regulated by hypoxia, but by the rapid growth of embryo after the recovery from hypoxia stress. When treated with AG, DAO activity was almost inhibited completely, and the GABA content decreased by 32.96% and 32.07% after treated for 3 and 5 days, respectively. Hence, it can be inferred that about 30% of GABA formed in germinating fava bean under hypoxia was supplied by polyamine degradation pathway.

  3. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) affects pollen tube growth via modulating putative Ca2+-permeable membrane channels and is coupled to negative regulation on glutamate decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guang-Hui; Zou, Jie; Feng, Jing; Peng, Xiong-Bo; Wu, Ju-You; Wu, Ying-Liang; Palanivelu, Ravishankar; Sun, Meng-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is implicated in pollen tube growth, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms that it mediates are largely unknown. Here, it is shown that exogenous GABA modulates putative Ca2+-permeable channels on the plasma membranes of tobacco pollen grains and pollen tubes. Whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments and non-invasive micromeasurement technology (NMT) revealed that the influx of Ca2+ increases in pollen tubes in response to exogenous GABA. It is also demonstrated that glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), the rate-limiting enzyme of GABA biosynthesis, is involved in feedback controls of Ca2+-permeable channels to fluctuate intracellular GABA levels and thus modulate pollen tube growth. The findings suggest that GAD activity linked with Ca2+-permeable channels relays an extracellular GABA signal and integrates multiple signal pathways to modulate tobacco pollen tube growth. Thus, the data explain how GABA mediates the communication between the style and the growing pollen tubes. PMID:24799560

  4. Effect of γ-aminobutyric acid on digestive enzymes, absorption function, and immune function of intestinal mucosa in heat-stressed chicken.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Xie, J; Wang, B; Tang, J

    2014-10-01

    To explore the effect of dietary γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on digestive enzyme activity, absorption function and immune function of intestinal mucosa in heat-stressed Wenchang chicken were studied. One-day-old male Wenchang chickens were randomly divided into a control group (CK), heat stress group (HS), and GABA+HS group. The chickens from the GABA+HS group were administered with 0.2 mL of GABA solution daily. Chickens from HS and GABA+HS groups were subjected to heat stress treatment at 40 ± 0.5°C for 2 h during 1300 to 1500 h every day. Blood was drawn and 0.5 cm-long duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were collected from the chickens on d 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, and 15. Results showed that the activity of Ca²⁺-Mg²⁺-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), Na⁺-K⁺-ATPase, maltase, sucrase, and alkaline phosphatase, the contents of secretory IgA, glutathione, and d-xylose, and the number of lymphocytes in HS group were significantly lower than those in the CK group. Among them, some were rescued after the treatment of GABA as the time extension. For maltase, d-xylose, alkaline phosphatase, and Na⁺-K⁺-ATPase, it required 5 to 7 d for achieving the significant effect. For sucrase, 12 d for the alleviation effect was required. In the case of other parameters, no alleviation was observed during the whole period of the study. We have concluded that HS can inhibit the activity of digestive enzymes and reduce absorption and immune functions of intestinal mucosa. γ-Aminobutyric acid can effectively alleviate these inhibitory effects.

  5. Sensitive determination of taurine, γ-aminobutyric acid and ornithine in wolfberry fruit and cortex lycii by HPLC with fluorescence detection and online mass spectrometry identification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangming; You, Jinmao; Suo, Yourui; Fan, Baolei

    2015-04-01

    A new, simple and highly sensitive method for the determination of taurine, γ-aminobutyric acid and ornithine using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection is described. Three non-protein amino acids were derivatized by a novel precolumn derivatization reagent 2-[2-(dibenzocarbazol)-ethoxy]ethyl chloroformate before injected. Optimum derivatization was obtained at 40°C for 5 min in the presence of sodium borate buffer (pH 9.0). Derivatives were sufficiently stable to be efficiently analyzed by HPLC without pretreatment. On a reversed-phase Hypersil BDS C8 column, the amino acids were separated in conjunction with a gradient elution with a good baseline resolution. The identification of derivatives was carried out by online postcolumn mass spectrometry with an electrospray ionization source in positive ion mode. Excellent linear responses were observed with the correlation coefficients of >0.9996, and instrument detection limits (at a signal to noise of 3 : 1) were in the range of 0.30-0.33 nmol/L. The proposed method is sensitive and reproducible for the precise determination of the amino acids from wolfberry fruit and cortex lycii samples.

  6. Reaction of gamma-tocopherol with hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quyen; Southwell-Keely, Peter T

    2007-03-01

    In addition to being a very good antioxidant, gamma-tocopherol is also an excellent electrophile trap. This is a study of the reactivity of gamma-tocopherol with hypochlorous acid/hypochlorite, a potential biological foe that is both an oxidant and an electrophile. Aqueous sodium hypochlorite (1.72 mmol; pH 7.4) was stirred with gamma-tocopherol (0.12 mmol) in hexane for 2 min at room temperature. The following products were isolated: gamma-tocopheryl quinone (0.6%), tocored (10%), 3-chloro-gamma-tocopheryl quinone (14%), an ether dimer of 3-chloro-gamma-tocopheryl quinone (0.4%), two isomers of 5-(5-gamma-tocopheryl)-gamma-tocopherol (3 and 2% respectively), 5-chloro-gamma-tocopherol (14%) and two chlorinated dimers (14 and 24% respectively) which were identified as diastereomers of (3R,10R)-11a-chloro-2,3,9,10-tetrahydro-3,5,6,10,12,13-hexamethyl-3,10-bis[(4R,8R)-4,8,12-trimethyltridecyl]-1H-pyrano(3,2a)-8H-pyrano(3,2g)-dibenzofuran-14(7aH)(14aH)-one. The chlorinated dimers, 5-chloro-gamma-tocopherol, 3-chloro-gamma-tocopheryl quinone and its ether dimer are new compounds.

  7. [Response of reactive oxygen metabolism in melon chloroplasts to short-term salinity-alkalinity stress regulated by exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Li-xia; Hu, Li-pan; Hu, Xiao-hui; Pan, Xiong-bo; Ren, Wen-qi

    2015-12-01

    The regulatory effect of exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in melon chloroplasts under short-term salinity-alkalinity stress were investigated in melon variety 'Jinhui No. 1', which was cultured with deep flow hydroponics. The result showed that under salinity-alkalinity stress, the photosynthetic pigment content, MDA content, superoxide anion (O₂·) production rate and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) content in chloroplast increased significantly, the contents of antioxidants ascorbic acid (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) increased, and the activities of H⁺-ATPase and H⁺-PPiase were inhibited obviously. With exogenous GABA application, the accumulations of O₂·, MDA and H₂O₂ induced by salinity-alkalinity stress were inhibited. Exogenous GABA alleviated the increase of photosynthetic pigment content, improved the activity of SOD, enzymes of AsA-GSH cycle, total AsA and total GSH while decreased the AsA/DHA ratio and GSH/GSSH ratio. Foliar GABA could enhance the H⁺-ATPase and H⁺-PPiase activities. Our results suggested that the exogenous GABA could accelerate the ROS metabolism in chloroplast, promote the recycle of AsA-GSH, and maintain the permeability of cell membrane to improve the ability of melon chloroplast against salinity-alkalinity stress.

  8. Dairy Streptococcus thermophilus improves cell viability of Lactobacillus brevis NPS-QW-145 and its γ-aminobutyric acid biosynthesis ability in milk.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinglong; Law, Yee-Song; Shah, Nagendra P

    2015-08-06

    Most high γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producers are Lactobacillus brevis of plant origin, which may be not able to ferment milk well due to its poor proteolytic nature as evidenced by the absence of genes encoding extracellular proteinases in its genome. In the present study, two glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) genes, gadA and gadB, were found in high GABA-producing L. brevis NPS-QW-145. Co-culturing of this organism with conventional dairy starters was carried out to manufacture GABA-rich fermented milk. It was observed that all the selected strains of Streptococcus thermophilus, but not Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, improved the viability of L. brevis NPS-QW-145 in milk. Only certain strains of S. thermophilus improved the gadA mRNA level in L. brevis NPS-QW-145, thus enhanced GABA biosynthesis by the latter. These results suggest that certain S. thermophilus strains are highly recommended to co-culture with high GABA producer for manufacturing GABA-rich fermented milk.

  9. Comparison of γ-Aminobutyric Acid and Biogenic Amine Content of Different types of Ewe’s Milk Cheese Produced in Sardinia, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Porcu, Arianna; Ru, Antonio; Salaris, Margherita; Franco, Mario A.; De Santis, Enrico P.L.

    2015-01-01

    The bioactive compounds γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and biogenic amines (BA), together with protein-free amino acids, were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography in ewe’s milk cheeses produced in Sardinia with different technological traits. The study included three types of cheese: Pecorino Sardo PDO, Pecorino and Casu Marzu. Farmhouse Casu Marzu and Pecorino showed GABA content (maximum levels: 1001.3 and 378.1 mg 100 g–1 respectively) that had never been found so high in cheese before, suggesting that these types of cheese present ideal conditions to produce GABA. These two types of cheese also showed high levels of BA (their total maximum levels were 1035.7 and 288.0 mg 100 g–1 respectively). Pearson correlation analysis detected significant correlation between GABA and the main BA present in the cheeses (tyramine, cadaverine and putrescine), suggesting that the factors affecting the production of GABA are the same as those influencing BA formation. PMID:27800396

  10. Dairy Streptococcus thermophilus improves cell viability of Lactobacillus brevis NPS-QW-145 and its γ-aminobutyric acid biosynthesis ability in milk

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qinglong; Law, Yee-Song; Shah, Nagendra P.

    2015-01-01

    Most high γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producers are Lactobacillus brevis of plant origin, which may be not able to ferment milk well due to its poor proteolytic nature as evidenced by the absence of genes encoding extracellular proteinases in its genome. In the present study, two glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) genes, gadA and gadB, were found in high GABA-producing L. brevis NPS-QW-145. Co-culturing of this organism with conventional dairy starters was carried out to manufacture GABA-rich fermented milk. It was observed that all the selected strains of Streptococcus thermophilus, but not Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, improved the viability of L. brevis NPS-QW-145 in milk. Only certain strains of S. thermophilus improved the gadA mRNA level in L. brevis NPS-QW-145, thus enhanced GABA biosynthesis by the latter. These results suggest that certain S. thermophilus strains are highly recommended to co-culture with high GABA producer for manufacturing GABA-rich fermented milk. PMID:26245488

  11. Protective propensity of bacoside A and bromelain on renal cholinesterases, γ-Aminobutyric acid and serotonin level of Mus musculus intoxicated with dichlorvos.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sonam; Chaudhary, Bharti; Bist, Renu

    2017-01-05

    Current study established a protective action of bacoside A and bromelain against the toxic effects of dichlorvos in kidneys of mice. Experimental design included five groups. The first group was control. Mice of groups II, III and IV were administered doses of dichlorvos, bromelain and bacoside A respectively. In group V, mice were treated with both the antioxidants (bacoside A and bromelain) and dichlorvos. After 21 days of exposure of different doses, levels of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and serotonin were measured in renal tissues. Dichlorvos significantly reduced the kidney AChE (p < 0.001), BChE (p < 0.01) and GABA level (p < 0.01) compared to control. A simultaneous significant elevation in the serotonin level (p < 0.01) was recorded after dichlorvos exposure. Concomitant exposure of bacoside A and bromelain followed by dichlorvos treatment in group V not only restored, but increased the renal cholinesterases and GABA level. Meanwhile, a significant decline in serotonin level (p < 0.001) was revealed, compared to dichlorvos exposed mice. Bacoside A and bromelain occupy a tremendous antioxidant action in the mice kidneys and a combination of the same ameliorates the renal toxicity induced by dichlorvos.

  12. Accumulation of γ‐aminobutyric acid by E nterococcus avium 9184 in scallop solution in a two‐stage fermentation strategy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haoyue; Hu, Linfeng; Liu, Song

    2015-01-01

    Summary In this study, a new bacterial strain having a high ability to produce γ‐aminobutyric acid (GABA) was isolated from naturally fermented scallop solution and was identified as E nterococcus avium. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to prove that E . avium possesses glutamate decarboxylase activity. The strain was then mutagenized with UV radiation and was designated as E . avium 9184. Scallop solution was used as the culture medium to produce GABA. A two‐stage fermentation strategy was applied to accumulate GABA. In the first stage, cell growth was regulated. Optimum conditions for cell growth were pH, 6.5; temperature, 37°C; and glucose concentration, 10 g·L−1. This produced a maximum dry cell mass of 2.10 g·L−1. In the second stage, GABA formation was regulated. GABA concentration reached 3.71 g·L−1 at 96 h pH 6.0, 37°C and initial l‐monosodium glutamate concentration of 10 g·L−1. Thus, compared with traditional one‐stage fermentation, the two‐stage fermentation significantly increased GABA accumulation. These results provide preliminary data to produce GABA using E . avium and also provide a new approach to process and utilize shellfish. PMID:26200650

  13. 2-Pyrrolidone synthesis from γ-aminobutyric acid produced by Lactobacillus brevis under solid-state fermentation utilizing toxic deoiled cottonseed cake.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Jasneet; Khare, S K

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing demand of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as drug and food additive, as well as feedstock to produce 2-pyrrolidone, a precursor for the synthesis of nylon 4. 2-Pyrrolidone is a petrochemical and depleting reserve which raises concern for its bio-based production. The study herein describes bio-based economical GABA production from Lactobacillus brevis by solid-state fermentation (SSF) using toxic deoiled cottonseed cake (CSC) as substrate. In general, the use of cottonseed cake remains restricted due to the presence of toxic gossypols. Thus, simultaneous detoxification observed during fermentation also widens the scope of utilization of this residual seedcake for feed use vis-a-vis production of other value added chemicals. The SSF conditions were optimized for maximum GABA production, viz., 19.7 mg/g, CSC of GABA was obtained at 6th day of fermentation with 70 % degradation of gossypols simultaneously. The potential of this bio-based GABA as a platform chemical is demonstrated in the synthesis of 2-pyrrolidone. Thus, a simple and cost-effective strategy for utilizing toxic biomass has been developed as an alternate to chemical synthetic route.

  14. Impact of Precooling and Controlled-Atmosphere Storage on γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Accumulation in Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) Fruit.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Molin; Ndeurumio, Kessy H; Zhao, Lei; Hu, Zhuoyan

    2016-08-24

    Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) fruit cultivars 'Chuliang' and 'Shixia' were analyzed for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulation after precooling and in controlled-atmosphere storage. Fruit were exposed to 5% O2 plus 3%, 5%, or 10% CO2 at 4 °C, and GABA and associated enzymes, aril firmness, and pericarp color were measured. Aril softening and pericarp browning were delayed by 5% CO2 + 5% O2. GABA concentrations and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD; EC 4.1.1.15) activities declined during storage at the higher-CO2 treatments. However, GABA aminotransferase (GABA-T; EC 2.6.1.19) activities in elevated CO2-treated fruit fluctuated during storage. GABA concentrations increased after precooling treatments. GAD activity and GABA-T activity were different between cultivars after precooling. GABA concentrations in fruit increased after 3 days of 10% CO2 + 5% O2 treatment and then declined as storage time increased. GABA accumulation was associated with stimulation of GAD activity rather than inhibition of GABA-T activity.

  15. Quantification of γ-aminobutyric acid in the heads of houseflies (Musca domestica) and diamondback moths (Plutella xylostella (L.)), using capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xueyan; Liang, Pei; Song, Dunlun; Yang, Wenling; Gao, Xiwu

    2012-02-01

    A novel method was developed for quantifying the levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the heads of houseflies (Musca domestica) and diamondback moths (Plutella xylostella (L.)), using capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF). The GABA in sample was derivatized with 4-chloro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-Cl) prior to CE-LIF analysis. In total, 32 mmol/L borate buffer, at pH 9.2 and containing 5.3 mmol/L β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and 10.4 mmol/L sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), was determined to be the optimum CE background electrolyte (BGE) for GABA analysis. The detection limit of GABA was 0.016 μmol/L. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the migration time and peak area of GABA were 1.78 and 4.93%, respectively. The average recoveries of 0.97, 3.88, and 5.83 μmol/L of GABA, each added to the head sample of housefly, ranged from 88.9 to 110.5%. This method is simple and applicable to GABA assays of the heads of insects. With this newly developed CE-LIF method, the amounts of GABA in the heads of houseflies (M. domestica) and diamondback moths (P. xylostella (L.)) were measured. The results are relevant to the understandings of some insecticides and insecticide-resistance mechanisms in pests.

  16. Enhancing Contents of γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) and Other Micronutrients in Dehulled Rice during Germination under Normoxic and Hypoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Ding, Junzhou; Yang, Tewu; Feng, Hao; Dong, Mengyi; Slavin, Margaret; Xiong, Shanbai; Zhao, Siming

    2016-02-10

    Biofortification of staple grains with high contents of essential micronutrients is an important strategy to overcome micronutrient malnutrition. However, few attempts have targeted at γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a functional nutrient for aging populations. In this study, two rice cultivars, Heinuo and Xianhui 207, were used to investigate changes in GABA and other nutritional compounds of dehulled rice after germination under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Forty-one metabolites were identified in both cultivars treated by normoxic germination, whereas the germinated dehulled rice of Heinuo and Xianhui 207 under hypoxic treatment had 43 and 41 metabolites identified, respectively. GABA increased in dehulled rice after germination, especially under hypoxia. Meanwhile, a number of other health-beneficial and/or flavor-related compounds such as lysine and d-mannose increased after the hypoxic treatment. The accumulation of GABA exhibited genotype-specific modes in both normoxic and hypoxic treatments. With regard to GABA production, Xianhui 207 was more responsive to the germination process than Heinuo, whereas Heinuo was more responsive to hypoxia than Xianhui 207. This study provides a promising approach to biofortify dehulled rice with increased GABA and other nutrients through metabolomic-based regulation.

  17. γ-Aminobutyric acid-, glycine-, and glutamate-immunopositive boutons on mesencephalic trigeminal neurons that innervate jaw-closing muscle spindles in the rat: ultrastructure and development.

    PubMed

    Paik, Sang Kyoo; Kwak, Myung Kyw; Bae, Jin Young; Yi, Hyun Won; Yoshida, Atsushi; Ahn, Dong Kuk; Bae, Yong Chul

    2012-10-15

    Unlike other primary sensory neurons, the neurons in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (Vmes) receive most of their synaptic input onto their somata. Detailed description of the synaptic boutons onto Vmes neurons is crucial for understanding the synaptic input onto these neurons and their role in the motor control of masticatory muscles. For this, we investigated the distribution of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-, glycine-, and glutamate-immunopositive (+) boutons on Vmes neurons and their ultrastructural parameters that relate to transmitter release: Vmes neurons that innervate masseteric muscle spindles were identified by labeling with horseradish peroxidase injected into the muscle, and immunogold staining and quantitative ultrastructural analysis of synapses onto these neurons were performed in adult rats and during postnatal development. The bouton volume, mitochondrial volume, and active zone area of the boutons contacting labeled somata (axosomatic synapses) were similar to those of boutons forming axoaxonic synapses with Vmes neurons but smaller than those of boutons forming axodendritic or axosomatic synapses with most other neurons. GABA+ , glycine+ , and glutamate+ boutons constituted a large majority (83%) of all boutons on labeled somata. A considerable fraction of boutons (28%) was glycine(+) , and all glycine+ boutons were also GABA+ . Bouton size remained unchanged during postnatal development. These findings suggest that the excitability of Vmes neurons is determined to a great extent by GABA, glycine, and glutamate and that the relatively lower synaptic strength of axosomatic synapses may reflect the role of the Vmes neurons in modulating orofacial motor function.

  18. γ-Aminobutyric Acid Imparts Partial Protection from Salt Stress Injury to Maize Seedlings by Improving Photosynthesis and Upregulating Osmoprotectants and Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongchao; Gu, Wanrong; Meng, Yao; Xie, Tenglong; Li, Lijie; Li, Jing; Wei, Shi

    2017-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) has high physiological activity in plant stress physiology. This study showed that the application of exogenous GABA by root drenching to moderately (MS, 150 mM salt concentration) and severely salt-stressed (SS, 300 mM salt concentration) plants significantly increased endogenous GABA concentration and improved maize seedling growth but decreased glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity compared with non-treated ones. Exogenous GABA alleviated damage to membranes, increased in proline and soluble sugar content in leaves, and reduced water loss. After the application of GABA, maize seedling leaves suffered less oxidative damage in terms of superoxide anion (O2·−) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. GABA-treated MS and SS maize seedlings showed increased enzymatic antioxidant activity compared with that of untreated controls, and GABA-treated MS maize seedlings had a greater increase in enzymatic antioxidant activity than SS maize seedlings. Salt stress severely damaged cell function and inhibited photosynthesis, especially in SS maize seedlings. Exogenous GABA application could reduce the accumulation of harmful substances, help maintain cell morphology, and improve the function of cells during salt stress. These effects could reduce the damage to the photosynthetic system from salt stress and improve photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters. GABA enhanced the salt tolerance of maize seedlings. PMID:28272438

  19. Evaluation of γ- aminobutyric acid, phytate and antioxidant activity of tempeh-like fermented oats (Avena sativa L.) prepared with different filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shengbao; Gao, Fengyi; Zhang, Xudong; Wang, Ou; Wu, Wei; Zhu, Songjie; Zhang, Di; Zhou, Feng; Ji, Baoping

    2014-10-01

    Tempeh is a popular traditional fermented food in Asia. Many tempeh-like foods are made from cereal grains. However, the information of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulation in those tempeh-like cereal grains during fermentation is lacking. Meanwhile, little information is available on the anti-nutrient contents and antioxidant activity of tempeh-like fermented oats. The aim of the present work was to study the changes of GABA, phytate, natural antioxidants and antioxidant activity of tempeh-like fermented oats. As fermentation time progressed, the GABA, total phenolics content (TPC) and flavonoids increased rapidly. The Aspergillus oryzae-fermented oats had the highest GABA, whereas Rhizopus oryzae-fermented oats had the highest TPC. Phytate, an anti-nutrient component, was dramatically reduced in the fermented oats, especially those by A. oryzae (reduced by about 63 %). The antioxidant activities of fermented oats were also significantly enhanced after 72 h fermentation (p < 0.05). This study demonstrated that oats fermented by generally recognized as safe (GRAS) fungi can be recommended as tempeh-like functional foods with higher GABA, more natural antioxidants and lower phytate compared with native oats.

  20. Expression of γ-aminobutyric acid ρ1 and ρ1Δ450 as gene fusions with the green fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2001-01-01

    The functional characteristics and cellular localization of the γaminobutyric acid (GABA) ρ1 receptor and its nonfunctional isoform ρ1Δ450 were investigated by expressing them as gene fusions with the enhanced version of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Oocytes injected with ρ1-GFP had receptors that gated chloride channels when activated by GABA. The functional characteristics of these receptors were the same as for those of wild-type ρ1 receptors. Fluorescence, because of the chimeric receptors expressed, was over the whole oocyte but was more intense near the cell surface and more abundant in the animal hemisphere. Similar to the wild type, ρ1Δ450-GFP did not lead to the expression of functional GABA receptors, and injected oocytes failed to generate currents even after exposure to high concentrations of GABA. Nonetheless, the fluorescence displayed by oocytes expressing ρ1Δ450-GFP was distributed similarly to that of ρ1-GFP. Mammalian cells transfected with the ρ1-GFP or ρ1Δ450-GFP constructs showed mostly intracellularly distributed fluorescence in confocal microscope images. A sparse localization of fluorescence was observed in the plasma membrane regardless of the cell line used. We conclude that ρ1Δ450 is expressed and transported close to, and perhaps incorporated into, the plasma membrane. Thus, ρ1- and ρ1Δ450-GFP fusions provide a powerful tool to visualize the traffic of GABA type C receptors. PMID:11172056

  1. Post-endocytotic Deubiquitination and Degradation of the Metabotropic γ-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor by the Ubiquitin-specific Protease 14*

    PubMed Central

    Lahaie, Nicolas; Kralikova, Michaela; Prézeau, Laurent; Blahos, Jaroslav; Bouvier, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms controlling the metabotropic γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAB) cell surface stability are still poorly understood. In contrast with many other G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), it is not subject to agonist-promoted internalization, but is constitutively internalized and rapidly down-regulated. In search of novel interacting proteins regulating receptor fate, we report that the ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (USP14) interacts with the GABAB(1b) subunit's second intracellular loop. Probing the receptor for ubiquitination using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), we detected a constitutive and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced ubiquitination of the receptor at the cell surface. PMA also increased internalization and accelerated receptor degradation. Overexpression of USP14 decreased ubiquitination while treatment with a small molecule inhibitor of the deubiquitinase (IU1) increased receptor ubiquitination. Treatment with the internalization inhibitor Dynasore blunted both USP14 and IU1 effects on the receptor ubiquitination state, suggesting a post-endocytic site of action. Overexpression of USP14 also led to an accelerated degradation of GABAB in a catalytically independent fashion. We thus propose a model whereby cell surface ubiquitination precedes endocytosis, after which USP14 acts as an ubiquitin-binding protein that targets the ubiquitinated receptor to lysosomal degradation and promotes its deubiquitination. PMID:26817839

  2. A simple high-throughput method for determination of antiepileptic analogues of γ-aminobutyric acid in pharmaceutical dosage forms using microplate fluorescence reader.

    PubMed

    Martinc, Boštjan; Vovk, Tomaž

    2013-01-01

    Pregabalin (PGB), gabapentin (GBP), and vigabatrin (VGB) are structural analogues of γ-aminobutyric acid used for the treatment of different forms of epilepsy. Their analytical determination is challenging since these molecules have no significant UV or visible absorption. Several derivatization methods have been developed and used for their determination in bulk or pharmaceutical dosage forms. We aimed to develop a high- throughput method using a microplate reader with fluorescence detection and simple derivatization with fluorescamine. Obtained method involves derivatization step of only 5 min at room temperature and simultaneous measurements of 96 samples (λex 395, λem 476 nm) thus rendering excellent high-throughput analysis. The method was found to be linear with r²>0.998 across investigated analytical ranges of 0.75 to 30.0 µg/mL for PGB, 2.00 to 80.0 µg/mL for GBP, and 1.50 to 60.0 µg/mL for VGB. Intraday and interday precision values did not exceed 4.93%. The accuracy was ranging between 96.6 to 103.5%. The method was also found to be specific since used excipients did not interfere with the method. The robustness study showed that derivatization procedure is more robust than spectrofluorimetric conditions. The developed high-throughput method was successfully applied for determination of drug content and dissolution profiles in pharmaceutical dosage forms of studied antiepileptic drugs.

  3. GABA (γ-Aminobutyric Acid) Uptake Via the GABA Permease GabP Represses Virulence Gene Expression in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

    PubMed

    McCraw, S L; Park, D H; Jones, R; Bentley, M A; Rico, A; Ratcliffe, R G; Kruger, N J; Collmer, A; Preston, G M

    2016-12-01

    The nonprotein amino acid γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the most abundant amino acid in the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaf apoplast and is synthesized by Arabidopsis thaliana in response to infection by the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (hereafter called DC3000). High levels of exogenous GABA have previously been shown to repress the expression of the type III secretion system (T3SS) in DC3000, resulting in reduced elicitation of the hypersensitive response (HR) in the nonhost plant tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). This study demonstrates that the GABA permease GabP provides the primary mechanism for GABA uptake by DC3000 and that the gabP deletion mutant ΔgabP is insensitive to GABA-mediated repression of T3SS expression. ΔgabP displayed an enhanced ability to elicit the HR in young tobacco leaves and in tobacco plants engineered to produce increased levels of GABA, which supports the hypothesis that GABA uptake via GabP acts to regulate T3SS expression in planta. The observation that P. syringae can be rendered insensitive to GABA through loss of gabP but that gabP is retained by this bacterium suggests that GabP is important for DC3000 in a natural setting, either for nutrition or as a mechanism for regulating gene expression. [Formula: see text] Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license .

  4. Library screening by means of mass spectrometry (MS) binding assays-exemplarily demonstrated for a pseudostatic library addressing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter 1 (GAT1).

