Science.gov

Sample records for gamma scan measurements

  1. Scanning Gamma Ray Densitometer System for Detonations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    in loaded detonators and delays. The 317 KEV gamma rays from an Ir192 source were collimated into a beam of 0.002 by 0.100 inch. A scanning system...minus 3%. With Ir192 , density measurements on NOL-130 were reproduced to plus or minus 5%, and on RDX to plus or minus 16%. Based on gamma ray

  2. Comparison of the barium test meal and the gamma camera scanning technic in measuring gastric emptying

    SciTech Connect

    Perkel, M.S.; Fajman, W.A.; Hersh, T.

    1981-09-01

    In 21 patients with nonresected stomachs and symptoms of delayed gastric emptying, obstruction was excluded by upper gastrointestinal series and upper endoscopy; all had abnormal results of barium test meal (BTM) study. Each had repeat BTM after the administration of 10 mg of metoclopramide. Each patient also had two gamma camera studies after a technetium Tc 99m sulfur colloid labeled meal; normal saline or metoclopramide was administered before each test in a blinded and random manner. Half-time (T 1/2) and percentage of isotope remaining at six hours (GC6) were recorded. Ten asymptomatic controls had a gamma camera scanning study, and seven of these had a BTM. Nine of 19 patients had a T 1/2 in the normal range, and in 12 of 19 patients the GC6 was in the normal range. The magnitude of retention of barium at six hours on the BTM did not correlate with the T 1/2 (r = 0.076) or the GC6 (r = 0.296). Thus, these tests were not comparable in this study. By regression analysis, a significant reduction was shown in the amount of retained food and barium (P < .01), the T 1/2 (P < .01), and the GC6 (P < .01) after intramuscular administration of metoclopramide, indicating that both tests were able to evaluate the effects of this drug.

  3. Comparison of the barium test meal and the gamma camera scanning technic in measuring gastric emptying

    SciTech Connect

    Perkel, M.S.; Fajman, W.A.; Hersh, T.; Moore, C.; Davidson, E.D.; Haun, C.

    1981-09-01

    In 21 patients with nonresected stomachs and symptoms of delayed gastric emptying, obstruction was excluded by upper gastrointestinal series and upper endoscopy; all had abnormal results of barium test meal (BTM) study. Each had repeat BTM after the administration of 10 mg of metoclopramide. Each patient also had two gamma camera studies after a technetium Tc 99m sulfur colloid labeled meal; normal saline or metoclopramide was administered before each test in a blinded and random manner. Half-time (T1/2) and percentage of isotope remaining at six hours (GC6) were recorded. Ten asymptomatic controls had a gamma camera scanning study, and seven of these had a BTM. Nine of 19 patients had a T1/2 in the normal range, and in 12 of 19 patients the GC6 was in the normal range. The magnitude of retention of barium at six hours on the BTM did not correlate with the T1/2 (r . 0.076) or the GC6 (r. 0.296). Thus, these tests were not comparable in this study. By regression analysis, a significant reduction was shown in the amount of retained food and barium (P less than .01), the T1/2 (P less than .01), and the GC6 (P less than .01) after intramuscular administration of metoclopramide, indicating that both tests were able to evaluate the effects of this drug.

  4. Graphite Gamma Scan Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mark W. Drigert

    2014-04-01

    This report documents the measurement and data analysis of the radio isotopic content for a series of graphite specimens irradiated in the first Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment, AGC-1. This is the first of a series of six capsules planned as part of the AGC experiment to fully characterize the neutron irradiation effects and radiation creep behavior of current nuclear graphites. The AGC-1 capsule was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INL at approximately 700 degrees C and to a peak dose of 7 dpa (displacements per atom). Details of the irradiation conditions and other characterization measurements performed on specimens in the AGC-1 capsule can be found in “AGC-1 Specimen Post Irradiation Data Report” ORNL/TM 2013/242. Two specimens from six different graphite types are analyzed here. Each specimen is 12.7 mm in diameter by 25.4 mm long. The isotope with the highest activity was 60Co. Graphite type NBG-18 had the highest content of 60Co with an activity of 142.89 µCi at a measurement distance of 47 cm.

  5. Combining Measurements with Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning System and Coded Aperture Gamma-Ray Imaging Systems for International Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Boehnen, Chris Bensing; Bogard, James S; Hayward, Jason P; Raffo-Caiado, Ana Claudia; Smith, Stephen E; Ziock, Klaus-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Being able to verify the operator's declaration in regards to technical design of nuclear facilities is an important aspect of every safeguards approach. In addition to visual observation, it is relevant to know if nuclear material is present or has been present in piping and ducts not declared. The possibility of combining different measurement techniques into one tool should optimize the inspection effort and increase safeguards effectiveness. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is engaged in a technical collaboration project involving two U.S. Department of Energy foreign partners to investigate combining measurements from a three-dimensional (3D) laser scanning system and gamma-ray imaging systems. ORNL conducted simultaneous measurements with a coded-aperture gamma-ray imager and the 3D laser scanner in an operational facility with complex configuration and different enrichment levels and quantities of uranium. This paper describes these measurements and their results.

  6. Combining Measurements with Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning System and Coded Aperture Gamma-Ray Imaging System for International Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Boehnen, Chris Bensing; Bogard, James S; Hayward, Jason P; Raffo-Caiado, Ana Claudia; Smith, Steven E; Ziock, Klaus-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Being able to verify the operator's declaration in regard to the technical design of nuclear facilities is an important aspect of every safeguards approach. In addition to visual observation, it is necessary to know if nuclear material is present or has been present in undeclared piping and ducts. The possibility of combining the results from different measurement techniques into one easily interpreted product should optimize the inspection effort and increase safeguards effectiveness. A collaborative effort to investigate the possibility of combining measurements from a three-dimensional (3D) laser scanning system and gamma-ray imaging systems is under way. The feasibility of the concept has been previously proven with different laboratory prototypes of gamma-ray imaging systems. Recently, simultaneous measurements were conducted with a new highly portable, mechanically cooled, High Purity Germanium (HPGe), coded-aperture gamma-ray imager and a 3D laser scanner in an operational facility with complex configuration and different enrichment levels and quantities of uranium. With specially designed software, data from both instruments were combined and a 3D model of the facility was generated that also identified locations of radioactive sources. This paper provides an overview of the technology, describes the measurements, discusses the various safeguards scenarios addressed, and presents results of experiments.

  7. Minimum Detectable Activity for Tomographic Gamma Scanning System

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataraman, Ram; Smith, Susan; Kirkpatrick, J. M.; Croft, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    For any radiation measurement system, it is useful to explore and establish the detection limits and a minimum detectable activity (MDA) for the radionuclides of interest, even if the system is to be used at far higher values. The MDA serves as an important figure of merit, and often a system is optimized and configured so that it can meet the MDA requirements of a measurement campaign. The non-destructive assay (NDA) systems based on gamma ray analysis are no exception and well established conventions, such the Currie method, exist for estimating the detection limits and the MDA. However, the Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) technique poses some challenges for the estimation of detection limits and MDAs. The TGS combines high resolution gamma ray spectrometry (HRGS) with low spatial resolution image reconstruction techniques. In non-imaging gamma ray based NDA techniques measured counts in a full energy peak can be used to estimate the activity of a radionuclide, independently of other counting trials. However, in the case of the TGS each “view” is a full spectral grab (each a counting trial), and each scan consists of 150 spectral grabs in the transmission and emission scans per vertical layer of the item. The set of views in a complete scan are then used to solve for the radionuclide activities on a voxel by voxel basis, over 16 layers of a 10x10 voxel grid. Thus, the raw count data are not independent trials any more, but rather constitute input to a matrix solution for the emission image values at the various locations inside the item volume used in the reconstruction. So, the validity of the methods used to estimate MDA for an imaging technique such as TGS warrant a close scrutiny, because the pair-counting concept of Currie is not directly applicable. One can also raise questions as to whether the TGS, along with other image reconstruction techniques which heavily intertwine data, is a suitable method if one expects to measure samples whose activities

  8. Gamma Astrometric Measurement Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, M.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Ligori, S.; Loreggia, D.; Vecchiato, A.

    GAME aims at the measurement of gravitational deflection of the light by the Sun, by an optimised telescope on board a small class satellite. The targeted precision on the gamma parameter of the Parametrised Post-Newtonian formulation of General Relativity is below 10-6, i.e. one to two orders of magnitude better than the best current results. Such precision is suitable to detect possible deviations from the unity value, associated to generalised Einstein models for gravitation, with potentially huge impacts on the cosmological distribution of dark matter and dark energy. The measurement principle is based on differential astrometry. The observations also allow additional scientific objectives related to tests of General Relativity and to the study of exo-planetary systems. The instrument concept is based on a dual field, multiple aperture Fizeau interferometer, observing simultaneously two regions close to the Solar limb. The diluted optics achieves efficient rejection of the solar radiation, with good angular resolution on the science targets. We describe the science motivation, the proposed mission implementation and the expected performance.

  9. Using NAI detectors for tomographic gamma scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Estep, R.J.; Melton, S.

    1997-03-01

    The authors examined two approaches for using NaI detectors to perform transmission corrections used in the tomographic gamma scanner (TGS) and segmented gamma scanner (SGS) nondestructive assay methods. They found that a material-basis-set (MBS) fit using empirical logarithmic response spectra is quite accurate. Because this is a gross count technique, it gives sensitivities (for equal numbers of detectors) that are roughly ten times better than those obtained using Germanium detectors. The authors also found that simple continuum subtraction can be used in MBS fits using the energy-group-analysis technique only when the Pu transmission is greater than 10%. Both approaches for using NaI detectors require a knowledge of the Pu (or other) isotopics to obtain full accuracy.

  10. Advanced gamma ray technology for scanning cargo containers.

    PubMed

    Orphan, Victor J; Muenchau, Ernie; Gormley, Jerry; Richardson, Rex

    2005-01-01

    The shipping industry is striving to increase security for cargo containers without significantly impeding traffic. Three Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) development programs are supporting this effort. SAIC's ICIS system combines SAIC's VACIS gamma ray imaging, radiation scanning, OCR, elemental analysis and other technologies to scan containers for nuclear materials and other hazards in normal terminal traffic. SAIC's enhanced gamma ray detector improves VACIS image resolution by a factor of three. And SAIC's EmptyView software analyzes VACIS images to automatically verify empty containers.

  11. A new gamma-ray detector, 3-dimension, fast scanning table for pulse-shape analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsz, M.; Duchene, G.; Didierjean, F.; Filliger, M.; Sigward, M.-H.; Pirard, B.

    2015-07-01

    The state-of-the art gamma-ray spectrometers such as AGATA and GRETA are using position sensitive multi-segmented HPGe crystals. Pulse-shape analysis (PSA) allows to retrieve the localisation of the gamma interactions and to perform gamma-ray tracking within germanium. The precision of the localisation depends on the quality of the pulse-shape database used for comparison. The IPHC laboratory developed a new fast scanning table allowing to measure experimental pulse shapes in the whole volume of any crystal. The results of the scan of an AGATA 36-fold segmented tapered coaxial detector are shown here, 48580 experimental pulse shapes are extracted within 2 weeks of scanning. These data will contribute to AGATA PSA performances, but have also applications for gamma cameras or Compton-suppressed detectors. (authors)

  12. A Mobile Automated Tomographic Gamma Scanning System - 13231

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, J.M.; LeBlanc, P.J.; Nakazawa, D.; Petroka, D.L.; Kane Smith, S.; Venkataraman, R.; Villani, M.

    2013-07-01

    Canberra Industries have recently designed and built a new automated Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) system for mobile deployment. The TGS technique combines high-resolution gamma spectroscopy with low spatial resolution 3-dimensional image reconstruction to provide increased accuracy over traditional approaches for the assay of non-uniform source distributions in low-to medium-density, non-heterogeneous matrices. Originally pioneered by R. Estep at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the TGS method has been further developed and commercialized by Canberra Industries in recent years. The present system advances the state of the art on several fronts: it is designed to be housed in a standard cargo transport container for ease of transport, allowing waste characterization at multiple facilities under the purview of a single operator. Conveyor feed, drum rotator, and detector and collimator positioning mechanisms operated by programmable logic control (PLC) allow automated batch mode operation. The variable geometry settings can accommodate a wide range of waste packaging, including but not limited to standard 220 liter drums, 380 liter overpack drums, and smaller 20 liter cans. A 20 mCi Eu-152 transmission source provides attenuation corrections for drum matrices up to 1 g/cm{sup 3} in TGS mode; the system can be operated in Segmented Gamma Scanning (SGS) mode to measure higher density drums. To support TGS assays at higher densities, the source shield is sufficient to house an alternate Co-60 transmission source of higher activity, up to 250 mCi. An automated shutter and attenuator assembly is provided for operating the system with a dual intensity transmission source. The system's 1500 kg capacity rotator turntable can handle heavy containers such as concrete lined 380 liter overpack drums. Finally, data acquisition utilizes Canberra's Broad Energy Germanium (BEGE) detector and Lynx MCA, with 32 k channels, providing better than 0.1 keV/channel resolution to

  13. SCAN+

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Krebs, John Svoboda

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determine the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.

