Science.gov

Sample records for gamma nuclear resonance

  1. Use of nuclear resonant scattering of gamma rays for in vivo measurement of iron

    SciTech Connect

    Vartsky, D.; Wielopolski, L.; Ellis, K.J.; Cohn, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for determination of elements in human body in-vivo, utilizing nuclear resonant scattering of gamma rays has been developed. 847 keV photons emitted from a gaseous /sup 56/MnCl/sub 2/ source are resonantly scattered from /sup 56/Fe present in the body. The detection of these gamma rays is used to estimate the iron content of the liver or heart of patients. Details of the calibration procedure and potential molecular effects are described.

  2. Gamma-ray nuclear resonance absorption (γ-NRA) for explosives detection in air cargo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartsky, D.; Goldberg, M. B.; Engler, G.; Goldschmidt, A.; Feldman, G.; Bar, D.; Sayag, E.; Katz, D.; Krauss, R. A.

    1999-06-01

    The γ-NRA method has been utilized to detect explosives concealed in aviation containers loaded with a variety of cargo. In γ-NRA, gamma-rays at an energy of 9.17 MeV undergo a resonant nuclear attenuation component proportional to the integrated density of 14N nuclei along the line of sight from source to detector. When inspecting objects in transmission mode, projected images of nitrogen density of their contents can be generated. In an experiment performed earlier this year at the Dynamitron accelerator lab. of Birmingham Univ., U.K., diverse items such as passenger bags, electronic equipment, paper goods and mixed cargo were scanned along with explosives simulants. The results from this run will be presented and anticipated performance ratings of an operational explosives detection system (EDS) discussed.

  3. Resonance production in. gamma gamma. collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Renard, F.M.

    1983-04-01

    The processes ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. hadrons can be depicted as follows. One photon creates a q anti q pair which starts to evolve; the other photon can either (A) make its own q anti q pair and the (q anti q q anti q) system continue to evolve or (B) interact with the quarks of the first pair and lead to a modified (q anti q) system in interaction with C = +1 quantum numbers. A review of the recent theoretical activity concerning resonance production and related problems is given under the following headings: hadronic C = +1 spectroscopy (q anti q, qq anti q anti q, q anti q g, gg, ggg bound states and mixing effects); exclusive ..gamma gamma.. processes (generalities, unitarized Born method, VDM and QCD); total cross section (soft and hard contributions); q/sup 2/ dependence of soft processes (soft/hard separation, 1/sup +- +/ resonances); and polarization effects. (WHK)

  4. The effects of proton-beam quality on the production of gamma rays for nuclear resonance absorption in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Graybill, R.; Morgado, R.E.; Cappiello, C.C.

    1994-05-01

    The authors describe a method for performing nuclear-resonance absorption with the proton beam from a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator. The objective was to assess the suitability of the pulsed beam from an RFQ to image nitrogen compared to electrostatic accelerators. This choice of accelerator results in trade-offs in performance and complexity, in return for the prospect of higher average current. In spite of a reduced resonance attenuation coefficient in nitrogen, they successfully produced three-dimensional tomographic images of real explosives in luggage the first time the unoptimized system was operated. The results and assessments of the initial laboratory measurements are reported.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-02-07

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor.

  6. Nuclear resonant spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturhahn, Wolfgang

    2004-02-01

    Nuclear resonant scattering techniques with synchrotron radiation (SR) are introduced on a basic level. We focus on the theoretical background and on experimental aspects of two popular methods with a widening range of applications, nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy. The inelastic method provides specific vibrational information, e.g., the phonon density of states. The Mössbauer method permits determination of hyperfine interactions. All nuclear resonance techniques take full advantage of the unique properties of SR: intensity, collimation, time structure, and polarization. As a result both methods discussed here have led to novel applications for materials under extreme conditions, proteins with biological functionality, and magnetic nanostructures.

  7. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Michael; Griffith, Robert; Bulatowicz, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) has concluded the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This presentation will describe the operational principles, design basics, and demonstrated performance of the NMRG including an overview of the NGC designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program.

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Griffith, Robert; Larsen, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) has concluded the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This poster will describe the history, operational principles, design, and demonstrated performance of the NMRG including an overview of the NGC designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program.

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Larsen, Michael; Mirijanian, James

    2012-06-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation is concluding the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This poster will describe the history, operational principles, and design basics of the NMRG including an overview of the NSD designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program. General performance results from phases 3 and 4 will also be presented.

  10. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Michael

    2011-05-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation is currently in phase 4 of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. The micro-NMRG technology is pushing the boundaries of size, weight, power, and performance allowing new small platform applications of navigation grade Inertial Navigation System (INS) technology. Information on the historical development of the technology, basics of operation, task performance goals, application opportunities, and a phase 2 sample of earth rate measurement data will be presented. Funding Provided by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)

  11. Preliminary Study of the Efficacy of Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence with Quasi-Monoenergetic Gamma-Ray Sources for Nuclear Safeguards Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M S; McNabb, D P; Hall, J M; Gonzalez, J J

    2011-02-17

    We have studied the efficacy of using nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF)-based techniques to assay spent nuclear fuel for Pu content using quasi-monoenergetic sources. We have developed two techniques to precisely determine the Pu content in a fuel rod/pin. One of our approaches is virtually free of systematic uncertainties. Using analytical models, we have determined the amount of time required to measure the Pu content in spent nuclear fuel rods and spent fuel assemblies to within 1% precision. We note that Pu content can be determined in a fuel assembly about as fast as in a single fuel pin. The performance of NRF-based assay techniques with improved photon sources, which are currently under development, will also estimated. For follow-on research we propose to: (1) Construct research prototype detection systems for both of the NRF-based assay systems proposed in this paper and measure their calibration curves; (2) Determine the systematic errors associated with both assay methods, explore ways to reduce the errors and fold the results into future performance calculations; (3) Develop an algorithm to assay a fuel assembly; (4) Perform validation measurements using a single pin and scaled assemblies; (5) Research and develop current-mode detection and/or threshold detection techniques to improve assay times; (6) Characterize the flux of newly constructed sources and fold the results into the calculations presented here to determine the feasibility of a variety of proposed sources; and (7) Collaborate with others in the safeguards community to build a prototype system and perform an NRF-based assay demonstration on spent fuel.

  12. nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Karwacki, F. A.; Griffin, J.

    1985-04-02

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope which derives angular rotation thereof from the phases of precessing nuclear moments utilizes a single-resonance cell situated in the center of a uniform DC magnetic field. The field is generated by current flow through a circular array of coils between parallel plates. It also utilizes a pump and read-out beam and associated electronics for signal processing and control. Encapsulated in the cell for sensing rotation are odd isotopes of Mercury Hg/sup 199/ and Hg/sup 201/. Unpolarized intensity modulated light from a pump lamp is directed by lenses to a linear polarizer, quarter wave plate combination producing circularly polarized light. The circularly polarized light is reflected by a mirror to the cell transverse to the field for optical pumping of the isotopes. Unpolarized light from a readout lamp is directed by lenses to another linear polarizer. The linearly polarized light is reflected by another mirror to the cell transverse to the field and orthogonal to the pump lamp light. The linear light after transversing the cell strikes an analyzer where it is converted to an intensity-modulated light. The modulated light is detected by a photodiode processed and utilized as feedback to control the field and pump lamp excitation and readout of angular displacement.

  13. Nuclear fuel microsphere gamma analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Valentine, Kenneth H.; Long, Jr., Ernest L.; Willey, Melvin G.

    1977-01-01

    A gamma analyzer system is provided for the analysis of nuclear fuel microspheres and other radioactive particles. The system consists of an analysis turntable with means for loading, in sequence, a plurality of stations within the turntable; a gamma ray detector for determining the spectrum of a sample in one section; means for analyzing the spectrum; and a receiver turntable to collect the analyzed material in stations according to the spectrum analysis. Accordingly, particles may be sorted according to their quality; e.g., fuel particles with fractured coatings may be separated from those that are not fractured, or according to other properties.

  14. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Michael; Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Mirijanian, James; Pavell, James

    2015-05-01

    The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) is being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC). Cold and hot atom interferometer based gyroscopes have suffered from Size, Weight, and Power (SWaP) challenges and limits in bandwidth, scale factor stability, dead time, high rotation rate, vibration, and acceleration. NMRG utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as a reference for determining rotation, providing continuous measurement, high bandwidth, stable scale factor, high rotation rate measurement, and low sensitivity to vibration and acceleration in a low SWaP package. The sensitivity to vibration has been partially tested and demonstrates no measured sensitivity within error bars. Real time closed loop implementation of the sensor significantly decreases environmental and systematic sensitivities and supports a compact and low power digital signal processing and control system. Therefore, the NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost SWaP package. The poster will describe the history, operation, and design of the NMRG. General performance results will also be presented along with recent vibration test results.

  15. Nuclear gamma rays from energetic particle interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Gamma ray line emission from nuclear deexcitation following energetic particle reactions is evaluated. The compiled nuclear data and the calculated gamma ray spectra and intensities can be used for the study of astrophysical sites which contain large fluxes of energetic protons and nuclei. A detailed evaluation of gamma ray line production in the interstellar medium is made.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of interaction of ligands with Streptococcus faecium dihydrofolate reductase labeled with (. gamma. -/sup 13/C)tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.E.; Groff, J.P.; Cocco, L.; Blakley, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase from Streptococcus faecium has been labeled with (..gamma..-/sup 13/C)tryptophan. We have determined changes occurring in the chemical shifts and line widths of the four resonances of the /sup 13/C NMR spectrum of the labeled enzyme, due to its interaction with various ligands. These include the coenzyme, NPDPH and related nucleotides, folate and its polyglutamate derivatives, and many inhibitors including methotrexate and trimethoprim. In addition, paramagnetic relaxation effects produced by a bound spin-labeled analogue of 2'-phosphoadenosine-5'-diphosphoribose on the tryptophan C/sup ..gamma../ carbons have been measured. Distances calculated from the relaxation data have been compared with corresponding distances in the crystallographic model of the NADPH-methotrexate ternary complex of Lactobacillus casei reductase. The paramagnetic relaxation data indicate that the two downfield resonances (1 and 2) correspond to tryptophans (W/sub A/ and W/sub B/) that are more remote from the catalytic site, and from the crystallographic model these are seen to be Trp-115 and Trp-160. The upfield resonances (3 and 4) that show broadening due to chemical exchange correspond to closer residues (W/sub C/ and W/sub D/), and these are identified with Trp-6 and Trp-22. However, the relaxation data do not permit specific assignments within the nearer and farther pairs. Although resonance 3, which is split due to chemical exchange, was formerly assigned to Trp-6, data obtained for the enzyme in the presence of various ligands are better interpreted if resonance 3 is assigned to Trp-22, which is located on a loop that joins elements of secondary structure and forms one side of the ligand-binding cavity.

  17. Compact Gamma-Beam Source for Nuclear Security Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkikh, P.; Urakawa, J.

    2015-10-01

    A compact gamma-beam source dedicated to the development of the nuclear security technologies by use of the nuclear resonance fluorescence is described. Besides, such source is a very promising tool for novel technologies of the express cargoes inspection to prevent nuclear terrorism. Gamma-beam with the quanta energies from 0.3MeV to 7.2MeV is generated in the Compton scattering of the "green" laser photons on the electron beam with energies from 90MeV to 430MeV. The characteristic property of the proposed gammabeam source is a narrow spectrum (less than 1%) at high average gamma-yield (of 1013γ/s) due to special operation mode.

  18. Gamma resonance absorption. New approach in human body composition studies.

    PubMed

    Wielopolski, L; Vartsky, D; Pierson, R; Goldberg, M; Heymsfield, S; Yasumura, S; Melnychuk, S T; Sredniawski, J

    2000-05-01

    The main stream of body elemental analysis is based on the delayed, prompt, and inelastic neutron interactions with the main elements found in the human body, and subsequent analysis of the measured delayed or prompt gamma ray spectra. This methodology traditionally was, and still is, applied for whole body analysis and requires relatively high radiation doses. A new method, based on gamma nuclear resonance absorption (GNRA), is being established at Brookhaven National Laboratory as part of its body composition program. The method is element specific with a high tomographic spatial-resolution capability, at a small fraction of the radiation dose used in the current system. The new system, with its components and capabilities, is described below. PMID:10865747

  19. Nuclear Forensics using Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, E. B.

    2016-09-01

    Much of George Dracoulis's research career was devoted to utilising gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the last several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  20. Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Quiter, Brian; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Ambers, Scott

    2011-06-30

    In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of gamma rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. NRF promises the unique capability of directly quantifying a specific isotope without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as is required in other measurement techniques. We have analyzed the potential of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique for quantitative measurements of Pu isotopes in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Given the low concentrations of 239Pu in SNF and its small integrated NRF cross sections, the main challenge in achieving precise and accurate measurements lies in accruing sufficient counting statistics in a reasonable measurement time. Using analytical modeling, and simulations with the radiation transport code MCNPX that has been experimentally tested recently, the backscatter and transmission methods were quantitatively studied for differing photon sources and radiation detector types. Resonant photon count rates and measurement times were estimated for a range of photon source and detection parameters, which were used to determine photon source and gamma-ray detector requirements. The results indicate that systems based on a bremsstrahlung source and present detector technology are not practical for high-precision measurements of 239Pu in SNF. Measurements that achieve the desired uncertainties within hour-long measurements will either require stronger resonances, which may be expressed by other Pu isotopes, or require quasi-monoenergetic photon sources with intensities that are approximately two orders of magnitude higher than those currently being designed or proposed.This work is part of a larger effort sponsored by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative to develop an integrated instrument, comprised of individual NDA techniques with complementary features, that is fully capable of

  1. Nuclear photofission studies with monochromatic {gamma} ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Csige, L.; Gulyas, J.; Habs, D.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Thirolf, P. G.; Tornyi, T. G.

    2012-07-09

    Two new research facilities will be ready for operation very soon (MEGa-Ray at Liver-more National Laboratory) or start construction (ELI-Nuclear Physics in Bucharest), both providing highly brilliant {gamma} beams with so far unprecedented properties via Compton backscattering of laser photons from a high-quality, relativistic electron beam. With these intense, monochromatic {gamma} beams, a new era of photonuclear physics will be enabled. A new research campaign is proposed to exploit the unprecedented properties of these highly-brilliant, novel {gamma} beams on highly-selective studies of extremely deformed nuclei in the multiple-humped potential energy landscape of the actinides via photofission. With the unique {gamma} beam bandwidth of {Delta}E/E = 10{sup -3}, we can aim at resolving individual resonances which could never be achieved so far due to the limited {gamma} bandwidth of bremsstrahlung beams. Exploratory, non-bremsstrahlung photofission experiments are going to be performed very soon at the HI{gamma}S facility (Duke University, USA) to investigate the fine structure of the sub-barrier transmission resonances of the actinides.

  2. Nuclear isomer suitable for gamma ray laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jha, S.

    1979-01-01

    The operation of gamma ray lasers (gasers) are studied. It is assumed that the nuclear isomers mentioned in previously published papers have inherent limitations. It is further assumed that the judicious use of Bormann effect or the application of the total external reflection of low energy gamma radiation at grazing angle of incidence may permit the use of a gaser crystal sufficiently long to achieve observable stimulated emission. It is suggested that a long lived 0(+) isomer decaying by low energy gamma ray emission to a short lived 2(+) excited nuclear state would be an attractive gaser candidate. It is also suggested that the nuclear isomer be incorporated in a matrix of refractory material having an electrostatic field gradient whose principal axis lies along the length of the medium. This results in the preferential transmission of electric quadrupole radiation along the length of the medium.

  3. Oxygen depth profiling by nuclear resonant scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, G. T.; Sheu, W. J.; Glass, G. A.; Wang, Y. Q.

    1999-06-10

    Nuclear resonance scattering (NRS) {sup 16}O({alpha},{alpha}){sup 16}O at 3.045 MeV ({gamma}=10 keV) has been used for oxygen depth profiling in various thin oxide films. There are two ways by which the oxygen concentration versus depth profile can be obtained from the experimental data: energy spectrum simulation or yield distribution analysis. Energy spectrum simulation is done using the standard RBS software/Rutherford Universal Manipulation Program (RUMP) where only one spectrum is usually needed from the measurement. Yield distribution analysis is accomplished by using a custom developed software/Resonance Analysis Program (RAP) and involves a series of spectra obtained by stepping up the beam energy above the resonance energy. This article aims at comparing the fundamentals of both methods and also discussing their advantages and disadvantages in terms of the data acquisition and the post data analysis. A thermally grown thick SiO{sub 2} film and a thin titanium oxide film grown by corona point discharge were examined.

  4. Oxygen depth profiling by nuclear resonant scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, G.T.; Sheu, W.J.; Glass, G.A. Wang, Y.Q.

    1999-06-01

    Nuclear resonance scattering (NRS) {sup 16}O({alpha},{alpha}){sup 16}O at 3.045 MeV ({Gamma}=10&hthinsp;keV) has been used for oxygen depth profiling in various thin oxide films. There are two ways by which the oxygen concentration versus depth profile can be obtained from the experimental data: energy spectrum simulation or yield distribution analysis. Energy spectrum simulation is done using the standard RBS software/Rutherford Universal Manipulation Program (RUMP) where only one spectrum is usually needed from the measurement. Yield distribution analysis is accomplished by using a custom developed software/Resonance Analysis Program (RAP) and involves a series of spectra obtained by stepping up the beam energy above the resonance energy. This article aims at comparing the fundamentals of both methods and also discussing their advantages and disadvantages in terms of the data acquisition and the post data analysis. A thermally grown thick SiO{sub 2} film and a thin titanium oxide film grown by corona point discharge were examined. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad; Kenouche, Samir; Coillot, Christophe; Alibert, Eric; Jabakhanji, Bilal; Schimpf, Remy; Zanca, Michel; Stein, Paul; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to characterize and model evanescent electromagnetic fields originating from NMR phenomenon. We report that in this experimental configuration the available NMR signal is one order of magnitude larger and follows an exponential decay inversely proportional to the size of the emitters. Those investigations open a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging. PMID:26751800

  6. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad; Kenouche, Samir; Coillot, Christophe; Alibert, Eric; Jabakhanji, Bilal; Schimpf, Remy; Zanca, Michel; Stein, Paul; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to characterize and model evanescent electromagnetic fields originating from NMR phenomenon. We report that in this experimental configuration the available NMR signal is one order of magnitude larger and follows an exponential decay inversely proportional to the size of the emitters. Those investigations open a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging.

  7. Improved Capture Gamma-Ray Libraries for Nuclear Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleaford, Brad; Firestone, Richard; Summers, Neil; Escher, Jutta

    2012-10-01

    The neutron capture reaction is of fundamental use in identifying and analyzing the gamma-ray spectrum from an unknown object as it gives unambiguous information on which isotopes are absorbing the neutrons. There are known data gaps in the ENDF libraries used by transport codes which are critical to various nuclear applications. The Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation file (EGAF) is a new thermal neutron capture database of discrete line spectra and cross sections for over 260 isotopes. This database is used to improve the capture gamma production in ENDF libraries. For medium to heavy nuclei the unresolved quasi continuum part of the gamma cascades are not experimentally available. This continuum can contain up to 90% of all the decay energy, in this work it is modeled with the statistical nuclear structure code Dicebox. We plan to continue the Dicebox approach through the resolved resonance region where spin and parity information is partially known. At higher energies to 20 MeV we are applying Hauser Feshbach models to predict the cross sections of gamma spectra to improve the neutron data libraries used for transport modeling of unknown objects.

  8. Membrane Resonance Enables Stable and Robust Gamma Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Moca, Vasile V.; Nikolić, Danko; Singer, Wolf; Mureşan, Raul C.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal mechanisms underlying beta/gamma oscillations (20–80 Hz) are not completely understood. Here, we show that in vivo beta/gamma oscillations in the cat visual cortex sometimes exhibit remarkably stable frequency even when inputs fluctuate dramatically. Enhanced frequency stability is associated with stronger oscillations measured in individual units and larger power in the local field potential. Simulations of neuronal circuitry demonstrate that membrane properties of inhibitory interneurons strongly determine the characteristics of emergent oscillations. Exploration of networks containing either integrator or resonator inhibitory interneurons revealed that: (i) Resonance, as opposed to integration, promotes robust oscillations with large power and stable frequency via a mechanism called RING (Resonance INduced Gamma); resonance favors synchronization by reducing phase delays between interneurons and imposes bounds on oscillation cycle duration; (ii) Stability of frequency and robustness of the oscillation also depend on the relative timing of excitatory and inhibitory volleys within the oscillation cycle; (iii) RING can reproduce characteristics of both Pyramidal INterneuron Gamma (PING) and INterneuron Gamma (ING), transcending such classifications; (iv) In RING, robust gamma oscillations are promoted by slow but are impaired by fast inputs. Results suggest that interneuronal membrane resonance can be an important ingredient for generation of robust gamma oscillations having stable frequency. PMID:23042733

  9. Introduction to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, Stanley L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to try to give a short overview of what the status is on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's a subject where one really has to spend some time to look at the physics in detail to develop a proper working understanding. I feel it's not appropriate to present to you density matrices, Hamiltonians of all sorts, and differential equations representing the motion of spins. I'm really going to present some history and status, and show a few very simple concepts involved in NMR. It is a form of radio frequency spectroscopy and there are a great number of nuclei that can be studied very usefully with the technique. NMR requires a magnet, a r.f. transmitter/receiver system, and a data acquisition system.

  10. Wide-range nuclear magnetic resonance detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J. C.; Jirberg, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Compact and easy to use solid state nuclear magnetic resonance detector is designed for measuring field strength to 20 teslas in cryogenically cooled magnets. Extremely low noise and high sensitivity make detector applicable to nearly all types of analytical nuclear magnetic resonance measurements and can be used in high temperature and radiation environments.

  11. Gamma radiation induced changes in nuclear waste glass containing Eu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, M.; Kadam, R. M.; Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P.; Tomar, B. S.; Godbole, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    Gamma radiation induced changes were investigated in sodium-barium borosilicate glasses containing Eu. The glass composition was similar to that of nuclear waste glasses used for vitrifying Trombay research reactor nuclear waste at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. Photoluminescence (PL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques were used to study the speciation of the rare earth (RE) ion in the matrix before and after gamma irradiation. Judd-Ofelt ( J- O) analyses of the emission spectra were done before and after irradiation. The spin counting technique was employed to quantify the number of defect centres formed in the glass at the highest gamma dose studied. PL data suggested the stabilisation of the trivalent RE ion in the borosilicate glass matrix both before and after irradiation. It was also observed that, the RE ion distributes itself in two different environments in the irradiated glass. From the EPR data it was observed that, boron oxygen hole centre based radicals are the predominant defect centres produced in the glass after irradiation along with small amount of E’ centres. From the spin counting studies the concentration of defect centres in the glass was calculated to be 350 ppm at 900 kGy. This indicated the fact that bulk of the glass remained unaffected after gamma irradiation up to 900 kGy.

  12. Measurement of the {sup 241}Am({gamma},n){sup 240}Am reaction in the giant dipole resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Tonchev, A. P.; Howell, C. R.; Hutcheson, A.; Kwan, E.; Raut, R.; Rusev, G.; Tornow, W.; Hammond, S. L.; Huibregtse, C.; Kelley, J. H.; Kawano, T.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2010-11-15

    The photodisintegration cross section of the radioactive nucleus {sup 241}Am has been obtained using activation techniques and monoenergetic {gamma}-ray beams from the HI{gamma}S facility. The induced activity of {sup 240}Am produced via the {sup 241}Am({gamma},n) reaction was measured in the energy interval from 9 to 16 MeV utilizing high-resolution {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. The experimental data for the {sup 241}Am({gamma},n) reaction in the giant dipole resonance energy region are compared with statistical nuclear-model calculations.

  13. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance -- Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Three Axis Vector Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Larsen, Michael; Mirijanian, James

    2012-06-01

    The Northrop Grumman Corporation is leveraging the technology developed for the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) to build a combined Electron Paramagnetic Resonance -- Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (EPR-NMR) magnetometer. The EPR-NMR approach provides a high bandwidth and high sensitivity simultaneous measurement of all three vector components of the magnetic field averaged over the small volume of the sensor's one vapor cell. This poster will describe the history, operational principles, and design basics of the EPR-NMR magnetometer including an overview of the NSD designs developed and demonstrated to date. General performance results will also be presented.

  14. Resonant Compton scattering and gamma-ray burst continuum spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, M. G.

    1995-01-01

    The Thomson limit of resonant inverse Compton scattering in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars is considered as a mechanism for producing gamma-ray burst continuum spectra. Photon production spectra and electron cooling rates are presented using the full magnetic Thomson cross-section. Model emission spectra are obtained as self-consistent solutions of a set of photon and electron kinetic equations, displaying spectral breaks and other structure at gamma-ray energies.

  15. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J; Ambers, Scott D

    2011-02-04

    In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of {gamma} rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. The promise of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique (NDA) in safeguards applications lies in its potential to directly quantify a specific isotope in an assay target without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as often required by other NDA methods. The use of NRF for detection of sensitive nuclear materials and other contraband has been researched in the past. In the safeguards applications considered here one has to go beyond mere detection and precisely quantify the isotopic content, a challenge that is discussed throughout this report. Basic NRF measurement methods, instrumentation, and the analytical calculation of NRF signal strengths are described in Section 2. Well understood modeling and simulation tools are needed for assessing the potential of NRF for safeguards and for designing measurement systems. All our simulations were performed with the radiation transport code MCNPX, a code that is widely used in the safeguards community. Our initial studies showed that MCNPX grossly underestimated the elastically scattered background at backwards angles due to an incorrect treatment of Rayleigh scattering. While new, corrected calculations based on ENDF form factors showed much better agreement with experimental data for the elastic scattering of photons on an uranium target, the elastic backscatter is still not rigorously treated. Photonuclear scattering processes (nuclear Thomson, Delbruck and Giant Dipole Resonance scattering), which are expected to play an important role at higher energies, are not yet included. These missing elastic scattering contributions were studied and their importance evaluated evaluated against data found in the literature as discussed in Section 3. A transmission experiment

  16. An improved nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Manatt, S. L.

    1967-01-01

    Cylindrical sample container provides a high degree of nuclear stabilization to a nuclear magnetic resonance /nmr/ spectrometer. It is placed coaxially about the nmr insert and contains reference sample that gives a signal suitable for locking the field and frequency of an nmr spectrometer with a simple audio modulation system.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Paul H.; Brainard, James R.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1997-01-01

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC.sub.16 H.sub.14 N.sub.6. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques.

  19. Electro and gamma nuclear physics in Geant4

    SciTech Connect

    J.P. Wellisch; M. Kossov; P. Degtyarenko

    2003-03-01

    Adequate description of electro and gamma nuclear physics is of utmost importance in studies of electron beam-dumps and intense electron beam accelerators. I also is mandatory to describe neutron backgrounds and activation in linear colliders. This physics was elaborated in Geant4 over the last year, and now entered into the stage of practical application. In the Geant4 Photo-nuclear data base there are at present about 50 nuclei for which the Photo-nuclear absorption cross sections have been measured. Of these, data on 14 nuclei are used to parametrize the gamma nuclear reaction cross-section The resulting cross section is a complex, factorized function of A and e = log(E{gamma}), where E{gamma} is the energy of the incident photon. Electro-nuclear reactions are so closely connected with Photo-nuclear reactions that sometimes they are often called ''Photo-nuclear''. The one-photon exchange mechanism dominates in Electro-nuclear reactions, and the electron can be substituted by a flux of photons. Folding this flux with the gamma-nuclear cross-section, we arrive at an acceptable description of the electro-nuclear physics. Final states in gamma and electro nuclear physics are described using chiral invariant phase-space decay at low gamma or equivalent photon energies, and quark gluon string model at high energies. We will present the modeling of this physics in Geant4, and show results from practical applications.

  20. Comparison of nuclear electric resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance in integer and fractional quantum Hall states

    SciTech Connect

    Tomimatsu, Toru Shirai, Shota; Hashimoto, Katsushi Sato, Ken; Hirayama, Yoshiro

    2015-08-15

    Electric-field-induced nuclear resonance (NER: nuclear electric resonance) involving quantum Hall states (QHSs) was studied at various filling factors by exploiting changes in nuclear spins polarized at quantum Hall breakdown. Distinct from the magnetic dipole interaction in nuclear magnetic resonance, the interaction of the electric-field gradient with the electric quadrupole moment plays the dominant role in the NER mechanism. The magnitude of the NER signal strongly depends on whether electronic states are localized or extended. This indicates that NER is sensitive to the screening capability of the electric field associated with QHSs.

  1. Method for determining fast-alpha-particle confinement in tokamak plasmas using resonant nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, F.E.; Zweben, S.J.; Medley, S.S.

    1986-03-01

    The resonant nuclear reactions D(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 6/Li, /sup 6/Li(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 10/B, and /sup 7/Li(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 11/B are examined as diagnostics of fast-alpha-particle confinement in tokamak plasmas. Gamma rays from these resonant reactions with energies from 2.1 MeV to 9.2 MeV may be used to infer the alpha-particle population between energies of 0.4 MeV and 2.6 MeV. The ratio of these alpha-burnup reactions to the reactions T(D,..gamma..)/sup 5/He and /sup 3/He(D,..gamma..)/sup 5/Li provides a technique for the measurement of alpha confinement.

  2. Satellite observation of atmospheric nuclear gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Letaw, J R; Share, G H; Kinzer, R L; Silberberg, R; Chupp, E L; Forrest, D J; Rieger, E

    1989-02-01

    We present a satellite observation of the spectrum of gamma radiation from the Earth's atmosphere in the energy interval from 300 keV to 8.5 MeV. The data were accumulated by the gamma ray spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission over 3 1/2 years, from 1980 to 1983. The excellent statistical accuracy of the data allows 20 atmospheric line features to be identified. The features are superimposed on a continuum background which is modeled using a power law with index -1.16. Many of these features contain a blend of more than one nuclear line. All of these lines (with the exception of the 511-keV annihilation line) are Doppler broadened. Line energies and intensities are consistent with production by secondary neutrons interacting with atmospheric 14N and 16O. Although we find no evidence for other production mechanisms, we cannot rule out significant contributions from direct excitation or spallation by primary cosmic ray protons. The relative intensities of the observed line features are in fair agreement with theoretical models; however, existing models are limited by the availability of neutron cross sections, especially at high energies. The intensity and spectrum of photons at energies below the 511-keV line, in excess of a power law continuum, can be explained by Compton scattering of the annihilation line photons in traversing an average of approximately 21 g cm-2 of atmosphere.

  3. Simple and Inexpensive Classroom Demonstrations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Joel A.; Nordell, Karen J.; Chesnik, Marla A.; Landis, Clark R.; Ellis, Arthur B.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Condren, S. Michael; Lisensky, George C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a set of simple, inexpensive, classical demonstrations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) principles that illustrate the resonance condition associated with magnetic dipoles and the dependence of the resonance frequency on environment. (WRM)

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance in Kondo lattice systems.

    PubMed

    Curro, Nicholas J

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has emerged as a vital tool to explore the fundamental physics of Kondo lattice systems. Because nuclear spins experience two different hyperfine couplings to the itinerant conduction electrons and to the local f moments, the Knight shift can probe multiple types of spin correlations that are not accessible via other techniques. The Knight shift provides direct information about the onset of heavy electron coherence and the emergence of the heavy electron fluid.

  5. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on the status of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from theoretical and clinical perspectives, reviewing NMR theory and relaxation parameters relevant to NMR imaging. Also reviews literature related to modern imaging strategies, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast agents, in vivo spectroscopy, spectroscopic imaging, clinical applications, and…

  6. Sample spinner for nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stejskal, E.O.

    1984-05-01

    A sample spinner for a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer having improved operating characteristics is described comprising a rotor supported at both ends by support gas bearings and positioned by a thrust gas bearing. Improved support gas bearings are also described which result in a spinner exhibiting long-term stable operation characteristics.

  7. Advanced Laser-Compton Gamma-Ray Sources for Nuclear Materials Detection, Assay and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barty, C. P. J.

    2015-10-01

    Highly-collimated, polarized, mono-energetic beams of tunable gamma-rays may be created via the optimized Compton scattering of pulsed lasers off of ultra-bright, relativistic electron beams. Above 2 MeV, the peak brilliance of such sources can exceed that of the world's largest synchrotrons by more than 15 orders of magnitude and can enable for the first time the efficient pursuit of nuclear science and applications with photon beams, i.e. Nuclear Photonics. Potential applications are numerous and include isotope-specific nuclear materials management, element-specific medical radiography and radiology, non-destructive, isotope-specific, material assay and imaging, precision spectroscopy of nuclear resonances and photon-induced fission. This review covers activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory related to the design and optimization of mono-energetic, laser-Compton gamma-ray systems and introduces isotope-specific nuclear materials detection and assay applications enabled by them.

  8. Applications Using High Flux LCS gamma-ray Beams: Nuclear Security and Contributions to Fukushima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Mamoru

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear nonproliferation and security are an important issue for the peaceful use of nuclear energy. Many countries now collaborate together for preventing serious accidents from nuclear terrorism. Detection of hidden long-lived radioisotopes and fissionable nuclides in a non-destructive manner is useful for nuclear safeguards and management of nuclear wastes as well as nuclear security. After introducing the present situation concerning the nuclear nonproliferation and security in Japan, we plan to show the present activities of JAEA to detect the hidden nuclear materials by means of the nuclear resonance fluorescence with energy-tunable, monochromatic gamma-rays generated by Laser Compton Scattering (LCS) with an electron beam. The energy recovery linac (ERL) machine is now under development with the KEK-JAEA collaboration for realizing the new generation of gamma-ray sources. The detection technologies of nuclear materials are currently developed using the existing electron beam facilities at Duke University and at NewSubaru. These developments in Japan will contribute to the nuclear security program in Japan and to the assay of melted nuclear fuels in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants.

  9. Prototype explosives detection system based on nuclear resonance absorption in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Morgado, R.E.; Arnone, G.J.; Cappiello, C.C.

    1996-05-01

    A laboratory prototype system has been developed for the experimental evaluation of an explosives detection technique based on nuclear resonance absorption of gamma rays in nitrogen. Major subsystems include a radiofrequency quadrupole proton accelerator and associated beam transport system, a high-power gamma-ray production target, an airline-luggage tomographic inspection system, and an image- processing/detection-alarm subsystem. The detection system performance, based on a limited experimental test, is reported.

  10. A Monte Carlo simulation to study a design of a gamma-ray detector for neutron resonance densitometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, H.; Harada, H.; Koizumi, M.; Kitatani, F.; Takamine, J.; Kureta, M.; Iimura, H.

    2013-11-01

    Neutron resonance densitometry (NRD) has been proposed to quantify nuclear materials in melted fuel (MF) that will be removed from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The problem is complex due to the expected presence of strong neutron absorbing impurities such as 10B and high radiation field that is mainly caused by 137Cs. To identify the impurities under the high radiation field, NRD is based on a combination of neutron resonance transmission analysis (NRTA) and neutron resonance capture analysis (NRCA). We investigated with Geant4 the performance of a gamma-ray detector for NRCA in NRD. The gamma-ray detector has a well shape, consisting of cylindrical and tube type LaBr3 scintillators. We show how it measures 478 keV gamma rays derived from 10B(n, αγ) reaction in MF under a high 137Cs-radiation environment. It was found that the gamma-ray detector was able to well suppress the Compton edge of 662-keV gamma rays of 137Cs and had a high peak-to-Compton continuum ratio, by using the tube type scintillator as a back-catcher detector. Then, we demonstrate that with this ability, detection of 478-keV gamma rays from 10B is accomplished in realistic measuring time.

  11. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence of 237 Np

    SciTech Connect

    Angell, Chris T.; Yee, R.; Joshi, T.; Swanberg, E.; Norman, E. B.; Hicks, C. L.; Klimenko, A.; Korbly, Steve; Wilson, C.; Kulp, W. D.; Warren, Glen A.; Bray, T. H.; Copping, R.; Glans, P.A.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shuh, David K.

    2010-11-15

    Identification and characterization of fissile material is of international concern because of the possibility of proliferation. For safeguards applications, techniques providing isotopic information are necessary [1]. However, few techniques can distinguish between fissile isotopes. Nuclear resonance fluorescence is one technique that can be used in applications to identify and quantify isotopic content. NRF has also been proposed in several detector systems as a viable way to identify fissile material in cargo containers [2, 3]. It is necessary to measure the characteristic resonances of each isotope that is to be distinguished in identification and assay applications.

  12. Neutron monitoring systems including gamma thermometers and methods of calibrating nuclear instruments using gamma thermometers

    DOEpatents

    Moen, Stephan Craig; Meyers, Craig Glenn; Petzen, John Alexander; Foard, Adam Muhling

    2012-08-07

    A method of calibrating a nuclear instrument using a gamma thermometer may include: measuring, in the instrument, local neutron flux; generating, from the instrument, a first signal proportional to the neutron flux; measuring, in the gamma thermometer, local gamma flux; generating, from the gamma thermometer, a second signal proportional to the gamma flux; compensating the second signal; and calibrating a gain of the instrument based on the compensated second signal. Compensating the second signal may include: calculating selected yield fractions for specific groups of delayed gamma sources; calculating time constants for the specific groups; calculating a third signal that corresponds to delayed local gamma flux based on the selected yield fractions and time constants; and calculating the compensated second signal by subtracting the third signal from the second signal. The specific groups may have decay time constants greater than 5.times.10.sup.-1 seconds and less than 5.times.10.sup.5 seconds.

  13. Nuclear resonance fluorescence of Np237

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angell, C. T.; Yee, R.; Joshi, T. H.; Swanberg, E.; Norman, E. B.; Hicks, C. L., Jr.; Klimenko, A.; Korbly, S.; Wilson, C.; Kulp, W. D.; Warren, G. A.; Bray, T. H.; Copping, R.; Glans, P. A.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shuh, D. K.

    2010-11-01

    Measurements of states excited by nuclear resonance fluorescence in Np237 were performed using a bremsstrahlung beam. Fifteen new states were observed in the region of 1.7 to 2.5 MeV. They can be used to detect or assay Np237 nondestructively for applications in security and safeguards. The states are populated with similar strength as those states found previously in U235 and Pu239 but are spread out more in energy.

  14. Nuclear resonance fluorescence of {sup 237}Np

    SciTech Connect

    Angell, C. T.; Yee, R.; Joshi, T. H.; Swanberg, E.; Norman, E. B.; Hicks, C. L. Jr.; Klimenko, A.; Korbly, S.; Wilson, C.; Kulp, W. D.; Warren, G. A.; Bray, T. H.; Copping, R.; Glans, P. A.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shuh, D. K.

    2010-11-15

    Measurements of states excited by nuclear resonance fluorescence in {sup 237}Np were performed using a bremsstrahlung beam. Fifteen new states were observed in the region of 1.7 to 2.5 MeV. They can be used to detect or assay {sup 237}Np nondestructively for applications in security and safeguards. The states are populated with similar strength as those states found previously in {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu but are spread out more in energy.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processing

    PubMed Central

    Serra, R. M.; Oliveira, I. S.

    2012-01-01

    For the past decade, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been established as a main experimental technique for testing quantum protocols in small systems. This Theme Issue presents recent advances and major challenges of NMR quantum information possessing (QIP), including contributions by researchers from 10 different countries. In this introduction, after a short comment on NMR-QIP basics, we briefly anticipate the contents of this issue. PMID:22946031

  16. Elastic properties of gamma-Pu by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, Albert; Betts, J; Trugman, A; Mielke, C H; Mitchell, J N; Ramos, M; Stroe, I

    2009-01-01

    Despite intense experimental and theoretical work on Pu, there is still little understanding of the strange properties of this metal. We used resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method to investigate the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline Pu at high temperatures. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli of the {gamma}-phase of Pu were determined simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth linear and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. We calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519K to 0.252 at 571K.

  17. Gamma spectrometric assessment of nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krištof, Edvard; Pregl, Gvido

    1990-12-01

    A description is given of a gamma spectrometric technique which has been developed with the aim of determining the amount of a certain radioactive fission product taking into consideration local variations of the linear attenuation coefficient of gamma rays. Also, an experiment using a fuel element of the TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana is presented.

  18. Nuclear gamma-rays from energetic particle interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Gamma-ray line emission due to nuclear deexcitation following energetic particle interactions with abundant constituents of cosmic matter is studied. Reactions induced by energetic protons and alpha particles in ambient nuclei (He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, and Fe) are considered, along with inverse reactions in which energetic nuclei interact with ambient H and He. Line-production cross sections are evaluated by analyzing a large body of laboratory nuclear data. Both prompt gamma rays, produced by direct excitation of nuclear levels and by spallation reactions that leave the secondary nucleus in an excited state, and delayed emission from long-lived radioactive nuclei also produced in the energetic particle reactions are investigated. A line list is provided, and the shapes of the gamma-ray lines are determined. Gamma-ray line production in the interstellar medium is evaluated in detail.

  19. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Quiter, Brian; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Prussin, Stanley

    2009-06-05

    This paper discusses the use of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) techniques for the isotopic and quantitative assaying of radioactive material. Potential applications include age-dating of an unknown radioactive source, pre- and post-detonation nuclear forensics, and safeguards for nuclear fuel cycles Examples of age-dating a strong radioactive source and assaying a spent fuel pin are discussed. The modeling work has ben performed with the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNPX, and the capability to simulate NRF has bee added to the code. Discussed are the limitations in MCNPX's photon transport physics for accurately describing photon scattering processes that are important contributions to the background and impact the applicability of the NRF assay technique.

  20. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Quiter, Brian J.; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Prussin, Stanley

    2009-06-29

    This paper discusses the use of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) techniques for the isotopic and quantitative assaying of radioactive material. Potential applications include age-dating of an unknown radioactive source, pre- and post-detonation nuclear forensics, and safeguards for nuclear fuel cycles Examples of age-dating a strong radioactive source and assaying a spent fuel pin are discussed. The modeling work has ben performed with the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNPX, and the capability to simulate NRF has bee added to the code. Discussed are the limitations in MCNPX?s photon transport physics for accurately describing photon scattering processes that are important contributions to the background and impact the applicability of the NRF assay technique.

  1. Resonant Interneurons Can Increase Robustness of Gamma Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Tikidji-Hamburyan, Ruben A.; Martínez, Joan José; White, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma oscillations are believed to play a critical role in in information processing, encoding, and retrieval. Inhibitory interneuronal network gamma (ING) oscillations may arise from a coupled oscillator mechanism in which individual neurons oscillate or from a population oscillator in which individual neurons fire sparsely and stochastically. All ING mechanisms, including the one proposed herein, rely on alternating waves of inhibition and windows of opportunity for spiking. The coupled oscillator model implemented with Wang–Buzsáki model neurons is not sufficiently robust to heterogeneity in excitatory drive, and therefore intrinsic frequency, to account for in vitro models of ING. Similarly, in a tightly synchronized regime, the stochastic population oscillator model is often characterized by sparse firing, whereas interneurons both in vivo and in vitro do not fire sparsely during gamma, but rather on average every other cycle. We substituted so-called resonator neural models, which exhibit class 2 excitability and postinhibitory rebound (PIR), for the integrators that are typically used. This results in much greater robustness to heterogeneity that actually increases as the average participation in spikes per cycle approximates physiological levels. Moreover, dynamic clamp experiments that show autapse-induced firing in entorhinal cortical interneurons support the idea that PIR can serve as a network gamma mechanism. Furthermore, parvalbumin-positive (PV+) cells were much more likely to display both PIR and autapse-induced firing than GAD2+ cells, supporting the view that PV+ fast-firing basket cells are more likely to exhibit class 2 excitability than other types of inhibitory interneurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Gamma oscillations are believed to play a critical role in information processing, encoding, and retrieval. Networks of inhibitory interneurons are thought to be essential for these oscillations. We show that one class of interneurons with an

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance properties of lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, D.; Weeks, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of Na-23, Al-27, and P-31 in fines samples 10084,60 and 14163,168 and in crystalline rock samples 12021,55 and 14321,166, have been recorded over a range of frequencies up to 20 MHz. A shift in the field at which maximum absorption occurs for all of the spectra relative to the field at which maximum absorption occurs for terrestrial analogues is attributed to a sample-dependent magnetic field at the Na, Al, and P sites opposing the laboratory field. The magnitude of these fields internal to the samples is sample dependent and varies from 5 to 10 G. These fields do not correlate with the iron content of the samples. However, the presence of single-domain particles of iron distributed throughout the plagioclase fraction that contains the principal fraction of Na and Al is inferred from electron magnetic resonance spectra shapes.

  3. An introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance in biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Andrew, E R

    1990-02-01

    In this paper the author illustrates the historical aspects of the development, first, of the fundamental principles of nuclear magnetic resonance and, second, the extension of these principles to magnetic resonance imaging and in vivo spectroscopy.

  4. Pulsed Photofission Delayed Gamma Ray Detection for Nuclear Material Identification

    SciTech Connect

    John Kavouras; Xianfei Wen; Daren R. Norman; Dante R. Nakazawa; Haori Yang

    2012-11-01

    Innovative systems with increased sensitivity and resolution are in great demand to detect diversion and to prevent misuse in support of nuclear materials management for the U.S. fuel cycle. Nuclear fission is the most important multiplicative process involved in non-destructive active interrogation. This process produces the most easily recognizable signature for nuclear materials. High-energy gamma rays can also excite a nucleus and cause fission through a process known as photofission. After photofission reactions, delayed signals are easily distinguishable from the interrogating radiation. Linac-based, advanced inspection techniques utilizing the fission signals after photofission have been extensively studied for homeland security applications. Previous research also showed that a unique delayed gamma ray energy spectrum exists for each fissionable isotope. Isotopic composition measurement methods based on delayed gamma ray spectroscopy will be the primary focus of this work.

  5. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed.

  6. Cyclotron resonant scattering and absorption. [in gamma ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Daugherty, Joseph K.

    1991-01-01

    The relativistic cross-sections for first-order absorption and second-order scattering are compared to determine the conditions under which the absorption cross-section is a good approximation to the much more complex scattering cross-section for purposes of modeling cyclotron lines in gamma-ray bursts. Differences in both the cross-sections and the line profiles are presented for a range of field strengths, angles, and electron temperatures. The relative difference of the cross-sections at one line width from resonance was found to increase with field strength and harmonic number. The difference is also strongly dependent on the photon angle to the magnetic field. For the field strength, 1.7 x 10 to the 12th G, and the angle inferred from the Ginga burst features, absorption is an excellent approximation for the profiles at the first and second harmonics.

  7. Characterization of nuclear material by Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradela, C.; Alaerts, G.; Becker, B.; Heyse, J.; Kopecky, S.; Moens, A.; Mondelaers, W.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Wynants, R.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Koizumi, M.; Tsuchiya, H.

    2016-11-01

    The use of Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis for the characterization of nuclear materials is discussed. The method, which relies on resonance structures in neutron-induced reaction cross sections, can be applied as a non-destructive method to characterise complex nuclear materials such as melted fuel resulting from a severe nuclear accident. Results of a demonstration experiment at the GELINA facility reveal that accurate data can be obtained at a compact facility even in the case of strong overlapping resonances.

  8. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence off 54Cr: The Onset of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, P. C.; Beck, T.; Beller, J.; Krishichayan; Gayer, U.; Isaak, J.; Löher, B.; Mertes, L.; Pai, H.; Pietralla, N.; Romig, C.; Savran, D.; Schilling, M.; Tornow, W.; Werner, V.; Zweidinger, M.

    2016-06-01

    Low-lying electric and magnetic dipole excitations (E1 and M1) below the neutron separation threshold, particularly the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR), have drawn considerable attention in the last years. So far, mostly moderately heavy nuclei in the mass regions around A = 90 and A = 140 were examined with respect to the PDR. In the present work, the systematics of the PDR have been extended by measuring excitation strengths and parity quantum numbers of J = 1 states in lighter nuclei near A = 50 in order to gather information on the onset of the PDR. The nuclei 50,52,54Cr and 48,50Ti were examined via bremsstrahlung produced at the DArmstadt Superconducting electron Linear Accelerator (S-DALINAC) with photon energies up to 9.7 MeV with the method of nuclear resonance fluorescence. Numerous excited states were observed, many of which for the first time. The parity quantum numbers of these states have been determined at the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIγS) of the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory in Durham, NC, USA. Informations to the methods and the experimental setups will be provided and the results on 54Cr achieved will be discussed with respect to the onset of the PDR.

  9. Nuclear structure studies with gamma-ray beams

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tonchev, Anton; Bhatia, Chitra; Kelley, John; Raut, Rajarshi; Rusev, Gencho; Tornow, Werner; Tsoneva, Nadia

    2015-05-28

    In stable and weakly bound neutron-rich nuclei, a resonance-like concentration of dipole states has been observed for excitation energies below the neutron-separation energy. This clustering of strong dipole states has been named the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR) in contrast to the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) that dominates the E1 response. Understanding the PDR is presently of great interest in nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. High-sensitivity studies of E1 and M1 transitions in closed-shell nuclei using monoenergetic and 100% linearly-polarized photon beams are presented.

  10. Highly efficient D/H scrambling and highly selective chlorination in /gamma/-irradiated D- and H-octane mixture in freon 113: Trace back of transient processes by the observation of D/H scrambling with high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Okazaki, M.; Toriyama, K.; Nunome, K.

    1989-08-15

    A high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study on the /gamma/-irradiated isotopic mixture of protiated and deuteriated octanes in freon 113 revealed that the protons and the deuterons are scrambled very efficiently (/ital G//gt/2000) at all the positions. While the solvent freon was substituted selectively with a proton and chlorination of protiated octane occurred selectively at the secondary position. These observations, coexistence of the random D/H scrambling and the selective substitution reactions, are the evidence that: (1) in the ''hot'' period rapid intermolecular radical migration occurs among the solute alkanes, the solvent freons, and the product chloroalkanes, (2) on the other hand, in the following ''thermalized'' period, chemical bonds within which radical site migration occurs are limited to those with smaller bonding energies, i.e., the secondary position of (protiated) alkane, the C--Cl bonds of freon, and the C--Cl bond of chloroalkanes.

  11. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence of ^148Sm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T. C.; Pietralla, N.; von Garrel, H.; Kneissl, U.; Kohstall, C.; Pitz, H. H.; Scheck, M.; Stedile, F.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Richter, A.; Fransen, C.; Werner, V.

    2004-10-01

    The evolution of the fundamental one-phonon 2^+_1,ms proton-neutron mixed-symmetry state as a function of nuclear deformation is unknown. The sequence of stable Sm isotopes represents the classic testing ground for the evolution of nuclear structure with quadruple deformation. In order to search for the 2^+_1,ms state of ^148Sm, we have studied the ^148Sm (γ,γ') photon scattering reaction at the Stuttgart DYNAMITRON accelerator using bremsstrahlung with an end point energy of 3.2 MeV. Nuclear resonance fluorescence from 11 excited states, including two 2^+ states, between 1.4 and 3.1 MeV has been observed with 3 large-volume Ge detectors. New low-spin states were observed. Spin quantum numbers were assigned from the angular distribution of the photon scattering intensity observed at θ = 90^o, 127^o and 150^o relative to the axis of the incident photon beam. Absolute photon scattering cross sections were measured relative to known cross sections in the calibration standard ^27Al. Level lifetimes have been deduced. The results will be presented. Supported by the NSF under grant No. PHY-0245018 and by the OJI program of the DOE under grant No. DE-FG02-04ER41334.

  12. Satellite observation of atmospheric nuclear gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letaw, John R.; Share, G. H.; Kinzer, R. L.; Silberberg, R.; Chupp, E. L.

    1989-01-01

    Satellite observations of the spectrum of gamma radiation from the earth's atmosphere in the energy interval from 300 keV to 8.5 MeV were obtained with a gamma-ray spectrometer during 1980-1983. A total of 20 atmospheric line features are superimposed on a continuum background which is modeled using a power law with an index of -1.16. The line energies and intensities are consistent with production by secondary neutrons interacting with atmospheric N-14 and O-16. The intensity and spectrum of photons at energies below the 511-keV line, in excess of a power law continuum, are explained by Compton scattering of the annihilation line photons in traversing an average of 21 g/sq cm of atmosphere.

  13. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Luke W.; Hunt, Alan W.; Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Mozin, Vladimir V.

    2012-04-01

    High-energy, beta-delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy is investigated as a non-destructive assay technique for the determination of plutonium mass in spent nuclear fuel. This approach exploits the unique isotope-specific signatures contained in the delayed gamma-ray emission spectra detected following active interrogation with an external neutron source. A high fidelity modeling approach is described that couples radiation transport, analytical decay/depletion, and a newly developed gamma-ray emission source reconstruction code. Initially simulated and analyzed was a “one-pass” delayed gamma-ray assay that focused on the long-lived signatures. Also presented are the results of an independent study that investigated “pulsed mode” measurements, to capture the more isotope-specific, short-lived signatures. Initial modeling results outlined in this paper suggest that delayed gamma-ray assay of spent nuclear fuel assemblies can be accomplished with a neutron generator of sufficient strength and currently available gamma-ray detectors.

  14. 197Au(n,gamma) Cross Section in the Unresolved Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    Lederer, C.; Koehler, Paul Edward

    2011-03-01

    The cross section of the reaction {sup 197}Au(n,{gamma}) was measured with the time-of-flight technique at the n{_}TOF (neutron time-of-flight) facility in the unresolved resonance region between 5 and 400 keV using a pair of C{sub 6}D{sub 6} (where D denotes {sup 2}H) liquid scintillators for the detection of prompt capture {gamma} rays. The results with a total uncertainty of 3.9%-6.7% for a resolution of 20 bins per energy decade show fair agreement with the Evaluated Nuclear Data File Version B-VII.0 (ENDF/B-VII.0), which contains the standard evaluation. The Maxwellian-averaged cross section (MACS) at 30 keV is in excellent agreement with the one according to the ENDF/B-VII.0 evaluation and 4.7% higher than the MACS measured independently by activation technique. Structures in the cross section, which had also been reported earlier, have been interpreted as being due to clusters of resonances.

  15. Electron magnetic resonance study of gamma-irradiated poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres.

    PubMed

    Claybourn, Mike; Gray, Helen; Murphy, Damien M; Purnell, Ian J; Rowlands, Christopher C

    2003-09-01

    A series of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) samples of compositions ranging from (75:25) to (65:35) to (50% (65:35):50% (50:50)) were gamma-irradiated under ambient conditions in air. The irradiation doses used were 15, 20, 25, and 30 kGy. The generation of radicals resulting from the gamma-irradiation was confirmed using EPR. Two major radical species were observed and identified as centered at alkyl and alkyl peroxy groups. The indication from the X-band (9 GHz) frequencies showed that alkyl radicals gave rise to a quartet hyperfine pattern. However, measurements performed at higher W-band frequencies (90 GHz) showed that the X-band spectra are actually a composite profile arising from a series of overlapping individual resonances. Using combined EPR and ENDOR (Electron-Nuclear DOuble Resonance) measurements, an alkyl peroxy radical was identified. For increasing glycolide concentration from 75:25 to the 50:50 blend, there was a factor of 7 increase in the concentration of radicals A and B. Furthermore, both radical species were found to be stable for several weeks after storage at ambient temperature conditions. At elevated temperatures and humidities, radical stability decreased--the decay rate was estimated at approximately 3x10(-8) mol K(-1). The stability characteristics of the radicals under different conditions are attributed to changes in the morphology of the polymer. PMID:12932720

  16. Explosives detection by nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garroway, Allen N.; Buess, Michael L.; Yesinowski, James P.; Miller, Joel B.; Krauss, Ronald A.