    PubMed

    Sindelar, Miriam; Wanner, Klaus T

    2012-09-01

    In the present study, the application of mass spectrometry (MS) binding assays as a tool for library screening is reported. For library generation, dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) was used. These libraries can be screened by means of MS binding assays when appropriate measures are taken to render the libraries pseudostatic. That way, the efficiency of MS binding assays to determine ligand binding in compound screening with the ease of library generation by DCC is combined. The feasibility of this approach is shown for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter 1 (GAT1) as a target, representing the most important subtype of the GABA transporters. For the screening, hydrazone libraries were employed that were generated in the presence of the target by reacting various sets of aldehydes with a hydrazine derivative that is delineated from piperidine-3-carboxylic acid (nipecotic acid), a common fragment of known GAT1 inhibitors. To ensure that the library generated is pseudostatic, a large excess of the nipecotic acid derivative is employed. As the library is generated in a buffer system suitable for binding and the target is already present, the mixtures can be directly analyzed by MS binding assays-the process of library generation and screening thus becoming simple to perform. The binding affinities of the hits identified by deconvolution were confirmed in conventional competitive MS binding assays performed with single compounds obtained by separate synthesis. In this way, two nipecotic acid derivatives exhibiting a biaryl moiety, 1-{2-[2'-(1,1'-biphenyl-2-ylmethylidene)hydrazine]ethyl}piperidine-3-carboxylic acid and 1-(2-{2'-[1-(2-thiophenylphenyl)methylidene]hydrazine}ethyl)piperidine-3-carboxylic acid, were found to be potent GAT1 ligands exhibiting pK(i) values of 6.186 ± 0.028 and 6.229 ± 0.039, respectively. This method enables screening of libraries, whether generated by conventional chemistry or DCC, and is applicable to all kinds of targets including

  5. Cytokine levels affected by gamma-linolenic acid.

    PubMed

    Dirks, J; van Aswegen, C H; du Plessis, D J

    1998-10-01

    This study was undertaken to assess whether gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) in the form of evening primrose oil (EPO) could affect rat serum cytokines, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The following diets were administered: control, glucan, Freund's adjuvant and glucan plus Freund's adjuvant with and without GLA. In the presence of GLA, the IFN-gamma and MCP-1 levels were significantly decreased in contrast to the control group of TNF-alpha, which was significantly stimulated. On account of interaction between diets and GLA, the remaining diet groups of TNF-alpha were either not affected or were inhibited in the presence of GLA. The observations indicate that GLA may modulate the level of serum IFN-gamma, MCP-1 and TNF-alpha, which may be a worthwhile line of treatment in certain human diseases.

  6. Cross-talk between P2X4 and γ-Aminobutyric Acid, Type A Receptors Determines Synaptic Efficacy at a Central Synapse*

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Young-Hwan; Donier, Emmanuelle; Martinez, Audrey; Garret, Maurice; Toulmé, Estelle; Boué-Grabot, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The essence of neuronal function is to generate outputs in response to synaptic potentials. Synaptic integration at postsynaptic sites determines neuronal outputs in the CNS. Using immunohistochemical and electrophysiological approaches, we first reveal that steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive neurons in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus express P2X4 subunits that are activated by exogenous ATP. Increased membrane expression of P2X4 channels by using a peptide competing with P2X4 intracellular endocytosis motif enhances neuronal excitability of SF-1 GFP-positive neurons. This increased excitability is inhibited by a P2X receptor antagonist. Furthermore, increased surface P2X4 receptor expression significantly decreases the frequency and the amplitude of GABAergic postsynaptic currents of SF-1 GFP-positive neurons. Co-immunopurification and pulldown assays reveal that P2X4 receptors complex with aminobutyric acid, type A (GABAA) receptors and demonstrate that two amino acids in the carboxyl tail of the P2X4 subunit are crucial for its physical association with GABAA receptors. Mutation of these two residues prevents the physical association, thereby blocking cross-inhibition between P2X4 and GABAA receptors. Moreover, disruption of the physical coupling using competitive peptides containing the identified motif abolishes current inhibition between P2X4 and GABAA receptors in recombinant system and P2X4 receptor-mediated GABAergic depression in SF-1 GFP-positive neurons. Our present work thus provides evidence for cross-talk between excitatory and inhibitory receptors that appears to be crucial in determining GABAergic synaptic strength at a central synapse. PMID:21482824

  7. Enhancement of γ-aminobutyric acid production in recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum by co-expressing two glutamate decarboxylase genes from Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Jiang, Junjun; Li, Yongfu; Li, Youxin; Xie, Yilong

    2013-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), a non-protein amino acid, is a bioactive component in the food, feed and pharmaceutical fields. To establish an effective single-step production system for GABA, a recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum strain co-expressing two glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) genes (gadB1 and gadB2) derived from Lactobacillus brevis Lb85 was constructed. Compared with the GABA production of the gadB1 or gadB2 single-expressing strains, GABA production by the gadB1-gadB2 co-expressing strain increased more than twofold. By optimising urea supplementation, the total production of L-glutamate and GABA increased from 22.57 ± 1.24 to 30.18 ± 1.33 g L⁻¹, and GABA production increased from 4.02 ± 0.95 to 18.66 ± 2.11 g L⁻¹ after 84-h cultivation. Under optimal urea supplementation, L-glutamate continued to be consumed, GABA continued to accumulate after 36 h of fermentation, and the pH level fluctuated. GABA production increased to a maximum level of 27.13 ± 0.54 g L⁻¹ after 120-h flask cultivation and 26.32 g L⁻¹ after 60-h fed-batch fermentation. The conversion ratio of L-glutamate to GABA reached 0.60-0.74 mol mol⁻¹. By co-expressing gadB1 and gadB2 and optimising the urea addition method, C. glutamicum was genetically improved for de novo biosynthesis of GABA from its own accumulated L-glutamate.

  8. Altered γ-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission in major depressive disorder: a critical review of the supporting evidence and the influence of serotonergic antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Pehrson, Alan L; Sanchez, Connie

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggesting that central nervous system γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations are reduced in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) has been present since at least 1980, and this idea has recently gained support from more recent magnetic resonance spectroscopy data. These observations have led to the assumption that MDD's underlying etiology is tied to an overall reduction in GABA-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission. In this paper, we review the mechanisms that govern GABA and glutamate concentrations in the brain, and provide a comprehensive and critical evaluation of the clinical data supporting reduced GABA neurotransmission in MDD. This review includes an evaluation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy data, as well as data on the expression and function of the GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase, GABA neuron-specific cell markers, such as parvalbumin, calretinin and calbindin, and the GABAA and GABAB receptors in clinical MDD populations. We explore a potential role for glial pathology in MDD-related reductions in GABA concentrations, and evidence of a connection between neurosteroids, GABA neurotransmission, and hormone-related mood disorders. Additionally, we investigate the effects of GABAergic pharmacological agents on mood, and demonstrate that these compounds have complex effects that do not universally support the idea that reduced GABA neurotransmission is at the root of MDD. Finally, we discuss the connections between serotonergic and GABAergic neurotransmission, and show that two serotonin-focused antidepressants - the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine and the multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine - modulate GABA neurotransmission in opposing ways, despite both being effective MDD treatments. Altogether, this review demonstrates that there are large gaps in our understanding of the relationship between GABA physiology and MDD, which must be remedied with more data from well-controlled empirical

  9. Rescue of deficient amygdala tonic γ-aminobutyric acidergic currents in the Fmr-/y mouse model of fragile X syndrome by a novel γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor-positive allosteric modulator.

    PubMed

    Martin, Brandon S; Martinez-Botella, Gabriel; Loya, Carlos M; Salituro, Francesco G; Robichaud, Albert J; Huntsman, Molly M; Ackley, Mike A; Doherty, James J; Corbin, Joshua G

    2016-06-01

    Alterations in the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory transmission are emerging as a common component of many nervous system disorders, including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Tonic γ-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) transmission provided by peri- and extrasynaptic GABA type A (GABAA ) receptors powerfully controls neuronal excitability and plasticity and, therefore, provides a rational therapeutic target for normalizing hyperexcitable networks across a variety of disorders, including ASDs. Our previous studies revealed tonic GABAergic deficits in principal excitatory neurons in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in the Fmr1(-/y) knockout (KO) mouse model fragile X syndrome. To correct amygdala deficits in tonic GABAergic neurotransmission in Fmr1(-/y) KO mice, we developed a novel positive allosteric modulator of GABAA receptors, SGE-872, based on endogenously active neurosteroids. This study shows that SGE-872 is nearly as potent and twice as efficacious for positively modulating GABAA receptors as its parent molecule, allopregnanolone. Furthermore, at submicromolar concentrations (≤1 μM), SGE-872 is selective for tonic, extrasynaptic α4β3δ-containing GABAA receptors over typical synaptic α1β2γ2 receptors. We further find that SGE-872 strikingly rescues the tonic GABAergic transmission deficit in principal excitatory neurons in the Fmr1(-/y) KO BLA, a structure heavily implicated in the neuropathology of ASDs. Therefore, the potent and selective action of SGE-872 on tonic GABAA receptors containing α4 subunits may represent a novel and highly useful therapeutic avenue for ASDs and related disorders involving hyperexcitability of neuronal networks.

  10. Tomato Glutamate Decarboxylase Genes SlGAD2 and SlGAD3 Play Key Roles in Regulating γ-Aminobutyric Acid Levels in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    PubMed

    Takayama, Mariko; Koike, Satoshi; Kusano, Miyako; Matsukura, Chiaki; Saito, Kazuki; Ariizumi, Tohru; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) can accumulate relatively high levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) during fruit development. However, the molecular mechanism underlying GABA accumulation and its physiological function in tomato fruits remain elusive. We previously identified three tomato genes (SlGAD1, SlGAD2 and SlGAD3) encoding glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), likely the key enzyme for GABA biosynthesis in tomato fruits. In this study, we generated transgenic tomato plants in which each SlGAD was suppressed and those in which all three SlGADs were simultaneously suppressed. A significant decrease in GABA levels, i.e. 50-81% compared with wild-type (WT) levels, was observed in mature green (MG) fruits of the SlGAD2-suppressed lines, while a more drastic reduction (up to <10% of WT levels) was observed in the SlGAD3- and triple SlGAD-suppressed lines. These findings suggest that both SlGAD2 and SlGAD3 expression are crucial for GABA biosynthesis in tomato fruits. The importance of SlGAD3 expression was also confirmed by generating transgenic tomato plants that over-expressed SlGAD3. The MG and red fruits of the over-expressing transgenic lines contained higher levels of GABA (2.7- to 5.2-fold) than those of the WT. We also determined that strong down-regulation of the SlGADs had little effect on overall plant growth, fruit development or primary fruit metabolism under normal growth conditions.

  11. Functional consequences of sulfhydryl modification of the γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 at a single solvent-exposed cysteine residue.

    PubMed

    Omoto, Jaison J; Maestas, Matthew J; Rahnama-Vaghef, Ali; Choi, Ye E; Salto, Gerardo; Sanchez, Rachel V; Anderson, Cynthia M; Eskandari, Sepehr

    2012-12-01

    The aims of this study were to optimize the experimental conditions for labeling extracellularly oriented, solvent-exposed cysteine residues of γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 (GAT1) with the membrane-impermeant sulfhydryl reagent [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]methanethiosulfonate (MTSET) and to characterize the functional and pharmacological consequences of labeling on transporter steady-state and presteady-state kinetic properties. We expressed human GAT1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes and used radiotracer and electrophysiological methods to assay transporter function before and after sulfhydryl modification with MTSET. In the presence of NaCl, transporter exposure to MTSET (1-2.5 mM for 5-20 min) led to partial inhibition of GAT1-mediated transport, and this loss of function was completely reversed by the reducing reagent dithiothreitol. MTSET treatment had no functional effect on the mutant GAT1 C74A, whereas the membrane-permeant reagents N-ethylmaleimide and tetramethylrhodamine-6-maleimide inhibited GABA transport mediated by GAT1 C74A. Ion replacement experiments indicated that MTSET labeling of GAT1 could be driven to completion when valproate replaced chloride in the labeling buffer, suggesting that valproate induces a GAT1 conformation that significantly increases C74 accessibility to the extracellular fluid. Following partial inhibition by MTSET, there was a proportional reduction in both the presteady-state and steady-state macroscopic signals, and the functional and pharmacological properties of the remaining signals were indistinguishable from those of unlabeled GAT1. Therefore, covalent modification of GAT1 at C74 results in completely nonfunctional as well as electrically silent transporters.

  12. Proteomic Characterization of Inhibitory Synapses Using a Novel pHluorin-tagged γ-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor, Type A (GABAA), α2 Subunit Knock-in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yasuko; Morrow, Danielle H; Modgil, Amit; Huyghe, Deborah; Deeb, Tarek Z; Lumb, Michael J; Davies, Paul A; Moss, Stephen J

    2016-06-03

    The accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAARs) at the appropriate postsynaptic sites is critical for determining the efficacy of fast inhibitory neurotransmission. Although we know that the majority of synaptic GABAAR subtypes are assembled from α1-3, β, and γ2 subunits, our understanding of how neurons facilitate their targeting to and stabilization at inhibitory synapses is rudimentary. To address these issues, we have created knock-in mice in which the pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the Myc epitope were introduced to the extracellular domain of the mature receptor α2 subunit (pHα2). Using immunoaffinity purification and mass spectroscopy, we identified a stable complex of 174 proteins that were associated with pHα2, including other GABAAR subunits, and previously identified receptor-associated proteins such as gephyrin and collybistin. 149 of these proteins were novel GABAAR binding partners and included G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channel subunits, proteins that regulate trafficking and degradation, regulators of protein phosphorylation, GTPases, and a number of proteins that regulate their activity. Notably, members of the postsynaptic density family of proteins that are critical components of excitatory synapses were not associated with GABAARs. Crucially, we demonstrated for a subset of these novel proteins (including cullin1, ephexin, potassium channel tetramerization domain containing protein 12, mitofusin2, metabotropic glutamate receptor 5, p21-activated kinase 7, and Ras-related protein 5A) bind directly to the intracellular domains of GABAARs, validating our proteomic analysis. Thus, our experiments illustrate the complexity of the GABAAR proteome and enhance our understanding of the mechanisms neurons use to construct inhibitory synapses.

  13. γ-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor Mediated Inhibition of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neurons Is Suppressed by Kisspeptin-G Protein-Coupled Receptor 54 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunguang; Bosch, Martha A.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2009-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the most important neurotransmitters that regulate the excitability of GnRH neurons. Numerous studies have shown that GABA activates Cl− currents in GnRH neurons, and these effects are antagonized by GABAA receptor antagonists. The GABAB receptor is a heterodimer composed of GABAB R1 and R2, and although both subunits have been localized in GnRH neurons, nothing is known about the cellular signaling of this Gαi,o-coupled receptor in GnRH neurons. Using whole-cell recordings from mouse enhanced green fluorescent protein-GnRH neurons, we found that the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen hyperpolarized GnRH neurons through activation of an inwardly rectifying K+ current in a concentration-dependent manner. The effects of baclofen were antagonized by the selective GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 52432 with a Ki (inhibitory constant) of 85 nm. Furthermore, in the presence of the GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin, GABA hyperpolarized GnRH neurons in a similar manner. Treatment with 17β-estradiol as compared with oil vehicle did not significantly alter either the EC50 for the baclofen-induced response (0.8 ± 0.1 vs. 1.0 ± 0.1 μm, respectively) or the maximal outward current (10.8 ± 1.7 pA vs. 11.4 ± 0.6 pA, respectively) in GnRH neurons. However, the outward current (and membrane hyperpolarization) was abrogated by submaximal concentrations of the G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) agonist kisspeptin-10 in both groups, indicating that Gαq-coupled (GPR54) can desensitize the GABAB receptor-mediated response. Therefore, the activation of GABAB receptors in GnRH neurons may provide increased inhibitory tone during estrogen-negative feedback states that is attenuated by kisspeptin during positive feedback. PMID:19164470

  14. Neurotoxins from Snake Venoms and α-Conotoxin ImI Inhibit Functionally Active Ionotropic γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Kudryavtsev, Denis S.; Shelukhina, Irina V.; Son, Lina V.; Ojomoko, Lucy O.; Kryukova, Elena V.; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N.; Zhmak, Maxim N.; Dolgikh, Dmitry A.; Ivanov, Igor A.; Kasheverov, Igor E.; Starkov, Vladislav G.; Ramerstorfer, Joachim; Sieghart, Werner; Tsetlin, Victor I.; Utkin, Yuri N.

    2015-01-01

    Ionotropic receptors of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAAR) regulate neuronal inhibition and are targeted by benzodiazepines and general anesthetics. We show that a fluorescent derivative of α-cobratoxin (α-Ctx), belonging to the family of three-finger toxins from snake venoms, specifically stained the α1β3γ2 receptor; and at 10 μm α-Ctx completely blocked GABA-induced currents in this receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes (IC50 = 236 nm) and less potently inhibited α1β2γ2 ≈ α2β2γ2 > α5β2γ2 > α2β3γ2 and α1β3δ GABAARs. The α1β3γ2 receptor was also inhibited by some other three-finger toxins, long α-neurotoxin Ls III and nonconventional toxin WTX. α-Conotoxin ImI displayed inhibitory activity as well. Electrophysiology experiments showed mixed competitive and noncompetitive α-Ctx action. Fluorescent α-Ctx, however, could be displaced by muscimol indicating that most of the α-Ctx-binding sites overlap with the orthosteric sites at the β/α subunit interface. Modeling and molecular dynamic studies indicated that α-Ctx or α-bungarotoxin seem to interact with GABAAR in a way similar to their interaction with the acetylcholine-binding protein or the ligand-binding domain of nicotinic receptors. This was supported by mutagenesis studies and experiments with α-conotoxin ImI and a chimeric Naja oxiana α-neurotoxin indicating that the major role in α-Ctx binding to GABAAR is played by the tip of its central loop II accommodating under loop C of the receptors. PMID:26221036

  15. The novel isoxazoline ectoparasiticide fluralaner: selective inhibition of arthropod γ-aminobutyric acid- and L-glutamate-gated chloride channels and insecticidal/acaricidal activity.

    PubMed

    Gassel, Michael; Wolf, Christian; Noack, Sandra; Williams, Heike; Ilg, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Isoxazolines are a novel class of parasiticides that are potent inhibitors of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channels (GABACls) and L-glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls). In this study, the effects of the isoxazoline drug fluralaner on insect and acarid GABACl (RDL) and GluCl and its parasiticidal potency were investigated. We report the identification and cDNA cloning of Rhipicephalus (R.) microplus RDL and GluCl genes, and their functional expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The generation of six clonal HEK293 cell lines expressing Rhipicephalus microplus RDL and GluCl, Ctenocephalides felis RDL-A285 and RDL-S285, as well as Drosophila melanogaster RDLCl-A302 and RDL-S302, combined with the development of a membrane potential fluorescence dye assay allowed the comparison of ion channel inhibition by fluralaner with that of established insecticides addressing RDL and GluCl as targets. In these assays fluralaner was several orders of magnitude more potent than picrotoxinin and dieldrin, and performed 5-236 fold better than fipronil on the arthropod RDLs, while a rat GABACl remained unaffected. Comparative studies showed that R. microplus RDL is 52-fold more sensitive than R. microplus GluCl to fluralaner inhibition, confirming that the GABA-gated chloride channel is the primary target of this new parasiticide. In agreement with the superior RDL on-target activity, fluralaner outperformed dieldrin and fipronil in insecticidal screens on cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis), yellow fever mosquito larvae (Aedes aegypti) and sheep blowfly larvae (Lucilia cuprina), as well as in acaricidal screens on cattle tick (R. microplus) adult females, brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) adult females and Ornithodoros moubata nymphs. These findings highlight the potential of fluralaner as a novel ectoparasiticide.

  16. Attenuation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transaminase activity contributes to GABA increase in the cerebral cortex of mice exposed to β-cypermethrin.

    PubMed

    Han, Y; Cao, D; Li, X; Zhang, R; Yu, F; Ren, Y; An, L

    2014-03-01

    The current study investigated the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels and GABA metabolic enzymes (GABA transaminase (GABA(T)) and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD)) activities at 2 and 4 h after treatment, using a high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detectors and colorimetric assay, in the cerebral cortex of mice treated with 20, 40 or 80 mg/kg β-cypermethrin by a single oral gavage, with corn oil as vehicle control. In addition, GABA protein (4 h after treatment), GABA(T) protein (2 h after treatment) and GABA receptors messenger RNA (mRNA) expression were detected by immunohistochemistry, Western blot and real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, respectively. β-Cypermethrin (80 mg/kg) significantly increased GABA levels in the cerebral cortex of mice, at both 2 and 4 h after treatment, compared with the control. Also, GABA immunohistochemistry results suggested that the number of positive granules was increased in the cerebral cortex of mice 4 h after exposure to 80 mg/kg β-cypermethrin when compared with the control. Furthermore, the results also showed that GABA(T) activity detected was significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex of mice 2 h after β-cypermethrin administration (40 or 80 mg/kg). No significant changes were found in GAD activity, or the expression of GABA(T) protein and GABAB receptors mRNA, in the cerebral cortex of mice, except that 80 mg/kg β-cypermethrin caused a significant decrease, compared with the vehicle control, in GABAA receptors mRNA expression 4 h after administration. These results suggested that attenuated GABA(T) activity induced by β-cypermethrin contributed to increased GABA levels in the mouse brain. The downregulated GABAA receptors mRNA expression is most likely a downstream event.

  17. Spinal nerve ligation decreases γ-aminobutyric acidB receptors on specific populations of immunohistochemically identified neurons in L5 dorsal root ganglion of the rat.

    PubMed

    Engle, Mitchell P; Merrill, Michelle A; Marquez De Prado, Blanca; Hammond, Donna L

    2012-06-01

    This study examined the distribution of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(B) receptors on immunohistochemically identified neurons, and levels of GABA(B(1)) and GABA(B(2)) mRNA, in the L4 and L5 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of the rat in the absence of injury and 2 weeks after L5 spinal nerve ligation. In uninjured DRG, GABA(B(1)) immunoreactivity colocalized exclusively with the neuronal marker (NeuN) and did not colocalize with the satellite cell marker S-100. The GABA(B(1)) subunit colocalized to >97% of DRG neurons immunoreactive (IR) for neurofilament 200 (N52) or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), or labeled by isolectin B4 (IB4). Immunoreactivity for GABA(B(2)) was not detectable. L5 spinal nerve ligation did not alter the number of GABA(B(1)) -IR neurons or its colocalization pattern in the L4 DRG. However, ligation reduced the number of GABA(B(1)) -IR neurons in the L5 DRG by ≈38% compared with sham-operated and naïve rats. Specifically, ligation decreased the number of CGRP-IR neurons in the L5 DRG by 75%, but did not decrease the percent colocalization of GABA(B(1)) in those that remained. In the few IB4-positive neurons that remained in the L5 DRG, colocalization of GABA(B(1)) -IR decreased to 75%. Ligation also decreased levels of GABA(B(1)) and GABA(B(2)) mRNA in the L5, but not the L4 DRG compared with sham-operated or naïve rats. These findings indicate that the GABA(B) receptor is positioned to presynaptically modulate afferent transmission by myelinated, unmyelinated, and peptidergic afferents in the dorsal horn. Loss of GABA(B) receptors on primary afferent neurons may contribute to the development of mechanical allodynia after L5 spinal nerve ligation.

  18. Unedited in vivo detection and quantification of γ-aminobutyric acid in the occipital cortex using short-TE MRS at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Near, Jamie; Andersson, Jesper; Maron, Eduard; Mekle, Ralf; Gruetter, Rolf; Cowen, Philip; Jezzard, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Short-TE MRS has been proposed recently as a method for the in vivo detection and quantification of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the human brain at 3 T. In this study, we investigated the accuracy and reproducibility of short-TE MRS measurements of GABA at 3 T using both simulations and experiments. LCModel analysis was performed on a large number of simulated spectra with known metabolite input concentrations. Simulated spectra were generated using a range of spectral linewidths and signal-to-noise ratios to investigate the effect of varying experimental conditions, and analyses were performed using two different baseline models to investigate the effect of an inaccurate baseline model on GABA quantification. The results of these analyses indicated that, under experimental conditions corresponding to those typically observed in the occipital cortex, GABA concentration estimates are reproducible (mean reproducibility error, <20%), even when an incorrect baseline model is used. However, simulations indicate that the accuracy of GABA concentration estimates depends strongly on the experimental conditions (linewidth and signal-to-noise ratio). In addition to simulations, in vivo GABA measurements were performed using both spectral editing and short-TE MRS in the occipital cortex of 14 healthy volunteers. Short-TE MRS measurements of GABA exhibited a significant positive correlation with edited GABA measurements (R = 0.58, p < 0.05), suggesting that short-TE measurements of GABA correspond well with measurements made using spectral editing techniques. Finally, within-session reproducibility was assessed in the same 14 subjects using four consecutive short-TE GABA measurements in the occipital cortex. Across all subjects, the average coefficient of variation of these four GABA measurements was 8.7 ± 4.9%. This study demonstrates that, under some experimental conditions, short-TE MRS can be employed for the reproducible detection of GABA at 3 T, but that the technique

  19. Dopamine and γ-aminobutyric acid are colocalized in restricted groups of neurons in the sea lamprey brain: insights into the early evolution of neurotransmitter colocalization in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Villar-Cerviño, Verona; Anadón, Ramón; Rodicio, María Celina

    2009-01-01

    Since its discovery, the possible corelease of classic neurotransmitters from neurons has received much attention. Colocalization of monoamines and amino acidergic neurotransmitters [mainly glutamate and dopamine (DA) or serotonin] in mammalian neurons has been reported. However, few studies have dealt with the colocalization of DA and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in neurons. With the aim of providing some insight into the colocalization of neurotransmitters during early vertebrate phylogeny, we studied GABA expression in dopaminergic neurons in the sea lamprey brain by using double-immunofluorescence methods with anti-DA and anti-GABA antibodies. Different degrees of colocalization of DA and GABA were observed in different dopaminergic brain nuclei. A high degree of colocalization (GABA in at least 25% of DA-immunoreactive neurons) was observed in populations of the caudal rhombencephalon, ventral isthmus, postoptic commissure nucleus, preoptic nucleus and in granule-like cells of the olfactory bulb. A new DA-immunoreactive striatal population that showed colocalization with GABA in about a quarter of its neurons was observed. In the periventricular hypothalamus, colocalization was observed in only a few cells, despite the abundance of DA- and GABA-immunoreactive neurons, and no double-labelled cells were observed in the paratubercular nucleus. The frequent colocalization of DA and GABA reveals that the dopaminergic populations of lampreys are more complex than previously reported. Double-labelled fibres or terminals were observed in different brain regions, suggesting possible corelease of DA and GABA by these lamprey neurons. The present results suggest that colocalization of DA and GABA in neurons appeared early in vertebrate evolution. PMID:19840024

  20. Positive Regulation by γ-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor Subunit-1 of Chondrogenesis through Acceleration of Nuclear Translocation of Activating Transcription Factor-4*

    PubMed Central

    Takahata, Yoshifumi; Hinoi, Eiichi; Takarada, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yukari; Ogawa, Shinya; Yoneda, Yukio

    2012-01-01

    A view that signaling machineries for the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are functionally expressed by cells outside the central nervous system is now prevailing. In this study, we attempted to demonstrate functional expression of GABAergic signaling molecules by chondrocytes. In cultured murine costal chondrocytes, mRNA was constitutively expressed for metabotropic GABAB receptor subunit-1 (GABABR1), but not for GABABR2. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the predominant expression of GABABR1 by prehypertrophic to hypertrophic chondrocytes in tibial sections of newborn mice. The GABABR agonist baclofen failed to significantly affect chondrocytic differentiation determined by Alcian blue staining and alkaline phosphatase activity in cultured chondrocytes, whereas newborn mice knocked out of GABABR1 (KO) showed a decreased body size and delayed calcification in hyoid bone and forelimb and hindlimb digits. Delayed calcification was also seen in cultured metatarsals from KO mice with a marked reduction of Indian hedgehog gene (Ihh) expression. Introduction of GABABR1 led to synergistic promotion of the transcriptional activity of activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4) essential for normal chondrogenesis, in addition to facilitating ATF4-dependent Ihh promoter activation. Although immunoreactive ATF4 was negligibly detected in the nucleus of chondrocytes from KO mice, ATF4 expression was again seen in the nucleus and cytoplasm after the retroviral introduction of GABABR1 into cultured chondrocytes from KO mice. In nuclear extracts of KO chondrocytes, a marked decrease was seen in ATF4 DNA binding. These results suggest that GABABR1 positively regulates chondrogenesis through a mechanism relevant to the acceleration of nuclear translocation of ATF4 for Ihh expression in chondrocytes. PMID:22879594

  1. Suppression of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transaminases induces prominent GABA accumulation, dwarfism and infertility in the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    PubMed

    Koike, Satoshi; Matsukura, Chiaki; Takayama, Mariko; Asamizu, Erika; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2013-05-01

    Tomatoes accumulate γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) at high levels in the immature fruits. GABA is rapidly converted to succinate during fruit ripening through the activities of GABA transaminase (GABA-T) and succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH). Although three genes encoding GABA-T and both pyruvate- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent GABA-T activities have been detected in tomato fruits, the mechanism underlying the GABA-T-mediated conversion of GABA has not been fully understood. In this work, we conducted loss-of-function analyses utilizing RNA interference (RNAi) transgenic plants with suppressed pyruvate- and glyoxylate-dependent GABA-T gene expression to clarify which GABA-T isoforms are essential for its function. The RNAi plants with suppressed SlGABA-T gene expression, particularly SlGABA-T1, showed severe dwarfism and infertility. SlGABA-T1 expression was inversely associated with GABA levels in the fruit at the red ripe stage. The GABA contents in 35S::SlGABA-T1(RNAi) lines were 1.3-2.0 times and 6.8-9.2 times higher in mature green and red ripe fruits, respectively, than the contents in wild-type fruits. In addition, SlGABA-T1 expression was strongly suppressed in the GABA-accumulating lines. These results indicate that pyruvate- and glyoxylate-dependent GABA-T is the essential isoform for GABA metabolism in tomato plants and that GABA-T1 primarily contributes to GABA reduction in the ripening fruits.