  14. Accounting for segment correlations in segmented gamma-ray scans

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, G.A.; Prettyman, T.H.; Piquette, E.C.

    1994-08-01

    In a typical segmented gamma-ray scanner (SGS), the detector`s field of view is collimated so that a complete horizontal slice or segment of the desired thickness is visible. Ordinarily, the collimator is not deep enough to exclude gamma rays emitted from sample volumes above and below the segment aligned with the collimator. This can lead to assay biases, particularly for certain radioactive-material distributions. Another consequence of the collimator`s low aspect ratio is that segment assays at the top and bottom of the sample are biased low because the detector`s field of view is not filled. This effect is ordinarily countered by placing the sample on a low-Z pedestal and scanning one or more segment thicknesses below and above the sample. This takes extra time, however, We have investigated a number of techniques that both account for correlated segments and correct for end effects in SGS assays. Also, we have developed an algorithm that facilitates estimates of assay precision. Six calculation methods have been compared by evaluating the results of thousands of simulated, assays for three types of gamma-ray source distribution and ten masses. We will report on these computational studies and their experimental verification.

  15. Three-dimensional gamma criterion for patient-specific quality assurance of spot scanning proton beams.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chang; Poole, Kendra L; Teran, Anthony V; Luckman, Scott; Mah, Dennis

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of full three-dimensional (3D) gamma algorithm for spot scanning proton fields, also referred to as pencil beam scanning (PBS) fields. The difference between the full 3D gamma algorithm and a simplified two-dimensional (2D) version was presented. Both 3D and 2D gamma algorithms are used for dose evaluations of clinical proton PBS fields. The 3D gamma algorithm was implemented in an in-house software program without resorting to 2D interpolations perpendicular to the proton beams at the depths of measurement. Comparison between calculated and measured dose points was carried out directly using Euclidian distance in 3D space and the dose difference as a fourth dimension. Note that this 3D algorithm faithfully implemented the original concept proposed by Low et al. (1998) who described gamma criterion using 3D Euclidian distance and dose difference. Patient-specific proton PBS plans are separated into two categories, depending on their optimization method: single-field optimization (SFO) or multifield optimized (MFO). A total of 195 measurements were performed for 58 SFO proton fields. A MFO proton plan with four fields was also calculated and measured, although not used for treatment. Typically three different depths were selected from each field for measurements. Each measurement was analyzed by both 3D and 2D gamma algorithms. The resultant 3D and 2D gamma passing rates are then compared and analyzed. Comparison between 3D and 2D gamma passing rates of SFO fields showed that 3D algorithm does show higher passing rates than its 2D counterpart toward the distal end, while little difference is observed at depths away from the distal end. Similar phenomenon in the lateral penumbra was well documented in photon radiation therapy, and in fact brought about the concept of gamma criterion. Although 2D gamma algorithm has been shown to suffice in addressing dose comparisons in lateral penumbra for photon intensity

  16. Three-dimensional gamma criterion for patient-specific quality assurance of spot scanning proton beams.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chang; Poole, Kendra L; Teran, Anthony V; Luckman, Scott; Mah, Dennis

    2015-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of full three-dimensional (3D) gamma algorithm for spot scanning proton fields, also referred to as pencil beam scanning (PBS) fields. The difference between the full 3D gamma algorithm and a simplified two-dimensional (2D) version was presented. Both 3D and 2D gamma algorithms are used for dose evaluations of clinical proton PBS fields. The 3D gamma algorithm was implemented in an in-house software program without resorting to 2D interpolations perpendicular to the proton beams at the depths of measurement. Comparison between calculated and measured dose points was car-ried out directly using Euclidian distance in 3D space and the dose difference as a fourth dimension. Note that this 3D algorithm faithfully implemented the original concept proposed by Low et al. (1998) who described gamma criterion using 3D Euclidian distance and dose difference. Patient-specific proton PBS plans are separated into two categories, depending on their optimization method: single-field optimization (SFO) or multifield optimized (MFO). A total of 195 measurements were performed for 58 SFO proton fields. A MFO proton plan with four fields was also calculated and measured, although not used for treatment. Typically three dif-ferent depths were selected from each field for measurements. Each measurement was analyzed by both 3D and 2D gamma algorithms. The resultant 3D and 2D gamma passing rates are then compared and analyzed. Comparison between 3D and 2D gamma passing rates of SFO fields showed that 3D algorithm does show higher passing rates than its 2D counterpart toward the distal end, while little difference is observed at depths away from the distal end. Similar phenomenon in the lateral penumbra was well documented in photon radiation therapy, and in fact brought about the concept of gamma criterion. Although 2D gamma algorithm has been shown to suffice in addressing dose comparisons in lateral penumbra for photon

  17. A Case Study Correlating Innovative Gamma Ray Scanning Detection Systems Data to Surface Soil Gamma Spectrometry Results - 13580

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Shannon; Rodriguez, Rene; Billock, Paul; Lit, Peter

    2013-07-01

    HydroGeoLogic (HGL), Inc. completed a United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) study to characterize radiological contamination at a site near Canoga Park, California. The characterized area contained 470 acres including the site of a prototype commercial nuclear reactor and other nuclear design, testing, and support operations from the 1950's until 1988 [1]. The site history included radiological releases during operation followed by D and D activities. The characterization was conducted under an accelerated schedule and the results will support the project remediation. The project has a rigorous cleanup to background agenda and does not allow for comparison to risk-based guidelines. To target soil sample locations, multiple lines of evidence were evaluated including a gamma radiation survey, geophysical surveys, historical site assessment, aerial photographs, and former worker interviews. Due to the time since production and decay, the primary gamma emitting radionuclide remaining is cesium-137 (Cs-137). The gamma ray survey covered diverse, rugged terrain using custom designed sodium iodide thallium-activated (NaI(Tl)) scintillation detection systems. The survey goals included attaining 100% ground surface coverage and detecting gamma radiation as sensitively as possible. The effectiveness of innovative gamma ray detection systems was tested by correlating field Cs-137 static count ratios to Cs-137 laboratory gamma spectrometry results. As a case study, the area encompassing the former location of the first nuclear power station in the U. S. was scanned, and second by second global positioning system (GPS)-linked gamma spectral data were evaluated by examining total count rate and nuclide-specific regions of interest. To compensate for Compton scattering from higher energy naturally occurring radionuclides (U-238, Th-232 and their progeny, and K-40), count rate ratios of anthropogenic nuclide-specific regions of interest to the total count rate were

  18. Results of the survey activities and mobile gamma scanning in Monticello, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Little, C.A.; Berven, B.A.

    1985-11-01

    The town of Monticello, Utah, was once the site of an active mill which processed vanadium ore (1942 to 1948), and uranium ore (1948 to 1960). Properties in the vicinity of that mill have become contaminated with radioactive material from ore processing. The Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was requested by the Division of Remedial Action Projects (DRAP) in the Department of Energy (DOE) to: (1) identify potentially contaminated properties; (2) assess natural background radiation levels; and (3) rapidly assess the magnitude, extent, and type (i.e. ore, tailings, etc.) of contamination present on these properties (if any). This survey was conducted by RASA during April 1983. In addition to the 114 properties previously identified from historical information, the ORNL mobile gamma scanning van located 36 new properties exhibiting anomalous gamma radiation levels. Onsite surveys were conducted on 145 of the 150 total properties identified either historically or with the gamma scanning van. Of these 145 properties, 122 of them appeared to have some type of contaminated material present on them; however, only 48 appeared to be contaminated to the extent where they were in excess of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria (40 CFR 192). Twenty-one other properties were recommended for additional investigation (indoor gamma scanning and radon daughter measurements); of these, only ten required further analysis. This report provides the detailed data and analyses related to the radiological survey efforts performed by ORNL in Monticello, Utah.

  19. Measurement of the gamma gamma* --> eta and gamma gamma* --> eta' transition form factors

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez et al, P.

    2011-02-07

    We study the reactions e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} {eta}{sup (/)} in the single-tag mode and measure the {gamma}{gamma}* {yields} {eta}{sup (/)} transition form factors in the momentum transfer range from 4 to 40 GeV{sup 2}. The analysis is based on 469 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

  20. Innovative Gamma Ray Spectrometer Detection Systems for Conducting Scanning Surveys on Challenging Terrain - 13583

    SciTech Connect

    Palladino, Carl; Mason, Bryan; Engle, Matt; LeVangie, James; Dempsey, Gregg; Klemovich, Ron

    2013-07-01

    The Santa Susana Field Laboratory located near Simi Valley, California was investigated to determine the nature and extent of gamma radiation anomalies. The primary objective was to conduct gamma scanning surveys over 100 percent of the approximately 1,906,000 square meters (471 acre) project site with the most sensitive detection system possible. The site had challenging topography that was not conducive to traditional gamma scanning detection systems. Terrain slope varied from horizontal to 48 degrees and the ground surface ranged from flat, grassy meadows to steep, rocky hillsides. In addition, the site was home to many protected endangered plant and animal species, and archaeologically significant sites that required minimal to no disturbance of the ground surface. Therefore, four innovative and unique gamma ray spectrometer detection systems were designed and constructed to successfully conduct gamma scanning surveys of approximately 1,076,000 square meters (266 acres) of the site. (authors)

  1. Gamma heating measurements with proportional counters

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, H.; Bennett, E.F.; Micklich, B.J.

    1990-05-01

    A new data acquisition technique (the Continuously-varied Bias- voltage Acquisition mode) has been developed and tested for the low-flux broad-energy regime characteristic of existing fusion blanket mock-ups. This method of analysis allows for the acquisition of data spanning several orders of magnitude in energy with a single proportional counter. Utilizing this method, the gamma energy deposition in a mixed neutron and gamma field was measured. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Results of mobile gamma scanning activities in Tonawanda, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Cottrell, W.D.; Witt, D.A.; Rodriguez, R.E.; Carrier, R.F.

    1990-12-01

    During the 1940s, the Linde Air Products Division of Union Carbide operated a plant in Tonawanda, New York, for the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). Uranium production and some nickel processing were conducted at the site. It is the policy of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to verify that radiological conditions at such sites or facilities comply with current DOE guidelines. Guidelines for release and use of such sites have become more stringent as research has provided more information since previous cleanups. The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established as part of that effort to confirm the closeout status of facilities under contract to agencies preceding DOE during early nuclear energy development. Under the FUSRAP program, the Linde site itself has been previously investigated to determine the extent of on-site radiological contamination. As a precaution to insure that no residual radioactive materials were transported off-site, the Department of Energy requested that ORNL survey the area in the vicinity of the Linde Plant, the waste water treatment facility on Tower Road, the Sheridan Park Fire Station (District 4), and the Tonawanda Landfill to assess whether any residual radioactive material could be detected. The survey was conducted the week of April 3, 1990. Results of analysis of soil samples from the Tonawanda Landfill revealed slightly elevated concentrations of {sup 238}U and {sup 226}Ra suggestive of residuals from former Linde Plant operations. Therefore, it is recommended that additional surveying of the landfill property and of Sheridan Creek from south of the Linde property to its confluence with the Niagara River be conducted. The survey should include the measurement of gamma radiation levels and radionuclide analysis of silt samples. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Gamma radiation background measurements from Spacelab 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.; Gregory, John C.; Fishman, Gerald J.

    1988-01-01

    A Nuclear Radiation Monitor incorporating a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector was flown as part of the verification flight instrumentation on the Spacelab 2 mission, July 29 to August 6, 1985. Gamma-ray spectra were measured with better than 20 s resolution throughout most of the mission in the energy range 0.1 to 30 MeV. Knowledge of the decay characteristics and the geomagnetic dependence of the counting rates enable measurement of the various components of the Spacelab gamma-ray background: prompt secondary radiation, Earth albedo, and delayed induced radioactivity. The status of the data analysis and present relevant examples of typical background behavior are covered.

  4. GAME: Gamma Astrometric Measurement Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Mario; Lattanzi, Mario G.; Ligori, Sebastiano; Vecchiato, Alberto

    2008-07-01

    The GAME mission concept aims at the very precise measurement of the gravitational deflection of light by the Sun, by means of an optimised telescope operating in the visible and launched in orbit on a small class satellite. The targeted precision on the γ parameter of the Parametrised Post-Newtonian formulation of General Relativity is 10-6 or better, i.e. one to two orders of magnitude better than the best currently available results. Such precision is suitable to detect possible deviations from the unity value, associated to generalised Einstein models for gravitation, with potentially huge impacts on the cosmological distribution of dark matter and dark energy. The measurement principle is based on the differential astrometric signature on the stellar positions, i.e., based on the spatial component of the effect rather than the temporal component as in the most recent experiments using radio link delay timing. The observation strategy also allows some additional scientific objectives related to other tests of General Relativity and to the study of exo-planetary field, multiple aperture Fizeau interferometer, observing simultaneously two regions close to the Solar limb. The diluted optics approach is selected for achieving an efficient rejection of the scattered solar radiation, while retaining an acceptable angular resolution on the science targets. We describe the science motivation, the proposed mission profile, the possible payload implementation and the expected performance.