    1994-10-01

    Pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of 14N nuclei is quite promising as a method for detecting explosives such as RDX and contraband narcotics such as cocaine and heroin in quantities of interest. Pure NQR is conducted without an external applied magnetic field, so potential concerns about damage to magnetically encoded data or exposure of personnel to large magnetic fields are not relevant. Because NQR frequencies of different compounds are quite distinct, we do not encounter false alarms from the NQR signals of other benign materials. We have constructed a laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector which interrogates a volume of 300 liters (10 ft3). This paper presents abbreviated results from a demonstration of the laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector conducted at the Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center in May 1994 on RDX-based explosives.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of liver hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Sigal, R.; Lanir, A.; Atlan, H.; Naschitz, J.E.; Simon, J.S.; Enat, R.; Front, D.; Israel, O.; Chisin, R.; Krausz, Y.

    1985-10-01

    Nine patients with cavernous hemangioma of the liver were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a 0.5 T superconductive magnet. Spin-echo technique was used with varying time to echo (TE) and repetition times (TR). Results were compared with /sup 99m/Tc red blood cell (RBC) scintigraphy, computed tomography (CT), echography, and arteriography. Four illustrated cases are reported. It was possible to establish a pattern for MRI characteristics of cavernous hemangiomas; rounded or smooth lobulated shape, marked increase in T1 and T2 values as compared with normal liver values. It is concluded that, although more experience is necessary to compare the specificity with that of ultrasound and CT, MRI proved to be very sensitive for the diagnosis of liver hemangioma, especially in the case of small ones which may be missed by /sup 99m/Tc-labeled RBC scintigraphy.

  18. Near-Zero-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledbetter, M. P.; Theis, T.; Blanchard, J. W.; Ring, H.; Ganssle, P.; Appelt, S.; Blümich, B.; Pines, A.; Budker, D.

    2011-09-01

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near zero field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high-field case, where heteronuclear J couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectra. Experimental results are in good agreement with first-order perturbation theory and with full numerical simulation when perturbation theory breaks down. We present simple rules for understanding the splitting patterns in near-zero-field NMR, which can be applied to molecules with nontrivial spectra.

  19. Geochemical Controls on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Rosemary; Prasad, Manika; Keating, Kristina

    2003-11-11

    OAK-B135 Our research objectives are to determine, through an extensive set of laboratory experiments, the effect of the specific mineralogic form of iron and the effect of the distribution of iron on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation mechanisms. In the first nine months of this project, we have refined the experimental procedures to be used in the acquisition of the laboratory NMR data; have ordered, and conducted preliminary measurements on, the sand samples to be used in the experimental work; and have revised and completed the theoretical model to use in this project. Over the next year, our focus will be on completing the first phase of the experimental work where the form and distribution of the iron in the sands in varied.

  20. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance petrophysics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Boqin; Dunn, Keh-Jim

    2005-02-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) opens a wide area for exploration in petrophysics and has significant impact to petroleum logging technology. When there are multiple fluids with different diffusion coefficients saturated in a porous medium, this information can be extracted and clearly delineated from CPMG measurements of such a system either using regular pulsing sequences or modified two window sequences. The 2D NMR plot with independent variables of T2 relaxation time and diffusion coefficient allows clear separation of oil and water signals in the rocks. This 2D concept can be extended to general studies of fluid-saturated porous media involving other combinations of two or more independent variables, such as chemical shift and T1/T2 relaxation time (reflecting pore size), proton population and diffusion contrast, etc. PMID:15833623

  1. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Evans, H.; Bryan, R. N.; Johnson, P.; Schonfeld, E.; Jhingran, S. G.

    1984-01-01

    A number of physiological changes have been demonstrated in bone, muscle and blood after exposure of humans and animals to microgravity. Determining mechanisms and the development of effective countermeasures for long duration space missions is an important NASA goal. The advent of tomographic nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR or MRI) gives NASA a way to greatly extend early studies of this phenomena in ways not previously possible; NMR is also noninvasive and safe. NMR provides both superb anatomical images for volume assessments of individual organs and quantification of chemical/physical changes induced in the examined tissues. The feasibility of NMR as a tool for human physiological research as it is affected by microgravity is demonstrated. The animal studies employed the rear limb suspended rat as a model of mucle atrophy that results from microgravity. And bedrest of normal male subjects was used to simulate the effects of microgravity on bone and muscle.

  2. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Using Different Photon Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Caggiano, Joseph A.; Ahmed, Mohammad; Bertozzi, William; Hunt, Alan W.; Johnson, James; Jones, James L.; Korbly, Steve; Reedy, Edward; Seipel, Heather; Stave, Sean; Watson, Scott; Weller, Henry

    2008-11-14

    Abstract–Nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) is a photon-based active interrogation approach that provides isotope-specific signatures that can be used to detect and characterize samples. As NRF systems are designed to address specific appli¬cations, an obvious first question to address is the type of photon source to be employed for the application. Our collaboration has conducted a series of NRF measurements using different photon sources to begin to examine this issue. The measurements were designed to be as similar as possible to facilitate a straightforward comparison of the different sources. Measurements were conducted with a high-duty factor electron accelerator using bremsstrahlung photons, with a pulsed linear accelerator using bremsstrahlung photons, and with a narrow bandwidth photon source using Compton backscattered photons. We present our observations on the advantages and disadvantages of each photon source type. Issues such as signal rate, the signal-to-noise ratio, and absorbed dose are discussed.

  3. Musculoskeletal applications of nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, K.L. Jr.; Genant, H.K.; Helms, C.A.; Chafetz, N.I.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-04-01

    Thirty healthy subjects and 15 patients with a variety of musculoskeletal disorders were examined by conventional radiography, computed tomography (CT), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). NMR proved capable of demonstrating important anatomic structures in the region of the lumbosacral spine. Lumbar disk protrusion was demonstrated in three patients with CT evidence of the disease. NMR appeared to differentiate annulus fibrosus from nucleus pulposus in intervertebral disk material. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head was demonstrated in two patients. The cruciate ligaments of the knee were well defined by NMR. Musceles, tendons and ligaments, and blood vessels could be reliably differentiated, and the excellent soft-tissue contrast of NMR proved useful in the evaluation of bony and soft-tissue tumors. NMR holds promise in the evaluation of musculoskeletal disorders.

  4. Selectivity in multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, W.S.

    1980-11-01

    The observation of multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance transitions in isotropic or anisotropic liquids is shown to give readily interpretable information on molecular configurations, rates of motional processes, and intramolecular interactions. However, the observed intensity of high multiple-quantum transitions falls off dramatically as the number of coupled spins increases. The theory of multiple-quantum NMR is developed through the density matrix formalism, and exact intensities are derived for several cases (isotropic first-order systems and anisotropic systems with high symmetry) to shown that this intensity decrease is expected if standard multiple-quantum pulse sequences are used. New pulse sequences are developed which excite coherences and produce population inversions only between selected states, even though other transitions are simultaneously resonant. One type of selective excitation presented only allows molecules to absorb and emit photons in groups of n. Coherent averaging theory is extended to describe these selective sequences, and to design sequences which are selective to arbitrarily high order in the Magnus expansion. This theory and computer calculations both show that extremely good selectivity and large signal enhancements are possible.

  5. Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance examination of female reproductive tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Noyszewski, E.A.; Raman, J.; Trupin, S.R.; McFarlin, B.L.; Dawson, M.J. )

    1989-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful method of investigating the relationship between metabolism and function in living tissues. We present evidence that the phosphorus 31 spectra of myometrium and placenta are functions of physiologic state and gestational age. Specific spectroscopic abnormalities are observed in association with disorders of pregnancy and gynecologic diseases. Our results suggest that noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy examinations may sometimes be a useful addition to magnetic resonance imaging examinations, and that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of biopsy specimens could become a cost-effective method of evaluating certain biochemical abnormalities.

  6. Potential Applications of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Glen; Caggiano, Jac; Peplowski, Patrick

    2009-12-01

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) is a photon-based active interrogation approach that provides isotope-specific signatures that can be used to detect and characterize samples. Photon energies are in the range of a few MeV, so that penetration through significant material is possible. Unlike other active interrogation techniques that are based on inducing fission, NRF is sensitive to a wide range of isotopes: for example 11B, 12C, 13C, 14N, 16O, 27Al, 208Pb, 235U, 238U and 239Pu just to name a few. NRF is most likely to outperform existing technologies for applications requiring isotopic information of sealed samples. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is conducting a review of potential applications that could be addressed by NRF techniques. These applications cover a wide range of topics, from geo-location, to material assay, to safeguarding the nuclear fuel cycle. The objective of the project is to search for potential applications, define technical requirements, identify physical limitations, conduct an initial assessment of the technique and design a research approach for developing the applications. In this report, our current progress on will be presented.

  7. Experiments in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong; Lu, Wei; Choi, J.-H.; Chia, H. J.; Mirsaidov, U. M.; Guchhait, S.; Cambou, A. D.; Cardenas, R.; Park, K.; Markert, J. T.

    2006-03-01

    We report our group's effort in the construction of an 8-T, ^3 He cryostat based nuclear magnetic resonance force microscope (NMRFM). The probe has two independent 3-D of piezoelectric x-y-z positioners for precise positioning of a fiber optic interferometer and a sample/gradient-producing magnet with respect to a micro-cantilever. The piezoelectric positioners have a very uniform controllable step size with virtually no backlash. A novel RF tuning circuit board design is implemented which allows us to simply swap out one RF component board with another for experiments involving different nuclear species. We successfully fabricated and are characterizing 50μm x50μm x0.2μm double torsional oscillators. We have also been characterizing ultrasoft cantilevers whose spring constant is on the order of 10-4 N/m. We also report NMRFM data for ammonium dihydrogen phosphate(ADP) at room temperature using our 1.2-T system. Observed features include the correct shift of the NMR peak with carrier frequency, increases in signal amplitude with both RF field strength and frequency modulation amplitude, and signal oscillation (spin nutation) as a function of tipping RF pulse length. Experiments in progress on NH4MgF3 (at 1.2 T) and MgB2 (at 8.1 T) will also be briefly reviewed. Robert A. Welch Foundation grant No.F-1191 and the National Science Foundation grant No. DMR-0210383.

  8. Neutron Capture Gamma-Ray Libraries for Nuclear Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleaford, B. W.; Firestone, R. B.; Summers, N.; Escher, J.; Hurst, A.; Krticka, M.; Basunia, S.; Molnar, G.; Belgya, T.; Revay, Z.; Choi, H. D.

    2011-06-01

    The neutron capture reaction is useful in identifying and analyzing the gamma-ray spectrum from an unknown assembly as it gives unambiguous information on its composition. This can be done passively or actively where an external neutron source is used to probe an unknown assembly. There are known capture gamma-ray data gaps in the ENDF libraries used by transport codes for various nuclear applications. The Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation file (EGAF) is a new thermal neutron capture database of discrete line spectra and cross sections for over 260 isotopes that was developed as part of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project. EGAF is being used to improve the capture gamma production in ENDF libraries. For medium to heavy nuclei the quasi continuum contribution to the gamma cascades is not experimentally resolved. The continuum contains up to 90% of all the decay energy and is modeled here with the statistical nuclear structure code DICEBOX. This code also provides a consistency check of the level scheme nuclear structure evaluation. The calculated continuum is of sufficient accuracy to include in the ENDF libraries. This analysis also determines new total thermal capture cross sections and provides an improved RIPL database. For higher energy neutron capture there is less experimental data available making benchmarking of the modeling codes more difficult. We are investigating the capture spectra from higher energy neutrons experimentally using surrogate reactions and modeling this with Hauser-Feshbach codes. This can then be used to benchmark CASINO, a version of DICEBOX modified for neutron capture at higher energy. This can be used to simulate spectra from neutron capture at incident neutron energies up to 20 MeV to improve the gamma-ray spectrum in neutron data libraries used for transport modeling of unknown assemblies.

  9. Capture Gamma-Ray Libraries for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sleaford, B.W.; Firestone, Richard B.; Summers, N.; Escher, J.; Hurst, A.; Krticka, M.; Basunia, S.; Molnar, G.; Belgya, T.; Revay, Z.; Choi, H.D.

    2010-05-01

    The neutron capture reaction is useful in identifying and analyzing the gamma-ray spectrum from an unknown assembly as it gives unambiguous information on its composition. This can be done passively or actively where an external neutron source is used to probe an unknown assembly. There are known capture gamma-ray data gaps in the ENDF libraries used by transport codes for various nuclear applications. The Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation file (EGAF) is a new thermal neutron capture database of discrete line spectra and cross sections for over 260 isotopes that was developed as part of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project. EGAF has been used to improve the capture gamma production in ENDF libraries. For medium to heavy nuclei the quasi continuum contribution to the gamma cascades is not experimentally resolved. The continuum contains up to 90percent of all the decay energy an is modeled here with the statistical nuclear structure code DICEBOX. This code also provides a consistency check of the level scheme nuclear structure evaluation. The calculated continuum is of sufficient accuracy to include in the ENDF libraries. This analysis also determines new total thermal capture cross sections and provides an improved RIPL database. For higher energy neutron capture there is less experimental data available making benchmarking of the modeling codes more difficult. We use CASINO, a version of DICEBOX that is modified for this purpose. This can be used to simulate the neutron capture at incident neutron energies up to 20 MeV to improve the gamma-ray spectrum in neutron data libraries used for transport modelling of unknown assemblies.

  10. Neutron Capture Gamma-Ray Libraries for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sleaford, B W; Firestone, R B; Summers, N; Escher, J; Hurst, A; Krticka, M; Basunia, S; Molnar, G; Belgya, T; Revay, Z; Choi, H D

    2010-11-04

    The neutron capture reaction is useful in identifying and analyzing the gamma-ray spectrum from an unknown assembly as it gives unambiguous information on its composition. this can be done passively or actively where an external neutron source is used to probe an unknown assembly. There are known capture gamma-ray data gaps in the ENDF libraries used by transport codes for various nuclear applications. The Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation file (EGAF) is a new thermal neutron capture database of discrete line spectra and cross sections for over 260 isotopes that was developed as part of an IAEA Coordinated Research project. EGAF is being used to improve the capture gamma production in ENDF libraries. For medium to heavy nuclei the quasi continuum contribution to the gamma cascades is not experimentally resolved. The continuum contains up to 90% of all the decay energy and is modeled here with the statistical nuclear structure code DICEBOX. This code also provides a consistency check of the level scheme nuclear structure evaluation. The calculated continuum is of sufficient accuracy to include in the ENDF libraries. This analysis also determines new total thermal capture cross sections and provides an improved RIPL database. For higher energy neutron capture there is less experimental data available making benchmarking of the modeling codes more difficult. They are investigating the capture spectra from higher energy neutrons experimentally using surrogate reactions and modeling this with Hauser-Feshbach codes. This can then be used to benchmark CASINO, a version of DICEBOX modified for neutron capture at higher energy. This can be used to simulate spectra from neutron capture at incident neutron energies up to 20 MeV to improve the gamma-ray spectrum in neutron data libraries used for transport modeling of unknown assemblies.

  11. Neutron Capture Gamma-Ray Libraries for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sleaford, B. W.; Summers, N.; Escher, J.; Firestone, R. B.; Basunia, S.; Hurst, A.; Krticka, M.; Molnar, G.; Belgya, T.; Revay, Z.; Choi, H. D.

    2011-06-28

    The neutron capture reaction is useful in identifying and analyzing the gamma-ray spectrum from an unknown assembly as it gives unambiguous information on its composition. This can be done passively or actively where an external neutron source is used to probe an unknown assembly. There are known capture gamma-ray data gaps in the ENDF libraries used by transport codes for various nuclear applications. The Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation file (EGAF) is a new thermal neutron capture database of discrete line spectra and cross sections for over 260 isotopes that was developed as part of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project. EGAF is being used to improve the capture gamma production in ENDF libraries. For medium to heavy nuclei the quasi continuum contribution to the gamma cascades is not experimentally resolved. The continuum contains up to 90% of all the decay energy and is modeled here with the statistical nuclear structure code DICEBOX. This code also provides a consistency check of the level scheme nuclear structure evaluation. The calculated continuum is of sufficient accuracy to include in the ENDF libraries. This analysis also determines new total thermal capture cross sections and provides an improved RIPL database. For higher energy neutron capture there is less experimental data available making benchmarking of the modeling codes more difficult. We are investigating the capture spectra from higher energy neutrons experimentally using surrogate reactions and modeling this with Hauser-Feshbach codes. This can then be used to benchmark CASINO, a version of DICEBOX modified for neutron capture at higher energy. This can be used to simulate spectra from neutron capture at incident neutron energies up to 20 MeV to improve the gamma-ray spectrum in neutron data libraries used for transport modeling of unknown assemblies.

  12. BROADBAND EXCITATION IN NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, R.

    1984-10-01

    Theoretical methods for designing sequences of radio frequency (rf) radiation pulses for broadband excitation of spin systems in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are described. The sequences excite spins uniformly over large ranges of resonant frequencies arising from static magnetic field inhomogeneity, chemical shift differences, or spin couplings, or over large ranges of rf field amplitudes. Specific sequences for creating a population inversion or transverse magnetization are derived and demonstrated experimentally in liquid and solid state NMR. One approach to broadband excitation is based on principles of coherent averaging theory. A general formalism for deriving pulse sequences is given, along with computational methods for specific cases. This approach leads to sequences that produce strictly constant transformations of a spin system. The importance of this feature in NMR applications is discussed. A second approach to broadband excitation makes use of iterative schemes, i.e. sets of operations that are applied repetitively to a given initial pulse sequences, generating a series of increasingly complex sequences with increasingly desirable properties. A general mathematical framework for analyzing iterative schemes is developed. An iterative scheme is treated as a function that acts on a space of operators corresponding to the transformations produced by all possible pulse sequences. The fixed points of the function and the stability of the fixed points are shown to determine the essential behavior of the scheme. Iterative schemes for broadband population inversion are treated in detail. Algebraic and numerical methods for performing the mathematical analysis are presented. Two additional topics are treated. The first is the construction of sequences for uniform excitation of double-quantum coherence and for uniform polarization transfer over a range of spin couplings. Double-quantum excitation sequences are demonstrated in a liquid crystal system. The

  13. Burn injury by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Eising, Ernst G; Hughes, Justin; Nolte, Frank; Jentzen, Walter; Bockisch, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has become a standard diagnostic procedure in clinical medicine and is well known to have hazards for patients with pacemaker or metallic foreign bodies. Compared to CT, the frequency of MRI examinations is increasing due to the missing exposure of the patients by X-rays. Furthermore, high-field magnetic resonance tomograph (MRT) with 3 T has entered clinical practice, and 7-T systems are installed in multiple scientific institutions. On the other hand, the possibility of burn injuries has been reported only in very few cases. Based on a clinical finding of a burn injury in a 31-year-old male patient during a routine MRI of the lumbar spine with standard protocol, the MR scanner was checked and the examination was simulated in an animal model. The patient received a third-degree burn injury of the skin of the right hand and pelvis in a small region of skin contact. The subsequent control of the MRI scanner indicated no abnormal values for radiofrequency (RF) and power. In the subsequent animal experiment, comparable injuries could only be obtained by high RF power in a microwave stove. It is concluded that 'tissue loops' resulting from a contact between hand and pelvis must be avoided. With regard to forensic aspects, the need to inform patients of such a minimal risk can be avoided if the patients are adequately positioned using an isolating material between the hands and pelvis. These facts must be emphasized more in the future, if high-field MRI with stronger RF gradients is available in routine imaging. PMID:20630342

  14. Gamma-ray identification of nuclear weapon materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gosnell, T. B., LLNL; Hall, J. M.; Jam, C. L.; Knapp, D. A.; Koenig, Z. M.; Luke, S. J.; Pohl, B. A.; Schach von Wittenau, A.; Wolford, J. K.

    1997-02-03

    There has been an accelerating national interest in countering nuclear smuggling. This has caused a corresponding expansion of interest in the use of gamma-ray spectrometers for checkpoint monitoring, nuclear search, and within networks of nuclear and collateral sensors. All of these are fieldable instruments--ranging from large, fixed portal monitors to hand-held and remote monitoring equipment. For operational reasons, detectors with widely varying energy resolution and detection efficiency will be employed. In many instances, such instruments must be sensitive to weak signals, always capable of recognizing the gamma-ray signatures from nuclear weapons materials (NWM), often largely insensitive to spectral alteration by radiation transport through intervening materials, capable of real-time implementation, and able to discriminate against signals from commonly encountered legitimate gamma-ray sources, such as radiopharmaceuticals. Several decades of experience in classified programs have shown that all of these properties are not easily achieved and successful approaches were of limited scope--such as the detection of plutonium only. This project was originally planned as a two-year LDRD-ER. Since funding for 1997 was not sustained, this is a report of the first year's progress.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Hricak, H.; Crooks, L.; Sheldon, P.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-02-01

    The role of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the kidney was analyzed in 18 persons (6 normal volunteers, 3 patients with pelvocaliectasis, 2 with peripelvic cysts, 1 with renal sinus lipomatosis, 3 with renal failure, 1 with glycogen storage disease, and 2 with polycystic kidney disease). Ultrasound and/or computed tomography (CT) studies were available for comparison in every case. In the normal kidney distinct anatomical structures were clearly differentiated by NMR. The best anatomical detail ws obtained with spin echo (SE) imaging, using a pulse sequence interval of 1,000 msec and an echo delay time of 28 msec. However, in the evaluation of normal and pathological conditions, all four intensity images (SE 500/28, SE 500/56, SE 1,000/28, and SE 1,000/56) have to be analyzed. No definite advantage was found in using SE imaging with a pulse sequence interval of 1,500 msec. Inversion recovery imaging enhanced the differences between the cortex and medulla, but it had a low signal-to-noise level and, therefore, a suboptimal overall resolution. The advantages of NMR compared with CT and ultrasound are discussed, and it is concluded that NMR imaging will prove to be a useful modality in the evaluation of renal disease.

  16. FY08 Annual Report for Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Caggiano, Joseph A.

    2009-01-06

    FY08 annual report for project the "Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging" project. Reviews accomplishments of last 3 years, including U-235 signature search, comparison of different photon sources, and examination of NRF measurements using monochromatic photon source.

  17. Nuclear quadrupole resonance studies in semi-metallic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, A. N.

    1974-01-01

    Both experimental and theoretical studies are presented on spectrum analysis of nuclear quadrupole resonance of antimony and arsenic tellurides. Numerical solutions for secular equations of the quadrupole interaction energy are also discussed.

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Double Resonance Using Weak Perturbing RF Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, G. Fredric

    1977-01-01

    Describes a nuclear magnetic resonance experimental example of spin tickling; also discusses a direct approach for verifying the relative signs of coupling constants in three-spin cyclopropyl systems. (SL)

  19. Single-level resonance parameters fit nuclear cross-sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drawbaugh, D. W.; Gibson, G.; Miller, M.; Page, S. L.

    1970-01-01

    Least squares analyses of experimental differential cross-section data for the U-235 nucleus have yielded single level Breit-Wigner resonance parameters that fit, simultaneously, three nuclear cross sections of capture, fission, and total.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C10H13ITe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhova, B. M.

    This document is part of Part 6 `Organic Metalloid Compounds' of Subvolume D 'Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13' of Landolt-Börnstein III/35 'Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III 'Condensed Matter'.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C9H11ITe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhova, B. M.

    This document is part of Part 6 `Organic Metalloid Compounds' of Subvolume D 'Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13' of Landolt-Börnstein III/35 'Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III 'Condensed Matter'.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance for cultural heritage.

    PubMed

    Brai, Maria; Camaiti, Mara; Casieri, Cinzia; De Luca, Francesco; Fantazzini, Paola

    2007-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) portable devices are now being used for nondestructive in situ analysis of water content, pore space structure and protective treatment performance in porous media in the field of cultural heritage. It is a standard procedure to invert T(1) and T(2) relaxation data of fully water-saturated samples to get "pore size" distributions, but the use of T(2) requires great caution. It is well known that dephasing effects due to water molecule diffusion in a magnetic field gradient can affect transverse relaxation data, even if the smallest experimentally available half echo time tau is used in Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill experiments. When a portable single-sided NMR apparatus is used, large field gradients due to the instrument, at the scale of the sample, are thought to be the dominant dephasing cause. In this paper, T(1) and T(2) (at different tau values) distributions were measured in natural (Lecce stone) and artificial (brick samples coming from the Greek-Roman Theatre of Taormina) porous media of interest for cultural heritage by a standard laboratory instrument and a portable device. While T(1) distributions do not show any appreciable effect from inhomogeneous fields, T(2) distributions can show strong effects, and a procedure is presented based on the dependence of 1/T(2) on tau to separate pore-scale gradient effects from sample-scale gradient effects. Unexpectedly, the gradient at the pore scale can be, in some cases, strong enough to make negligible the effects of gradients at the sample scale of the single-sided device.

  3. A novel power amplification scheme for nuclear magnetic resonance/nuclear quadrupole resonance systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinwang; Schemm, Nathan; Balkır, Sina

    2011-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR)-based chemical analysis systems have been widely utilized in various areas such as medicine, security, and academic research. In these applications, the power amplifier stage plays a key role in generating the required oscillating magnetic fields within a radio frequency coil that serves as the probe. However, the bulky size and relatively low efficiency of the traditional power amplification schemes employed present a bottleneck for the realization of compact sized and portable NMR and NQR systems. To address this problem, this work presents a class D voltage-switching power amplification scheme with novel fast-start and fast-stop functions that are suitable for generating ideal NMR and NQR excitation signals. Compared to the traditional analog power amplifiers (PAs), the proposed switched-mode PA can achieve significant improvement on the power efficiency as well as the physical volume. A PA circuit for portable NQR-based explosive detection systems has been designed and built using the proposed scheme with 1 kW possible maximum output power and 10 MHz maximum operating frequency. Test results show that the presented PA achieves more than 60% measured efficiency within a highly compact volume while sustaining fast start and stop of excitation signals in the order of microseconds.

  4. Summary Comments: Nuclear Physics and Gamma-Ray Sources for Nuclear Security and Nonproliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barty, C. P. J.

    2015-10-01

    The Nuclear Physics and Gamma-ray Sources for Nuclear Security and Nonproliferation (NPNSNP) meeting held in Tokai-mura, Japan from January 28th to 30th, 2014 revealed both the rapid evolution and growth of monoenergetic, laser-Compton, gamma-ray source technology and the emergence of numerous important applications enabled by this technology. More than 500M of large-scale source and development activities were represented at the meeting, including all of the major projects in the United States, Europe and Japan. The meeting was both highly stimulating intellectually and provided an excellent venue for the exploration of new collaborations between groups...

  5. The limitations of resonant Compton scattering as a gamma-ray burst model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Resonant Compton upscattering is commended as a mechanism that produces a hard gamma-ray spectrum while suppressing X-rays. This model, however, has severe physical and observational limitations. Effective X-ray suppression places a lower limit on the electron density; above this limit X-rays scatter multiple times, so the single-scattering approximation of this mechanism is invalid. Multiple scattering produces a spectrum that is much harder than the single-scattering spectrum. As the Thomson optical depth of a power-law electron beam approaches unity, photon spawning commences at a high rate and physically invalidates the underlying electron distribution. The Compton upscattering model is therefore only valid over a narrow range of electron densities. An observational consequence of this model is the absence of the third cyclotron resonance. Resonant scattering produces gamma-rays that propagate nearly along the magnetic field. The resonant cross section of the third harmonic, which is strongly angle dependent, falls below the Compton continuum for these gamma rays. The observation of a third cyclotron resonance in a gamma-ray burst spectrum would eliminate resonant Compton scattering as a gamma-ray burst process.

  6. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J.; Ambers, Scott D.

    2011-01-14

    The Next Generation Safeguard Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S Department of Energy is supporting a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies and to detect the diversion of pins with non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. The following 14 NDA techniques are being studied: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation, Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer, Neutron Multiplicity, Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity, Total Neutron (Gross Neutron), X-Ray Fluorescence, {sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron Detection, Delayed Gamma, Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, Passive Prompt Gamma, Self-integration Neutron Resonance Densitometry, and Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis. Understanding and maturity of the techniques vary greatly, ranging from decades old, well-understood methods to new approaches. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) is a technique that had not previously been studied for SNF assay or similar applications. Since NRF generates isotope-specific signals, the promise and appeal of the technique lies in its potential to directly measure the amount of a specific isotope in an SNF assay target. The objectives of this study were to design and model suitable NRF measurement methods, to quantify capabilities and corresponding instrumentation requirements, and to evaluate prospects and the potential of NRF for SNF assay. The main challenge of the technique is to achieve the sensitivity and precision, i.e., to accumulate sufficient counting statistics, required for quantifying the mass of Pu isotopes in SNF assemblies. Systematic errors, considered a lesser problem for a direct measurement and only briefly discussed in this report, need to be evaluated for specific instrument designs in the future. Also, since the technical capability of using NRF to measure Pu in SNF has not been established, this report does not directly address issues such as cost, size

  7. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy in nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, C.T.; Lyon, M.J.; Stanbro, W.D.; Mullen, M.F.; Sinha, D.N.

    1993-08-01

    Objects resonate at specific frequencies when mechanically excited. The specific resonance frequencies are a function of shape, size, material of construction, and contents of the object. This paper discusses the use of acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS) to monitor containers and detect tampering. Evaluation of this technique is based on simulated storage simulations. Although these simulations show promise for this application of ARS, final evaluation will require actual field testing.

  8. Observation of the competitive double-gamma nuclear decay.

    PubMed

    Walz, C; Scheit, H; Pietralla, N; Aumann, T; Lefol, R; Ponomarev, V Yu

    2015-10-15

    The double-gamma (γγ)-decay of a quantum system in an excited state is a fundamental second-order process of quantum electrodynamics. In contrast to the well-known single-gamma (γ)-decay, the γγ-decay is characterized by the simultaneous emission of two γ quanta, each with a continuous energy spectrum. In nuclear physics, this exotic decay mode has only been observed for transitions between states with spin-parity quantum numbers J(π) = 0(+) (refs 1-3). Single-gamma decays-the main experimental obstacle to observing the γγ-decay-are strictly forbidden for these 0(+) → 0(+) transitions. Here we report the observation of the γγ-decay of an excited nuclear state (J(π) = 11/2(-)) that is directly competing with an allowed γ-decay (to ground state J(π) = 3/2(+)). The branching ratio of the competitive γγ-decay of the 11/2(-) isomer of (137)Ba to the ground state relative to its single γ-decay was determined to be (2.05 ± 0.37) × 10(-6). From the measured angular correlation and the shape of the energy spectra of the individual γ-rays, the contributing combinations of multipolarities of the γ radiation were determined. Transition matrix elements calculated using the quasiparticle-phonon model reproduce our measurements well. The γγ-decay rate gives access to so far unexplored important nuclear structure information, such as the generalized (off-diagonal) nuclear electric polarizabilities and magnetic susceptibilities.

  9. Observation of the competitive double-gamma nuclear decay.

    PubMed

    Walz, C; Scheit, H; Pietralla, N; Aumann, T; Lefol, R; Ponomarev, V Yu

    2015-10-15

    The double-gamma (γγ)-decay of a quantum system in an excited state is a fundamental second-order process of quantum electrodynamics. In contrast to the well-known single-gamma (γ)-decay, the γγ-decay is characterized by the simultaneous emission of two γ quanta, each with a continuous energy spectrum. In nuclear physics, this exotic decay mode has only been observed for transitions between states with spin-parity quantum numbers J(π) = 0(+) (refs 1-3). Single-gamma decays-the main experimental obstacle to observing the γγ-decay-are strictly forbidden for these 0(+) → 0(+) transitions. Here we report the observation of the γγ-decay of an excited nuclear state (J(π) = 11/2(-)) that is directly competing with an allowed γ-decay (to ground state J(π) = 3/2(+)). The branching ratio of the competitive γγ-decay of the 11/2(-) isomer of (137)Ba to the ground state relative to its single γ-decay was determined to be (2.05 ± 0.37) × 10(-6). From the measured angular correlation and the shape of the energy spectra of the individual γ-rays, the contributing combinations of multipolarities of the γ radiation were determined. Transition matrix elements calculated using the quasiparticle-phonon model reproduce our measurements well. The γγ-decay rate gives access to so far unexplored important nuclear structure information, such as the generalized (off-diagonal) nuclear electric polarizabilities and magnetic susceptibilities. PMID:26469051

  10. Integrated neutron/gamma-ray portal monitors for nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Fehlau, P.E.

    1993-09-01

    Radiation monitoring is one nuclear-safeguards measure used to protect against the theft of special nuclear materials (SNM) by pedestrians departing from SNM access areas. The integrated neutron/gamma-ray portal monitor is an ideal radiation monitor for the task when the SNM is plutonium. It achieves high sensitivity for detecting both bare and shielded plutonium by combining two types of radiation detector. One type is a neutron-chamber detector, comprising a large, hollow, neutron moderator that contains a single thermal-neutron proportional counter. The entrance wall of each chamber is thin to admit slow neutrons from plutonium contained in a moderating shield, while the other walls are thick to moderate fast neutrons from bare or lead-shielded plutonium so that they can be detected. The other type of detector is a plastic scintillator that is primarily for detecting gamma rays from small amounts of unshielded plutonium. The two types of detector are easily integrated by making scintillators part of the thick back wall of each neutron chamber or by inserting them into each chamber void. We compared the influence of the two methods of integration on detecting neutrons and gamma rays, and we examined the effectiveness of other design factors and the methods for signal detection as well.

  11. Nuclear Deexcitation Gamma Ray Lines from Accelerated Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, B.; Ramaty, R.

    2001-12-01

    Since the comprehensive treatment of nuclear deexcitation gamma-ray line emission by Ramaty, Kozlovsky and Lingenfelter in 1979, many new laboratory measurements of the cross sections have become available. Such new measurements allow improved theoretical evaluations of cross sections and the addition of more lines in the analyses of gamma-ray data. For example, the inclusion of lines produced by energetic 3He will provide unique information about its abundance. We present these improved cross sections as a function of the projectile energy for proton, alpha and 3He reactions with He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca and Fe. We also present calculations of gamma-ray line yields based on these cross sections and show how line ratios depend on the assumed ambient and accelerated-particle abundances and on the accelerated-particle energy spectrum. Such calculations are essential for interpretation of gamma-ray line observations of astrophysical sites that contain significant fluxes of energetic particles such as solar flares, the Earth's atmosphere, planetary atmospheres and surfaces, the interstellar medium and galactic nebulae. Part of the research reported here was supported by NASA DPR S92680F and W19977.

  12. First results from ASP on resonance production in. gamma gamma. interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Roe, N.

    1988-05-01

    The reaction e/sup +/e/sup -//yields/e/sup +/e/sup -//gamma/sup *//gamma/sup *///yields/(e/sup +/e/sup -/)/eta/, with subsequent decay of the /eta/ into two photons, has been observed with the ASP detector at the PEP e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring at /radical/ s=29 GeV. A measurement of the radiative width of the /eta/ yields the preliminary result /Gamma/(/eta//yields//gamma//gamma/) = .489 /+-/ .009 /+-/ .055 keV. Evidence for the production of the /eta/' with decay into two photons has also been observed.

  13. Don Clayton and Nuclear Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jerry

    2005-01-01

    For over four decades, Don Clayton has been a driving force in nuclear gamma-ray astronomy. During the 1960's, he published the first papers that gave us the scientific objectives for many balloon-borne and satellite-borne observations to come. He inspired others to work in this field as both theorists and observers. Later, he was a strong advocate for a major observatory; he helped get the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory off the ground. Over the years, he has advised and mentored many who are now among the leaders in our field. I will attempt to summarize his many contributions to theory and the interpretation of observations in this field.

  14. Gamma Ray Mirrors for Direct Measurement of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovaroff, Dr. Michael J.; Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Harrison, Mark J; Soufli, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Direct measurement of the amount of Pu and U in spent nuclear fuel represents a challenge for the safeguards community. Ideally, the characteristic gamma-ray emission lines from different isotopes provide an observable suitable for this task. However, these lines are generally lost in the fierce flux of radiation emitted by the fuel. The rates are so high that detector dead times limit measurements to only very small solid angles of the fuel. Only through the use of carefully designed view ports and long dwell times are such measurements possible. Recent advances in multilayer grazing-incidence gamma-ray optics provide one possible means of overcoming this difficulty. With a proper optical and coating design, such optics can serve as a notch filter, passing only narrow regions of the overall spectrum to a fully shielded detector that does not view the spent fuel directly. We report on the design of a mirror system and a number of experimental measurements.

  15. Neutron interrogation system using high gamma ray signature to detect contraband special nuclear materials in cargo

    DOEpatents

    Slaughter, Dennis R.; Pohl, Bertram A.; Dougan, Arden D.; Bernstein, Adam; Prussin, Stanley G.; Norman, Eric B.

    2008-04-15

    A system for inspecting cargo for the presence of special nuclear material. The cargo is irradiated with neutrons. The neutrons produce fission products in the special nuclear material which generate gamma rays. The gamma rays are detecting indicating the presence of the special nuclear material.

  16. The Dawn of Nuclear Photonics with Laser-based Gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, C J

    2011-03-17

    A renaissance in nuclear physics is occurring around the world because of a new kind of incredibly bright, gamma-ray light source that can be created with short pulse lasers and energetic electron beams. These highly Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) sources produce narrow, laser-like beams of incoherent, tunable gamma-rays and are enabling access and manipulation of the nucleus of the atom with photons or so called 'Nuclear Photonics'. Just as in the early days of the laser when photon manipulation of the valence electron structure of the atom became possible and enabling to new applications and science, nuclear photonics with laser-based gamma-ray sources promises both to open up wide areas of practical isotope-related, materials applications and to enable new discovery-class nuclear science. In the United States, the development of high brightness and high flux MEGa-ray sources is being actively pursued at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore (LLNL), California near San Francisco. The LLNL work aims to create by 2013 a machine that will advance the state of the art with respect to source the peak brightness by 6 orders of magnitude. This machine will create beams of 1 to 2.3 MeV photons with color purity matching that of common lasers. In Europe a similar but higher photon energy gamma source has been included as part of the core capability that will be established at the Extreme Light Infrastructure Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility in Magurele, Romania outside of Bucharest. This machine is expected to have an end point gamma energy in the range of 13 MeV. The machine will be co-located with two world-class, 10 Petawatt laser systems thus allowing combined intense-laser and gamma-ray interaction experiments. Such capability will be unique in the world. In this talk, Dr. Chris Barty from LLNL will review the state of the art with respect to MEGa-ray source design, construction and experiments and will describe both the ongoing projects

  17. Contraband Detection with Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence: Feasibility and Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Pruet, J; Lange, D

    2007-01-03

    In this report they show that cargo interrogation systems developed to thwart trafficking of illicit nuclear materials could also be powerful tools in the larger fight against contraband smuggling. In particular, in addition to detecting special nuclear materials, cargo scanning systems that exploit nuclear resonance fluorescence to detect specific isotopes can be used to help find: chemical weapons; some drugs as well as some chemicals regulated under the controlled substances act; precious metals; materials regulated under export control laws; and commonly trafficked fluorocarbons.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with single spin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Müller, C; Kong, X; Cai, J-M; Melentijević, K; Stacey, A; Markham, M; Twitchen, D; Isoya, J; Pezzagna, S; Meijer, J; Du, J F; Plenio, M B; Naydenov, B; McGuinness, L P; Jelezko, F

    2014-08-22

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging at the ultimate sensitivity limit of single molecules or single nuclear spins requires fundamentally new detection strategies. The strong coupling regime, when interaction between sensor and sample spins dominates all other interactions, is one such strategy. In this regime, classically forbidden detection of completely unpolarized nuclei is allowed, going beyond statistical fluctuations in magnetization. Here we realize strong coupling between an atomic (nitrogen-vacancy) sensor and sample nuclei to perform nuclear magnetic resonance on four (29)Si spins. We exploit the field gradient created by the diamond atomic sensor, in concert with compressed sensing, to realize imaging protocols, enabling individual nuclei to be located with Angstrom precision. The achieved signal-to-noise ratio under ambient conditions allows single nuclear spin sensitivity to be achieved within seconds.

  19. Investigations in cosmic and gamma ray astronomy and nuclear instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The Nuclear Radiation Monitor (NRM) is flying on the Spacelab 2 vehicle as part of a set of instrumentation designed to measure the ambient physical environment on Spacelab in orbit. The NRM measures the natural and induced gamma ray activity. The instrument is constituted of a 25 sq in (NaI (T1)) crystal viewed with a single phototube and surrounded by a plastic anticoincidence shield. It is mounted on a pedestal and placed, with its electronics, on the Spacelab pallet. The detector head was designed and a development model fabricated and tested. Extensive software studies for on board and GSE microprocessors for use with the NRM were also made.

  20. Suitability of nuclear medicine gamma cameras as gamma spectrometers in the event of a radiological emergency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engdahl, J. C.; Bharwani, K.

    2005-11-01

    Nuclear medicine gamma cameras are large area NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors that measure both the position and energy of incident gamma rays. A typical, commercial, large field-of-view (LFOV), gamma camera has about 2000 cm 3 of useful detector volume with an entrance window of 50×40 cm 2 by 1 cm thickness. A 3″×3″ NaI(Tl) detector, by comparison, has 17.4% of the volume and 2.3% of the area of the LFOV gamma camera. A 2002 survey reported 11,700 gamma cameras as being installed in hospitals and clinics in the US. In the event of a radiological emergency, the ability to utilize some of this installed detector capacity would be desirable. This work investigates the feasibility of using the gamma camera as a large area gamma spectrometer for detecting and quantifying isotopes likely to be involved in a radiological emergency caused by dispersion of radioactivity by a so called "dirty bomb." Monte Carlo modeling was used to analyze detection sensitivity as a function of energy for the camera vs. the 3″×3″ cylinder. For a point source positioned 100 cm from the face of the detector, the ratio of total extrinsic efficiency of the camera to that of the 3″×3″ cylinder varied from 40.3 at 140 keV to 7.3 at 5 MeV. Ratios for extrinsic efficiency of peaks (including the full energy peak, single escape, and double escape peaks) varied from 41.1 at 140 keV to 5.5 at 5 MeV. Modifications that will be required to enable the cameras to function as spectrometers over a wide energy range are described and discussed. Given the large sensitivity advantage, the fact that the camera is shielded on three sides, and that cameras are already present at many locations to where victims of a disaster would be transported, it is desirable that such system capabilities be investigated.

  1. A gamma-ray verification system for special nuclear material

    SciTech Connect

    Lanier, R.G.; Prindle, A.L.; Friensehner, A.V.; Buckley, W.M.

    1994-07-01

    The Safeguards Technology Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a gamma-ray screening system for use by the Materials Management Section of the Engineering Sciences Division at LLNL for verifying the presence or absence of special nuclear material (SNM) in a sample. This system facilitates the measurements required under the ``5610`` series of US Department of Energy orders. MMGAM is an intelligent, menu driven software application that runs on a personal computer and requires a precalibrated multi-channel analyzer and HPGe detector. It provides a very quick and easy-to-use means of determining the presence of SNM in a sample. After guiding the operator through a menu driven set-up procedure, the system provides an on-screen GO/NO-GO indication after determining the system calibration status. This system represents advances over earlier used systems in the areas of ease-of use, operator training requirements, and quality assurance. The system records the gamma radiation from a sample using a sequence of measurements involving a background measurement followed immediately by a measurement of the unknown sample. Both spectra are stored and available for analysis or output. In the current application, the presence of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 208}Tl isotopes are indicated by extracting, from the stored spectra, four energy ``windows`` preset around gamma-ray lines characteristic of the radioactive decay of these nuclides. The system is easily extendible to more complicated problems.

  2. Dynamic nuclear polarization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment.

    PubMed

    Issac, Corinne E; Gleave, Christine M; Nasr, Paméla T; Nguyen, Hoang L; Curley, Elizabeth A; Yoder, Jonilyn L; Moore, Eric W; Chen, Lei; Marohn, John A

    2016-04-01

    We report achieving enhanced nuclear magnetization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment at 0.6 tesla and 4.2 kelvin using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect. In our experiments a microwire coplanar waveguide delivered radiowaves to excite nuclear spins and microwaves to excite electron spins in a 250 nm thick nitroxide-doped polystyrene sample. Both electron and proton spin resonance were observed as a change in the mechanical resonance frequency of a nearby cantilever having a micron-scale nickel tip. NMR signal, not observable from Curie-law magnetization at 0.6 T, became observable when microwave irradiation was applied to saturate the electron spins. The resulting NMR signal's size, buildup time, dependence on microwave power, and dependence on irradiation frequency was consistent with a transfer of magnetization from electron spins to nuclear spins. Due to the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field introduced by the cantilever's magnetic tip, the electron spins in the sample were saturated in a microwave-resonant slice 10's of nm thick. The spatial distribution of the nuclear polarization enhancement factor ε was mapped by varying the frequency of the applied radiowaves. The observed enhancement factor was zero for spins in the center of the resonant slice, was ε = +10 to +20 for spins proximal to the magnet, and was ε = -10 to -20 for spins distal to the magnet. We show that this bipolar nuclear magnetization profile is consistent with cross-effect DNP in a ∼10(5) T m(-1) magnetic field gradient. Potential challenges associated with generating and using DNP-enhanced nuclear magnetization in a nanometer-resolution magnetic resonance imaging experiment are elucidated and discussed. PMID:26964007

  3. Dynamic nuclear polarization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment.

    PubMed

    Issac, Corinne E; Gleave, Christine M; Nasr, Paméla T; Nguyen, Hoang L; Curley, Elizabeth A; Yoder, Jonilyn L; Moore, Eric W; Chen, Lei; Marohn, John A

    2016-04-01

    We report achieving enhanced nuclear magnetization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment at 0.6 tesla and 4.2 kelvin using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect. In our experiments a microwire coplanar waveguide delivered radiowaves to excite nuclear spins and microwaves to excite electron spins in a 250 nm thick nitroxide-doped polystyrene sample. Both electron and proton spin resonance were observed as a change in the mechanical resonance frequency of a nearby cantilever having a micron-scale nickel tip. NMR signal, not observable from Curie-law magnetization at 0.6 T, became observable when microwave irradiation was applied to saturate the electron spins. The resulting NMR signal's size, buildup time, dependence on microwave power, and dependence on irradiation frequency was consistent with a transfer of magnetization from electron spins to nuclear spins. Due to the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field introduced by the cantilever's magnetic tip, the electron spins in the sample were saturated in a microwave-resonant slice 10's of nm thick. The spatial distribution of the nuclear polarization enhancement factor ε was mapped by varying the frequency of the applied radiowaves. The observed enhancement factor was zero for spins in the center of the resonant slice, was ε = +10 to +20 for spins proximal to the magnet, and was ε = -10 to -20 for spins distal to the magnet. We show that this bipolar nuclear magnetization profile is consistent with cross-effect DNP in a ∼10(5) T m(-1) magnetic field gradient. Potential challenges associated with generating and using DNP-enhanced nuclear magnetization in a nanometer-resolution magnetic resonance imaging experiment are elucidated and discussed.

  4. Delayed gamma radiation from lightning induced nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, M. B.; Sakuma, K.; Ikeda, Y.; Kubo, K.

    2004-03-01

    An increase in atmospheric gamma radiation observed with NaI and Ge detectors positioned about 15 m above ground was observed following natural lightning near Tokyo, Japan [1]. Background subtracted gamma ray rates GRR following numerous lightning strokes observed since 2001 persisted for a few hours and subsequently decayed with a half-life of about 50 minutes. Using a 3x3 Ge detector, with 2 KeV resolution, positioned about 2 m from one of the NaI detectors increases in GRR were observed minutes after the onset of lightning with a delayed 50 min exponential decay. Although most of the increase in activity occured at less than a few 100 KeV, on July 11, 2003 a 1267 +/-2 KeV line was observed. Although the statistics of this event were poor, the appearance of this line with an exponential decay of 50 min half-life suggests the possibility that it may be due to 39Cl (1267 MeV; half-life = 55.5 min) via the 40Ar(gamma,p)39Cl, 40Ar(p,2p)39Cl and/or 40Ar(n,d)39Cl reactions. Observations of > 10 MeV gamma rays observed in NaI detectors within 10s of meters from and coincident with rocket-triggered lightning at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing suggest that charged particles accelerated in intense electric fields associated with lightning give rise to photons with sufficient energy to initiate nuclear reactions [2]. Further work to explain the cause of this anomalous activity is underway using natural and triggered lightning. 1. M. B. Greenfield et al., Journal of Applied Physics 93 no. 3 (2003) pp 1839-184. 2. J. R. Dwyer et al., Science 299, (2003), pp 694-697 and recent communications

  5. Locking electron spins into resonance by electron-nuclear feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowack, Katja

    2009-03-01

    All basic building blocks for spin-based quantum information processing using electron spins in GaAs quantum dots have recently been realized. Recent experiments have shown single-shot read-out of an individual spin [1], the implementation of the SWAP gate [2] and (magnetically induced) coherent single electron spin rotations [3]. However, the main drawback of using electron spins in a GaAs environment is the short spin coherence time, which is measured to be in the nanosecond range [2,4]. The source of this fast decoherence is the hyperfine interaction of the localized electron spin with the randomly fluctuating nuclear spins of the host lattice. The fluctuations of the nuclear spins have to be reduced to extend the electron spin coherence time. We therefore study the electron-nuclear spin interaction and use magnetically driven spin resonance to control the electron spin and indirectly manipulate the nuclear spins. We apply continuous microwave excitation to the electron spin and observe strong electron-nuclear feedback. One experimental signature of this feedback is the locking of the electron spin system into resonance with the microwaves. Once the electron spin is locked into resonance, this resonance condition remains fullfilled even when the external magnetic field or the microwave frequency is changed. This is due to dynamically build up nuclear polarizations (up to 500 mT) which generally counteract the external magnetic field. Locking of the electron spin system into resonance might indicate that the nuclear polarization exhibits stable configurations where fluctuations of the nuclear distribution are reduced [5]. [4pt] References [0pt] [1] J. M. Elzerman et al. , Nature 430, 431 (2004) [0pt] [2]. J. R. Petta et al., Science 309, 2180 (2005). [0pt] [3] F. H. L. Koppens et al., Nature 442, 766 (2006). [0pt] [4] F. H. L. Koppens et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 236802 (2008). [0pt] [5] J. Danon and Yu. V. Nazarov, private communication.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance in environmental engineering: principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Lens, P N; Hemminga, M A

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to applications in the field of environmental science and engineering. The underlying principles of high resolution solution and solid state NMR, relaxation time measurements and imaging are presented. Then, the use of NMR is illustrated and reviewed in studies of biodegradation and biotransformation of soluble and solid organic matter, removal of nutrients and xenobiotics, fate of heavy metal ions, and transport processes in bioreactor systems.

  7. Active Detection and Imaging of Nuclear Materials with High-Brightness Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, C J; Gibson, D J; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Anderson, G G; Betts, S M; Berry, R D; Fisher, S E; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P

    2009-02-26

    A Compton scattering {gamma}-ray source, capable of producing photons with energies ranging from 0.1 MeV to 0.9 MeV has been commissioned and characterized, and then used to perform nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments. The performances of the two laser systems (one for electron production, one for scattering), the electron photoinjector, and the linear accelerator are also detailed, and {gamma}-ray results are presented. The key source parameters are the size (0.01 mm{sup 2}), horizontal and vertical divergence (6 x 10 mrad{sup 2}), duration (10 ps), spectrum and intensity (10{sup 5} photons/shot). These parameters are summarized by the peak brightness, 1.5 x 10{sup 15} photons/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/s/0.1% bandwidth, measured at 478 keV. Additional measurements of the flux as a function of the timing difference between the drive laser pulse and the relativistic photo-electron bunch, {gamma}-ray beam profile, and background evaluations are presented. These results are systematically compared to theoretical models and computer simulations. NRF measurements performed on {sup 7}Li in LiH demonstrate the potential of Compton scattering photon sources to accurately detect isotopes in situ.

  8. Resonant microwave cavity for 8.5-12 GHz optically detected electron spin resonance with simultaneous nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colton, J. S.; Wienkes, L. R.

    2009-03-01

    We present a newly developed microwave resonant cavity for use in optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) experiments. The cylindrical quasi-TE011 mode cavity is designed to fit in a 1 in. magnet bore to allow the sample to be optically accessed and to have an adjustable resonant frequency between 8.5 and 12 GHz. The cavity uses cylinders of high dielectric material, so-called "dielectric resonators," in a double-stacked configuration to determine the resonant frequency. Wires in a pseudo-Helmholtz configuration are incorporated into the cavity to provide frequencies for simultaneous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The system was tested by measuring cavity absorption as microwave frequencies were swept, by performing ODMR on a zinc-doped InP sample, and by performing optically detected NMR on a GaAs sample. The results confirm the suitability of the cavity for ODMR with simultaneous NMR.

  9. Observation of nuclear reactors on satellites with a balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Terrence J.; Kerrick, Alan D.; Ait-Ouamer, Farid; Tumer, O. Tumay; Zych, Allen D.

    1989-01-01

    Four Soviet nuclear-powered satellites flying over a double Compton gamma-ray telescope resulted in the detection of gamma rays with 0.3-8.0 MeV energies on April 15, 1988, as the balloonborne telescope searched, from a 35-km altitude, for celestial gamma-ray sources. The satellites included Cosmos 1900 and 1932. The USSR is the only nation currently employing moderated nuclear reactors for satellite power; reactors in space may cause significant problems for gamma-ray astronomy by increasing backgrounds, especially in the case of gamma-ray bursts.

  10. Development of the NPL gamma-ray spectrometer NANA for traceable nuclear decay and structure studies.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, G; Shearman, R; Regan, P H; Judge, S M; Bell, S; Collins, S M; Larijani, C; Ivanov, P; Jerome, S M; Keightley, J D; Lalkovski, S; Pearce, A K; Podolyak, Zs

    2016-03-01

    We present a brief report on the progress towards the construction of the National Nuclear Array (NANA), a gamma-ray coincidence spectrometer for discrete-line nuclear structure and decay measurements. The proposed spectrometer will combine a gamma-ray energy resolution of approximately 3% at 1MeV with sub-nanosecond timing discrimination between successive gamma rays in mutually coincident decay cascades. We also review a number of recent measurements using coincidence fast-timing gamma-ray spectroscopy for nuclear structure studies, which have helped to inform the design criteria for the NANA spectrometer.