  2. γ-aminobutyric acid type A α4, β2, and δ subunits assemble to produce more than one functionally distinct receptor type.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Megan M; Bracamontes, John; Shu, Hong-Jin; Li, Ping; Mennerick, Steven; Steinbach, Joe Henry; Akk, Gustav

    2014-12-01

    Native γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors consisting of α4, β1-3, and δ subunits mediate responses to the low, tonic concentration of GABA present in the extracellular milieu. Previous studies on heterologously expressed α4βδ receptors have shown a large degree of variability in functional properties, including sensitivity to the transmitter. We studied properties of α4β2δ receptors employing free subunits and concatemeric constructs, expressed in Xenopus oocytes, HEK 293 cells, and cultured hippocampal neurons. The expression system had a strong effect on the properties of receptors containing free subunits. The midpoint of GABA activation curve was 10 nM for receptors in oocytes versus 2300 nM in HEK cells. Receptors activated by the steroid alfaxalone had an estimated maximal open probability of 0.6 in oocytes and 0.01 in HEK cells. Irrespective of the expression system, receptors resulting from combining the tandem construct β2-δ and a free α4 subunit exhibited large steroid responses. We propose that free α4, β2, and δ subunits assemble in different configurations with distinct properties in oocytes and HEK cells, and that subunit linkage can overcome the expression system-dependent preferential assembly of free subunits. Hippocampal neurons transfected with α4 and the picrotoxin-resistant δ(T269Y) subunit showed large responses to alfaxalone in the presence of picrotoxin, suggesting that α4βδ receptors may assemble in a similar configuration in neurons and oocytes.

  3. Activation of γ-aminobutyric Acid (A) Receptor Protects Hippocampus from Intense Exercise-induced Synapses Damage and Apoptosis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yi; Xie, Lan; Chang, Cun-Qing; Chen, Zhi-Min; Ai, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background: Our previous study has confirmed that one bout of exhaustion (Ex) can cause hippocampus neurocyte damage, excessive apoptosis, and dysfunction. Its initial reason is intracellular calcium overload in hippocampus triggered by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) over-activation. NMDAR activation can be suppressed by γ-aminobutyric acid (A) receptor (GABAAR). Whether GABAAR can prevent intense exercise-induced hippocampus apoptosis, damage, or dysfunction will be studied in this study. Methods: According to dose test, rats were randomly divided into control (Con), Ex, muscimol (MUS, 0.1 mg/kg) and bicuculline (BIC, 0.5 mg/kg) groups, then all rats underwent once swimming Ex except ones in Con group only underwent training. Intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) was measured by Fura-2-acetoxymethyl ester; glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and synaptophysin (SYP) immunofluorescence were also performed; apoptosis were displayed by dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) stain; endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis pathway was detected by Western blotting analysis; Morris water maze was used to detect learning ability and spatial memory. Results: The appropriate dose was 0.1 mg/kg for MUS and 0.5 mg/kg for BIC. Ex group showed significantly increased [Ca2+]i and astrogliosis; TUNEL positive cells and levels of GFAP, B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) associated X protein (Bax), caspase-3, caspase-12 cleavage, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), and p-Jun amino-terminal kinase (p-JNK) in Ex group also raised significantly compared to Con group, while SYP, synapse plasticity, and Bcl-2 levels in Ex group were significantly lower than those in Con group. These indexes were back to normal in MUS group. BIC group had the highest levels of [Ca2+]i, astrogliosis, TUNEL positive cell, GFAP, Bax, caspase-3, caspase-12 cleavage, CHOP, and p-JNK, it also gained the lowest SYP, synapse plasticity, and Bcl-2 levels among all groups

  4. Contribution of the activated catalase to oxidative stress resistance and γ-aminobutyric acid production in Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Changjiang; Hu, Sheng; Huang, Jun; Luo, Maiqi; Lu, Tao; Mei, Lehe; Yao, Shanjing

    2016-12-05

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are generally sensitive to H2O2, a compound which can paradoxically produce themselves and lead to the growth arrest and cell death. To counteract the potentially toxic effects of this compound, the gene katE encoding a heme-dependent catalase (CAT) belonging to the family of monofunctional CATs was cloned from Lactobacillus brevis CGMCC1306. The enhanced homologous CAT expression was achieved using the NICE system. L. brevis cells with overexpressed CAT showed 685-fold and 823-fold higher survival when exposed to 30mmol/L of H2O2 and long-term aerated stress (after 72h), respectively, than that of the wild type cells. Furtherly, the effects of activated CAT on GABA production in L. brevis were investigated. A GABA production level of 66.4g/L was achieved using two-step biotransformation that successively employed the growing and resting cells derived from engineering L. brevis CAT. These results demonstrated clearly that overexpression of the KatE gene in L. brevis led to a marked increased survival in oxidizing environment, and shed light on a novel feasible approach to enhance the GABA production level by improving the antioxidative properties.

  5. cDNA cloning and expression of a gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor epsilon-subunit in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Moragues, N; Ciofi, P; Lafon, P; Odessa, M F; Tramu, G; Garret, M

    2000-12-01

    A cDNA encoding a GABA(A) receptor subunit was isolated from rat brain. The predicted protein is 70% identical to the human epsilon-subunit. It was recently reported [Sinkkonen et al. (2000), J. Neurosci., 20, 3588-3595] that the rodent epsilon-subunit mRNA encoded an additional sequence ( approximately 400 residues). We provide evidence that human and rat epsilon-subunit are similar in size. The distribution of cells expressing the GABA(A) epsilon-subunit was examined in the rat brain. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that epsilon-subunit mRNA is expressed by neurons located in septal and preoptic areas, as well as in various hypothalamic nuclei, including paraventricular, arcuate, dorsomedial and medial tuberal nuclei. The mRNA was also detected in major neuronal groups with broad-range influence, such as the cholinergic (basal nucleus), dopaminergic (substantia nigra compacta), serotonergic (raphe nuclei), and noradrenergic (locus coeruleus) systems. Immunohistochemistry using an affinity-purified antiserum directed towards the N-terminal sequence unique to the rat epsilon-subunit revealed the presence of epsilon-subunit immunoreactivity over the somatodendritic domain of neurons with a distribution closely matching that of mRNA-expressing cells. Moreover, using in situ hybridization, alpha3, theta and epsilon GABA(A) subunit mRNAs were all detected with an overlapping distribution in neurons of the dorsal raphe and the locus coeruleus. Our results suggest that novel GABA(A) receptors may regulate, neuroendocrine and modulatory systems in the brain.

  6. Putative Neurotransmitters in ’Aplysia’: Distribution of Gamma- Aminobutyric Acid, Aspartate and Glutamate in Ganglia and Single Neurons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-01

    been described in other inver- 21 7 tebrate nervous systems. Lewis and Evans note the presence of large amounts of taurine in...and Tauc, L. Pharmacological specificities of neurones in an elementary central nervous system. Nature 189:924-925, 1961. 15 12. Giller, E...Abstract 1349), 1974. 32. Usherwood, P. N. R., Machili, P. and Leaf, G. L-glutamate at insect excit- atory nerve-muscle synapses. Nature 219

  7. Effect of pressure on the release of radioactive glycine and gamma-aminobutyric acid from spinal cord synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, S.C.; Colton, J.S.; Dutka, A.J.

    1987-11-01

    Exposure to high hydrostatic pressure produces neurological changes referred to as the high-pressure nervous syndrome (HPNS). Manifestations of HPNS include tremor, EEG changes, and convulsions. These symptoms suggest an alteration in synaptic transmission, particularly with inhibitory neural pathways. Because spinal cord transmission has been implicated in HPNS, this study investigated inhibitory neurotransmitter function in the cord at high pressure. Guinea pig spinal cord synaptosome preparations were used to study the effect of compression to 67.7 atmospheres. This study suggest that decreased tonic inhibitory regulation at the level of the spinal cord contributes to the hyperexcitability observed in animals with compression to high pressure.

  8. Neuronal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors undergo cognate ligand chaperoning in the endoplasmic reticulum by endogenous GABA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Eshaq, Randa S.; Meshul, Charles K.; Moore, Cynthia; Hood, Rebecca L.; Leidenheimer, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. Dysfunction of these receptors is associated with various psychiatric/neurological disorders and drugs targeting this receptor are widely used therapeutic agents. Both the efficacy and plasticity of GABAA receptor-mediated neurotransmission depends on the number of surface GABAA receptors. An understudied aspect of receptor cell surface expression is the post-translational regulation of receptor biogenesis within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have previously shown that exogenous GABA can act as a ligand chaperone of recombinant GABAA receptors in the early secretory pathway leading us to now investigate whether endogenous GABA facilitates the biogenesis of GABAA receptors in primary cerebral cortical cultures. In immunofluorescence labeling experiments, we have determined that neurons expressing surface GABAA receptors contain both GABA and its degradative enzyme GABA transaminase (GABA-T). Treatment of neurons with GABA-T inhibitors, a treatment known to increase intracellular GABA levels, decreases the interaction of the receptor with the ER quality control protein calnexin, concomittantly increasing receptor forward-trafficking and plasma membrane insertion. The effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction is not due to the activation of surface GABAA or GABAB receptors. Consistent with our hypothesis that GABA acts as a cognate ligand chaperone in the ER, immunogold-labeling of rodent brain slices reveals the presence of GABA within the rough ER. The density of this labeling is similar to that present in mitochondria, the organelle in which GABA is degraded. Lastly, the effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction was prevented by pretreatment with a GABA transporter inhibitor. Together, these data indicate that endogenous GABA acts in the rough ER as a cognate ligand chaperone to facilitate the biogenesis of neuronal GABAA receptors. PMID:26041994

  9. Transmembrane topology, subcellular distribution and turnover of the gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodizaepine receptor in chick brain cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were performed utilizing trypsinization of the GABA/BZD-R in intact cells to determine (1) the subcellular distribution of membrane-associated GABA/BZD-Rs and (2) aspects of the transmembrane topology of the BZD-R. Additionally, R07-0213, a positively charged benzodiazepine, was used to distinguish between cell surface and intracellular BZD-Rs. Following trypsin treatment of intact cells a cleaved receptor fragment of M{sub r} = 24,000 (xRF24) is generated. It remains anchored in the plasma membrane and not only retains the ability to bind ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepan reversibly and irreversibly but also retains the ability to be modulated by GABA. xRF24 is not observed following trypsinization of saponin-treated cells or cell homogenates, indicating that it has a cytoplasmic domain as well as a cell surface domain, as expected for a transmembrane fragment of the BZD-R. By utilizing ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepam as an irreversible photoaffinity label, BZD-R turnover was also investigated.

  10. A phase transition from monoclinic C2 with Z' = 1 to triclinic P1 with Z' = 4 for the quasiracemate L-2-aminobutyric acid-D-methionine (1/1).

    PubMed

    Görbitz, Carl Henrik; Wragg, David S; Bakke, Ingrid Marie Bergh; Fleischer, Christian; Grønnevik, Gaute; Mykland, Maria; Park, Yoomin; Trovik, Kristian Wiedicke; Serigstad, Halvard; Sundsli, Bård Edgar Vestheim

    2016-07-01

    Racemates of hydrophobic amino acids with linear side chains are known to undergo a unique series of solid-state phase transitions that involve sliding of molecular bilayers upon heating or cooling. Recently, this behaviour was shown to extend also to quasiracemates of two different amino acids with opposite handedness [Görbitz & Karen (2015). J. Phys. Chem. B, 119, 4975-4984]. Previous investigations are here extended to an L-2-aminobutyric acid-D-methionine (1/1) co-crystal, C4H9NO2·C5H11NO2S. The significant difference in size between the -CH2CH3 and -CH2CH2SCH3 side chains leads to extensive disorder at room temperature, which is essentially resolved after a phase transition at 229 K to an unprecedented triclinic form where all four D-methionine molecules in the asymmetric unit have different side-chain conformations and all three side-chain rotamers are used for the four partner L-2-aminobutyric acid molecules.

  11. Formation of biologically relevant carboxylic acids during the gamma irradiation of acetic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1976-01-01

    Irradiation of aqueous solutions of acetic acid with gamma rays produced several carboxylic acids in small yield. Their identification was based on the technique of gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry. Some of these acids are Krebs Cycle intermediates. Their simultaneous formation in experiments simulating the primitive conditions on the earth suggests that metabolic pathways may have had their origin in prebiotic chemical processes.

  12. Content and in vitro release of endogenous amino acids in the area of the nucleus of the solitary tract of the rat.

    PubMed

    Meeley, M P; Underwood, M D; Talman, W T; Reis, D J

    1989-12-01

    We sought to identify amino acid neurotransmitter candidates within the nucleus of the solitary tract in rats. Twenty endogenous amino acids were quantified by reverse-phase HPLC with fluorescence detection (30-fmol limit). Micropunches (1 mm) of the intermediate area of the solitary nucleus were prepared, and the amino acid content determined. Of all the components measured, the putative transmitters Glu, Gly, gamma-aminobutyric acid, taurine, Asp, and Ala appeared in greatest concentrations. Bilateral micropunches superfused in vitro with buffered medium containing 56 mM potassium released Glu, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and Gly in a significant manner (p less than 0.05) compared with basal levels. With Glu, 78% was calcium-dependent and, therefore, presumably from nerve endings; 99% of gamma-aminobutyric acid and 42% of Gly were dependent on calcium. After removal of the nodose ganglion, a bilateral decrease in the calcium-dependent release of Glu and gamma-aminobutyric acid, but not Gly, was observed; decreases were significant ipsilateral to the site of ablation. We conclude that (a) Glu is a transmitter of primary afferents in the nucleus of the solitary tract; (b) glutamatergic afferents may interact with gamma-aminobutyric acid system(s) in this region; (c) Gly also may participate in the mediation and/or modulation of cardiovascular or other visceral reflexes; and (d) amino acid neurotransmission may play an integral role in the neurogenic control of arterial pressure.

  13. Effect of Jian-Pi-Zhi-Dong Decoction on striatal glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid levels detected using microdialysis in a rat model of Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Wei, Li; Yu, Wenjing; Cui, Xia; Liu, Xiaofang; Wang, Qian; Wang, Sumei

    2016-01-01

    Background Jian-Pi-Zhi-Dong Decoction (JPZDD) is a dedicated treatment of Tourette syndrome (TS). The balance of neurotransmitters in the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical network is crucial to the occurrence of TS and related to its severity. This study evaluated the effect of JPZDD on glutamate (Glu) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and their receptors in a TS rat model. Materials and methods Rats were divided into four groups (n=12 each). TS was induced in three of the groups by injecting them with 3,3′-iminodipropionitrile for 7 consecutive days. Two model groups were treated with tiapride (Tia) or JPZDD, while the control and the remaining model group were gavaged with saline. Behavior was assessed by stereotypic score and autonomic activity. Striatal Glu and GABA contents were detected using microdialysis. Expressions of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 and GABAA receptor (GABAAR) were observed using Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Tia and JPZDD groups had decreased stereotypy compared with model rats; however, the JPZDD group showed a larger decrease in stereotypy than the Tia group at a 4-week time point. In a spontaneous activity test, the total distance of the JPZDD and Tia groups was significantly decreased compared with the model group. The Glu levels of the model group were higher than the control group and decreased with Tia or JPZDD treatment. The GABA level was higher in the model group than the control group. Expressions of GABAAR protein in the model group were higher than in the control group. Treatment with Tia or JPZDD reduced the expression of GABAAR protein. In the case of the mRNA expression, only Tia reduced the expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1, compared with the model group. Conclusion JPZDD could alleviate impairments in behavior and dysfunctional signaling by downregulating GABAAR in the striatum. We suggest that this acts to maintain the balance of Glu and GABA. PMID:27279743

  14. Effect of Functional Bread Rich in Potassium, γ-Aminobutyric Acid and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors on Blood Pressure, Glucose Metabolism and Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Becerra-Tomás, Nerea; Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Quilez, Joan; Merino, Jordi; Ferré, Raimon; Díaz-López, Andrés; Bulló, Mònica; Hernández-Alonso, Pablo; Palau-Galindo, Antoni; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Because it has been suggested that food rich in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) peptides have beneficial effects on blood pressure (BP) and other cardiovascular risk factors, we tested the effects of low-sodium bread, but rich in potassium, GABA, and ACEI peptides on 24-hour BP, glucose metabolism, and endothelial function. A randomized, double-blind, crossover trial was conducted in 30 patients with pre or mild-to-moderate hypertension, comparing three 4-week nutritional interventions separated by 2-week washout periods. Patients were randomly assigned to consume 120 g/day of 1 of the 3 types of bread for each nutritional intervention: conventional wheat bread (CB), low-sodium wheat bread enriched in potassium (LSB), and low-sodium wheat bread rich in potassium, GABA, and ACEI peptides (LSB + G). For each period, 24-hour BP measurements, in vivo endothelial function, and biochemical samples were obtained. After LSB + G consumption, 24-hour ambulatory BP underwent a nonsignificant greater reduction than after the consumption of CB and LSB (0.26 mm Hg in systolic BP and −0.63 mm Hg in diastolic BP for CB; −0.71 mm Hg in systolic BP and −1.08 mm Hg in diastolic BP for LSB; and −0.75 mm Hg in systolic BP and −2.12 mm Hg in diastolic BP for LSB + G, respectively). Diastolic BP at rest decreased significantly during the LSB + G intervention, although there were no significant differences in changes between interventions. There were no significant differences between interventions in terms of changes in in vivo endothelial function, glucose metabolism, and peripheral inflammatory parameters. Compared with the consumption of CB or LSB, no greater beneficial effects on 24-hour BP, endothelial function, or glucose metabolism were demonstrated after the consumption of LSB + G in a population with pre or mild-to-moderate hypertension. Further studies are warranted to clarify the

  15. β-Aminobutyric acid increases abscisic acid accumulation and desiccation tolerance and decreases water use but fails to improve grain yield in two spring wheat cultivars under soil drying

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng-Min

    2012-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of the non-protein amino acid, β-aminobutyric acid (BABA), on the homeostasis between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant defence during progressive soil drying, and its relationship with the accumulation of abscisic acid (ABA), water use, grain yield, and desiccation tolerance in two spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars released in different decades and with different yields under drought. Drenching the soil with 100 µM BABA increased drought-induced ABA production, leading to a decrease in the lethal leaf water potential (Ψ) used to measure desiccation tolerance, decreased water use, and increased water use efficiency for grain (WUEG) under moderate water stress. In addition, at severe water stress levels, drenching the soil with BABA reduced ROS production, increased antioxidant enzyme activity, and reduced the oxidative damage to lipid membranes. The data suggest that the addition of BABA triggers ABA accumulation that acts as a non-hydraulic root signal, thereby closing stomata, and reducing water use at moderate stress levels, and also reduces the production of ROS and increases the antioxidant defence enzymes at severe stress levels, thus increasing the desiccation tolerance. However, BABA treatment had no effect on grain yield of wheat when water availability was limited. The results suggest that there are ways of effectively priming the pre-existing defence pathways, in addition to genetic means, to improve the desiccation tolerance and WUEG of wheat. PMID:22859677

  16. Development and Validation of a HPTLC Method for Simultaneous Estimation of L-Glutamic Acid and γ-Aminobutyric Acid in Mice Brain.

    PubMed

    Sancheti, J S; Shaikh, M F; Khatwani, P F; Kulkarni, Savita R; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2013-11-01

    A new robust, simple and economic high performance thin layer chromatographic method was developed for simultaneous estimation of L-glutamic acid and γ-amino butyric acid in brain homogenate. The high performance thin layer chromatographic separation of these amino acid was achieved using n-butanol:glacial acetic acid:water (22:3:5 v/v/v) as mobile phase and ninhydrin as a derivatising agent. Quantitation of the method was achieved by densitometric method at 550 nm over the concentration range of 10-100 ng/spot. This method showed good separation of amino acids in the brain homogenate with Rf value of L-glutamic acid and γ-amino butyric acid as 21.67±0.58 and 33.67±0.58, respectively. The limit of detection and limit of quantification for L-glutamic acid was found to be 10 and 20 ng and for γ-amino butyric acid it was 4 and 10 ng, respectively. The method was also validated in terms of accuracy, precision and repeatability. The developed method was found to be precise and accurate with good reproducibility and shows promising applicability for studying pathological status of disease and therapeutic significance of drug treatment.

  17. The study of gamma irradiation effects on poly (glycolic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao Nakka, Rajeswara; Rao Thumu, Venkatappa; Reddy SVS, Ramana; Rao Buddhiraju, Sanjeeva

    2015-05-01

    We have investigated the effects of gamma irradiation on chemical structure, thermal and morphological properties of biodegradable semi-crystalline poly (glycolic acid) (PGA). PGA samples were subjected to irradiation treatment using a 60Co gamma source with a delivered dose of 30, 60 and 90 kGy, respectively. Gamma irradiation induces cleavage of PGA main chains forming ∼OĊH2 and ĊH2COO∼ radicals in both amorphous and crystalline regions. The free radicals formed in the amorphous region abstract atmospheric oxygen and convert them to peroxy radicals. The peroxy radical causes chain scission at the crystal interface through hydrogen abstraction from methylene groups forming the ∼ĊHCOO∼ (I) radical. Consequently, the observed electron spin resonance (ESR) doublet of irradiated PGA is assigned to (I). The disappearance of the ESR signal above 190°C indicates that free radicals are formed in the amorphous region and decay below the melting temperature of PGA. Fourier transform infrared and optical absorption studies confirm that the ? groups are not influenced by gamma irradiation. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies showed that the melting temperature of PGA decreased from 212°C to 202°C upon irradiation. Degree of crystallinity increased initially and then decreased with an increase in radiation as per DSC and X-ray diffraction studies. Irradiation produced changes in the physical properties of PGA as well as affecting the morphology of the material.

  18. Mechanism of Inactivation of γ-Aminobutyric Acid Aminotransferase by (1S ,3S)-3-Amino-4-difluoromethylene-1-cyclopentanoic Acid (CPP-115)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyunbeom; Doud, Emma H.; Wu, Rui; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Juncosa, Jose I.; Liu, Dali; Kelleher, Neil L.; Silverman, Richard B.

    2015-01-23

    γ-Aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that degrades GABA, the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in mammalian cells. When the concentration of GABA falls below a threshold level, convulsions can occur. Inhibition of GABA-AT raises GABA levels in the brain, which can terminate seizures as well as have potential therapeutic applications in treating other neurological disorders, including drug addiction. Among the analogues that we previously developed, (1S,3S)-3-amino-4-difluoromethylene-1-cyclopentanoic acid (CPP-115) showed 187 times greater potency than that of vigabatrin, a known inactivator of GABA-AT and approved drug (Sabril) for the treatment of infantile spasms and refractory adult epilepsy. Recently, CPP-115 was shown to have no adverse effects in a Phase I clinical trial. Here we report a novel inactivation mechanism for CPP-115, a mechanism-based inactivator that undergoes GABA-AT-catalyzed hydrolysis of the difluoromethylene group to a carboxylic acid with concomitant loss of two fluoride ions and coenzyme conversion to pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP). The partition ratio for CPP-115 with GABA-AT is about 2000, releasing cyclopentanone-2,4-dicarboxylate (22) and two other precursors of this compound (20 and 21). Time-dependent inactivation occurs by a conformational change induced by the formation of the aldimine of 4-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid and PMP (20), which disrupts an electrostatic interaction between Glu270 and Arg445 to form an electrostatic interaction between Arg445 and the newly formed carboxylate produced by hydrolysis of the difluoromethylene group in CPP-115, resulting in a noncovalent, tightly bound complex. Ultimately, this represents a novel mechanism for inactivation of GABA-AT and a new approach for the design of mechanism-based inactivators in general.

  19. Manganese accumulation in membrane fractions of primary astrocytes is associated with decreased γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) uptake, and is exacerbated by oleic acid and palmitate.

    PubMed

    Fordahl, Steve C; Erikson, Keith M

    2014-05-01

    Manganese (Mn) exposure interferes with GABA uptake; however, the effects of Mn on GABA transport proteins (GATs) have not been identified. We sought to characterize how Mn impairs GAT function in primary rat astrocytes. Astrocytes exposed to Mn (500 μM) had significantly reduced (3)H-GABA uptake despite no change in membrane or cytosolic GAT3 protein levels. Co-treatment with 100 μM oleic or palmitic acids (both known to be elevated in Mn neurotoxicity), exacerbated the Mn-induced decline in (3)H-GABA uptake. Mn accumulation in the membrane fraction of astrocytes was enhanced with fatty acid administration, and was negatively correlated with (3)H-GABA uptake. Furthermore, control cells exposed to Mn only during the experimental uptake had significantly reduced (3)H-GABA uptake, and the addition of GABA (50 μM) blunted cytosolic Mn accumulation. These data indicate that reduced GAT function in astrocytes is influenced by Mn and fatty acids accumulating at or interacting with the plasma membrane.

  20. Reduced γ-Aminobutyric Acid and Glutamate+Glutamine Levels in Drug-Naïve Patients with First-Episode Schizophrenia but Not in Those at Ultrahigh Risk

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yingying; Zhang, Tianhong; Cui, Huiru; Xu, Lihua; Zeng, Botao; Li, Yu; Li, Gaiying; Li, Chunbo; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Jianye

    2016-01-01

    Altered γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu) levels, and an imbalance between GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmissions have been involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, it remains unclear how these abnormalities impact the onset and course of psychosis. In the present study, 21 drug-naïve subjects at ultrahigh risk for psychosis (UHR), 16 drug-naïve patients with first-episode schizophrenia (FES), and 23 healthy controls (HC) were enrolled. In vivo GABA and glutamate+glutamine (Glx) levels in the medial prefrontal cortex were measured using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Medial prefrontal GABA and Glx levels in FES patients were significantly lower than those in HC and UHR, respectively. GABA and Glx levels in UHR were comparable with those in HC. In each group, there was a positive correlation between GABA and Glx levels. Reduced medial prefrontal GABA and Glx levels thus may play an important role in the early stages of schizophrenia. PMID:28003912

  1. γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Production and Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activity of Fermented Soybean Containing Sea Tangle by the Co-Culture of Lactobacillus brevis with Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eun Kyeong; Kim, Nam Yeun; Ahn, Hyung Jin; Ji, Geun Eog

    2015-08-01

    To enhance the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content, the optimized fermentation of soybean with added sea tangle extract was evaluated at 30°C and pH 5.0. The medium was first inoculated with Aspergillus oryzae strain FMB S46471 and fermented for 3 days, followed by the subsequent inoculation with Lactobacillus brevis GABA 100. After fermentation for 7 days, the fermented soybean showed approximately 1.9 g/kg GABA and exhibited higher ACE inhibitory activity than the traditional soybean product. Furthermore, several peptides in the fraction containing the highest ACE inhibitory activity were identified. The novel fermented soybean enriched with GABA and ACE inhibitory components has great pharmaceutical and functional food values.

  2. The production of poly-(gamma-glutamic acid) from microorganisms and its various applications.

    PubMed

    Shih, I L; Van, Y T

    2001-09-01

    This review article deals with the chemistry and biosynthesis of poly-(gamma-glutamic acid) (gamma-PGA) produced by various strains of Bacillus. Potential applications of gamma-PGA as thickener, cryoprotectant, humectant, drug carrier, biological adhesive, flocculant, or heavy metal absorbent, etc. with biodegradability in the fields of food, cosmetics, medicine and water treatments are also reviewed.

  3. Natural and edible biopolymer poly-gamma-glutamic acid: synthesis, production, and applications.

    PubMed

    Sung, Moon-Hee; Park, Chung; Kim, Chul-Joong; Poo, Haryoung; Soda, Kenji; Ashiuchi, Makoto

    2005-01-01

    Poly-gamma-glutamic acid (gamma-PGA) is a very promising biodegradable polymer that is produced by Bacillus subtilis. Gamma-PGA is water-soluble, anionic, biodegradable, and edible. This paper reviews the production of a strain of gamma-PGA and recent developments with respect to applications in terms of Ca absorption, moisturizing properties, gamma-PGA conjugation, super absorbent polymer, and so on. Our recent research shows that gamma-PGA can be used as an immune-stimulating and anti-tumor agent, especially at high molecular weight.