  5. Gamma-Gamma Angular Correlation Measurements With GRIFFIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, Andrew; Griffin Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this work was to explore the sensitivity of the Gamma-Ray Infrastructure For Fundamental Investigations of Nuclei (GRIFFIN) 16 clover-detector γ-ray spectrometer at TRIUMF-ISAC to such γ - γ angular correlations. The methodology was established using both experimental measurements and Geant4 simulations that were used to create angular correlation templates for the GRIFFIN geometry. Direct comparisons were made between experimental data sets and the simulated angular correlation templates. A first in-beam test of the γ - γ angular correlation measurements with GRIFFIN was performed with a radioactive beam of 66Ga. Mixing ratios of δ = - 2 . 1(2) and δ = - 0 . 08(3) were measured for the 2+ ->2+ ->0+ 833-1039 keV and 1+ ->2+ ->0+ 2752-1039 keV cascades in the daughter nucleus 66Zn. These results are in good agreement with pervious literature values and the mixing ratio for the 833-1039 keV cascade has a higher precision. Also, the sensitivity to the 1333-1039 keV cascade, with its pronounced 0+ ->2+ ->0+ angular correlation, was measured.A test measurement of the superallowed Fermi β emitter 62Ga will also be discussed. Canada Foundation of Innovation, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, National Research Council of Canada and Canadian Research Chairs Program.

  6. Energy gaps measured by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Giambattista, B.; Slough, C. G.; Coleman, R. V.; Subramanian, M. A.

    1990-11-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has been used to measure energy gaps in the charge-density-wave (CDW) phases of the layer-structure dichalcogenides and in the high-temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8. Measured values of ΔCDW at 4.2 K for 2H-TaSe2, 2H-TaS2, and 2H-NbSe2 are 80, 50, and 34 meV giving values of 2ΔCDW/kBTc equal to 15.2, 15.4, and 23.9, indicating strong coupling in these CDW systems. Measured values of ΔCDW at 4.2 K in 1T-TaSe2 and 1T-TaS2 are ~150 meV for both materials giving 2ΔCDW/kBTc~=5.8. STM scans of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 at 4.2 K resolve atoms on the BiOx layer and show possible variations in electronic structure. The energy gap determined from I versus V and dI/dV versus V curves is in the range 30-35 meV giving values of 2Δ/kBTc~=8. Spectroscopy measurements with the STM can exhibit large zero-bias anomalies which complicate the analysis of the energy-gap structure, but adequate separation has been accomplished.

  7. PRESAGE 3D dosimetry accurately measures Gamma Knife output factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klawikowski, Slade J.; Yang, James N.; Adamovics, John; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2014-12-01

    Small-field output factor measurements are traditionally very difficult because of steep dose gradients, loss of lateral electronic equilibrium, and dose volume averaging in finitely sized detectors. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry is ideal for measuring small output factors and avoids many of these potential challenges of point and 2D detectors. PRESAGE 3D polymer dosimeters were used to measure the output factors for the 4 mm and 8 mm collimators of the Leksell Perfexion Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatment system. Discrepancies between the planned and measured distance between shot centers were also investigated. A Gamma Knife head frame was mounted onto an anthropomorphic head phantom. Special inserts were machined to hold 60 mm diameter, 70 mm tall cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters. The phantom was irradiated with one 16 mm shot and either one 4 mm or one 8 mm shot, to a prescribed dose of either 3 Gy or 4 Gy to the 50% isodose line. The two shots were spaced between 30 mm and 60 mm apart and aligned along the central axis of the cylinder. The Presage dosimeters were measured using the DMOS-RPC optical CT scanning system. Five independent 4 mm output factor measurements fell within 2% of the manufacturer’s Monte Carlo simulation-derived nominal value, as did two independent 8 mm output factor measurements. The measured distances between shot centers varied by ±0.8 mm with respect to the planned shot displacements. On the basis of these results, we conclude that PRESAGE dosimetry is excellently suited to quantify the difficult-to-measure Gamma Knife output factors.

  8. Remote Gamma Scanning System for Characterization of BWR and PWR Fuel Rod Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, Shannon L.; Alzheimer, James M.

    2011-08-08

    Sometimes challenges with the design and deployment of automated equipment in remote environments deals more with the constraints imposed by the remote environment than it does with the details of the automation. This paper discusses the development of a scanning system used to provide gamma radiation profiles of irradiated fuel rod segments. The system needed the capability to provide axial scans of cut segments of BWR and PWR fuel rods. The scanning location is A-Cell at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Hanford site in Washington State. The criteria for the scanning equipment included axial scanning increments of a tenth of an inch or less, ability to scan fuel rods with diameters ranging from 3/8 inch to 5/8 inch in diameter, and fuel rod segments up to seven feet in length. Constraints imposed by the environment included having the gamma detector and operator controls on the outside of the hot cell and the scanning hardware on the inside of the hot cell. This entailed getting a narrow, collimated beam of radiation from the fuel rod to the detector on the outside of the hot cell while minimizing the radiation exposure caused by openings for the wires and cables traversing the hot cell walls. Setup and operation of all of the in-cell hardware needed to accommodate limited access ports and use of hot cell manipulators. The radiation levels inside the cell also imposed constraints on the materials used.

  9. Measurements of the CKM Angle Gamma at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Latour, Emmanuel; /Ecole Polytechnique

    2007-10-02

    We present a short review of the measurements of the CKM angle {gamma} performed by the BABAR experiment. We focus on methods using charged B decays, which give a direct access to {gamma} and provide the best constraints so far.

  10. Baseline measurements of terrestrial gamma radioactivity at the CEBAF site

    SciTech Connect

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Smith, A.R.

    1991-10-01

    A survey of the gamma radiation background from terrestrial sources was conducted at the CEBAF site, Newport News, Virginia, on November 12--16, 1990, to provide a gamma radiation baseline for the site prior to the startup of the accelerator. The concentrations and distributions of the natural radioelements in exposed soil were measured, and the results of the measurements were converted into gamma-ray exposure rates. Concurrently, samples were collected for laboratory gamma spectral analyses.

  11. Aerosol and gamma background measurements at Basic Environmental Observatory Moussala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelov, Christo; Arsov, Todor; Penev, Ilia; Nikolova, Nina; Kalapov, Ivo; Georgiev, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Trans boundary and local pollution, global climate changes and cosmic rays are the main areas of research performed at the regional Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) station Moussala BEO (2925 m a.s.l., 42°10'45'' N, 23°35'07'' E). Real time measurements and observations are performed in the field of atmospheric chemistry and physics. Complex information about the aerosol is obtained by using a threewavelength integrating Nephelometer for measuring the scattering and backscattering coefficients, a continuous light absorption photometer and a scanning mobile particle sizer. The system for measuring radioactivity and heavy metals in aerosols allows us to monitor a large scale radioactive aerosol transport. The measurements of the gamma background and the gamma-rays spectrum in the air near Moussala peak are carried out in real time. The HYSPLIT back trajectory model is used to determine the origin of the data registered. DREAM code calculations [2] are used to forecast the air mass trajectory. The information obtained combined with a full set of corresponding meteorological parameters is transmitted via a high frequency radio telecommunication system to the Internet.

  12. Scan posture definition and hip girth measurement: the impact on clothing design and body scanning.

    PubMed

    Gill, Simeon; Parker, Christopher J

    2016-11-15

    Ergonomic measurement is central to product design and development; especially for body worn products and clothing. However, there is a large variation in measurement definitions, complicated by new body scanning technology that captures measurements in a posture different to traditional manual methods. Investigations of hip measurement definitions in current clothing measurement practices supports analysis of the effect of scan posture and hip measurement definition on the circumferences of the hip. Here, the hip girth is a key clothing measurement that is not defined in current body scanning measurement standards. Sixty-four participants were scanned in the standard scan posture of a [TC](2) body scanner, and also in a natural posture similar to that of traditional manual measurement collection. Results indicate that scan posture affects hip girth circumferences, and that some current clothing measurement practices may not define the largest lower body circumference. Recommendations are made concerning how the hip is defined in measurement practice and within body scanning for clothing product development. Practitioner Summary: The hip girth is an important measurement in garment design, yet its measurement protocol is not currently defined. We demonstrate that body posture during body scanning affects hip circumferences, and that current clothing measurement practices may not define the largest lower body circumference. This paper also provides future measurement practice recommendations.

  13. Effects of precipitation on surface-scan gamma ray survey results - case study

    SciTech Connect

    Dorrell, N.

    2013-07-01

    It has been known for many years that certain weather events (e.g., precipitation, low barometric pressure, etc.) can affect the results of outdoor gamma-ray surveys, particularly those where gamma spectroscopy is being used for the detection of uranium and its progeny. These effects are a result of a natural phenomenon that produces anomalous results that are contrary to the true concentrations present at the survey site. Gamma-ray survey results sometimes overestimate uranium concentrations during and immediately following rain or snowfall events. The effects that a precipitation event has upon a drive-over gamma-ray survey are discussed in this paper. Surveys were conducted using a sensitive array of sodium iodide (NaI) detectors mounted to an all-terrain vehicle in late fall/early winter where snow was encountered. Isotope-specific measurements taken before and during precipitation events are compared and visually presented in iso-contour maps. (authors)

  14. Measurements of Branching Fractions for B+ -> rho+ gamma, B0 -> rho0 gamma, and B0 -> omega gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2008-08-15

    The authors present branching fraction measurements for the radiative decays B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma}, B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}, and B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}{gamma}. The analysis is based on a data sample of 465 million B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). They find {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma}) = (1.20{sub -0.37}{sup +0.42} {+-} 0.20) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (0.97{sub -0.22}{sup +0.24} {+-} 0.06) x 10{sup -6}, and a 90% C.L. upper limit {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}{gamma}) < 0.9 x 10{sup -6}, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. They also measure the isospin-violating quantity {Lambda}(B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma})/2{Lambda}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}) - 1 = -0.43{sub -0.22}{sup +0.25} {+-} 0.10.

  15. Novel Beta-Gamma Coincidence Measurements Using Phoswich Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, James H.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Panisko, Mark E.; Ripplinger, Mike D.

    2003-09-30

    The PNNL has developed an Automated Radio-xenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA) for the CTBT to measure four radio-xenon isotopes using a beta-gamma coincidence counting detector. A novel method to measure beta-gamma coincidences using a phoswich detector with state-of-the-art pulse shape discrimination techniqueses has been investigated.

  16. Rapid scanning autocorrelator for measurements of picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, H.; Burggraf, H.

    1981-08-01

    A rapid scanning autocorrelation interferometer for measurements of picosecond laser pulses is described which uses a rotating prism as scanning device in one arm of the interferometer to permit continuous display of autocorrelation traces at audio frequencies on an oscilloscope. Scan widths of more than 500 ps with high linearity can be achieved. Autocorrelation measurements of picosecond pulses from a synchronously pumped mode-locked dye laser are presented.

  17. The measurement of gamma ray induced heating in a mixed neutron and gamma ray environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, H.K.

    1991-10-01

    The problem of measuring the gamma heating in a mixed DT neutron and gamma ray environment was explored. A new detector technique was developed to make this measurement. Gamma heating measurements were made in a low-Z assembly irradiated with 14-Mev neutrons and (n, n{prime}) gammas produced by a Texas Nuclear Model 9400 neutron generator. Heating measurements were made in the mid-line of the lattice using a proportional counter operating in the Continuously-varied Bias-voltage Acquisition mode. The neutron-induced signal was separated from the gamma-induced signal by exploiting the signal rise-time differences inherent to radiations of different linear energy transfer coefficient, which are observable in a proportional counter. The operating limits of this measurement technique were explored by varying the counter position in the low-Z lattice, hence changing the irradiation spectrum observed. The experiment was modelled numerically to help interpret the measured results. The transport of neutrons and gamma rays in the assembly was modelled using the one- dimensional radiation transport code ANISN/PC. The cross-section set used for these calculations was derived from the ENDF/B-V library using the code MC{sup 2}-2 for the case of DT neutrons slowing down in a low-Z material. The calculated neutron and gamma spectra in the slab and the relevant mass-stopping powers were used to construct weighting factors which relate the energy deposition in the counter fill-gas to that in the counter wall and in the surrounding material. The gamma energy deposition at various positions in the lattice is estimated by applying these weighting factors to the measured gamma energy deposition in the counter at those locations.

  18. Measuring the charged pion polarizability in the gamma gamma -> pi+pi- reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, David W.; Miskimen, Rory A.; Mushkarenkov, Alexander Nikolaevich; Smith, Elton S.

    2013-08-01

    Development has begun of a new experiment to measure the charged pion polarizability $\\alpha_{\\pi}-\\beta_{\\pi}$. The charged pion polarizability ranks among the most important tests of low-energy QCD presently unresolved by experiment. Analogous to precision measurements of $\\pi^{\\circ}\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ that test the intrinsic odd-parity (anomalous) sector of QCD, the pion polarizability tests the intrinsic even-parity sector of QCD. The measurement will be performed using the $\\gamma\\gamma\\rightarrow\\pi^{+{}}\\pi^{-{}}$ cross section accessed via the Primakoff mechanism on nuclear targets using the GlueX detector in Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The linearly polarized photon source in Hall-D will be utilized to separate the Primakoff cross-section from coherent $\\rho^{\\circ}$ production.