  11. Change in the observed half-life of an excited nuclear state under conditions of a resonance environment

    SciTech Connect

    Loginov, Yu. E.

    2010-01-15

    A model description of the increase in the observed value of the half-life of isomeric nuclei {sup 119m1}Sn (E = 23.8 keV, T{sub 1/2} {approx} 18 ns) in a resonance environment created by stable nuclei of {sup 119}Sn is proposed. According to the model used, the observed effect is due to gamma radiation from isomeric nuclei {sup 119m1}Sn newly produced upon the resonance capture of gamma rays emitted in {sup 119m1}Sn decay by stable nuclei of {sup 119}Sn. On the basis of T{sub 1/2} values that were measured previously, the radiative shift of the position of an excited nuclear state (nuclear analog of the Lamb shift in an atom), {Delta}{omega}{sub 0}, was estimated at 1.5(2) x 10{sup 11} s{sup -1} for the isomer {sup 119m1}Sn.

  12. Gamma-resonance Contraband Detection using a high current tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, B. F.; Beis, J.; Dale, D.; Rogers, J.; Ruegg, R.; Debiak, T.; Kamykowski, E.; Melnychuk, S.; Rathke, J.; Sredniawski, J.

    1999-04-26

    TRIUMF and Northrop Grumman have developed a new system for the detection of concealed explosives and drugs. This Contraband Detection System (CDS) is based on the resonant absorption by {sup 14}N of gammas produced using {sup 13}C(p,{gamma}){sup 14}N. The chosen reaction uses protons at 1.75 MeV and the gammas have an energy of 9.17 MeV. By measuring both the resonant and the non-resonant absorption using detectors with good spatial resolution, and applying standard tomographic techniques, we are able to produce 3D images of both the nitrogen partial density and the total density. The images together may be utilized with considerable confidence to determine if small amounts of nitrogen based explosives, heroin or cocaine are present in the interrogated containers. Practical Gamma Resonant Absorption (GRA) scanning requires an intense source of protons. However this proton source must also be very stable, have low energy spread, and have good spatial definition. These demands suggested a tandem as the accelerator of choice. We have therefore constructed a 2 MeV H{sup -} tandem optimized for high current (10 mA) operation, while minimizing the overall size of the accelerator. This has required several special innovations which will be presented in the paper. We will also present initial commissioning results.

  13. Cyclotron resonant scattering in gamma-ray bursts - Line strengths and signature of neutron star rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Wang, J. C. L.; Wasserman, I.

    1992-01-01

    We explain the relative line strengths in gamma-ray bursts in terms of cyclotron resonant scattering. We describe the line signature of neutron star rotation and discuss the possibility that variations seen in the strengths and widths of the lines in GB780325 and GB870303 are due to rotation.

  14. The fluorinated (10, 0) boron nitride nanotube: a computational nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance study.

    PubMed

    Seif, Ahmad; Boshra, Asadollah; Bodaghi, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations at the level of density functional theory (DFT) were carried out to investigate the influence of fluorination boron and nitrogen nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and also nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) parameters in the (10, 0) single-wall boron nitride nanotube (SWBNNT). To achieve this aim three models of (10, 0) boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), raw and two F-attached (exohedral and endohedral) derivatives were studied. The results of calculations showed that while the boron atom chemically bonded to F atom has the largest chemical shielding isotropy (CSI); it has the smallest quadrupole coupling constant (CQ) value among the other boron nuclei.

  15. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Studies in MICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, S.; Rhadakrishna, S.; Marino, R. A.

    1986-02-01

    Aluminum-27 NQR transitions were detected in Muscovite Mica at room temperature using double resonance by level crossing (DRLC) techniques. Three lines were observed with frequencies of 572.5, 1052.0, and 1624.5 kHz. These lines are assigned to the octahedrally coordinated site, AlO4(OH)2. The corresponding quadrupole coupling constant, e2q Q/h, and asymmetry parameter, η, are 3554.8 kHz and 0.265, respectively. The remaining tetrahedrally coordinated sites, AlO4, gave no discernible signal, perhaps due to the greater 27Al- 1H distance.

  16. Portable gamma camera for clinical use in nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Scopinaro, F.

    1996-12-31

    Up today Hamamatsu R3292 is the Position Sensitive Photo Multiplier Tube (PSPMT) with the largest sensitive area (10 cm of diameter). At the same time it has the minimum size for clinical application in Nuclear Medicine. A portable gamma camera was realized, based on 5 inches PSPMT coupled to a scintillating array. The head has a light weight (15 Kg.) spatial resolution resulted better than that of Anger Camera with good linearity response, good energy resolution and FOV coincident with intrinsic one of PSPMT. To optimize gamma camera response two different scintillating arrays were tested: YAP:Ce and CsI (Tl). Their overall size cover all photochatode active area, and crystal pixel size was 2 mm x 2 mm. The detection efficiency resulted comparable to that of Anger Camera. The best result was obtained by CsI (Tl) scintillating: an intrinsic spatial resolution of 1.6 mm FWHM and a relative energy resolution of 17% FWHM. With a standard general purpose collimator a spatial resolution of about 2 mm resulted. Some preliminary results were also obtained in breast scintigraphy.

  17. New studies of nuclear decay {gamma}-rays from novae

    SciTech Connect

    Starrfield, S.; Truran, J.W.; Wiescher, M.C.

    1997-11-01

    The cause of the nova outburst is a thermonuclear runaway (TNR) in hydrogen rich material transferred by a companion onto a white dwarf. Studies of this phenomenon have shown that the TNR produces large concentrations of the short lived positron unstable isotopes of the CNO nuclei which are transported to the surface by convection so that early in the outburst we expect significant numbers of radioactive decays to occur at the surface. The resulting {gamma}-ray emission may be detectable from nearby novae early in their outbursts. The TNR is also expected to produce substantial amounts of {sup 7}Be and {sup 22}Na. Their decays also yield potentially detectable levels of {gamma}-ray emission for relatively nearby novae. We are also interested in the role played by novae in the production of the {approximately}2M{circle_dot} of {sup 26}Al found in the galaxy. In order to improve our predictions of this phenomenon, we have performed a new set of calculations of TNR`s on ONeMg and CO white dwarfs with an updated nuclear reaction network and opacities.

  18. Probing vibrational anisotropy with nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlik, J. W.; Barabanschikov, A.; Oliver, A. G.; Alp, E. E.; Sturhahn, W.; Zhao, J.; Sage, J. T.; Scheidt, W. R.

    2010-06-14

    A NRVS single-crystal study (NRVS=nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy) has provided detailed information on the in-plane modes of nitrosyl iron porphyrinate [Fe(oep)(NO)] (see picture; oep=octaethylporphyrin). The axial nitrosyl ligand controls the direction of the in-plane iron motion.

  19. Landau zeroth-sound and nuclear giant resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strutinsky, V.; Magner, A.; Denisov, V.

    1984-10-01

    Analytical solution for the zeroth-sound in the infinite matter is used as a basis for constructing the distribution functions in finite-size nuclei. Simple characteristic equation is obtained which determines frequencies of isoscalar nuclear giant resonances due to the zeroth-sound modes coupled to the surface distortions.

  20. Nuclear resonant scattering beamline at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Alp, E.E.; Mooney, T.M.; Toellner, T.; Sturhahn, W.

    1993-09-01

    The principal and engineering aspects of a dedicated synchrotron radiation beamline under construction at the Advanced Photon Source for nuclear resonant scattering purposes are explained. The expected performance in terms of isotopes to be studied, flux, and timing properties is discussed.

  1. C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance in organic geochemistry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balogh, B.; Wilson, D. M.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1972-01-01

    Study of C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of polycyclic fused systems. The fingerprint qualities of the natural abundance in C-13 NMR spectra permitting unequivocal identification of these compounds is discussed. The principle of structural additivity of C-13 NMR information is exemplified on alpha and beta androstanes, alpha and beta cholestanes, ergostanes, sitostanes, and isodecanes.

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Coupling Constants and Electronic Structure in Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venanzi, Thomas J.

    1982-01-01

    Theory of nuclear magnetic resonance spin-spin coupling constants and nature of the three types of coupling mechanisms contributing to the overall spin-spin coupling constant are reviewed, including carbon-carbon coupling (neither containing a lone pair of electrons) and carbon-nitrogen coupling (one containing a lone pair of electrons).…

  3. Concepts in Biochemistry: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Biochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Steve

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the nature of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment, the techniques used, the types of structural and dynamic information obtained, and how one can view and refine structures using computer graphics techniques in combination with NMR data. Provides several spectra and a computer graphics image from B-form DNA. (MVL)

  4. High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maciel, Gary E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines recent developments in techniques for obtaining high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra on solid samples, discussing the kinds of applications for which these techniques are well suited. Also discusses the characteristics of NMR of solids and generating magnetization for NMR in solids. (JN)

  5. Introduction to nuclear resonant scattering with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E.E.; Toellner, T.S.; Hession, P.; Hu, M.; Sutter, J.

    1997-08-01

    In recent years, the use of synchrotron radiation has enjoyed increasing interest in applications to topics of Moessbauer spectroscopy. The development was initiated by the pioneering experimental work of Gerdau et al. following the original proposal of Ruby to use synchrotron radiation for the excitation of low energy nuclear resonances. From the early experiments it was clear that synchrotron radiation experiments with nuclear resonances would only succeed if familiar energy resolved measurements were replaced with a new time resolved technique. During the last decade, the authors experienced the refinement of this novel method for obtaining hyperfine parameters. This exciting development-materialized because of more intense synchrotron radiation sources at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), powerful new avalanche photo diode detectors, and improved high energy resolution monochromators. Simultaneously the tools for evaluation of the novel time spectra were created, e.g., Sturhahn and Gerdau developed extensive computer codes based on the theoretical descriptions of Hannon and Trammel. Many beautiful demonstrations of the basic features of the coherent elastic scattering channel using Bragg- and Laue-reflections from single crystals deepened the understanding of nuclear resonant scattering. The concepts leading to the application of synchrotron radiation to elastic and inelastic nuclear resonant scattering are discussed. The resulting new experimental techniques are compared to conventional Moessbauer spectroscopy. A survey of situations that favor experiments with synchrotron radiation is offered.

  6. Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Measuring Ternary Phase Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodworth, Jennifer K.; Terrance, Jacob C.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is presented for the upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry curriculum in which the ternary phase diagram of water, 1-propanol and n-heptane is measured using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The experiment builds upon basic concepts of NMR spectral analysis, typically taught in the undergraduate…

  7. Cyclotron resonant scattering in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Wang, J. C. L.; Loredo, T. J.; Wasserman, I.; Fenimore, E. E.

    1989-01-01

    Data on the GB880205 gamma-ray bursts are presented that have implications for the nature of gamma-ray burst sources. It is shown that cyclotron resonant scattering and Raman scattering account well for the positions, strengths, and shapes of the relative strengths of the first and second harmonics and their narrow widths. These results imply the existence of a superstrong (B of about 2 x 10 to the 12th G) magnetic field in the vicinity of the X-ray emission region of GB880205. Such a superstrong magnetic field points to a strongly magnetic neutron star as the origin of gamma-ray bursts, and to the fact that the gamma-ray sources belong to the Galaxy.

  8. Rotational resonance with multiple-pulse scaling in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Richard G. S.; Fishbein, Kenneth W.; Levitt, Malcolm H.; Griffin, Robert G.

    1994-04-01

    Multiple-pulse techniques are applied to rotational resonance experiments in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. The usual rotational resonance condition is satisfied when an integral multiple of the magic-angle spinning speed equals the difference in isotropic chemical shifts of the two members of a homonuclear spin-1/2 pair. We show that sequences of rapid periodic radio-frequency pulses scale and rotate both the Zeeman and dipole-dipole Hamiltonians, leading to a modification of the resonance condition and to the introduction of new, single- and double-quantum, rotational resonances. Experimental results are presented which demonstrate these effects in the spectra of doubly 13C-labeled solids.

  9. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.

    1986-01-01

    During the past year the Woodlands Baylor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facility became fully operational. A detailed description of this facility is given. One significant instrument addition this year was the 100 MHz, 40cm bore superconducting imaging spectrometer. This instrument gives researchers the capability to acquire high energy phosphate spectra. This will be used to investigate ATP, phosphocreatinine and inorganic phosphate changes in normal and atrophied muscle before, during and after exercise. An exercise device for use within the bore of the imaging magnet is under design/construction. The results of a study of T sub 1 and T sub 2 changes in atrophied muscle in animals and human subjects are given. The imaging and analysis of the lower leg of 15 research subjects before and after 5 weeks of complete bedrest was completed. A compilation of these results are attached.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacing devices.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Francisco; Sánchez-Gómez, Juan M; Sancho-Tello, María J; Olagüe, José; Osca, Joaquín; Cano, Oscar; Arnau, Miguel A; Igual, Begoña

    2010-06-01

    Currently, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging is contraindicated in patients with a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. This study was carried out because the potential risks in this situation need to be clearly defined. This prospective study evaluated clinical and electrical parameters before and after magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 33 patients (five with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and 28 with pacemakers). In these patients, magnetic resonance imaging was considered clinically essential. There were no clinical complications. There was a temporary communication failure in two cases, sensing errors during imaging in two cases, and a safety signal was generated in one pacemaker at the maximum magnetic resonance frequency and output level. There were no technical restrictions on imaging nor were there any permanent changes in the performance of the cardiac pacing device. PMID:20515632

  11. Capacitor-based detection of nuclear magnetization: nuclear quadrupole resonance of surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gregorovič, Alan; Apih, Tomaž; Kvasić, Ivan; Lužnik, Janko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko; Strle, Drago; Muševič, Igor

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate excitation and detection of nuclear magnetization in a nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) experiment with a parallel plate capacitor, where the sample is located between the two capacitor plates and not in a coil as usually. While the sensitivity of this capacitor-based detection is found lower compared to an optimal coil-based detection of the same amount of sample, it becomes comparable in the case of very thin samples and even advantageous in the proximity of conducting bodies. This capacitor-based setup may find its application in acquisition of NQR signals from the surface layers on conducting bodies or in a portable tightly integrated nuclear magnetic resonance sensor.

  12. Moessbauer medium with a hidden nuclear population inversion and negative absorption of gamma quanta

    SciTech Connect

    Rivlin, Lev A

    2011-06-30

    We consider physical foundations of an eventual experiment aimed at observing stimulated gamma-photon emission of long-lived Moessbauer isomers through selective frequency modulation of gamma-resonances establishing hidden population inversion without exceeding the number of excited nuclei over unexcited ones and without additional pumping. The examples of suitable nuclei and numerical estimates of the parameters are presented. (active media)

  13. Use of alanine-silicone pellets for electron paramagnetic resonance gamma dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, J.; Galindo, S. )

    1991-03-01

    Silicone is proposed as an alternative binding substance in the production of D-L alanine pellets used in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry of gamma rays. The dosimeters are manufactured at room temperature, making the production simple. Examination by EPR silicone-alanine pellets irradiated with 60Co gamma rays in the dose range 10 to 10(6) Gy shows that the proposed silicone binder does not affect typical alanine dose-response curves. Thermal stability of the pellets below 40 degrees C is good, but their pre-dose EPR signal amplitude is slightly higher than for nonirradiated alanine.

  14. X-ray suppression in gamma-ray bursts through resonant Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    An X-ray that scatters with an electron in the first Landau level of a strong magnetic field is converted into a gamma ray. This process has a resonant cross section at X-ray energies and is therefore highly likely to occur even when the first Landau level is sparsely populated. Converted X-rays are cyclotron absorbed, maintaining the equilibrium between the cyclotron photon density and the population of the first Landau level. By suppressing a neutron star's black body emission, this mechanism can produce a gamma-ray burst with a low X-ray flux.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with 90-nm resolution.

    PubMed

    Mamin, H J; Poggio, M; Degen, C L; Rugar, D

    2007-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful imaging technique that typically operates on the scale of millimetres to micrometres. Conventional MRI is based on the manipulation of nuclear spins with radio-frequency fields, and the subsequent detection of spins with induction-based techniques. An alternative approach, magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), uses force detection to overcome the sensitivity limitations of conventional MRI. Here, we show that the two-dimensional imaging of nuclear spins can be extended to a spatial resolution better than 100 nm using MRFM. The imaging of 19F nuclei in a patterned CaF(2) test object was enabled by a detection sensitivity of roughly 1,200 nuclear spins at a temperature of 600 mK. To achieve this sensitivity, we developed high-moment magnetic tips that produced field gradients up to 1.4 x 10(6) T m(-1), and implemented a measurement protocol based on force-gradient detection of naturally occurring spin fluctuations. The resulting detection volume was less than 650 zeptolitres. This is 60,000 times smaller than the previous smallest volume for nuclear magnetic resonance microscopy, and demonstrates the feasibility of pushing MRI into the nanoscale regime.

  16. Polarization of nuclear spins by a cold nanoscale resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Mark C.; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2011-12-15

    A cold nanoscale resonator coupled to a system of nuclear spins can induce spin relaxation. In the low-temperature limit where spin-lattice interactions are ''frozen out,'' spontaneous emission by nuclear spins into a resonant mechanical mode can become the dominant mechanism for cooling the spins to thermal equilibrium with their environment. We provide a theoretical framework for the study of resonator-induced cooling of nuclear spins in this low-temperature regime. Relaxation equations are derived from first principles, in the limit where energy donated by the spins to the resonator is quickly dissipated into the cold bath that damps it. A physical interpretation of the processes contributing to spin polarization is given. For a system of spins that have identical couplings to the resonator, the interaction Hamiltonian conserves spin angular momentum, and the resonator cannot relax the spins to thermal equilibrium unless this symmetry is broken by the spin Hamiltonian. The mechanism by which such a spin system becomes ''trapped'' away from thermal equilibrium can be visualized using a semiclassical model, which shows how an indirect spin-spin interaction arises from the coupling of multiple spins to one resonator. The internal spin Hamiltonian can affect the polarization process in two ways: (1) By modifying the structure of the spin-spin correlations in the energy eigenstates, and (2) by splitting the degeneracy within a manifold of energy eigenstates, so that zero-frequency off-diagonal terms in the density matrix are converted to oscillating coherences. Shifting the frequencies of these coherences sufficiently far from zero suppresses the development of resonator-induced correlations within the manifold during polarization from a totally disordered state. Modification of the spin-spin correlations by means of either mechanism affects the strength of the fluctuating spin dipole that drives the resonator. In the case where product states can be chosen as energy

  17. Algorithmic cooling in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atia, Yosi; Elias, Yuval; Mor, Tal; Weinstein, Yossi

    2016-01-01

    Algorithmic cooling is a method that employs thermalization to increase qubit purification level; namely, it reduces the qubit system's entropy. We utilized gradient ascent pulse engineering, an optimal control algorithm, to implement algorithmic cooling in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. Various cooling algorithms were applied onto the three qubits of C132-trichloroethylene, cooling the system beyond Shannon's entropy bound in several different ways. In particular, in one experiment a carbon qubit was cooled by a factor of 4.61. This work is a step towards potentially integrating tools of NMR quantum computing into in vivo magnetic-resonance spectroscopy.

  18. Electron spin resonance study of. gamma. -irradiated nylon 6

    SciTech Connect

    Takigami, S.; Matsumoto, I.; Nakamura, Y.

    1981-12-01

    The free radicals trapped in oriented nylon 6 filaments after ..gamma..-irradiation under vacuum at room temperature were studied by ESR spectroscopy. The ESR spectrum measured after irradiation gradually changed to a broad singlet spectrum with decrease in the intensity. The ESR spectrum consisted of radicals with different orientation effects with respect to the outer magnetic field, and saturation effects in reference to microwave power. The simulation of the ESR spectrum from a Gaussian function gave a better fit to the observed spectrum than the calculation from a Lorentzian function. From the resolution of the spectrum from a Gaussian function, the observed spectrum is generated from three kinds of radicals. The relative radical concentration for the first, second, and third radical is about 75%, 6%, and 19% of the total radical concentration, respectively. With regard to the stability of the radicals, the third radical shows a comparatively long lifetime. The first and second radicals show almost identical lifetime, and their concentrations reduce to about 40% of the initial value during the 2 days at room temperature.

  19. Assembly of the nuclear pore: biochemically distinct steps revealed with NEM, GTP gamma S, and BAPTA

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    A key event in nuclear formation is the assembly of functional nuclear pores. We have used a nuclear reconstitution system derived from Xenopus eggs to examine the process of nuclear pore assembly in vitro. With this system, we have identified three reagents which interfere with nuclear pore assembly, NEM, GTP gamma S, and the Ca++ chelator, BAPTA. These reagents have allowed us to determine that the assembly of a nuclear pore requires the prior assembly of a double nuclear membrane. Inhibition of nuclear vesicle fusion by pretreatment of the membrane vesicle fraction with NEM blocks pore complex assembly. In contrast, NEM treatment of already fused double nuclear membranes does not block pore assembly. This indicates that NEM inhibits a single step in pore assembly--the initial fusion of vesicles required to form a double nuclear membrane. The presence of GTP gamma S blocks pore assembly at two distinct steps, first by preventing fusion between nuclear vesicles, and second by blocking a step in pore assembly that occurs on already fused double nuclear membranes. Interestingly, when the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA is added to a nuclear assembly reaction, it only transiently blocks nuclear vesicle fusion, but completely blocks nuclear pore assembly. This results in the formation of a nucleus surrounded by a double nuclear membrane, but devoid of nuclear pores. To order the positions at which GTP gamma S and BAPTA interfere with pore assembly, a novel anchored nuclear assembly assay was developed. This assay revealed that the BAPTA-sensitive step in pore assembly occurs after the second GTP gamma S-sensitive step. Thus, through use of an in vitro nuclear reconstitution system, it has been possible to biochemically define and order multiple steps in nuclear pore assembly. PMID:8567730

  20. Probing soil and aquifer material porosity with nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinedi, Z. R.; Kabala, Z. J.; Skaggs, T. H.; Borchardt, D. B.; Lee, R. W. K.; Chang, A. C.

    1993-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation measurements were used to identify different characteristic porosity domains in soil and aquifer materials. The porosity distribution can be inferred from these measurements by a regularization method applicable to any nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation, or by an analytic method applicable only to multiexponential relaxations (D. Orazio et al., 1989). The porosity distribution obtained from NMR relaxation measurements strongly depends on the pore shape factor. For the Borden aquifer material, both the regularized and the analytic pore size distribution obtained from NMR relaxation measurements are consistent with those obtained by Ball et al. (1990) using Hg porosimetry and N2 adsorption. For the Eustis and the Webster soils, the measured porosity domains are qualitatively consistent with those expected based on their respective composition. Our findings suggest that due to the long time required to saturate fine pores, NMR measurements of porosity distribution that are collected at short saturation times are biased toward larger pore sizes.

  1. Chemometric Analysis of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Data

    SciTech Connect

    ALAM,TODD M.; ALAM,M. KATHLEEN

    2000-07-20

    Chemometric analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has increased dramatically in recent years. A variety of different chemometric techniques have been applied to a wide range of problems in food, agricultural, medical, process and industrial systems. This article gives a brief review of chemometric analysis of NMR spectral data, including a summary of the types of mixtures and experiments analyzed with chemometric techniques. Common experimental problems encountered during the chemometric analysis of NMR data are also discussed.

  2. Multiple resonant scattering in the Compton upscatter model of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Resonant Compton scattering, an increasingly popular mechanism for suppressing X-rays and producing gamma rays, must be treated as a multiple-scattering process for conditions thought characteristic of gamma-ray bursts. Photons that multiply scatter with a beamed power-law electron distribution in a uniform magnetic field produce a flat spectrum between the cyclotron frequency and an optical-depth-dependent critical energy; this critical energy ranges between several hundred keV and several MeV. Above this critical energy, the gamma-ray spectrum has a shape determined by the electron distribution and described by a single-scattering model. Only electron distributions that are nearly proportional to the electron momentum are able to simultaneously suppress X-rays and produce a single-scattering spectrum. As the Thomson optical depth approaches unity, photons that experience multiple scatterings often spawn additional photons at a rate that makes the model unphysical.

  3. Gamma-ray cascade transitions from resonant neutron capture in Cd-111 and Cd-113

    SciTech Connect

    Rusev, Gencho Y.

    2012-08-27

    A neutron-capture experiment on {sup nat}Cd has been carried out at DANCE. Multiple-fold coincidence {gamma}-ray spectra have been collected from J=0, 1 resonances in {sup 111}Cd and {sup 113}Cd. The cascades ending at the ground state can be described by the SLO model while the cascades ending at the 2+ states are better reproduced by the mixed SLO+KMF model.

  4. Low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonance with a dc SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.W.

    1991-07-01

    Conventional pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a technique well suited for the study of very large quadrupolar interactions. Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have been developed for the study of smaller quadrupolar interactions. However, there are many nuclei which have quadrupolar interactions of intermediate strength. Quadrupolar interactions in this region have traditionally been difficult or unfeasible to detect. This work describes the development and application of a SQUID NQR technique which is capable of measuring intermediate strength quadrupolar interactions, in the range of a few hundred kilohertz to several megahertz. In this technique, a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) is used to monitor the longitudinal sample magnetization, as opposed to the transverse magnetization, as a rf field is swept in frequency. This allows the detection of low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonances over a very wide frequency range with high sensitivity. The theory of this NQR technique is discussed and a description of the dc SQUID system is given. In the following chapters, the spectrometer is discussed along with its application to the study of samples containing half-odd-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei, in particular boron-11 and aluminum-27. The feasibility of applying this NQR technique in the study of samples containing integer spin nuclei is discussed in the last chapter. 140 refs., 46 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Exact calculations of nuclear-recoil energies from prompt gamma decays resulting from neutron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, J.H.

    1981-07-20

    The results of an accurate determination of the recoil spectrum from (n, ..gamma..) reactions in molybdenum are presented. The recoil spectrum has been calculated from nuclear level structure data and measured branching ratios. Angular correlations between successive gammas have been accounted for using the standard theoretical techniques of Racah algebra and the density matrix formalism.

  6. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Fan, N.Q.; Clarke, J.

    1993-10-19

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced. 7 figures.

  7. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Non Q.; Clarke, John

    1993-01-01

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced.

  8. Isotopic imaging via nuclear resonance fluorescence with laser-based Thomson radiation

    DOEpatents

    Barty, Christopher P. J.; Hartemann, Frederic V.; McNabb, Dennis P.; Pruet, Jason A.

    2009-07-21

    The present invention utilizes novel laser-based, high-brightness, high-spatial-resolution, pencil-beam sources of spectrally pure hard x-ray and gamma-ray radiation to induce resonant scattering in specific nuclei, i.e., nuclear resonance fluorescence. By monitoring such fluorescence as a function of beam position, it is possible to image in either two dimensions or three dimensions, the position and concentration of individual isotopes in a specific material configuration. Such methods of the present invention material identification, spatial resolution of material location and ability to locate and identify materials shielded by other materials, such as, for example, behind a lead wall. The foundation of the present invention is the generation of quasimonochromatic high-energy x-ray (100's of keV) and gamma-ray (greater than about 1 MeV) radiation via the collision of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons. Such a process as utilized herein, i.e., Thomson scattering or inverse-Compton scattering, produces beams having diameters from about 1 micron to about 100 microns of high-energy photons with a bandwidth of .DELTA.E/E of approximately 10E.sup.-3.

  9. Extending Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data for Permeability Estimation in Fine-Grained Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, H.; Dugan, B.

    2008-12-01

    We developed a method for using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) T2 data and gamma ray data to estimate lithology-dependent permeability in silt- and clay-rich sediments. This model, based on the Schlumberger-Doll Research (SDR) model, allows for high resolution (<1 m) permeability estimates throughout a logged interval. Our model was calibrated using direct measurements on core samples from Keathley Canyon Lease Block 151 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. From NMR and gamma ray data we are able to determine permeability from 10-18 to 10-14 m2 (0.001 to 10 millidarcies). Thus from discrete core samples and log data we were able to develop a permeability model for the entire sedimentary column (425 m). Lithologic variation was incorporated into the model by varying the A coefficient based on the gamma ray response. This provides a more accurate permeability model than assigning a constant value to A as is typically done. The relationship between A and intrinsic lithologic properties is unclear; simple pore system models suggest that A may be related to specific surface, tortuosity, and pore structure; we investigate simple models to quantify how these properties vary with sediment consolidation and what their relationship is to A. A comprehensive understanding that links NMR data and A to pore-scale properties will provide new constraints on deformation and flow in porous systems, and will contribute to our understanding of sediment properties for fluid flow modeling at local and regional scales.

  10. Nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation by 187Os

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessas, D.; Sergueev, I.; Merkel, D. G.; Chumakov, A. I.; Rüffer, R.; Jafari, A.; Kishimoto, S.; Wolny, J. A.; Schünemann, V.; Needham, R. J.; Sadler, P. J.; Hermann, R. P.

    2015-06-01

    We performed nuclear forward and inelastic scattering of synchrotron radiation by elemental Os utilizing the nuclear excited state of 187Os which is otherwise inaccessible using any practical radioactive decay process. The lifetime of the excited state, 3.06 (8 )ns , and the energy of the transition, 9.778 (3 )keV , are refined. The nuclear quadrupole moment of the excited state, Q3 /2=1.46 (10 ) b , is determined. The density of phonon states for elemental Os, which is herein experimentally determined, suggests that the Os lattice is a model for the lattice dynamics of hcp-Fe. The combination of the low energy of the nuclear transition and the large nuclear mass leads to a high recoil free fraction, fL M=0.95 (1 ) , at room temperature, a large value that strongly supports the viability of nuclear resonance scattering as a reliable method to study electronic, magnetic, and elastic properties of Os compounds, including Os organometallics.

  11. An inductively coupled, doubly tuned resonator for in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNichols, Roger J.; Wright, Steven M.; Wasser, Jeremy S.; Coté, Gerard L.

    1999-08-01

    We present a coil designed for in vivo 31P and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy which consists of a doubly tuned resonator inductively coupled to separate 1H and 31P feed coils. The advantages of the resonator include the ability to 1H shim over the same volume from which 31P spectra are extracted by using a single sample coil, elimination of coupling problems between separate 1H and 31P coils, ease of design and tuning over conventional double-tuned coils, and reduced match/tune sensitivity to coil loading, which is important in in vivo applications. We have used this coil to collect phosphorus spectra from the in situ heart of the western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii) at 2 T. The total heart volume was less than 1 mL and acquisition time was just under 10 min.

  12. A loop-gap resonator for chirality-sensitive nuclear magneto-electric resonance (NMER).

    PubMed

    Garbacz, Piotr; Fischer, Peer; Krämer, Steffen

    2016-09-14

    Direct detection of molecular chirality is practically impossible by methods of standard nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) that is based on interactions involving magnetic-dipole and magnetic-field operators. However, theoretical studies provide a possible direct probe of chirality by exploiting an enantiomer selective additional coupling involving magnetic-dipole, magnetic-field, and electric field operators. This offers a way for direct experimental detection of chirality by nuclear magneto-electric resonance (NMER). This method uses both resonant magnetic and electric radiofrequency (RF) fields. The weakness of the chiral interaction though requires a large electric RF field and a small transverse RF magnetic field over the sample volume, which is a non-trivial constraint. In this study, we present a detailed study of the NMER concept and a possible experimental realization based on a loop-gap resonator. For this original device, the basic principle and numerical studies as well as fabrication and measurements of the frequency dependence of the scattering parameter are reported. By simulating the NMER spin dynamics for our device and taking the (19)F NMER signal of enantiomer-pure 1,1,1-trifluoropropan-2-ol, we predict a chirality induced NMER signal that accounts for 1%-5% of the standard achiral NMR signal. PMID:27634253

  13. A loop-gap resonator for chirality-sensitive nuclear magneto-electric resonance (NMER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacz, Piotr; Fischer, Peer; Krämer, Steffen

    2016-09-01

    Direct detection of molecular chirality is practically impossible by methods of standard nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) that is based on interactions involving magnetic-dipole and magnetic-field operators. However, theoretical studies provide a possible direct probe of chirality by exploiting an enantiomer selective additional coupling involving magnetic-dipole, magnetic-field, and electric field operators. This offers a way for direct experimental detection of chirality by nuclear magneto-electric resonance (NMER). This method uses both resonant magnetic and electric radiofrequency (RF) fields. The weakness of the chiral interaction though requires a large electric RF field and a small transverse RF magnetic field over the sample volume, which is a non-trivial constraint. In this study, we present a detailed study of the NMER concept and a possible experimental realization based on a loop-gap resonator. For this original device, the basic principle and numerical studies as well as fabrication and measurements of the frequency dependence of the scattering parameter are reported. By simulating the NMER spin dynamics for our device and taking the 19F NMER signal of enantiomer-pure 1,1,1-trifluoropropan-2-ol, we predict a chirality induced NMER signal that accounts for 1%-5% of the standard achiral NMR signal.

  14. Precision linac and laser technologies for nuclear photonics gamma-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Hartemann, F. V.; Anderson, S. G.; Cross, R. R.; Gibson, D. J.; Hall, J.; Marsh, R. A.; Messerly, M.; Wu, S. S.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2012-05-15

    Tunable, high precision gamma-ray sources are under development to enable nuclear photonics, an emerging field of research. This paper focuses on the technological and theoretical challenges related to precision Compton scattering gamma-ray sources. In this scheme, incident laser photons are scattered and Doppler upshifted by a high brightness electron beam to generate tunable and highly collimated gamma-ray pulses. The electron and laser beam parameters can be optimized to achieve the spectral brightness and narrow bandwidth required by nuclear photonics applications. A description of the design of the next generation precision gamma-ray source currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented, along with the underlying motivations. Within this context, high-gradient X-band technology, used in conjunction with fiber-based photocathode drive laser and diode pumped solid-state interaction laser technologies, will be shown to offer optimal performance for high gamma-ray spectral flux, narrow bandwidth applications.

  15. Precision linac and laser technologies for nuclear photonics gamma-ray sourcesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, F.; Hartemann, F. V.; Anderson, S. G.; Cross, R. R.; Gibson, D. J.; Hall, J.; Marsh, R. A.; Messerly, M.; Wu, S. S.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2012-05-01

    Tunable, high precision gamma-ray sources are under development to enable nuclear photonics, an emerging field of research. This paper focuses on the technological and theoretical challenges related to precision Compton scattering gamma-ray sources. In this scheme, incident laser photons are scattered and Doppler upshifted by a high brightness electron beam to generate tunable and highly collimated gamma-ray pulses. The electron and laser beam parameters can be optimized to achieve the spectral brightness and narrow bandwidth required by nuclear photonics applications. A description of the design of the next generation precision gamma-ray source currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented, along with the underlying motivations. Within this context, high-gradient X-band technology, used in conjunction with fiber-based photocathode drive laser and diode pumped solid-state interaction laser technologies, will be shown to offer optimal performance for high gamma-ray spectral flux, narrow bandwidth applications.

  16. Structural characterization of AlON by {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and quantum chemistry method[Magic-Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Y.; Min, X.M.; Nan, C.W.; Pei, X.M.; Ren, H.L.

    1999-07-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (AlON) is a nitrogen-stabilized defective spinel phase of alumina ({gamma}-Al{sub 2}{sub 3}). Its structure has not been well understood so far. Solid-state {sup 27}Al magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance and quantum chemistry calculation are used to characterize {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and AlON ceramics in the present study. The resonance spectra clearly show different units (e.g., [AlN{sub 4}], [AlO{sub 4}] and [AlO{sub 6}]) and vary with composition. The calculation shows that the vacancy located at octahedral site is more stable than that located at the tetrahedral site, and nitrogen atoms preferentially replace oxygen atoms in the tetrahedral site, which is in agreement with the experimental analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance.

  17. Enabling in situ thermometry using transmission nuclear resonance fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angell, Christopher T.

    2016-02-01

    Transmission nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) has been proposed for use as an assay and detection technique for nuclear security and safeguards applications because of its isotope-specific sensitivity and the penetrating capability of γ -rays. It can also be used for in situ thermometry because the absorbing resonance profile is sensitive to temperature. Using transmission NRF for thermometry could provide a new avenue for studying the ion temperature evolution of laser-induced plasmas using the upcoming ELI-NP facility. It could also be used for applications where thermometry would be otherwise infeasible, such as for determining the average fuel temperature of spent nuclear fuel, a step that would reduce the assay uncertainty using transmission NRF. In this paper, two different transmission NRF thermometry scenarios are presented and analyzed for sensitivity. This analysis demonstrated that thermometry using γ -rays is possible independent of γ -ray beam type and will be feasible with next-generation high-intensity γ -ray sources. Beyond thermometry, an application of temperature effects was found in the improvement of transmission NRF efficacy for assay and detection: using a cryogenic witness target will reduce the required measurement time by 40%.

  18. Cantilever noise in off-cantilever-resonance force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrell, Lee E.; Thurber, Kent R.; Smith, Doran D.

    2004-03-01

    Early work in force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (FD-NMR) and magnetic resonance force microscopy was restricted to nuclei with a relatively large gyromagnetic ratio γ. Increasingly, as researchers look to apply FD-NMR to practical problems, observing isotopes with a small γ is becoming necessary. The small γ of these isotopes places severe restrictions on the radio frequency field strength necessary to flip the sample spins at practical cantilever frequencies by adiabatic rapid passage. These restrictions led us to investigate the feasibility of observing FD-NMR by flipping sample spins at a rate well below the cantilever frequency. In this article we show that there is no increase in thermomechanical force noise in off-cantilever-resonance FD-NMR relative to on-cantilever-resonance work. Further, we show that working off-cantilever resonance can reduce artifacts and decrease data acquisition time. The major disadvantage to working off-cantilever resonance—reduced cantilever response—increases the importance of low noise detection of cantilever oscillation.

  19. Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance in isolated perfused rat pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Takehisa; Kanno, Tomio; Seo, Yoshiteru; Murakami, Masataka; Watari, Hiroshi National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki )

    1988-04-01

    Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was applied to measure phosphorus energy metabolites in isolated perfused rat pancreas. The gland was perfused with a modified Krebs-Henseleit solution at room temperature (25{degree}C). {sup 31}P resonances of creatine phosphate (PCr), ATP, ADP, inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}) and phosphomonoesters (PMEs) were observed in all the preparations of pancreas. In different individual preparations, the resonance of PCr varied, but those of ATP were almost the same. The initial levels of PCr and ATP in individual preparations, however, remained almost unchanged during perfusion with the standard solution for 2 h. When the perfusion was stopped, the levels of ATP and PCr decreased, while the levels of PME and P{sub i} increased. At that time, the P{sub i} resonance shfted to a higher magnetic field, indicating that the tissue pH decreased. On reperfusion, the tissue levels of phosphorus compounds and the tissue pH were restored to their initial resting levels. Continuous infusion of 0.1 {mu}M acetylcholine caused marked and sustained increases in the flow of pancreatic juice and protein output. During the stimulation the tissue levels of phosphorus compounds remained unchanged, while the tissue pH was decreased slightly.

  20. Nuclear Structure of {sup 8}B Studied by Proton Resonance Scatterings on {sup 7}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hayakawa, S.; Amadio, G.; Kubono, S.; Fujikawa, H.; Niikura, M.; Binh, D. N.; Saito, A.; He, J. J.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Nishimura, S.; Togano, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.; Khiem, L. H.

    2008-05-21

    A new measurement of the proton resonance scattering on {sup 7}Be was performed up to the excitation energy of 6.8 MeV using the low-energy RI beam facility CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. The excitation function of {sup 8}B above 3.5 MeV was successfully measured for the first time, providing important information about the reaction rate of {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B, which is the key reaction in the solar {sup 8}B neutrino production. For more intensive experimental studies with RI beams, the development of a cryogenic gas target system is ongoing at CNS. In this paper a preliminary result of the {sup 7}Be experiment and the present status of the development of the target system are presented.

  1. Design of narrow-band Compton scattering sources for nuclear resonance fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, F.; Anderson, S. G.; Gibson, D. J.; Marsh, R. A.; Wu, S. S.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J.; Hartemann, F. V.

    2011-05-01

    The design of narrow-band Compton scattering sources for specific applications using nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) is presented. NRF lines are extremely narrow (ΔE/Ẽ10-6) and require spectrally narrow sources to be excited selectively and efficiently. This paper focuses on the theory of spectral broadening mechanisms involved during Compton scattering of laser photons from relativistic electron beams. It is shown that in addition to the electron beam emittance, energy spread, and the laser parameters, nonlinear processes during the laser-electron interaction can have a detrimental effect on the gamma-ray source bandwidth, including a newly identified weakly nonlinear phase shift accumulated over the effective interaction duration. Finally, a design taking these mechanisms into consideration is outlined.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with hyper-polarized noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, D.M.; George, J.S.; Penttila, S.I.; Caprihan, A.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a six-month, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The nuclei of noble gases can be hyper polarized through a laser-driven spin exchange to a degree many orders of magnitude larger than that attainable by thermal polarization without requiring a strong magnetic field. The increased polarization from the laser pumping enables a good nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal from a gas. The main goal of this project was to demonstrate diffusion-weighted imaging of such hyper-polarized noble gas with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Possible applications include characterizing porosity of materials and dynamically imaging pressure distributions in biological or acoustical systems.

  3. Revision of Spin Echoes in Pure Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriles, C. A.

    2001-04-01

    Goldman's spin-1/2 formalism has been used for describing the response of an I=3/2 spin system to a two-pulse sequence in a pure nuclear quadrupole resonance experiment. A detailed analysis of the polarization evolution and quadrupolar echo generation is carried out through the use of explicit expressions for secular homo- and heteronuclear dipolar interactions. In striking contrast with previous studies, it is predicted that Van Vleck's second moments governing a classical solid-echo or Hahn sequence differ from those obtained by equivalent means in magnetic resonance. In fact, it is shown that, although measured moments still complement each other, the combined use of standard sequences does not allow the separate determination of homo- and heteronuclear dipolar contributions to the linewidth, not even in an indirect manner. In this context, the importance and potential usefulness of a crossed coil probe are also briefly discussed.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography with a toroid cavity detector

    SciTech Connect

    Woelk, K.; Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

    1995-02-01

    A new type of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tomography has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The method uses the strong radio frequency field gradient within a cylindrical toroid cavity to provide high-resolution NMR spectral information while simultaneously resolving distances on the micron scale. The toroid cavity imaging technique differs from conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in that NMR structural information is not lost during signal processing. The new technique could find a wide range of applications in the characterization of surface layers and in the production of advanced materials. Potential areas of application include in situ monitoring of growth sites during ceramic formation processes, analysis of the oxygen annealing step for wires coated with high-temperature superconducting films, and investigation of the reaction chemistry as a function of distance within the diffusion layer for electrochemical processes.

  5. Magnetic-field cycling instrumentation for dynamic nuclear polarization-nuclear magnetic resonance using photoexcited triplets.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Akinori; Negoro, Makoto; Takeda, Kazuyuki; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2009-04-01

    To advance static solid-state NMR with hyperpolarized nuclear spins, a system has been developed enabling dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) using electron spins in the photoexcited triplet state with X-band microwave apparatus, followed by static solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments using the polarized nuclear-spin system with a goniometer. In order to perform the DNP and NMR procedures in different magnetic fields, the DNP system and the NMR system are spatially separated, between which the sample can be shuttled while its orientation is controlled in a reproducible fashion. We demonstrate that the system developed in this work is operational for solid-state NMR with hyperpolarized nuclear-spin systems in static organic materials, and also discuss the application of our system.

  6. Nuclear resonance scattering measurement of human iron stores

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Ancona, R.C.; Mossey, R.T.; Vaswani, A.N.; Cohn, S.H.

    1985-07-01

    Hepatic iron stores were measured noninvasively in 31 patients (thalassemia, hemodialysis, hemosiderosis, refractory anemia) with suspected iron overload, employing a nuclear resonance scattering (NRS) technique. The thalassemia patients were undergoing desferrioxamine chelation therapy during the NRS measurements. The hemodialysis patients were measured before chelation therapy. Iron levels measured by NRS were in general agreement with those determined in liver biopsies by atomic absorption spectroscopy. In addition, NRS measurements from the thorax of some of these patients suggest that this method may also prove useful for clinical assessment of cardiac iron.

  7. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Applications to Unconventional Fossil Fuel Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinberg, R. L.; Leu, G.

    2008-12-01

    Technical and economic projections strongly suggest that fossil fuels will continue to play a dominant role in the global energy market through at least the mid twenty-first century. However, low-cost conventional oil and gas will be depleted in that time frame. Therefore new sources of energy will be needed. We discuss two relatively untapped unconventional fossil fuels: heavy oil and gas hydrate. In both cases, nuclear magnetic resonance plays a key role in appraising the resource and providing information needed for designing production processes.

  8. A versatile pulse programmer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarr, C. E.; Nickerson, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    A digital pulse programmer producing the standard pulse sequences required for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is described. In addition, a 'saturation burst' sequence, useful in the measurement of long relaxation times in solids, is provided. Both positive and negative 4 V trigger pulses are produced that are fully synchronous with a crystal-controlled time base, and the pulse programmer may be phase-locked with a maximum pulse jitter of 3 ns to the oscillator of a coherent pulse spectrometer. Medium speed TTL integrated circuits are used throughout.

  9. In vivo Carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alger, J. R.; Sillerud, L. O.; Behar, K. L.; Gillies, R. J.; Shulman, R. G.; Gordon, R. E.; Shaw, D.; Hanley, P. E.

    1981-11-01

    Natural abundance carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonances (NMR) from human arm and rat tissues have been observed in vivo. These signals arise primarily from triglycerides in fatty tissue. Carbon-13 NMR was also used to follow, in a living rat, the conversion of C-1--labeled glucose, which was introduced into the stomach, to C-1--labeled liver glycogen. The carbon-13 sensitivity and resolution obtained shows that natural abundance carbon-13 NMR will be valuable in the study of disorders in fat metabolism, and that experiments with substrates labeled with carbon-13 can be used to study carbohydrate metabolism in vivo.

  10. Flat RF coils in static field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Stork, H; Gädke, A; Nestle, N; Fujara, F

    2009-10-01

    The use of flat RF coils allows considerable gains in the sensitivity of static field gradient (SFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. In this article, this effect is studied theoretically as well as experimentally. Additionally, the flat coil geometry has been studied theoretically depending on magnetic field gradient, pulse sequence and amplifier power. Moreover, detecting the signal directly from the free induction decay (FID) turned out to be quite attractive for STRAFI-like microimaging experiments, especially when using flat coils. In addition to wound rectangular flat coils also spiral flat coils have been developed which can be manufactured by photolithography from printed circuit boards.

  11. Stochastic dipolar recoupling in nuclear magnetic resonance of solids.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Robert

    2007-11-01

    I describe a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, called stochastic dipolar recoupling (SDR), that permits continuous experimental control of the character of spin dynamics between coherent and incoherent limits in a system of magnetic dipole-coupled nuclei. In the fully incoherent limit of SDR, spin polarization transfers occur at distance-dependent rates without the quantum mechanical interferences among pairwise dipole-dipole couplings that often limit the feasibility or precision of structural studies of solids by NMR. In addition to facilitating structural studies, SDR represents a possible route to experimental studies of effects of decoherence on the dynamics of quantum many-body systems.

  12. Nuclear quadrupole resonance studies project. [spectrometer design and spectrum analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, A. N.

    1978-01-01

    The participation of undergraduates in nuclear quadrupole resonance research at Grambling University was made possible by NASA grants. Expanded laboratory capabilities include (1) facilities for high and low temperature generation and measurement; (2) facilities for radio frequency generation and measurement with the modern spectrum analyzers, precision frequency counters and standard signal generators; (3) vacuum and glass blowing facilities; and (4) miscellaneous electronic and machine shop facilities. Experiments carried out over a five year period are described and their results analyzed. Theoretical studies on solid state crystalline electrostatic fields, field gradients, and antishielding factors are included.

  13. Stochastic Dipolar Recoupling in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, Robert

    2007-11-02

    I describe a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, called stochastic dipolar recoupling (SDR), that permits continuous experimental control of the character of spin dynamics between coherent and incoherent limits in a system of magnetic dipole-coupled nuclei. In the fully incoherent limit of SDR, spin polarization transfers occur at distance-dependent rates without the quantum mechanical interferences among pairwise dipole-dipole couplings that often limit the feasibility or precision of structural studies of solids by NMR. In addition to facilitating structural studies, SDR represents a possible route to experimental studies of effects of decoherence on the dynamics of quantum many-body system000.

  14. Stochastic dipolar recoupling in nuclear magnetic resonance of solids

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert

    2008-01-01

    I describe a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, called stochastic dipolar recoupling (SDR), that permits continuous experimental control of the character of spin dynamics between coherent and incoherent limits in a system of magnetic dipole-coupled nuclei. In the fully incoherent limit of SDR, spin polarization transfers occur at distance-dependent rates without the quantum mechanical interferences among pairwise dipole-dipole couplings that often limit the feasibility or precision of structural studies of solids by NMR. In addition to facilitating structural studies, SDR represents a possible route to experimental studies of effects of decoherence on the dynamics of quantum many-body systems. PMID:17995438

  15. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance sensors to cultural heritage.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Noemi; Capitani, Donatella; Di Tullio, Valeria

    2014-04-21

    In recent years nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors have been increasingly applied to investigate, characterize and monitor objects of cultural heritage interest. NMR is not confined to a few specific applications, but rather its use can be successfully extended to a wide number of different cultural heritage issues. A breakthrough has surely been the recent development of portable NMR sensors which can be applied in situ for non-destructive and non-invasive investigations. In this paper three studies illustrating the potential of NMR sensors in this field of research are reported.

  16. Applications of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Sensors to Cultural Heritage

    PubMed Central

    Proietti, Noemi; Capitani, Donatella; Di Tullio, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    In recent years nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors have been increasingly applied to investigate, characterize and monitor objects of cultural heritage interest. NMR is not confined to a few specific applications, but rather its use can be successfully extended to a wide number of different cultural heritage issues. A breakthrough has surely been the recent development of portable NMR sensors which can be applied in situ for non-destructive and non-invasive investigations. In this paper three studies illustrating the potential of NMR sensors in this field of research are reported. PMID:24755519

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance-based quantification of organic diphosphates.

    PubMed

    Lenevich, Stepan; Distefano, Mark D

    2011-01-15

    Phosphorylated compounds are ubiquitous in life. Given their central role, many such substrates and analogs have been prepared for subsequent evaluation. Prior to biological experiments, it is typically necessary to determine the concentration of the target molecule in solution. Here we describe a method where concentrations of stock solutions of organic diphosphates and bisphosphonates are quantified using (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with standard instrumentation using a capillary tube with a secondary standard. The method is specific and is applicable down to a concentration of 200 μM. The capillary tube provides the reference peak for quantification and deuterated solvent for locking. PMID:20833124

  18. Coherent nuclear resonant optics for third generation synchrotron radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Alp, E.E.; Mooney, T.M.; Toellner, T.; Homma, H.; Kentjana, M.

    1992-06-01

    The insertion-device-based, third-generation, synchrotron radiation sources now under construction in Europe, the USA, and Japan bring new opportunities and challenges in the design and manufacture of x-ray optics. These high brightness sources provide new opportunities to overcome some of the outstanding problems associated with nuclear resonant monochromatization of synchrotron radiation. New methods such as polarizing monochromators, and zone plates provide alternative methods for production of {mu}eV-neV resolution in the hard x-ray regime. The design principles, and characterization, and performance of crystal monochromators and of nuclear coherent scattering optics, including Grazing Incidence Anti Reflection (GIAR) films, multilayers, zone plates, as well as single crystals are discussed.

  19. Application of nuclear resonance scattering for in vivo measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Vartsky, D.; Cohn, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear resonance scattering is applied in our laboratory to measure hepatic and cardiac iron overload. For iron analysis, a gaseous source of 4 mg MnCl/sub 2/ is introduced into an evacuated quartz vial. Following irradiation in a nuclear reactor, /sup 56/Mn decays by beta emission to the 847-keV level of /sup 56/Fe, which subsequently decays to the ground state of /sup 56/Fe with a 7 ps half-life. The principal aim of this work is to evaluate the efficacy of the iron chelation therapy. Serial measurements over a time period of 6 to 12 months of a given patient will enable us to see how the iron is removed from the critical organs.

  20. Parahydrogen-enhanced zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theis, T.; Ganssle, P.; Kervern, G.; Knappe, S.; Kitching, J.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Budker, D.; Pines, A.

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance, conventionally detected in magnetic fields of several tesla, is a powerful analytical tool for the determination of molecular identity, structure and function. With the advent of prepolarization methods and detection schemes using atomic magnetometers or superconducting quantum interference devices, interest in NMR in fields comparable to the Earth's magnetic field and below (down to zero field) has been revived. Despite the use of superconducting quantum interference devices or atomic magnetometers, low-field NMR typically suffers from low sensitivity compared with conventional high-field NMR. Here we demonstrate direct detection of zero-field NMR signals generated through parahydrogen-induced polarization, enabling high-resolution NMR without the use of any magnets. The sensitivity is sufficient to observe spectra exhibiting 13C-1H scalar nuclear spin-spin couplings (known as J couplings) in compounds with 13C in natural abundance, without the need for signal averaging. The resulting spectra show distinct features that aid chemical fingerprinting.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the circadian clock of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yong-Gang; Tseng, Roger; Kuo, Nai-Wei; LiWang, Andy

    2013-07-01

    The most well-understood circadian clock at the level of molecular mechanisms is that of cyanobacteria. This overview is on how solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has contributed to this understanding. By exciting atomic spin-½ nuclei in a strong magnetic field, NMR obtains information on their chemical environments, inter-nuclear distances, orientations, and motions. NMR protein samples are typically aqueous, often at near-physiological pH, ionic strength, and temperature. The level of information obtainable by NMR depends on the quality of the NMR sample, by which we mean the solubility and stability of proteins. Here, we use examples from our laboratory to illustrate the advantages and limitations of the technique. PMID:23667047

  2. Nuclear-magnetic-resonance quantum calculations of the Jones polynomial

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, Raimund; Spoerl, Andreas; Pomplun, Nikolas; Schulte-Herbrueggen, Thomas; Glaser, Steffen J.; Fahmy, Amr; Kauffman, Louis; Lomonaco, Samuel; Myers, John M.

    2010-03-15

    The repertoire of problems theoretically solvable by a quantum computer recently expanded to include the approximate evaluation of knot invariants, specifically the Jones polynomial. The experimental implementation of this evaluation, however, involves many known experimental challenges. Here we present experimental results for a small-scale approximate evaluation of the Jones polynomial by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR); in addition, we show how to escape from the limitations of NMR approaches that employ pseudopure states. Specifically, we use two spin-1/2 nuclei of natural abundance chloroform and apply a sequence of unitary transforms representing the trefoil knot, the figure-eight knot, and the Borromean rings. After measuring the nuclear spin state of the molecule in each case, we are able to estimate the value of the Jones polynomial for each of the knots.