  4. Gamma amino butyric acid accumulation in medicinal plants without stress

    PubMed Central

    Anju, P.; Moothedath, Ismail; Rema Shree, Azhimala Bhaskaranpillai

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) is an important ubiquitous four carbon nonprotein amino acid with an amino group attached to gamma carbon instead of beta carbon. It exists in different organisms including bacteria, plants, and animals and plays a crucial role in humans by regulating neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system. It is directly responsible for the regulation of muscle tone and also effective in lowering stress, blood pressure, and hypertension. Aim and Objective: The aim of the study was to develop the fingerprint profile of selected medicinally and economically important plants having central nervous system (CNS) activity and to determine the quantity of GABA in the selected plants grown under natural conditions without any added stress. Materials and Methods: The high-performance thin layer chromatography analysis was performed on precoated silica gel plate 60F–254 plate (20 cm × 10 cm) in the form of bands with width 8 mm using Hamilton syringe (100 μl) using n-butanol, acetic acid, and water in the proportion 5:2:2 as mobile phase in a CAMAG chamber which was previously saturated for 30 min. CAMAG TLC scanner 3 was used for the densitometric scanning at 550 nm. Specific marker compounds were used for the quantification. Results and Conclusion: Among the screened medicinal plants, Zingiber officinale and Solanum torvum were found to have GABA. The percentage of GABA present in Z. officinale and S. torvum were found to be 0.0114% and 0.0119%, respectively. The present work confirmed that among the selected CNS active medicinal plants, only two plants contain GABA. We found a negative correlation with plant having CNS activity and accumulation of GABA. The GABA shunt is a conserved pathway in eukaryotes and prokaryotes but, although the role of GABA as a neurotransmitter in mammals is clearly established, its role in plants is still vague. PMID:25861139

  5. Incorporation and distribution of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid in cultured human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Punnonen, K.; Puustinen, T.; Jansen, C.T.

    1986-02-01

    Human keratinocytes in culture were labelled with /sup 14/C-dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid or /sup 14/C-eicosapentaenoic acid. All three eicosanoid precursor fatty acids were effectively incorporated into the cells. In phospholipids most of the radioactivity was recovered, in neutral lipids a substantial amount, and as free unesterified fatty acids only a minor amount. Most of the radioactivity was found in phosphatidylethanolamine which was also the major phospholipid as measured by phosphorous assay. The incorporation of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid into lipid subfractions was essentially similar. Eicosapentaenoic acid was, however, much less effectively incorporated into phosphatidylinositol + phosphatidylserine and, correspondingly, more effectively into triacylglycerols as compared to the two other precursor fatty acids. Once incorporated, the distribution of all three precursor fatty acids was relatively stable, and only minor amounts of fatty acids were released into the culture medium during short term culture (two days). Our study demonstrates that eicosanoid precursor fatty acids are avidly taken up by human keratinocytes and esterified into membrane lipids. The clinical implication of this finding is that dietary manipulations might be employed to cause changes in the fatty acid composition of keratinocytes.

  6. Novel high-affinity and selective biaromatic 4-substituted gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) analogues as GHB ligands: design, synthesis, and binding studies.

    PubMed

    Høg, Signe; Wellendorph, Petrine; Nielsen, Birgitte; Frydenvang, Karla; Dahl, Ivar F; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Brehm, Lotte; Frølund, Bente; Clausen, Rasmus P

    2008-12-25

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a metabolite of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and has been proposed to function as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. GHB is used in the treatment of narcolepsy and is a drug of abuse. GHB binds to both GABA(B) receptors and specific high-affinity GHB sites in brain, of which the latter have not been linked unequivocally to function, but are speculated to be GHB receptors. In this study, a series of biaromatic 4-substituted GHB analogues, including 4'-phenethylphenyl, 4'-styrylphenyl, and 4'-benzyloxyphenyl GHB analogues, were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically in a [3H](E,RS)-(6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5-hydroxy-5H-benzocyclohept-6-ylidene)acetic acid ([3H]NCS-382) binding assay and in GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor binding assays. The compounds were selective for the high-affinity GHB binding sites and several displayed Ki values below 100 nM. The affinity of the 4-[4'-(2-iodobenzyloxy)phenyl] GHB analogue 17b was shown to reside predominantly with the R-enantiomer (Ki = 22 nM), which has higher affinity than previously reported GHB ligands.

  7. Drug-facilitated sexual assault involving gamma-hydroxybutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Stillwell, Matthew E

    2002-09-01

    The first case involving an alleged sexual assault linked to the use of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) in Oklahoma is reported. A-48-year-old Caucasian woman taking amitriptyline was known to have voluntarily ingested a sports drink containing a relaxing health product. She purportedly experienced unconsciousness that persisted for approximately 4 h. The toxicological testing on urine identified GHB, amitriptyline, and nortriptyline using a capillary Hewlett-Packard 6890 gas chromatograph coupled to a Hewlett-Packard 5973 mass selective detector (MSD). The GHB concentration in urine was 26.9 microg/mL. Urine concentrations of amitriptyline and nortriptyline were not determined. The analytical method used for identifying and quantitating GHB can be applied to matters of forensic interests.

  8. Heterogenous expression of poly-gamma-glutamic acid synthetase complex gene of Bacillus licheniformis WBL-3.

    PubMed

    Wang, N; Yang, G; Che, C; Liu, Y

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus licheniformis WBL-3, one of poly-gamma-glutamic acid (gamma-PGA) producers, depends on the existence of glutamate in the medium. In this paper, gamma-PGA synthetase complex gene (pgsBCA) was cloned from Bacillus licheniformis WBL-3. pgsBCA gene of B. licheniformis WBL-3 was highly homologous with pgsBCA gene of B. licheniformis 14580. The similarity was 97%, but the similarity of pgsBCA gene between B. licheniformis WBL-3 and Bacillus subtilis IF03336 was only 74%. However, when pgsBCA was expressed in Escherichia coli, the E. coli clone produced gamma-PGA extracellularly. The yield of gamma-PGA was 8.624 g/l. This result infers that B. licheniformis and B. subtilis has the similar gamma-PGA biosynthesis mechanism, namely, glutamic acid is catalyzed by an ATP-dependent amide ligase to synthesize gamma-PGA.

  9. Fatty acid accumulation in the yeast Sporidiobolus salmonicolor during batch production of gamma-decalactone.

    PubMed

    Feron, G; Dufossé, L; Mauvais, G; Bonnarme, P; Spinnler, H E

    1997-04-01

    This paper provides new information about the metabolism of various fatty acids and gamma-decalactone production by yeast. An analysis of the fatty acid composition of the yeast Sporidiobolus salmonicolor during batch production of lactone with ricinoleic acid methyl ester as a precursor showed an accumulation of the gamma-decalactone precursor inside the cells. Electron microscopy of the yeasts showed the presence of large internal inclusions leading to membrane and organelle lysis and, consequently, death of the yeast. S. salmonicolor cultivated with methyl oleate did not produce gamma-decalactone and is viable during the whole culture. Analysis of the long chain fatty acid fraction showed incorporation of methyl oleate.

  10. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. II - Five carbon acyclic primary beta-, gamma-, and delta-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Pizzarello, S.; Yuen, G. U.

    1985-01-01

    The five-carbon acyclic primary beta, gamma, and delta amino alkanoic acids of the Murchison meteorite are studied using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion exchange chromatography. The chromatograms reveal that alpha is the most abundant monoamino alkanoic acid followed by gamma and beta, and an exponential increase in the amount of amino acid is observed as the carbon number increases in the homologous series. The influence of frictional heating, spontaneous thermal decomposition, and radiation of the synthesis of amino acids is examined. The data obtained support an amino acid synthesis process involving random combination of single-carbon precursors.

  11. Locations of amino acids in brain slices from the rat. Tetrodotoxin-sensitive release of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, A M; Quastel, J H

    1972-07-01

    1. Amino acids, particularly glutamate, gamma-aminobutyrate, aspartate and glycine, were released from rat brain slices on incubation with protoveratrine (especially in a Ca(2+)-deficient medium) or with ouabain or in the absence of glucose. Release was partially or wholly suppressed by tetrodotoxin. 2. Tetrodotoxin did not affect the release of glutamine under various incubation conditions, nor did protoveratrine accelerate it. 3. Protoveratrine caused an increased rate of formation of glutamine in incubated brain slices. 4. Increased K(+) in the incubation medium caused release of gamma-aminobutyrate, the process being partly suppressed by tetrodotoxin. 5. Incubation of brain slices in a glucose-free medium led to increased production of aspartate and to diminished tissue contents of glutamates, glutamine and glycine. 6. Use of tetrodotoxin to suppress the release of amino acids from neurons in slices caused by the joint action of protoveratrine and ouabain (the latter being added to diminish reuptake of amino acids), it was shown that the major pools of glutamate, aspartate, glycine, serine and probably gamma-aminobutyrate are in the neurons. 7. The major pool of glutamine lies not in the neurons but in the glia. 8. The tricarboxylic cycle inhibitors, fluoroacetate and malonate, exerted different effects on amino acid contents in, and on amino acid release from, brain slices incubated in the presence of protoveratrine. Fluoroacetate (3mm) diminished the content of glutamine, increased that of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyrate and did not affect respiration. Malonate (2mm) diminished aspartate and gamma-aminobutyrate content, suppressed respiration and did not affect glutamine content. It is suggested that malonate acts mainly on the neurons, and that fluoroacetate acts mainly on the glia, at the concentrations quoted. 9. Glutamine was more effective than glutamate as a precursor of gamma-aminobutyrate. 10. It is suggested that glutamate released from neurons is

  12. Neurosteroid Analogues. 18. Structure–Activity Studies of ent-Steroid Potentiators of γ-Aminobutyric Acid type A Receptors and Comparison of Their Activities with Those of Alphaxalone and Allopregnanolone

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Mingxing; Krishnan, Kathiresan; Kudova, Eva; Li, Ping; Manion, Brad D.; Taylor, Amanda; Elias, George; Akk, Gustav; Evers, Alex S.; Zorumski, Charles F.; Mennerick, Steven; Covey, Douglas F.

    2014-01-01

    A model of the alignment of neurosteroids and ent-neurosteroids at the same binding site on γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors was evaluated for its ability to identify the structural features in ent-neurosteroids that enhance their activity as positive allosteric modulators of this receptor. Structural features that were identified included: 1) a ketone group at position C-16; 2) an axial 4α-OMe group and 3) a C-18 methyl group. Two ent-steroids were identified that were more potent than the anesthetic steroid alphaxalone in their threshold for and duration of loss of the righting reflex in mice. In tadpoles, loss of righting reflex for these two ent-steroids occurs with EC50 values similar to those found for allopregnanolone. The results indicate that ent-steroids have considerable potential to be developed as anesthetic agents as and drugs to treat brain disorders that are ameliorated by positive allosteric modulators of GABAA receptor function. PMID:24328079

  13. Synthesis and characterization of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of tridentate Schiff base derived from vanillin and DL-α-aminobutyric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, M. Sivasankaran; Joseyphus, R. Selwin

    2008-09-01

    Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of the Schiff base derived from vanillin and DL-α-aminobutyric acid were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, electronic spectra, conductance measurements, magnetic measurements, powder XRD and biological activity. The analytical data show the composition of the metal complex to be [ML(H 2O)], where L is the Schiff base ligand. The conductance data indicate that all the complexes are non-electrolytes. IR results demonstrate the tridentate binding of the Schiff base ligand involving azomethine nitrogen, phenolic oxygen and carboxylato oxygen atoms. The IR data also indicate the coordination of a water molecule with the metal ion in the complex. The electronic spectral measurements show that Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes have tetrahedral geometry, while Cu(II) complex has square planar geometry. The powder XRD studies indicate that Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes are amorphous, whereas Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes are crystalline in nature. Magnetic measurements show that Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes have paramagnetic behaviour. Antibacterial results indicated that the metal complexes are more active than the ligand.

  14. Synthesis of gamma,delta-unsaturated glycolic acids via sequenced brook and Ireland--claisen rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Daniel C; Johnson, Jeffrey S

    2010-03-05

    Organozinc, -magnesium, and -lithium nucleophiles initiate a Brook/Ireland-Claisen rearrangement sequence of allylic silyl glyoxylates resulting in the formation of gamma,delta-unsaturated alpha-silyloxy acids.

  15. Synthesis of phosphonic analogues of carnitine and gamma-amino-beta-hydroxybutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Tadeusiak, Elzbieta J

    2004-12-01

    The involvement of carnitine and gamma-amino-beta-hydroxybutyric acid in the biology of mammalian cells, the physiology of the human body, and some important aspects of medicinal treatment has induced many research groups to develop their pharmacologically potent analogues. Among them are the very important phosphonic analogues: phosphocarnitine and gamma-amino-beta-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid. This mini-review describes the various methodologies used for the synthesis of these compounds.

  16. Simultaneous determination of basal and evoked output levels of aspartate, glutamate, taurine and 4-aminobutyric acid during microdialysis and from superfused brain slices.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, L; Della Corte, L; Tipton, K F

    1999-02-19

    A HPLC method, involving pre-column derivatisation with o-phthalaldehyde and fluorescence detection, is described. It allows the resolution of aspartate, glutamate, taurine and GABA, in a single run with detection limits of 3.2, 1.7, 1.4 and 2 fmol/microl of perfusate, respectively. It is sufficiently sensitive and rapid (15 min) for the determination "on line" of the four amino acids in perfusates obtained during in vivo microdialysis experiments. The procedure has been used to determine basal, K+ - or veratridine-stimulated release of these amino acids in different brain areas during microdialysis and from perfused tissue slices.

  17. Kinetic studies on the inhibition of GABA-T by gamma-vinyl GABA and taurine.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Saba A J; Suliman, Fakhr Eldin O; Barghouthi, Samira

    2003-08-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T, EC 2.6.1.19) is a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) dependent enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of gamma-aminobutyric acid. The kinetics of this reaction are studied in vitro, both in the absence, and in the presence of two inhibitors: gamma-vinyl GABA (4-aminohex-5-enoic acid), and a natural product, taurine (ethylamine-2-sulfonic acid). A kinetic model that describes the transamination process is proposed. GABA-T from Pseudomonas fluorescens is inhibited by gamma-vinyl GABA and taurine at concentrations of 51.0 and 78.5 mM. Both inhibitors show competitive inhibition behavior when GABA is the substrate and the inhibition constant (Ki) values for gamma-vinyl GABA and taurine were found to be 26 +/- 3 mM and 68 +/- 7 mM respectively. The transamination process of alpha-ketoglutarate was not affected by the presence of gamma-vinyl GABA, whereas, taurine was a noncompetitive inhibitor of GABA-T when alpha-ketoglutarate was the substrate. The inhibition dissociation constant (Kii) for this system was found to be 96 +/- 10 mM. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) in the absence of inhibition, was found to be 0.79 +/- 0.11 mM, and 0.47 +/- 0.10 mM for GABA and alpha-ketoglutarate respectively.

  18. Effect of Yi-nao-jie-yu decoction on γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor in the hippocampus and serum inflammatory factors in a rat model of poststroke anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Zhao, Ruizhen; Li, Xiaoli; Cui, Xia; Zhao, Zijun; Mao, Yingqiu; Wu, Fengzhi; Tang, Qisheng

    2016-01-01

    Background The Yi-nao-jie-yu decoction (YNJYD) is a herbal preparation widely used in the clinics of traditional Chinese medicine and has been recently used as an important new therapeutic agent in poststroke anxiety (PSA). The neuroendocrine–immune system plays an important role in PSA mechanisms, although the modulating effects of YNJYD remain unknown. This study investigated the potential effects of YNJYD on the neuroendocrine–immune system in a rat model of PSA. Materials and methods The PSA model was induced by injecting collagenase (type VII) into the right globus pallidus, accompanied by empty water bottle stimulation for 2 weeks. The sham group and the PSA model group were gavaged with saline, while the treatment groups received buspirone (BuSpar) or YNJYD. Behavior was evaluated with the open field test and elevated plus maze once a week. Pathological changes were observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Serum levels of tumor necrosis factor, interleukin (IL)-6, adrenocorticotropic hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, IL-1α, and cortisol were detected by radioimmunoassay. Expression of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR) α2 subunit was examined by Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results YNJYD-treated rats exhibited significantly better recovery than BuSpar-treated rats at 21 days and 28 days in the open field test and elevated plus maze. Hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed neural repair in the hippocampus in the treatment groups. Serum levels of IL-1α in the YNJYD group were significantly less than those in the model group and the BuSpar group. GABAAR protein and mRNA expressions were higher in the PSA model group than in the sham group, and YNJYD reversed these effects. Conclusion YNJYD alleviated the symptoms of PSA mainly by decreasing IL-1α levels and downregulating GABAAR expression in the hippocampus to maintain a neuroendocrine–mmune system balance. PMID

  19. Epileptiform activity in the CA1 region of the hippocampus becomes refractory to attenuation by cannabinoids in part because of endogenous γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Messer, Ricka D; Levine, Eric S

    2012-07-01

    The anticonvulsant properties of marijuana have been known for centuries. The recently characterized endogenous cannabinoid system thus represents a promising target for novel anticonvulsant agents; however, administration of exogenous cannabinoids has shown mixed results in both human epilepsy and animal models. The ability of cannabinoids to attenuate release of both excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters may explain the variable effects of cannabinoids in different models of epilepsy, but this has not been well explored. Using acute mouse brain slices, we monitored field potentials in the CA1 region of the hippocampus to characterize systematically the effects of the cannabinoid agonist WIN55212-2 (WIN) on evoked basal and epileptiform activity. WIN, acting presynaptically, significantly reduced the amplitude and slope of basal field excitatory postsynaptic potentials as well as stimulus-evoked epileptiform responses induced by omission of magnesium from the extracellular solution. In contrast, the combination of omission of magnesium plus elevation of potassium induced an epileptiform response that was refractory to attenuation by WIN. The effect of WIN in this model was partially restored by blocking γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA(B) ), but not GABA(A) , receptors. Subtle differences in models of epileptiform activity can profoundly alter the efficacy of cannabinoids. Endogenous GABA(B) receptor activation played a role in the decreased cannabinoid sensitivity observed for epileptiform activity induced by omission of magnesium plus elevation of potassium. These results suggest that interplay between presynaptic G protein-coupled receptors with overlapping downstream targets may underlie the variable efficacy of cannabinoids in different models of epilepsy.

  20. A functional role for both γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter-1 and GABA transporter-3 in the modulation of extracellular GABA and GABAergic tonic conductances in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Kersanté, Flavie; Rowley, Samuel C S; Pavlov, Ivan; Gutièrrez-Mecinas, María; Semyanov, Alexey; Reul, Johannes M H M; Walker, Matthew C; Linthorst, Astrid C E

    2013-01-01

    Tonic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor-mediated signalling controls neuronal network excitability in the hippocampus. Although the extracellular concentration of GABA (e[GABA]) is critical in determining tonic conductances, knowledge on how e[GABA] is regulated by different GABA transporters (GATs) in vivo is limited. Therefore, we studied the role of GATs in the regulation of hippocampal e[GABA] using in vivo microdialysis in freely moving rats. Here we show that GAT-1, which is predominantly presynaptically located, is the major GABA transporter under baseline, quiescent conditions. Furthermore, a significant contribution of GAT-3 in regulating e[GABA] was revealed by administration of the GAT-3 inhibitor SNAP-5114 during simultaneous blockade of GAT-1 by NNC-711. Thus, the GABA transporting activity of GAT-3 (the expression of which is confined to astrocytes) is apparent under conditions in which GAT-1 is blocked. However, sustained neuronal activation by K+-induced depolarization caused a profound spillover of GABA into the extrasynaptic space and this increase in e[GABA] was significantly potentiated by sole blockade of GAT-3 (i.e. even when uptake of GAT-1 is intact). Furthermore, experiments using tetrodotoxin to block action potentials revealed that GAT-3 regulates extrasynaptic GABA levels from action potential-independent sources when GAT-1 is blocked. Importantly, changes in e[GABA] resulting from both GAT-1 and GAT-3 inhibition directly precipitate changes in tonic conductances in dentate granule cells as measured by whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Thus, astrocytic GAT-3 contributes to the regulation of e[GABA] in the hippocampus in vivo and may play an important role in controlling the excitability of hippocampal cells when network activity is increased. PMID:23381899

  1. Evaluation of radiological data of some saturated fatty acids using gamma ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kore, Prashant S.; Pawar, Pravina P.; Palani Selvam, T.

    2016-02-01

    Radiological parameters such as mass attenuation coefficients (μm), total attenuation cross section (σtot), molar extinction coefficient (ε), mass energy absorption coefficient (μen/ρ) and effective electronic cross section (σt, el) of saturated fatty acids, namely butyric acid (C4H8O2), caproic acid (C6H12O2), enanthic acid (C7H14O2), caprylic acid (C8H16O2), pelargonic acid (C9H18O2) and valeric acid (C5H10O2) were measured using NaI(Tl)-based gamma spectrometry. Radioactive sources used in the study are 57Co, 133Ba, 137Cs, 54Mn, 60Co and 22Na. Gamma ray transmission method in a narrow beam good geometry set up was used in the study. The measured data were compared against Win-XCOM-based data. The agreement is within 1%.

  2. Radiation-induced degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid in aqueous solutions by gamma ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Wenbao; He, Yanquan; Ling, Yongsheng; Hei, Daqian; Shan, Qing; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jiatong

    2015-04-01

    The radiation-induced degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid under gamma ray irradiation was investigated. Degradation experiments were performed with 100 mL sealed Pyrex glass vessels loaded with 80 mL of cyclohexanebutyric acid solutions at various initial concentrations of 10, 20, and 40 mg L-1. The absorbed doses were controlled at 0, 0.65, 1.95, 3.25, 6.5, 9.75, and 13 kGy. The results showed that gamma ray irradiation could effectively degrade cyclohexanebutyric acid in aqueous solutions. The removal rate of cyclohexanebutyric acid increased significantly with the increase of absorbed dose and the decrease of its initial concentration. At the same time, the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was as effective as that of cyclohexanebutyric acid. The kinetic studies showed that the degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid followed pseudo first-order reaction. Above all, the proposed mechanism obtained when NaNO2, NaNO3 and tert-butanol were added showed that the •OH radical played a major role in the gamma degradation process of cyclohexanebutyric acid, while •H and eaq- played a minor role in the gamma degradation process. The degradation products were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) during cyclohexanebutyric acid degradation.

  3. GC-MS Analysis of [gamma]-Hydroxybutyric Acid Analogs: A Forensic Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henck, Colin; Nally, Luke

    2007-01-01

    An upper-division forensic chemistry experiment is described. It involves using glycolic acid and sodium glycolate as analogs of [gamma]-hydroxybutyric acid and its sodium salt. The experiment shows the use of silylation in GC-MS analysis and gives students the opportunity to work with a commonly used silylating reagent,…

  4. Treatment of Huntington disease with gamma-acetylenic GABA an irreversible inhibitor of GABA-transaminase: increased CSF GABA and homocarnosine without clinical amelioration.

    PubMed

    Tell, G; Böhlen, P; Schechter, P J; Koch-Weser, J; Agid, Y; Bonnet, A M; Coquillat, G; Chazot, G; Fischer, C

    1981-02-01

    gamma-Acetylenic GABA (GAG, RMI 71.645), a potent irreversible inhibitor of gamma-aminobutyric acid transaminase, was given orally in various dosage schedules to 14 patients with Huntington disease. The biochemical effects of the drug on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the GABA-containing dipeptide, homocarnosine, were measured in 10 of 14 patients. Treatment with GAG increased CSF concentrations of GABA and homocarnosine as compared to pretreatment values, suggesting that the drug increased brain GABA concentration. Despite this neurochemical effect, the clinical state was not improved. Except for single seizure episodes in five patients, GAG therapy was well tolerated. These results do not exclude the possibility that agents that augment CNS GABAergic function may prove useful in therapy of Huntington disease.

  5. Positive and Negative Allosteric Modulation of an α1β3γ2 γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type A (GABAA) Receptor by Binding to a Site in the Transmembrane Domain at the γ+-β− Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Jayakar, Selwyn S.; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Savechenkov, Pavel Y.; Chiara, David C.; Desai, Rooma; Bruzik, Karol S.; Miller, Keith W.; Cohen, Jonathan B.

    2015-01-01

    In the process of developing safer general anesthetics, isomers of anesthetic ethers and barbiturates have been discovered that act as convulsants and inhibitors of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs) rather than potentiators. It is unknown whether these convulsants act as negative allosteric modulators by binding to the intersubunit anesthetic-binding sites in the GABAAR transmembrane domain (Chiara, D. C., Jayakar, S. S., Zhou, X., Zhang, X., Savechenkov, P. Y., Bruzik, K. S., Miller, K. W., and Cohen, J. B. (2013) J. Biol. Chem. 288, 19343–19357) or to known convulsant sites in the ion channel or extracellular domains. Here, we show that S-1-methyl-5-propyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyl-diazirynylphenyl) barbituric acid (S-mTFD-MPPB), a photoreactive analog of the convulsant barbiturate S-MPPB, inhibits α1β3γ2 but potentiates α1β3 GABAAR responses. In the α1β3γ2 GABAAR, S-mTFD-MPPB binds in the transmembrane domain with high affinity to the γ+-β− subunit interface site with negative energetic coupling to GABA binding in the extracellular domain at the β+-α− subunit interfaces. GABA inhibits S-[3H]mTFD-MPPB photolabeling of γ2Ser-280 (γM2–15′) in this site. In contrast, within the same site GABA enhances photolabeling of β3Met-227 in βM1 by an anesthetic barbiturate, R-[3H]methyl-5-allyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyl-diazirynylphenyl)barbituric acid (mTFD-MPAB), which differs from S-mTFD-MPPB in structure only by chirality and two hydrogens (propyl versus allyl). S-mTFD-MPPB and R-mTFD-MPAB are predicted to bind in different orientations at the γ+-β− site, based upon the distance in GABAAR homology models between γ2Ser-280 and β3Met-227. These results provide an explanation for S-mTFD-MPPB inhibition of α1β3γ2 GABAAR function and provide a first demonstration that an intersubunit-binding site in the GABAAR transmembrane domain binds negative and positive allosteric modulators. PMID:26229099

  6. PP2C gamma: a human protein phosphatase with a unique acidic domain.

    PubMed

    Travis, S M; Welsh, M J

    1997-08-04

    We have cloned a novel cDNA from human skeletal muscle which encodes a protein phosphatase with a unique acidic domain. It is 34% identical to mammalian PP2C alpha and PP2C beta and we call it PP2C gamma. It more closely resembles PP2Cs from Paramecium tetraurelia and Schizosaccharomyces pombe than mammalian PP2Cs. Northern blot analysis shows that PP2C gamma is widely expressed, and is most abundant in testis, skeletal muscle, and heart. Like known PP2Cs, recombinant PP2C gamma requires Mg2+ or Mn2+ for activity. Unlike any other known phosphatase, PP2C gamma has a highly acidic domain: 75% of the 54 residues are glutamate or aspartate.

  7. [EEG changes during sedation with gamma-hydroxybutyric acid].

