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Sample records for gamma knife surgery

  1. Gamma knife surgery for craniopharyngioma.

    PubMed

    Prasad, D; Steiner, M; Steiner, L

    1995-01-01

    We present our results of Gamma Knife surgery for craniopharyngioma in nine patients. The current status of surgery, radiation therapy, intracavitary instillation of radionucleides and Gamma Knife surgery in the management of craniopharyngiomas is discussed.

  2. Surgery or gamma -knife for the treatment of arteriovenous malformations?

    PubMed

    Shigeno, T; Atsuchi, M; Tanaka, J; Goto, K; Ogata, N

    2000-09-01

    Decision making for either surgery or gamma-knife for the treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) cannot be uniform. The skill of the neurosurgeon in operating on AVMs is now being compared with that of the gamma-knife. The decision varies from case to case and is to be taken by the neurosurgeon. This report presents three cases in which such decision making was not easy. Case 1 was a non-ruptured cingulate AVM of 2.5 cm diameter in the cingulate cortex. The operative field was anticipated to be very narrow between the parietal bridging veins. Case 2 was a tiny ruptured AVM in the speech-motor area which was buried underneath the cortex. Case 3 was a large ruptured thalamo-stiriate-capsular AVM with feeders from the anterior and posterior choroidal arteries. All cases were operated without serious morbidity. A combination of pre-operative intravascular surgery (cases 1 and 3) or postoperative gamma-knife (case 3) was adopted. In conclusion, there is no unitary rule to decide on surgery or gamma-knife for the treatment of AVMs. It depends on what good or harm the responsible surgeon or the gamma-knife does.

  3. Gamma Knife

    MedlinePlus

    ... equipment? How is safety ensured? What is this equipment used for? The Gamma Knife® and its associated ... in size. top of page How does the equipment work? The Gamma Knife® utilizes a technique called ...

  4. Gamma knife surgery-induced ependymoma after the treatment of meningioma - a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Pan, Li; Che, Xiaoming; Lou, Meiqing

    2012-01-01

    Gamma knife surgery is widely used for a number of neurological disorders. However, little is known about its long-term complications such as carcinogenic risks. Here, we present a case of a radiosurgery-induced ependymoma by gamma knife surgery for the treatment of a spinal meningioma in a 7-year-old patient. In light of reviewing the previous reports, we advocate high caution in making young patients receive this treatment.

  5. Angiomatous lesion and delayed cyst formation after gamma knife surgery for intracranial meningioma: case report and review of literatures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiyong; He, Min; Chen, Hongxu; Liu, Yi; Li, Qiang; Li, Lin; Li, Jin; Chen, Haifeng; Xu, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Gamma Knife has become a major therapeutic method for intracranial meningiomas, vascular malformations and schwannomas with exact effect. In recent years an increasing number of delayed complications after Gamma Knife surgery have been reported, such as secondary tumors, cystic changes or cyst formation. But angiomatous lesion and delayed cyst formation after Gamma Knife for intracranial lesion has rarely been reported. Here we report the first case of angiomatous lesion and delayed cyst formation following Gamma Knife for intracranial meningioma and discuss its pathogenesis.

  6. Quality of life: Gamma Knife surgery and whole brain radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Janice

    2007-01-01

    Cerebral metastasis of cancers originating outside the brain has traditionally been treated with whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Gamma Knife Radiosurgery (GKS) provides safe and effective alternative treatment that is less invasive and has fewer side effects. Both WBRT and GKS are reviewed and discussed in terms of quality of life and health outcomes. The case studies of two individuals who underwent Gamma Knife surgery are presented.

  7. An intermediate term benefits and complications of gamma knife surgery in management of glomus jugulare tumor.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Raef F A; Morgan, Magad S; Fahmy, Osama M

    2016-02-15

    Glomus tumors are rare skull base slow-growing, hypervascular neoplasms that frequently involve critical neurovascular structures, and delay in diagnosis is frequent. Surgical removal is rarely radical and is usually associated with morbidity or mortality. Gamma knife surgery (GKS) has gained an increasing dependable role in the management of glomus jugulare tumors, with high rate of tumor growth control, preserving or improving clinical status and with limited complications. This study aims to evaluate intermediate term benefits and complications of gamma knife surgery in management of twenty-two patients bearing growing glomus jugulare tumors at the International Medical Center (IMC), Cairo, Egypt, between 2005 and 2011. The mean follow-up period was 56 months (range 36-108 months); there were 3 males, 19 females; mean age was 43.6 years; 15 patients had GKS as the primary treatment; 2 patients had surgical residuals; 2 had previous radiation therapy; and 3 previously underwent endovascular embolization. The average tumor volume was 7.26 cm3, and the mean marginal dose was 14.7 Gy. Post gamma knife surgery through the follow-up period neurological status was improved in 12 patients, 7 showed stable clinical condition and 3 patients developed new moderate deficits. Tumor volume post GKS was unchanged in 13 patients, decreased in 8, and showed tumor regrowth in 1 patient. Tumor progression-free survival in our studied patients was 95.5% at 5 and 7 years of the follow-up period post GKS. Gamma knife surgery could be used safely and effectively with limited complications as a primary management tool in the treatment of glomus jugulare tumors controlling tumor growth with preserving or improving clinical status especially those who do not have significant cranial or cervical extension, elderly, and surgically unfit patients; moreover, it is safe and highly effective as adjuvant therapy as well.

  8. Successful use of Gamma Knife surgery in a distal lenticulostriate artery aneurysm intervention.

    PubMed

    Lan, ZhiGang; Li, Jin; You, Chao; Chen, Jing

    2012-02-01

    We report a case of a 21-year-old woman who underwent radiosurgical treatment of a distal lenticulostriate artery (LSA) aneurysm. Twenty-two months after treatment, repeat angiography demonstrated patency of the parent vessel and complete obliteration of the aneurysm. Our case implies that Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) might serve as an alternative microinvasive technique in the treatment of LSA aneurysms, making this procedure a potential addition to present methods.

  9. Two cases of cystic enlargement of vestibular schwannoma as a late complication following gamma knife surgery.

    PubMed

    Shuto, Takashi; Matsunaga, Shigeo

    2016-11-01

    Cyst formation is the most common long-term complication after gamma knife surgery (GKS) for cerebral arteriovenous malformations; however, this rarely occurs after GKS for vestibular schwannoma (VS). We describe two patients that developed aggressive, symptomatic large cysts at more than 4 and 12years after GKS for VS, although the tumor control for these patients had been acceptable at 3 and 11years, respectively. During the surgery, a reddish lesion, which was distinct from the surrounding tumor, was observed. The microscopic examination of the reddish lesion revealed dilated capillary vessels and hemorrhage, which was compatible with late radiation changes; these were usually seen in arteriovenous malformations following radiosurgery. The present patients indicated that cyst formation and enlargement may occur as a late complication following GKS even in extra-axial benign tumors such as VS.

  10. Dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Shuang; Swanson, Nathan; Chen, Zhe; Ma, Lijun

    2009-03-01

    Gamma knife has been the treatment of choice for various brain tumors and functional disorders. Current gamma knife radiosurgery is planned in a 'ball-packing' approach and delivered in a 'step-and-shoot' manner, i.e. it aims to 'pack' the different sized spherical high-dose volumes (called 'shots') into a tumor volume. We have developed a dynamic scheme for gamma knife radiosurgery based on the concept of 'dose-painting' to take advantage of the new robotic patient positioning system on the latest Gamma Knife C™ and Perfexion™ units. In our scheme, the spherical high dose volume created by the gamma knife unit will be viewed as a 3D spherical 'paintbrush', and treatment planning reduces to finding the best route of this 'paintbrush' to 'paint' a 3D tumor volume. Under our dose-painting concept, gamma knife radiosurgery becomes dynamic, where the patient moves continuously under the robotic positioning system. We have implemented a fully automatic dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery treatment planning system, where the inverse planning problem is solved as a traveling salesman problem combined with constrained least-square optimizations. We have also carried out experimental studies of dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery and showed the following. (1) Dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery is ideally suited for fully automatic inverse planning, where high quality radiosurgery plans can be obtained in minutes of computation. (2) Dynamic radiosurgery plans are more conformal than step-and-shoot plans and can maintain a steep dose gradient (around 13% per mm) between the target tumor volume and the surrounding critical structures. (3) It is possible to prescribe multiple isodose lines with dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery, so that the treatment can cover the periphery of the target volume while escalating the dose for high tumor burden regions. (4) With dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery, one can obtain a family of plans representing a tradeoff between the delivery time and the

  11. Acute necrosis after Gamma Knife surgery in vestibular schwannoma leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Kapitza, Sandra; Pangalu, Athina; Horstmann, Gerhard A; van Eck, Albert T; Regli, Luca; Tarnutzer, Alexander A

    2016-08-01

    We discuss a rare acute complication after Gamma Knife therapy (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) in a single patient. A 52-year-old woman presented with vertigo, facial weakness and hearing loss emerging 48hours following Gamma Knife radiosurgery for a right-sided vestibular schwannoma. Neurological examination 6days after symptom onset showed right-sided facial palsy, spontaneous left-beating nystagmus and pathologic head-impulse testing to the right. Pure-tone audiogram revealed right-sided sensorineural hearing loss. A diagnosis of acute vestibulocochlear and facial neuropathy was made. Brain MRI demonstrated focal contrast sparing within the schwannoma, likely related to acute radiation necrosis. Acute multiple cranial neuropathies of the cerebellopontine angle after Gamma Knife treatment should raise suspicion of acute tissue damage within the schwannoma and should result in urgent MRI. Treatment with steroids may be considered based on accompanying swelling and edema.

  12. Gamma Knife surgery for patients with jugular foramen schwannomas: a multiinstitutional retrospective study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Toshinori; Kato, Takenori; Kida, Yoshihisa; Sasaki, Ayaka; Iwai, Yoshiyasu; Kondoh, Takeshi; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Sato, Manabu; Sato, Mitsuya; Nagano, Osamu; Nakaya, Kotaro; Nakazaki, Kiyoshi; Kano, Tadashige; Hasui, Koichi; Nagatomo, Yasushi; Yasuda, Soichiro; Moriki, Akihito; Serizawa, Toru; Osano, Seiki; Inoue, Akira

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aimed to explore the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery in patients with jugular foramen schwannomas (JFSs). METHODS This study was a multiinstitutional retrospective analysis of 117 patients with JFSs who were treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) at 18 medical centers of the Japan Leksell Gamma Knife Society. The median age of the patients was 53 years. Fifty-six patients underwent GKS as their initial treatment, while 61 patients had previously undergone resection. At the time of GKS, 46 patients (39%) had hoarseness, 45 (38%) had hearing disturbances, and 43 (36%) had swallowing disturbances. Eighty-five tumors (73%) were solid, and 32 (27%) had cystic components. The median tumor volume was 4.9 cm(3), and the median prescription dose administered to the tumor margin was 12 Gy. Five patients were treated with fractionated GKS and maximum and marginal doses of 42 and 21 Gy, respectively, using a 3-fraction schedule. RESULTS The median follow-up period was 52 months. The last follow-up images showed partial remission in 62 patients (53%), stable tumors in 42 patients (36%), and tumor progression in 13 patients (11%). The actuarial 3- and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 91% and 89%, respectively. The multivariate analysis showed that pre-GKS brainstem edema and dumbbell-shaped tumors significantly affected PFS. During the follow-up period, 20 patients (17%) developed some degree of symptomatic deterioration. This condition was transient in 12 (10%) of these patients and persistent in 8 patients (7%). The cause of the persistent deterioration was tumor progression in 4 patients (3%) and adverse radiation effects in 4 patients (3%), including 2 patients with hearing deterioration, 1 patient with swallowing disturbance, and 1 patient with hearing deterioration and hypoglossal nerve palsy. However, the preexisting hoarseness and swallowing disturbances improved in 66% and 63% of the patients, respectively

  13. Long-Term Results for Trigeminal Schwannomas Treated With Gamma Knife Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Toshinori Kato, Takenori; Iizuka, Hiroshi; Kida, Yoshihisa

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Surgical resection is considered the desirable curative treatment for trigeminal schwannomas. However, complete resection without any complications remains challenging. During the last several decades, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has emerged as a minimally invasive treatment modality. Information regarding long-term outcomes of SRS for patients harboring trigeminal schwannomas is limited because of the rarity of this tumor. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term tumor control and functional outcomes in patients harboring trigeminal schwannomas treated with SRS, specifically with gamma knife surgery (GKS). Methods and Materials: Fifty-three patients harboring trigeminal schwannomas treated with GKS were evaluated. Of these, 2 patients (4%) had partial irradiation of the tumor, and 34 patients (64%) underwent GKS as the initial treatment. The median tumor volume was 6.0 cm{sup 3}. The median maximum and marginal doses were 28 Gy and 14 Gy, respectively. Results: The median follow-up period was 98 months. On the last follow-up image, 7 patients (13%) had tumor enlargement, including the 2 patients who had partial treatment. Excluding the 2 patients who had partial treatment, the actuarial 5- and 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 90% and 82%, respectively. Patients with tumors compressing the brainstem with deviation of the fourth ventricle had significantly lower PFS rates. If those patients with tumors compressing the brainstem with deviation of the fourth ventricle are excluded, the actuarial 5- and 10-year PFS rates increased to 95% and 90%, respectively. Ten percent of patients had worsened facial numbness or pain in spite of no tumor progression, indicating adverse radiation effect. Conclusions: GKS can be an acceptable alternative to surgical resection in patients with trigeminal schwannomas. However, large tumors that compress the brainstem with deviation of the fourth ventricle should be surgically removed first and then

  14. Comparative clinical dosimetry with X-knife and gamma knife.

    PubMed

    Semwal, M K; Singh, Sukhvir; Sarin, A; Bhatnagar, S; Pathak, H C

    2012-07-01

    X-knife and gamma knife techniques are well-established for cranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Due to differences in their radiation delivery methods, some of the dosimetric parameters of these two techniques differ which may have clinical significance. There are many dosimetric studies comparing linear accelerator based techniques such as X-knife with gamma knife but generally from different institutions. We carried out a retrospective comparative study of the dosimetric parameters of the SRS treatments performed at our centre with X-knife (circular cones) and gamma knife. Our results indicate that the dose conformity and dose fall-off in the vicinity of the target volumes were better for patients treated with gamma knife as compared to X-knife. However, the dose fall-off pattern shows a reversal at a larger distance from the target. It was better for the X-knife as compared to gamma knife in the low dose region.

  15. Monte Carlo simulations to optimize experimental dosimetry of narrow beams used in Gamma Knife radio-surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lymperopoulou, G.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Papagiannis, P.; Steiner, M.; Spevacek, V.; Semnicka, J.; Dvorak, P.; Seimenis, I.

    2007-09-01

    The Leksell Gamma Knife is a stereotactic radio-surgery unit for the treatment of small volumes (on the order of 25 mm 3) that employs a hemispherical configuration of 201 60Co sources and appropriate configurations of collimation to form beams of 4, 8, 14 and 18 mm nominal diameter at the Unit Center Point (UCP). Although Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is well suited for narrow-beam dosimetry, experimental dosimetry is required at least for acceptance testing and quality assurance purposes. Besides other drawbacks of conventional point dosimeters, the main problems associated with narrow-beam dosimetry in stereotactic applications are accurate positioning and volume averaging. In this work, MCNPX and EGSnrc MC simulation dosimetry results for a Gamma Knife unit are benchmarked through their comparison to treatment planning software calculations based on radio-chromic film measurements. Then, MC dosimetry results are utilized to optimize the only three-dimensional experimental dosimetry method available; the polymer gel-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) method. MC results are used to select the spatial resolution in the imaging session of the irradiated gels and validate a mathematical tool for the localization of the UCP in the three-dimensional experimental dosimetry data acquired. Experimental results are compared with corresponding MC calculations and shown capable to provide accurate dosimetry, free of volume averaging and positioning uncertainties.

  16. Acute clinical adverse radiation effects after Gamma Knife surgery for vestibular schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Tuleasca, Constantin; George, Mercy; Faouzi, Mohamed; Schiappacasse, Luis; Leroy, Henri-Arthur; Zeverino, Michele; Daniel, Roy Thomas; Maire, Raphael; Levivier, Marc

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Vestibular schwannomas (VSs) represent a common indication of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS). While most studies focus on the long-term morbidity and adverse radiation effects (AREs), none describe the acute clinical AREs that might appear on a short-term basis. These types of events are investigated, and their incidence, type, and outcomes are reported in the present paper. METHODS The included patients were treated between July 2010 and March 2016, underwent at least 6 months of follow-up, and presented with a disabling symptom during the first 6 months after GKS that affected their quality of life. The timing of appearance, as well as the type of main symptom and outcome, were noted. The prescribed dose was 12 Gy at the margin. RESULTS Thirty-five (22%) of 159 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria had acute clinical AREs. The mean followup period was 30 months (range 6-49.2 months). The mean time of appearance was 37.9 days (median 31 days; range 3-110 days). In patients with de novo symptoms, the more frequent symptoms were vertigo (n = 4; 11.4%) and gait disturbance (n = 3; 8.6%). The exacerbation of a preexisting symptom was more frequently related to hearing loss (n = 10; 28.6%), followed by gait disturbance (n = 7; 20%) and vertigo (n = 3, 8.6%). In the univariate logistic regression analysis, the following factors were statistically significant: age (p = 0.002; odds ratio [OR] 0.96), hearing at baseline by Gardner-Robertson (GR) class (p = 0.006; OR 0.21), pure tone average at baseline (p = 0.006; OR 0.97), and Koos grade at baseline (with Koos Grade I used as a reference) (for Koos Grade II, OR 0.17 and p = 0.002; for Koos Grade III, OR 0.42 and p = 0.05). The following were not statistically significant but showed a tendency toward significance: the number of isocenters (p = 0.06; OR 0.94) and the maximal dose received by the cochlea (p = 0.07; OR 0.74). Fractional polynomial regression analysis showed a nonlinear relationship between the

  17. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Rolston, John D.; Blevins, Lewis S.

    2012-01-01

    Acromegaly is debilitating disease occasionally refractory to surgical and medical treatment. Stereotactic radiosurgery, and in particular Gamma Knife surgery (GKS), has proven to be an effective noninvasive adjunct to traditional treatments, leading to disease remission in a substantial proportion of patients. Such remission holds the promise of eliminating the need for expensive medications, along with side effects, as well as sparing patients the damaging sequelae of uncontrolled acromegaly. Numerous studies of radiosurgical treatments for acromegaly have been carried out. These illustrate an overall remission rate over 40%. Morbidity from radiosurgery is infrequent but can include cranial nerve palsies and hypopituitarism. Overall, stereotactic radiosurgery is a promising therapy for patients with acromegaly and deserves further study to refine its role in the treatment of affected patients. PMID:22518132

  18. Development of Dose-Volume Relation Model for Gamma Knife Surgery of Non-Skull Base Intracranial Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.-T.; Kim, Dong Gyu Paek, Sun Ha; Jung, Hee-Won

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To provide a dose-volume relationship for gamma knife surgery (GKS) of non-skull base intracranial meningiomas. Methods and Materials: The radiologic outcomes of GKS of 82 imaging-defined benign meningiomas located at non-skull base areas were analyzed. A total of 80 patients were included and all underwent treatment with GKS as the first and the only treatment modality. The mean patient age was 55.0 years (range, 26-78) and the mean tumor volume was 5.6 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.5-16.8). On average, 14.6 Gy (range, 10-20) was applied to the 50% isodose surface. The binary logistic regression method was applied to find prognostic factors of signal change (SC) on T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging after GKS. Results: The actuarial tumor control rate was 91.6% at 5 years. A total of 29 lesions (35.4%) showed newly developed or aggravated SCs. The volume irradiated {>=}14 Gy was the only statistically significant (p < .01) prognostic factor of SC. A dose-volume relation model obtained from the cases without SC estimated a 12.2% SC probability. Conclusion: This model can be used in GKS to treat small- to medium-size (<9.2 cm{sup 3}) non-skull base meningiomas.

  19. The gamma knife in ophthalmology. Part One--Uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wygledowska-Promieńska, Dorota; Jurys, Małgorzata; Wilczyński, Tomasz; Drzyzga, Łukasz

    2014-01-01

    The Gamma Knife was designed by Lars Leksell in the early 1950's. It gave rise to a new discipline of medicine--stereotactic radiosurgery. Primarily dedicated to neurosurgery, the Gamma Knife has become an alternative, widely used surgery technique. According to Elekta's statistics, approximately 60,000 people are treated with Leksell Gamma Knife every year and it is the most extensively studied stereotactic radiosurgery system in the world. The Leksell Gamma Knife can also be used in ophthalmology. The gamma ray beam concentration enables effective treatment of uveal melanoma, choroidal hemangioma, orbital tumors or even choroidal neovascularization. The virtue of Leksell Gamma Knife is its extreme precision, non-invasiveness and the possibility of outpatient treatment, which significantly reduces costs and diminishes post-operative complications. Innovative solutions shorten a single session to a minimum, which is very comfortable and safe for both staff and patients. Advantages and possible side effects of gamma knife radiosurgery are well-documented in the professional literature. The objective of this review is to present the recognized applications of Leksell Gamma Knife in ophthalmology.

  20. A Simple and Efficient Methodology To Improve Geometric Accuracy in Gamma Knife Radiation Surgery: Implementation in Multiple Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Karaiskos, Pantelis; Moutsatsos, Argyris; Pappas, Eleftherios; Georgiou, Evangelos; Roussakis, Arkadios; Torrens, Michael; Seimenis, Ioannis

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To propose, verify, and implement a simple and efficient methodology for the improvement of total geometric accuracy in multiple brain metastases gamma knife (GK) radiation surgery. Methods and Materials: The proposed methodology exploits the directional dependence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-related spatial distortions stemming from background field inhomogeneities, also known as sequence-dependent distortions, with respect to the read-gradient polarity during MRI acquisition. First, an extra MRI pulse sequence is acquired with the same imaging parameters as those used for routine patient imaging, aside from a reversal in the read-gradient polarity. Then, “average” image data are compounded from data acquired from the 2 MRI sequences and are used for treatment planning purposes. The method was applied and verified in a polymer gel phantom irradiated with multiple shots in an extended region of the GK stereotactic space. Its clinical impact in dose delivery accuracy was assessed in 15 patients with a total of 96 relatively small (<2 cm) metastases treated with GK radiation surgery. Results: Phantom study results showed that use of average MR images eliminates the effect of sequence-dependent distortions, leading to a total spatial uncertainty of less than 0.3 mm, attributed mainly to gradient nonlinearities. In brain metastases patients, non-eliminated sequence-dependent distortions lead to target localization uncertainties of up to 1.3 mm (mean: 0.51 ± 0.37 mm) with respect to the corresponding target locations in the “average” MRI series. Due to these uncertainties, a considerable underdosage (5%-32% of the prescription dose) was found in 33% of the studied targets. Conclusions: The proposed methodology is simple and straightforward in its implementation. Regarding multiple brain metastases applications, the suggested approach may substantially improve total GK dose delivery accuracy in smaller, outlying targets.

  1. Predictive Nomogram for the Durability of Pain Relief From Gamma Knife Radiation Surgery in the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, John T.; Nida, Adrian M.; Isom, Scott; Marshall, Kopriva; Bourland, John D.; Laxton, Adrian W.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Chan, Michael D.

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To determine factors associated with the durability of stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2008, 446 of 777 patients with TN underwent SRS and had evaluable follow-up in our electronic medical records and phone interview records. The median follow-up was 21.2 months. The Barrow Neurologic Institute (BNI) pain scale was used to determine pre- and post-SRS pain. Dose-volume anatomical measurements, Burchiel pain subtype, pain quality, prior procedures, and medication usage were included in this retrospective cohort to identify factors impacting the time to BNI 4-5 pain relapse by using Cox proportional hazard regression. An internet-based nomogram was constructed based on predictive factors of durable relief pre- and posttreatment at 6-month intervals. Results: Rates of freedom from BNI 4-5 failure at 1, 3, and 5 years were 84.5%, 70.4%, and 46.9%, respectively. Pain relief was BNI 1-3 at 1, 3, and 5 years in 86.1%, 74.3%, and 51.3% of type 1 patients; 79.3%, 46.2%, and 29.3% of type 2 patients; and 62.7%, 50.2%, and 25% of atypical facial pain patients. BNI type 1 pain score was achieved at 1, 3, and 5 years in 62.9%, 43.5%, and 22.0% of patients with type 1 pain and in 47.5%, 25.2%, and 9.2% of type 2 patients, respectively. Only 13% of patients with atypical facial pain achieved BNI 1 response; 42% of patients developed post-Gamma Knife radiation surgery (GKRS) trigeminal dysfunction. Multivariate analysis revealed that post-SRS numbness (hazard ratio [HR], 0.47; P<.0001), type 1 (vs type 2) TN (HR, 0.6; P=.02), and improved post-SRS BNI score at 6 months (HR, 0.009; P<.0001) were predictive of a durable pain response. Conclusions: The durability of SRS for TN depends on the presenting Burchiel pain type, the post-SRS BNI score, and the presence of post-SRS facial numbness. The durability of pain relief can be estimated pre- and posttreatment by using our

  2. Development of anterior inferior cerebellar artery pseudoaneurysm after gamma knife surgery for vestibular schwannoma. A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Geraint; Hassan, Faizul; Bhatnagar, Priya; Mitchell, Patrick; Jayakrishnan, Vijayam; Forster, David; Mendelow, Alexander David

    2014-08-01

    Gamma knife surgery (GKS) is a well-established modality for controlling the progression of vestibular schwannomas. Adverse effects of this treatment are extremely rare but include cyst formation and malignant transformation. We report a case of anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) pseudoaneurysm development rupture presenting as a poor WFNS grade subarachnoid haemorrhage. This is only the fourth case of aneurysm development (AICA aneurysm) following GKS reported but due to its serious nature we believe this potential complication warrants awareness in those offering this treatment.

  3. Treatment of epidermoid tumors with gamma knife radiosurgery: Case series

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Javier A. Jacobo; Fonnegra, Julio R.; Diez, Juan C.; Fonnegra, Andres

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epidermoid tumors (ETs) are benign lesions that are treated mainly by means of surgical resection, with overall good results. External beam radiotherapy is an alternative treatment for those recurrent tumors, in which a second surgery might not be the best choice for the patient. A little information exists about the effectiveness of gamma knife radiosurgery for the treatment of newly diagnosed and recurrent ETs. We present three cases of ETs treated with gamma knife radiosurgery. Case Description: Case 1 is a 21-year-old female with an ET located in the left cerebellopontine angle (CPA) with symptoms related to VIII cranial nerve dysfunction. Symptom control was achieved and maintained after single session radiosurgery with gamma knife. Case 2 is a 59-year-old female patient with the history of trigeminal neuralgia secondary to a recurrent ET located in the left CPA. Significant pain improvement was achieved after treatment with gamma knife radiosurgery. Case 3 is a 29-year-old male patient with a CPA ET causing long lasting trigeminal neuralgia, pain relief was achieved in this patient after gamma knife radiosurgery. Conclusion: Long-term symptom relief was achieved in all three cases proving that gamma knife radiosurgery is a good and safe alternative for patients with recurrent or nonsurgically treated ETs. PMID:26958427

  4. Gamma knife radiosurgery in movement disorders: Indications and limitations.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Yoshinori; Matsuda, Shinji; Serizawa, Toru

    2017-01-01

    Functional radiosurgery has advanced steadily during the past half century since the development of the gamma knife technique for treating intractable cancer pain. Applications of radiosurgery for intracranial diseases have increased with a focus on understanding radiobiology. Currently, the use of gamma knife radiosurgery to ablate deep brain structures is not widespread because visualization of the functional targets remains difficult despite the increased availability of advanced neuroimaging technology. Moreover, most existing reports have a small sample size or are retrospective. However, increased experience with intraoperative neurophysiological evaluations in radiofrequency thalamotomy and deep brain stimulation supports anatomical and neurophysiological approaches to the ventralis intermedius nucleus. Two recent prospective studies have promoted the clinical application of functional radiosurgery for movement disorders. For example, unilateral gamma knife thalamotomy is a potential alternative to radiofrequency thalamotomy and deep brain stimulation techniques for intractable tremor patients with contraindications for surgery. Despite the promising efficacy of gamma knife thalamotomy, however, these studies did not include sufficient follow-up to confirm long-term effects. Herein, we review the radiobiology literature, various techniques, and the treatment efficacy of gamma knife radiosurgery for patients with movement disorders. Future research should focus on randomized controlled studies and long-term effects. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  5. Automated Gamma Knife dose planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leichtman, Gregg S.; Aita, Anthony L.; Goldman, H. W.

    1998-06-01

    The Gamma Knife (Elekta Instruments, Inc., Atlanta, GA), a neurosurgical, highly focused radiation delivery device, is used to eradicate deep-seated anomalous tissue within the human brain by delivering a lethal dose of radiation to target tissue. This dose is the accumulated result of delivering sequential `shots' of radiation to the target where each shot is approximately 3D Gaussian in shape. The size and intensity of each shot can be adjusted by varying the time of radiation exposure and by using one of four collimator sizes ranging from 4 - 18 mm. Current dose planning requires that the dose plan be developed manually to cover the target, and only the target, with a desired minimum radiation intensity using a minimum number of shots. This is a laborious and subjective process which typically leads to suboptimal conformal target coverage by the dose. We have used adaptive simulated annealing/quenching followed by Nelder-Mead simplex optimization to automate the selection and placement of Gaussian-based `shots' to form a simulated dose plane. In order to make the computation of the problem tractable, the algorithm, based upon contouring and polygon clipping, takes a 2 1/2-D approach to defining the cost function. Several experiments have been performed where the optimizers have been given the freedom to vary the number of shots and the weight, collimator size, and 3D location of each shot. To data best results have been obtained by forcing the optimizers to use a fixed number of unweighted shots with each optimizer set free to vary the 3D location and collimator size of each shot. Our preliminary results indicate that this technology will radically decrease planning time while significantly increasing accuracy of conformal target coverage and reproducibility over current manual methods.

  6. Concomitant GRID boost for Gamma Knife radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Lijun; Kwok, Young; Chin, Lawrence S.; Simard, J. Marc; Regine, William F.

    2005-11-15

    We developed an integrated GRID boost technique for Gamma Knife radiosurgery. The technique generates an array of high dose spots within the target volume via a grid of 4-mm shots. These high dose areas were placed over a conventional Gamma Knife plan where a peripheral dose covers the full target volume. The beam weights of the 4-mm shots were optimized iteratively to maximize the integral dose inside the target volume. To investigate the target volume coverage and the dose to the adjacent normal brain tissue for the technique, we compared the GRID boosted treatment plans with conventional Gamma Knife treatment plans using physical and biological indices such as dose-volume histogram (DVH), DVH-derived indices, equivalent uniform dose (EUD), tumor control probabilities (TCP), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). We found significant increase in the target volume indices such as mean dose (5%-34%; average 14%), TCP (4%-45%; average 21%), and EUD (2%-22%; average 11%) for the GRID boost technique. No significant change in the peripheral dose coverage for the target volume was found per RTOG protocol. In addition, the EUD and the NTCP for the normal brain adjacent to the target (i.e., the near region) were decreased for the GRID boost technique. In conclusion, we demonstrated a new technique for Gamma Knife radiosurgery that can escalate the dose to the target while sparing the adjacent normal brain tissue.

  7. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Choroidal Hemangioma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yun Taek; Kang, Se Woong; Lee, Jung-Il

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Patients with choroidal hemangioma (CH), a benign ocular hamartoma, frequently presents with visual disturbance as a result of exudative retinal detachment (RD), which originates in subretinal fluid accumulation. We report our experience using the Leksell Gamma Knife in the management of symptomatic CH. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with symptomatic CH (circumscribed form in 3 patients and diffuse form in 4) were treated with the Leksell Gamma Knife at our institution during a 7-year period. All patients presented with exudative RD involving the macula that resulted in severe visual deterioration. The prescription dose to the target margin was 10 Gy in all cases. The mean tumor volume receiving the prescription dose was 536 mm{sup 3} (range, 151-1,057). The clinical data were analyzed in a retrospective fashion after a mean follow-up of 34.4 months (range, 9-76). Results: The resolution of exudative RD was achieved within 6 months, and the visual acuity of the affected eye had improved at the latest follow-up examination (p = .018) in all patients. No recurrence of exudative RD occurred. Thinning of the CHs was observed in most patients; however, symptomatic radiation toxicity had not developed in any of the patients. Conclusion: Symptomatic CHs can be safely and effectively managed with Gamma Knife radiosurgery using a marginal dose of 10 Gy.

  8. Semiquantitative Analysis Using Thallium-201 SPECT for Differential Diagnosis Between Tumor Recurrence and Radiation Necrosis After Gamma Knife Surgery for Malignant Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, Shigeo; Shuto, Takashi; Takase, Hajime; Ohtake, Makoto; Tomura, Nagatsuki; Tanaka, Takahiro; Sonoda, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Semiquantitative analysis of thallium-201 chloride single photon emission computed tomography ({sup 201}Tl SPECT) was evaluated for the discrimination between recurrent brain tumor and delayed radiation necrosis after gamma knife surgery (GKS) for metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The medical records were reviewed of 75 patients, including 48 patients with metastatic brain tumor and 27 patients with high-grade glioma who underwent GKS in our institution, and had suspected tumor recurrence or radiation necrosis on follow-up neuroimaging and deteriorating clinical status after GKS. Analysis of {sup 201}Tl SPECT data used the early ratio (ER) and the delayed ratio (DR) calculated as tumor/normal average counts on the early and delayed images, and the retention index (RI) as the ratio of DR to ER. Results: A total of 107 tumors were analyzed with {sup 201}Tl SPECT. Nineteen lesions were removed surgically and histological diagnoses established, and the other lesions were evaluated with follow-up clinical and neuroimaging examinations after GKS. The final diagnosis was considered to be recurrent tumor in 65 lesions and radiation necrosis in 42 lesions. Semiquantitative analysis demonstrated significant differences in DR (P=.002) and RI (P<.0001), but not in ER (P=.372), between the tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis groups, and no significant differences between metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas in all indices (P=.926 for ER, P=.263 for DR, and P=.826 for RI). Receiver operating characteristics analysis indicated that RI was the most informative index with the optimum threshold of 0.775, which provided 82.8% sensitivity, 83.7% specificity, and 82.8% accuracy. Conclusions: Semiquantitative analysis of {sup 201}Tl SPECT provides useful information for the differentiation between tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis in metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas after GKS, and the RI may be the most

  9. Long-term safety and efficacy of stereotactic radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: evaluation of 440 patients more than 10 years after treatment with Gamma Knife surgery.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Toshinori; Kida, Yoshihisa; Kato, Takenori; Iizuka, Hiroshi; Kuramitsu, Shunichiro; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2013-03-01

    Object Little is known about long-term outcomes, including tumor control and adverse radiation effects, in patients harboring vestibular schwannomas (VSs) treated with stereotactic radiosurgery > 10 years previously. The aim of this study was to confirm whether Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) for VSs continues to be safe and effective > 10 years after treatment. Methods A total of 440 patients with VS (including neurofibromatosis Type 2) treated with GKS between May 1991 and December 2000 were evaluable. Of these, 347 patients (79%) underwent GKS as an initial treatment and 93 (21%) had undergone prior resection. Three hundred fifty-eight patients (81%) had a solid tumor and 82 (19%) had a cystic tumor. The median tumor volume was 2.8 cm(3) and the median marginal dose was 12.8 Gy. Results The median follow-up period was 12.5 years. The actuarial 5- and ≥ 10-year progression-free survival was 93% and 92%, respectively. No patient developed treatment failure > 10 years after treatment. According to multivariate analysis, significant factors related to worse progression-free survival included brainstem compression with a deviation of the fourth ventricle (p < 0.0001), marginal dose ≤ 13 Gy (p = 0.01), prior treatment (p = 0.02), and female sex (p = 0.02). Of 287 patients treated at a recent optimum dose of ≤ 13 Gy, 3 (1%) developed facial palsy, including 2 with transient palsy and 1 with persistent palsy after a second GKS, and 3 (1%) developed facial numbness, including 2 with transient and 1 with persistent facial numbness. The actuarial 10-year facial nerve preservation rate was 97% in the high marginal dose group (> 13 Gy) and 100% in the low marginal dose group (≤ 13 Gy). Ten patients (2.3%) developed delayed cyst formation. One patient alone developed malignant transformation, indicating an incidence of 0.3%. Conclusions In this study GKS was a safe and effective treatment for the majority of patients followed > 10 years after treatment. Special attention

  10. Gamma Knife surgery for tumor-related trigeminal neuralgia: targeting both the tumor and the trigeminal root exit zone in a single session.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Kwon; Kim, Dong Gyu; Se, Young-Bem; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Yong Hwy; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Paek, Sun Ha

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) represents an alternative treatment for patients with tumor-related trigeminal neuralgia (TRTN). However, in previous studies, the primary GKS target was limited to mass lesions. The authors evaluated whether GKS could target both the tumor and the trigeminal root exit zone (REZ) in a single session while providing durable pain relief and minimizing radiation dose-related complications for TRTN patients. METHODS The authors' institutional review board approved the retrospective analysis of data from 15 consecutive patients (6 men and 9 women, median age 67 years, range 45-79 years) with TRTN who had undergone GKS. In all cases, the radiation was delivered in a single session targeting both the tumor and trigeminal REZ. The authors assessed the clinical outcomes, including the extent of pain relief, durability of the treatment response, and complications. Radiation doses to organs at risk (OARs), including the brainstem and the cranial nerve VII-VIII complex, were analyzed as doses received by 2% or 50% of the tissue volume and the tissue volume covered by a dose of 12 Gy (V12Gy). RESULTS The median length of clinical follow-up was 38 months (range 12-78 months). Pain relief with GKS was initially achieved in 14 patients (93.3%) and at the last follow-up in 13 patients (86.7%). The actuarial recurrence-free survival rates were 93%, 83%, and 69% at 1, 3, and 5 years after GKS, respectively. Persistent facial numbness was observed in 3 patients (20.0%). There were no complications such as facial weakness, altered taste function, hearing impairment, and balance difficulties indicating impaired function of the cranial nerve VII-VIII complex. The V12Gy in the brainstem was less than or equal to 0.24 cm(3) in all patients. There were no significant differences in any OAR values in the brainstem between patients with and without facial numbness after GKS. CONCLUSIONS The strategy of performing GKS for both tumor and trigeminal REZ in a

  11. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for intracranial hemangioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Silva, Danilo; Grabowski, Mathew M; Juthani, Rupa; Sharma, Mayur; Angelov, Lilyana; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Chao, Samuel; Suh, John; Mohammadi, Alireza; Barnett, Gene H

    2016-09-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has become a treatment option for intracranial hemangioblastomas, especially in patients with poor clinical status and also high-risk surgical candidates. The objective of this study was to analyze clinical outcome and tumor control rates. Retrospective chart review revealed 12 patients with a total of 20 intracranial hemangioblastomas treated with GKRS from May 1998 until December 2014. Kaplan-Meier plots were used to calculate the actuarial local tumor control rates and rate of recurrence following GKRS. Univariate analysis, including log rank test and Wilcoxon test were used on the Kaplan-Meier plots to evaluate the predictors of tumor progression. Two-tailed p value of <0.05 was considered as significant. Median follow-up was 64months (2-184). Median tumor volume pre-GKRS was 946mm(3) (79-15970), while median tumor volume post-GKRS was 356mm(3) (30-5404). Complications were seen in two patients. Tumor control rates were 100% at 1year, 90% at 3years, and 85% at 5years, using the Kaplan-Meier method. There were no statistically significant univariate predictors of progression identified, although there was a trend towards successful tumor control in solid tumors (p=0.07). GKRS is an effective and safe option for treating intracranial hemangioblastoma with favorable tumor control rates.

  12. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Aubuchon, Adam C.; Chan, Michael D.; Lovato, James F.; Balamucki, Christopher J.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80-90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60-90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  13. A new Gamma Knife radiosurgery paradigm: Tomosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaoliang

    The Leksell (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden) Gamma Knife(TM) (LGK) is the worldwide standard-of-care for the radiosurgical treatment of a wide variety of intracranial lesions. The current LGK utilizes a step-and-shoot dose delivery mechanism where the centroid of each conformal radiation dose (i.e., the shot isocenter) requires repositioning the patient outside of the irradiation field. Perhaps the greatest challenge the LGK treatment team faces is planning the treatment of large and/or complexly shaped lesions that may be in close proximity to critical neural or vascular structures. The standard manual treatment planning approach is a time consuming procedure where additional time spent does not guarantee the identification of an increasingly optimal treatment plan. I propose a new radiosurgery paradigm which I refer to as "Tomosurgery". The Tomosurgery paradigm begins with the division of the target volume into a series of adjacent treatment slices, each with a carefully determined optimal thickness. The use of a continuously moving disk-shaped radiation shot that moves through the lesion in a raster-scanning pattern is expected to improve overall radiation dose conformality and homogeneity. The Tomosurgery treatment planning algorithm recruits a two-stage optimization strategy, which first plans each treatment slice as a simplified 2D problem and secondly optimally assembles the 2D treatment plans into the final 3D treatment plan. Tested on 11 clinical LGK cases, the automated inversely-generated Tomosurgery treatment plans performed as well or better than the neurosurgeon's manually created treatment plans across all criteria: (a) dose volume histograms, (b) dose homogeneity, (c) dose conformality, and (d) critical structure damage, where applicable. LGK Tomosurgery inverse treatment planning required much less time than standard of care, manual (i.e., forward) LGK treatment planning procedures. These results suggest that Tomosurgery might provide an improvement

  14. Dosimetry of the Leksell gamma knife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltsner, Sheridan Griffin

    No accepted official protocol exists for the dosimetry of the Leksell Gamma KnifeRTM (GK) stereotactic radiosurgery device. Establishment of a dosimetry protocol has been complicated by the unique partial-hemisphere arrangement of 201 separate 60Co beams simultaneously focused on the treatment volume and by the rigid geometry of the GK unit itself. This paper proposes an air kerma based dosimetry protocol using an in-air or in-acrylic phantom measurement to determine the dose rate of fields collimated by the 18 mm helmet of a GK unit. A small-volume ionization chamber was used to make measurements at the physical isocenter of three GK units. The dose rate to water was determined using a modified version of the AAPM Task Group 21 protocol designed for use with 60Co-based teletherapy machines. This experimentally determined dose rate was compared to the treatment planning system (TPS) dose rate that is determined by the clinical medical physicist at the time of machine commissioning. The TPS dose rate is defined as dose rate to water at a depth of 8 cm. The dose rate to water for the 18 mm helmet determined using the air kerma based calculations presented here is consistently between 1.5% and 2.9% higher than the TPS dose rate. These air kerma based measurements allow GK dosimetry to be performed with an established dosimetry protocol and without complications arising from the use of and possible variations in solid phantom material. Measurements were made with the same chamber in a spherical acrylic phantom for comparison. This methodology will allow future development of calibration methods appropriate for the smaller fields of GK units to be compared to a well established standard. Multiple three-dimensional dosimetry methods were also used to capture the dose distribution of the entire field of the GK. These methods included radiosensitive gel, a novel three-dimensional radiochromic film phantom, and Monte Carlo modeling. These methods were also compared to the

  15. Implementation of Monte Carlo Simulations for the Gamma Knife System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, W.; Huang, D.; Lee, L.; Feng, J.; Morris, K.; Calugaru, E.; Burman, C.; Li, J.; Ma, C.-M.

    2007-06-01

    Currently the Gamma Knife system is accompanied with a treatment planning system, Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) which is a standard, computer-based treatment planning system for Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In LGP, the dose calculation algorithm does not consider the scatter dose contributions and the inhomogeneity effect due to the skull and air cavities. To improve the dose calculation accuracy, Monte Carlo simulations have been implemented for the Gamma Knife planning system. In this work, the 201 Cobalt-60 sources in the Gamma Knife unit are considered to have the same activity. Each Cobalt-60 source is contained in a cylindric stainless steel capsule. The particle phase space information is stored in four beam data files, which are collected in the inner sides of the 4 treatment helmets, after the Cobalt beam passes through the stationary and helmet collimators. Patient geometries are rebuilt from patient CT data. Twenty two Patients are included in the Monte Carlo simulation for this study. The dose is calculated using Monte Carlo in both homogenous and inhomogeneous geometries with identical beam parameters. To investigate the attenuation effect of the skull bone the dose in a 16cm diameter spherical QA phantom is measured with and without a 1.5mm Lead-covering and also simulated using Monte Carlo. The dose ratios with and without the 1.5mm Lead-covering are 89.8% based on measurements and 89.2% according to Monte Carlo for a 18mm-collimator Helmet. For patient geometries, the Monte Carlo results show that although the relative isodose lines remain almost the same with and without inhomogeneity corrections, the difference in the absolute dose is clinically significant. The average inhomogeneity correction is (3.9 ± 0.90) % for the 22 patients investigated. These results suggest that the inhomogeneity effect should be considered in the dose calculation for Gamma Knife treatment planning.

  16. Peripheral dose in ocular treatments with CyberKnife and Gamma Knife radiosurgery compared to proton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zytkovicz, A.; Daftari, I.; Phillips, T. L.; Chuang, C. F.; Verhey, L.; Petti, P. L.

    2007-09-01

    Peripheral radiation can have deleterious effects on normal tissues throughout the body, including secondary cancer induction and cataractogenesis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the peripheral dose received by various regions of the body after ocular treatment delivered with the Model C Gamma Knife, proton radiotherapy with a dedicated ocular beam employing no passive-scattering system, or a CyberKnife unit before and after supplemental shielding was introduced. TLDs were used for stray gamma and x-ray dosimetry, whereas CR-39 dosimeters were used to measure neutron contamination in the proton experiments. Doses to the contralateral eye, neck, thorax and abdomen were measured on our anthropomorphic phantom for a 56 Gy treatment to a 588 mm3 posterior ocular lesion. Gamma Knife (without collimator blocking) delivered the highest dose in the contralateral eye, with 402-2380 mSv, as compared with 118-234 mSv for CyberKnife pre-shielding, 46-255 mSv for CyberKnife post-shielding and 9-12 mSv for proton radiotherapy. Gamma Knife and post-shielding CyberKnife delivered comparable doses proximal to the treatment site, with 190 versus 196 mSv at the thyroid, whereas protons doses at these locations were less than 10 mSv. Gamma Knife doses decreased dramatically with distance from the treatment site, delivering only 13 mSv at the lower pelvis, comparable to the proton result of 4 to 7 mSv in this region. In contrast, CyberKnife delivered between 117 and 132 mSv to the lower pelvis. In conclusion, for ocular melanoma treatments, a proton beam employing no double scattering system delivers the lowest peripheral doses proximally to the contralateral eye and thyroid when compared to radiosurgery with the Model C Gamma Knife or CyberKnife. At distal locations in the pelvis, peripheral doses delivered with proton and Gamma Knife are of an order of magnitude smaller than those delivered with CyberKnife.

  17. Gamma Knife surgery targeting the centromedian nucleus of the thalamus for the palliative management of thalamic pain: durable response in stroke-induced thalamic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Keep, Marcus F; Mastrofrancesco, Lois; Craig, Arthur D; Ashby, Lynn S

    2006-12-01

    The authors report the neuroimaging features, treatment planning, and outcome in a case of radiosurgical thalamotomy targeting the centromedian nucleus (CMN) for stroke-induced thalamic pain. A 79-year-old man, with embolic occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery and large hemispheric infarction involving the thalamus, suffered a right hemiplegia and expressive aphasia. One year poststroke, severe right-sided facial, scalp, arm, and trunk pain developed and was exacerbated by any tactile contact. Medical treatment had failed. Medical illness, including mandatory anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation, precluded surgical procedures. Minimally invasive radiosurgery was offered as an alternative. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography were used to localize the left CMN. A single shot of 140 Gy was delivered to the 100% isodose line by using the 4-mm collimator helmet. The patient was evaluated at regular intervals. By 12 weeks posttreatment, he had significant improvements in pain control and his ability to tolerate physical contact during activities of daily living. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated baseline encephalomalacia from his prior stroke, and signal changes in the left CMN consistent with gamma irradiation-based thalamotomy. Currently, nearly 7 years after radiosurgery, he continues to enjoy a marked reduction in pain without the need of analgesic medications. Thalamic pain syndrome is generally refractory to conventional treatment. Neurosurgical interventions provide modest benefit and carry associated risks of invasive surgery and anesthesia. The CMN is readily localized with neuroimaging and is an approximate target to reduce the suffering aspect of pain. In this case, radiosurgery was a safe and effective treatment, providing durable symptom control and improved quality of life.

  18. Worldwide variance in the potential utilization of Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Travis; Dade Lunsford, L

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The role of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has expanded worldwide during the past 3 decades. The authors sought to evaluate whether experienced users vary in their estimate of its potential use. METHODS Sixty-six current Gamma Knife users from 24 countries responded to an electronic survey. They estimated the potential role of GKRS for benign and malignant tumors, vascular malformations, and functional disorders. These estimates were compared with published disease epidemiological statistics and the 2014 use reports provided by the Leksell Gamma Knife Society (16,750 cases). RESULTS Respondents reported no significant variation in the estimated use in many conditions for which GKRS is performed: meningiomas, vestibular schwannomas, and arteriovenous malformations. Significant variance in the estimated use of GKRS was noted for pituitary tumors, craniopharyngiomas, and cavernous malformations. For many current indications, the authors found significant variance in GKRS users based in the Americas, Europe, and Asia. Experts estimated that GKRS was used in only 8.5% of the 196,000 eligible cases in 2014. CONCLUSIONS Although there was a general worldwide consensus regarding many major indications for GKRS, significant variability was noted for several more controversial roles. This expert opinion survey also suggested that GKRS is significantly underutilized for many current diagnoses, especially in the Americas. Future studies should be conducted to investigate health care barriers to GKRS for many patients.

  19. Stereotactic radiosurgery of the brain using the first United States 201 cobalt-60 source gamma knife

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, L.D.; Flickinger, J.; Lindner, G.; Maitz, A.

    1989-02-01

    The first United States 201 cobalt-60 source gamma knife for stereotactic radiosurgery of brain tumors and arteriovenous malformations became operational at the University of Pittsburgh on August 14, 1987. Four and one-half years of intensive planning, regulatory agency review, and analysis of published results preceded the first radiosurgical procedure. Installation of this 18,000-kg device and loading of the 201 cobalt-60 sources posed major challenges in engineering, architecture, and radiophysics. In the first 4 months of operation, we treated 52 patients (29 with arteriovenous malformations, 19 with extra-axial neoplasms of the skull base, and 4 with intra-axial malignant tumors). Most patients either had lesions considered inoperable or had residual lesions after attempted surgical resection. Neither surgical mortality nor significant morbidity was associated with gamma knife radiosurgery. As compared with treatment by conventional intracranial surgery (craniotomy), the average length of stay for radiosurgery was reduced by 4 to 14 days, and hospital charges were reduced by as much as 65%. Based on both the previously published results of treatment of more than 2,000 patients worldwide and on our initial clinical experience, we believe that gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery is a therapeutically effective and economically sound alternative to more conventional neurosurgical procedures, in selected cases.

  20. First clinical experience with the automatic positioning system and Leksell gamma knife Model C. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Horstmann, G A; Schöpgens, H; van Eck, A T; Kreiner, H J; Herz, W

    2000-12-01

    In May of 1999, the first Leksell Model C gamma knife was installed at the Gamma Knife Zentrum in Krefeld, Germany. The authors recount their experience with this latest technical gamma knife development. Until the end of 1999, extensive physical and technical tests were performed and the system's hardware and software were continuously improved and adapted to the user's needs. By the end of 1999, 163 GKSs had been performed using the new functionality of the Model C in manual or "trunnion" mode. The trunnions, the two parts of the system that fix the patient headframe to the gamma knife when the isocenter positions, are checked manually. During the same period the new automatic positioning system (APS) was extensively tested and refined so that the first APS treatment could be performed in January 2000. Fifty GKSs have been performed with the APS capability of the Model C. It was possible to use APS alone in 74% of surgeries whereas in 14% some shots were given with APS and some with trunnions. In 12%, GKS was scheduled and planned for APS, but due to unexpected technical (6%) or mechanical (6%) reasons the treatment had to be performed manually. At present there are some spatial restrictions with Model C in APS mode when compared with the Model B. The most significant restriction is the narrow space for the patient's shoulders, especially when deep-seated lesions are treated. Through mechanical changes of the APS motor housing and some modifications of and to the motor driven couch adjustment, these limitations will be reduced in the future. The APS treatment runs smoothly and fast. In no case did any relevant safety error occur during GKS. The more stringent mechanical limitations of the APS compared with the Model B means that frame placement on the head is more critical than before.

  1. MCNP-based computational model for the Leksell Gamma Knife

    SciTech Connect

    Trnka, Jiri; Novotny, Josef Jr.; Kluson, Jaroslav

    2007-01-15

    We have focused on the usage of MCNP code for calculation of Gamma Knife radiation field parameters with a homogenous polystyrene phantom. We have investigated several parameters of the Leksell Gamma Knife radiation field and compared the results with other studies based on EGS4 and PENELOPE code as well as the Leksell Gamma Knife treatment planning system Leksell GammaPlan (LGP). The current model describes all 201 radiation beams together and simulates all the sources in the same time. Within each beam, it considers the technical construction of the source, the source holder, collimator system, the spherical phantom, and surrounding material. We have calculated output factors for various sizes of scoring volumes, relative dose distributions along basic planes including linear dose profiles, integral doses in various volumes, and differential dose volume histograms. All the parameters have been calculated for each collimator size and for the isocentric configuration of the phantom. We have found the calculated output factors to be in agreement with other authors' works except the case of 4 mm collimator size, where averaging over the scoring volume and statistical uncertainties strongly influences the calculated results. In general, all the results are dependent on the choice of the scoring volume. The calculated linear dose profiles and relative dose distributions also match independent studies and the Leksell GammaPlan, but care must be taken about the fluctuations within the plateau, which can influence the normalization, and accuracy in determining the isocenter position, which is important for comparing different dose profiles. The calculated differential dose volume histograms and integral doses have been compared with data provided by the Leksell GammaPlan. The dose volume histograms are in good agreement as well as integral doses calculated in small calculation matrix volumes. However, deviations in integral doses up to 50% can be observed for large

  2. PRESAGE 3D dosimetry accurately measures Gamma Knife output factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klawikowski, Slade J.; Yang, James N.; Adamovics, John; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2014-12-01

    Small-field output factor measurements are traditionally very difficult because of steep dose gradients, loss of lateral electronic equilibrium, and dose volume averaging in finitely sized detectors. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry is ideal for measuring small output factors and avoids many of these potential challenges of point and 2D detectors. PRESAGE 3D polymer dosimeters were used to measure the output factors for the 4 mm and 8 mm collimators of the Leksell Perfexion Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatment system. Discrepancies between the planned and measured distance between shot centers were also investigated. A Gamma Knife head frame was mounted onto an anthropomorphic head phantom. Special inserts were machined to hold 60 mm diameter, 70 mm tall cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters. The phantom was irradiated with one 16 mm shot and either one 4 mm or one 8 mm shot, to a prescribed dose of either 3 Gy or 4 Gy to the 50% isodose line. The two shots were spaced between 30 mm and 60 mm apart and aligned along the central axis of the cylinder. The Presage dosimeters were measured using the DMOS-RPC optical CT scanning system. Five independent 4 mm output factor measurements fell within 2% of the manufacturer’s Monte Carlo simulation-derived nominal value, as did two independent 8 mm output factor measurements. The measured distances between shot centers varied by ±0.8 mm with respect to the planned shot displacements. On the basis of these results, we conclude that PRESAGE dosimetry is excellently suited to quantify the difficult-to-measure Gamma Knife output factors.

  3. Brain metastases in women with epithelial ovarian cancer: multimodal treatment including surgery or gamma-knife radiation is associated with prolonged survival.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaoyu; Rajanbabu, Anupama; Delisle, Megan; Peng, Feng; Vijaykumar, Dehannathuparambil K; Pavithran, Keechilattu; Feng, Yukuan; Lau, Susie; Gotlieb, Walter H; Press, Joshua Z

    2013-09-01

    Objectif : Explorer les effets de la modalité de traitement sur la survie chez les patientes qui présentent des métastases cérébrales attribuables au cancer épithélial de l’ovaire. Méthodes : Nous avons mené une analyse rétrospective des cas de cancer de l’ovaire donnant lieu à des métastases cérébrales qui ont été traités dans des établissements se situant dans trois pays (Canada, Chine et Inde); de plus, nous avons mené une recherche qui visait les études ayant traité des métastases cérébrales associées au cancer de l’ovaire qui faisaient mention des taux de survie liés aux modalités de traitement. La survie a été analysée en fonction de schémas de traitement mettant en jeu (1) une forme quelconque d’excision chirurgicale ou de radiochirurgie par scalpel gamma avec ou sans autres modalités, (2) d’autres modalités sans chirurgie ni radiochirurgie par scalpel gamma ou (3) des modalités palliatives seulement. Résultats : Douze patientes (âge moyen : 56 ans) comptant des données détaillées en ce qui concerne le traitement / les issues ont été admises à l’étude; cinq d’entre elles étaient de la Chine, quatre du Canada et trois de l’Inde. Le délai médian entre le diagnostic de cancer de l’ovaire et l’apparition de métastases cérébrales était de 19 mois (plage de 10 à 37 mois), et la durée de survie médiane globale à la suite du diagnostic de cancer de l’ovaire était de 38 mois (de 13 à 82 mois). La durée de survie médiane à la suite du diagnostic de métastases cérébrales était de 17 mois (de 1 à 45 mois). Chez les patientes ayant subi un traitement multimodal qui faisait appel à la radiochirurgie par scalpel gamma ou à l’excision chirurgicale, la durée de survie médiane à la suite de l’identification des métastases cérébrales était de 25,6 mois, par comparaison avec 6,0 mois chez les patientes dont le traitement ne faisait pas appel à ce type de modalit

  4. Dosimetrical evaluation of Leksell Gamma Knife 4C radiosurgery unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajeev, Thomas; Mustafa, Mohamed M.; Supe, Sanjay S.

    2011-01-01

    A number of experiments was performed using standard protocols, in order to evaluate the dosimetric accuracy of Leksell Gamma Knife 4C unit. Verification of the beam alignment has been performed for all collimators using solid plastic head phantom and Gafchromic™ type MD-55 films. The study showed a good agreement of Leksell Gammaplan calculated dose profiles with experimentally determined profiles in all three axes. Isocentric accuracy is verified using a specially machined cylindrical aluminium film holder tool made with very narrow geometric tolerances aligned between trunnions of 4 mm collimator. Considering all uncertainties in all three dimensions, the estimated accuracy of the unit was 0.1 mm. Dose rate at the centre point of the unit has been determined according to the IAEA, TRS-398 protocol, using Unidose-E (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) with a 0.125 cc ion chamber, over a period of 6 years. The study showed that the Leksell Gamma Knife 4C unit is excellent radiosurgical equipment with high accuracy and precision, which makes it possible to deliver larger doses of radiation, within the limits defined by national and international guidelines, applicable for stereotactic radiosurgery procedures.

  5. Stereotactic gamma knife radiosurgery. Initial North American experience in 207 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, L.D.; Flickinger, J.; Coffey, R.J. )

    1990-02-01

    The first North American gamma knife for stereotactic radiosurgery of brain tumors and arteriovenous malformations entered the therapeutic armamentarium at the University of Pittsburgh (Pa) on August 14, 1987. In this article, we report our initial testing and subsequent experience with this technique. In the first 16 months of operation, 207 patients were treated (113 had arteriovenous malformations, 78 had extra-axial skull base neoplasms, 9 had glial neoplasms, and 7 had metastatic tumors). The patients' lesions either were considered previously as inoperable or were residual lesions after attempted surgical resection, or the radiosurgery was performed after the patient declined surgical excision. Gamma radiosurgery was associated with no surgical mortality and no significant early morbidity, and the results were encouraging during the minimum follow-up period of 6 months. Compared with treatment by conventional intracranial surgery (craniotomy), both the average length of stay and hospital charges for radiosurgery were significantly lower. Our initial experience further suggests that stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife is a therapeutically effective and economically sound alternative to microneurosurgical removal of selected intracranial tumors and vascular malformations.

  6. A meta-analysis of treatment of vestibular schwannoma using Gamma Knife radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Zabek, Miroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study One of the alternative methods of surgical treatment of vestibular schwannoma is Gamma Knife radiosurgery. The purpose of this metaanalysis was to analyze the progress in treatment of vestibular schwannoma using Gamma Knife radiosurgery based on data in the literature of the last five years. Material and methods In the collected English-language literature from the years 2007–2011, contained in 20 scientific journals, clinical articles of many years study at a single center were extracted and also review papers and case reports. The main criteria of our own analysis were: patient age, tumor size, the dose in Gy, the time from surgery to follow-up, the degree of tumor growth inhibition, and hearing preservation. For statistical calculations comparing series of studies we used nonparametric analysis of variance and tests at the significance level of p > 0.05. Results The 46 evaluated clinical articles show the results of studies over many years. A comparison of the results of the analysis made on the basis of papers published in the period 1998-2007 with the results of the current series from the period 2007–2011 allowed us to establish that the average dose applied to the periphery of the tumor was lower (12.4 Gy) than in the earlier series of 1998–2007 (14.2 Gy), and hearing preservation was higher (66.45% vs. 51.0%). Conclusions Clinical findings widely documented in the literature over the past five years indicate the progress in treatment of vestibular schwannoma using Gamma Knife radiosurgery. PMID:24876823

  7. Stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife for acoustic neuromas

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, R.L.; Coffey, R.J.; Swanson, J.W.

    1995-07-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife for acoustic neuromas. Between January 1990 and January 1993, 36 patients with acoustic neuromas were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife. The median maximum tumor diameter was 21 mm (range: 6-32 mm). Tumor volumes encompasses within the prescribed isodose line varied from 266 to 8,667 mm{sup 3} (median: 3,135 mm{sup 3}). Tumors {<=} 20 mm in maximum diameter received a dose of 20 Gy to the margin, tumors between 21 and 30 mm received 18 Gy, and tumors > 30 mm received 16 Gy. The dose was prescribed to the 50% isodose line in 31 patients and to the 45%, 55%, 60%, 70%, and 80% isodose line in one patient each. Nine tumors (26%) were smaller, and 26 tumors (74%) were unchanged. No tumor had progressed. The 1- and 2-year actuarial incidences of facial neuropathy were 52.2% and 66.5%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year actuarial incidences of trigeminal neuropathy were 33.7% and 58.9%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year actuarial incidence of facial or trigeminal neuropathy (or both) was 60.8% and 81.7%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that the following were associated with the time of onset or worsening of facial weakness or trigeminal neuropathy: (a) patients < age 65 years, (b) dose to the tumor margin, (c) maximum tumor diameter {>=} 21 mm, (d) use of the 18 mm collimator, and (e) use of > five isocenters. The 1- and 2-year actuarial rates of preservation of useful hearing (Gardner-Robertson class I or II) were 100% and 41.7% {plus_minus} 17.3, respectively. Stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife provides short-term control of acoustic neuromas when a dose of 16 to 20 Gy to the tumor margin is used. Preservation of useful hearing can be accomplished in a significant proportion of patients. 30 refs., 5 tabs.

  8. A modular Geant4 model of Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipek, J.; Novotný, J.; Novotný, J., Jr.; Kozubíková, P.

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a Monte Carlo model of Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion as well as the main parameters of the dose distribution in the standard phantom obtained using this model. The model is developed in the Geant4 simulation toolkit in a modular way which enables its reuse in other Perfexion studies. Large phase space files were created, containing particles that are entering the inner machine cavity after being transported through the collimation system. All 14 output factors of the machine and effective output factors for both the 4 mm (0.830 ± 0.009) and 8 mm (0.921 ± 0.004) collimators were calculated. Dose profiles along the main axes are also included for each collimator size. All results are compared to the values obtained from the treatment planning system, from experiments, and from other Monte Carlo models.

  9. Gamma knife radiosurgery for the treatment of brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Sansur, C A; Chin, L S; Ames, J W; Banegura, A T; Aggarwal, S; Ballesteros, M; Amin, P; Simard, J M; Eisenberg, H

    2000-01-01

    One hundred and ninety-three patients with brain metastases from various primary sites received Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKR) from July 1992 to August 1997 and were reviewed to evaluate their clinical outcome. Survival follow-up was available on 173 patients. Whole-brain radiation therapy was also administered to 148 of these patients. The median survival was 13.1 months from initial detection of brain metastases, and 7.5 months from GKR. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine prognostic factors that influenced survival following GKR. Enhanced survival is observed in patients with radiosensitive tumor types, supratentorial tumor, history of brain tumor resection, controlled primary site, and absent extracranial metastases. Local lesion control was obtained in 82% of the patients according to their last follow-up MRI scan. GKR is an effective means of treating patients with brain metastases.

  10. A modular Geant4 model of Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion™.

    PubMed

    Pipek, J; Novotný, J; Novotný, J; Kozubíková, P

    2014-12-21

    This work presents a Monte Carlo model of Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion as well as the main parameters of the dose distribution in the standard phantom obtained using this model. The model is developed in the Geant4 simulation toolkit in a modular way which enables its reuse in other Perfexion studies. Large phase space files were created, containing particles that are entering the inner machine cavity after being transported through the collimation system. All 14 output factors of the machine and effective output factors for both the 4 mm (0.830 ± 0.009) and 8 mm (0.921 ± 0.004) collimators were calculated. Dose profiles along the main axes are also included for each collimator size. All results are compared to the values obtained from the treatment planning system, from experiments, and from other Monte Carlo models.

  11. No need to change the skin knife in modern arthroplasty surgery.

    PubMed

    Ottesen, C; Skovby, A; Troelsen, A; Specht, C; Friis-Møller, A; Husted, H

    2014-08-01

    Earlier studies have found varying contamination rates using separate skin and deep knives in total hip (THA) and total knee (TKA) arthroplasty surgery. Previous studies were primarily conducted in the setting of concomitant use of laminar airflow and/or plastic adhesive draping. This has lead to conflicting conclusions regarding discarding the skin knife or not. This study evaluates the prevalence of contamination of a separate skin knife using modern antiseptic technique in primary THA and TKA without laminar airflow. Three knives from each primary THA and TKA surgery in non-laminar airflow operating rooms were collected: one used for the skin, one used for deeper tissues and one control knife. A total of 831 knife blades from 277 patients were cultured 12 days. Contamination of the skin knife was found in eight patients (2.8 %), contamination of the "deep" knife in five patients (1.8 %) and contamination of the control knife in five patients (1.8 %). No patient developed an infection with 1-year follow-up. Our findings suggest a very low rate of contamination of the skin knife using modern antiseptic technique without laminar airflow and/or plastic adhesive draping and do not support the use of a separate skin knife in arthroplasty surgery.

  12. SU-E-T-542: Comparison of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) of Brain Lesions Using Gamma Knife, VMAT, IMRT, and Conformal Arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S; Charpentier, P; Chan, P; Neicu, T; Miyamoto, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare dose distributions in stereotactic radiation surgery of brain lesions using gamma Knife, VMAT, conformal arcs, and IMRT in order to provide an optimal treatment. Methods: Dose distributions from single shot of 4C model of Gamma Knife at the helmet collimation sizes of 4, 8, 14, and 18 mm in diameter were compared with full arcs with the square shapes of 4×4 (or 5×5), 8×8 (or 10×10), and spherical shapes of 16 or 20 mm in diameter using EDR3 films in the same gamma knife QA phantom. Plans for ten SRS cases with single and multiple lesions were created in gamma knife plans and Pinnacle plans. The external beam plans had enlarged field size by 2-mm and used single conformal full circle arc for solitary lesion and none coplanar arcs/beams for multiple lesions. Coverage, conformity index, dose to critical organs, and integral dose to the brain and nearby critical structures were compared on all plans. Structures and dose matrices were registered in a Velocity deformable image registration system. Results: Single full circle arc from Elekta beam-modulate MLC (4-mm leaf thickness) and agility MLC (5-mm leaf thickness) have larger penumbra and less flatness than that of Gamma Knife single shot. None-coplanar arcs or beams were required to achieve similar dose distribution. In general, Gamma Knife plans provided significant less integral dose than that of linac-based plans. Benefits of IMRT and VMAT versus gamma Knife and conformal arcs were not significant. Conclusion: Our dose measurement and treatment planning evaluation clearly demonstrated dose distribution differences amount current popular SRS modalities for small solitary and multiple brain lesions. The trend of using MLC shape beams or arcs to replace conventional cones should be revisited in order to keep lower integral dose if the late correlates with some radiation-induced side effects. Pilot grant from Elekta LLC.

  13. Gamma Knife radiosurgery with CT image-based dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Andy Yuanguang; Bhatnagar, Jagdish; Bednarz, Greg; Niranjan, Ajay; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John; Lunsford, L Dade; Huq, M Saiful

    2015-11-01

    The Leksell GammaPlan software version 10 introduces a CT image-based segmentation tool for automatic skull definition and a convolution dose calculation algorithm for tissue inhomogeneity correction. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the impact of these new approaches on routine clinical Gamma Knife treatment planning. Sixty-five patients who underwent CT image-guided Gamma Knife radiosurgeries at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in recent years were retrospectively investigated. The diagnoses for these cases include trigeminal neuralgia, meningioma, acoustic neuroma, AVM, glioma, and benign and metastatic brain tumors. Dose calculations were performed for each patient with the same dose prescriptions and the same shot arrangements using three different approaches: 1) TMR 10 dose calculation with imaging skull definition; 2) convolution dose calculation with imaging skull definition; 3) TMR 10 dose calculation with conventional measurement-based skull definition. For each treatment matrix, the total treatment time, the target coverage index, the selectivity index, the gradient index, and a set of dose statistics parameters were compared between the three calculations. The dose statistics parameters investigated include the prescription isodose volume, the 12 Gy isodose volume, the minimum, maximum and mean doses on the treatment targets, and the critical structures under consideration. The difference between the convolution and the TMR 10 dose calculations for the 104 treatment matrices were found to vary with the patient anatomy, location of the treatment shots, and the tissue inhomogeneities around the treatment target. An average difference of 8.4% was observed for the total treatment times between the convolution and the TMR algorithms. The maximum differences in the treatment times, the prescription isodose volumes, the 12 Gy isodose volumes, the target coverage indices, the selectivity indices, and the gradient indices from the convolution

  14. Gamma Knife radiosurgery with CT image-based dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Andy Yuanguang; Bhatnagar, Jagdish; Bednarz, Greg; Niranjan, Ajay; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John; Lunsford, L Dade; Huq, M Saiful

    2015-11-08

    The Leksell GammaPlan software version 10 introduces a CT image-based segmentation tool for automatic skull definition and a convolution dose calculation algorithm for tissue inhomogeneity correction. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the impact of these new approaches on routine clinical Gamma Knife treatment planning. Sixty-five patients who underwent CT image-guided Gamma Knife radiosurgeries at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in recent years were retrospectively investigated. The diagnoses for these cases include trigeminal neuralgia, meningioma, acoustic neuroma, AVM, glioma, and benign and metastatic brain tumors. Dose calculations were performed for each patient with the same dose prescriptions and the same shot arrangements using three different approaches: 1) TMR 10 dose calculation with imaging skull definition; 2) convolution dose calculation with imaging skull definition; 3) TMR 10 dose calculation with conventional measurement-based skull definition. For each treatment matrix, the total treatment time, the target coverage index, the selectivity index, the gradient index, and a set of dose statistics parameters were compared between the three calculations. The dose statistics parameters investigated include the prescription isodose volume, the 12 Gy isodose volume, the minimum, maximum and mean doses on the treatment targets, and the critical structures under consideration. The difference between the convolution and the TMR 10 dose calculations for the 104 treatment matrices were found to vary with the patient anatomy, location of the treatment shots, and the tissue inhomogeneities around the treatment target. An average difference of 8.4% was observed for the total treatment times between the convolution and the TMR algorithms. The maximum differences in the treatment times, the prescription isodose volumes, the 12 Gy isodose volumes, the target coverage indices, the selectivity indices, and the gradient indices from the convolution

  15. Air kerma based dosimetry calibration for the Leksell Gamma Knife

    SciTech Connect

    Meltsner, Sheridan Griffin; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2009-02-15

    No accepted official protocol exists for the dosimetry of the Leksell Gamma Knife registered (GK) stereotactic radiosurgery device. Establishment of a dosimetry protocol has been complicated by the unique partial-hemisphere arrangement of 201 individual {sup 60}Co beams simultaneously focused on the treatment volume and by the rigid geometry of the GK unit itself. This article proposes an air kerma based dosimetry protocol using either an in-air or in-acrylic phantom measurement to determine the absorbed dose rate of fields of the 18 mm helmet of a GK unit. A small-volume air ionization chamber was used to make measurements at the physical isocenter of three GK units. The absorbed dose rate to water was determined using a modified version of the AAPM Task Group 21 protocol designed for use with {sup 60}Co-based teletherapy machines. This experimentally determined absorbed dose rate was compared to the treatment planning system (TPS) absorbed dose rate. The TPS used with the GK unit is Leksell GammaPlan. The TPS absorbed dose rate at the time of treatment is the absorbed dose rate determined by the physicist at the time of machine commissioning decay corrected to the treatment date. The TPS absorbed dose rate is defined as absorbed dose rate to water at the isocenter of a water phantom with a radius of 8 cm. Measurements were performed on model B and C Gamma Knife units. The absorbed dose rate to water for the 18 mm helmet determined using air-kerma based calculations is consistently between 1.5% and 2.9% higher than the absorbed dose rate provided by the TPS. These air kerma based measurements allow GK dosimetry to be performed with an established dosimetry protocol and without complications arising from the use of and possible variations in solid phantom material. Measurements were also made with the same ionization chamber in a spherical acrylic phantom for comparison. This methodology will allow further development of calibration methods appropriate for the

  16. Analytical description of dose profile behaviour in Gamma Knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenner, J.; Gwilliam, M.; Mehrem, R.; Bird, A.; Walton, L.