  3. Measurement of {sup 25}Al+p resonant elastic scattering for studying the {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Y. K.; Lee, C. S.; Jung, H. S.; Moon, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Yun, C. C.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Choi, Seonho; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Park, J. S.; Kim, E. J.; Moon, C.-B.; Teranishi, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; and others

    2012-11-12

    Proton resonant states in {sup 26}Si have been studied by the resonant elastic scattering of {sup 25}Al+p with a {sup 25}Al radioactive ion beam at 2.863 MeV/nucleon bombarding a thick H{sub 2} gas target with the inverse kinematics method at the low-energy RI beam facility CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), University of Tokyo. The properties of these resonance states are important to better determine the production rates of {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si reaction, which is one of the astrophysically important nuclear reactions to understand the production of the ground state of {sup 26}Al, the emitter of its characteristic 1.809-MeV gamma-ray, under the explosive stellar environments such as novae and X-ray bursts. In this work, several resonances above the proton threshold level have been observed with a high statistics and background free through a covered the range of excitation energies from E{sub x}{approx} 6.8 to 8.2 MeV.

  4. Resonant Electromagnetic Interaction in Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Scott

    2008-03-01

    Basic ideas about how resonant electromagnetic interaction (EMI) can take place in finite solids are reviewed. These ideas not only provide a basis for conventional, electron energy band theory (which explains charge and heat transport in solids), but they also explain how through finite size effects, it is possible to create many of the kinds of effects envisioned by Giuliano Preparata. The underlying formalism predicts that the orientation of the external fields in the SPAWAR protocolootnotetextKrivit, Steven B., New Energy Times, 2007, issue 21, item 10. http://newenergytimes.com/news/2007/NET21.htm^,ootnotetextSzpak, S.; Mosier-Boss, P.A.; Gordon, F.E. Further evidence of nuclear reactions in the Pd lattice: emission of charged particles. Naturwissenschaften 94,511(2007)..has direct bearing on the emission of high-energy particles. Resonant EMI also implies that nano-scale solids, of a particular size, provide an optimal environment for initiating Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) in the PdD system.

  5. Physics with gamma-beams and charged particle detectors: I) Nuclear structure II) Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, Moshe

    2015-02-24

    The Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) is proposing to construct large area Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), a gas Time Projection Chamber detector read by an electronic readout system (eTPC) and a Bubble Chamber (BC) containing superheated high purity water to be used in measurements utilizing intense gamma-ray beams from the newly constructed ELI-NP facility at Magurele, Bucharest in Romania. We intend to use the SSD and eTPC detectors to address essential problems in nuclear structure physics, such as clustering and the many alpha-decay of light nuclei such as {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O. All three detectors (SSD, eTPC and BC) will be used to address central problems in nuclear astrophysics such as the astrophysical cross section factor of the {sup 12}C(α,γ) reaction and other processes central to stellar evolution. The CPWG intends to submit to the ELI-NP facility a Technical Design Report (TDR) for the proposed detectors.

  6. Physics with gamma-beams and charged particle detectors: I) Nuclear structure II) Nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Moshe

    2015-02-01

    The Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) is proposing to construct large area Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), a gas Time Projection Chamber detector read by an electronic readout system (eTPC) and a Bubble Chamber (BC) containing superheated high purity water to be used in measurements utilizing intense gamma-ray beams from the newly constructed ELI-NP facility at Magurele, Bucharest in Romania. We intend to use the SSD and eTPC detectors to address essential problems in nuclear structure physics, such as clustering and the many alpha-decay of light nuclei such as 12C and 16O . All three detectors (SSD, eTPC and BC) will be used to address central problems in nuclear astrophysics such as the astrophysical cross section factor of the 12C (α,γ) reaction and other processes central to stellar evolution. The CPWG intends to submit to the ELI-NP facility a Technical Design Report (TDR) for the proposed detectors.

  7. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  8. Electron-nuclear double resonance on copper (II) tetraimidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Camp, Harlan L.; Sands, Richard H.; Fee, James A.

    1981-09-01

    We have investigated the electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) from frozen aqueous solutions of 65Cu++(imidazole)4, 65Cu++ (imidazole-15N)4, and 65Cu++(imidazole-Dn)4, where n = 1, 2, 3, and 4 for selectively deuterated imidazole. We have observed ENDOR associated with the imidazole protons and the two imidazole nitrogens. The selective deuteration has allowed us to attempt identification of the weakly coupled protons responsible for the ENDOR spectrum, and a comparison of the overall line shape of that spectrum taken at two extreme points of the EPR spectrum suggests that some of the imidazole planes are tilted with respect to the plane of the complex. The ENDOR arising from the nitrogen nearest the copper is primarily isotropic with A(g⊥) = 41.6±1.5 MHz and A(g∥) = 39.8±1.5 MHz. The resonance shows little structure and seems consistent with a picture that requires some inequivalence among the various imidazoles. The remote nitrogen ENDOR reveals both hyperfine and quadrupole effects with approximately isotropic A(14N) = 1.79 MHz, Qz'z'?0.360 MHz, and Qx'x'y'x'?0.349 MHz. These values are in agreement with the results of the nuclear modulation effect [J. Chem. Phys. 69, 4921 (1978)]. The values for the quadrupole constants are thought to be accurate within 10% and are the same as are found in free imidazole. It is also demonstrated that, in this instance, ENDOR and the nuclear modulation effect are complementary in that they have each provided different parts of the same hyperfine spectrum.

  9. Coherent nuclear resonant scattering by {sup 61}Ni using the nuclear lighthouse effect

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, T.; Leupold, O.; Wille, H.-C.; Rueffer, R.; Quast, K.W.; Burkel, E.; Roehlsberger, R.

    2005-04-01

    We have observed coherent nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation from the 67.41-keV level of {sup 61}Ni. The time evolution of the forward scattering signal was recorded by employing the nuclear lighthouse effect. This method is used to investigate Moessbauer isotopes in a coherent scattering process with synchrotron radiation at high transition energies. The decay of the excited ensemble of nuclei in Ni metal shows quantum beats that allowed the determination of the magnetic hyperfine field at the {sup 61}Ni nucleus. Moreover, we determined the lifetime of the 67.41-keV level of {sup 61}Ni to be 7.4(1) ns.

  10. The Fourier Transform in Chemistry. Part 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Roy W.; Williams, Kathryn R.

    1989-01-01

    Using fourier transformation methods in nuclear magnetic resonance has made possible increased sensitivity in chemical analysis. This article describes these methods as they relate to magnetization, the RF magnetic field, nuclear relaxation, the RF pulse, and free induction decay. (CW)

  11. Investigating resonances above and below the threshold in nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Kiss, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Spitaleri, C.; Trippella, O.

    2015-10-15

    Resonances in nuclear cross sections dramatically change their trends. Therefore, the presence of unexpected resonances might lead to unpredicted consequences on astrophysics and nuclear physics. In nuclear physics, resonances allow one to study states in the intermediate compound systems, to evaluate their cluster structure, for instance, especially in the energy regions approaching particle decay thresholds. In astrophysics, resonances might lead to changes in the nucleosynthesis flow, determining different isotopic compositions of the nuclear burning ashes. For these reasons, the Trojan Horse method has been modified to investigate resonant reactions. Thanks to this novel approach, for the first time normalization to direct data might be avoided. Moreover, in the case of sub threshold resonances, the Trojan Horse method modified to investigate resonances allows one to deduce the asymptotic normalization coefficient, showing the close connection between the two indirect approaches.

  12. Investigating resonances above and below the threshold in nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cognata, M.; Kiss, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Spitaleri, C.; Trippella, O.

    2015-10-01

    Resonances in nuclear cross sections dramatically change their trends. Therefore, the presence of unexpected resonances might lead to unpredicted consequences on astrophysics and nuclear physics. In nuclear physics, resonances allow one to study states in the intermediate compound systems, to evaluate their cluster structure, for instance, especially in the energy regions approaching particle decay thresholds. In astrophysics, resonances might lead to changes in the nucleosynthesis flow, determining different isotopic compositions of the nuclear burning ashes. For these reasons, the Trojan Horse method has been modified to investigate resonant reactions. Thanks to this novel approach, for the first time normalization to direct data might be avoided. Moreover, in the case of sub threshold resonances, the Trojan Horse method modified to investigate resonances allows one to deduce the asymptotic normalization coefficient, showing the close connection between the two indirect approaches.

  13. Simulations of nuclear resonance fluorescence in GEANT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanan, Manu N.; Harrawood, Brian P.; Rusev, Gencho; Agasthya, Greeshma A.; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2014-11-01

    The nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) technique has been used effectively to identify isotopes based on their nuclear energy levels. Specific examples of its modern-day applications include detecting spent nuclear waste and cargo scanning for homeland security. The experimental designs for these NRF applications can be more efficiently optimized using Monte Carlo simulations before the experiment is implemented. One of the most widely used Monte Carlo physics simulations is the open-source toolkit GEANT4. However, NRF physics has not been incorporated into the GEANT4 simulation toolkit in publicly available software. Here we describe the development and testing of an NRF simulation in GEANT4. We describe in depth the development and architecture of this software for the simulation of NRF in any isotope in GEANT4; as well as verification and validation testing of the simulation for NRF in boron. In the verification testing, the simulation showed agreement with the analytical model to be within 0.6% difference for boron and iron. In the validation testing, the simulation showed agreement to be within 20.5% difference with the experimental measurements for boron, with the percent difference likely due to small uncertainties in beam polarization, energy distribution, and detector composition.

  14. A dual neutron/gamma source for the Fissmat Inspection for Nuclear Detection (FIND) system.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; King, Michael; Rossi, Paolo; McDaniel, Floyd Del; Morse, Daniel Henry; Antolak, Arlyn J.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Raber, Thomas N.

    2008-12-01

    Shielded special nuclear material (SNM) is very difficult to detect and new technologies are needed to clear alarms and verify the presence of SNM. High-energy photons and neutrons can be used to actively interrogate for heavily shielded SNM, such as highly enriched uranium (HEU), since neutrons can penetrate gamma-ray shielding and gamma-rays can penetrate neutron shielding. Both source particles then induce unique detectable signals from fission. In this LDRD, we explored a new type of interrogation source that uses low-energy proton- or deuteron-induced nuclear reactions to generate high fluxes of mono-energetic gammas or neutrons. Accelerator-based experiments, computational studies, and prototype source tests were performed to obtain a better understanding of (1) the flux requirements, (2) fission-induced signals, background, and interferences, and (3) operational performance of the source. The results of this research led to the development and testing of an axial-type gamma tube source and the design/construction of a high power coaxial-type gamma generator based on the {sup 11}B(p,{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction.

  15. Nuclear data production, calculation and measurement: a global overview of the gamma heating issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombier, A.-C.; Amharrak, H.; Fourmentel, D.; Ravaux, S.; Régnier, D.; Gueton, O.; Hudelot, J.-P.; Lemaire, M.

    2013-03-01

    The gamma heating evaluation in different materials found in current and future generations of nuclear reactor (EPRTM, GENIV, MTR-JHR), is becoming an important issue especially for the design of many devices (control rod, heavy reflector, in-core & out-core experiments…). This paper deals with the works started since 2009 in the Reactor Studies Department of CEA Cadarache in ordre to answer to several problematic which have been identified as well for nuclear data production and calculation as for experimental measurement methods. The selected subjects are: Development of a Monte Carlo code (FIFRELIN) to simulate the prompt fission gamma emission which represents the major part of the gamma heating production inside the core Production and qualification of new evaluations of nuclear data especially for radiative capture and inelastic neutron scattering which are the main sources of gamma heating out-core Development and qualification of a recommended method for the total gamma heating calculation using the Monte Carlo simulation code TRIPOLI-4 Development, test and qualification of new devices dedicated to the in-core gamma heating measurement as well in MTR-JHR as in zero power facilities (EOLE-MINERVE) of CEA, Cadarache to increase the experimental measurement accuracy.

  16. Nucleon resonances and pion-nucleon interaction in nuclear matter above the [Delta] resonance energy

    SciTech Connect

    Arima, M. ); Masutani, K. ); Seki, R. Department of Physics, California State University, Northridge, California 91330 )

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the [pi]-nucleon interaction in nuclear matter around [radical][ital s] =1.5 GeV by examining dynamical modifications of [ital N][sup *] resonances microscopically. The pion production through the [pi][Delta] channel is suppressed appreciably in nuclear matter because the pion produced is strongly distorted through a [Delta] formation with a neighboring nucleon. This effect makes the width of [ital N](1520) smaller and the mass larger in nuclear medium than in free space, and the [pi][ital N] [ital D][sub 13]-wave amplitude loses much of its inelasticity. A similar situation arises with [ital N](1535) and the [pi][ital N] [ital S][sub 11]-wave amplitude because the [eta][ital N] channel is suppressed by Pauli blocking of the nucleus that accompanies [eta]. The total widths of [ital N][sup *] in nuclear medium, however, could be larger than in free space because of their spreading potentials.

  17. Electron paramagnetic resonance of natural and gamma-irradiated alunite and kaolin mineral powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koksal, F.; Koseoglu, R.; Saka, I.; Basaran, E.; Sener, F.

    2004-06-01

    Natural alunite and kaolin minerals obtained from West Anatolia were investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in natural and gamma-irradiated states at room temperature and at 113 K. The paramagnetic centres at ambient temperature in natural alunite were attributed to the (C) over dot H 2OH, (C) over dot O-3(-), (S) over dot O-2(-), (C) over dot O-2(-) and [AlO4 ](0) radicals. In natural kaolin, the paramagnetic centres were attributed to the (C) over dot O-3(-), (S) over dot O-2(-) (C) over dot O-2(-) and [AlO4](0) radicals. The gamma-irradiation does not produce any detectable effects on these radicals. At 113 K, the lines for (C) over dot H2OH could not be observed well, probably due to the anisotropic behaviour of the hyperfine interaction of the methylene protons, but the lines for [AlO4](0) centres were found to be perfectly observable at above 20 mW microwave power in both alunite and kaolin powders before and after gamma-irradiation. The EPR parameters of the observed paramagnetic centres were reported.

  18. Spin and Parity Assignment of Neutron Resonances using Gamma-ray Multiplicity

    SciTech Connect

    Agvaanluvsan, U.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Dashdorj, D.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W. E.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krticka, M.; Becvar, F.

    2009-03-31

    Decay gamma rays following neutron capture on various isotopes are collected by the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) array, which is located at flight path 14 at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The high segmentation (160 detectors) and close packing of the detector array enable gamma-ray multiplicity measurements. The calorimetric properties of the DANCE array coupled with the neutron time-of-flight technique enables one to gate on a specific resonance of a given isotope in the time-of-flight spectrum and obtain the summed energy spectrum for that isotope. The singles gamma-ray spectrum for each multiplicity can be separated by their DANCE cluster multiplicity. The multiplicity distribution contains the signatures of spin and parity of the capture state. Under suitable circumstances where the difference between spins of the initial (capture) and final (ground) state is large enough, the signatures in the multiplicity distribution can be used in improving the spin assignment of the initial state. The spin assignment is applied with varying degree of success to difference isotopes and description of this application for {sup 95}Mo, {sup 151,153}Eu, and {sup 155,157}Gd is reviewed briefly.

  19. Sensitivity of nuclear-quadrupole double-resonance detection of half-integer spin nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliger, J.; Žagar, V.

    2008-10-01

    The sensitivity of the Slusher and Hahn's nuclear quadrupole double resonance technique is calculated in general for an arbitrary nuclear spin S of the quadrupole nuclei and for an arbitrary asymmetry parameter η of the electric field gradient tensor. The nuclear spin S = 5/2 ( 17O, 25Mg, …) is treated in details. The influence of the cross-relaxation rate between the quadrupole nuclei and the abundant spin system on the sensitivity of double resonance is discussed. The results of the theoretical analysis are applied in the analysis of the 1H- 17O nuclear quadrupole double resonance spectra in p-toluenesulfonamide and 2-nitrobenzoic acid. The 17O nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies from a sulfonamide group are determined for the first time. The proton-oxygen cross-relaxation rates and the proton local frequency in zero external magnetic field are experimentally determined from the nuclear quadrupole double resonance spectra.

  20. Nuclear quadrupole resonance studies of the SORC sequence and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakody, J.R.P.

    1993-12-31

    The behavior of induction signals during steady-state pulse irradiation in {sup 14}N NQR was investigated experimentally. Because Strong Off-resonance Comb (SORC) signals recur as long as the pulsing continues, very efficient signal-averaging can result. The dependence of these steady-state SORC signals on pulse parameters and on frequency offset are presented, together with a discussion of the applicability of the method. Also as part of the NQR work, cocaine base has been detected using conventional NQR techniques. The experimental results show that SORC detection can be of sufficient sensitivity to form the basis of narcotics screening devices for both mail and airline baggage. A new NMR technique, to obtain the correlation time of the random thermal motion of a polymer at temperatures near the glass transition has been introduced. The temperature dependence is a result of thermal motion. For slow-motion of a polymer chain near the glass transition, the CSA parameter begins to decrease. This motional narrowing can be interpreted to yield the correlation time of the thermal motion. In this work nitrocellulose isotopically highly enriched with {sup 15}N was studied at four different temperatures between 27{degrees} and 120{degrees} Celsius and the correlation times for polymer backbone motions were obtained. Naflon films containing water (D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2} {sup 17}O) and methanol (CH{sub 3}OD, CH{sub 3} {sup 17}OH), have been studied using deuteron and oxygen-17 NMR spectroscopy. Glassy behavior of the water domains at low temperature is evidenced by the specific nature of the {sup 2}H NMR lineshapes. Activation energies extracted from {sup 2}H spin-lattice relaxation data on the high temperature side of the T{sub 1} minimum exhibit a steady increase with increasing water content. In spite of a high degree of molecular mobility, angular-dependent spectra of both unstretched and stretched samples reflect considerable anisotrophy of the host polymer.

  1. {sup 57}Co(n,{gamma}){sup 58}Co reaction cross section: Thermal and resonance integral measurements and energy dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Maidana, Nora L.; Mesa, Joel; Vanin, Vito R.; Castro, Ruy M.; Dias, Mauro S.; Koskinas, Marina F.

    2004-07-01

    The {sup 57}Co(n,{gamma}){sup 58}Co thermal and resonance integral cross section were measured as 51(5) b and 20.0(19) b, respectively, by irradiating aliquots of {sup 57}Co solution sealed inside quartz bottles near the core of the IEA-R1 IPEN research reactor and counting the gamma-ray residual activity. The irradiations were monitored using Au-Al alloy foils, with and without Cd cover. The gamma-ray measurements were performed with a shielded HPGe detector. Westcott formalism was applied for the average neutron flux determination. The cross section energy dependence was evaluated using the multilevel Breit-Wigner expression considering the first two resonances and the statistical model for energies above the second resonance. Maxwellian averaged neutron capture cross section with neutron temperatures between 5 and 100 keV were also evaluated.

  2. ACTIVE MEDIA: Pump and amplification dynamics of gamma rays in a nuclear medium with the hidden population inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivlin, Lev A.

    2009-12-01

    The features of the pump dynamics of isomeric nuclei excited by X-rays of a repetitively pulsed relativistic electron beam followed by the production of a medium with the negative absorption of gamma quanta are analysed. In the extended nuclear medium, the pump excites a travelling hidden-population-inversion wave with the anisotropic gamma amplification, which becomes positive in the case of the excess over the critical pump parameter equal to the product of the peak spectral power density of the X-ray source and the relative duration of an ultrashort relativistic electron bunch. In the alternative scheme with orthogonal directions of pumping X-rays and a flux of amplified gamma quanta, the absence of the amplification anisotropy opens up the possibility for constructing a standard two-mirror resonator with Bragg single-crystal reflectors. The critical peak value of the spectral pump power density is compared with the known characteristics of relativistic-electron X-ray sources by examples of some nuclides.

  3. Instructions for calibrating gamma detectors using the Canberra-Nuclear Data Genie Gamma Spectroscopy System

    SciTech Connect

    Brunk, J.L.

    1995-09-01

    A straight forward protocol provides a way to guide the calibration of a gamma detector for a particular geometry and material. Several programs have used the Low Level Gamma Counting Facility of the Health and Ecological Assessment Division of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to count a variety of large environmental samples contained in several unique geometries. The equipment and calibration requirements needed to analyze these types of samples are explained. This document describes the calibration protocol that has been developed and describes how it is used to calibrate the detectors.

  4. The orphan nuclear receptor DAX-1 acts as a novel transcriptional corepressor of PPAR{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Gwang Sik; Lee, Gha Young; Nedumaran, Balachandar; Park, Yun-Yong; Kim, Kyung Tae; Park, Sang Chul; Lee, Young Chul; Kim, Jae Bum Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2008-05-30

    DAX-1 is an atypical nuclear receptor (NR) which functions primarily as a transcriptional corepressor of other NRs via heterodimerization. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {gamma} is a ligand-dependent NR which performs a key function in adipogenesis. In this study, we evaluated a novel cross-talk mechanism between DAX-1 and PPAR{gamma}. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that DAX-1 inhibits the transactivity of PPAR{gamma} in a dose-dependent manner. DAX-1 directly competed with the PPAR{gamma} coactivator (PGC)-1{alpha} for binding to PPAR{gamma}. Endogenous levels of DAX-1 were significantly lower in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes as compared to preadipocytes. Using a retroviral expression system, we demonstrated that DAX-1 overexpression downregulates the expression of PPAR{gamma} target genes, resulting in an attenuation of adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells. Our results suggest that DAX-1 acts as a corepressor of PPAR{gamma} and performs a potential function in the regulation of PPAR{gamma}-mediated cellular differentiation.

  5. Gradient elution capillary electrochromatography and hyphenation with nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gfrörer, P; Schewitz, J; Pusecker, K; Tseng, L H; Albert, K; Bayer, E

    1999-01-01

    Coupling of gradient capillary electrochromatography (gradient CEC) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) was performed using a recently developed capillary NMR interface. This technique was applied for the analysis of pharmaceuticals and food. An analgesic was investigated using isocratic and gradient continuous-flow CEC-NMR. Comparison of the results demonstrated the superiority of gradient CEC over isocratic CEC. Aspartame and caffeine, both ingredients of soft beverages, were separated and analyzed by continuous flow CZE-NMR. The order of elution could be reversed by altering the pH. This reversal led to an increased sample concentration in the NMR detection cell, thus allowing the acquisition of a totally correlated spectroscopy (TOCSY) two-dimensional (2-D) spectrum of the synthetic peptide aspartame. PMID:10065951

  6. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Keelan T.; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system.

  7. Desktop fast-field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometer.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Duarte Mesquita; Marques, Gil Domingos; Cascais, José Manuel; Sebastião, Pedro José

    2010-07-01

    In this paper a new type of Fast Field Cycling (FFC) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxometer with low power consumption (200W) and cycle to cycle field stability better than 10(-4) is described. The new high-permeability magnet was designed to allow for good magnetic field homogeneity and allows for the sample rotation around an axis perpendicular to magnetic field, operating with magnetic fields between 0 and 0.21T. The power supply of the new relaxometer was specially developed in order to have steady state accurate currents and allow for magnetic field switching times less than 3ms. Additional control circuits were developed and included to compensate the Earth magnetic field component parallel to the field axis and to compensate for parasitic currents. The main aspects of the developed circuits together with some calibrating experimental results using the liquid crystal compounds 5CB and 8CB are presented and discussed.

  8. Bremsstrahlung from nuclear scattering at low energy near a resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trail, C. C.; Lesser, P. M. S.; Liou, M. K.

    1984-04-01

    A program to contribute to the general understanding of nuclear reactions by determining as many of the off-shell properties of the proton-nucleus interaction as possible through the study of the proton-nucleus bremsstrahlung process is discussed. The limits of validity of a model independent analysis of these reactions in the neighborhood of a resonance or a breakup threshold are sought. The differences between this analysis and the data is utilized to elucidate those off-shell constraints which any valid proton-nucleus model interaction must satisfy. The bremsstrahlung process provides a method for determining the off-shell properties of the proton-nucleus potential, and the Brooklyn College program offers a unique opportunity to measure these crucial aspects of the low energy proton-nucleus interaction.

  9. Serum metabonomics of acute leukemia using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Siddiqui, Amna Jabbar; Shamsi, Tahir; Choudhary, M. Iqbal; Rahman, Atta-ur

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is a critical neoplasm of white blood cells. In order to differentiate between the metabolic alterations associated with two subtypes of acute leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we investigated the serum of ALL and AML patients and compared with two controls (healthy and aplastic anemia) using 1H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy. Thirty-seven putative metabolites were identified using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence. The use of PLS-DA and OPLS-DA models gave results with 84.38% and 90.63% classification rate, respectively. The metabolites responsible for classification are mainly lipids, lactate and glucose. Compared with controls, ALL and AML patients showed serum metabonomic differences involving aberrant metabolism pathways including glycolysis, TCA cycle, lipoprotein changes, choline and fatty acid metabolisms. PMID:27480133

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance evaluation of stroke: a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, R.N.; Willcott, M.R.; Schneiders, N.J.; Ford, J.J.; Derman, H.S.

    1983-10-01

    Nine patients who had acute and subacute stroke were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using a 6-MHz Bruker Instruments proton scanner. A modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence was used for signal detection. The resultant string of spin-echoes was Fourier transformed into projections that were subsequently back-projected to a series of spin-echo images. From these images, spin density and T/sub 2/ were calculated for each pixel. The NMR scans revealed stroke in each of the patients, while CT demonstrated only eight of the lesions. T/sub 2/ was prolonged in all of the ischemic regions and is the most sensitive NMR parameter in detecting stroke. These preliminary results suggest that NMR scanning of patients who have acute stroke may be cliniclly useful, and that the T/sub 2/ component of the NRM signal is most important.

  11. Multipole-multimode Floquet theory in nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Ramesh; Griffin, Robert G

    2005-04-22

    In this paper, we present a new analytical approach for describing the spin dynamics of synchronous and asynchronous time-dependent modulations in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. The approach, based on multimode Floquet theory, employs the multipole operator basis of Sanctuary for spin description and illustrates the time evolution in the Floquet-Liouville space using the effective Hamiltonians obtained from the contact (or van Vleck) transformation procedure. Since the Hamiltonian and the density operator are expressed in terms of irreducible tensor operators, extensions to higher spin magnitudes (I>12) and multiple spins are quite straightforward and permit analytical treatments for many problems. We outline the general underlying principles involved in this approach with a brief mention of its potential application in other branches of spectroscopy. PMID:15945688

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis and molecular properties of berberine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Ju; Lee, Ken S.; Hurley, Sharon J.

    An extensive theoretical study of berberine has been performed at the ab initio HF/6-31G**, HF/6-311G**, and B3LYP/6-311G** levels with and without solvent effects. The optimized structures are compared with X-ray data. We found that the optimized structures with solvent effects are in slightly better agreement with X-ray data than those without solvent effects. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of berberine were calculated by using the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) (with and without solvent effects), CSGT, and IGAIM methods. The calculated chemical shifts were compared with the two-dimensional NMR experimental data. Overall, the calculated chemical shifts show very good agreement with the experimental results. The harmonic vibrational frequencies for berberine were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G** level.

  13. Observation of superconductivity in hydrogen sulfide from nuclear resonant scattering.

    PubMed

    Troyan, Ivan; Gavriliuk, Alexander; Rüffer, Rudolf; Chumakov, Alexander; Mironovich, Anna; Lyubutin, Igor; Perekalin, Dmitry; Drozdov, Alexander P; Eremets, Mikhail I

    2016-03-18

    High-temperature superconductivity remains a focus of experimental and theoretical research. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to be superconducting at high pressures and with a high transition temperature. We report on the direct observation of the expulsion of the magnetic field in H2S compressed to 153 gigapascals. A thin (119)Sn film placed inside the H2S sample was used as a sensor of the magnetic field. The magnetic field on the (119)Sn sensor was monitored by nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that an external static magnetic field of about 0.7 tesla is expelled from the volume of (119)Sn foil as a result of the shielding by the H2S sample at temperatures between 4.7 K and approximately 140 K, revealing a superconducting state of H2S. PMID:26989248

  14. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of toad retina.

    PubMed Central

    Apte, D V; Koutalos, Y; McFarlane, D K; Dawson, M J; Ebrey, T G

    1989-01-01

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectra were obtained from living toad retinae and toad retinal extracts at 4 degrees C. Several phosphorus metabolites--nucleoside di- and triphosphates (NTP), phosphocreatine, phosphodiesters, inorganic phosphate, and phosphomonoesters--were identified from the spectra of whole retinae. The intracellular pH was determined to be 7.27 +/- 0.06 at 4 degrees C and the intracellular MgNTP/NTP ratio was at least 0.77. These results are consistent with those reported by other techniques, and they show that 31P-NMR spectroscopy can be used for noninvasively and quantitatively studying the metabolism of living toad retinae, and for monitoring its changes over time. PMID:2506940

  15. Nuclear resonance fluorescence imaging in non-intrusive cargo inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertozzi, William; Ledoux, Robert J.

    2005-12-01

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence is able to non-intrusively interrogate a region space and measure the isotopic content of the material in that space for any element with atomic number greater than that of helium. The technique involves exposing material to a continuous energy distribution of photons and detecting the scattered photons that have a discrete energy distribution unique to an isotope. The interrogating photons, which range from 2 to 8 MeV, are the most penetrating probes and can "see" through many inches of steel. Determination of the chemical components of the material occupying a region of space greatly enhances the identification of threats such as explosives, fissile materials, toxic materials and weapons of mass destruction. Systems can be designed to involve minimal operator intervention, to minimize dose to the sample, and to provide high throughput at commercial seaports, airports and other entry points.

  16. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Keelan T; Fridjonsson, Einar O; Stanwix, Paul L; Johns, Michael L

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system. PMID:27343484

  17. Gradient elution capillary electrochromatography and hyphenation with nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gfrörer, P; Schewitz, J; Pusecker, K; Tseng, L H; Albert, K; Bayer, E

    1999-01-01

    Coupling of gradient capillary electrochromatography (gradient CEC) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) was performed using a recently developed capillary NMR interface. This technique was applied for the analysis of pharmaceuticals and food. An analgesic was investigated using isocratic and gradient continuous-flow CEC-NMR. Comparison of the results demonstrated the superiority of gradient CEC over isocratic CEC. Aspartame and caffeine, both ingredients of soft beverages, were separated and analyzed by continuous flow CZE-NMR. The order of elution could be reversed by altering the pH. This reversal led to an increased sample concentration in the NMR detection cell, thus allowing the acquisition of a totally correlated spectroscopy (TOCSY) two-dimensional (2-D) spectrum of the synthetic peptide aspartame.

  18. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in process engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladden, Lynn F.; Alexander, Paul

    1996-03-01

    During the past decade, the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging techniques to problems of relevance to the process industries has been identified. The particular strengths of NMR techniques are their ability to distinguish between different chemical species and to yield information simultaneously on the structure, concentration distribution and flow processes occurring within a given process unit. In this paper, examples of specific applications in the areas of materials and food processing, transport in reactors and two-phase flow are discussed. One specific study, that of the internal structure of a packed column, is considered in detail. This example is reported to illustrate the extent of new, quantitative information of generic importance to many processing operations that can be obtained using NMR imaging in combination with image analysis.

  19. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Keelan T; Fridjonsson, Einar O; Stanwix, Paul L; Johns, Michael L

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system.

  20. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cardiac metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Seeholzer, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the increasing use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques for following the metabolic fate of compounds specifically labeled with /sup 13/C. The goals of the present study are: (1) to develop reliable quantitative procedures for measuring the /sup 13/C enrichment of specific carbon sites in compounds enriched by the metabolism of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates in rat heart, and (2) to use these quantitative measurements of fractional /sup 13/C enrichment within the context of a mathematical flux model describing the carbon flow through the TCA cycle and ancillary pathways, as a means for obtaining unknown flux parameters. Rat hearts have been perfused in vitro with various combinations of glucose, acetate, pyruvate, and propionate to achieve steady state flux conditions, followed by perfusion with the same substrates labeled with /sup 13/C in specific carbon sites. The hearts were frozen at different times after addition of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates and neutralized perchloric acid extracts were used to obtain high resolution proton-decoupled /sup 13/C NMR spectra at 90.55 MHz. The fractional /sup 13/C enrichment (F.E.) of individual carbon sites in different metabolites was calculated from the area of the resolved resonances after correction for saturation and nuclear Overhauser effects. These F.E. measurements by /sup 13/C NMR were validated by the analysis of /sup 13/C-/sup 1/H scalar coupling patterns observed in /sup 1/H NMR spectra of the extracted metabolites. The results obtained from perfusion of hearts glucose plus either (2-/sup 13/C) acetate or (3-/sup 13/C) pyruvate are similar to those obtained by previous investigators using /sup 14/C-labeled substrates.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Heaney, M.B. . Dept. of Physics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 {times} 10{sup 17} in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO{sub 3} crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  2. Frequency selective detection of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spin echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasundaram, Samuel D.; Jakobsson, Andreas; Smith, John A. S.; Althoefer, Kaspar A.

    2006-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a radio frequency (RF) technique that can be used to detect the presence of quadrupolar nuclei, such as the 14N nucleus prevalent in many explosives and narcotics. The technique has been hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios and is further aggravated by the presence of RF interference (RFI). To ensure accurate detection, proposed detectors should exploit the rich form of the NQR signal. Furthermore, the detectors should also be robust to any remaining residual interference, left after suitable RFI mitigation has been employed. In this paper, we propose a new NQR data model, particularly for the realistic case where multiple pulse sequences are used to generate trains of spin echoes. Furthermore, we refine two recently proposed approximative maximum likelihood (AML) detectors, enabling the algorithm to optimally exploit the data model of the entire echo train and also incorporate knowledge of the temperature dependent spin-echo decay time. The AML-based detectors ensure accurate detection and robustness against residual RFI, even when the temperature of the sample is not precisely known, by exploiting the dependencies of the NQR resonant lines on temperature. Further robustness against residual interference is gained as the proposed detector is frequency selective; exploiting only those regions of the spectrum where the NQR signal is expected. Extensive numerical evaluations based on both simulated and measured NQR data indicate that the proposed Frequency selective Echo Train AML (FETAML) detector offers a significant improvement as compared to other existing detectors.

  3. Laser-induced nuclear magnetic resonance splitting in hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Ikäläinen, Suvi; Lantto, Perttu; Manninen, Pekka; Vaara, Juha

    2008-09-28

    Irradiation of matter with circularly polarized light (CPL) shifts all nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) lines. The phenomenon arises from the second-order interaction of the electron cloud with the optical field, combined with the orbital hyperfine interaction. The shift occurs in opposite directions for right and left CPL, and rapid switching between them will split the resonance lines into two. We present ab initio and density functional theory predictions of laser-induced NMR splittings for hydrocarbon systems with different sizes: ethene, benzene, coronene, fullerene, and circumcoronene. Due to the computationally challenging nature of the effect, traditional basis sets could not be used for the larger systems. A novel method for generating basis sets, mathematical completeness optimization, was employed. As expected, the magnitude of the spectral splitting increases with the laser beam frequency and polarizability of the system. Massive amplification of the effect is also observed close to the optical excitation energies. A much larger laser-induced splitting is found for the largest of the present molecules than for the previously investigated noble gas atoms or small molecules. The laser intensity required for experimental detection of the effect is discussed.

  4. On the quantumness of correlations in nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Soares-Pinto, D O; Auccaise, R; Maziero, J; Gavini-Viana, A; Serra, R M; Céleri, L C

    2012-10-13

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was successfully employed to test several protocols and ideas in quantum information science. In most of these implementations, the existence of entanglement was ruled out. This fact introduced concerns and questions about the quantum nature of such bench tests. In this paper, we address some issues related to the non-classical aspects of NMR systems. We discuss some experiments where the quantum aspects of this system are supported by quantum correlations of separable states. Such quantumness, beyond the entanglement-separability paradigm, is revealed via a departure between the quantum and the classical versions of information theory. In this scenario, the concept of quantum discord seems to play an important role. We also present an experimental implementation of an analogue of the single-photon Mach-Zehnder interferometer employing two nuclear spins to encode the interferometric paths. This experiment illustrates how non-classical correlations of separable states may be used to simulate quantum dynamics. The results obtained are completely equivalent to the optical scenario, where entanglement (between two field modes) may be present.

  5. Mass optimization studies of gamma shield materials for space nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Banjac, V.; Heger, A.S. . Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering)

    1994-10-01

    A mass optimization study of the total shield mass requirements for gamma attenuation for a space nuclear power system is carried out. The reference system is a nuclear electric power-generating reactor with a 10[sup 16] [gamma]/s source term and reference dimensions based on the Russian TOPAZ-II. Seven potential shield materials are analyzed, and the total gamma shield masses are presented for a desired dose equivalent of 5.0 mrem/h at the end of the shield. A three-dimensional shielding code, QAD-CGGP, is used to model the reactor and the truncated cone shield. Gamma energies of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 MeV are analyzed, and the required shield masses are normalized to the lowest value, giving a mass index.'' Comparison of the required masses and mass indices for both direct radiation and buildup dose is presented. For all three gamma energies, depleted uranium has a mass index of 1.0 and provides the required shielding with the lowest mass requirement. Mass indices between 1.2 and 1.7 are characteristic of tungsten and lead, making them potential substitutes for depleted uranium in the case of smaller reactor power levels.

  6. Probing nuclear shapes close to the fission limit with the giant dipole resonance in {sup 216}Rn

    SciTech Connect

    Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Brekiesz, M.; Krolas, W.; Meczynski, W.; Styczen, J.; Zieblinski, M.; Million, B.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Benzoni, G.; Leoni, S.; Wieland, O.; Brambilla, S.; Herskind, B.; Kicinska-Habior, M.; Dubray, N.; Dudek, J.; Schunck, N.

    2004-12-01

    The gamma-ray decay of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in the compound nucleus {sup 216}Rn formed with the reaction {sup 18}O+{sup 198}Pt at the bombarding energy of 96 MeV was investigated. High-energy gamma-ray spectra in coincidence with both prompt and delayed low-energy transitions were measured. The obtained GDR width at the average temperature {approx_equal}1 MeV was found to be larger than that at T=0 MeV and to be approximately constant as a function of spin. The measured width value of 7 MeV is found to be consistent with the predictions based on calculations of the nuclear shape distribution using the newest approach for the treatment of the fission barrier within the liquid drop model. The present study is the first investigation of the giant dipole resonance width from the fusion-evaporation decay channel in this nuclear mass range.

  7. Determination of γ -ray widths in 15N using nuclear resonance fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szücs, T.; Bemmerer, D.; Caciolli, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Massarczyk, R.; Michelagnoli, C.; Reinhardt, T. P.; Schwengner, R.; Takács, M. P.; Ur, C. A.; Wagner, A.; Wagner, L.

    2015-07-01

    Background: The stable nucleus 15N is the mirror of 15O, the bottleneck in the hydrogen burning CNO cycle. Most of the 15N level widths below the proton emission threshold are known from just one nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurement, with limited precision in some cases. A recent experiment with the AGATA demonstrator array determined level lifetimes using the Doppler shift attenuation method in 15O. As a reference and for testing the method, level lifetimes in 15N have also been determined in the same experiment. Purpose: The latest compilation of 15N level properties dates back to 1991. The limited precision in some cases in the compilation calls for a new measurement to enable a comparison to the AGATA demonstrator data. The widths of several 15N levels have been studied with the NRF method. Method: The solid nitrogen compounds enriched in 15N have been irradiated with bremsstrahlung. The γ rays following the deexcitation of the excited nuclear levels were detected with four high-purity germanium detectors. Results: Integrated photon-scattering cross sections of 10 levels below the proton emission threshold have been measured. Partial γ -ray widths of ground-state transitions were deduced and compared to the literature. The photon-scattering cross sections of two levels above the proton emission threshold, but still below other particle emission energies have also been measured, and proton resonance strengths and proton widths were deduced. Conclusions: Gamma and proton widths consistent with the literature values were obtained, but with greatly improved precision.

  8. Analysis of the transient response of nuclear spins in GaAs with/without nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasly, Mahmoud; Lin, Zhichao; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Uemura, Tetsuya

    2016-05-01

    As an alternative to studying the steady-state responses of nuclear spins in solid state systems, working within a transient-state framework can reveal interesting phenomena. The response of nuclear spins in GaAs to a changing magnetic field was analyzed based on the time evolution of nuclear spin temperature. Simulation results well reproduced our experimental results for the transient oblique Hanle signals observed in an all-electrical spin injection device. The analysis showed that the so called dynamic nuclear polarization can be treated as a cooling tool for the nuclear spins: It works as a provider to exchange spin angular momentum between polarized electron spins and nuclear spins through the hyperfine interaction, leading to an increase in the nuclear polarization. In addition, a time-delay of the nuclear spin temperature with a fast sweep of the external magnetic field produces a possible transient state for the nuclear spin polarization. On the other hand, the nuclear magnetic resonance acts as a heating tool for a nuclear spin system. This causes the nuclear spin temperature to jump to infinity: i.e., the average nuclear spins along with the nuclear field vanish at resonant fields of 75As, 69Ga and 71Ga, showing an interesting step-dip structure in the oblique Hanle signals. These analyses provide a quantitative understanding of nuclear spin dynamics in semiconductors for application in future computation processing.

  9. Gamma Rays, Nuclear Structure and the Search for a Clean Energy Release From Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, James J.

    2008-03-01

    Gamma rays are emitted when a nucleus makes a transition from one state to another, so that a sequence of gamma rays chronicles the manner in which a nucleus sheds excess internal energy. The detection and analysis of gamma-ray emission therefore allows a determination of the properties of nuclear states and the probabilities for transitions between them. Not only do these transitions provide important physical insight into nuclear structure, they also present some intriguing possibilities. For example, a nucleus with a fortuitous combination of states might permit stimulated emission of an electromagnetic transition just as in atoms or molecules, leading to the development of a gamma-ray laser. Also, some nuclear excited states are known to decay so slowly that they are considered to be metastable: such isomers, a term borrowed from chemistry, can store excess internal energy with lifetimes up to many decades. It is possible that this energy could be harnessed without resorting to fission reactions, with their accompanying production of radioactive by-products. This talk will discuss the present synergy between state-of-the-art research into nuclear structure and ideas related to a controlled energy release from nuclei.

  10. Feasibility study of a gamma camera for monitoring nuclear materials in the PRIDE facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Woo Jin; Kim, Hyun-Il; An, Su Jung; Lee, Chae Young; Song, Han-Kyeol; Chung, Yong Hyun; Shin, Hee-Sung; Ahn, Seong-Kyu; Park, Se-Hwan

    2014-05-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing pyroprocessing technology, in which actinides are recovered together with plutonium. There is no pure plutonium stream in the process, so it has an advantage of proliferation resistance. Tracking and monitoring of nuclear materials through the pyroprocess can significantly improve the transparency of the operation and safeguards. An inactive engineering-scale integrated pyroprocess facility, which is the PyRoprocess Integrated inactive DEmonstration (PRIDE) facility, was constructed to demonstrate engineering-scale processes and the integration of each unit process. the PRIDE facility may be a good test bed to investigate the feasibility of a nuclear material monitoring system. In this study, we designed a gamma camera system for nuclear material monitoring in the PRIDE facility by using a Monte Carlo simulation, and we validated the feasibility of this system. Two scenarios, according to locations of the gamma camera, were simulated using GATE (GEANT4 Application for Tomographic Emission) version 6. A prototype gamma camera with a diverging-slat collimator was developed, and the simulated and experimented results agreed well with each other. These results indicate that a gamma camera to monitor the nuclear material in the PRIDE facility can be developed.

  11. Controlling nuclear JAKs and STATs for specific gene activation by IFN{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Noon-Song, Ezra N.; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Dabelic, Rea; Canton, Johnathan; Johnson, Howard M.

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Gamma interferon (IFN{gamma}) and its receptor subunit, IFNGR1, interact with the promoter region of IFN{gamma}-associated genes along with transcription factor STAT1{alpha}. {yields} We show that activated Janus kinases pJAK2 and pJAK1 also associate with IFNGR1 in the nucleus. {yields} The activated Janus kinases are responsible for phosphorylation of tyrosine 41 on histone H3, an important epigenetic event for specific gene activation. -- Abstract: We previously showed that gamma interferon (IFN{gamma}) and its receptor subunit, IFNGR1, interacted with the promoter region of IFN{gamma}-activated genes along with transcription factor STAT1{alpha}. Recent studies have suggested that activated Janus kinases pJAK2 and pJAK1 also played a role in gene activation by phosphorylation of histone H3 on tyrosine 41. This study addresses the question of the role of activated JAKs in specific gene activation by IFN{gamma}. We carried out chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by PCR in IFN{gamma} treated WISH cells and showed association of pJAK1, pJAK2, IFNGR1, and STAT1 on the same DNA sequence of the IRF-1 gene promoter. The {beta}-actin gene, which is not activated by IFN{gamma}, did not show this association. The movement of activated JAK to the nucleus and the IRF-1 promoter was confirmed by the combination of nuclear fractionation, confocal microscopy and DNA precipitation analysis using the biotinylated GAS promoter. Activated JAKs in the nucleus was associated with phosphorylated tyrosine 41 on histone H3 in the region of the GAS promoter. Unphosphorylated JAK2 was found to be constitutively present in the nucleus and was capable of undergoing activation in IFN{gamma} treated cells, most likely via nuclear IFNGR1. Association of pJAK2 and IFNGR1 with histone H3 in IFN{gamma} treated cells was demonstrated by histone H3 immunoprecipitation. Unphosphorylated STAT1 protein was associated with histone H3 of untreated cells. IFN{gamma

  12. Gamma-resonance study of the reaction of iron ions with synthetic L-dopa melanin

    SciTech Connect

    Bagirov, R.M.; Stukan, R.A.; Lapina, V.A.; Dontsov, A.E.; Ostrovskii, M.A.

    1986-07-01

    The reaction of Fe/sup 3 +/ and Fe/sup 2 +/ ions with synthetic L-dopa melanin, which is a model compound of natural melanin (the melanoprotein granules in the pigment epithelial cells in vertebrate and human eyes), has been studied by gamma-resonance spectroscopy. The investigations showed that L-dopa melanin is capable of effectively binding iron ions and that it displays oxidative or reducing properties with respect to Fe, depending on the composition of the subsystem of the Fe ions and the ambient pH. Trivalent Fe/sup 3 +/ ions form stronger complexes with L-dopa melanin than do Fe/sup 2 +/ ions. The coordination takes place mainly with the carboxyl groups and the amino and imino groups of the polymer. The conformational state of the polymer apparently changes as the pH is varied.

  13. Study of free radicals in gamma irradiated cellulose of cultural heritage materials using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Yasko; Rodrigues, Orlando, Jr.; Garcia, Rafael Henrique Lazzari; Santos, Paulo de Souza; Vasquez, Pablo A. S.

    2016-07-01

    Main subject of this article was to study room temperature stable radicals in Co-60 gamma irradiated contemporary paper using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectrometer (EPR). XRD was used to study the effect of ionizing radiation on the morphology of book paper. SEM images presented regions with cellulose fibers and regions with particles agglomeration on the cellulose fibers. Those agglomerations were rich in calcium, observed by EDS. XRD analysis confirmed presence of calcium carbonate diffraction peaks. The main objective of this study was to propose a method using conventional kinetics chemical reactions for the observed radical formed by ionizing radiation. Therefore, further analyses were made to study the half-life and the kinetics of the free radical created. This method can be suitably applied to study radicals on cultural heritage objects.

  14. Resonant Compton cooling and annihilation line production in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preece, R. D.; Harding, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to a synchrotron self-Compton emission model for gamma-ray bursts which produces narrow annihilation features for a variety of field strengths, primary electron injection energies, and injection rates. In this model, primary electrons are injected and cooled by synchrotron emission in a strong, homogeneous magnetic field, resulting in a pair cascade. Multiple resonant scattering with cyclotron photons efficiently traps and cools pairs in the ground state to an average energy where the Compton energy loss rate is zero, which is in agreement with previous estimates of a Compton temperature. The particle distributions in the ground state are determined by numerically solving the Fokker-Planck equation in the steady state. In the case of isotropic injection of primary electrons, a significant narrow-line feature appears in the overall emission. In the case of beamed injection, the annihilation line is broadened to the extent that it would not be observable.

  15. Inverse Compton gamma-ray source for nuclear physics and related applications at the Duke FEL

    SciTech Connect

    O`Shea, P.G.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years the development of intense, short-wavelength FEL light sources has opened opportunities for the development new applications of high-energy Compton-backscattered photons. These applications range from medical imaging with X-ray photons to high-energy physics with {gamma}{gamma} colliders. In this paper we discuss the possibilities for nuclear physics studies using polarized Compton backscattered {gamma}-rays from the Duke storage-ring-driven UV-FEL. There are currently a number of projects that produce polarized {gamma}-rays for nuclear physics studies. All of these facilities operate by scattering conventional laser-light against electrons circulating in a storage ring. In our scheme, intra-cavity scattering of the UV-FEL light will produce a {gamma}-flux enhancement of approximately 10{sup 3} over existing sources. The Duke ring can operate at energies up to 1.2 GeV and can produce FEL photons up to 12.5 eV. We plan to generate {gamma}-rays up to 200 MeV in energy with an average flux in excess of 10{sup 7} /s/MeV, using a modest scattering beam of 10-mA average stored current. The {gamma}-ray energy may be tuned by varying the FEL wavelength or by adjusting the stored electron beam energy. Because of the intense flux, we can eliminate the need for photon energy tagging by collimating of the {gamma}-ray beam. We will discuss the characteristics of the device and its research opportunities.

  16. Study of resonances in light nuclei for nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaraz Calderon, Sergio Jesus

    Resonances in exotic nuclei play a central role in the nucleosynthesis processes occurring in the stars. Nuclear reactions proceed through resonance states in exotic nuclei. This dissertation reports on measurements of resonances in 18Ne, 30S and 9Be. The radioactive nucleus 18Ne was studied via the 16O(3He, n) reaction. These resonances are relevant in understanding one of the two breakout paths from the Hot Carbon-Oxygen-Nitrogen (HCNO) cycle. Neutrons from this reaction were measured in coincidence with charged particles from the decay of resonances in 18Ne to directly extract the charged particle branching ratios of the populated resonance states. Significant alpha branching ratios coming from the resonances at Eex = 7.95 MeV and Eex = 8.09 MeV were measured for the first time. Evidence of an exotic 2p decay is indicated from the state at Eex = 6.15 MeV. The results from this work allows for a more reliable calculation of the 14O( alpha, p)17F reaction rate, central in the breakout of the HCNO cycle and in the direct competition between alphap-process and the rp-process for the flow of nuclear material in the proton rich side of the valley of stability. The exotic nucleus 30S was studied via the 28 Si(3He, n) transfer reaction. Neutrons from this reaction were measured in coincidence with charged particle decays from the populated resonance states in 30S. Several states above Eex = 8.5 MeV are reported for the first time. For the states measured between the proton decay threshold and the alpha decay threshold, the branching ratios were extracted and used to tentatively assign spins and parities. The results led to the determination of the first experimental 26Si(alpha, p) 29P reaction rate. The calculated reaction rate is compared with statistical methods traditionally used in the calculations of such reaction rate. The results of the present work will be combined with the results of the 32S(p, t) experiment carried out by O'Brien. Resonance states with Isospin

  17. Cut and paste RNA for nuclear magnetic resonance, paramagnetic resonance enhancement, and electron paramagnetic resonance structural studies.

    PubMed

    Duss, Olivier; Diarra Dit Konté, Nana; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2015-01-01

    RNA is a crucial regulator involved in most molecular processes of life. Understanding its function at the molecular level requires high-resolution structural information. However, the dynamic nature of RNA complicates structure determination because crystallization is often not possible or can result in crystal-packing artifacts resulting in nonnative structures. To study RNA and its complexes in solution, we described an approach in which large multi-domain RNA or protein-RNA complex structures can be determined at high resolution from isolated domains determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and then constructing the entire macromolecular structure using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) long-range distance constraints. Every step in this structure determination approach requires different types of isotope or spin-labeled RNAs. Here, we present a simple modular RNA cut and paste approach including protocols to generate (1) small isotopically labeled RNAs (<10 nucleotides) for NMR structural studies, which cannot be obtained by standard protocols, (2) large segmentally isotope and/or spin-labeled RNAs for diamagnetic NMR and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement NMR, and (3) large spin-labeled RNAs for pulse EPR spectroscopy.

  18. Cyclotron resonant scattering in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. C. L.; Lamb, D. Q.; Loredo, T. J.; Wasserman, I. M.; Salpeter, E. E.

    1989-01-01

    Fits of theoretical spectra from Monte Carlo radiation-transfer calculations to dips at approximately 20 and 40 keV in a spectrum of the gamma-ray burst source GB 880 205 give best-fit values and 68 percent-confidence intervals for the magnetic field of (1.71 + or - 0.07) x 10 to the 12th G, the electron density of (1.2 + or - 0.6) x 10 to the 21st electrons/cm-squared, and the cosine of the viewing angle relative to the field of 0.31 + or - 0.05. The dips observed at approximately 20 keV in the spectra are interpreted as cyclotron resonant scattering, in which electrons undergo radiative 0 to 1 to 0 Landau transitions initiated by photons near the first harmonic. Physical self-consistency fixes the temperature, and the equilibrium temperature equals 5.3 + 0.3 or - 0.2 keV. These results suggest that this gamma-ray burst and many others which exhibit a low-energy dip originate from strongly magnetic neutron stars and are galactic in origin.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of macroscopic morphology and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Barrall, G A

    1995-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are traditionally used to study molecular level structure and dynamics with a noted exception in medically applied NMR imaging (MRI). In this work, new experimental methods and theory are presented relevant to the study of macroscopic morphology and dynamics using NMR field gradient techniques and solid state two-dimensional exchange NMR. The goal in this work is not to take some particular system and study it in great detail, rather it is to show the utility of a number of new and novel techniques using ideal systems primarily as a proof of principle. By taking advantage of the analogy between NMR imaging and diffraction, one may simplify the experiments necessary for characterizing the statistical properties of the sample morphology. For a sample composed of many small features, e.g. a porous medium, the NMR diffraction techniques take advantage of both the narrow spatial range and spatial isotropy of the sample`s density autocorrelation function to obtain high resolution structural information in considerably less time than that required by conventional NMR imaging approaches. The time savings of the technique indicates that NMR diffraction is capable of finer spatial resolution than conventional NMR imaging techniques. Radio frequency NMR imaging with a coaxial resonator represents the first use of cylindrically symmetric field gradients in imaging. The apparatus as built has achieved resolution at the micron level for water samples, and has the potential to be very useful in the imaging of circularly symmetric systems. The study of displacement probability densities in flow through a random porous medium has revealed the presence of features related to the interconnectedness of the void volumes. The pulsed gradient techniques used have proven successful at measuring flow properties for time and length scales considerably shorter than those studied by more conventional techniques.

  20. Detecting special nuclear materials in containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Eric B.; Prussin, Stanley G.