    PubMed

    Entholzner, E; Mielke, L; Pichlmeier, R; Weber, F; Schneck, H

    1995-05-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a naturally occurring transmitter in the mammalian brain, related to sleep regulation and possibly to energy balance in diving or hibernating animals. It has been used for almost 35 years as an intravenous agent for induction of anaesthesia and for long-term sedation. Its convincing pharmacological properties, without serious adverse effects on circulation or respiration, are compromised by its unpredictable duration of action. This is not a major problem with long-term sedation during ICU treatment. GHB has been used with good results for sedation of patients with severe brain injury, where it compares favourably with barbiturates. In animal studies, it seems to possess a protective action against hypoxia on a cellular and whole organ level. However, in some experimental animals GHB has been shown to produce seizure-like activities, and the compound is being used to produce absence-like seizures. GHB has been used in our ICU for years to provide adequate sedation for patients under controlled ventilation or for patients fighting the respirator during spontaneous respiration. No serious side effects were observed in these patients, while in some patients under haemodialysis hypernatraemia and metabolic alkalosis developed; both were reversible after discontinuation of GHB and restriction of additional sodium input (Somsanit, the commercially available GHB preparation in Germany, contains 9.2 mmol sodium/g; the daily dose averages 20-40 g GHB, i.e. 180-370 mmol sodium). PATIENTS AND METHODS. In 31 patients after major abdominal surgery, sedation was established with GHB 50 mg/kg BW injected via perfusion pump over a 20-min period. No centrally acting medication had been given for at least 2 h. A computer-based multichannel EEG system (CATEEM, MediSyst, Linden) was used, allowing for fast Fourier transformation, spectral analysis and topographical brain mapping. EEG during induction of sedation was followed after a baseline EEG (10

  8. High Selectivity of the γ-Aminobutyric Acid Transporter 2 (GAT-2, SLC6A13) Revealed by Structure-based Approach*

    PubMed Central

    Schlessinger, Avner; Wittwer, Matthias B.; Dahlin, Amber; Khuri, Natalia; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Fan, Hao; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Sali, Andrej

    2012-01-01

    The solute carrier 6 (SLC6) is a family of ion-dependent transporters that mediate uptake into the cell of osmolytes such as neurotransmitters and amino acids. Four SLC6 members transport GABA, a key neurotransmitter that triggers inhibitory signaling pathways via various receptors (e.g., GABAA). The GABA transporters (GATs) regulate the concentration of GABA available for signaling and are thus targeted by a variety of anticonvulsant and relaxant drugs. Here, we characterize GAT-2, a transporter that plays a role in peripheral GABAergic mechanisms, by constructing comparative structural models based on crystallographic structures of the leucine transporter LeuT. Models of GAT-2 in two different conformations were constructed and experimentally validated, using site-directed mutagenesis. Computational screening of 594,166 compounds including drugs, metabolites, and fragment-like molecules from the ZINC database revealed distinct ligands for the two GAT-2 models. 31 small molecules, including high scoring compounds and molecules chemically related to known and predicted GAT-2 ligands, were experimentally tested in inhibition assays. Twelve ligands were found, six of which were chemically novel (e.g., homotaurine). Our results suggest that GAT-2 is a high selectivity/low affinity transporter that is resistant to inhibition by typical GABAergic inhibitors. Finally, we compared the binding site of GAT-2 with those of other SLC6 members, including the norepinephrine transporter and other GATs, to identify ligand specificity determinants for this family. Our combined approach may be useful for characterizing interactions between small molecules and other membrane proteins, as well as for describing substrate specificities in other protein families. PMID:22932902

  9. Gamma-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions. [prebiotic significance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Graff, R. L.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1980-01-01

    The gamma-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions was studied under initially oxygenated and oxygen-free conditions in an attempt to determine the possible interconversion of malic acid into other carboxylic acids, specifically those associated with Krebs cycle. The effect of dose on product formation of the system was investigated. Gas-liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry was used as the principal means of identification of the nonvolatile products. Thin layer chromatography and direct probe mass spectroscopy were also employed. The findings show that a variety of carboxylic acids are formed, with malonic and succinic acids in greatest abundance. These products have all been identified as being formed in the gamma-irradiation of acetic acid, suggesting a common intermediary. Since these molecules fit into a metabolic cycle, it is strongly suggestive that prebiotic pathways provided the basis for biological systems.

  10. Interaction of carvacrol with the Ascaris suum nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors, potential mechanism of antinematodal action.

    PubMed

    Trailović, Saša M; Marjanović, Djordje S; Nedeljković Trailović, Jelena; Robertson, Alan P; Martin, Richard J

    2015-08-01

    Essential plant oils (or their active principles) are safe to use and a potentially attractive alternative to current antiparasitic drugs. In the present study, we tested the effects of carvacrol on the isolated tissues of Ascaris suum and investigated potential interactions with other antiparasitic drugs. We used somatic muscle flaps for contraction assays, as well as for electrophysiological investigations. Carvacrol 300 μM highly significantly inhibited contractions caused by 1, 3, 10, 30, and 100 μM of ACh (p = 0.0023, p = 0.0002, p = 0.0002, p < 0.0001, and p < 0.0001). The control EC50 for acetylcholine was 8.87 μM (log EC50 = 0.95 ± 0.26), while R max was 2.53 ± 0.24 g. The EC50 of acetylcholine in the presence of 300 μM of carvacrol was 27.71 μM (log EC50 = 1.44 ± 0.28) and the R max decreased to 1.63 ± 0.32 g. Furthermore, carvacrol highly significant potentiates inhibitory effect of GABA and piperazine on the contractions induced by ACh. However, carvacrol (100 and 300 μM), did not produce any changes in the membrane potential or conductance of the A. suum muscle cell. While, 300 μM of carvacrol showed a significant inhibitory effect on ACh-induced depolarization response. The mean control depolarization was 13.58 ± 0.66 mV and decreased in presence of carvacrol to 4.50 ± 1.02 mV (p < 0.0001). Mean control Δg was 0.168 ± 0.017 μS, while in the presence of 300 μM of carvacrol, Δg significantly decreased to 0.060 ± 0.018 ΔS (p = 0.0017). The inhibitory effect on contractions may be the explanation of the antinematodal potential of carvacrol. Moreover, inhibition of depolarizations caused by ACh and reduction of conductance changes directly points to an interaction with the nAChR in A. suum.

  11. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA): a fast excitatory transmitter which may regulate the development of hippocampal neurones in early postnatal life.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Y; Tseeb, V; Raggozzino, D; Khazipov, R; Gaiarsa, J L

    1994-01-01

    The properties of neonatal GABAergic synapses were investigated in neurones of the hippocampal CA3 region. GABA, acting on GABAA receptors, provides most of the excitatory drive on immature CA3 pyramidal neurones at an early stage of development, whereas glutamatergic synapses (in particular, those mediated by AMPA receptors) are mostly quiescent. Thus, during the first postnatal week of life, bicuculline fully blocked spontaneous and evoked depolarising potentials, and GABAA receptor agonists depolarised CA3 pyramidal neurones. GABAA mediated currents also had a reduced sensitivity to benzodiazepines. In the presence of bicuculline, between P0 and P4, increasing the stimulus strength reveals an excitatory postsynaptic potential which is mostly mediated by NMDA receptors. During the same developmental period, pre- (but not post) synaptic GABAB inhibition is present. Intracellular injections of biocytin showed that the axonal network of the GABAergic interneurones is well developed at birth, whereas the pyramidal recurrent collaterals are only beginning to develop. Finally, chronic bicuculline treatment of hippocampal neurones in culture reduced the extent of neuritic arborisation, suggesting that GABA acts as a trophic factor in that period. In conclusion, it is suggested that during the first postnatal week of life, when excitatory inputs are still poorly developed, GABAA receptors provide the excitatory drive necessary for pyramidal cell outgrowth. Starting from the end of the first postnatal week of life, when excitatory inputs are well developed, GABA (acting on both GABAA and GABAB receptors) will hyperpolarise the CA3 pyramidal neurones and, as in the adult, will prevent excessive neuronal discharges. Our electrophysiological and morphological studies have shown that hippocampal GABAergic interneurones are in a unique position to modulate the development of CA3 pyramidal neurones. Developing neurones require a certain degree of membrane depolarisation, and a consequent rise in intracellular calcium, for stimulating neurite outgrowth; the GABAergic network, which develops prior to the glutamatergic one, appears to provide this depolarisation. Starting from the end of the first postnatal week of life, at a time when excitatory pathways are developing, GABA (acting on both GABAA and GABAB receptors) would reverse its action, and start to play its well-known role as an inhibitory neurotransmitter.

  12. N-methyl-D-aspartate, hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) and gamma-aminobutyric acid conductances govern the risk of epileptogenesis following febrile seizures in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ouardouz, Mohamed; Lema, Pablo; Awad, Patricia N; Di Cristo, Graziella; Carmant, Lionel

    2010-04-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common types of seizure in children, and are generally considered to be benign. However, febrile seizures in children with dysgenesis have been associated with the development of temporal lobe epilepsy. We have previously shown in a rat model of dysgenesis (cortical freeze lesion) and hyperthermia-induced seizures that 86% of these animals developed recurrent seizures in adulthood. The cellular changes underlying the increased risk of epileptogenesis in this model are not known. Using whole cell patch-clamp recordings from CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells, we found a more pronounced increase in excitability in rats with both hyperthermic seizures and dysgenesis than in rats with hyperthermic seizures alone or dysgenesis alone. The change was found to be secondary to an increase in N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Inversely, hyperpolarization-activated cation current was more pronounced in naïve rats with hyperthermic seizures than in rats with dysgenesis and hyperthermic seizures or with dysgenesis alone. The increase in GABAA-mediated inhibition observed was comparable in rats with or without dysgenesis after hyperthermic seizures, whereas no changes were observed in rats with dysgenesis alone. Our work indicates that in this two-hit model, changes in NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs may facilitate epileptogenesis following febrile seizures. Changes in the hyperpolarization-activated cation currents may represent a protective reaction and act by damping the NMDA receptor-mediated hyperexcitability, rather than converting inhibition into excitation. These findings provide a new hypothesis of cellular changes following hyperthermic seizures in predisposed individuals, and may help in the design of therapeutic strategies to prevent epileptogenesis following prolonged febrile seizures.

  13. Ex vivo binding of t-( sup 35 S) butylbicyclophosphorothionate: A biochemical tool to study the pharmacology of ethanol at the gamma-aminobutyric acid-coupled chloride channel

    SciTech Connect

    Sanna, E.; Concas, A.; Serra, M.; Santoro, G.; Biggio, G. )

    1991-03-01

    The effects of acute administration of ethanol on t-(35S)Butylbiclophosphorothionate (35S-TBPS) binding measured ex vivo in unwashed membrane preparations of rat cerebral cortex were investigated. Ethanol, given i.g., decreased in a dose-related (0.5-4 g/kg) and time-dependent manner the binding of 35S-TBPS. This effect was similar to that induced by the administration of diazepam (0.5-4 mg/kg i.p.). Scatchard plot analysis of this radioligand binding revealed that ethanol, differently from diazepam, decreased the apparent affinity of 35S-TBPS recognition sites whereas it failed to change the density of these binding sites. The effect of ethanol on 35S-TBPS binding could not be reversed by the previous administration to rats of the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, Ro 15-1788 (ethyl-8-fluoro-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H- imidazo (1,5a) (1,4) benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate). Vice versa, the benzodiazepine receptor partial inverse agonist, Ro 15-4513 (ethyl-8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H- imidazo (1,5a) (4,4) benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate) (8 mg/kg i.p.), prevented completely ethanol-induced decrease of 35S-TBPS binding. The ability of Ro 15-4513 to prevent the action of ethanol was shared by the anxiogenic and proconvulsant beta-carboline derivatives, FG 7142 (N-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide) (12.5 mg/kg i.p.) and ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (0.6 mg/kg i.v.), which, per se, enhanced this parameter. Moreover, ethanol (0.5-4 g/kg) was able to reverse the increase of 35S-TBPS binding elicited by the s.c. injection of isoniazid (350 mg/kg) and to clearly attenuate the severity of tonic-clonic seizures produced by this inhibitor of the GABAergic transmission.

  14. Colocalization and shared distribution of endomorphins with substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and the mu opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Greenwell, Thomas N; Martin-Schild, Sheryl; Inglis, Fiona M; Zadina, James E

    2007-07-10

    The endomorphins are endogenous opioids with high affinity and selectivity for the mu opioid receptor (MOR, MOR-1, MOP). Endomorphin-1 (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH(2); EM1) and endomorphin-2 (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH(2); EM2) have been localized to many regions of the central nervous system (CNS), including those that regulate antinociception, autonomic function, and reward. Colocalization or shared distribution (overlap) of two neurotransmitters, or a transmitter and its cognate receptor, may imply an interaction of these elements in the regulation of functions mediated in that region. For example, previous evidence of colocalization of EM2 with substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and MOR in primary afferent neurons suggested an interaction of these peptides in pain modulation. We therefore investigated the colocalization of EM1 and EM2 with SP, CGRP, and MOR in other areas of the CNS. EM2 was colocalized with SP and CGRP in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and with SP, CGRP and MOR in the parabrachial nucleus. Several areas in which EM1 and EM2 showed extensive shared distributions, but no detectable colocalization with other signaling molecules, are also described.

  15. Chemical composition and structure of the microcrystals formed between silver(I) and gamma-hydroxybutyric acid and gamma-hydroxyvaleric acid.

    PubMed

    Bell, Suzanne C; Oldfield, Lucy S; Shakleya, Diaa M; Petersen, Jeffrey L; Mercer, Jennifer W

    2006-07-01

    This study examined microcrystals formed by silver with gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and gamma-hydroxyvaleric acid (GHV), the five-carbon analog of GHB, in the presence of silver, copper, and lanthanide nitrates. Distinct microcrystals formed with silver (+1) and lanthanum (+3) ions but not with the copper (+2) ions. The crystals formed with GHB were distinctly different than those formed with GHV and in all cases, the drug microcrystals were easily distinguishable from reagent crystals. X-ray diffraction analysis provided definitive structure for the microcrystals. The morphological differences between the silver-GHB and silver-GHV crystals were characterized using simple measurements such as size and angles provided by image recognition software. The utility of the test for casework was demonstrated using spiked beverage samples.

  16. Cortical and subcortical gamma amino acid butyric acid deficits in anxiety and stress disorders: Clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety and stress disorders are a major public health issue. However, their pathophysiology is still unclear. The gamma amino acid butyric acid (GABA) neurochemical system has been strongly implicated in their pathogenesis and treatment by numerous preclinical and clinical studies, the most recent of which have been highlighted and critical review in this paper. Changes in cortical GABA appear related to normal personality styles and responses to stress. While there is accumulating animal and human neuroimaging evidence of cortical and subcortical GABA deficits across a number of anxiety conditions, a clear pattern of findings in specific brain regions for a given disorder is yet to emerge. Neuropsychiatric conditions with anxiety as a clinical feature may have GABA deficits as an underlying feature. Different classes of anxiolytic therapies support GABA function, and this may be an area in which newer GABA neuroimaging techniques could soon offer more personalized therapy. Novel GABAergic pharmacotherapies in development offer potential improvements over current therapies in reducing sedative and physiologic dependency effects, while offering rapid anxiolysis. PMID:27014597

  17. Safety and tolerability of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid in the treatment of alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Beghè, F; Carpanini, M T

    2000-04-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) has been in clinical use in Italy since 1991 for treatment of alcohol dependence. Results of phase III and phase IV studies have shown that the drug is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome and in reducing alcohol consumption and alcohol craving. Pharmacosurveillance indicates that abuse of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid is a limited phenomenon in clinical settings when the drug is dispensed under strict medical surveillance and entrusted to a referring familiar member of the patient.

  18. Analytical characterization of a ferulic acid/gamma-cyclodextrin inclusion complex.

    PubMed

    Anselmi, Cecilia; Centini, Marisanna; Ricci, Maurizio; Buonocore, Anna; Granata, Paola; Tsuno, Takuo; Facino, Roberto Maffei

    2006-03-03

    Ferulic acid (FA) is a well-known antioxidant of natural source with promising properties as photoprotective agent (approved in Japan as sunscreen) and its derivatives (alkyl ferulates) are under screening for the prevention of photoinduced skin tumours. In the present work we describe the preparation of a solid inclusion complex between ferulic acid and gamma-cyclodextrin (gamma-CD) and its characterization by different analytical techniques: differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) and by supporting information of molecular modelling. All these approaches indicate that ferulic acid is able to form an association complex with gamma-CD but only 1H NMR and molecular modelling studies give an unequivocal evidence that the antioxidant molecule is embedded into the gamma-CD cavity to form an inclusion complex. In detail it is entrapped inside the hydrophobic core of gamma-CD with the lipophilic aromatic ring and the ethylenic moieties, leaving the more polar functional groups close to wider rim or outside the cavity.

  19. Maximising opportunities in supercritical chemistry: the continuous conversion of levulinic acid to gamma-valerolactone in CO(2).

    PubMed

    Bourne, Richard A; Stevens, James G; Ke, Jie; Poliakoff, Martyn

    2007-11-28

    Phase behaviour is manipulated during the hydrogenation of aqueous levulinic acid in supercritical CO(2) to separate almost pure gamma-valerolactone from water and unreacted acid with reduced energy requirements compared to conventional processing.

  20. Solute-enhanced production of gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from aqueous solutions of levulinic acid

    DOEpatents

    Dumesic, James A.; Wettstein, Stephanie G.; Alonso, David Martin; Gurbuz, Elif Ispir

    2016-06-28

    A method to produce levulinic acid (LA) and gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from biomass-derived cellulose or lignocellulose by selective extraction of LA using GVL and optionally converting the LA so isolated into GVL, with no purifications steps required to yield the GVL.

  1. Solute-enhanced production of gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from aqueous solutions of levulinic acid

    DOEpatents

    Dumesic, James A; Wettstein, Stephanie G; Alonso, David Martin; Gurbuz, Elif Ispir

    2015-02-24

    A method to produce levulinic acid (LA) and gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from biomass-derived cellulose or lignocellulose by selective extraction of LA using GVL and optionally converting the LA so isolated into GVL, with no purifications steps required to yield the GVL.

  2. Adsorption of toxic mercury(II) by an extracellular biopolymer poly(gamma-glutamic acid).

    PubMed

    Inbaraj, B Stephen; Wang, J S; Lu, J F; Siao, F Y; Chen, B H

    2009-01-01

    Adsorption of mercury(II) by an extracellular biopolymer, poly(gamma-glutamic acid) (gamma-PGA), was studied as a function of pH, temperature, agitation time, ionic strength, light and heavy metal ions. An appreciable adsorption occurred at pH>3 and reached a maximum at pH 6. Isotherms were well predicted by Redlich-Peterson model with a dominating Freundlich behavior, implying the heterogeneous nature of mercury(II) adsorption. The adsorption followed an exothermic and spontaneous process with increased orderliness at solid/solution interface. The adsorption was rapid with 90% being attained within 5 min for a 80 mg/L mercury(II) solution, and the kinetic data were precisely described by pseudo second order model. Ionic strength due to added sodium salts reduced the mercury(II) binding with the coordinating ligands following the order: Cl(-) >SO(4)(2-) >NO(3)(-). Both light and heavy metal ions decreased mercury(II) binding by gamma-PGA, with calcium(II) ions showing a more pronounced effect than monovalent sodium and potassium ions, while the interfering heavy metal ions followed the order: Cu(2+) > Cd(2+) > Zn(2+). Distilled water adjusted to pH 2 using hydrochloric acid recovered 98.8% of mercury(II), and gamma-PGA reuse for five cycles of operation showed a loss of only 6.5%. IR spectra of gamma-PGA and Hg(II)-gamma-PGA revealed binding of mercury(II) with carboxylate and amide groups on gamma-PGA.

  3. Quantitative structure-activity relationship and molecular docking studies of a series of quinazolinonyl analogues as inhibitors of gamma amino butyric acid aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Abdulfatai, Usman; Uzairu, Adamu; Uba, Sani

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship and molecular docking studies were carried out on a series of quinazolinonyl analogues as anticonvulsant inhibitors. Density Functional Theory (DFT) quantum chemical calculation method was used to find the optimized geometry of the anticonvulsants inhibitors. Four types of molecular descriptors were used to derive a quantitative relation between anticonvulsant activity and structural properties. The relevant molecular descriptors were selected by Genetic Function Algorithm (GFA). The best model was validated and found to be statistically significant with squared correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.934, adjusted squared correlation coefficient (R(2)adj) value of 0.912, Leave one out (LOO) cross validation coefficient (Q(2)) value of 0.8695 and the external validation (R(2)pred) of 0.72. Docking analysis revealed that the best compound with the docking scores of -9.5 kcal/mol formed hydrophobic interaction and H-bonding with amino acid residues of gamma aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABAAT). This research has shown that the binding affinity generated was found to be better than the commercially sold anti-epilepsy drug, vigabatrin. Also, it was found to be better than the one reported by other researcher. Our QSAR model and molecular docking results corroborate with each other and propose the directions for the design of new inhibitors with better activity against GABAAT. The present study will help in rational drug design and synthesis of new selective GABAAT inhibitors with predetermined affinity and activity and provides valuable information for the understanding of interactions between GABAAT and the anticonvulsants inhibitors.

  4. OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic- and hydroxycinnamic acids and formation of aromatic products—A gamma radiolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimmel, Birgit; Swoboda, Friederike; Solar, Sonja; Reznicek, Gottfried

    2010-12-01

    The OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic acids (HBA), hydroxycinnamic acids (HCiA) and methoxylated derivatives, as well as of chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid was studied by gamma radiolysis in aerated aqueous solutions. Primary aromatic products resulting from an OH-radical attachment to the ring (hydroxylation), to the position occupied by the methoxyl group (replacement -OCH 3 by -OH) as well as to the propenoic acid side chain of the cinnamic acids (benzaldehyde formations) were analysed by HPLC-UV and LC-ESI-MS. A comparison of the extent of these processes is given for 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, isovanillic acid, syringic acid, cinnamic acid, 4-hydroxycinnamic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, isoferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, and rosmarinic acid. For all cinnamic acids and derivatives benzaldehydes were significant oxidation products. With the release of caffeic acid from chlorogenic acid the cleavage of a phenolic glycoside could be demonstrated. Reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  5. Degradation of 3-chloro-4-hydroxybenzoic acid in biological treated effluent by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Libing; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-02-01

    Gamma irradiation-induced degradation of a chlorinated aromatic compound, 3-chloro-4-hydroxybenzoic acid (CHBA) in biological treated effluent was studied and the results were compared with those obtained in deionized water. Gamma irradiation led to a complete decomposition of CHBA and a partial mineralization in the treated effluent. The removal of CHBA followed the pseudo first-order reaction kinetic model and the rate constant in the treated effluent was 1.7-3.5 times lower than that in deionized water. The CHBA degradation rate was higher at acidic condition than at neutral and alkaline conditions. The radiolytic yield, G-value for CHBA degradation was lower in the treated effluent, which decreased with increase in absorbed doses and increased with increase in initial concentrations of CHBA. The degradation mechanism of CHBA using gamma irradiation was proposed through the oxidation by -OH and reduction by eaq- and H- radicals. As exposed to gamma irradiation, dechlorination takes place rapidly and combines with the oxidation and cleavage of the aromatic ring, producing chloride ions, small carboxylic acids, acetaldehyde and other intermediates into the solution.

  6. Monitoring of the interconversion of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) to gamma hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Tasnim; Brewster, Victoria L; Edwards, Howell G M; Hargreaves, Michael D; Jilani, Shelina K; Scowen, Ian J

    2013-08-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a drug-of-abuse that has recently become associated with drug-facilitated sexual assault, known as date rape. For this reason the drug is commonly found 'spiked' in alcoholic beverages. When GHB is in solution it may undergo conversion into the corresponding lactone, Gamma-butyrolactone (GBL). Studies have been carried out to determine the detection limits of GHB and GBL in various solutions by Raman spectroscopy and to monitor the interconversion of GHB and GBL in solution with different pH conditions and temperature. In this study, a portable Raman spectrometer was used to study the interconversion of GHB and GBL in water and ethanol solutions as a function of pH, time, and temperature. The aim of this was to determine the optimum pH range for conversion in order to relate this to the pH ranges that the drug is likely to be subjected to, first in spiked beverages and secondly after ingestion in the digestive system. The aim was also to identify a timescale for this conversion in relation to possible scenarios, for example if GHB takes a number of hours to convert to GBL, it is likely for the beverage to be ingested before esterification can take place. GHB and GBL were then spiked into a selection of beverages of known pH in order to study the stability of GHB and GBL in real systems.

  7. Hypocholesterolemic effect of gamma-linolenic acid as evening primrose oil in rats.

    PubMed

    Sugano, M; Ide, T; Ishida, T; Yoshida, K

    1986-01-01

    The hypocholesterolemic effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids was compared in male rats given high-cholesterol diets containing either evening primrose oil (EPO, linoleic plus gamma-linolenic), safflower oil (SFO, linoleic) or olive oil (OLO, low linoleic) at the 10% level. EPO with a phytosterol content of 1.47% was found to be more hypocholesterolemic than SFO (phytosterols 0.34%), and rats given EPO excreted more neutral (cholesterol and its metabolites) but not acidic steroids during the first 2 weeks of the feeding. Even when the phytosterol content of EPO and SFO was adjusted to be the same (0.67%), EPO was still more hypocholesterolemic than SFO but to a lesser extent, although fecal neutral steroid excretion was comparable in these two dietary fat regimens. The results indicate a significant hypocholesterolemic efficacy of gamma-linolenic acid.

  8. Production, Identification, and Toxicity of (gamma)-Decalactone and 4-Hydroxydecanoic Acid from Sporidiobolus spp

    PubMed Central

    Feron, G.; Dufosse, L.; Pierard, E.; Bonnarme, P.; Quere, J. L.; Spinnler, H.

    1996-01-01

    During the bioconversion of ricinoleic acid to (gamma)-decalactone under controlled pH conditions, Sporidiobolus salmonicolor produced only the lactone form, while Sporidiobolus ruinenii produced both the lactone form and a precursor. By using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-Fourier transform infrared analysis techniques, the precursor was identified as 4-hydroxydecanoic acid. The levels of production in the presence of high concentrations of ricinoleic acid methyl ester differed in the two Sporidiobolus species. This difference was due on the one hand to the high sensitivity of S. salmonicolor to the lactone and on the other hand to the high level of 4-hydroxydecanoic acid produced by S. ruinenii. 4-Hydroxydecanoic acid is much less toxic to the microorganisms than the lactone. In contrast to S. ruinenii, S. salmonicolor is not able to catabolize 4-hydroxydecanoic acid. PMID:16535376

  9. Fabrication of an implantable fine needle-type glucose sensor using gamma-polyglutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, Hiroki; Yasuzawa, Mikito

    2010-01-01

    Implantable fine needle-type glucose sensors with an outer diameter of less that 0.2 mm were fabricated using a low-cost and non-animal origin polyamide, gamma-polyglutamic acid (PGA) as a glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilizing material. Two types of PGA, gamma-polyglutamic acid (PGAH) and gamma-polyglutamic acid sodium salt (PGANa), were employed to prepare GOx immobilized film by the covalent attachment of GOx using water-soluble carbodiimide (EDC). Nafion/cellulose acetate composite film and polyurethane/polydimethylsiloxane composite film were employed as a permselective inner film and a biocompatible outer film, respectively. The procedure of enzyme-immobilized film fabrication affected the stability of the sensor; that is, GOx immobilized film prepared by pouring a mixture solution of GOx and EDC on a PGA precoated surface showed higher sensor stability than that prepared by pouring a mixture solution of GOx, PGA and EDC. Although, obvious differences in the sensor properties were not observed between the use of PGANa and PGAH, the electrode prepared with PGAH had a lower swelling degree. The glucose sensors prepared with both PGANa and PGAH were practically not affected by the existence of electroactive compounds, such as uric acid, and provided long-term stability for approximately 5 weeks. These sensors also showed good performance in horse serum.

  10. Effect of gamma-linolenic acid and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced mammary tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramchurren, N.; Karmali, R.A. )

    1991-03-15

    Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and its sequential metabolite, dihomogamma-linolenic acid (DHLA) have been reported to influence growth of neoplastic cells in culture. The pure forms of these fatty acids have not been tested in vivo. The authors have studied the effect of GLA and DHLA on mammary tumors induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a) anthracene (DMBA) (7.5 mg/rat) in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats received either 0.15 g of GLA or DHLA or corn oil (CO) orally, twice weekly for a period of 12 weeks. All three groups of rats were maintained on a diet containing 5% (w/w) corn oil as fat. Tumor incidence and multiplicity were recorded. The group receiving 0.15 g Co had higher tumor yields than those receiving GLA or DHLA. At the end of the experiment, tumor incidence was the lowest in the group receiving DHLA. Tumor multiplicity was consistently lowest with GLA. Fatty acid composition of mammary tissue and liver reflected that of fatty acid treatment. These results suggest that oral administration of GLA or DHLA retards the development of DMBA-induced mammary tumors in rats receiving a diet containing 5% (w/w) corn oil.

  11. Antioxidant activities of fucoidan degraded by gamma irradiation and acidic hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sangyong; Choi, Jong-il; Park, Hyun

    2015-04-01

    Low molecular weight fucoidan, prepared by radical degradation using gamma ray was investigated for its antioxidant activities with different assay methods. As the molecular weight of fucoidan decreased with a higher absorbed dose, ferric-reducing antioxidant power values increased, but β-carotene bleaching inhibition did not change significantly. The antioxidant activity of acid-degraded fucoidan was also examined to investigate the effect of different degradation methods. At the same molecular weight, fucoidan degraded by gamma irradiation showed higher 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity than that observed with the acidic method. This result reveals that in addition to molecular weight, the degradation method affects the antioxidant activity of fucoidan.