    2008-04-01

    Stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery utilizes ionizing beams from 60Co sources and relies on a combination of collimator sizes, weighting, etc to generate a high-dose region that is conformal with a designated target volume. Dose computation is typically performed by computer, but in this paper, single collimator dose profile behaviour is modelled analytically and then extended to accommodate multiple collimators of different weights with co-located isocentres. The dose profile from a single helmet is derived from a top-hat beam profile approximation and an idealized symmetric distribution of sources is used to represent the 201 sources within a collimating helmet. The results from the analysis are validated by an independent numerical model and also compared with those obtained by other groups using numerical and experimental methods. With respect to multiple collimators, the relationship between the size (full width half maximum) of the irradiated volume and relative collimator weighting is also examined using the simple analytical model. The simplicity of the mathematics clarifies the relationship between beam profile, dose profile and multiple collimator behaviour, and provides data that compare favourably with published literature.

  17. Gamma Knife output factor measurements using VIP polymer gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Moutsatsos, A.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Karaiskos, P.; Papagiannis, P.; Georgiou, E.; Dardoufas, K.; Sandilos, P.; Torrens, M.; Pantelis, E.; Kantemiris, I.; Sakelliou, L.; Seimenis, I.

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: Water equivalent polymer gel dosimeters and magnetic resonance imaging were employed to measure the output factors of the two smallest treatment fields available in a Gamma Knife model C radiosurgery unit, those formed employing the 4 and 8 mm final collimator helmets. Methods: Three samples of the VIP normoxic gel formulation were prepared and irradiated so that a single shot of the field whose output factor is to be measured and a single shot of the reference 18 mm field were delivered in each one. Emphasis is given to the development and benchmarking of a refined data processing methodology of reduced uncertainty that fully exploits the 3D dose distributions registered in the dosimeters. Results: Polymer gel results for the output factor of the 8 mm collimator helmet are found to be in close agreement with the corresponding value recommended by the vendor (0.955{+-}0.007 versus 0.956, respectively). For the 4 mm collimator helmet, however, polymer gel results suggest an output factor 3% lower than the value recommended by the vendor (0.841{+-}0.009 versus 0.870, respectively). Conclusions: A comparison with corresponding measurements published in the literature indicates that output factor results of this work are in agreement with those obtained using dosimetric systems which, besides fine spatial resolution and lack of angular and dose rate dependence of the dosimeter's response, share with polymer gels the favorable characteristic of minimal radiation field perturbation.

  18. Measurement of Gamma Knife registered helmet factors using MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Kurjewicz, Laryssa; Berndt, Anita

    2007-03-15

    The relative dose rate for the different Gamma Knife registered helmets (4, 8, 14, and 18 mm) is characterized by their respective helmet factors. Since the plateau of the dose profile for the 4 mm helmet is at most 1 mm wide, detector choices are limited. Traditionally helmet factors have been measured using 1x1x1 mm{sup 3} thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). However, these are time-consuming, cumbersome measurements. This article investigates the use of metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) (active area of 0.2x0.2 mm{sup 2}) as a more accurate and convenient dosimeter. Their suitability for these measurements was confirmed by basic characterization measurements. Helmet factors were measured using both MOSFETs and the established TLD approach. A custom MOSFET cassette was designed in analogy to the Elekta TLD cassette (Elekta Instruments AB) for use with the Elekta dosimetry sphere. Although both dosimeters provided values within 3% of the manufacturer's suggestion, MOSFETs provided superior accuracy and precision, in a fraction of the time required for the TLD measurements. Thus, MOSFETs proved to be a reasonable alternative to TLDs for performing helmet factor measurements.

  19. First year experience with newly developed Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Jagdish P; Novotny, Josef; Niranjan, Ajay; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John; Lunsford, Dade; Huq, M Saiful

    2009-07-01

    A new model of Leksell Gamma Knife(R) (LGK), known as Perfexion (LGK PFX), was introduced by Elekta Instrument, AB, Sweden, in 2006. This model has a radically different design from the earlier models U, B, C and 4C. Dosimetric characteristics of LGK PFX, technical differences between LGK PFX and LGK 4C, experience gained with acceptance testing and commissioning of the LGK PFX, and comparison between LGK PFX and LGK 4C are presented in this study. Excellent agreement is found between the manufacturers recommended values of absorbed dose rate, relative output factors for 4 and 8 mm collimators, coincidence of mechanical and dosimetric isocenter, FWHM for beam profiles for various collimators and those reported in the present study. Excellent agreement is also found between the dosimetric characteristics of LGK PFX and LGK 4C for the 4 and 8 mm collimators. Examples of clinical cases treated with LGK PFX and impact of LGK PFX on workflow and dosimetric conformity of treatment planning is also given. The set up and treatment of patients on the LGK PFX is much more efficient since it is a fully automated system. The system also provides more options to generate plan with high dosimetric conformity.

  20. Dose verification of single shot gamma knife applications using VIPAR polymer gel and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaiskos, P.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Tatsis, E.; Angelopoulos, A.; Baras, P.; Kozicki, M.; Papagiannis, P.; Rosiak, J. M.; Sakelliou, L.; Sandilos, P.; Vlachos, L.

    2005-03-01

    This work describes an experimental procedure with potential to assess the overall accuracy associated with gamma knife clinical applications, from patient imaging and dosimetry planning to patient positioning and dose delivery using the automated positioning system of a Leksell Gamma Knife model C. The VIPAR polymer gel-MRI dosimetry method is employed due to its inherent three-dimensional feature and linear dose response over the range of gamma knife applications. Different polymer gel vials were irradiated with single shot gamma knife treatment plans using each of the four available collimator helmets to deliver a maximum dose of 30 Gy. Percentage relative dose results are presented not only in the form of one-dimensional profiles but also planar isocontours and isosurfaces in three dimensions. Experimental results are compared with corresponding Gammaplan treatment planning system calculations as well as acceptance test radiochromic film measurements. A good agreement, within the experimental uncertainty, is observed between measured and expected dose distributions. This experimental uncertainty is of the order of one imaging pixel in the MRI gel readout session (<1 mm) and allows for the verification of single shot gamma knife applications in terms of acceptance specifications for precision in beam alignment and accuracy. Averaging net R2 results in the dose plateau of the 4 mm and 18 mm collimator irradiated gel vials, which were MR scanned in the same session, provides a crude estimate of the 4 mm output factor which agrees within errors with the default value of 0.870.

  1. Stereotactic diffusion tensor imaging tractography for Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Cormac G; Ian Sabin, H

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The integration of modern neuroimaging into treatment planning has increased the therapeutic potential and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery. The authors report their method of integrating stereotactic diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography into conventional treatment planning for Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS). The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique and to address some of the technical limitations of previously reported techniques. METHODS Twenty patients who underwent GKRS composed the study cohort. They consisted of 1 initial test case (a patient with a vestibular schwannoma), 5 patients with arteriovenous malformations, 9 patients with cerebral metastases, 1 patient with parasagittal meningioma, and 4 patients with vestibular schwannoma. DT images were obtained at the time of standard GKRS protocol MRI (T1 and T2 weighted) for treatment, with the patient's head secured by a Leksell stereotactic frame. All studies were performed using a 1.5-T magnet with a single-channel head coil. DTI was performed with diffusion gradients in 32 directions and coregistered with the volumetric T1-weighted study. DTI postprocessing by means of commercially available software allowed tensor computation and the creation of directionally encoded color-, apparent diffusion coefficient-, and fractional anisotropy-mapped sequences. In addition, the software allowed visualized critical tracts to be exported as a structural volume and integrated into GammaPlan as an "organ at risk" during shot planning. Combined images were transferred to GammaPlan and integrated into treatment planning. RESULTS Stereotactic DT images were successfully acquired in all patients, with generation of correct directionally encoded color images. Tract generation with the software was straightforward and reproducible, particularly for axial tracts such as the optic radiation and the arcuate fasciculus. Corticospinal tract visualization was hampered by some

  2. Leksell Gamma Knife treatment for pilocytic astrocytomas: long-term results.

    PubMed

    Simonova, Gabriela; Kozubikova, Petra; Liscak, Roman; Novotny, Josef

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate long-term treatment results, radiation-related toxicity, and prognostic factors for the progression-free survival (PFS) of patients with pilocytic astrocytomas treated by means of stereotactic radiosurgery with a Leksell Gamma Knife. METHODS A total of 25 patients with pilocytic astrocytomas underwent Gamma Knife surgery during the period 1992-2002. The median target volume was 2700 mm(3) (range 205-25,000 mm(3)). The 18 patients treated with 5 daily fractions received a median minimum target dose of 25 Gy. Doses for the 2 patients treated with 10 fractions over 5 days (2 fractions delivered on the same day at least 6 hours apart) were 23 and 28 Gy. For the 5 patients treated with a single fraction, the minimum target dose ranged from 13 to 20 Gy (median 16 Gy). RESULTS Complete regression occurred in 10 patients (40%) and partial regression in 10 patients (40%). The 10-year overall survival rate was 96% and the 10-year PFS rate was 80%. Target volume appeared to be a significant prognostic factor for PFS (p = 0.037). Temporary Grade 3 toxicity appeared in 2 patients (8%), and these patients were treated with corticosteroids for 2 months. Permanent Grade 4 toxicity appeared in 2 patients (8%) and was associated with neurocognitive dysfunction. In these 2 individuals, the neurocognitive dysfunction was also felt to be in part the result of the additional therapeutic interventions (4 in one case and 6 in the other) required to achieve durable control of their tumors. CONCLUSIONS Radiosurgery represents an alternative treatment modality for small residual or recurrent volumes of pilocytic astrocytomas and provides long-term local control. Target volume appears to be the most important factor affecting PFS.

  3. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for the Treatment of Cystic Cerebral Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Ebinu, Julius O.; Lwu, Shelly; Monsalves, Eric; Arayee, Mandana; Chung, Caroline; Laperriere, Normand J.; Kulkarni, Abhaya V.; Goetz, Pablo; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) in the treatment of nonsurgical cystic brain metastasis, and to determine predictors of response to GKRS. Methods: We reviewed a prospectively maintained database of brain metastases patients treated at our institution between 2006 and 2010. All lesions with a cystic component were identified, and volumetric analysis was done to measure percentage of cystic volume on day of treatment and consecutive follow-up MRI scans. Clinical, radiologic, and dosimetry parameters were reviewed to establish the overall response of cystic metastases to GKRS as well as identify potential predictive factors of response. Results: A total of 111 lesions in 73 patients were analyzed; 57% of lesions received prior whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Lung carcinoma was the primary cancer in 51% of patients, 10% breast, 10% colorectal, 4% melanoma, and 26% other. Fifty-seven percent of the patients were recursive partitioning analysis class 1, the remainder class 2. Mean target volume was 3.3 mL (range, 0.1-23 mL). Median prescription dose was 21 Gy (range, 15-24 Gy). Local control rates were 91%, 63%, and 37% at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. Local control was improved in lung primary and worse in patients with prior WBRT (univariate). Only lung primary predicted local control in multivariate analysis, whereas age and tumor volume did not. Lesions with a large cystic component did not show a poorer response compared with those with a small cystic component. Conclusions: This study supports the use of GKRS in the management of nonsurgical cystic metastases, despite a traditionally perceived poorer response. Our local control rates are comparable to a matched cohort of noncystic brain metastases, and therefore the presence of a large cystic component should not deter the use of GKRS. Predictors of response included tumor subtype. Prior WBRT decreased effectiveness of SRS for local control rates.

  4. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for hemangioma of the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Chia; Sheehan, Jason P; Kano, Hideyuki; Akpinar, Berkcan; Martinez-Alvarez, Roberto; Martinez-Moreno, Nuria; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Lunsford, L Dade; Liu, Kang-Du

    2016-06-24

    OBJECTIVE Cavernous sinus hemangiomas (CSHs) are rare vascular tumors. A direct microsurgical approach usually results in massive hemorrhage and incomplete tumor resection. Although stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has emerged as a therapeutic alternative to microsurgery, outcome studies are few. Authors of the present study evaluated the role of SRS for CSH. METHODS An international multicenter study was conducted to review outcome data in 31 patients with CSH. Eleven patients had initial microsurgery before SRS, and the other 20 patients (64.5%) underwent Gamma Knife SRS as the primary management for their CSH. Median age at the time of radiosurgery was 47 years, and 77.4% of patients had cranial nerve dysfunction before SRS. Patients received a median tumor margin dose of 12.6 Gy (range 12-19 Gy) at a median isodose of 55%. RESULTS Tumor regression was confirmed by imaging in all 31 patients, and all patients had greater than 50% reduction in tumor volume at 6 months post-SRS. No patient had delayed tumor growth, new cranial neuropathy, visual function deterioration, adverse radiation effects, or hypopituitarism after SRS. Twenty-four patients had presented with cranial nerve disorders before SRS, and 6 (25%) of them had gradual improvement. Four (66.7%) of the 6 patients with orbital symptoms had symptomatic relief at the last follow-up. CONCLUSIONS Stereotactic radiosurgery was effective in reducing the volume of CSH and attaining long-term tumor control in all patients at a median of 40 months. The authors' experience suggests that SRS is a reasonable primary and adjuvant treatment modality for patients in whom a CSH is diagnosed.

  5. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases From Primary Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kased, Norbert; Binder, Devin K.; McDermott, Michael W.; Nakamura, Jean L.; Huang, Kim; Berger, Mitchel S.; Wara, William M.; Sneed, Penny K.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The relative roles of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) vs. whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in the treatment of patients with brain metastases from breast cancer remain undefined. In this study, we reviewed our experience with these patients. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all patients treated between 1991 and 2005 with Gamma Knife SRS for brain metastases from breast cancer. The actuarial survival and freedom from progression endpoints were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Between 1991 and 2005, 176 patients underwent SRS for brain metastases from breast cancer. The median survival time was 16.0 months for 95 newly diagnosed patients and 11.7 months for 81 patients with recurrent brain metastases. In the newly diagnosed patients, omission of upfront WBRT did not significantly affect the MST (p = .20), brain freedom from progression (p = .75), or freedom from new brain metastases (p = .83). Longer survival was associated with age <50 years, Karnofsky performance score >=70, primary tumor control, estrogen receptor positivity, and Her2/neu overexpression. No association was found between the number of treated brain metastases and the survival time. Conclusion: We have described prognostic factors for breast cancer patients treated with SRS for newly diagnosed or recurrent brain metastases. Most patient subsets had a median survival time of >=11 months. Unexpectedly, upfront WBRT did not appear to improve brain freedom from progression, and a larger number of brain metastases was not associated with a shorter survival time. Breast cancer might be distinct from other primary sites in terms of prognostic factors and the roles of WBRT and SRS for brain metastases.

  6. Real-time inverse planning for Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Q Jackie; Chankong, Vira; Jitprapaikulsarn, Suradet; Wessels, Barry W; Einstein, Douglas B; Mathayomchan, Boonyanit; Kinsella, Timothy J

    2003-11-01

    The challenges of real-time Gamma Knife inverse planning are the large number of variables involved and the unknown search space a priori. With limited collimator sizes, shots have to be heavily overlapped to form a smooth prescription isodose line that conforms to the irregular target shape. Such overlaps greatly influence the total number of shots per plan, making pre-determination of the total number of shots impractical. However, this total number of shots usually defines the search space, a pre-requisite for most of the optimization methods. Since each shot only covers part of the target, a collection of shots in different locations and various collimator sizes selected makes up the global dose distribution that conforms to the target. Hence, planning or placing these shots is a combinatorial optimization process that is computationally expensive by nature. We have previously developed a theory of shot placement and optimization based on skeletonization. The real-time inverse planning process, reported in this paper, is an expansion and the clinical implementation of this theory. The complete planning process consists of two steps. The first step is to determine an optimal number of shots including locations and sizes and to assign initial collimator size to each of the shots. The second step is to fine-tune the weights using a linear-programming technique. The objective function is to minimize the total dose to the target boundary (i.e., maximize the dose conformity). Results of an ellipsoid test target and ten clinical cases are presented. The clinical cases are also compared with physician's manual plans. The target coverage is more than 99% for manual plans and 97% for all the inverse plans. The RTOG PITV conformity indices for the manual plans are between 1.16 and 3.46, compared to 1.36 to 2.4 for the inverse plans. All the inverse plans are generated in less than 2 min, making real-time inverse planning a reality.

  7. Salvage Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Surgically Refractory Trigeminal Neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Little, Andrew S.; Shetter, Andrew G. Shetter, Mary E.; Kakarla, Udaya K.; Rogers, C. Leland

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcome of patients with surgically refractory trigeminal neuralgia (TN) treated with rescue gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS). Methods and Materials: Seventy-nine patients with typical TN received salvage GKRS between 1997 and 2002 at the Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI). All patients had recurrent pain following at least one prior surgical intervention. Prior surgical interventions included percutaneous destructive procedures, microvascular decompression (MVD), or GKRS. Thirty-one (39%) had undergone at least two prior procedures. The most common salvage dose was 80 Gy, although 40-50 Gy was typical in patients who had received prior radiosurgery. Pain outcome was assessed using the BNI Pain Intensity Score, and quality of life was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. Results: Median follow-up after salvage GKRS was 5.3 years. Actuarial analysis demonstrated that at 5 years, 20% of patients were pain-free and 50% had pain relief. Pain recurred in patients who had an initial response to GKRS at a median of 1.1 years. Twenty-eight (41%) required a subsequent surgical procedure for recurrence. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model suggested that the strongest predictor of GKRS failure was a history of prior MVD (p=0.029). There were no instances of serious morbidity or mortality. Ten percent of patients developed worsening facial numbness and 8% described their numbness as 'very bothersome.' Conclusions: GKRS salvage for refractory TN is well tolerated and results in long-term pain relief in approximately half the patients treated. Clinicians may reconsider using GKRS to salvage patients who have failed prior MVD.

  8. Patient-specific independent 3D GammaPlan quality assurance for Gamma Knife Perfexion radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Mamalui-Hunter, Maria; Yaddanapudi, Sridhar; Zhao, Tianyu; Mutic, Sasa; Low, Daniel A; Drzymala, Robert E

    2013-01-07

    One of the most important aspects of quality assurance (QA) in radiation therapy is redundancy of patient treatment dose calculation. This work is focused on the patient-specific time and 3D dose treatment plan verification for stereotactic radiosurgery using Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (LGK PFX). The virtual model of LGK PFX was developed in MATLAB, based on the physical dimensions provided by the manufacturer. The ring-specific linear attenuation coefficients (LAC) and output factors (OFs) reported by the manufacturer were replaced by the measurement-based collimator size-specific OFs and a single LAC = 0.0065 mm-1. Calculation depths for each LGK PFX shot were obtained by ray-tracing technique, and the dose calculation formalism was similar to the one used by GammaPlan treatment planning software versions 8 and 9. The architecture of the QA process was based on the in-house online database search of the LGK PFX database search for plan-specific information. A series of QA phantom plans was examined to verify geometric and dosimetric accuracy of the software. The accuracy of the QA process was further evaluated through evaluation of a series of patient plans. The shot time/focus point dose verification for each shot took less than 1 sec/shot with full 3D isodose verification taking about 30 sec/shot on a desktop PC. GammaPlan database access time took less than 0.05 sec. The geometric accuracy (location of the point of maximum dose) of the phantom and patient plan was dependent on the resolution of the original dose matrix and was of the order of 1 dose element. Dosimetric accuracy of the independently calculated phantom and patient point (focus) doses was within 3.5% from the GammaPlan, with the mean = 2.3% and SD= 1.1%. The process for independent pretreatment patient-specific Gamma Knife Perfexion time and dose verification was created and validated.

  9. A constrained tracking algorithm to optimize plug patterns in multiple isocenter Gamma Knife radiosurgery planning

    SciTech Connect

    Li Kaile; Ma Lijun

    2005-10-15

    We developed a source blocking optimization algorithm for Gamma Knife radiosurgery, which is based on tracking individual source contributions to arbitrarily shaped target and critical structure volumes. A scalar objective function and a direct search algorithm were used to produce near real-time calculation results. The algorithm allows the user to set and vary the total number of plugs for each shot to limit the total beam-on time. We implemented and tested the algorithm for several multiple-isocenter Gamma Knife cases. It was found that the use of limited number of plugs significantly lowered the integral dose to the critical structures such as an optical chiasm in pituitary adenoma cases. The main effect of the source blocking is the faster dose falloff in the junction area between the target and the critical structure. In summary, we demonstrated a useful source-plugging algorithm for improving complex multi-isocenter Gamma Knife treatment planning cases.

  10. Gamma Knife radiosurgery in pituitary adenomas: Why, who, and how to treat?

    PubMed

    Castinetti, Frederic; Brue, Thierry

    2010-08-01

    Pituitary adenomas are benign tumors that can be either secreting (acromegaly, Cushing's disease, prolactinomas) or non-secreting. Transsphenoidal neurosurgery is the gold standard treatment; however, it is not always effective. Gamma Knife radiosurgery is a specific modality of stereotactic radiosurgery, a precise radiation technique. Several studies reported the efficacy and low risk of adverse effects induced by this technique: in secreting pituitary adenomas, hypersecretion is controlled in about 50% of cases and tumor volume is stabilized or decreased in 80-90% of cases, making Gamma Knife a valuable adjunctive or first-line treatment. As hormone levels decrease progressively, the main drawback is the longer time to remission (12-60 months), requiring an additional treatment during this period. Hypopituitarism is the main side effect, observed in 20-40% cases. Gamma Knife is thus useful in the therapeutic algorithms of pituitary adenomas in well-defined indications, mainly low secreting small lesions well identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  11. A quality assurance program in stereotactic radiosurgery using the Gamma Knife unit.

    PubMed

    Stuecklschweiger, G F; Feichtinger, K

    1998-10-01

    Because of the large single-fraction dose in stereotactic radiosurgery it is important to guarantee a high geometric and dosimetric accuracy. The paper represent the quality assurance program for the Gamma Knife unit at the University Clinic of Neurosurgery in Graz. The program includes the following procedures: timer control, mechanical radiation isocenter coincidence, trunnion centricity, helmet microswitches test, radiation output and relative helmet factors, dose profile verification, safety interlocks checks and software quality assurance. In summary, the mechanical accuracy and reproducibility of the Gamma Knife unit are < 1 mm. The geometric failure in stereotactic Gamma Knife treatment is limited by the human error in setting the clinical target volume and the spatial accuracy of dose delivery to the patient is limited by the accuracy of modern target localization procedures.

  12. Curative effect and costs of surgical and gamma knife treatments on intractable epilepsy caused by temporal-hippocampal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Z T; Chen, Q X

    2015-07-31

    This study aimed to investigate the curative effect and costs of surgical and gamma knife treatments on intractable epilepsy caused by temporal-hippocampal sclerosis. The subjects comprised patients who suffered from intractable epilepsy caused by temporal-hippocampal sclerosis and received treatment in the Department of Neurosurgery of our hospital between 2010 and 2011. After obtaining their consent, patients were evaluated and selected to receive surgical or gamma knife treatments. In the surgical group, the short-term curative rate was 92.60% and the average cost was US$ 1311.50 while in the gamma knife group, the short-term curative rate was 53.79%, and the average cost was US$ 2786.90. Both surgical and gamma knife treatments of intractable epilepsy caused by temporal-hippocampal sclerosis are safe and effective, but the short-term curative effect of surgical treatment is better than that of gamma knife, and its cost is lower.

  13. Extreme volume expansion of a vestibular schwannoma due to intratumoral hemorrhage after gamma knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Miki, Shunichiro; Ishikawa, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Akutsu, Hiroyoshi; Matsuda, Masahide; Sakamoto, Noriaki; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-07-01

    A 48-year-old man with right hemi-facial palsy and cerebellar ataxia was referred to our hospital. Three years and 10 months earlier he had undergone gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) at the referring hospital for an 18 mm right vestibular schwannoma. Slight tumor enlargement had been observed on MRI performed at the referring hospital 3 years after the GKRS. On close follow-up after another 6 months an MRI showed an obvious enlargement of the tumor. An MRI on admission revealed an iso-intense mass lesion measuring 36 mm in maximum diameter at the right cerebellopontine angle. A two stage surgery was conducted using a retrosigmoid approach because bleeding from the tumor wall was difficult to control intraoperatively during the first operation. At the second operation, the majority of the tumor capsule had converted to necrotic tissue. A large hematoma cavity was present inside the tumor capsule which explained the rapid increase in size over a short period of time. Near total removal was achieved. Histopathological examination revealed massive intratumoral hemorrhage within a typical vestibular schwannoma with no malignancy. The complication of intratumoral hemorrhage is very rare and the utility of stereotactic radiation surgery/therapy, including GKRS, for vestibular schwannoma is well known. However, we must emphasize that careful follow-up is still required, even after several years.

  14. Two-year experience with the commercial Gamma Knife Check software.

    PubMed

    Xu, Andy Yuanguang; Bhatnagar, Jagdish; Bednarz, Greg; Novotny, Josef; Flickinger, John; Lunsford, L Dade; Huq, M Saiful

    2016-07-01

    The Gamma Knife Check software is an FDA approved second check system for dose calculations in Gamma Knife radiosurgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and the stability of the commercial software package as a tool for independent dose verification. The Gamma Knife Check software version 8.4 was commissioned for a Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion and a 4C unit at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in May 2012. Independent dose verifications were performed using this software for 319 radiosurgery cases on the Perfexion and 283 radiosurgery cases on the 4C units. The cases on each machine were divided into groups according to their diagnoses, and an averaged absolute percent dose difference for each group was calculated. The percentage dose difference for each treatment target was obtained as the relative difference between the Gamma Knife Check dose and the dose from the tissue maximum ratio algorithm (TMR 10) from the GammaPlan software version 10 at the reference point. For treatment plans with imaging skull definition, results obtained from the Gamma Knife Check software using the measurement-based skull definition method are used for comparison. The collected dose difference data were also analyzed in terms of the distance from the treatment target to the skull, the number of treatment shots used for the target, and the gamma angles of the treatment shots. The averaged percent dose differences between the Gamma Knife Check software and the GammaPlan treatment planning system are 0.3%, 0.89%, 1.24%, 1.09%, 0.83%, 0.55%, 0.33%, and 1.49% for the trigeminal neuralgia, acoustic neuroma, arteriovenous malformation (AVM), meningioma, pituitary adenoma, glioma, functional disorders, and metastasis cases on the Perfexion unit. The corresponding averaged percent dose differences for the 4C unit are 0.33%, 1.2%, 2.78% 1.99%, 1.4%, 1.92%, 0.62%, and 1.51%, respectively. The dose difference is, in general, larger for treatment targets in the

  15. Two-year experience with the commercial Gamma Knife Check software.

    PubMed

    Xu, Andy Yuanguang; Bhatnagar, Jagdish; Bednarz, Greg; Novotny, Josef; Flickinger, John; Lunsford, L Dade; Huq, M Saiful

    2016-07-08

    The Gamma Knife Check software is an FDA approved second check system for dose calculations in Gamma Knife radiosurgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and the stability of the commercial software package as a tool for independent dose verification. The Gamma Knife Check software version 8.4 was commissioned for a Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion and a 4C unit at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in May 2012. Independent dose verifications were performed using this software for 319 radiosurgery cases on the Perfexion and 283 radiosurgery cases on the 4C units. The cases on each machine were divided into groups according to their diagnoses, and an averaged absolute percent dose difference for each group was calculated. The percentage dose difference for each treatment target was obtained as the relative difference between the Gamma Knife Check dose and the dose from the tissue maximum ratio algorithm (TMR 10) from the GammaPlan software version 10 at the reference point. For treatment plans with imaging skull definition, results obtained from the Gamma Knife Check software using the measurement-based skull definition method are used for comparison. The collected dose difference data were also analyzed in terms of the distance from the treatment target to the skull, the number of treatment shots used for the target, and the gamma angles of the treatment shots. The averaged percent dose differences between the Gamma Knife Check software and the GammaPlan treatment planning system are 0.3%, 0.89%, 1.24%, 1.09%, 0.83%, 0.55%, 0.33%, and 1.49% for the trigeminal neuralgia, acoustic neuroma, arteriovenous malformation (AVM), meningioma, pituitary adenoma, glioma, functional disorders, and metastasis cases on the Perfexion unit. The corresponding averaged percent dose differences for the 4C unit are 0.33%, 1.2%, 2.78% 1.99%, 1.4%, 1.92%, 0.62%, and 1.51%, respectively. The dose difference is, in general, larger for treatment targets in the

  16. Whole-procedure clinical accuracy of Gamma Knife treatments of large lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Lijun; Chuang, Cynthia; Descovich, Martina; Petti, Paula; Smith, Vernon; Verhey, Lynn

    2008-11-15

    The mechanical accuracy of Gamma Knife radiosurgery based on single-isocenter measurement has been established to within 0.3 mm. However, the full delivery accuracy for Gamma Knife treatments of large lesions has only been estimated via the quadrature-sum analysis. In this study, the authors directly measured the whole-procedure accuracy for Gamma Knife treatments of large lesions to examine the validity of such estimation. The measurements were conducted on a head-phantom simulating the whole treatment procedure that included frame placement, computed tomography imaging, treatment planning, and treatment delivery. The results of the measurements were compared with the dose calculations from the treatment planning system. Average agreements of 0.1-1.6 mm for the isodose lines ranging from 25% to 90% of the maximum dose were found despite potentially large contributing uncertainties such as 3-mm imaging resolution, 2-mm dose grid size, 1-mm frame registration, multi-isocenter deliveries, etc. The results of our measurements were found to be significantly smaller (>50%) than the calculated value based on the quadrature-sum analysis. In conclusion, Gamma Knife treatments of large lesions can be delivered much more accurately than predicted from the quadrature-sum analysis of major sources of uncertainties from each step of the delivery chain.

  17. Dose De-Escalation With Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in the Treatment of Choroidal Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schirmer, Clemens M.; Chan, Michael; Mignano, John; Duker, Jay; Melhus, Christopher S.; Williams, Lloyd B.; Wu, Julian K.; Yao, Kevin C.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Single-fraction targeted radiation therapy delivered by the Leksell Gamma Knife system is a minimally invasive treatment option for choroidal melanoma that has been used as an alternative to enucleation, proton beam therapy, or brachytherapy. Previously reported Gamma Knife series involved the treatment of choroidal melanomas with a dose of 40 to 50 Gy at the tumor margin. We report our institutional experience using a significantly lower dose. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with choroidal melanoma were treated with the Leksell Gamma Knife at our institution over a 7-year period. The treatment and clinical data were analyzed in a retrospective fashion after a mean follow-up of 32.2 months. Results: The mean dose to the tumor margin was 22.2 {+-} 2.4 Gy (range, 20- 25 Gy). Mean treated tumor volume was 1.1 {+-} 1.2 cc. Local control was achieved in 13 cases (93%). In 1 patient both intraocular spread and distant metastatic disease developed after treatment. Visual function of the affected eye was preserved in 5 patients (36%) at latest follow-up, in 9 patients (64%) visual loss ensued. Mild to moderate radiation toxicity developed in 8 patients. Conclusions: Choroidal melanoma can be safely and effectively treated using Leksell Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery with a marginal dose of less than 25 Gy.

  18. Whole-procedure clinical accuracy of gamma knife treatments of large lesions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lijun; Chuang, Cynthia; Descovich, Martina; Petti, Paula; Smith, Vernon; Verhey, Lynn

    2008-11-01

    The mechanical accuracy of Gamma Knife radiosurgery based on single-isocenter measurement has been established to within 0.3 mm. However, the full delivery accuracy for Gamma Knife treatments of large lesions has only been estimated via the quadrature-sum analysis. In this study, the authors directly measured the whole-procedure accuracy for Gamma Knife treatments of large lesions to examine the validity of such estimation. The measurements were conducted on a head-phantom simulating the whole treatment procedure that included frame placement, computed tomography imaging, treatment planning, and treatment delivery. The results of the measurements were compared with the dose calculations from the treatment planning system. Average agreements of 0.1-1.6 mm for the isodose lines ranging from 25% to 90% of the maximum dose were found despite potentially large contributing uncertainties such as 3-mm imaging resolution, 2-mm dose grid size, 1-mm frame registration, multi-isocenter deliveries, etc. The results of our measurements were found to be significantly smaller (>50%) than the calculated value based on the quadrature-sum analysis. In conclusion, Gamma Knife treatments of large lesions can be delivered much more accurately than predicted from the quadrature-sum analysis of major sources of uncertainties from each step of the delivery chain.

  19. Comparative analyses of linac and Gamma Knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L.; Kwok, Y.; Chin, L. S.; Yu, C.; Regine, W. F.

    2005-11-01

    Dedicated linac-based radiosurgery has been reported for trigeminal neuralgia treatments. In this study, we investigated the dose fall-off characteristics and setup error tolerance of linac-based radiosurgery as compared with standard Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In order to minimize the errors from different treatment planning calculations, consistent imaging registration, dose calculation and dose volume analysis methods were developed and implemented for both Gamma Knife and linac-based treatments. Intra-arc setup errors were incorporated into the treatment planning process of linac-based deliveries. The effects of intra-arc setup errors with increasing number of arcs were studied and benchmarked against Gamma Knife deliveries with and without plugging patterns. Our studies found equivalent dose fall-off properties between Gamma Knife and linac-based radiosurgery given a sufficient number of arcs (>7) and small intra-arc errors (<0.5 mm) were satisfied for linac-based deliveries. Increasing the number of arcs significantly decreased the variations in the dose fall-off curve at the low isodose region (e.g. from 40% to 10%) and also improved dose uniformity at the high isodose region (e.g. from 70% to 90%). As the number of arcs increased, the effects of intra-arc setup errors on the dose fall-off curves decreased. Increasing the number of arcs also reduced the integral dose to the distal normal brain tissues. In conclusion, linac-based radiosurgery produces equivalent dose fall-off characteristics to Gamma Knife radiosurgery with a high number of arcs. However, one must note the increased treatment time for a large number of arcs and isocentre accuracies.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics and the prediction of outcome of vestibular schwannomas following Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chih-Chun; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Chung, Wen-Yuh; Wu, Hisu-Mei; Lin, Chung-Jung; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Liu, Kang-Du; Yang, Huai-Che

    2017-02-10

    OBJECTIVE Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) is a promising treatment modality for patients with vestibular schwannomas (VSs), but a small percentage of patients have persistent postradiosurgical tumor growth. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical and quantitative MRI features of VS as predictors of long-term tumor control after GKS. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective study of all patients with VS treated with GKS using the Leksell Gamma Knife Unit between 2005 and 2013 at their institution. A total of 187 patients who had a minimum of 24 months of clinical and radiological assessment after radiosurgery were included in this study. Those who underwent a craniotomy with tumor removal before and after GKS were excluded. Study patients comprised 85 (45.5%) males and 102 (54.5%) females, with a median age of 52.2 years (range 20.4-82.3 years). Tumor volumes, enhancing patterns, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were measured by region of interest (ROI) analysis of the whole tumor by serial MRI before and after GKS. RESULTS The median follow-up period was 60.8 months (range 24-128.9 months), and the median treated tumor volume was 3.54 cm(3) (0.1-16.2 cm(3)). At last follow-up, imaging studies indicated that 150 tumors (80.2%) showed decreased tumor volume, 20 (10.7%) had stabilized, and 17 (9.1%) continued to grow following radiosurgery. The postradiosurgical outcome was not significantly correlated with pretreatment volumes or postradiosurgical enhancing patterns. Tumors that showed regression within the initial 12 months following radiosurgery were more likely to have a larger volume reduction ratio at last follow-up than those that did not (volume reduction ratio 55% vs 23.6%, respectively; p < 0.001). Compared with solid VSs, cystic VSs were more likely to regress or stabilize in the initial postradiosurgical 6-12-month period and during extended follow-up. Cystic VSs exhibited a greater volume reduction ratio at last follow-up (cystic

  1. Application of the gamma evaluation method in Gamma Knife film dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeong-Hoon; Han, Jung Ho; Kim, Chae-Yong; Oh, Chang Wan; Lee, Do-Heui; Suh, Tae-Suk; Gyu Kim, Dong; Chung, Hyun-Tai

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Gamma Knife (GK) radiosurgery is a minimally invasive surgical technique for the treatment of intracranial lesions. To minimize neurological deficits, submillimeter accuracy is required during treatment delivery. In this paper, the delivery accuracy of GK radiosurgery was assessed with the gamma evaluation method using planning dose distribution and film measurement data. Methods: Single 4, 8, and 16 mm and composite shot plans were developed for evaluation using the GK Perfexion (PFX) treatment planning system (TPS). The planning dose distributions were exported as digital image communications in medicine - radiation therapy (DICOM RT) files using a new function of GK TPS. A maximum dose of 8 Gy was prescribed for four test plans. Irradiation was performed onto a spherical solid water phantom using Gafchromic EBT2 films in the axial and coronal planes. The exposed films were converted to absolute dose based on a 4th-order polynomial calibration curve determined using ten calibration films. The film measurement results and planning dose distributions were registered for further analysis in the same Leksell coordinate using in-house software. The gamma evaluation method was applied to two dose distributions with varying spatial tolerance (0.3-2.0 mm) and dosimetric tolerance (0.3-2.0%), to verify the accuracy of GK radiosurgery. The result of gamma evaluation was assessed using pass rate, dose gamma index histogram (DGH), and dose pass rate histogram (DPH). Results: The 20, 50, and 80% isodose lines found in film measurements were in close agreement with the planning isodose lines, for all dose levels. The comparison of diagonal line profiles across the axial plane yielded similar results. The gamma evaluation method resulted in high pass rates of >95% within the 50% isodose line for 0.5 mm/0.5% tolerance criteria, in both the axial and coronal planes. They satisfied 1.0 mm/1.0% criteria within the 20% isodose line. Our DGH and DPH also showed that low

  2. NOTE: Monte Carlo calculated output factors of a Leksell Gamma Knife unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Joel Y. C.; Yu, K. N.; Ho, Robert T. K.; Yu, C. P.

    1999-12-01

    The Leksell Gamma Knife is a standard radiosurgical tool for treating brain lesions by directing beams of gamma radiation to a specific region. The diameter of the gamma beams is confined by collimator systems and available collimator sizes are 4, 8, 14 and 18 mm. The reduction in dose rate for each collimator helmet is called the output factor (OPF). Experimental determination of OPFs is difficult due to the extremely narrow beams for which the dose is determined. In the present work, the PRESTA version of the EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to obtain relative OPFs for the Leksell Gamma Knife for collimator sizes of 14, 8 and 4 mm (relative to that of the 18 mm collimator). A spherical probe with a radius of 1 mm was utilized in this computer experiment. Our Monte Carlo results gave OPFs of 0.974, 0.951 and 0.872 for the 14 mm, 8 mm and 4 mm collimators respectively, relative to the 18 mm collimator. Our calculated OPF for the 4 mm collimator helmet was more than 8% higher than the value currently used, but in good agreement with the average of experimental values obtained by various Gamma Knife centres throughout the world and with the value now recommended by the manufacturer, Elekta (Elekta Instrument AB, Skeppargatan 8, S-114 52 Stockholm, Sweden).

  3. Selective source blocking for Gamma Knife radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia based on analytical dose modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kaile; Ma, Lijun

    2004-08-01

    We have developed an automatic critical region shielding (ACRS) algorithm for Gamma Knife radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia. The algorithm selectively blocks 201 Gamma Knife sources to minimize the dose to the brainstem while irradiating the root entry area of the trigeminal nerve with 70-90 Gy. An independent dose model was developed to implement the algorithm. The accuracy of the dose model was tested and validated via comparison with the Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) calculations. Agreements of 3% or 3 mm in isodose distributions were found for both single-shot and multiple-shot treatment plans. After the optimized blocking patterns are obtained via the independent dose model, they are imported into the LGP for final dose calculations and treatment planning analyses. We found that the use of a moderate number of source plugs (30-50 plugs) significantly lowered (~40%) the dose to the brainstem for trigeminal neuralgia treatments. Considering the small effort involved in using these plugs, we recommend source blocking for all trigeminal neuralgia treatments with Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

  4. A technique to sharpen the beam penumbra for Gamma Knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M.; Li, X. Allen; Ma, Lijun

    2003-06-01

    In stereotactic radiosurgery, a narrow beam penumbra is often desired for producing steep dose fall-off between the target volume and adjacent critical structures. Due to limited source sizes and the scattering effects, the physical penumbra of the Gamma Knife (GK) is often restricted to a width of 1-2 mm. In this work, we developed a technique to further reduce the beam penumbra and improve the dose profile for the Gamma Knife delivery. Under this technique, a conic filter is inserted into an individual plug collimator of a GK helmet to flatten the beam profile. Monte Carlo calculations were carried out to simulate the GK geometry of the individual plug collimator and to optimize the physical shapes of the filters. The calculations were performed for a series of filter shapes with different collimator sizes. Our results show that a proper filter significantly reduces the single GK beam penumbra width (defined as the distance from the 90% to 50% isodose lines) by 30-60%. The beam intensity is reduced by about 20-50% when the filter is used. A treatment plan was developed for a trigeminal neuralgia case by commissioning the filtered beam profile for Leksell Gamma Plan (version 5.31). Compared with the conventional treatment plan, a significant improvement was found on the critical structure sparing and on the target dose uniformity. In conclusion, the proposed technique is feasible and effective in sharpening the beam penumbra for Gamma Knife beam profiles.

  5. A simple method of independent treatment time verification in gamma knife radiosurgery using integral dose

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Jianyue; Drzymala, Robert; Li Zuofeng

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a simple independent dose calculation method to verify treatment plans for Leksell Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Our approach uses the total integral dose within the skull as an end point for comparison. The total integral dose is computed using a spreadsheet and is compared to that obtained from Leksell GammaPlan registered . It is calculated as the sum of the integral doses of 201 beams, each passing through a cylindrical volume. The average length of the cylinders is estimated from the Skull-Scaler measurement data taken before treatment. Correction factors are applied to the length of the cylinder depending on the location of a shot in the skull. The radius of the cylinder corresponds to the collimator aperture of the helmet, with a correction factor for the beam penumbra and scattering. We have tested our simple spreadsheet program using treatment plans of 40 patients treated with Gamma Knife registered in our center. These patients differ in geometry, size, lesion locations, collimator helmet, and treatment complexities. Results show that differences between our calculations and treatment planning results are typically within {+-}3%, with a maximum difference of {+-}3.8%. We demonstrate that our spreadsheet program is a convenient and effective independent method to verify treatment planning irradiation times prior to implementation of Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

  6. Analysis of risk factors to predict communicating hydrocephalus following gamma knife radiosurgery for intracranial schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghoon; Seo, Seong-Wook; Hwang, Juyoung; Seol, Ho Jun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Lee, Jung-Il; Kong, Doo-Sik

    2016-12-01

    Communicating hydrocephalus (HCP) in vestibular schwannomas (VS) after gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has been reported in the literature. However, little information about its incidence and risk factors after GKRS for intracranial schwannomas is yet available. The objective of this study was to identify the incidence and risk factors for developing communicating HCP after GKRS for intracranial schwannomas. We retrospectively reviewed a total of 702 patients with intracranial schwannomas who were treated with GKRS between January 2002 and December 2015. We investigated patients' age, gender, tumor origin, previous surgery history, tumor volume, marginal radiation dose, and presence of tumor control to identify associations with communicating HCP following GKRS. To make predictive models of communicating HCP, we performed Cox regression analyses and constructed a decision tree for risk factors. In total, 29 of the 702 patients (4.1%) developed communicating HCP following GKRS, which required ventriculo-peritoneal (VP) shunt surgery. Multivariate analyses indicated that age (P = 0.0011), tumor origin (P = 0.0438), and tumor volume (P < 0.0001) were significant predictors of communicating HCP in patients with intracranial schwannoma after GKRS. Using machine-learning methods, we fit an optimal predictive model. We found that developing communicating HCP following GKRS was most likely if the tumor was vestibular origin and had a volume ≥13.65 cm(3) . Communicating HCP is not a rare complication of GKRS for intracranial schwannomas. Under specific conditions, communicating HCP following GKRS is warranted for this patient group, and this patient group should be closely followed up.

  7. Three-dimensional radiation dosimetry for gamma knife using a gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Kazi Muazzam

    The use of three-dimensional radiation dosimetry has been limited. With the use of water phantoms and ionization chambers, it has been possible to determine three dimensional dose distributions on a gross scale for cobalt 60 and linear accelerator sources. This method has been somewhat useful for traditional radiotherapy. There is, however, a need for more precise dosimetry, particularly with stereotactic radiosurgery. Most gamma knife facilities use either thermoluminescant dosimetry or film, neither of which provides three dimensional dose distributions. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a gel dosimetry system that relies on the production of a ferric ion-xylenol orange colored complex. This work demonstrates the use of laser light and a detector to quantify radiation-induced colorimetric changes in absorbance for the gel dosimeter. The absorbance has been reconstructed by the back projection technique to demonstrate the applicability of the gel dosimeter to gamma knife 3D-dose distributions.

  8. Gamma knife radiosurgery to the trigeminal ganglion for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia secondary to vertebrobasilar ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Somaza, Salvador; Hurtado, Wendy; Montilla, Eglee; Ghaleb, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Background: We report the result obtained using Gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery on the trigeminal ganglion (TG) in a patient with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) secondary to vertebrobasilar ectasia (VBE). Case Description: Retrospective review of medical records corresponding to one patient with VBE-related trigeminal pain treated with radiosurgery. Because of the impossibility of visualization of the entry zone or the path of trigeminal nerve through the pontine cistern, we proceeded with stereotactic radiosurgery directed to the TG. The maximum radiation dose was 86 Gy with a 8-mm and a 4-mm collimator. The follow-up period was 24 months. The pain disappeared in 15 days, passing from Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) grade V to BNI grade IIIa in 4 months and then to grade I. The patient did not experience noticeable subjective facial numbness. Conclusions: This experience showed that Gamma knife radiosurgery was effective in the management of VBE-related trigeminal pain, using the TG as radiosurgical target. PMID:25593782

  9. TH-A-9A-06: Inverse Planning of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Using Natural Physical Models

    SciTech Connect

    Riofrio, D; Ma, L; Zhou, J; Luan, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Treatment-planning systems rely on computer intensive optimization algorithms in order to provide radiation dose localization. We are investigating a new optimization paradigm based on natural physical modeling and simulations, which tend to evolve in time and find the minimum energy state. In our research, we aim to match physical models with radiation therapy inverse planning problems, where the minimum energy state coincides with the optimal solution. As a prototype study, we have modeled the inverse planning of Gamma Knife radiosurgery using the dynamic interactions between charged particles and demonstrate the potential of the paradigm. Methods: For inverse planning of Gamma Knife radiosurgery: (1) positive charges are uniformly placed on the surface of tumors and critical structures. (2) The Gamma Knife dose kernels of 4mm, 8mm and 16mm radii are modeled as geometric objects with variable charges. (3) The number of shots per each kernel radii is obtained by solving a constrained integer-linear problem. (4) The shots are placed into the tumor volume and move under electrostatic forces. The simulation is performed until internal forces are zero or maximum iterations are reached. (5) Finally, non-negative least squares (NNLS) is used to calculate the beam-on times for each shot. Results: A 3D C-shaped tumor surrounding a spherical critical structure was used for testing the new optimization paradigm. These tests showed that charges spread out evenly covering the tumor while keeping distance from the critical structure, resulting in a high quality plan. Conclusion: We have developed a new paradigm for dose optimization based on the simulation of physical models. As prototype studies, we applied electrostatic models to Gamma Knife radiosurgery and demonstrated the potential of the new paradigm. Further research and fine-tuning of the model are underway. NSF CBET-0853157.

  10. Shot sequencing based on biological equivalent dose considerations for multiple isocenter Gamma Knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lijun; Lee, Letitia; Barani, Igor; Hwang, Andrew; Fogh, Shannon; Nakamura, Jean; McDermott, Michael; Sneed, Penny; Larson, David A.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2011-11-01

    Rapid delivery of multiple shots or isocenters is one of the hallmarks of Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In this study, we investigated whether the temporal order of shots delivered with Gamma Knife Perfexion would significantly influence the biological equivalent dose for complex multi-isocenter treatments. Twenty single-target cases were selected for analysis. For each case, 3D dose matrices of individual shots were extracted and single-fraction equivalent uniform dose (sEUD) values were determined for all possible shot delivery sequences, corresponding to different patterns of temporal dose delivery within the target. We found significant variations in the sEUD values among these sequences exceeding 15% for certain cases. However, the sequences for the actual treatment delivery were found to agree (<3%) and to correlate (R2 = 0.98) excellently with the sequences yielding the maximum sEUD values for all studied cases. This result is applicable for both fast and slow growing tumors with α/β values of 2 to 20 according to the linear-quadratic model. In conclusion, despite large potential variations in different shot sequences for multi-isocenter Gamma Knife treatments, current clinical delivery sequences exhibited consistent biological target dosing that approached that maximally achievable for all studied cases.

  11. New techniques of determining focus position in gamma knife operation using 3D image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yingen; Wang, Dezong; Zhou, Quan

    1994-09-01

    In this paper, new techniques of determining the focus of a disease position in a gamma knife operation are presented. In these techniques, the transparent 3D color image of the human body organ is reconstructed using a new three-dimensional reconstruction method, and then the position, the area, and the volume of focus of a disease such as cancer or a tumor are calculated. They are used in the gamma knife operation. The CT pictures are input into a digital image processing system. The useful information is extracted and the original data are obtained. Then the transparent 3D color image is reconstructed using these original data. By using this transparent 3D color image, the positions of the human body organ and the focus of a disease are determined in a coordinate system. While the 3D image is reconstructed, the area and the volume of human body organ and focus of a disease can be calculated at the same time. It is expressed through actual application that the positions of human body organ and focus of a disease can be determined exactly by using the transparent 3D color image. It is very useful in gamma knife operation or other surgical operation. The techniques presented in this paper have great application value.

  12. Stereotactic radiosurgery using the Leksell Gamma Knife: current trends and future directives.

    PubMed

    Jawahar, Ajay; Jawahar, Lisa L; Nanda, Anil; Sharp, Christopher D; Warren, April; Elrod, John W; Jennings, Merilyn; Alexander, J Steven; Minagar, Alireza

    2004-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is the extremely precise administration of a radiation dosage in three-dimensional space to treat an increasingly broad spectrum of intracranial and skull-base lesions. 455 patients with various indications were treated using the 201 Source Co-60 Leksell Model "B" Gamma Knife(r) at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport, Louisiana. 273 (60.2%) patients received radiosurgery as the first line of treatment for their disease. The mean Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) of the patients was 70. Cerebral metastases were the main indications for radiosurgery at our center accounting for 27% of the patients, while meningioma, AVM, trigeminal neuralgia, movement disorders, and primary CNS malignant tumors were the other indications. Our institutional experience and results indicate that low incidence of complications coupled with a high tumor control rate makes Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery a viable option for patients who must undergo neurosurgery. As the Gamma Knife continues to prove itself as a first-line treatment of many complex brain disorders, new indications for this technology will continue to emerge, further broadening the scope of patient care.

  13. Fractionated Stereotactic Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Large Brain Metastases: A Retrospective, Single Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Ran; Lee, Jae Meen; Kim, Jin Wook; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Kim, Dong Gyu; Jung, Hee-Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is widely used for brain metastases but has been relatively contraindicated for large lesions (>3 cm). In the present study, we analyzed the efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery to treat metastatic brain tumors for which surgical resection were not considered as the primary treatment option. Methods and Materials Thirty-six patients, forty cases were treated with Gamma Knife-based fractionated SRS for three to four consecutive days with the same Leksell frame on their heads. The mean gross tumor volume was 18.3 cm³, and the median dose was 8 Gy at 50% isodose line with 3 fractions for three consecutive days (range, 5 to 11 Gy and 2 to 4 fractions for 2 to 4 consecutive days). Survival rates and prognostic factors were analyzed. Results The overall survival rate at one and two years was 66.7 and 33.1%, respectively. The median survival time was 16.2 months, and the local control rate was 90%. RTOG toxicity grade 1 was observed in 3 (8.3%) patients, grade 2 in 1 (2.7%) patient and grade 3 in 1 (2.7%) patient respectively. Radiation necrosis was developed in 1 (2.7%) patient. KPS scores and control of primary disease resulted in significant differences in survival. Conclusions Our findings suggest that consecutive hypofractionated Gamma Knife SRS could be applied to large metastatic brain tumors with effective tumor control and low toxicity rates. PMID:27661613

  14. Gamma Knife relative dosimetry using VIP polymer gel and EBT radiochromic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutsatsos, A.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Zourari, K.; Papagiannis, P.; Karaiskos, P.; Dardoufas, K.; Damilakis, J.; Seimenis, I.; Georgiou, E.

    2009-05-01

    The VIP polymer gel-MRI method and EBT Gafchromic films were employed to obtain relative dosimetry results for the Gamma Knife (GK) radiation fields of 4 mm and 18 mm nominal diameter. Results are compared to the corresponding calculations of GammaPlan Treatment Planning System (TPS) in the form of 1D profiles and 2D distributions. Measured and planned relative dosimetry datasets are found in close agreement within experimental uncertainties. A corresponding agreement is shown for Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) results that are available only through the application of the polymer gel method.

  15. Accuracy and stability of positioning in radiosurgery: Long term results of the Gamma Knife system

    SciTech Connect

    Heck, Bernhard; Jess-Hempen, Anja; Kreiner, Hans Juerg; Schoepgens, Hans; Mack, Andreas

    2007-04-15

    The primary aim of this investigation was to determine the long term overall accuracy of an irradiation position of Gamma Knife systems. The mechanical accuracy of the system as well as the overall accuracy of an irradiation position was examined by irradiating radiosensitive films. To measure the mechanical accuracy, the GafChromic registered film was fixed by a special tool at the unit center point (UCP). For overall accuracy the film was mounted inside a phantom at a target position given by a two-dimensional cross. Its position was determined by CT or MRI scans, a treatment was planned to hit this target by use of the standard planning software and the radiation was finally delivered. This procedure is named ''system test'' according to DIN 6875-1 and is equivalent to a treatment simulation. The used GafChromic registered films were evaluated by high resolution densitometric measurements. The Munich Gamma Knife UCP coincided within x;y;z: -0.014{+-}0.09 mm; 0.013{+-}0.09 mm; -0.002{+-}0.06 mm (mean{+-}SD) to the center of dose distribution. There was no trend in the measured data observed over more than ten years. All measured data were within a sphere of 0.2 mm radius. When basing the target definition in the system test on MRI scans, we obtained an overall accuracy of an irradiation position in the x direction of 0.21{+-}0.32 mm and in the y direction 0.15{+-}0.26 mm (mean{+-}SD). When a CT-based target definition was used, we measured distances in x direction 0.06{+-}0.09 mm and in y direction 0.04{+-}0.09 mm (mean{+-}SD), respectively. These results were compared with those obtained with a Gamma Knife equipped with an automatic positioning system (APS) by use of a different phantom. This phantom was found to be slightly less accurate due to its mechanical construction and the soft fixation into the frame. The phantom related position deviation was found to be about {+-}0.2 mm, and therefore the measured accuracy of the APS Gamma Knife was evidently less

  16. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Treatment of Cerebral Metastases From Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, Micaela; Vecchio, Antonella del; Attuati, Luca; Picozzi, Piero; Perna, Lucia; Franzin, Alberto; Bolognesi, Angelo; Cozzarini, Cesare; Calandrino, Riccardo; Mortini, Pietro; Muzio, Nadia di

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical and physico-dosimetric variables affecting clinical outcome of patients treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between 2001 and 2006, 373 patients (298 men and 75 women, median age 65 years) with brain metastases from NSCLC underwent GKRS. All of them had KPS {>=} 60%, eight or fewer brain metastases, confirmed histopathological diagnosis and recent work-up (<3 months). Thirty-five patients belonged to recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class I, 307 patients were in RPA Class II, 7 patients were in RPA Class III. Median tumor volume was 3.6 cm{sup 3}. Median marginal dose was 22.5 Gy at 50% isodose.; median 10 Gy and 12 Gy isodose volumes were 30.8 cm{sup 3} and 15.8 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Follow-up with MRI was performed every 3 months. Overall survival data were collected from internal database, telephone interviews, and identifying registries. Results: Mean follow-up after GKRS was 51 months (range, 6 to 96 months); mean overall survival was 14.2 months. Of 373 patients, 29 were alive at time of writing, 104 had died of cerebral progression, and 176 had died of systemic progression. In 64 cases it was not possible to ascertain the cause. Univariate and multivariate analysis were adjusted for the following: RPA class, surgery, WBRT, age, gender, number of lesions, median tumor volume, median peripheral dose, and 10 Gy and 12 Gy volumes. Identified RPA class and overall tumor volume >5 cc were the only two covariates independently predictive of overall survival in patients who died of cerebral progression. Conclusions: Global volume of brain disease should be the main parameter to consider for performing GKRS, which is a first-line therapy for patient in good general condition and controlled systemic disease.

  17. A simple and effective method for validation and measurement of collimator output factors for Leksell Gamma Knife® Perfexion™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lijun; Kjäll, Per; Novotny, Josef Jr; Nordström, Håkan; Johansson, Jonas; Verhey, Lynn

    2009-06-01

    Accurate determination of collimator output factors is important for Leksell Gamma Knife radiosurgery. The new Leksell Gamma Knife® Perfexion™ system has a completely redesigned collimator system and the collimator output factors are different from the other Leksell Gamma Knife® models. In this study, a simple method was developed to validate the collimator output factors specifically for Leksell Gamma Knife® Perfexion™. The method uses double-shot exposures on a single film to eliminate repeated setups and the necessity to acquire dose calibration curves required for the traditional film exposure method. Using the method, the collimator output factors with respect to the 16 mm collimator were measured to be 0.929 ± 0.009 and 0.817 ± 0.012 for the 8 mm and the 4 mm collimator, respectively. These values are in agreement (within 2%) with the default values of 0.924 and 0.805 in the Leksell Gamma Plan® treatment planning system. These values also agree with recently published results of 0.917 (8 mm collimator) and 0.818 (4 mm collimator) obtained from the traditional methods. Given the efficiency of the method, measurement and validation of the collimator output factors can be readily adopted in commissioning and quality assurance of a Leksell Gamma Knife® Perfexion™ system.

  18. Calibration of the Gamma Knife using a new phantom following the AAPM TG51 and TG21 protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Drzymala, R. E.; Wood, R. C.; Levy, J.

    2008-02-15

    Purpose: To compare calibration of the Leksell Gamma Knife according to the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Groups 21 and 51 protocols. A new phantom was fabricated for this purpose. Its design, physical properties, and composition are described. Materials and methods: The Gamma Knife TG-51 calibration phantom is designed to be filled with water and support an ionization chamber positioned at its center. The phantom is thimble-shaped, with a 2 mm plastic wall to contain water. The phantom and chamber assembly was mounted in a LeksellTM stereotactic frame. The location of the chamber's sensitive volume was determined using computed tomography. The chamber-phantom assembly was attached to the 18 mm helmet in the Gamma Knife by the stereotactic frame. The phantom's geometry allowed radiation beams from each of the 201 Gamma Knife cobalt-60 sources to converge after an 8 cm path to the ionization chamber's sensitive volume. This is similar to the arrangement by which one calibrates the Gamma Knife using the manufacturer-supplied polystyrene phantom. Results: The phantom was attached to the Gamma Knife so that the ionization chamber was reproducibly positioned at the convergence of the radiation beams. Because of the phantom's design, the phantom could be affixed to either trunnions or the automatic patient positioning system, once mounted in the LeksellTM stereotectic frame. Comparisons using different phantoms and protocols resulted in the following calibration ratios for TG-21 in the polystyrene sphere phantom, TG-21 in the water phantom, and TG-51 in the water phantom, respectively: 1.000, 1.008, 0.986, when corrected for transmission through the plastic water reservoir wall and using the same ionization chamber. Transmission measurements using a 1 cm thickness of the same material in the Co-60 beam determined that the phantom's 2 mm plastic wall resulted in a reduction in the measured the output by 0.5%. Conclusions: Calibration of the Gamma

  19. Verification of Gamma Knife extend system based fractionated treatment planning using EBT2 film

    SciTech Connect

    Natanasabapathi, Gopishankar; Bisht, Raj Kishor

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This paper presents EBT2 film verification of fractionated treatment planning with the Gamma Knife (GK) extend system, a relocatable frame system for multiple-fraction or serial multiple-session radiosurgery.Methods: A human head shaped phantom simulated the verification process for fractionated Gamma Knife treatment. Phantom preparation for Extend Frame based treatment planning involved creating a dental impression, fitting the phantom to the frame system, and acquiring a stereotactic computed tomography (CT) scan. A CT scan (Siemens, Emotion 6) of the phantom was obtained with following parameters: Tube voltage—110 kV, tube current—280 mA, pixel size—0.5 × 0.5 and 1 mm slice thickness. A treatment plan with two 8 mm collimator shots and three sectors blocking in each shot was made. Dose prescription of 4 Gy at 100% was delivered for the first fraction out of the two fractions planned. Gafchromic EBT2 film (ISP Wayne, NJ) was used as 2D verification dosimeter in this process. Films were cut and placed inside the film insert of the phantom for treatment dose delivery. Meanwhile a set of films from the same batch were exposed from 0 to 12 Gy doses for calibration purposes. An EPSON (Expression 10000 XL) scanner was used for scanning the exposed films in transparency mode. Scanned films were analyzed with inhouse written MATLAB codes.Results: Gamma index analysis of film measurement in comparison with TPS calculated dose resulted in high pass rates >90% for tolerance criteria of 1%/1 mm. The isodose overlay and linear dose profiles of film measured and computed dose distribution on sagittal and coronal plane were in close agreement.Conclusions: Through this study, the authors propose treatment verification QA method for Extend frame based fractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery using EBT2 film.

  20. Rotating and static sources for gamma knife radiosurgery systems: Monte Carlo studies.

    PubMed

    Cheung, J Y C; Yu, K N

    2006-07-01

    Rotating gamma systems (RGSs), GammaART-6000, and its Chinese equivalents, such as OUR and MASEP, etc., are new radiosurgery systems that use rotating 60Co sources instead of the 201 static sources (Leksell gamma knife, LGK). The rotating sources of RGSs simulate an infinite number of beams and promote extremely high target to surface dose ratios. However, the results of Monte Carlo in this study shows that RGS variants (modeled as having the same latitude angles, source to focus distance, and the distance from the source to the end of the collimator as the LGK) have smaller beam profile penumbra in the z direction, while LGK has smaller penumbra in the x and y directions. The differences are more significant in using larger collimators.

  1. Rotating and static sources for gamma knife radiosurgery systems: Monte Carlo studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, J. Y. C.; Yu, K. N.

    2006-07-15

    Rotating gamma systems (RGSs), GammaART-6000{sup TM}, and its Chinese equivalents, such as OUR and MASEP, etc., are new radiosurgery systems that use rotating {sup 60}Co sources instead of the 201 static sources (Leksell gamma knife, LGK). The rotating sources of RGSs simulate an infinite number of beams and promote extremely high target to surface dose ratios. However, the results of Monte Carlo in this study shows that RGS variants (modeled as having the same latitude angles, source to focus distance, and the distance from the source to the end of the collimator as the LGK) have smaller beam profile penumbra in the z direction, while LGK has smaller penumbra in the x and y directions. The differences are more significant in using larger collimators.

  2. Role of Gamma Knife® Radiosurgery for the Treatment of Brain Metastases from Gynecological Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Rahim; Potrebko, Peter S; Pepe, Julie; Wu, Meiling; Saigal, Kunal; Biagioli, Matthew; Shridhar, Ravi; Holloway, Robert; Field, Melvin; Rao, Nikhil G

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Gamma Knife® (GK) (Elekta Instruments, Stockholm, Sweden) radiosurgery is well established for treatment of brain metastases. There are limited data on patients treated with GK from gynecological cancers. The authors sought to determine the effectiveness of the GK in patients with brain metastases from gynecological cancers. Methods: An IRB-approved database was queried for patients with gynecologic cancers treated with GK between June 1996 and May 2016. Imaging studies were reviewed post-SRS (stereotactic radiosurgery) to evaluate local control (LC) and distant brain control (DC). Overall survival (OS), local control, and distant brain control were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier (KM) method and log-rank test.  Results: Thirty-three patients underwent SRS for 73 separate cranial lesions. The median age was ­58.5 years, and 17 (52%) also had extracranial metastases. Ten (30%) patients had previously received whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT), and 11 (33%) underwent concurrent WBRT. The median tumor volume was 0.96 cm3. Median radiographic follow-up was 11 months. At the time of treatment, 39% of patients were categorized as recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class I, 55% as RPA Class II, and 6% as RPA Class III. The local failure rate was 8%. Five patients (15%) developed new brain lesions outside the radiation field with a median progression-free survival (PFS) of seven (range: 3-9) months. Median OS was 15 months from GK treatment. One-year OS was 72.9% from GK treatment. Primary cancer histology was a significant predictor of OS, favoring ovarian and endometrial cancer (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery for gynecologic brain metastases leads to excellent control rates of treated lesions. Primary histology may have a significant impact on OS following GK, with improved survival seen with ovarian and cervical cancer following Gamma Knife radiosurgery (p = 0.03). PMID:28168125

  3. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for glomus jugulare tumors: a single-center series of 75 cases.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Ramez; Ammori, Mohannad B; Yianni, John; Grainger, Alison; Rowe, Jeremy; Radatz, Matthias

    2016-07-08

    OBJECTIVE Glomus jugulare tumors are rare indolent tumors that frequently involve the lower cranial nerves (CNs). Complete resection can be difficult and associated with lower CN injury. Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has established its role as a noninvasive alternative treatment option for these often formidable lesions. The authors aimed to review their experience at the National Centre for Stereotactic Radiosurgery, Sheffield, United Kingdom, specifically the long-term tumor control rate and complications of GKRS for these lesions. METHODS Clinical and radiological data were retrospectively reviewed for patients treated between March 1994 and December 2010. Data were available for 75 patients harboring 76 tumors. The tumors in 3 patients were treated in 2 stages. Familial and/or hereditary history was noted in 12 patients, 2 of whom had catecholamine-secreting and/or active tumors. Gamma Knife radiosurgery was the primary treatment modality in 47 patients (63%). The median age at the time of treatment was 55 years. The median tumor volume was 7 cm(3), and the median radiosurgical dose to the tumor margin was 18 Gy (range 12-25 Gy). The median duration of radiological follow-up was 51.5 months (range 12-230 months), and the median clinical follow-up was 38.5 months (range 6-223 months). RESULTS The overall tumor control rate was 93.4% with low CN morbidity. Improvement of preexisting deficits was noted in 15 patients (20%). A stationary clinical course and no progression of symptoms were noted in 48 patients (64%). Twelve patients (16%) had new symptoms or progression of their preexisting symptoms. The Kaplan-Meier actuarial tumor control rate was 92.2% at 5 years and 86.3% at 10 years. CONCLUSIONS Gamma Knife radiosurgery offers a risk-versus-benefit treatment option with very low CN morbidity and stable long-term results.

  4. Clinical Evaluation of Targeting Accuracy of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in Trigeminal Neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Massager, Nicolas Abeloos, Laurence; Devriendt, Daniel; Op de Beeck, Marc; Levivier, Marc

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: The efficiency of radiosurgery is related to its highly precise targeting. We assessed clinically the targeting accuracy of radiosurgical treatment with the Leksell Gamma Knife for trigeminal neuralgia. We also studied the applied radiation dose within the area of focal contrast enhancement on the trigeminal nerve root following radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: From an initial group of 78 patients with trigeminal neuralgia treated with gamma knife radiosurgery using a 90-Gy dose, we analyzed a subgroup of 65 patients for whom 6-month follow-up MRI showed focal contrast enhancement of the trigeminal nerve. Follow-up MRI was spatially coregistered to the radiosurgical planning MRI. Target accuracy was assessed from deviation of the coordinates of the intended target compared with the center of enhancement on postoperative MRI. Radiation dose delivered at the borders of contrast enhancement was evaluated. Results: The median deviation of the coordinates between the intended target and the center of contrast enhancement was 0.91 mm in Euclidean space. The radiation doses fitting within the borders of the contrast enhancement of the trigeminal nerve root ranged from 49 to 85 Gy (median value, 77 {+-} 8.7 Gy). Conclusions: The median deviation found in clinical assessment of gamma knife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia is low and compatible with its high rate of efficiency. Focal enhancement of the trigeminal nerve after radiosurgery occurred in 83% of our patients and was not associated with clinical outcome. Focal enhancement borders along the nerve root fit with a median dose of 77 {+-} 8.7 Gy.