    2007-10-02

    A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a container. The system and its method include irradiating the container with an energetic beam, so as to induce a fission in the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

  1. Polaron hopping in olivine phosphates studied by nuclear resonant scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Sally June

    Valence fluctuations of Fe2+ and Fe3+ were studied in a solid solution of LixFePO4 by nuclear resonant forward scattering of synchrotron x rays while the sample was heated in a diamond-anvil pressure cell. The spectra acquired at different temperatures and pressures were analyzed for the frequencies of valence changes using the Blume-Tjon model of a system with a fluctuating Hamiltonian. These frequencies were analyzed to obtain activation energies and an activation volume for polaron hopping. There was a large suppression of hopping frequency with pressure, giving an anomalously large activation volume. This large, positive value is typical of ion diffusion, which indicates correlated motions of polarons, and Li+ ions that alter the dynamics of both. In a parallel study of NaxFePO4, the interplay between sodium ordering and electron mobility was investigated using a combination of synchrotron x-ray diffraction and nuclear resonant scattering. Conventional Mossbauer spectra were collected while the sample was heated in a resistive furnace. An analysis of the temperature evolution of the spectral shapes was used to identify the onset of fast electron hopping and determine the polaron hopping rate. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out in the same temperature range. Reitveld analysis of the diffraction patterns was used to determine the temperature of sodium redistribution on the lattice. The diffraction analysis also provides new information about the phase stability of the system. The temperature evolution of the iron site occupancies from the Mossbauer measurements, combined with the synchrotron diffraction results give strong evidence for a relationship between the onset of fast electron dynamics and the redistribution of sodium in the lattice. Measurements of activation barriers for polaron hopping gave fundamental insights about the correlation between electronic carriers and mobile ions. This work established that polaron-ion interactions

  2. Nuclear photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-09

    With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of

  3. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Laws, David D.

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone ({phi}/{psi}) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined {sup 13}C{sub a}, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of {alpha}-helical and {beta}-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly {beta}-sheet.

  4. Precision X-Band Linac Technologies for Nuclear Photonics Gamma-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Houck, T L; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Adolphsen, C E; Chu, T S; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, F; Wang, J W; Raubenheimer, T O; Ighigeanu, D; Toma, M; Cutoiu, D

    2011-08-31

    Nuclear photonics is an emerging field of research requiring new tools, including high spectral brightness, tunable gamma-ray sources; high photon energy, ultrahigh-resolution crystal spectrometers; and novel detectors. This presentation focuses on the precision linac technology required for Compton scattering gamma-ray light sources, and on the optimization of the laser and electron beam pulse format to achieve unprecedented spectral brightness. Within this context, high-gradient X-band technology will be shown to offer optimal performance in a compact package, when used in conjunction with the appropriate pulse format, and photocathode illumination and interaction laser technologies. The nascent field of nuclear photonics is enabled by the recent maturation of new technologies, including high-gradient X-band electron acceleration, robust fiber laser systems, and hyper-dispersion CPA. Recent work has been performed at LLNL to demonstrate isotope-specific detection of shielded materials via NRF using a tunable, quasi-monochromatic Compton scattering gamma-ray source operating between 0.2 MeV and 0.9 MeV photon energy. This technique is called Fluorescence Imaging in the Nuclear Domain with Energetic Radiation (or FINDER). This work has, among other things, demonstrated the detection of {sup 7}Li shielded by Pb, utilizing gamma rays generated by a linac-driven, laser-based Compton scattering gamma-ray source developed at LLNL. Within this context, a new facility is currently under construction at LLNL, with the goal of generating tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range, at a repetition rate of 120 Hz, and with a peak brightness in the 10{sup 20} photons/(s x mm{sup 2} x mrad{sup 2} x 0.1% bw).

  5. Discovery of Cyclotron Resonance Features in the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1806-20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Alaa I.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Swank, Jean H.; Parke, William; Zane, Silvia; Turolla, Roberto

    2002-01-01

    We report evidence of cyclotron resonance features from the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1806-20 in outburst, detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer in the spectrum of a long, complex precursor that preceded a strong burst. The features consist of a narrow 5.0 keV absorption line with modulation near its second and third harmonics (at 11.2 keV and 17.5 keV respectively). The line features are transient and are detected in the harder part of the precursor. The 5.0 keV feature is strong, with an equivalent width of approx. 500 eV and a narrow width of less than 0.4 keV. Interpreting the features as electron cyclotron lines in the context of accretion models leads to a large mass-radius ratio (M/R greater than 0.3 solar mass/km) that is inconsistent with neutron stars or that requires a low (5-7) x 10(exp 11) G magnetic field that is unlikely for SGRs. The line widths are also narrow compared with those of electron cyclotron resonances observed so far in X-ray pulsars. In the magnetar picture, the features are plausibly explained as ion cyclotron resonances in an ultra-strong magnetic field that have recently been predicted from magnetar candidates. In this view, the 5.0 keV feature is consistent with a proton cyclotron fundamental whose energy and width are close to model predictions. The line energy would correspond to a surface magnetic field of 1.0 x 10(exp 15) G for SGR 1806-20, in good agreement with that inferred from the spin-down measure in the source.

  6. Discovery of Cyclotron Resonance Features in the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1806-20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, A. I.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Swank, Jean H.; Parke, William; Zane, Silvia; Turolla, Roberto; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report evidence for cyclotron resonance features from the Soft Gamma Repeater SCR 1806-20 in outburst, detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer in the spectrum of a long, complex precursor that preceded a strong burst. The features consist of a narrow 5.0 keV absorption line with modulation near its second and third harmonics (at 11.2 keV and 17.5 keV respectively). The line features are transient and are detected in the harder part of the precursor. The 5.0 keV feature is strong, with an equivalent width of approx. 500 eV, and a narrow width of < 0.4 keV. Interpreting the features as electron cyclotron lines in the context of accretion models leads to a large mass-radius ratio (M/R > 0.3 Solar Mass/km) that is inconsistent with neutron stars, or requires a low (5 - 7) x 10(exp 11) G magnetic field that is unlikely for SGRs. The line widths are also narrow compared to those of electron cyclotron resonances observed so far in X-ray pulsars. In the magnetar picture, the features are plausibly explained as ion cyclotron resonances in an ultra-strong magnetic field, which have recently been predicted from magnetar candidates. In this view, the 5.0 keV feature is consistent with a proton cyclotron fundamental whose energy and width are close to model predictions. The line energy would correspond to a surface magnetic field of 1.0 x 10(exp 15) G for SGR 1806-20, in good agreement with that inferred from the spin-down measure in the source.

  7. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance of quadrupolar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuanhu

    1997-09-17

    This dissertation describes two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance theory and experiments which have been developed to study quadruples in the solid state. The technique of multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) is extensively reviewed and expanded upon in this thesis. Specifically, MQMAS is first compared with another technique, dynamic-angle spinning (DAS). The similarity between the two techniques allows us to extend much of the DAS work to the MQMAS case. Application of MQMAS to a series of aluminum containing materials is then presented. The superior resolution enhancement through MQMAS is exploited to detect the five- and six-coordinated aluminum in many aluminosilicate glasses. Combining the MQMAS method with other experiments, such as HETCOR, greatly expands the possibility of the use of MQMAS to study a large range of problems and is demonstrated in Chapter 5. Finally, the technique switching-angle spinning (SAS) is applied to quadrupolar nuclei to fully characterize a quadrupolar spin system in which all of the 8 NMR parameters are accurately determined. This dissertation is meant to demonstrate that with the combination of two-dimensional NMR concepts and new advanced spinning technologies, a series of multiple-dimensional NMR techniques can be designed to allow a detailed study of quadrupolar nuclei in the solid state.

  8. Updated methodology for nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of shales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.

    2013-01-01

    Unconventional petroleum resources, particularly in shales, are expected to play an increasingly important role in the world’s energy portfolio in the coming years. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), particularly at low-field, provides important information in the evaluation of shale resources. Most of the low-field NMR analyses performed on shale samples rely heavily on standard T1 and T2 measurements. We present a new approach using solid echoes in the measurement of T1 and T1–T2 correlations that addresses some of the challenges encountered when making NMR measurements on shale samples compared to conventional reservoir rocks. Combining these techniques with standard T1 and T2 measurements provides a more complete assessment of the hydrogen-bearing constituents (e.g., bitumen, kerogen, clay-bound water) in shale samples. These methods are applied to immature and pyrolyzed oil shale samples to examine the solid and highly viscous organic phases present during the petroleum generation process. The solid echo measurements produce additional signal in the oil shale samples compared to the standard methodologies, indicating the presence of components undergoing homonuclear dipolar coupling. The results presented here include the first low-field NMR measurements performed on kerogen as well as detailed NMR analysis of highly viscous thermally generated bitumen present in pyrolyzed oil shale.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance proton imaging of bone pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Atlan, H.; Sigal, R.; Hadar, H.; Chisin, R.; Cohen, I.; Lanir, A.; Soudry, M.; Machtey, Y.; Schreiber, R.; Benmair, J.

    1986-02-01

    Thirty-two patients with diversified pathology were examined with a supraconductive NMR imager using spin echo with different TR and TE to obtain T1 and T2 weighted images. They included 20 tumors (12 primary, eight metastasis), six osteomyelitis, three fractures, two osteonecrosis, and one diffuse metabolic (Gaucher) disease. In all cases except for the stress fractures, the bone pathology was clearly visualized in spite of the normal lack of signal from the compact cortical bone. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging proved to be at least as sensitive as radionuclide scintigraphy but much more accurate than all other imaging procedures including computed tomography (CT) and angiography to assess the extension of the lesions, especially in tumors extended to soft tissue. This is due both to easy acquisition of sagittal and coronal sections and to different patterns of pathologic modifications of T1 and T2 which are beginning to be defined. It is hoped that more experience in clinical use of these patterns will help to discriminate between tumor extension and soft-tissue edema. We conclude that while radionuclide scintigraphy will probably remain the most sensitive and easy to perform screening test for bone pathology, NMR imaging, among noninvasive diagnostic procedures, appears to be at least as specific as CT. In addition, where the extension of the lesions is concerned, NMR imaging is much more informative than CT. In pathology of the spine, the easy visualization of the spinal cord should decrease the need for myelography.

  10. Discrete decoding based ultrafast multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Liangjie; Ye, Qimiao; Li, Jing; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-07-14

    The three-dimensional (3D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy constitutes an important and powerful tool in analyzing chemical and biological systems. However, the abundant 3D information arrives at the expense of long acquisition times lasting hours or even days. Therefore, there has been a continuous interest in developing techniques to accelerate recordings of 3D NMR spectra, among which the ultrafast spatiotemporal encoding technique supplies impressive acquisition speed by compressing a multidimensional spectrum in a single scan. However, it tends to suffer from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions, which deteriorates in cases of NMR spectroscopy with more dimensions. In this study, the discrete decoding is proposed to liberate the ultrafast technique from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions by focusing decoding on signal-bearing sites. For verifying its feasibility and effectiveness, we utilized the method to generate two different types of 3D spectra. The proposed method is also applicable to cases with more than three dimensions, which, based on the experimental results, may widen applications of the ultrafast technique.

  11. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Naruse, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tanaka, C.; Hirakawa, K.; Nishikawa, H.; Yoshizaki, K.

    1982-06-01

    The water in normal and edematous brain tissues of rats was studied by the pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, measuring the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and the transverse relaxation time (T2). In the normal brain, T1 and T2 were single components, both shorter than in pure water. Prolongation and separation of T2 into two components, one fast and one slow, were the characteristic findings in brain edema induced by both cold injury and triethyl tin (TET), although some differences between the two types of edema existed in the content of the lesion and in the degree of changes in T1 and T2 values. Quantitative analysis of T1 and T2 values in their time course relating to water content demonstrated that prolongation of T1 referred to the volume of increased water in tissues examined, and that two phases of T2 reflected the distribution and the content of the edema fluid. From the analysis of the slow component of T2 versus water content during edema formation, it was demonstrated that the increase in edema fluid was steady, and its content was constant during formation of TET-induced edema. On the contrary, during the formation of cold-injury edema, water-rich edema fluid increased during the initial few hours, and protein-rich edema fluid increased thereafter. It was concluded that proton NMR relaxation time measurements may provide new understanding in the field of brain edema research.

  12. Monitoring iron mineralization processes using nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, Kristina

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements can be used to probe the molecular-scale physical and chemical environment of water in the pore space of geological materials. In geophysics, NMR relaxation measurements are used in to measure water content and estimate permeability in the top 100 m of Earth's surface. The goal of the research presented in this thesis is to determine if NMR can also be used in geophysical applications to monitor iron mineralization processes associated with contaminant remediation. The first part of the research presented in this thesis focuses on understanding the effect of iron mineral form and redox state on the NMR relaxation response of water in geologic material. Laboratory NMR measurements were made on Fe(III)-bearing minerals (ferrihydrite, lepidocrocite, goethite, and hematite), Fe(II)-bearing minerals (siderite, pyrite, and troilite), and a mixed valence iron-bearing mineral (magnetite). The results of these measurements show that the relaxation rate of water is strongly dependent on the mineral form of iron. Shown in the final section of this thesis are results from an experiment exploring temporal changes in the measured NMR relaxation rates during the reaction of ferrihydrite with aqueous Fe(II). These results show that NMR can be used to monitor temporal chemical changes in iron minerals. I conclude that this research shows that NMR indeed has the potential to be used as a tool for monitoring geochemical reactions associated with contaminant remediation.

  13. Water Permeability of Chlorella Cell Membranes by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Darryl G.; Steponkus, Peter L.; Bustard, Larry D.; Cotts, Robert M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurement by two nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques of the mean residence time τa of water molecules inside Chlorella vulgaris (Beijerinck) var. “viridis” (Chodot) is reported. The first is the Conlon and Outhred (1972 Biochim Biophys Acta 288: 354-361) technique in which extracellular water is doped with paramagnetic Mn2+ ions. Some complications in application of this technique are identified as being caused by the affinity of Chlorella cell walls for Mn2+ ions which shortens the NMR relaxation times of intra- and extracellular water. The second is based upon observations of effects of diffusion on the spin echo of intra- and extracellular water. Echo attenuation of intracellular water is distinguished from that of extracellular water by the extent to which diffusive motion is restricted. Intracellular water, being restricted to the cell volume, suffers less echo attenuation. From the dependence of echo amplitude upon gradient strength at several values of echo time, the mean residence time of intracellular water can be determined. From the mean residence time of intracellular water, the diffusional water permeability coefficient of the Chlorella membrane is calculated to be 2.1 ± 0.4 × 10−3 cm sec−1. PMID:16660456

  14. TOPICAL REVIEW: Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keevil, Stephen F.

    2006-08-01

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications.

  15. Stray-field nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, Leoncio; Sampayo, José

    2008-03-01

    Magnetic levitation has been proposed as an alternative approach to simulate on Earth microgravity conditions encountered in space, allowing the investigation of weightlessness on materials and biological systems. In general, very strong magnetic fields, 15T or higher, are required to achieve levitation for a majority of diamagnetic substances. Here, we show that it is possible to achieve levitation of these substances in a commercial superconductive magnet operating with a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer at 9.4T at ambient conditions. Furthermore, stray-field proton NMR imaging is performed in situ at the location where a sample is levitating, showing that it is feasible to obtain the corresponding one-dimensional profile. Considering that water is a diamagnetic substance and the main constituent of living systems, the outlined approach could be useful to investigate alterations in water proton NMR properties induced by low gravity and magnetic forces upon levitating, e.g., seeds, cells, etc. In addition to protons, it would also be possible to observe other nuclei (e.g., F19, P31, etc.) that may be of interest in metabolic and therapeutic investigations.

  16. Advances in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Powers, Robert

    2009-10-01

    BACKGROUND: Drug discovery is a complex and unpredictable endeavor with a high failure rate. Current trends in the pharmaceutical industry have exasperated these challenges and are contributing to the dramatic decline in productivity observed over the last decade. The industrialization of science by forcing the drug discovery process to adhere to assembly-line protocols is imposing unnecessary restrictions, such as short project time-lines. Recent advances in nuclear magnetic resonance are responding to these self-imposed limitations and are providing opportunities to increase the success rate of drug discovery. OBJECTIVE/METHOD: A review of recent advancements in NMR technology that have the potential of significantly impacting and benefiting the drug discovery process will be presented. These include fast NMR data collection protocols and high-throughput protein structure determination, rapid protein-ligand co-structure determination, lead discovery using fragment-based NMR affinity screens, NMR metabolomics to monitor in vivo efficacy and toxicity for lead compounds, and the identification of new therapeutic targets through the functional annotation of proteins by FAST-NMR. CONCLUSION: NMR is a critical component of the drug discovery process, where the versatility of the technique enables it to continually expand and evolve its role. NMR is expected to maintain this growth over the next decade with advancements in automation, speed of structure calculation, in-cell imaging techniques, and the expansion of NMR amenable targets.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of bovine γB-crystallin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurston, George; Mills, Jeffrey; Michel, Lea; Mathews, Kaylee; Zanet, John; Payan, Angel; van Nostrand, Keith; Kotlarchyk, Michael; Ross, David; Wahle, Christopher; Hamilton, John

    Anisotropy of shape and/or interactions play an important role in determining the properties of concentrated solutions of the eye lens protein, γB-crystallin, including its liquid-liquid phase transition. We are studying γB anisotropic interactions with use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) concentration- and temperature-dependent chemical shift perturbations (CSPs). We analyze two-dimensional heteronuclear spin quantum coherence (HSQC) spectra on backbone nitrogen and attached hydrogen nuclei for CSPs, up to 3 percent volume fraction. Cumulative distribution functions of the CSPs show a concentration and temperature-dependent spread. Many peaks that are highly shifted with either concentration or temperature are close (i) crystal intermolecular contacts (ii) locations of cataractogenic point mutations of a homologous human protein, human γD-crystallin, and (iii) charged amino-acid residues. We also discuss the concentration- and temperature-dependence of NMR and quasielastic light scattering measurements of rotational and translational diffusion of γB crystallin in solution, affected by interprotein attractions. Supported by NIH EY018249.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the kidney: renal masses

    SciTech Connect

    Hricak, H.; Williams, R.D.; Moon, K.L. Jr.; Moss, A.A.; Alpers, C.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-06-01

    Fifteen patients with a variety of renal masses were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), computed tomography, ultrasound, and intravenous urography. NMR clearly differentiated between simple renal cysts and other renal masses. On spin echo images, the simple renal cyst appeared as a round or slightly oval, homogeneous low-intensity mass with characteristically long T1 and T2 values. The thickness of the cyst wall was not measurable. The cyst had a smooth outer margin and a distict, sharp interface with normal parenchyma. Hemorrhagic cysts were seen as high-intensity lesions. Renal cell carcinomas displayed a wide range of intensity. The T1 and T2 values of the tumors were always different from those of the surrounding renal parenchyma. Tumor pseudocapsule was identified in four of five patients examined. All carcinomas were accurately staged by NMR and extension of the tumor thrombus into the inferior vena cava was demonstrated. The authors predict that if these preliminary results are confirmed by data from a larger number of patients, NMR will play a significant role in renal imaging.

  19. Spherical tensor analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance signals.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Jacco D; Carravetta, Marina; Antonioli, Gian Carlo; Levitt, Malcolm H

    2005-06-22

    In a nuclear magnetic-resonance (NMR) experiment, the spin density operator may be regarded as a superposition of irreducible spherical tensor operators. Each of these spin operators evolves during the NMR experiment and may give rise to an NMR signal at a later time. The NMR signal at the end of a pulse sequence may, therefore, be regarded as a superposition of spherical components, each derived from a different spherical tensor operator. We describe an experimental method, called spherical tensor analysis (STA), which allows the complete resolution of the NMR signal into its individual spherical components. The method is demonstrated on a powder of a (13)C-labeled amino acid, exposed to a pulse sequence generating a double-quantum effective Hamiltonian. The propagation of spin order through the space of spherical tensor operators is revealed by the STA procedure, both in static and rotating solids. Possible applications of STA to the NMR of liquids, liquid crystals, and solids are discussed. PMID:16035785

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water content in the subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hendricks; T. Yao; A. Kearns

    1999-01-21

    Previous theoretical and experimental studies indicated that surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has the potential to provide cost-effective water content measurements in the subsurface and is a technology ripe for exploitation in practice. The objectives of this investigation are (a) to test the technique under a wide range of hydrogeological conditions and (b) to generalize existing NMR theories in order to correctly model NMR response from conductive ground and to assess properties of the inverse problem. Twenty-four sites with different hydrogeologic settings were selected in New Mexico and Colorado for testing. The greatest limitation of surface NMR technology appears to be the lack of understanding in which manner the NMR signal is influenced by soil-water factors such as pore size distribution, surface-to-volume ratio, paramagnetic ions dissolved in the ground water, and the presence of ferromagnetic minerals. Although the theoretical basis is found to be sound, several advances need to be made to make surface NMR a viable technology for hydrological investigations. There is a research need to investigate, under controlled laboratory conditions, how the complex factors of soil-water systems affect NMR relaxation times.

  1. Polarization enhanced Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance with an atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Michael W.; Barrall, Geoffrey A.; Espy, Michelle A.; Monti, Mark C.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Okamitsu, Jeffrey K.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) has been demonstrated for the detection of 14-N in explosive compounds. Application of a material specific radio-frequency (RF) pulse excites a response typically detected with a wire- wound antenna. NQR is non-contact and material specific, however fields produced by NQR are typically very weak, making demonstration of practical utility challenging. For certain materials, the NQR signal can be increased by transferring polarization from hydrogen nuclei to nitrogen nuclei using external magnetic fields. This polarization enhancement (PE) can enhance the NQR signal by an order of magnitude or more. Atomic magnetometers (AM) have been shown to improve detection sensitivity beyond a conventional antenna by a similar amount. AM sensors are immune to piezo-electric effects that hamper conventional NQR, and can be combined to form a gradiometer for effective RF noise cancellation. In principle, combining polarization enhancement with atomic magnetometer detection should yield improvement in signal-to-noise ratio that is the product of the two methods, 100-fold or more over conventional NQR. However both methods are even more exotic than traditional NQR, and have never been combined due to challenges in operating a large magnetic field and ultra-sensitive magnetic field sensor in proximity. Here we present NQR with and without PE with an atomic magnetometer, demonstrating signal enhancement greater than 20-fold for ammonium nitrate. We also demonstrate PE for PETN using a traditional coil for detection with an enhancement factor of 10. Experimental methods and future applications are discussed.

  2. A nuclear magnetic resonance study of water in aggrecan solutions

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Richard J.; Damion, Robin A.; Baboolal, Thomas G.; Smye, Stephen W.; Ries, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Aggrecan, a highly charged macromolecule found in articular cartilage, was investigated in aqueous salt solutions with proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates were determined at two different field strengths, 9.4 T and 0.5 T, for a range of temperatures and aggrecan concentrations. The diffusion coefficients of the water molecules were also measured as a function of temperature and aggrecan concentration, using a pulsed field gradient technique at 9.4 T. Assuming an Arrhenius relationship, the activation energies for the various relaxation processes and the translational motion of the water molecules were determined from temperature dependencies as a function of aggrecan concentration in the range 0–5.3% w/w. The longitudinal relaxation rate and inverse diffusion coefficient were approximately equally dependent on concentration and only increased by upto 20% from that of the salt solution. The transverse relaxation rate at high field demonstrated greatest concentration dependence, changing by an order of magnitude across the concentration range examined. We attribute this primarily to chemical exchange. Activation energies appeared to be approximately independent of aggrecan concentration, except for that of the low-field transverse relaxation rate, which decreased with concentration. PMID:27069663

  3. Discrete decoding based ultrafast multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Liangjie; Ye, Qimiao; Li, Jing; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-07-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy constitutes an important and powerful tool in analyzing chemical and biological systems. However, the abundant 3D information arrives at the expense of long acquisition times lasting hours or even days. Therefore, there has been a continuous interest in developing techniques to accelerate recordings of 3D NMR spectra, among which the ultrafast spatiotemporal encoding technique supplies impressive acquisition speed by compressing a multidimensional spectrum in a single scan. However, it tends to suffer from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions, which deteriorates in cases of NMR spectroscopy with more dimensions. In this study, the discrete decoding is proposed to liberate the ultrafast technique from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions by focusing decoding on signal-bearing sites. For verifying its feasibility and effectiveness, we utilized the method to generate two different types of 3D spectra. The proposed method is also applicable to cases with more than three dimensions, which, based on the experimental results, may widen applications of the ultrafast technique.

  4. Work in progress: nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the gallbladder

    SciTech Connect

    Hricak, H.; Filly, R.A.; Margulis, A.R.; Moon, K.L.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-05-01

    A preliminary study of the relation between food intake and intensity of gallbladder bile on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images was made. Twelve subjects (seven volunteers, five patients) were imaged following a minimum of 14 hours of fasting. Six of seven volunteers were reimaged one hour after stimulation by either a fatty meal or an alcoholic beverage. An additional seven patients were imaged two hours after a hospital breakfast. It was found that concentrated bile emits a high-intensity spin echo signal (SE), while hepatic bile in the gallbladder produces a low-intensity SE signal. Following ingestion of cholecystogogue, dilute hepatic bile settles on top of the concentrated bile, each emitting SE signals of different intensity. The average T1 value of concentrated bile was 594 msec, while the T1 vaue of dilute hepatic bile was 2,646 msec. The average T2 values were 104 msec for concentrated bile and 126 msec for dilute bile. The most likely cause for the different SE intensities of bile is the higher water content, and therefore longer T1 or T2 relaxation times, of hepatic bile. It is suggested that NMR imaging has the ability to provide physiological information about the gallbladder and that it may prove to be a simple and safe clinical test of gallbladder function.

  5. Advances in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Background Drug discovery is a complex and unpredictable endeavor with a high failure rate. Current trends in the pharmaceutical industry have exasperated these challenges and are contributing to the dramatic decline in productivity observed over the last decade. The industrialization of science by forcing the drug discovery process to adhere to assembly-line protocols is imposing unnecessary restrictions, such as short project time-lines. Recent advances in nuclear magnetic resonance are responding to these self-imposed limitations and are providing opportunities to increase the success rate of drug discovery. Objective/Method A review of recent advancements in NMR technology that have the potential of significantly impacting and benefiting the drug discovery process will be presented. These include fast NMR data collection protocols and high-throughput protein structure determination, rapid protein-ligand co-structure determination, lead discovery using fragment-based NMR affinity screens, NMR metabolomics to monitor in vivo efficacy and toxicity for lead compounds, and the identification of new therapeutic targets through the functional annotation of proteins by FAST-NMR. Conclusion NMR is a critical component of the drug discovery process, where the versatility of the technique enables it to continually expand and evolve its role. NMR is expected to maintain this growth over the next decade with advancements in automation, speed of structure calculation, in-cell imaging techniques, and the expansion of NMR amenable targets. PMID:20333269

  6. Nuclear resonance tomography with a toroid cavity detector

    DOEpatents

    Woelk, K.; Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

    1996-11-12

    A toroid cavity detection system is described for determining the spectral properties and distance from a fixed point for a sample using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The detection system consists of a toroid with a central conductor oriented along the main axis of the toroidal cylinder and perpendicular to a static uniform magnetic field oriented along the main axis of the toroid. An rf signal is input to the central conductor to produce a magnetic field perpendicular to the central axis of the toroid and whose field strength varies as the inverse of the radius of the toroid. The toroid cavity detection system can be used to encapsulate a sample, or the detection system can be perforated to allow a sample to flow into the detection device or to place the samples in specified sample tubes. The central conductor can also be coated to determine the spectral property of the coating and the coating thickness. The sample is then subjected to the respective magnetic fields and the responses measured to determine the desired properties. 4 figs.

  7. A metabonomics investigation of multiple sclerosis by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Mehrpour, Masoud; Kyani, Anahita; Tafazzoli, Mohsen; Fathi, Fariba; Joghataie, Mohammad-Taghi

    2013-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects the fatty myelin sheaths around the axons of the brain and spinal cord, leading to demyelination and a broad range of signs and symptoms. MS can be difficult to diagnose because its signs and symptoms may be similar to other medical problems. To find out which metabolites in serum are effective for the diagnosis of MS, we utilized metabolic profiling using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-NMR). Random forest (RF) was used to classify the MS patients and healthy subjects. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to measure the serum levels of selenium. The results showed that the levels of selenium were lower in the MS group, when compared with the control group. RF was used to identify the metabolites that caused selenium changes in people with MS by building a correlation model between these metabolites and serum levels of selenium. For the external test set, the obtained classification model showed a 93% correct classification of MS and healthy subjects. The regression model of levels of selenium and metabolites showed the correlation (R(2)) value of 0.88 for the external test set. The results indicate the suitability of NMR as a screen for identifying MS patients and healthy subjects. A novel model with good prediction outcomes was constructed between serum levels of selenium and NMR data. PMID:23255426

  8. Nuclear resonance tomography with a toroid cavity detector

    DOEpatents

    Woelk, Klaus; Rathke, Jerome W.; Klingler, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    A toroid cavity detection system for determining the spectral properties and distance from a fixed point for a sample using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The detection system consists of a toroid with a central conductor oriented along the main axis of the toroidal cylinder and perpendicular to a static uniform magnetic field oriented along the main axis of the toroid. An rf signal is inputted to the central conductor to produce a magnetic field perpendicular to the central axis of the toroid and whose field strength varies as the inverse of the radius of the toroid. The toroid cavity detection system can be used to encapsulate a sample, or the detection system can be perforated to allow a sample to flow into the detection device or to place the samples in specified sample tubes. The central conductor can also be coated to determine the spectral property of the coating and the coating thickness. The sample is then subjected to the respective magnetic fields and the responses measured to determine the desired properties.

  9. Phenotypic screening of hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4-{gamma} receptor knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdin, Anna Karin; Surve, Vikas V.; Joensson, Marie; Bjursell, Mikael; Edenro, Anne; Schuelke, Meint; Saad, Alaa; Bjurstroem, Sivert; Lundgren, Elisabeth Jensen; Snaith, Michael; Fransson-Steen, Ronny; Toernell, Jan; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad . E-mail: mohammad.bohlooly@astrazeneca.com

    2006-10-20

    Using the mouse as a model organism in pharmaceutical research presents unique advantages as its physiology in many ways resembles the human physiology, it also has a relatively short generation time, low breeding and maintenance costs, and is available in a wide variety of inbred strains. The ability to genetically modify mouse embryonic stem cells to generate mouse models that better mimic human disease is another advantage. In the present study, a comprehensive phenotypic screening protocol is applied to elucidate the phenotype of a novel mouse knockout model of hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4-{gamma}. HNF4-{gamma} is expressed in the kidneys, gut, pancreas, and testis. First level of the screen is aimed at general health, morphologic appearance, normal cage behaviour, and gross neurological functions. The second level of the screen looks at metabolic characteristics and lung function. The third level of the screen investigates behaviour more in-depth and the fourth level consists of a thorough pathological characterisation, blood chemistry, haematology, and bone marrow analysis. When compared with littermate wild-type mice (HNF4-{gamma}{sup +/+}), the HNF4-{gamma} knockout (HNF4-{gamma}{sup -/-}) mice had lowered energy expenditure and locomotor activity during night time that resulted in a higher body weight despite having reduced intake of food and water. HNF4-{gamma}{sup -/-} mice were less inclined to build nest and were found to spend more time in a passive state during the forced swim test.

  10. Color changes in CR-39 nuclear track detector by gamma and laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouh, S. A.; Said, A. F.; Atta, M. R.; El-Melleegy, W. M.; El-Meniawy, S.

    2006-07-01

    A study of the effect of gamma and laser irradiation on the color changes of polyallyl diglycol (CR-39) solid-state nuclear track detector was performed. CR-39 detector samples were classified into two main groups. The first group was irradiated with gamma doses at levels between 20 and 300 kGy, whereas the second group was exposed to infrared laser radiation with energy fluences at levels between 0.71 and 8.53 J/cm(2) . The transmission of these samples in the wavelength range 300-2500 nm, as well as any color changes, was studied. Using the transmission data, both the tristimulus and the coordinate values of the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) LAB were calculated. Also, the color differences between the non-irradiated samples and those irradiated with different gamma or laser doses were calculated. The results indicate that the CR-39 detector acquires color changes under gamma or laser irradiation, but it has more response to color changes by gamma irradiation. In addition, structural property studies using infrared spectroscopy were performed. The results indicate that the irradiation of a CR-39 detector with gamma or laser radiations causes the cleavage of the carbonate linkage that can be attributed to the H abstraction from the backbone of the polymer, associated with the formation of CO 2 and OH with varying intensities.

  11. Nuclear Reactions X-Sections By Evaporation Model, Gamma-Cascades

    2000-06-27

    Calculation of energy-averaged cross sections for nuclear reactions with emission of particles and gamma rays and fission. The models employed are the evaporation model with inclusion of pre-equilibrium decay and gamma ray cascade model. Angular momentum and parity conservation are accounted for. Major improvement to the 1976 STAPRE program (NEA 0461) relates to level density approach, implemwnted in subroutine ZSTDE. Generalized superfluid model is incorporated, Boltzman-gas modelling of intrinsic state density and semi-empirical modelling ofmore » a few quasiparticle effects in total level density in equilibrium and saddle deformations of actinide nuclei.« less

  12. Initial results from a multiple monoenergetic gamma radiography system for nuclear security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Day, Buckley E.; Hartwig, Zachary S.; Lanza, Richard C.; Danagoulian, Areg

    2016-10-01

    The detection of assembled nuclear devices and concealed special nuclear materials (SNM) such as plutonium or uranium in commercial cargo traffic is a major challenge in mitigating the threat of nuclear terrorism. Currently available radiographic and active interrogation systems use ∼1-10 MeV bremsstrahlung photon beams. Although simple to build and operate, bremsstrahlung-based systems deliver high radiation doses to the cargo and to potential stowaways. To eliminate problematic issues of high dose, we are developing a novel technique known as multiple monoenergetic gamma radiography (MMGR). MMGR uses ion-induced nuclear reactions to produce two monoenergetic gammas for dual-energy radiography. This allows us to image the areal density and effective atomic number (Zeff) of scanned cargo. We present initial results from the proof-of-concept experiment, which was conducted at the MIT Bates Research and Engineering Center. The purpose of the experiment was to assess the capabilities of MMGR to measure areal density and Zeff of container cargo mockups. The experiment used a 3.0 MeV radiofrequency quadrupole accelerator to create sources of 4.44 MeV and 15.11 MeV gammas from the 11B(d,nγ)12C reaction in a thick natural boron target; the gammas are detected by an array of NaI(Tl) detectors after transmission through cargo mockups . The measured fluxes of transmitted 4.44 MeV and 15.11 MeV gammas were used to assess the areal density and Zeff. Initial results show that MMGR is capable of discriminating the presence of high-Z materials concealed in up to 30 cm of iron shielding from low- and mid-Z materials present in the cargo mockup.

  13. Search for the electromagnetic decay of {Delta}(1232) resonance in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Badala, A.; Barbera, R.; Gulino, M.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G.S.; Riggi, F.; Russo, A.C.; Russo, G.; Turrisi, R.; Barbera, R.; Gulino, M.; Riggi, F.; Russo, G.; Turrisi, R.; Bonasera, A.

    1998-01-01

    In order to inquire into the existence and significance of non-nucleonic degrees of freedom in the intermediate-energy regime, the production of protons and high-energy photons (E{sub {gamma}}{gt}30 MeV) emitted in the reaction {sup 36}Ar+{sup 27}Al at 95 MeV/nucleon has been studied. The quantitative analysis of the ({gamma}-p) invariant-mass and relative-angle distributions shows evidences of {Delta}(1232)-resonance excitation and {Delta}{r_arrow}N{gamma} decay. Experimental data are in agreement with microscopic theoretical calculations. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. MEMS-Based Force-Detected Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FDNMR) Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choonsup; Butler, Mark C.; Elgammal, Ramez A.; George, Thomas; Hunt, Brian; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allows assignment of molecular structure by acquiring the energy spectrum of nuclear spins in a molecule, and by interpreting the symmetry and positions of resonance lines in the spectrum. As such, NMR has become one of the most versatile and ubiquitous spectroscopic methods. Despite these tremendous successes, NMR experiments suffer from inherent low sensitivity due to the relatively low energy of photons in the radio frequency (rt) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Here, we describe a high-resolution spectroscopy in samples with diameters in the micron range and below. We have reported design and fabrication of force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (FDNMR).

  15. Nuclear Transparency with the gamma + n -> pi- + p Process in 4He

    SciTech Connect

    Dipangkar Dutta; Feng Xiong; Lingyan Zhu; John Arrington; Todd Averett; Elizabeth Beise; John Calarco; Ting Chang; Jian-Ping Chen; Eugene Chudakov; Marius Coman; Benjamin Clasie; Christopher Crawford; Sonja Dieterich; Frank Dohrmann; Kevin Fissum; Salvatore Frullani; Haiyan Gao; Ronald Gilman; Charles Glashausser; Javier Gomez; Kawtar Hafidi; Jens-Ole Hansen; Douglas Higinbotham; R.J. Holt; Cornelis De Jager; Xiaochao Zheng; X. Jiang; Edward Kinney; Kevin Kramer; Gerfried Kumbartzki; John LeRose; Nilanga Liyanage; David Mack; Pete Markowitz; Kathy McCormick; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Robert Michaels; J. Mitchell; Sirish Nanda; David Potterveld; Ronald Ransome; Paul Reimer; Bodo Reitz; Arunava Saha; Elaine Schulte; Charles Seely; Simon Sirca; Steffen Strauch; Vincent Sulkosky; Branislav Vlahovic; Lawrence Weinstein; Krishni Wijesooriya; Claude Williamson; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Hong XIANG; Wang Xu; J. Zeng

    2003-08-01

    We have measured the nuclear transparency of the fundamental process {gamma} n {yields} {pi}{sup -} p in {sup 4}He. These measurements were performed at Jefferson Lab in the photon energy range of 1.6 to 4.5 GeV and at {theta}{sub cm}{sup {pi}} = 70{sup o} and 90{sup o}. These measurements are the first of their kind in the study of nuclear transparency in photoreactions. They also provide a benchmark test of Glauber calculations based on traditional models of nuclear physics. The transparency results suggest deviations from the traditional nuclear physics picture. The momentum transfer dependence of the measured nuclear transparency is consistent with Glauber calculations which include the quantum chromodynamics phenomenon of color transparency.

  16. Development of a micro nuclear magnetic resonance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloshevsky, Artem

    Application of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to on-line/in-line control of industrial processes is currently limited by equipment costs and requirements for installation. A superconducting magnet generating strong fields is the most expensive part of a typical NMR instrument. In industrial environments, fringe magnetic fields make accommodation of NMR instruments difficult. However, a portable, low-cost and low-field magnetic resonance system can be used in virtually any environment. Development of a number of hardware components for a portable, low-cost NMR instrument is reported in this dissertation. Chapter one provides a discussion on a miniaturized Helmholtz spiral radio-frequency (RF) coil (average diameter equal to 3.5 mm) and an NMR probe built around a capillary (outer diameter = 1.59 mm and inner diameter = 1.02 mm) for flow imaging. Experiments of NMR spectroscopy, static and dynamic (flow) imaging, conducted with the use of the miniaturized coil, are described. Chapter two presents a microfabricated package of two biaxial gradient coils and a Helmholtz RF coil. Planar configuration of discrete wires was used to create magnetic field gradients. Performance of the microfabricated gradient coils while imaging water flow compared well with a commercial gradient set of much larger size. Chapter three reports on flow imaging experiments with power law fluids (aqueous solutions of sodium salt of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)) of different viscosities, carried out in the NMR probe with the miniaturized RF coil and capillary. Viscosities of the CMC solutions were determined based on the curve fits of the velocity profiles and simultaneous measurements of the flow rates. The curve fits were carried out according to the power law model equations. The NMR viscosity measurements compared well with measurements of the same CMC samples, performed on a conventional rotational rheometer. A portable, home-built transceiver, designed for NMR applications utilizing a

  17. [Progress in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for early cancer diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiu-xiang; Xu, Yi-zhuang; Zhao, Mei-xian; Qi, Jian; Li, Hui-zhen; Wu, Jin-guang

    2008-08-01

    Based on more than 100 references, the present paper reviews the progress in the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, an effective method to study the variation in chemical composition and molecular structure in biological samples for early diagnosis of cancer at molecular level. In the past several decades, numerous works have demonstrated that NMR spectroscopy may be developed into a sensitive diagnosis method to detect cancer in early stage. Because of the rapid development of NMR spectroscopic techniques, it becomes possible to record NMR spectra of biological samples in both in-vitro and in-vivo manner. Systematic spectral differences between biological samples from cancer patients and normal controls can be observed from both liquid-state and solid-state 1H, 31P NMR spectra and used to reflect the changes in metabolic behavior of malignant tissues. This paper has summarized NMR spectroscopic investigation on biological fluid, cultured cancerous cells, resected tissues, as well as in-vivo malignant tissues by using various advanced NMR techniques including recently developedhigh-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS)and magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRSI) methods. First, characteristic peaks, which are related to choline, phosphocholine (PC) and glycerophosphocholine, can be observed in both 1H and 31P NMR spectra of biological fluid samples from cancer patients. These results indicate that alternation in the metabolic pattern occurs with the progression of cancer. The research on cultured cells by using NMR spectroscopy showed that the signal of various phospholipids and their metabolites such as PME increased significantly in cultured cancer cells. For resected tissues, two methods can be utilized. The first one is to investigate the tissues directly by using HR-MAS spectroscopy. The second method is to extract various metabolites with various solvents such as CHCl3/methonal mixtures, HClO4 solutions, etc. and then

  18. Gated in vivo examination of cardiac metabolites with /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kantor, H.L.; Briggs, R.W.; Metz, K.R.; Balaban, R.S.

    1986-07-01

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 31/P NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the temporal aspects of metabolism of canine heart in vivo. An NMR catheter coil was passed through the jugular vein of a dog into the apex of the right ventricle and spectra were recorded at four points in the cardiac cycle by triggering from the blood pressure trace of the animal. The /sup 31/P spin-lattice relaxation times of phosphocreatine (PC) and the ..gamma../sup -/,..cap alpha../sup -/, and ..beta..-phosphates of ATP at 1.89 Tesla are 4.4, 1.8, 1.7, and 1.6 s, respectively. The ratio of PC to ATP is 2.0. No changes in PC/ATP were noted in any of the four portions of the cardiac cycle examined, and difference spectra exhibited no observable signals, in contrast to previously reported results for glucose-perfused rat hearts. On the assumption that intracellular pH and the total creatine pool were constant, the expression for the creatine kinase reaction was used to deduce that free ADP concentrations were invariant throughout the cardiac cycle. This is in apparent disagreement with the proposed regulatory role for ADP in heart oxidative phosphorylation.

  19. Extreme nuclear shapes examined via giant dipole resonance lineshapes in hot light-mass systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, Deepak; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pal, Surajit; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Dey, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T.; Banerjee, S. R.; De, A.; Gupta, D.

    2010-06-15

    The influence of alpha clustering on nuclear reaction dynamics is investigated using the giant dipole resonance (GDR) lineshape studies in the reactions {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=145,160 MeV) + {sup 12}C and {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=160 MeV) + {sup 27}Al, populating {sup 32}S and {sup 47}V, respectively. The GDR lineshapes from the two systems are remarkably different from each other. Whereas, the non-alpha-like {sup 47}V undergoes Jacobi shape transition and matches exceptionally well with the theoretical GDR lineshape estimated under the framework rotating liquid drop model (RLDM) and thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) signifying shape equilibration, for the alpha cluster {sup 32}S an extended prolate kind of shape is observed. This unusual deformation, seen directly via gamma decay for the first time, is predicted to be due to the formation of orbiting dinuclear configuration or molecular structure of {sup 16}O + {sup 16}O in the {sup 32}S superdeformed band.

  20. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS). In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. PMID:27294925

  1. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2016-06-09

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS). In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery.

  2. Detecting body cavity bombs with nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Michael London

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a technology with great potential for detecting hidden explosives. Past NQR research has studied the detection of land mines and bombs concealed within luggage and packages. This thesis focuses on an NQR application that has received less attention and little or no publicly available research: detecting body cavity bombs (BCBs). BCBs include explosives that have been ingested, inserted into orifices, or surgically implanted. BCBs present a threat to aviation and secure facilities. They are extremely difficult to detect with the technology currently employed at security checkpoints. To evaluate whether or not NQR can be used to detect BCBs, a computational model is developed to assess how the dielectric properties of biological tissue affect the radio frequency magnetic field employed in NQR (0.5-5MHz). The relative permittivity of some biological tissue is very high (over 1,000 at 1MHz), making it conceivable that there is a significant effect on the electromagnetic field. To study this effect, the low-frequency approximation known as the Darwin model is employed. First, the electromagnetic field of a coil is calculated in free space. Second, a dielectric object or set of objects is introduced, and the free-space electric field is modified to accommodate the dielectric object ensuring that the relevant boundary conditions are obeyed. Finally, the magnetic field associated with the corrected electric field is calculated. This corrected magnetic field is evaluated with an NQR simulation to estimate the impact of dielectric tissue on NQR measurements. The effect of dielectric tissue is shown to be small, thus obviating a potential barrier to BCB detection. The NQR model presented may assist those designing excitation and detection coils for NQR. Some general coil design considerations and strategies are discussed.

  3. Advances in Theory of Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Mananga, Eugene S.; Moghaddasi, Jalil; Sana, Ajaz; Akinmoladun, Andrew; Sadoqi, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in theory of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) such as Floquet-Magnus expansion and Fer expansion, address alternative methods for solving a time-dependent linear differential equation which is a central problem in quantum physics in general and solid-state NMR in particular. The power and the salient features of these theoretical approaches that are helpful to describe the time evolution of the spin system at all times are presented. This review article presents a broad view of manipulations of spin systems in solid-state NMR, based on milestones theories including the average Hamiltonian theory and the Floquet theory, and the approaches currently developing such as the Floquet-Magnus expansion and the Fer expansion. All these approaches provide procedures to control and describe the spin dynamics in solid-state NMR. Applications of these theoretical methods to stroboscopic and synchronized manipulations, non-synchronized experiments, multiple incommensurated frequencies, magic-angle spinning samples, are illustrated. We also reviewed the propagators of these theories and discussed their convergences. Note that the FME is an extension of the popular Magnus Expansion and Average Hamiltonian Theory. It aims is to bridge the AHT to the Floquet Theorem but in a more concise and efficient formalism. Calculations can then be performed in a finite-dimensional Hilbert space instead of an infinite dimensional space within the so-called Floquet theory. We expected that the FME will provide means for more accurate and efficient spin dynamics simulation and for devising new RF pulse sequence. PMID:26878063

  4. Predicting Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectra of [Fe(OEP)(NO)].

    PubMed

    Peng, Qian; Pavlik, Jeffrey W; Scheidt, W Robert; Wiest, Olaf

    2012-01-10

    Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy (NRVS) is a sensitive vibrational probe for biologically important heme complexes. The exquisite sensitivity of the NRVS data to the electronic structure provides detailed insights into the nature of these interesting compounds, but requires highly accurate computational methods for the mode assignments. To determine the best combinations of density functionals and basis sets, a series of benchmark DFT calculations on the previously characterized complex [Fe(OEP)NO] (OEP(2-)=octaethylporphyrinatio dianion) were performed. A test set of 21 methodology combinations including 8 functionals (BP86, mPWPW91, B3LYP, PBE1PBE, M062X, M06L, LC-BP86 and ωB97X-D) and 5 basis set (VTZ, TZVP, Lanl2DZ for iron and 6-31G*, 6-31+G* for other atoms) was carried out to calculate electronic structures and vibrational frequencies. We also implemented the conversion of frequency calculations into orientation-selective mode composition factors (e(2)), which can used to simulate the Vibrational Density Of States (VDOS) using Gaussian normal distribution functions. These use a series of user-friendly scripts for their application to NRVS. The structures as well as the isotropic and anisotropic NRVS of [Fe(OEP)NO] obtained with the M06L functional with a variety of basis sets are found to best reproduce the available experimental data, followed by B3LYP/LanL2DZ calculations. Other density functionals and basis sets do not produce the same level of accuracy. The noticeably worse agreement between theory and experiment for the out-plane NRVS compared with the excellent performance of the M06L functional for the in-plane prediction is attributed to deficiencies of the physical model rather than the computational methodology. PMID:23204948

  5. Prompt gamma ray diagnostics and enhanced hadron-therapy using neutron-free nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffrida, L.; Margarone, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Picciotto, A.; Cuttone, G.; Korn, G.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a series of simulations about the potential use of Boron isotopes to trigger neutron-free (aneutronic) nuclear reactions in cancer cells through the interaction with an incoming energetic proton beam, thus resulting in the emission of characteristic prompt gamma radiation (429 keV, 718 keV and 1435 keV). Furthermore assuming that the Boron isotopes are absorbed in cancer cells, the three alpha-particles produced in each p-11B aneutronic nuclear fusion reactions can potentially result in the enhancement of the biological dose absorbed in the tumor region since these multi-MeV alpha-particles are stopped inside the single cancer cell, thus allowing to spare the surrounding tissues. Although a similar approach based on the use of 11B nuclei has been proposed in [Yoon et al. Applied Physics Letters 105, 223507 (2014)], our work demonstrate, using Monte Carlo simulations, the crucial importance of the use of 10B nuclei (in a solution containing also 11B) for the generation of prompt gamma-rays, which can be applied to medical imaging. In fact, we demonstrate that the use of 10B nuclei can enhance the intensity of the 718 keV gamma-ray peak more than 30 times compared to the solution containing only 11B nuclei. A detailed explanation of the origin of the different prompt gamma-rays, as well as of their application as real-time diagnostics during a potential cancer treatment, is here discussed.

  6. A feasibility study of the in vivo prompt gamma activation analysis using a mobile nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Chung, C; Yuan, L J; Chen, K B; Weng, P S; Chang, P S; Ho, Y H

    1985-05-01

    A facility for in vivo prompt gamma activation analysis using moderated neutron beams from a 0.1 W mobile nuclear reactor is described. The low-power nuclear reactor provides total neutron flux of 3.3 X 10(4)n cm-2 s-1 on the surface of a vertical beam tube to which a liquid phantom is positioned. The capability of such a partial-body irradiation facility is demonstrated by measuring trace amounts of toxic cadmium in kidney. The detection limit of Cd in kidney for a skin dose of 1.66 mSv (166 mrem) is 1.34 mg under 500 s irradiation. This facility therefore combines the advantages of mobility with high sensitivity of detection of a toxic element under low neutron and gamma doses.

  7. Gamma and neutron detection modeling in the nuclear detection figure of merit (NDFOM) portal

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, Phillip D; Saeger, Kevin J

    2009-01-01

    The Nuclear Detection Figure Of Merit (NDFOM) portal is a database of objects and algorithms for evaluating the performance of radiation detectors to detect nuclear material. This paper describes the algorithms used to model the physics and mathematics of radiation detection. As a first-principles end-to-end analysis system, it starts with the representation of the gamma and neutron spectral fluxes, which are computed with the particle and radiation transport code MCNPX. The gamma spectra emitted by uranium, plutonium, and several other materials of interest are described. The impact of shielding and other intervening material is computed by the method of build-up factors. The interaction of radiation with the detector material is computed by a detector response function approach. The construction of detector response function matrices based on MCNPX simulation runs is described in detail. Neutron fluxes are represented in a three group formulation to treat differences in detector sensitivities to thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons.

  8. Nuclear Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy at the Limit of Particle Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Norbert Pietralla

    2006-03-29

    The research project ''Nuclear Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy at the Limit of Particle Stability'' with sponsor ID ''DE-FG02-04ER41334'' started late-summer 2004 and aims at the investigation of highly excited low-spin states of selected key-nuclei in the vicinity of the particle separation threshold by means of high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy in electromagnetic excitation reactions. This work addresses nuclear structures with excitation energies close to the binding energy or highly excited off-yrast states in accordance with the NSAC milestones. In 2005 the program was extended towards additional use of virtual photons and theoretical description of the low-lying collective excitations in the well deformed nuclei.

  9. Comparison of Radionuclide Ratios in Atmospheric Nuclear Explosions and Nuclear Releases from Chernobyl and Fukushima seen in Gamma Ray Spectormetry

    SciTech Connect

    Friese, Judah I.; Kephart, Rosara F.; Lucas, Dawn D.

    2013-05-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) has remote radionuclide monitoring followed by an On Site Inspection (OSI) to clarify the nature of a suspect event. An important aspect of radionuclide measurements on site is the discrimination of other potential sources of similar radionuclides such as reactor accidents or medical isotope production. The Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear reactor disasters offer two different reactor source term environmental inputs that can be compared against historical measurements of nuclear explosions. The comparison of whole-sample gamma spectrometry measurements from these three events and the analysis of similarities and differences are presented. This analysis is a step toward confirming what is needed for measurements during an OSI under the auspices of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.

  10. Novel detection schemes of nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging: applications from analytical chemistry to molecular sensors.

    PubMed

    Harel, Elad; Schröder, Leif; Xu, Shoujun

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a well-established analytical technique in chemistry. The ability to precisely control the nuclear spin interactions that give rise to the NMR phenomenon has led to revolutionary advances in fields as diverse as protein structure determination and medical diagnosis. Here, we discuss methods for increasing the sensitivity of magnetic resonance experiments, moving away from the paradigm of traditional NMR by separating the encoding and detection steps of the experiment. This added flexibility allows for diverse applications ranging from lab-on-a-chip flow imaging and biological sensors to optical detection of magnetic resonance imaging at low magnetic fields. We aim to compare and discuss various approaches for a host of problems in material science, biology, and physics that differ from the high-field methods routinely used in analytical chemistry and medical imaging.

  11. Nuclear-resonance magnetometer with flowing liquid for superstrong inhomogeneous fields measuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, V. V.; Dudkin, V. I.; Vologdin, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    Multichannel nuclear-resonance magnetometer for remote monitoring of induction and heterogeneity of a magnetic field in different areas inside and near a charged particle accelerator is considered. The maximal distance between the nuclear magnetic resonance signal detector and the magnetometer is 50 m. Measurement error is 0.5%, sensitivity of the magnetometer is 10-10 T/Hz1/2, measurement time of the magnetic field parameters in 24 control points is no more than 4 minutes.

  12. Nuclear gamma rays from Li-7 in the galactic cosmic radiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.; Clayton, D. D.

    1972-01-01

    The observation of a gamma-ray line feature from the direction of the galactic center by Johnson, Harnden, and Haymes is interpreted as the 478-keV nuclear de-excitation of low-energy Li-7 cosmic rays as they inelastically scatter from the interstellar gas. The prediction of an associated line at 432 keV is proposed as a definitive test of this idea.

  13. An evolution of technologies and applications of gamma imagers in the nuclear cycle industry

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, R. A.; Menaa, N.; De Toro, D.; Varet, T.