  12. Fatty acid profile of gamma-irradiated and cooked African oil bean seed (Pentaclethra macrophylla Benth)

    PubMed Central

    Olotu, Ifeoluwa; Enujiugha, Victor; Obadina, Adewale; Owolabi, Kikelomo

    2014-01-01

    The safety and shelf-life of food products can be, respectively, ensured and extended with important food-processing technologies such as irradiation. The joint effect of cooking and 10 kGy gamma irradiation on the fatty acid composition of the oil of Pentaclethra macrophylla Benth was evaluated. Oils from the raw seed, cooked seeds, irradiated seeds (10 kGy), cooked, and irradiated seeds (10 kGy) were extracted and analyzed for their fatty acid content. An omega-6-fatty acid (linoleic acid) was the principal unsaturated fatty acid in the bean seed oil (24.6%). Cooking significantly (P < 0.05) increased Erucic acid by 3.3% and Linolenic acid by 23.0%. Combined treatment significantly (P < 0.05) increased C18:2, C6:0, C20:2, C18:3, C20:3, C24:0, and C22:6 being linoleic, caproic, eicosadienoic, linolenic, eicosatrienoic, ligoceric, and docosahexaenoic acid, respectively, and this increase made the oil sample to have the highest total fatty acid content (154.9%), unsaturated to saturated fatty acid ratio (109.6), and unsaturated fatty acid content (153.9%). 10 kGy irradiation induces the formation of C20:5 (eicosapentaenoic), while cooking induced the formation of C20:4 (arachidic acid), C22:6 (Heneicosanoic acid), and C22:2 (docosadienoic acid). Combined 10 kGy cooking and irradiation increased the susceptibility of the oil of the African oil bean to rancidity. PMID:25493197

  13. Dose-dependent effects of dietary gamma-linolenic acid on rat spleen lymphocyte functions.

    PubMed

    Peterson, L D; Thies, F; Calder, P C

    1999-07-01

    Feeding rodents a diet rich in evening primrose oil (EPO), which contains 5-10 g gamma-linolenic acid (GLA)/100 g total fatty acids, has been shown to decrease lymphocyte proliferation and natural killer cell activity. However, EPO contains a very high level of linoleic acid which itself can affect lymphocyte functions and it is not clear to what extent the effects of EPO can be attributed to GLA. The current study investigated the effect of two levels of GLA in the rat diet upon immune cell functions; the level of linoleic acid was maintained below 30 g/100 g total fatty acids. Weanling rats were fed on high fat (178 g/kg) diets which contained 4.4 g or 10 g GLA/100 g total fatty acids in place of a proportion of linoleic acid. The total polyunsaturated fatty acid content and the n-6 to n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid ratio of the diet were maintained at 35 g/100 g total fatty acids and 7, respectively. The fatty acid compositions of the serum and of spleen leukocytes were markedly influenced by that of the diet, with an increase in the proportions of GLA and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid when the diets containing GLA were fed; these diets also increased the proportion of arachidonic acid in spleen leukocytes. Spleen lymphocyte proliferation in response to concanavalin A was significantly reduced (by 60%) by feeding the diet containing the higher level of GLA, but not by the diet containing the lower level of GLA. Spleen natural killer cell activity and prostaglandin E (PGE) production by spleen leukocytes were not significantly affected by inclusion of GLA in the diet, although there was a tendency towards decreased natural killer cell activity by cells from rats fed the high GLA diet. Thus, this study shows that dietary GLA is capable of altering the fatty acid composition of cells of the immune system and of exerting some immunomodulatory effects, but that the level of GLA in the diet must exceed 4.4 g/100 g total fatty acids for these effects to become apparent.

  14. [Effect of additives on the amination of 2-oxoglutaric acid by gamma-radiation].

    PubMed

    Ema, K; Hikichi, T; Shinagawa, M

    1977-07-01

    The effect of added substances was studied on the yield of glutamic acid produced by gamma-ray irradiation of 2-oxoglutaric acid and ammonia in aqueous solution. The contents of amino acids in the irradiated solutions were determined with amino acids analyzer. Sodium nitrate, allyl alcohol or sodium formate was used as an added substance. The yield of glutamic acid significantly decreased by the addition of nitrate, and it was little affected by the addition of allyl alcohol. In the presence of formate the yield increased from G = 0.4 (2-oxoglutaric acid 0.05M and ammonium hydroxide 2M) to G = 1.1. As a result, it was found that hydrated electron contributes on the formation of glutamic acid, but hydroxyl radical does not. The yield showed a maximum at ca. 0.1 M ammonium hydroxide concentration. These facts indicate that NH2 radical does not contribute to the formation of glutamic acid. As a reaction mechanism, it can be explained that 2-oxoglutaric acid which had been reduced by hydrated electron reacts with ammonia.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of zinc chloride containing poly(acrylic acid) hydrogel by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong-Seok; Kuang, Jia; Gwon, Hui-Jeong; Lim, Youn-Mook; Jeong, Sung-In; Shin, Young-Min; Seob Khil, Myung; Nho, Young-Chang

    2013-07-01

    In this study, the characterization of zinc chloride incorporated into a poly(acrylic acid) (PAAc) hydrogel prepared by gamma-ray irradiation was investigated. Zinc chloride powder with different concentrations was dissolved in the PAAc solution, and it was crosslinked with gamma-ray irradiation. The effects of various parameters such as zinc ion concentration and irradiation doses on characteristics of the hydrogel formed were investigated in detail for obtaining an antibacterial wound dressing. In addition, the gel content, pH-sensitive (pH 4 or 7) swelling ratio, and UV-vis absorption spectra of the zinc particles in the hydrogels were characterized. Moreover, antibacterial properties of these new materials against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli strains were observed on solid growth media. The antibacterial tests indicated that the zinc chloride containing PAAc hydrogels have good antibacterial activity.

  16. The correlations among serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and sialic acids with peripheral lymphocytes in bovine tropical theileriosis.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Seyed Mostafa; Nazifi, Saeed; Emadi, Mahboobeh; Rakhshandehroo, Ehsan

    2010-10-01

    The infection with protozoan parasite Theileria annulata induces changes triggering the activation and/or proliferation of the host lymphocytes. In order to find out the possible correlations among peripheral circulatory lymphocytes, cytokine activities and the level of sialic acids, 50 dairy Holstein cattle, naturally infected with T. annulata, were divided into 4 subgroups according to their parasitemia rates (<1%, 1-3%, 3-5% and >5%). Also, ten non-infected cattle were sampled as control group. Blood samples were taken from jugular vein into acid citrate dextrose-containing tubes for measuring hematological parameters and B and T (CD(4) and CD(8)) cell populations and without anticoagulant for TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and sialic acid concentrations. Remarkable decreases observed in red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs) and packed cell volume (PCV) in infected cattle compared to healthy ones (P < 0.05). Also, with increase in parasitemia rate, total lymphocytes and monocytes alleviated in the diseased groups. By contrast, total neutrohpils and the concentrations of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and total sialic acids were significantly elevated (P < 0.05) in infected animals. Accordingly, the circulatory populations of CD(4) and CD(8) T cells and B cells showed a substantial decrease, while a significant increase was observed in T (CD(4) and CD(8)) cells in cattle infected with <1% parasitemia rates. Decreased circulatory T cell population shows the ineffective responses of T cells to the stimulatory cytokines such as IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha. On the other hand, the elevation of cytokines (particularly IFN-gamma) and sialic acids have presumably an inhibitory role on circulatory B cell population in infected cattle. In addition, a high level of sialic acid concentration indicates the probable role of sialic acid to regulate the parasite-host cell adhesion during sporozoites invasion.

  17. Lipidomic analysis reveals a radiosensitizing role of gamma-linolenic acid in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Antal, Otilia; Péter, Mária; Hackler, László; Mán, Imola; Szebeni, Gábor; Ayaydin, Ferhan; Hideghéty, Katalin; Vigh, László; Kitajka, Klára; Balogh, Gábor; Puskás, Laszló G

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) is effective against glioma cells under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. In the present study we determined how GLA alone or in combination with irradiation alters the fatty acid (FA) and lipid profiles, the lipid droplet (LD) content, the lipid biosynthetic gene expression and the apoptosis of glioma cells. In GLA-treated cells direct correlations were found between the levels of various FAs and the expression of the corresponding FA biosynthetic genes. The total levels of saturated and monosaturated FAs decreased in concert with the down-regulation of FASN and SCD1 gene expression. Similarly, decreased FADS1 gene expression was paralleled by lowered arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6) and eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 n-3) contents, while the down-regulation of FADS2 expression was accompanied by a diminished docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 n-3) content. Detailed mass spectrometric analyses revealed that individual treatments gave rise to distinct lipidomic fingerprints. Following uptake, GLA was subjected to elongation, resulting in dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (20:3 n-6, DGLA), which was used for the synthesis of the LD constituent triacylglycerols and cholesteryl esters. Accordingly, an increased number of LDs were observed in response to GLA administration after irradiation. GLA increased the radioresponsiveness of U87 MG cells, as demonstrated by an increase in the number of apoptotic cells determined by FACS analysis. In conclusion, treatment with GLA increased the apoptosis of irradiated glioma cells, and GLA might therefore increase the therapeutic efficacy of irradiation in the treatment of gliomas.

  18. Effect of gamma irradiation on hyaluronic acid and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Mohd, Hur Munawar Kabir; bin Ayob, Muhammad Taqiyuddin Mawardi; Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md; Mohamed, Faizal; Radiman, Shahidan; Rahman, Irman Abdul

    2014-09-01

    DPPC lipids are the major component constituting the biological membrane, and their importances in various physiological functions are well documented. Hyaluronic acid (HA) in the synovial joint fluid functions as a lubricant, shock absorber and a nutrient carrier. Gamma irradiation has also been found to be effective in depolymerizing and cleaving molecular chains related to free radicals, thus extends with changes in chemical composition as well as its physiological functions. This research are conducted to investigate the hyaluronic acid (HA) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction in form of vesicles and its effect to gamma radiation. The size of DPPC vesicles formed via gentle hydration method is between 100 to 200 nm in diameter. HA (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml) was added into the vesicles and characterized by using TEM to determine vesicle size distributions, fusion and rupture of DPPC structure. The results demonstrated that the size of the vesicles approximately between 200 to 300 nm which caused by vesicles fusion with HA and formed even larger vesicles. After being irradiated by 0 to 200 Gy, the size of vesicles decreased as HA was degraded. To elucidate the mechanism of these effects, FTIR spectra were carried out and have shown that at absorption bands at 1700-1750 cm-1 due to formation of carboxylic acid and leads to alteration of HA structure.

  19. Effect of gamma irradiation on hyaluronic acid and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Mohd, Hur Munawar Kabir; Taqiyuddin Mawardi bin Ayob, Muhammad; Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md; Mohamed, Faizal; Radiman, Shahidan; Rahman, Irman Abdul

    2014-09-03

    DPPC lipids are the major component constituting the biological membrane, and their importances in various physiological functions are well documented. Hyaluronic acid (HA) in the synovial joint fluid functions as a lubricant, shock absorber and a nutrient carrier. Gamma irradiation has also been found to be effective in depolymerizing and cleaving molecular chains related to free radicals, thus extends with changes in chemical composition as well as its physiological functions. This research are conducted to investigate the hyaluronic acid (HA) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction in form of vesicles and its effect to gamma radiation. The size of DPPC vesicles formed via gentle hydration method is between 100 to 200 nm in diameter. HA (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml) was added into the vesicles and characterized by using TEM to determine vesicle size distributions, fusion and rupture of DPPC structure. The results demonstrated that the size of the vesicles approximately between 200 to 300 nm which caused by vesicles fusion with HA and formed even larger vesicles. After being irradiated by 0 to 200 Gy, the size of vesicles decreased as HA was degraded. To elucidate the mechanism of these effects, FTIR spectra were carried out and have shown that at absorption bands at 1700–1750 cm{sup −1} due to formation of carboxylic acid and leads to alteration of HA structure.

  20. The radiolysis of CMPO: effects of acid, metal complexation and alpha vs. gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Gary S. Groenewold

    2016-05-01

    Abstract The group actinide/lanthanide complexing agent octylphenylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO) has been examined for its radiation stability by measuring the kinetics of its reactions with free radicals in both the aqueous and organic phases for the free and metal-complexed ligand, identifying its degradation products for both alpha and gamma irradiation, measuring the effects on solvent extraction performance, and measuring the G-values for its degradation under various conditions. This includes the G-values for CMPO in the absence of, and in contact with the acidic aqueous phase, where it is shown that the acidic aqueous phase provides radio-protection for this ligand. It was found that both solvent and metal complexation affect the kinetics of the reaction of the •NO3 radical, a product of HNO3 radiolysis, with CMPO. For example, CMPO complexed with lanthanides has a rate constant for this reaction an order of magnitude higher than for the free ligand, and the reaction for the free ligand in the organic phase is about three times faster than in the aqueous phase. In steady state radiolysis kinetics it was determined that HNO3, although not NO3- anion, provides radio-protection to CMPO, with the G-value for its degradation decreasing with increasing acidity, until it was almost completely suppressed by irradiation in contact with 5 M HNO3. The same degradation products were produced by irradiation with alpha and gamma-sources, except that the relative abundances of these products varied. For example, the product of C-C bond scission was produced only in low amounts for gamma-radiolysis, but it was an important product for samples irradiated with a He ion beam. These results are compared to the new data appearing in the literature on DGA radiolysis, since CMPO and the DGAs both contain the amide functional group.

  1. Gamma-linolenic acid enrichment from Borago officinalis and Echium fastuosum seed oils and fatty acids by low temperature crystallization.

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, Juan Carlos; Campra-Madrid, Pablo; Guil-Guerrero, José Luis

    2004-01-01

    Solvent winterization of seed oil and free fatty acids (FFAs) was employed to obtain gamma-linolenic acid (GLA; 18:3omega6) concentrates from seed oils of two Boraginaceae species, Echium fastuosum and Borago officinalis. Different solutions of seed oils and FFAs from these two oils at 10%, 20% and 40% (w/w) were crystallized at 4 degrees C, -24 degrees C and -70 degrees C, respectively, using hexane, acetone, diethyl ether, isobutanol and ethanol as solvents. Best results were obtained for B. officinalis FFAs in hexane, reaching a maximum GLA concentration of 58.8% in the liquid fraction (LF). In E. fastuosum, the highest GLA concentration (39.9%) was also achieved with FFAs in hexane.

  2. Metal ion blockage of tritium incorporation into gamma-carboxyglutamic acid of prothrombin. Stoichiometry of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid to Gd3+ for the high affinity sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, S.P.; Saini, R.; Katz, A.; Cai, G.Z.; Maki, S.L.; Brodsky, G.L.

    1988-07-15

    Prothrombin possesses two high affinity and four low affinity gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla)-dependent gadolinium binding sites. Earlier work has shown that tritium can be specifically incorporated at the gamma-carbon of Gla in proteins at pH 5. In the present work we show that inclusion of saturating concentrations of Ca2+ in nondenaturing buffer systems ranging from pH 5.5 to 8.5 prevents the exchange of tritium into all 10 Gla residues of prothrombin. Similarly, saturating concentrations of Gd3+ prevent tritium incorporation into Gla at pH 5.5. Positive cooperativity was observed for the binding of Gd3+ to human prothrombin (at pH 5.5) for the two high affinity sites (Kd congruent to 35 nM). The four low affinity sites bind Gd3+ with a Kd congruent to 5 microM. Incubation of prothrombin ranging in concentrations from 10 to 40 microM with 2 eq of Gd3+ at pH 5.5 prevents 5.7 (average of seven determinations) Gla residues from tritium incorporation. Sedimentation velocity experiments conducted at pH 5.5 indicate that prothrombin in the presence of saturating concentrations of Gd3+ polymerizes, most likely, to a trimer. Further, in the presence of 2 eq of Gd3+, calculated percent weight average concentration of monomer prothrombin is congruent to 100% at 10 microM, approximately equal to 95% at 20 microM, and congruento to 80% at 40 microM protein concentration. Thus, it appears that under conditions in which prothrombin primarily exists as a monomer, occupancy of the initial two metal binding sites by Gd3+ involves six Gla residues.

  3. Delta-6 desaturase from borage converts linoleic acid to gamma-linolenic acid in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Nimal, Jonathan; Li, Wanli; Liu, Xia; Cao, Wenguang

    2011-07-08

    Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA, 18:3 n6) is an essential polyunsaturated fatty acid of the omega-6 family and is found to be effective in prevention and/or treatment of various health problems. In this study, we evaluated the possibility of increasing γ-linolenic acid contents in mammalian cells using the delta-6 gene from Borago officinalis. The borage Δ6-desaturase gene (sDelta-6) was codon-optimized and introduced into HEK293 cells by lipofectin transfection. Co-expression of GFP with sDelta-6 and RT-PCR analysis indicated that sDelta-6 could be expressed in mammalian cells. Subsequently, the heterologous expression of borage Δ6-desaturase was evaluated by fatty acid analysis. Total cellular lipid analysis of transformed cells fed with linoleic acid (LA 18:2 n6) as a substrate showed that the expression of sDelta-6 resulted in an 228-483% (p<0.05) increase of GLA when compared with that in the control cells. The highest conversion efficiency of LA into GLA in sDelta-6(+) cells was 6.9 times higher than that in the control group (11.59% vs. 1.69%; p<0.05). Our present work demonstrated that the sDelta-6 gene from borage could be functionally expressed in mammalian cells, and could convert LA into GLA. Furthermore, this study may pave the way to generate transgenic livestock that can synthesise GLA.

  4. 14C dating of bone using (gamma) Carboxyglutamic Acid and Carboxyglycine (Aminomalonate)

    SciTech Connect

    Southon, J R; Burky, R T; Kirner, D L; Taylor, R E; Hare, P E

    1999-04-27

    Radiocarbon determinations have been obtained on {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid [Gla] and {alpha}-carboxyglycine (aminomalonate) [Am] as well as acid- and base-hydrolyzed total amino acids isolated from a series of fossil bones. As far as they are aware, Am has not been reported previously in fossil bone and neither Gla nor Am {sup 14}C values have been measured previously. Interest in Gla, an amino acid found in the non-collagen proteins osteocalcin and matrix Gla-protein (MGP), proceeds from the suggestion that it may be preferentially retained and more resistant to diagenetic contamination affecting {sup 14}C values in bones exhibiting low and trace amounts of collagen. The data do not support these suggestions. The suite of bones examined showed a general tendency for total amino acid and Gla concentrations to decrease in concert. Even for bones retaining significant amounts of collagen, Gla (and Am extracts) can yield {sup 14}C values discordant with their expected age and with {sup 14}C values obtained on total amino-acid fractions isolated from the same bone sample.

  5. Abnormalities in dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid release in the pathogenesis of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mtabaji, J P; Manku, M S; Horrobin, D F

    1993-06-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) respond to angiotensin and norepinephrine with an exaggerated pressor response. We have investigated the possibility that increased vascular reactivity in SHR may be related to a reduced synthesis of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) resulting from a defect in the release of its precursor, dihomo-gamma-linoleic acid (DGLA). Isolated perfused mesenteric vascular beds of SHR and age matched Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were perfused with Kreb's bicarbonate buffer. The effluent was collected and the fatty acid composition determined by gas chromatography. In SHR the release of DGLA, arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and virtually all other fatty acids detected in the effluent were reduced when compared to their normotensive controls. This difference could not be explained by low tissue fatty acid levels because these were higher in SHR. Evening primrose oil (EPO) when added to the diet increased the release of DGLA but not of other prostanoid precursors. EPO also reduced vascular reactivity and reduced blood pressure in SHR. It is suggested that the defect in the release of DGLA may be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension because it occurs early before hypertension has actually occurred.

  6. Increased delta aminolevulinic acid and decreased pineal melatonin production. A common event in acute porphyria studies in the rat.

    PubMed

    Puy, H; Deybach, J C; Bogdan, A; Callebert, J; Baumgartner, M; Voisin, P; Nordmann, Y; Touitou, Y

    1996-01-01

    Tryptophan (TRP) is the precursor of melatonin, the primary secretory product of the pineal gland. Hepatic heme deficiency decreases the activity of liver tryptophan pyrrolase, leading to increased plasma TRP and serotonin. As a paradox, patients with attacks of acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), exhibit low nocturnal plasma melatonin levels. This study using a rat experimental model was designed to produce a pattern of TRP and melatonin production similar to that in AIP patients. Pineal melatonin production was measured in response to: (a) a heme synthesis inhibitor, succinylacetone, (b) a heme precursor, delta-aminolevulinic acid (Ala), (c) a structural analogue of Ala, gamma-aminobutyric acid. Studies were performed in intact rats, perifused pineal glands, and pinealocyte cultures. Ala, succinylacetone, and gamma-aminobutyric acid significantly decreased plasma melatonin levels independently of blood TRP concentration. In the pineal gland, the key enzyme activities of melatonin synthesis were unchanged for hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase and decreased for N-acetyltransferase. Our results strongly suggest that Ala overproduced by the liver acts by mimicking the effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid on pineal melatonin in AIP. They also support the view that Ala acts as a toxic element in the pathophysiology of AIP.

  7. Gamma-aminobutric acid and glutamate decarboxylas (l-glutamate 1-carboxy-lyase e.c. 4.1.1.15) in the nervous system of the cockroach, periplaneta americana.i.regional distribution and properties of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Baxter, C F; Torralba, G F

    1975-02-14

    Both the central and peripheral nervous system of the cockroach Periplaneta americana contain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). In the central ganglia of the cockroach, an average of more that 60 mumoles of GABA are formed from glutamate (Glu) per gram wet weight of tissue per hour. This activity level of the GAD apoenzyme is considerably higher than that found in the central nervous system of crustaceans, amphibians, avians and mammals but is similar to that reported for nervous system tissues from other insect species. A comparison of properties of the crude cockroach enzyme with GAD from crustacean and mammalian origin revealed both similarities and differences: whereas crude cockroach GAD has cofactor requirements and an affinity for Glu substrate (Km 2.8 X 10-2) which are similar to GAD from lobster and mouse, it is uniquely inhibited by both Cl-and by GABA. The GAD from cockroach nervous tissues has two apparent pH optima of which the lower one is preferentially inhibited by a compound which is found in the nerve sheath and the fat body tissue adjacent to ganglia and axons.

  8. Biosynthesis of gamma-linolenic acid in cotyledons and microsomal preparations of the developing seeds of common borage (Borago officinalis).

    PubMed Central

    Stymne, S; Stobart, A K

    1986-01-01

    The developing seeds of Borago officinalis (common borage) accumulate a triacylglycerol oil that is relatively rich in the uncommon fatty acid gamma-linolenate (octadec-6,9,12-trienoic acid). Incubation of developing, whole, cotyledons with [14C]oleate and [14C]linoleate showed that the gamma-linolenate was synthesized by the sequential desaturation of oleate----linoleate----gamma-linolenate. Microsomal membrane preparations from the developing cotyledons contained an active delta 6-desaturase enzyme that catalysed the conversion of linoleate into gamma-linolenate. Experiments were designed to manipulate the [14C]linoleate content of the microsomal phosphatidylcholine. The [14C]linoleoyl phosphatidylcholine labelled in situ was converted into gamma-linolenoyl phosphatidylcholine in the presence of NADH. The substrate for the delta 6-desaturase in borage was, therefore, the linoleate in the complex microsomal lipid phosphatidylcholine, rather than, as in animals, the acyl-CoA. This was further confirmed in experiments that compared the specific radioactivity of the gamma-linolenate, in acyl-CoA and phosphatidylcholine, that was synthesized when [14C]linoleoyl-CoA was incubated with microsomal membranes, NADH and non-radioactive gamma-linolenoyl-CoA. The delta 6-desaturase was positionally specific and only utilized the linoleate in position 2 of sn-phosphatidylcholine. Analysis of the positional distribution of fatty acids in the endogenous microsomal sn-phosphatidylcholine showed that, whereas position 1 contained substantial linoleate, only small amounts of gamma-linolenate were present. The results shed further light on the synthesis of C18 polyunsaturated fatty acids in plants and in particular its relationship to the regulation of the acyl quality of the triacylglycerols in oilseeds. PMID:3028375

  9. Biosynthesis of gamma-linolenic acid in cotyledons and microsomal preparations of the developing seeds of common borage (Borago officinalis).

    PubMed

    Stymne, S; Stobart, A K

    1986-12-01

    The developing seeds of Borago officinalis (common borage) accumulate a triacylglycerol oil that is relatively rich in the uncommon fatty acid gamma-linolenate (octadec-6,9,12-trienoic acid). Incubation of developing, whole, cotyledons with [14C]oleate and [14C]linoleate showed that the gamma-linolenate was synthesized by the sequential desaturation of oleate----linoleate----gamma-linolenate. Microsomal membrane preparations from the developing cotyledons contained an active delta 6-desaturase enzyme that catalysed the conversion of linoleate into gamma-linolenate. Experiments were designed to manipulate the [14C]linoleate content of the microsomal phosphatidylcholine. The [14C]linoleoyl phosphatidylcholine labelled in situ was converted into gamma-linolenoyl phosphatidylcholine in the presence of NADH. The substrate for the delta 6-desaturase in borage was, therefore, the linoleate in the complex microsomal lipid phosphatidylcholine, rather than, as in animals, the acyl-CoA. This was further confirmed in experiments that compared the specific radioactivity of the gamma-linolenate, in acyl-CoA and phosphatidylcholine, that was synthesized when [14C]linoleoyl-CoA was incubated with microsomal membranes, NADH and non-radioactive gamma-linolenoyl-CoA. The delta 6-desaturase was positionally specific and only utilized the linoleate in position 2 of sn-phosphatidylcholine. Analysis of the positional distribution of fatty acids in the endogenous microsomal sn-phosphatidylcholine showed that, whereas position 1 contained substantial linoleate, only small amounts of gamma-linolenate were present. The results shed further light on the synthesis of C18 polyunsaturated fatty acids in plants and in particular its relationship to the regulation of the acyl quality of the triacylglycerols in oilseeds.

  10. The effect of gamma radiation on some succinic acid derivatives in the solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sütçü, Kerem; Osmanoǧlu, Y. Emre

    2017-01-01

    2,2-dimethyl succinic acid, 2,3-dimethyl succinic acid and monomethyl succinate were exposed to gamma radiation in the form of powder. EPR measurements were carried out to investigate the free radicals produced in all of them, following irradiation. Three of the radical species formed after irradiation were identified and spectroscopic parameters were discussed thereafter. The radical species were attributed to the ĊHCH2, HOOCCH(CH3)2ĊCOOH and H3COOCCH2ĊHCOOH radicals, respectively. The hyperfine splitting constants for all radicals were confirmed by the simulation of the experimental spectra. The radiation sensitivity of the samples was mainly attributed to the EPR line properties of stable radicals.

  11. [The effect of gamma rays on glutathion and ascorbic acid content in rabbit lenses (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Zygulska-Mach, H; Mach, Z

    1975-01-01

    It is pointed out that the partner non radiated eye is also influenced after employment of high radiation on an eye. The authors radiated rabbit eyes with gamma rays employing Stallard-applicators and determined the glutathion and ascorbic acid content in the lenses. The lenses of the partner eye were also examined for comparison. In those eyes which were directly radiated there was a fall of concentration of the two substances indirectly proportional to the dose of rays employed. In the partner eyes which were not directly subjected to direct radiation there were changes of similar character which were however not so much pronounced. The role of glutathion and ascorbic acid in lens metabolism is pointed out.

  12. ESR study of some gamma irradiated amino acids and condensed 1,4-dihydropyridines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydın, Murat; Şimşek, Rahime; Gündüz, Miyase Gözde; Şafak, Cihat; Osmanoğlu, Y. Emre

    2013-03-01

    L-alanine methyl ester hydrochloride, 2-aminoisobutyric acid and some condensed 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives (Compounds R1-R4) were gamma irradiated, the induced free radicals was investigated at room temperature by electron spin resonance techniques. The observed paramagnetic species of amino acids compounds were attributed to the CH3ĊHCOOCH3 and (CH3)2ĊCOOH radicals, respectively. The observed spectra of the 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives interpreted in terms of some type of amine radical fragments. The spectra were computer simulated and the g values of the radicals and the hyperfine structure constants of the unpaired electron with nearby protons and 14N nucleus were determined. In this study, the observed paramagnetic species were found to be stable at room temperature more than 2 months.

  13. Gamma-irradiation effect on a commercial composite anticorrosive pigment and acidity-to-alkalinity conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Weiqiang; Niu, Kaihui; Wu, Longchao

    2016-05-01

    A commercial composite anticorrosive pigment based on aluminum dihydrogen tripolyphosphate was studied after exposure to gamma irradiation (Co60, 0, 20, 50, 100 and 150 kGy) using FTIR, XRD, TGA and acid-base titration technologies. Although the FTIR spectra showed that the effect of the irradiation on functional groups in the pigments was not obvious, the decrease in the crystal lattice parameters of the irradiated pigments was observed in the XRD spectra compared to the non-irradiated sample. But the extent of the lattice parameter decrease monotonically with the increase of absorbed dose from 20 to 150 kGy, which was attributed to the decomposition of water and the simultaneous occurrence of lattice damage when the pigments were exposed to gamma rays. Of particular significance was the displayed basicity of the aqueous solutions of the irradiated pigments compared to the acidity of the solution of the non-irradiated pigment, which was attributed to the decomposition of P-OH groups (combined water).