  5. Technical Note: PRESAGE three-dimensional dosimetry accurately measures Gamma Knife output factors

    PubMed Central

    Klawikowski, Slade J.; Yang, James N.; Adamovics, John; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Small-field output factor measurements are traditionally very difficult because of steep dose gradients, loss of lateral electronic equilibrium, and dose volume averaging in finitely sized detectors. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry is ideal for measuring small output factors and avoids many of these potential challenges of point and two-dimensional detectors. PRESAGE 3D polymer dosimeters were used to measure the output factors for the 4 mm and 8 mm collimators of the Leksell Perfexion Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatment system. Discrepancies between the planned and measured distance between shot centers were also investigated. A Gamma Knife head frame was mounted onto an anthropomorphic head phantom. Special inserts were machined to hold 60 mm diameter, 70 mm tall cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters. The phantom was irradiated with one 16 mm shot and either one 4 mm or one 8 mm shot, to a prescribed dose of either 3 Gy or 4 Gy to the 50% isodose line. The two shots were spaced between 30 mm and 60 mm apart and aligned along the central axis of the cylinder. The Presage dosimeters were measured using the DMOS-RPC optical CT scanning system. Five independent 4 mm output factor measurements fell within 2% of the manufacturer’s Monte Carlo simulation-derived nominal value, as did two independent 8 mm output factor measurements. The measured distances between shot centers varied by ± 0.8 mm with respect to the planned shot displacements. On the basis of these results, we conclude that PRESAGE dosimetry is excellently suited to quantify the difficult-to-measure Gamma Knife output factors. PMID:25368961

  6. SU-E-T-536: Inhomogeneity Correction in Planning of Gamma Knife Treatments for Acoustic Schwannoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, L; Gupta, N; Hessler, J; Liu, A; Weldon, M; McGregor, J; Ammirati, M; Guiou, M; Xia, F; Grecula, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To find out the dose difference on targets and organs at risk for the treatment of acoustic schwannoma if the inhomogeneity correction (Convolution algorithm) is applied. Methods: Images of patients treated for acoustic schwannoma with Gamma Knife using TMR 10 algorithm were retrieved from database and replanned with Convolution and TMR 10 algorithm respectively. These patients were treated using a preplan scheme in following: (1) Before the actual treatment day, using the MRI image that was taken without a head frame on the patient's skull, a pre-treatment plan was made based on the default skull coordinates in the Gamma Knife treatment planning system (LGP); (2) then on treatment day, a head frame was placed on the patient's skull, and a CT image was taken. The CT image with head frame was registered and fused with the completed preplan; (3) the treatment plan was finalized and the treatment was delivered. To find out the dosimetry impact of inhomogeneity correction, we used the retrieved CT images to replan the treatment using Convolution algorithm in LGP software version 10.1.1. The dose distributions and the dose volume histograms for targets and OARs were compared for these two dose calculation algorithms. Results: The dose calculated with the Convolution algorithm in general is slightly lower than the one from TMR 10 around the boney area. The effect from the inhomogeneity correction is observable but not significant, and varies with the location of the tumor. Conclusion: Inhomogeneity correction slightly improve the dose accuracy for acoustic schwannoma Gamma Knife treatments although the correction may not be very significant. Our Result provides evidence for dose prescription adjustment to treat acoustic schwannoma. The actual clinical outcome of switching from using TMR10 to using Convolution needs to be further investigated.

  7. Benchmark Experiment of Dose Rate Distributions Around the Gamma Knife Medical Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, K.; Kosako, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Sonoki, I.

    2014-06-01

    Dose rate measurements around a gamma knife apparatus were performed by using an ionization chamber. Analyses have been performed by using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5. The nuclear library used for the dose rate distribution of 60Co was MCPLIB04. The calculation model was prepared with a high degree of fidelity, such as the position of each Cobalt source and shielding materials. Comparisons between measured results and calculated ones were performed, and a very good agreement was observed. It is concluded that the Monte Carlo calculation method with its related nuclear data library is very effective for such a complicated radiation oncology apparatus.

  8. Phantom Positioning Variation in the Gamma Knife® Perfexion Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, N. A.; Potiens, M. P. A.; Saraiva, C. W. C.

    2016-07-01

    The use of small volume ionization chamber has become required for the dosimetry of equipments that use small radiation fields such as the Gamma Knife® Perfexion (GKP) unit. In this work, a pinpoint ionization chamber was inserted into the dosimetry phantom and measurements were performed with the phantom in different positions, in order to verify if the change in the phantom positioning affects the dosimetry of the GKP. Four different phantom positions were performed. The variation in the result is within the range allowed for the dosimetry of a GKP equipment.

  9. An improved technique for comparing Gamma Knife dose-volume distributions in stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozer-Loft, Stephen M.; Walton, Lee; Forster, David M. C.; Kemeny, Andras A.

    1999-08-01

    A function derived from the geometry of brachytherapy dose distributions is applied to stereotactic radiosurgery and an algorithm for the production of a novel dose-volume histogram, the Anderson inverse-square shifted dose-volume histogram (DVH), is proposed. The expected form of the function to be plotted is checked by calculating its value for single focus exposures, and its application to clinical examples of Gamma Knife treatments described. The technique is shown to provide a valuable tool for assessing the adequacy of radiosurgical plans and comparing and reporting dose distributions.

  10. Benchmark Experiment of Dose Rate Distributions Around the Gamma Knife Medical Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, K.; Kosako, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Sonoki, I.

    2014-06-15

    Dose rate measurements around a gamma knife apparatus were performed by using an ionization chamber. Analyses have been performed by using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5. The nuclear library used for the dose rate distribution of {sup 60}Co was MCPLIB04. The calculation model was prepared with a high degree of fidelity, such as the position of each Cobalt source and shielding materials. Comparisons between measured results and calculated ones were performed, and a very good agreement was observed. It is concluded that the Monte Carlo calculation method with its related nuclear data library is very effective for such a complicated radiation oncology apparatus.

  11. Gamma Knife® radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chun-Po; Schlesinger, David; Sheehan, Jason P

    2011-11-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is characterized by a temporary paroxysmal lancinating facial pain in the trigeminal nerve distribution. The prevalence is four to five per 100,000. Local pressure on nerve fibers from vascular loops results in painful afferent discharge from an injured segment of the fifth cranial nerve. Microvascular decompression addresses the underlying pathophysiology of the disease, making this treatment the gold standard for medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia. In patients who cannot tolerate a surgical procedure, those in whom a vascular etiology cannot be identified, or those unwilling to undergo an open surgery, stereotactic radiosurgery is an appropriate alternative. The majority of patients with typical facial pain will achieve relief following radiosurgical treatment. Long-term follow-up for recurrence as well as for radiation-induced complications is required in all patients undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia.

  12. The use of a Leksell-BRW adapter for linac radiosurgery as an adjunct to Gamma Knife treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Hinson, William H.; Bourland, J. Daniel; de Guzman, Allan F.; Stieber, Volker W.; Tatter, Steven B.; Ellis, Thomas L.

    2003-12-01

    We have investigated the use of an adapter that permits the use of a Leksell coordinate frame with a linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery system based on the Brown-Robert-Wells (BRW) design. This device is useful when lesions that are planned for treatment on a Leksell Gamma Knife system are found to be inaccessible to the Gamma Knife. We have found that with this device objects within a head phantom can be targeted by the linear accelerator within an accuracy of approximately 1 mm.

  13. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-03: Continuous Dose Delivery with Gamma Knife Perfexion

    SciTech Connect

    Ghobadi,; Li, W; Chung, C; Jaffray, D; Aleman, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We propose continuous dose delivery techniques for stereotactic treatments delivered by Gamma Knife Perfexion using inverse treatment planning system that can be applied to various tumour sites in the brain. We test the accuracy of the plans on Perfexion’s planning system (GammaPlan) to ensure the obtained plans are viable. This approach introduces continuous dose delivery for Perefxion, as opposed to the currently employed step-and-shoot approaches, for different tumour sites. Additionally, this is the first realization of automated inverse planning on GammaPlan. Methods: The inverse planning approach is divided into two steps of identifying a quality path inside the target, and finding the best collimator composition for the path. To find a path, we select strategic regions inside the target volume and find a path that visits each region exactly once. This path is then passed to a mathematical model which finds the best combination of collimators and their durations. The mathematical model minimizes the dose spillage to the surrounding tissues while ensuring the prescribed dose is delivered to the target(s). Organs-at-risk and their corresponding allowable doses can also be added to the model to protect adjacent organs. Results: We test this approach on various tumour sizes and sites. The quality of the obtained treatment plans are comparable or better than forward plans and inverse plans that use step- and-shoot technique. The conformity indices in the obtained continuous dose delivery plans are similar to those of forward plans while the beam-on time is improved on average (see Table 1 in supporting document). Conclusion: We employ inverse planning for continuous dose delivery in Perfexion for brain tumours. The quality of the obtained plans is similar to forward and inverse plans that use conventional step-and-shoot technique. We tested the inverse plans on GammaPlan to verify clinical relevance. This research was partially supported by Elekta

  14. Gamma Knife irradiation method based on dosimetric controls to target small areas in rat brains

    SciTech Connect

    Constanzo, Julie; Paquette, Benoit; Charest, Gabriel; Masson-Côté, Laurence; Guillot, Mathieu

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Targeted and whole-brain irradiation in humans can result in significant side effects causing decreased patient quality of life. To adequately investigate structural and functional alterations after stereotactic radiosurgery, preclinical studies are needed. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust standardized method of targeted irradiation on small regions of the rat brain. Methods: Euthanized male Fischer rats were imaged in a stereotactic bed, by computed tomography (CT), to estimate positioning variations relative to the bregma skull reference point. Using a rat brain atlas and the stereotactic bregma coordinates obtained from CT images, different regions of the brain were delimited and a treatment plan was generated. A single isocenter treatment plan delivering ≥100 Gy in 100% of the target volume was produced by Leksell GammaPlan using the 4 mm diameter collimator of sectors 4, 5, 7, and 8 of the Gamma Knife unit. Impact of positioning deviations of the rat brain on dose deposition was simulated by GammaPlan and validated with dosimetric measurements. Results: The authors’ results showed that 90% of the target volume received 100 ± 8 Gy and the maximum of deposited dose was 125 ± 0.7 Gy, which corresponds to an excellent relative standard deviation of 0.6%. This dose deposition calculated with GammaPlan was validated with dosimetric films resulting in a dose-profile agreement within 5%, both in X- and Z-axes. Conclusions: The authors’ results demonstrate the feasibility of standardizing the irradiation procedure of a small volume in the rat brain using a Gamma Knife.

  15. Neurological Change after Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases Involving the Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chang-Yong; Choi, Hyun-Yong; Lee, Sang-Ryul; Roh, Tae Hoon; Seo, Mi-Ra

    2016-01-01

    Background Although Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) can provide beneficial therapeutic effects for patients with brain metastases, lesions involving the eloquent areas carry a higher risk of neurologic deterioration after treatment, compared to those located in the non-eloquent areas. We aimed to investigate neurological change of the patients with brain metastases involving the motor cortex (MC) and the relevant factors related to neurological deterioration after GKRS. Methods We retrospectively reviewed clinical, radiological and dosimetry data of 51 patients who underwent GKRS for 60 brain metastases involving the MC. Prior to GKRS, motor deficits existed in 26 patients (50.9%). The mean target volume was 3.2 cc (range 0.001–14.1) at the time of GKRS, and the mean prescription dose was 18.6 Gy (range 12–24 Gy). Results The actuarial median survival time from GKRS was 19.2±5.0 months. The calculated local tumor control rates at 6 and 12 months after GKRS were 89.7% and 77.4%, respectively. During the median clinical follow-up duration of 12.3±2.6 months (range 1–54 months), 18 patients (35.3%) experienced new or worsened neurologic deficits with a median onset time of 2.5±0.5 months (range 0.3–9.7 months) after GKRS. Among various factors, prescription dose (>20 Gy) was a significant factor for the new or worsened neurologic deficits in univariate (p=0.027) and multivariate (p=0.034) analysis. The managements of 18 patients were steroid medication (n=10), boost radiation therapy (n=5), and surgery (n=3), and neurological improvement was achieved in 9 (50.0%). Conclusion In our series, prescription dose (>20 Gy) was significantly related to neurological deterioration after GKRS for brain metastases involving the MC. Therefore, we suggest that careful dose adjustment would be required for lesions involving the MC to avoid neurological deterioration requiring additional treatment in the patients with limited life expectancy. PMID:27867921

  16. Deconvolution of detector size effect for output factor measurement for narrow Gamma Knife radiosurgery beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarz, G.; Saiful Huq, M.; Rosenow, U. F.

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements of output factors (OFs) for a model U Gamma Knife collimator, with special emphasis on the accurate determination of the OF for the 4 mm collimator (OF4). In the past, the OF4 was set to 0.800 relative to the 18 mm collimator. Recently, the manufacturer has recommended a new value of 0.870 for OF4. However, most centres still use the old value of the OF4. In the present study, the Gamma Knife OFs were measured using a commercially available miniature diamond detector and a miniature 0.006 cc ion chamber, which was especially designed for the task. The measured OF4 were corrected for spatial averaging effects by measuring dose profiles for the 4 mm collimator with the same detectors and deconvolving their response from the measured profiles. A Gaussian kernel was used to describe the detector response. The relative OFs measured with the diamond detector/ion chamber were 0.986/0.982, 0.953/0.935 and 0.812/0.765 for the 14, 8 and 4 mm collimators, respectively, as compared with the manufacturer's values of 0.984, 0.956 and 0.87. The corrected OF4 was 0.881 +/- 0.012 for the diamond detector and 0.851 +/- 0.012 for the ion chamber, supporting the manufacturer's revised value for this collimator.

  17. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery as a Therapeutic Strategy for Intracranial Sarcomatous Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Flannery, Thomas; Kano, Hideyuki; Niranjan, Ajay M.Ch.; Monaco, Edward A.; Flickinger, John C.; Kofler, Julia; Lunsford, L. Dade; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the indication and outcomes for Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) in the care of patients with intracranial sarcomatous metastases. Methods and Materials: Data from 21 patients who underwent radiosurgery for 60 sarcomatous intracranial metastases (54 parenchymal and 6 dural-based) were studied. Nine patients had radiosurgery for solitary tumors and 12 for multiple tumors. The primary pathology was metastatic leiomyosarcoma (4 patients), osteosarcoma (3 patients), soft-tissue sarcoma (5 patients), chondrosarcoma (2 patients), alveolar soft part sarcoma (2 patients), and rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, liposarcoma, neurofibrosarcoma, and synovial sarcoma (1 patient each). Twenty patients received multimodality management for their primary tumor, and 1 patient had no evidence of systemic disease. The mean tumor volume was 6.2 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.07-40.9 cm{sup 3}), and a median margin dose of 16 Gy was administered. Three patients had progressive intracranial disease despite fractionated whole-brain radiotherapy before SRS. Results: A local tumor control rate of 88% was achieved (including patients receiving boost, up-front, and salvage SRS). New remote brain metastases developed in 7 patients (33%). The median survival after diagnosis of intracranial metastasis was 16 months, and the 1-year survival rate was 61%. Conclusions: Gamma Knife radiosurgery was a well-tolerated and initially effective therapy in the management of patients with sarcomatous intracranial metastases. However, many patients, including those who also received fractionated whole-brain radiotherapy, developed progressive new brain disease.

  18. WE-A-304-02: Strategies and Technologies for Cranial Radiosurgery Planning: Gamma Knife

    SciTech Connect

    Schlesinger, D.

    2015-06-15

    The high fractional doses, stringent requirements for accuracy and precision, and surgical perspective characteristic of intracranial radiosurgery create considerations for treatment planning which are distinct from most other radiotherapy procedures. This session will introduce treatment planning techniques specific to two popular intracranial SRS modalities: Gamma Knife and MLC-based Linac. The basic treatment delivery characteristics of each device will be reviewed with a focus on how those characteristics determine the paradigm used for treatment planning. Basic techniques for treatment planning will be discussed, including considerations such as isodose selection, target and organ-at-risk definition, quality indices, and protection of critical structures. Future directions for SRS treatment planning will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: Introduce the basic physical principles of intracranial radiosurgery and how they are realized in the treatment planning paradigms for Gamma Knife and Linac radiosurgery. Demonstrate basic treatment planning techniques. Discuss metrics for evaluating SRS treatment plan quality. Discuss recent and future advances in SRS treatment planning. D. Schlesinger receives research support from Elekta, AB.

  19. An algorithm for independent verification of Gamma Knife{sup TM} treatment plans

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, James; Berndt, Anita

    2004-10-01

    A formalism for independent treatment verification has been developed for Gamma Knife{sup TM} radiosurgery in analogy to the second checks being performed routinely in the field of external beam radiotherapy. A verification algorithm is presented, and evaluated based on its agreement with treatment planning calculations for the first 40 Canadian Gamma Knife{sup TM} patients. The algorithm is used to calculate the irradiation time for each shot, and the value of the dose at the maximum dose point in each calculation matrix. Data entry consists of information included on the plan printout, and can be streamlined by using an optional plan import feature. Calculated shot times differed from those generated by the treatment planning software by an average of 0.3%, with a standard deviation of 1.4%. The agreement of dose maxima was comparable with an average of -0.2% and a standard deviation of 1.3%. Consistently accurate comparisons were observed for centrally located lesions treated with a small number of shots. Large discrepancies were almost all associated with dose plans utilizing a large number of collimator plugs, for which the simplifying approximations used by the program are known to break down.

  20. Single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas.

    PubMed

    El-Shehaby, Amr M N; Reda, Wael A; Abdel Karim, Khaled M; Emad Eldin, Reem M; Nabeel, Ahmed M

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Because of their critical and central location, it is deemed necessary to fractionate when considering irradiating optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas. Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy is considered safer when dealing with gliomas in this location. In this study, the safety and efficacy of single-session stereotactic radiosurgery for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas were reviewed. METHODS Between December 2004 and June 2014, 22 patients with optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas were treated by single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Twenty patients were available for follow-up for a minimum of 1 year after treatment. The patients were 5 to 43 years (median 16 years) of age. The tumor volume was 0.15 to 18.2 cm(3) (median 3.1 cm(3)). The prescription dose ranged from 8 to 14 Gy (median 11.5 Gy). RESULTS The mean follow-up period was 43 months. Five tumors involved the optic nerve only, and 15 tumors involved the chiasm/hypothalamus. Two patients died during the follow-up period. The tumors shrank in 12 cases, remained stable in 6 cases, and progressed in 2 cases, thereby making the tumor control rate 90%. Vision remained stable in 12 cases, improved in 6 cases, and worsened in 2 cases in which there was tumor progression. Progression-free survival was 83% at 3 years. CONCLUSIONS The initial results indicate that single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery is a safe and effective treatment option for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas.

  1. A simplified model of the source channel of the Leksell GammaKnife tested with PENELOPE.

    PubMed

    Al-Dweri, Feras M O; Lallena, Antonio M; Vilches, Manuel

    2004-06-21

    Monte Carlo simulations using the code PENELOPE have been performed to test a simplified model of the source channel geometry of the Leksell GammaKnife. The characteristics of the radiation passing through the treatment helmets are analysed in detail. We have found that only primary particles emitted from the source with polar angles smaller than 3 degrees with respect to the beam axis are relevant for the dosimetry of the Gamma Knife. The photon trajectories reaching the output helmet collimators at (x, v, z = 236 mm) show strong correlations between rho = (x2 + y2)(1/2) and their polar angle theta, on one side, and between tan(-1)(y/x) and their azimuthal angle phi, on the other. This enables us to propose a simplified model which treats the full source channel as a mathematical collimator. This simplified model produces doses in good agreement with those found for the full geometry. In the region of maximal dose, the relative differences between both calculations are within 3%, for the 18 and 14 mm helmets, and 10%, for the 8 and 4 mm ones. Besides, the simplified model permits a strong reduction (larger than a factor 15) in the computational time.

  2. Study of scattered photons from the collimator system of Leksell Gamma Knife using the EGS4 Monte Carlo Code

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Joel Y.C.; Yu, K.N.

    2006-01-15

    In the algorithm of Leksell GAMMAPLAN (the treatment planning software of Leksell Gamma Knife), scattered photons from the collimator system are presumed to have negligible effects on the Gamma Knife dosimetry. In this study, we used the EGS4 Monte Carlo (MC) technique to study the scattered photons coming out of the single beam channel of Leksell Gamma Knife. The PRESTA (Parameter Reduced Electron-Step Transport Algorithm) version of the EGS4 (Electron Gamma Shower version 4) MC computer code was employed. We simulated the single beam channel of Leksell Gamma Knife with the full geometry. Primary photons were sampled from within the {sup 60}Co source and radiated isotropically in a solid angle of 4{pi}. The percentages of scattered photons within all photons reaching the phantom space using different collimators were calculated with an average value of 15%. However, this significant amount of scattered photons contributes negligible effects to single beam dose profiles for different collimators. Output spectra were calculated for the four different collimators. To increase the efficiency of simulation by decreasing the semiaperture angle of the beam channel or the solid angle of the initial directions of primary photons will underestimate the scattered component of the photon fluence. The generated backscattered photons from within the {sup 60}Co source and the beam channel also contribute to the output spectra.

  3. NOTE: The effect of user-defined variables on dosimetry consistency in Gamma Knife planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lijun; Chin, Lawrence S.; Shepard, David; Amin, Pradip; Slawson, Robert

    2000-05-01

    We report a dosimetric variation caused by a user-defined variable for the Leksell Gamma Knife planning system. Treatment plans of 31 randomly selected patients were studied retrospectively to determine the dosimetric effects in the dose prescription and computation as a result of dose matrix positioning in the Leksell Gamma Plan (LGP, Version 4.12). Phantom studies with ion chamber measurements were carried out to validate the accuracy of the computation results. An average overdose of 2% was found due to the variations in the user-defined dose matrix position for the studied cases. In the extreme, the overdose value was as high as 5% with an over-treatment time exceeding 2 min. The phantom measurements were found to agree with the LGP calculation within 0.5%. An adaptive method was developed and demonstrated in this study to eliminate such dosimetry variations.

  4. Development of an algorithm to improve the accuracy of dose delivery in Gamma Knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernica, George Dumitru

    2007-12-01

    Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery has demonstrated decades of successful treatments. Despite its high spatial accuracy, the Gamma Knife's planning software, GammaPlan, uses a simple exponential as the TPR curve for all four collimator sizes, and a skull scaling device to acquire ruler measurements to interpolate a threedimensional spline to model the patient's skull. The consequences of these approximations have not been previously investigated. The true TPR curves of the four collimators were measured by blocking 200 of the 201 sources with steel plugs. Additional attenuation was provided through the use of a 16 cm tungsten sphere, designed to enable beamlet measurements along one axis. TPR, PDD, and beamlet profiles were obtained using both an ion chamber and GafChromic EBT film for all collimators. Additionally, an in-house planning algorithm able to calculate the contour of the skull directly from an image set and implement the measured beamlet data in shot time calculations was developed. Clinical and theoretical Gamma Knife cases were imported into our algorithm. The TPR curves showed small deviations from a simple exponential curve, with average discrepancies under 1%, but with a maximum discrepancy of 2% found for the 18 mm collimator beamlet at shallow depths. The consequences on the PDD of the of the beamlets were slight, with a maximum of 1.6% found with the 18 mm collimator beamlet. Beamlet profiles of the 4 mm, 8 mm, and 14 mm showed some underestimates of the off-axis ratio near the shoulders (up to 10%). The toes of the profiles were underestimated for all collimators, with differences up to 7%. Shot times were affected by up to 1.6% due to TPR differences, but clinical cases showed deviations by no more than 0.5%. The beamlet profiles affected the dose calculations more significantly, with shot time calculations differing by as much as 0.8%. The skull scaling affected the shot time calculations the most significantly, with differences of up to 5

  5. Dosimetry of Gamma Knife and linac-based radiosurgery using radiochromic and diode detectors.

    PubMed

    Somigliana, A; Cattaneo, G M; Fiorino, C; Borelli, S; del Vecchio, A; Zonca, G; Pignoli, E; Loi, G; Calandrino, R; Marchesini, R

    1999-04-01

    In stereotactic radiosurgery the choice of appropriate detectors, whether for absolute or relative dosimetry, is very important due to the steep dose gradient and the incomplete lateral electronic equilibrium. For both linac-based and Leksell Gamma Knife radiosurgery units, we tested the use of calibrated radiochromic film to measure absolute doses and relative dose distributions. In addition a small diode was used to estimate the relative output factors. The data obtained using radiochromic and diode detectors were compared with measurements performed with other conventional methods of dosimetry, with calculated values by treatment planning systems and with data prestored in the treatment planning system supplied by the Leksell Gamma Knife (LGK) vendor. Two stereotactic radiosurgery techniques were considered: Leksell Gamma Knife (using gamma-rays from 60Co) and linac-based radiosurgery (LR) (6 MV x-rays). Different detectors were used for both relative and absolute dosimetry: relative output factors (OFs) were estimated by using radiochromic and radiographic films and a small diode; relative dose distributions in the axial and coronal planes of a spherical polystyrene phantom were measured using radiochromic film and calculated by two different treatment planning systems (TPSs). The absolute dose at the sphere centre was measured by radiochromic film and a small ionization chamber. An accurate selection of radiochromic film was made: samples of unexposed film showing a percentage standard deviation of less than 3% were used for relative dose profiles, and for absolute dose and OF evaluations this value was reduced to 1.5%. Moreover a proper calibration curve was made for each set of measurements. With regard to absolute doses, the results obtained with the ionization chamber are in good correlation with radiochromic film-generated data, for both LGK and LR, showing a dose difference of less than 1%. The output factor evaluations, performed using different methods

  6. Effects of bone- and air-tissue inhomogeneities on the dose distributions of the Leksell Gamma Knife calculated with PENELOPE.

    PubMed

    Al-Dweri, Feras M O; Rojas, E Leticia; Lallena, Antonio M

    2005-12-07

    Monte Carlo simulation with PENELOPE (version 2003) is applied to calculate Leksell Gamma Knife dose distributions for heterogeneous phantoms. The usual spherical water phantom is modified with a spherical bone shell simulating the skull and an air-filled cube simulating the frontal or maxillary sinuses. Different simulations of the 201 source configuration of the Gamma Knife have been carried out with a simplified model of the geometry of the source channel of the Gamma Knife recently tested for both single source and multisource configurations. The dose distributions determined for heterogeneous phantoms including the bone- and/or air-tissue interfaces show non-negligible differences with respect to those calculated for a homogeneous one, mainly when the Gamma Knife isocentre approaches the separation surfaces. Our findings confirm an important underdosage (approximately 10%) nearby the air-tissue interface, in accordance with previous results obtained with the PENELOPE code with a procedure different from ours. On the other hand, the presence of the spherical shell simulating the skull produces a few per cent underdosage at the isocentre wherever it is situated.

  7. WE-G-BRA-08: Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y; Bhatnagar, J; Bednarz, G; Flickinger, J; Arai, Y; Huq, M Saiful; Vacsulka, J; Monaco, E; Niranjan, A; Lunsford, L Dade; Feng, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To perform a failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) study for Gamma Knife (GK) radiosurgery processes at our institution based on our experience with the treatment of more than 13,000 patients. Methods: A team consisting of medical physicists, nurses, radiation oncologists, neurosurgeons at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and an external physicist expert was formed for the FMEA study. A process tree and a failure mode table were created for the GK procedures using the Leksell GK Perfexion and 4C units. Three scores for the probability of occurrence (O), the severity (S), and the probability of no detection (D) for failure modes were assigned to each failure mode by each professional on a scale from 1 to 10. The risk priority number (RPN) for each failure mode was then calculated (RPN = OxSxD) as the average scores from all data sets collected. Results: The established process tree for GK radiosurgery consists of 10 sub-processes and 53 steps, including a sub-process for frame placement and 11 steps that are directly related to the frame-based nature of the GK radiosurgery. Out of the 86 failure modes identified, 40 failure modes are GK specific, caused by the potential for inappropriate use of the radiosurgery head frame, the imaging fiducial boxes, the GK helmets and plugs, and the GammaPlan treatment planning system. The other 46 failure modes are associated with the registration, imaging, image transfer, contouring processes that are common for all radiation therapy techniques. The failure modes with the highest hazard scores are related to imperfect frame adaptor attachment, bad fiducial box assembly, overlooked target areas, inaccurate previous treatment information and excessive patient movement during MRI scan. Conclusion: The implementation of the FMEA approach for Gamma Knife radiosurgery enabled deeper understanding of the overall process among all professionals involved in the care of the patient and helped identify potential

  8. Gamma Knife

    MedlinePlus

    ... a radiation therapy that uses computerized treatment planning software to help physicians locate and irradiate small targets ... that the imaging and treatment planning computers and software are correct and acceptable. What is this equipment ...

  9. Correction of measured Gamma-Knife output factors for angular dependence of diode detectors and PinPoint ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Hršak, Hrvoje; Majer, Marija; Grego, Timor; Bibić, Juraj; Heinrich, Zdravko

    2014-12-01

    Dosimetry for Gamma-Knife requires detectors with high spatial resolution and minimal angular dependence of response. Angular dependence and end effect time for p-type silicon detectors (PTW Diode P and Diode E) and PTW PinPoint ionization chamber were measured with Gamma-Knife beams. Weighted angular dependence correction factors were calculated for each detector. The Gamma-Knife output factors were corrected for angular dependence and end effect time. For Gamma-Knife beams angle range of 84°-54°. Diode P shows considerable angular dependence of 9% and 8% for the 18 mm and 14, 8, 4 mm collimator, respectively. For Diode E this dependence is about 4% for all collimators. PinPoint ionization chamber shows angular dependence of less than 3% for 18, 14 and 8 mm helmet and 10% for 4 mm collimator due to volumetric averaging effect in a small photon beam. Corrected output factors for 14 mm helmet are in very good agreement (within ±0.3%) with published data and values recommended by vendor (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden). For the 8 mm collimator diodes are still in good agreement with recommended values (within ±0.6%), while PinPoint gives 3% less value. For the 4 mm helmet Diodes P and E show over-response of 2.8% and 1.8%, respectively. For PinPoint chamber output factor of 4 mm collimator is 25% lower than Elekta value which is generally not consequence of angular dependence, but of volumetric averaging effect and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. Diodes P and E represent good choice for Gamma-Knife dosimetry.

  10. Gamma Knife 3-D dose distribution near the area of tissue inhomogeneities by normoxic gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Isbakan, Fatih; Uelgen, Yekta; Bilge, Hatice; Ozen, Zeynep; Agus, Onur; Buyuksarac, Bora

    2007-05-15

    The accuracy of the Leksell GammaPlan registered , the dose planning system of the Gamma Knife Model-B, was evaluated near tissue inhomogeneities, using the gel dosimetry method. The lack of electronic equilibrium around the small-diameter gamma beams can cause dose calculation errors in the neighborhood of an air-tissue interface. An experiment was designed to investigate the effects of inhomogeneity near the paranosal sinuses cavities. The homogeneous phantom was a spherical glass balloon of 16 cm diameter, filled with MAGIC gel; i.e., the normoxic polymer gel. Two hollow PVC balls of 2 cm radius, filled with N{sub 2} gas, represented the air cavities inside the inhomogeneous phantom. For dose calibration purposes, 100 ml gel-containing vials were irradiated at predefined doses, and then scanned in a MR unit. Linearity was observed between the delivered dose and the reciprocal of the T2 relaxation time constant of the gel. Dose distributions are the results of a single shot of irradiation, obtained by collimating all 201 cobalt sources to a known target in the phantom. Both phantoms were irradiated at the same dose level at the same coordinates. Stereotactic frames and fiducial markers were attached to the phantoms prior to MR scanning. The dose distribution predicted by the Gamma Knife planning system was compared with that of the gel dosimetry. As expected, for the homogeneous phantom the isodose diameters measured by the gel dosimetry and the GammaPlan registered differed by 5% at most. However, with the inhomogeneous phantom, the dose maps in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes were spatially different. The diameters of the 50% isodose curves differed 43% in the X axis and 32% in the Y axis for the Z=90 mm axial plane; by 44% in the X axis and 24% in the Z axis for the Y=90 mm coronal plane; and by 32% in the Z axis and 42% in the Y axis for the X=92 mm sagittal plane. The lack of ability of the GammaPlan registered to predict the rapid dose fall off, due

  11. Dosimetric effects of Onyx embolization on Gamma Knife arteriovenous malformation dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, David J; Nordström, Håkan; Lundin, Anders; Xu, Zhiyuan; Sheehan, Jason P

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) subsequent to embolization suffer from elevated local failure rates and differences in adverse radiation effects. Onyx is a common embolic material for AVMs. Onyx is formulated with tantalum, a high atomic number (Z = 73) element that has been investigated as a source of dosimetric uncertainty contributing to the less favorable clinical results. However, prior studies have not modeled the complicated anatomical and beam geometries characteristic of GKRS. This study investigated the magnitude of dose perturbation that can occur due to Onyx embolization using clinically realistic anatomical and Gamma Knife beam models. METHODS Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) was used to segment the AVM nidus and areas of Onyx from postcontrast stereotactic MRI for 7 patients treated with GKRS postembolization. The resulting contours, skull surface, and clinically selected dose distributions were exported from LGP in DICOM-RT (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine-radiotherapy) format. Isocenter locations and dwell times were recorded from the LGP database. Contours were converted into 3D mesh representations using commercial and in-house mesh-editing software. The resulting data were imported into a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation engine (Pegasos, Elekta Instruments AB) with a beam geometry for the Gamma Knife Perfexion. The MC-predicted dose distributions were calculated with Onyx assigned manufacturer-reported physical constants (MC-Onyx), and then compared with corresponding distributions in which Onyx was reassigned constants for water (MC-water). Differences in dose metrics were determined, including minimum, maximum, and mean dose to the AVM nidus; selectivity index; and target coverage. Combined differences in dose magnitude and distance to agreement were calculated as 3D Gamma analysis passing rates using tolerance criteria of 0.5%/0.5 mm, 1.0%/1.0 mm, and 3.0%/3.0 mm

  12. An efficient method of measuring the 4 mm helmet output factor for the Gamma Knife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lijun; Li, X. Allen; Yu, Cedric X.

    2000-03-01

    It is essential to have accurate measurements of the 4 mm helmet output factor in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia patients using the Gamma Knife. Because of the small collimator size and the sharp dose gradient at the beam focus, this measurement is generally tedious and difficult. We have developed an efficient method of measuring the 4 mm helmet output factor using regular radiographic films. The helmet output factor was measured by exposing a single Kodak XV film in the standard Leksell spherical phantom using the 18 mm helmet with 30-40 of its plug collimators replaced by the 4 mm plug collimators. The 4 mm helmet output factor was measured to be 0.876 ± 0.009. This is in excellent agreement with our EGS4 Monte Carlo simulated value of 0.876 ± 0.005. This helmet output factor value also agrees with more tedious TLD, diode and radiochromic film measurements that were each obtained using two separate measurements with the 18 mm helmet and the 4 mm helmet respectively. The 4 mm helmet output factor measured by the diode was 0.884 ± 0.016, and the TLD measurement was 0.890 ± 0.020. The radiochromic film measured value was 0.870 ± 0.018. Because a single-exposure measurement was performed instead of a double-exposure measurement, most of the systematic errors that appeared in the double-exposure measurements due to experimental setup variations were cancelled out. Consequently, the 4 mm helmet output factor is more precisely determined by the single-exposure approach. Therefore, routine measurement and quality assurance of the 4 mm helmet output factor of the Gamma Knife could be efficiently carried out using the proposed single-exposure technique.

  13. Development of a 3-dimensional dosimetry system for Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, KyoungJun; Kwak, JungWon; Lee, DoHeui; Cho, ByungChul; Lee, SangWook; Ahn, SeungDo

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of our study is to develop a new, 3-dimensional dosimetry system to verify the accuracy of dose deliveries in Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (LGKP) (Elekta, Norcross, GA, USA). The instrument consists of a moving head phantom, an embedded thin active layer and a CCD camera system and was designed to be mounted to LGKP. As an active material concentrically located in the hemispheric head phantom, we choose Gafchromic EBT3 films and Gd2O2S:Tb phosphor sheets for dosimetric measurements. Also, to compensate for the lack of backscatter, we located a 1-cm-thick poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) plate downstream of the active layer. The PMMA plate was transparent to scintillation light to reach the CCD with 1200 × 1200 pixels and a 5.2 µm pitch. With this system, 300 images with a 0.2-mm slice gap were acquired under each of three collimator setups, i.e. 4-mm, 8-mm, and 16-mm, respectively. The 2D projected images taken by the CCD camera were compared with the dose distributions measured by the EBT3 films under the same conditions. All 2D distributions were normalized to the maximum values derived by fitting peaks for each collimator setup. The differences in the full widths at half maximum (FWHM) of 2D profiles between CCD images and film doses were measured to be less than 0.3-mm. The scanning task for all peak regions took less than three minutes with the new instrument. So it can be utilized as a QA tool for the Gamma knife radiosurgery system instead of film dosimetry, the use of which requires much more time and many more resources.

  14. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Skull Base Meningiomas: Long-Term Radiologic and Clinical Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Gyu Chung, Hyun-Tai; Park, Chul-Kee; Paek, Sun Ha; Kim, Chae-Yong; Jung, Hee-Won

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze the long-term outcomes in patients with skull base meningiomas (SBMNGs) treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS). Methods and Materials: Of the 98 consecutive patients with SBMNGs treated with GKRS between 1998 and 2002, 63 were followed up for more than 48 months. The mean ({+-}SD) age of the patients was 50 {+-} 12 years, the mean tumor volume was 6.5 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.5-18.4 cm{sup 3}), the mean marginal dose was 12.6 Gy (range, 7.0-20.0 Gy), and the mean follow-up duration was 77 {+-} 18 months. The mean number of shots was 13.7 {+-} 3.8. The tumor volume was decreased at the last follow-up in 28 patients (44.4%) and increased in 6 (9.6%). The actuarial tumor control rate was 90.2% at 5 years. No notable prognostic factor related to tumor control was identified. Ten patients (15.9%) with a cranial neuropathy showed unfavorable outcomes. The rate of improvement in patients with a cranial neuropathy was 45.1%. Age >70 years was likely correlated with an unfavorable outcome in patients with cranial neuropathy (odds ratio = 0.027; p = 0.025; 95% confidence interval 0.001-0.632). Cavernous sinus location was significantly associated with improvement of a cranial neuropathy (odds ratio = 7.314; p = 0.007; 95% confidence interval 1.707-31.34). Conclusions: Gamma Knife radiosurgery is an effective modality for the treatment of SBMNGs and provides favorable outcomes in patients with cranial neuropathy, even in the long-term follow-up period. However, radiosurgery for patients with no or only mild symptoms should be performed cautiously because neither complication rate is low enough to be negligible, especially in elderly patients. A cranial neuropathy by MNGs involving the cavernous sinus seems to have a higher chance of improvement after radiosurgery than other SBMNGs.

  15. A Gamma-Knife-Enabled Mouse Model of Cerebral Single-Hemisphere Delayed Radiation Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Liya; Engelbach, John A.; Cates, Jeremy; Perez-Torres, Carlos J.; Gao, Feng; Thotala, Dinesh; Drzymala, Robert E.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Rich, Keith M.; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Ackerman, Joseph J. H.; Garbow, Joel R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop a Gamma Knife-based mouse model of late time-to-onset, cerebral radiation necrosis (RN) with serial evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology. Methods and Materials Mice were irradiated with the Leksell Gamma Knife® (GK) PerfexionTM (Elekta AB; Stockholm, Sweden) with total single-hemispheric radiation doses (TRD) of 45- to 60-Gy, delivered in one to three fractions. RN was measured using T2-weighted MR images, while confirmation of tissue damage was assessed histologically by hematoxylin & eosin, trichrome, and PTAH staining. Results MRI measurements demonstrate that TRD is a more important determinant of both time-to-onset and progression of RN than fractionation. The development of RN is significantly slower in mice irradiated with 45-Gy than 50- or 60-Gy, where RN development is similar. Irradiated mouse brains demonstrate all of the pathologic features observed clinically in patients with confirmed RN. A semi-quantitative (0 to 3) histologic grading system, capturing both the extent and severity of injury, is described and illustrated. Tissue damage, as assessed by a histologic score, correlates well with total necrotic volume measured by MRI (correlation coefficient = 0.948, with p<0.0001), and with post-irradiation time (correlation coefficient = 0.508, with p<0.0001). Conclusions Following GK irradiation, mice develop late time-to-onset cerebral RN histology mirroring clinical observations. MR imaging provides reliable quantification of the necrotic volume that correlates well with histologic score. This mouse model of RN will provide a platform for mechanism of action studies, the identification of imaging biomarkers of RN, and the development of clinical studies for improved mitigation and neuroprotection. PMID:26440791

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of the Leksell Gamma Knife®: I. Source modelling and calculations in homogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskvin, Vadim; DesRosiers, Colleen; Papiez, Lech; Timmerman, Robert; Randall, Marcus; DesRosiers, Paul

    2002-06-01

    The Monte Carlo code PENELOPE has been used to simulate photon flux from the Leksell Gamma Knife®, a precision method for treating intracranial lesions. Radiation from a single 60Co assembly traversing the collimator system was simulated, and phase space distributions at the output surface of the helmet for photons and electrons were calculated. The characteristics describing the emitted final beam were used to build a two-stage Monte Carlo simulation of irradiation of a target. A dose field inside a standard spherical polystyrene phantom, usually used for Gamma Knife® dosimetry, has been computed and compared with experimental results, with calculations performed by other authors with the use of the EGS4 Monte Carlo code, and data provided by the treatment planning system Gamma Plan®. Good agreement was found between these data and results of simulations in homogeneous media. Owing to this established accuracy, PENELOPE is suitable for simulating problems relevant to stereotactic radiosurgery.

  17. Gamma-Knife radiosurgery in the management of melanoma patients with brain metastases: A series of 106 patients without whole-brain radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudy-Marqueste, Caroline . E-mail: marqueste@wanadoo.fr; Regis, Jean-Marie; Muracciole, Xavier; Laurans, Renaud; Richard, Marie-Aleth; Bonerandi, Jean-Jacques; Grob, Jean-Jacques

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To assess retrospectively a strategy that uses Gamma-Knife radiosurgery (GKR) in the management of patients with brain metastases (BMs) of malignant melanoma (MM). Methods: GKR without whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) was performed for patients with Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) of 60 or above who harbored 1 to 4 BMs of 30 mm or less and was repeated as often as needed. Survival was assessed in the whole population, whereas local-control rates were assessed for patients with follow-up longer than 3 months. Results: A total of 221 BMs were treated in 106 patients; 61.3% had a single BM. Median survival from the time of GKR was 5.09 months. Control rate of treated BMs was 83.7%, with 14% of complete response (14 BMs), 42% of partial response (41 BMs), and 43% of stabilization (43 BMs). In multivariate analysis, survival prognosis factors retained were KPS greater than 80, cortical or subcortical location, and Score Index for Radiosurgery (SIR) greater than 6. On the basis of KPS, BM location, and age, a score called MM-GKR, predictive of survival in our population, was defined. Conclusion: Gamma-Knife radiosurgery provides a surgery-like ability to obtain control of a solitary BM and could be consider as an alternative treatment to the combination of GKR+WBRT as a palliative strategy. MM-GKR classification is more adapted to MM patients than are SIR, RPA and Brain Score for Brain Metastasis.

  18. The role of diffusion tensor imaging tractography for Gamma Knife thalamotomy planning.

    PubMed

    Gomes, João Gabriel Ribeiro; Gorgulho, Alessandra Augusta; de Oliveira López, Amanda; Saraiva, Crystian Wilian Chagas; Damiani, Lucas Petri; Pássaro, Anderson Martins; Salvajoli, João Victor; de Oliveira Siqueira, Ludmila; Salvajoli, Bernardo Peres; De Salles, Antônio Afonso Ferreira

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The role of tractography in Gamma Knife thalamotomy (GK-T) planning is still unclear. Pyramidal tractography might reduce the risk of radiation injury to the pyramidal tract and reduce motor complications. METHODS In this study, the ventralis intermedius nucleus (VIM) targets of 20 patients were bilaterally defined using Iplannet Stereotaxy Software, according to the anterior commissure-posterior commissure (AC-PC) line and considering the localization of the pyramidal tract. The 40 targets and tractography were transferred as objects to the GammaPlan Treatment Planning System (GP-TPS). New targets were defined, according to the AC-PC line in the functional targets section of the GP-TPS. The target offsets required to maintain the internal capsule (IC) constraint of < 15 Gy were evaluated. In addition, the strategies available in GP-TPS to maintain the minimum conventional VIM target dose at > 100 Gy were determined. RESULTS A difference was observed between the positions of both targets and the doses to the IC. The lateral (x) and the vertical (z) coordinates were adjusted 1.9 mm medially and 1.3 mm cranially, respectively. The targets defined considering the position of the pyramidal tract were more medial and superior, based on the constraint of 15 Gy touching the object representing the IC in the GP-TPS. The best strategy to meet the set constraints was 90° Gamma angle (GA) with automatic shaping of dose distribution; this was followed by 110° GA. The worst GA was 70°. Treatment time was substantially increased by the shaping strategy, approximately doubling delivery time. CONCLUSIONS Routine use of DTI pyramidal tractography might be important to fine-tune GK-T planning. DTI tractography, as well as anisotropy showing the VIM, promises to improve Gamma Knife functional procedures. They allow for a more objective definition of dose constraints to the IC and targeting. DTI pyramidal tractography introduced into the treatment planning may reduce the

  19. A simplified model of the source channel of the Leksell Gamma Knife®: testing multisource configurations with PENELOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Dweri, Feras M. O.; Lallena, Antonio M.

    2004-08-01

    A simplification of the source channel geometry of the Leksell Gamma Knife® (GK), recently proposed by the authors and checked for a single source configuration (Al-Dweri F M O, Lallena A M and Vilches M 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 2687-703), has been used to calculate the dose distributions along the x, y and z axes in a water phantom with a diameter of 160 mm, for different configurations of the Gamma Knife, including 201, 150 and 102 unplugged sources. The code PENELOPE (v. 2001) has been used to perform the Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the output factors for the 14, 8 and 4 mm helmets have been calculated. The results found for the dose profiles show a qualitatively good agreement with previous ones obtained with EGS4 and PENELOPE (v. 2000) codes and with the predictions of GammaPlan®. The output factors obtained with our model agree within the statistical uncertainties with those calculated with the same Monte Carlo codes and with those measured with different techniques. Owing to the accuracy of the results obtained and to the reduction in the computational time with respect to full geometry simulations (larger than a factor 15), this simplified model opens the possibility of using Monte Carlo tools for planning purposes in the Gamma Knife®.

  20. A simplified model of the source channel of the Leksell Gamma Knife: testing multisource configurations with PENELOPE.

    PubMed

    Al-Dweri, Feras M O; Lallena, Antonio M

    2004-08-07

    A simplification of the source channel geometry of the Leksell Gamma Knife (GK), recently proposed by the authors and checked for a single source configuration (Al-Dweri F M O, Lallena A M and Vilches M 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 2687-703), has been used to calculate the dose distributions along the x, y and z axes in a water phantom with a diameter of 160 mm, for different configurations of the Gamma Knife, including 201, 150 and 102 unplugged sources. The code PENELOPE (v. 2001) has been used to perform the Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the output factors for the 14, 8 and 4 mm helmets have been calculated. The results found for the dose profiles show a qualitatively good agreement with previous ones obtained with EGS4 and PENELOPE (v. 2000) codes and with the predictions of GammaPlan. The output factors obtained with our model agree within the statistical uncertainties with those calculated with the same Monte Carlo codes and with those measured with different techniques. Owing to the accuracy of the results obtained and to the reduction in the computational time with respect to full geometry simulations (larger than a factor 15), this simplified model opens the possibility of using Monte Carlo tools for planning purposes in the Gamma Knife.

  1. Verification of source and collimator configuration for Gamma Knife Perfexion using panoramic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Young-Bin; Prooijen, Monique van; Jaffray, David A.; Islam, Mohammad K.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: The new model of stereotactic radiosurgery system, Gamma Knife Perfexion, allows automatic selection of built-in collimation, eliminating the need for the time consuming manual collimator installation required with previous models. However, the configuration of sources and collimators inside the system does not permit easy access for the verification of the selected collimation. While the conventional method of exposing a film at the isocenter is useful for obtaining composite dose information, it is difficult to interpret the data in terms of the integrity of each individual source and corresponding collimation. The primary aim of this study was to develop a method of verifying the geometric configuration of the sources and collimator modules of the Gamma Knife Perfexion. In addition, the method was extended to make dose measurements and verify the accuracy of dose distributions calculated by the mathematical formalism used in the treatment planning system, Leksell Gamma Plan. Methods: A panoramic view of all of 192 cobalt sources was simultaneously acquired by exposing a radiochromic film wrapped around the surface of a cylindrical phantom. The center of the phantom was mounted at the isocenter with its axis aligned along the longitudinal axis of the couch. The sizes and shapes of the source images projected on the phantom surface were compared to those calculated based on the manufacturer's design specifications. The measured dose at various points on the film was also compared to calculations using the algorithm of the planning system. Results: The panoramic images allowed clear identification of each of the 192 sources, verifying source integrity and selected collimator sizes. Dose on the film surface is due to the primary beam as well as phantom scatter and leakage contributions. Therefore, the dose at a point away from the isocenter cannot be determined simply based on the proportionality of collimator output factors; the use of a dose computation

  2. Assessment of absorbed dose to thyroid, parotid and ovaries in patients undergoing Gamma Knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanzadeh, H.; Sharafi, A.; Allah Verdi, M.; Nikoofar, A.

    2006-09-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery was originally introduced by Lars Leksell in 1951. This treatment refers to the noninvasive destruction of an intracranial target localized stereotactically. The purpose of this study was to identify the dose delivered to the parotid, ovaries, testis and thyroid glands during the Gamma Knife radiosurgery procedure. A three-dimensional, anthropomorphic phantom was developed using natural human bone, paraffin and sodium chloride as the equivalent tissue. The phantom consisted of a thorax, head and neck and hip. In the natural places of the thyroid, parotid (bilateral sides) and ovaries (midline), some cavities were made to place TLDs. Three TLDs were inserted in a batch with 1 cm space between the TLDs and each batch was inserted into a single cavity. The final depth of TLDs was 3 cm from the surface for parotid and thyroid and was 15 cm for the ovaries. Similar batches were placed superficially on the phantom. The phantom was gamma irradiated using a Leksell model C Gamma Knife unit. Subsequently, the same batches were placed superficially over the thyroid, parotid, testis and ovaries in 30 patients (15 men and 15 women) who were undergoing radiosurgery treatment for brain tumours. The mean dosage for treating these patients was 14.48 ± 3.06 Gy (10.5-24 Gy) to a mean tumour volume of 12.30 ± 9.66 cc (0.27-42.4 cc) in the 50% isodose curve. There was no significant difference between the superficial and deep batches in the phantom studies (P-value < 0.05). The mean delivered doses to the parotid, thyroid, ovaries and testis in human subjects were 21.6 ± 15.1 cGy, 9.15 ± 3.89 cGy, 0.47 ± 0.3 cGy and 0.53 ± 0.31 cGy, respectively. The data can be used in making decisions for special clinical situations such as treating pregnant patients or young patients with benign lesions who need radiosurgery for eradication of brain tumours.

  3. Assessment of absorbed dose to thyroid, parotid and ovaries in patients undergoing Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Hasanzadeh, H; Sharafi, A; Allah Verdi, M; Nikoofar, A

    2006-09-07

    Stereotactic radiosurgery was originally introduced by Lars Leksell in 1951. This treatment refers to the noninvasive destruction of an intracranial target localized stereotactically. The purpose of this study was to identify the dose delivered to the parotid, ovaries, testis and thyroid glands during the Gamma Knife radiosurgery procedure. A three-dimensional, anthropomorphic phantom was developed using natural human bone, paraffin and sodium chloride as the equivalent tissue. The phantom consisted of a thorax, head and neck and hip. In the natural places of the thyroid, parotid (bilateral sides) and ovaries (midline), some cavities were made to place TLDs. Three TLDs were inserted in a batch with 1 cm space between the TLDs and each batch was inserted into a single cavity. The final depth of TLDs was 3 cm from the surface for parotid and thyroid and was 15 cm for the ovaries. Similar batches were placed superficially on the phantom. The phantom was gamma irradiated using a Leksell model C Gamma Knife unit. Subsequently, the same batches were placed superficially over the thyroid, parotid, testis and ovaries in 30 patients (15 men and 15 women) who were undergoing radiosurgery treatment for brain tumours. The mean dosage for treating these patients was 14.48 +/- 3.06 Gy (10.5-24 Gy) to a mean tumour volume of 12.30 +/- 9.66 cc (0.27-42.4 cc) in the 50% isodose curve. There was no significant difference between the superficial and deep batches in the phantom studies (P-value < 0.05). The mean delivered doses to the parotid, thyroid, ovaries and testis in human subjects were 21.6 +/- 15.1 cGy, 9.15 +/- 3.89 cGy, 0.47 +/- 0.3 cGy and 0.53 +/- 0.31 cGy, respectively. The data can be used in making decisions for special clinical situations such as treating pregnant patients or young patients with benign lesions who need radiosurgery for eradication of brain tumours.

  4. A dosimetric evaluation of tissue equivalent phantom prepared using 270 Bloom gelatin for absorbed dose imaging in Gamma knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavinato, C. C.; Rodrigues, O., Jr.; Cervantes, J. H.; Rabbani, S. R.; Campos, L. L.

    2009-05-01

    Tissue equivalent gel phantoms have been widely studied in radiation therapy for both relative and reference dosimetry. A Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) spherical phantom was evaluated by means of magnetic resonance image method (MRI) to measure absorbed dose distribution resulted from gamma knife irradiation. The FXG phantom was prepared using 270 Bloom gelatin. The gelatin is a tissue equivalent material, of easy preparation, can be used to mold phantoms into different shapes and volumes, is commercially available and inexpensive. The results show that the Fricke gel phantom prepared with 270 Bloom gelatin satisfy the requirements to be used for the quality control in stereotactic radiosurgery using Gamma Knife technique and may constitute one more option of dosimeter in radiation therapy applications.

  5. A film technique for the determination of output factors and end effect times for the Leksell Gamma Knife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel

    2001-03-01

    The relative output factors of the four helmets for a model B Leksell Gamma Knife and the end effect times for each helmet have been measured. For the three helmets with the smallest-diameter collimators a technique employing Kodak XV-2 film was used. The measured output factors are in good agreement with the values recommended by the manufacturer. The end effect times vary with the collimator size, with the shorter time occurring with the smaller collimator.

  6. End-to-end test of spatial accuracy in Gamma Knife treatments for trigeminal neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Brezovich, Ivan A. Wu, Xingen; Duan, Jun; Popple, Richard A.; Shen, Sui; Benhabib, Sidi; Huang, Mi; Christian Dobelbower, M.; Fisher III, Winfield S.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Spatial accuracy is most crucial when small targets like the trigeminal nerve are treated. Although current quality assurance procedures typically verify that individual apparatus, like the MRI scanner, CT scanner, Gamma Knife, etc., are meeting specifications, the cumulative error of all equipment and procedures combined may exceed safe margins. This study uses an end-to-end approach to assess the overall targeting errors that may have occurred in individual patients previously treated for trigeminal neuralgia. Methods: The trigeminal nerve is simulated by a 3 mm long, 3.175 mm (1/8 in.) diameter MRI-contrast filled cavity embedded within a PMMA plastic capsule. The capsule is positioned within the head frame such that the location of the cavity matches the Gamma Knife coordinates of an arbitrarily chosen, previously treated patient. Gafchromic EBT2 film is placed at the center of the cavity in coronal and sagittal orientations. The films are marked with a pinprick to identify the cavity center. Treatments are planned for radiation delivery with 4 mm collimators according to MRI and CT scans using the clinical localizer boxes and acquisition protocols. Shots are planned so that the 50% isodose surface encompasses the cavity. Following irradiation, the films are scanned and analyzed. Targeting errors are defined as the distance between the pinprick, which represents the intended target, and the centroid of the 50% isodose line, which is the center of the radiation field that was actually delivered. Results: Averaged over ten patient simulations, targeting errors along the x, y, and z coordinates (patient’s left-to-right, posterior-to-anterior, and head-to-foot) were, respectively, −0.060 ± 0.363, −0.350 ± 0.253, and 0.348 ± 0.204 mm when MRI was used for treatment planning. Planning according to CT exhibited generally smaller errors, namely, 0.109 ± 0.167, −0.191 ± 0.144, and 0.211 ± 0.094 mm. The largest errors along individual axes in MRI

  7. TSH-secreting pituitary adenomas treated by gamma knife radiosurgery: our case experience and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mouslech, Zadalla; Somali, Maria; Sakali, Anastasia Konstantina; Savopoulos, Christos; Mastorakos, George; Hatzitolios, Apostolos I

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman, previously misdiagnosed as having primary hyperthyroidism and treated with antithyroid drugs, presented to us with overt hyperthyroidism, high levels of thyroid hormones and elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Μagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a pituitary microadenoma extending suprasellarly. The patient responded favorably to initial treatment with somatostatin analogs for 2 years but due to the escape phenomenon, TSH levels escalated and hyperthyroidism relapsed. Transsphenoidal adenomectomy was applied but recurrence was again observed due to incomplete tumor removal. Gamma knife radiosurgery was finally employed 5.5 years ago, resulting in complete disease remission without evidence of long-term complications to date. Thyrotropin-secreting adenomas (TSHomas) are rare with an estimated prevalence of about one case per million. We retrieved from the literature 14 cases of TSHomas treated by gamma knife radiosurgery and compared the outcomes. Our results demonstrate the efficacy and safety of gamma knife radiosurgery for achieving remission in most of the cases, suggesting validation of this technique as an effective treatment option for the management of recurrent TSHomas.

  8. MASEP gamma knife radiosurgery for secretory pituitary adenomas: experience in 347 consecutive cases

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Heng; Chihiro, Ohye; Yuan, Shubin

    2009-01-01

    Background Secretory pituitary adenomas are very common brain tumors. Historically, the treatment armamentarium for secretory pituitary adenomas included neurosurgery, medical management, and fractionated radiotherapy. In recent years, MASEP gamma knife radiosurgery (MASEP GKRS) has emerged as an important treatment modality in the management of secretory pituitary adenomas. The goal of this research is to define accurately the efficacy, safety, complications, and role of MASEP GKRS for treatment of secretory pituitary adenomas. Methods Between 1997 and 2007 a total of 347 patients with secretory pituitary adenomas treated with MASEP GKRS and with at least 60 months of follow-up data were identified. In 47 of these patients some form of prior treatment such as transsphenoidal resection, or craniotomy and resection had been conducted. The others were deemed ineligible for microsurgery because of body health or private choice, and MASEP GKRS served as the primary treatment modality. Endocrinological, ophthalmological, and neuroradiological responses were evaluated. Results MASEP GKRS was tolerated well in these patients under the follow-up period ranged from 60 to 90 months; acute radioreaction was rare and 17 patients had transient headaches with no clinical significance. Late radioreaction was noted in 1 patient and consisted of consistent headache. Of the 68 patients with adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting(ACTH) adenomas, 89.7% showed tumor volume decrease or remain unchanged and 27.9% experienced normalization of hormone level. Of the 176 patients with prolactinomas, 23.3% had normalization of hormone level and 90.3% showed tumor volume decrease or remain unchanged. Of the 103 patients with growth hormone-secreting(GH) adenomas, 95.1% experienced tumor volume decrease or remain unchanged and 36.9% showed normalization of hormone level. Conclusion MASEP GKRS is safe and effective in treating secretory pituitary adenomas. None of the patients in our study

  9. SU-E-T-605: A New Design for a Rotating Gamma Knife. Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mora, G; Chibani, O; Li, J; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: to determine the characteristics of the 60Co beam emerging from a new design of a rotating Gamma Knife system and to calculate 3D dose distributions at the isocenter for different source configurations and collimator openings. Methods: We employed the BEAM-Monte Carlo code to realistically model the geometry design, including 30 60Co source capsules, two circular primary collimators (diameter of 6.6mm and 6.1mm) and four different changeable collimators. The shielding of the head design was also simulated. The sources (2.8mm diameter) are distributed in six groups in the spherical geometry. Each source is individually collimated to obtained four different circular fields at the isocenter (3mm, 3.5mm, 6mm and 8mm).The phase-space particles reaching the scoring plane below the primary collimation assembly were recorded and the BEAMDP code was used to determine the fluence and energy spectra of the particles emerging from each source-collimator configuration. The dose distributions at the isocenter plane (397.6mm from the source) were calculated in a spherical component module for the circular field sizes studied. Results: The energy spectra below the head assembly and primary collimators have been obtained, which exhibited the typical 60Co peaks and a small low-energy tail due to scattered photons (from about 200keV to 1MeV). The scattered component of the spectra represents about 8 % of the total number of photons reaching the scoring plane. The radial photon fluence does not vary significantly inside the collimator openings. The spectra of particles from different source groups are compared. Conclusion: The 60Co beam emerging from each source configuration was characterized, which can be used to establish a generic source model for all the sources for fast MC dose calculation. Further investigations are needed to determine the dose variations as a result of partial switching on/off different groups of sources for advanced Gamma Knife SRS/SBRT planning.

  10. Impact of Millimeter-Level Margins on Peripheral Normal Brain Sparing for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Lijun; Sahgal, Arjun; Larson, David A.; Pinnaduwage, Dilini; Fogh, Shannon; Barani, Igor; Nakamura, Jean; McDermott, Michael; Sneed, Penny

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate how millimeter-level margins beyond the gross tumor volume (GTV) impact peripheral normal brain tissue sparing for Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: A mathematical formula was derived to predict the peripheral isodose volume, such as the 12-Gy isodose volume, with increasing margins by millimeters. The empirical parameters of the formula were derived from a cohort of brain tumor and surgical tumor resection cavity cases (n=15) treated with the Gamma Knife Perfexion. This was done by first adding margins from 0.5 to 3.0 mm to each individual target and then creating for each expanded target a series of treatment plans of nearly identical quality as the original plan. Finally, the formula was integrated with a published logistic regression model to estimate the treatment-induced complication rate for stereotactic radiosurgery when millimeter-level margins are added. Results: Confirmatory correlation between the nominal target radius (ie, R{sub T}) and commonly used maximum target size was found for the studied cases, except for a few outliers. The peripheral isodose volume such as the 12-Gy volume was found to increase exponentially with increasing Δ/R{sub T}, where Δ is the margin size. Such a curve fitted the data (logarithmic regression, R{sup 2} >0.99), and the 12-Gy isodose volume was shown to increase steeply with a 0.5- to 3.0-mm margin applied to a target. For example, a 2-mm margin on average resulted in an increase of 55% ± 16% in the 12-Gy volume; this corresponded to an increase in the symptomatic necrosis rate of 6% to 25%, depending on the Δ/R{sub T} values for the target. Conclusions: Millimeter-level margins beyond the GTV significantly impact peripheral normal brain sparing and should be applied with caution. Our model provides a rapid estimate of such an effect, particularly for large and/or irregularly shaped targets.

  11. Prospective study of the short-term adverse effects of gamma knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Chao, Samuel T; Thakkar, Vipul V; Barnett, Gene H; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Angelov, Lilyana; Weil, Robert J; Rasmussen, Peter; Reuther, Alwyn M; Jamison, Betty; Neyman, Gennady; Suh, John H

    2012-04-01

    Purpose of this study is to determine the types, incidence, and severity of acute complications of intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), specifically Gamma Knife (GK). Patients who had never had previous SRS were eligible for this prospective IRB-approved study. The questionnaire used applicable questions from CTCAE v.3.0, the Brief Pain Questionnaire (Short Form), Brief Fatigue Inventory, and the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory. Questionnaires were obtained prior to Gamma Knife (GK), 1 week, 1 month, and 2 months to assess complications. Seventy-six eligible patients (median age of 62 years) had complete data and were analyzed. Diagnoses included: 26 (34%) with brain metastases, 15 (20%) with trigeminal neuralgia, 12 (16%) with schwannoma, 10 (13%) with meningioma, 7 (9%) with arteriovenous malformation, 3 (4%) with pituitary adenoma, and 3 (4%) with other. At 1 week, 24% developed minimal scalp numbness (p =0.0004 baseline compared to 1 week). Only 13% had minimal scalp numbness at 1 month and 2% at 2 months (both p=NS compared to baseline). There was no difference in scalp tingling between baseline and the various time points. Thirteen percent developed pin site pain at 1 week with a median intensity level of 2 out of 10. By one month, only 3% had pin site pain with a median intensity level of 3 out of 10. Four percent developed pin-site infection at 1 week and none at 1 and 2 months. There was no significant difference in nausea from baseline at 1 week, but there was worsening nausea at 1 month (p =0.0114). By 1 month, 10% reported new local hair loss. 23%, 16%, and 15% complained of new/worsening fatigue at 1 week, 1 month, and 2 months, respectively, but 40% reported fatigue at baseline. Balance improved following SRS over all time periods (for all comparisons, p <0.009). 1%, 6%, and 3% developed new tinnitus at 1 week, 1 month, and 2 months, respectively, which was significant when comparing baseline to non-baseline (p =0.0269). Thirty-two patients were

  12. CyberKnife radiosurgery for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Wowra, Berndt; Muacevic, Alexander; Tonn, Jörg-Christian

    2012-01-01

    Classic radiosurgery is a neurosurgical treatment concept for single-fraction irradiation of cerebral lesions not amenable to open surgery. Until recently it has been realized mainly by frame-based technologies (Gamma Knife; stereotactic linear accelerators). The CyberKnife described in 1997 is an image-guided frameless robotic technology for whole-body radiosurgery. It can be used for classic single-fraction radiosurgery and for hypofractionated treatments. The CyberKnife treatment procedure is completely non-invasive and can be repeated throughout the body if necessary. Brain metastases are an important and frequently treated indication of modern radiosurgery. Data concerning radiosurgical treatment of brain metastases with the CyberKnife are reviewed. Scientific evidence shows that the full-body applicability of the CyberKnife is not at the expense of an inferior intracranial treatment quality when compared to standard frame-based technology. The clinical results of CyberKnife single-fraction radiosurgery are in line with the published literature. The attractive therapeutic profile of CyberKnife radiosurgery is reflected by a high tumor control and a low toxicity and the repeatability of the treatments for recurrent metastases. Although hypofractionated treatments (in 3-5 fractions) of brain metastases have been performed with the CyberKnife to treat large metastases, the clinical significance of this new radiosurgical concept is unclear and requires further study. A new approach is to treat the resection cavity with radiosurgery after surgical removal of brain metastases. In this concept radiosurgery replaces fractionated radiation therapy as an adjunct to surgery. The initial results are very promising. The CyberKnife has been established as a modern non-invasive technology for intra- and extracranial radiosurgery. It adds to the oncological armamentarium and confers upon radiosurgery a greater emphasis as an oncological treatment concept.

  13. Characteristic and quality control test in sector collimator gamma knife perfexion at Siloam hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesly Manik, Jhon; Hidayanto, Eko; Sutanto, Heri

    2017-01-01

    In this study conducted to evaluate the collimator 4 mm, 8 mm, 16 mm to determine the level of precision Gamma Knife Perfexion there three years and eight months has not carried out measurements after the first year and verify the alignment of sector 1-8. Measurement with three axes (x-axis, y-axis, z-axis) using the film Gafcromic EBT-3, which will be signaled to a central point in the film to be measured and given a dose of 5 Gy for 10 minutes and then scanned and analyzed using ImageJ softwere 1.50 and dose rate in film comparison with measurent dose rate using electrometer. Alignment of Patient-Positioning System (PPS) with Radiation Focal Point (RFP) determination of quality control testing each collimator 4 mm in the standard test with < 0.1 and > 0.4 mm passive voice AAPM 54. The results of the standard are still in conformity item 0.21 mm for 4 mm and corelasi dose rate film and measurent using electrometer collimator 4 mm = 0.965, 8 mm = 0.964, 16 mm = 0.959.

  14. Gamma knife, stereotactic linac radiosurgery, and micro multileaf collimator optimized treatment plan comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulik, Carine; Vermandel, Maximilien; Rousseau, Jean; Gibon, D.; Maouche, Salah

    2002-05-01

    The aim of conformal radiation therapy and of radiosurgery (Gamma Knife and Multi-beam radiosurgery) is to irradiate the pathological target volume with ionizing radiation while avoiding as well as possible the surrounding normal tissues. Recently, new micro multileaf collimator ((mu) MLC) devices are available for conformal therapy. A (mu) MLC is formed by narrow sliding leafs in such a manner that the irradiation field can be adjusted to the shape of the target. It is interesting to compare the different techniques to evaluate their effectiveness and their accuracy. This comparison involves 8 clinical cases. For each treatment modality, we compare indexes defined in the international literature by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). This theoretical study shows (i) the interest of the use of intensity modulation in the case of conformal radiation therapy and (ii) the improvement of RTOG indexes with using the conformal radiotherapy although the volumes of irradiated normal tissue remains lower with the radiosurgery than those with the (mu) MLC. However the comparison between these three techniques for the brain tumors shows that in complex cases it is more effective to use the fractionated conformal therapy with intensity modulation instead of radiosurgery. It is already sure that the micro multileaf collimator holds an important place in conformal therapy.

  15. Out of field dose during Gamma Knife treatment: a paediatric case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutrie, V.; Grace, M.; Izard, M. A.; Fuller, J. W.

    2017-01-01

    An 11-year-old girl with an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) was referred for Gamma Knife treatment. As this would be the first paediatric treatment in Australia, additional investigations were undertaken into out of field dose to assure the best possible long term outcome for the patient. A phantom was constructed from water equivalent materials to simulate the patient. A target volume was defined to emulate the size and location of the AVM visible in diagnostic images. An ionisation chamber and EBT3 Gafchromic film were used to record absorbed dose at strategic points both on the surface and at depth within the phantom. On the day of treatment, EBT3 Gafchromic film was used to conduct in vivo dosimetry. The pre-treatment phantom measurements matched the planning system for the cranial section (the only modelled section) and no measurable dose above background was detected in the extracranial sites. In vivo measurements of the lenses returned doses of up to 2 cGy for imaging and 8 cGy for treatment which was also consistent with the planned dose. Dose to the thyroid, chest and abdomen was not measurable above background.

  16. Effect of beam channel plugging on the outcome of gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Massager, Nicolas . E-mail: nmassage@ulb.ac.be; Nissim, Ouzi; Murata, Noriko; Devriendt, Daniel; Desmedt, Francoise; Vanderlinden, Bruno; Regis, Jean; Levivier, Marc

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: We studied the influence of using plugs for brainstem protection during gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR) of trigeminal neuralgia (TN), with special emphasis on irradiation doses delivered to the trigeminal nerve, pain outcomes, and incidence of trigeminal dysfunction. Methods and Materials: A GKR procedure for TN using an anterior cisternal target and a maximum dose of 90 Gy was performed in 109 patients. For 49 patients, customized beam channel blocking (plugs) were used to reduce the dose delivered to the brainstem. We measured the mean and integrated radiation doses delivered to the trigeminal nerve and the clinical course of patients treated with and without plugs. Results: We found that blocking increases the length of trigeminal nerve exposed to high-dose radiation, resulting in a significantly higher mean dose to the trigeminal nerve. Significantly more of the patients with blocking achieved excellent pain outcomes (84% vs. 62%), but with higher incidences of moderate and bothersome trigeminal nerve dysfunction (37% mild/10% bothersome with plugs vs. 30% mild/2% bothersome without). Conclusions: The use of plugs to protect the brainstem during GKR treatment for TN increases the dose of irradiation delivered to the intracisternal trigeminal nerve root and is associated with an important increase in the incidence of trigeminal nerve dysfunction. Therefore, beam channel blocking should be avoided for 90 Gy-GKR of TN.

  17. Radiation Exposure During Head Repositioning With the Automatic Positioning System for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Yoichi . E-mail: watan016@umn.edu; Gerbi, Bruce J.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To measure radiation exposure to a patient during head repositioning with the automatic positioning system (APS) for Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: A 16-cm diameter spherical solid phantom, provided by the manufacturer, was mounted to the APS unit using a custom-made holder. A small-volume ionization chamber (0.07-cm{sup 3} volume) was placed at the center of the phantom. We recorded the temporal variation of ionization current during the entire treatment. Measurements were made for 3 test cases and 7 clinical cases. Results: The average transit time between successive shots, during which the APS unit was moving the phantom for repositioning the shot coordinates, was 20.5 s for 9 cases. The average dose rate, which was measured at the center of the phantom and at a point outside the shot location, was 0.36 {+-} 0.09 cGy/min when the beam output was approximately 3.03 Gy/min for the 18-mm collimator helmet. Hence, the additional intracranial radiation dose during the APS-driven head repositioning between two successive shots (or APS transit dose) was 0.12 {+-} 0.050 cGy. The APS transit dose was independent of the helmet size and the position of shots within the phantom relative to the measurement point. Conclusion: The head repositioning with the APS system adds a small but not negligible dose to the dose expected for the manual repositioning method.