  19. Measurment of B Decays to phi K gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-11-28

    The authors search for the decays B{sup -} {yields} {phi}K{sup -}{gamma} and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{bar K}{sup 0}{gamma} in a data sample of 228 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. They measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} {phi}K{sup -}{gamma}) = (3.5 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6} and set an upper limit {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{bar K}{sup 0}{gamma}) < 2.7 x 10{sup -6} at the 90% confidence level. They also measure the direct CP asymmetry in B{sup -} {yields} {phi}K{sup -}{gamma}, {Alpha}{sub CP} = (-26 {+-} 14 {+-} 5)%. The uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  20. Perspectives of the GAMMA-400 space observatory for high-energy gamma rays and cosmic rays measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topchiev, N. P.; Galper, A. M.; Bonvicini, V.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Bergstrom, L.; Berti, E.; Bigongiari, G.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Castellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cumani, P.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Dedenko, G. L.; De Donato, C.; Dogiel, V. A.; Finetti, N.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kaplun, A. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Larsson, J.; Leonov, A. A.; Loginov, V. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Men'shenin, A. L.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Ricciarini, S.; Runtso, M. F.; Ryde, F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tavani, M.; Tiberio, A.; Tyurin, E. M.; Ulanov, M. V.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zampa, N.; Zirakashvili, V. N.; Zverev, V. G.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern the following scientific tasks: investigation of point sources of gamma-rays, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons. Also the GAMMA- 400 instrument provides the possibility for protons and nuclei measurements up to knee. But the main goal for the GAMMA-400 mission is to perform a sensitive search for signatures of dark matter particles in high-energy gamma-ray emission. To fulfill these measurements the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics in comparison with previous and present experiments. The major advantage of the GAMMA-400 instrument is excellent angular and energy resolution for gamma-rays above 10 GeV. The GAMMA-400 experiment will be installed onboard of the Navigator space platform, manufactured by the NPO Lavochkin Association. The expected orbit will be a highly elliptical orbit (with apogee 300.000 km and perigee 500 km) with 7 days orbital period. An important profit of such an orbit is the fact that the full sky coverage will always be available for gamma ray astronomy.

  1. Gamma-ray dosimetry measurements of the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Plassmann, E.A.; Pederson, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    We present the current status of our gamma-ray dosimetry results for the Little Boy replica. Both Geiger-Mueller and thermoluminescent detectors were used in the measurements. Future work is needed to test assumptions made in data analysis.

  2. Reconstruction of the activity of point sources for the accurate characterization of nuclear waste drums by segmented gamma scanning.

    PubMed

    Krings, Thomas; Mauerhofer, Eric

    2011-06-01

    This work improves the reliability and accuracy in the reconstruction of the total isotope activity content in heterogeneous nuclear waste drums containing point sources. The method is based on χ(2)-fits of the angular dependent count rate distribution measured during a drum rotation in segmented gamma scanning. A new description of the analytical calculation of the angular count rate distribution is introduced based on a more precise model of the collimated detector. The new description is validated and compared to the old description using MCNP5 simulations of angular dependent count rate distributions of Co-60 and Cs-137 point sources. It is shown that the new model describes the angular dependent count rate distribution significantly more accurate compared to the old model. Hence, the reconstruction of the activity is more accurate and the errors are considerably reduced that lead to more reliable results. Furthermore, the results are compared to the conventional reconstruction method assuming a homogeneous matrix and activity distribution.

  3. Variation of quantitative emphysema measurements from CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Barr, R. Graham; Yankelevitz, David F.

    2008-03-01

    Emphysema is a lung disease characterized by destruction of the alveolar air sacs and is associated with long-term respiratory dysfunction. CT scans allow for imaging of the anatomical basis of emphysema, and several measures have been introduced for the quantification of the extent of disease. In this paper we compare these measures for repeatability over time. The measures of interest in this study are emphysema index, mean lung density, histogram percentile, and the fractal dimension. To allow for direct comparisons, the measures were normalized to a 0-100 scale. These measures have been computed for a set of 2,027 scan pairs in which the mean interval between scans was 1.15 years (σ: 93 days). These independent pairs were considered with respect to three different scanning conditions (a) 223 pairs where both were scanned with a 5 mm slice thickness protocol, (b) 695 with the first scanned with the 5 mm protocol and the second with a 1.25 mm protocol, and (c) 1109 pairs scanned both times using a 1.25 mm protocol. We found that average normalized emphysema index and histogram percentiles scores increased by 5.9 and 11 points respectively, while the fractal dimension showed stability with a mean difference of 1.2. We also found, a 7 point bias introduced for emphysema index under condition (b), and that the fractal dimension measure is least affected by scanner parameter changes.

  4. Design and operation of gamma scan and fission gas sampling systems for characterization of irradiated commercial nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, C.A.; Thornhill, R.E.; Mellinger, G.B.

    1989-09-01

    One of the primary objectives of the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) is to acquire and characterize spent fuels used in waste form testing related to nuclear waste disposal. The initial steps in the characterization of a fuel rod consist of gamma scanning the rod and sampling the gas contained in the fuel rod (referred to as fission gas sampling). The gamma scan and fission gas sampling systems used by the MCC are adaptable to a wide range of fuel types and have been successfully used to characterize both boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rods. This report describes the design and operation of systems used to gamma scan and fission gas sample full-length PWR and BWR fuel rods. 1 ref., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Measurement of the {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reaction with the DANCE {gamma} calorimeter array

    SciTech Connect

    Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Walker, C. L.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Wu, C. Y.; Becvar, F.; Kroll, J.; Krticka, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2011-07-15

    The {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reaction was measured with the DANCE {gamma} calorimeter (consisting of 160 BaF{sub 2} scintillation detectors) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The multiplicity distributions of the {gamma} decay were used to determine the resonance spins up to E{sub n}=300 eV. The {gamma}-ray energy spectra for different multiplicities were measured for the s-wave resonances. The shapes of these spectra were compared with simulations based on the use of the DICEBOX statistical model code. Simulations showed that the scissors mode is required not only for the ground-state transitions but also for transitions between excited states.

  6. Low-resolution gamma-ray measurements of uranium enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.; Christiansen, A.; Cole, R.; Collins, M.L.

    1996-11-01

    Facilities that process special nuclear material perform periodic inventories. In bulk facilities that process low-enriched uranium, these inventories and their audits are based primarily on weight and enrichment measurements. Enrichment measurements determine the {sup 211}U weight fraction of the uranium compound from the passive gamma-ray emissions of the sample. Both international inspectors and facility operators rely on the capability to make in-field gamma-ray measurements of uranium enrichment. These users require rapid, portable measurement capability. Some in-field measurements have been biased, forcing the inspectors to resort to high-resolution measurements or mass spectrometry to accomplish their goals.

  7. A new measurement of the rare decay eta -> pi^0 gamma gamma with the Crystal Ball/TAPS detectors at the Mainz Microtron

    SciTech Connect

    Nefkens, B M; Prakhov, S; Aguar-Bartolom��, P; Annand, J R; Arends, H J; Bantawa, K; Beck, R; Bekrenev, V; Bergh��user, H; Braghieri, A; Briscoe, W J; Brudvik, J; Cherepnya, S; Codling, R F; Collicott, C; Costanza, S; Danilkin, I V; Denig, A; Demissie, B; Dieterle, M; Downie, E J; Drexler, P; Fil'kov, L V; Fix, A; Garni, S; Glazier, D I; Gregor, R; Hamilton, D; Heid, E; Hornidge, D; Howdle, D; Jahn, O; Jude, T C; Kashevarov, V L; K��ser, A; Keshelashvili, I; Kondratiev, R; Korolija, M; Kotulla, M; Koulbardis, A; Kruglov, S; Krusche, B; Lisin, V; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J; Maghrbi, Y; Mancel, J; Manley, D M; McNicoll, E F; Mekterovic, D; Metag, V; Mushkarenkov, A; Nikolaev, A; Novotny, R; Oberle, M; Ortega, H; Ostrick, M; Ott, P; Otte, P B; Oussena, B; Pedroni, P; Polonski, A; Robinson, J; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, T; Schumann, S; Sikora, M H; Starostin, A; Strakovsky, I I; Strub, T; Suarez, I M; Supek, I; Tarbert, C M; Thiel, M; Thomas, A; Unverzagt, M; Watts, D P; Werthmueller, D; Witthauer, L

    2014-08-01

    A new measurement of the rare, doubly radiative decay eta->pi^0 gamma gamma was conducted with the Crystal Ball and TAPS multiphoton spectrometers together with the photon tagging facility at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. New data on the dependence of the partial decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma), on the two-photon invariant mass squared, m^2(gamma gamma), as well as a new, more precise value for the decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma) = (0.33+/-0.03_tot) eV, are based on analysis of 1.2 x 10^3 eta->pi^0 gamma gamma decays from a total of 6 x 10^7 eta mesons produced in the gamma p -> eta p reaction. The present results for dGamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma)/dm^2(gamma gamma) are in good agreement with previous measurements and recent theoretical calculations for this dependence.

  8. Evaluation of the measurement geometries and data processing algorithms for industrial gamma tomography technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, N Y; Jung, S H; Kim, J B

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluated the measurement geometries and data processing algorithms for industrial gamma tomography technology. Several phantoms simulating industrial objects were tested in various conditions with the gamma-ray CT system developed in KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). Radiation was measured with lead shielded 24 1x1in Nal detectors. Regarding the parallel beam geometry, the EM algorithm showed the best resolution among the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART), simultaneous iterative reconstructive technique (SIRT) and expectation maximization (EM). However, the fan beam scanning was more time efficient than the parallel projection for the similar quality of reconstructed image. Future developments of the industrial gamma ray CT will be focused on a large-scale application which is more practical for a diagnosis in the petrochemical industry.

  9. Scanning measurement of Seebeck coefficient of a heated sample

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Iwanaga, Shiho

    2016-04-19

    A novel scanning Seebeck coefficient measurement technique is disclosed utilizing a cold scanning thermocouple probe tip on heated bulk and thin film samples. The system measures variations in the Seebeck coefficient within the samples. The apparatus may be used for two dimensional mapping of the Seebeck coefficient on the bulk and thin film samples. This technique can be utilized for detection of defective regions, as well as phase separations in the sub-mm range of various thermoelectric materials.

  10. Precision of the CAESAR scan-extracted measurements.

    PubMed

    Robinette, Kathleen M; Daanen, Hein A M

    2006-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) body scanners are increasingly used to derive 1D body dimensions from 3D whole body scans for instance, as input for clothing grading systems to make made-to-measure clothing or for width and depth dimensions of a seated workstation. In this study, the precision of the scanner-derived 1D dimensions from the CAESAR survey, a multinational anthropometric survey, was investigated. Two combinations of scanning teams with 3D whole body scanners were compared, one called the US Team and the other the Dutch Team. Twenty subjects were measured three times by one scanner and one team, and three times by the other combination. The subjects were marked prior to scanning using small dots, and the linear distances between the dots were calculated after processing the scans. The mean absolute difference (MAD) of the repetitions was calculated and this was compared to reported acceptable errors in manual measurements from the US Army's ANSUR survey when similar measurements were available. In addition, the coefficient of variation (CV) was calculated for all measurements. The results indicate that the CAESAR scan-extracted measurements are highly reproducible; for most measures the MAD is less than 5mm. In addition, more than 93% of the MAD values for CAESAR are significantly smaller than the ANSUR survey acceptable errors. Therefore, it is concluded that the type of scan-extracted measures used in CAESAR are as good as or better than comparable manual measurements. Scan-extracted measurements that do not use markers or are not straight-line distances are not represented here and additional studies would be needed to verify their precision.

  11. Gamma Efficiency Simulations towards Coincidence Measurements for Fusion Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, M.; Courtin, S.; Fruet, G.; Jenkins, D. G.; Montanari, D.; Morris, L.; Regan, P. H.; Rudigier, M.; Symochko, D.

    2016-10-01

    With the experimental station STELLA (STELlar LAboratory) we will measure fusion cross sections of astrophysical relevance making use of the coincident detection of charged particles and gamma rays for background reduction. For the measurement of gamma rays from the de-excitation of fusion products a compact array of 36 UK FATIMA LaBr3 detectors is designed based on efficiency studies with Geant4. The photo peak efficiency in the region of interest compares to other gamma detection systems used in this field. The features of the internal decay of 138La is used in a background study to obtain an online calibration of the gamma detectors. Background data are fit to the Monte Carlo model of the self activity assuming crude exponential behavior of external background. Accuracy in the region of interest is of the order of some keV in this first study.