  14. [Effect of synthetic cyclopentane beta,beta'-triketones on amino acid metabolism in roots of buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench.) seedlings].

    PubMed

    Demina, E A; Tishchenko, L Ia; Shestak, O P; Novikov, V L; Anisimov, M M

    2009-01-01

    Germination of buckwheat seeds in solutions of synthetic mono- and tricyclic cyclopentane-containing beta,beta'-triketones of various concentrations was accompanied by inhibition of seedling root growth and changes in the contents of glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, proline, glutamine, and alanine. The monocyclic triketone also affected the amount of isoleucine. It is likely that the increase in proline content is a nonspecific response significant for enhancing stress tolerance in seedlings.

  15. Enantioselective synthesis of beta-aryl-gamma-amino acid derivatives via Cu-catalyzed asymmetric 1,4-reductions of gamma-phthalimido-substituted alpha,beta-unsaturated carboxylic acid esters.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jun; Hu, Xiang-Ping; Huang, Jia-Di; Yu, Sai-Bo; Wang, Dao-Yong; Duan, Zheng-Chao; Zheng, Zhuo

    2008-08-01

    A series of chiral beta-aryl-substituted gamma-amino butyric acid derivatives were synthesized in good enantioselectivities via the Cu-catalyzed asymmetric conjugate reduction of gamma-phthalimido-alpha,beta-unsaturated carboxylic acid esters using Cu(OAc)2 x H2O as a catalyst precursor, (S)-BINAP as a ligand, PMHS as a hydride source, and t-BuOH as an additive. The methodology has been applied successfully to the enantioselective synthesis of a chiral pharmaceutical, (R)-baclofen.

  16. Formation of hydrocarbons from acid-Clay suspensions by gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz-Castaneda, J.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.

    2013-07-03

    The adsorption of certain organic compounds by clays gives rise to the transformation of the adsorbate through the action of the clays. This phenomenon can be enhanced using ionizing radiation. In this context, these kinds of reactions play an important role in many natural and industrial processes. For example, in oil and gas exploration, the source and trap of petroleum hydrocarbons is frequently clay-rich rocks. Clay-water-based muds are also seen as environmentally friendly alternatives to toxic oil-based fluids. The principal processes that occur in sediments are usually held to be of bacterial action and thermal transformation, which may include thermally induced catalytic alteration of the organic debris. On the other hand, radioactive materials are widely distributed throughout Earth. They were more abundant in the past, but are present in petroleum reservoirs. Their presence induced radioactive bombardment, which may have altered these sediments. This important subject has not been extensively studied. The aim of this work is to study the behavior of fatty acids-like behenic acid-and dicarboxylic acids-like fumaric acid-as model compounds, which are adsorbed in a clay mineral (Na-montmorillonite) and exposed to gamma radiation. The results show that the radiation-induced decomposition of the clay-acid system goes along a definitive path (oxidation), rather than following several modes of simultaneous decomposition, as happens in radiolysis without clay or by heating the system. The main radiolytic products for fatty acids are their corresponding hydrocarbons, with one C-atom less than the original acid.

  17. Synthesis of a novel acrylated abietic acid-g-bacterial cellulose hydrogel by gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Abeer, Muhammad Mustafa; Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd; Lazim, Azwan Mat; Pandey, Manisha; Martin, Claire

    2014-09-22

    Acrylated abietic acid (acrylated AbA) and acrylated abietic acid-grafted bacterial cellulose pH sensitive hydrogel (acrylated AbA-g-BC) were prepared by a one-pot synthesis. The successful dimerization of acrylic acid (AA) and abietic acid (AbA) and grafting of the dimer onto bacterial cellulose (BC) was confirmed by 13C solid state NMR as well as FT-IR. X-ray diffraction analysis showed characteristic peaks for AbA and BC; further, there was no effect of increasing amorphous AA content on the overall crystallinity of the hydrogel. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed a glass transition temperature of 80°C. Gel fraction and swelling studies gave insight into the features of the hydrogel, suggesting that it was suitable for future applications such as drug delivery. Scanning electron microscopy observations showed an interesting interpenetrating network within the walls of hydrogel samples with the lowest levels of AA and gamma radiation doses. Cell viability test revealed that the synthesized hydrogel is safe for future use in biomedical applications.

  18. Gamma-linolenic acid in borage oil reverses epidermal hyperproliferation in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Chung, S; Kong, S; Seong, K; Cho, Y

    2002-10-01

    As dietary sources of gamma-linolenic acid [GLA; 18:3(n-6)], borage oil (BO; 24-25 g/100 g GLA) and evening primrose oil (PO; 8-10 g/100 g GLA) are efficacious in treating skin disorders. The triglycerol stereospecificity of these oils is distinct, with GLA being concentrated in the sn-2 position of BO and in the sn-3 position of PO. To determine whether the absolute level and/or the triglycerol stereospecificity of GLA in oils affect biological efficacy, epidermal hyperproliferation was induced in guinea pigs by a hydrogenated coconut oil (HCO) diet for 8 wk. Subsequently, guinea pigs were fed diets of PO, BO or a mixture of BO and safflower oil (SO) for 2 wk. The mixture of BO and SO (BS) diet had a similar level of GLA as PO but with sn-2 stereospecificity. As controls, two groups were fed SO and HCO for 10 wk. Epidermal hyperproliferation was reversed by all three oils in the order of BO > BS > PO. However, proliferation scores of group PO were higher than of the normal control group, SO. The accumulations of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid [DGLA; 20:3(n-6)], an elongase product of GLA, into phospholipids and ceramides, of 15-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (15-HETrE), the potent antiproliferative metabolite of DGLA, and of ceramides, the major lipid maintaining epidermal barrier, in the epidermis of group BO were greater than of groups BS and PO. Group BS had higher levels of DGLA, 15-HETrE and ceramides than group PO. With primary dependence on absolute levels, our data demonstrate that the antiproliferative efficacy of GLA in the epidermis is preferably exerted from sn-2 stereospecificity of GLA in BO.

  19. Gamma-linolenic acid provides additional protection against ventricular fibrillation in aged rats fed linoleic acid rich diets.

    PubMed

    Charnock, J S

    2000-02-01

    Ligation of the coronary artery in rats produces severe ventricular fibrillation (VF) and malignant cardiac arrhythmia. Mortality increases with the age of the animal. Diets rich in saturated fatty acids (SF) but low in linoleic acid (LA) increase, but diets high in LA and low in SF decrease the severity of VF and mortality in older animals. The effects of an LA enriched diet can be blocked by inhibition of cyclooxygenase suggesting that conversion of LA to eicosanoids is central to the development of VF. Conversion of LA to gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) via delta-6 desaturase is the first step in the process. The activity of delta-6 desaturase declines with age. Thus inclusion of GLA in the diet of older animals may provide an additional benefit over LA alone. Dietary supplements of evening primrose oil (EPO) to one year old rats reduced ischaemic VF more than a supplement of sunflower seed oil (SSO) without GLA. Substitution of borage oil (more GLA than EPO but less LA than either EPO or SSO) was without additional benefit.

  20. Improved enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw by combined use of gamma ray and dilute acid for bioethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun Hong, Sung; Taek Lee, Jae; Lee, Sungbeom; Gon Wi, Seung; Ju Cho, Eun; Singh, Sudhir; Sik Lee, Seung; Yeoup Chung, Byung

    2014-01-01

    Pretreating wheat straw with a combination of dilute acid and gamma irradiation was performed in an attempt to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis for bioethanol production. The glucose yield was significantly affected by combined pretreatment (3% sulfuric acid-gamma irradiation), compared with untreated wheat straw and individual pretreatment. The increasing enzymatic hydrolysis after combined pretreatment is resulting from decrease in crystallinity of cellulose, loss of hemicelluloses, and removal or modification of lignin. Therefore, combined pretreatment is one of the most effective methods for enhancing the enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw biomass.

  1. Co-supplementation of healthy women with fish oil and evening primrose oil increases plasma docosahexaenoic acid, gamma-linolenic acid and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid levels without reducing arachidonic acid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Geppert, Julia; Demmelmair, Hans; Hornstra, Gerard; Koletzko, Berthold

    2008-02-01

    Fish oil supplementation during pregnancy not only improves maternal and neonatal DHA status, but often reduces gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), dihomo-GLA (DGLA), and arachidonic acid (ARA) levels also, which may compromise foetal and infant development. The present study investigated the effects of a fish oil/evening primrose oil (FSO/EPO) blend (456 mg DHA/d and 353 mg GLA/d) compared to a placebo (mixture of habitual dietary fatty acids) on the plasma fatty acid (FA) composition in two groups of twenty non-pregnant women using a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel design. FA were quantified in plasma total lipids, phospholipids, cholesterol esters, and TAG at weeks 0, 4, 6 and 8. After 8 weeks of intervention, percentage changes from baseline values of plasma total lipid FA were significantly different between FSO/EPO and placebo for GLA (+49.9 % v. +2.1 %, means), DGLA (+13.8 % v. +0.7 %) and DHA (+59.6 % v. +5.5 %), while there was no significant difference for ARA ( - 2.2 % v. - 5.9 %). FA changes were largely comparable between plasma lipid fractions. In both groups three subjects reported mild adverse effects. As compared with placebo, FSO/EPO supplementation did not result in any physiologically relevant changes of safety parameters (blood cell count, liver enzymes). In women of childbearing age the tested FSO/EPO blend was well tolerated and appears safe. It increases plasma GLA, DGLA, and DHA levels without impairing ARA status. These data provide a basis for testing this FSO/EPO blend in pregnant women for its effects on maternal and neonatal FA status and infant development.

  2. Hepatic handling of a synthetic gamma-labeled bile acid (/sup 75/SeHCAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Galatola, G.; Jazrawi, R.P.; Bridges, C.; Joseph, A.E.; Northfield, T.C.

    1988-03-01

    /sup 75/Se-homocholic acid-taurine (/sup 75/SeHCAT) is the first available gamma-labeled bile acid, and should therefore be handled more efficiently and specifically by the liver than previous hepatoscintigraphic agents. We have measured serum and hepatic kinetics for /sup 75/SeHCAT, and compared them with those for the conventional hepatobiliary scintigraphic agent 99mTc-hepatoiminodiacetic acid, and with serum kinetics for the corresponding natural bile acid, (/sup 14/C)cholic acid-taurine. We used a dynamic scintigraphic technique and serial blood sampling in 8 subjects. Initial hepatic uptake rate was identical to initial serum disappearance rate (14% dose/min) for /sup 75/SeHCAT, but significantly lower for 99mTc-hepatoiminodiacetic acid (6% vs. 14% dose/min, p less than 0.001). Hepatic transit time was shorter for /sup 75/SeHCAT (13 min vs. 22 min, p less than 0.02), net hepatic excretory rate was more rapid (1.4% vs. 0.8% dose/min, p less than 0.001), and urinary excretion was lower (1.0% vs. 9.0% dose, p less than 0.001). Initial and late-plasma disappearance rates were significantly lower for /sup 75/SeHCAT (14.3% and 1.5% dose/min) than for (/sup 14/C)cholic acid-taurine (21.3% and 2.8% dose/min, respectively), and plasma clearance was also lower (2/sup 75/ vs. 670 ml/min). In vitro, /sup 75/SeHCAT was bound to serum proteins more completely than (/sup 14/C)cholic acid-taurine (90.4% vs. 86.5%, p less than 0.005). We conclude that /sup 75/SeHCAT provides a hepatoscintigraphic agent that is handled more efficiently and specifically by the liver than the conventionally used agent 99mTc-hepatoiminodiacetic acid. It is not cleared from the serum as rapidly as (/sup 14/C)cholic acid-taurine, probably due to its stronger protein binding. The clinical value of /sup 75/SeHCAT in assessing liver disease should be investigated.

  3. Gamma Peptide Nucleic Acids: As Orthogonal Nucleic Acid Recognition Codes for Organizing Molecular Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Sacui, Iulia; Hsieh, Wei-Che; Manna, Arunava; Sahu, Bichismita; Ly, Danith H

    2015-07-08

    Nucleic acids are an attractive platform for organizing molecular self-assembly because of their specific nucleobase interactions and defined length scale. Routinely employed in the organization and assembly of materials in vitro, however, they have rarely been exploited in vivo, due to the concerns for enzymatic degradation and cross-hybridization with the host's genetic materials. Herein we report the development of a tight-binding, orthogonal, synthetically versatile, and informationally interfaced nucleic acid platform for programming molecular interactions, with implications for in vivo molecular assembly and computing. The system consists of three molecular entities: the right-handed and left-handed conformers and a nonhelical domain. The first two are orthogonal to each other in recognition, while the third is capable of binding to both, providing a means for interfacing the two conformers as well as the natural nucleic acid biopolymers (i.e., DNA and RNA). The three molecular entities are prepared from the same monomeric chemical scaffold, with the exception of the stereochemistry or lack thereof at the γ-backbone that determines if the corresponding oligo adopts a right-handed or left-handed helix, or a nonhelical motif. These conformers hybridize to each other with exquisite affinity, sequence selectivity, and level of orthogonality. Recognition modules as short as five nucleotides in length are capable of organizing molecular assembly.

  4. Preferential pi-pi complexation between tamoxifen and borage oil/gamma linolenic acid: transcutaneous delivery and NMR spectral modulation.

    PubMed

    Heard, Charles M; Gallagher, Simon J; Congiatu, Costantino; Harwood, John; Thomas, Christopher P; McGuigan, Christopher; Nemcová, Marta; Nouskova, Tereza

    2005-09-30

    The effect of different proportions of borage oil on the in vitro transcutaneous delivery of tamoxifen were studied, with the aim of developing a gel capable of the simultaneous delivery of tamoxifen and gamma linolenic acid across (breast) skin. Supplementary work probed 1H NMR spectral data for tamoxifen in the presence of different proportions of polyunsaturated or unsaturated fatty acids. Typical, non-aqueous gels were modified to contain 1% tamoxifen and three levels of borage oil ( approximately 25% gamma linolenic acid) and the transcutaneous delivery of both tamoxifen and GLA across full thickness skin determined in vitro. Both tamoxifen and gamma linolenic acid permeated the skin with the ratio of moles being consistent at approximately 4:1. This was irrespective of time, amount of borage oil contained in the formulation (above a minimum) and the presence of other (unsaturated) excipients: mineral oil, Miglyiol 810N, white soft paraffin, PEG400 and Cabosil M5. Dose-dependent downfield shifts of tamoxifen aromatic protons were observed in the presence of borage oil and linolenic acid (gamma and alpha), but not saturated triacyl glycerol. The permeation data suggested vehicular complexation between tamoxifen and polyunsaturated constituents of borage oil and that such complexes permeated the skin intact. The 1H NMR data supported the hypothesis that such complexation was a consequence of preferential pi-pi orbital interactions between the phenyl groups of tamoxifen and the multiple double bonds of GLA. The mechanism for the permeation of intact complexes across skin remains to be elucidated.

  5. Crystal structure of FAS thioesterase domain with polyunsaturated fatty acyl adduct and inhibition by dihomo-[gamma]-linolenic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Chakravarty, Bornali; Zheng, Fei; Gu, Ziwei; Wu, Hongmei; Mao, Jianqiang; Wakil, Salih J.; Quiocho, Florante A.

    2012-05-29

    Human fatty acid synthase (hFAS) is a homodimeric multidomain enzyme that catalyzes a series of reactions leading to the de novo biosynthesis of long-chain fatty acids, mainly palmitate. The carboxy-terminal thioesterase (TE) domain determines the length of the fatty acyl chain and its ultimate release by hydrolysis. Because of the upregulation of hFAS in a variety of cancers, it is a target for antiproliferative agent development. Dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been known to confer beneficial effects on many diseases and health conditions, including cancers, inflammations, diabetes, and heart diseases, but the precise molecular mechanisms involved have not been elucidated. We report the crystal structure of the hFAS TE domain covalently modified and inactivated by methyl {gamma}-linolenylfluorophosphonate. Whereas the structure confirmed the phosphorylation by the phosphonate head group of the active site serine, it also unexpectedly revealed the binding of the 18-carbon polyunsaturated {gamma}-linolenyl tail in a long groove-tunnel site, which itself is formed mainly by the emergence of an {alpha} helix (the 'helix flap'). We then found inhibition of the TE domain activity by the PUFA dihomo-{gamma}-linolenic acid; {gamma}- and {alpha}-linolenic acids, two popular dietary PUFAs, were less effective. Dihomo-{gamma}-linolenic acid also inhibited fatty acid biosynthesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and selective human breast cancer cell lines, including SKBR3 and MDAMB231. In addition to revealing a novel mechanism for the molecular recognition of a polyunsaturated fatty acyl chain, our results offer a new framework for developing potent FAS inhibitors as therapeutics against cancers and other diseases.

  6. Formation of an 8-hydroxyguanine moiety in deoxyribonucleic acid on gamma-irradiation in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Dizdaroglu, M.

    1985-07-30

    Isolation and characterization of a novel radiation-induced product, i.e., the 8-hydroxyguanine residue, produced in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), 2'-deoxyguanosine, and 2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-monophosphate by gamma-irradiation in aqueous solution, are described. For this purpose, gamma-irradiated DNA was first hydrolyzed with a mixture of four enzymes, i.e., DNase I, spleen and snake venom exonucleases, and alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the resulting mixture by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after trimethylsilylation revealed the presence of a product, which was identified as 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine on the basis of the typical fragment ions of its trimethylsilyl (Me3Si) derivative. This product was then isolated by using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The UV and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra taken from the isolated product confirmed the structure suggested by the mass spectrum of its Me3Si derivative. The yield of 8-hydroxyguanine was also measured. Its mechanism of formation is believed to involve OH radical addition to the C-8 position of guanine followed by oxidation of the radical adduct.

  7. Report on the analysis of common beverages spiked with gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) using NMR and the PURGE solvent-suppression technique.

    PubMed

    Lesar, Casey T; Decatur, John; Lukasiewicz, Elaan; Champeil, Elise

    2011-10-10

    In forensic evidence, the identification and quantitation of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) in "spiked" beverages is challenging. In this report, we present the analysis of common alcoholic beverages found in clubs and bars spiked with gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL). Our analysis of the spiked beverages consisted of using (1)H NMR with a water suppression method called Presaturation Utilizing Relaxation Gradients and Echoes (PURGE). The following beverages were analyzed: water, 10% ethanol in water, vodka-cranberry juice, rum and coke, gin and tonic, whisky and diet coke, white wine, red wine, and beer. The PURGE method allowed for the direct identification and quantitation of both compounds in all beverages except red and white wine where small interferences prevented accurate quantitation. The NMR method presented in this paper utilizes PURGE water suppression. Thanks to the use of a capillary internal standard, the method is fast, non-destructive, sensitive and requires no sample preparation which could disrupt the equilibrium between GHB and GBL.

  8. [Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) dependence and the GHB withdrawal syndrome: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    van Noorden, Martijn S; Kamal, Rama; de Jong, Cor A J; Vergouwen, A C M Ton; Zitman, Frans G

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a neurotransmitter that occurs naturally in the brain and is increasingly being used as a 'party drug' because of its relaxing and euphoria-inducing effects. GHB has a limited medical use in the treatment of narcolepsy. GHB-intoxications occur often in non-medical use, and generally result in a coma of short duration. GHB use several times a day can lead to tolerance and dependence. After sudden cessation or reduction of intensive GHB use, a severe withdrawal syndrome may occur with symptoms varying from tremor, anxiety and agitation to autonomic instability, hallucinations and delirium. Treatment of the GHB withdrawal syndrome consists of supportive care and benzodiazepines, often in high doses. The controlled detoxification of GHB using pharmaceutical GHB in an adjusted dose is currently being investigated in the Netherlands. There is no literature concerning the treatment of patients following GHB intoxication or after detoxification.

  9. [The knowledge about gamma-hydroxybutyric acid as by students of Physical Education Academy].

    PubMed

    Chwaluk, Paweł; Chwaluk, Agnieszka; Parnicki, Florian

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid is a substance stealthily used by criminals to facilitate sexual assaults. It is also known as doping agent in sports. Physical Education Academies should prepare their graduates to be educators for young people, their trainers, organizers of sports and recreational events. Second year students of two majors: physical education and tourism and recreation were surveyed by means of questionnaire on "date-rape drug". As much as 320 among 327 students surveyed had heard about "date-rape drug". However their knowledge on it was shallow and unsystematic. None of the surveyed knew that the substance of "date-rape drug" could also be used as a doping agent. Only 31% of respondents were aware of existence of the test to detect "date-rape drug" in drinks. Physical Education Academy students should be thoroughly and relevantly educated on the matter of pharmacologic doping agents and drugs endangerment.

  10. Baclofen antagonises intravenous self-administration of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Fattore, L; Cossu, G; Martellotta, M C; Deiana, S; Fratta, W

    2001-07-20

    gamma-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a widely used recreational drug known to exert positive reinforcing effects in animals and humans. The GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen has been proved to possess antimotivational effect and to inhibit alcohol, cocaine, heroin and nicotine intake. In the present study we evaluated the effect of baclofen on i.v. self-administration of GHB in drug-naive mice under a fixed-ratio (FR-1) schedule of reinforcement and nose-poking-like response as operandum. Results show that baclofen was able to completely prevent GHB seeking behaviour, decreasing the rate of responding to basal values, without showing any reinforcing properties when made contingent on nose-poking response. Our findings demonstrate that baclofen antagonises GHB i.v. self-administration, supporting an important role for the GABA(B) receptor in reward-related mechanisms underlying addictive behaviour.

  11. Early continuous white noise exposure alters l-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor subunit glutamate receptor 2 and gamma-aminobutyric acid type a receptor subunit beta3 protein expression in rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinghong; Yu, Liping; Zhang, Jiping; Cai, Rui; Sun, Xinde

    2010-02-15

    Auditory experience during the postnatal critical period is essential for the normal maturation of auditory function. Previous studies have shown that rearing infant rat pups under conditions of continuous moderate-level noise delayed the emergence of adult-like topographic representational order and the refinement of response selectivity in the primary auditory cortex (A1) beyond normal developmental benchmarks and indefinitely blocked the closure of a brief, critical-period window. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of these physiological changes after noise rearing, we studied expression of the AMPA receptor subunit GluR2 and GABA(A) receptor subunit beta3 in the auditory cortex after noise rearing. Our results show that continuous moderate-level noise rearing during the early stages of development decreases the expression levels of GluR2 and GABA(A)beta3. Furthermore, noise rearing also induced a significant decrease in the level of GABA(A) receptors relative to AMPA receptors. However, in adult rats, noise rearing did not have significant effects on GluR2 and GABA(A)beta3 expression or the ratio between the two units. These changes could have a role in the cellular mechanisms involved in the delayed maturation of auditory receptive field structure and topographic organization of A1 after noise rearing.

  12. Alteration of cyclosporine (CsA)-induced nephrotoxicity by gamma linolenic acid (GLA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Morphake, P; Bariety, J; Darlametsos, I; Tsipas, G; Gkikas, G; Hornysh, A; Papanikolaou, N

    1994-01-01

    Administration of cyclosporine (CsA), 37.4 microM (45 mg)/Kg, per day for 7 days, to Wistar rats, induced decreased creatinine clearance (Ccr) and body weight loss (BWL), but it did not induce proteinuria. These changes were associated with enhanced urinary thromboxane B2 (TXB2) and diminished 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (6kPGF1 alpha) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) excretions. The augmentation in TXB2 and the decrease in PGs highly diminished the ratios of 6kPGF1 alpha/TXB2 and PGE2/TXB2. In microscopic sections all of the kidneys were affected to variable degrees. When CsA was administered to animals fed for 70 days, prior to the experiment, on standard chow (SC) containing evening primrose oil (EPO) or fish oil (FO), 1% and 10% respectively (EPO contained 9% gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and FO 5.6% eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)), the nephrotoxic effect of CsA was partially prevented. These changes were accompanied by increased ratios of urinary 6kPGF1 alpha/TXB2 and PGE2/TXB2 excretions. Light microscopic (LM) studies showed that rats' kidneys fed on SC containing EPO or FO were not always affected and the lesions were of minor importance. In conclusion, these results suggest that EPO (GLA) and FO (EPA) could play a beneficial role in the development or the modulation of the renal syndrome induced by CsA.

  13. The occurrence and biosynthesis of gamma-linolenic acid in a blue-green alga,Spirulina platensis.

    PubMed

    Nichols, B W; Wood, B J

    1968-01-01

    The acyl-lipid and fatty acid composition of six blue-green algae, namely,Spirulina platensis, Myxosarcina chroococcoides, Chlorogloea fritschii, Anabaena cylindrica, Anabaena flos-aquae, and Mastigocladus laminosus is reported.All contain major proportions of mono-and digalactosyl diglyceride, sulfoquinovosyl diglyceride, and phosphatidyl glycerol, but none possess lecithin, phophatidyl ethanolamine, or phosphatidyl inositol. Trans-3-hexadecenoic acid was absent from all extracts.The analyses provide further evidence that there is no general chemical or physical requirement for any specific fatty acid in photosynthesis. S. platensis is unique among photoautotrophic organisms so far studied, containing major quantities of gamma-linolenic acid (6,9,12-octadecatrienoic acid). This acid is synthesized by the alga by direct desaturation of linoleic acid and is primarily located in the mono- and digalactosyl diglyceride fractions.The possible phylogenetic relationship betweenS. platensis and other plant forms is discussed.

  14. Expression of a cyanobacterial {del}{sup 6}-desaturase gene results in {gamma}-linolenic acid production in transgenic plants

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, A.S.; Thomas, T.L.

    1996-05-01

    Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), a nutritionally important fatty acid in human and animal diets, is not produced in oil seed crops. Many oil seed plants, however, produce significant quantities of linoleic acid, a fatty acid that could be converted to GLA by the enzyme {del}{sup 6}-desaturase if it were present. As a first step to producing GLA in oil seed crops, we have cloned a cyanobacterial {del}{sup 6}-desaturase gene. Expression of this gene in transgenic tobacco resulted in GLA accumulation. Octadecatetraenoic acid, a highly unsaturated, industrially important fatty acid, was also found in transgenic tobacco plants expressing the cyanobacterial {del}{sup 6}-desaturase. This is the first example of engineering the production of `novel` polyunsaturated fatty acids in transgenic plants. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Helix formation in preorganized beta/gamma-peptide foldamers: hydrogen-bond analogy to the alpha-helix without alpha-amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Almeida, Aaron M; Zhang, Weicheng; Reidenbach, Andrew G; Choi, Soo Hyuk; Guzei, Ilia A; Gellman, Samuel H

    2010-06-16

    We report the first high-resolution structural data for the beta/gamma-peptide 13-helix (i,i+3 C=O...H-N H-bonds), a secondary structure that is formed by oligomers with a 1:1 alternation of beta- and gamma-amino acid residues. Our characterization includes both crystallographic and 2D NMR data. Previous studies suggested that beta/gamma-peptides constructed from conformationally flexible residues adopt a different helical secondary structure in solution. Our design features preorganized beta- and gamma-residues, which strongly promote 13-helical folding by the 1:1 beta/gamma backbone.

  16. Possible involvement of delta-6-desaturase in control of melanoma growth by gamma-linolenic acid.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, N S; Duncan, J R

    1991-03-01

    This study examined the effects of linoleic acid (LA) and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) on BL6 melanoma growth in cell culture and of safflower oil (SFO) which contains LA and evening primrose oil (EPO) which contains GLA, on melanoma growth when grown in mice. The delta-6-desaturase activity of the melanoma cells in the two systems was also examined and an attempt made to relate the activity of the enzyme to the effects of GLA on cell and tumour growth. LA and GLA were found to be equipotent in inhibiting growth of the in vitro cultured BL6 cells which were found to contain an appreciable level of delta-6-desaturase activity. EPO was however found to be a more potent promoter of in vivo melanoma growth in mice than SFO. Melanomas grown in mice were found to lack delta-6-desaturase activity suggesting that the EPO diet, by providing GLA, was able to compensate for the loss of enzyme activity in the melanomas. The possibility that melanomas in mice have a requirement for GLA for growth while in in vitro cultured cells excess GLA inhibits the growth of the cells through an increase in lipid peroxidation is discussed.

  17. The 3-amino-derivative of gamma-cyclodextrin as chiral selector of Dns-amino acids in electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida, A; Contino, A; Maccarrone, G; Messina, M; Cucinotta, V

    2009-04-24

    The enantioseparation of the enantiomeric pairs of 10 Dns derivatives of alpha-amino acids was successfully carried out by using for the first time the 3-amino derivative of the gamma-cyclodextrin. The effects of pH and selector concentration on the migration times and the resolutions of analytes were studied in detail. 3-Deoxy-3-amino-2(S),3(R)-gamma-cyclodextrin (GCD3AM) shows very good chiral recognition ability even at very low concentrations at all the three investigated values of pH, as shown by the very large values of selectivity and resolution towards several pairs of amino acids. The role played by the cavity, the substitution site and the protonation equilibria on the observed properties of chiral selectivity, on varying the specific amino acid involved, is discussed.