  18. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Arthurs, Benjamin J; Lamoreaux, Wayne T; Giddings, Neil A; Fairbanks, Robert K; Mackay, Alexander R; Demakas, John J; Cooke, Barton S; Lee, Christopher M

    2009-12-18

    Vestibular schwannomas, also called acoustic neuromas, are benign tumors of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Patients with these tumours almost always present with signs of hearing loss, and many also experience tinnitus, vertigo, and equilibrium problems. Following diagnosis with contrast enhanced MRI, patients may choose to observe the tumour with subsequent scans or seek active treatment in the form of microsurgery, radiosurgery, or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, definitive guidelines for treating vestibular schwannomas are lacking, because of insufficient evidence comparing the outcomes of therapeutic modalities.We present a contemporary case report, describing the finding of a vestibular schwannoma in a patient who presented with dizziness and a "clicking" sensation in the ear, but no hearing deficit. Audible clicking is a symptom that, to our knowledge, has not been associated with vestibular schwannoma in the literature. We discuss the diagnosis and patient's decision-making process, which led to treatment with Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Treatment resulted in an excellent radiographic response and complete hearing preservation. This case highlights an atypical presentation of vestibular schwannoma, associated with audible "clicks" and normal hearing. We also provide a concise review of the available literature on modern vestibular schwannoma treatment, which may be useful in guiding treatment decisions.

  19. Gamma Knife Treatment of Growing Vestibular Schwannoma in Norway: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Varughese, Jobin Kotakkathu; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Pedersen, Paal-Henning; Mahesparan, Ruby; Lund-Johansen, Morten

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has been increasingly used in the treatment of vestibular schwannoma (VS). Very few studies relate tumor control and post-treatment growth rates to pretreatment growth rates. Methods and Materials: We prospectively included 45 consecutive VS patients who were initially treated conservatively and then received GKRS between 2000 and 2007 because of demonstrated tumor growth. Pretreatment and post-treatment tumor volumes were estimated. Patients underwent audiograms, reported their symptoms, and responded to the Short Form General Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire on each visit. Results: Volume doubling times before and after treatment were 1.36 years (95% confidence intervals, 1.14-1.68) and -13.1 years (95% confidence intervals, -111.0 to -6.94), respectively. Tumor control, defined as a post-GKRS growth rate {<=}0, was achieved in 71.1% of patients, with highest odds for tumor control among older patients and those with larger tumors. The 5-year retreatment-free survival rate was 93.9% (95% confidence intervals, 76.5-98.5). None of the clinical endpoints investigated showed statistically significant changes after GKRS, but improvement was seen in a few SF-36 parameters. Conclusions: GKRS alters the natural course of the tumor by reducing growth. Mathematic models yield poorer tumor control rates than those found by clinical assessment. Symptoms were unaffected by treatment, but quality of life was improved.

  20. Long term efficacy and patient satisfaction of microvascular decompression and gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Anil; Javalkar, Vijayakumar; Zhang, Shihao; Ahmed, Osama

    2015-05-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the long term efficacy of microvascular decompression (MVD) and gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) with respect to pain relief and patient satisfaction. Both these modalities are accepted modalities of treatment for intractable trigeminal neuralgia. We excluded deceased patients, those who had a prior intervention and those requiring an additional intervention following initial treatment. A total of 69 patients were included in the study. Of these, 49 patients underwent treatment by GKRS and 20 by MVD. Pain status was assessed using the Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) pain scale. The median follow up was 5.3years. There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to initial pain relief (100% MVD, 84% GKRS; p=0.055). There was no significant difference in pain recurrence between the two groups (39% GKRS, 20% MVD; p=0.133). At last follow up, 85% of patients who underwent MVD had total pain relief (BNI scale I) compared to only 45% of GKRS patients (p=0.002). There was no significant difference in the patient satisfaction with respect to undergoing the same procedure again (90% MVD, 69% GKRS; p=0.1) and recommending it to family members (95% MVD, 84% GKRS; p=0.2). MVD offered total pain relief in a significantly higher number of patients than GKRS. There was no significant difference in the patient satisfaction rate between the two groups.

  1. Salvage Gamma Knife Radiosurgery after failed management of bilateral trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Ami B.; Salluzzo, Jennifer; Dvorak, Tomas; Price, Lori Lyn; Mignano, John E.; Wu, Julian K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The incidence of bilateral trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is 1-6% of total number of TN cases. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery (GKRS) is effective in treating unilateral TN; however, outcomes of bilateral TN treated by GKRS have not been well evaluated. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the long-term GKRS outcomes of bilateral TN at our institution and compare with our published treatment outcomes of unilateral TN. Methods: Between 2000 and 2006, eight patients with bilateral TN were treated with GKRS. Data available on seven patients were collected. Facial pain outcomes were defined using the Barrow Neurological Institute pain intensity scale. Outcomes and toxicities were compared to published outcomes of unilateral TN patients treated with GKRS at our institution. Results: The incidence of bilateral TN in our series is 2.3%. Treatment outcomes were excellent in 5/14, good in 1/14, and poor in 8/14. Median follow-up time was 58 months. Median time-to-failure was 38 months. Pain control rate was 80% at 12 months and 65% at 36 months. Bothersome side effects were seen in 4/14 nerves treated. Compared with our long-term unilateral TN cohort, there was no statistically significant difference in outcome, time-to-failure, or rate of toxicity. Conclusion: Bilateral TN is rare, and effective treatment is crucial to improve the quality of life of those afflicted. Salvage GKRS is a reasonable treatment modality for individuals with bilateral TN. PMID:25525553

  2. Effect of skull contours on dose calculations in Gamma Knife Perfexion stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Komori, Masataka; Mori, Yoshimasa; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Shibamoto, Yuta; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Hashizume, Chisa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya

    2014-03-06

    In treatment planning of Leksell Gamma Knife (LGK) radiosurgery, the skull geometry defined by generally dedicated scalar measurement has a crucial effect on dose calculation. The LGK Perfexion (PFX) unit is equipped with a cone-shaped collimator divided into eight sectors, and its configuration is entirely different from previous model C. Beam delivery on the PFX is made by a combination of eight sectors, but it is also mechanically available from one sector with the remaining seven blocked. Hence the treatment time using one sector is more likely to be affected by discrepancies in the skull shape than that of all sectors. In addition, the latest version (Ver. 10.1.1) of the treatment planning system Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) includes a new function to directly generate head surface contouring from computed tomography (CT) images in conjunction with the Leksell skull frame. This paper evaluates change of treatment time induced by different skull models. A simple simulation using a uniform skull radius of 80 mm and anthropomorphic phantom was implemented in LGP to find the trend between dose and skull measuring error. To evaluate the clinical effect, we performed an interobserver comparison of ruler measurement for 41 patients, and compared instrumental and CT-based contours for 23 patients. In the phantom simulation, treatment time errors were less than 2% when the difference was within 3 mm. In the clinical cases, the variability of treatment time induced by the differences in interobserver measurements was less than 0.91%, on average. Additionally the difference between measured and CT-based contours was good, with a difference of -0.16% ± 0.66% (mean ±1 standard deviation) on average and a maximum of 3.4%. Although the skull model created from CT images reduced the dosimetric uncertainty caused by different measurers, these results showed that even manual skull measurement could reproduce the skull shape close to that of a patient's head within an acceptable

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of the Leksell Gamma Knife®: II. Effects of heterogeneous versus homogeneous media for stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskvin, Vadim; Timmerman, Robert; DesRosiers, Colleen; Randall, Marcus; DesRosiers, Paul; Dittmer, Phil; Papiez, Lech

    2004-11-01

    The absence of electronic equilibrium in the vicinity of bone-tissue or air-tissue heterogeneity in the head can misrepresent deposited dose with treatment planning algorithms that assume all treatment volume as homogeneous media. In this paper, Monte Carlo simulation (PENELOPE) and measurements with a specially designed heterogeneous phantom were applied to investigate the effect of air-tissue and bone-tissue heterogeneity on dose perturbation with the Leksell Gamma Knife®. The dose fall-off near the air-tissue interface caused by secondary electron disequilibrium leads to overestimation of dose by the vendor supplied treatment planning software (GammaPlan®) at up to 4 mm from an interface. The dose delivered to the target area away from an air-tissue interface may be underestimated by up to 7% by GammaPlan® due to overestimation of attenuation of photon beams passing through air cavities. While the underdosing near the air-tissue interface cannot be eliminated with any plug pattern, the overdosage due to under-attenuation of the photon beams in air cavities can be eliminated by plugging the sources whose beams intersect the air cavity. Little perturbation was observed next to bone-tissue interfaces. Monte Carlo results were confirmed by measurements. This study shows that the employed Monte Carlo treatment planning is more accurate for precise dosimetry of stereotactic radiosurgery with the Leksell Gamma Knife® for targets in the vicinity of air-filled cavities.

  4. Determination of the Absorbed Dose Rate to Water for the 18-mm Helmet of a Gamma Knife

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hyun-Tai; Park, Youngho; Hyun, Sangil; Choi, Yongsoo; Kim, Gi Hong; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chun, Kook Jin

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To measure the absorbed dose rate to water of {sup 60}Co gamma rays of a Gamma Knife Model C using water-filled phantoms (WFP). Methods and Materials: Spherical WFP with an equivalent water depth of 5, 7, 8, and 9 cm were constructed. The dose rates at the center of an 18-mm helmet were measured in an 8-cm WFP (WFP-3) and two plastic phantoms. Two independent measurement systems were used: one was calibrated to an air kerma (Set I) and the other was calibrated to the absorbed dose to water (Set II). The dose rates of WFP-3 and the plastic phantoms were converted to dose rates for an 8-cm water depth using the attenuation coefficient and the equivalent water depths. Results: The dose rate measured at the center of WFP-3 using Set II was 2.2% and 1.0% higher than dose rates measured at the center of the two plastic phantoms. The measured effective attenuation coefficient of Gamma Knife photon beam in WFPs was 0.0621 cm{sup -1}. After attenuation correction, the difference between the dose rate at an 8-cm water depth measured in WFP-3 and dose rates in the plastic phantoms was smaller than the uncertainty of the measurements. Conclusions: Systematic errors related to the characteristics of the phantom materials in the dose rate measurement of a Gamma Knife need to be corrected for. Correction of the dose rate using an equivalent water depth and attenuation provided results that were more consistent.

  5. Characterization of system-related geometric distortions in MR images employed in Gamma Knife radiosurgery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, E. P.; Seimenis, I.; Moutsatsos, A.; Georgiou, E.; Nomikos, P.; Karaiskos, P.

    2016-10-01

    This work provides characterization of system-related geometric distortions present in MRIs used in Gamma Knife (GK) stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment planning. A custom-made phantom, compatible with the Leksell stereotactic frame model G and encompassing 947 control points (CPs), was utilized. MR images were obtained with and without the frame, thus allowing discrimination of frame-induced distortions. In the absence of the frame and following compensation for field inhomogeneities, measured average CP disposition owing to gradient nonlinearities was 0.53 mm. In presence of the frame, contrarily, detected distortion was greatly increased (up to about 5 mm) in the vicinity of the frame base due to eddy currents induced in the closed loop of its aluminum material. Frame-related distortion was obliterated at approximately 90 mm from the frame base. Although the region with the maximum observed distortion may not lie within the GK treatable volume, the presence of the frame results in distortion of the order of 1.5 mm at a 7 cm distance from the center of the Leksell space. Additionally, severe distortions observed outside the treatable volume could possibly impinge on the delivery accuracy mainly by adversely affecting the registration process (e.g. the position of the lower part of the N-shaped fiducials used to define the stereotactic space may be miss-registered). Images acquired with a modified version of the frame developed by replacing its front side with an acrylic bar, thus interrupting the closed aluminum loop and reducing the induced eddy currents, were shown to benefit from relatively reduced distortion. System-related distortion was also identified in patient MR images. Using corresponding CT angiography images as a reference, an offset of 1.1 mm was detected for two vessels lying in close proximity to the frame base, while excellent spatial agreement was observed for a vessel far apart from the frame base.

  6. Evaluation of Different Score Index for Predicting Prognosis in Gamma Knife Radiosurgical Treatment for Brain Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Franzin, Alberto Snider, Silvia; Picozzi, Piero; Bolognesi, Angelo; Serra, Carlo; Vimercati, Alberto; Passarin, Olga; Mortini, Pietro

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the utility of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RPA) and Score Index for Radiosurgery (SIR) stratification systems in predicting survival in patients with brain metastasis treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS). Methods and Materials: A total of 185 patients were included in the study. Patients were stratified according to RPA and SIR classes. The RPA and SIR classes, age, Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS), and systemic disease were correlated with survival. Results: Five patients were lost to follow-up. Median survival in patients in RPA Class 1 (30 patients) was 17 months; in Class 2 (140 patients), 10 months; and in Class 3 (10 patients), 3 months. Median survival in patients in SIR Class 1 (30 patients) was 3 months; in Class 2 (135 patients), 8 months; and in Class 3 (15 patients), 20 months. In univariate testing, age younger than 65 years (p = 0.0004), KPS higher than 70 (p = 0.0001), RPA class (p = 0.0078), SIR class (p = 0.0002), and control of the primary tumor (p = 0.02) were significantly associated with improved outcome. In multivariate analysis, KPS (p < 0.0001), SIR class (p = 0.0008), and RPA class (p = 0.03) had statistical value. Conclusions: This study supports the use of GKRS as a single-treatment modality in this selected group of patients. Stratification systems are useful in the estimation of patient eligibility for GKRS. A second-line treatment was necessary in 30% of patients to achieve distal or local brain control. This strategy is useful to control brain metastasis in long-surviving patients.

  7. Time-Staged Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Large Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Ran; Lee, Jae Meen; Kim, Jin Wook; Han, Jung-Ho; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Dong Gyu; Paek, Sun Ha

    2016-01-01

    Objective We retrospectively analyzed our experience with time-staged gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKS) in treating large arteriovenous malformation(AVM)s;≥ 10 cm3). Methods Forty-five patients who underwent time-staged GKS (2-stage, n = 37;3-stage,n = 8) between March 1998 and December 2011 were included. The mean volume treated was 20.42±6.29 cm3 (range, 10.20–38.50 cm3). Obliteration rates of AVMs and the associated complications after GKS were evaluated. Results Mean AVM volume (and median marginal dose) at each GKS session in the 37 patients who underwent 2-stage GKS was 19.67±6.08 cm3 (13 Gy) at session 1 and 6.97±6.92 cm3 (17 Gy) at session 2. The median interval period was 39 months. After follow-up period of 37 months, the complete obliteration rate was 64.9%. The mean AVM volume (and median marginal dose) at each GKS session in the 8 patients who underwent 3-stage GKS was 23.90±6.50 cm3 (12.25 Gy), 19.43±7.46 cm3 (13.5 Gy), 7.48±6.86 cm3 (15.5 Gy) at session 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The median interval duration between each GKS session was 37.5 and 38 months, respectively. After a median follow-up period of 47.5 months, 5 patients (62.5%) achieved complete obliteration. Postradiosurgical hemorrhage developed in 5 patients (11.1%) including one case of major bleeding and 4 cases of minor bleeding. No patient suffered from clinically symptomatic radiation necrosis following radiation. Conclusion Time-staged GKS could be an effective and safe treatment option in the management of large AVMs. PMID:27806123

  8. Tolerance of Pyramidal Tract to Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Based on Diffusion-Tensor Tractography

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Keisuke Kamada, Kyousuke; Ota, Takahiro; Koga, Tomoyuki; Itoh, Daisuke; Ino, Kenji R.T.; Aoki, Shigeki; Tago, Masao; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Shin, Masahiro; Saito, Nobuhito

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To minimize the morbidity of radiosurgery for critically located lesions, we integrated diffusion-tensor tractography into treatment planning for gamma-knife radiosurgery. We calculated the refined tolerance of the pyramidal tract (PT) after prospective application of the technique to additional patients. Methods and Materials: The relationship between the dosimetry during treatment planning and the development of subsequent motor complications was investigated in 24 patients, 9 studied retrospectively and 15 studied prospectively. The maximal dose to the PT and the volumes of the PT that received {>=}20 Gy (20-Gy volume) and {>=}25 Gy (25-Gy volume) were calculated. Univariate logistic regression analyses were used to produce dose-response curves. Differences in the tolerable dose according to the PT location were calculated. Results: Univariate logistic regression analysis of the motor complications revealed a significant independent correlation with the maximal dose to the PT and the 20- and 25-Gy volumes. The maximal dose to the PT with a 5% risk of motor complications was 23 Gy compared with 15 Gy in our previous report. The risk of motor complications was significantly greater in the internal capsule than in the corona radiata for the 20- and 25-Gy volumes in generalized Wilcoxon tests (p = 0.031), although no significant difference was observed for the maximal dose. Conclusion: The tolerable dose of the PT was greater than that previously reported. The internal capsule was more sensitive to high-dose irradiation over a wide area of the PT, probably owing to the dense concentration of motor fibers.

  9. Long-Term Outcome of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Treatment of Typical Trigeminal Neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Paek, Sun Ha; Kim, Yong Hwy; Kim, Chae-Yong; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Young-Hoon; Jeong, Sang Soon

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To analyze the long-term outcomes of patients with typical trigeminal neuralgia treated with gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS). Patients and Methods: A total of 62 consecutive patients with typical trigeminal neuralgia were treated with GKRS between 1998 and 2004. Of the 62 patients, 2 were lost to follow-up; the remaining 60 patients were followed for >12 months. The mean prescribed maximal dose was 79.7 Gy (range, 75-80), using a 4-mm shot. Results: Of the 60 patients, 48 were followed for >4 years. An additional 3 patients, followed for <4 years, experienced recurrent pain after a favorable initial response and were incorporated into the long-term response analysis. Of these 51 patients (mean age, 61 +- 11 years; 37 women [72.5%]; and mean follow-up duration, 58 +- 14 months), 46 (90.2%) responded to GKRS, as demonstrated by an improvement in their Barrow Neurological Institute pain intensity score. Of the 46 patients, 24 (52.2%) had pain recurrence. The actuarial recurrence-free survival rate was 84.8%, 76.1%, 69.6%, 63.0%, and 45.8% at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years after radiosurgery, respectively. Patient age >70 years correlated with a favorable outcome in terms of pain recurrence after radiosurgery (hazard ratio, 0.125; 95% confidence interval, 0.016-0.975; p = .047) on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: GKRS seems to be an effective treatment modality for patients with typical trigeminal neuralgia considering the initial response rate; however, fewer than one-half of patients might continue to benefit from GKRS after long-term follow-up. Elderly patients might be good candidates for radiosurgery considering the long-term durability of efficacy.

  10. SU-E-T-104: Development of 3 Dimensional Dosimetry System for Gamma Knife

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, K; Kwak, J; Cho, B; Lee, D; Ahn, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a new 3 dimensional dosimetry system to verify the dosimetric accuracy of Leksell Gamma Knife-Perfexion™ (LGK) (Elekta, Norcross, GA). Methods: We designed and manufactured a lightweight dosimetry instrument to be equipped with the head frame to LGK. It consists of a head phantom, a scintillator, a CCD camera and a step motor. The 10×10 cm2 sheet of Gd2O3;Tb phosphor or Gafchromic EBT3 film was located at the center of the 16 cm diameter hemispherical PMMA, the head phantom. The additional backscatter compensating material of 1 cm thick PMMA plate was placed downstream of the phosphor sheet. The backscatter plate was transparent for scintillation lights to reach the CCD camera with 1200×1200 pixels by 5.2 um pitch. With This equipment, 300 images with 0.2 mm of slice gap were acquired under three collimator setups (4mm, 8mm and 16mm), respectively. The 2D projected doses from 3D distributions were compared with the exposured film dose. Results: As all doses normalized by the maximum dose value in 16 mm setup, the relative differences between the equipment dose and film dose were 0.2% for 4mm collimator and 0.5% for 8mm. The acquisition of 300 images by the equipment took less than 3 minutes. Conclusion: The new equipment was verified to be a good substitute to radiochromic film, with which required more time and resources. Especially, the new methods was considered to provide much convenient and faster solution in the 3D dose acquisition for LGK.

  11. Clinical Realization of Sector Beam Intensity Modulation for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery: A Pilot Treatment Planning Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Lijun; Mason, Erica; Sneed, Penny K.; McDermott, Michael; Polishchuk, Alexei; Larson, David A.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the clinical feasibility and potential benefits of sector beam intensity modulation (SBIM) specific to Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). Methods and Materials: SBIM is based on modulating the confocal beam intensities from individual sectors surrounding an isocenter in a nearly 2π geometry. This is in contrast to conventional GKSRS delivery, in which the beam intensities from each sector are restricted to be either 0% or 100% and must be identical for any given isocenter. We developed a SBIM solution based on available clinical planning tools, and we tested it on a cohort of 12 clinical cases as a proof of concept study. The SBIM treatment plans were compared with the original clinically delivered treatment plans to determine dosimetric differences. The goal was to investigate whether SBIM would improve the dose conformity for these treatment plans without prohibitively lengthening the treatment time. Results: A SBIM technique was developed. On average, SBIM improved the Paddick conformity index (PCI) versus the clinically delivered plans (clinical plan PCI = 0.68 ± 0.11 vs SBIM plan PCI = 0.74 ± 0.10, P=.002; 2-tailed paired t test). The SBIM plans also resulted in nearly identical target volume coverage (mean, 97 ± 2%), total beam-on times (clinical plan 58.4 ± 38.9 minutes vs SBIM 63.5 ± 44.7 minutes, P=.057), and gradient indices (clinical plan 3.03 ± 0.27 vs SBIM 3.06 ± 0.29, P=.44) versus the original clinical plans. Conclusion: The SBIM method is clinically feasible with potential dosimetric gains when compared with conventional GKSRS.

  12. SU-E-T-86: A Systematic Method for GammaKnife SRS Fetal Dose Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Geneser, S; Paulsson, A; Sneed, P; Braunstein, S; Ma, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Estimating fetal dose is critical to the decision-making process when radiation treatment is indicated during pregnancy. Fetal doses less than 5cGy confer no measurable non-cancer developmental risks but can produce a threefold increase in developing childhood cancer. In this study, we estimate fetal dose for a patient receiving Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) treatment and develop a method to estimate dose directly from plan details. Methods: A patient underwent GKSRS on a Perfexion unit for eight brain metastases (two infratentorial and one brainstem). Dose measurements were performed using a CC13, head phantom, and solid water. Superficial doses to the thyroid, sternum, and pelvis were measured using MOSFETs during treatment. Because the fetal dose was too low to accurately measure, we obtained measurements proximally to the isocenter, fitted to an exponential function, and extrapolated dose to the fundus of the uterus, uterine midpoint, and pubic synthesis for both the preliminary and delivered plans. Results: The R-squared fit for the delivered doses was 0.995. The estimated fetal doses for the 72 minute preliminary and 138 minute delivered plans range from 0.0014 to 0.028cGy and 0.07 to 0.38cGy, respectively. MOSFET readings during treatment were just above background for the thyroid and negligible for all inferior positions. The method for estimating fetal dose from plan shot information was within 0.2cGy of the measured values at 14cm cranial to the fetal location. Conclusion: Estimated fetal doses for both the preliminary and delivered plan were well below the 5cGy recommended limit. Due to Pefexion shielding, internal dose is primarily governed by attenuation and drops off exponentially. This is the first work that reports fetal dose for a GK Perfexion unit. Although multiple lesions were treated and the duration of treatment was long, the estimated fetal dose remained very low.

  13. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Benign Tumors With Symptoms From Brainstem Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Nakaya, Kotaro; Niranjan, Ajay; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: This study evaluated the role of radiosurgery in the management of symptomatic patients with brainstem compression from benign basal tumors. Methods and Materials: Over a 17-year, period 246 patients (202 vestibular schwannomas and 44 meningiomas) with brainstem compression from benign skull-base tumors were managed with Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Median tumor volumes were 3.9 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.8-39.0 mL) and 6.6 mL (range, 1.6-25.1 mL) for vestibular schwannomas and meningiomas, respectively. For both tumors, a median marginal dose of 13 Gy was prescribed. Median follow-up of patients was 65 months for vestibular schwannomas and 60 months for meningiomas. Patients were categorized into four groups on the basis of the tumor-brainstem relationship on neuroimaging. Results: Preservation of function was stratified according to grade of brainstem compression. We analyzed the effect of radiosurgery on symptoms of brainstem compression. The tumor control rate was 100 % for meningioma and 97% for vestibular schwannomas (although 5% required an additional procedure such as a ventriculoperitoneal shunt). In patients with vestibular schwannoma, serviceable hearing was preserved in 72.0%. Balance improved in 31.9%, remained unchanged in 56.5%, and deteriorated in 11.6% of patients who had imbalance at presentation. Balance improved significantly in patients who had less tumor compression (p = 0.0357) after radiosurgery. Symptoms improved in 43.2% of patients with meningioma. Conclusion: Radiosurgery is a minimally invasive option for patients with benign basal tumors that indent or distort the brainstem. A high tumor growth control rate and satisfactory rate of neurological preservation and symptom control can be obtained with radiosurgery.

  14. Anatomic Landmarks Versus Fiducials for Volume-Staged Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Large Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, Paula L. . E-mail: ppetti@radonc.ucsf.edu; Coleman, Joy; McDermott, Michael; Smith, Vernon; Larson, David A.

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to compare the accuracy of using internal anatomic landmarks instead of surgically implanted fiducials in the image registration process for volume-staged gamma knife (GK) radiosurgery for large arteriovenous malformations. Methods and Materials: We studied 9 patients who had undergone 10 staged GK sessions for large arteriovenous malformations. Each patient had fiducials surgically implanted in the outer table of the skull at the first GK treatment. These markers were imaged on orthogonal radiographs, which were scanned into the GK planning system. For the same patients, 8-10 pairs of internal landmarks were retrospectively identified on the three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance imaging studies that had been obtained for treatment. The coordinate transformation between the stereotactic frame space for subsequent treatment sessions was then determined by point matching, using four surgically embedded fiducials and then using four pairs of internal anatomic landmarks. In both cases, the transformation was ascertained by minimizing the chi-square difference between the actual and the transformed coordinates. Both transformations were then evaluated using the remaining four to six pairs of internal landmarks as the test points. Results: Averaged over all treatment sessions, the root mean square discrepancy between the coordinates of the transformed and actual test points was 1.2 {+-} 0.2 mm using internal landmarks and 1.7 {+-} 0.4 mm using the surgically implanted fiducials. Conclusion: The results of this study have shown that using internal landmarks to determine the coordinate transformation between subsequent magnetic resonance imaging scans for volume-staged GK arteriovenous malformation treatment sessions is as accurate as using surgically implanted fiducials and avoids an invasive procedure.

  15. Gamma Knife radiosurgery of olfactory groove meningiomas provides a method to preserve subjective olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Gande, Abhiram; Kano, Hideyuki; Bowden, Gregory; Mousavi, Seyed H; Niranjan, Ajay; Flickinger, John C; Lunsford, L Dade

    2014-02-01

    Anosmia is a common outcome after resection of olfactory groove meningioma(s) (OGM) and for some patients represents a significant disability. To evaluate long term tumor control rates and preservation of subjective olfaction after Gamma Knife (GK) stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of OGM. We performed a retrospective chart review and telephone assessments of 41 patients who underwent GK SRS between 1987 and 2008. Clinical outcomes were stratified by full, partial or no subjective olfaction, whereas tumor control was assessed by changes in volume greater or lesser than 25%. The median clinical and imaging follow-up were 76 and 65 months, respectively. Prior to SRS, 19 (46%) patients had surgical resections and two (5%) had received fractionated radiation therapy. Twenty four patients (59%) reported a normal sense of smell, 12 (29%) reported a reduced sense of smell and five (12%) had complete anosmia. The median tumor volume was 8.5 cm(3) (range 0.6-56.1), the mean radiation dose at the tumor margin was 13 Gy (range 10-20) and the median estimated dose to the olfactory nerve was 5.1 Gy (range 1.1-18.1). At follow-up, 27 patients (66%) reported intact olfaction (three (7%) described return to a normal sense of smell), nine (22%) described partial anosmia, and five (12%) had complete anosmia. No patient reported deterioration in olfaction after SRS. Thirteen patients (32%) showed significant tumor regression, 26 (63%) had no further growth and two (5%) had progressed. The progression free tumor control rates were 97% at 1 year and 95% at 2, 10 and 20 years. Symptomatic adverse radiation effects occurred in three (7%) patients. Stereotactic radiosurgery provided both long term tumor control and preservation of olfaction.

  16. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty in a patient with internal carotid artery stenosis following gamma knife radiosurgery for recurrent pituitary adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hidemichi; Onodera, Hidetaka; Sase, Taigen; Uchida, Masashi; Morishima, Hiroyuki; Oshio, Kotaro; Shuto, Takashi; Tanaka, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intracranial vascular complications following radiosurgery are extremely rare. Case Description: We report a case of stenosis in the internal carotid artery 5 years after gamma knife radiosurgery for a recurrent pituitary adenoma. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty was performed successfully with anatomical and functional improvement. Conclusion: These results suggested the importance of monitoring for arterial stenosis in the long-term follow-up. Moreover, this is the first case of endovascular treatment as an effective therapy for intracranial arterial stenosis due to radiotherapy. PMID:26069850

  17. Three-dimensional dose verification of the clinical application of gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery using polymer gel and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiannis, P.; Karaiskos, P.; Kozicki, M.; Rosiak, J. M.; Sakelliou, L.; Sandilos, P.; Seimenis, I.; Torrens, M.

    2005-05-01

    This work seeks to verify multi-shot clinical applications of stereotactic radiosurgery with a Leksell Gamma Knife model C unit employing a polymer gel-MRI based experimental procedure, which has already been shown to be capable of verifying the precision and accuracy of dose delivery in single-shot gamma knife applications. The treatment plan studied in the present work resembles a clinical treatment case of pituitary adenoma using four 8 mm and one 14 mm collimator helmet shots to deliver a prescription dose of 15 Gy to the 50% isodose line (30 Gy maximum dose). For the experimental dose verification of the treatment plan, the same criteria as those used in the clinical treatment planning evaluation were employed. These included comparison of measured and GammaPlan calculated data, in terms of percentage isodose contours on axial, coronal and sagittal planes, as well as 3D plan evaluation criteria such as dose-volume histograms for the target volume, target coverage and conformity indices. Measured percentage isodose contours compared favourably with calculated ones despite individual point fluctuations at low dose contours (e.g., 20%) mainly due to the effect of T2 measurement uncertainty on dose resolution. Dose-volume histogram data were also found in a good agreement while the experimental results for the percentage target coverage and conformity index were 94% and 1.17 relative to corresponding GammaPlan calculations of 96% and 1.12, respectively. Overall, polymer gel results verified the planned dose distribution within experimental uncertainties and uncertainty related to the digitization process of selected GammaPlan output data.

  18. A simplified model of the source channel of the Leksell GammaKnife® tested with PENELOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Dweri, Feras M. O.; Lallena, Antonio M.; Vilches, Manuel

    2004-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulations using the code PENELOPE have been performed to test a simplified model of the source channel geometry of the Leksell GammaKnife®. The characteristics of the radiation passing through the treatment helmets are analysed in detail. We have found that only primary particles emitted from the source with polar angles smaller than 3° with respect to the beam axis are relevant for the dosimetry of the Gamma Knife. The photon trajectories reaching the output helmet collimators at (x, y, z = 236 mm) show strong correlations between rgr = (x2 + y2)1/2 and their polar angle thgr, on one side, and between tan-1(y/x) and their azimuthal angle phgr, on the other. This enables us to propose a simplified model which treats the full source channel as a mathematical collimator. This simplified model produces doses in good agreement with those found for the full geometry. In the region of maximal dose, the relative differences between both calculations are within 3%, for the 18 and 14 mm helmets, and 10%, for the 8 and 4 mm ones. Besides, the simplified model permits a strong reduction (larger than a factor 15) in the computational time.

  19. On the development of a comprehensive MC simulation model for the Gamma Knife Perfexion radiosurgery unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, E. P.; Moutsatsos, A.; Pantelis, E.; Zoros, E.; Georgiou, E.; Torrens, M.; Karaiskos, P.

    2016-02-01

    This work presents a comprehensive Monte Carlo (MC) simulation model for the Gamma Knife Perfexion (PFX) radiosurgery unit. Model-based dosimetry calculations were benchmarked in terms of relative dose profiles (RDPs) and output factors (OFs), against corresponding EBT2 measurements. To reduce the rather prolonged computational time associated with the comprehensive PFX model MC simulations, two approximations were explored and evaluated on the grounds of dosimetric accuracy. The first consists in directional biasing of the 60Co photon emission while the second refers to the implementation of simplified source geometric models. The effect of the dose scoring volume dimensions in OF calculations accuracy was also explored. RDP calculations for the comprehensive PFX model were found to be in agreement with corresponding EBT2 measurements. Output factors of 0.819  ±  0.004 and 0.8941  ±  0.0013 were calculated for the 4 mm and 8 mm collimator, respectively, which agree, within uncertainties, with corresponding EBT2 measurements and published experimental data. Volume averaging was found to affect OF results by more than 0.3% for scoring volume radii greater than 0.5 mm and 1.4 mm for the 4 mm and 8 mm collimators, respectively. Directional biasing of photon emission resulted in a time efficiency gain factor of up to 210 with respect to the isotropic photon emission. Although no considerable effect on relative dose profiles was detected, directional biasing led to OF overestimations which were more pronounced for the 4 mm collimator and increased with decreasing emission cone half-angle, reaching up to 6% for a 5° angle. Implementation of simplified source models revealed that omitting the sources’ stainless steel capsule significantly affects both OF results and relative dose profiles, while the aluminum-based bushing did not exhibit considerable dosimetric effect. In conclusion, the results of this work suggest that any PFX

  20. Robustness of the neurological prognostic score in brain metastasis patients treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Serizawa, Toru; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Nagano, Osamu; Matsuda, Shinji; Aoyagi, Kyoko; Ono, Junichi; Saeki, Naokatsu; Iwadate, Yasuo; Hirai, Tatsuo; Takemoto, Shinya; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-12-02

    OBJECTIVE The neurological prognostic score (NPS) was recently proposed as a means for predicting neurological outcomes, such as the preservation of neurological function and the prevention of neurological death, in brain metastasis patients treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS). NPS consists of 2 groups: Group A patients were expected to have better neurological outcomes, and Group B patients were expected to have poorer outcomes. NPS robustness was tested in various situations. METHODS In total, 3040 patients with brain metastases that were treated with GKRS were analyzed. The cumulative incidence of the loss of neurological function independence (i.e., neurological deterioration) was estimated using competing risk analysis, and NPS was compared between Groups A and B by employing Gray's model. NPS was tested to determine if it can be applied to 5 cancer categories-non-small cell lung cancer, small cell lung cancer, gastrointestinal tract cancer, breast cancer, and other cancers-as well as if it can be incorporated into the 5 major grading systems: recursive partitioning analysis (RPA), score index for stereotactic radiosurgery (SIR), basic score for brain metastases (BSBM), graded prognostic assessment (GPA), and modified-RPA (M-RPA). RESULTS There were 2263 patients in NPS Group A and 777 patients in Group B. Neurological deterioration was observed in 586 patients (19.2%). The cumulative incidences of neurological deterioration were 9.5% versus 21.0%, 14.1% versus 25.4%, and 17.6% versus 27.8% in NPS Groups A and B at 1, 2, and 5 years, respectively. Significant differences were detected between the NPS groups in all cancer categories. There were significant differences between NPS Groups A and B for all classes in terms of the BSBM, GPA, and M-RPA systems, but the differences failed to reach statistical significance in terms of RPA Class I and SIR Class 0 to 3. CONCLUSIONS The NPS was verified as being highly applicable to all cancer categories and

  1. Gamma-knife radiosurgery in acromegaly: a 4-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Attanasio, Roberto; Epaminonda, Paolo; Motti, Enrico; Giugni, Enrico; Ventrella, Laura; Cozzi, Renato; Farabola, Mario; Loli, Paola; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Arosio, Maura

    2003-07-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery by gamma-knife (GK) is an attractive therapeutic option after failure of microsurgical removal in patients with pituitary adenoma. In these tumors or remnants of them, it aims to obtain the arrest of cell proliferation and hormone hypersecretion using a single precise high dose of ionizing radiation, sparing surrounding structures. The long-term efficacy and toxicity of GK in acromegaly are only partially known. Thirty acromegalic patients (14 women and 16 men) entered a prospective study of GK treatment. Most were surgical failures, whereas in 3 GK was the primary treatment. Imaging of the adenoma and target coordinates identification were obtained by high resolution magnetic resonance imaging. All patients were treated with multiple isocenters (mean, 8; range, 3-11). The 50% isodose was used in 27 patients (90%). The mean margin dose was 20 Gy (range, 15-35), and the dose to the visual pathways was always less than 8 Gy. After a median follow-up of 46 months (range, 9-96), IGF-I fell from 805 micro g/liter (median; interquartile range, 640-994) to 460 micro g/liter (interquartile range, 217-654; P = 0.0002), and normal age-matched IGF-I levels were reached in 7 patients (23%). Mean GH levels decreased from 10 micro g/liter (interquartile range, 6.4-15) to 2.9 micro g/liter (interquartile range, 2-5.3; P < 0.0001), reaching levels below 2.5 micro g/liter in 11 (37%). The rate of persistently pathological hormonal levels was still 70% at 5 yr by Kaplan-Meier analysis. The median volume was 1.43 ml (range, 0.20-3.7). Tumor shrinkage (at least 25% of basal volume) occurred after 24 months (range, 12-36) in 11 of 19 patients (58% of assessable patients). The rate of shrinkage was 79% at 4 yr. In no case was further growth observed. Only 1 patient complained of side-effects (severe headache and nausea immediately after the procedure, with full recovery in a few days with steroid therapy). Anterior pituitary failures were observed in 2 patients

  2. Comparative study of treatment dose plans after the refinement of Leksell Gamma Knife registered single-beam dose profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Joel Y. C.; Ng, K. P.; Yu, C. P.; Ho, Robert T. K.

    2007-09-15

    We investigated the amplification of discrepancy when using multiple shots of the same collimator size helmet, by comparing dose plans in the Leksell GammaPlan registered employing the default single-beam dose profiles and the Monte Carlo generated single-beam profiles. Four collimator helmets were studied. The results show that the largest amplification of discrepancy with multiple shots was found with the 8 mm collimator because of the largest discrepancy of its single-beam dose profile. The amplification of discrepancy is significant when tumor volumes increase but insignificant when the tumor volumes are in an elongated shape. Using close shot overlapping strategy (i.e., more shots close packed together) shows no observable increase in the amplification of discrepancy. For the best quality of Leksell Gamma Knife registered radiosurgery, it is suggested that the single-beam dose profiles should be refined, especially the 8 mm collimator, to prevent error amplification when using multiple collimator shots.

  3. SU-E-T-382: Evaluation of Clinical Application and Dosimetric Comparison for Treatment Plans of Gamma Knife and CyberKnife for Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To analyze and compare the characteristics of dose distributions between Gamma Knife (GK) and CyberKnife (CK), in treating arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and evaluate the influences on their clinical applications. Methods: Twenty four patients with AVMs treated with CK of prescribed dose (PD) of 16–25 Gy in single fraction were selected. Each patient’s CT images used for CK treatment planning with contours of targets and critical organs were exported and then loaded into the GK planning system. GK treatment plan with the same PD used in CK was generated for each patient. The metrics for dose comparison between GK and CK included conformity index (CI), gradient index (GI) of 75%, 50% and 25% of the PD, heterogeneity index (HI), volume of brain tissues covered by 10 Gy and 12 Gy, maximum dose to brainstem and beam-on time. Paired Samples t-test was used to analyze these metrics for significance (p value). Results: The CI were 0.744 ± 0.075 (GK) and 0.768 ± 0.086 (CK), p = 0.281. The GI75%, GI50%, and GI25% in GK and CK were 1.735 ± 0.100 and 2.439 ± 0.338 (p < 0.001), 3.169 ± 0.265 and 4.972 ± 0.852 (p < 0.001), and 8.650 ± 0.914 and 14.261 ± 2.476 (p < 0.001). The HI were 0.728 ± 0.072 (GK) and 0.313 ± 0.069 (CK), p < 0.001. There were significant differences both for volume of brain tissues covered by 10 Gy and 12 Gy in GK and CK (p < 0.001). GK had smaller maximum dose to brainstem. CK had shorter beam-on time. Conclusion: GK has similar dose conformity as CK, and has better normal tissue sparing but is less efficient than CK.

  4. Radiological aspects of gamma knife radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations and other non-tumoural disorders of the brain.

    PubMed

    Guo, W Y

    1993-01-01

    The aims of the thesis were to investigate stereotaxic procedures in radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and radiation effects of single session high-dose irradiation delivered by gamma knife on the human brain. Investigation of gamma knife radiosurgery in 1,464 patients constitutes the data base of this thesis. High quality stereotaxic angiography is the gold standard targeting imaging in radiosurgery for cerebral AVMs, particularly for small AVMs or residual AVMs after other treatments. For medium and large size AVMs, stereotaxic MR techniques can improve targeting precision and decrease irradiation volume as compared to stereotaxic angiography in selected cases provided that proper pulse sequences are used. Combined treatments, where embolization precedes radiosurgery, can improve amenability of the treatment for large AVMs. This is on condition that the partially embolized nidi are well delineated and the volume of the residual nidi has been decreased to a level where an optimum irradiation can be safely prescribed. Radiologically, adverse radiation effects (ARE) of gamma knife radiosurgery for cerebral AVMs are observed in 16% (131/816) of the patients. The ARE are observed as a focal low attenuation on CT or as a focal high signal on MR image without enhancement in 47% (61/131), and as a peripheral or homogeneous enhancing lesion in 48% (63/131). MR imaging is more sensitive than CT in detecting the ARE. 91% of the ARE are observed within 18 months after radiosurgery and 89% are seen to regress within 18 months. Clinically, symptomatic ARE are only observed in 6% (51/816) and only in half of them, i.e. 3%, are the symptoms permanent. The risk of ARE in radiosurgery for venous angiomas is higher as compared to AVMs. Other mechanisms have probably been employed. In gamma capsulotomy, the necrotic lesions and reaction volumes created by using multiple isocentres of 4 mm collimators are less predictable as compared to that by single

  5. Assessment and characterization of the total geometric uncertainty in Gamma Knife radiosurgery using polymer gels

    SciTech Connect

    Moutsatsos, A.; Karaiskos, P.; Pantelis, E.; Georgiou, E.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Sakelliou, L.; Torrens, M.; Seimenis, I.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: This work proposes and implements an experimental methodology, based on polymer gels, for assessing the total geometric uncertainty and characterizing its contributors in Gamma Knife (GK) radiosurgery. Methods: A treatment plan consisting of 26, 4-mm GK single shot dose distributions, covering an extended region of the Leksell stereotactic space, was prepared and delivered to a polymer gel filled polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) head phantom (16 cm diameter) used to accurately reproduce every link in the GK treatment chain. The center of each shot served as a 'control point' in the assessment of the GK total geometric uncertainty, which depends on (a) the spatial dose delivery uncertainty of the PERFEXION GK unit used in this work, (b) the spatial distortions inherent in MR images commonly used for target delineation, and (c) the geometric uncertainty contributor associated with the image registration procedure performed by the Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) treatment planning system (TPS), in the case that registration is directly based on the apparent fiducial locations depicted in each MR image by the N-shaped rods on the Leksell localization box. The irradiated phantom was MR imaged at 1.5 T employing a T2-weighted pulse sequence. Four image series were acquired by alternating the frequency encoding axis and reversing the read gradient polarity, thus allowing the characterization of the MR-related spatial distortions. Results: MR spatial distortions stemming from main field (B{sub 0}) inhomogeneity as well as from susceptibility and chemical shift phenomena (also known as sequence dependent distortions) were found to be of the order of 0.5 mm, while those owing to gradient nonlinearities (also known as sequence independent distortions) were found to increase with distance from the MR scanner isocenter extending up to 0.47 mm at an Euclidean distance of 69.6 mm. Regarding the LGP image registration procedure, the corresponding average contribution to the total

  6. Effects of bone- and air-tissue inhomogeneities on the dose distributions of the Leksell Gamma Knife® calculated with PENELOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Dweri, Feras M. O.; Rojas, E. Leticia; Lallena, Antonio M.

    2005-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulation with PENELOPE (version 2003) is applied to calculate Leksell Gamma Knife® dose distributions for heterogeneous phantoms. The usual spherical water phantom is modified with a spherical bone shell simulating the skull and an air-filled cube simulating the frontal or maxillary sinuses. Different simulations of the 201 source configuration of the Gamma Knife have been carried out with a simplified model of the geometry of the source channel of the Gamma Knife recently tested for both single source and multisource configurations. The dose distributions determined for heterogeneous phantoms including the bone- and/or air-tissue interfaces show non-negligible differences with respect to those calculated for a homogeneous one, mainly when the Gamma Knife isocentre approaches the separation surfaces. Our findings confirm an important underdosage (~10%) nearby the air-tissue interface, in accordance with previous results obtained with the PENELOPE code with a procedure different from ours. On the other hand, the presence of the spherical shell simulating the skull produces a few per cent underdosage at the isocentre wherever it is situated.

  7. Review of the Poster 'Dosimetric Comparison of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery vs. {sup 125}I Plaque Brachytherapy in a Cohort of Choroidal Melanomas'

    SciTech Connect

    Odell, Kelly R.

    2009-07-01

    Historically, treatment for choroidal melanomas was surgical enucleation. Currently, treatment methods such as stereotactic radiosurgery and brachytherapy are being used to spare the eye. The poster 'Dosimetric Comparison of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery vs. I-125 Plaque Brachytherapy in a Cohort of Choroidal Melanomas' presented at ASTRO 2007 by Anderson et al. provides a comparison of these methods. The dose to disk, fovea and lens in 29 patients from a simulated I-125 treatment and a delivered Gamma Knife radiosurgery was compared. Thirty Gy was prescribed to the 50% Isodose line in the radiosurgery and 85 Gy was prescribed to the apex of the tumor in the I-125 simulation. It was found that the Gamma Knife spares the disk better in 59% of the tumors, including those {>=}6.5 mm in height; spares the fovea better in 69% of the tumors, including those {>=}5.5 mm; and spares lens better in only 30% of the tumors, with no distinction in size. Tumor location was not taken into account for this study, which could explain the variations in smaller tumors. For larger tumors, gamma knife will protect most organs at risk more effectively. This study shows how a tumor's parameters can be used in selecting treatment modality.

  8. Review of the poster "Dosimetric comparison of gamma knife radiosurgery vs. 125I plaque brachytherapy in a cohort of choroidal melanomas".

    PubMed

    Odell, Kelly R

    2009-01-01

    Historically, treatment for choroidal melanomas was surgical enucleation. Currently, treatment methods such as stereotactic radiosurgery and brachytherapy are being used to spare the eye. The poster "Dosimetric Comparison of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery vs. I-125 Plaque Brachytherapy in a Cohort of Choroidal Melanomas" presented at ASTRO 2007 by Anderson et al. provides a comparison of these methods. The dose to disk, fovea and lens in 29 patients from a simulated I-125 treatment and a delivered Gamma Knife radiosurgery was compared. Thirty Gy was prescribed to the 50% Isodose line in the radiosurgery and 85 Gy was prescribed to the apex of the tumor in the I-125 simulation. It was found that the Gamma Knife spares the disk better in 59% of the tumors, including those >or=6.5 mm in height; spares the fovea better in 69% of the tumors, including those >or=5.5 mm; and spares lens better in only 30% of the tumors, with no distinction in size. Tumor location was not taken into account for this study, which could explain the variations in smaller tumors. For larger tumors, gamma knife will protect most organs at risk more effectively. This study shows how a tumor's parameters can be used in selecting treatment modality.

  9. Calibration of the Gamma Knife Perfexion using TG-21 and the solid water Leksell dosimetry phantom

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Daniel; Yount, Caroline; Koch, Nicholas; Ashenafi, Michael; Peng, Jean; Vanek, Kenneth

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To calibrate a Gamma Knife (GK) Perfexion using TG-21 with updated chamber-dependent values for modern microionization chambers in the new solid water Leksell dosimetry phantom. This work illustrates a calibration method using commercially available equipment, instruments, and an established dosimetry protocol that may be adopted at any GK center, thus reducing the interinstitutional variation in GK calibration. The calibration was verified by three third-party dosimetry checks. In addition, measurements of the relative output factors are presented and compared to available data and the new manufacturer-provided relative output factors yet to be released. Methods: An absolute dose calibration based on the TG-21 formalism, utilizing recently reported phantom material and chamber-dependent factors, was performed using a microionization chamber in a spherical solid water phantom. The result was compared to other calibration protocols based on TG-51. Independent verification of the machine output was conducted through M.D. Anderson Dosimetry Services (MDADS), using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) in an anthropomorphic head phantom; the Radiological Physics Center (RPC), using TLDs in the standard Elekta ABS plastic calibration phantom (gray phantom), included with the GK; and through a collaborative international calibration survey by the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) using alanine dosimeters, also in the gray phantom. The alanine dosimeters were read by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Finally, Gafchromic EBT film was used to measure relative output factors and these factors were compared to values reported in the literature as well as new values announced for release by Elekta. The films were exposed in the solid water phantom using an included film insert accessory. Results: Compared to the TG-21 protocol in the solid water phantom, the modified and unmodified TG-51 calibrations resulted in dose rates which were 1

  10. On the use of polymer gels for assessing the total geometrical accuracy in clinical Gamma Knife radiosurgery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutsatsos, A.; Karaiskos, P.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Zourari, K.; Pantelis, E.; Sakelliou, L.; Seimenis, I.; Constantinou, C.; Peraticou, A.; Georgiou, E.

    2010-11-01

    The nearly tissue equivalent MRI properties and the unique ability of registering 3D dose distributions of polymer gels were exploited to assess the total geometrical accuracy in clinical Gamma Knife applications, taking into account the combined effect of the unit's mechanical accuracy, dose delivery precision and the geometrical distortions inherent in MR images used for irradiation planning. Comparison between planned and experimental data suggests that the MR-related distortions due to susceptibility effects dominate the total clinical geometrical accuracy which was found within 1 mm. The dosimetric effect of the observed sub-millimetre uncertainties on single shot GK irradiation plans was assessed using the target percentage coverage criterion, and a considerable target dose underestimation was found.

  11. Recurrent tumor vs radiation effects after Gamma Knife radiosurgery of intracerebral metastases: Diagnosis with PET-FDG

    SciTech Connect

    Mogard, J.; Kihlstroem, L.; Ericson, K. |

    1994-03-01

    Our objective was to differentiate radiation effects from tumor progression in metastases stereotaxically irradiated with the multicobalt unit (Gamma Knife). Eleven patients with stereotaxically irradiated cerebral metastases were examined with PET using [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to differentiate recurrent tumor from radiation effects. Six patients had increased uptake of FDG, and clinical, radiological, and pathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of recurrent metastases. These patients had an unfavorable prognosis and were all dead within 54 weeks after radiosurgery. Five patients had lesions without an increased accumulation of FDG. Four of these patients were alive after a total follow-up of 1.7 years, while one patient died of a peptic ulcer 56 weeks after radiosurgery. Positron emission tomography with FDG was of obvious prognostic value in this small series of patients and was clearly superior to CT and MR in the distinction between tumor recurrence and radiation effects (verified necrosis in one case). 24 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Linear Accelerator and Gamma Knife-Based Stereotactic Cranial Radiosurgery: Challenges and Successes of Existing Quality Assurance Guidelines and Paradigms

    SciTech Connect

    Goetsch, Steven J.

    2008-05-01

    Intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery has been practiced since 1951. The technique has expanded from a single dedicated unit in Stockholm in 1968 to hundreds of centers performing an estimated 100,000 Gamma Knife and linear accelerator cases in 2005. The radiation dosimetry of small photon fields used in this technique has been well explored in the past 15 years. Quality assurance recommendations have been promulgated in refereed reports and by several national and international professional societies since 1991. The field has survived several reported treatment errors and incidents, generally reacting by strengthening standards and precautions. An increasing number of computer-controlled and robotic-dedicated treatment units are expanding the field and putting patients at risk of unforeseen errors. Revisions and updates to previously published quality assurance documents, and especially to radiation dosimetry protocols, are now needed to ensure continued successful procedures that minimize the risk of serious errors.

  13. Predictive factors of early distant brain failure after gamma knife radiosurgery alone in patients with brain metastases of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Na, Young Cheol; Jung, Hyun Ho; Kim, Hye Ryun; Cho, Byoung Chul; Chang, Jin Woo; Park, Yong Gou; Chang, Won Seok

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the predictive factors for early distant brain failure in patients with brain metastases of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who were treated with gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) without previous whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) or surgery. We retrospectively reviewed clinical and imaging data of 459 patients with brain metastases of NSCLC who underwent GKRS from June 2008 to December 2013. The primary end-point was early distant brain failure, defined as the detection of newly developed metastatic lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 3 months after GKRS. Factors such as tumor pathology subtype, concurrent systemic chemotherapy, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status, use of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), systemic disease status, presence of a metastatic lesion only in delayed MRI, and volume and number of metastases were analyzed. There were no statistically significant differences with respect to pathologic subtype, concurrent systemic chemotherapy, EGFR mutation, and early distant brain failure. Patients treated with EGFR-TKIs (p = 0.004), with a stable systemic disease status (p = 0.028) and 3 or fewer brain lesions (p = 0.000) experienced a significantly lower incidence of early distant brain failure. This study suggests that GKRS alone could be considered for patients treated with EGFR-TKIs who have a stable systemic disease status and 3 or fewer brain lesions. WBRT should be considered for other patients.

  14. Novel biomarker identification using metabolomic profiling to differentiate radiation necrosis and recurrent tumor following Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Lu, Alex Y; Turban, Jack L; Damisah, Eyiyemisi C; Li, Jie; Alomari, Ahmed K; Eid, Tore; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Chiang, Veronica L

    2016-11-25

    OBJECTIVE Following an initial response of brain metastases to Gamma Knife radiosurgery, regrowth of the enhancing lesion as detected on MRI may represent either radiation necrosis (a treatment-related inflammatory change) or recurrent tumor. Differentiation of radiation necrosis from tumor is vital for management decision making but remains difficult by imaging alone. In this study, gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF) was used to identify differential metabolite profiles of the 2 tissue types obtained by surgical biopsy to find potential targets for noninvasive imaging. METHODS Specimens of pure radiation necrosis and pure tumor obtained from patient brain biopsies were flash-frozen and validated histologically. These formalin-free tissue samples were then analyzed using GC-TOF. The metabolite profiles of radiation necrosis and tumor samples were compared using multivariate and univariate statistical analysis. Statistical significance was defined as p ≤ 0.05. RESULTS For the metabolic profiling, GC-TOF was performed on 7 samples of radiation necrosis and 7 samples of tumor. Of the 141 metabolites identified, 17 (12.1%) were found to be statistically significantly different between comparison groups. Of these metabolites, 6 were increased in tumor, and 11 were increased in radiation necrosis. An unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis found that tumor had elevated levels of metabolites associated with energy metabolism, whereas radiation necrosis had elevated levels of metabolites that were fatty acids and antioxidants/cofactors. CONCLUSIONS To the authors' knowledge, this is the first tissue-based metabolomics study of radiation necrosis and tumor. Radiation necrosis and recurrent tumor following Gamma Knife radiosurgery for brain metastases have unique metabolite profiles that may be targeted in the future to develop noninvasive metabolic imaging techniques.

  15. Assessment of variation in Elekta plastic spherical-calibration phantom and its impact on the Leksell Gamma Knife calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Novotny, Josef Jr.; Bhatnagar, Jagdish P.; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Johansson, Jonas; Bednarz, Greg; Ma, Lijun; Saiful Huq, M.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Traditionally, the dose-rate calibration (output) of the Leksell Gamma Knife (LGK) unit is performed using a 160 mm diameter plastic spherical phantom provided by the vendor of the LGK, Elekta Instrument AB. The purpose of this study was to evaluate variations in the Elekta spherical phantom and to assess its impact and use for the LGK calibration. Methods: Altogether, 13 phantoms from six different centers were acquired, 10 of these phantoms were manufactured within the past 10 years and the last 3 approximately 15-20 years ago. To assess variation in phantoms, the diameter and mass densities were measured. To assess the impact on LGK calibration, the output of two models of LGK (LGK Perfexion and LGK 4C) were measured under identical irradiation conditions using all 13 phantoms for each LGK model. Results: The mean measured deviation in diameter from expected nominal 160 mm for 13 phantoms was 0.51 mm (range of 0.09-1.51 mm). The mean measured phantom mass density for 13 phantoms was 1.066{+-}0.019 g/cm{sup 3} (range of 1.046-1.102 g/cm{sup 3}). The percentage deviation of output for individual phantom from mean of 13 phantom outputs ranged from -0.37% to 0.55% for LGK Perfexion. Similarly, the percentage deviation of output for individual phantom from mean of 13 phantom outputs ranged from -0.72% to 0.47% for LGK 4C. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that small variations in terms of phantom size and mass density of the phantom material do not have a significant impact on dose-rate measurements of the Leksell Gamma Knife. Also, date of manufacture of the phantom did not show up to be a significant factor in this study.

  16. Dosimetric characterization of hypofractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery of large or complex brain tumors versus linear accelerator-based treatments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Peng; Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; Pinnaduwage, Dilini; Braunstein, Steve; Theodosopoulos, Philip; McDermott, Michael; Sneed, Penny; Ma, Lijun

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Noninvasive Gamma Knife (GK) platforms, such as the relocatable frame and on-board imaging, have enabled hypofractionated GK radiosurgery of large or complex brain lesions. This study aimed to characterize the dosimetric quality of such treatments against linear accelerator-based delivery systems that include the CyberKnife (CK) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). METHODS Ten patients treated with VMAT at the authors' institution for large brain tumors (> 3 cm in maximum diameter) were selected for the study. The median prescription dose was 25 Gy (range 20-30 Gy) in 5 fractions. The median planning target volume (PTV) was 9.57 cm(3) (range 1.94-24.81 cm(3)). Treatment planning was performed using Eclipse External Beam Planning V11 for VMAT on the Varian TrueBeam system, Multiplan V4.5 for the CyberKnife VSI System, and Leksell GammaPlan V10.2 for the Gamma Knife Perfexion system. The percentage of the PTV receiving at least the prescription dose was normalized to be identical across all platforms for individual cases. The prescription isodose value for the PTV, conformity index, Paddick gradient index, mean and maximum doses for organs at risk, and normal brain dose at variable isodose volumes ranging from the 5-Gy isodose volume (V5) to the 15-Gy isodose volume (V15) were compared for all of the cases. RESULTS The mean Paddick gradient index was 2.6 ± 0.2, 3.2 ± 0.5, and 4.3 ± 1.0 for GK, CK, and VMAT, respectively (p < 0.002). The mean V15 was 7.5 ± 3.7 cm(3) (range 1.53-13.29 cm(3)), 9.8 ± 5.5 cm(3) (range 2.07-18.45 cm(3)), and 16.1 ± 10.6 cm(3) (range 3.58-36.53 cm(3)) for GK, CK, and VMAT, respectively (p ≤ 0.03, paired 2-tailed t-tests). However, the average conformity index was 1.18, 1.12, and 1.21 for GK, CK, and VMAT, respectively (p > 0.06). The average prescription isodose values were 52% (range 47%-69%), 60% (range 46%-68%), and 88% (range 70%-94%) for GK, CK, and VMAT, respectively, thus producing significant variations in

  17. MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry for validating plans with multiple matrices in Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Gopishankar, N; Watanabe, Yoichi; Subbiah, Vivekanandhan

    2011-01-31

    One of treatment planning techniques with Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) for Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) uses multiple matrices with multiple dose prescriptions. Computational complexity increases when shots are placed in multiple matrices with different grid sizes. Hence, the experimental validation of LGP calculated dose distributions is needed for those cases. For the current study, we used BANG3 polymer gel contained in a head-sized glass bottle to simulate the entire treatment process of GKSRS. A treatment plan with three 18 mm shots and one 8 mm shot in separate matrices was created with LGP. The prescribed maximum dose was 8 Gy to three shots and 16 Gy to one of the 18 mm shots. The 3D dose distribution recorded in the gel dosimeter was read using a Siemens 3T MRI scanner. The scanning parameters of a CPMG pulse sequence with 32 equidistant echoes were as follows: TR = 7 s, echo step = 13.6 ms, field-of-view = 256 mm × 256 mm, and pixel size = 1 mm × 1 mm. Interleaved acquisition mode was used to obtain 15 to 45 2-mm-thick slices. Using a calibration relationship between absorbed dose and the spin-spin relaxation rate (R2), we converted R2 images to dose images. MATLAB-based in-house programs were used for R2 estimation and dose comparison. Gamma-index analysis for the 3D data showed gamma values less than unity for 86% of the voxels. Through this study we accomplished the first application of polymer gel dosimetry for a true comparison between measured 3D dose distributions and LGP calculations for plans using multiple matrices for multiple targets.

  18. Measurement of prompt gamma profiles in inhomogeneous targets with a knife-edge slit camera during proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priegnitz, M.; Helmbrecht, S.; Janssens, G.; Perali, I.; Smeets, J.; Vander Stappen, F.; Sterpin, E.; Fiedler, F.

    2015-06-01

    Proton and ion beam therapies become increasingly relevant in radiation therapy. To fully exploit the potential of this irradiation technique and to achieve maximum target volume conformality, the verification of particle ranges is highly desirable. Many research activities focus on the measurement of the spatial distributions of prompt gamma rays emitted during irradiation. A passively collimating knife-edge slit camera is a promising option to perform such measurements. In former publications, the feasibility of accurate detection of proton range shifts in homogeneous targets could be shown with such a camera. We present slit camera measurements of prompt gamma depth profiles in inhomogeneous targets. From real treatment plans and their underlying CTs, representative beam paths are selected and assembled as one-dimensional inhomogeneous targets built from tissue equivalent materials. These phantoms have been irradiated with monoenergetic proton pencil beams. The accuracy of range deviation estimation as well as the detectability of range shifts is investigated in different scenarios. In most cases, range deviations can be detected within less than 2 mm. In close vicinity to low-density regions, range detection is challenging. In particular, a minimum beam penetration depth of 7 mm beyond a cavity is required for reliable detection of a cavity filling with the present setup. Dedicated data post-processing methods may be capable of overcoming this limitation.

  19. Validation of accuracy in image co-registration with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Mori, Yoshimasa; Komori, Masataka; Shibamoto, Yuta; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Hashizume, Chisa

    2014-09-01

    The latest version of Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) is equipped with Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) image-processing functions including image co-registration. Diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) taken prior to Gamma Knife treatment is available for virtual treatment pre-planning. On the treatment day, actual dose planning is completed on stereotactic MRI or computed tomography (CT) (with a frame) after co-registration with the diagnostic MRI and in association with the virtual dose distributions. This study assesses the accuracy of image co-registration in a phantom study and evaluates its usefulness in clinical cases. Images of three kinds of phantoms and 11 patients are evaluated. In the phantom study, co-registration errors of the 3D coordinates were measured in overall stereotactic space and compared between stereotactic CT and diagnostic CT, stereotactic MRI and diagnostic MRI, stereotactic CT and diagnostic MRI, and stereotactic MRI and diagnostic MRI co-registered with stereotactic CT. In the clinical study, target contours were compared between stereotactic MRI and diagnostic MRI co-registered with stereotactic CT. The mean errors of coordinates between images were < 1 mm in all measurement areas in both the phantom and clinical patient studies. The co-registration function implemented in LGP has sufficient geometrical accuracy to assure appropriate dose planning in clinical use.

  20. Effective usage of a clearance check to avoid a collision in Gamma Knife Perfexion radiosurgery with the Leksell skull frame.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Mori, Yoshimasa; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Komori, Masataka; Hashizume, Chisa; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kobayashi, Tatsuya

    2014-11-01

    Skull frame attachment is one of the most significant issues with Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Because of the potential for suffering by patients, careful control of the frame position is required to avoid circumstances such as collision between the frame or the patient's head and the collimator helmet, and inaccessible target coordinates. This study sought to develop a simulation method to find the appropriate frame location on the patient's head by retrospective analysis of treatment plans for brain metastasis cases. To validate the accuracy of the collision warning, we compared the collision distance calculated using Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) with actual measured distances. We then investigated isocenter coordinates in near-collision cases using data from 844 previously treated patients and created a clearance map by superimposing them on CT images for just the frame, post and stereotactic fiducial box. The differences in distance between the simulation in LGP and the measured values were <1.0 mm. In 177 patients, 213 lesions and 461 isocenters, there was a warning of one possible collision. The clearance map was helpful for simulating appropriate skull frame placement. The clearance simulation eliminates the psychological stress associated with potential collisions, and enables more comfortable treatment for the patient.

  1. Development and Validation of a Small Animal Immobilizer and Positioning System for the Study of Delivery of Intracranial and Extracranial Radiotherapy Using the Gamma Knife System.

    PubMed

    Awan, Musaddiq J; Dorth, Jennifer; Mani, Arvind; Kim, Haksoo; Zheng, Yiran; Mislmani, Mazen; Welford, Scott; Yuan, Jiankui; Wessels, Barry W; Lo, Simon S; Letterio, John; Machtay, Mitchell; Sloan, Andrew; Sohn, Jason W

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this research is to establish a process of irradiating mice using the Gamma Knife as a versatile system for small animal irradiation and to validate accurate intracranial and extracranial dose delivery using this system. A stereotactic immobilization device was developed for small animals for the Gamma Knife head frame allowing for isocentric dose delivery. Intercranial positional reproducibility of a reference point from a primary reference animal was verified on an additional mouse. Extracranial positional reproducibility of the mouse aorta was verified using 3 mice. Accurate dose delivery was validated using film and thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements with a solid water phantom. Gamma Knife plans were developed to irradiate intracranial and extracranial targets. Mice were irradiated validating successful targeted radiation dose delivery. Intramouse positional variability of the right mandible reference point across 10 micro-computed tomography scans was 0.65 ± 0.48 mm. Intermouse positional reproducibility across 2 mice at the same reference point was 0.76 ± 0.46 mm. The accuracy of dose delivery was 0.67 ± 0.29 mm and 1.01 ± 0.43 mm in the coronal and sagittal planes, respectively. The planned dose delivered to a mouse phantom was 2 Gy at the 50% isodose with a measured thermoluminescent dosimeter dose of 2.9 ± 0.3 Gy. The phosphorylated form of member X of histone family H2A (γH2AX) staining of irradiated mouse brain and mouse aorta demonstrated adjacent tissue sparing. In conclusion, our system for preclinical studies of small animal irradiation using the Gamma Knife is able to accurately deliver intracranial and extracranial targeted focal radiation allowing for preclinical experiments studying focal radiation.

  2. Ten-Year Survival of a Patient Treated with Stereotactic Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases from Colon Cancer with Ovarian and Lymph Node Metastases: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Morinaga, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Naritaka; Shitara, Yoshinori; Ishizaki, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Takatomo; Kouga, Hideaki; Wakabayashi, Kazuki; Fukuchi, Minoru; Tsunoda, Yoshiyuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastasis from colorectal cancer is infrequent and carries a poor prognosis. Herein, we present a patient alive 10 years after the identification of a first brain metastasis from sigmoid colon cancer. A 39-year-old woman underwent sigmoidectomy for sigmoid colon cancer during an emergency operation for pelvic peritonitis. The pathological finding was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Eleven months after the sigmoidectomy, a metastatic lesion was identified in the left ovary. Despite local radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy, the left ovarian lesion grew, so resection of the uterus and bilateral ovaries was performed. Adjuvant chemotherapy with tegafur-uracil (UFT)/calcium folinate (leucovorin, LV) was initiated. Seven months after resection of the ovarian lesion, brain metastases appeared in the bilateral frontal lobes and were treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Cervical and mediastinal lymph node metastases were also diagnosed, and irradiation of these lesions was performed. After radiotherapy, 10 courses of oxaliplatin and infused fluorouracil plus leucovorin (FOLFOX) were administered. During FOLFOX administration, recurrent left frontal lobe brain metastasis was diagnosed and treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In this case, the brain metastases were well treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery, and the systemic disease arising from sigmoid colon cancer has been kept under control with chemotherapies, surgical resection, and radiotherapy.

  3. A novel technique to evaluate the geometrical accuracy of CT-MR image fusion in Gamma Knife radiosurgery procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sajeev; Sampath, S.; Indiradevi, B.; Bhanumathy, G.; Supe, Sanjay S.; Musthafa, M. M.

    2010-01-01

    In order to optimize the accuracy of imaging in Gamma Knife radiosurgery using the image fusion options available in the Leksell gamma plan. Phantom images from 1.5 Tesla MRI Scan (Magnetom vision - Siemens) and Computed Tomography images from Philips Brilliance 16 CT scanner were used for image fusion in Gammaplan treatment planning system. The images were fused using co-registration technique using multiview and imagemerge modules. Stereotactic coordinates were then calculated for known targets. Vector distances from the centre of the Leksell coordinate system to five known targets were measured in CT, MR and CT-MR fused images and compared with geometrical measurements. The mean values of maximum absolute errors were 0.34 mm, 0.41 mm.0.38 mm (along x-axis), 0.43 mm, 1.53 mm, 0.62 mm (along y-axis) and 0.75 mm 2.02 mm, 0.93 mm (along z-axis) for CT, MR and CT-MR fused image data respectively. The mean error in calculating the vector distances from the center of the Leksell coordinate system (100, 100, 100) to the known target volumes are 0.22 mm, 0.8 mm and 0.43 mm for CT, MR and CT-MR fused images, respectively. Image fusion functions available in gamma plan are useful for combining the features of CT and MR imaging modalities. These methods are highly useful in clinical situations where the error associated with Magnetic Resonance Imaging is beyond acceptable levels.

  4. SU-E-T-476: Quality Assurance for Gamma Knife Perfexion Using the Exradin W1 Plastic Scintillation Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Pino, R; Therriault-Proulx, F; Yang, J; Beddar, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To perform dose profile and output factor measurements for the Exradin W1 plastic scintillation detector (PSD) for the Gamma Knife Perfexion (GKP) collimators in a Lucy phantom and to compare these values to an Exradin A16 ion chamber, EBT3 radiochromic film and treatment planning system (TPS) data. Methods: We used the Exradin W1 PSD which has a small volume, near-water equivalent sensitive element. It has also been shown to be energy independent. This new detector is manufactured and distributed by Standard Imaging, Inc. Measurements were performed for all three collimators (4 mm, 8 mm and 16 mm) for the GKP. The Lucy phantom with the PSD inserted was moved in small steps to acquire profiles in all three directions. EBT3 film was inserted in the Lucy phantom and exposed to a single shot for each collimator. Relative output factors were measured using the three detectors while profiles acquired with the PSD were compared to the ones measured with EBT3 radiochromic film. Results: Measured output factors relative to the largest collimator are as followsCollimator PS EBT3 A1616mm 1.000 1.000 1.0008mm 0.892 0.881 0.8834mm 0.795 0.793 0.727 The nominal (vendor) OFs for GKP are 1.000, 0.900, and 0.814, for collimators 16 mm, 8 mm and 4 mm, respectively. There is excellent agreement between all profiles measured with the PSD and EBT3 as well as with the TPS data provided by the vendor. Conclusion: Output factors measured with the W1 were consistent with the ones measured with EBT3 and A16 ion chamber. Measured profiles are in excellent agreement. The W1 detector seems well suited for beam QA for Gamma Knife due to its dosimetric characteristics. Sam Beddar would like to disclose a NIH/NCI SBIR Phase II grant (2R44CA153824-02A1) with Standard Imaging, Title: “Water-Equivalent Plastic Scintillation Detectors for Small Field Radiotherapy”.

  5. Automated gamma knife radiosurgery treatment planning with image registration, data-mining, and Nelder-Mead simplex optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kuan J.; Barber, David C.; Walton, Lee

    2006-07-15

    Gamma knife treatments are usually planned manually, requiring much expertise and time. We describe a new, fully automatic method of treatment planning. The treatment volume to be planned is first compared with a database of past treatments to find volumes closely matching in size and shape. The treatment parameters of the closest matches are used as starting points for the new treatment plan. Further optimization is performed with the Nelder-Mead simplex method: the coordinates and weight of the isocenters are allowed to vary until a maximally conformal plan specific to the new treatment volume is found. The method was tested on a randomly selected set of 10 acoustic neuromas and 10 meningiomas. Typically, matching a new volume took under 30 seconds. The time for simplex optimization, on a 3 GHz Xeon processor, ranged from under a minute for small volumes (<1000 cubic mm, 2-3 isocenters), to several tens of hours for large volumes (>30 000 cubic mm,>20 isocenters). In 8/10 acoustic neuromas and 8/10 meningiomas, the automatic method found plans with conformation number equal or better than that of the manual plan. In 4/10 acoustic neuromas and 5/10 meningiomas, both overtreatment and undertreatment ratios were equal or better in automated plans. In conclusion, data-mining of past treatments can be used to derive starting parameters for treatment planning. These parameters can then be computer optimized to give good plans automatically.