    2011-07-01

    The tracking of radiation contamination and distribution has become a high priority in the nuclear cycle industry in order to respect the ALARA principle which is a main challenge during decontamination and dismantling activities. To support this need, AREVA/CANBERRA and CEA LIST have been actively carrying out research and development on a gamma-radiation imager. In this paper we will present the new generation of gamma camera, called GAMPIX. This system is based on the Timepix chip, hybridized with a CdTe substrate. A coded mask could be used in order to increase the sensitivity of the camera. Moreover, due to the USB connection with a standard computer, this gamma camera is immediately operational and user-friendly. The final system is a very compact gamma camera (global weight is less than 1 kg without any shielding) which could be used as a hand-held device for radioprotection purposes. In this article, we present the main characteristics of this new generation of gamma camera and we expose experimental results obtained during in situ measurements. Even though we present preliminary results the final product is under industrialization phase to address various applications specifications. (authors)

  14. An investigation of HPGe gamma efficiency calibration software (ANGLE V.3) for applications in nuclear decommissioning.

    PubMed

    Bell, S J; Judge, S M; Regan, P H

    2012-12-01

    High resolution gamma spectrometry offers a rapid method to characterise waste materials on a decommissioning nuclear site. To meet regulatory requirements, measurements must be traceable to national standards, meaning that the spectrometers must be calibrated for a wide range of materials. Semi-empirical modelling software (such as ANGLE™) offers a convenient method to carry out such calibrations. This paper describes an assessment of the modelling software for use by a small laboratory based on a nuclear site. The results confirmed the need for accurate information on the detection construction if the calibration were to be accurate to within 10%. PMID:23041778

  15. Structural Isomer Identification via NMR: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiment for Organic, Analytical, or Physical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szafran, Zvi

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment that examines the ability of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to distinguish between structural isomers via resonance multiplicities and chemical shifts. Reasons for incorporating the experiment into organic, analytical, or physical chemistry…

  16. Mossbauer Spectroscopic Study of Gamma Irradiation on the Structural Properties of Hematite, Magnetite and Limonite Concrete for Nuclear Reactor Shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eissa, N. A.; Kany, M. S. I.; Mohamed, A. S.; Sallam, A. A.; El Fouly, M. H.

    1998-12-01

    This work investigate the effect of gamma irradiation on a heavy type of concrete, constructed for nuclear reactor shield. The effect of gamma irradiation was studied after annealing the concrete samples at 300°C for 24 hours in air.

  17. Nuclear spin conversion of water inside fullerene cages detected by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Mamone, Salvatore Concistrè, Maria; Carignani, Elisa; Meier, Benno; Krachmalnicoff, Andrea; Johannessen, Ole G.; Denning, Mark; Carravetta, Marina; Whitby, Richard J.; Levitt, Malcolm H.; Lei, Xuegong; Li, Yongjun; Goh, Kelvin; Horsewill, Anthony J.

    2014-05-21

    The water-endofullerene H{sub 2}O@C{sub 60} provides a unique chemical system in which freely rotating water molecules are confined inside homogeneous and symmetrical carbon cages. The spin conversion between the ortho and para species of the endohedral H{sub 2}O was studied in the solid phase by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance. The experimental data are consistent with a second-order kinetics, indicating a bimolecular spin conversion process. Numerical simulations suggest the simultaneous presence of a spin diffusion process allowing neighbouring ortho and para molecules to exchange their angular momenta. Cross-polarization experiments found no evidence that the spin conversion of the endohedral H{sub 2}O molecules is catalysed by {sup 13}C nuclei present in the cages.

  18. Electron spin resonance studies of free radicals in gamma-irradiated soybean paste.

    PubMed

    Lee, E J; Volkov, V I; Lee, C H

    2001-07-01

    Free radicals in gamma-irradiated soybean paste were investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy to determine the effect of temperature (77-296 K) and moisture content (1-54%) of samples irradiated at high dose (1-40 kGy). The samples were kept in liquid nitrogen (77 K) during irradiation and subsequent ESR measurements. The spectra shown at 77 K consisted of the hydrogen atom lines at low and high field and complicated symmetric spectrum. By increasing the microwave power, the line shape of ESR spectra altered, which indicated the detection of different paramagnetic centers at different microwave powers. In saturation curves, it was possible to select four types of spectra components which were different in their relaxation times. By the different irradiation doses, the change in free radical concentration showed a curvilinearly increasing relationship with irradiation dose in wet samples, whereas a proportional relationship was observed with dried samples. This might indicate that the indirect process of free radical formation was involved with the existence of free water radicals in the wet samples.

  19. Nuclear Data Resources for Capture gamma-Ray Spectroscopy and Related Topics

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko, B.; Pritychenko,B.

    2011-08-18

    Nuclear reaction data play an important role in nuclear reactor, medical, and fundamental science and national security applications. The wealth of information is stored in internally adopted ENDF-6 and EXFOR formats. We present a complete calculation of resonance integrals, Westcott factors, thermal and Maxwellian-averaged cross sections for Z = 1-100 using evaluated nuclear reaction data. The addition of newly-evaluated neutron reaction libraries, and improvements in data processing techniques allows us to calculate nuclear industry and astrophysics parameters, and provide additional insights on all currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations will be discussed and an overview of the latest reaction data developments will be given.

  20. Measurement of untruncated nuclear spin interactions via zero- to ultralow-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, J. W.; Sjolander, T. F.; King, J. P.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Levine, E. H.; Bajaj, V. S.; Budker, D.; Pines, A.

    2015-12-01

    Zero- to ultralow-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ZULF NMR) provides a new regime for the measurement of nuclear spin-spin interactions free from the effects of large magnetic fields, such as truncation of terms that do not commute with the Zeeman Hamiltonian. One such interaction, the magnetic dipole-dipole coupling, is a valuable source of spatial information in NMR, though many terms are unobservable in high-field NMR, and the coupling averages to zero under isotropic molecular tumbling. Under partial alignment, this information is retained in the form of so-called residual dipolar couplings. We report zero- to ultralow-field NMR measurements of residual dipolar couplings in acetonitrile-2-13C aligned in stretched polyvinyl acetate gels. This permits the investigation of dipolar couplings as a perturbation on the indirect spin-spin J coupling in the absence of an applied magnetic field. As a consequence of working at zero magnetic field, we observe terms of the dipole-dipole coupling Hamiltonian that are invisible in conventional high-field NMR. This technique expands the capabilities of zero- to ultralow-field NMR and has potential applications in precision measurement of subtle physical interactions, chemical analysis, and characterization of local mesoscale structure in materials.

  1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of High Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounce, Andrew M.

    The high temperature superconductors HgBa2CuO 4+delta (Hg1201) and Bi2SrCa2Cu2O 8+delta (Bi2212) have been treated with 17O for both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensitivity and various electronic properties. Subsequently, NMR experiments were performed on Hg1201 and Bi2212 to reveal the nature of the pseudogap, in the normal state, and vortex phases, in the superconducting state. NMR has been performed on 17O in an underdoped Hg1201 crystal with a superconducting transition transition temperature of 74 K to look for circulating orbital currents proposed theoretically and inferred from neutron scattering. The measurements reveal narrow spectra which preclude static local fields in the pseudogap phase at the apical site, suggesting that the moments observed with neutrons are fluctuating or the orbital current ordering is not the correct model for the neutron scattering observation. The fine detail of the NMR frequency shifts at the apical oxygen site are consistent with a dipolar field from the Cu+2 site and diamagnetism below the superconducting transition. It has been predicted that superconducting vortices should be electrically charged and that this effect is particularly enhanced for high temperature superconductors. Here it is shown that the Abrikosov vortex lattice, characteristic of the mixed state of superconductors, will become unstable at sufficiently high magnetic field if there is charge trapped on the vortex core for highly anisotropic superconductors. NMR measurements of the magnetic fields generated by vortices in Bi2212 single crystals provide evidence for an electro-statically driven vortex lattice reconstruction with the magnitude of charge on each vortex pancake of 2x10-3e, depending on doping, in line with theoretical estimates. Competition with magnetism is at the heart of high temperature superconductivity, most intensely felt near a vortex core. To investigate vortex magnetism spatially resolved NMR has been used, finding a strongly non

  2. Microstructure of Wet Cement Pastes: a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehng, Jyh-Yuar

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analysis has been applied to interpret the evolution of microstructure in a cement paste during hydration. The work in this thesis has yielded a better understanding of the geometric and physical characterization of porous materials, and specifically cement pastes. A basic understanding of the wet-dry and freeze-thaw processes of cement pastes has been developed. The pore structure evolution has been studied by the suppression of the freezing temperature of water and compared with relaxation analysis performed at room temperature. Both methods consistently show that hydrating cement pastes have two principal components in their size distribution. Firstly, in situ measurements have been made of the water consumption, the total specific surface area, and pore water size distribution as a function of hydration time. The amount of evaporable water in the pore space can be determined from the magnitude of the NMR signal, and the NMR relaxation times provide a measure of the characteristic pore sizes. Drying studies have been performed to determine the surface spin-spin relaxation time. The NMR results on evolution of cement pore structure with hydration clearly show five different stages. The water consumption was determined to be a linear function of the logarithm of hydration time over a wide range during which the total surface area of the wet gel remains constant. These experiments support a model of capillary and gel pores in the cement paste and provide strong evidence of a stable dense-gel structure. Secondly, supercooling and thawing point depression of confined water has been studied systematically. The depression of the freezing point of liquid water confined within a pore was found to be dependent on the pore size with capillary pore water freezing at 240 K and the remaining gel pore water freezing over a temperature range extending to as low as 160 K. Finally, an important application of NMR has been developed to monitor

  3. Dynamics of Protein Kinases: Insights from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yao; Liddle, Jennifer C.; Pardi, Arthur; Ahn, Natalie G.

    2015-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Protein kinases are ubiquitous enzymes with critical roles in cellular processes and pathology. As a result, researchers have studied their activity and regulatory mechanisms extensively. Thousands of X-ray structures give snapshots of the architectures of protein kinases in various states of activation and ligand binding. However, the extent of and manner by which protein motions and conformational dynamics underlie the function and regulation of these important enzymes is not well understood. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods provide complementary information about protein conformation and dynamics in solution. However, until recently, the large size of these enzymes prevented researchers from using these methods with kinases. Developments in transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY)-based techniques and more efficient isotope labeling strategies are now allowing researchers to carry out NMR studies on full-length protein kinases. In this Account, we describe recent insights into the role of dynamics in protein kinase regulation and catalysis that have been gained from NMR measurements of chemical shift changes and line broadening, residual dipolar couplings, and relaxation. These findings show strong associations between protein motion and events that control kinase activity. Dynamic and conformational changes occurring at ligand binding sites and other regulatory domains of these proteins propagate to conserved kinase core regions that mediate catalytic function. NMR measurements of slow time scale (microsecond to millisecond) motions also reveal that kinases carry out global exchange processes that synchronize multiple residues and allosteric interconversion between conformational states. Activating covalent modifications or ligand binding to form the Michaelis complex can induce these global processes. Inhibitors can also exploit the exchange properties of kinases by using conformational selection to form dynamically quenched

  4. New frontiers in nuclear physics with high-power lasers and brilliant monochromatic gamma beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gales, S.; Balabanski, D. L.; Negoita, F.; Tesileanu, O.; Ur, C. A.; Ursescu, D.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    The development of high power lasers and the combination of such novel devices with accelerator technology has enlarged the science reach of many research fields, in particular particle and nuclear physics, astrophysics as well as societal applications in material science, nuclear energy and applications for medicine. The European Strategic Forum for Research Infrastructures has selected a proposal based on these new premises called the Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI). The ELI will be built as a network of three complementary pillars at the frontier of laser technologies. The ELI-NP pillar (NP for nuclear physics) is under construction near Bucharest (Romania) and will develop a scientific program using two 10 PW lasers and a Compton back-scattering high-brilliance and intense low-energy gamma beam, a combination of laser and accelerator technology at the frontier of knowledge. This unique combination of beams that are unique worldwide allows us to develop an experimental program in nuclear physics at the frontiers of present-day knowledge as well as society driven applications. In the present paper, the technical description of the facility as well as the new perspectives in nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and nuclear astrophysics will be presented.

  5. Particle-gamma and particle-particle correlations in nuclear reactions using Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshback model

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Talou, Patrick; Watanabe, Takehito; Chadwick, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for particle and {gamma}-ray emissions from an excited nucleus based on the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory are performed to obtain correlated information between emitted particles and {gamma}-rays. We calculate neutron induced reactions on {sup 51}V to demonstrate unique advantages of the Monte Carlo method. which are the correlated {gamma}-rays in the neutron radiative capture reaction, the neutron and {gamma}-ray correlation, and the particle-particle correlations at higher energies. It is shown that properties in nuclear reactions that are difficult to study with a deterministic method can be obtained with the Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Goodson, Boyd M.

    1999-12-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI.

  7. Inter-laboratory comparisons of short-lived gamma-emitting radionuclides in nuclear reactor water.

    PubMed

    Klemola, S K

    2008-01-01

    Inter-laboratory comparisons of gamma-emitting nuclides in nuclear power plant coolant water have been carried out in Finland since 1994. The reactor water samples are taken and prepared by one of the two nuclear power plants and delivered to the participants. Since all the participants get their sample within just a few hours it has been possible to analyse and compare results of nuclides with half-lives shorter than 1h. The total number of short-lived nuclides is 26. All the main nuclides are regularly identified and the activities have been obtained with reasonable accuracy throughout the years. The overall deviation of the results has decreased in 13 years. The effects of true coincidence summing and discrepancies in nuclear data have been identified as potential sources of remaining discrepancies. All the participants have found this type of comparison very useful.

  8. Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of fluorophenylalanine- and fluorotryptophan-labeled avian egg white lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Lian, C; Le, H; Montez, B; Patterson, J; Harrell, S; Laws, D; Matsumura, I; Pearson, J; Oldfield, E

    1994-05-01

    We report the 470-MHz (11.7 T) 19F solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 2-, 3-, and 4-fluorophenylalanine incorporated into the egg white lysozymes (EC 3.2.1.17) of chicken, pheasant, and duck, as well as spectra of 4-fluorotryptophan incorporated into chicken, California valley quail, and Bob White quail and 5- and 6-fluorotryptophan-labeled chicken lysozyme. The 19F solution NMR spectrum of [4-F]Phe hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) consists of three sharp resonances, which span a total chemical shift range of 4.8 ppm (at p2H = 6.1). For [3-F]Phe HEWL, the chemical shift range is much smaller, 1.0 ppm (at p2H = 5.9), due presumably to the occurrence of fast phenyl ring flips about the C beta-C gamma bond axis. For [2-F]Phe HEWL, six resonances are observed, spanning a chemical shift range of 7.4 ppm (at p2H = 5.8), due to slow C beta-C gamma ring flips, i.e., both ring-flip isomers appear to be "frozen in" because of steric hindrance. Rotation of the [2-F]Phe residues remains slow up to 55 degrees C (p2H = 4.7). With the [F]Trp-labeled proteins, we find a maximal 14.6-ppm shielding range for [4-F]Trp HEWL but only a 2.8- and 2.4-ppm range for [5- and 6-F]Trp HEWL, respectively, due presumably to increased solvent exposure in the latter cases. Guanidinium chloride denaturation causes loss of essentially all chemical shift nonequivalence, as does thermal denaturation. Spectra recorded as a function of pH show relatively small chemical shift changes (< 1.4 ppm) over the pH range of approximately 1.2-7.8.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8172898

  9. Nuclear cascades in electromagnetic showers produced by primary gamma-quanta in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilova, T. V.; Erlykin, A. D.; Mironov, A. V.; Tukish, E. I.

    1985-01-01

    Distributions were calculated for the number of electrons N sub e, number of muons with the energy above 5 GeV N sub mu and the energy of hadron component E sub h in electromagnetic showers, produced by primary gamma-quanta with energies theta approx. equals 30 deg and observed at the mountain level 700 g/square centimeters. The mean number of nuclear interactions of photos with the energy above 5 GeV is about 0.3 per each TeV of the primary energy and nuclear cascades take out in average about 2% of the total shower energy. The mean number of 5 GeV muons for the electromagnetic shower is (2 to 5)% from the number of muons in cosmic ray showers with the same number of electrons at the observation level. similar value for the total energy of hadron component is also (2 to 5)%. N sub mu and N sub e values as well as E sub h and n sub e don't correlate at the fixed primary energy E sug gamma (o). Between N sub mu and E sub h there is a positive correlation at the given E sub gamma.

  10. Radiation does from medical in-vivo prompt gamma-ray activation using a mobile nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Chung, C; Chen, C P; Chang, P S

    1988-10-01

    A method of medical diagnosis of toxic elements, using a neutron beam from a mobile nuclear reactor to perform partial-body in-vivo prompt gamma-ray activation technique, has been developed. Both neutron and gamma-ray dose equivalents in an irradiated phantom and around medical researchers were measured and evaluated. Neutron flux at various kinetic energies was measured using an activation foil technique, and the neutron dose equivalents at tissues of risk inside the irradiated phantom were calculated by neutron transport code. Gamma-ray dose equivalents inside the irradiated phantom and around the nuclear reactor were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters. The risk associated with the neutron and gamma radiation dose equivalents received by both the irradiated phantom and medical researchers were evaluated in detail. The radiation safety of the in-vivo medical diagnosis using the mobile nuclear reactor, under the context of radiation protection guidelines, is discussed.

  11. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Campbell, Luke; Favalli, Andrea; Alan W. Hunt; Edward T. Reedy; Heather A. Seipel

    2015-06-01

    Modeling capabilities were added to an existing framework and codes were adapted as needed for analyzing experiments and assessing application-specific assay concepts including simulation of measurements over many short irradiation/spectroscopy cycles. The code package was benchmarked against the data collected at the IAC for small targets and assembly-scale data collected at LANL. A study of delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy for nuclear safeguards was performed for a variety of assemblies in the extensive NGSI spent fuel library. The modeling results indicate that delayed gamma-ray responses can be collected from spent fuel assemblies with statistical quality sufficient for analyzing their isotopic composition using a 1011 n/s neutron generator and COTS detector instrumentation.

  12. Tomographic gamma scanning (TGS) to measure inhomogeneous nuclear material matrices from future fuel cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Estep, R.J.; Prettyman, T.H.; Sheppard, G.A.

    1993-06-01

    Current methods for the non-destructive assay (NDA) of special nuclear materials (SNM) in 208-L drums can give assay errors of 100% or more when the drum matrix and/or radionuclide distribution is nonuniform. To address this problem, we have developed the tomographic-gamma-scanner (TGS) method for assaying heterogeneous drummed SNM. TGS improves on the well-established segmented-gamma-scanner (SGS) method by performing low-resolution tomographic emission and transmission scans on the drum, yielding coarse three-dimensional images of the matrix density and radionuclide distributions. The images are used to make accurate, point-to-point attenuation corrections. The TGS geometric counting efficiency is 60% that of a typical SGS device, allowing a TGS assay time of only 28 min per drum with a one-detector system. TGS may also be useful for non-destructive examination (NDE). Currently, TGS is the only practical method of imaging SNM in drums.

  13. Characterization of PE-g-HEMA films prepared by gamma irradiation through nuclear microprobe techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. M.; Leal, J. P.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Alves, L. C.; Falcão, A. N.; Gil, M. H.

    2012-09-01

    PE-g-HEMA films with different grafting yields prepared by mutual gamma irradiation method at a 60Co source were characterized with ion beam analytical techniques using a nuclear microprobe. Qualitative analysis showed a random and heterogeneous distribution of contaminant elements, independent of the grafting degree, suggesting the existence of several sources of contamination at different stages of their preparation. Results also suggest that this "phased" contamination occurs simultaneously with mechanisms of agglomeration/entrapment of impurities during the gamma induced copolymerization reaction. Moreover, quantitative data showed that all contaminants found in the copolymeric films are natural contaminants of their reagents of preparation, although at concentrations without toxicological hazard, which points to a low cytotoxic potential.

  14. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of advanced energy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, George D.

    In order to better understand the physical electrochemical changes that take place in lithium ion batteries and asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been useful to probe and identify changes on the atomic and molecular level. NMR is used to characterize the local environment and investigate the dynamical properties of materials used in electrochemical storage devices (ESD). NMR investigations was used to better understand the chemical composition of the solid electrolyte interphase which form on the negative and positive electrodes of lithium batteries as well as identify the breakdown products that occur in the operation of the asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors. The use of nano-structured particles in the development of new materials causes changes in the electrical, structural and other material properties. NMR was used to investigate the affects of fluorinated and non fluorinated single wall nanotubes (SWNT). In this thesis three experiments were performed using solid state NMR samples to better characterize them. The electrochemical reactions of a lithium ion battery determine its operational profile. Numerous means have been employed to enhance battery cycle life and operating temperature range. One primary means is the choice and makeup of the electrolyte. This study focuses on the characteristics of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that is formed on the electrodes surface during the charge discharge cycle. The electrolyte in this study was altered with several additives in order to determine the influence of the additives on SEI formation as well as the intercalation and de-intercalation of lithium ions in the electrodes. 7Li NMR studies where used to characterize the SEI and its composition. Solid state NMR studies of the carbon enriched acetonitrile electrolyte in a nonaqueous asymmetric hybrid supercapacitor were performed. Magic angle spinning (MAS) coupled with cross polarization NMR

  15. Effects of projectile resonances on the total, Coulomb, and nuclear breakup cross sections in the 6Li+152Sm reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukeru, B.; Lekala, M. L.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we analyze the effects of the projectile resonances on the total, Coulomb, and nuclear breakup cross sections as well as on the Coulomb-nuclear interferences at different arbitrary incident energies. It is found that these resonances have non-negligible effects on the total, Coulomb, and nuclear breakup cross sections. Qualitatively, they have no effects on the constructiveness or destructiveness of the Coulomb-nuclear interferences. Quantitatively, we obtained that these resonances increase by 7.38%, 7.58%, and 20.30% the integrated total, Coulomb, and nuclear breakup cross sections, respectively at Elab=35 MeV . This shows that the nuclear breakup cross sections are more affected by the effects of the projectile resonances than their total and Coulomb breakup counterparts. We also obtain that the effects of the resonances on the total, Coulomb, and nuclear breakup cross sections decrease as the incident energy increases.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the blue copper protein plastocyanin

    SciTech Connect

    Kojiro, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    Plastocyanins (pcy) from a higher plant (spinach, Spinacia oleracea), a cyanobacterium (Anabaena variabilis), and a green alga (Chlorella fusca), were studied by /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR. All three histidine /sup 13/C/sub ..gamma../ peaks in A. variabilis pcy were assigned. Previous assignments of the homologous /sup 13/C/sub ..gamma../ peaks in spinach pcy were corrected. A glutamic acid /sup 13/C/sub delta/ peak was found to titrate with an unusually high pK/sub a/ (approx.5.3); this peak was assigned to the N-terminal Glu-(-2). Exchange of /sup 113/Cd(II) for Cu(I) led to changes in chemical shifts of groups at the metal binding site. Spectral changes observed with residues as far as 18 A from the metal site indicate that the structure at the metal binding site is coupled to the structure at the opposite end of the molecule.

  17. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Campbell, Luke; Favalli, Andrea; Alan W. Hunt; Reedy, Edward T.E.; Seipel, Heather

    2015-06-01

    High-­energy, beta-delayed gamma-­ray spectroscopy is a potential, non-­destructive assay techniques for the independent verification of declared quantities of special nuclear materials at key stages of the fuel cycle and for directly assaying nuclear material inventories for spent fuel handling, interim storage, reprocessing facilities, repository sites, and final disposal. Other potential applications include determination of MOX fuel composition, characterization of nuclear waste packages, and challenges in homeland security and arms control verification. Experimental measurements were performed to evaluate fission fragment yields, to test methods for determining isotopic fractions, and to benchmark the modeling code package. Experimental measurement campaigns were carried out at the IAC using a photo-­neutron source and at OSU using a thermal neutron beam from the TRIGA reactor to characterize the emission of high-­energy delayed gamma rays from 235U, 239Pu, and 241Pu targets following neutron induced fission. Data were collected for pure and combined targets for several irradiation/spectroscopy cycle times ranging from 10/10 seconds to 15/30 minutes.The delayed gamma-ray signature of 241Pu, a significant fissile constituent in spent fuel, was measured and compared to 239Pu. The 241Pu/239Pu ratios varied between 0.5 and 1.2 for ten prominent lines in the 2700-­3600 keV energy range. Such significant differences in relative peak intensities make it possible to determine relative fractions of these isotopes in a mixed sample. A method for determining fission product yields by fitting the energy and time dependence of the delayed gamma-­ray emission was developed and demonstrated on a limited 235U data set. De-­convolution methods for determining fissile fractions were developed and tested on the experimental data. The use of high count-­rate LaBr3 detectors

  18. Coulomb and nuclear excitations of narrow resonances in 17Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marganiec, J.; Wamers, F.; Aksouh, F.; Aksyutina, Yu.; Álvarez-Pol, H.; Aumann, T.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Bertulani, C. A.; Boretzky, K.; Borge, M. J. G.; Chartier, M.; Chatillon, A.; Chulkov, L. V.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Emling, H.; Ershova, O.; Fraile, L. M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Galaviz, D.; Geissel, H.; Heil, M.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Hoffmann, J.; Johansson, H. T.; Jonson, B.; Karagiannis, C.; Kiselev, O. A.; Kratz, J. V.; Kulessa, R.; Kurz, N.; Langer, C.; Lantz, M.; Le Bleis, T.; Lemmon, R.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Mahata, K.; Müntz, C.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Nyman, G.; Ott, W.; Panin, V.; Paschalis, S.; Perea, A.; Plag, R.; Reifarth, R.; Richter, A.; Rodriguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D.; Riisager, K.; Savran, D.; Schrieder, G.; Simon, H.; Stroth, J.; Sümmerer, K.; Tengblad, O.; Typel, S.; Weick, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wimmer, C.

    2016-08-01

    New experimental data for dissociation of relativistic 17Ne projectiles incident on targets of lead, carbon, and polyethylene targets at GSI are presented. Special attention is paid to the excitation and decay of narrow resonant states in 17Ne. Distributions of internal energy in the 15O + p + p three-body system have been determined together with angular and partial-energy correlations between the decay products in different energy regions. The analysis was done using existing experimental data on 17Ne and its mirror nucleus 17N. The isobaric multiplet mass equation is used for assignment of observed resonances and their spins and parities. A combination of data from the heavy and light targets yielded cross sections and transition probabilities for the Coulomb excitations of the narrow resonant states. The resulting transition probabilities provide information relevant for a better understanding of the 17Ne structure.

  19. Geometric matrix research for nuclear waste drum tomographic gamma scanning transmission image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin-Zhao; Tuo, Xian-Guo

    2015-06-01

    A geometric matrix model of nuclear waste drums is proposed for transmission image reconstruction from tomographic gamma scans (TGS). The model assumes that rays are conical, with intensity uniformly distributed within the cone. The attenuation coefficients are centered on the voxel (cube) of the geometric center. The proposed model is verified using the EM algorithm and compared to previously reported models. The calculated results show that the model can obtain good reconstruction results even when the sample models are highly heterogeneous. Supported by NSFC (41374130), National Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scholars (41025015) National Science Foundation (41274109, 41104118)

  20. Comparison of Bayesian and classical reconstructions of tomographic gamma scanning for assay of nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, T.L.; Mercer, D.J.; Prettyman, T.H.

    1998-12-01

    Tomographic gamma scanning has been used to assay special nuclear material for the past several years. Field experience suggests that the data analysis techniques can significantly affect the assay uncertainty. For example, a positive bias has been observed for low-activity samples. Recent attempts to reduce the bias without unacceptable increase in variance have taken a non-Bayesian approach. This paper will compare some of these non-Bayesian approaches to a Bayesian approach which is a modification of an approach used in photon emission computed tomography. The Bayesian approach is both more computationally demanding and more satisfying, though the choice of the prior probability for the distribution of nuclear material can impact the analysis. Assay results for scaled-down versions of the full-dimensioned problem will be presented for several methods and cases.

  1. Nuclear structure and shapes from prompt gamma ray spectroscopy of fission products

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Morss, L.R.; Durell, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    Many nuclear shape phenomena are predicted to occur in neutron-rich nuclei. The best source for the production of these nuclides is the spontaneous fission which produces practically hundreds of nuclides with yields of greater than 0.1 % per decay. Measurements of coincident gamma rays with large Ge arrays have recently been made to obtain information on nuclear structures and shapes of these neutron- rich nuclei. Among the important results that have been obtained from such measurements are octupole correlations in Ba isotopes, triaxial shapes in Ru nuclei, two-phonon vibrations in {sup 106}Mo and level lifetimes and quadrupole moments in Nd isotopes and A=100 nuclei. These data have been used to test theoretical models.

  2. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results on resonance reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S.; Gulino, M.; Tumino, A.; Lamia, L.

    2014-05-09

    Nuclear astrophysics aims to measure nuclear-reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest to be included into models to study stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Low energies, < 1 MeV or even < 10 keV, are requested for this is the window where these processes are more effective. Two effects have prevented to achieve a satisfactory knowledge of the relevant nuclear processes, namely, the Coulomb barrier exponentially suppressing the cross section and the presence of atomic electrons. These difficulties have triggered theoretical and experimental investigations to extend our knowledge down to astrophysical energies. For instance, indirect techniques such as the Trojan Horse Method have been devised yielding new cutting-edge results. In particular, I will focus on the application of this indirect method to resonance reactions. Resonances might dramatically enhance the astrophysical S(E)-factor so, when they occur right at astrophysical energies, their measurement is crucial to pin down the astrophysical scenario. Unknown or unpredicted resonances might introduce large systematic errors in nucleosynthesis models. These considerations apply to low-energy resonances and to sub-threshold resonances as well, as they may produce sizable modifications of the S-factor due to, for instance, destructive interference with another resonance.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance micro-imaging in the investigation of plant cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Köckenberger, W

    2001-04-01

    Micro-imaging based on nuclear magnetic resonance offers the possibility to map metabolites in plant tissues non-invasively. Major metabolites such as sucrose and amino acids can be observed with high spatial resolution. Stable isotope tracers, such as (13)C-labelled metabolites can be used to measure the in vivo conversion rates in a metabolic network. This review summarizes the different nuclear magnetic resonance micro-imaging techniques that are available to obtain spatially resolved information on metabolites in plants. A short general introduction into NMR imaging techniques is provided. Particular emphasis is given to the difficulties encountered when NMR micro-imaging is applied to plant systems.

  4. Observation of Fe-H/D modes by nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Uwe; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Linn, Donald E; Jenney, Francis E; Adams, Michael W W; Rupnik, Kresimir; Hales, Brian J; Alp, Ercan E; Mayse, Aaron; Cramer, Stephen P

    2003-04-01

    Metal-hydrogen bonding is important in chemistry and catalysis, but H atoms are often difficult to observe, especially in metalloproteins. In this work we show that Fe-H interactions can be probed by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy at the 14.4 keV 57Fe nuclear resonance. An important advantage of this method, compared to Raman and IR spectroscopy, is the selectivity for modes that involve 57Fe motion. We present data on the FeS4 site in rubredoxin and the [FeH(D)6]2- ion. Prospects for studying more complex systems are discussed.

  5. Observation of Fe-H/D Modes by Nuclear Resonant Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, U B; Sturhahn, W; Linn, D E; Jenny, F E; Adams, M W. W.; Rupnik, K; Hales, B J; Alp, E E; Mayse, A; Cramer, S P; XFD,

    2003-04-01

    Metal-hydrogen bonding is important in chemistry and catalysis, but H atoms are often difficult to observe, especially in metalloproteins. In this work we show that Fe-H interactions can be probed by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy at the 14.4 keV 57Fe nuclear resonance. An important advantage of this method, compared to Raman and IR spectroscopy, is the selectivity for modes that involve {sup 57}Fe motion. We present data on the FeS{sub 4} site in rubredoxin and the [FeH(D){sub 6}]{sup 2-} ion. Prospects for studying more complex systems are discussed.

  6. Photo-nuclear astrophysics in NewSUBARU {gamma}-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Takehito

    2010-08-12

    A laser Compton scattering (LCS){gamma}-ray source has been installed at an electron storage ring NewSUBARU at SPring-8. We have studied the nuclear physics using this LCS g-ray source. The half-lives of unstable isotopes, {sup 184}Re and {sup 164}Ho{sup m}, produced by photo-induced reactions have been measured. These half-lives are shorter than previous recommended values by 7% and 3%, respectively. These changes of the half-lives affects to evaluation of cross-sections using the activation method. We have discussed a problem of the residual ratio of an isomer in {sup 180}Ta in supernova explosions. The unstable ground state and the metastable isomer are linked by ({gamma}, {gamma}') reactions. We have developed a new time-dependent model to calculate the isomer ratio in supernovae. The solar abundance of {sup 180}Ta is reproduced by the supernova neutrino process with the present calculated isomer ratio.

  7. Cosmic veto gamma-spectrometry for Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, J. L.; Davies, A. V.

    2014-05-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) is supported by a global network of monitoring stations that perform high-resolution gamma-spectrometry on air filter samples for the identification of 85 radionuclides. At the UK CTBT Radionuclide Laboratory (GBL15), a novel cosmic veto gamma-spectrometer has been developed to improve the sensitivity of station measurements, providing a mean background reduction of 80.8% with mean MDA improvements of 45.6%. The CTBT laboratory requirement for a 140Ba MDA is achievable after 1.5 days counting compared to 5-7 days using conventional systems. The system consists of plastic scintillation plates that detect coincident cosmic-ray interactions within an HPGe gamma-spectrometer using the Canberra LynxTM multi-channel analyser. The detector is remotely configurable using a TCP/IP interface and requires no dedicated coincidence electronics. It would be especially useful in preventing false-positives at remote station locations (e.g. Halley, Antarctica) where sample transfer to certified laboratories is logistically difficult. The improved sensitivity has been demonstrated for a CTBT air filter sample collected after the Fukushima incident.

  8. Radioisotope identification method for poorly resolved gamma-ray spectrum of nuclear security concern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninh, Giang Nguyen; Phongphaeth, Pengvanich; Nares, Chankow; Hao, Quang Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray signal can be used as a fingerprint for radioisotope identification. In the context of radioactive and nuclear materials security at the border control point, the detection task can present a significant challenge due to various constraints such as the limited measurement time, the shielding conditions, and the noise interference. This study proposes a novel method to identify the signal of one or several radioisotopes from a poorly resolved gamma-ray spectrum. In this method, the noise component in the raw spectrum is reduced by the wavelet decomposition approach, and the removal of the continuum background is performed using the baseline determination algorithm. Finally, the identification of radioisotope is completed using the matrix linear regression method. The proposed method has been verified by experiments using the poorly resolved gamma-ray signals from various scenarios including single source, mixing of natural uranium with five of the most common industrial radioactive sources (57Co, 60Co, 133Ba, 137Cs, and 241Am). The preliminary results show that the proposed algorithm is comparable with the commercial method.

  9. Study of the Nuclear Structure of 39P Using Beta-Delayed Gamma Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abromeit, Brittany; NSCL Experiment E14063 Team Team

    2016-03-01

    Investigation of nuclei with neutron and proton imbalance is at the forefront of nuclear physics research today. This is driven by the fact that the structure in these regimes may vary with that seen near the valley of stability. With eight neutrons more than the stable isotope of phosphorous, 39P is a neutron-rich exotic nucleus that has very limited information on it: previous studies of 39P produce only three known energy levels and gamma rays. The fragmentation of a 48Ca primary beam on a 564mg/cm2 thick Be target at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) was used to produce exotic 39Si. Using the NSCL Beta Counting System (BCS), consisting of a thick planner germanium double-sided strip detector (GeDSSD) and 16 High-purity germanium detectors in an array, SeGA, the beta-gamma coincidences from the decay of 39Si to 39P were analyzed. The resulting level scheme of 39P, including over 12 new gamma rays and energy states, confirmation of the previously measured half-life, and first-time logft values will be presented. This work was supported by the NSF under Grant No. 1401574.

  10. Contemporary research with nuclear resonance fluorescence at the S-DALINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Zweidinger, M.; Beck, T.; Beller, J.; Gayer, U.; Mertes, L.; Pai, H.; Pietralla, N.; Ries, P.; Romig, C.; Werner, V.

    2015-02-24

    In the last decades many nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments aiming for low-lying dipole excitations were performed at the Darmstadt High Intensity Photon Setup at S-DALINAC facility. On the electric dipole side, quadrupole-octupole coupled states and the Pygmy Dipole Resonance are of particular interest. On the magnetic dipole side, the so-called scissors mode is in the focus of interest. Furthermore, using the method of resonant self absorption, the decay behavior of J{sup π} = 1{sup −} states was investigated in {sup 140}Ce.

  11. Nuclear clusters studied with alpha resonant scatterings using RI beams at CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kawabata, T.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. N.; Kubono, S.; Suhara, T.; Kanada-En'yo, Y.; Moon, J. Y.; Kim, A.; Iwasa, N.; Lee, P. S.; Chae, K. Y.; Cha, S. M.; Gwak, M. S.; Kim, D. H.; Milman, E.

    2014-12-01

    Alpha resonant scattering is a simple and promising method to study α-cluster structure in nuclei. It has several good features which enable us to perform measurements with short-lived and relatively low-intense RI beams. Several measurements on alpha resonant scattering have been carried out at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Recent α resonant scattering studies at CRIB, using 7Li, 7Be and 10Be beams with a helium gas target, are discussed.

  12. Measurement of the 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies by the solid effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliger, J.; Žagar, V.

    2008-07-01

    1H- 14N nuclear quadrupole double resonance using magnetic field cycling between high and low magnetic field and solid effect in the low magnetic field is analyzed in details. The transition probabilities per unit time for the solid-effect transitions are calculated. The double resonance spectra are calculated in the limiting cases of fast and slow nitrogen spin-lattice relaxation. The double resonance spectra are measured in histamine and quinolinic acid. The experimental spectra are analyzed and the 14N NQR frequencies are determined.

  13. Plutonium gamma-ray measurements for mutual reciprocal inspections of dismantled nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Z.M.; Carlson, J.B.; Clark, D.; Gosnell, T.B.

    1995-07-01

    The O`Leary-Mikhailov agreement of March 1994 stated that the U.S. and the Russian Federation would engage in mutual reciprocal inspections (MRI) of fissile materials removed from dismantled nuclear weapons. It was decided to begin with the plutonium (Pu) removed from dismantled weapons and held in storage containers. Later discussions between U.S. and Russian technical experts led to the conclusion that, to achieve the O`Leary-Mikhailov objectives, Pu MRI would need to determine that the material in the containers has properties consistent with a nuclear-weapon component. Such a property is a {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratio consistent with weapons-grade material. One of the candidate inspection techniques under consideration for Pu MRI is to use a narrow region (630-670 keV) of the plutonium gamma-ray spectrum, taken with a high-purity germanium detector, to determine that it is weapons-grade plutonium as well as to estimate the minimum mass necessary to produce the observed gamma-ray intensity. We developed software (the Pu600 code) for instrument control and analysis especially for this purpose. In November 1994, U.S. and Russian scientists met at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for joint experiments to evaluate candidate Pu MRI inspection techniques. In one of these experiments, gamma-ray intensities were measured from three unclassified weapons-grade plutonium source standards and one reactor-grade standard (21% {sup 240}pu). Using our software, we determined the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratio of these standards to accuracies within {+-}10%, which is adequate for Pu MRI. The minimum mass estimates varied, as expected, directly with the exposed surface area of the standards.

  14. Nuclear Waste Cross Site Transfer Pump Operational Resonance Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    HAUCK, F.M.

    1999-12-01

    Two single-volute, multi-stage centrifugal pumps are installed at a nuclear waste transfer station operated by the Department of Energy in Hanford, WA. The two parallel 100% pumps are Variable Frequency Drive operated and designed to transport waste etc.

  15. High homogeneity B(1) 30.2 MHz Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Probe for off-resonance relaxation times measurements.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, M; Woźniak-Braszak, A; Jurga, K

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on design and construction of a double coil high-homogeneity ensuring Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Probe for off-resonance relaxation time measurements. NMR off-resonance experiments pose unique technical problems. Long irradiation can overheat the sample, dephase the spins because of B(1) field inhomogeneity and degrade the signal received by requiring the receiver bandwidth to be broader than that needed for normal experiment. The probe proposed solves these problems by introducing a separate off-resonance irradiation coil which is larger than the receiver coil and is wound up on the dewar tube that separates it from the receiver coil thus also thermally protects the sample from overheating. Large size of the irradiation coil also improves the field homogeneity because as a ratio of the sample diameter to the magnet (coil) diameter increases, the field inhomogeneity also increases (Blümich et al., 2008) [1]. The small receiver coil offers maximization of the filling factor and a high signal to the noise ratio.

  16. Unraveling multi-spin effects in rotational resonance nuclear magnetic resonance using effective reduced density matrix theory.

    PubMed

    SivaRanjan, Uppala; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2014-02-01

    A quantum-mechanical model integrating the concepts of reduced density matrix and effective Hamiltonians is proposed to explain the multi-spin effects observed in rotational resonance (R(2)) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Employing this approach, the spin system of interest is described in a reduced subspace inclusive of its coupling to the surroundings. Through suitable model systems, the utility of our theory is demonstrated and verified with simulations emerging from both analytic and numerical methods. The analytic results presented in this article provide an accurate description/interpretation of R(2) experimental results and could serve as a test-bed for distinguishing coherent/incoherent effects in solid-state NMR.

  17. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on the variant-3 neurotoxin from Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing: Sequential assignment of resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Nettesheim, D.G.; Klevit, R.E.; Drobny, G.; Watt, D.D.; Krishna, N.R. )

    1989-02-21

    The authors report the sequential assignment of resonances to specific residues in the proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the variant-3 neurotoxin from the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing (range southwestern U.S.A.). A combination of two-dimensional NMR experiments such as 2D-COSY, 2D-NOESY, and single- and double-RELAY coherence transfer spectroscopy has been employed on samples of the protein dissolved in D{sub 2}O and in H{sub 2}O for assignment purposes. These studies provide a basis for the determination of the solution-phase conformation of this protein and for undertaking detailed structure-function studies of these neurotoxins that modulate the flow of sodium current by binding to the sodium channels of excitable membranes.

  18. Unraveling multi-spin effects in rotational resonance nuclear magnetic resonance using effective reduced density matrix theory

    SciTech Connect

    SivaRanjan, Uppala; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2014-02-07

    A quantum-mechanical model integrating the concepts of reduced density matrix and effective Hamiltonians is proposed to explain the multi-spin effects observed in rotational resonance (R{sup 2}) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Employing this approach, the spin system of interest is described in a reduced subspace inclusive of its coupling to the surroundings. Through suitable model systems, the utility of our theory is demonstrated and verified with simulations emerging from both analytic and numerical methods. The analytic results presented in this article provide an accurate description/interpretation of R{sup 2} experimental results and could serve as a test-bed for distinguishing coherent/incoherent effects in solid-state NMR.

  19. Zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of viscous liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Y.; Blanchard, J. W.; Pustelny, S.; Saielli, G.; Bagno, A.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Budker, D.; Pines, A.

    2015-01-01

    We report zero-field NMR measurements of a viscous organic liquid, ethylene glycol. Zero-field spectra were taken showing resolved scalar spin-spin coupling (J-coupling) for ethylene glycol at different temperatures and water contents. Molecular dynamics strongly affects the resonance linewidth, which closely follows viscosity. Quantum chemical calculations have been used to obtain the relative stability and coupling constants of all ethylene glycol conformers. The results show the potential of zero-field NMR as a probe of molecular structure and dynamics in a wide range of environments, including viscous fluids.

  20. Prototype explosives detection system based on nuclear resonance absorption in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Morgado, R.E.; Arnone, G.; Cappiello, C.C.; Gardner, S.D.; Hollas, C.L.; Ussery, L.E.; White, J.M.; Zahrt, J.D.; Krauss, R.A.

    1993-12-01

    A-prototype explosives detection system that was developed for experimental evaluation of a nuclear resonance absorption techniques is described. The major subsystems are a proton accelerator and beam transport, high-temperature proton target, an airline-luggage tomographic inspection station, and an image-processing/detection- alarm subsystem. The detection system performance, based on a limited experimental test, is reported.

  1. MEMS-based force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer for in situ planetary exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T.; Leskowitz, G.; Madsen, L.; Weitekamp, D.; Tang, W.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic resonance (NMR) is a well-known spectroscopic technique used by chemists and is especially powerful in detecting the presence of water and distinguishing between arbitrary physisorbed and chemisorbed states. This ability is of particular importance in the search for extra-terrestrial life on planets such as Mars.

  2. The Effect of Electronic Paramagnetism on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Frequencies in Metals

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Townes, C. H.; Herring, C.; Knight, W. D.

    1950-09-22

    Observations on the shifts of nuclear resonances in metals ( Li{sup 7}, Na{sup 23}, Cu {sup 63}, Be{sup 9}, Pb{sup 207}, Al{sup 27}, and Ca{sup 69} ) due to free electron paramagnetism; comparison with theoretical values.

  3. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of phosphoric acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Z; Kovács, Z

    1985-07-01

    (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of alkyi and alkylaryl phosphates, condensed phosphates, phosphoric arids and their salts, are reported. These are listed by classes of compounds so that relationships between chemical shifts and the substituent groups on phosphorus atoms can be recognized. These relationships are useful for qualitative identification of the specific compounds listed and of related compounds by extrapolation.

  4. The Complexation of the Na(super +) by 18-Crown-6 Studied via Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Steven J.; Stevenson, Cheryl D.

    2004-01-01

    A student friendly experiment that teaches several important concepts of modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), like multinuclear capabilities, the NMR time scale, and time-averaged signals, is described along with some important concepts of thermo chemical equilibria. The mentioned experiment involves safe and inexpensive compounds, such as…

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Nail Polish Remover Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann, Markus M.; Caccamis, Joshua T.; Heitz, Mark P.; Schlecht, Kenneth D.

    2008-01-01

    Substantial modifications are presented for a previously described experiment using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to quantitatively determine analytes in commercial nail polish remover. The revised experiment is intended for a second- or third-year laboratory course in analytical chemistry and can be conducted for larger laboratory…

  6. A bi-symmetric square wave Zeeman modulator for nuclear quadrupole resonance.

    PubMed

    Mao, D; Petersen, G L; Bray, P J

    1992-11-01

    A simple circuit has been designed to generate a bi-symmetric square wave Zeeman modulation for the detection of nuclear quadrupole resonance. The square waveform not only provides an optimum result among bi-symmetric modulation waveforms, but also allows the observation of the Zeeman perturbed NQR powder pattern without the need for an extra external magnetic field.

  7. Sealed magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe and process for spectroscopy of hazardous samples

    DOEpatents

    Cho, Herman M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Townsend, Mark R.; Ewing, James R.

    2016-06-14

    A magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is described that includes double containment enclosures configured to seal and contain hazardous samples for analysis. The probe is of a modular design that ensures containment of hazardous samples during sample analysis while preserving spin speeds for superior NMR performance and convenience of operation.

  8. The Isoscalar Giant Dipole Resonance in {sup 20}Pb, {sup 90}Zr and the Nuclear Compressibility

    SciTech Connect

    Yildirim, Serbulent; Koeroglu, Ulas

    2008-11-11

    The isoscalar giant dipol resonance (ISGDR) in finite nuclei is studied within the framework of a relativistic transport approach. The excitation energies of spherical {sup 90}Zr and {sup 208}Pb nuclei are obtained for different quantum hydrodynamical Lagrangian parametrization. The sensitivity of ISGDR excitation energy on the nuclear bulk to surface properties are also investigated.

  9. A Noninvasive Method to Study Regulation of Extracellular Fluid Volume in Rats Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR)-based measurement of body composition of rodents is an effective method to quickly and repeatedly measure proportions of fat, lean, and fluid without anesthesia. TD-NMR provides a measure of free water in a living animal, termed % f...

  10. Prototype explosives-detection system based on nuclear-resonance absorption in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Morgado, R.E.; Arnone, G.; Cappiello, C.C.; Gardner, S.D.; Hollas, C.L.; Ussery, L.E.; White, J.M.; Zahrt, J.D.; Krauss, R.A.

    1994-06-01

    A prototype explosives-detection system (EDS) that was developed for experimental evaluation of a nuclear-resonance absorption technique is described. The major subsystems are a proton accelerator and beam transport, high-temperature proton target, an airline-luggage tomographic inspection station, and an image-processing/detection-alarm subsystem. The detection system performance, based on a limited experimental test, is reported.

  11. An Accessible Two-Dimensional Solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiment on Human Ubiquitin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rovnyak, David; Thompson, Laura E.

    2005-01-01

    Solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an invaluable tool in structural and molecular biology research, but may be underutilized in undergraduate laboratories because instrumentation for performing structural studies of macromolecules in aqueous solutions is not yet widely available for use in undergraduate laboratories. We have…

  12. Mechanism of induction of nuclear anomalies by gamma-radiation in the colonic epithelium of the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.M.; Heddle, J.A.; Blakey, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    The induction of karyorrhexis and nuclear anomalies in colonic crypt cells has been correlated positively with the induction of colonic tumors by chemical treatment. These nuclear anomalies occur in the proliferative region of the crypt and exhibit a variety of morphological characteristics. Some nuclear anomalies resemble the micronuclei that arise from chromosomal fragments after mitosis. Here, we report that the nuclear anomalies observed within the first few hr of insult with gamma-radiation are independent of mitosis for their expression, as evidenced by failure of colchicine to inhibit their induction, and do not arise from chromosomal material lost during mitosis.

  13. Utilization of pure nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy for the study of pharmaceutical crystal forms.

    PubMed

    Pérez, S C; Cerioni, L; Wolfenson, A E; Faudone, S; Cuffini, S L

    2005-07-14

    Solid-state physical characterization of a pharmaceutical substance is necessary for successful development and approval of the final product. Different physical analytical techniques are available to do so: X-ray diffraction (XRD), IR, Raman, DSC, TG and NMR. Moreover, all of them detect the presence of excipients perturbing the analysis of the pure substance in low doses. In order to study polymorphism and pseudo polymorphism of drug, this paper introduces possible applications of pure nuclear quadrupole resonance, as a non-destructive technique in qualitative and quantitative approaches. Chlorpropamide and diclofenac sodium were used as examples. Unlike the mentioned techniques, the nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signal of pharmaceutical compounds is not perturbed by the presence of solid excipient or other substances unless they possess resonance frequencies in the same frequency range of the compound studied.

  14. Effect of {sigma}-{omega}-{gamma} mixing on the dimesonic function in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Zhou, Q.; Lai, T.

    1995-05-01

    The {sigma}-{omega} mixing in nuclear matter is extended to include the electromagnetic interaction between protons by mixing the photon propagator with the {sigma},{omega} propagators. The total dimesonic function, including the electromagnetic interaction is derived and its real and imaginary parts as well as the dispersion relation are calculated numerically. We find that the electromagnetic interaction has a very large effect on the real part of the dimesonic function for low momentum transfer and zero energy (or zero frequency). The imaginary part of the dimesonic function shows a resonant behavior as a function of energy for fixed momentum, where the point of the negative minimum is verified to correspond to the point in the acoustic sound spectra of the collective excitation. The dispersion relation at normal nuclear matter density indicates the existence of a completely damped acoustic sound collective excitation.

  15. Mechanical design parameters for detection of nuclear signals by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.J.; Hanlon, J.A.; Lamartine, B.; Hawley, M.; Solem, J.C.; Signer, S.; Jarmer, J.J.; Penttila, S.; Sillerud, L.O.; Pryputniewicz, R.J.

    1993-10-01

    Recent theoretical work has shown that mechanical detection of magnetic resonance from a single nuclear spin is in principle possible. This theory has recently been experimentally validated by the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance signals using microscale cantilevers. Currently we are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are three orders of magnitude lower in intensity than electron signals. In order to achieve the needed thousand-fold improvement in sensitivity we have undertaken the development of optimized mechanical cantilevers and highly polarized samples. Finite element modeling is used as a tool to simulate cantilever beam dynamics and to optimize the mechanical properties including Q, resonant frequency, amplitude of vibration and spring constant. Simulations are compared to experiments using heterodyne hologram interferometry. Nanofabrication of optimized cantilevers via ion milling will be directed by the outcome of these simulations and experiments. Highly polarized samples are developed using a three-fold approach: (1) high magnetic field strength (2.5T), (2) low temperature (1K), and (3) use of samples polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization. Our recent experiments have demonstrated nuclear polarizations in excess of 50% in molecules of toulene.

  16. Structure Determination of Natural Products by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Du.

    High-field NMR experiments were used to determine the full structures of six new natural products extracted from plants. These are: four saponins (PT-2, P1, P2 and P3) from the plant Alphitonia zizyphoides found in Samoa; one sesquiterpene (DF-4) from Douglas fir and one diterpene derivative (E-2) from a Chinese medicinal herb. By concerted use of various 1D and 2D NMR techniques, the structures of the above compounds were established and complete resonance assignments were achieved. The 2D INADEQUATE technique coupled with a computerized spectral analysis was extensively used. When carried out on concentrations as low as 60 mg of sample, this technique provided absolute confirmation of the assignments for 35 of the possible 53 C-C bonds for PT-2. On 30 mg of sample of E-21, it revealed 22 of 28 possible C-C bonds.

  17. Measurement of Charged Pions from Neutrino-produced Nuclear Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Clifford N.

    2014-01-01

    A method for identifying stopped pions in a high-resolution scintillator bar detector is presented. I apply my technique to measure the axial mass MΔAfor production of the Δ(1232) resonance by neutrino, with the result MΔA = 1.16±0.20 GeV (68% CL) (limited by statistics). The result is produced from the measured spectrum of reconstructed momentum-transfer Q2. I proceed by varying the value of MΔA in a Rein-Sehgal-based Monte Carlo to produce the best agreement, using shape only (not normalization). The consistency of this result with recent reanalyses of previous bubble-chamber experiments is discussed.

  18. Influence of gamma radiation and magnetic resonance imaging radiation on micro-structure, hardness and electrochemical corrosion behavior of Co‒Cr-based dental alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakr El-Bediwi, Abu; Saada, Mohamed; El-Fallal, Abeer A.; El-Khaligy, Samar

    2011-03-01

    The effects of therapeutic gamma radiation at 10, 20 and 30 kGy and magnetic resonance imaging radiation from a 1.5 T MR scanner on the micro-structure, electrochemical corrosion behavior and micro-hardness of commercial dental Magnum H50 (Co=64%, Cr=29%, Mo=6.5%) alloy have been investigated. The corrosion rate, corrosion resistance, corrosion potential and corrosion current density values of the alloy treated with 0.5 M HCl vary due to gamma and magnetic resonance imaging radiation. At 30 kGy, the corrosion resistance of Magnum H50 reaches a minimum value and the corrosion rate obtains a maximum value. The Vickers hardness value of the Magnum H50 alloy decreases after both gamma and magnetic resonance imaging radiation.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of single proteins using quantum logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovchinsky, I.; Sushkov, A. O.; Urbach, E.; de Leon, N. P.; Choi, S.; De Greve, K.; Evans, R.; Gertner, R.; Bersin, E.; Müller, C.; McGuinness, L.; Jelezko, F.; Walsworth, R. L.; Park, H.; Lukin, M. D.