  18. Enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of poplar bark by combined use of gamma ray and dilute acid for bioethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Lee, Jae Taek; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Kim, Ung-Jin; Bae, Hyeun-Jong; Gon Wi, Seung; Cho, Jae-Young

    2012-08-01

    Pretreatment of poplar bark with a combination of sulfuric acid (3%, w/w, H2SO4) and gamma irradiation (0-1000 kGy) was performed in an attempt to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis for bioethanol production. The yields of reducing sugar were slightly increased with an increasing irradiation dose, ranging from 35.4% to 51.5%, with a 56.1% reducing sugar yield observed after dilute acid pretreatment. These results clearly showed that soluble sugars were released faster and to a greater extent in dilute acid-pretreated poplar bark than in gamma irradiation-pretreated bark. When combined pretreatment was carried out, a drastic increase in reducing sugar yield (83.1%) was found compared with individual pretreatment, indicating the possibility of increasing the convertibility of poplar bark following combined pretreatment. These findings are likely associated with cellulose crystallinity, lignin modification, and removal of hemicelluloses.

  19. Trans-gamma-hydroxycrotonic acid binding sites in brain: evidence for a subpopulation of gamma-hydroxybutyrate sites.

    PubMed

    Hechler, V; Schmitt, M; Bourguignon, J J; Maitre, M

    1990-03-02

    Trans-gamma-hydroxycrotonate (THCA), a compound naturally present in rat brain, possesses high-affinity binding sites with a heterogeneous distribution which are superimposable with those for gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). Binding studies of THCA on rat brain membranes revealed two binding components, one of high affinity (Kd1, 7 nM, Bmax1 42 fmol/mg protein) and the other of low affinity (Kd2, 2 microM, Bmax2 13 pmol/mg protein). Displacement curves of [3H]THCA by THCA and GHB or of [3H]GHB by THCA are in favour of the existence of a specific high affinity site for THCA. Quantitative autoradiography with image analysis of [3H]THCA binding in rat brain slices indicated that [3H]THCA high affinity binding was displaced at a lower potency by GHB. THCA showed also some selectivity in displacing [3H]GHB from its high affinity binding site (Kd = 95 nM). This mutual overlap favours a subpopulation of GHB receptors, which have THCA as a natural ligand, showing partial agonistic properties compared to GHB. The functional significance of this result remains unknown.

  20. Ginkgolides, diterpene trilactones of Ginkgo biloba, as antagonists at recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2L GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shelley H; Duke, Rujee K; Chebib, Mary; Sasaki, Keiko; Wada, Keiji; Johnston, Graham A R

    2004-06-28

    Ginkgolides A, B, and C are diterpene trilactones and active constituents of the 50:1 Ginkgo biloba leaf extract widely used in the symptomatic treatment of mild to moderate dementia. Using the two-electrode voltage clamp methodology, these ginkgolides were found to be moderately potent antagonists at recombinant human alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2L) GABA(A) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Ginkgolides A, B, and C inhibited the direct action of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) with K(i) values of 14.5+/-1.0, 12.7+/-1.7, and 16.3+/-2.4 microM respectively. Antagonism by these ginkgolides at alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2L) GABA(A) receptors appears to be noncompetitive as indicated by the nonparallel right shift and reduced maximal GABA response in their GABA concentration-effect curves.

  1. Effects of dietary supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid or gamma-linolenic acid on neutrophil phospholipid fatty acid composition and activation responses.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, M P; Ziboh, V A

    1990-10-01

    Previous data that alimentation with fish oil rich in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:n-3) or vegetable oil rich in gamma-linolenic acid (GLA; 18:3n-6) can reduce symptoms of inflammatory skin disorders lead us to determine the effects of dietary supplements of oils rich in EPA or GLA on guinea pig (GP) neutrophil (PMN) membrane potential (delta gamma), secretion, and superoxide (O2-) responses. Weanling GPs were initially fed diets supplemented with olive oil (less than 0.1% EPA; less than 0.1% GLA) for 2 weeks, followed by a crossover by two sets of animals to diets supplemented with fish oil (19% EPA) or borage oil (25% GLA). At 4-week intervals, 12% sterile casein-elicited peritoneal neutrophils (PMN) were assessed for membrane polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) profiles and FMLP-, LTB4-, and PMA-stimulated delta gamma changes, changes in flow cytometrically measured forward scatter (FWD-SC) (shape change), 90 degrees scatter (90 degrees -SC) in cytochalasin B-pretreated-PMN (secretion response), and superoxide responses, GP incorporated EPA and GLA (as the elongation product, dihomo-GLA or DGLA) into their PMN phospholipids by 4 weeks. The peritoneal PMN of all groups demonstrated broad resting FWD-SC and poor activation-related FWD-SC increases, suggesting in vivo activation. While secretion was comparable in the three groups in response to FMLP, there was a trend toward inhibition of LTB4-stimulated 90 degrees -SC loss in both fish and borage oil groups. This was significant only with borage oil (21.7 +/- 2.1 vs 15.3 +/- 1.2% loss of baseline 90 degrees -SC, olive vs borage: P = 0.03). PMN from borage- and fish oil-fed GPs showed a progressively lower O2- response to FMLP than the olive oil group (73.9 +/- 3.9 and 42.9 +/- 6.8% of olive oil response for borage and fish oils, respectively; P less than 0.005 and P less than 0.01, respectively, at 12 weeks), while PMA-stimulated O2- was inhibited only in the fish oil-fed group and only at 12 weeks (62.0 +/- 2

  2. Bioconversion of methyl ricinoleate to 4-hydroxy-decanoic acid and to gamma-decalactone by yeasts of the genus Candida.

    PubMed

    Endrizzi, A; Belin, J M

    1995-01-01

    The capacity of several strains of yeasts to do the bioconversion of methyl ricinoleate into gamma-decalactone, was studied in a medium containing this methylic ester of fatty acid as sole carbon source. Amongst the strains which are able to do this bioconversion, two types of behaviour are observed: some of the strains produce gamma-decalactone during all the incubation in bioconversion medium while others produce this aroma compound very quickly and then consume it fast too. The tested strains produce at the same time gamma-decalactone and the corresponding acid form (4-hydroxy-decanoic acid), and this, in variable proportions.

  3. Identification of a new metabolite of GHB: gamma-hydroxybutyric acid glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Ida Nymann; Tortzen, Christian; Kristensen, Jesper Langgaard; Pedersen, Daniel Sejer; Breindahl, Torben

    2013-06-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an important analyte in clinical and forensic toxicology with a narrow detection window of 3-6 h. In the search of improved detection methods, the existence in vivo of a glucuronated GHB metabolite (GHB-GLUC) was hypothesized. Chemically pure standards of GHB-GLUC and a deuterated analogue for chromatography were synthesized. Liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry were used for targeted analysis in anonymous clinical urine samples (n = 50). GHB-GLUC was found in concentrations ranging from 0.11 to 5.0 µg/mL (mean: 1.3 ± 1.2 µg/mL). Thus far, this is the first report of a GHB glucuronide detected in biological samples. Given that glucuronides generally have longer half-life values than their corresponding free drugs, GHB-GLUC should theoretically be a biomarker of GHB intoxication. It is also proposed that the hitherto unexplained reports of elevated GHB concentrations in some biological samples, which has caused the setting of a relatively high cutoff value (10 µg/mL), represent total GHB measurements (sum of free GHB and actively chemically hydrolyzed GHB-GLUC). To address these challenges, the present study must be followed by comprehensive pharmacokinetic and stability studies after the controlled administration of GHB.

  4. The endothelial cell binding determinant of human factor IX resides in the. gamma. -carboxyglutamic acid domain

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, J.R.; Roberts, H.R.; Stafford, D.W. ); Smith, K.J. United Blood Services, Albuquerque, NM )

    1992-02-18

    The blood coagulation factor IX(a) binds specifically to a site on endothelial cells with a K{sub d} of 2.0-3.0 nM. A number of previous studies have attempted to define the region(s) of factor IX(a) that mediate this interaction. These studies suggested that there are two regions of factor IX(a), the {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain and the epidermal growth factor like (EGF-like) domains, that mediate high-affinity binding to endothelial cells. Recently, however, the participation of the EGF1 domain has been excluded from the interaction. This indicated that if there was an EGF component of factor IX contributing to the binding affinity, then it must be in the second EGF-like domain. In order to further evaluate this relationship, the authors performed competitive binding experiments between {sup 125}I plasma factor IX and a set of six chimeric proteins composed of portions of factor VII and factor IX. The data suggest that the high-affinity interaction between factor IX and the endothelial cell binding site is mediated by the factor IX Gla domain and that the factor IX EGF domains are not involved in binding specificity.

  5. Biosynthesis of gamma-linolenic acid in developing seeds of borage (Borago officinalis L.).

    PubMed

    Galle, A M; Joseph, M; Demandre, C; Guerche, P; Dubacq, J P; Oursel, A; Mazliak, P; Pelletier, G; Kader, J C

    1993-08-20

    delta 6-desaturation of [14C]linoleoyl-CoA or [14C]oleoyl-CoA leading to the synthesis of gamma-linolenic acid was studied in vitro with microsomal fractions from developing seeds of Borago officinalis. Time course of the reaction, effects of protein and precursor concentrations and nucleotide requirements were examined. These parameters allowed us to improve the in vitro delta 6-desaturation assay. We observed that the precursors were acylated mainly in phosphatidylcholine, diacylglycerol and triacylglycerol, and then desaturated. NADH was absolutely required when [14C]oleoyl-CoA was the precursor, but not when [14C]linoleoyl-CoA was the precursor although it stimulated the reaction. The in vitro delta 6-desaturase activity was found mainly in phosphatidylcholine, associated with enriched endoplasmic reticulum membranes (ER) from embryos. No activity was observed in ER from seed coat or seedling. During maturation of the seeds, delta 6-desaturase reached its highest activity 14 to 16 days after pollination.

  6. Gamma-linoleic acid and ascorbate improves skeletal ossification in offspring of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Braddock, Rattana; Simán, C Martin; Hamilton, Katherine; Garland, Hugh O; Sibley, Colin P

    2002-05-01

    Maternal diabetes causes a range of complications in offspring, including reduced skeletal ossification. This study examined whether feeding gamma-linoleic acid (GLA) and ascorbate, alone or in combination, to diabetic pregnant rats improves skeletal development in their offspring. In addition, Ca(2+) concentration was monitored in maternal plasma and fetal tissue, as well as placental mRNA expression of calbindin-D(9k). Female rats rendered diabetic with streptozotocin were fed GLA (500 mg/kg/d), ascorbate (290 mg/kg/d), ascorbyl-GLA (790 mg/kg/d), or GLA and ascorbate (500 and 290 mg/kg/d, respectively) throughout pregnancy. Fetal skeletons were studied after alizarin red staining. Fewer ossification centers were observed in offspring of diabetic rats compared with offspring of control rats (68 +/- 4% of control, p = 0.01). An almost complete restoration of ossification occurred with all the treatments (92-95 +/- 3% of control). The effects of treatment on fetal ossification could not be explained by altered maternal plasma Ca(2+) concentrations or by mRNA expression of the placental Ca(2+)-transporting protein calbindin-D(9K). We conclude that GLA and/or ascorbate treatment was effective against diabetes-induced fetal ossification defects by a mechanism not related to placental Ca(2+) supply.

  7. Structural characterization of triacylglycerol in several oils containing gamma-linolenic acid.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Satoru; Nakano, Masuo

    2003-01-01

    The differences are reported in the triacylglycerol (TG) structures of oils containing gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) from Oenothera biennis Linn seed oil (OBLO) from the wild plant, evening primrose seed oil (EPO) from a cultured plant, and bio-GLA oil (BIO) from a mold, the physiological functions of which were ascertained by animal testing. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic separation detected 12 TG peaks each for OBLO and EPO, and 28 TG peaks for BIO. TG-containing GLA were composed of five molecular species each in OBLO and EPO, and ten molecular species in BIO. The totals of the molecular species containing GLA were 29.8% in OBLO, 23.8% in EPO, and 56.6% in BIO. In OBLO, the GLA level at the sn-2 position of the major TG species was higher than that in EPO. In BIO, the GLA level at the sn-2 position of the major TG species was lower than those in OBLO and EPO.

  8. Fatality due to gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and heroin intoxication.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, S D; Tedeschi, L; Frison, G; Rossi, A

    1995-05-01

    The first case of fatal intoxication due to ingestion of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and intravenous use of heroin is reported. A 42-year-old man, known to have been a heroin addict and to have taken other psychoactive substances, who had been in treatment with GHB for several months, was found dead. Anatomohistopathologic examination showed generalized visceral congestion, edema and pulmonary anthracosis, chronic bronchitis and chronic active hepatitis. Toxicological findings included fluid and tissue distributions of GHB, morphine and 6-monoacetylmorphine. GHB and morphine concentrations were respectively 11.5 and 0.77 micrograms/mL (blood), 84.3 and 0.3 micrograms/mL (vitreous humor), 258.3 and 1.35 micrograms/mL (urine), 57.0 and 14.3 micrograms/mL (bile), 40.0 and 0.43 micrograms/g (brain), 43.0 and 0.60 micrograms/g (liver), 47.0 and 0.68 micrograms/g (kidney). Blood and urine levels of 6-monoacetylmorphine were 28.5 and 12.1 ng/mL respectively. The presumed mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics of GHB are briefly reviewed, with reference to its therapeutic use and to reports of non-fatal GHB intoxication.

  9. Therapeutic intervention in mice deficient for succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (gamma-hydroxybutyric aciduria).

    PubMed

    Gupta, Maneesh; Greven, Rachel; Jansen, Erwin E W; Jakobs, Cornelis; Hogema, Boris M; Froestl, Wolfgang; Snead, O Carter; Bartels, Hilke; Grompe, Markus; Gibson, K Michael

    2002-07-01

    Therapeutic intervention for human succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency (gamma-hydroxybutyric aciduria) has been limited to vigabatrin (VGB). Pharmacologically, VGB should be highly effective due to 4-aminobutyrate-transaminase (GABA-transaminase) inhibition, lowering succinic semialdehyde and, thereby, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) levels. Unfortunately, clinical efficacy has been limited. Because GHB possesses a number of potential receptor interactions, we addressed the hypothesis that antagonism of these interactions in mice with SSADH deficiency could lead to the development of novel treatment strategies for human patients. SSADH-deficient mice have significantly elevated tissue GHB levels, are neurologically impaired, and die within 4 weeks postnatally. In the current report, we compared oral versus intraperitoneal administration of VGB, CGP 35348 [3-aminopropyl(diethoxymethyl)phosphinic acid, a GABA(B) receptor antagonist], and the nonprotein amino acid taurine in rescue of SSADH-deficient mice from early death. In addition, we assessed the efficacy of the specific GHB receptor antagonist NCS-382 (6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5-[H]benzocycloheptene-5-ol-6-ylideneacetic acid) using i.p. administration. All interventions led to significant lifespan extension (22-61%), with NCS-382 being most effective (50-61% survival). To explore the limited human clinical efficacy of VGB, we measured brain GHB and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels in SSADH-deficient mice receiving VGB. Whereas high-dose VGB led to the expected elevation of brain GABA, we found no parallel decrease in GHB levels. Our data indicate that, at a minimum, GHB and GABA(B) receptors are involved in the pathophysiology of SSADH deficiency. We conclude that taurine and NCS-382 may have therapeutic relevance in human SSADH deficiency and that the poor clinical efficacy of VGB in this disease may relate to an inability to decrease brain GHB concentrations.

  10. Low Dose Gamma Irradiation Does Not Affect the Quality or Total Ascorbic Acid Concentration of "Sweetheart" Passionfruit (Passiflora edulis).

    PubMed

    Golding, John B; Blades, Barbara L; Satyan, Shashirekha; Spohr, Lorraine J; Harris, Anne; Jessup, Andrew J; Archer, John R; Davies, Justin B; Banos, Connie

    2015-08-26

    Passionfruit (Passiflora edulis, Sims, cultivar "Sweetheart") were subject to gamma irradiation at levels suitable for phytosanitary purposes (0, 150, 400 and 1000 Gy) then stored at 8 °C and assessed for fruit quality and total ascorbic acid concentration after one and fourteen days. Irradiation at any dose (≤1000 Gy) did not affect passionfruit quality (overall fruit quality, colour, firmness, fruit shrivel, stem condition, weight loss, total soluble solids level (TSS), titratable acidity (TA) level, TSS/TA ratio, juice pH and rot development), nor the total ascorbic acid concentration. The length of time in storage affected some fruit quality parameters and total ascorbic acid concentration, with longer storage periods resulting in lower quality fruit and lower total ascorbic acid concentration, irrespective of irradiation. There was no interaction between irradiation treatment and storage time, indicating that irradiation did not influence the effect of storage on passionfruit quality. The results showed that the application of 150, 400 and 1000 Gy gamma irradiation to "Sweetheart" purple passionfruit did not produce any deleterious effects on fruit quality or total ascorbic acid concentration during cold storage, thus supporting the use of low dose irradiation as a phytosanitary treatment against quarantine pests in purple passionfruit.

  11. Effects of colistin on amino acid neurotransmitters and blood-brain barrier in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Yi, Meishuang; Chen, Xueping; Muhammad, Ishfaq; Liu, Fangping; Li, Rui; Li, Jian; Li, Jichang

    2016-01-01

    Neurotoxicity is one of the major potential side effects of colistin therapy. However, the mechanistic aspects of colistin-induced neurotoxicity remain largely unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of colistin on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and amino acid neurotransmitters in the cerebral cortex of mouse. Mice were divided into four groups (n=5) and were administrated intravenously with 15mg/kg/day of colistin sulfate for 1, 3 and 7days successively while the control group was administrated intravenously with saline solution. The permeability and ultrastructure of the BBB were detected using the Evans blue (EB) dye and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the expression of Claudin-5 were determined by real-time PCR examination and western blotting. The brain uptake of colistin was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The effects of colistin on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors were also examined by HPLC and real-time PCR. The results of EB extravasation, TEM and expression of Claudin-5 showed that colistin treatment did not affect the BBB integrity. In addition, multiple doses of colistin could induce accumulation of this compound in the brain parenchyma although there was poor brain uptake of colistin. Moreover, colistin exposure significantly increased the contents of glutamate (Glu) and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), and enhanced the mRNA expression levels of gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR), gamma aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABABR), N-methyl-d-aspartate 1 receptor (NR1), N-methyl-d-aspartate 2A receptor (NR2A) and N-methyl-d-aspartate 2B receptor (NR2B) in the cerebral cortex. Our data demonstrate that colistin is able to accumulate in the mouse brain and elevate the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters. These findings may be associated with colistin-induced neurotoxicity.

  12. Enantioselective syntheses and configuration assignments of gamma-chiral butenolides from Plagiomnium undulatum: butenolide synthesis from tetronic acids.

    PubMed

    Kapferer, Tobias; Brückner, Reinhard; Herzig, Axel; König, Wilfried A

    2005-03-18

    Both enantiomers of the gamma-chiral alpha,beta-dimethylated butyrolactones nat-1 and nat-2 from the moss Plagiomnium undulatum were synthesized stereoselectively through butenolides and tetronic acids, respectively. The configuration of the natural products was determined by GLC comparisons with mono(3-O-acetyl-6-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-2-O-methyl)hexakis(6-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-2,3-di-O-methyl)-beta-cyclodextrin as a stationary phase.

  13. High Dose Gamma Radiation Selectively Reduces GABAA-slow Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Dagne, Beza A; Sunay, Melis K; Cayla, Noëlie S; Ouyang, Yi-Bing; Knox, Susan J; Giffard, Rona G; Adler, John R.

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the effects of gamma radiation on brain tissue have produced markedly differing results, ranging from little effect to major pathology, following irradiation. The present study used control-matched animals to compare effects on a well characterized brain region following gamma irradiation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 60 Gy of whole brain gamma radiation and, after 24-hours, 48-hours, and one-week periods, hippocampal brain slices were isolated and measured for anatomical and physiological differences. There were no major changes observed in tissue appearance or evoked synaptic responses at any post-irradiation time point. However, exposure to 60 Gy of irradiation resulted in a small, but statistically significant (14% change; ANOVA p < 0.005; n = 9) reduction in synaptic inhibition seen at 100 ms, indicating a selective depression of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) slow form of inhibition. Population spike (PS) amplitudes also transiently declined by ~ 10% (p < 0.005; n = 9) when comparing the 24-hour group to sham group. Effects on PS amplitude recovered to baseline 48 hour and one week later. There were no obvious negative pathological effects; however, a subtle depression in circuit level inhibition was observed and provides evidence for ‘radiomodulation’ of brain circuits.

  14. Unprecedented asymmetric induction through configurationally stable lithium N-(alpha-methylbenzyl)phosphinamides. A new entry to enantiomerically pure gamma-aminophosphinic acids and esters.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ignacio; Gómez, Gloria Ruiz; Alfonso, Ignacio; Iglesias, María J; Ortiz, Fernando López

    2005-11-21

    The first examples of configurationally stable N-benzyl-N-phosphinoyl carbanions are described. Their applications to the synthesis of homochiral gamma-aminophosphinic acids and esters via highly enantioselective dearomatising reactions are shown.

  15. Modes and nodes explain the mechanism of action of vortioxetine, a multimodal agent (MMA): modifying serotonin's downstream effects on glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) release.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Stephen M

    2015-08-01

    Vortioxetine is an antidepressant with multiple pharmacologic modes of action at targets where serotonin neurons connect with other neurons. These actions modify the release of both glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) within various brain circuits.

  16. Gamma-linolenic acid dietary supplementation can reverse the aging influence on rat liver microsome delta 6-desaturase activity.

    PubMed

    Biagi, P L; Bordoni, A; Hrelia, S; Celadon, M; Horrobin, D F

    1991-05-08

    We have recently demonstrated that in rats the process of delta 6-desaturation of linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids slows with aging. One method of counteracting the effect of slowed desaturation of linoleic acid would be to provide the 6-desaturated metabolite, gamma-linolenic acid (18:3(n-6) GLA) directly. We have here investigated the 6-desaturation of both linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids in liver microsomes of young and old rats given GLA in the form of evening primrose oil (EPO) (B diet) in comparison to animals given soy bean oil alone (A diet), monitoring also the fatty acid composition of liver microsomes and relating this to the microviscosity of the membranes. In young rats the different experimental diets did not produce any difference in delta 6-desaturase (D6D) activity on either substrate suggesting that, when D6D activity is at or near its peak, the variations in diet tested are unable to influence it. In the old animals the rate of 6-desaturation of linoleic and particularly of alpha-linolenic acid was significantly greater in the B diet fed animals than in the A diet fed. The effects of the diets on the fatty acid composition of liver microsomes were consistent with the findings with regard to 6-desaturation. Administration of GLA partially corrected the abnormalities of n-6 essential fatty acid (EFA) metabolism by raising the concentration of 20:4(n-6) and other 6-desaturated EFAs. Furthermore, the GLA rich diet also increased the levels of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid and of 6-desaturated n-3 EFAs in the liver microsomes. The microviscosity of microsomal membranes as indicated by DPH polarization was correlated with the unsaturation index of the same membranes. There was a very strong correlation between the two. In both young and old rats the B diet reduced the microviscosity and increased the unsaturation index. However, the effect was much greater in the old animals.

  17. Comparison of growth and fatty acid metabolism in rats fed diets containing equal levels of gamma-linolenic acid from high gamma-linolenic acid canola oil or borage oil.

    PubMed

    Palombo, J D; DeMichele, S J; Liu, J W; Bistrian, B R; Huang, Y S

    2000-09-01

    We have utilized transgenic technology to develop a new source of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) using the canola plant as a host. The aim of the present study was to compare the growth and fatty acid metabolism in rats fed equal amounts of GLA obtained from the transgenic canola plant relative to GLA from the borage plant. Young male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 10/group) were randomized and fed a purified AIN93G diet (10% lipid by weight) containing either a mixture of high GLA canola oil (HGCO) and corn oil or a control diet containing borage oil (BO) for 6 wk. GLA accounted for 23%, of the triglyceride fatty acids in both diets. Growth and diet consumption were monitored every 2-3 d throughout the study. At study termination, the fatty acid composition of the liver and plasma phospholipids was analyzed by gas chromatography. The growth and diet consumption of the HGCO group were similar to the BO group. There were no adverse effects of either diet on the general health or appearance of the rats, or on the morphology of the major organs. There was no significant difference between the diet groups for total percentage of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids present in either the total or individual phospholipid fractions of liver or plasma. The relative percentage of GLA and its main metabolite, arachidonic acid, in each phospholipid fraction of liver or plasma were also similar between groups. The percentage of 18:2n-6 in liver phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol/serine was higher (P < 0.05) and 22:5n-6 was lower in the HGCO group than the BO group. This finding could be attributed to the higher 18:3n-3 content in the HGCO diet than the BO diet. Results from this long-term feeding study of rats show for the first time that a diet containing transgenically modified canola oil was well-tolerated, and had similar biological effects, i.e., growth characteristics and hepatic metabolism of n-6 fatty acids, as a diet containing borage oil.

  18. Fatal Combination with 3-Methylmethcathinone (3-MMC) and Gamma-Hydroxybutyric Acid (GHB).

    PubMed

    Jamey, Carole; Kintz, Pascal; Martrille, Laurent; Raul, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-09-01

    We reported the case of 69-year-old man who was discovered dead at a friend's home. 3-Methylmethcathinone (3-MMC) and poppers (alkyl nitrites) were found at the scene by the police. Autopsy specimens including peripheral and cardiac blood, urine, gastric content, bile and hair were sent to our laboratory to document a possible death involving abuse of drugs. Routine toxicological analysis was performed with gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID), high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD), headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-MS. After liquid-liquid extraction at alkaline pH, 3-MMC was identified with GC-MS (to allow the discrimination with 4-MMC) and quantified with ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS)-MS with the two following transitions: m/z 178.1 > 160 and 178.1 > 144.9. Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) was analyzed by GC-MS for fluids and GC-MS-MS for hair. Toxicological analysis in peripheral blood revealed the presence of 3-MMC (0.33 mg/L), pseudoephedrine (0.03 mg/L) and GHB (576 mg/L). These molecules have also been found in other post-mortem fluids. Furthermore, testing for "poppers" by HS-GC-MS was negative. Hair analysis, without segmentation, demonstrated the presence of 3-MMC (206.7 ng/mg), pseudoephedrine (0.16 ng/mg) and GHB (96.3 ng/mg) and suggested a repeated consumption of these substances. However, one cannot exclude contamination by sweat during the agony period. Toxicological post-mortem results suggest a fatal combination of 3-MMC and GHB. Despite his age, the decedent was known to abuse drugs.

  19. Protein fluorescence decay: A gamma function description of thermally induced interconversion of amino acid rotamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolinski, Olaf J.; Scobie, Katherine; Birch, David J. S.

    2009-05-01

    We present a description of fluorescence decay kinetics in complex environments based on gamma functions rather than the conventional approach using exponentials. The gamma function description is tested in measurements on the temperature dependence of the protein human serum albumin (HSA), N-acetyl tryptophanamide (NATA), and 2, 5-dipenyl oxazole (PPO). The monitoring of macromolecular structure and dynamics is demonstrated by means of distinct tryptophan (Trp) rotamer populations and their interconversion in HSA.

  20. Antimony leaching in plastics from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) with various acids and gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tostar, Sandra; Stenvall, Erik; Boldizar, Antal; Foreman, Mark R. St. J.

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • We have proposed a method to recover antimony from electronic plastics. • The most efficient acid solution was sodium hydrogen tartrate in dimethyl sulfoxide. • Gamma irradiation did not influence the antimony leaching ability. - Abstract: There has been a recent interest in antimony since the availability in readily mined areas is decreasing compared to the amounts used. It is important in many applications such as flame retardants and in the production of polyester, which can trigger an investigation of the leachability of antimony from plastics using different acids. In this paper, different types of acids are tested for their ability to leach antimony from a discarded computer housing, made of poly(acrylonitrile butadiene styrene), which is a common plastic type used in electrical and electronic equipment. The acid solutions included sodium hydrogen tartrate (0.5 M) dissolved in either dimethyl sulfoxide or water (at ca. 23 °C and heated to ca. 105 °C). The metal content after leaching was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The most efficient leaching medium was the heated solution of sodium hydrogen tartrate in dimethyl sulfoxide, which leached almost half of the antimony from the poly(acrylonitrile butadiene styrene). Gamma irradiation, which is proposed to improve the mechanical properties in plastics, was used here to investigate the influence of antimony leaching ability. No significant change in the amount of leached antimony could be observed.