  12. Precision Measurement of {eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} Decay Width via the Primakoff Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Liping Gin

    2013-08-01

    A precision measurement of the {eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} decay width via the Primakoff effect is underway in Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The decay width will be extracted from measured differential cross sections at forward angles on two light targets, liquid hydrogen and 4He, using a 11.5 GeV tagged photon beam. Results of this experiment will not only potentially resolve a long standing discrepancy between the Primakoff and the collider measurements, but will also reduce the experimental uncertainty by a factor of two on the average value of previous experimental results listed by the Particle Data Group(PDG). It will directly improve all other eta partial decay widths which rely on the accuracy of the eta radiative decay width. The projected 3% precision on the {Gamma}({eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} ) measurement will have a significant impact on the experimental determination of the fundamental parameters in QCD, such as the ratio of light quark masses (m{sub u},m{sub d},m{sub s}) and the {eta} - {eta}' mixing angle. It will be a sensitive probe for understanding QCD symmetries and the origin and the dynamics of QCD symmetry breaking.

  13. Measurements of (n,{gamma}) cross sections with small samples

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, P.E.; Kaeppeler, F.

    1995-02-05

    Neutron capture cross section data for certain isotopes of very small natural abundance are crucial for a better understanding of the s- and p-processes of nucleosynthesis. Also, recent work has shown that many previous (n,{gamma}) measurements need to be extended to lower neutron energies and that the accuracy of some previous data need to be improved. At Los Alamos we have developed a system for measuring (n,{gamma}) cross sections on samples as small as 1 mg. We give examples of measurements made with this apparatus and discuss the nuclear astrophysics motivation for these and future measurements.

  14. Measurements of (n,{gamma}) cross sections with small samples

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, P.E.; Kaeppeler, F.

    1994-09-01

    Neutron capture cross section data for certain isotopes of very small natural abundance are crucial for a better understanding of the s- and p-processes of nucleosynthesis. Also, recent work has shown that many previous (n,{gamma}) measurements need to be extended to lower neutron energies and that the accuracy of some previous data need to be improved. At Los Alamos the authors have developed a system for measuring (n,{gamma}) cross sections on samples as small as 1 mg. They give examples of measurements made with this apparatus and discuss the nuclear astrophysics motivation for these and future measurements.

  15. Moisture effect in prompt gamma measurements from soil samples.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, A A; Khiari, F Z; Liadi, F A; Khateeb-Ur-Rehman; Raashid, M A; Isab, A H

    2016-09-01

    The variation in intensity of 1.78MeV silicon, 6.13MeV oxygen, and 2.22MeV hydrogen prompt gamma rays from soil samples due to the addition of 5.1, 7.4, 9.7, 11.9 and 14.0wt% water was studied for 14MeV incident neutron beams utilizing a LaBr3:Ce gamma ray detector. The intensities of 1.78MeV and 6.13MeV gamma rays from silicon and oxygen, respectively, decreased with increasing sample moisture. The intensity of 2.22MeV hydrogen gamma rays increases with moisture. The decrease in intensity of silicon and oxygen gamma rays with moisture concentration indicates a loss of 14MeV neutron flux, while the increase in intensity of 2.22MeV gamma rays with moisture indicates an increase in thermal neutron flux due to increasing concentration of moisture. The experimental intensities of silicon, oxygen and hydrogen prompt gamma rays, measured as a function of moisture concentration in the soil samples, are in good agreement with the theoretical results obtained through Monte Carlo calculations.

  16. Scan-rescan reproducibility of CT densitometric measures of emphysema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, D.; van Rikxoort, E. M.; Kim, H. J.; Goldin, J. G.; Brown, M. S.

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the reproducibility of HRCT densitometric measures of emphysema in patients scanned twice one week apart. 24 emphysema patients from a multicenter study were scanned at full inspiration (TLC) and expiration (RV), then again a week later for four scans total. Scans for each patient used the same scanner and protocol, except for tube current in three patients. Lung segmentation with gross airway removal was performed on the scans. Volume, weight, mean lung density (MLD), relative area under -950HU (RA-950), and 15th percentile (PD-15) were calculated for TLC, and volume and an airtrapping mask (RA-air) between -950 and -850HU for RV. For each measure, absolute differences were computed for each scan pair, and linear regression was performed against volume difference in a subgroup with volume difference <500mL. Two TLC scan pairs were excluded due to segmentation failure. The mean lung volumes were 5802 +/- 1420mL for TLC, 3878 +/- 1077mL for RV. The mean absolute differences were 169mL for TLC volume, 316mL for RV volume, 14.5g for weight, 5.0HU for MLD, 0.66p.p. for RA-950, 2.4HU for PD-15, and 3.1p.p. for RA-air. The <500mL subgroup had 20 scan pairs for TLC and RV. The R2 values were 0.8 for weight, 0.60 for MLD, 0.29 for RA-950, 0.31 for PD-15, and 0.64 for RA-air. Our results indicate that considerable variability exists in densitometric measures over one week that cannot be attributed to breathhold or physiology. This has implications for clinical trials relying on these measures to assess emphysema treatment efficacy.

  17. Calibration of line-scan cameras for precision measurement.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Zhu, Jigui; Yang, Linghui; Yang, Shourui; Niu, Zhiyuan

    2016-09-01

    Calibration of line-scan cameras for precision measurement should have large calibration volume and be flexible in the actual measurement field. In this paper, we present a high-precision calibration method. Instead of using a large 3D pattern, we use a small planar pattern and a precalibrated matrix camera to obtain plenty of points with a suitable distribution, which would ensure the precision of the calibration results. The matrix camera removes the necessity of precise adjustment and movement and links the line-scan camera to the world easily, both of which enhance flexibility in the measurement field. The method has been verified by experiments. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method gives a practical solution to calibrate line scan cameras for precision measurement.

  18. ICF Gamma-Ray measurements on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Hans; Kim, Y.; Hoffman, N. M.; Batha, S. H.; Stoeffl, W.; Church, J. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Liebman, J. A.; Cerjan, C. J.; Carpenter, A. C.; Grafil, E. M.; Khater, H. Y.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.

    2013-10-01

    The primary objective of the NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic is to provide bang time and burn width information in order to constrain implosion simulation parameters such as shell velocity and confinement time. This is accomplished by measuring DT fusion gamma-rays with energy-thresholded Gas Cherenkov detectors that convert MeV gamma-rays into UV/visible photons for high-bandwidth optical detection. Burn-weighted CH ablator areal density is also inferred based on measurement of the 12C(n,n') gammas emitted at 4.44 MeV from DT neutrons inelastically scattering off carbon nuclei as they pass through the plastic ablator. This requires that the four independent GRH gas cells be set to differing Cherenkov thresholds (e.g., 2.9, 4.5, 8 & 10 MeV) in order to be able to unfold the primary spectral components predicted to be in the gamma ray energy spectrum (i.e., DT γ 27Al & 28Si (n,n') γ from the thermo-mechanical package (TMP); and 12C(n,n' γ from the ablator). The GRH response to 12C(n,n') γ is calibrated in-situ by placing a known areal density of carbon in the form of a puck placed ~6 cm from a DT exploding pusher implosion. Comparisons between inferred gamma fluences and simulations based on the nuclear cross sections databases will be presented. Supported by US DOE NNSA.

  19. Optimizing Lidar Scanning Strategies for Wind Energy Measurements (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, J. F.; Bonin, T. A.; Klein, P.; Wharton, S.; Chilson, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    Environmental concerns and rising fossil fuel prices have prompted rapid development in the renewable energy sector. Wind energy, in particular, has become increasingly popular in the United States. However, the intermittency of available wind energy makes it difficult to integrate wind energy into the power grid. Thus, the expansion and successful implementation of wind energy requires accurate wind resource assessments and wind power forecasts. The actual power produced by a turbine is affected by the wind speeds and turbulence levels experienced across the turbine rotor disk. Because of the range of measurement heights required for wind power estimation, remote sensing devices (e.g., lidar) are ideally suited for these purposes. However, the volume averaging inherent in remote sensing technology produces turbulence estimates that are different from those estimated by a sonic anemometer mounted on a standard meteorological tower. In addition, most lidars intended for wind energy purposes utilize a standard Doppler beam-swinging or Velocity-Azimuth Display technique to estimate the three-dimensional wind vector. These scanning strategies are ideal for measuring mean wind speeds but are likely inadequate for measuring turbulence. In order to examine the impact of different lidar scanning strategies on turbulence measurements, a WindCube lidar, a scanning Halo lidar, and a scanning Galion lidar were deployed at the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Summer 2013. Existing instrumentation at the ARM site, including a 60-m meteorological tower and an additional scanning Halo lidar, were used in conjunction with the deployed lidars to evaluate several user-defined scanning strategies. For part of the experiment, all three scanning lidars were pointed at approximately the same point in space and a tri-Doppler analysis was completed to calculate the three-dimensional wind vector every 1 second. In another part of the experiment, one of

  20. Application of Bayesian decision theory to airborne gamma snow measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bissell, V. C.

    1975-01-01

    Measured values of several variables are incorporated into the calculation of snow water equivalent as measured from an aircraft by snow attenuation of terrestrial gamma radiation. Bayesian decision theory provides a snow water equivalent measurement by taking into account the uncertainties in the individual measurement variables and filtering information about the measurement variables through prior notions of what the calculated variable (water equivalent) should be.

  1. Scanning Light Sheet Would Measure Deflection Of Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Monteith, James H.; Weisenborn, Michael D.; Franke, John M.; Jordan, Thomas L.

    1992-01-01

    Scanning-light-sheet apparatus designed to measure linear and angular displacement or deflection of structure. Intended specifically to measure deflection of beam-shaped truss structure. Includes conventional low-powered laser, lenses, mounts, single-axis optical scanner, several photodiodes, and electronic controller. Apparatus measures motion of structure and also used to determine positions, deflections, and velocities. Besides use in aerospace field, displacement measurements have many applications in construction-equipment and automotive industries.

  2. Measurement of background gamma radiation in the northern Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Bordner, Autumn S; Crosswell, Danielle A; Katz, Ainsley O; Shah, Jill T; Zhang, Catherine R; Nikolic-Hughes, Ivana; Hughes, Emlyn W; Ruderman, Malvin A

    2016-06-21

    We report measurements of background gamma radiation levels on six islands in the northern Marshall Islands (Enewetak, Medren, and Runit onEnewetak Atoll; Bikini and Nam on Bikini Atoll; and Rongelap on Rongelap Atoll). Measurable excess radiation could be expected from the decay of (137)Cs produced by the US nuclear testing program there from 1946 to 1958. These recordings are of relevance to safety of human habitation and resettlement. We find low levels of gamma radiation for the settled island of Enewetak [mean = 7.6 millirem/year (mrem/y) = 0.076 millisievert/year (mSv/y)], larger levels of gamma radiation for the island of Rongelap (mean = 19.8 mrem/y = 0.198 mSv/y), and relatively high gamma radiation on the island of Bikini (mean = 184 mrem/y = 1.84 mSv/y). Distributions of gamma radiation levels are provided, and hot spots are discussed. We provide interpolated maps for four islands (Enewetak, Medren, Bikini, and Rongelap), and make comparisons to control measurements performed on the island of Majuro in the southern Marshall Islands, measurements made in Central Park in New York City, and the standard agreed upon by the United States and the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) governments (100 mrem/y = 1 mSv/y). External gamma radiation levels on Bikini Island significantly exceed this standard (P = <0.01), and external gamma radiation levels on the other islands are below the standard. To determine conclusively whether these islands are safe for habitation, radiation exposure through additional pathways such as food ingestion must be considered.

  3. Measurement of background gamma radiation in the northern Marshall Islands

    PubMed Central

    Bordner, Autumn S.; Crosswell, Danielle A.; Katz, Ainsley O.; Shah, Jill T.; Zhang, Catherine R.; Nikolic-Hughes, Ivana; Hughes, Emlyn W.; Ruderman, Malvin A.

    2016-01-01

    We report measurements of background gamma radiation levels on six islands in the northern Marshall Islands (Enewetak, Medren, and Runit onEnewetak Atoll; Bikini and Nam on Bikini Atoll; and Rongelap on Rongelap Atoll). Measurable excess radiation could be expected from the decay of 137Cs produced by the US nuclear testing program there from 1946 to 1958. These recordings are of relevance to safety of human habitation and resettlement. We find low levels of gamma radiation for the settled island of Enewetak [mean = 7.6 millirem/year (mrem/y) = 0.076 millisievert/year (mSv/y)], larger levels of gamma radiation for the island of Rongelap (mean = 19.8 mrem/y = 0.198 mSv/y), and relatively high gamma radiation on the island of Bikini (mean = 184 mrem/y = 1.84 mSv/y). Distributions of gamma radiation levels are provided, and hot spots are discussed. We provide interpolated maps for four islands (Enewetak, Medren, Bikini, and Rongelap), and make comparisons to control measurements performed on the island of Majuro in the southern Marshall Islands, measurements made in Central Park in New York City, and the standard agreed upon by the United States and the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) governments (100 mrem/y = 1 mSv/y). External gamma radiation levels on Bikini Island significantly exceed this standard (P = <<0.01), and external gamma radiation levels on the other islands are below the standard. To determine conclusively whether these islands are safe for habitation, radiation exposure through additional pathways such as food ingestion must be considered. PMID:27274073

  4. Lunar Elemental Abundances from Gamma-Ray and Neutron Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Vaniman, D. T.