  6. Automated gamma knife radiosurgery treatment planning with image registration, data-mining, and Nelder-Mead simplex optimization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuan J; Barber, David C; Walton, Lee

    2006-07-01

    Gamma knife treatments are usually planned manually, requiring much expertise and time. We describe a new, fully automatic method of treatment planning. The treatment volume to be planned is first compared with a database of past treatments to find volumes closely matching in size and shape. The treatment parameters of the closest matches are used as starting points for the new treatment plan. Further optimization is performed with the Nelder-Mead simplex method: the coordinates and weight of the isocenters are allowed to vary until a maximally conformal plan specific to the new treatment volume is found. The method was tested on a randomly selected set of 10 acoustic neuromas and 10 meningiomas. Typically, matching a new volume took under 30 seconds. The time for simplex optimization, on a 3 GHz Xeon processor, ranged from under a minute for small volumes (<1000 cubic mm, 2-3 isocenters), to several tens of hours for large volumes (>30,000 cubic mm, >20 isocenters). In 8/10 acoustic neuromas and 8/10 meningiomas, the automatic method found plans with conformation number equal or better than that of the manual plan. In 4/10 acoustic neuromas and 5/10 meningiomas, both overtreatment and undertreatment ratios were equal or better in automated plans. In conclusion, data-mining of past treatments can be used to derive starting parameters for treatment planning. These parameters can then be computer optimized to give good plans automatically.

  7. SU-E-T-471: Improvement of Gamma Knife Treatment Planning Through Tumor Control Probability for Metastatic Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z; Feng, Y; Lo, S; Grecula, J; Mayr, N; Yuh, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The dose–volume histogram (DVH) has been normally accepted as a tool for treatment plan evaluation. However, spatial information is lacking in DVH. As a supplement to the DVH in three-dimensional treatment planning, the differential DVH (DDVH) provides the spatial variation, the size and magnitude of the different dose regions within a region of interest, which can be incorporated into tumor control probability model. This study was to provide a method in evaluating and improving Gamma Knife treatment planning. Methods: 10 patients with brain metastases from different primary tumors including melanoma (#1,#4,#5, #10), breast cancer (#2), prostate cancer (#3) and lung cancer (#6–9) were analyzed. By using Leksell GammaPlan software, two plans were prepared for each patient. Special attention was given to the DDVHs that were different for different plans and were used for a comparison between two plans. Dose distribution inside target and tumor control probability (TCP) based on DDVH were calculated, where cell density and radiobiological parameters were adopted from literature. The plans were compared based on DVH, DDVH and TCP. Results: Using DVH, the coverage and selectivity were the same between plans for 10 patients. DDVH were different between two plans for each patient. The paired t-test showed no significant difference in TCP between the two plans. For brain metastases from melanoma (#1, #4–5), breast cancer (#2) and lung cancer (#6–8), the difference in TCP was less than 5%. But the difference in TCP was about 6.5% for patient #3 with the metastasis from prostate cancer, 10.1% and 178.7% for two patients (#9–10) with metastasis from lung cancer. Conclusion: Although DVH provides average dose–volume information, DDVH provides differential dose– volume information with respect to different regions inside the tumor. TCP provides radiobiological information and adds additional information on improving treatment planning as well as adaptive

  8. Efficacy and Quality of Life Outcomes in Patients With Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia Treated With Gamma-Knife Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Dhople, Anil Kwok, Young; Chin, Lawrence; Shepard, David Ph.D.; Slawson, Robert; Amin, Pradip; Regine, William

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To assess efficacy and quality of life (QOL) outcomes associated with gamma-knife radiosurgery (GK-RS) in treating atypical trigeminal neuralgia (ATN) compared with classic trigeminal neuralgia (CTN). Methods and Materials: Between September 1996 and September 2004, 35 cases of ATN were treated with GK-RS. Patients were categorized into two groups: Group I comprised patients presenting with ATN (57%); Group II consisted of patients presenting with CTN then progressing to ATN (43%). Median prescription dose 75 Gy (range, 70-80 Gy) was delivered to trigeminal nerve root entry zone. Treatment efficacy and QOL improvements were assessed with a standardized questionnaire. Results: With median follow-up of 29 months (range, 3-74 months), 72% reported excellent/good outcomes, with mean time to relief of 5.8 weeks (range, 0-24 weeks) and mean duration of relief of 62 weeks (range, 1-163 weeks). This rate of pain relief is similar to rate achieved in our previously reported experience treating CTN with GK-RS (p = 0.36). There was a trend toward longer time to relief (p = 0.059), and shorter duration of relief (p = 0.067) in patients with ATN. There was no difference in rate of, time to, or duration of pain relief between Groups I and II. Of the patients with ATN, 88% discontinued or decreased the use of pain medications. Among the patients with sustained pain relief, QOL improved an average of 85%. Conclusion: This is the largest reported GK-RS experience for the treatment of ATN. Patients with ATN can achieve rates of pain relief similar to those in patients with CTN. Further follow-up is necessary to assess adequately the durability of response.

  9. Dosimetric and Clinical Analysis of Spatial Distribution of the Radiation Dose in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannoma

    SciTech Connect

    Massager, Nicolas; Lonneville, Sarah; Delbrouck, Carine; Benmebarek, Nadir; Desmedt, Francoise; Devriendt, Daniel

    2011-11-15

    Objectives: We investigated variations in the distribution of radiation dose inside (dose inhomogeneity) and outside (dose falloff) the target volume during Gamma Knife (GK) irradiation of vestibular schwannoma (VS). We analyzed the relationship between some parameters of dose distribution and the clinical and radiological outcome of patients. Methods and Materials: Data from dose plans of 203 patients treated for a vestibular schwannoma by GK C using same prescription dose (12 Gy at the 50% isodose) were collected. Four different dosimetric indexes were defined and calculated retrospectively in all plannings on the basis of dose-volume histograms: Paddick conformity index (PI), gradient index (GI), homogeneity index (HI), and unit isocenter (UI). The different measures related to distribution of the radiation dose were compared with hearing and tumor outcome of 203 patients with clinical and radiological follow-up of minimum 2 years. Results: Mean, median, SD, and ranges of the four indexes of dose distribution analyzed were calculated; large variations were found between dose plans. We found a high correlation between the target volume and PI, GI, and UI. No significant association was found between the indexes of dose distribution calculated in this study and tumor control, tumor volume shrinkage, hearing worsening, loss of functional hearing, or complete hearing loss at last follow-up. Conclusions: Parameters of distribution of the radiation dose during GK radiosurgery for VS can be highly variable between dose plans. The tumor and hearing outcome of patients treated is not significantly related to these global indexes of dose distribution inside and around target volume. In GK radiosurgery for VS, the outcome seems more to be influenced by local radiation dose delivered to specific structures or volumes than by global dose gradients.

  10. Absolute calibration of the Gamma Knife{sup ®} Perfexion™ and delivered dose verification using EPR/alanine dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hornbeck, Amaury E-mail: tristan.garcia@cea.fr; Garcia, Tristan E-mail: tristan.garcia@cea.fr; Cuttat, Marguerite; Jenny, Catherine

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Elekta Leksell Gamma Knife{sup ®} (LGK) is a radiotherapy beam machine whose features are not compliant with the international calibration protocols for radiotherapy. In this scope, the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel and the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital decided to conceive a new LKG dose calibration method and to compare it with the currently used one. Furthermore, the accuracy of the dose delivered by the LGK machine was checked using an “end-to-end” test. This study also aims to compare doses delivered by the two latest software versions of the Gammaplan treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: The dosimetric method chosen is the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of alanine. Dose rate (calibration) verification was done without TPS using a spherical phantom. Absolute calibration was done with factors calculated by Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP-X). For “end-to-end” test, irradiations in an anthropomorphic head phantom, close to real treatment conditions, are done using the TPS in order to verify the delivered dose. Results: The comparison of the currently used calibration method with the new one revealed a deviation of +0.8% between the dose rates measured by ion chamber and EPR/alanine. For simple fields configuration (less than 16 mm diameter), the “end-to-end” tests showed out average deviations of −1.7% and −0.9% between the measured dose and the calculated dose by Gammaplan v9 and v10, respectively. Conclusions: This paper shows there is a good agreement between the new calibration method and the currently used one. There is also a good agreement between the calculated and delivered doses especially for Gammaplan v10.

  11. SU-E-T-517: Investigation of Factors Contributing to Extracranial Radiation Doses From Leksell Gamma Knife

    SciTech Connect

    Kon, D; Nakano, M; Nawa, K; Haga, A; Nakagawa, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to investigate dominant factors for doses to extracranial sites in treatment with Leksell Gamma Knife (LGK). Methods Monte Carlo simulation was implemented using EGS5 version 1.4.401. The simulation was divided into two major steps for the purpose of efficiency. As the first step, phase-space files were obtained at a scoring plane located just below patient-side surface of the collimator helmet of LGK. Scored particles were classified into three groups, primary, leakage and scatter, using their history information until their arrival to the scoring plane. Then classification was used at the following second step simulation to investigate which type of particle is dominant in the deposited energy at extra-cranial sites. In the second stage, a cylindrical phantom with a semisphere shaped head was modeled such that the geometrical center of the phantom’s head corresponds to the unit center point (UCP) of LGK. Scoring regions were arranged at 10 cm intervals from the UCP to 70 cm away on the central axis of the phantom. Energy deposition from each type of particles and location of interaction were recorded. Results The dominant factor of deposited energy depended on the collimator size. In the case of smaller collimator size, leakage was dominant. However, contribution of leakage was relatively small in the case of larger collimator size. The contribution of internal scatter varied with the distance from the UCP. In the proximal areas, internal scatter was dominant, whereas in the distal areas, particles interacting with machine components became dominant factor. Conclusion The Result of this study indicates that the dominant factor to dose to an extracranial site can vary with the distance from UCP and with collimator size. This means that the variation of this contribution must be considered for modeling of the extracranial dose especially in the distal area. This work was partly supported by the JSPS Core-to-Core Program (No

  12. Measurement of relative output factors for the 8 and 4 mm collimators of Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion by film dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Novotny, Josef Jr.; Bhatnagar, Jagdish P.; Quader, Mubina A.; Bednarz, Greg; Lunsford, L. Dade; Huq, M. Saiful

    2009-05-15

    Three types of films, Kodak EDR2, Gafchromic EBT, and Gafchromic MD-V2-55, were used to measure relative output factors of 4 and 8 mm collimators of the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion. The optical density to dose calibration curve for each of the film types was obtained by exposing the films to a range of known doses. Ten data points were acquired for each of the calibration curves in the dose ranges from 0 to 4 Gy, 0 to 8 Gy, and 0 to 80 Gy for Kodak EDR2, Gafchromic EBT, and Gafchromic MD-V2-55 films, respectively. For the measurement of relative output factors, five films of each film type were exposed to a known dose. All films were scanned using EPSON EXPRESSION 10000 XL scanner with 200 dpi resolution in 16 bit gray scale for EDR2 film and 48 bit color scale for Gafchromic films. The scanned images were imported in the red channel for both Gafchromic films. The background corrections from an unexposed film were applied to all films. The output factors obtained from film measurements were in a close agreement both with the Monte Carlo calculated values of 0.924 and 0.805 for 8 and 4 mm collimators, respectively. These values are provided by the vendor and used as default values in the vendor's treatment planning system. The largest differences were noted for the Kodak EDR 2 films (-2.1% and -4.5% for 8 and 4 mm collimators, respectively). The best agreement observed was for EBT Gafchromic film (-0.8% and +0.6% differences for 8 and 4 mm collimators, respectively). Based on the present values, no changes in the default relative output factor values were made in the treatment planning system.

  13. Toxicity of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in the Treatment of Intracranial Tumors in Patients With Collagen Vascular Diseases or Multiple Sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lowell, Dot; Tatter, Stephen B.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Guzman, Allan F. de; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Lovato, James F.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Shaw, Edward G.; Urbanic, James J.; Chan, Michael D.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess toxicity in patients with either a collagen vascular disease (CVD) or multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with intracranial radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Between January 2004 and April 2009, 6 patients with MS and 14 patients with a CVD were treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for intracranial tumors. Treated lesions included 15 total brain metastases in 7 patients, 11 benign brain tumors, 1 low grade glioma, and 1 cavernous malformation. Toxicities were graded by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute/Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria. 'Rare toxicities' were characterized as those reported in the scientific literature at an incidence of <5%. Results: Median follow-up time was 16 months. Median dose to the tumor margin was 13.0 Gy (range, 12-21 Gy). Median size of tumor was 5.0 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.14-7.8 cm{sup 3}). Of the 14 patients with CVD, none experienced a Grade 3 or 4 toxicity or a toxicity characterized as rare. Of the 6 patients with MS, 3 experienced rare toxicities, and two of these were Grade 3 toxicities. Rare complications included a patient experiencing both communicating hydrocephalus and facial nerve palsy, as well as 2 additional patients with motor cranial nerve palsy. High-grade toxicities included the patient with an acoustic neuroma requiring ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement for obstructive hydrocephalus, and 1 patient with a facial nerve schwannoma who experienced permanent facial nerve palsy. Interval between radiosurgery and high-grade toxicities ranged from 1 week to 4 months. Conclusions: Our series suggests that patients with MS who receive GKRS may be at increased risk of rare and high-grade treatment-related toxicity. Given the time course of toxicity, treatment-related edema or demyelination represent potential mechanisms.

  14. Validity of the Graded Prognostic Assessment-Derived Index to Predict Brain-Metastatic Patients' Survival After Gamma Knife Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, Shang-Ming

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To appraise whether the graded prognostic assessment (GPA)-derived index is valid for selecting patients with brain metastases for Gamma Knife (GK) radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: A total of 56 consecutive patients in recursive partioning analysis (RPA) Class I (n = 19, 34%) and II (n = 37, 66%) formed the basis of this retrospective study. Their mean age was of 57 years with mean Karnofsky performance score of 77. Primary cancers stemmed mainly from the lungs (59%). A total of 45 patients (80%) harbored multiple tumors. The mean clinical follow-up period was 9 months. Results: Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that the overall median survival time (MST) for the whole series was 11.5 months: 16.5 vs. 6.5 months for RPA class I and II (p = 0.017). Multivariate Cox analysis revealed that female patients and a pre-GK good functional state were favorable prognostic factors. The favorable MST was in patients with a GPA score of 3 to 4 (17 months) followed by a GPA score of 2 to 2.5 (11 months) and GPA score 0 to 1.5 (6.5 months), but without statistical differences (p = 0.413) in between. A modified index (MGPA) is proposed with gender as a cofactor, then there existed a distinct survival differences (p = 0.028) between patients with an MGPA score of 3.5 to 5 (15 months) and with an MGPA score of 0 to 3 (7 months). In addition, the original GPA index failed to imply the difference of MST in patients with lung origin. Conclusions: The GPA-derived index is not applicable to our set of patients for comparing their survival after GK radiosurgery. The gender of the patients is a suggested cofactor to further refine the greater prognostic accuracy of the GPA index.

  15. Experimental Comparison of Knife-Edge and Multi-Parallel Slit Collimators for Prompt Gamma Imaging of Proton Pencil Beams.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Julien; Roellinghoff, Frauke; Janssens, Guillaume; Perali, Irene; Celani, Andrea; Fiorini, Carlo; Freud, Nicolas; Testa, Etienne; Prieels, Damien

    2016-01-01

    More and more camera concepts are being investigated to try and seize the opportunity of instantaneous range verification of proton therapy treatments offered by prompt gammas emitted along the proton tracks. Focusing on one-dimensional imaging with a passive collimator, the present study experimentally compared in combination with the first, clinically compatible, dedicated camera device the performances of instances of the two main options: a knife-edge slit (KES) and a multi-parallel slit (MPS) design. These two options were experimentally assessed in this specific context as they were previously demonstrated through analytical and numerical studies to allow similar performances in terms of Bragg peak retrieval precision and spatial resolution in a general context. Both collimators were prototyped according to the conclusions of Monte Carlo optimization studies under constraints of equal weight (40 mm tungsten alloy equivalent thickness) and of the specificities of the camera device under consideration (in particular 4 mm segmentation along beam axis and no time-of-flight discrimination, both of which less favorable to the MPS performance than to the KES one). Acquisitions of proton pencil beams of 100, 160, and 230 MeV in a PMMA target revealed that, in order to reach a given level of statistical precision on Bragg peak depth retrieval, the KES collimator requires only half the dose the present MPS collimator needs, making the KES collimator a preferred option for a compact camera device aimed at imaging only the Bragg peak position. On the other hand, the present MPS collimator proves more effective at retrieving the entrance of the beam in the target in the context of an extended camera device aimed at imaging the whole proton track within the patient.

  16. Experimental Comparison of Knife-Edge and Multi-Parallel Slit Collimators for Prompt Gamma Imaging of Proton Pencil Beams

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Julien; Roellinghoff, Frauke; Janssens, Guillaume; Perali, Irene; Celani, Andrea; Fiorini, Carlo; Freud, Nicolas; Testa, Etienne; Prieels, Damien

    2016-01-01

    More and more camera concepts are being investigated to try and seize the opportunity of instantaneous range verification of proton therapy treatments offered by prompt gammas emitted along the proton tracks. Focusing on one-dimensional imaging with a passive collimator, the present study experimentally compared in combination with the first, clinically compatible, dedicated camera device the performances of instances of the two main options: a knife-edge slit (KES) and a multi-parallel slit (MPS) design. These two options were experimentally assessed in this specific context as they were previously demonstrated through analytical and numerical studies to allow similar performances in terms of Bragg peak retrieval precision and spatial resolution in a general context. Both collimators were prototyped according to the conclusions of Monte Carlo optimization studies under constraints of equal weight (40 mm tungsten alloy equivalent thickness) and of the specificities of the camera device under consideration (in particular 4 mm segmentation along beam axis and no time-of-flight discrimination, both of which less favorable to the MPS performance than to the KES one). Acquisitions of proton pencil beams of 100, 160, and 230 MeV in a PMMA target revealed that, in order to reach a given level of statistical precision on Bragg peak depth retrieval, the KES collimator requires only half the dose the present MPS collimator needs, making the KES collimator a preferred option for a compact camera device aimed at imaging only the Bragg peak position. On the other hand, the present MPS collimator proves more effective at retrieving the entrance of the beam in the target in the context of an extended camera device aimed at imaging the whole proton track within the patient. PMID:27446802

  17. Monte Carlo calculated and experimentally determined output correction factors for small field detectors in Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmakhlouf, H.; Johansson, J.; Paddick, I.; Andreo, P.

    2015-05-01

    The measurement of output factors (OF) for the small photon beams generated by Leksell Gamma Knife® (LGK) radiotherapy units is a challenge for the physicist due to the under or over estimation of these factors by a vast majority of the detectors commercially available. Output correction factors, introduced in the international formalism published by Alfonso (2008 Med. Phys. 35 5179-86), standardize the determination of OFs for small photon beams by correcting detector-reading ratios to yield OFs in terms of absorbed-dose ratios. In this work output correction factors for a number of detectors have been determined for LGK Perfexion™ 60Co γ-ray beams by Monte Carlo (MC) calculations and measurements. The calculations were made with the MC system PENELOPE, scoring the energy deposited in the active volume of the detectors and in a small volume of water; the detectors simulated were two silicon diodes, one liquid ionization chamber (LIC), alanine and TLD. The calculated LIC output correction factors were within ± 0.4%, and this was selected as the reference detector for experimental determinations where output correction factors for twelve detectors were measured, normalizing their readings to those of the LIC. The MC-calculated and measured output correction factors for silicon diodes yielded corrections of up to 5% for the smallest LGK collimator size of 4 mm diameter. The air ionization chamber measurements led to extremely large output correction factors, caused by the well-known effect of partial volume averaging. The corrections were up to 7% for the natural diamond detector in the 4 mm collimator, also due to partial volume averaging, and decreased to within about ± 0.6% for the smaller synthetic diamond detector. The LIC, showing the smallest corrections, was used to investigate machine-to-machine output factor differences by performing measurements in four LGK units with different dose rates. These resulted in OFs within ± 0.6% and ± 0

  18. Automated medial axis seeding and guided evolutionary simulated annealing for optimization of gamma knife radiosurgery treatment plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengpeng

    The Leksell Gamma KnifeRTM (LGK) is a tool for providing accurate stereotactic radiosurgical treatment of brain lesions, especially tumors. Currently, the treatment planning team "forward" plans radiation treatment parameters while viewing a series of 2D MR scans. This primarily manual process is cumbersome and time consuming because the difficulty in visualizing the large search space for the radiation parameters (i.e., shot overlap, number, location, size, and weight). I hypothesize that a computer-aided "inverse" planning procedure that utilizes tumor geometry and treatment goals could significantly improve the planning process and therapeutic outcome of LGK radiosurgery. My basic observation is that the treatment team is best at identification of the location of the lesion and prescribing a lethal, yet safe, radiation dose. The treatment planning computer is best at determining both the 3D tumor geometry and optimal LGK shot parameters necessary to deliver a desirable dose pattern to the tumor while sparing adjacent normal tissue. My treatment planning procedure asks the neurosurgeon to identify the tumor and critical structures in MR images and the oncologist to prescribe a tumoricidal radiation dose. Computer-assistance begins with geometric modeling of the 3D tumor's medial axis properties. This begins with a new algorithm, a Gradient-Phase Plot (G-P Plot) decomposition of the tumor object's medial axis. I have found that medial axis seeding, while insufficient in most cases to produce an acceptable treatment plan, greatly reduces the solution space for Guided Evolutionary Simulated Annealing (GESA) treatment plan optimization by specifying an initial estimate for shot number, size, and location, but not weight. They are used to generate multiple initial plans which become initial seed plans for GESA. The shot location and weight parameters evolve and compete in the GESA procedure. The GESA objective function optimizes tumor irradiation (i.e., as close to

  19. SU-E-T-607: An Experimental Validation of Gamma Knife Based Convolution Algorithm On Solid Acrylic Anthropomorphic Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Gopishankar, N; Bisht, R K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To perform dosimetric evaluation of convolution algorithm in Gamma Knife (Perfexion Model) using solid acrylic anthropomorphic phantom. Methods: An in-house developed acrylic phantom with ion chamber insert was used for this purpose. The middle insert was designed to fit ion chamber from top(head) as well as from bottom(neck) of the phantom, henceforth measurement done at two different positions simultaneously. Leksell frame fixed to phantom simulated patient treatment. Prior to dosimetric study, hounsfield units and electron density of acrylic material were incorporated into the calibration curve in the TPS for convolution algorithm calculation. A CT scan of phantom with ion chamber (PTW Freiberg, 0.125cc) was obtained with following scanning parameters: Tube voltage-110kV, Slice thickness-1mm and FOV-240mm. Three separate single shot plans were generated in LGP TPS (Version 10.1.) with collimators 16mm, 8mm and 4mm respectively for both ion chamber positions. Both TMR10 and Convolution algorithm based planning (CABP) were used for dose calculation. A dose of 6Gy at 100% isodose was prescribed at centre of ion chamber visible in the CT scan. The phantom with ion chamber was positioned in the treatment couch for dose delivery. Results: The ion chamber measured dose was 5.98Gy for 16mm collimator shot plan with less than 1% deviation for convolution algorithm whereas with TMR10 measured dose was 5.6Gy. For 8mm and 4mm collimator plan merely a dose of 3.86Gy and 2.18Gy respectively were delivered at TPS calculated time for CABP. Conclusion: CABP is expected to perform accurate prediction of time for dose delivery for all collimators, but significant variation in measured dose was observed for 8mm and 4mm collimator which may be due collimator size effect. Effect of metal artifacts caused by pins and frame on the CT scan also may have role in misinterpreting CABP. The study carried out requires further investigation.

  20. WE-G-BRD-08: End-To-End Targeting Accuracy of the Gamma Knife for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Brezovich, I; Wu, X; Duan, J; Benhabib, S; Huang, M; Shen, S; Cardan, R; Popple, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Current QA procedures verify accuracy of individual equipment parameters, but may not include CT and MRI localizers. This study uses an end-to-end approach to measure the overall targeting errors in individual patients previously treated for trigeminal neuralgia. Methods: The trigeminal nerve is simulated by a 3 mm long, 3.175 mm (1/8 inch) diameter MRI contrast-filled cavity embedded within a PMMA plastic capsule. The capsule is positioned within the head frame such that the cavity position matches the Gamma Knife coordinates of 10 previously treated patients. Gafchromic EBT2 film is placed at the center of the cavity in coronal and sagittal orientations. The films are marked with a pin prick to identify the cavity center. Treatments are planned for delivery with 4 mm collimators using MRI and CT scans acquired with the clinical localizer boxes and acquisition protocols. Coordinates of shots are chosen so that the cavity is centered within the 50% isodose volume. Following irradiation, the films are scanned and analyzed. Targeting errors are defined as the distance between the pin prick and the centroid of the 50% isodose line. Results: Averaged over 10 patient simulations, targeting errors along the x, y and z coordinates (patient left-to-right, posterior-anterior, head-to-foot) were, respectively, −0.060 +/− 0.363, −0.350 +/− 0.253, and 0.364 +/− 0.191 mm when MRI was used for treatment planning. Planning according to CT exhibited generally smaller errors, namely 0.109 +/− 0.167, −0.191 +/− 0.144, and 0.211 +/− 0.94 mm. The largest errors in MRI and CT planned treatments were, respectively, y = −0.761 and x = 0.428 mm. Conclusion: Unless patient motion or stronger MRI image distortion in actual treatments caused additional errors, all patients received the prescribed dose, i.e., the targeted section of the trig±eminal nerve was contained within the 50% isodose surface in all cases.

  1. SU-D-BRB-04: Plan Quality Comparison of Intracranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) for Gamma Knife and VMAT Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, V; Algan, O; Ahmad, S; Hossain, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare treatment plan quality of intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for VMAT (RapidArc) and Gamma Knife (GK) systems. Methods: Ten patients with 24 tumors (seven with 1–2 and three with 4–6 lesions), previously treated with GK 4C (prescription doses ranging from 14–23 Gy) were re-planned for RapidArc. Identical contour sets were kept on MRI images for both plans with tissues assigned a CT number of zero. RapidArc plans were performed using 6 MV flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams with dose rate of 1400 MU/minute using two to eight arcs with the following combinations: 2 full coplanar arcs and the rest non-coplanar half arcs. Beam selection was based on target depth. Areas that penetrated more than 10 cm of tissue were avoided by creating smaller arcs or using avoidance sectors in optimization. Plans were optimized with jaw tracking and a high weighting to the normal-brain-tissue and Normal-Tissue-Objective without compromising PTV coverage. Plans were calculated on a 1 mm grid size using AAA algorithm and then normalized so that 99% of each target volume received the prescription dose. Plan quality was assessed by target coverage using Paddick Conformity Index (PCI), sparing of normal-brain-tissue through analysis of V4, V8, and V12 Gy, and integral dose. Results: In all cases critical structure dose criteria were met. RapidArc had a higher PCI than GK plans for 23 out of 24 lesions. The average PCI was 0.76±0.21 for RapidArc and 0.46±0.20 for GK plans (p≤0.001), respectively. Integral dose and normal-brain-tissue doses for all criteria were lower for RapidArc in nearly all patients. The average ratio of GK to RapidArc plans was 1.28±0.27 (p=0.018), 1.31±0.25 (p=0.017), 1.81±0.43 (p=0.005), and 1.50±0.61 (p=0.006) for V4, V8, and V12 Gy, and integral dose, respectively. Conclusion: VMAT was capable of producing higher quality treatment plans than GK when using optimal beam geometries and proper optimization techniques.

  2. The Importance of the Conformality, Heterogeneity, and Gradient Indices in Evaluating Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Treatment Plans for Intracranial Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Balagamwala, Ehsan H.; Suh, John H.; Barnett, Gene H.; Khan, Mohammad K.; Neyman, Gennady; Cai, Rong S.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Novak, Eric; Chao, Samuel T.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between the conformality index (CIn), heterogeneity index (HIn), and gradient index (GIn) and the development of toxicity in patients treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for intracranial meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Treatment records of patients treated from 1997 to 2009 with at least 6 months of follow-up were reviewed. The following parameters were collected: CIn, HIn, GIn (ratio of the volume receiving half the prescription isodose to the volume receiving the full prescription isodose), brainstem (BS) maximum dose (MD), BS volume receiving {>=}12 Gy (V12), optic apparatus (OA) MD, OA V8 Gy, OA V10, number of isocenters, number of isocenters outside target volume, and the occurrence of six toxicities. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression modeling were used for analysis. Results: This study included 145 patients (148 meningiomas) with a median follow-up time of 27 months (range, 6-113.9 months). The majority of meningiomas were located in the skull base (53%). The median prescription dose was 13 Gy (range, 10-24 Gy) to the 51.50% (range, 50-92%) isodose. A lower HIn was correlated with a higher GIn (p = 0.007). CIn was not associated with any toxicity. Higher HIn was associated with the development of dizziness (odds ratio [OR] 1.9; p = 0.02), whereas a lower GIn was associated with motor deficits (OR 0.38; p = 0.04) and auditory changes (OR 0.59; p = 0.04). The OA MD, V8, and V12 were not associated with visual changes, but visual changes were associated with a higher number of isocenters outside the target volume (OR 1.93; p = 0.07). BS V12 was correlated with the development of auditory changes (OR 1.05; p = 0.05), whereas patients with higher BS MD tended to have increased toxicity. Conclusions: Close attention must be paid to all three indices (CIn, HIn, GIn) when optimal treatment plans are determined. We recommend that the target CIn should be {<=}2.0, the HIn {<=}2.0, and the GIn {>=}3

  3. Quality of life is maintained using Gamma Knife radiosurgery: a prospective study of a brain metastases patient cohort.

    PubMed

    Skeie, Bente Sandvei; Eide, Geir Egil; Flatebø, Marianne; Heggdal, Jan Ingeman; Larsen, Elisabeth; Bragstad, Sidsel; Pedersen, Paal-Henning; Enger, Per Øyvind

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) is increasingly used in the management of brain metastases (BMs), but few studies have evaluated how GKRS impacts quality of life (QOL). The aim of this study was to monitor QOL as the primary end point following GKRS in a patient cohort with BM. METHODS The study included 97 consecutive patients with 1-6 BMs treated with GKRS between May 2010 and September 2011. QOL was assessed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months postoperatively using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain (FACT-BR) questionnaire with the brain cancer subscale (BRCS) questionnaire. Factors predicting QOL were identified by mixed linear regression analyses. Local control and toxicity were evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and the European Organisation for Research and Treatment/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (EORTC/RTOG) criteria of late effects, respectively. RESULTS Compliance was high from baseline (97%) to 12-month follow-up (78%). Mean BRCS scores remained high during follow-up: they improved in 66% of patients and remained unchanged in 6% at 9 months. Local control (p = 0.018), improved symptoms (p = 0.005), and stable extracerebral disease (p = 0.001) correlated with high QOL-BRCS score. High baseline recursive partitioning analysis class predicted improved QOL (p = 0.031), whereas high Karnofsky Performance Scale score (p = 0.017), asymptomatic BMs (p = 0.001), and no cognitive deficits (p = 0.033) or seizures (p = 0.040) predicted high, stable QOL-BRCS during the 12-month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS QOL remained stable for up to 12 months following GKRS for the total cohort. High QOL was reported if local control occurred, cerebral symptoms improved/stabilized, or the need for steroids declined, which all reflected successful GKRS. Conversely, low QOL accompanied progression of intra- and extracerebral disease. Based on the study findings, GKRS appears to be a safe and effective treatment

  4. SU-E-J-240: The Impact On Clinical Dose-Distributions When Using MR-Images Registered with Stereotactic CT-Images in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Benmakhlouf, H; Kraepelien, T; Forander, P; Wangerid, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Most Gamma knife treatments are based solely on MR-images. However, for fractionated treatments and to implement TPS dose calculations that require electron densities, CT image data is essential. The purpose of this work is to assess the dosimetric effects of using MR-images registered with stereotactic CT-images in Gamma knife treatments. Methods: Twelve patients treated for vestibular schwannoma with Gamma Knife Perfexion (Elekta Instruments, Sweden) were selected for this study. The prescribed doses (12 Gy to periphery) were delivered based on the conventional approach of using stereotactic MR-images only. These plans were imported into stereotactic CT-images (by registering MR-images with stereotactic CT-images using the Leksell gamma plan registration software). The dose plans, for each patient, are identical in both cases except for potential rotations and translations resulting from the registration. The impact of the registrations was assessed by an algorithm written in Matlab. The algorithm compares the dose-distributions voxel-by-voxel between the two plans, calculates the full dose coverage of the target (treated in the conventional approach) achieved by the CT-based plan, and calculates the minimum dose delivered to the target (treated in the conventional approach) achieved by the CT-based plan. Results: The mean dose difference between the plans was 0.2 Gy to 0.4 Gy (max 4.5 Gy) whereas between 89% and 97% of the target (treated in the conventional approach) received the prescribed dose, by the CT-plan. The minimum dose to the target (treated in the conventional approach) given by the CT-based plan was between 7.9 Gy and 10.7 Gy (compared to 12 Gy in the conventional treatment). Conclusion: The impact of using MR-images registered with stereotactic CT-images has successfully been compared to conventionally delivered dose plans showing significant differences between the two. Although CTimages have been implemented clinically; the effect of the

  5. SU-E-T-563: Multi-Fraction Stereotactic Radiosurgery with Extend System of Gamma Knife: Treatment Verification Using Indigenously Designed Patient Simulating Multipurpose Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Bisht, R; Kale, S; Gopishankar, N; Rath, G; Julka, P; Agarwal, D; Singh, M; Garg, A; Kumar, P; Thulkar, S; Sharma, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Aim of the study is to evaluate mechanical and radiological accuracy of multi-fraction regimen and validate Gamma knife based fractionation using newly developed patient simulating multipurpose phantom. Methods: A patient simulating phantom was designed to verify fractionated treatments with extend system (ES) of Gamma Knife however it could be used to validate other radiotherapy procedures as well. The phantom has options to insert various density material plugs and mini CT/MR distortion phantoms to analyze the quality of stereotactic imaging. An additional thorax part designed to predict surface doses at various organ sites. The phantom was positioned using vacuum head cushion and patient control unit for imaging and treatment. The repositioning check tool (RCT) was used to predict phantom positioning under ES assembly. The phantom with special inserts for film in axial, coronal and sagittal plane were scanned with X-Ray CT and the acquired images were transferred to treatment planning system (LGP 10.1). The focal precession test was performed with 4mm collimator and an experimental plan of four 16mm collimator shots was prepared for treatment verification of multi-fraction regimen. The prescription dose of 5Gy per fraction was delivered in four fractions. Each fraction was analyzed using EBT3 films scanned with EPSON 10000XL Scanner. Results: The measurement of 38 RCT points showed an overall positional accuracy of 0.28mm. The mean deviation of 0.28% and 0.31 % were calculated as CT and MR image distortion respectively. The radiological focus accuracy test showed its deviation from mechanical center point of 0.22mm. The profile measurement showed close agreement between TPS planned and film measured dose. At tolerance criteria of 1%/1mm gamma index analysis showed a pass rate of > 95%. Conclusion: Our results show that the newly developed multipurpose patient simulating phantom is highly suitable for the verification of fractionated stereotactic

  6. Time-resolved imaging of prompt-gamma rays for proton range verification using a knife-edge slit camera based on digital photon counters.

    PubMed

    Cambraia Lopes, Patricia; Clementel, Enrico; Crespo, Paulo; Henrotin, Sebastien; Huizenga, Jan; Janssens, Guillaume; Parodi, Katia; Prieels, Damien; Roellinghoff, Frauke; Smeets, Julien; Stichelbaut, Frederic; Schaart, Dennis R

    2015-08-07

    Proton range monitoring may facilitate online adaptive proton therapy and improve treatment outcomes. Imaging of proton-induced prompt gamma (PG) rays using a knife-edge slit collimator is currently under investigation as a potential tool for real-time proton range monitoring. A major challenge in collimated PG imaging is the suppression of neutron-induced background counts. In this work, we present an initial performance test of two knife-edge slit camera prototypes based on arrays of digital photon counters (DPCs). PG profiles emitted from a PMMA target upon irradiation with a 160 MeV proton pencil beams (about 6.5 × 10(9) protons delivered in total) were measured using detector modules equipped with four DPC arrays coupled to BGO or LYSO : Ce crystal matrices. The knife-edge slit collimator and detector module were placed at 15 cm and 30 cm from the beam axis, respectively, in all cases. The use of LYSO : Ce enabled time-of-flight (TOF) rejection of background events, by synchronizing the DPC readout electronics with the 106 MHz radiofrequency signal of the cyclotron. The signal-to-background (S/B) ratio of 1.6 obtained with a 1.5 ns TOF window and a 3 MeV-7 MeV energy window was about 3 times higher than that obtained with the same detector module without TOF discrimination and 2 times higher than the S/B ratio obtained with the BGO module. Even 1 mm shifts of the Bragg peak position translated into clear and consistent shifts of the PG profile if TOF discrimination was applied, for a total number of protons as low as about 6.5 × 10(8) and a detector surface of 6.6 cm × 6.6 cm.

  7. Stereotactic Radiosurgery - Gamma Knife

    MedlinePlus

    ... nerve that connects the ear to the brain ( acoustic neuroma ) Pituitary tumors Tumors that are not cancer ( ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Acoustic Neuroma Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy Browse the Encyclopedia ...

  8. SU-E-E-15: Design of a Water Calorimeter for Dual Use in An Integrated MRI-Linac and Gamma-Knife

    SciTech Connect

    Entezari, N; Renaud, J; Ly, D; Sarfehnia, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To design a water calorimeter for dual use in an integrated MRI-linac and Gamma-Knife. In calorimetry, dose to water is measured based on the assumption that energy absorbed in a sensitive volume is completely converted to temperature rise {sub (}ΔΤ{sub )} according to the specific heat capacity of the medium c: D=c*ΔT*k, where k is heat transfer correction factor and compensates for heat gain or loss at point of measurement due to conductive effects. Methods: A commercial finite element method software package was used to model four different water calorimeter designs. The long term (48 h) thermal stability of each design was accurately modeled, and the optimization of the final design was based on evaluation of the standard deviation of k for ten consecutive irradiation runs (lower standard deviation translates to greater thermal stability). Several insulator materials of varying thicknesses were investigated, and a sensitivity study of thermal stability to variations in ambient temperature fluctuations was undertaken. Specifically, we evaluated the effect of possible variations in coolant temperature circulating around the calorimeter tank in several scenarios (constant, slowly increasing, or fluctuating). Results: Due to MRI-compatibility requirements, the calorimeter is to be built entirely out of plastic. Among all insulation materials tested, solid state aerogel-based insulation resulted in least heat loss and thermal stability. The final design is cylindrical on top (to be used upright in MRI-linac) and semi-spherical at bottom (for use in GammaKnife). The range of k was found to be 1.002 ± 0.013 (k = 1), comparable with a k of 1.002 ± 0.014 for typical water calorimeters used in high energy beams. A long term stability of 0.36 µK/hr was evaluated. Conclusion: Optimization of a water calorimeter design for dual use in MRI-linac and Gamma-Knife has been completed and the device is currently in production. Supported by NSERC RGPIN 435608.

  9. A unified optimization platform comparison of three radiosurgery techniques: Gamma Knife, BrainLAB micro-MLC, and NOMOS MIMiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheek, Dennis Allen

    The objective of this research is to build a unified optimization treatment planning system in order to accurately compare the three modalities unburdened by underlying assumptions that could alter the outcome of the comparison. The hypothesis for the dissertation is: Three photon radiosurgery delivery mechanisms are utilized for the delivery of necrotic radiation doses to a cranial lesion: the Gamma Knife, micro-MLC intensity modulated radiosurgery, and MIMiC based intensity modulated radiosurgery. Each modality has its own strength and weaknesses in their ability to deliver radiosurgery treatments. We hypothesize the MIMiC based intensity modulated radiosurgery will allow improvements to radiosurgery treatments compared to the conventional Gamma Knife and micro-MLC, as quantified by the following metrics: isodose line display, dose volume histograms, Ian Paddick conformality index, homogeneity index, and objective function score. The specific aims for the dissertation are: (1) Develop a radiosurgery treatment planning software platform to import image and structure data and to offer evaluation tools. The evaluation tools will include isodose line display, dose volume histogram, Ian Paddick conformality index, homogeneity index, and objective function score. (2) Develop a simulated annealing optimization routine, with an associated objective function, that will determine the optimal treatment plan for the defined solution space. The objective, or cost function will be based on Ian Paddick conformality index. (3) Perform multiple repeat optimizations of each modality for a given lesion in order to gather statistical information about the minimum solution found. This test will quantify the ability of the optimization routine to arrive at a similar local minimum and therefore quantify the reliability of the comparison performed in specific aim five. (4) Investigate the affect of the Gamma Knife's shot limitation on the resulting dose distribution for a given lesion

  10. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for brain metastases from pulmonary large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma: a Japanese multi-institutional cooperative study (JLGK1401).

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Takuya; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Sato, Yasunori; Yomo, Shoji; Kondoh, Takeshi; Nagano, Osamu; Serizawa, Toru; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Okamoto, Hisayo; Akabane, Atsuya; Aita, Kazuyasu; Sato, Manabu; Jokura, Hidefumi; Kawagishi, Jun; Shuto, Takashi; Kawai, Hideya; Moriki, Akihito; Kenai, Hiroyuki; Iwai, Yoshiyasu; Gondo, Masazumi; Hasegawa, Toshinori; Yasuda, Soichiro; Kikuchi, Yasuhiro; Nagatomo, Yasushi; Watanabe, Shinya; Hashimoto, Naoya

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE In 1999, the World Health Organization categorized large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) of the lung as a variant of large cell carcinoma, and LCNEC now accounts for 3% of all lung cancers. Although LCNEC is categorized among the non-small cell lung cancers, its biological behavior has recently been suggested to be very similar to that of a small cell pulmonary malignancy. The clinical outcome for patients with LCNEC is generally poor, and the optimal treatment for this malignancy has not yet been established. Little information is available regarding management of LCNEC patients with brain metastases (METs). This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for patients with brain METs from LCNEC. METHODS The Japanese Leksell Gamma Knife Society planned this retrospective study in which 21 Gamma Knife centers in Japan participated. Data from 101 patients were reviewed for this study. Most of the patients with LCNEC were men (80%), and the mean age was 67 years (range 39-84 years). Primary lung tumors were reported as well controlled in one-third of the patients. More than half of the patients had extracranial METs. Brain metastasis and lung cancer had been detected simultaneously in 25% of the patients. Before GKRS, brain METs had manifested with neurological symptoms in 37 patients. Additionally, prior to GKRS, resection was performed in 17 patients and radiation therapy in 10. A small cell lung carcinoma-based chemotherapy regimen was chosen for 48 patients. The median lesion number was 3 (range 1-33). The median cumulative tumor volume was 3.5 cm(3), and the median radiation dose was 20.0 Gy. For statistical analysis, the standard Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine post-GKRS survival. Competing risk analysis was applied to estimate GKRS cumulative incidences of maintenance of neurological function and death, local recurrence, appearance of new lesions, and complications. RESULTS The overall median survival time

  11. Dosimetric characteristics and quality control tests for the collimator sectors of the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion{sup TM}

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, Jagdish P.; Novotny, Josef Jr.; Saiful Huq, M.

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of each sector of the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (LGK PFX) and to develop tests that can be done for the routine quality assurance checks of the sectors of the LGK PFX. Methods: The following tests were performed to evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of the sectors: (1) Flash-radiation dose for the 16 mm collimator, (2) transit-radiation dose for the 8 and 4 mm collimators, (3) sector leakage within the radiation cavity and, (4) sector output uniformity. In these tests, the Elekta ABS phantom was used. A micropoint ion-chamber Exradin A16 was placed at the center of the phantom for all measurements. Results: With the version 8.0 of the control software of the MCU in the LGK PFX, the average flash-radiation dose per sector for the 16 mm collimator was measured to be 0.423 {+-} 0.003 cGy, and the average transit-radiation dose per sector for the 8 and 4 mm collimators was measured to be 0.169 {+-} 0.0009 and 0.147 {+-} 0.020 cGy, respectively. The calibration dose rate on the day of measurements was 280.8 cGy/min. Here, the authors have introduced a new concept of ''equivalent-time-duration'' (ETD) to represent the time duration, during which the flash-radiation or the transit-radiation dose is delivered. The ETD is a quotient of the measured dose of the flash-radiation or the transit-radiation and the respective calibrated dose rate for the 16, 8, or 4 mm collimator. The ETD constancy is an indicator of the constancy of the sector movements. The average value of ETD per sector was measured to be 724 {+-} 6, 313 {+-} 2, and 311 {+-} 45 ms for the 16, 8, and 4 mm collimators, respectively. During monthly spot checks, the authors have been measuring the total ETD for the flash-radiation when all eight sectors are open with the 16 mm collimator. The average value of the total ETD of the last 40 consecutive months was measured to be 642 {+-} 10 ms. This number is a useful quality

  12. Long-term stability of the Leksell Gamma Knife{sup ®} Perfexion™ patient positioning system (PPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Novotny, J.; Bhatnagar, J. P.; Xu, Y.; Huq, M. S.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the long-term mechanical stability and accuracy of the patient positioning system (PPS) of the Leksell Gamma Knife{sup ®} Perfexion™ (LGK PFX). Methods: The mechanical stability of the PPS of the LGK PFX was evaluated using measurements obtained between September 2007 and June 2011. Three methods were employed to measure the deviation of the coincidence of the radiological focus point (RFP) and the PPS calibration center point (CCP). In the first method, the onsite diode test tool with single diode detector was used together with the 4 mm collimator on a daily basis. In the second method, a service diode test tool with three diode detectors was used biannually at the time of the routine preventive maintenance. The test performed with the service diode test tool measured the deviations for all three collimators 4, 8, and 16 mm and also for three different positions of the PPS. The third method employed the conventional film pin-prick method. This test was performed annually for the 4 mm collimator at the time of the routine annual QA. To estimate the effect of the patient weight on the performance of the PPS, the focus precision tests were also conducted with varying weights on the PPS using a set of lead bricks. Results: The average deviations measured from the 641 daily focus precision tests were 0.1 ± 0.1, 0.0 ± 0.0, and 0.0 ± 0.0 mm, respectively, for the 4 mm collimator in the X (left/right of the patient), Y (anterior/posterior of the patient), and Z (superior/inferior of the patient) directions. The average of the total radial deviations as measured during ten semiannual measurements with the service diode test tool were 0.070 ± 0.029, 0.060 ± 0.022, and 0.103 ± 0.028 mm, respectively for the central, long, and short diodes for the 4 mm collimator. Similarly, the average total radial deviations measured during the semiannual measurements for the 4, 8, and 16 mm collimators and using the central diode were 0.070 ± 0.029, 0.097 ± 0

  13. Radiosurgery in the management of brain metastasis: a retrospective single-center study comparing Gamma Knife and LINAC treatment.

    PubMed

    Tuleasca, Constantin; Negretti, Laura; Faouzi, Mohamed; Magaddino, Vera; Gevaert, Thierry; von Elm, Erik; Levivier, Marc

    2017-03-24

    OBJECTIVE The authors present a retrospective analysis of a single-center experience with treatment of brain metastases using Gamma Knife (GK) and linear accelerator (LINAC)-based radiosurgery and compare the results. METHODS From July 2010 to July 2012, 63 patients with brain metastases were treated with radiosurgery. Among them, 28 (with 83 lesions) were treated with a GK unit and 35 (with 47 lesions) with a LINAC. The primary outcome was local progression-free survival (LPFS), evaluated on a per-lesion basis. The secondary outcome was overall survival (OS), evaluated per patient. Statistical analysis included standard tests and Cox regression with shared-frailty models to account for the within-patient correlation. RESULTS The mean follow-up period was 11.7 months (median 7.9 months, range 1.7-32 months) for GK and 18.1 months (median 17 months, range 7.5-28.7 months) for LINAC. The median number of lesions per patient was 2.5 (range 1-9) in the GK group and 1 (range 1-3) in the LINAC group (p < 0.01, 2-sample t-test). There were more radioresistant lesions (e.g., melanoma) and more lesions located in functional areas in the GK group. Additional technical reasons for choosing GK instead of LINAC were limitations of LINAC movements, especially if lesions were located in the lower posterior fossa or multiple lesions were close to highly functional areas (e.g., the brainstem), precluding optimal dosimetry with LINAC. The median marginal dose was 24 Gy with GK and 20 Gy with LINAC (p < 0.01, 2-sample t-test). For GK, the actuarial LPFS rate at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 17 months was 96.96%, 96.96%, 96.96%, 88.1%, and 81.5%, remaining stable until 32 months. For LINAC the rate at 3, 6, 12, 17, 24, and 33 months was 91.5%, 91.5%, 91.5%, 79.9%, 55.5%, and 17.1% (log-rank p = 0.03). In the Cox regression with shared-frailty model, the risk of local progression in the LINAC group was almost twice that of the GK group (HR 1.92, p > 0.05). The mean OS was 16.0 months (95% CI 11

  14. The impact of cobalt-60 source age on biologically effective dose in high-dose functional Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Kann, Benjamin H; Yu, James B; Stahl, John M; Bond, James E; Loiselle, Christopher; Chiang, Veronica L; Bindra, Ranjit S; Gerrard, Jason L; Carlson, David J

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Functional Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) procedures have been increasingly used for treating patients with tremor, trigeminal neuralgia (TN), and refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder. Although its rates of toxicity are low, GKRS has been associated with some, if low, risks for serious sequelae, including hemiparesis and even death. Anecdotal reports have suggested that even with a standardized prescription dose, rates of functional GKRS toxicity increase after replacement of an old cobalt-60 source with a new source. Dose rate changes over the course of the useful lifespan of cobalt-60 are not routinely considered in the study of patients treated with functional GKRS, but these changes may be associated with significant variation in the biologically effective dose (BED) delivered to neural tissue. METHODS The authors constructed a linear-quadratic model of BED in functional GKRS with a dose-protraction factor to correct for intrafraction DNA-damage repair and used standard single-fraction doses for trigeminal nerve ablation for TN (85 Gy), thalamotomy for tremor (130 Gy), and capsulotomy for obsessive-compulsive disorder (180 Gy). Dose rate and treatment time for functional GKRS involving 4-mm collimators were derived from calibrations in the authors' department and from the cobalt-60 decay rate. Biologically plausible values for the ratio for radiosensitivity to fraction size (α/β) and double-strand break (DSB) DNA repair halftimes (τ) were estimated from published experimental data. The biphasic characteristics of DSB repair in normal tissue were accounted for in deriving an effective τ1 halftime (fast repair) and τ2 halftime (slow repair). A sensitivity analysis was performed with a range of plausible parameter values. RESULTS After replacement of the cobalt-60 source, the functional GKRS dose rate rose from 1.48 to 2.99 Gy/min, treatment time fell, and estimated BED increased. Assuming the most biologically plausible parameters, source

  15. Unintended attenuation in the Leksell Gamma Knife registered Perfexion trade mark sign calibration-phantom adaptor and its effect on dose calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, Jagdish P.; Novotny, Josef Jr.; Quader, Mubina A.; Bednarz, Greg; Huq, M. Saiful

    2009-04-15

    The calibration of Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (LGK PFX) is performed using a spherical polystyrene phantom 160 mm in diameter, which is provided by the manufacturer. This is the same phantom that has been used with LGK models U, B, C, and 4C. The polystyrene phantom is held in irradiation position by an aluminum adaptor, which has stainless steel side-fixation screws. The phantom adaptor partially attenuates the beams from sectors 3 and 7 by 3.2% and 4.6%, respectively. This unintended attenuation introduces a systematic error in dose calibration. The overall effect of phantom-adaptor attenuation on output calibration of the LGK PFX unit is to underestimate output by about 1.0%.

  16. Feasibility of a wireless gamma probe in radioguided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye Min; Joo, Koan Sik

    2016-06-01

    Radioguided surgery through the use of a gamma probe is an established practice, and has been widely applied in the case of sentinel lymph node biopsies. A wide range of intraoperative gamma probes is commercially available. The primary characteristics of the gamma probes include their sensitivity, spatial resolution, and energy resolution. We present the results obtained from a prototype of a new wireless gamma probe. This prototype is composed of a 20 mm thick cerium-doped gadolinium aluminum gallium garnet (Ce:GAGG) inorganic scintillation crystal from Furukawa Denshi and a Hamamatsu S12572-100C multi-pixel photon counter equipped with a designed electronics. The measured performance characteristics include the energy resolution, energy linearity, angular aperture, spatial resolution and sensitivity. Measurements were carried out using 57Co, 133Ba, 22Na, and 137Cs sources. The energy resolutions for 0.122 and 0.511 MeV were 17.2% and 6.9%, respectively. The designed prototype consumes an energy of approximately 4.4 W, weighs about 310 g (including battery) having a dimension of 20 mm (D)  ×  130 mm (L).

  17. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations in children/adolescents and adults. Part II: Differences in obliteration rates, treatment-obliteration intervals, and prognostic factors

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolato, Antonio . E-mail: antonio.nicolato@mail.azosp.vr.it; Lupidi, Francesco; Sandri, Marco F. Dr. Econom.; Foroni, Roberto; Zampieri, Piergiuseppe; Mazza, Carlo; Pasqualin, Alberto; Beltramello, Alberto; Gerosa, Massimo

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare obliteration rates (OBRs) and treatment-obliteration intervals (TOIs) for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (cAVMs) treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery in children/adolescents and adults; and to determine factors predicting the OBR and TOI in these two populations. Methods and Materials: This study concerned 62 children/adolescents and 193 adults observed for {>=}3 years. Fisher exact two-tailed and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests, multiple logistics, and Cox proportional hazard models were used for statistical analysis. Results: The overall OBR was 85.5% in children/adolescents and 87.6% in adults (p 0.671), but children/adolescents showed higher 36-month actuarial OBRs (69.35%) and shorter median TOIs (25.7 months) than adults (66.84% and 28.2 months; p 0.006 and p = 0.017, respectively). In children/adolescents, lower Spetzler-Martin grades (p = 0.043) and younger age (p = 0.019) correlated significantly with OBRs, and lower Spetzler-Martin grades (p 0.024) and noneloquent cAVM locations (p = 0.046) with TOIs. In adults, low flow through the cAVM and <6.2-cm{sup 3} volume were associated with both OBR and TOI (p 0.012 and p = 0.002, respectively). Conclusions: The differences in OBRs within 3 years and TOIs, although slight, seem to show that pediatric cAVMs behave differently from those in adults after Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

  18. Time-resolved imaging of prompt-gamma rays for proton range verification using a knife-edge slit camera based on digital photon counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambraia Lopes, Patricia; Clementel, Enrico; Crespo, Paulo; Henrotin, Sebastien; Huizenga, Jan; Janssens, Guillaume; Parodi, Katia; Prieels, Damien; Roellinghoff, Frauke; Smeets, Julien; Stichelbaut, Frederic; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2015-08-01

    Proton range monitoring may facilitate online adaptive proton therapy and improve treatment outcomes. Imaging of proton-induced prompt gamma (PG) rays using a knife-edge slit collimator is currently under investigation as a potential tool for real-time proton range monitoring. A major challenge in collimated PG imaging is the suppression of neutron-induced background counts. In this work, we present an initial performance test of two knife-edge slit camera prototypes based on arrays of digital photon counters (DPCs). PG profiles emitted from a PMMA target upon irradiation with a 160 MeV proton pencil beams (about 6.5   ×   109 protons delivered in total) were measured using detector modules equipped with four DPC arrays coupled to BGO or LYSO : Ce crystal matrices. The knife-edge slit collimator and detector module were placed at 15 cm and 30 cm from the beam axis, respectively, in all cases. The use of LYSO : Ce enabled time-of-flight (TOF) rejection of background events, by synchronizing the DPC readout electronics with the 106 MHz radiofrequency signal of the cyclotron. The signal-to-background (S/B) ratio of 1.6 obtained with a 1.5 ns TOF window and a 3 MeV-7 MeV energy window was about 3 times higher than that obtained with the same detector module without TOF discrimination and 2 times higher than the S/B ratio obtained with the BGO module. Even 1 mm shifts of the Bragg peak position translated into clear and consistent shifts of the PG profile if TOF discrimination was applied, for a total number of protons as low as about 6.5   ×   108 and a detector surface of 6.6 cm  ×  6.6 cm.

  19. SU-E-T-213: Comparison of Treatment Efficiency of Gamma Knife SRS Plans for Brain Metastases with Different Planning Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Y; Huang, Z; Lo, S; Mayr, N; Yuh, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To improve Gamma Knife SRS treatment efficiency for brain metastases and compare the differences of treatment time and radiobiological effects between two different planning methods of automatic filling and manual placement of shots with inverse planning. Methods: T1-weighted MRI images with gadolinium contrast from five patients with a single brain metastatic-lesion were used in this retrospective study. Among them, two were from primary breast cancer, two from primary melanoma cancer and one from primary prostate cancer. For each patient, two plans were generated in Leksell GammaPlan10.1.1 for radiosurgical treatment with a Leksell GammaKnife Perfexion machine: one with automatic filling, automatic sector configuration and inverse optimization (Method1); and the other with manual placement of shots, manual setup of collimator sizes, manual setup of sector blocking and inverse optimization (Method2). Dosimetric quality of the plans was evaluated with parameters of Coverage, Selectivity, Gradient-Index and DVH. Beam-on Time, Number-of-Shots and Tumor Control Probability(TCP) were compared for the two plans while keeping their dosimetric quality very similar. Relative reduction of Beam-on Time and Number-of-Shots were calculated as the ratios among the two plans and used for quantitative analysis. Results: With very similar dosimetric and radiobiological plan quality, plans created with Method 2 had significantly reduced treatment time. Relative reduction of Beam-on Time ranged from 20% to 51 % (median:29%,p=0.001), and reduction of Number-of-Shots ranged from 5% to 67% (median:40%,p=0.0002), respectively. Time of plan creation for Method1 and Method2 was similar, approximately 20 minutes, excluding the time for tumor delineation. TCP calculated for the tumors from differential DVHs did not show significant difference between the two plans (p=0.35). Conclusion: The method of manual setup combined with inverse optimization in LGP for treatment of brain

  20. Simulational study of a dosimetric comparison between a Gamma Knife treatment plan and an intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan for skull base tumors.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Mori, Yoshimasa; Komori, Masataka; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Hashizume, Chisa; Uchiyama, Yukio; Hagiwara, Masahiro

    2014-05-01

    Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is performed with a linear accelerator-based system such as Novalis. Recently, Gamma Knife Perfexion (PFX) featured the Extend system with relocatable fixation devices available for SRT. In this study, the dosimetric results of these two modalities were compared from the viewpoint of conformity, heterogeneity and gradient in target covering. A total of 14 patients with skull base tumors were treated with Novalis intensity-modulated (IM)-SRT. Treatment was planned on an iPlan workstation. Five- to seven-beam IM-SRT was performed in 14-18 fractions with a fraction dose of 2.5 or 3 Gy. With these patients' data, additional treatment planning was simulated using a GammaPlan workstation for PFX-SRT. Reference CT images with planning structure contour sets on iPlan, including the planning target volume (PTV, 1.1-102.2 ml) and organs at risk, were exported to GammaPlan in DICOM-RT format. Dosimetric results for Novalis IM-SRT and PFX-SRT were evaluated in the same prescription doses. The isocenter number of PFX was between 12 and 50 at the isodose contour of 50-60%. The PTV coverage was 95-99% for Novalis and 94-98% for PFX. The conformity index (CI) was 1.11-1.61 and 1.04-1.15, the homogeneity index (HI) was 1.1-3.62 and 2.3-3.25, and the gradient index (GI) was 3.72-7.97 and 2.54-3.39 for Novalis and PFX, respectively. PTV coverage by Novalis and PFX was almost equivalent. PFX was superior in CI and GI, and Novalis was better in HI. Better conformality would be achieved by PFX, when the homogeneity inside tumors is less important.

  1. Simulational study of a dosimetric comparison between a Gamma Knife treatment plan and an intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan for skull base tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Mori, Yoshimasa; Komori, Masataka; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Hashizume, Chisa; Uchiyama, Yukio; Hagiwara, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is performed with a linear accelerator-based system such as Novalis. Recently, Gamma Knife Perfexion (PFX) featured the Extend system with relocatable fixation devices available for SRT. In this study, the dosimetric results of these two modalities were compared from the viewpoint of conformity, heterogeneity and gradient in target covering. A total of 14 patients with skull base tumors were treated with Novalis intensity-modulated (IM)-SRT. Treatment was planned on an iPlan workstation. Five- to seven-beam IM-SRT was performed in 14–18 fractions with a fraction dose of 2.5 or 3 Gy. With these patients' data, additional treatment planning was simulated using a GammaPlan workstation for PFX-SRT. Reference CT images with planning structure contour sets on iPlan, including the planning target volume (PTV, 1.1–102.2 ml) and organs at risk, were exported to GammaPlan in DICOM-RT format. Dosimetric results for Novalis IM-SRT and PFX-SRT were evaluated in the same prescription doses. The isocenter number of PFX was between 12 and 50 at the isodose contour of 50–60%. The PTV coverage was 95–99% for Novalis and 94–98% for PFX. The conformity index (CI) was 1.11–1.61 and 1.04–1.15, the homogeneity index (HI) was 1.1–3.62 and 2.3–3.25, and the gradient index (GI) was 3.72–7.97 and 2.54–3.39 for Novalis and PFX, respectively. PTV coverage by Novalis and PFX was almost equivalent. PFX was superior in CI and GI, and Novalis was better in HI. Better conformality would be achieved by PFX, when the homogeneity inside tumors is less important. PMID:24351459

  2. Results of volume-staged fractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery for large complex arteriovenous malformations: obliteration rates and clinical outcomes of an evolving treatment paradigm.

    PubMed

    Franzin, Alberto; Panni, Pietro; Spatola, Giorgio; Vecchio, Antonella Del; Gallotti, Alberto L; Gigliotti, Carmen R; Cavalli, Andrea; Donofrio, Carmine A; Mortini, Pietro

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE There are few reported series regarding volume-staged Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for the treatment of large, complex, cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The object of this study was to report the results of using volume-staged Gamma Knife radiosurgery for patients affected by large and complex AVMs. METHODS Data from 20 patients with large AVMs were prospectively included in the authors' AVM database between 2004 and 2012. A staging strategy was used when treating lesion volumes larger than 10 cm(3). Hemorrhage and seizures were the presenting clinical feature for 6 (30%) and 8 (40%) patients, respectively. The median AVM volume was 15.9 cm(3) (range 10.1-34.3 cm(3)). The mean interval between stages (± standard deviation) was 15 months (± 9 months). The median margin dose for each stage was 20 Gy (range 18-25 Gy). RESULTS Obliteration was confirmed in 8 (42%) patients after a mean follow-up of 45 months (range 19-87 months). A significant reduction (> 75%) of the original nidal volume was achieved in 4 (20%) patients. Engel Class I-II seizure status was reported by 75% of patients presenting with seizures (50% Engel Class I and 25% Engel Class II) after radiosurgery. After radiosurgery, 71.5% (5/7) of patients who had presented with a worsening neurological deficit reported a complete resolution or amelioration. None of the patients who presented acutely because of hemorrhage experienced a new bleeding episode during follow-up. One (5%) patient developed radionecrosis that caused sensorimotor hemisyndrome. Two (10%) patients sustained a bleeding episode after GKRS, although only 1 (5%) was symptomatic. High nidal flow rate and a time interval between stages of less than 11.7 months were factors significantly associated with AVM obliteration (p = 0.021 and p = 0.041, respectively). Patient age younger than 44 years was significantly associated with a greater than 75% reduction in AVM volume but not with AVM obliteration (p = 0

  3. Towards clinical application: prompt gamma imaging of passively scattered proton fields with a knife-edge slit camera.

    PubMed

    Priegnitz, M; Barczyk, S; Nenoff, L; Golnik, C; Keitz, I; Werner, T; Mein, S; Smeets, J; Vander Stappen, F; Janssens, G; Hotoiu, L; Fiedler, F; Prieels, D; Enghardt, W; Pausch, G; Richter, C

    2016-11-21

    Prompt γ-ray imaging with a knife-edge shaped slit camera provides the possibility of verifying proton beam range in tumor therapy. Dedicated experiments regarding the characterization of the camera system have been performed previously. Now, we aim at implementing the prototype into clinical application of monitoring patient treatments. Focused on this goal of translation into clinical operation, we systematically addressed remaining challenges and questions. We developed a robust energy calibration routine and corresponding quality assurance protocols. Furthermore, with dedicated experiments, we determined the positioning precision of the system to 1.1 mm (2σ). For the first time, we demonstrated the application of the slit camera, which was intentionally developed for pencil beam scanning, to double scattered proton beams. Systematic experiments with increasing complexity were performed. It was possible to visualize proton range shifts of 2-5 mm with the camera system in phantom experiments in passive scattered fields. Moreover, prompt γ-ray profiles for single iso-energy layers were acquired by synchronizing time resolved measurements to the rotation of the range modulator wheel of the treatment system. Thus, a mapping of the acquired profiles to different anatomical regions along the beam path is feasible and additional information on the source of potential range shifts can be obtained. With the work presented here, we show that an application of the slit camera in clinical treatments is possible and of potential benefit.

  4. Towards clinical application: prompt gamma imaging of passively scattered proton fields with a knife-edge slit camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priegnitz, M.; Barczyk, S.; Nenoff, L.; Golnik, C.; Keitz, I.; Werner, T.; Mein, S.; Smeets, J.; Vander Stappen, F.; Janssens, G.; Hotoiu, L.; Fiedler, F.; Prieels, D.; Enghardt, W.; Pausch, G.; Richter, C.

    2016-11-01

    Prompt γ-ray imaging with a knife-edge shaped slit camera provides the possibility of verifying proton beam range in tumor therapy. Dedicated experiments regarding the characterization of the camera system have been performed previously. Now, we aim at implementing the prototype into clinical application of monitoring patient treatments. Focused on this goal of translation into clinical operation, we systematically addressed remaining challenges and questions. We developed a robust energy calibration routine and corresponding quality assurance protocols. Furthermore, with dedicated experiments, we determined the positioning precision of the system to 1.1 mm (2σ). For the first time, we demonstrated the application of the slit camera, which was intentionally developed for pencil beam scanning, to double scattered proton beams. Systematic experiments with increasing complexity were performed. It was possible to visualize proton range shifts of 2-5 mm with the camera system in phantom experiments in passive scattered fields. Moreover, prompt γ-ray profiles for single iso-energy layers were acquired by synchronizing time resolved measurements to the rotation of the range modulator wheel of the treatment system. Thus, a mapping of the acquired profiles to different anatomical regions along the beam path is feasible and additional information on the source of potential range shifts can be obtained. With the work presented here, we show that an application of the slit camera in clinical treatments is possible and of potential benefit.

  5. Equivalence of cell survival data for radiation dose and thermal dose in ablative treatments: analysis applied to essential tremor thalamotomy by focused ultrasound and gamma knife.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, D; Lee, M; Ter Haar, G; Sela, B; Eames, M; Snell, J; Kassell, N; Sheehan, J; Larner, J M; Aubry, J-F

    2017-01-31

    Thermal dose and absorbed radiation dose have historically been difficult to compare because different biological mechanisms are at work. Thermal dose denatures proteins and the radiation dose causes DNA damage in order to achieve ablation. The purpose of this paper is to use the proportion of cell survival as a potential common unit by which to measure the biological effect of each procedure. Survival curves for both thermal and radiation doses have been extracted from previously published data for three different cell types. Fits of these curves were used to convert both thermal and radiation dose into the same quantified biological effect: fraction of surviving cells. They have also been used to generate and compare survival profiles from the only indication for which clinical data are available for both focused ultrasound (FUS) thermal ablation and radiation ablation: essential tremor thalamotomy. All cell types could be fitted with coefficients of determination greater than 0.992. As an illustration, survival profiles of clinical thalamotomies performed by radiosurgery and FUS are plotted on a same graph for the same metric: fraction of surviving cells. FUS and Gamma Knife have the potential to be used in combination to deliver a more effective treatment (for example, FUS may be used to debulk the main tumour mass, and radiation to treat the surrounding tumour bed). In this case, a model which compares thermal and radiation treatments is valuable in order to adjust the dose between the two.

  6. Assessment of radiochromic gel dosimeter based on Turnbull Blue dye for relative output factor measurements of the Leksell Gamma Knife® PerfexionTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozubikova, P.; Solc, J.; Novotny, J., Jr.; Pilarova, K.; Pipek, J.; Koncekova, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to perform assessment of radiochromic gel dosimeter based on Turnbull blue dye formed by irradiation (TB gel dosimeter) for measurement of ROFs for 4 mm and 8 mm collimators for the Leksell Gamma Knife PerfexionTM. All measurements have been carried out using home-made spherical Perspex glass phantom of diameter 160 mm. TB gel dosimeters were scanned using homemade optical CT scanner. The results are compared with vendor recommended Monte Carlo calculated ROFs values of 0.814 and 0.900 for 4 mm and 8 mm collimators, respectively. The comparisons between the gel measurements and the treatment planning system (TPS) calculation are presented in the form of 2D isodoses for the central slices and 1D profile. Measured ROF 0.746 and 0.874 for 4 mm and 8 mm collimators respectively are in a reasonable agreement with vendor recommended values and measured relative dose distribution in a central slice and measured profiles of all shots show excellent correspondence with TPS.

  7. Pros, cons, and current indications of open craniotomy versus gamma knife in the treatment of arteriovenous malformations and the role of endovascular embolization.

    PubMed

    Surdell, Daniel L; Bhattacharjee, Sumon; Loftus, Christopher M

    2002-06-01

    The successful treatment of an intracranial arteriovenous malformation poses both technical and conceptual problems to the neurosurgeon. Treatment decisions are made in light of current understanding of the natural history of these lesions. It is important to understand the pros, cons and current indication of open craniotomy vs. gamma knife in the treatment of arteriovenous malformations and the role of endovascular embolization. Surgical removal of an arteriovenous malformation is indicated when the operative risk is less than the morbidity and mortality associated with its natural history. The treatment goal of complete angiographic obliteration of arteriovenous malformations is achieved most effectively by microneurosurgery in low-grade lesions. Large lesions frequently require a combination of embolization and microsurgery. Although recent advances in technology and medical management have allowed previously inoperable arteriovenous malformations to be surgically excised, there is still a small group of arteriovenous malformations that cannot be excised safely due to their size and location. Stereotactic radiosurgery is clearly an important adjunct in the multimodality treatment approach for large arteriovenous malformations. Endovascular embolization can potentially increase safety and efficacy in the treatment of arteriovenous malformations when applied to selective cases with well-defined treatment goals.

  8. Surgery for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of watery brown discharge for a few weeks. Laser surgery A focused laser beam, directed through the vagina, is used to ... cervix. This is done using a surgical or laser knife (cold knife cone biopsy) or using a ...

  9. Peripheral doses in CyberKnife radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, Paula L.; Chuang, Cynthia F.; Smith, Vernon; Larson, David A.