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the structural analysis of organic compounds and biomolecules but typically requires macroscopic sample quantities. We use a sensor, which consists of two quantum bits corresponding to an electronic spin and an ancillary nuclear spin, to demonstrate room temperature magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of multiple nuclear species within individual ubiquitin proteins attached to the diamond surface. Using quantum logic to improve readout fidelity and a surface-treatment technique to extend the spin coherence time of shallow nitrogen-vacancy centers, we demonstrate magnetic field sensitivity sufficient to detect individual proton spins within 1 second of integration. This gain in sensitivity enables high-confidence detection of individual proteins and allows us to observe spectral features that reveal information about their chemical composition.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of single proteins using quantum logic.

    PubMed

    Lovchinsky, I; Sushkov, A O; Urbach, E; de Leon, N P; Choi, S; De Greve, K; Evans, R; Gertner, R; Bersin, E; Müller, C; McGuinness, L; Jelezko, F; Walsworth, R L; Park, H; Lukin, M D

    2016-02-19

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the structural analysis of organic compounds and biomolecules but typically requires macroscopic sample quantities. We use a sensor, which consists of two quantum bits corresponding to an electronic spin and an ancillary nuclear spin, to demonstrate room temperature magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of multiple nuclear species within individual ubiquitin proteins attached to the diamond surface. Using quantum logic to improve readout fidelity and a surface-treatment technique to extend the spin coherence time of shallow nitrogen-vacancy centers, we demonstrate magnetic field sensitivity sufficient to detect individual proton spins within 1 second of integration. This gain in sensitivity enables high-confidence detection of individual proteins and allows us to observe spectral features that reveal information about their chemical composition.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of single proteins using quantum logic.

    PubMed

    Lovchinsky, I; Sushkov, A O; Urbach, E; de Leon, N P; Choi, S; De Greve, K; Evans, R; Gertner, R; Bersin, E; Müller, C; McGuinness, L; Jelezko, F; Walsworth, R L; Park, H; Lukin, M D

    2016-02-19

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the structural analysis of organic compounds and biomolecules but typically requires macroscopic sample quantities. We use a sensor, which consists of two quantum bits corresponding to an electronic spin and an ancillary nuclear spin, to demonstrate room temperature magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of multiple nuclear species within individual ubiquitin proteins attached to the diamond surface. Using quantum logic to improve readout fidelity and a surface-treatment technique to extend the spin coherence time of shallow nitrogen-vacancy centers, we demonstrate magnetic field sensitivity sufficient to detect individual proton spins within 1 second of integration. This gain in sensitivity enables high-confidence detection of individual proteins and allows us to observe spectral features that reveal information about their chemical composition. PMID:26847544

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials, and organisms.

    PubMed

    Goodson, Boyd M

    2002-04-01

    The sensitivity of conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques is fundamentally limited by the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This review describes the principles and magnetic resonance applications of laser-polarized noble gases. The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across numerous disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, NMR sensitivity enhancement via polarization transfer, and low-field NMR and MRI. PMID:12036331

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance force microscopy at high magnetic field and low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marohn, John A.; Harrell, Lee H.; Thurber, Kent; Fainchtein, Raul; Smith, Doran D.

    2000-03-01

    We will report detection of nuclear magnetic resonance at 6.5 Tesla from a micron-scale sample by magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) at low-temperature. We will detail a ``bare bones" one-inch diameter probe (including a novel ``string and spring" fiber positioning element, a tuned and matched RF coil, and a heating element) suitable for simple variable-temperature magnetic-resonance force microscopy studies. The compact probe design succeeded in minimizing both deleterious thermal drifts in the positions of probe components and pickup of environmental vibrations. In studying Nd-doped calcium fluoride at a magnetic field higher than has previously been employed in an MRFM experiment, we found that even sample-on-cantilever experiments can be complicated by the cantilever's resonance frequency changing with magnetic field.

  4. Quantifying the passive gamma signal from spent nuclear fuel in support of determining the plutonium content in spent nuclear fuel with nondestructive assay

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael L; Tobin, Steven J; Menlove, Howard O; Swinhoe, Martyn T

    2009-01-01

    The objective of safeguarding nuclear material is to deter diversions of significant quantities of nuclear materials by timely monitoring and detection. There are a variety of motivations for quantifying plutonium in spent fuel (SF), by means of nondestructive assay (NDA), in order to meet this goal. These motivations include the following: strengthening the capabilities of the International Atomic Energy Agencies ability to safeguard nuclear facilities, shipper/receiver difference, input accountability at reprocessing facilities and burnup credit at repositories. Many NDA techniques exist for measuring signatures from SF; however, no single NDA technique can, in isolation, quantify elemental plutonium in SF. A study has been undertaken to determine the best integrated combination of 13 NDA techniques for characterizing Pu mass in spent fuel. This paper focuses on the development of a passive gamma measurement system in support the spent fuel assay system. Gamma ray detection for fresh nuclear fuel focuses on gamma ray emissions that directly coincide with the actinides of interest to the assay. For example, the 186-keV gamma ray is generally used for {sup 235}U assay and the 384-keV complex is generally used for assaying plutonium. In spent nuclear fuel, these signatures cannot be detected as the Compton continuum created from the fission products dominates the signal in this energy range. For SF, the measured gamma signatures from key fission products ({sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 154}Eu) are used to ascertain burnup, cooling time, and fissile content information. In this paper the Monte Carlo modeling set-up for a passive gamma spent fuel assay system will be described. The set-up of the system includes a germanium detector and an ion chamber and will be used to gain passive gamma information that will be integrated into a system for determining Pu in SF. The passive gamma signal will be determined from a library of {approx} 100 assemblies that have been

  5. Examination of gamma-irradiated fruits and vegetables by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desrosiers, Marc F.; McLaughlin, William L.

    The ESR spectra of the seeds, pits, shells, and skins of a variety of irradiated fruits and vegetables were measured. All spectra, control and irradiated, contained a single resonance with a g-factor of 2.00. Additional resonances due to Mn 2+ were observed for the drupelets of blackberries and red raspberries. An unusual radiation-induced radical was observed for irradiated mango seed; however, the signal decayed completely within a few days. It was concluded that only in a few specialized cases could the ESR resonances observed be suitable for postirradiation monitoring or dosimetry.

  6. Measurement of the Ec.m. = 184 keV resonance strength in the 26gAl (p, gamma)27 Si reaction.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, C; Parikh, A; José, J; Buchmann, L; Caggiano, J A; Chen, A A; Clark, J A; Crawford, H; Davids, B; D'Auria, J M; Davis, C; Deibel, C; Erikson, L; Fogarty, L; Frekers, D; Greife, U; Hussein, A; Hutcheon, D A; Huyse, M; Jewett, C; Laird, A M; Lewis, R; Mumby-Croft, P; Olin, A; Ottewell, D F; Ouellet, C V; Parker, P; Pearson, J; Ruprecht, G; Trinczek, M; Vockenhuber, C; Wrede, C

    2006-06-30

    The strength of the Ec.m. = 184 keV resonance in the 26gAl(p, gamma)27 reaction has been measured in inverse kinematics using the DRAGON recoil separator at TRIUMF's ISAC facility. We measure a value of omega gamma = 35 +/- 7 microeV and a resonance energy of Ec.m. = 184 +/- 1 keV, consistent with p-wave proton capture into the 7652(3) keV state in 27Si, and discuss the implications of these values for 26GAl nucleosynthesis in typical oxygen-neon white-dwarf novae.

  7. Measurement of the Ec.m. = 184 keV resonance strength in the 26gAl (p, gamma)27 Si reaction.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, C; Parikh, A; José, J; Buchmann, L; Caggiano, J A; Chen, A A; Clark, J A; Crawford, H; Davids, B; D'Auria, J M; Davis, C; Deibel, C; Erikson, L; Fogarty, L; Frekers, D; Greife, U; Hussein, A; Hutcheon, D A; Huyse, M; Jewett, C; Laird, A M; Lewis, R; Mumby-Croft, P; Olin, A; Ottewell, D F; Ouellet, C V; Parker, P; Pearson, J; Ruprecht, G; Trinczek, M; Vockenhuber, C; Wrede, C

    2006-06-30

    The strength of the Ec.m. = 184 keV resonance in the 26gAl(p, gamma)27 reaction has been measured in inverse kinematics using the DRAGON recoil separator at TRIUMF's ISAC facility. We measure a value of omega gamma = 35 +/- 7 microeV and a resonance energy of Ec.m. = 184 +/- 1 keV, consistent with p-wave proton capture into the 7652(3) keV state in 27Si, and discuss the implications of these values for 26GAl nucleosynthesis in typical oxygen-neon white-dwarf novae. PMID:16907298

  8. Applications of gamma-ray spectrometry in the quantitative nondestructive assay of special nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, T.E.; Parker, J.L.

    1990-04-16

    Nearly all applications of gamma-ray spectrometry in the quanitative assay of special nuclear materials can be grouped into five general categories. They are as follows: (1) Quanitative passive assay, of which transmission-corrected passive assay methods for measuring isotopic masses/concentrations are an important subset; (2) Enrichment measurements on infinitely thick'' samples for absolute determination of isotopic fractions/concentrations; (3) Measurements of isotopic ratios using relative detection efficiency principles resulting in absolute isotopic distributions without recourse to standards; (4) Absorption-edge densitometry measurements of elemental concentrations; and (5) X-ray fluorescence measurements of elemental concentrations. Careful and correct practice of these techniques can yield measurement accuracies in the range of 0.1% to 1.0% in favorable situations with measurement times generally in the range of 15 minutes to 1 hour. We present examples of these general categories with emphasis on those measurements and techniques exhibiting the best accuracy, as well as those which are not routinely practiced in many other applications of gamma-ray spectrometry. 20 refs., 6 fig.

  9. High performance gamma measurements of equipment retrieved from Hanford high-level nuclear waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Troyer, G.L.

    1997-03-17

    The cleanup of high level defense nuclear waste at the Hanford site presents several progressive challenges. Among these is the removal and disposal of various components from buried active waste tanks to allow new equipment insertion or hazards mitigation. A unique automated retrieval system at the tank provides for retrieval, high pressure washing, inventory measurement, and containment for disposal. Key to the inventory measurement is a three detector HPGe high performance gamma spectroscopy system capable of recovering data at up to 90% saturation (200,000 counts per second). Data recovery is based on a unique embedded electronic pulser and specialized software to report the inventory. Each of the detectors have different shielding specified through Monte Carlo simulation with the MCNP program. This shielding provides performance over a dynamic range of eight orders of magnitude. System description, calibration issues and operational experiences are discussed.

  10. CARTOGAM - a portable gamma camera for remote localisation of radioactive sources in nuclear facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, O.; Izac, C.; Jean, F.; Lainé, F.; Lévêque, C.; Nguyen, A.

    2001-03-01

    We have developed a compact gamma-imaging system, CARTOGAM, for remote localisation of radioactive sources in nuclear facilities. This system is under industrial development and commercialisation by the firm EURISYS Mesures. The most specific characteristics of CARTOGAM lie in its size (8 cm in diameter) and mass (15 kg for the detection head, including the shield), which make it portable by a person. As an example, CARTOGAM detects a 660 keV source producing a 0.4 μGy/h dose rate at the camera location in 10 min. The angular resolution at that energy ranges from 1° to 3°, depending on the field of view (30° or 50°) and scintillator thickness (2 or 4 mm). We present here a review of the specifications of the camera and show a few images illustrating its performance.

  11. High-performance gamma spectroscopy for equipment retrieval from Hanford high-level nuclear waste tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Gary L.; Hillesand, K. E.; Goodwin, S. G.; Kessler, S. F.; Killian, E. W.; Legare, D.; Nelson, Joseph V., Jr.; Richard, R. F.; Nordquist, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    The cleanup of high level defense nuclear waste at the Hanford site presents several progressive challenges. Among these is the removal and disposal of various components from buried active waste tanks to allow new equipment insertion or hazards mitigation. A unique automated retrieval system at the tank provides for retrieval, high pressure washing, inventory measurement, and containment for disposal. Key to the inventory measurement is a three detector HPGe high performance gamma spectroscopy system capable of recovering data at up to ninety per cent saturation (200,000 counts per second). Data recovery is based on a unique embedded electronic pulser and specialized software to report the inventory. Each of the detectors have different shielding specified through Monte Carlo simulation with the MCNP program. This shielding provides performance over a dynamic range of eight orders of magnitude. System description, calibration issues and operational experiences are discussed.

  12. Nuclear Material Accountability Applications of a Continuous Energy and Direction Gamma Ray Detector

    SciTech Connect

    David Gerts; Robert Bean; Marc Paff

    2010-07-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory has recently developed a detector system based on the principle of a Wilson cloud chamber that gives the original energy and direction to a gamma ray source. This detector has the properties that the energy resolution is continuous and the direction to the source can be resolved to desired fidelity. Furthermore, the detector has low power requirements, is durable, operates in widely varying environments, and is relatively cheap to produce. This detector is expected, however, to require significant time to perform measurements. To mitigate the significant time for measurements, the detector is expected to scale to very large sizes with a linear increase in cost. For example, the proof of principle detector is approximately 30,000 cm3. This work describes the technical results that lead to these assertions. Finally, the applications of this detector are described in the context of nuclear material accountability.

  13. Observation of gamma-rays from fallout collected at Ibaraki, Japan, during the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, Jun; Kikuta, Yasuaki; Akino, Hitoshi

    2013-07-01

    Gamma-ray pulse height distributions were measured for a fallout sample collected at Ibaraki, Japan, during the Fukushima accident in March 2011. The fallout was collected in a pan of water and then evaporated to dryness on a stainless-steel holder. The sample was measured by a germanium detector three times over a year. In the pulse height distribution of the initial measurement, approximately 140 peaks were observed in the 50-2048 keV energy region. Most of these peaks were either total absorption peaks or sum peaks of Te, I or Cs isotopes. Unlike fallout samples at the past nuclear accidents, nuclides such as Ce and Ru were not detected whereas (110m)Ag was prominently observed. The radioactivity concentration of (137)Cs was determined to be at least 1.4×10(4) Bq m(-2), approximately 14% of which was attributed to rainout.

  14. LYNX: An unattended sensor system for detection of gamma-ray and neutron emissions from special nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Runkle, Robert C.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Kiff, Scott D.; Sidor, Daniel E.; Morris, Scott J.; Rohrer, John S.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Pfund, David M.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Bowler, Ryan S.; Mullen, Crystal A.

    2009-01-21

    This manuscript profiles an unattended and fully autonomous detection system sensitive to gamma-ray and neutron emissions from special nuclear material. The LYNX design specifically targets applications that require radiation detection capabilities but possess little or no infrastructure. In these settings, users need the capability to deploy sensors for extended periods of time that analyze whatever signal-starved data can be captured, since little or no control may be exerted over measurement conditions. The fundamental sensing elements of the LYNX system are traditional NaI(Tl) and 3He detectors. The new developments reported here center on two themes: low-power electronics and computationally simple analysis algorithms capable of discriminating gamma-ray signatures indicative of special nuclear materials from those of naturally occurring radioactive material. Incorporating tripwire-detection algorithms based on gamma-ray spectral signatures into a low-power electronics package significantly improves performance in environments where sensors encounter nuisance sources.

  15. Method of using a nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy standard

    DOEpatents

    Spicer, Leonard D.; Bennett, Dennis W.; Davis, Jon F.

    1985-01-01

    (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO is produced by the reaction of ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 NH with SO.sub.2. Also produced in the reaction are ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 O and a new solid compound [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ]. Both (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO and [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ] have fluorescent properties. The reaction of the subject invention is used in a method of measuring the concentration of SO.sub.2 pollutants in gases. By the method, a sample of gas is bubbled through a solution of ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 NH, whereby any SO.sub.2 present in the gas will react to produce the two fluorescent products. The measured fluorescence of these products can then be used to calculate the concentration of SO.sub.2 in the original gas sample. The solid product [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ] may be used as a standard in solid state NMR spectroscopy, wherein the resonance peaks of either .sup.1 H, .sup.13 C, .sup.15 N, or .sup.29 Si may be used as a reference.

  16. Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance imaging: characterisation of experimental cerebral oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, D; McDonald, W I; Johnson, G; Tofts, P S; Landon, D N

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used quantitatively to define the characteristics of two different models of experimental cerebral oedema in cats: vasogenic oedema produced by cortical freezing and cytotoxic oedema induced by triethyl tin. The MRI results have been correlated with the ultrastructural changes. The images accurately delineated the anatomical extent of the oedema in the two lesions, but did not otherwise discriminate between them. The patterns of measured increase in T1' and T2' were, however, characteristic for each type of oedema, and reflected the protein content. The magnetisation decay characteristics of both normal and oedematous white matter were monoexponential for T1 but biexponential for T2 decay. The relative sizes of the two component exponentials of the latter corresponded with the physical sizes of the major tissue water compartments. Quantitative MRI data can provide reliable information about the physico-chemical environment of tissue water in normal and oedematous cerebral tissue, and are useful for distinguishing between acute and chronic lesions in multiple sclerosis. Images PMID:3572428

  17. Chemical structures in pyrodextrin determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yanjie; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2016-10-20

    Glycosidic linkages in a pyrodextrin were identified by NMR spectroscopy for the first time. Pyrodextrin was prepared by slurrying waxy maize starch at pH 3, filtering and drying at 40°C to 10-15% moisture content, then heating at 170°C for 4h. (1)H and (13)C NMR resonances of the pyrodextrin were assigned with the assistance of 2D techniques including COSY, TOCSY, HSQC, and HMBC, all measured on a 500MHz instrument. During dextrinization, native waxy maize starch was hydrolyzed and extensively branched with new glycosidic linkages. The resulting pyrodextrin became 100% soluble in water and produced lower viscosity solutions at 30% solids. There were only 1.2% reducing ends (α-form) detected in the pyrodextrin, but 1,6-anhydro-β-d-glucopyranosyl units accounted for 5.2% of repeating units and they were thought to be at the potential reducing end. New glycosyl linkages including α-1,6, β-1,6, α-1,2, and β-1,2 were identified. The total non-α-1,4 linkages in the pyrodextrin were about 17.8% compared to 5.8% in a maltodextrin prepared by α-amylase digestion. Transglycosidation and depolymerization occurred during dextrinization, and the resulting pyrodextrin was highly branched. PMID:27474585

  18. Discrete deexcitations in 235U from Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, E.; Howell, C. R.; Raut, R.; Rusev, G.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Adekola, A. S.; Hammond, S. L.; Karwowski, H. J.; Pedroni, R.; Kelley, J. H.

    2010-11-01

    Systematics of the even-even rare-earth nuclei suggest a concentration of M1 excitations peaking around 3 MeV with a ∑B(M1) strength of ˜3μN^2. In addition, a linear dependence on the square of the ground-state deformation was observed in the systematics of the ∑B(M1) strengths. The actinide region is interesting for investigation of the ``scissors'' mode of M1 excitations because it has neutron-rich nuclei with large deformations. Evidence of M1 resonances concentrated around 2.0-2.5 MeV were found in ^238U & ^232Th. A research program has been initiated at TUNL to measure dipole transitions in the actinide using HIγS. Nearly monoenergic & circular polarized γ-ray beams below 3.0 MeV was used to measure transitions in ^235U. More than 20 transitions were observed. The integrated cross sections, B(M1) strengths & branching transitions intensities will be presented and compared with previous measurements.

  19. Compton Gamma Ray Observatory/BATSE observations of energetic electrons scattered by cyclotron resonance with waves from powerful VLF transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datlowe, Dayton W.; Imhof, William L.

    1994-01-01

    To obtain a better understanding of the wave-particle mechanisms responsible for the loss of electrons from the radiation belts, energetic electron data from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the NASA's Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) was studied. Powerful ground-based VLF transmitters resonantly scatter electrons from the inner radiation belt onto trajectories from which they precipitate into the atmosphere as they drift eastward. 563 instances in which the satellite traversed a cloud of energetic electrons which had been scattered into quasi-trapped trajectories were identified. From the longitude distribution, it was concluded that waves from the VLF transmitter NWC at 114 deg E are the origin of 257 of the events, and waves from UMSat 44 deg E related to 45 more. In another 177 cases the electrons had drifted from the longitude of these transmitters to a location in the western hemisphere. The previously reported seasonal variation in the frequency of occurrence of cyclotron resonance interaction is confirmed with the continuous coverage provided by GRO. The frequency of occurrence of the cyclotron resonance interactions is largest before sunrise, which we attribute to the diurnal variations in the transmission VLF waves through the ionosphere. For the first time, unique very narrow sheets of electrons occurring in the aftermath of a large geomagnetic storm are reported.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of human brain function.

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, R G; Blamire, A M; Rothman, D L; McCarthy, G

    1993-01-01

    The techniques of in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and spectroscopy have been established over the past two decades. Recent applications of these methods to study human brain function have become a rapidly growing area of research. The development of methods using standard MR contrast agents within the cerebral vasculature has allowed measurements of regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV), which are activity dependent. Subsequent investigations linked the MR relaxation properties of brain tissue to blood oxygenation levels which are also modulated by consumption and blood flow (rCBF). These methods have allowed mapping of brain activity in human visual and motor cortex as well as in areas of the frontal lobe involved in language. The methods have high enough spatial and temporal sensitivity to be used in individual subjects. MR spectroscopy of proton and carbon-13 nuclei has been used to measure rates of glucose transport and metabolism in the human brain. The steady-state measurements of brain glucose concentrations can be used to monitor the glycolytic flux, whereas subsequent glucose metabolism--i.e., the flux into the cerebral glutamate pool--can be used to measure tricarboxylic acid cycle flux. Under visual stimulation the concentration of lactate in the visual cortex has been shown to increase by MR spectroscopy. This increase is compatible with an increase of anaerobic glycolysis under these conditions as earlier proposed from positron emission tomography studies. It is shown how MR spectroscopy can extend this understanding of brain metabolism. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8475050

  1. Effective temperature of amorphous carbon studied using nuclear-resonance photon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreh, R.; Beck, O.; Jäger, D.; Finkelstein, Y.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Maser, H.; Pitz, H. H.

    1997-07-01

    The effective temperature of isotopic amorphous carbon (13C) was measured, at 295 K, by employing the nuclear resonance photon scattering (NRPS) technique. The photon beam was in the form of bremsstrahlung obtained from an electron beam of the Stuttgart Dynamitron, with E=4.1 MeV, and the resonance scattering from the 3089-keV and the 3684-keV levels in 13C was measured. The effective temperature of 13C was found to be (822+/-123) K, which is higher by about 13% than that calculated from the experimental vibrational density of states of amorphous carbon. This deviation is discussed.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of liquids morphology inside partially saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechifor, Ruben; Badea, Codruta; Ardelean, Ioan

    2009-08-01

    In the present contribution we are investigating the relationship between liquid morphology and relaxation time distribution in partially saturated pores. The filling fluids are acetone (polar) and tetradecane (nonpolar). The porous sample is a silica glass (Vitrapor#5) with the nominal mean pore size is d = 1 μm (± 0.6 μm). All nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments are performed at 20C using a NMR instrument operable at 20 MHz proton resonance frequency. The experimental results are compared with a two phase exchange model providing us information on the strength of surface relaxation.

  3. Resonant scattering experiments with radioactive nuclear beams - Recent results and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Teranishi, T.; Sakaguchi, S.; Uesaka, T.; Kubono, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kurihara, Y.; Bihn, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Watanabe, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Khiem, L. H.; Cuong, P. V.; Goto, A.

    2013-04-19

    Resonant scattering with low-energy radioactive nuclear beams of E < 5 MeV/u have been studied at CRIB of CNS and at RIPS of RIKEN. As an extension to the present experimental technique, we will install an advanced polarized proton target for resonant scattering experiments. A Monte-Carlo simulation was performed to study the feasibility of future experiments with the polarized target. In the Monte-Carlo simulation, excitation functions and analyzing powers were calculated using a newly developed R-matrix calculation code. A project of a small-scale radioactive beam facility at Kyushu University is also briefly described.

  4. High sensitivity nuclear magnetic resonance probe for anvil cell pressure experiments.

    PubMed

    Haase, Jürgen; Goh, Swee K; Meissner, Thomas; Alireza, Patricia L; Rybicki, Damian

    2009-07-01

    While the highest pressures can be achieved with diamond anvil cells, limited sample size and anvil geometry have hampered their application in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments due to weak signal-to-noise. Here we report a new probe design that is based on having the resonant radio frequency coil that encloses the sample within the anvil cell inside the gasket hole. This increases the filling factor tremendously and results in greatly enhanced NMR sensitivity. The setup is described together with room temperature Na and Al NMR experiments. PMID:19655963

  5. Resonance strengths in the {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O and {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marta, Michele; Trompler, Erik; Bemmerer, Daniel; Beyer, Roland; Grosse, Eckart; Hannaske, Roland; Junghans, Arnd R.; Nair, Chithra; Schwengner, Ronald; Wagner, Andreas; Yakorev, Dmitry; Broggini, Carlo; Caciolli, Antonio; Erhard, Martin; Menegazzo, Roberto; Fueloep, Zsolt; Gyuerky, Gyoergy; Szuecs, Tamas; Vezzu, Simone

    2010-05-15

    The {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O reaction is the slowest reaction of the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen cycle of hydrogen burning in stars. As a consequence, it determines the rate of the cycle. The {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C reaction is frequently used in inverse kinematics for hydrogen depth profiling in materials. The {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O and {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C reactions have been studied simultaneously, using titanium nitride targets of natural isotopic composition and a proton beam. The strengths of the resonances at E{sub p} = 1058 keV in {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O and at E{sub p} = 897 and 430 keV in {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C have been determined with improved precision, relative to the well-known resonance at E{sub p} = 278 keV in {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O. The new recommended values are omegagamma=0.353+-0.018, 362+-20, and 21.9+-1.0 eV for their respective strengths. In addition, the branching ratios for the decay of the E{sub p} = 1058 keV resonance in {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O have been redetermined. The data reported here should facilitate future studies of off-resonant capture in the {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O reaction that are needed for an improved R-matrix extrapolation of the cross section. In addition, the data on the 430 keV resonance in {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C may be useful for hydrogen depth profiling.

  6. Detecting special nuclear materials in suspect containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Eric B [Oakland, CA; Prussin, Stanley G [Kensington, CA

    2009-05-05

    A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a suspect container. The system and its method include irradiating the suspect container with a beam of neutrons, so as to induce a thermal fission in a portion of the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the thermal fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

  7. Detecting special nuclear materials in suspect containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Eric B.; Prussin, Stanley G.

    2009-01-27

    A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a suspect container. The system and its method include irradiating the suspect container with a beam of neutrons, so as to induce a thermal fission in a portion of the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the thermal fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

  8. Detecting special nuclear materials in suspect containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Eric B.; Prussin, Stanley G.

    2009-01-06

    A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a suspect container. The system and its method include irradiating the suspect container with a beam of neutrons, so as to induce a thermal fission in a portion of the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the thermal fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

  9. On-site gamma-ray spectroscopic measurements of fission gas release in irradiated nuclear fuel.

    PubMed

    Matsson, I; Grapengiesser, B; Andersson, B

    2007-01-01

    An experimental, non-destructive in-pool, method for measuring fission gas release (FGR) in irradiated nuclear fuel has been developed. Using the method, a significant number of experiments have been performed in-pool at several nuclear power plants of the BWR type. The method utilises the 514 keV gamma-radiation from the gaseous fission product (85)Kr captured in the fuel rod plenum volume. A submergible measuring device (LOKET) consisting of an HPGe-detector and a collimator system was utilised allowing for single rod measurements on virtually all types of BWR fuel. A FGR database covering a wide range of burn-ups (up to average rod burn-up well above 60 MWd/kgU), irradiation history, fuel rod position in cross section and fuel designs has been compiled and used for computer code benchmarking, fuel performance analysis and feedback to reactor operators. Measurements clearly indicate the low FGR in more modern fuel designs in comparison to older fuel types.

  10. New Resolved Resonance Region Evaluation for 63Cu and 65Cu for Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz C; Guber, Klaus H; Forget, Benoit; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Siegler, P.

    2014-01-01

    A new resolved resonance region evaluation of 63Cu and 65Cu was done in the energy region from 10-5 eV to 99.5 keV. The R-Matrix SAMMY method using the Reich-Moore approximation was used to create a new set of consistent resonance parameters. The new evaluation was based on three experimental transmission data sets; two measured at ORELA and one from MITR, and two radiative capture experimental data sets from GELINA. A total of 141 new resonances were identied for 63Cu and 117 for 65Cu. The corresponding set of external resonances for each isotope was based on the identied resonances above 99.5 keV from the ORELA transmission data. The negative external levels (bound levels) were determined to match the dierential thermal cross section measured at the MITR. Double dierential elastic scattering cross sections were calculated from the new set of resonance parameters. Benchmarking calculations were carried out on a set of ICSBEP benchmarks. This work is in support of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program.

  11. Scientific opportunities in nuclear resonance spectroscopy from source-driven revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, G. K.; Röhlsberger, R.

    2008-02-01

    From the beginning of its discovery the Mössbauer effect has continued to be one of the most powerful tools with broad applications in diverse areas of science and technology. With the advent of synchrotron radiation sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and the Super Photon Ring-8 (SPring-8), the tool has enlarged its scope and delivered new capabilities. The popular techniques most generally used in the field of materials physics, chemical physics, geoscience, and biology are hyperfine spectroscopy via elastic nuclear forward scattering (NFS), vibrational spectroscopy via nuclear inelastic scattering (NRIXS), and, to a lesser extent, diffusional dynamics from quasielastic nuclear forward scattering (QNFS). As we look ahead, new storage rings with enhanced brilliance such as PETRA-III under construction at DESY, Hamburg, and PEP-III in its early design stage at SLAC, Stanford, will provide new and unique science opportunities. In the next two decades, x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE-XFELs) and a seed (SXFELs), with unique time structure, coherence and a five to six orders higher average brilliance will truly revolutionize nuclear resonance applications in a major way. This overview is intended to briefly address the unique radiation characteristics of new sources on the horizon and to provide a glimpse of scientific prospects and dreams in the nuclear resonance field from the new radiation sources. We anticipate an expanded nuclear resonance research activity with applications such as spin and phonon mapping of a single nanostructure and their assemblies, interfaces, and surfaces; spin dynamics; nonequilibrium dynamics; photochemical reactions; excited-state spectroscopy; and nonlinear phenomena.

  12. Scientific opportunities in nuclear resonance spectroscopy from source-driven revolution.

    SciTech Connect

    Shenoy, G. K.; Rohlsberger, R.; X-Ray Science Division; DESY

    2008-02-01

    From the beginning of its discovery the Moessbauer effect has continued to be one of the most powerful tools with broad applications in diverse areas of science and technology. With the advent of synchrotron radiation sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and the Super Photon Ring-8 (SPring-8), the tool has enlarged its scope and delivered new capabilities. The popular techniques most generally used in the field of materials physics, chemical physics, geoscience, and biology are hyperfine spectroscopy via elastic nuclear forward scattering (NFS), vibrational spectroscopy via nuclear inelastic scattering (NRIXS), and, to a lesser extent, diffusional dynamics from quasielastic nuclear forward scattering (QNFS). As we look ahead, new storage rings with enhanced brilliance such as PETRA-III under construction at DESY, Hamburg, and PEP-III in its early design stage at SLAC, Stanford, will provide new and unique science opportunities. In the next two decades, x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE-XFELs) and a seed (SXFELs), with unique time structure, coherence and a five to six orders higher average brilliance will truly revolutionize nuclear resonance applications in a major way. This overview is intended to briefly address the unique radiation characteristics of new sources on the horizon and to provide a glimpse of scientific prospects and dreams in the nuclear resonance field from the new radiation sources. We anticipate an expanded nuclear resonance research activity with applications such as spin and phonon mapping of a single nanostructure and their assemblies, interfaces, and surfaces; spin dynamics; nonequilibrium dynamics; photochemical reactions; excited-state spectroscopy; and nonlinear phenomena.

  13. Electron spin resonance of gamma-irradiated poly/ethylene 2,6-naphthalene dicarboxylate/.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Pezdirtz, G. F.

    1971-01-01

    The two types of radicals trapped in gamma-irradiated PEN 2,6 are identified by ESR as - O - CH - CH2 - O - (radical I) and a radical located on the naphthalene ring (radical II). The concentrations of the radicals in the gross polyer are 10 to 20% of I and 80 to 90% of II. Similar trapped radicals are established in beta-irradiated PET, a structurally related polymer.

  14. Electron spin resonance of gamma-irradiated poly/ethylene 2,6-naphthalene dicarboxylate/.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Pezdirtz, G. F.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the ESR spectra of this gamma-irradiated compound (PEN-2,6) aimed at determining the effect of replacing the phenylene ring with naphthalene rings in the polymer on the formation of radicals and at identifying the radical species. The two types of radicals trapped in the PEN-2,6 compound have been identified as -O-CH-CH2-O- (radical I) and a radical located on the naphthalene ring (radical II).

  15. Optimized {gamma}-Multiplicity Based Spin Assignments of s-Wave Neutron Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Becvar, F.; Koehler, Paul Edward; Krticka, Milan; Mitchell, G. E.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    The multiplicity of -ray emission following neutron capture at isolated resonances carries valuable information on the resonance spin. Several methods utilizing this information have been developed. The latest method was recently introduced for analyzing the data from time-of-flight measurements with 4 -calorimetric detection systems. The present paper describes a generalization of this method. The goal is the separation of the -emission yields belonging to the two neutron capturing state spins of isolated (or even unresolved) s-wave neutron resonances on targets with non-zero spin. The formalism for performing this separation is described and then tested on artificially generated data. This new method was applied to the -multiplicity data obtained for the 147Sm(n, )148Sm reaction using the DANCE detector system at the LANSCE facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The analyzing power of the upgraded method is supported by combined dicebox and geant4 simulations of the fluctuation properties of the multiplicity distributions.

  16. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements on ^237Np for Security and Safeguards Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angell, C. T.; Joshi, T.; Yee, Ryan; Norman, E. B.; Kulp, W. D.; Warren, G. A.; Korbly, S.; Klimenko, A.; Wilson, C.; Copping, R.; Shuh, D. K.

    2009-10-01

    The smuggling of nuclear material and the diversion of fissile material for covert weapon programs both present grave risks to world security. Methods are needed to detect nuclear material smuggled in cargo, and for proper material accountability in civilian fuel re-processing facilities. Nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) is a technique that can address both needs. It is a non-destructive active interrogation method that provides isotope-specific information. It works by using a γ-ray beam to resonantly excite levels in a nucleus and observing the γ-rays emitted whose energy and intensity are characteristic of that isotope. ^237Np presents significant safeguard challenges; it is fissile yet currently has fewer safeguard restrictions. NRF measurements on ^237Np will expand the nuclear database and will permit designing interrogation and assay systems. Measurements were made using the bremsstrahlung beam at the HVRL at MIT on a 7 g target of ^237Np with two incident electron energies of 2.8 and 3.1 MeV. Results will be presented with discussion of the relevant nuclear structure necessary to predict levels in other actinides.

  17. High Repetition Rate, LINAC-based Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence FY 2009 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew Kinlaw; Scott Watson; James Johnson; Alan Hunt; Heather Seipel; Edward Reedy

    2009-10-01

    Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF), which is possible for nuclei with atomic numbers greater than helium (Z=2), occurs when a nuclear level is excited by resonant absorption of a photon and subsequently decays by reemission of a photon. The excited nuclear states can become readily populated, provided the incident photon’s energy is within the Doppler-broadened width of the energy level being excited. Utilizing continuous energy photon spectra, as is characteristic of a bremsstrahlung photon beam, as the inspection source, ensures that at least some fraction of the impinging beam will contribute to the population of the excited energy levels in the material of interest. Upon de-excitation, either to the ground state or to a lower-energy excited state, the emitted fluorescence photon’s energy will correspond to the energy difference between the excited state and the state to which it decays. As each isotope inherently contains unique nuclear energy levels, the NRF states for each isotope are also unique. By exploiting this phenomenon, NRF photon detection provides a well-defined signature for identifying the presence of individual nuclear species. This report summarizes the second year (Fiscal Year [FY] 2009) of a collaborative research effort between Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho State University’s Idaho Accelerator Center, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This effort focused on continuing to assess and optimize NRF-based detection techniques utilizing a slightly modified, commercially available, pulsed medical electron accelerator.

  18. Model for the {Delta}(1600) resonance and {gamma}N{yields}{Delta}(1600) transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ramalho, G.; Tsushima, K.

    2010-10-01

    A covariant spectator constituent quark model is applied to study the {gamma}N{yields}{Delta}(1600) transition. Two processes are important in the transition: a photon couples to the individual quarks of the {Delta}(1600) core (quark core), and a photon couples to the intermediate pion-baryon states (pion cloud). While the quark core contributions are estimated assuming {Delta}(1600) as the first radial excitation of {Delta}(1232), the pion cloud contributions are estimated based on an analogy with the {gamma}N{yields}{Delta}(1232) transition. To estimate the pion cloud contributions in the {gamma}N{yields}{Delta}(1600) transition, we include the relevant intermediate states, {pi}N, {pi}{Delta}, {pi}N(1440) and {pi}{Delta}(1600). Dependence on the four-momentum transfer squared, Q{sup 2}, is predicted for the magnetic dipole transition form factor, G{sub M}*(Q{sup 2}), as well as the helicity amplitudes, A{sub 1/2}(Q{sup 2}) and A{sub 3/2}(Q{sup 2}). The results at Q{sup 2}=0 are compared with the existing data.

  19. A model for the Delta(1600) resonance and gamma N -> Delta(1600) transition

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ramalho, K. Tsushima

    2010-10-01

    A covariant spectator constituent quark model is applied to study the gamma N -> Delta(1600) transition. Two processes are important in the transition: a photon couples to the individual quarks of the Delta(1600) core (quark core), and a photon couples to the intermediate pion-baryon states (pion cloud). While the quark core contributions are estimated assuming Delta(1600) as the first radial excitation of Delta(1232), the pion cloud contributions are estimated based on an analogy with the gamma N -> Delta(1232) transition. To estimate the pion cloud contributions in the gamma N -> Delta(1600) transition, we include the relevant intermediate states, pi-N, pi-Delta, pi-N(1440) and pi-Delta(1600). Dependence on the four-momentum transfer squared, Q2, is predicted for the magnetic dipole transition form factor, GM*(Q2), as well as the helicity amplitudes, A_1/2(Q2) and A_3/2(Q2). The results at Q2=0 are compared with the existing data.

  20. Role of high-spin hyperon resonances in the reaction of $\\gamma p \\to K^+ K^+ \\Xi^-$

    SciTech Connect

    J. Ka Shing Man, Yongseok Oh, K. Nakayama

    2011-05-01

    The recent data taken by the CLAS Collaboration at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility for the reaction of $\\gamma p \\to K^+ K^+ \\Xi^-$ are reanalyzed within a relativistic meson-exchange model of hadronic interactions. The present model is an extension of the one developed in an earlier work by Nakayama, Oh, and Haberzettl [Phys. Rev. C 74, 035205 (2006)]. In particular, the role of the spin-5/2 and -7/2 hyperon resonances, which were not included in the previous model, is investigated in the present study. It is shown that the contribution of the $\\Sigma(2030)$ hyperon having spin-7/2 and positive parity has a key role to bring the model predictions into a fair agreement with the measured data for the $K^+\\Xi^-$ invariant mass distribution.

  1. Characterization and identification of gamma-irradiated sauces by electron spin resonance spectroscopy using different sample pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Akram, Kashif; Ahn, Jae-Jun; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2013-06-01

    Tomato ketchup, barbeque sauce, sweet chili sauce, and spaghetti sauce were gamma irradiated at 0, 1, 5, and 10 kGy. Electron spin resonance (ESR) technique was used to characterize the irradiated sauces, targeting radiation-induced cellulose radicals and using a modified sample pretreatment method. The samples were first washed with water, and then the residues were extracted with alcohol. The non-irradiated sauces exhibited the single central signal, whose intensity showed a significant increase on irradiation. The ESR spectra from the radiation-induced cellulose radicals, with two side peaks (g=2.02012 and g=1.98516) equally spaced (± 3 mT) from the central signal, were also observed in the irradiated sauces. The improvements in the central (natural) and radiation-induced (two side peaks corresponding to the cellulose radicals) signal intensities were obvious, when compared with routine freeze-drying and alcoholic-extraction techniques. PMID:23411320

  2. Billion-fold enhancement in sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for magnesium ions in solution.

    PubMed

    Gottberg, Alexander; Stachura, Monika; Kowalska, Magdalena; Bissell, Mark L; Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Blaum, Klaus; Helmke, Alexander; Johnston, Karl; Kreim, Kim; Larsen, Flemming H; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Garcia Ruiz, Ronald F; Szunyogh, Daniel; Thulstrup, Peter W; Yordanov, Deyan T; Hemmingsen, Lars

    2014-12-15

    β-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is highly sensitive compared to conventional NMR spectroscopy, and may be applied for several elements across the periodic table. β-NMR has previously been successfully applied in the fields of nuclear and solid-state physics. In this work, β-NMR is applied, for the first time, to record an NMR spectrum for a species in solution. (31)Mg β-NMR spectra are measured for as few as 10(7) magnesium ions in ionic liquid (EMIM-Ac) within minutes, as a prototypical test case. Resonances are observed at 3882.9 and 3887.2 kHz in an external field of 0.3 T. The key achievement of the current work is to demonstrate that β-NMR is applicable for the analysis of species in solution, and thus represents a novel spectroscopic technique for use in general chemistry and potentially in biochemistry.

  3. Billion-fold enhancement in sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for magnesium ions in solution.

    PubMed

    Gottberg, Alexander; Stachura, Monika; Kowalska, Magdalena; Bissell, Mark L; Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Blaum, Klaus; Helmke, Alexander; Johnston, Karl; Kreim, Kim; Larsen, Flemming H; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Garcia Ruiz, Ronald F; Szunyogh, Daniel; Thulstrup, Peter W; Yordanov, Deyan T; Hemmingsen, Lars

    2014-12-15

    β-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is highly sensitive compared to conventional NMR spectroscopy, and may be applied for several elements across the periodic table. β-NMR has previously been successfully applied in the fields of nuclear and solid-state physics. In this work, β-NMR is applied, for the first time, to record an NMR spectrum for a species in solution. (31)Mg β-NMR spectra are measured for as few as 10(7) magnesium ions in ionic liquid (EMIM-Ac) within minutes, as a prototypical test case. Resonances are observed at 3882.9 and 3887.2 kHz in an external field of 0.3 T. The key achievement of the current work is to demonstrate that β-NMR is applicable for the analysis of species in solution, and thus represents a novel spectroscopic technique for use in general chemistry and potentially in biochemistry. PMID:25303164

  4. Key metabolites in tissue extracts of Elliptio complanata identified using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hurley-Sanders, Jennifer L; Levine, Jay F; Nelson, Stacy A C; Law, J M; Showers, William J; Stoskopf, Michael K

    2015-01-01

    We used (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to describe key metabolites of the polar metabolome of the freshwater mussel, Elliptio complanata. Principal components analysis documented variability across tissue types and river of origin in mussels collected from two rivers in North Carolina (USA). Muscle, digestive gland, mantle and gill tissues yielded identifiable but overlapping metabolic profiles. Variation in digestive gland metabolic profiles between the two mussel collection sites was characterized by differences in mono- and disaccharides. Variation in mantle tissue metabolomes appeared to be associated with sex. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a sensitive means to detect metabolites in the tissues of E. complanata and holds promise as a tool for the investigation of freshwater mussel health and physiology.

  5. Protein carbon-13 spin systems by a single two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, B.H.; Westler, W.M.; Darba, P.; Markley, J.L.

    1988-05-13

    By applying a two-dimensional double-quantum carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance experiment to a protein uniformly enriched to 26% carbon-13, networks of directly bonded carbon atoms were identified by virtue of their one-bond spin-spin couplings and were classified by amino acid type according to their particular single- and double-quantum chemical shift patterns. Spin systems of 75 of the 98 amino acid residues in a protein, oxidized Anabaena 7120 ferredoxin (molecular weight 11,000), were identified by this approach, which represents a key step in an improved methodology for assigning protein nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. Missing spin systems corresponded primarily to residues located adjacent to the paramagnetic iron-sulfur cluster. 25 references, 2 figures.

  6. Analysis of antimycin A by reversed-phase liquid chromatography/nuclear magnetic-resonance spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ha, Steven T.K.; Wilkins, Charles L.; Abidi, Sharon L.

    1989-01-01

    A mixture of closely related streptomyces fermentation products, antimycin A, Is separated, and the components are identified by using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with directly linked 400-MHz proton nuclear magnetic resonance detection. Analyses of mixtures of three amino acids, alanine, glycine, and valine, are used to determine optimal measurement conditions. Sensitivity increases of as much as a factor of 3 are achieved, at the expense of some loss in chromatographic resolution, by use of an 80-μL NMR cell, Instead of a smaller 14-μL cell. Analysis of the antimycin A mixture, using the optimal analytical high performance liquid chromatography/nuclear magnetic resonance conditions, reveals it to consist of at least 10 closely related components.

  7. Nuclear quadrupole resonance lineshape analysis for different motional models: Stochastic Liouville approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Earle, K. A.; Mielczarek, A.; Kubica, A.; Milewska, A.; Moscicki, J.

    2011-12-01

    A general theory of lineshapes in nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), based on the stochastic Liouville equation, is presented. The description is valid for arbitrary motional conditions (particularly beyond the valid range of perturbation approaches) and interaction strengths. It can be applied to the computation of NQR spectra for any spin quantum number and for any applied magnetic field. The treatment presented here is an adaptation of the "Swedish slow motion theory," [T. Nilsson and J. Kowalewski, J. Magn. Reson. 146, 345 (2000), 10.1006/jmre.2000.2125] originally formulated for paramagnetic systems, to NQR spectral analysis. The description is formulated for simple (Brownian) diffusion, free diffusion, and jump diffusion models. The two latter models account for molecular cooperativity effects in dense systems (such as liquids of high viscosity or molecular glasses). The sensitivity of NQR slow motion spectra to the mechanism of the motional processes modulating the nuclear quadrupole interaction is discussed.

  8. Key metabolites in tissue extracts of Elliptio complanata identified using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hurley-Sanders, Jennifer L.; Levine, Jay F.; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Law, J. M.; Showers, William J.; Stoskopf, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    We used 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to describe key metabolites of the polar metabolome of the freshwater mussel, Elliptio complanata. Principal components analysis documented variability across tissue types and river of origin in mussels collected from two rivers in North Carolina (USA). Muscle, digestive gland, mantle and gill tissues yielded identifiable but overlapping metabolic profiles. Variation in digestive gland metabolic profiles between the two mussel collection sites was characterized by differences in mono- and disaccharides. Variation in mantle tissue metabolomes appeared to be associated with sex. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a sensitive means to detect metabolites in the tissues of E. complanata and holds promise as a tool for the investigation of freshwater mussel health and physiology. PMID:27293708

  9. Controlling nuclear spin exchange via optical Feshbach resonances in Y171b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Iris; Julienne, Paul S.; Deutsch, Ivan H.

    2009-08-01

    Nuclear spin exchange occurs in ultracold collisions of fermionic alkaline-earth-metal-like atoms due to a difference between s - and p -wave phase shifts. We study the use of an optical Feshbach resonance, excited on the S10→P31 intercombination line of Y171b , to affect a large modification of the s -wave scattering phase shift and thereby optically mediate nuclear exchange forces. We perform a full multichannel calculation of the photoassociation resonances and wave functions and from these calculate the real and imaginary parts of the scattering length. As a figure of merit of this interaction, we estimate the fidelity to implement a SWAP entangling quantum logic gate for two atoms trapped in the same well of an optical lattice. For moderate parameters one can achieve a gate fidelity of ˜95% in a time of ˜50μs .

  10. Nuclear quadrupole resonance lineshape analysis for different motional models: stochastic Liouville approach.

    PubMed

    Kruk, D; Earle, K A; Mielczarek, A; Kubica, A; Milewska, A; Moscicki, J

    2011-12-14

    A general theory of lineshapes in nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), based on the stochastic Liouville equation, is presented. The description is valid for arbitrary motional conditions (particularly beyond the valid range of perturbation approaches) and interaction strengths. It can be applied to the computation of NQR spectra for any spin quantum number and for any applied magnetic field. The treatment presented here is an adaptation of the "Swedish slow motion theory," [T. Nilsson and J. Kowalewski, J. Magn. Reson. 146, 345 (2000)] originally formulated for paramagnetic systems, to NQR spectral analysis. The description is formulated for simple (Brownian) diffusion, free diffusion, and jump diffusion models. The two latter models account for molecular cooperativity effects in dense systems (such as liquids of high viscosity or molecular glasses). The sensitivity of NQR slow motion spectra to the mechanism of the motional processes modulating the nuclear quadrupole interaction is discussed. PMID:22168707

  11. Negotiated identities of chemical instrumentation: the case of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, 1956-1969.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jody A

    2003-05-01

    What is an NMR spectrometer? Beginning with this seemingly simple question, I will explore the development of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy between the years 1956 and 1969 from two vantage points: the organic chemists who used the new instrument, and Varian Associates-the makers of the first NMR spectrometers-. Through an examination of the articles and advertisements published in the Journal of Organic Chemistry, I will draw two conclusions. First, organic chemists and Varian Associates (along with other actors) are co-responsible for the development of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (i.e., NMR spectroscopy was not created by a single actor). Second, by changing the way NMR spectrometers are used, organic chemists attempted to change to the identity of the instrument. Similarly, when Varian Associates advertised their NMR spectrometers in a different way, they, too, attempted to change the identity of the instrument.

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) analysis of a Kel-F resin and lacquer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutenberg, A. C.

    1985-08-01

    Proton, carbon, and fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to determine the concentration of various species present in Kel-F 800 resin and its lacquers. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to characterize Kel-F 800 resin and to measure the various chemical species present in a lacquer based on this resin. Proton NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the ratio of ethyl acetate to xylenes and to estimate the vinylidene fluoride content of the resin. Fluorine NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the water and ethanol content of the lacquer as well as some of its components. Fluorine NMR spectroscopy was also used to estimate the amount of perfluorodecanoate emulsifier present in the Kel-F resin. Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the isomeric composition of various batches of xylenes and as an alternate method for measuring the vinylidene fluoride content of the resin.

  13. Stimulated echoes and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for solids with simple line shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geil, Burkhard; Diezemann, Gregor; Böhmer, Roland

    2008-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments on ion conductors often yield rather unstructured spectra, which are hard to interpret if the relation between the actual translational motion of the mobile species and the changes of the NMR frequencies is not known. In order to facilitate a general analysis of experiments on solids with such spectra, different models for the stochastic evolution of the NMR frequencies are considered. The treated models involve random frequency jumps, diffusive evolutions, or approximately fixed frequency jumps. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra as well as stimulated-echo functions for the study of slow and ultraslow translational dynamics are calculated for Gaussian equilibrium line shapes. The results are compared with corresponding ones from rotational models and with experimental data.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is highly sensitive for lipid-soluble metabolites.

    PubMed

    Dai, Haiyang; Hong, Bikai; Xu, Zhifeng; Ma, Lian; Chen, Yaowen; Xiao, Yeyu; Wu, Renhua

    2013-08-01

    Although the water-soluble metabolite profile of human mesenchymal stem cells is known, the lipid profile still needs further investigation. In this study, methanol-chloroform was used to extract pid-soluble metabolites and perchloric acid was used to extract water-soluble metabolites. Furthermore, a dual phase extraction method using methanol-chloroform and water was used to obtain both water and lipid fractions simultaneously. All metabolite extractions were analyzed on a 9.4T high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. Metabolite resonance peaks were assigned in the acquired spectra according to the chemical shift, and the extraction efficiency of ferent methods was compared. Results showed that in the spectra of water-soluble extracts, major metabolites comprised low molecular weight metabolites, including lactate, acetic acid, fatty acids, threonine, glutamic acid, creatine, choline and its derivatives, while in the spectra of lipid-soluble extracts, most metabolites were assigned to fatty acids. Among the different extraction procedures, perchloric acid was more efficient in extracting water-soluble metabolites and methanol-chloroform was efficient in extracting organic components compared with the dual phase extraction method. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that as low as 0.7 mg organic yield was enough to obtain clear resonance peaks, while about 6.0 mg water-soluble yield was needed to obtain relatively favorable spectral lines. These results show that the efficiency of extracting water and lipid fractions is higher using perchloric acid and methanol-chloroform compared with dual phase extraction and that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is highly sensitive for analyzing lipid-soluble extracts.

  15. Classification of iron-sulfur cores in ferredoxins by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, K; Ozaki, Y; Kyogoku, Y; Hase, T; Matsubara, H

    1983-09-01

    A 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study was carried out on various ferredoxins which possess one of three types of iron-sulfur clusters, (2Fe-2S), (3Fe-3S), or (4Fe-4S). In the isolated form, (2Fe-2S) ferredoxins from spinach (Spinacea oleracia), pokeweed (Phytolacca americana), a blue-green alga (Spirulina platensis), and a halobacterium (Halobacterium halobium) exhibited two broad resonances common in chemical shift at the region downfield of 10 ppm. In their reduced forms, seven contact-shifted resonances appeared spread over 30 ppm. Although the positions of the contact-shifted resonances in the reduced state differed among the four, a common trend in the temperature dependence of their resonance positions was recognized. Two (4Fe-4S) ferredoxins from Bacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus thermoproteolyticus exhibited almost indistinguishable spectral patterns in both the oxidized and reduced forms. The ferricyanide-treated ferredoxins of B. stearothermophilus and B. thermoproteolyticus showed characteristic contact-shifted resonances distinct from the spectra of the original (4Fe-4S) ferredoxins. This corresponds to the recent finding of the interconversion of (4Fe-4S) and (3Fe-3S) clusters with ferricyanide in the ferredoxin. Based on our data together with reported NMR data on other ferredoxins, contact-shift resonances of three types of clusters were tabulated. The reliability of NMR classification increases when we compare the NMR spectra of a ferredoxin with the classification standards at the two redox states. Moreover, not only the absolute values of the chemical shifts of contact-shifted resonances but also their temperature dependence give distinctive information applicable to iron core identification.