    1999-01-01

    The determination of elemental abundances is one of the highest science objectives of most lunar missions. Such multi-element abundances, ratios, or maps should include results for elements that are diagnostic or important in lunar processes, including heat-producing elements (such as K and Th), important incompatible elements (Th and rare earth elements), H (for polar deposits and regolith maturity), and key variable elements in major lunar provinces (such as Fe and Ti in the maria). Both neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy can be used to infer elemental abundances; the two complement each other. These elemental abundances need to be determined with high accuracy and precision from measurements such as those made by the gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS) and neutron spectrometers (NS) on Lunar Prospector. As presented here, a series of steps, computer codes, and nuclear databases are needed to properly convert the raw gamma-ray and neutron measurements into good elemental abundances, ratios, and/or maps. Lunar Prospector (LP) is the first planetary mission that has measured neutrons escaping from a planet other than the Earth. The neutron spectrometers on Lunar Prospector measured a wide range of neutron energies. The ability to measure neutrons with thermal (E < 0.1 eV), epithermal (E about equal 0.1 - 1000 eV), and fast (E about 0.1-10 MeV) energies maximizes the scientific return, being especially sensitive to both H (using epithermal neutrons) and thermal-neutron-absorbing elements. Neutrons are made in the lunar surface by the interaction of galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) particles with the atomic nuclei in the surface. Most neutrons are produced with energies above about 0.1 MeV. The flux of fast neutrons in and escaping from the Moon depends on es the intensity of the cosmic rays (which vary with solar activity) and the elemental composition of the surface. Variations in the elemental composition of the lunar surface can affect the flux of fast neutrons by about 25

  5. Neutron/Gamma-ray discrimination through measures of fit

    SciTech Connect

    Amiri, Moslem; Prenosil, Vaclav; Cvachovec, Frantisek

    2015-07-01

    Statistical tests and their underlying measures of fit can be utilized to separate neutron/gamma-ray pulses in a mixed radiation field. In this article, first the application of a sample statistical test is explained. Fit measurement-based methods require true pulse shapes to be used as reference for discrimination. This requirement makes practical implementation of these methods difficult; typically another discrimination approach should be employed to capture samples of neutrons and gamma-rays before running the fit-based technique. In this article, we also propose a technique to eliminate this requirement. These approaches are applied to several sets of mixed neutron and gamma-ray pulses obtained through different digitizers using stilbene scintillator in order to analyze them and measure their discrimination quality. (authors)

  6. A COMPARISON OF GADRAS SIMULATED AND MEASURED GAMMA RAY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffcoat, R.; Salaymeh, S.

    2010-06-28

    Gamma-ray radiation detection systems are continuously being developed and improved for detecting the presence of radioactive material and for identifying isotopes present. Gamma-ray spectra, from many different isotopes and in different types and thicknesses of attenuation material and matrixes, are needed to evaluate the performance of these devices. Recently, a test and evaluation exercise was performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory that required a large number of gamma-ray spectra. Simulated spectra were used for a major portion of the testing in order to provide a pool of data large enough for the results to be statistically significant. The test data set was comprised of two types of data, measured and simulated. The measured data were acquired with a hand-held Radioisotope Identification Device (RIID) and simulated spectra were created using Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS, Mitchell and Mattingly, Sandia National Laboratory). GADRAS uses a one-dimensional discrete ordinate calculation to simulate gamma-ray spectra. The measured and simulated spectra have been analyzed and compared. This paper will discuss the results of the comparison and offer explanations for spectral differences.

  7. Gamma background measurements in the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane.

    PubMed

    Malczewski, Dariusz; Kisiel, Jan; Dorda, Jerzy

    In situ gamma-ray measurements were taken at six locations in the Modane Underground Laboratory. Count rates for gamma radiation within the energy range of 7-2734 keV varied from 15 to 108 γs(-1). The arithmetic mean was 79 γs(-1) for measurements taken without a collimator. The metamorphic rocks surrounding the Lab are characterized by low activity concentrations of uranium and thorium equal to 12 and 10 Bq kg(-1), respectively.

  8. Dynamic-pressure measurements using an electronically scanned pressure module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapin, W. G.

    1983-01-01

    Frequency response was measured for different lengths and diameters of tubing between a sinusoidal pressure source and a pressure sensing module from an electronically scanned pressure measuring system. Measurements were made for straight runs of both steel and vinyl tubing. For steel tubing, measured results are compared with results calculated by using equations developed by Tijdeman and Bergh. Measurements were also made with a bend in the vinyl tubing at the module. In addition, measurements were made with two coils placed in the tubing near the middle of the run.

  9. High-resolution gamma ray attenuation density measurements on mining exploration drill cores, including cut cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, P.-S.; Bourke, A.

    2017-01-01

    Physical property measurements are increasingly important in mining exploration. For density determinations on rocks, one method applicable on exploration drill cores relies on gamma ray attenuation. This non-destructive method is ideal because each measurement takes only 10 s, making it suitable for high-resolution logging. However calibration has been problematic. In this paper we present new empirical, site-specific correction equations for whole NQ and BQ cores. The corrections force back the gamma densities to the "true" values established by the immersion method. For the NQ core caliber, the density range extends to high values (massive pyrite, 5 g/cm3) and the correction is thought to be very robust. We also present additional empirical correction factors for cut cores which take into account the missing material. These "cut core correction factors", which are not site-specific, were established by making gamma density measurements on truncated aluminum cylinders of various residual thicknesses. Finally we show two examples of application for the Abitibi Greenstone Belt in Canada. The gamma ray attenuation measurement system is part of a multi-sensor core logger which also determines magnetic susceptibility, geochemistry and mineralogy on rock cores, and performs line-scan imaging.

  10. Systematic Effects on Duration Measurements of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshut, Thomas M.; Paciesas, William S.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; vanParadijs, Jan; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.

    1996-01-01

    The parameters T(sub 90) and T(sub 50) have recently been introduced as a measurement of the duration of gamma-ray bursts. We present here a description of the method of measuring T(sub 90) and T(sub 50) and its application to gamma-ray bursts observed with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) onboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO). We use simulated as well as observed time profiles to address some of the possible systematic effects affecting individual T(sub 90) (T(sub 50)) measurements. We show that these systematic effects do not mimic those effects that would result from time dilation if the burst sources are at distances of several Gpc. We discuss the impact of these systematic effects on the T(sub 90) (T(sub 50)) distributions for the gamma-ray bursts observed with BATSE. We distinguish between various types of T(sub 90) (T(sub 50)) distributions, and discuss the ways in which distributions observed with different experiments can vary, even though the measurements for commonly observed bursts may be the same. We then discuss the distributions observed with BATSE and compare them to those observed with other experiments.

  11. Measurements of B to V(Gamma) Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Yarritu, Aaron K.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-09-02

    The standard model has been highly successful at describing current experimental data. However, extensions of the standard model predict particles that have masses at energy scales that are above the electroweak scale. The flavor-changing neutral current processes of the B meson are sensitive to the influences of these new physics contributions. These processes proceed through loop diagrams, thus allowing new physics to enter at the same order as the standard model. New physics may contribute to the enhancement or suppression of rate asymmetries or the decay rates of these processes. The transition B {yields} V{gamma} (V = K*(892), {rho}(770), {omega}(782), {phi}(1020)) represents radiative decays of the B meson that proceed through penguin processes. Hadronic uncertainties limit the theoretical accuracy of the prediction of the branching fractions. However, uncertainties, both theoretical and experimental, are much reduced when considering quantities involving ratios of branching fractions, such as CP or isospin asymmetries. The most dominant exclusive radiative b {yields} s transition is B {yields} K*{gamma}. We present the best measurements of the branching fractions, direct CP, and isospin asymmetries of B {yields} K*{gamma}. The analogous b {yields} d transitions are B {yields} {rho}{gamma} and B {yields} {omega}{gamma}, which are suppressed by a factor of |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}|{sup 2} {approx} 0.04 relative to B {yields} K*{gamma}. A measurement of the branching fractions and isospin asymmetry of B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma} and B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}, as well as a search for B {yields} {omega}{gamma}, are also given. These measurements are combined to calculate the ratio of CKM matrix elements |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}|, which corresponds to the length of one side of the unitary triangle. Finally, we present a search for the penguin annihilation process B {yields}{phi}{gamma}. We use a sample of 383 million B{bar B} events collected with

  12. Wind Measurements from Arc Scans with Doppler Wind Lidar

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Clifton, Andy; ...

    2015-11-25

    When defining optimal scanning geometries for scanning lidars for wind energy applications, we found that it is still an active field of research. Our paper evaluates uncertainties associated with arc scan geometries and presents recommendations regarding optimal configurations in the atmospheric boundary layer. The analysis is based on arc scan data from a Doppler wind lidar with one elevation angle and seven azimuth angles spanning 30° and focuses on an estimation of 10-min mean wind speed and direction. When flow is horizontally uniform, this approach can provide accurate wind measurements required for wind resource assessments in part because of itsmore » high resampling rate. Retrieved wind velocities at a single range gate exhibit good correlation to data from a sonic anemometer on a nearby meteorological tower, and vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, though derived from range gates located on a conical surface, match those measured by mast-mounted cup anemometers. Uncertainties in the retrieved wind velocity are related to high turbulent wind fluctuation and an inhomogeneous horizontal wind field. Moreover, the radial velocity variance is found to be a robust measure of the uncertainty of the retrieved wind speed because of its relationship to turbulence properties. It is further shown that the standard error of wind speed estimates can be minimized by increasing the azimuthal range beyond 30° and using five to seven azimuth angles.« less

  13. Wind Measurements from Arc Scans with Doppler Wind Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Clifton, Andy; Pryor, S. C.

    2015-11-25

    When defining optimal scanning geometries for scanning lidars for wind energy applications, we found that it is still an active field of research. Our paper evaluates uncertainties associated with arc scan geometries and presents recommendations regarding optimal configurations in the atmospheric boundary layer. The analysis is based on arc scan data from a Doppler wind lidar with one elevation angle and seven azimuth angles spanning 30° and focuses on an estimation of 10-min mean wind speed and direction. When flow is horizontally uniform, this approach can provide accurate wind measurements required for wind resource assessments in part because of its high resampling rate. Retrieved wind velocities at a single range gate exhibit good correlation to data from a sonic anemometer on a nearby meteorological tower, and vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, though derived from range gates located on a conical surface, match those measured by mast-mounted cup anemometers. Uncertainties in the retrieved wind velocity are related to high turbulent wind fluctuation and an inhomogeneous horizontal wind field. Moreover, the radial velocity variance is found to be a robust measure of the uncertainty of the retrieved wind speed because of its relationship to turbulence properties. It is further shown that the standard error of wind speed estimates can be minimized by increasing the azimuthal range beyond 30° and using five to seven azimuth angles.

  14. Fragility of Ionic Liquids Measured by Flash Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ran; Gurung, Eshan; Quitevis, Edward L.; Simon, Sindee L.

    Ionic liquids are a class of materials that possess attractive properties. They generally have low rates of crystallization due to their bulky and asymmetrical ion structure, and are often considered as good glass-forming materials. In this work, a series of imidazolium-based ionic liquids with varying functionalities from aliphatic to aromatic groups and a fixed anion are characterized using fast scanning differential scanning calorimetry. The limiting fictive temperature Tf', which is equivalent to the glass transition temperature Tg, is measured on heating as a function of cooling rate using Flash differential scanning calorimetry. Different calculation methods are employed and compared for the determination of Tf'. The dynamic fragility is obtained for the series of ionic liquids, and using this data along with a compilation of data from the literature reveals the relationship between molecular structure and fragility for ionic liquids.

  15. Directional correlation measurements for gamma transitions in /sup 127/Te

    SciTech Connect

    de Souza, M.O.M.D.; Saxena, R.N.

    1985-02-01

    The directional correlation of coincident ..gamma.. transitions in /sup 127/Te has been measured following the ..beta../sup -/ decay of /sup 127/Sb (T/sub 1/2/ = 3.9 d) using Ge(Li)-Ge(Li) and Ge(Li)-NaI(T1) gamma spectrometers. Measurements have been carried out for 14 gamma cascades resulting in the determination of multipole mixing ratios delta(E2/M1) for 15 ..gamma.. transitions. The present results permitted a definite spin assignment of (7/2) for the 785 keV level and confirmation of several previous assignments to other levels in /sup 127/Te. The g factor of the 340 keV ((9/2)/sup -/) level has also been measured using the integral perturbed angular correlation method in the hyperfine magnetic field of a Te in Ni matrix. The results of the g factor as well as the mixing ratio for the 252 keV ((9/2)/sup -/..-->..(11/2)/sup -/) transition support the earlier interpretation of this state as an anomalous coupling state.

  16. The Gamma Astrometric Measurement Experiment (GAME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Mario; Vecchiato, Alberto; Ligori, Sebastiano; Fineschi, Silvano; Lattanzi, Mario G.