    2006-06-15

    The purpose of this work is to measure the dose outside the treatment field for conformal CyberKnife treatments, to compare the results to those obtained for similar treatments delivered with gamma knife or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and to investigate the sources of peripheral dose in CyberKnife radiosurgery. CyberKnife treatment plans were developed for two hypothetical lesions in an anthropomorphic phantom, one in the thorax and another in the brain, and measurements were made with LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100 capsules) placed within the phantom at various depths and distances from the irradiated volume. For the brain lesion, gamma knife and 6-MV IMRT treatment plans were also developed, and peripheral doses were measured at the same locations as for the CyberKnife plan. The relative contribution to the CyberKnife peripheral dose from inferior- or superior-oblique beams entering or exiting through the body, internally scattered radiation, and leakage radiation was assessed through additional experiments using the single-isocenter option of the CyberKnife treatment-planning program with different size collimators. CyberKnife peripheral doses (in cGy) ranged from 0.16 to 0.041 % ({+-}0.003%) of the delivered number of monitor units (MU) at distances between 18 and 71 cm from the field edge. These values are two to five times larger than those measured for the comparable gamma knife brain treatment, and up to a factor of four times larger those measured in the IMRT experiment. Our results indicate that the CyberKnife peripheral dose is due largely to leakage radiation, however at distances less than 40 cm from the field edge, entrance, or exit dose from inferior- or superior-oblique beams can also contribute significantly. For distances larger than 40 cm from the field edge, the CyberKnife peripheral dose is directly related to the number of MU delivered, since leakage radiation is the dominant component.

  10. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for treatment of growing vestibular schwannomas in patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2: a matched cohort study with sporadic vestibular schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Kruyt, Ivo J; Verheul, Jeroen B; Hanssens, Patrick E J; Kunst, Henricus P M

    2017-01-27

    OBJECTIVE Neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) is a tumor syndrome characterized by an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. The hallmark of NF2 is the development of bilateral vestibular schwannomas (VSs), generally by 30 years of age. One of the first-line treatment options for small to medium-large VSs is radiosurgery. Although radiosurgery shows excellent results in sporadic VS, its use in NF2-related VS is still a topic of dispute. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term tumor control, hearing preservation rates, and factors influencing outcome of optimally dosed, contemporary Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for growing VSs in patients with NF2 and compare the findings to data obtained in patients with sporadic VS also treated by means of GKRS. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective analysis of 47 growing VSs in 34 NF2 patients who underwent GKRS treatment performed with either the Model C or Perfexion Leksell Gamma Knife, with a median margin dose of 11 Gy. Actuarial tumor control rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. For patient- and treatment-related factors, a Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify predictors of outcome. Trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerve function were assessed before and after treatment. NF2-related VS patients were matched 1:1 with sporadic VS patients who were treated in the same institute, and the same indications for treatment, definitions, and dosimetry were used in order to compare outcomes. RESULTS Actuarial tumor control rates in NF2 patients after 1, 3, 5, and 8 years were 98%, 89%, 87%, and 87%, respectively. Phenotype and tumor volume had significant hazard rates of 0.086 and 22.99, respectively, showing that Feiling-Gardner phenotype and a tumor volume not exceeding 6 cm(3) both were associated with significantly better outcome. Actuarial rates of serviceable hearing preservation after 1, 3, 5, and 7 years were 95%, 82%, 59%, and 33%, respectively. None of the patients

  11. Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery as Salvage Therapy After Failure of Whole-Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Sunit; Chan, Michael D.; Lovato, James F.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Munley, Michael T.; Guzman, Allan F. de; Shaw, Edward G.; Urbanic, James J.; McMullen, Kevin P.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Radiosurgery has been successfully used in selected cases to avoid repeat whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in patients with multiple brain metastases of most solid tumor histological findings. Few data are available for the use of radiosurgery for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Methods and Materials: Between November 1999 and June 2009, 51 patients with SCLC and previous WBI and new brain metastases were treated with GammaKnife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). A median dose of 18 Gy (range, 10-24 Gy) was prescribed to the margin of each metastasis. Patients were followed with serial imaging. Patient electronic records were reviewed to determine disease-related factors and clinical outcomes after GKSRS. Local and distant brain failure rates, overall survival, and likelihood of neurologic death were determined based on imaging results. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine survival and local and distant brain control. Cox proportional hazard regression was performed to determine strength of association between disease-related factors and survival. Results: Median survival time for the entire cohort was 5.9 months. Local control rates at 1 and 2 years were 57% and 34%, respectively. Distant brain failure rates at 1 and 2 years were 58% and 75%, respectively. Fifty-three percent of patients ultimately died of neurologic death. On multivariate analysis, patients with stable (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.89) or progressive (HR = 6.98) extracranial disease (ECD) had worse overall survival than patients without evidence of ECD (p = 0.00002). Concurrent chemotherapy improved local control (HR = 89; p = 0.006). Conclusions: GKSRS represents a feasible salvage option in patients with SCLC and brain metastases for whom previous WBI has failed. The status of patients' ECD is a dominant factor predictive of overall survival. Local control may be inferior to that seen with other cancer histological results, although the use of concurrent chemotherapy may help to improve

  12. SU-E-T-366: Estimation of Whole Body Dose From Cranial Irradiation From C and Perfexion Series Gamma Knife Units

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S; Andersen, A; Lulu, B; Das, I; Cheng, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The Leksell Gamma Knife (GK) B & C series contains 201 Cobalt-60 sources with a helmet. The new model, Perfexion uses 192 Cobalt-60 sources without a helmet; using IRIS system for collimation and stereotactic guidance to deliver SRS to brain tumors. Relative dose to extracranial organs at risk (OARs) is measured in phantom in this study for Perfexion and C-series GK. Materials & Methods: Measurements were performed in a Rando anthropomorphic phantom on both systems using a large ion chamber (Keithley-175) for each collimator. The Keithley-175 cc ion chamber was sandwiched between phantom slices at various locations in the phantom to correspond to different extracranial OARs (thyroid, heart, kidney, ovary and testis, etc.) The dose measurement was repeated with OSL detectors for each position and collimator. Results: A large variation is observed in the normalized dose between these two systems. The dose beyond the housing falls off exponentially for Perfexion. Dose beyond the C-series GK housing falls off exponentially from 0–20cm then remains relatively constant from 20–40cm and again falls off with distance but less rapidly. The variation of extracranial dose with distance for each collimator is found to be parallel to each other for both systems. Conclusion: Whole body dose is found to vary significantly between these systems. It is important to measure the extracranial dose, especially for young patients. It is estimated that dose falls off exponentially from the GK housing and is about 1% for large collimators at 75 cm. The dose is two-orders of magnitude smaller for the 4mm collimator. However, this small dose for patient may be significant radiologically.

  13. Differential dose volume histograms of Gamma Knife in the presence of inhomogeneities using MRI-polymer gel dosimetry and MC simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Allahverdi Pourfallah, Tayyeb; Allahverdi, Mahmoud; Riahi Alam, Nader; Ay, Mohammad-Reza; Zahmatkesh, Mohammad-Hasan

    2009-07-15

    Polymer gel dosimeters offer a practical solution to 3D dose verification for conventional radiotherapy as well as intensity-modulated and stereotactic radiotherapy. In this study, EGSnrc calculated and PAGAT polymer gel dosimeter measured dose volume histograms (DVHs) for single-shot irradiations of the Gamma Knife (GK) unit were used to investigate the effects of the presence of inhomogeneities on 3D dose distribution. The head phantom was a custom-built 16 cm diameter Plexiglas sphere. Inside the phantom, there is a cubic cutout for inserting the gel vials and another cutout for inserting the inhomogeneities. Following irradiation with the GK unit, the polymer gel phantoms were scanned with a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Comparing the results of measurement in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms revealed that inserting inhomogeneities inside the homogeneous phantom did not cause considerable disturbances on dose distribution in irradiation with 8 mm collimator within low isodose levels (<50%), which is essential for the dose sparing of sensitive structures. The results of simulation for homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms in irradiation with 18 mm collimator of the GK unit showed 23.24% difference in DVH within 90%-100% relative isodose level and also revealed that a significant part of the target (28.56%) received relative doses higher than the maximum dose, which exceeds the acceptance criterion (5%). Based on these results it is concluded that the presence of inhomogeneities inside the phantom can cause considerable errors in dose calculation within high isodose levels with respect to LGP prediction which assumes that the target is a homogeneous material. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the applied MC code is an accurate and stand-alone tool for 3D evaluation of dose distribution in irradiation with the GK unit, which can provide important, 3D plan evaluation criteria used in clinical practice.

  14. SU-E-T-14: A Comparative Study Between Forward and Inverse Planning in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuroma Tumours

    SciTech Connect

    Gopishankar, N; Agarwal, Priyanka; Bisht, Raj Kishor; Kale, S S; Rath, G K; Chander, S; Sharma, B S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate forward and inverse planning methods for acoustic neuroma cases treated in Gamma Knife Perfexion. Methods: Five patients with acoustic neuroma tumour abutting brainstem were planned twice in LGP TPS (Version 10.1) using TMR10 algorithm. First plan was entirely based on forward planning (FP) in which each shot was chosen manually. Second plan was generated using inverse planning (IP) for which planning parameters like coverage, selectivity, gradient index (GI) and beam-on time threshold were set. Number of shots in IP was automatically selected by objective function using iterative process. In both planning methods MRI MPRAGE sequence images were used for tumour localization and planning. A planning dose of 12Gy at 50% isodose level was chosen. Results and Discussion: Number of shots used in FP was greater than IP and beam-on time in FP was in average 1.4 times more than IP. One advantage of FP was that the brainstem volume subjected to 6Gy dose (25% isodose) was less in FP than IP. Our results showed use of more number of shots as in FP results in GI less than or equal to 2.55 which is close to its lower limit. Dose homogeneity index (DHI) analysis of FP and IP showed average values of 0.59 and 0.67 respectively. General trend in GK for planning in acoustic neuroma cases is to use small collimator shots to avoid dose to adjacent critical structures. More number of shots and prolonged treatment time causes inconvenience to the patients. Similarly overuse of automatic shot shaping as in IP results in increased scatter dose. A compromise is required in shot selection for these cases. Conclusion: IP method could be used in acoustic neuroma cases to decrease treatment time provided the source sector openings near brainstem are shielded or adjusted appropriately to reduce brainstem dose.

  15. Utilization of Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Angiography in Planning for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery of Arteriovenous Malformations: A Case Series and Early Report

    PubMed Central

    Safain, Mina G.; Rahal, Jason P.; Raval, Ami; Rivard, Mark J.; Mignano, John; Wu, Julian; Malek, Adel M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKR) for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) is predicated on inclusion of the entire nidus while excluding normal tissue. As such, GKR may be limited by the resolution and accuracy of the imaging modality used in targeting. Objective We present the first case series to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing ultra-high-resolution C-arm cone beam computed tomography angiography (CBCT-A) in AVM targeting. Methods From June 2009 to June 2013, CBCT-A was utilized for targeting of all patients with AVMs treated with GKR at our institution. Patients underwent Leksell stereotactic head frame placement followed by catheter-based biplane 2-D digital subtraction angiography (DSA), 3-D rotational angiography (3DRA), as well as CBCT-A. The CBCT-A dataset was used for stereotactic planning for GKR. Patients were followed up at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months, and then annually thereafter. Results CBCT-A-based targeting was used in twenty-two consecutive patients. CBCT-A provided detailed spatial resolution and sensitivity of nidal angioarchitecture enabling treatment. The average radiation dose to the margin of the AVM nidus corresponding to the 50% percent isodose line was 15.6 Gy. No patient had treatment-associated hemorrhage. At early follow-up (mean=16 months), 84% of patients had a decreasing or obliterated AVM nidus. Conclusion CBCT-A-guided radiosurgery is feasible and useful because it provides sufficient detailed resolution and sensitivity for imaging brain AVMs. PMID:24584136

  16. Three-dimensional assessment of the effects of high-density embolization material on the absorbed dose in the target for Gamma Knife radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yoichi; Sandhu, Divyajot; Warmington, Leighton; Moen, Sean; Tummala, Ramachandra

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an intracranial vascular disorder. Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) is used in conjunction with intraarterial embolization to eradicate the nidus of AVMs. Clinical results indicate that patients with prior embolization tend to gain less benefit from GKRS. The authors hypothesized that this was partly caused by dosimetric deficiency. The actual dose delivered to the target may be smaller than the intended dose because of increased photon attenuation by high-density embolic materials. The authors performed a phantom-based study to quantitatively evaluate the 3D dosimetric effect of embolic material on GKRS. METHODS A 16-cm-diameter and 12-cm-long cylindrical phantom with a 16-cm-diameter hemispherical dome was printed by a 3D printer. The phantom was filled with radiologically tissue-equivalent polymer gel. To simulate AVM treatment with embolization, phantoms contained Onyx 18. The material was injected into an AVM model, which was suspended in the polymer gel. The phantom was attached to a Leksell frame by standard GK fixation method, using aluminum screws, for imaging. The phantom was scanned by a Phillips CT scanner with the standard axial-scanning protocol (120 kV and 1.5-mm slice thickness). CT-based treatment planning was performed with the GammaPlan treatment planning system (version 10.1.1). The plan was created to cover a fictitious AVM target volume near the embolization areas with eleven 8-mm shots and a prescription dose of 20 Gy to 50% isodose level. Dose distributions were computed using both tissue maximum ratio (TMR) 10 and convolution dose-calculation algorithms. These two 3D dose distributions were compared using an in-house program. Additionally, the same analysis method was applied to evaluate the dosimetric effects for 2 patients previously treated by GKRS. RESULTS The phantom-based analyses showed that the mean dose difference between TMR 10 and convolution doses of the AVM target was no larger than

  17. Treating Mycobacterium ulcerans disease (Buruli ulcer): from surgery to antibiotics, is the pill mightier than the knife?

    PubMed Central

    Converse, Paul J; Nuermberger, Eric L; Almeida, Deepak V; Grosset, Jacques H

    2011-01-01

    Until 2004, the skin disease known as Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, could only be treated by surgery and skin grafting. Although this worked reasonably well on early lesions typically found in patients in Australia, the strategy was usually impractical on large lesions resulting from diagnostic delay in patients in rural West Africa. Based on promising preclinical studies, treatment trials in West Africa have shown that a combination of rifampin and streptomycin administered daily for 8 weeks can kill M. ulcerans bacilli, arrest the disease, and promote healing without relapse or reduce the extent of surgical excision. Improved treatment options are the focus of research that has increased tremendously since the WHO began its Global Buruli Ulcer Initiative in 1998. PMID:22004037

  18. Dosimetric Study of Automatic Brain Metastases Planning in Comparison with Conventional Multi-Isocenter Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy and Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Multiple Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Kaneda, Naoki; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Ishiguchi, Tuneo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The efficacy of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) using Gamma Knife (GK) (Elekta, Tokyo) is well known. Recently, Automatic Brain Metastases Planning (ABMP) Element (BrainLAB, Tokyo) for a LINAC-based radiation system was commercially released. It covers multiple off-isocenter targets simultaneously inside a multi-leaf collimator field and enables SRS / stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with a single group of LINAC-based dynamic conformal multi-arcs (DCA) for multiple brain metastases. In this study, dose planning of ABMP (ABMP-single isocenter DCA (ABMP-SIDCA)) for SRS of small multiple brain metastases was evaluated in comparison with those of conventional multi-isocenter DCA (MIDCA-SRS) (iPlan, BrainLAB, Tokyo) and GK-SRS (GKRS). Methods Simulation planning was performed with ABMP-SIDCA and GKRS in the two cases of multiple small brain metastases (nine tumors in both), which had been originally treated with iPlan-MIDCA. First, a dosimetric comparison was done between ABMP-SIDCA and iPlan-MIDCA in the same setting of planning target volume (PTV) margin and D95 (dose covering 95% of PTV volume). Second, dosimetry of GKRS with a margin dose of 20 Gy was compared with that of ABMP-SIDCA in the setting of PTV margin of 0, 1 mm, and 2 mm, and D95=100% dose (20 Gy). Results First, the maximum dose of PTV and minimum dose of gross tumor volume (GTV) were significantly greater in ABMP-SIDCA than in iPlan-MIDCA. Conformity index (CI, 1/Paddick’s CI) and gradient index (GI, V (half of prescription dose) / V (prescription dose)) in ABMP-SIDCA were comparable with those of iPlan-MIDCA. Second, PIV (prescription isodose volume) of GKRS was consistent with that of 1 mm margin - ABMP-SIDCA plan in Case 1 and that of no-margin ABMP-SIDCA plan in Case 2. Considering the dose gradient, the mean of V (half of prescription dose) of ABMP-SIDCA was not broad, comparable to GKRS, in either Case 1 or 2. Conclusions The conformity and dose gradient with ABMP-SIDCA were as good

  19. The Shoemaker's Knife

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Archimedes, the famous Greek mathematician, lived from 287 BCE until approximately 212 BCE. He thought that the figure of two semi-circles on a straight line enclosed by a larger semi-circle resembled a shoemaker's knife. Archimedes called this figure an "arbelos" since arbelos is the Greek word for a shoemaker's knife. The author describes the…

  20. A comprehensive overview of radioguided surgery using gamma detection probe technology

    PubMed Central

    Povoski, Stephen P; Neff, Ryan L; Mojzisik, Cathy M; O'Malley, David M; Hinkle, George H; Hall, Nathan C; Murrey, Douglas A; Knopp, Michael V; Martin, Edward W

    2009-01-01

    The concept of radioguided surgery, which was first developed some 60 years ago, involves the use of a radiation detection probe system for the intraoperative detection of radionuclides. The use of gamma detection probe technology in radioguided surgery has tremendously expanded and has evolved into what is now considered an established discipline within the practice of surgery, revolutionizing the surgical management of many malignancies, including breast cancer, melanoma, and colorectal cancer, as well as the surgical management of parathyroid disease. The impact of radioguided surgery on the surgical management of cancer patients includes providing vital and real-time information to the surgeon regarding the location and extent of disease, as well as regarding the assessment of surgical resection margins. Additionally, it has allowed the surgeon to minimize the surgical invasiveness of many diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, while still maintaining maximum benefit to the cancer patient. In the current review, we have attempted to comprehensively evaluate the history, technical aspects, and clinical applications of radioguided surgery using gamma detection probe technology. PMID:19173715

  1. Souvenir knife: a retained transcranial knife blade.

    PubMed

    Davis, Neil L; Kahana, Tzipi; Hiss, Jehuda

    2004-09-01

    Upon necroscopic examination of a homeless male found comatose in the street and pronounced dead at a medical center 12 hours later, a sharp tip of a knife lodged in the right parietal region of his skull was incidentally discovered. The blade transected the diploe and penetrated the cerebral cortex. Subsequent police investigation revealed that this was the remnant of a stabbing attempt on his life several months prior to his death. The cause of death was determined to be unrelated to the metallic blade fragment, thus making it a truly incidental and rare finding of a "souvenir knife." Nevertheless, since the injury sustained in the stabbing was potentially life threatening, the investigation into that assault was reopened.A case report is presented, along with a brief review of the literature on "souvenir objects."

  2. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations in children/adolescents and adults. Part I: Differences in epidemiologic, morphologic, and clinical characteristics, permanent complications, and bleeding in the latency period

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolato, Antonio . E-mail: antonio.nicolato@mail.azosp.vr.it; Lupidi, Francesco; Sandri, Marco F.; Foroni, Roberto; Zampieri, Piergiuseppe; Mazza, Carlo; Maluta, Sergio; Beltramello, Alberto; Gerosa, Massimo

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To compare the epidemiologic, morphologic, and clinical characteristics of 92 children/adolescents (Group A) and 362 adults (Group B) with cerebral arteriovenous malformations (cAVMs) considered suitable for radiosurgery; to correlate radiosurgery-related permanent complication and post-radiosurgery bleeding rates in the 75 children/adolescents and 297 adults available for follow-up. Methods and Materials: Radiosurgery was performed with a model C 201-source Co{sup 6} Leksell Gamma Unit (Elekta Instruments, Stockholm, Sweden). Fisher exact two-tailed, Wilcoxon rank-sum, and two-sample binomial exact tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: There were significant differences between the two populations in sex (p = 0.015), clinical presentation (p = 0.001), and location (p = 0.008). The permanent complication rate was lower in younger (1.3%) than in older patients (5.4%), although the difference was not significant (p = 0.213). The postradiosurgery bleeding rate was lower in Group A (1.3%) than in Group B (2.7%) (p = 0.694), with global actuarial bleeding rates of 0.56% per year and 1.15% per year, respectively. Conclusions: The different characteristics of child/adolescent and adult cAVMs suggest that they should be considered two distinct vascular disorders. The similar rates of radiosurgery-related complications and latency period bleeding in the two populations show that gamma knife radiosurgery does not expose young patients to a higher risk of sequelae than that for older patients.

  3. Surgical strategies for managing foraminal nerve sheath tumors: the emerging role of CyberKnife ablation

    PubMed Central

    Murovic, Judith A.; Charles Cho, S.

    2009-01-01

    Sixteen Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC) patients with foraminal nerve sheath tumors had charts reviewed. CyberKnife radiosurgery was innovative in management. Parameters were evaluated for 16 foraminal nerve sheath tumors undergoing surgery, some with CyberKnife. Three neurofibromas had associated neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Eleven patients had one resection; others had CyberKnife after one (two) and two (three) operations. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) had prior field-radiation and adds another case. Approaches included laminotomy and laminectomies with partial (three) or total (two) facetectomies/fusions. Two cases each had supraclavicular, lateral extracavitary, retroperitoneal and Wiltze and costotransversectomy/thoracotomy procedures. Two underwent a laminectomy/partial facetectomy, then CyberKnife. Pre-CyberKnife, one of two others had a laminectomy/partial facetectomy, then total facetectomy/fusion and the other, two supraclavicular approaches. The MPNST had a hemi-laminotomy then laminectomy/total facetectomy/fusion, followed by CyberKnife. Roots were preserved, except in two. Of 11 single-operation-peripheral nerve sheath tumors, the asymptomatic case remained stable, nine (92%) improved and one (9%) worsened. Examinations remained intact in three (27%) and improved in seven (64%). Two having a single operation then CyberKnife had improvement after both. Of two undergoing two operations, one had symptom resolution post-operatively, worsened 4 years post-CyberKnife then has remained unchanged after re-operation. The other such patient improved post-operatively, had no change after re-operation and improved post-CyberKnife. The MPNST had presentation improvement after the first operation, worsened and after the second surgery \\and CyberKnife, the patient expired from tumor spread. In conclusion, surgery is beneficial for pain relief and function preservation in foraminal nerve sheath tumors. Open surgery with CyberKnife

  4. Surgical strategies for managing foraminal nerve sheath tumors: the emerging role of CyberKnife ablation.

    PubMed

    Murovic, Judith A; Charles Cho, S; Park, Jon

    2010-02-01

    Sixteen Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC) patients with foraminal nerve sheath tumors had charts reviewed. CyberKnife radiosurgery was innovative in management. Parameters were evaluated for 16 foraminal nerve sheath tumors undergoing surgery, some with CyberKnife. Three neurofibromas had associated neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Eleven patients had one resection; others had CyberKnife after one (two) and two (three) operations. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) had prior field-radiation and adds another case. Approaches included laminotomy and laminectomies with partial (three) or total (two) facetectomies/fusions. Two cases each had supraclavicular, lateral extracavitary, retroperitoneal and Wiltze and costotransversectomy/thoracotomy procedures. Two underwent a laminectomy/partial facetectomy, then CyberKnife. Pre-CyberKnife, one of two others had a laminectomy/partial facetectomy, then total facetectomy/fusion and the other, two supraclavicular approaches. The MPNST had a hemi-laminotomy then laminectomy/total facetectomy/fusion, followed by CyberKnife. Roots were preserved, except in two. Of 11 single-operation-peripheral nerve sheath tumors, the asymptomatic case remained stable, nine (92%) improved and one (9%) worsened. Examinations remained intact in three (27%) and improved in seven (64%). Two having a single operation then CyberKnife had improvement after both. Of two undergoing two operations, one had symptom resolution post-operatively, worsened 4 years post-CyberKnife then has remained unchanged after re-operation. The other such patient improved post-operatively, had no change after re-operation and improved post-CyberKnife. The MPNST had presentation improvement after the first operation, worsened and after the second surgery \\and CyberKnife, the patient expired from tumor spread. In conclusion, surgery is beneficial for pain relief and function preservation in foraminal nerve sheath tumors. Open surgery with CyberKnife

  5. Performance of a small CdTe gamma camera for radio-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Sakahara, Harmui; Hayama, Kazuhide; Funaki, Minoru; Shirahata, T.; Orskaug, Terje; Maehlum, Gunnar; Yoshioka, Koki; Nygard, Einar

    2001-12-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy has been shown to be highly accurate for detecting metastatic diseases, such as melanoma and breast cancer. Gamma probes that measure only the relative presence of radioactivity are commonly used to identify sentinel lymph nodes. We have developed a small semiconductor gamma camera (SSGC) that allows the size, shape, and location of the target tissues to be visualized. The purpose of this study is to characterize the performance of the SSGC for radioguided surgery of metastatic lesions and for diagnosing other diseases amenable to the smaller- format associated with this prototype imaging system. Methods & Design: The detector head was comprised of a 32 x 32 Cadmium Telluride semiconductor array and application- specific integrated circuit (ASIC) with a tungsten collimator. The entire assembly was encased in a lead housing measuring 152 mm x 166 mm x 65 mm. The effective visual field was 44.8 mm x 44.8 mm. Two spherical 5 mm diameter Tc-99m radioactive sources having activities of 0.15 MBq and 100 MBq were used to simulate sentinel lymph nodes and injection site. The relative detectability of these foci was compared using the new detector and a conventional scintillation camera. Use of the prototype was also explored on patients in a variety of clinical applications. Results: the SSGC provided better spatial resolution on phantom studies than the conventional gamma camera control. Both foci could be visualized clearly by the SSGC using a 15 second acquisition time, whereas they could not be readily identified using the conventional system under comparable conditions. Preliminary clinical tests of the SSGC were found to be successful in imaging diseases in a variety of tissues including salivary and thyroid glands, temporomandibular joints, and sentinel lymph nodes. Conclusion: The SSGC has significant potential for use in diagnosing diseases and for facilitating subsequent radioguided surgery. (This project was supported by a Grant- in

  6. The Knife Machine. Module 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This module on the knife machine, one in a series dealing with industrial sewing machines, their attachments, and operation, covers one topic: performing special operations on the knife machine (a single needle or multi-needle machine which sews and cuts at the same time). These components are provided: an introduction, directions, an objective,…

  7. [CyberKnife radiosurgery--present status and future prospect].

    PubMed

    Nomura, Ryutaro; Suzuki, Ichiro

    2011-03-01

    The CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery System is a non-invasive alternative to surgery for the treatment of both cancerous and non-cancerous tumors anywhere in the body, including the prostate, lung, brain, spine, liver, pancreas, and kidney. The treatment, which involves the delivery of high doses of radiation to tumors with extreme accuracy, offers new hope to patients who have inoperable or surgically complex tumors or who may prefer a nonsurgical option. To date, more than 95,000 patients have been treated and more than 207 systems have been installed worldwide. The CyberKnife System is a one-of-a-kind device because of the following reasons. First, the CyberKnife System uses image guidance software to track and continually adjust treatment for any patient or tumor movement. This advantage places the system far ahead of other similar treatments. It allows patients to breathe normally and relax comfortably during treatment. Second, some forms of radiosurgery require rigid head frames that are screwed into the patient's skull in order to minimize any head movement. The CyberKnife System does not require such extreme procedures to maintain the head position; instead, it relies on the sophisticated tracking software, allowing for a much more comfortable and noninvasive treatment. Third, unlike some radiosurgery systems, which can only treat tumors in the head, the CyberKnife System has unlimited reach to treat a broad range of tumors throughout the body, including the prostate, lung, brain, spine, liver, pancreas, and kidney. Finally, the CyberKnife System's treatment accuracy is unrivaled. Its ability to treat tumors with supreme accuracy is noncomparable to that of other radiation therapy and radiosurgery systems. The CyberKnife System can essentially "paint" the tumor with radiation, allowing it to precisely deliver treatment to the tumor alone, sparing surrounding healthy tissue.

  8. Radioisotope guided surgery with imaging probe, a hand-held high-resolution gamma camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soluri, A.; Trotta, C.; Scopinaro, F.; Tofani, A.; D'Alessandria, C.; Pasta, V.; Stella, S.; Massari, R.

    2007-12-01

    Since 1997, our group of Physics together with Nuclear Physicians studies imaging probes (IP), hand-held, high-resolution gamma cameras for radio-guided surgery (RGS). Present work is aimed to verify the usefulness of two updated IP in different surgical operations. Forty patients scheduled for breast cancer sentinel node (SN) biopsy, five patients with nodal recurrence of thyroid cancer, seven patients with parathyroid adenomas, five patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NET), were operated under the guide of IP. We used two different IP with field of view of 1 and 4 in. 2, respectively and intrinsic spatial resolution of about 2 mm. Radioisotopes were 99mTc, 123I and 111In. The 1 in. 2 IP detected SN in all the 40 patients and more than one node in 24, whereas anger camera (AC) failed locating SN in four patients and detected true positive second nodes in only nine patients. The 4 in. 2 IP was used for RGS of thyroid, parathyroid and NETs. It detected eight latero-cervical nodes. In the same patients, AC detected five invaded nodes. Parathyroid adenomas detected by IP were 10 in 7 patients, NET five in five patients. One and 4 in. 2 IPs showed usefulness in all operations. Initial studies on SN biopsy were carried out on small series of patients to validate IP and to demonstrate the effectiveness and usefulness of IP alone or against conventional probes. We propose the use of the IP as control method for legal documentation and surgeon strategy guide before and after lesion(s) removal.

  9. Peripheral dose measurement for CyberKnife radiosurgery with upgraded linac shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Cynthia F.; Larson, David A.; Zytkovicz, Andrea; Smith, Vernon; Petti, Paula L.

    2008-04-15

    The authors investigated the peripheral dose reduction for CyberKnife radiosurgery treatments after the installation of a linac shielding upgrade. As in a previous investigation, the authors considered two treatment plans, one for a hypothetical target in the brain and another for a target in the thorax, delivered to an anthropomorphic phantom. The results of the prior investigation showed that the CyberKnife delivered significantly higher peripheral doses than comparable model C Gamma Knife or IMRT treatments. Current measurements, after the linac shielding upgrade, demonstrate that the additional shielding decreased the peripheral dose, expressed as a percentage of the delivered monitor units (MU), by a maximum of 59%. The dose reduction was greatest for cranial-caudal distances from the field edge less than 30 cm, and at these distances, the CyberKnife peripheral dose, expressed as a percentage of the delivered MU, is now comparable to that measured for the other treatment modalities in our previous investigation. For distances between 30 and 70 cm from the field edge, the additional shielding reduced the peripheral dose by between 20% and 55%. At these distances, the CyberKnife peripheral dose remains higher than doses measured in our previous study for the model C Gamma Knife and IMRT.

  10. Pilocytic Midbrain Astrocytoma Presenting with Fresh Bleed after Twenty-one-years Survival Following First Surgery: A Unique Case of Longest Brainstem Glioma Survival

    PubMed Central

    Satyarthee, Guru Dutta; Sudhan, M. D.; Mehta, V. S.

    2016-01-01

    Brainstem glioma usually carries a poor prognosis and prolonged survival is very infrequent. In a detailed Pubmed, Medline search for prolonged survival, authors could got a longest survival only up to seventeen years, reported by Umehara et al, who was subjected to gamma knife therapy and got symptomatic, MRI brain reveled large tumor growth during pregnancy necessitating emergency surgery and histopathological diagnosis was pilocytic astrocytoma. Authors report an interesting case of midbrain glioma diagnosed 21 years back, who underwent gross resection in the year 1993, histopathology was pilocytic astrocytoma, WHO grade I, and received gamma knife surgery for residual subsequently and he presented with sudden onset left sided hemiplegia on the current admission. The cranial MRI imaging revealed an infarct involving right hemi midbrain, contrast MRI brain revealed no residual glioma. To the best knowledge of authors such prolonged survival is not reported with a case of brainstem glioma survived twenty- one years with non residual tumor on the last imaging study represents first case of its kind in the western literature and probably developed hemiplegia due to bleed, highlighting bleed as delayed complication following gamma knife therapy for cranial tumors PMID:28163514

  11. Comparison of O-Type HybridKnife to Conventional Knife in Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Gastric Mucosal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rui; Yan, Honglin; Ren, Gui; Pan, Yanglin; Zhang, Linhui; Liu, Zhiguo; Guo, Xuegang; Wu, Kaichun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been accepted as a minimal invasive alternative to surgery for localized superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms recently. However, the procedure remains to be technically challenging and time consuming. A new dissecting knife with partially insulated tip has been recently developed with built-in injection capability. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the efficiency of ESD procedure could be improved with this new device. A total of 78 patients, who underwent ESD with gastric mucosal lesions including flat type polyps, adenoma or early gastric cancer, were randomly assigned to either ESD with O-type HybridKnife or conventional ESD knives without waterjet. Procedure time and related factors of ESD were analyzed. ESD procedure time was 43.0 (interquartile range, IQR 27.0–60.0) minutes in HybridKnife group compared to 60.5 (IQR 44.0–86.3) minutes in the control group (P = 0.001). There was no difference in the clinical outcome and the adverse event rate. The former demonstrated more favorable results in lesions ≤4 cm of specimen size (P ≤ 0.0001) and when located in the distal stomach (P = 0.001), also in lesions with fibrosis (P = 0.008). Multivariate regression analysis showed that O-type Knife (P ≤ 0.0001), specimen size (P ≤ 0.0001), and fibrosis (P ≤ 0.0001) were independent predictors of procedure time. The O-type HybridKnife yielded faster procedure time compared to the conventional knives in gastric ESD with a similar safety profile. PMID:27043675

  12. Thymic Carcinoma Treated by CyberKnife Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Shinichiro

    2017-01-01

    The standard treatment for advanced thymic carcinoma has not yet been established. Most patients have no symptoms until the advanced stage. Radiation therapy has been used for advanced stage cancer, usually in combination with surgery or chemotherapy; however, the survival rates are 30%-50%. We performed hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy with CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) for 10 cases of advanced thymic cancer. All cases reached at least partial remission (PR) in two months with progression-free irradiated lesions and minimal radiation-related toxicity. It took only seven to 12 days for each therapy that did not require admission. CyberKnife is beneficial for patients even at the terminal stage. PMID:28367393

  13. Biomechanics of knife stab attacks.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, E K; Nicol, A C; Lane, J V; Gray, T G

    1999-10-25

    Equipment, materials and methods for the measurement of the biomechanical parameters governing knife stab attacks have been developed and data have been presented that are relevant to the improvement of standards for the testing of stab-resistant materials. A six-camera Vicon motion analysis system was used to measure velocity, and derive energy and momentum during the approach phase of the attack and a specially developed force-measuring knife was used to measure three-dimensional forces and torque during the impact phase. The body segments associated with the knife were modelled as a series of rigid segments: trunk, upper arm, forearm and hand. The velocities of these segments, together with knowledge of the mass distribution from biomechanical tables, allowed the calculation of the individual segment energy and momentum values. The instrumented knife measured four components of load: axial force (along the length of the blade), cutting force (parallel to the breadth of the blade), lateral force (across the blade) and torque (twisting action) using foil strain gauges. Twenty volunteers were asked to stab a target with near maximal effort. Three styles of stab were used: a short thrust forward, a horizontal style sweep around the body and an overhand stab. These styles were chosen based on reported incidents, providing more realistic data than had previously existed. The 95th percentile values for axial force and energy were 1885 N and 69 J, respectively. The ability of current test methods to reproduce the mechanical parameters measured in human stab attacks has been assessed. It was found that current test methods could reproduce the range of energy and force values measured in the human stab attacks, although the simulation was not accurate in some respects. Non-axial force and torque values were also found to be significant in the human tests, but these are not reproduced in the standard mechanical tests.

  14. Using the phacoemulsification crescent knife in dacryocystorhinostomy.

    PubMed

    Fong, K S; Koh, A H; Choo, C T

    1998-04-01

    Dacryocystorhinostomy is an effective treatment for nasolacrimal duct obstruction. Most techniques employ a conventional blade or knife in making the incision of the nasal mucosa and lacrimal sac. The authors describe the use of a phacoemulsification crescent knife for this purpose. This technique can be effective and at the same time safer and easier to perform.

  15. Image-guided robotic radiosurgery (CyberKnife) for pancreatic insulinoma: is laparoscopy becoming old?

    PubMed

    Huscher, Cristiano Germano Sigismondo; Mingoli, Andrea; Sgarzini, Giovanna; Mereu, Andrea; Gasperi, Maurizio

    2012-03-01

    Insulinomas constitute about 25% of endocrine pancreatic tumors. Laparoscopic surgery is the treatment of choice. However, pancreas-related complications rate is very high, even in experienced hands, ranging up to 37%. Alternative procedures such as embolization with trisacryl have not been accepted by the surgical community. Image-guided robotic radiosurgery or stereotactic radiosurgery (CyberKnife) is a minimally invasive procedure delivering large doses of ionizing radiation to a well-defined target. CyberKnife radiosurgery is successfully used in brain cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, liver metastases, kidney cancer, and pancreatic cancer. The authors present the first case to their knowledge of a benign functioning insulinoma successfully treated by a CyberKnife technique with a 3-year follow-up.

  16. Quality assurance for gamma knives

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.D.; Banks, W.W.; Fischer, L.E.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes and summarizes the results of a quality assurance (QA) study of the Gamma Knife, a nuclear medical device used for the gamma irradiation of intracranial lesions. Focus was on the physical aspects of QA and did not address issues that are essentially medical, such as patient selection or prescription of dose. A risk-based QA assessment approach was used. Sample programs for quality control and assurance are included. The use of the Gamma Knife was found to conform to existing standards and guidelines concerning radiation safety and quality control of external beam therapies (shielding, safety reviews, radiation surveys, interlock systems, exposure monitoring, good medical physics practices, etc.) and to be compliant with NRC teletherapy regulations. There are, however, current practices for the Gamma Knife not covered by existing, formalized regulations, standards, or guidelines. These practices have been adopted by Gamma Knife users and continue to be developed with further experience. Some of these have appeared in publications or presentations and are slowly finding their way into recommendations of professional organizations.

  17. Reflections on the Knife Edge

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, John Patrick Michael

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The accompanying article, written by John Murphy, a retired lawyer and lifelong outdoorsman from his beloved Colorado Rockies, draws the striking parallel between his experiences as a mountain climber and as a patient with metastatic melanoma facing the hope and uncertainty of experimental therapy. Both are life-threatening circumstances, demanding courage and hope, and challenging our soul in a way almost unique to human experience. Both involve a conscious choice to move forward into dangerous and uncertain territory, and require a determination to look death (John's “Reaper”) in the eye. Many remarkable books and films have been written about such experiences. I recall in particular the 2003 documentary film Touching the Void, about the incredible survival of a mountaineer who returned from a perilous fall in Peru. I highly recommend it to the reader. Another is Laura Hillenbrand's Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption (Random House, 2010), about the survival of a prisoner of war, the celebrated miler Louis Zamperini. Again, unbridled courage and undeniable hope turned futility into future. John Murphy's reflections remind us of the daily heroism of our patients who are holding tight to the lifeline offered by clinical research. Good climbing, John. All of us are with you on that Knife Edge, waiting for our turn to ascend... and hoping to be as courageous as you were then on Capitol Peak and are again now on the Knife Edge of a clinical trial. For our turn will come. PMID:21349953

  18. Maintaining knife sharpness in industrial meat cutting: A matter of knife or meat cutter ability.

    PubMed

    Karltun, J; Vogel, K; Bergstrand, M; Eklund, J

    2016-09-01

    Knife sharpness is imperative in meat cutting. The aim of this study was to compare the impact of knife blade steel quality with meat cutters' individual ability to maintain the cutting edge sharp in an industrial production setting. Twelve meat cutters in two different companies using three different knives during normal production were studied in this quasi-experimental study. Methods included were measuring knife cutting force before and after knife use, time knives were used, ratings of sharpness and discomfort and interviews. Results showed that the meat cutters' skill of maintaining sharpness during work had a much larger effect on knife sharpness during work than the knife steel differences. The ability was also related to feelings of discomfort and to physical exertion. It was found that meat cutters using more knives were more likely to suffer from discomfort in the upper limbs, which is a risk for developing MSD.

  19. 78 FR 18318 - U.S. Healthcare Trade Mission to Turkey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... devices, Clinical chemistry and laboratory devices, Dental devices, Implants used in orthopedics and..., cyber knife and gamma knife treatments, ophthalmology, plastic surgery, dental services and...

  20. Knife-edge seal for vacuum bagging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Cam actuated clamps pinch bagging material between long knife edge (mounted to clamps) and high temperature rubber cushion bonded to baseplate. No adhesive, tape, or sealing groove is needed to seal edge of bagging sheet against base plate.

  1. A sharp knife for high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    Electrically heated nickel-chrome-steel alloy knife may be used to cut heat resistant plastic felt and similar materials with relative ease. Blade made of commercially available alloy RA 330 retains edge at temperatures as high as 927 C.

  2. Surgery for acromegaly: evolution of the techniques and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Laws, Edward R

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents an overview of the evolution of pituitary surgery for acromegaly. It begins with the first case, attempted in 1893, through the initial transsphenoidal successes in 1907-1910, to the development of effective craniotomy approaches, and ultimately to the resurrection of the transsphenoidal approach in the 1970s and thereafter. Today, the minimally endoscopic transnasal endoscopic approach is fast becoming the norm. Indications for surgery include active acromegaly, visual loss and other forms of mass effect, pituitary tumor apoplexy, and failure of other therapies (medical, radiation). Contraindications include advanced age, debility or other medical conditions increasing the risk of general anaesthesia or surgery. Surgery for acromegaly has the advantage of immediate lowering of the growth hormone excess, with endocrine remission rates of 70% for microadenomas and 50% for macroadenomas. When surgery fails to obtain remission, a program of therapy is designed for the patient to include adjunctive medical therapy (dopamine agonists, somatostatin analogs, and growth hormone receptor antagonists), radiation therapy or radiosurgery (Gamma knife, Cyberknife, etc.).

  3. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy with CyberKnife for advanced thymic carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fan, C Y; Huang, W Y; Jen, Y M; Lin, M J; Lin, K T

    2015-10-01

    Thymic carcinoma is a rare but lethal mediastinal cancer. The optimal treatment for advanced thymic carcinoma is not yet established. This report is the first known of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (sabr) with CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA, U.S.A.) as definitive therapy for thymic carcinoma. The patient, a 70-year-old woman with thymic carcinoma, invasion into neighboring organs, and pleural metastases-underwent CyberKnife sabr at 40 Gy in 5 fractions for two lesions, one in the thymus and one in the right paraspinal pleura. After 61 months of observation, a partial response was observed in the irradiated fields. However, disease progression in the non-irradiated pleura was noted. The patient underwent salvage CyberKnife sabr for the four initially nonirradiated pleural lesions. Computed tomography images obtained 10 months after the salvage therapy revealed a partial response. The patient is living, with progression-free irradiated lesions and no radiation-related toxicity. CyberKnife sabr is feasible for patients who are unable to undergo either surgery or conventionally fractionated radiation therapy.

  4. 21 CFR 886.4230 - Ophthalmic knife test drum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ophthalmic knife test drum. 886.4230 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4230 Ophthalmic knife test drum. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic knife test drum is a device intended to test the keenness of ophthalmic...

  5. 21 CFR 886.4230 - Ophthalmic knife test drum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ophthalmic knife test drum. 886.4230 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4230 Ophthalmic knife test drum. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic knife test drum is a device intended to test the keenness of ophthalmic...

  6. 21 CFR 886.4230 - Ophthalmic knife test drum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ophthalmic knife test drum. 886.4230 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4230 Ophthalmic knife test drum. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic knife test drum is a device intended to test the keenness of ophthalmic...

  7. 21 CFR 886.4230 - Ophthalmic knife test drum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic knife test drum. 886.4230 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4230 Ophthalmic knife test drum. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic knife test drum is a device intended to test the keenness of ophthalmic...

  8. 21 CFR 886.4230 - Ophthalmic knife test drum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ophthalmic knife test drum. 886.4230 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4230 Ophthalmic knife test drum. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic knife test drum is a device intended to test the keenness of ophthalmic...

  9. Impalement head injury with serrated meat knife.

    PubMed

    Binitie, Op; Shilong, Dj; Ugwu, Bt; Ekedigwe, Je; Oyeniran, Oo; Adighije, Pf; Mairiga, An; Ninmol, Pj; Alayande, B

    2012-01-01

    An unsuspecting motorcycle passenger was ambushed and impaled on the right side of the head with a 30cm serrated meat carving knife during a sectarian crisis in the city of Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria. The patient escaped running with the knife in his head and was rescued to a military hospital from where he was promptly transferred within 90 minutes of the incident to the Emergency Department of Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH), Jos. Prompt resuscitation and CT brain imaging facilitated a successful neurosurgical intervention and a good outcome in the management of this patient.

  10. High grade anorectal stricture complicating Crohn's disease: endoscopic treatment using insulated-tip knife

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Hyung Ku; Shin, Ik Sang; Kim, Sang Wook

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic treatments have emerged as an alternative to surgery, in the treatment of benign colorectal stricture. Unlike endoscopic balloon dilatation, there is limited data on endoscopic electrocautery incision therapy for benign colorectal stricture, especially with regards to safety and long-term patency. We present a case of a 29-year-old female with Crohn's disease who had difficulty in defecation and passing thin stools. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging scan, gastrograffin enema, and sigmoidoscopy showed a high-grade anorectal stricture. An endoscopic insulated-tip knife incision was successfully performed to resolve the problem. From our experience, we suggest that endoscopic insulated-tip knife treatment may be a feasible and effective modality for patients with short-segment, very rigid, fibrotic anorectal stricture. PMID:27433152

  11. Submillisecond Optical Knife-Edge Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurlow, P.

    1983-01-01

    Fast computer-controlled sampling of optical knife-edge response (KER) signal increases accuracy of optical system aberration measurement. Submicrosecond-response detectors in optical focal plane convert optical signals to electrical signals converted to digital data, sampled and feed into computer for storage and subsequent analysis. Optical data are virtually free of effects of index-of-refraction gradients.

  12. High-resolution mini gamma camera for diagnosis and radio-guided surgery in diabetic foot infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopinaro, F.; Capriotti, G.; Di Santo, G.; Capotondi, C.; Micarelli, A.; Massari, R.; Trotta, C.; Soluri, A.

    2006-12-01

    The diagnosis of diabetic foot osteomyelitis is often difficult. 99mTc-WBC (White Blood Cell) scintigraphy plays a key role in the diagnosis of bone infections. Spatial resolution of Anger camera is not always able to differentiate soft tissue from bone infection. Aim of present study is to verify if HRD (High-Resolution Detector) is able to improve diagnosis and to help surgery. Patients were studied by HRD showing 25.7×25.7 mm 2 FOV, 2 mm spatial resolution and 18% energy resolution. The patients were underwent to surgery and, when necessary, bone biopsy, both guided by HRD. Four patients were positive at Anger camera without specific signs of osteomyelitis. HRS (High-Resolution Scintigraphy) showed hot spots in the same patients. In two of them the hot spot was bar-shaped and it was localized in correspondence of the small phalanx. The presence of bone infection was confirmed at surgery, which was successfully guided by HRS. 99mTc-WBC HRS was able to diagnose pedal infection and to guide the surgery of diabetic foot, opening a new way in the treatment of infected diabetic foot.

  13. Sequential annealing gradient Gamma-Knife radiosurgery optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ove, Roger; Popple, Richard

    2003-07-01

    Simulated annealing and gradient methods are commonly employed for inverse planning of radiotherapy delivery schemes. Annealing is effective in finding an approximation of the global solution, suffering from slow late convergence and in some cases poor dose homogeneity. Gradient methods converge well but not necessarily to the global minimum. We explored simulated annealing followed by gradient optimization to improve on either method alone, using radiosurgery as the model system. Simulated annealing and gradient inverse planning programs using the same objective function were adapted for radiosurgical optimization. The objective function chosen is a least-squares dose-matching function, with differential weighting of tissues. A simple test target allowing local minima in the objective function was evaluated. Two hundred trials using the gradient method were done. The gradient method approximated the global solution only 12% of the time, commonly finding a local minimum. The annealing-gradient technique converged to the global minimum in 78 out of 80 trials, more efficiently than annealing alone. Dose homogeneity was improved. In conclusion, sequential annealing-gradient optimization can improve on either method alone. The technique may be extensible to radiotherapy inverse planning in general, with benefit expected for problems characterized by slow gradient method convergence and local minima.

  14. Usefulness and safety of SB knife Jr in endoscopic submucosal dissection for colorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Oka, Shiro; Tanaka, Shinji; Takata, Sayaka; Kanao, Hiroyuki; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2012-05-01

    Use of a Dual knife has become commonplace for endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) of colorectal tumors at Hiroshima University Hosipital. A Hook knife has been also used in combination with the Dual knife, depending on the location of the lesion. We have had recent opportunities to use a scissors-type SB knife Jr. We retrospectively compared outcomes of colorectal ESD performed with the Dual knife in combination with the SB knife Jr versus the Hook knife. In conclusion, although the Hook knife was shown to be a very useful auxiliary device for colorectal ESD, the SB knife Jr. yielded better results than the Hook knife in terms of complete en block resection and avoidance of perforation. Use of the Dual knife with the SB Knife Jr shows good potential for improving complete en bloc resection rate and safety of technically difficult colorectal ESD.

  15. A Retrospective Review of CyberKnife Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Adrenal Tumors (Primary and Metastatic): Winthrop University Hospital Experience.

    PubMed

    Desai, Amishi; Rai, Hema; Haas, Jonathan; Witten, Matthew; Blacksburg, Seth; Schneider, Jeffrey G

    2015-01-01

    The adrenal gland is a common site of cancer metastasis. Surgery remains a mainstay of treatment for solitary adrenal metastasis. For patients who cannot undergo surgery, radiation is an alternative option. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an ablative treatment option allowing larger doses to be delivered over a shorter period of time. In this study, we report on our experience with the use of SBRT to treat adrenal metastases using CyberKnife technology. We retrospectively reviewed the Winthrop University radiation oncology data base to identify 14 patients for whom SBRT was administered to treat malignant adrenal disease. Of the factors examined, the biological equivalent dose (BED) of radiation delivered was found to be the most important predictor of local adrenal tumor control. We conclude that CyberKnife-based SBRT is a safe, non-invasive modality that has broadened the therapeutic options for the treatment of isolated adrenal metastases.

  16. Some observations on glass-knife making.

    PubMed

    Ward, R T

    1977-11-01

    The yield of usable knife edge per knife (for thin sectioning) was markedly increased when glass knives were made at an included angle of 55 degrees rather than the customary 45 degrees. A large number of measurements of edge check marks made with a routine light scattering method as well as observations made on a smaller number of test sections with the electron microscope indicated the superiority of 55 degrees knives. Knives were made with both taped pliers and an LKB Knifemaker. Knives were graded by methods easily applied in any biological electron microscope laboratory. Depending on the mode of fracture, the yield of knives having more than 33% of their edges free of check marks was 30 to 100 times greater at 55 degrees than 45 degrees.

  17. Knife blade as a facial foreign body.

    PubMed

    Gardner, P A; Righi, P; Shahbahrami, P B

    1997-08-01

    This case demonstrates the unpredictability of foreign bodies in the face. The retained knife blade eluded detection on two separate examinations. The essential components to making a correct diagnosis of a foreign body following a stabbing to the face include a thorough review of the mechanism of injury, a complete head and neck examination, a high index of suspicion, and plain radiographs of the face.

  18. [Design and application of silver needle-knife].

    PubMed

    Sun, Guodong; Shi, Bin; Zhang, Benwu; Xu, Haidong

    2015-04-01

    A silver needle-knife which has the dual function of silver needle and needle-knife is designed. The main components of this silver needle-knife are approximately 50% silver and approximately 50% nichrome. The silver needle-knife is composed of five parts, including needle-knife tail, spiral handle; steering handle, needle-knife body and needle-knife edge. It converges the advantages of needle-knife and silver needle, which can cut loose of diseased tissue and peel adhesion of lesions, but also be heated with moxa cone and thermal therapeutic instrument, and connect with electroacupuncture apparatus. It has the function of warming channel and removing coldness, dispelling wind and eliminating dampness, resolving spasm and relieving pain, dredging the channel and so on. Due to the spiral handle and the steering handle, the operation is easier, which reduces the blindness of cutting and increase the safety. It is mainly used for soft tissue injury, rheumatism and rheumatoid arthritis, as well as degenerative diseases of spine and joint, and it has obvious efficacy on some internal medical diseases.

  19. Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site: Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Park Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC. National Register of Historic Places.

    This guide provides history and social studies teachers, at all grade levels, with information and activities about the American Indians of the Northern Plains who lived in the area of the Knife River where it enters the Missouri River. Located in what is now North Dakota, this area is the Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site. The…

  20. [Clamshell thoracotomy after thoracic knife wounds].

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Marcus; Schneider, Niko R E; Popp, Erik

    2017-01-04

    Resuscitation in the event of traumatic cardiac arrest was for a long time considered to be a less than promising technique to employ; however, current data indicate that the prospects of success need not be any poorer than for resuscitation due to cardiac distress. The targeted and rapid remedying of reversible causes can re-establish the circulatory function and the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) algorithm for traumatic cardiac arrest is a helpful guide in this respect. This case report illustrates the resolute implementation of this algorithm in the prehospital environment in the case of an attempted suicide by a thoracic knife wound.

  1. Melanoma of the eye

    MedlinePlus

    Small melanomas may be treated with: Surgery Laser Radiation therapy (such as Gamma Knife , CyberKnife , brachytherapy) Surgery to remove the eye (enucleation) may be needed. Other treatments that may be used ...

  2. Comparison of pain and swelling after removal of oral leukoplakia with CO2 laser and cold knife: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    López-Jornet, Pía

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare conventional surgery with carbon dioxide (CO2) laser in patients with oral leukoplakia, and to evaluate the postoperative pain and swelling. Study design: A total of 48 patients (27 males and 21 females) with a mean age of 53.7 ± 11.7 years and diagnosed with oral leukoplakia were randomly assigned to receive treatment either with conventional surgery using a cold knife or with a CO2 laser technique. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to score pain and swelling at different postoperative time points. Results: Pain and swelling reported by the patients was greater with the conventional cold knife than with the CO2 laser, statistically significant differences for pain and swelling were observed between the two techniques during the first three days after surgery. Followed by a gradual decrease over one week. In neither group was granuloma formation observed, and none of the patients showed malignant transformation during the period of follow-up. Conclusions: The CO2 laser causes only minimal pain and swelling, thus suggesting that it may be an alternative method to conventional surgery in treating patients with oral leukoplakia. Key words:Oral leukoplakia, treatment, laser surgery, cold knife, pain, swelling. PMID:23229239

  3. A nurse clinician's approach to knife crime prevention.

    PubMed

    England, Rachel; Jackson, Rob

    This article outlines a new and creative contribution to knife crime prevention by an emergency nurse clinician and an initial evaluation of its effectiveness. The 'knife crime prevention programme' is delivered to young people aged 11-16 years by one of the authors, Rob Jackson, an emergency nurse clinician at Liverpool University Hospital; the aim is to educate young people about the medical consequences of knife injury. A group of 140 students and 17 teachers responded to a questionnaire evaluating the effectiveness of the session delivered to four schools in Liverpool. Students and teachers positively rated the session, with the combination of the nurse clinician's knowledge and expertise and photographs and depictions of knife crime as a unique and impacting approach to knife crime prevention. It is suggested that the nurse clinician and other experienced health professionals have an important contribution to make in preventive approaches to knife crime. Further evaluation of the knife crime prevention programme will be conducted by the authors.

  4. How Sharp Does a "Knife Edge" Have to Be?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, Eric R.; Gash, Philip W.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to help understand the effect of the curvature of the laboratory equipment support (cylindrical rod instead of knife-edge) on the frequency of oscillation of pendula. (ZWH)

  5. Optical knife-edge technique for nanomechanical displacement detection

    SciTech Connect

    Karabacak, D.; Kouh, T.; Huang, C.C.; Ekinci, K.L.

    2006-05-08

    We describe an optical knife-edge technique for nanomechanical displacement detection. Here, one carefully focuses a laser spot on a moving edge and monitors the reflected power as the edge is displaced sideways. To demonstrate nanomechanical displacement detection using the knife-edge technique, we have measured in-plane resonances of nanometer scale doubly clamped beams. The obtained displacement sensitivity is in the {approx}1 pm/{radical}(Hz) range--in close agreement with a simple analytical model.

  6. Usefulness of a novel slim type FlushKnife-BT over conventional FlushKnife-BT in esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Yoshiko; Toyonaga, Takashi; Hoshi, Namiko; Tanaka, Shinwa; Baba, Shinichi; Takihara, Hiroshi; Kawara, Fumiaki; Ishida, Tsukasa; Morita, Yoshinori; Umegaki, Eiji; Azuma, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigated the usefulness of a novel slim type ball-tipped FlushKnife (FlushKnife-BTS) over ball-tipped FlushKnife (FlushKnife-BT) in functional experiments and clinical practice. METHODS In order to evaluate the functionality of FlushKnife-BTS, water aspiration speed, resistance to knife insertion through the scope, and waterjet flushing speed were compared between FlushKnife-BTS and BT. In clinical practice, esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) performed using FlushKnife-BTS or BT by an experienced endoscopist between October 2015 and January 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. The treatment speed and frequency of removing and reinserting the knife to aspirate fluid and air during ESD sessions were analyzed. RESULTS Functional experiments revealed that water aspiration speed by the endoscope equipped with a 2.8-mm working channel with FlushKnife-BTS was 7.7-fold faster than that with conventional FlushKnife-BT. Resistance to knife insertion inside the scope with a 2.8-mm working channel was reduced by 40% with FlushKnife-BTS. The waterjet flushing speed was faster with the use of FlushKnife-BT. In clinical practice, a comparison of 6 and 7 ESD using FlushKnife-BT and BTS, respectively, revealed that the median treatment speed was 25.5 mm2/min (range 19.6-30.3) in the BT group and 44.2 mm2/min (range 15.5-55.4) in the BTS group (P = 0.0633). However, the median treatment speed was significantly faster with FlushKnife-BTS when the resection size was larger than 1000 m2 (n = 4, median 24.2 mm2/min, range 19.6-27.7 vs n = 4, median 47.4 mm2/min, range 44.2-55.4, P = 0.0209). The frequency of knife replacement was less in the BTS group (median 1.76 times in one hour, range 0-5.45) than in the BT group (7.02 times in one hour, range 4.23-15) (P = 0.0065). CONCLUSION Our results indicate that FlushKnife-BTS enhances the performance of ESD, particularly for large lesions, by improving air and fluid aspiration and knife insertion during ESD and

  7. Supernova hemorrhage: obliterative hemorrhage of brain arteriovenous malformations following γ knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew D; Hetts, Steven W; Young, William L; Halbach, Van V; Dowd, Christopher F; Higashida, Randall T; English, Joey D

    2012-09-01

    Hemorrhage represents the most feared complication of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in both untreated patients and those treated with gamma knife radiosurgery. Radiosurgery does not immediately lead to obliteration of the malformation, which often does not occur until years following treatment. Post-obliteration hemorrhage is rare, occurring months to years after radiosurgery, and has been associated with residual or recurrent AVM despite prior apparent nidus elimination. Three cases are reported of delayed intracranial hemorrhage in patients with cerebral AVMs treated with radiosurgery in which no residual AVM was found on catheter angiography at the time of delayed post-treatment hemorrhage. That the pathophysiology of these hemorrhages involves progressive venous outflow occlusion is speculated and the possible mechanistic link to subsequent vascular rupture is discussed.

  8. Penetration tests to study the mechanical tribological properties of chisel type knife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlăduţoiu, L.; Chişiu, G.; Andrei, T.; Predescu, A.; Muraru, C.; Vlăduţ, V.

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this study was to analyze the behaviour of chisel knife type penetration in a certain type of sand. A series of penetration tests were carried out with chisel knife type, the answer to penetration depending mainly on nature, shape, size of knife and operating parameters such as speed, depth and working conditions. Tests were conducted in work conditions with wet sand and dry sand and determined force of resistance to penetration of the chisel knife type to a certain depth.

  9. Development of an air knife to remove seed coat fragments during lint cleaning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An air knife is a tool commonly used to blow off debris in a manufacturing line. The knife may also be used to break the attachment force between a lint cleaner saw and a seed coat fragment (SCF) with attached fiber, and remove them. Work continued on evaluating an auxiliary air knife mounted on t...

  10. A retracting wire knife for cutting fiber bundles and making sheet lesions of brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Shibata, M; Russell, I S

    1979-07-01

    A retracting knife which has two cutting wires for the transection of fiber bundles is described. The knife holds the fiber bundles of the stria terminalis between the two cutting wires and transects them by a shearing movement as the wires close. In addition, the feasability of such a knife producing a sheet lesion around the n. caudatus is also described.

  11. Computed tomography-guided endoscopic needle knife therapy for ileal pouch sinus.

    PubMed

    Nyabanga, Custon T; Veniero, Joseph; Shen, Bo

    2016-11-01

    Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis surgery can be complicated by anastomotic leaks, leading to the formation of abscess and chronic sinus that have been routinely managed by a surgical approach. We developed the endoscopic needle knife sinusotomy (NKSi) technique, which has become a valid alternative. The basic principle of endoscopic NKSi is dissection and drainage of the sinus through its orifice internally into the lumen of pouch body. The success of NKSi requires an access to the sinus from the pouch side. One of the most challenging situations for NKSi is a closed orifice of the sinus, which leaves an isolated chronic abscess cavity. Here we report a case of complicated presacral sinus with a closed orifice that was not amenable to NKSi, necessitating a CT-guided guide wire placement and subsequent NKSi.

  12. Dose Calculation Accuracy of the Monte Carlo Algorithm for CyberKnife Compared with Other Commercially Available Dose Calculation Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Subhash; Ott, Joseph Williams, Jamone; Dickow, Danny

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithms have the potential for greater accuracy than traditional model-based algorithms. This enhanced accuracy is particularly evident in regions of lateral scatter disequilibrium, which can develop during treatments incorporating small field sizes and low-density tissue. A heterogeneous slab phantom was used to evaluate the accuracy of several commercially available dose calculation algorithms, including Monte Carlo dose calculation for CyberKnife, Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm and Pencil Beam convolution for the Eclipse planning system, and convolution-superposition for the Xio planning system. The phantom accommodated slabs of varying density; comparisons between planned and measured dose distributions were accomplished with radiochromic film. The Monte Carlo algorithm provided the most accurate comparison between planned and measured dose distributions. In each phantom irradiation, the Monte Carlo predictions resulted in gamma analysis comparisons >97%, using acceptance criteria of 3% dose and 3-mm distance to agreement. In general, the gamma analysis comparisons for the other algorithms were <95%. The Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for CyberKnife provides more accurate dose distribution calculations in regions of lateral electron disequilibrium than commercially available model-based algorithms. This is primarily because of the ability of Monte Carlo algorithms to implicitly account for tissue heterogeneities, density scaling functions; and/or effective depth correction factors are not required.

  13. Dose calculation accuracy of the Monte Carlo algorithm for CyberKnife compared with other commercially available dose calculation algorithms.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Subhash; Ott, Joseph; Williams, Jamone; Dickow, Danny

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithms have the potential for greater accuracy than traditional model-based algorithms. This enhanced accuracy is particularly evident in regions of lateral scatter disequilibrium, which can develop during treatments incorporating small field sizes and low-density tissue. A heterogeneous slab phantom was used to evaluate the accuracy of several commercially available dose calculation algorithms, including Monte Carlo dose calculation for CyberKnife, Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm and Pencil Beam convolution for the Eclipse planning system, and convolution-superposition for the Xio planning system. The phantom accommodated slabs of varying density; comparisons between planned and measured dose distributions were accomplished with radiochromic film. The Monte Carlo algorithm provided the most accurate comparison between planned and measured dose distributions. In each phantom irradiation, the Monte Carlo predictions resulted in gamma analysis comparisons >97%, using acceptance criteria of 3% dose and 3-mm distance to agreement. In general, the gamma analysis comparisons for the other algorithms were <95%. The Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for CyberKnife provides more accurate dose distribution calculations in regions of lateral electron disequilibrium than commercially available model-based algorithms. This is primarily because of the ability of Monte Carlo algorithms to implicitly account for tissue heterogeneities, density scaling functions; and/or effective depth correction factors are not required.

  14. A phase-knife wave-front sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A S; Larichev, A V

    2005-01-31

    The use of an optical system with a phase knife is proposed to record qualitatively the shape of the optical-radiation wave front. Theoretical and numerical studies of a sensor based on a phase knife are performed, the algorithms for reconstruction of the phase function and schemes for sensor realisation are developed, and the range in which the device can be used expediently is determined. The sensor component parameters required for its realisation are determined, and the sensor efficiency in various operational modes is tested experimentally. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  15. Investigation of waste glass pouring behavior over a knife edge

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The development of vitrification technology for converting radioactive waste into a glass solid began in the early 1960s. Some problems encountered in the vitrification process are still waiting for a solution. One of them is wicking. During pouring, the glass stream flows down the wall of the pour spout until it reaches an angled cut in the wall. At this point, the stream is supposed to break cleanly away from the wall of the pour spout and fall freely into the canister. However, the glass stream is often pulled toward the wall and does not always fall into the canister, a phenomenon known as wicking. Phase 1 involves the assembly, construction, and testing of a melter capable of supplying molten glass at operational flow rates over a break-off point knife edge. Phase 2 will evaluate the effects of glass and pour spout temperatures as well as glass flow rates on the glass flow behavior over the knife edge. Phase 3 will identify the effects on wicking resulting from varying the knife edge diameter and height as well as changing the back-cut angle of the knife edge. The following tasks were completed in FY97: Design the experimental system for glass melting and pouring; Acquire and assemble the melter system; and Perform initial research work.

  16. The Shoemaker's Knife--An Approach of the Polya Type.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libeskind, Shlomo; Lott, Johnny W.

    1984-01-01

    Archimedes' shoemaker's knife problem is interesting in its own right and also allows the demonstration of heuristic teaching ideas and a different method of doing a routine construction. The focus in the article is on the thought processes involved and questions asked when attempting proofs with the problem. (MNS)

  17. 40. Main fuses and knife switch for power to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Main fuses and knife switch for power to the bridge, located in the control house. This is one of two located at either end of the main electrical panel (photograph 41). Facing east. - Henry Ford Bridge, Spanning Cerritos Channel, Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. "Fist, Stick, Knife, Gun": Getting Real in Upward Bound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pace, Barbara G.; Adkins, Theresa A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how a teacher found literature for Upward Bound students. Presents Geoffrey Canada's "Fist, Stick, Knife, Gun: A Personal History of Violence in America" as a nonfiction work to provide clarity and connections that might not have been available in a fictional work, yet it had elements of literary fiction that made the text…

  19. Adjustable knife cuts honeycomb material to specified depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Calibrated, adjustable knife cuts aluminum honeycomb or other soft materials to a desired depth. The frame of the device accommodates standard commercial blades. Since the blade is always visible to the operator, the device can be used on any straight or irregular layout line.

  20. Electromagnetic tracker accuracy in the CyberKnife suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Emmanuel; Slack, Rebecca; Banovac, Filip; Dieterich, Sonja; Zhang, Hui; Cleary, Kevin

    2006-03-01

    Electromagnetic trackers have found inroads into medical applications as a tool for navigation in recent years. Their susceptibility to interference from both electromagnetic and ferromagnetic sources have prompted several accuracy assessment studies in past years. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first accuracy study conducted to characterize measurement accuracy of an NDI AURORA electromagnetic tracker within a CyberKnife radiosurgery suite. CyberKnife is a frameless, stereotactic radiosurgery device used to ablate tumors within the brain, spine and in recent years, the chest and abdomen. This paper uses a data collection protocol to collect uniformly distributed data points within a subset of the AURORA measurement volume in a CyberKnife suite. The key aim of the study is to determine the extent to which large metal components of the CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery device and robot mount contribute to overall system performance for the AURORA electromagnetic device. A secondary goal of the work is to determine the variation in accuracy and device behavior with the presence of ionizing radiation when the LINAC is turned on.

  1. A new strategy of CyberKnife treatment system based radiosurgery followed by early use of adjuvant bevacizumab treatment for brain metastasis with extensive cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Enmin; Pan, Li; Dai, Jiazhong; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Xin; Liu, Xiaoxia; Mei, Guanghai; Sheng, Xiaofang

    2014-09-01

    Bevacizumab blocks the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor in leakage-prone capillaries and has been suggested as a new treatment for cerebral radiation edema and necrosis. CyberKnife is a new, frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system. This work investigated the safety and efficacy of CyberKnife followed by early bevacizumab treatment for brain metastasis with extensive cerebral edema. The eligibility criteria of the patients selected for radiosurgery followed by early use of adjuvant bevacizumab treatment were: (1) brain tumors from metastasis with one solitary brain lesion and symptomatic extensive cerebral edema; (2) >18 years of age; (3) the patient refused surgery due to the physical conditions and the risk of surgery; (4) no contraindications for bevacizumab. (5) bevacizumab was applied for a minimum of 2 injections and a maximum of 6 injections with a 2-week interval between treatments, beginning within 2 weeks of the CyberKnife therapy; (6) Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥30. Tumor size and edema were monitored by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Dexamethasone dosage, KPS, adverse event occurrence and associated clinical outcomes were also recorded. Eight patients were accrued for this new treatment. Radiation dose ranged from 20 to 33 Gy in one to five sessions, prescribed to the 61-71 % isodose line. Bevacizumab therapy was administered 3-10 days after completion of CyberKnife treatment for a minimum of two cycles (5 mg/kg, at 2-week intervals). MRI revealed average reductions of 55.8 % (post-gadolinium) and 63.4 % (T2/FLAIR). Seven patients showed significant clinical neurological improvements. Dexamethasone was reduced in all patients, with five successfully discontinuing dexamethasone treatment 4 weeks after bevacizumab initiation. Hypertension, a bevacizumab-related adverse event, occurred in one patient. After 3-8 months, all patients studied were alive and primary brain metastases were under control, 2 developed new brain

  2. Cosmetic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body Looking and feeling your best Cosmetic surgery Cosmetic surgery Teens might have cosmetic surgery for a ... about my body? What are the risks of cosmetic surgery? top People who have cosmetic surgery face ...

  3. Knife mill operating factors effect on switchgrass particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bitra, V.S.P.; Womac, A.R.; Yang, Y.T.; Igathinathane, C.; Miu, P.I; Chevanan, Nehru; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2009-06-01

    Biomass particle size impacts handling, storage, conversion, and dust control systems. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) particle size distributions created by a knife mill were determined for integral classifying screen sizes from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, operating speeds from 250 to 500 rpm, and mass input rates from 2 to 11 kg/min. Particle distributions were classified with standardized sieves for forage analysis that included horizontal sieving motion with machined-aluminum sieves of thickness proportional to sieve opening dimensions. Then, a wide range of analytical descriptors were examined to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions. Correlation coefficient of geometric mean length with knife mill screen size, feed rate, and speed were 0.872, 0.349, and 0.037, respectively. Hence, knife mill screen size largely determined particle size of switchgrass chop. Feed rate had an unexpected influence on particle size, though to a lesser degree than screen size. The Rosin Rammler function fit the chopped switchgrass size distribution data with an R2 > 0.982. Mass relative span was greater than 1, which indicated a wide distribution of particle sizes. Uniformity coefficient was more than 4.0, which indicated a large assortment of particles and also represented a well-graded particle size distribution. Knife mill chopping of switchgrass produced strongly fine skewed mesokurtic particles with 12.7 25.4 mm screens and fine skewed mesokurtic particles with 50.8 mm screen. Results of this extensive analysis of particle sizes can be applied to selection of knife mill operating parameters to produce a particular size of switchgrass chop, and will serve as a guide for relations among the various analytic descriptors of biomass particle distributions.