  16. Validation of accuracy in image co-registration with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in Gamma Knife radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Mori, Yoshimasa; Komori, Masataka; Shibamoto, Yuta; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Hashizume, Chisa

    2014-01-01

    The latest version of Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) is equipped with Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) image-processing functions including image co-registration. Diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) taken prior to Gamma Knife treatment is available for virtual treatment pre-planning. On the treatment day, actual dose planning is completed on stereotactic MRI or computed tomography (CT) (with a frame) after co-registration with the diagnostic MRI and in association with the virtual dose distributions. This study assesses the accuracy of image co-registration in a phantom study and evaluates its usefulness in clinical cases. Images of three kinds of phantoms and 11 patients are evaluated. In the phantom study, co-registration errors of the 3D coordinates were measured in overall stereotactic space and compared between stereotactic CT and diagnostic CT, stereotactic MRI and diagnostic MRI, stereotactic CT and diagnostic MRI, and stereotactic MRI and diagnostic MRI co-registered with stereotactic CT. In the clinical study, target contours were compared between stereotactic MRI and diagnostic MRI co-registered with stereotactic CT. The mean errors of coordinates between images were < 1 mm in all measurement areas in both the phantom and clinical patient studies. The co-registration function implemented in LGP has sufficient geometrical accuracy to assure appropriate dose planning in clinical use. PMID:24781505

  17. Fetal imaging by nuclear magnetic resonance: a study in goats: work in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, M.A.; Knight, C.H.; Rimmington, J.E.; Mallard, J.R.

    1983-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance proton imaging was used to obtain images of goat fetuses in utero. The long T1 relaxation time of amniotic fluid makes it appear black on proton density images when examined using the Aberdeen imager, and so allows very good discrimination of the position and structure of the fetus. Some fetal internal tissues can be seen on T1 images. These findings suggest that NMR imaging has great potential in pregnancy studies.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of granular flows: Technical progress report, quarter ending 09/30/93

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-27

    This Technical Progress Report for the quarter ending 09/30/93 describes work on two tasks which are part of nuclear magnetic resonance studies of granular flows. (1) Research has been directed toward improving concentration measurements under reasonably fast conditions. (2) The process continues of obtaining comprehensive velocity, concentration, and diffusion information at several angular velocities of the cylinder for seeds (mustard, sesame, and sunflower seeds) flowing in a half-filled cylinder.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance at millitesla fields using a zero-field spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tayler, Michael C D; Sjolander, Tobias F; Pines, Alexander; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-09-01

    We describe new analytical capabilities for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in which signal detection is performed with chemical resolution (via spin-spin J couplings) in the zero to ultra-low magnetic field region, below 1μT. Using magnetic fields in the 100μT to 1mT range, we demonstrate the implementation of conventional NMR pulse sequences with spin-species selectivity.

  20. Fissile and Non-Fissile Material Detection Using Nuclear Acoustic Resonance Signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard R. Tittmann; P.M. Lenahan; David Spears; Rhys Williams

    2008-11-25

    The objective of this project is to develop anovel technique for remote, non-destructive, non-radiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs. We propse the development of a detection system based on magnetic resonance principles (NAR), which would work where radiation detection is not possible. The approach would be non-intrusive, penetrating, applicable to many materials of interest for Nonproliferation, and be able to identify the nuclear samples under investigation.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance at millitesla fields using a zero-field spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayler, Michael C. D.; Sjolander, Tobias F.; Pines, Alexander; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-09-01

    We describe new analytical capabilities for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in which signal detection is performed with chemical resolution (via spin-spin J couplings) in the zero to ultra-low magnetic field region, below 1 μT. Using magnetic fields in the 100 μT to 1 mT range, we demonstrate the implementation of conventional NMR pulse sequences with spin-species selectivity.

  2. Coaxial probe for nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yiqiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-02-01

    A coaxial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is built to measure diffusion and relaxation properties of liquid samples. In particular, we demonstrate the acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) distribution functions (T1-T2 and diffusion-T2), essential for fluids characterization. The compact design holds promise for miniaturization, thus enabling the measurement of molecular diffusion that is inaccessible to conventional micro-NMR setups. Potential applications range from crude oil characterization to biomolecular screening and detections.

  3. Robert Vivian Pound and the Discovery of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Condensed Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlish, Ursula

    2010-06-01

    This paper is based upon five interviews I conducted with Robert Vivian Pound in 2006-2007 and covers his childhood interest in radios, his time at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Radiation Laboratory during the Second World War, his work on the discovery of nuclear magnetic resonance in condensed matter, his travels as a professor at Harvard University, and his social interactions with other physicists.

  4. Theory and applications of maps on SO(3) in nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, H.M.

    1987-02-01

    Theoretical approaches and experimental work in the design of multiple pulse sequences in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) are the subjects of this dissertation. Sequences of discrete pulses which reproduce the nominal effect of single pulses, but over substantially broader, narrower, or more selective ranges of transition frequencies, radiofrequency field amplitudes, and spin-spin couplings than the single pulses they replace, are developed and demonstrated. 107 refs., 86 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Threshold self-powered gamma detector for use as a monitor of power in a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    LeVert, Francis E.; Cox, Samson A.

    1978-01-01

    A self-powered gamma monitor for placement near the core of a nuclear reactor comprises a lead prism surrounded by a coaxial thin nickel sheet, the combination forming a collector. A coaxial polyethylene electron barrier encloses the collector and is separated from the nickel sheet by a vacuum region. The electron barrier is enclosed by a coaxial stainless steel emitter which, in turn, is enclosed within a lead casing. When the detector is placed in a flux of gamma rays, a measure of the current flow in an external circuit between emitter and collector provides a measure of the power level of the reactor.

  6. Resonance-inclined optical nuclear spin polarization of liquids in diamond structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Schwarz, I.; Jelezko, F.; Retzker, A.; Plenio, M. B.

    2016-02-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of molecules in a solution at room temperature has the potential to revolutionize nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. The prevalent methods for achieving DNP in solutions are typically most effective in the regime of small interaction correlation times between the electron and nuclear spins, limiting the size of accessible molecules. To solve this limitation, we design a mechanism for DNP in the liquid phase that is applicable for large interaction correlation times. Importantly, while this mechanism makes use of a resonance condition similar to solid-state DNP, the polarization transfer is robust to a relatively large detuning from the resonance due to molecular motion. We combine this scheme with optically polarized nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center spins in nanodiamonds to design a setup that employs optical pumping and is therefore not limited by room temperature electron thermal polarization. We illustrate numerically the effectiveness of the model in a flow cell containing nanodiamonds immobilized in a hydrogel, polarizing flowing water molecules 4700-fold above thermal polarization in a magnetic field of 0.35 T, in volumes detectable by current NMR scanners.

  7. Controlled manipulation of elastomers with radiation: Insights from multiquantum nuclear-magnetic-resonance data and mechanical measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.; Weisgraber, T.; Dinh, L. N.; Gee, R. H.; Wilson, T.; Chinn, S.; Maxwell, R. S.

    2011-03-15

    Filled and cross-linked elastomeric rubbers are versatile network materials with a multitude of applications ranging from artificial organs and biomedical devices to cushions, coatings, adhesives, interconnects, and seismic-isolation, thermal, and electrical barriers. External factors such as mechanical stress, temperature fluctuations, or radiation are known to create chemical changes in such materials that can directly affect the molecular weight distribution (MWD) of the polymer between cross-links and alter the structural and mechanical properties. From a materials science point of view it is highly desirable to understand, affect, and manipulate such property changes in a controlled manner. Unfortunately, that has not yet been possible due to the lack of experimental characterization of such networks under controlled environments. In this work we expose a known rubber material to controlled dosages of {gamma} radiation and utilize a newly developed multiquantum nuclear-magnetic-resonance technique to characterize the MWD as a function of radiation. We show that such data along with mechanical stress-strain measurements are amenable to accurate analysis by simple network models and yield important insights into radiation-induced molecular-level processes.

  8. Comparative proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies of amantadine complexes formed in aqueous solutions with three major cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Lis-Cieplak, Agnieszka; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2014-01-01

    Host-guest complexes of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins (α-CD, β-CD, and γ-CD, respectively) with amantadine (1-aminoadamantane, AMA; an antiviral agent) were characterized in aqueous solutions using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Host-guest molecular interactions were manifested by changes in the chemical shifts of AMA protons. NMR Job's plots showed that the stoichiometry of all the studied complexes was 1:1. Two-dimensional T-ROESY experiments demonstrated that the complexes were formed by different degrees of incorporation of the adamantyl group of AMA into the CD cavity. The mode of AMA binding was proposed. The AMA molecule came into the α-CD cavity (the smallest size) or β-CD cavity (the intermediate size) through its wide entrance to become shallowly or deeply accommodated, respectively. In the complex of AMA with γ-CD (the largest cavity size), the adamantyl group was also quite deeply inserted into the CD cavity, but it arrived there through the narrow cavity entrance. It was found that the adamantyl group of AMA was best accommodated by the β-CD cavity. The binding constants Kaa of the studied complexes (in M(-1) ), determined from DOSY NMR, were fairly high; their values in an ascending order were: α-CD (183) < γ-CD (306) ≪ β-CD (5150).

  9. Gamma radiation-induced blue shift of resonance peaks of Bragg gratings in pure silica fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustov, A. V.; Gusarov, A. I.; Mégret, P.; Wuilpart, M.; Kinet, D.; Zhukov, A. V.; Novikov, S. G.; Svetukhin, V. V.; Fotiadi, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    We report the first observation of a significant gamma radiation-induced blue shift of the reflection/transmission peak of fibre Bragg gratings inscribed into pure-silica core fibres via multiphoton absorption of femtosecond pulses. At a total dose of ~100 kGy, the shift is ~20 pm. The observed effect is attributable to the ionising radiation-induced decrease in the density of the silica glass when the rate of colour centre formation is slow. We present results of experimental measurements that provide the key parameters of the dynamics of the gratings for remote dosimetry and temperature sensing.

  10. {sup 12}C+{sup 16}O: Properties of sub-barrier resonance {gamma}-decay

    SciTech Connect

    Goasduff, A.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Lebhertz, D.; Jenkins, D. G.; Fallis, J.; Ruiz, C.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Amandruz, P.-A.; Davis, C.; Hager, U.; Ottewell, D.; Ruprecht, G.

    2012-10-20

    In a recent experiment performed at Triumf using the Dragon 0 Degree-Sign spectrometer and its associated BGO array, the complete {gamma}-decay of the radiative capture channel below the Coulomb barrier has been measured for the first time. This measurement has been performed at two energies E{sub c.m.}= 6.6 and 7.2 MeV. A selective contribution of the entrance spins 2{sup +} and 3{sup -} has been evidenced which is consistent with existing results above the barrier.

  11. Measurement and Analysis of Gamma-Rays Emitted From Spent Nuclear Fuel Above 3 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Douglas C.; Anderson, Elaina R.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Campbell, Luke W.; Fast, James E.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Orton, Christopher R.; Runkle, Robert C.; Stave, Sean C.

    2013-12-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum of spent nuclear fuel in the 3- to 6-MeV energy range is important for active interrogation since emitted gamma rays emitted from nuclear decay are not expected to interfere with measurements in this energy region. There is, unfortunately, a dearth of empirical measurements from spent nuclear fuel in this region. This work is an initial attempt to partially ll this gap by presenting an analysis of gamma-ray spectra collected from a set of spent nuclear fuel sources using a high-purity germanium detector array. This multi-crystal array possesses a large collection volume, providing high energy resolution up to 16 MeV. The results of these measurements establish the continuum count-rate in the energy region between 3- and 6-MeV. Also assessed is the potential for peaks from passive emissions to interfere with peak measurements resulting from active interrogation delayed emissions. As one of the first documented empirical measurements of passive emissions from spent fuel for energies above 3 MeV, this work provides a foundation for active interrogation model validation and detector development.

  12. Measurement and analysis of gamma-rays emitted from spent nuclear fuel above 3 MeV.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Douglas C; Anderson, Elaina; Anderson, Kevin K; Campbell, Luke W; Fast, James E; Jarman, Kenneth; Kulisek, Jonathan; Orton, Christopher R; Runkle, Robert C; Stave, Sean

    2013-12-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum of spent nuclear fuel in the 3-6 MeV energy range is important for active interrogation since gamma rays emitted from nuclear decay are not expected to interfere with measurements in this energy region. There is, unfortunately, a dearth of empirical measurements from spent nuclear fuel in this region. This work is an initial attempt to partially fill this gap by presenting an analysis of gamma-ray spectra collected from a set of spent nuclear fuel sources using a high-purity germanium detector array. This multi-crystal array possesses a large collection volume, providing high energy resolution up to 16 MeV. The results of these measurements establish the continuum count-rate in the energy region between 3 and 6 MeV. Also assessed is the potential for peaks from passive emissions to interfere with peak measurements resulting from active interrogation delayed emissions. As one of the first documented empirical measurements of passive emissions from spent fuel for energies above 3 MeV, this work provides a foundation for active interrogation model validation and detector development. PMID:24035928

  13. Enhanced affinity of ketotifen toward tamarind seed polysaccharide in comparison with hydroxyethylcellulose and hyaluronic acid: a nuclear magnetic resonance investigation.

    PubMed

    Uccello-Barretta, Gloria; Nazzi, Samuele; Balzano, Federica; Di Colo, Giacomo; Zambito, Ylenia; Zaino, Chiara; Sansò, Marco; Salvadori, Eleonora; Benvenuti, Marco

    2008-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy demonstrated that, in aqueous solution, ketotifen fumarate bound more strongly to tamarind seed polysaccharide (TSP) than to hydroxyethylcellulose or hyaluronic acid. Results were confirmed by dynamic dialysis technique.

  14. Time differentiated nuclear resonance spectroscopy coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells.

    PubMed

    Kupenko, I; Strohm, C; McCammon, C; Cerantola, V; Glazyrin, K; Petitgirard, S; Vasiukov, D; Aprilis, G; Chumakov, A I; Rüffer, R; Dubrovinsky, L

    2015-11-01

    Developments in pulsed laser heating applied to nuclear resonance techniques are presented together with their applications to studies of geophysically relevant materials. Continuous laser heating in diamond anvil cells is a widely used method to generate extreme temperatures at static high pressure conditions in order to study the structure and properties of materials found in deep planetary interiors. The pulsed laser heating technique has advantages over continuous heating, including prevention of the spreading of heated sample and/or the pressure medium and, thus, a better stability of the heating process. Time differentiated data acquisition coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells was successfully tested at the Nuclear Resonance beamline (ID18) of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. We show examples applying the method to investigation of an assemblage containing ε-Fe, FeO, and Fe3C using synchrotron Mössbauer source spectroscopy, FeCO3 using nuclear inelastic scattering, and Fe2O3 using nuclear forward scattering. These examples demonstrate the applicability of pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells to spectroscopic techniques with long data acquisition times, because it enables stable pulsed heating with data collection at specific time intervals that are synchronized with laser pulses. PMID:26628151

  15. Time differentiated nuclear resonance spectroscopy coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kupenko, I. Strohm, C.; McCammon, C.; Cerantola, V.; Petitgirard, S.; Dubrovinsky, L.; Glazyrin, K.; Vasiukov, D.; Aprilis, G.; Chumakov, A. I.; Rüffer, R.

    2015-11-15

    Developments in pulsed laser heating applied to nuclear resonance techniques are presented together with their applications to studies of geophysically relevant materials. Continuous laser heating in diamond anvil cells is a widely used method to generate extreme temperatures at static high pressure conditions in order to study the structure and properties of materials found in deep planetary interiors. The pulsed laser heating technique has advantages over continuous heating, including prevention of the spreading of heated sample and/or the pressure medium and, thus, a better stability of the heating process. Time differentiated data acquisition coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells was successfully tested at the Nuclear Resonance beamline (ID18) of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. We show examples applying the method to investigation of an assemblage containing ε-Fe, FeO, and Fe{sub 3}C using synchrotron Mössbauer source spectroscopy, FeCO{sub 3} using nuclear inelastic scattering, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} using nuclear forward scattering. These examples demonstrate the applicability of pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells to spectroscopic techniques with long data acquisition times, because it enables stable pulsed heating with data collection at specific time intervals that are synchronized with laser pulses.

  16. Bioengineered Magnetoferritin Nanoprobes for Single-Dose Nuclear-Magnetic Resonance Tumor Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanzhao; Liang, Minmin; Li, Xiao; Fan, Kelong; Xiao, Jie; Li, Yanli; Shi, Hongcheng; Wang, Fei; Choi, Hak Soo; Cheng, Dengfeng; Yan, Xiyun

    2016-04-26

    Despite all the advances in multimodal imaging, it remains a significant challenge to acquire both magnetic resonance and nuclear imaging in a single dose because of the enormous difference in sensitivity. Indeed, nuclear imaging is almost 10(6)-fold more sensitive than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); thus, repeated injections are generally required to obtain sufficient MR signals after nuclear imaging. Here, we show that strategically engineered magnetoferritin nanoprobes can image tumors with high sensitivity and specificity using SPECT and MRI in living mice after a single intravenous injection. The magnetoferritin nanoprobes composed of (125)I radionuclide-conjugated human H-ferritin iron nanocages ((125)I-M-HFn) internalize robustly into cancer cells via a novel tumor-specific HFn-TfR1 pathway. In particular, the endocytic recycling characteristic of TfR1 transporters solves the nuclear signal blocking issue caused by the high dose nanoprobes injected for MRI, thus enabling simultaneous functional and morphological tumor imaging without reliance on multi-injections.

  17. ON THE FORMATION OF Lyalpha EMISSION FROM RESONANTLY SCATTERED CONTINUUM PHOTONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURST's AFTERGLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Wen; Wu Xiangping

    2010-02-20

    The continuum spectrum of gamma-ray burst's (GRB) afterglow at Lyalpha wavelength is known to be otherwise featureless except for the existence of a pair of smooth damping wings. Resonant scattering of photons with the ambient neutral hydrogen around the GRB may alter this picture. We study the formation and evolution of the spectral imprint of these resonantly scattered photons in the context of GRB's afterglow. Based on an analytic model that includes photons that are scattered only once, as well as a complete treatment of all the scatterings using Monte Carlo simulations, we are able to calculate the spectrum and luminosity of this Lyalpha emission from a very early moment up to a late epoch. We find that the amount, the motion, and the geometry of the neutral hydrogen around the GRB, together with the time behavior of the source are the crucial factors that affect the predicted luminosity and spectral profile. The flux of the Lyalpha emission is found to be mainly contributed by photons that are scattered only once. The flux is of the order 10{sup -4}-10{sup -9} relative to the undecayed maximum flux of the transmitted continuum, making the feature negligible but potentially observable. If not obscured by the host galaxy's damped Lyalpha absorption systems or intergalactic neutral hydrogen, the feature may appear sometime from 1 hr to several years when the directly transmitted light has faded away. This scattered emission feature can be distinguished from Lyalpha photons of other origins by its luminosity evolution and by its gradual narrowing of profile with time. The typical timescale for spectral variance is that of the light crossing time of a hydrogen clump close to the GRB. If observed, the resonant peaks' time-dependent behavior is a scanning probe on the distribution of neutral hydrogen in GRB's immediate neighborhood.

  18. Applications of resonance-averaged gamma-ray spectroscopy with tailored beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The use of techniques based on the direct experimental averaging over compound nuclear capturing states has proved valuable for investigations of nuclear structure. The various methods that have been employed are described, with particular emphasis on the transmission filter, or tailored beam technique. The mathematical limitations on averaging imposed by the filter band pass are discussed. It can readily be demonstrated that a combination of filters at different energies can form a powerful method for spin and parity predictions. Several recent examples from the HFBR program are presented.

  19. Electrically detected nuclear magnetic resonance in GaAs/AlGaAs-based quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Zachary; Godfrey, Matthew; Burke, Adam; Chen, Jason; Fricke, Sebastian; Klochan, Oleh; Micolich, Adam; Beere, Harvey; Ritchie, Dave; Trunov, Kirill; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas; Hamilton, Alex

    2011-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a well-known technique with widespread applications in physics, chemistry and medicine. Conventional NMR studies use inductive coils to detect the magnetic field produced by precessing nuclear spins; this approach requires on the order of 1012 spins for detection. Recently, resistive detection of NMR through the hyperfine interaction has been demonstrated with electrons in mesoscopic 2- and 1-dimensional devices based on high-quality GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures. These studies are typically sensitive to 108 spins, enabling NMR on much smaller sample volumes. Holes are predicted to have much weaker nuclear spin coupling than electrons, which could be relevant to the emerging fields of spintronics and quantum information processing. We present a preliminary comparison between the magnitude of the NMR signal in electron and hole quantum point contacts.

  20. High Repetition Rate, LINAC-Based Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence FY 2008 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Scott M Watson; Mathew T Kinlaw; James L Jones; Alan W. Hunt; Glen A. Warren

    2008-12-01

    This summarizes the first year of a multi-laboratory/university, multi-year effort focusing on high repetition rate, pulsed LINAC-based nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements. Specifically, this FY2008 effort centered on experimentally assessing NRF measurements using pulsed linear electron accelerators, operated at various repetition rates, and identifying specific detection requirements to optimize such measurements. Traditionally, interest in NRF as a detection technology, which continues to receive funding from DHS and DOE/NA-22, has been driven by continuous-wave (CW), Van de Graff-based bremsstrahlung sources. However, in addition to the relatively sparse present-day use of Van de Graff sources, only limited NRF data from special nuclear materials has been presented; there is even less data available regarding shielding effects and photon source optimization for NRF measurements on selected nuclear materials.

  1. Design and operation of gamma scan and fission gas sampling systems for characterization of irradiated commercial nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, C.A.; Thornhill, R.E.; Mellinger, G.B.

    1989-09-01

    One of the primary objectives of the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) is to acquire and characterize spent fuels used in waste form testing related to nuclear waste disposal. The initial steps in the characterization of a fuel rod consist of gamma scanning the rod and sampling the gas contained in the fuel rod (referred to as fission gas sampling). The gamma scan and fission gas sampling systems used by the MCC are adaptable to a wide range of fuel types and have been successfully used to characterize both boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rods. This report describes the design and operation of systems used to gamma scan and fission gas sample full-length PWR and BWR fuel rods. 1 ref., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  2. New model of the cascade gamma decay of neutron resonances for practitioners: Basic concepts and attainable precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhovoj, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    A model-free extraction of level densities and radiative strength functions for cascade dipole gamma transitions that has been performed to date revealed the need for developing a new model of the deexcitation of compound states of nuclei having arbitrary masses and belonging to any type over a broad range of their excitations. Such a model should provide a practical means for determining thresholds for the breaking of nucleon Cooper pairs below the neutron binding energy, the relationship between the level densities for excitations of the quasiparticle and phonon types, and the emission widths for nuclear-reaction products in excited nuclei. From an analysis of data on the intensities of two-step cascades initiated by radiative thermal-neutron capture, it can be seen that the highest precision in describing available experimental spectra is reached upon taking into account the breaking of three to four Cooper pairs of nucleons.

  3. New model of the cascade gamma decay of neutron resonances for practitioners: Basic concepts and attainable precision

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhovoj, A. M.

    2015-03-15

    A model-free extraction of level densities and radiative strength functions for cascade dipole gamma transitions that has been performed to date revealed the need for developing a new model of the deexcitation of compound states of nuclei having arbitrary masses and belonging to any type over a broad range of their excitations. Such a model should provide a practical means for determining thresholds for the breaking of nucleon Cooper pairs below the neutron binding energy, the relationship between the level densities for excitations of the quasiparticle and phonon types, and the emission widths for nuclear-reaction products in excited nuclei. From an analysis of data on the intensities of two-step cascades initiated by radiative thermal-neutron capture, it can be seen that the highest precision in describing available experimental spectra is reached upon taking into account the breaking of three to four Cooper pairs of nucleons.

  4. Advanced Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopies of Iron-Sulfur Proteins: Electron Nuclear Double Resonance (ENDOR) and Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM)

    PubMed Central

    Cutsail, George E.; Telser, Joshua; Hoffman, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    The advanced electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques, electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopies, provide unique insights into the structure, coordination chemistry, and biochemical mechanism of Nature’s widely distributed iron-sulfur cluster (FeS) proteins. This review describes the ENDOR and ESEEM techniques and then provides a series of case studies on their application to a wide variety of FeS proteins including ferredoxins, nitrogenase, and radical SAM enzymes. PMID:25686535

  5. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20–25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier (Thurber et al., J. Magn. Reson. 2008) [1], but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized 13C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional 13C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly 13C-labeled L-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly 13C-labeled amino acids. PMID:23238592

  6. [Recent progress in nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum for drug research and development].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jun; Jiang, Xue-mei

    2015-01-01

    In the process of modern drug research, the new methods and technologies which can detect drug molecules' chemical composition, structure and interaction with biomolecules are always the key scientific problems people care about. Spectra (including IR, UV and NMR) are the most common analytical methods, of which NMR can obtain detailed parameter about the nucleus of organic molecules through researching the laws of nuclear transition in the impact of surrounding chemical environment. The parameter contains rich information about the chemical composition, structure and interaction with other molecules of organic molecules. In many complex environments, such as liquid, solid or gas state, even biological in situ environment, NMR can provide molecules' chemical composition, atomic-resolution three-dimensional structure, information of interaction with each other and dynamic process, especially the information about drug interacting with biomacromolecules. In recent years, the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum in drug research and development are more and more widespread. This paper reviewed its recent progress in structure and dynamic of targeted biological macromolecules, drug design and screening and drug metabolism in drug research and development. In the first part, we gave a brief introduction of nuclear magnetic resonance technology and its applications in drug research. In the second part, we explained the basic principles briefly and summarized progress in methods and techniques for drug research. In the third part, we discussed applications of nuclear magnetic resonance ir structure and dynamic of targeted biological macromolecules, drug design and screening and drug metabolism in detail. The conclusions were stated in the last part.

  7. [Recent progress in nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum for drug research and development].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jun; Jiang, Xue-mei

    2015-01-01

    In the process of modern drug research, the new methods and technologies which can detect drug molecules' chemical composition, structure and interaction with biomolecules are always the key scientific problems people care about. Spectra (including IR, UV and NMR) are the most common analytical methods, of which NMR can obtain detailed parameter about the nucleus of organic molecules through researching the laws of nuclear transition in the impact of surrounding chemical environment. The parameter contains rich information about the chemical composition, structure and interaction with other molecules of organic molecules. In many complex environments, such as liquid, solid or gas state, even biological in situ environment, NMR can provide molecules' chemical composition, atomic-resolution three-dimensional structure, information of interaction with each other and dynamic process, especially the information about drug interacting with biomacromolecules. In recent years, the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum in drug research and development are more and more widespread. This paper reviewed its recent progress in structure and dynamic of targeted biological macromolecules, drug design and screening and drug metabolism in drug research and development. In the first part, we gave a brief introduction of nuclear magnetic resonance technology and its applications in drug research. In the second part, we explained the basic principles briefly and summarized progress in methods and techniques for drug research. In the third part, we discussed applications of nuclear magnetic resonance ir structure and dynamic of targeted biological macromolecules, drug design and screening and drug metabolism in detail. The conclusions were stated in the last part. PMID:25993865

  8. Public acceptability of the use of gamma rays from spent nuclear fuel as a hazardous waste treatment process

    SciTech Connect

    Mincher, B.J.; Wells, R.P.; Reilly, H.J.

    1992-01-01

    Three methods were used to estimate public reaction to the use of gamma irradiation of hazardous wastes as a hazardous waste treatment process. The gamma source of interest is spent nuclear fuel. The first method is Benefit-Risk Decision Making, where the benefits of the proposed technology are compared to its risks. The second analysis compares the proposed technology to the other, currently used nuclear technologies and estimates public reaction based on that comparison. The third analysis is called Analysis of Public Consent, and is based on the professional methods of the Institute for Participatory Management and Planning. The conclusion of all three methods is that the proposed technology should not result in negative public reaction sufficient to prevent implementation.

  9. Stabilized, hand-held, gamma-ray verification instrument for special nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fehlau, P.E.; Wiig, G.

    1988-01-01

    For many years, Los Alamos has developed intelligent, hand-held, search instruments for use by non-specialists to search for special nuclear materials (SNM). The instruments sense SNM by detecting its emitted radiation with scintillation detectors monitored by digital alarm circuitry. Now, we have developed a new hand-held instrument that can verify the presence or absence of particular radioisotopes by analyzing gamma-ray spectra. The new instrument is similar to recent, microprocessor-based, search instruments, but has LED detector stabilization, three adjustable regions-of-interest, and additional operating programs for spectrum analysis. We call the new instrument an SNM verification instrument. Its spectrum analysis capability can verify the presence or absence of specific plutonium isotopes in containers or verify the presence of uranium and its enrichment. The instrument retains the search capability, light weight, and low-power requirement of its predecessors. Its ready portability, detector stabilization, and simple operation allow individuals with little technical training to verify the contents of SNM containers. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation as a unique electronic, structural and thermodynamic probe

    SciTech Connect

    Alp, E. Ercan; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Toellner, Thomas S.; Zhao, Jiyong; Leu, Bogdan M.

    2012-05-09

    Discovery of Moessbauer effect in a nuclear transition was a remarkable development. It revealed how long-lived nuclear states with relatively low energies in the kiloelectron volt (keV) region can be excited without recoil. This new effect had a unique feature involving a coupling between nuclear physics and solid-state physics, both in terms of physics and sociology. Physics coupling originates from the fact that recoilless emission and absorption or resonance is only possible if the requirement that nuclei have to be bound in a lattice with quantized vibrational states is fulfilled, and that the finite electron density on the nucleus couples to nuclear degrees of freedom leading to hyperfine interactions. thus, Moessbauer spectroscopy allows peering into solid-state effects using unique nuclear transitions. Sociological aspects of this coupling had been equally startling and fruitful. The interaction between diverse scientific communities, who learned to use Moessbauer spectroscopy proved to be very valuable. For example, biologists, geologists, chemists, physics, materials scientists, and archeologists, all sharing a common spectroscopic technique, also learned to appreciate the beauty and intricacies of each other's fields. As a laboratory-based technique, Moessbauer spectroscopy matured by the end of the 1970s. Further exciting developments took place when accelerator-based techniques were employed, like synchrotron radiation or 'in-beam'Moessbauer experiments with implanted radioactive ions. More recently, two Moessbauer spectrometers on the surface of the Mars kept the technique vibrant and viable up until present time. In this chapter, the authors look into some of the unique aspects of nuclear resonance excited with synchrotron radiation as a probe of condensed matter, including magnetism, valence, vibrations, and lattice dynamics, and review the development of nuclear resonance inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) and synchrotron Moessbauer spectroscopy

  11. The gamma decay of the giant dipole resonance: from zero to finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, Angela; Camera, Franco

    2016-08-01

    This paper is intended to give a selected and rather brief overview of the work made in the last thirty years to study the properties of the giant dipole resonance focusing in particular on nuclei formed at finite temperatures using heavy ion reactions. The physical problems that are discussed (using examples of particular results) in this paper can be grouped into 3 major topics: (i) the temperature dependence of the GDR width; (ii) the dipole oscillation in reaction dynamics; (iii) the isospin mixing at finite temperature.

  12. [Value of the nuclear magnetic cholangio resonance in the study of the patient with jaundice].

    PubMed

    Gramática, L; Struni, M; Carranza, D; Verasay, G; Taborda, B; Caballero, F; Gramática, L

    1999-01-01

    This report analyse the results about forty three (43) patients, thirty six (36) of which showed an extrahepatic obstructive biliary Syndrome was made evident by ultrasonography, five (5) with a cholecistolithiasis and doubtful history of jaundice were evaluated to carry out a video-surgery procedure and two (2) patients whom hepatic-yeyunostomy had been practiced, a control of anastomosis in postoperative period was required. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Operative Cholangiography findings were correlated and afterward with the anatomopathological studies when they arrived. In all cases the Nuclear Magnetic Cholangio Resonance (NMCR) let us prove the diagnosis of extrahepatic biliary obstruction determining with precision furthermore the topographical site of the lesion. Respecting the aetiology of obstruction, NMCR was accurate in 34 out of 36 cases (94.4%). In conclusion Cholangio-Resonance is an excellent diagnostic method to evaluate biliary ductal system including anatomic changes. However, there are some limitations yet in order to determine the aetiology of lesions about extrahepatic biliary via extremes. We emphasize its features such as non-invasive, little operating dependent, and without morbimortality that become it as a method of choice to study the biliary via from a diagnostic viewpoint.

  13. Effect of 1. 5 tesla nuclear magnetic resonance imaging scanner on implanted permanent pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, D.L.; Holmes, D.R. Jr.; Gray, J.E.

    1987-10-01

    Patients with a permanent pacemaker are currently restricted from diagnostic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging because of potential adverse effects on the pacemaker by the magnet. Previous work has shown that NMR imaging will result in asynchronous pacing of the pulse generator within a given distance of the magnet. The radiofrequency signal generated by the system may also result in rapid cardiac pacing, which may have deleterious effects. This study utilized a 1.5 tesla unit in an in vivo laboratory animal to evaluate the unit's effects on eight different pulse generators from two manufacturers. All pacemakers functioned in an asynchronous mode when placed within a certain distance of the magnet. In addition, transient reed switch inhibition was observed. Seven of the eight pulse generators paced rapidly when exposed to the radiofrequency signal and there was a dramatic decrease in arterial blood pressure. Whether effective rapid cardiac pacing would occur could not be predicted before exposure to the magnetic resonance unit. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields in patients with a pacemaker should continue to be avoided until the mechanism of the rapid cardiac pacing can be further delineated and either predicted or prevented.

  14. Electron spin resonance and electron nuclear double resonance of photogenerated polarons in polyfluorene and its fullerene composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marumoto, K.; Kato, M.; Kondo, H.; Kuroda, S.; Greenham, N. C.; Friend, R. H.; Shimoi, Y.; Abe, S.

    2009-06-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) of photogenerated polarons in poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) and its composite with fullerene (C60) using variable photoexcitation energy up to 4.1 eV are reported. For PFO, a light-induced ESR (LESR) signal (g=2.003) is observed below 60 K, and its transient response and excitation spectrum indicate that the observed spins are photogenerated polarons on PFO. For the PFO-C60 composite, two LESR signals of photogenerated positive polarons on PFO (g1=2.003) and radical anions on C60 (g2=1.999) , respectively, are observed below 120 K, which are caused by photoinduced electron transfer from PFO to C60 . A remarkable enhancement of the LESR signals in the excitation spectrum at ˜2.8eV is observed compared with the case of pure PFO. The bimolecular-recombination kinetics of photogenerated charge carriers in the composite are confirmed by the dependence of the LESR on excitation-light intensity and by the decay dynamics. Light-induced ENDOR (LENDOR) signals are clearly observed for excitation around 2.8 eV owing to the highly efficient photoinduced electron transfer in the composite. Broad LENDOR shifts directly reflect the spin-density distribution of the polarons in PFO. We have determined its maximum shift using LENDOR-induced ESR, and have evaluated the maximum spin density on the carbon site coupled to the proton as 0.032. This value is consistent with the theoretical result obtained by Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP) model, where the spatial extent of the polarons is calculated as ˜3 monomer units of PFO. The calculated LESR spectra of PFO based on the PPP model are consistent with the experimental spectra, which confirm the above spatial extension of the polaron in PFO.

  15. Establishment of M1 multipolarity of a 6.5 (micro)2n resonance in 172Yb at E(gamma) = 3.3 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Schiller, A; Voinov, A; Algin, E; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Garrett, P E; Guttormsen, M; Nelson, R O; Rekstad, J; Siem, S

    2004-02-04

    Two-step-cascade spectra in {sup 172}Yb have been measured after thermal neutron capture. they are compared to calculations based on experimental values of the level density and radiative strength function (RSF) obtained from the {sup 173}Yb(3{sup 3}He,{alpha}{gamma}){sup 172}Yb reaction. The multipolarity of a 6.5(15) {mu}{sub N}{sup 2} resonance at E{sub {gamma}} = 3.3(1) MeV in the RSF is determined to be M1 by this comparison.

  16. Logical operations with single x-ray photons via dynamically-controlled nuclear resonances.

    PubMed

    Gunst, Jonas; Keitel, Christoph H; Pálffy, Adriana

    2016-04-27

    Photonic qubits lie at the heart of quantum information technology, often encoding information in their polarization state. So far, only low-frequency optical and infrared photons have been employed as flying qubits, as the resources that are at present easiest to control. With their essentially different way of interacting with matter, x-ray qubits would bear however relevant advantages: they are extremely robust, penetrate deep through materials, and can be focused down to few-nm waveguides, allowing unprecedented miniaturization. Also, x-rays are resonant to nuclear transitions, which are very well isolated from the environment and present long coherence times. Here, we show theoretically that x-ray polarization qubits can be dynamically controlled by nuclear Mössbauer resonances. The control knob is played by nuclear hyperfine magnetic fields, that allow via fast rotations precise processing of single x-ray quanta polarization. With such rotations, single-qubit and binary logical operations such as a destructive C-NOT gate can be implemented.

  17. Logical operations with single x-ray photons via dynamically-controlled nuclear resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunst, Jonas; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana

    2016-04-01

    Photonic qubits lie at the heart of quantum information technology, often encoding information in their polarization state. So far, only low-frequency optical and infrared photons have been employed as flying qubits, as the resources that are at present easiest to control. With their essentially different way of interacting with matter, x-ray qubits would bear however relevant advantages: they are extremely robust, penetrate deep through materials, and can be focused down to few-nm waveguides, allowing unprecedented miniaturization. Also, x-rays are resonant to nuclear transitions, which are very well isolated from the environment and present long coherence times. Here, we show theoretically that x-ray polarization qubits can be dynamically controlled by nuclear Mössbauer resonances. The control knob is played by nuclear hyperfine magnetic fields, that allow via fast rotations precise processing of single x-ray quanta polarization. With such rotations, single-qubit and binary logical operations such as a destructive C-NOT gate can be implemented.

  18. Logical operations with single x-ray photons via dynamically-controlled nuclear resonances.

    PubMed

    Gunst, Jonas; Keitel, Christoph H; Pálffy, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Photonic qubits lie at the heart of quantum information technology, often encoding information in their polarization state. So far, only low-frequency optical and infrared photons have been employed as flying qubits, as the resources that are at present easiest to control. With their essentially different way of interacting with matter, x-ray qubits would bear however relevant advantages: they are extremely robust, penetrate deep through materials, and can be focused down to few-nm waveguides, allowing unprecedented miniaturization. Also, x-rays are resonant to nuclear transitions, which are very well isolated from the environment and present long coherence times. Here, we show theoretically that x-ray polarization qubits can be dynamically controlled by nuclear Mössbauer resonances. The control knob is played by nuclear hyperfine magnetic fields, that allow via fast rotations precise processing of single x-ray quanta polarization. With such rotations, single-qubit and binary logical operations such as a destructive C-NOT gate can be implemented. PMID:27118340

  19. Logical operations with single x-ray photons via dynamically-controlled nuclear resonances

    PubMed Central

    Gunst, Jonas; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Photonic qubits lie at the heart of quantum information technology, often encoding information in their polarization state. So far, only low-frequency optical and infrared photons have been employed as flying qubits, as the resources that are at present easiest to control. With their essentially different way of interacting with matter, x-ray qubits would bear however relevant advantages: they are extremely robust, penetrate deep through materials, and can be focused down to few-nm waveguides, allowing unprecedented miniaturization. Also, x-rays are resonant to nuclear transitions, which are very well isolated from the environment and present long coherence times. Here, we show theoretically that x-ray polarization qubits can be dynamically controlled by nuclear Mössbauer resonances. The control knob is played by nuclear hyperfine magnetic fields, that allow via fast rotations precise processing of single x-ray quanta polarization. With such rotations, single-qubit and binary logical operations such as a destructive C-NOT gate can be implemented. PMID:27118340

  20. Nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at high pressure and low temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bi, Wenli; Zhao, Jiyong; Lin, Jung -Fu; Jia, Quanjie; Hu, Michael Y.; Jin, Changqing; Ferry, Richard; Yang, Wenge; Struzhkin, Viktor; Alp, E. Ercan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new synchrotron radiation experimental capability of coupling nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering with the cryogenically cooled high-pressure diamond anvil cell technique is presented. The new technique permits measurements of phonon density of states at low temperature and high pressure simultaneously, and can be applied to studies of phonon contribution to pressure- and temperature-induced magnetic, superconducting and metal–insulator transitions in resonant isotope-bearing materials. In this report, a pnictide sample, EuFe2As2, is used as an example to demonstrate this new capability at beamline 3-ID of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. A detailed description of the technicalmore » development is given. The Fe-specific phonon density of states and magnetism from the Fe sublattice in Eu57Fe2As2 at high pressure and low temperature were derived by using this new capability.« less

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Fukushima, Eiichi; Roeder, Stephen B. W.; Assink, Roger A.; Gibson, Atholl A. V.

    1986-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio-frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  2. Line broadening interference for high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra under inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zhiliang; Yang, Jian; Lin, Yanqin E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Zhong E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Youhe

    2015-04-07

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy serves as an important tool for analyzing chemicals and biological metabolites. However, its performance is subject to the magnetic-field homogeneity. Under inhomogeneous fields, peaks are broadened to overlap each other, introducing difficulties for assignments. Here, we propose a method termed as line broadening interference (LBI) to provide high-resolution information under inhomogeneous magnetic fields by employing certain gradients in the indirect dimension to interfere the magnetic-field inhomogeneity. The conventional spectral-line broadening is thus interfered to be non-diagonal, avoiding the overlapping among adjacent resonances. Furthermore, an inhomogeneity correction algorithm is developed based on pattern recognition to recover the high-resolution information from LBI spectra. Theoretical deductions are performed to offer systematic and detailed analyses on the proposed method. Moreover, experiments are conducted to prove the feasibility of the proposed method for yielding high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  3. Line broadening interference for high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra under inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhiliang; Yang, Jian; Chen, Youhe; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy serves as an important tool for analyzing chemicals and biological metabolites. However, its performance is subject to the magnetic-field homogeneity. Under inhomogeneous fields, peaks are broadened to overlap each other, introducing difficulties for assignments. Here, we propose a method termed as line broadening interference (LBI) to provide high-resolution information under inhomogeneous magnetic fields by employing certain gradients in the indirect dimension to interfere the magnetic-field inhomogeneity. The conventional spectral-line broadening is thus interfered to be non-diagonal, avoiding the overlapping among adjacent resonances. Furthermore, an inhomogeneity correction algorithm is developed based on pattern recognition to recover the high-resolution information from LBI spectra. Theoretical deductions are performed to offer systematic and detailed analyses on the proposed method. Moreover, experiments are conducted to prove the feasibility of the proposed method for yielding high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  4. Analysis of ringing effects due to magnetic core materials in pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhu Gaunkar, N. Bouda, N. R. Y.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Hadimani, R. L.; Mina, M.; Jiles, D. C.; Bulu, I.; Ganesan, K.; Song, Y. Q.

    2015-05-07

    This work presents investigations and detailed analysis of ringing in a non-resonant pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) circuit. Ringing is a commonly observed phenomenon in high power switching circuits. The oscillations described as ringing impede measurements in pulsed NMR systems. It is therefore desirable that those oscillations decay fast. It is often assumed that one of the causes behind ringing is the role of the magnetic core used in the antenna (acting as an inductive load). We will demonstrate that an LRC subcircuit is also set-up due to the inductive load and needs to be considered due to its parasitic effects. It is observed that the parasitics associated with the inductive load become important at certain frequencies. The output response can be related to the response of an under-damped circuit and to the magnetic core material. This research work demonstrates and discusses ways of controlling ringing by considering interrelationships between different contributing factors.

  5. Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectra of Five-Coordinate Imidazole-ligated Iron(II) Porphyrinates

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chuanjiang; Barabanschikov, Alexander; Ellison, Mary K.; Zhao, Jiyong; Alp, E. Ercan; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Zgierski, Marek Z.; Sage, J. Timothy; Scheidt, W. Robert

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear resonance vibrational spectra have been obtained for six five-coordinate imidazole-ligated iron(II) porphyrinates, [Fe(Por)(L)] (Por = tetraphenylporphyrinate, octaethylporphyrinate, tetratolylporphyrinate or protoporphyrinate IX and L = 2-methylimidazole or 1,2-dimethylimidazole). Measurements have been made on both powder and oriented crystal samples. The spectra are dominated by strong signals around 200–300 cm−1. Although the in-plane and out-of-plane vibrations are seriously overlapped, oriented crystal spectra allow their deconvolution. Thus, oriented crystal experimental data, along with DFT calculations, enable the assignment of key vibrations in the spectra. Molecular dynamics are also discussed. The nature of the Fe–NIm vibrations has been elaborated further than was possible from resonance Raman studies. Our study suggests that the Fe motions are coupled with the porphyrin core and peripheral groups motions. Both peripheral groups and their conformations have significant influence on the vibrational spectra (position and shape). PMID:22243131

  6. Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance and biochemical characterization of fluorotyrosine-labeled-thymidylate-synthetase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosson, Dan; Lewis, Charles A.; Ellis, Paul D.; Dunlap, R. Bruce

    1994-03-01

    Fluorotyrosine has been incorporated into thymidylate synthetase from Lactobacillus casei by growth of the bacterium in media containing 3-fluorotyrosine. The enzyme exhibited a specific activity 70% of that of the normal enzyme and formed a covalent binary complex with pyrimidine nucleotides, as well as a covalent ternary complex with 5-fluorodeoxyuridylate and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate. 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to follow the formation of these complexes. 5-Fluorodeoxyuridylate, dUMP, dTMP and dCMP produced identical conformational changes in the enzyme as monitored by the fluorotyrosyl resonances. Ternary complex formation of the fluorotyrosine-containing enzyme with 5-fluorodeoxyuridylate and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate resulted in further spectral changes.

  7. 77Se nuclear magnetic resonance of topological insulator Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, Nataliya M.; Rybicki, Damian; Guehne, Robin; Williams, Grant V. M.; Chong, Shen V.; Kadowaki, Kazuo; Garate, Ion; Haase, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Topological insulators constitute a new class of materials with an energy gap in the bulk and peculiar metallic states on the surface. We report on new features resulting from the bulk electronic structure, based on a comprehensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of 77Se on Bi2Se3 and Cu0.15Bi2Se3 single crystals. First, we find two resonance lines and show that they originate from the two inequivalent Se lattice sites. Second, we observe unusual field-independent linewidths and attribute them to an unexpectedly strong internuclear coupling mediated by bulk electrons. In order to support this interpretation, we present a model calculation of the indirect internuclear coupling and show that the Bloembergen-Rowland coupling is much stronger than the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida coupling. Our results call for a revision of earlier NMR studies and add information concerning the bulk electronic properties.

  8. Demonstration of a transmission nuclear resonance fluorescence measurement for a realistic radioactive waste canister scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angell, C. T.; Hajima, R.; Hayakawa, T.; Shizuma, T.; Karwowski, H. J.; Silano, J.

    2015-03-01

    Transmission nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) is a promising method for precision non-destructive assay (NDA) of fissile isotopes-including 239Pu-in spent fuel while inside a storage canister. The assay, however, could be confounded by the presence of overlapping resonances from competing isotopes in the canister. A measurement is needed to demonstrate that transmission NRF is unaffected by the shielding material. To this end, we carried out a transmission NRF measurement using a mono-energetic γ-ray beam on a proxy target (Al) and absorbing material simulating a realistic spent fuel storage canister. Similar amounts of material as would be found in a possible spent fuel storage canister were placed upstream: concrete, stainless steel (SS 304), lead (as a proxy for U), and water. An Al absorption target was also used as a reference. These measurements demonstrated that the canister material should not significantly influence the non-destructive assay.

  9. Nuclear gamma rays from solar flares. [analysis of theory of gamma ray line emission from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of gamma-ray line emission from solar flares is reviewed and revised. It is shown that the line emissions at 0.5, 2.2, 4.4, and 6.1 MeV are due to positron annihilation, deuterium deexcitation following neutron capture on hydrogen, and the deexcitation of excited states in carbon and oxygen. From the observed relative line intensities it is possible to determine the spectrum of accelerated protons in the flare region. This spectrum is found to be very similar to that of charged particles from the flare observed near earth. The total number of protons at the sun is deduced from the observed absolute line intensities for various interaction models.

  10. Nuclear resonant forward scattering of synchrotron radiation from 121 Sb at 37.13 keV.

    SciTech Connect

    Wille, H. C.; Shvydko, Y. V.; Alp, E. E.; Ruter, H. D.; Leupold, O.; Sergueev, I.; Ruffer, R.; Barla, A.; Sanchez, J. P.; X-Ray Science Division; European Synchrotron Radiation Facility; Univ. of Hamburg; Hamburder Synchrotronstrahlungslabor

    2006-02-22

    We report on the observation of nuclear resonant forward scattering of synchrotron radiation from {sup 121}Sb nuclei. A temperature stabilized {alpha}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystal Bragg backscattering high-resolution monochromator with a relative energy resolution of 2 x 10{sup -7} was introduced. As first spectroscopic applications the hyperfine parameters in Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, USb and DySb were determined. The energy of the nuclear transition in {sup 121}Sb was measured to be 37.1298(2)keV, 40 times more precisely than reported before. The results open the field of nuclear resonance spectroscopy on antimony compounds taking advantage of the outstanding features of 3rd-generation synchrotron sources. Nuclear resonance scattering on Sb compounds at these sources allows element-specific dynamical studies on thermoelectric materials as well as studies on magnetism in micro- and nanometer dimensional systems like spintronic devices.

  11. Flocculation Effects on Bound Water in Sludges as Measured by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Carberry, Judith Bower; Prestowitz, Robert A.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times (T1 and T2) were measured for flocculated and unflocculated samples of activated sludge. The weight of water and solids in the sludge samples was found and related to T1 to find the relative percentage of bound water. The results suggest that the amount of bound water increases as the samples become more unflocculated. The values of T1 and T2 also indicate that unflocculated individual particles are characterized by loose packing of shorter molecules and that the addition of larger molecules may induce flocculation. PMID:16346723

  12. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance studies of molecular structure in liquids and liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker, S.P.

    1991-07-01

    Magnetic couplings between protons, such as through-space dipole couplings, and scalar J-couplings depend sensitively on the structure of the molecule. Two dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance experiments provide a powerful tool for measuring these couplings, correlating them to specific pairs of protons within the molecule, and calculating the structure. This work discusses the development of NMR methods for examining two such classes of problems -- determination of the secondary structure of flexible molecules in anisotropic solutions, and primary structure of large biomolecules in aqueous solutions. 201 refs., 84 figs., 19 tabs.

  13. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of seminolipid from bovine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, J G; Storey, B T; Hemling, M L; Grob, R L

    1990-06-01

    The high-resolution one- and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) characterization of seminolipid from bovine spermatozoa is presented. The 1H-NMR data was confirmed by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the partially methylated alditol acetates of the sugar unit, mild alkaline methanolysis of the glyceryl ester, mobility on normal phase and diphasic thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS). The structure of the molecule corresponds to 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-hexadecanoyl-3-O-beta-D-(3'-sulfo)-galactopyranosyl- sn-glycerol. PMID:2373957

  14. Nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance with a 1.9-nm-deep nitrogen-vacancy sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Loretz, M.; Degen, C. L.; Pezzagna, S.; Meijer, J.

    2014-01-20

    We present nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements performed with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers located down to about 2 nm from the diamond surface. NV centers were created by shallow ion implantation followed by a slow, nanometer-by-nanometer removal of diamond material using oxidative etching in air. The close proximity of NV centers to the surface yielded large {sup 1}H NMR signals of up to 3.4 μT-rms, corresponding to ∼330 statistically polarized or ∼10 fully polarized proton spins in a (1.8 nm){sup 3} detection volume.

  15. Coaxial probe for nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation correlation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yiqiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-02-21

    A coaxial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is built to measure diffusion and relaxation properties of liquid samples. In particular, we demonstrate the acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) distribution functions (T{sub 1}-T{sub 2} and diffusion–T{sub 2}), essential for fluids characterization. The compact design holds promise for miniaturization, thus enabling the measurement of molecular diffusion that is inaccessible to conventional micro-NMR setups. Potential applications range from crude oil characterization to biomolecular screening and detections.

  16. Molecular Structure Laboratory. Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FTNMR) Spectrometer and Ancillary Instrumentation at SUNY Geneseo

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, David K

    2015-12-31

    An Agilent 400-MR nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer and ancillary equipment were purchased, which are being used for molecular structure elucidation.  The instrumentation is housed in a pre-existing facility designed specifically for its use. This instrument package is being used to expand the research and educational efforts of the faculty and students at SUNY-Geneseo and is made available to neighboring educational institutions and business concerns.  Funds were also used for training of College personnel, maintenance of the instrumentation, and installation of the equipment.

  17. Micro-coil detection of nuclear magnetic resonance for nanofluidic samples

    SciTech Connect

    Shibahara, A.; Casey, A.; Lusher, C. P.; Saunders, J.; Aßmann, C.; Schurig, Th.; Drung, D.

    2014-02-15

    We have developed a novel dc SQUID system with a micro-coil input circuit to act as a local probe of quantum matter and nanosystems. The planar niobium micro-coil pickup loop is located remotely from the SQUID, coupled through a superconducting twisted pair. A high degree of coupling between the coil and the region of interest of similar dimensions (up to ∼ 100 microns) can be achieved. We report nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements to characterise the sensitivity of these coils to {sup 3}He in the gas phase at 4.2 K in a 30 mT magnetic field.

  18. Material degradation of liquid organic semiconductors analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Junichi; Fukuchi, Masashi; Kaji, Hironori; Hirata, Shuzo; Jung, Heo Hyo; Adachi, Chihaya; Hirata, Osamu; Shibano, Yuki

    2015-08-15

    Liquid organic light-emitting diodes (liquid OLEDs) are unique devices consisting only of liquid organic semiconductors in the active layer, and the device performances have been investigated recently. However, the device degradation, especially, the origin has been unknown. In this study, we show that material degradation occurs in liquid OLEDs, whose active layer is composed of carbazole with an ethylene glycol chain. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments clearly exhibit that the dimerization reaction of carbazole moiety occurs in the liquid OLEDs during driving the devices. In contrast, cleavages of the ethylene glycol chain are not detected within experimental error. The dimerization reaction is considered to be related to the device degradation.

  19. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of seminolipid from bovine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, J G; Storey, B T; Hemling, M L; Grob, R L

    1990-06-01

    The high-resolution one- and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) characterization of seminolipid from bovine spermatozoa is presented. The 1H-NMR data was confirmed by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the partially methylated alditol acetates of the sugar unit, mild alkaline methanolysis of the glyceryl ester, mobility on normal phase and diphasic thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS). The structure of the molecule corresponds to 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-hexadecanoyl-3-O-beta-D-(3'-sulfo)-galactopyranosyl- sn-glycerol.

  20. Combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations to Characterize Carvedilol Polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Carlos A; San Gil, Rosane A S; Borré, Leandro B; Pires, José Ricardo; Vaiss, Viviane S; Resende, Jackson A L C; Leitão, Alexandre A; De Alencastro, Ricardo B; Leal, Katia Z

    2016-09-01

    The experiments of carvedilol form II, form III, and hydrate by (13)C and (15)N cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CP MAS) are reported. The GIPAW (gauge-including projector-augmented wave) method from DFT (density functional theory) calculations was used to simulate (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts. A very good agreement was found for the comparison between the global results of experimental and calculated nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts for carvedilol polymorphs. This work aims a comprehensive understanding of carvedilol crystalline forms employing solution and solid-state NMR as well as DFT calculations.