    2009-08-01

    The GAME mission concept is aimed at very precise measurement of the gravitational deflection of light by the Sun, by an optimized telescope in the visible and launched in orbit on a small class satellite. The targeted precision on the γ parameter of the Parametrized Post-Newtonian formulation of General Relativity is 10-6 or better, i.e. one to two orders of magnitude better than the best current results. Such precision is suitable to detect possible deviations from unity value, associated to generalized Einstein models for gravitation, with potentially huge impacts on the cosmological distribution of dark matter and dark energy. The measurement principle is based on differential astrometric signature on the stellar positions, i.e. on the spatial component of the effect rather than the temporal component as in recent experiments using radio link delay timing. Exploiting the observation strategy, it is also possible to target other interesting scientific goals both in the realm of General Relativity and in the observations of extrasolar systems. The instrument is a dual field, multiple aperture Fizeau interferometer, observing simultaneously two regions close to the Solar limb. The diluted optics approach is selected for efficient rejection of the solar radiation, while retaining an acceptable angular resolution on the science targets. We describe the science motivation, the proposed mission profile, the payload concept and the expected performance from recent results.

  17. Measurement of the gamma gamma* to eta_c transition form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C.M.; /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-04-28

    The authors study the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} {eta}{sub c}, {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sub S}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and obtain {eta}{sub c} mass and width values 2982.2 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 1.6 MeV/c{sup 2} and 31.7 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 0.8 MeV, respectively. They find {Lambda}({eta}{sub c} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}){Beta}({eta}{sub c} {yields} K{bar K}{pi}) = 0.374 {+-} 0.009 {+-} 0.031 keV, and measure the {gamma}{gamma}* {yields} {eta}{sub c} transition form factor in the momentum transfer range from 2 to 50 GeV{sup 2}. The analysis is based on 469 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

  18. A portable absorbed dose measuring instrument with gamma discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quam, W. M.; Wilde, W. I.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of an electronic instrument for measuring the radiation dose absorbed by tissues are presented. The detector is a sphere of tissue-equivalent plastic with a single wire located on a diameter of the sphere. The electronic circuits and method of operation of the detector are described. Advantages are the small size and easy portability plus ability to selectively measure neutron and gamma plus neutron events.

  19. Measurements of the CKM angle gamma at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Marchiori, G.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2011-11-07

    We report on our recent measurements of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa CP-violating phase {gamma} and of related CP-asymmetries and branching fraction ratios. The measurements have been performed on samples of up to 465 million B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory in the years 1999-2007.

  20. Measurements of dimensional accuracy using linear and scanning profile techniques.

    PubMed

    Harrison, A; Huggett, R; Zissis, A

    1992-01-01

    Various measurement methods have been described for the determination of dimensional accuracy and stability of denture base materials. This investigation introduces a computerised coordinate measuring machine (CCMM) and compares it with two methods routinely used for assessment of the accuracy of fit of denture base materials. The results demonstrate that the three methods (digital calipers, optical comparator, and CCMM) are acceptable for linear measurement. The CCMM was also used in its scanning mode to define and to quantify the contour changes of the resin bases. The advantages of the CCMM become apparent when two-dimensional changes require assessment.

  1. Accurate Measurement of Heat Capacity by Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Experience with high quality heat capacity measurement by differential scanning calorimetry is summarized and illustrated, pointing out three major causes of error: (1) incompatible thermal histories of the sample, reference and blank runs; (2) unstable initial and final isotherms; (3) incompatible differences between initial and final isotherm amplitudes for sample, reference and blank runs. Considering these problems, it is shown for the case of polyoxymethylene that accuracies in heat capacity of 0.1 percent may be possible.

  2. Implications of final L3 measurement of {sigma}{sub tot}({gamma}{gamma}{yields}bb)

    SciTech Connect

    Chyla, Jiri

    2006-02-01

    The excess of data on the total cross section of bb production in {gamma}{gamma} collisions over QCD predictions, observed by L3, OPAL and DELPHI Collaborations at LEP2, has so far defied explanation. The recent final analysis of L3 data has brought important new information concerning the dependence of the observed excess on the {gamma}{gamma} collisions energy W{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}. The implications of this dependence are discussed.

  3. PWR and BWR spent fuel assembly gamma spectra measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccaro, S.; Tobin, S. J.; Favalli, A.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Hu, J.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Trellue, H.; Vo, D.

    2016-10-01

    A project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies is underway. The research team comprises the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), embodied by the European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards; the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB); two universities; and several United States national laboratories. The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative-Spent Fuel project team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. This study focuses on spectrally resolved gamma-ray measurements performed on a diverse set of 50 assemblies [25 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and 25 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies]; these same 50 assemblies will be measured with neutron-based NDA instruments and a full-length calorimeter. Given that encapsulation/repository and dry storage safeguards are the primarily intended applications, the analysis focused on the dominant gamma-ray lines of 137Cs, 154Eu, and 134Cs because these isotopes will be the primary gamma-ray emitters during the time frames of interest to these applications. This study addresses the impact on the measured passive gamma-ray signals due to the following factors: burnup, initial enrichment, cooling time, assembly type (eight different PWR and six different BWR fuel designs), presence of gadolinium rods, and anomalies in operating history. To compare the measured results with theory, a limited number of ORIGEN-ARP simulations were performed.

  4. PWR and BWR spent fuel assembly gamma spectra measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Vaccaro, S.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Favalli, Andrea; Grogan, Brandon R.; Jansson, Peter; Liljenfeldt, Henrik; Mozin, Vladimir; Hu, Jianwei; Schwalbach, P.; Sjoland, A.; Trellue, Holly; Vo, D.

    2016-07-17

    A project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies is underway. The research team comprises the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), embodied by the European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards; the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB); two universities; and several United States national laboratories. The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative–Spent Fuel project team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. This study focuses on spectrally resolved gamma-ray measurements performed on a diverse set of 50 assemblies [25 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and 25 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies]; these same 50 assemblies will be measured with neutron-based NDA instruments and a full-length calorimeter. Given that encapsulation/repository and dry storage safeguards are the primarily intended applications, the analysis focused on the dominant gamma-ray lines of 137Cs, 154Eu, and 134Cs because these isotopes will be the primary gamma-ray emitters during the time frames of interest to these applications. This study addresses the impact on the measured passive gamma-ray signals due to the following factors: burnup, initial enrichment, cooling time, assembly type (eight different PWR and six different BWR fuel designs), presence of gadolinium rods, and anomalies in operating history. As a result, to compare the measured results with theory, a limited number of ORIGEN-ARP simulations were performed.

  5. PWR and BWR spent fuel assembly gamma spectra measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Vaccaro, S.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Favalli, Andrea; ...

    2016-07-17

    A project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies is underway. The research team comprises the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), embodied by the European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards; the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB); two universities; and several United States national laboratories. The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative–Spent Fuel project team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detectmore » the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. This study focuses on spectrally resolved gamma-ray measurements performed on a diverse set of 50 assemblies [25 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and 25 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies]; these same 50 assemblies will be measured with neutron-based NDA instruments and a full-length calorimeter. Given that encapsulation/repository and dry storage safeguards are the primarily intended applications, the analysis focused on the dominant gamma-ray lines of 137Cs, 154Eu, and 134Cs because these isotopes will be the primary gamma-ray emitters during the time frames of interest to these applications. This study addresses the impact on the measured passive gamma-ray signals due to the following factors: burnup, initial enrichment, cooling time, assembly type (eight different PWR and six different BWR fuel designs), presence of gadolinium rods, and anomalies in operating history. As a result, to compare the measured results with theory, a limited number of ORIGEN-ARP simulations were performed.« less

  6. Measurements with Pinhole and Coded Aperture Gamma-Ray Imaging Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Raffo-Caiado, Ana Claudia; Solodov, Alexander A; Abdul-Jabbar, Najeb M; Hayward, Jason P; Ziock, Klaus-Peter

    2010-01-01

    From a safeguards perspective, gamma-ray imaging has the potential to reduce manpower and cost for effectively locating and monitoring special nuclear material. The purpose of this project was to investigate the performance of pinhole and coded aperture gamma-ray imaging systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). With the aid of the European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC), radiometric data will be combined with scans from a three-dimensional design information verification (3D-DIV) system. Measurements were performed at the ORNL Safeguards Laboratory using sources that model holdup in radiological facilities. They showed that for situations with moderate amounts of solid or dense U sources, the coded aperture was able to predict source location and geometry within ~7% of actual values while the pinhole gave a broad representation of source distributions

  7. Evaluation of three lidar scanning strategies for turbulence measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Newman, Jennifer F.; Klein, Petra M.; Wharton, Sonia; ...

    2016-05-03

    Several errors occur when a traditional Doppler beam swinging (DBS) or velocity–azimuth display (VAD) strategy is used to measure turbulence with a lidar. To mitigate some of these errors, a scanning strategy was recently developed which employs six beam positions to independently estimate the u, v, and w velocity variances and covariances. In order to assess the ability of these different scanning techniques to measure turbulence, a Halo scanning lidar, WindCube v2 pulsed lidar, and ZephIR continuous wave lidar were deployed at field sites in Oklahoma and Colorado with collocated sonic anemometers.Results indicate that the six-beam strategy mitigates some of the errors caused bymore » VAD and DBS scans, but the strategy is strongly affected by errors in the variance measured at the different beam positions. The ZephIR and WindCube lidars overestimated horizontal variance values by over 60 % under unstable conditions as a result of variance contamination, where additional variance components contaminate the true value of the variance. A correction method was developed for the WindCube lidar that uses variance calculated from the vertical beam position to reduce variance contamination in the u and v variance components. The correction method reduced WindCube variance estimates by over 20 % at both the Oklahoma and Colorado sites under unstable conditions, when variance contamination is largest. This correction method can be easily applied to other lidars that contain a vertical beam position and is a promising method for accurately estimating turbulence with commercially available lidars.« less

  8. Scanning Twyman interferometer for measuring small angular displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianguo; Tong, Yue

    2010-12-01

    We present a simple but effective method for measuring small angular displacement based on a scanning Twyman interferometer ,in which, one of the two mirrors is mounted on the piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) droved by saw-tooth voltage, the status of interference fringes changes from static to dynamic. A photoelectric detector detects this dynamic photo-signal and changes into electronic signal. The signal is inputted into an oscillograph. The oscillogram will present interference crests. The method for measuring small angular displacement is based on the linear relation between the angular displacement and the crest shift on the oscillogram.

  9. Scanning Twyman interferometer for measuring small angular displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianguo; Tong, Yue

    2011-05-01

    We present a simple but effective method for measuring small angular displacement based on a scanning Twyman interferometer ,in which, one of the two mirrors is mounted on the piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) droved by saw-tooth voltage, the status of interference fringes changes from static to dynamic. A photoelectric detector detects this dynamic photo-signal and changes into electronic signal. The signal is inputted into an oscillograph. The oscillogram will present interference crests. The method for measuring small angular displacement is based on the linear relation between the angular displacement and the crest shift on the oscillogram.

  10. Measurement of dihedral angles by scanning electron microscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achutaramayya, G.; Scott, W. D.

    1973-01-01

    The extension of Hoover's (1971) technique to the case of dihedral-angle measurement is described. Dihedral angles are often determined by interferometry on thermally grooved grain boundaries to obtain information on relative interfacial energies. In the technique considered the measured angles approach the true angles as the tilt angle approaches 90 deg. It is pointed out that the scanning electron microscopy method provides a means of seeing the real root of a groove at a lateral magnification which is higher than that obtainable with interferometry.

  11. Measurements of the CKM Angle phi3/gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Tisserand, Vincent; /Annecy, LAPP

    2007-06-27

    We present a review on the measurements of the CKM angle {gamma} ({phi}{sub 3}){sup 1} as performed by the BABAR and Belle experiments at the asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} B factories colliders PEP-II and KEKB. These measurements are using either charged or neutral B decays. For charged B decays the modes {tilde D}{sup 0}K{sup -}, {tilde D}*{sup 0}K{sup -}, and {tilde D}{sup 0}K*{sup -} are employed, where {tilde D}{sup 0} indicates either a D{sup 0} or a {bar D}{sup 0} meson. Direct CP violation is exploited. It is caused by interferences between V{sub ub} and V{sub cb} accessible transitions that generate asymmetries in the final states. For these decays various methods exist to enhance the sensitivity to the V{sub ub} transition, carrying the weak phase {gamma}. For neutral B decays, the modes D{sup (*){+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and D{sup {+-}}{rho}{sup {-+}} are used. In addition to the V{sub ub} and V{sub cb} interferences, these modes are sensitive to the B{sup 0}-{bar B}{sup 0} mixing, so that time dependent analyses are performed to extract sin(2{beta} + {gamma}). An alternative method would use the lower branching ratios decay modes {tilde D}{sup (*)0}{bar K}{sup (*)0} where much larger asymmetries are expected. The various available methods are mostly ''theoretically clean'' and always free of penguins diagrams. In some cases a high sensitivity to {gamma} is expected and large asymmetries may be seen. But these measurements are always experimentally difficult as one has to face with either low branching ratios, or small asymmetries, or additional technical/theoretical difficulties due to Dalitz/SU(3) and re-scattering models needed to treat/estimate nuisance parameters such as unknown strong phases and the relative magnitude of the amplitude of the interfering ''V{sub ub}'' transitions. Thus at the present time only a relatively limited precision on {gamma} can be extracted from these measurements. The current world average is {gamma} = (78{sub -26}{sup +19

  12. Determination of the measurement threshold in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Korun, M; Vodenik, B; Zorko, B

    2017-03-01

    In gamma-ray spectrometry the measurement threshold describes the lover boundary of the interval of peak areas originating in the response of the spectrometer to gamma-rays from the sample measured. In this sense it presents a generalization of the net indication corresponding to the decision threshold, which is the measurement threshold at the quantity value zero for a predetermined probability for making errors of the first kind. Measurement thresholds were determined for peaks appearing in the spectra of radon daughters (214)Pb and (214)Bi by measuring the spectrum 35 times under repeatable conditions. For the calculation of the measurement threshold the probability for detection of the peaks and the mean relative uncertainty of the peak area were used. The relative measurement thresholds, the ratios between the measurement threshold and the mean peak area uncertainty, were determined for 54 peaks where the probability for detection varied between some percent and about 95% and the relative peak area uncertainty between 30% and 80%. The relative measurement thresholds vary considerably from peak to peak, although the nominal value of the sensitivity parameter defining the sensitivity for locating peaks was equal for all peaks. At the value of the sensitivity parameter used, the peak analysis does not locate peaks corresponding to the decision threshold with the probability in excess of 50%. This implies that peaks in the spectrum may not be located, although the true value of the measurand exceeds the decision threshold.