  4. Knife mill operating factors effect on switchgrass particle size distributions.

    PubMed

    Bitra, Venkata S P; Womac, Alvin R; Yang, Yuechuan T; Igathinathane, C; Miu, Petre I; Chevanan, Nehru; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2009-11-01

    Biomass particle size impacts handling, storage, conversion, and dust control systems. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) particle size distributions created by a knife mill were determined for integral classifying screen sizes from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, operating speeds from 250 to 500 rpm, and mass input rates from 2 to 11 kg/min. Particle distributions were classified with standardized sieves for forage analysis that included horizontal sieving motion with machined-aluminum sieves of thickness proportional to sieve opening dimensions. Then, a wide range of analytical descriptors were examined to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions. Correlation coefficient of geometric mean length with knife mill screen size, feed rate, and speed were 0.872, 0.349, and 0.037, respectively. Hence, knife mill screen size largely determined particle size of switchgrass chop. Feed rate had an unexpected influence on particle size, though to a lesser degree than screen size. The Rosin-Rammler function fit the chopped switchgrass size distribution data with an R(2)>0.982. Mass relative span was greater than 1, which indicated a wide distribution of particle sizes. Uniformity coefficient was more than 4.0, which indicated a large assortment of particles and also represented a well-graded particle size distribution. Knife mill chopping of switchgrass produced 'strongly fine skewed mesokurtic' particles with 12.7-25.4 mm screens and 'fine skewed mesokurtic' particles with 50.8 mm screen. Results of this extensive analysis of particle sizes can be applied to selection of knife mill operating parameters to produce a particular size of switchgrass chop, and will serve as a guide for relations among the various analytic descriptors of biomass particle distributions.

  5. CyberKnife radiosurgery for the treatment of orbital metastases.

    PubMed

    Klingenstein, A; Kufeld, M; Wowra, B; Muacevic, A; Fürweger, C; Schaller, U C

    2012-10-01

    Purpose of this study is to evaluate radiographic therapy response, clinical outcome and adverse effects of CyberKnife radiosurgery in patients suffering from orbital metastases. Sixteen orbital metastases originating from different solid cancers in fourteen patients were treated by single fraction CyberKnife radiosurgery. Radiographic response and clinical outcome were evaluated. The treated tumor volume ranged from 0.2 to 35 cm3 (median 2.3 cm3, mean 7.0 cm3, SD 6 10.4 cm3, CI 0.9-9.4 cm3). The prescription dose ranged from 16.5-21 Gy (median 18 Gy, mean 18.2 Gy, SD 6 1.2 Gy, CI 17.0-18.4 Gy). A no change situation was observed in nine lesions, partial remission in four as well as complete remission in one metastasis. Tumor growth was stabilized or regressive following CyberKnife therapy in 87% of the cases. Recurrence was observed in two cases (13%). Before therapy, three patients suffered from visual disturbance and five patients reported diplopia. Six patients had no initial symptoms. After therapy, one patient indicated improvement of the present visual deficit and two patients no change. Out of the two patients with persistent diplopia, two reported improvement after therapy and three no change. No progression of symptoms was noted in any of the cases. Fourteen out of sixteen treated lesions were stable or regressive following CyberKnife radiosurgery (87%). As no serious adverse effects were reported in this series, CyberKnife therapy was shown to be of great value for local management of orbital metastases.

  6. Feasibility Study on Applying Radiophotoluminescent Glass Dosimeters for CyberKnife SRS Dose Verification

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shih-Ming; Hung, Chao-Hsiung; Liao, Yi-Jen; Fu, Hsiao-Mei; Tsai, Jo-Ting

    2017-01-01

    CyberKnife is one of multiple modalities for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Due to the nature of CyberKnife and the characteristics of SRS, dose evaluation of the CyberKnife procedure is critical. A radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter was used to verify the dose accuracy for the CyberKnife procedure and validate a viable dose verification system for CyberKnife treatment. A radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter, thermoluminescent dosimeter, and Kodak EDR2 film were used to measure the lateral dose profile and percent depth dose of CyberKnife. A Monte Carlo simulation for dose verification was performed using BEAMnrc to verify the measured results. This study also used a radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter coupled with an anthropomorphic phantom to evaluate the accuracy of the dose given by CyberKnife. Measurements from the radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter were compared with the results of a thermoluminescent dosimeter and EDR2 film, and the differences found were less than 5%. The radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter has some advantages in terms of dose measurements over CyberKnife, such as repeatability, stability, and small effective size. These advantages make radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters a potential candidate dosimeter for the CyberKnife procedure. This study concludes that radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters are a promising and reliable dosimeter for CyberKnife dose verification with clinically acceptable accuracy within 5%. PMID:28046056

  7. Feasibility Study on Applying Radiophotoluminescent Glass Dosimeters for CyberKnife SRS Dose Verification.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shih-Ming; Hung, Chao-Hsiung; Liao, Yi-Jen; Fu, Hsiao-Mei; Tsai, Jo-Ting; Huang, Yung-Hui; Huang, David Y C

    2017-01-01

    CyberKnife is one of multiple modalities for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Due to the nature of CyberKnife and the characteristics of SRS, dose evaluation of the CyberKnife procedure is critical. A radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter was used to verify the dose accuracy for the CyberKnife procedure and validate a viable dose verification system for CyberKnife treatment. A radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter, thermoluminescent dosimeter, and Kodak EDR2 film were used to measure the lateral dose profile and percent depth dose of CyberKnife. A Monte Carlo simulation for dose verification was performed using BEAMnrc to verify the measured results. This study also used a radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter coupled with an anthropomorphic phantom to evaluate the accuracy of the dose given by CyberKnife. Measurements from the radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter were compared with the results of a thermoluminescent dosimeter and EDR2 film, and the differences found were less than 5%. The radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter has some advantages in terms of dose measurements over CyberKnife, such as repeatability, stability, and small effective size. These advantages make radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters a potential candidate dosimeter for the CyberKnife procedure. This study concludes that radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters are a promising and reliable dosimeter for CyberKnife dose verification with clinically acceptable accuracy within 5%.

  8. Dependence of normal brain integral dose and normal tissue complication probability on the prescription isodose values for γ-knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lijun

    2001-11-01

    A recent multi-institutional clinical study suggested possible benefits of lowering the prescription isodose lines for stereotactic radiosurgery procedures. In this study, we investigate the dependence of the normal brain integral dose and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) on the prescription isodose values for γ-knife radiosurgery. An analytical dose model was developed for γ-knife treatment planning. The dose model was commissioned by fitting the measured dose profiles for each helmet size. The dose model was validated by comparing its results with the Leksell gamma plan (LGP, version 5.30) calculations. The normal brain integral dose and the NTCP were computed and analysed for an ensemble of treatment cases. The functional dependence of the normal brain integral dose and the NCTP versus the prescribing isodose values was studied for these cases. We found that the normal brain integral dose and the NTCP increase significantly when lowering the prescription isodose lines from 50% to 35% of the maximum tumour dose. Alternatively, the normal brain integral dose and the NTCP decrease significantly when raising the prescribing isodose lines from 50% to 65% of the maximum tumour dose. The results may be used as a guideline for designing future dose escalation studies for γ-knife applications.

  9. A noninvasive eye fixation monitoring system for CyberKnife radiotherapy of choroidal and orbital tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Daftari, I. K.; Petti, P. L.; Larson, D. A.; O'Brien, J. M.; Phillips, T. L.

    2009-03-15

    A new noninvasive monitoring system for fixing the eye has been developed to treat orbital and choroidal tumors with CyberKnife-based radiotherapy. This device monitors the eye during CT/MRI scanning and during treatment. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of the fixation light system for CyberKnife-based treatments of orbital and choroidal tumors and supports the idea that larger choroidal melanomas and choroidal metastases could be treated with CyberKnife without implanting fiducial markers.

  10. SRAO: optical design and the dual-knife-edge WFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M.; Tokovinin, Andrei

    2016-07-01

    The Southern Robotic Adaptive Optics (SRAO) instrument will bring the proven high-efficiency capabilities of Robo-AO to the Southern-Hemisphere, providing the unique capability to image with high-angular-resolution thousands of targets per year across the entire sky. Deployed on the modern 4.1m SOAR telescope located on Cerro Tololo, the NGS AO system will use an innovative dual-knife-edge wavefront sensor, similar to a pyramid sensor, to enable guiding on targets down to V=16 with diffraction limited resolution in the NIR. The dual-knife-edge wavefront sensor can be up to two orders of magnitude less costly than custom glass pyramids, with similar wavefront error sensitivity and minimal chromatic aberrations. SRAO is capable of observing hundreds of targets a night through automation, allowing confirmation and characterization of the large number of exoplanets produced by current and future missions.

  11. Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Plastic Surgery KidsHealth > For Teens > Plastic Surgery Print A ... her forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word " ...

  12. Outpatient Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Outpatient Surgery Share this Page Preparing For Surgery Effects of Anesthesia Children and Anesthesia Pregnancy and Anesthesia Seniors and Anesthesia Surgery Risks Anesthesia Awareness Obesity and Anesthesia Sleep Apnea and Anesthesia Smoking and Anesthesia Outpatient Surgery ...

  13. A knife-edge array field emission cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.

    1994-08-01

    many cathode applications require a new type of cathode that is able to produce short pulsed electron beams at high emission current. Gated field emitter arrays of micrometer size are recognized as candidates to meet this need and have become the research focus of vacuum microelectronics. Existing fabrication methods produce emitters that are limited either in frequency response or in current emission. One reason is that the structure of these emitters are not sufficiently optimized. In this study, the author investigated the factors that affect the performance of field emitters. An optimum emitter structure, the knife-edge field emitter array, was developed from the analysis. Large field enhancement factor, large effective emission area, and small emitter capacitance are the advantages of the structure. The author next explored various options of fabricating the knife-edge emitter structure. He proposed a unique thin film process procedure and developed the fabrication techniques to build the emitters on (110) silicon wafers. Data from the initial cathode tests showed very low onset voltages and Fowler-Nordheim type emission. Emission simulation based on the fabricated emitter structure indicated that the knife-edge emitter arrays have the potential to produce high performance in modulation frequency and current emission. Several fabrication issues that await further development are discussed and possible solutions are suggested.

  14. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott; Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W.; Sloan, Andrew

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system—MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was “printed” using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm). A

  15. Femoral bifurcation disease: balloon or knife.

    PubMed

    Bosiers, Marc; Deloose, Koen

    2009-10-01

    Arterial occlusive disease at the level of the femoral bifurcation mostly occurs in combination with inflow and/or outflow lesions. Surgical endarterectomy of the femoral bifurcation is a well-proven low-risk and easy surgical intervention with known durable success, while, although proven to be safe, evidence is lacking about the durability of the endovascular approach. Based on the evidence at hand, the surgical approach should be recommended for the vast majority of patients and the endovascular approach should only be indicated as the first strategy in selected cases presenting with factors that might compromise the outcome of surgery in the groin. If feasible, the hybrid approach with endarterectomy at the level of the bifurcation and endovascular repair of the inflow and outflow lesions is preferred in patients with multilevel disease.

  16. Increased CD147 and MMP-9 expression in the normal rat brain after gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Wei, Ming; Li, Shenghui; Zhou, Ziwei; Xu, Desheng

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced vascular injury is a major complication of Gamma knife surgery (GKS). Previous studies have shown that CD147 and MMP-9 are closely associated with vascular remodeling and pathological angiogenesis. Thus, we analysed changes in CD147 and MMP-9 expression in the cerebral cortex to investigate the correlation between CD147 and MMP-9 in the rat following GKS. Adult male Wistar rats were subjected to GKS at a maximum dose of 75 Gy and then euthanized 1 to 12 weeks later. Using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis, we found that CD147 and MMP-9 expression were markedly upregulated in the target area 8-12 weeks after GKS when compared with the control group. Immunofluorescent double staining demonstrated that CD147 signals colocalized with CD31, GFAP and MMP-9-positive cells. Importantly, CD147 levels correlated with increased MMP-9 expression in irradiated brain tissue. For the first time, these data demonstrate a potential relationship between CD147 and MMP-9 following GKS. In addition, our study also suggests that CD147 and MMP-9 may play a role in vascular injury after GKS.

  17. Direct measures of mechanical energy for knife mill size reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Bitra, V.S.P.; Womac, A.R.; Igathinathane, C.; Miu, P.I; Yang, Y.T.; Smith, D.R.; Chevanan, Nehru; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2009-08-01

    Lengthy straw/stalk of biomass may not be directly fed into grinders such as hammer mills and disc refiners. Hence, biomass needs to be preprocessed using coarse grinders like a knife mill to allow for efficient feeding in refiner mills without bridging and choking. Size reduction mechanical energy was directly measured for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.), and corn stover (Zea mays L.) in an instrumented knife mill. Direct power inputs were determined for different knife mill screen openings from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, rotor speeds between 250 and 500 rpm, and mass feed rates from 1 to 11 kg/min. Overall accuracy of power measurement was calculated to be 0.003 kW. Total specific energy (kWh/Mg) was defined as size reduction energy to operate mill with biomass. Effective specific energy was defined as the energy that can be assumed to reach the biomass. The difference is parasitic or no-load energy of mill. Total specific energy for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover chopping increased with knife mill speed, whereas, effective specific energy decreased marginally for switchgrass and increased for wheat straw and corn stover. Total and effective specific energy decreased with an increase in screen size for all the crops studied. Total specific energy decreased with increase in mass feed rate, but effective specific energy increased for switchgrass and wheat straw, and decreased for corn stover at increased feed rate. For knife mill screen size of 25.4 mm and optimum speed of 250 rpm, optimum feed rates were 7.6, 5.8, and 4.5 kg/min for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively, and the corresponding total specific energies were 7.57, 10.53, and 8.87 kWh/Mg and effective specific energies were 1.27, 1.50, and 0.24 kWh/Mg for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively. Energy utilization ratios were calculated as 16.8%, 14.3%, and 2.8% for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively. These

  18. Endoscopy-Assisted Single-Incision Technique to Harvest the Conchal Cartilage and Temporal Fascia Simultaneously by Using Phaco Slit Knife.

    PubMed

    Ugurlu, Alper Mete; Ersozlu, Tolga; Basat, Salih Onur; Ceran, Fatih

    2015-11-01

    Conchal cartilage and temporal fascia grafts are useful materials for secondary rhinoplasty cases. Generally, surgeons require to access autologous grafts fast and effortlessly. Harvesting 2 different types of graft, such as cartilage and fascia, however, are associated with limitations, such as additional surgery time, extra incisions, and postoperative additional distortions at the graft-host interface. The authors evolved a modified single incision that would harvest conchal cartilage and temporal fascia simultaneously by using 4 mm endoscope and 3 mm angled phaco slit knife.

  19. OUTCOME OF CLIVAL CHORDOMAS AFTER SKULL BASE SURGERIES WITH MEAN FOLLOW-UP OF 10 YEARS

    PubMed Central

    TAMURA, TAKAMITSU; SATO, TAKU; KISHIDA, YUGO; ICHIKAWA, MASAHIRO; ODA, KEIKO; ITO, EIJI; WATANABE, TADASHI; SAKUMA, JUN; SAITO, KIYOSHI

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background and Objective: Skull base chordomas are clinically malignant because of the difficulty of total removal, high recurrence rate, and occasional drop metastasis. Although aggressive surgical resection and postoperative radiation have been recommended, the long-term outcome remains unsatisfactory. Methods: From 1992 to 2011, we treated 24 patients with skull base chordoma using aggressive surgical removal as a principal strategy. Skull base approaches were selected according to tumor extension to remove the tumor and surrounding bone as completely as possible. After surgery, all patients were closely observed with MRI to find small and localized recurrent tumors, which were treated with gamma-knife radiosurgery or surgical resection. The mean postoperative follow-up duration was 10.2 years (range, 1-17.2 years). Results: The 5-, 10-, and 15-year overall survival rates were 86%, 72%, and 72%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year progression-free survival rates were 47% and 35%, respectively. Tumor extension to the brainstem and partial tumor removal were the factors related to poor survival. Conclusions: Our results suggest that aggressive surgical removal improves the long-term outcome of patients with skull base chordoma. We would like to emphasize that skull base chordomas should be aggressively removed using various skull base approaches. PMID:26370681

  20. Use of Sato's curved laryngoscope and an insulated-tip knife for endoscopic incisional therapy of esophageal web.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Shouji; Yoshida, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Tatsuya; Uetake, Tomoyosi; Sato, Tadashi; Hayashi, Akira; Kanai, Mari; Yamamoto, Takanori; Hatsushika, Kyosuke; Masuyama, Keisuke; Enomoto, Nobuyuki

    2015-05-01

    We experienced two cases of esophageal web accompanying severe stricture that were treated by endoscopic incisions with an insulated-tip knife (IT-knife). With attention paid to the mucosa at the stricture, the lesion was incised with an IT-knife without complications. Sato's curved laryngoscope was used even in cervical esophageal lesions and an excellent field was secured.

  1. Removing seed coat fragments with a lint cleaner grid bar air knife

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed coat fragments (SCF) in ginned lint cause spinning problems at the textile mill and undesirable defects in finished goods. Work continued on developing an air knife that may help remove SCF from ginned lint. The air knife is mounted on the 1st lint cleaner grid bar of a saw-type lint cleaner,...

  2. [Research progress of needles with knife-edge for carotid cardiac syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tan, Lingqiong; Zhao, Yanling

    2015-04-01

    According to topographic anatomy, pathogenesis and by retrieving, summarizing and analyzing literature regarding needle-knife and needles with knife-edge for carotid cardiac syndrome, it is found out that clinical misdiagnosis rate of carotid cardiac syndrome is considerably high. Needle-knife and needles with knife-edge could significantly improve the clinical symptoms of carotid cardiac syndrome, showing characteristic and advantage in treatment, but it is deficient in technique standard and efficacy criteria that should be united and authoritative. Researches regarding pathogenesis of carotid cardiac syndrome are not systematic. Clinical observation regarding long-term efficacy and relapse of needle-knife and needles with knife-edge treatment is rare. It is believed that the awareness on carotid cardiac syndrome should be increased to reduce misdiagnosis; scientific and standardized technique standard and efficacy criteria should be established; systematic and comprehensive researches regarding mechanism of needle-knife and needles with knife-edge for carotid cardiac syndrome should be launched; besides, clinical discussion regarding its long-term efficacy should start to provide a better clinical guideline.

  3. [Diagnostic image (310). A man with a knife in his head].

    PubMed

    Beltman, J J; Wilde, J

    2007-02-10

    A 30-year-old man presented with a knife in his head; it had perforated the left temporal area and its point was located in the mouth. After surgical removal of the knife, the patient left the hospital without functional deficits.

  4. Geology of the Knife River area, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, William Edward

    1953-01-01

    The Knife River area, consisting of six 15-minute quadrangles, includes the lower half of the Knife River valley in west-central North Dakota. The area, in the center of the Williston Basin, is underlain by the Tongue River member of the Fort Union formation (Paleocene) and the Golden Valley formation (Eocene). The Tongue River includes beds equivalent to the Sentinel Butte shale; the Golden Valley formation, which receives its first detailed description in this report, consists of two members, a lower member of gray to white sandy kaolin clay and an upper member of cross-bedded micaceous sandstone. Pro-Tongue River rocks that crop out in southwestern North Dakota include the Ludlow member of the Fort Union formation, the Cannonball marine formation (Paleocene) and the Hell Creek, Fox Hills, and Pierre formations, all upper Cretaceous. Post-Golden Valley rocks include the White River formation (Oligocene) and gravels on an old planation surface that may be Miocene or Pliocent. Surficial deposits include glacial and fluvial deposits of Pleistocene age and alluvium, dune sand, residual silica, and landslide blocks of Recent age. Three ages of glacial deposits can be differentiated, largely on the basis of three fills, separated by unconformities, in the Knife River valley. All three are of Wisconsin age and probably represent the Iowan, Tazewell, and Mankato substages. Deposits of the Cary substage have not been identified either in the Knife River area or elsewhere in southern North Dakota. Iowan glacial deposits form the outermost drift border in North Dakota. Southwest of this border are a few scattered granite boulders that are residual from the erosion of either the White River formation or a pre-Wisconsin till. The Tazewell drift border cannot be followed in southern North Dakota. The Mankato drift border can be traced in a general way from the South Dakota State line northwest across the Missouri River and through the middle of the Knife River area. The major

  5. Robotic surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Robot-assisted surgery; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery; Laparoscopic surgery with robotic assistance ... computer station and directs the movements of a robot. Small surgical tools are attached to the robot's ...

  6. Periscopic Spine Surgery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-02-01

    four patients during CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery treatments under an IRB-approved protocol. 5) Developed a respiratory motion simulator with...two 3 degree of freedom platforms to evaluate CyberKnife treatments which compensate for internal organ motion.

  7. Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) KidsHealth > For Parents > Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) ... or bariatric surgery might be an option. About Bariatric Surgery Bariatric surgery had its beginnings in the 1960s, ...

  8. Radioguided Adrenal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Deus, Javier; Millera, Alfonso; Andrés, Alejandro; Prats, Enrique; Gil, Ismael; Suarez, Manuel; Salcini, José L.; Lahoz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The laparoscopic adrenalectomy is considered as the procedure of choice for the treatment of adrenal hyperplasia and tumor lesions. However, some special situations may limit the use of this method due to the difficulty to locate the gland and perform the lesion excision. We analyze 2 patients of a left adrenal tumor, explaining how they have overcome the difficulties in both situations. The first case was a patient with a history of intra-abdominal surgery and the other patient suffered from severe obesity. We performed with the use of the gamma probe, and the 2 cases, was of great help to access and glandular localization. The help of gamma probe test was achieved in the surgical bed, that removal was complete. The use of the portable gamma probe facilitated the access to the left adrenal gland as well as conducting the glandular excision without delay, despite the difficulties due to the intra abdominal surgery caused by the previous surgery, and in the case of severe obesity. PMID:26426608

  9. Endoscopic treatment for pancreatic diseases: Needle-knife-guided cannulation via the minor papilla

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Gong, Biao; Jiang, Wei-Song; Liu, Lei; Bielike, Kouken; Xv, Bin; Wu, Yun-Lin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the efficacy and safety of meticulous cannulation by needle-knife. METHODS: Three needle-knife procedures were used to facilitate cannulation in cases when standard cannulation techniques failed. A total of 104 cannulations via the minor papilla attempted in 74 patients at our center between January 2008 and June 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Standard methods were successful in 79 cannulations. Of the 25 cannulations that could not be performed by standard methods, 19 were performed by needle-knife, while 17 (89.5%) were successful. Needle-knife use improved the success rate of cannulation [76.0%, 79/104 vs 92.3%, (79 + 17)/104; P = 0.001]. When the 6 cases not appropriate for needle-knife cannulation were excluded, the success rate was improved further (80.6%, 79/98 vs 98.0%, 96/98; P = 0.000). There were no significant differences in the rates of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography adverse events between the group using standard methods alone and the group using needle-knife after failure of standard methods (4.7% vs 10.5%, P = 0.301). CONCLUSION: The needle-knife procedure may be an alternative method for improving the success rate of cannulation via the minor papilla, particularly when standard cannulation has failed. PMID:26019460

  10. [Lasers in dermatologic surgery].

    PubMed

    Takac, S; Stojanović, S; Muhi, B

    1997-01-01

    The authors review their experiences with the use of carbon-dioxide (CO2) lasers in dermatological surgery in a group of 3000 patients, with a total number of 3920 tumorous skin lesions, during a three-year period. The word LASER is an acronym for L-ight A-mplification by S-timulated E-mission of R-adiation. It must be pointed out that it is electromagnetic radiation, not X-irradiation. In regard to the spectrum laser light is between infrared and ultraviolet light, mainly in the visible spectrum, so its application does not produce new generations of iatrogenic malignancies as in the case of ionizing radiation. The laser is a new scalpel which differs from the metal surgical scalpel (also called "optical knife" and "light scalpel"). In the conclusion authors state that using (CO2) complete success was achieved in treatment of the following skin lesions: common viral warts, senile keratosis, seborrhoeic keratosis, plantar viral warts, papillomas, capillary telangiectasias of the face, hemangiomas, juvenile viral warts of the face, ingrown nails, condyloma acuminata, pendular fibromas, xanthelasmas, atheromas, pyogenic granulomas, keratoacanthomas, tattooed skin and basocellular epitheliomas.

  11. Novel design and sensitivity analysis of displacement measurement system utilizing knife edge diffraction for nanopositioning stages.

    PubMed

    Lee, ChaBum; Lee, Sun-Kyu; Tarbutton, Joshua A

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a novel design and sensitivity analysis of a knife edge-based optical displacement sensor that can be embedded with nanopositioning stages. The measurement system consists of a laser, two knife edge locations, two photodetectors, and axillary optics components in a simple configuration. The knife edge is installed on the stage parallel to its moving direction and two separated laser beams are incident on knife edges. While the stage is in motion, the direct transverse and diffracted light at each knife edge is superposed producing interference at the detector. The interference is measured with two photodetectors in a differential amplification configuration. The performance of the proposed sensor was mathematically modeled, and the effect of the optical and mechanical parameters, wavelength, beam diameter, distances from laser to knife edge to photodetector, and knife edge topography, on sensor outputs was investigated to obtain a novel analytical method to predict linearity and sensitivity. From the model, all parameters except for the beam diameter have a significant influence on measurement range and sensitivity of the proposed sensing system. To validate the model, two types of knife edges with different edge topography were used for the experiment. By utilizing a shorter wavelength, smaller sensor distance and higher edge quality increased measurement sensitivity can be obtained. The model was experimentally validated and the results showed a good agreement with the theoretically estimated results. This sensor is expected to be easily implemented into nanopositioning stage applications at a low cost and mathematical model introduced here can be used for design and performance estimation of the knife edge-based sensor as a tool.

  12. Lung surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... are thoracotomy and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Robotic surgery may also be used. Lung surgery using a ... clot from the pulmonary artery ( pulmonary embolism ) Treat complications of tuberculosis Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery can be used to treat many of these ...

  13. Fatal missile injury from the rotating knife of an agricultural mower.

    PubMed

    Roll, P; Klintschar, M

    1998-06-08

    The first case of a lethal injury inflicted by a projectile-wise shot piece of the rotating knife of an agricultural mower (gyro mower) is presented. The knife had travelled approximately 100 m through the air before hitting the victim's body. It transected most organs of the ventral neck including both carotids, the trachea and the esophagus and led to death from exsanguination. The type of the knife which was recovered from the body led to the identification of the mower whose operator had not noticed the accident. Legal action against the user or against the producer of the mower were considered but dismissed as no safety regulations had been violated.

  14. SU-E-J-64: Feasibility Study of Surgical Clips for Fiducial Tracking in CyberKnife System

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H; Yoon, J; Lee, E; Cho, S; Park, K; Choi, W; Baek, J; Keum, K; Koom, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the ability of CyberKnife to track surgical clips used as fiducial markers. Methods: The Octavius 1000SRS detector and solid water (RW3) slab phantom were used with motion platform to evaluate the study. The RW3 slab phantom was set up to measure the dose distribution from coronal plane. It consists of 9 plates and the thickness of each plate is 10mm. Among them, one plate was attached with 3 surgical clips, which are orthogonally positioned on outer region of array. The length of attached clip was represented as 1cm on planning CT. The clip plate was placed on the 1000SRS detector and 3 slabs were stacked up on the plate to build the measuring depth. Below the detector, 5 slabs were set. The two-axis motion platform was programmed with 1D sinusoidal movement (20mm peak-to-peak, 3s period) toward superior/inferior and left/right directions to simulate target motion. During delivery, two clips were extracted by two X-ray imagers, which led to translational error correction only. Synchrony was also used for dynamic tracking. After the irradiation, the measured dose distribution of coronal plane was compared with the planar dose distribution calculated by the CyberKnife treatment planning system (Multiplan) for cross verification. The results were assessed by comparing the absolute Gamma (γ) index. Results: The dose distributions measured by the 1000SRS detector were in good agreements with those calculated by Multiplan. In the dosimetric comparison using γ-function criteria based on the distance-to-agreement of 3mm and the local dose difference of 3%, the passing rate with γ- parameter ≤1 was 91% in coronal plane. Conclusion: The surgical clips can be considered as new fiducials for robotic radiosurgery delivery by considering the target margin with less than 5mm.

  15. Non-uniform sampling knife-edge method for camera modulation transfer function measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yaxuan; Xue, Xun; Chen, Yongquan; Tian, Liude; Zhao, Jianke; Gao, Limin

    2016-11-01

    Traditional slanted knife-edge method experiences large errors in the camera modulation transfer function (MTF) due to tilt angle error in the knife-edge resulting in non-uniform sampling of the edge spread function. In order to resolve this problem, a non -uniform sampling knife-edge method for camera MTF measurement is proposed. By applying a simple direct calculation of the Fourier transform of the derivative for the non-uniform sampling data, the camera super-sampled MTF results are obtained. Theoretical simulations for images with and without noise under different tilt angle errors are run using the proposed method. It is demonstrated that the MTF results are insensitive to tilt angle errors. To verify the accuracy of the proposed method, an experimental setup for camera MTF measurement is established. Measurement results show that the proposed method is superior to traditional methods, and improves the universality of the slanted knife-edge method for camera MTF measurement.

  16. Influence on grip of knife handle surface characteristics and wearing protective gloves.

    PubMed

    Claudon, Laurent

    2006-11-01

    Ten subjects were asked to apply maximum torques on knife handles with either their bare hand or their hand wearing a Kevlar fibre protective glove. Four knife handles (2 roughnesses, 2 hardnesses) were tested. Surface electromyograms of 6 upper limb and shoulder muscles were recorded and subject opinions on both knife handle hardness and friction in the hand were also assessed. The results revealed the significant influence of wearing gloves (p<0.0001), knife type (p<0.0005) and handle hardness (p<0.005) on the applied torque. Wearing Kevlar fibre gloves greatly increased the torque independently of the other two parameters. Under the bare hand condition, a 90 degrees ShA slightly rough handle provided the greatest torque. Subject opinion agreed with the observed effects on recorded torque values except for the hardness factor, for which a preference for the 70 degrees ShA value over the 90 degrees ShA value emerged.

  17. Liminal Masculinity in Richard Selzer's Knife Song Korea.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiena

    2014-03-01

    The doctor in a foreign country is a recurring theme in physician writer Richard Selzer's stories. In his 2009 novel, Knife Song Korea, Selzer returns to this theme, examining it in depth through the lens of gender. Selzer features the American military surgeon Sloane's multiple border-crossings, namely, from America to Korea, from health to patienthood, and from sex-exploitation to love. Crossing those visible or invisible borders in the gender and race conscious contexts of medical profession and military in wartime Korea, Sloane finds himself liminally located among various masculine stereotypes. The mixed-race situation in the novel further pushes Sloane to realize the unbearability of the baggage of American manhood as represented in his profession. Selzer's punishment of Sloane's border-crossings seems to suggest that physicians, together with patients, are equally likely to be victimized by the macho norms in medicine.

  18. Pretreatment clinical prognostic factors for brain metastases from breast cancer treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Roehrig, Andrew T.; Ferrel, Ethan A.; Benincosa, Devon A.; MacKay, Alexander R.; Ling, Benjamin C.; Carlson, Jonathan D.; Demakas, John J.; Wagner, Aaron; Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Fairbanks, Robert K.; Call, Jason A.; Cooke, Barton S.; Peressini, Ben; Lee, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brain metastases significantly affect morbidity and mortality rates for patients with metastatic breast cancer. Treatment for brain metastases lengthens survival, and options such as stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) can increase survival to 12 months or longer. This study retrospectively analyzes the prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) for patients with one or multiple brain metastases from breast cancer treated with SRS. Methods: Between December 2001 and May 2015, 111 patients with brain metastases from breast cancer were grouped by potential prognostic factors including age at diagnosis, Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) score, number of brain metastases, and whether or not they received adjuvant treatments such as whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) or surgical resection. Survival rates were determined for all groups, and hazard ratios were calculated using univariate and multivariate analyses to compare differences in OS. Results: Median OS was 16.8 ± 4.22 months. Univariate analysis of patients with a KPS ≤60 and multivariate analysis of KPS 70–80 showed significantly shorter survival than those with KPS 90–100 (5.9 ± 1.22 months, 21.3 ± 11.69 months, and 22.00 ± 12.56 months, P = 0.024 and < 0.001). Other results such as age ≥65 years and higher number of brain metastases trended toward shorter survival but were not statistically significant. No difference in survival was found for patients who had received WBRT in addition to SRS (P = 0.779). Conclusion: SRS has been shown to be safe and effective in treating brain metastases from breast cancer. We found our median survival to be 16.8 ± 4.22 months, an increase from other clinical reports. In addition, 38.4% of our population was alive at 2 years and 15.6% survived 5 years. Significant prognostic factors can help inform clinical treatment decisions. This study found that KPS was a significant prognostic indicator of OS in these patients. PMID:27990315

  19. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Patients With Nonfunctioning Pituitary Adenomas: Results From a 15-Year Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Bruce E. Cochran, Joseph; Natt, Neena; Brown, Paul D.; Erickson, Dana; Link, Michael J.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Foote, Robert L.; Stafford, Scott L.; Schomberg, Paula J.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and complications of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFA). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective review of 62 patients with NFA undergoing radiosurgery between 1992 and 2004, of whom 59 (95%) underwent prior tumor resection. The median treatment volume was 4.0 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.8-12.9). The median treatment dose to the tumor margin was 16 Gy (range, 11-20). The median maximum point dose to the optic apparatus was 9.5 Gy (range, 5.0-12.6). The median follow-up period after radiosurgery was 64 months (range, 23-161). Results: Tumor size decreased for 37 patients (60%) and remained unchanged for 23 patients (37%). Two patients (3%) had tumor growth outside the prescribed treatment volume and required additional treatment (fractionated radiation therapy, n = 1; repeat radiosurgery, n 1). Tumor growth control was 95% at 3 and 7 years after radiosurgery. Eleven (27%) of 41 patients with normal (n = 30) or partial (n = 11) anterior pituitary function before radiosurgery developed new deficits at a median of 24 months after radiosurgery. The risk of developing new anterior pituitary deficits at 5 years was 32%. The 5-year risk of developing new anterior pituitary deficits was 18% for patients with a tumor volume of {<=}4.0 cm{sup 3} compared with 58% for patients with a tumor volume >4.0 cm{sup 3} (risk ratio 4.5; 95% confidence interval = 1.3-14.9, p = 0.02). No patient had a decline in visual function. Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery is effective in the management of patients with residual or recurrent NFA, although longer follow-up is needed to evaluate long-term outcomes. The primary complication is hypopituitarism, and the risk of developing new anterior pituitary deficits correlates with the size of the irradiated tumor.

  20. A novel technique of anesthesia induction in supine position with impaled knife in the back

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ajay; Saha, Kamales Kumar; Jagiasi, Bharat; Saha, Kakalee K

    2015-01-01

    Current technique of airway management for impaled knife in the back includes putting the patient in lateral position and intubation. We present here a novel technique of anesthesia induction (intubation and central line insertion) in a patient with impaled knife in the back which is simple and easily reproducible. This technique can be used for single lung ventilation using double lumen tube or bronchial blocker also if desired. PMID:25849698

  1. [Application of robotized radiosurgical system CyberKnife for the treatment of neurosurgical patients].

    PubMed

    Konovalov, A N; Golanov, A V; Gorlachev, G E; Kornienko, V N; Trunin, Iu Iu; Kotel'nikova, T M; Zolotova, S V; Vetlova, E R; Galkin, M V; Antipina, N A; Mariashev, S A; Pronin, I N; Arutiunov, N V; Lubnin, A Iu; Iakovlev, S B

    2012-01-01

    Robotized system for radiosurgery CyberKnife (Accuray Inc., USA) is the first device dedicated and optimized for advanced irradiation during 1-7 fractions (i.e. radiosurgery and hypofractionation). CyberKnife is characterized by elaborate guidance system, high precision of dose delivery, possibility of conformal dose distributions with high gradient of target borderline dose which is most important in proximity of critical structures. The first CyberKnife system in Russia was installed in Burdenko Neurosurgery Institute. The paper presents 2-year experience of treating patients using CyberKnife. From April 2009 till October 2011 896 patients were treated using CyberKnife. Mean age was 48 years. Overall number of sessions was 2626. Radiosurgical procedures were performed in 21.8% of patients. 91% of cases were treated for intracranial lesions. Limited follow-up period in all kinds of pathology demonstrated results consistent with standard fractionation or radiosurgery. The rates of observed complications were also comparable with accepted techniques. CyberKnife system plays significant role in everyday activity of department of radiation therapy. In careful and thorough selection of patients it allows efficient and high-quality treatment of patients with neurosurgical diseases.

  2. Real-time prompt γ monitoring in spot-scanning proton therapy using imaging through a knife-edge-shaped slit.

    PubMed

    Bom, Victor; Joulaeizadeh, Leila; Beekman, Freek

    2012-01-21

    In this paper we report on Monte Carlo simulations to investigate real-time monitoring of the track depth profile in particle therapy by measuring prompt gamma ray emissions: a high sensitivity imaging system employing a knife-edge-shaped slit combined with a position-sensitive gamma detector was evaluated. Calculations to test this new concept were performed for a head-sized software phantom. Clear spatial correlation is shown between the distribution of gamma rays detected with energies above 1.5 MeV and the distribution of prompt gamma rays emitted from the phantom. The number of neutrons originating from nuclear reactions in the phantom that are detected at these high energies is small. Most importantly it is shown that under common therapy conditions enough data may be collected during one spot-step (of the order of 10 ms) to locate the distal dose edge with a 1σ accuracy of better than 1 mm. This indicates that simple slit cameras have high potential for accurate real-time particle therapy adjustment and may become a practical way to improve particle therapy accuracy.

  3. Maze Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery to treat an arrhythmia called chronic atrial fibrillation (AF). AF is a fast, irregular heart rhythm ... Surgeons http://www.sts.org/node/2275 Atrial Fibrillation Surgery – Maze Procedure Updated August 2016 Please contact ...

  4. Turbinate surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Turbinectomy; Turbinoplasty; Turbinate reduction; Nasal airway surgery ... There are several types of turbinate surgery: Turbinectomy: All or part of the lower turbinate is taken out. This can be done in several different ways, but sometimes a ...

  5. After Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... side effects. There is usually some pain with surgery. There may also be swelling and soreness around ... the first few days, weeks, or months after surgery. Some other questions to ask are How long ...

  6. Brainstem Cavernous Angioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... the floor of this ventricle. Stereotactic radiosurgery (“gamma knife”) is generally not an accepted method of treatment ... J, Suematsu K, Nakamura J, Nagashima K. Gamma Knife surgery for angiographically occult vascular malformations. Stereotact Funct ...

  7. Endoscopic submucosal tunnel dissection of upper gastrointestinal submucosal tumors: A comparative study of hook knife vs hybrid knife

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jie-Qiong; Tang, Xiao-Wei; Ren, Yu-Tang; Wei, Zheng-Jie; Huang, Si-Lin; Gao, Qiao-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Yang, Jian-Feng; Gong, Wei; Jiang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    AIM To compare the efficacy and safety of a hook knife (HO) with a hybrid knife (HK) during endoscopic submucosal tunnel dissection (ESTD) procedure. METHODS Between August 2012 and December 2015, the ESTD procedure was performed for 83 upper GI submucosal lesions, which originated from the muscularis propria layer identified by upper endoscopy and endoscopic ultrasonography. Of these, 34 lesions were treated by a HO, whereas 49 lesions were treated by a HK. Data regarding age, gender, presenting symptoms, tumor location and size, procedure time, complications, en bloc resection rate and others were analyzed and compared between the two groups. RESULTS There were no significant differences in the age, gender, presenting symptoms and tumor location between the two groups. ESTD was successfully completed in all the patients, and no case was converted to laparoscopy. The mean procedure time was significantly shorter in the HK group than in the HO group (41.3 ± 20.3 min vs 57.2 ± 28.0 min, P = 0.004). The mean frequency of device exchange was 1.4 ± 0.6 in the HK group and significantly less than 3.3 ± 0.6 in the HO group (P < 0.001). The differences in tumor size and histopathological diagnoses were not significant between the two groups (P = 0.813, P = 0.363, respectively). Both groups had an equal en bloc resection rate and complete resection rate. Additionally, the complication rate was similar between the two groups (P = 0.901). During the follow-up, no recurrence occurred in either group. CONCLUSION We demonstrate for the first time that HO and HK do not differ in efficacy or safety, but HK reduces the frequency of device exchange and procedure time. PMID:28348490

  8. Observation of Phase Objects by Using an X-ray Microscope with a Foucault Knife-Edge

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, N.; Sasaya, T.; Imai, Y.; Iwata, S.; Zama, K.; Aoki, S.

    2011-09-09

    An x-ray microscope with a zone plate was assembled at the synchrotron radiation source of BL3C, Photon Factory. A Foucault knife-edge was set at the back focal plate of the objective zone plate and phase retrieval was tested by scanning the knife-edge. A preliminary result shows that scanning the knife-edge during exposure was effective for phase retrieval. Phase-contrast tomography was investigated using differential projection images calculated from two Schlieren images with the oppositely oriented knife-edges. Fairly good reconstruction images of polystyrene beads and spores could be obtained.

  9. Observation of Phase Objects by Using an X-ray Microscope with a Foucault Knife-Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, N.; Sasaya, T.; Imai, Y.; Iwata, S.; Zama, K.; Aoki, S.

    2011-09-01

    An x-ray microscope with a zone plate was assembled at the synchrotron radiation source of BL3C, Photon Factory. A Foucault knife-edge was set at the back focal plate of the objective zone plate and phase retrieval was tested by scanning the knife-edge. A preliminary result shows that scanning the knife-edge during exposure was effective for phase retrieval. Phase-contrast tomography was investigated using differential projection images calculated from two Schlieren images with the oppositely oriented knife-edges. Fairly good reconstruction images of polystyrene beads and spores could be obtained.

  10. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for superficial esophageal neoplasms using the stag beetle knife.

    PubMed

    Fujinami, H; Hosokawa, A; Ogawa, K; Nishikawa, J; Kajiura, S; Ando, T; Ueda, A; Yoshita, H; Sugiyama, T

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an accepted standard treatment for early gastric cancer but is not widely used in the esophagus because of technical difficulties. To increase the safety of esophageal ESD, we used a scissors-type device called the stag beetle (SB) knife. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of ESD using the SB knife. We performed a single-center retrospective, uncontrolled trial. A total of 38 lesions were excised by ESD from 35 consecutive patients who were retrospectively divided into the following two groups according to the type of knife used to perform ESD: the hook knife (hook group) was used in 20 patients (21 lesions), and the SB knife (SB group) was used in 15 patients (17 lesions). We evaluated and compared the operative time, lesion size, en bloc resection rate, pathological margins free rate, and complication rate in both groups. The operative time was shorter in the SB group (median 70.0 minutes [interquartile range, 47.5-87.0]) than in the hook group (92.0 minutes [interquartile range, 63.0-114.0]) (P = 0.019), and the rate of complications in the SB group was 0% compared with 45.0% in the hook group (P = 0.004). However, the lesion size, en bloc resection rate, and pathological margins free rate did not differ significantly between the two groups. In conclusion, ESD using the SB knife was safer than that using a conventional knife for superficial esophageal neoplasms.

  11. Size reduction of high- and low-moisture corn stalks by linear knife grid system

    SciTech Connect

    Womac, A.R.; Igathinathane, C.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Narayan, S.

    2009-04-01

    High- and low-moisture corn stalks were tested using a linear knife grid size reduction device developed for first-stage size reduction. The device was used in conjunction with a universal test machine that quantified shearing stress and energy characteristics for forcing a bed of corn stalks through a grid of sharp knives. No published engineering performance data for corn stover with similar devices are available to optimize performance; however, commercial knife grid systems exist for forage size reduction. From the force displacement data, mean and maximum ultimate shear stresses, cumulative and peak mass-based cutting energies for corn stalks, and mean new surface area-based cutting energies were determined from 4 5 refill runs at two moisture contents (78.8% and 11.3% wet basis), three knife grid spacings (25.4, 50.8, and 101.6 mm), and three bed depths (50.8, 101.6, and 152.4 mm). In general, the results indicated that peak failure load, ultimate shear stress, and cutting energy values varied directly with bed depth and inversely with knife grid spacing. Mean separation analysis established that high- and low-moisture conditions and bed depths 101.6 mm did not differ significantly (P < 0.05) for ultimate stress and cutting energy values, but knife grid spacing were significantly different. Linear knife grid cutting energy requirements for both moisture conditions of corn stalks were much smaller than reported cutting energy requirements. Ultimate shear stress and cutting energy results of this research should aid the engineering design of commercial scale linear knife gird size reduction equipment for various biomass feedstocks.

  12. Dosimetric comparison between cone/Iris-based and InCise MLC-based CyberKnife plans for single and multiple brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Jang, Si Young; Lalonde, Ron; Ozhasoglu, Cihat; Burton, Steven; Heron, Dwight; Huq, M Saiful

    2016-09-01

    We performed an evaluation of the CyberKnife InCise MLC by comparing plan qualities for single and multiple brain lesions generated using the first version of InCise MLC, fixed cone, and Iris collimators. We also investigated differences in delivery efficiency among the three collimators. Twenty-four patients with single or multiple brain mets treated previously in our clinic on a CyberKnife M6 using cone/Iris collimators were selected for this study. Treatment plans were generated for all lesions using the InCise MLC. Number of monitor units, delivery time, target coverage, conformity index, and dose falloff were compared between MLC- and clinical cone/Iris-based plans. Statistical analysis was performed using the nonparametric Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney signed-rank test. The planning accuracy of the MLC-based plans was validated using chamber and film measurements. The InCise MLC-based plans achieved mean dose and target coverage comparable to the cone/Iris-based plans. Although the conformity indices of the MLC-based plans were slightly higher than those of the cone/Iris-based plans, beam delivery time for the MLC-based plans was shorter by 30%∼40%. For smaller targets or cases with OARs located close to or abutting target volumes, MLC-based plans provided inferior dose conformity compared to cone/Iris-based plans. The QA results of MLC-based plans were within 5% absolute dose difference with over 90% gamma passing rate using 2%/2 mm gamma criteria. The first version of InCise MLC could be a useful delivery modality, especially for clinical situations for which delivery time is a limiting factor or for multitarget cases. PACS number(s): 87.53.Ly, 87.55.D.

  13. Dosimetric comparison between cone/Iris-based and InCise MLC-based CyberKnife plans for single and multiple brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Jang, Si Young; Lalonde, Ron; Ozhasoglu, Cihat; Burton, Steven; Heron, Dwight; Huq, M Saiful

    2016-09-08

    We performed an evaluation of the CyberKnife InCise MLC by comparing plan qualities for single and multiple brain lesions generated using the first version of InCise MLC, fixed cone, and Iris collimators. We also investigated differences in delivery efficiency among the three collimators. Twenty-four patients with single or multiple brain mets treated previously in our clinic on a CyberKnife M6 using cone/Iris collimators were selected for this study. Treatment plans were generated for all lesions using the InCise MLC. Number of monitor units, delivery time, target coverage, conformity index, and dose falloff were compared between MLC- and clinical cone/Iris-based plans. Statistical analysis was performed using the non-parametric Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney signed-rank test. The planning accuracy of the MLC-based plans was validated using chamber and film measurements. The InCise MLC-based plans achieved mean dose and target coverage comparable to the cone/Iris-based plans. Although the conformity indices of the MLC-based plans were slightly higher than those of the cone/Iris-based plans, beam delivery time for the MLC-based plans was shorter by 30% ~ 40%. For smaller targets or cases with OARs located close to or abutting target volumes, MLC-based plans provided inferior dose conformity compared to cone/Iris-based plans. The QA results of MLC-based plans were within 5% absolute dose difference with over 90% gamma passing rate using 2%/2 mm gamma criteria. The first version of InCise MLC could be a useful delivery modality, especially for clinical situations for which delivery time is a limiting factor or for multitarget cases.

  14. Inflammatory cytokine expression following the use of bipolar electrocoagulation, ultracision harmonic scalpel and cold knife biopsy.

    PubMed

    Litta, Pietro; Saccardi, Carlo; Gizzo, Salvatore; Conte, Lorena; Ambrosi, Giulia; Sissi, Claudia; Palumbo, Manlio

    2015-08-01

    Electrical surgical devices may determine tissue damage through lateral thermal spread and activation of inflammatory processes. Several tissue effects are associated with the use of different surgical instruments. The aim of the present study was to compare tissue damage following the application of cold knife biopsy, bipolar electrocoagulation and the ultracision harmonic scalpel, through the analysis of inflammatory gene mediator expression. Three fragments of the round ligament (length 0.5 cm) were obtained from 22 females who had undergone total or subtotal laparoscopic hysterectomy using three different modes of resection: Cold knife biopsy, bipolar electrocoagulation and ultracision harmonic scalpel. The tissue fragments were examined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis of selected cytokines. Gene expression analysis demonstrated large standard deviations due to individual variability among patients and indicated variability in the concentrations of cytokines in the three different samples. The quantity of cytokine mRNA in the cold knife biopsy samples was generally greater than those obtained by other techniques. Tumor necrosis factor-α expression was significantly higher in the sample obtained with the ultracision harmonic scalpel and bipolar electrocoagulation (P=0.033) when compared with cold knife biopsy. The inflammatory response was analyzed by the quantification of gene expression through the use of qPCR. The ultracision harmonic scalpel and bipolar electrocoagulation triggered the inflammatory cascade and resulted in an increased production of cytokines compared with cold knife biopsy.

  15. Management of Liver Cancer Argon-helium Knife Therapy with Functional Computer Tomography Perfusion Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongbo; Shu, Shengjie; Li, Jinping; Jiang, Huijie

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the change in blood perfusion of liver cancer following argon-helium knife treatment with functional computer tomography perfusion imaging. Twenty-seven patients with primary liver cancer treated with argon-helium knife and were included in this study. Plain computer tomography (CT) and computer tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging were conducted in all patients before and after treatment. Perfusion parameters including blood flows, blood volume, hepatic artery perfusion fraction, hepatic artery perfusion, and hepatic portal venous perfusion were used for evaluating therapeutic effect. All parameters in liver cancer were significantly decreased after argon-helium knife treatment (p < 0.05 to all). Significant decrease in hepatic artery perfusion was also observed in pericancerous liver tissue, but other parameters kept constant. CT perfusion imaging is able to detect decrease in blood perfusion of liver cancer post-argon-helium knife therapy. Therefore, CTP imaging would play an important role for liver cancer management followed argon-helium knife therapy.

  16. [Facial surgery].

    PubMed

    Meningaud, Jean-Paul

    2010-11-20

    The patient who has to sustain facial surgery is doubly concerned by the functional issues of his case and his cosmetic appearance. Fortunately, in the recent period of time, huge advancements have been done permitting to offer a solution in more and more difficult situations. The aim of the present article is to give a panorama of facial plastic surgery for non-specialized physicians. The main aspects of the specialty are approached through the surgical techniques born from the progress of technology and biology. This paper treats issues of orthognatic surgery, endoscopic techniques, osteogenic distraction, different types of graft, cosmetic surgery, skin expander-balloons.

  17. Laparoscopic surgery - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... performed laparoscopically, including gallbladder removal (laparoscopic cholecystectomy), esophageal surgery (laparoscopic fundoplication), colon surgery (laparoscopic colectomy), and surgery on ...

  18. Influence of the substrate material on the knife-edge based profiling of tightly focused light beams.

    PubMed

    Huber, C; Orlov, S; Banzer, P; Leuchs, G

    2016-04-18

    The performance of the knife-edge method as a beam profiling technique for tightly focused light beams depends on several parameters, such as the material and height of the knife-pad as well as the polarization and wavelength of the focused light beam under study. Here we demonstrate that the choice of the substrate the knife-pads are fabricated on has a crucial influence on the reconstructed beam projections as well. We employ an analytical model for the interaction of the knife-pad with the beam and report good agreement between our numerical and experimental results. Moreover, we simplify the analytical model and demonstrate, in which way the underlying physical effects lead to the apparent polarization dependent beam shifts and changes of the beamwidth for different substrate materials and heights of the knife-pad.

  19. Influence of the substrate material on the knife-edge based profiling of tightly focused light beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, C.; Orlov, S.; Banzer, P.; Leuchs, G.

    2016-04-01

    The performance of the knife-edge method as a beam profiling technique for tightly focused light beams depends on several parameters, such as the material and height of the knife-pad as well as the polarization and wavelength of the focused light beam under study. Here we demonstrate that the choice of the substrate the knife-pads are fabricated on has a crucial influence on the reconstructed beam projections as well. We employ an analytical model for the interaction of the knife-pad with the beam and report good agreement between our numerical and experimental results. Moreover, we simplify the analytical model and demonstrate, in which way the underlying physical effects lead to the apparent polarization dependent beam shifts and changes of the beamwidth for different substrate materials and heights of the knife-pad.

  20. Rhabdomyosarcoma: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... is and what type of operation is done. Physical changes after surgery can range from little more than a scar to changes in appearance or in how some parts of the body function, which may require physical rehabilitation. For more on surgery as a treatment ...

  1. Characteristics of Bone Injuries Resulting from Knife Wounds Incised with Different Forces.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Caitlin; Kumaratilake, Jaliya; Henneberg, Maciej

    2017-02-23

    The aim of this research was to experimentally determine the characteristics of incised bone wounds, which are commonly found in defense injuries. A specially constructed pivoting arm device was used to inflict wounds with controlled forces and direction. Five knives were selected to inflict the wounds on porcine forelimbs. Eight incised wounds were made per knife per force. A larger knife and a greater force caused longer and wider bone wounds. Comparisons of individual knives at the two forces produced varying results in the bone wounds. A correlation was seen between the force and the length (r = 0.69), width (r = 0.63), and depth (r = 0.57) of bone wounds. Serrated-edge and nonserrated knives can be distinguished from the appearance of the wound. The outcomes may be applicable in forensic investigations to ascertain the forces associated with incised wounds and identify the specific knife used.

  2. [Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy with CyberKnife®for Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Mihara, Koki; Kaihara, Masaki; Sunahori, Sayaka; Yamashiro, Naotsugu; Nishiya, Shin; Ito, Yasuhiro; Funakoshi, Kazuto; Egawa, Tomohisa; Tsukamoto, Nobuhiro; Nagashima, Atsushi

    2015-10-01

    For treatment of colorectal liver metastases, liver resection is recommended for resectable cases in the clinical guidelines for colorectal cancer. On the other hand, there are currently no data supporting the efficacy of radiation therapy as a topical treatment, and this treatment can therefore not presently be recommended. With CyberKnife®, it is possible to perform stereotactic radiation therapy using a linear accelerator with high accuracy, even for lesions in the trunk area such as liver metastases. Between December 2009 and September 2014 in our hospital, we performed radiation treatment using CyberKnife® for 14 cases with 22 colorectal liver metastases. As a result, we obtained response and local control rates of 76.2%and 81.0%, respectively. Moreover, no advanced adverse events were observed. Thus, we consider that CyberKnife® treatment for colorectal liver metastases is effective as a topical treatment, with low invasiveness and high safety.

  3. Gamma II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Thurburn; Castelaz, M.; Cline, J.; Owen, L.; Boehme, J.; Rottler, L.; Whitworth, C.; Clavier, D.

    2011-05-01

    GAMMA II is the Guide Star Automatic Measuring MAchine relocated from STScI to the Astronomical Photographic Data Archive (APDA) at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI). GAMMA II is a multi-channel laser-scanning microdensitometer that was used to measure POSS and SERC plates to create the Guide Star Catalog and the Digital Sky Survey. The microdensitometer is designed with submicron accuracy in x and y measurements using a HP 5507 laser interferometer, 15 micron sampling, and the capability to measure plates as large as 0.5-m across. GAMMA II is a vital instrument for the success of digitizing the direct, objective prism, and spectra photographic plate collections in APDA for research. We plan several targeted projects. One is a collaboration with Drs. P.D. Hemenway and R. L. Duncombe who plan to scan 1000 plates of 34 minor planets to identify systematic errors in the Fundamental System of celestial coordinates. Another is a collaboration with Dr. R. Hudec (Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic) who is working within the Gaia Variability Unit CU7 to digitize objective prism spectra on the Henize plates and Burrell-Schmidt plates located in APDA. These low dispersion spectral plates provide optical counterparts of celestial high-energy sources and cataclysmic variables enabling the simulation of Gaia BP/RP outputs. The astronomical community is invited to explore the more than 140,000 plates from 20 observatories now archived in APDA, and use GAMMA II. The process of relocating GAMMA to APDA, re-commissioning, and starting up the production scan programs will be described. Also, we will present planned research and future upgrades to GAMMA II.

  4. Refractive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kellum, Keith

    2000-01-01

    The concept of surgically altering the eye to correct refractive errors has been considered for hundreds of years, but only in the past 60 years has interest grown considerably due to the development of modern refractive surgery techniques such as astigmatic keratotomies to correct astigmatism induced by cataract surgery and future technologies currently being investigated. Modern refractive surgery is more involved than setting the correct parameters on the laser. Patient selection and examination, proper technique, and postoperative follow-up for potential complications are essential for a successful refractive procedure. Critical evaluation of new techniques is vital to avoid the pitfall of overly exuberant enthusiasm for new and unproven methods of refractive surgery. Kellum K. Refractive surgery. The Ochsner Journal 2000; 2:164-167. PMID:21765686

  5. A Clinical Analysis of Secondary Surgery in Trigeminal Neuralgia Patients Who Failed Prior Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Il Ho; Park, Chang Kyu; Malla, Hridayesh Pratap; Lee, Sung Ho; Rhee, Bong Arm

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although many treatment modalities have been introduced for trigeminal neuralgia (TN), the long-term clinical results remain unsatisfactory. It has been particularly challenging to determine an appropriate treatment strategy for patients who have responded poorly to initial therapies. We analyzed the surgical outcomes in TN patients who failed prior treatments. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 37 patients with recurrent or persistent TN symptoms who underwent surgery at our hospital between January 2010 and December 2014. Patients with follow-up data of at least one year were included. The prior treatment modalities of the 37 patients included microvascular decompression (MVD), gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS), and percutaneous procedures such as radiofrequency rhizotomy (RFR), balloon compression, and glycerol rhizotomy (GR). The mean follow-up period was 69.9 months (range : 16–173). The mean interval between the prior treatment and second surgery was 26 months (range : 7–123). We evaluated the surgical outcomes using the Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) pain intensity scale. Results Among the 37 recurrent or persistent TN patients, 22 underwent MVD with partial sensory rhizotomy (PSR), 8 received MVD alone, and 7 had PSR alone. Monitoring of the surgical treatment outcomes via the BNI pain intensity scale revealed 8 (21.6%) patients with a score of I, 13 (35.1%) scoring II, 13 (35.1%) scoring III, and 3 (8.2%) scoring IV at the end of the follow-up period. Overall, 91.8% of patients had good surgical outcomes. With regard to postoperative complications, 1 patient had transient cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea (2.7%), another had a subdural hematoma (2.7%), and facial sensory changes were noted in 8 (21.1%) patients after surgery. Conclusion Surgical interventions, such as MVD and PSR, are safe and very effective treatment modalities in TN patients who failed initial or prior treatments. We presume that the combination of MVD with

  6. Successful Treatment of Eccrine Porocarcinoma Metastasized to a Cervical Lymph Node with CyberKnife Radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Taku; Hashimoto, Akira; Furudate, Sadanori; Kambayashi, Yumi; Haga, Takahiro; Aiba, Setsuya

    2014-05-01

    Eccrine porocarcinoma is a rare type of skin cancer that originates from eccrine sweat glands or acrosyringium and mainly occurs in the elderly. In this report, we describe an 85-year-old Japanese woman with eccrine porocarcinoma that metastasized to a cervical lymph node who was cured with CyberKnife radiosurgery. Because our patient had a high risk of perioperative complication, standard surgical therapy with a wide margin was impractical. Our present study suggests the novel possibility of using CyberKnife for the treatment of inoperable metastatic porocarcinoma.

  7. Reliability of the frozen section in sharp knife cone biopsy of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Woodford, H D; Poston, W; Elkins, T E

    1986-10-01

    Eight patient records were reviewed following cold knife conization in which frozen section diagnosis was utilized to aid the surgeon in formulating appropriate therapy after conization. Two patients were diagnosed as having microinvasive squamous cell carcinoma on final pathology when frozen sections were read as showing no invasion. Furthermore, in the 51 instances in which a degree of cervical dysplasia was determined from frozen sections, 14 discrepancies were noted on final pathology (27%). Such discrepancies may lead to unnecessary hysterectomies performed for cervical dysplasia that is easily treated with outpatient office procedures, especially when cold knife conization and frozen section diagnosis are performed without prior colposcopy and biopsy.

  8. Gamma watermarking

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Wood, Lowell L.; Lougheed, Ronald W.; Moody, Kenton J.; Wang, Tzu-Fang

    2004-05-25

    A covert, gamma-ray "signature" is used as a "watermark" for property identification. This new watermarking technology is based on a unique steganographic or "hidden writing" digital signature, implemented in tiny quantities of gamma-ray-emitting radioisotopic material combinations, generally covertly emplaced on or within an object. This digital signature may be readily recovered at distant future times, by placing a sensitive, high energy-resolution gamma-ray detecting instrument reasonably precisely over the location of the watermark, which location may be known only to the object's owner; however, the signature is concealed from all ordinary detection means because its exceedingly low level of activity is obscured by the natural radiation background (including the gamma radiation naturally emanating from the object itself, from cosmic radiation and material surroundings, from human bodies, etc.). The "watermark" is used in object-tagging for establishing object identity, history or ownership. It thus may serve as an aid to law enforcement officials in identifying stolen property and prosecuting theft thereof. Highly effective, potentially very low cost identification-on demand of items of most all types is thus made possible.

  9. Brain surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  10. Hemorrhoid surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002939.htm Hemorrhoid surgery To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hemorrhoids are swollen veins around the anus. They may ...

  11. Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... procedure that can help smooth or camouflage severe acne scars) — sometimes feel more comfortable with their appearance ... procedures teens choose include nose reshaping, ear surgery, acne and acne scar treatment, and breast reduction. previous ...

  12. Cosmetic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... image Body image and your kids Cosmetic surgery Eating disorders Pregnancy and body image Subscribe to Body Image ... Association of America http://www.adaa.org National Eating Disorders Association National Institute of Mental Health Information Center, ...

  13. Foot Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... be advised by a podiatrist, depending on your test results or a specific medical condition. Postoperative Care The type of foot surgery performed determines the length and kind of aftercare required ...

  14. Laparoscopic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgeon’s perspective, laparoscopic surgery may allow for easier dissection of abdominal scar tissue (adhesions), less surgical trauma, ... on Facebook About ACG ACG Store ACG Patient Education & Resource Center Home GI Health and Disease Recursos ...

  15. Pleuroscopic punch biopsy using insulated-tip diathermic knife-2 for the diagnosis of desmoplastic malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Masai, Kyohei; Sasada, Shinji; Izumo, Takehiro; Taniyama, Tomoko; Nakamura, Yukiko; Chavez, Christine; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Tsuta, Koji; Tsuchida, Takaaki

    2013-10-01

    Desmoplastic malignant mesothelioma (DMM) is a rare subtype of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) and is often difficult to distinguish from pleural fibrosis and reactive mesothelial hyperplasia, especially if the biopsy samples are small. We performed full-thickness pleural biopsy on a lesion suspected to be DMM using an insulated-tip diathermic knife-2 (IT knife-2) during flex-rigid pleuroscopy. IT knife-2 is a novel electrosurgical device for endoscopic submucosal dissection in the early gastrointestinal cancer. It consists of a needle knife with 3 short blades at the distal end attached to an insulated ceramic tip. A 54-year-old man presenting with chest wall mass and thickened pleura, in whom a computed tomography-guided percutaneous needle aspiration had remained negative, underwent flex-rigid pleuroscopy for definitive diagnosis. While applying electric current, we used the IT knife-2 to incise the pleura in a circular shape just above the endothoracic fascia. The incised pleura was removed by forceps and examined pathologically. The microscopic examination was compatible with DMM. We discovered that pleuroscopic punch biopsy using IT knife-2 can diagnose DMM. Use of IT knife-2 during flex-rigid pleuroscopy can obtain sufficient samples from densely thickened pleura, which is difficult to diagnose with small biopsies.

  16. [Aesthetic surgery].

    PubMed

    Bruck, Johannes C

    2006-01-01

    The WHO describes health as physical, mental and social well being. Ever since the establishment of plastic surgery aesthetic surgery has been an integral part of this medical specialty. It aims at reconstructing subjective well-being by employing plastic surgical procedures as described in the educational code and regulations for specialists of plastic surgery. This code confirms that plastic surgery comprises cosmetic procedures for the entire body that have to be applied in respect of psychological exploration and selection criteria. A wide variety of opinions resulting from very different motivations shows how difficult it is to differentiate aesthetic surgery as a therapeutic procedure from beauty surgery as a primarily economic service. Jurisdiction, guidelines for professional conduct and ethical codes have tried to solve this question. Regardless of the intention and ability of the health insurances, it has currently been established that the moral and legal evaluation of advertisements for medical procedures depends on their purpose: advertising with the intent of luring patients into cosmetic procedures that do not aim to reconstruct a subjective physical disorder does not comply with a medical indication. If, however, the initiative originates with the patient requesting the amelioration of a subjective disorder of his body, a medical indication can be assumed.

  17. Tennis elbow surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Lateral epicondylitis - surgery; Lateral tendinosis - surgery; Lateral tennis elbow - surgery ... Surgery to repair tennis elbow is usually an outpatient surgery. This means you will not stay in the hospital overnight. You will be given ...

  18. Plastic Surgery Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... PRS GO PSN PSEN GRAFT Contact Us News Plastic Surgery Statistics Plastic surgery procedural statistics from the ... Plastic Surgery Statistics 2005 Plastic Surgery Statistics 2016 Plastic Surgery Statistics Stats Report 2016 National Clearinghouse of ...

  19. Heart valve surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery - minimally invasive Aortic valve surgery - open Bicuspid aortic valve Endocarditis Heart valve surgery Mitral valve prolapse Mitral valve surgery - minimally invasive Mitral valve surgery - open Pulmonary valve stenosis Smoking - tips on how to quit Patient Instructions ...

  20. Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection Using a Novel Versatile Knife: An Animal Feasibility Study (with Video)

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Kim, Gwangil; Kim, Won Hee; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Hong, Sung Pyo; Jeong, Seok; Lee, Don Haeng

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims In order to reduce the procedure time and the number of accessory changes during endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), we developed a novel versatile knife, which has the combined advantages of several conventional knives. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy, safety, and histological quality of ESD performed using this novel versatile knife and a combination of several conventional knives. Methods This was an in vivo animal study comparing two different modalities of ESD in mini-pigs. Completion time of each resection was documented, and the resected specimens were retrieved and evaluated for completeness. To assess the quality control of the procedures and adverse events, detailed histopathological examinations were performed. Results A total of 18 specimens were dissected by ESD safely and easily (nine specimens using the new versatile knife; nine specimens by mixing conventional knives). All resections were completed as en bloc resections. There was no significant difference in procedure time between the 2 modalities (456 seconds vs. 355 seconds, p=0.258) and cutting speed (1.983 mm2/sec vs. 1.57 mm2/sec, p=1.000). The rate of adverse events and histological quality did not statistically differ between the modalities. Conclusions ESD with a versatile knife appeared to be an easy, safe, and technically efficient method. PMID:25505721

  1. Past, Present and Future. Dull Knife Memorial College (Indian Action Program Inc.).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    Five vocational training programs as well as academic coursework are offered on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation by Dull Knife Memorial College. Established and operated by the Northern Cheyenne, and located in Lame Deer, Montana, the college was chartered by a tribal ordinance in 1975. Approximately 75 trainees are currently involved in the…

  2. Knife River: Early Village Life on the Plains. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalf, Fay

    This document, from the lesson plan series, "Teaching with Historic Places," examines the Native Americans who lived on the plains along the Knife River in what is now North Dakota. Following an introductory section, the document sets out student objectives, teaching activities, readings, and illustrations. The teaching activity…

  3. Chief Dull Knife Community Is Strengthening the Northern Cheyenne Language and Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlebear, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    Language revitalization programs should focus on whether they want to teach the language, teach about the language, teach with the language, or teach the language for academic credit. A program at Chief Dull Knife College (Montana) teaches the Cheyenne language using the Total Physical Response method, which replicates the manner in which first…

  4. Quantitative phase tomography by using x-ray microscope with Foucault knife-edge scanning filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Norio; Tsuburaya, Yuji; Shimada, Akihiro; Aoki, Sadao

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative phase tomography was evaluated by using a differential phase microscope with a Foucault knife-edge scanning filter. A 3D x-ray phase image of polystyrene beads was obtained at 5.4 keV. The reconstructed refractive index was fairly good agreement with the Henke's tabulated data.

  5. 18. DETAIL OF COMBINATION HANDWASH SINK/KNIFE STERILIZER ON SPLITTERS' PLATFORM; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAIL OF COMBINATION HANDWASH SINK/KNIFE STERILIZER ON SPLITTERS' PLATFORM; KNIVES AND CLEAVERS WERE CLEANED FREQUENTLY BY DIPPING THEM INTO STEAM-HEATED WATER IN THE RECTANGULAR TANK; NOTE FOOT-OPERATED FAUCETS - Rath Packing Company, Beef Killing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  6. Development of an air-knife system for highly reproducible fabrication of polydimethylsiloxane microstencils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin Ho; Kim, Gyu Man

    2015-08-01

    In this study, an air-knife system was developed for the automated fabrication of polymer microstencils with microscale perforated patterns. Blowing compressed N2 gas through the air knife provided a uniform laminar gas flow of high intensity suitable for perforating holes in the stencil. The polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stencil was replicated from a master mold prepared by photolithography. When the prepolymer of PDMS was spin-coated onto the master mold, a thin layer of the prepolymer remained on top of the master's structure and consequently prevented the formation of the perforated patterns. This residual layer was easily removed by the presented air knife. The air-knife system controlled the flow rate of N2 gas and the conveying speed of the master mold; therefore, the system possessed high reproducibility compared to manual gas blowing. Its use reduced the fabrication time for perforated biocompatible polymer microstencils, allowing for their mass production via an automated system. The validity of this suggested method was proven through experiments and was evaluated by application in various fields.

  7. Implementation of a quantitative Foucault knife-edge method by means of isophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhevlakov, A. P.; Zatsepina, M. E.; Kirillovskii, V. K.

    2014-06-01

    Detailed description of stages of computer processing of the shadowgrams during implementation of a modern quantitative Foucault knife-edge method is presented. The map of wave-front aberrations introduced by errors of an optical surface or a system, along with the results of calculation of the set of required characteristics of image quality, are shown.

  8. The Effects of Swedish Knife Model on Students' Understanding of the Digestive System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerrah Ozsevgec, Lale; Artun, Huseyin; Unal, Melike

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the effect of Swedish Knife Model on students' understanding of digestive system. A simple experimental design (pretest-treatment-posttest) was used in the study and internal comparison of the results of the one group was made. The sample consisted of 40 7th grade Turkish students whose ages range from 13 to 15.…

  9. Quantitative phase tomography by using x-ray microscope with Foucault knife-edge scanning filter

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Norio; Tsuburaya, Yuji; Shimada, Akihiro; Aoki, Sadao

    2016-01-28

    Quantitative phase tomography was evaluated by using a differential phase microscope with a Foucault knife-edge scanning filter. A 3D x-ray phase image of polystyrene beads was obtained at 5.4 keV. The reconstructed refractive index was fairly good agreement with the Henke’s tabulated data.

  10. CT-Guided Fiducial Placement for CyberKnife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: An Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Sotiropoulou, Evangelia; Stathochristopoulou, Irene; Stathopoulos, Konstantinos; Verigos, Kosmas; Salvaras, Nikolaos; Thanos, Loukas

    2010-06-15

    CyberKnife frameless image-guided radiosurgery has become a widely used system for parenchymal extracranial lesions. Gold fiducials are required for the planning and aiming of CyberKnife therapy. We report our initial experience and describe the technique of positioning tumor markers, under CT guidance. We conducted a retrospective review of 105 patients who were referred for CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery at Iatropolis CyberKnife Center in Athens. All patients underwent percutaneous fiducial placement via CT guidance. At the desired location, the 18-G needle was advanced into or near the tumor. Data collected included number and locations of fiducials placed and complications experienced to date. One hundred five patients underwent fiducial placement under CT guidance and a total number of 319 gold seeds were implanted. We experienced one episode of pneumothorax that required drainage, one mild pneumothorax, and three episodes of perifocal pulmonary hemorrhage. In conclusion, fiducial implantation under CT guidance appears to be a safe and efficient procedure, as long as it is performed by an experienced interventional radiologist.

  11. Extracranial Facial Nerve Schwannoma Treated by Hypo-fractionated CyberKnife Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Shinichiro; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2016-01-01

    Facial nerve schwannoma is a rare intracranial tumor. Treatment for this benign tumor has been controversial. Here, we report a case of extracranial facial nerve schwannoma treated successfully by hypo-fractionated CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA) radiosurgery and discuss the efficacy of this treatment. A 34-year-old female noticed a swelling in her right mastoid process. The lesion enlarged over a seven-month period, and she experienced facial spasm on the right side. She was diagnosed with a facial schwannoma via a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the head and neck and was told to wait until the facial nerve palsy subsides. She was referred to our hospital for radiation therapy. We planned a fractionated CyberKnife radiosurgery for three consecutive days. After CyberKnife radiosurgery, the mass in the right parotid gradually decreased in size, and the facial nerve palsy disappeared. At her eight-month follow-up, her facial spasm had completely disappeared. There has been no recurrence and the facial nerve function has been normal. We successfully demonstrated the efficacy of CyberKnife radiosurgery as an alternative treatment that also preserves neurofunction for facial nerve schwannomas. PMID:27774363

  12. Extracranial Facial Nerve Schwannoma Treated by Hypo-fractionated CyberKnife Radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ayaka; Miyazaki, Shinichiro; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2016-09-21

    Facial nerve schwannoma is a rare intracranial tumor. Treatment for this benign tumor has been controversial. Here, we report a case of extracranial facial nerve schwannoma treated successfully by hypo-fractionated CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA) radiosurgery and discuss the efficacy of this treatment. A 34-year-old female noticed a swelling in her right mastoid process. The lesion enlarged over a seven-month period, and she experienced facial spasm on the right side. She was diagnosed with a facial schwannoma via a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the head and neck and was told to wait until the facial nerve palsy subsides. She was referred to our hospital for radiation therapy. We planned a fractionated CyberKnife radiosurgery for three consecutive days. After CyberKnife radiosurgery, the mass in the right parotid gradually decreased in size, and the facial nerve palsy disappeared. At her eight-month follow-up, her facial spasm had completely disappeared. There has been no recurrence and the facial nerve function has been normal. We successfully demonstrated the efficacy of CyberKnife radiosurgery as an alternative treatment that also preserves neurofunction for facial nerve schwannomas.

  13. Gamma Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    E[exp{-Bn Xn 1 U-Y nU-X vi ] - EeUY )Ee (v+Bu)X1 (2.4) where, in the last step, we have dropped the indices n and n-1 because of stationarity and...1967). "Some Problems of Statistical Inference Relating to Double-Gamma Distribution," Trabajos de Estadistica , 18, 67-87. Hugus, D. K. (1982

  14. Effect of CyberKnife stereotactic body radiation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma on hepatic toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ping; Huang, Cheng; Liang, Shi-Xiong; Li, Ye-Fei; Huang, Shang-Xiao; Lian, Zu-Ping; Liu, Jian-Min; Tang, Yang; Lu, Hai-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety of CyberKnife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and identify the treatment-related risk factors of hepatic toxicity. Materials and methods One hundred and four HCC patients treated with CyberKnife SBRT were included in this study between August 2009 and December 2012. The average dose of prescribed radiation was 42.81±4.78 Gy (28–55 Gy) with the average fraction size of 8–16 Gy to the planning target volume. The average fractions were 3.31±0.81 (2–6 fractions). Response rates were determined, and the Child–Pugh (CP) score and class following CyberKnife SBRT were obtained to evaluate hepatic toxicity. Results Seventeen patients experienced progression in CP class and 24 patients experienced CTCAE V. 4.0 grade 2–3 hepatic toxicity during the five-month follow-up period, while no patient experienced grade 4 liver toxicity. Multivariate analysis indicated that only V25 was an independent factor in grade 2–3 hepatic toxicity (P=0.029, <0.05). Radiation-induced hepatic toxicity (RIHT), defined as an increase of at least two points within three months following CyberKnife SBRT, occurred in 13 of the 104 patients (13/104, 12.5%), and only the normal liver tissue was found to be associated with RIHT (P=0.008, <0.05). Conclusion CyberKnife SBRT is a feasible and safe treatment for HCC with regard to hepatic toxicity, while V25 and normal liver volume may be an independent factor of grade 2–3 hepatic toxicity and RIHT, respectively. PMID:27920555

  15. [Endoscopic surgery].

    PubMed

    Rushfeldt, Christian; Pham, Khanh Do-Cong; Aabakken, Lars

    2016-05-01

    Endoscopic surgery of the stomach/gastrointestinal tract was developed in the 1990s in Japan as a minimally invasive method of removing early-stage tumours, using a gastro-/coloscope instead of open or laparoscopic surgery. Its advantages are obvious, in that the patient is spared more major surgery, the hospital saves on resources as well as admission to a ward, and society is spared the costs of days of sickness absence. Endoscopic submucosal dissection is considered the most difficult technique, but it allows for the accurate dissection of large tumours. In 1999, Japanese surgeon Takuji Gotoda and his team were the first to perform these types of dissections of early cancers in the rectum using a diathermic needle and a flexible scope.

  16. [Foreskin surgery].

    PubMed

    Kolehmainen, Maija; Taskinen, Seppo; Ossi, Lindell

    2010-01-01

    Balanitis, phimosis and foreskin adhesions are common indications for foreskin surgery during childhood. In phimosis, the foreskin cannot be drawn behind the glans penis because of the narrow external opening of the former. It is important to be able to distinguish between physiologic and pathologic phimosis, since their treatment is different. In adulthood, the need for surgery can be caused by phimosis, a difficult sequel of paraphimosis, recurrent inflammations of the glans penis and foreskin, diseases and cancers of the skin as well as difficulties at intercourse due to the shortness of the frenulum of the prepuce of the penis.

  17. Acne Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dilworth, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    Acne surgery consists of comedone extraction of non-inflamed lesions, triamcinolone acetate injections of some inflamed lesions, and extraction of milia. Prevention is a very important part of comedone treatment, especially avoidance of picking, moisturizers and harsh soaps. Instruments are also very important: even the finest may be too thick and may have to be filed down. Acne surgery is only an adjunct of good medical therapy. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:21283373

  18. Intraoperative breakage of Sachse’s knife blade: a rare complication of optical internal urethrotomy (one case managing experience)

    PubMed Central

    Kanodia, Gautam Kumar; Sankhwar, Satyanarayan; Jhanwar, Ankur; Bansal, Ankur; Kumar, Manoj; Gupta, Ashok

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Optical internal urethrotomy (OIU) is the most common procedure performed for short segment bulbar urethral stricture worldwide. This procedure most commonly performed using Sachse’s cold knife. Various perioperative complications of internal urethrotomy have been described in literature including bleeding, urinary tract infection, extravasation of fluid, incontinence, impotence, and recurrence of stricture. Here we report a unique complication of breakage of Sachse knife blade intraoperatively and its endoscopic management. PMID:28124540

  19. Replantation surgery.

    PubMed

    Sabapathy, S Raja; Venkatramani, Hari; Bharathi, R Ravindra; Bhardwaj, Praveen

    2011-06-01

    The current concepts of replantation surgery, a procedure that has been practiced for half a century, can be discussed in terms of patients' demands and expectations, present indications for the procedure, available evidence that influences decision making, and technical refinements practiced to produce better outcomes.

  20. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  1. Nose Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... requests or policy questions to our media and public relations staff at newsroom@entnet.org . Improving Form And Function Of The Nose Each year thousands of people undergo surgery of the ... plan to avoid appearing in public for about a week due to swelling and ...

  2. Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope: computational fluid dynamic analyses and evaluation of the air knife model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuillen, Isaac; Phelps, LeEllen; Warner, Mark; Hubbard, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Implementation of an air curtain at the thermal boundary between conditioned and ambient spaces allows for observation over wavelength ranges not practical when using optical glass as a window. The air knife model of the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) project, a 4-meter solar observatory that will be built on Haleakalā, Hawai'i, deploys such an air curtain while also supplying ventilation through the ceiling of the coudé laboratory. The findings of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis and subsequent changes to the air knife model are presented. Major design constraints include adherence to the Interface Control Document (ICD), separation of ambient and conditioned air, unidirectional outflow into the coudé laboratory, integration of a deployable glass window, and maintenance and accessibility requirements. Optimized design of the air knife successfully holds full 12 Pa backpressure under temperature gradients of up to 20°C while maintaining unidirectional outflow. This is a significant improvement upon the .25 Pa pressure differential that the initial configuration, tested by Linden and Phelps, indicated the curtain could hold. CFD post- processing, developed by Vogiatzis, is validated against interferometry results of initial air knife seeing evaluation, performed by Hubbard and Schoening. This is done by developing a CFD simulation of the initial experiment and using Vogiatzis' method to calculate error introduced along the optical path. Seeing error, for both temperature differentials tested in the initial experiment, match well with seeing results obtained from the CFD analysis and thus validate the post-processing model. Application of this model to the realizable air knife assembly yields seeing errors that are well within the error budget under which the air knife interface falls, even with a temperature differential of 20°C between laboratory and ambient spaces. With ambient temperature set to 0°C and conditioned temperature set to 20

  3. Reference dosimetry condition and beam quality correction factor for CyberKnife beam

    SciTech Connect

    Kawachi, Toru; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Katayose, Tetsurou; Myojoyama, Atsushi; Hatano, Kazuo

    2008-10-15

    This article is intended to improve the certainty of the absorbed dose determination for reference dosimetry in CyberKnife beams. The CyberKnife beams do not satisfy some conditions of the standard reference dosimetry protocols because of its unique treatment head structure and beam collimating system. Under the present state of affairs, the reference dosimetry has not been performed under uniform conditions and the beam quality correction factor k{sub Q} for an ordinary 6 MV linear accelerator has been temporally substituted for the k{sub Q} of the CyberKnife in many sites. Therefore, the reference conditions and k{sub Q} as a function of the beam quality index in a new way are required. The dose flatness and the error of dosimeter reading caused by radiation fields and detector size were analyzed to determine the reference conditions. Owing to the absence of beam flattening filter, the dose flatness of the CyberKnife beam was inferior to that of an ordinary 6 MV linear accelerator. And if the absorbed dose is measured with an ionization chamber which has cavity length of 2.4, 1.0 and 0.7 cm in reference dosimetry, the dose at the beam axis for a field of 6.0 cm collimator was underestimated 1.5%, 0.4%, and 0.2% on a calculation. Therefore, the maximum field shaped with a 6.0 cm collimator and ionization chamber which has a cavity length of 1.0 cm or shorter were recommended as the conditions of reference dosimetry. Furthermore, to determine the k{sub Q} for the CyberKnife, the realistic energy spectrum of photons and electrons in water was simulated with the BEAMnrc. The absence of beam flattening filter also caused softer photon energy spectrum than that of an ordinary 6 MV linear accelerator. Consequently, the k{sub Q} for ionization chambers of a suitable size were determined and tabulated as a function of measurable beam quality indexes in the CyberKnife beam.

  4. Clinical application of CyberKnife for high-risk central nervous system tumors: A clinical trial report of 60 cases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Jiang, Peng; Ma, Jian-Jun; Qu, Zhen; Liu, Han-Chen; Wang, Shan-Shan; Wang, Yi-Shan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the application potential of CyberKnife for high-risk tumors of the central nervous system and to analyze the effectiveness of CyberKnife in relation to dose recovery and gain division (times). A total of Eighty-one targeted areas from 139 central nervous tumor lesions in 60 patients were treated with I-VI ranged CyberKnife for 1 week. Following CyberKnife treatment, imaging tests revealed a decrease in tumor volume, reduction of central nervous system symptoms and an increase in the life quality of patients. The advantages of CyberKnife include non-invasiveness, individualized treatment, flexibility, high accuracy and rapid treatment. CyberKnife produces slight damage and a favorable therapeutic effect and expands our concepts concerning precise radiotherapy for tumors. It is an indispensable method for personalized tumor treatment.

  5. [Lop ear - knife, tape, or nothing at all?].

    PubMed

    Klockars, Tuomas

    2013-01-01

    More than 200 different surgical techniques of correction of lop ear have been published. The operation is usually recommended to be performed at the age of six years or after. In addition, lop ear surgery involves risks, the most common complications being bleeding, infections, sensory alterations and scarring problems. Surgical preference and decision should always be based on realistic expectations of the patient or the parents, and prior to the decision they should have adequate information about the nature of the procedure and potential complications. Splint therapy of lop ear is possible for infants.

  6. Treatment of over 20 mm gastric cancer by endoscopic submucosal dissection using an insulation-tipped diathermic knife

    PubMed Central

    Hirasaki, Shoji; Kanzaki, Hiromitsu; Matsubara, Minoru; Fujita, Kohei; Ikeda, Fusao; Taniguchi, Hideaki; Yumoto, Eiichiro; Suzuki, Seiyuu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effectiveness of endoscopic submucosal dissection using an insulation-tipped diathermic knife (IT-ESD) for the treatment of patients with over 20 mm early gastric cancer (EGC). METHODS: A total of 112 patients with over 10 mm EGC were treated with IT-ESD at Sumitomo Besshi Hospital and Shikoku Cancer Center in the 5 year period from January 2002 to December 2006, including 40 patients with over 20 mm EGC. We compared patient backgrounds, the one-piece resection rate, complete resection (CR) rate, operation time, bleeding rate, perforation rate between patients with over 20 mm EGC [over 20 mm group (21-40 mm)] and the remaining patients (under 20 mm group). RESULTS: We found no significant difference in the rate of underlying cardiopulmonary disease (over 20 mm group vs under 20 mm group, 5.0% vs 5.6%), one-piece resection rate (95% vs 96%), CR rate (85% vs 89%), operation time (72.3 min vs 66.5 min), bleeding rate (5% vs 4.2%), and perforation rate (0% vs 1.4%) between the 2 groups. Three patients in each group had submucosal invasion and two in each groups underwent additional surgery. CONCLUSION: There was no significant difference in the outcome resulting from IT-ESD between the 2 groups. Our study proves that IT-ESD is a feasible treatment for patients with over 20 mm mucosal gastric cancer although the long-term outcome should be evaluated in the future. PMID:17663514

  7. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass; OPCAB; Beating heart surgery; Bypass surgery - heart; CABG; Coronary artery bypass graft; Coronary artery bypass surgery; Coronary bypass surgery; Coronary artery disease - CABG; CAD - CABG; Angina - ...

  8. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Treatment Surgery for Breast Cancer Surgery is a common treatment for breast cancer, ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  9. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor Treating Lung Carcinoid Tumors Surgery to Treat Lung Carcinoid Tumors Surgery is the main treatment for ... often be cured by surgery alone. Types of lung surgery Different operations can be used to treat ( ...

  10. Refractive corneal surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Nearsightedness surgery - discharge; Refractive surgery - discharge; LASIK - discharge; PRK - discharge ... You had refractive corneal surgery to help improve your vision. This surgery uses a laser to reshape your cornea. It corrects mild-to-moderate nearsightedness, ...

  11. Fraunhofer diffraction of a slit aperture between a knife-edge and a metal cylinder.

    PubMed

    Fukaya, J; Sasaki, A; Matsuda, Y; Aoyama, H

    1995-12-01

    The Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of a slit aperture formed between a reference knife-edge and a metal-cylinder surface is different from that of an ideal slit aperture. This pattern should include reflected light coming from both the front and rear sides of a cylinder surface. To investigate the influence of light reflected from the cylinder surface, we discuss the theoretical consideration based on the simple model of the reflected light on the surface. The experimental setup is designed and constructed to measure the actual diffraction pattern produced by the slit between the knife-edge and the cylinder surface. As a result it is obvious that the reflection of diffracted light on the rear side is dominant in both the simulation and the experiment.

  12. Differential phase microscope and micro-tomography with a Foucault knife-edge scanning filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, N.; Hashizume, J.; Goto, M.; Yamaguchi, M.; Tsujimura, T.; Aoki, S.

    2013-10-01

    An x-ray differential phase microscope with a Foucault knife-edge scanning filter was set up at the bending magnet source BL3C, Photon Factory. A reconstructed phase profile from the differential phase image of an aluminium wire at 5.36 keV was fairly good agreement with the numerical simulation. Phase tomography of a biological specimen, such as an Artemia cyst, could be successfully demonstrated.

  13. SonoKnife: Feasibility of a line-focused ultrasound device for thermal ablation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Duo; Xia, Rongmin; Chen, Xin; Shafirstein, Gal; Corry, Peter M.; Griffin, Robert J.; Penagaricano, Jose A.; Tulunay-Ugur, Ozlem E.; Moros, Eduardo G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of line-focused ultrasound for thermal ablation of superficially located tumors. Methods: A SonoKnife is a cylindrical-section ultrasound transducer designed to radiate from its concave surface. This geometry generates a line-focus or acoustic edge. The motivation for this approach was the noninvasive thermal ablation of advanced head and neck tumors and positive neck nodes in reasonable treatment times. Line-focusing may offer advantages over the common point-focusing of spherically curved radiators such as faster coverage of a target volume by scanning of the acoustic edge. In this paper, The authors report studies using numerical models and phantom and ex vivo experiments using a SonoKnife prototype. Results: Acoustic edges were generated by cylindrical-section single-element ultrasound transducers numerically, and by the prototype experimentally. Numerically, simulations were performed to characterize the acoustic edge for basic design parameters: transducer dimensions, line-focus depth, frequency, and coupling thickness. The dimensions of the acoustic edge as a function of these parameters were determined. In addition, a step-scanning simulation produced a large thermal lesion in a reasonable treatment time. Experimentally, pressure distributions measured in degassed water agreed well with acoustic simulations, and sonication experiments in gel phantoms and ex vivo porcine liver samples produced lesions similar to those predicted with acoustic and thermal models. Conclusions: Results support the feasibility of noninvasive thermal ablation with a SonoKnife. PMID:21859038

  14. Experimental and computational studies on Coanda nozzle flow for the air knife application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Soon-Bum; Lee, Dong-Won; Kwon, Young-Doo

    2007-05-01

    To control the film thickness of zinc in the process of continuous hot-dip galvanizing, it is known from the early days that the gas wiping through an air knife is the most effective one. The gas wiping using in galvanizing process brings about a problem of splashing from the strip edge for a certain high speed of coating. So, in the present study, the effects of the deflection angle of Coanda nozzle on jet structure and the distribution of impinging pressure at the plate surface are investigated numerically and experimentally. In numerical analysis, the governing equations consisted of three-dimensional time dependent full Navier-Stokes equations, standard k-ɛ turbulence model to solve turbulent stress and so on are employed. In experiment, 16 channel pressure scanning valve and 3-axis auto traversing unit are used to measure the impinging pressure at the strip surface. As a result, it is found that the smaller the deflection angle for the same nozzle slit of air knife is, the larger the impinging pressure is. To reduce the size of separation bubble and to enhance the cutting ability, it is recommendable to use an air knife with the Coanda nozzle.

  15. Ribbons of semithin sections: an advanced method with a new type of diamond knife.

    PubMed

    Blumer, Michael J F; Gahleitner, P; Narzt, T; Handl, C; Ruthensteiner, B

    2002-10-15

    Complete series of semithin sections are imperative for 3-D reconstruction, but with traditional microtomy techniques it is difficult and time-consuming to trace stained and labeled structures. In the present study we introduce a method for making and collecting ribbons of semithin sections with a new, commercial available diamond knife (histo-jumbo-diamond knife, Diatome AG, Biel, Switzerland). The special feature of the diamond knife is the large water bath (boat) into which a glass slide can be dipped. The method has distinct advantages and the handling is simple. The resin block is trimmed into a truncated pyramid. Contact glue is applied to the leading face of the pyramid, which makes sections stick together to form a ribbon. Following sectioning, the ribbons are mounted onto glass slides and aligned in parallel. Stretching out and drying the ribbons on a hot plate is the final step of the method. Major advantages of this method are the perfect alignment of sections with identical orientation of structures, the completeness of series, and the significant saving of time. This facilitates tracing of stained and labeled structures, yielding quick 3-D reconstruction. Semithin sections can be cut from 0.5 to 2 micro m and several ribbons can be mounted side by side onto the slide. Two examples are presented to illustrate the advantages of the method.

  16. Statistical bounds and maximum likelihood performance for shot noise limited knife-edge modeled stellar occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNicholl, Patrick J.; Crabtree, Peter N.

    2014-09-01

    Applications of stellar occultation by solar system objects have a long history for determining universal time, detecting binary stars, and providing estimates of sizes of asteroids and minor planets. More recently, extension of this last application has been proposed as a technique to provide information (if not complete shadow images) of geosynchronous satellites. Diffraction has long been recognized as a source of distortion for such occultation measurements, and models subsequently developed to compensate for this degradation. Typically these models employ a knife-edge assumption for the obscuring body. In this preliminary study, we report on the fundamental limitations of knife-edge position estimates due to shot noise in an otherwise idealized measurement. In particular, we address the statistical bounds, both Cramér- Rao and Hammersley-Chapman-Robbins, on the uncertainty in the knife-edge position measurement, as well as the performance of the maximum-likelihood estimator. Results are presented as a function of both stellar magnitude and sensor passband; the limiting case of infinite resolving power is also explored.

  17. Bulk flow coupled to a viscous interfacial film sheared by a rotating knife edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunandan, Aditya; Rasheed, Fayaz; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    The measurement of the interfacial properties of highly viscous biofilms, such as DPPC (the primary component of lung surfactant), present on the surface of liquids (bulk phase) continues to attract significant attention. Most measurement techniques rely on shearing the interfacial film and quantifying its viscous response in terms of a surface (excess) viscosity at the air-liquid interface. The knife edge viscometer offers a significant advantage over other approaches used to study highly viscous films as the film is directly sheared by a rotating knife edge in direct contact with the film. However, accurately quantifying the viscous response is non-trivial and involves accounting for the coupled interfacial and bulk phase flows. Here, we examine the nature of the viscous response of water insoluble DPPC films sheared in a knife edge viscometer over a range of surface packing, and its influence on the strength of the coupled bulk flow. Experimental results, obtained via Particle Image Velocimetry in the bulk and at the surface (via Brewster Angle Microscopy), are compared with numerical flow predictions to quantify the coupling across hydrodynamic flow regimes, from the Stokes flow limit to regimes where flow inertia is significant. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  18. Experience with the CyberKnife for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery: Analysis of dosimetry indices

    SciTech Connect

    Floriano, Alejandro Santa-Olalla, Iciar; Sanchez-Reyes, Alberto

    2014-04-01

    We evaluated coverage, dose homogeneity, dose conformity, and dose gradient in CyberKnife VSI treatment plans. Several dosimetric indices were calculated, and the results were compared with those of previous publications. The effect of target volume on the radiosurgical treatment indices selected was also investigated. The study population comprised the first 40 patients treated at our department from March 2011 to September 2012. Dosimetric indices were calculated and compared with published results for other frame-based and frameless intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy techniques. A comparison of the indices confirmed the ability of the CyberKnife VSI system to provide very high-quality dosing plans. The results were independent of target volume for coverage, homogeneity, and dose conformity. However, a dependence on target volume was observed for the dose-gradient indices analyzed. Based on the indices proposed, CyberKnife provides very good treatment plans and compares favorably with other techniques in most cases. However, greater consensus on the radiosurgery indices calculated would be desirable to facilitate comparison of the various techniques or the same techniques when applied by different users.

  19. CyberKnife therapy of 24 multiple brain metastases from lung cancer: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guiqing; Wang, Yishan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Lin, Sixiang; Sun, Dongning

    2013-08-01

    Brain metastasis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and a critical complication of non-central nervous system primary carcinoma. The present study describes the clinical case of a 46-year-old male with lung cancer and life-threatening brain metastases. The patient was diagnosed with lung cancer with a clinical stage of T2N0M1 (stage IV). Six months after the initial diagnosis and administration of conformal radiotherapy combined with three cycles of chemotherapy, an enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain revealed abnormalities with double-dosing of intravenous contrast. The CT scan identified >24 lesions scattered in the whole brain. The patient was treated with three-fraction Cyberknife radiotherapy at 22 Gy, delivered to the brain metastases at the Center for Tumor Treatment of People's Liberation Army 107th Hospital. Following CyberKnife therapy, a CT scan of the brain revealed that most of the tumors had disappeared with almost no residual traces. The stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) conducted using CyberKnife, an image-guided frameless robotic technology for whole-body radiosurgery, had produced a marked response. The present case report demonstrates that CyberKnife therapy plays a significant role in the management of multiple meta-static brain tumors.

  20. Experience with the CyberKnife for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery: analysis of dosimetry indices.

    PubMed

    Floriano, Alejandro; Santa-Olalla, Iciar; Sanchez-Reyes, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated coverage, dose homogeneity, dose conformity, and dose gradient in CyberKnife VSI treatment plans. Several dosimetric indices were calculated, and the results were compared with those of previous publications. The effect of target volume on the radiosurgical treatment indices selected was also investigated. The study population comprised the first 40 patients treated at our department from March 2011 to September 2012. Dosimetric indices were calculated and compared with published results for other frame-based and frameless intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy techniques. A comparison of the indices confirmed the ability of the CyberKnife VSI system to provide very high-quality dosing plans. The results were independent of target volume for coverage, homogeneity, and dose conformity. However, a dependence on target volume was observed for the dose-gradient indices analyzed. Based on the indices proposed, CyberKnife provides very good treatment plans and compares favorably with other techniques in most cases. However, greater consensus on the radiosurgery indices calculated would be desirable to facilitate comparison of the various techniques or the same techniques when applied by different users.

  1. Stereotactic radiosurgery of prostate cancer - dose distribution for VMAT and CyberKnife techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ślosarek, Krzysztof; Osewski, Wojciech; Grządziel, Aleksandra; Stąpór-Fudzińska, Małgorzata; Szlag, Marta

    2016-06-01

    New capabilities of biomedical accelerators allow for very precise depositing of the radiation dose and imaging verification during the therapy. In addition, computer algorithms calculating dose distributions are taking into account the increasing number of physical effects. Therefore, administration of high dose fractionation, which is consistent with radiobiology used in oncology, becomes safer and safer. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), which is very precise irradiation with high dose fractionation is increasingly widespread use in radiotherapy of prostate cancer. For this purpose different biomedical accelerators are used. The aim of this study is to compare dose distributions for two techniques: VMAT and CyberKnife. Statistical analysis was performed for the two groups of patients treated by VMAT technique (25 patients), and CyberKnife technique (15 patients). The analysis shows that the dose distributions are comparable, both in the treated area (prostate) and in the critical organs (rectum, urinary bladder, femoral heads). The results show that stereotactic radiosurgery of prostate cancer can be carried out on CyberKnife accelerator as well as on the classical accelerator with the use of VMAT technique.

  2. Electric Field Screening by the Proximity of Two Knife-Edge Field Emitters of Finite Width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, P.; Tang, W.; Lau, Y. Y.; Hoff, B.

    2015-11-01

    Field emitter arrays have the potential to provide high current density, low voltage operation, and high pulse repetition for radar and communication. It is well known that packing density of the field emitter arrays significantly affect the emission current. Previously we calculated analytically the electric field profile of two-dimensional knife-edge cathodes with arbitrary separation by using a Schwarz-Christoffel transformation. Here we extend this previous work to include the finite width of two identical emitters. From the electric field profile, the field enhancement factor, thereby the severity of the electric field screening, are determined. It is found that for two identical emitters with finite width, the magnitude of the electric field on the knife-edge cathodes depends strongly on the ratio h / a and h / r , where h is the height of the knife-edge cathode, 2a is the distance between the cathodes, and 2 r represents their width. Particle-in-cell simulations are performed to compare with the analytical results on the emission current distribution. P. Y. Wong was supported by a Directed Energy Summer Scholar internship at Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, and by AFRL Award No. FA9451-14-1-0374.

  3. A novel fully integrated handheld gamma camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massari, R.; Ucci, A.; Campisi, C.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present an innovative, fully integrated handheld gamma camera, namely designed to gather in the same device the gamma ray detector with the display and the embedded computing system. The low power consumption allows the prototype to be battery operated. To be useful in radioguided surgery, an intraoperative gamma camera must be very easy to handle since it must be moved to find a suitable view. Consequently, we have developed the first prototype of a fully integrated, compact and lightweight gamma camera for radiopharmaceuticals fast imaging. The device can operate without cables across the sterile field, so it may be easily used in the operating theater for radioguided surgery. The prototype proposed consists of a Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) array coupled with a proprietary scintillation structure based on CsI(Tl) crystals. To read the SiPM output signals, we have developed a very low power readout electronics and a dedicated analog to digital conversion system. One of the most critical aspects we faced designing the prototype was the low power consumption, which is mandatory to develop a battery operated device. We have applied this detection device in the lymphoscintigraphy technique (sentinel lymph node mapping) comparing the results obtained with those of a commercial gamma camera (Philips SKYLight). The results obtained confirm a rapid response of the device and an adequate spatial resolution for the use in the scintigraphic imaging. This work confirms the feasibility of a small gamma camera with an integrated display. This device is designed for radioguided surgery and small organ imaging, but it could be easily combined into surgical navigation systems.

  4. γ knife radiosurgery of brain metastasis from breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Padovani, Laetitia; Muracciole, Xavier; Régis, Jean

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of brain metastasis in patients with metastatic breast cancer ranges from 14 to 16%.Age, number of metastatic sites, short disease-free survival and molecular subtypes are associated with the occurrence of brain metastasis. Patients classified in the triple-negative group more frequently presented brain metastasis as the first site (26%) than those in the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive (6%) or luminal (12%) subtypes. Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is still the standard treatment for breast cancer patients with brain metastasis. The 1- and 2-year survival rates of patients with brain metastasis were 25 and 10%, respectively, with a median survival of 6 months. In selected patients with single brain metastasis, majority of lung cancer, three randomized controlled trials underlined the significant survival benefit in adding local treatment such as surgery or stereotactic radio surgery to WBRT. Similarly, the upfront stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone did not affect survival rate in three other randomized studies and represents an alternative treatment for patients with stage 1-4. Metastatic breast cancer patients with Karnofsky Performance Scale ≥70, single or oligometastatic brain metastases and well-controlled extracranial disease or favorable disease-specific graded prognostic assessment group presented a median overall survival of 16 months. Delaying WBRT could spare patients of neurocognitive toxicity due to full-dose whole brain irradiation. Nevertheless, the real WBRT neurocognitive impact is still unclear. These patients should be followed with serial magnetic resonance image every 3 months and treated with WBRT or additional SRS at recurrence to control brain disease.

  5. Prostate-specific antigen kinetics after primary stereotactic body radiation therapy using CyberKnife for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong Hyun; Choi, In Young; Yoon, Sei Chul; Jang, Hong Seok; Moon, Hyong Woo; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Kim, Sae Woong; Hwang, Tae-Kon; Lee, Ji Youl

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics and report on the oncologic outcomes for patients with localized prostate cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using CyberKnife. Methods We extracted the list and data of 39 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer who had undergone primary SBRT using CyberKnife between January 2008 and December 2012 from the Smart Prostate Cancer database system of Seoul St. Mary's Hospital. Changes in PSA over time, PSA velocity, and PSA nadir were evaluated from the completion of SBRT using CyberKnife. Biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free survival after primary SBRT using CyberKnife was determined using Kaplan–Meier analysis. Results The rate of PSA decrease was maximal in the first month (median −3.34 ng/mL/mo), which then fell gradually with median values of −1.51, −0.32, −0.28, −0.20, and −0.03 ng/mL/mo for durations of 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 months after SBRT using CyberKnife, respectively. The median PSA nadir was 0.31 ng/mL after a median 23 months. Kaplan–Meier analysis calculates an actuarial 5-year BCR-free survival after SBRT using CyberKnife as 80.8%. Conclusions PSA decline occurred rapidly in the first month, and then the rate of PSA decline fell off steadily over time throughout 2 years after treatment. Also, SBRT using CyberKnife leads to long-term favorable BCR-free survival in localized prostate cancer. PMID:26157760

  6. Clinical efficacy of CyberKnife combined with chemotherapy and hyperthermia for advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Lin, Si-Xiang; Yang, Gui-Qing; Liu, Han-Chen; Sun, Dong-Ning; Wang, Yi-Shan

    2013-05-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is responsible for at least 80% of all lung tumors and has a poor prognosis, since 75% of NSCLCs are first diagnosed at an advanced stage. This study was conducted to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of CyberKnife in combination with chemotherapy and hyperthermia for selected patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Clinical charts, imaging and pathology reports of patients with advanced NSCLC who underwent CyberKnife therapy in our Tumor Therapy Center were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical efficacy was evaluated for local control, Karnofsky performance status scale (KPS) and toxicity analysis. A total of 119 patients with 136 target areas were evaluated. A prescribed dose of 24-51 Gy to the gross tumor volume was delivered in 3-6 fractions. The median prescription dose was 35 Gy (mean, 34.73±4.80 Gy), with an average of five fractions. Patients, who voluntarily participated in the study, were assigned to one of three groups, which were as follows: CyberKnife therapy alone, CyberKnife combined with chemotherapy and CyberKnife combined with chemotherapy and hyperthermia. The median follow-up period was 6 months and curative efficiencies were 62.16, 71.79 and 90.70%, respectively, as determined by radiographic and clinical re-examinations. Patients treated by CyberKnife combined with chemotherapy and hyperthermia achieved optimal improvement in the aspect of KPS, which was statistically different compared to the other two groups (P<0.05). In conclusion, our results indicated that CyberKnife combined with chemotherapy and hyperthermia achieved favorable short-term outcomes and may be a more viable option for patients with advanced NSCLC. However, further investigations are required to evaluate long-term outcomes.

  7. [Robotic surgery].

    PubMed

    Sándor, József; Haidegger, Tamás; Kormos, Katalin; Ferencz, Andrea; Csukás, Domokos; Bráth, Endre; Szabó, Györgyi; Wéber, György

    2013-10-01

    Due to the fast spread of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, surgical procedures have been changed essentially. The new techniques applied for both abdominal and thoracic procedures provided the possibility for minimally invasive access with all its advantages. Robots - originally developed for industrial applications - were retrofitted for laparoscopic procedures. The currently prevailing robot-assisted surgery is ergonomically more advantageous for the surgeon, as well as for the patient through the more precise preparative activity thanks to the regained 3D vision. The gradual decrease of costs of robotic surgical systems and development of new generations of minimally invasive devices may lead to substantial changes in routine surgical procedures.

  8. Gamma ray generator

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  9. Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To conduct an evidence-based analysis of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery. Background Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of at last 30 kg/m2.1 Morbid obesity is defined as a BMI of at least 40 kg/m2 or at least 35 kg/m2 with comorbid conditions. Comorbid conditions associated with obesity include diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemias, obstructive sleep apnea, weight-related arthropathies, and stress urinary incontinence. It is also associated with depression, and cancers of the breast, uterus, prostate, and colon, and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Obesity is also associated with higher all-cause mortality at any age, even after adjusting for potential confounding factors like smoking. A person with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 has about a 50% higher risk of dying than does someone with a healthy BMI. The risk more than doubles at a BMI of 35 kg/m2. An expert estimated that about 160,000 people are morbidly obese in Ontario. In the United States, the prevalence of morbid obesity is 4.7% (1999–2000). In Ontario, the 2004 Chief Medical Officer of Health Report said that in 2003, almost one-half of Ontario adults were overweight (BMI 25–29.9 kg/m2) or obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2). About 57% of Ontario men and 42% of Ontario women were overweight or obese. The proportion of the population that was overweight or obese increased gradually from 44% in 1990 to 49% in 2000, and it appears to have stabilized at 49% in 2003. The report also noted that the tendency to be overweight and obese increases with age up to 64 years. BMI should be used cautiously for people aged 65 years and older, because the “normal” range may begin at slightly above 18.5 kg/m2 and extend into the “overweight” range. The Chief Medical Officer of Health cautioned that these data may underestimate the true extent of the problem, because they were based on self reports, and people tend to over-report their

  10. Knife grid size reduction to pre-process packed beds of high- and low-moisture switchgrass.

    PubMed

    Igathinathane, C; Womac, A R; Sokhansanj, S; Narayan, S

    2008-05-01

    A linear knife grid device was developed for first-stage size reduction of high- and low-moisture switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), a tough, fibrous perennial grass being considered as a feedstock for bioenergy. The size reduction is by a shearing action accomplished by forcing a thick packed bed of biomass against a grid of sharp knives. The system is used commercially for slicing forages for drying or feed mixing. No performance data or engineering equations are available in published literature to optimize the machine and the process for biomass size reductions. Tests of a linear knife grid with switchgrass quantified the combined effect of shearing stresses, packed bed consolidation, and frictional resistance to flow through a knife grid. A universal test machine (UTM) measured load-displacement of switchgrass at two moisture contents: 51%, and 9% wet basis; three knife grid spacings: 25.4, 50.8, and 101.6mm; and three packed bed depths: 50.8, 101.6, and 152.4mm. Results showed that peak load, ultimate shear stress, and cutting energy values varied inversely with knife grid spacing and directly with packed bed depth (except ultimate shear stress). Mean ultimate shear stresses of high- and low-moisture switchgrass were 0.68+/-0.24, and 0.41+/-0.21 MPa, mass-based cutting energy values were 4.50+/-4.43, and 3.64+/-3.31 MJ/dry Mg, and cutting energy based on new surface area, calculated from packed-circle theory, were 4.12+/-2.06, and 2.53+/-0.45 kJ/m2, respectively. The differences between high- and low-moisture switchgrass were significant (P<0.05), such that high-moisture switchgrass required increased shear stress and cutting energy. Reduced knife grid spacing and increased packed bed depths required increased cutting energy. Overall, knife grid cutting energy was much less than energy values published for rotary equipment. A minimum knife grid spacing of 25.4mm appears to be a practical lower limit, considering the high ram force that would be needed for

  11. Short-term outcomes of CyberKnife therapy for advanced high-risk tumors: A report of 160 cases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Shan; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Jiang, Peng; Ma, Jian-Jun; Qu, Zhen; Wang, Xi-Lin; Li, Jun-Ti; Jia, Xi-Feng

    2012-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate short-term outcomes of CyberKnife therapy in patients with advanced high-risk tumors. A total of 201 target areas from 341 advanced high-risk tumor lesions in 160 patients were treated with CyberKnife. A prescribed dose of 18-60 Gy to the gross tumor volume was delivered in 1-6 fractions to complete the entire treatment in 1 week. Radiographic studies and clinical examinations were performed at 1- to 3-month follow-up intervals, and the results were compared to outcomes of 160 similar advanced high-risk tumor patients who were treated by conformal radiotherapy (CRT). After CyberKnife therapy, the short-term improvement in the quality of life was significant according to radiographic study, radioimmunoassay and ZPS scores of these patients. The total rates of objective efficacy and alleviation of ascities were as high as 66.88 and 67.90%. The short-term outcomes in our series of patients with advanced high-risk tumors treated with CyberKnife appeared to be better compared to conventional CRT. CyberKnife may be an option for patients with incurable advanced high-risk tumors, although further studies of the long-term outcomes are required to confirm the validity.

  12. A stab in the dark: Design and construction of a novel device for conducting incised knife trauma investigations and its initial test.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Caitlin; Kumaratilake, Jaliya; Henneberg, Maciej

    2016-05-01

    Knife attacks are commonly seen in Australia and other countries. During forensic investigations the force with which a wound was inflicted is often questioned. The ability to examine resultant trauma and particular weapons at different forces with an experimental device may lead to better interpretations of knife wounds. The objective of this study is to design, construct and test a device to analyse the characteristics and forces involved in knife attacks, particularly incised wounds. The mechanical variables (e.g. force, angle, knife geometry) involved in knife attacks have been considered to design and construct a suitable device which allows these variables to be systematically controlled and varied. A device was designed and constructed from mild steel. This included a pivoting arm and instrumented knife holder. The arm has adjustable angle and weight so that knives can be operated at different calculated forces. A device was successfully constructed and the repeatability of incised knife trauma and its characteristics in skeletal tissues were investigated. A device which allows reproducible and controlled experiments with knife wounds will be advantageous to forensic investigations. In particular, in determining forces and types of weapons associated with particular wounds, identifying or eliminating suspected weapons and more accurately answering the common question: How much force would be required to cause that particular wound. This could help to characterise the perpetrator. The device can be altered to be used in the future to investigate trauma caused by other weapons.

  13. Robotic Surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Automated Endoscopic System for Optimal Positioning, or AESOP, was developed by Computer Motion, Inc. under a SBIR contract from the Jet Propulsion Lab. AESOP is a robotic endoscopic positioning system used to control the motion of a camera during endoscopic surgery. The camera, which is mounted at the end of a robotic arm, previously had to be held in place by the surgical staff. With AESOP the robotic arm can make more precise and consistent movements. AESOP is also voice controlled by the surgeon. It is hoped that this technology can be used in space repair missions which require precision beyond human dexterity. A new generation of the same technology entitled the ZEUS Robotic Surgical System can make endoscopic procedures even more successful. ZEUS allows the surgeon control various instruments in its robotic arms, allowing for the precision the procedure requires.

  14. Endodontic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lieblich, Stuart E

    2012-01-01

    Conventional endodontic therapy is successful approximately 80-85% of the time. Many of these failures will occur after one year. The presence of continued pain, drainage, mobility or an increasing size of a radiolucent area are some of the indications to treat the case surgically. Since many of these cases may have had final restorations placed by the dentist, the salvage of these cases is of importance to the patient. Advances in periapical surgery have included the use of ultrasonic root end preparation. With the use of these piezoelectric devices, a more controlled apical preparation can be achieved. Additionally, isthmus areas between canals can be appropriately prepared and sealed. The precision afforded with these devices reduces the chances for a malpositioned fill and a more successful outcome.

  15. Evaluation of dose delivery accuracy of gamma knife using MRI polymer gel dosimeter in an inhomogeneous phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourfallah T, A.; Alam N, Riahi; M, Allahverdi; M, Ay; M, Zahmatkesh

    2009-05-01

    Polymer gel dosimetry is still the only dosimetry method for directly measuring three-dimensional dose distributions. MRI Polymer gel dosimeters are tissue equivalent and can act as a phantom material. Because of high dose response sensitivity, the MRI was chosen as readout device. In this study dose profiles calculated with treatment-planning software (LGP) and measurements with the MR polymer gel dosimeter for single-shot irradiations were compared. A custom-built 16 cm diameter spherical plexiglas head phantom was used in this study. Inside the phantom, there is a cubic cutout for insertion of gel phantoms and another cutout for inserting the inhomogeneities. The phantoms were scanned with a 1.5T MRI (Siemens syngo MR 2004A 4VA25A) scanner. The multiple spin-echo sequence with 32 echoes was used for the MRI scans. Calibration relations between the spin-spin relaxation rate and the absorbed dose were obtained by using small cylindrical vials, which were filled with the PAGAT polymer gel from the same batch as for the spherical phantom. 1D and 2D data obtained using gel dosimeter for homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms were compared with dose obtained using LGP calculation. The distance between relative isodose curves obtained for homogeneous phantom and heterogeneous phantoms exceed the accepted total positioning error (>±2mm). The findings of this study indicate that dose measurement using PAGAT gel dosimeter can be used for verifying dose delivering accuracy in GK unit in presence of inhomogeneities.

  16. [Minimally invasive surgery and robotic surgery: surgery 4.0?].

    PubMed

    Feußner, H; Wilhelm, D

    2016-03-01

    Surgery can only maintain its role in a highly competitive environment if results are continuously improved, accompanied by further reduction of the interventional trauma for patients and with justifiable costs. Significant impulse to achieve this goal was expected from minimally invasive surgery and, in particular, robotic surgery; however, a real breakthrough has not yet been achieved. Accordingly, the new strategic approach of cognitive surgery is required to optimize the provision of surgical treatment. A full scale integration of all modules utilized in the operating room (OR) into a comprehensive network and the development of systems with technical cognition are needed to upgrade the current technical environment passively controlled by the surgeon into an active collaborative support system (surgery 4.0). Only then can the true potential of minimally invasive surgery and robotic surgery be exploited.

  17. A quiet harvest: linkage between ritual, seed selection and the historical use of the finger-bladed knife as a traditional plant breeding tool in Ifugao, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kevin M

    2017-01-13

    The transverse harvest knife, also commonly called the finger or finger-bladed knife, has been utilized by rice farmers in southeast Asia for many centuries. The finger knife persisted in many traditional cultures long after the introduction of the sickle, a tool which provided farmers with the means to execute a much faster harvest. Several theories in interpretative archaeology have attempted to account for this rejection of more modern technological innovations. These theories, which include community-based social organization ideas and practical reasons for the continued use of the finger knife, are presented in this paper. Here I suggest an alternate theory based on a re-interpretation of existing research and fusion of existing theories: the primary reason for the historical and continued use of the finger knife is for seed selection through a centuries old tradition of plant breeding. Though I accept the accuracy of the practical and community-based, socio-cultural reasons for the use of the finger knife put forth by other authors, I suggest that seed selection and genetic improvement was the driving factor in the use of the finger knife. Indeed, intricate planting and harvesting rituals, which both ensured and encouraged varietal conservation and improvement co-evolved with the use of the finger knife as the primary harvest tool due to its unique ability to aid the farmer in the art and science of seed selection. When combined with previous ideas, this interpretative theory, based on the connection between ethnoagronomy and material culture, may provide a more complete picture of the story around the persistence of the finger knife in traditional rice-growing cultures in southeast Asia. I focus my theory on the terrace-building Ifugao people in the mountainous Cordillera region of northcentral Philippines; however, to put the use of the finger into a wider regional context, I draw from examples of the use of the finger knife in other traditional cultures

  18. What Is Heart Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Another type of heart surgery is called off-pump, or beating heart, surgery. It's like traditional open- ... heart-lung bypass machine isn't used. Off-pump heart surgery is limited to CABG. Surgeons can ...

  19. Dental Implant Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Dental implant surgery Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Dental implant surgery is a procedure that replaces tooth roots with ... look and function much like real ones. Dental implant surgery can offer a welcome alternative to dentures ...

  20. Weight Loss Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Weight Loss Surgery KidsHealth > For Teens > Weight Loss Surgery A A ... Risks and Side Effects? What Is Weight Loss Surgery? For some people, being overweight is about more ...

  1. Surgery for Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of retroperitoneal lymph node surgery called nerve-sparing surgery that is very successful when done by ... children. These men may wish to discuss nerve-sparing surgery with their doctors, as well as sperm ...

  2. Tennis elbow surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... epicondylitis surgery - discharge; Lateral tendinosis surgery - discharge; Lateral tennis elbow surgery - discharge ... long as you are told. This helps ensure tennis elbow will not return. You may be prescribed a ...

  3. Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... LASIK Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures Laser Surgery Recovery Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures Dec. 12, 2015 Today's refractive ... that releases controlled amounts of radio frequency (RF) energy, instead of a laser, to apply heat to ...

  4. Surgery for pancreatic cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007649.htm Surgery for pancreatic cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... surgery are used in the surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer. Whipple procedure: This is the most common surgery ...

  5. Laser surgery - skin

    MedlinePlus

    Surgery using a laser ... used is directly related to the type of surgery being performed and the color of the tissue ... Laser surgery can be used to: Close small blood vessels to reduce blood loss Remove warts , moles , sunspots, and ...

  6. Weight Loss Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious medical problems. Weight loss surgery (also called bariatric surgery) can help very obese people lose weight. But ... Gastric banding is the simplest of the three weight loss surgeries. People who get it might not lose as ...

  7. Bariatric Surgery Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center Access to Care Toolkit EHB Access Toolkit Bariatric Surgery Procedures Bariatric surgical procedures cause weight loss by ... minimally invasive techniques (laparoscopic surgery). The most common bariatric surgery procedures are gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, adjustable gastric ...

  8. Gastric Sleeve Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors recommend weight loss surgery (also known as bariatric surgery ) for very overweight teens if they've tried ... it is at a children's hospital with a bariatric surgery program that involves a team of specialists. Members ...

  9. Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & ... Surgery Types of Surgery Gastric Bypass ... or intestines removed due to ulcers or cancer tended to lose a lot of weight after ...

  10. Implementation of Monte Carlo Dose calculation for CyberKnife treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Li, J. S.; Deng, J.; Fan, J.

    2008-02-01

    Accurate dose calculation is essential to advanced stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) especially for treatment planning involving heterogeneous patient anatomy. This paper describes the implementation of a fast Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm in SRS/SRT treatment planning for the CyberKnife® SRS/SRT system. A superposition Monte Carlo algorithm is developed for this application. Photon mean free paths and interaction types for different materials and energies as well as the tracks of secondary electrons are pre-simulated using the MCSIM system. Photon interaction forcing and splitting are applied to the source photons in the patient calculation and the pre-simulated electron tracks are repeated with proper corrections based on the tissue density and electron stopping powers. Electron energy is deposited along the tracks and accumulated in the simulation geometry. Scattered and bremsstrahlung photons are transported, after applying the Russian roulette technique, in the same way as the primary photons. Dose calculations are compared with full Monte Carlo simulations performed using EGS4/MCSIM and the CyberKnife treatment planning system (TPS) for lung, head & neck and liver treatments. Comparisons with full Monte Carlo simulations show excellent agreement (within 0.5%). More than 10% differences in the target dose are found between Monte Carlo simulations and the CyberKnife TPS for SRS/SRT lung treatment while negligible differences are shown in head and neck and liver for the cases investigated. The calculation time using our superposition Monte Carlo algorithm is reduced up to 62 times (46 times on average for 10 typical clinical cases) compared to full Monte Carlo simulations. SRS/SRT dose distributions calculated by simple dose algorithms may be significantly overestimated for small lung target volumes, which can be improved by accurate Monte Carlo dose calculations.

  11. Dosimetric analysis of trigeminal nerve, brain stem doses in CyberKnife radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Sudahar, H; Kurup, P G G; Murali, V; Velmurugan, J

    2012-07-01

    CyberKnife radiosurgery treatment of Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is performed as a non-invasive image guided procedure. The prescription dose for TN is very high. The brainstem is the adjacent critical organ at risk (OAR) which is prone to receive the very high target dose of TN. The present study is to analyze the dose distribution inside the tiny trigeminal nerve target and also to analyze the dose fall off in the brain stem. Seven TN cases treated between November 2010 and January 2012 were taken for this study retrospectively. The treatment plans were analyzed for target dose conformity, homogeneity and dose coverage. In the brainstem the volume doses D(1%), D(2%) were taken for analyzing the higher doses in the brain stem. The dose fall off was analyzed in terms of D(5%) and D(10%). The mean value of maximum dose within the trigeminal nerve target was 73.5±2.1Gy (P=0.0007) and the minimum dose was 50.0±4.1Gy (P=0.1315). The mean conformity index was 2.19 and the probable reason could be the smallest CyberKnife collimator of 5mm used in the treatment plan. The mean D(1%), of the brainstem was 10.5± 2.1Gy (P=0.5316) and the mean value of the maximum point dose within the brainstem was 35.6±3.8Gy. This shows the degree of dose fall off within the brainstem. Though the results of the present study are showing superior sparing of brain stem and reasonable of target coverage, it is necessary to execute the treatment plan with greater accuracy in CyberKnife as the immobilization is noninvasive and frameless.

  12. gamma-Hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    gamma - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( gamma - HCH ) ; CASRN 58 - 89 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Asse

  13. Knife cuts of entorhinal cortex: effects on development of amygdaloid kindling and seizure-induced decrease of muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, D.D.; Rigsbee, L.C.; McNamara, J.O.

    1985-02-01

    This report examines the effect of transection of the entorhinal hippocampal projection on amygdaloid kindling. We found that: bilateral knife cuts of entorhinal cortex but not of dorsal neocortex antagonize the development of amygdaloid kindling; and bilateral knife cuts of entorhinal cortex eliminate the seizure-induced decrease in number of muscarinic receptors of dentate granule cells. We suggest the following interpretations of these data: the hippocampal formation circuitry facilitates the development of amygdaloid kindling; and the decline of muscarinic receptors after kindled seizures is due to excessive activation of granule cells by axons from entorhinal cortex, a noncholinergic afferent.

  14. Measurement of Gaussian laser beam radius using the knife-edge technique: improvement on data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, Marcos A. de; Silva, Rubens; Lima, Emerson de; Pereira, Daniel P.; Oliveira, Paulo C. de

    2009-01-10

    We revisited the well known Khosrofian and Garetz inversion algorithm [Appl. Opt.22, 3406-3410 (1983)APOPAI0003-6935] that was developed to analyze data obtained by the application of the traveling knife-edge technique. We have analyzed the approximated fitting function that was used for adjusting their experimental data and have found that it is not optimized to work with a full range of the experimentally-measured data. We have numerically calculated a new set of coefficients, which makes the approximated function suitable for a full experimental range, considerably improving the accuracy of the measurement of a radius of a focused Gaussian laser beam.

  15. Mathematical model parameters for describing the particle size spectra of knife-milled corn stover

    SciTech Connect

    Bitra, V.S.P; Womac, A.R.; Yang, Y.T.; Miu, P.I.; Igathanathane, C.

    2009-09-01

    Particle size distributions of Corn stover (Zea mays L.) created by a knife mill were determined using integral classifying screens with sizes from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, operating at speeds from 250 to 500 rpm, and mass input rates ranging from 1 to 9 kg min_1. Particle distributions were classified using American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) standardised sieves for forage analysis that incorporated a horizontal sieving motion. The sieves were made from machined-aluminium with their thickness proportional to the sieve opening dimensions. A wide range of analytical descriptors that could be used to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions were examined. The correlation coefficients between geometric mean length and screen size, feed rate, and speed were 0.980, 0.612, and _0.027, respectively. Screen size and feed rate directly influenced particle size, whereas operating speed had a weak indirect relation with particle size. The Rosin Rammler equation fitted the chopped corn stover size distribution data with coefficient of determination (R2) > 0.978. This indicated that particle size distribution of corn stover was well-fit by the Rosin Rammler function. This can be attributed to the fact that Rosin Rammler expression was well suited to the skewed distribution of particle sizes. Skewed distributions occurred when significant quantities of particles, either finer or coarser, existed or were removed from region of the predominant size. The mass relative span was slightly greater than 1, which indicated that it was a borderline narrow to wide distribution of particle sizes. The uniformity coefficient was <4.0 for 19.0 50.8 mm screens, which indicated particles of relatively uniform size. Knife mill chopping of corn stover produced fine-skewed mesokurtic particles with 12.7 50.8 mm screens. Size-related parameters, namely, geometric mean length, Rosin Rammler size parameter, median length, effective length, and

  16. [Thinking of therapeutic mechanism of small knife needle in treating closed myofascitis].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Fang, Wei; Qin, Wei-kai

    2014-09-01

    The authors investigated and discussed therapeutic mechanism of small knife needle in treating closed myofascitis on the basis of pathomechanism of modern medicine and acupuncture theory of TCM among numbers of clinical cases and experimental data. Therapeutic mechanism lies in 6 aspects: (1) Relieve the energy crisis of tenderness point on muscular fasciae; (2) Affect nervous system and reduce induction of harmful stimulating signal; (3) Inhibit aseptic inflammatory reaction on muscular fasciae; (4) Regulate dynamic equilibrium of soft tissue by cutting scar and releasing the conglutination; (5) Increase patients' regional threshold of feeling; (6) Reduce tension and pressure of soft tissue of tenderness point so as to relieve extrusion of nervus cutaneous.

  17. X-ray Phase Imaging Microscopy with Two-Dimensional Knife-Edge Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaeho; Park, Yong-Sung

    2012-04-01

    A novel scheme of X-ray differential phase imaging was implemented with an array source and a two-dimensional Foucault knife-edge (2DFK). A pinhole array lens was employed to manipulate the X-ray beam on the Fourier space. An emerging biaxial scanning procedure was also demonstrated with the periodic 2DFK. The differential phase images (DPIs) of the midrib in a leaf of a rose bush were visualized to verify the phase imaging of biological specimens by the proposed method. It also has features of depicting multiple-stack phase images, and rendering morphological DPIs, because it acquires pure phase information.

  18. Radiation shielding evaluation based on five years of data from a busy CyberKnife center.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Feng, Jing

    2014-11-08

    We examined the adequacy of existing shielding guidelines using five-year clinical data from a busy CyberKnife center. From June 2006 through July 2011, 1,370 patients were treated with a total of 4,900 fractions and 680,691 radiation beams using a G4 CyberKnife. Prescription dose and total monitor units (MU) were analyzed to estimate the shielding workload and modulation factor. In addition, based on the beam's radiation source position, targeting position, MU, and beam collimator size, the MATLAB program was used to project each beam toward the shielding barrier. The summation of the projections evaluates the distribution of the shielding load. On average, each patient received 3.6 fractions, with an average 9.1 Gy per fraction prescribed at the 71.1% isodose line, using 133.7 beams and 6,200 MU. Intracranial patients received an average of 2.7 fractions, with 8.6 Gy per fraction prescribed at the 71.4% isodose line, using 133 beams and 5,083 MU. Extracranial patients received an average of 3.94 fractions, with 9.2 Gy per frac- tion prescribed at the 71% isodose line, using 134 beams and 6,514 MU. Most- used collimator sizes for intracranial patients were smaller (7.5 to 20 mm) than for extracranial patients (20 to 40 mm). Eighty-five percent of the beams exited through the floor, and about 40% of the surrounding wall area received no direct beam. For the rest of the wall, we found "hot" areas that received above-average MU. The locations of these areas were correlated with the projection of the nodes for extracranial treatments. In comparison, the beam projections on the wall were more spread for intracranial treatments. The maximum MU any area received from intracranial treatment was less than 0.25% of total MU used for intracranial treatments, and was less than 1.2% of total MU used for extracranial treatments. The combination of workload, modulation factor, and use factor in our practice are about tenfold less than recommendations in the existing CyberKnife

  19. [Baldness surgery].

    PubMed

    Dardour, J-C; Hennebert, H

    2003-10-01

    Redistribution from hair-rich to hair-poor areas is the fundamental principle of baldness surgery. Success of hair transplantation is based on the fact that transplanted hair follicles will behave as they did in their original area and continue to grow. Three basic techniques are employed: scalp flaps, scalp reductions and hair grafts. Each technique has undergone considerable refinements answering to initial wrong results and criticisms. The typical doll-hair tufted effect of old macro-grafts has disappeared with micro-graft shift. The unaesthetic cheese-like Hippocratic crown donor defect aspect ended when harvesting a long strip of occipital hair bearing scalp. The posteriorly directed hair growth has disappeared by using superiorly based flaps. Respective indications and tension-free closure ensure that the incidence of necrosis is low. Limited results of old scalp reductions have decreased by testing preoperative laxity of the scalp and using extensive undermining of the scalp. The future may release on medical treatment avoiding dihydrotestosterone to act on genetically predisposed follicles avoiding miniaturization of the hair and baldness development. However, when baldness has appeared, as the hair follicle's culture is not actually effective, the state of art is still to plan a surgical strategy using successive stages of this large panel of techniques to reach a natural effect with the best hair orientation and density.

  20. Rehabilitation of gamma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poynton, Charles A.

    1998-07-01

    Gamma characterizes the reproduction of tone scale in an imaging system. Gamma summarizes, in a single numerical parameter, the nonlinear relationship between code value--in an 8-bit system, from 0 through 255--and physical intensity. Nearly all image coding systems are nonlinear, and so involve values of gamma different from unity. Owing to poor understanding of tone scale reproduction, and to misconceptions about nonlinear coding, gamma has acquired a terrible reputation in computer graphics and image processing. In addition, the world-wide web suffers from poor reproduction of grayscale and color images, due to poor handling of nonlinear image coding. This paper aims to make gamma respectable again.

  1. Computation of the Knife-Edge Cusp of a Rising Bubble in a Viscoelastic Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Ruobo; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2006-11-01

    We consider the buoyant rise of an originally-spherical bubble through a viscoelastic fluid. Experiments have demonstrated that the sharp trailing edge could develop a three dimensional cusp of ``knife-like'' shape under certain conditions (high capillary number, large drop size). In order to understand the complex physics of this phenomenon, we have conducted a linear, three-dimensional temporal stability analysis of a computationally-obtained axisymmetric cusped bubble. The in-house time-accurate code is control-volume based and uses a body-fitted grid. Flux-difference splitting is employed to handle large Deborah numbers. Artificial compressibility is used for time marching. The resulting eigenanalysis shows the only linearly-unstable mode to be the one with azimuthal wavenumber of 2. The eigenvalue is real and the nature of instability is an exchange of stability. Thus an axisymmetric cusp can indeed develop into a knife-like shape. An investigation of the energy production and dissipation for the disturbances shows that the normal pressure gradient of the base-state along the free surface plays an important role in the evolution of the instability.

  2. Initial Experience with the Extracorporeal HIFU Knife with 49 Patients: Japanese Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganaha, F.; Okuno, T.; Lee, C. O.; Shimizu, T.; Osako, K.; Oka, S.; Lee, K. H.; Chen, W. Z.; Zhu, H.; Park, S. H.; Qi, Z.; Shi, D.; Song, H. S.

    2005-03-01

    Forty nine patients with 63 tumours were treated with the Chongqing Haifu knife, as an adjunct to intra-arterial chemoinfusion. Treatment targets included breast (20 lesions), liver (16), bone (8), lymph-node (6), soft tissue (4), lung and pleura (4), pancreas (2), kidney (2) and adrenal gland (1). Follow-up contrast MRI was performed at 3 weeks to assess the effects of HIFU ablation. All cases completed the planned treatment. Of 25 lesions treated with the intention of complete tumour ablation, complete necrosis was obtained in 19 lesions (76%) including 4 secondary success cases. Among 32 lesions having partial and palliative treatment, tumour size was decreased in 6 lesions (21%), and good pain control was obtained in 6 out of 7 patients (86%). Skin injury was the most common complication after HIFU (16%), and was mostly a superficial dermal burn that did not necessitate any treatment. However, there was one patient with deep skin injury at an operation scar which resulted in skin perforation. Other adverse events included soft tissue swelling, prolonged fever, anorexia, persistent pain, shortness of the breath, sacroiliac joint fracture and prolonged diarrhoea. In our limited experience, superficial lesions (e.g. breast cancer, bone, soft tissue, lymph-node and pleural metastasis) appear to be good candidates for HIFU treatment. There appears to be a role for the HIFU knife in pain control for patients with bone metastasis and pancreatic cancer.

  3. Dose distribution transfer from CyberKnife to Varian treatment planning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osewski, W.; Ślosarek, K.; Karaszewska, B.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this paper was to introduce one of the options of the locally developed DDcon.exe which gives the possibility to transfer the dose distribution from CyberKnife (Accuray) treatment planning system (CK TPS) to Varian treatment planning system (Eclipse TPS, Varian). DICOM format is known as a universal format for medical data. The dose distribution is stored as RTdose file in DICOM format, so there should be a possibility to transfer it between different treatment planning systems. Trying to transfer RTdose file from CK TPS to Eclipse TPS the error message occurs. That's because the RTdose file in CK TPS is connected with Structure_Set_Sequence against Eclipse TPS where it's connected with RT_Plan_Sequence. To make it transferable RTdose file from CK TPS have to be 'disconnected' from Structure_Set_Sequence and 'connected' with RT_Plan_Sequence. This is possible thanks DDcon software which creates new RTdose file by changing proper DICOM tags in original RTdose file. New homemade software gives us an opportunity to transfer dose distribution from CyberKnife TPS to TPS Eclipse. This method opens new possibilities to combine or compare different treatment techniques in Varian TPS.

  4. Successful CyberKnife Irradiation of 1000 cc Hemicranial Meningioma: 6-year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Golanov, Andrey V.; Antipina, Natalia; Gorlachev, Gennady

    2015-01-01

    Meningiomas are common benign tumors with accepted treatment approaches and usually don't challenge healthcare specialists. We present a case of a huge unresectable hemicranial meningioma, which was successfully treated with hypofractionated irradiation. A male patient, sixty-two years of age, suffered for over 12 years from headaches, facial deformity, right eye displacement, right eye movement restriction, right-sided ptosis, and facial hypoesthesia. MRI and CT studies revealed an extended hemicranial meningioma. Prior to irradiation, the patient underwent four operations. Eventually, the tumor was irradiated with the CyberKnife in August 2009. Tumor volume composed 1085 cc. The mean dose of 35.3 Gy was delivered in 7 fractions (31.5 Gy at 72% isodose line comprising 95% of tumor volume). The patient was followed during six years and experienced only mild (Grade 1-2 CTCAE) acute skin and mucosa reactions. During the follow-up period, we observed target volume shrinkage for 17% (for 26% after excluding hyperostosis) and regression of intracranial hypertension signs. Due to the extreme volume and complex shape of the tumor, spreading along the surface of the hemisphere as well as an optic nerve involvement, the case presented would not be generally considered suitable for irradiation, especially for hypofractionation. We regard this clinical situation not as a treatment recommendation, but as a demonstration of the underestimated possibilities of hypofractionation regimen and CyberKnife system, both of which are limited with our habit of conventional treatments. PMID:26719827

  5. Dosimetric characterization of CyberKnife radiosurgical photon beams using polymer gels

    SciTech Connect

    Pantelis, E.; Antypas, C.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Karaiskos, P.; Papagiannis, P.; Kozicki, M.; Georgiou, E.; Sakelliou, L.; Seimenis, I.

    2008-06-15

    Dose distributions registered in water equivalent, polymer gel dosimeters were used to measure the output factors and off-axis profiles of the radiosurgical photon beams employed for CyberKnife radiosurgery. Corresponding measurements were also performed using a shielded silicon diode commonly employed for CyberKnife commissioning, the PinPoint ion chamber, and Gafchromic EBT films, for reasons of comparison. Polymer gel results of this work for the output factors of the 5, 7.5, and 10 mm diameter beams are (0.702{+-}0.029), (0.872{+-}0.039), and (0.929{+-}0.041), respectively. Comparison of polymer gel and diode measurements shows that the latter overestimate output factors of the two small beams (5% for the 5 mm beam and 3% for the 7.5 mm beams). This is attributed to the nonwater equivalence of the high atomic number silicon material of the diode detector. On the other hand, the PinPoint chamber is found to underestimate output factors up to 10% for the 5 mm beam due to volume averaging effects. Polymer gel and EBT film output factor results are found in close agreement for all beam sizes, emphasizing the importance of water equivalence and fine detector sensitive volume for small field dosimetry. Relative off-axis profile results are in good agreement for all dosimeters used in this work, with noticeable differences observed only in the PinPoint estimate of the 80%-20% penumbra width, which is relatively overestimated.

  6. Image guidance quality assurance of a G4 CyberKnife robotic stereotactic radiosurgery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantelis, E.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Antypas, C.

    2009-05-01

    The image guidance of a CyberKnife robotic radiosurgery system was quality controlled, including the overall performance of the target locating subsystem and the performance of the x-ray generators and flat panel digital cameras subcomponents. Accuracy and precision of the kV and exposure time settings of the x-ray generators, linearity of the x-ray output, spatial resolution and geometrical distortion of the acquired x-ray images were measured. Total accuracy and precision of the target locating subsystem in defining the position of an anthropomorphic head and neck phantom placed on treatment couch was also measured. Accuracy and precision of the kV as well as exposure time settings and linearity of the x-ray output were found within the acceptance limits suggested in diagnostic radiology. The acquired x-ray images were found to depict the shapes of the imaging objects without any geometrical distortion, being able to resolve differences in the features of imaging objects with critical frequency of 1.3 lp/mm and 1.5 lp/mm for camera A and B, respectively. Total target locating system accuracy was found within 0.2 mm and 0.2° in translations and rotations, respectively. Corresponding precision was found lower than 0.5%. These findings render the target locating subsystem of the CyberKnife capable of accurately registering the patient to treatment position and monitoring patient's movement during treatment delivery.

  7. Automated skull tracking for the CyberKnife image-guided radiosurgery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Dongshan; Kuduvalli, Gopinath; Mitrovic, Vladimir; Main, William; Thomson, Larry

    2005-04-01

    We have developed an automated skull tracking method to perform near real-time patient alignment and position correction during CyberKnife image-guided intracranial radiosurgery. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) are first generated offline from a CT study before treatment, and are used as reference images for the patient position. Two orthogonal projection X-ray images are then acquired at the time of patient alignment or treatment. Multi-phase registration is used to register the DRRs with the X-ray images. The registration in each projection is carried out independently; the results are then combined and converted to a 3-D rigid transformation. The in-plane transformation and the out-of-plane rotations are estimated using different search methods including multi-resolution matching, steepest descent minimization and one-dimensional search. Two similarity measure methods, optimized pattern intensity and sum of squared difference (SSD), are applied at different search phases to optimize both accuracy and computation speed. Experiments on an anthropomorphic skull phantom showed that the tracking accuracy (RMS error) is better than 0.3 mm for each translation and better than 0.3 degree for each rotation, and the targeting accuracy (clinically relevant accuracy) tested with the CyberKnife system is better than 1 mm. The computation time required for the tracking algorithm is within a few seconds.

  8. Successful CyberKnife Irradiation of 1000 cc Hemicranial Meningioma: 6-year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Galkin, Mikhail; Golanov, Andrey V; Antipina, Natalia; Gorlachev, Gennady

    2015-11-20

    Meningiomas are common benign tumors with accepted treatment approaches and usually don't challenge healthcare specialists. We present a case of a huge unresectable hemicranial meningioma, which was successfully treated with hypofractionated irradiation. A male patient, sixty-two years of age, suffered for over 12 years from headaches, facial deformity, right eye displacement, right eye movement restriction, right-sided ptosis, and facial hypoesthesia. MRI and CT studies revealed an extended hemicranial meningioma. Prior to irradiation, the patient underwent four operations. Eventually, the tumor was irradiated with the CyberKnife in August 2009. Tumor volume composed 1085 cc. The mean dose of 35.3 Gy was delivered in 7 fractions (31.5 Gy at 72% isodose line comprising 95% of tumor volume). The patient was followed during six years and experienced only mild (Grade 1-2 CTCAE) acute skin and mucosa reactions. During the follow-up period, we observed target volume shrinkage for 17% (for 26% after excluding hyperostosis) and regression of intracranial hypertension signs. Due to the extreme volume and complex shape of the tumor, spreading along the surface of the hemisphere as well as an optic nerve involvement, the case presented would not be generally considered suitable for irradiation, especially for hypofractionation. We regard this clinical situation not as a treatment recommendation, but as a demonstration of the underestimated possibilities of hypofractionation regimen and CyberKnife system, both of which are limited with our habit of conventional treatments.

  9. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... get enough calories to heal and grow. After heart surgery, most babies and infants (younger than 12 to 15 months) can take ... valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... open heart surgery References Bernstein D. General principles ...

  10. Correlation and prediction uncertainties in the CyberKnife Synchrony respiratory tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Pepin, Eric W.; Wu, Huanmei; Zhang, Yuenian; Lord, Bryce

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The CyberKnife uses an online prediction model to improve radiation delivery when treating lung tumors. This study evaluates the prediction model used by the CyberKnife radiation therapy system in terms of treatment margins about the gross tumor volume (GTV). Methods: From the data log files produced by the CyberKnife synchrony model, the uncertainty in radiation delivery can be calculated. Modeler points indicate the tracked position of the tumor and Predictor points predict the position about 115 ms in the future. The discrepancy between Predictor points and their corresponding Modeler points was analyzed for 100 treatment model data sets from 23 de-identified lung patients. The treatment margins were determined in each anatomic direction to cover an arbitrary volume of the GTV, derived from the Modeler points, when the radiation is targeted at the Predictor points. Each treatment model had about 30 min of motion data, of which about 10 min constituted treatment time; only these 10 min were used in the analysis. The frequencies of margin sizes were analyzed and truncated Gaussian normal functions were fit to each direction's distribution. The standard deviation of each Gaussian distribution was then used to describe the necessary margin expansions in each signed dimension in order to achieve the desired coverage. In this s