  13. Influence of gamma radiation on potato starch gelatinization studied by differential scanning calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, Krystyna; Eliasson, Ann-Charlotte

    2002-05-01

    The paper presents a study of the influence of the conditions applied during differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements (concentration and heating rate) on the possible detection of the differences between gelatinization occurring in both non-irradiated and irradiated potato starch with a dose of 20 kGy. Differences in gelatinization of irradiated and non-irradiated potato starch during DSC analysis was attributed to the radiation induced destruction of crystalline ordering. This was confirmed by studies of the samples irradiated to very high doses (446 and 600 kGy), and by comparing with the effect of grinding. Changes of starch properties caused by radiodepolymerization—contrary to those caused by grinding—influences gelatinization behaviour much more than the WAXS crystallinity in solid state.

  14. Focal depth measurement of scanning helium ion microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hongxuan; Itoh, Hiroshi; Wang, Chunmei; Zhang, Han; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-07-14

    When facing the challenges of critical dimension measurement of complicated nanostructures, such as of the three dimension integrated circuit, characterization of the focal depth of microscopes is important. In this Letter, we developed a method for characterizing the focal depth of a scanning helium ion microscope (HIM) by using an atomic force microscope tip characterizer (ATC). The ATC was tilted in a sample chamber at an angle to the scanning plan. Secondary electron images (SEIs) were obtained at different positions of the ATC. The edge resolution of the SEIs shows the nominal diameters of the helium ion beam at different focal levels. With this method, the nominal shapes of the helium ion beams were obtained with different apertures. Our results show that a small aperture is necessary to get a high spatial resolution and high depth of field images with HIM. This work provides a method for characterizing and improving the performance of HIM.

  15. Delayed Gamma Measurements in Different Nuclear Research Reactors Bringing Out the Importance of the Delayed Contribution in Gamma Flux Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fourmentel, D.; Radulovic, V.; Barbot, L.; Villard, J-F.; Zerovnik, G.; Snoj, L.; Tarchalski, M.; Pytel, K.; Malouch, F.

    2015-07-01

    Neutron and gamma flux levels are key parameters in nuclear research reactors. In Material Testing Reactors, such as the future Jules Horowitz Reactor, under construction at the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA Cadarache, France), the expected gamma flux levels are very high (nuclear heating is of the order of 20 W/g at 100 MWth). As gamma rays deposit their energy in the reactor structures and structural materials it is important to take them into account when designing irradiation devices. There are only a few sensors which allow measurements of the nuclear heating ; a recent development at the CEA Cadarache allows measurements of the gamma flux using a miniature ionization chamber (MIC). The measured MIC response is often compared with calculation using modern Monte Carlo (MC) neutron and photon transport codes, such as TRIPOLI-4 and MCNP6. In these calculations only the production of prompt gamma rays in the reactor is usually modelled thus neglecting the delayed gamma rays. Hence calculations and measurements are usually in better accordance for the neutron flux than for the gamma flux. In this paper we study the contribution of delayed gamma rays to the total MIC signal in order to estimate the systematic error in gamma flux MC calculations. In order to experimentally determine the delayed gamma flux contributions to the MIC response, we performed gamma flux measurements with CEA developed MIC at three different research reactors: the OSIRIS reactor (MTR - 70 MWth at CEA Saclay, France), the TRIGA MARK II reactor (TRIGA - 250 kWth at the Jozef Stefan Institute, Slovenia) and the MARIA reactor (MTR - 30 MWth at the National Center for Nuclear Research, Poland). In order to experimentally assess the delayed gamma flux contribution to the total gamma flux, several reactor shut down (scram) experiments were performed specifically for the purpose of the measurements. Results show that on average about 30 % of the MIC signal is due to

  16. Novel scanning method for distortion-free BOTDA measurements.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Lopez, Alejandro; Yang, Zhisheng; Soto, Marcelo A; Angulo-Vinuesa, Xabier; Martin-Lopez, Sonia; Thevenaz, Luc; Gonzalez-Herraez, Miguel

    2016-05-16

    Systematic errors induced by distortions in the pump pulse of conventional Brillouin distributed fiber sensors are thoroughly investigated. Experimental results, supported by a theoretical analysis, demonstrate that the two probe sidebands in standard Brillouin optical time-domain analyzers provide a non-zero net gain on the pump pulse, inducing severe distortions of the pump when scanning the pump-probe frequency offset, especially at high probe power levels. Compared to the impact of non-local effects reported in the state-of-the-art, measurements here indicate that for probe powers in the mW range (below the onset of amplified spontaneous Brillouin scattering), the obtained gain and loss spectra show two strong side-lobes that lead to significant strain/temperature errors. This phenomenon is not related to the well-known spectral hole burning resulting from pump depletion, but it is strictly related to the temporal and spectral distortions that the pump pulse experiences when scanning the Brillouin gain/loss spectrum. As a solution to this problem, a novel scanning scheme for Brillouin sensing is proposed. The method relies on a fixed frequency separation between the two probe sidebands, so that a flat zero net gain is achieved on the pump pulse when scanning the pump-probe frequency offset. The proposed technique is experimentally validated, demonstrating its ability to completely cancel out non-local effects up to a probe power ultimately limited by the onset of amplified spontaneous Brillouin scattering. The method allows for one order of magnitude improvement in the figure-of-merit of optimized long-range Brillouin distributed fiber sensors, enabling measurements along a 100 km-long sensing fiber with 2 m spatial resolution and with no need of added features for performance enhancement.

  17. The StarScan Plate Measuring Machine: Overview and Calibrations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-28

    negligible, and we measure here the accuracy of the x, y-table coordinates of StarScan. In the following we refer to these sets of measures as m1c and m2c ...BETWEEN TWO SETS OF DATA, DCP IS CALIBRATION PLATE, M1C AND M2C ARE THE SETS 1 AND 2 OF MEASURES OF CENTRAL DOTS, AND 000 TO 270 INDICATE THE...ORIENTATION OF A MEASURE. SEE TEXT FOR MORE DETAILS. Result number Data set 1 Data set 2 Model rms x (μm) rms y (μm) 1 DCP m1c 000 DCP m2c 000 linear 0.31 0.20

  18. Burg algorithm for enhancing measurement performance in wavelength scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcock, Rebecca; Muhamedsalih, Hussam; Martin, Haydn; Jiang, Xiangqian

    2016-06-01

    Wavelength scanning interferometry (WSI) is a technique for measuring surface topography that is capable of resolving step discontinuities and does not require any mechanical movement of the apparatus or measurand, allowing measurement times to be reduced substantially in comparison to related techniques. The axial (height) resolution and measurement range in WSI depends in part on the algorithm used to evaluate the spectral interferograms. Previously reported Fourier transform based methods have a number of limitations which is in part due to the short data lengths obtained. This paper compares the performance auto-regressive model based techniques for frequency estimation in WSI. Specifically, the Burg method is compared with established Fourier transform based approaches using both simulation and experimental data taken from a WSI measurement of a step-height sample.

  19. Gamma Ray Burst 150518a measured at different wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apala, Ellizabeth Ann; Soderberg, Alicia Margarita; West, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Gamma Ray Burst (GRB's), extremely energetic flashes of Gamma Rays, are caused by either deaths of massive unstable stars or colliding binary neutron stars. A unique burst, GRB 150518a, had two recorded bursts fifteen minutes apart which is very rare and is considered to be ultra-long, lasting around thirty minutes total and is associated with a Supernova explosion. GBR 150518a is also extremely close compared to the average burst being measured to have a redshift of .2, this is important to note because GRB's measuring less than a redshift of .3 only are seen every ten years. Gamma rays are emitted by supernovae, neutron stars, black holes, and quasars and by studying GRB's it allows us to see more deeply into how these objects function. The first few days of GRB 150518as' detected afterglow was plotted in different wavelengths, including optical, x-ray, radio, and infrared, in flux verses time. Data is continuously being added as time goes on. This research is funded by the NSF, grant number 1358990.

  20. Pavement cracking measurements using 3D laser-scan images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, W.; Xu, B.

    2013-10-01

    Pavement condition surveying is vital for pavement maintenance programs that ensure ride quality and traffic safety. This paper first introduces an automated pavement inspection system which uses a three-dimensional (3D) camera and a structured laser light to acquire dense transverse profiles of a pavement lane surface when it carries a moving vehicle. After the calibration, the 3D system can yield a depth resolution of 0.5 mm and a transverse resolution of 1.56 mm pixel-1 at 1.4 m camera height from the ground. The scanning rate of the camera can be set to its maximum at 5000 lines s-1, allowing the density of scanned profiles to vary with the vehicle's speed. The paper then illustrates the algorithms that utilize 3D information to detect pavement distress, such as transverse, longitudinal and alligator cracking, and presents the field tests on the system's repeatability when scanning a sample pavement in multiple runs at the same vehicle speed, at different vehicle speeds and under different weather conditions. The results show that this dedicated 3D system can capture accurate pavement images that detail surface distress, and obtain consistent crack measurements in repeated tests and under different driving and lighting conditions.

  1. Measuring the spatial accuracy of the spatial scan statistic.

    PubMed

    Read, Simon; Bath, Peter; Willett, Peter; Maheswaran, Ravi

    2011-06-01

    The spatial scan statistic is well established in spatial epidemiology. However, studies of its spatial accuracy are infrequent and vary in approach, often using multiple measures which complicate the objective ranking of different implementations of the statistic. We address this with three novel contributions. Firstly, a modular framework into which different definitions of spatial accuracy can be compared and hybridised. Secondly, we derive a new single measure, Ω, which takes account of all true and detected clusters, without the need for arbitrary weightings and irrespective of any chosen significance threshold. Thirdly, we demonstrate the new measure, alongside existing ones, in a study of the six output filter options provided by SaTScan™. The study suggests filtering overlapping detected clusters tends to reduce spatial accuracy, and visualising overlapping clusters may be better than filtering them out. Although we only address spatial accuracy, the framework and Ω may be extendible to spatio-temporal accuracy.

  2. Technical Note: PRESAGE three-dimensional dosimetry accurately measures Gamma Knife output factors

    PubMed Central

    Klawikowski, Slade J.; Yang, James N.; Adamovics, John; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Small-field output factor measurements are traditionally very difficult because of steep dose gradients, loss of lateral electronic equilibrium, and dose volume averaging in finitely sized detectors. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry is ideal for measuring small output factors and avoids many of these potential challenges of point and two-dimensional detectors. PRESAGE 3D polymer dosimeters were used to measure the output factors for the 4 mm and 8 mm collimators of the Leksell Perfexion Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatment system. Discrepancies between the planned and measured distance between shot centers were also investigated. A Gamma Knife head frame was mounted onto an anthropomorphic head phantom. Special inserts were machined to hold 60 mm diameter, 70 mm tall cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters. The phantom was irradiated with one 16 mm shot and either one 4 mm or one 8 mm shot, to a prescribed dose of either 3 Gy or 4 Gy to the 50% isodose line. The two shots were spaced between 30 mm and 60 mm apart and aligned along the central axis of the cylinder. The Presage dosimeters were measured using the DMOS-RPC optical CT scanning system. Five independent 4 mm output factor measurements fell within 2% of the manufacturer’s Monte Carlo simulation-derived nominal value, as did two independent 8 mm output factor measurements. The measured distances between shot centers varied by ± 0.8 mm with respect to the planned shot displacements. On the basis of these results, we conclude that PRESAGE dosimetry is excellently suited to quantify the difficult-to-measure Gamma Knife output factors. PMID:25368961

  3. Improved detector for the measurement of gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelt, F. B.

    1985-07-01

    The present invention lies in the field of gamma ray spectrometry of geologic deposits and other materials, such as building materials (cement, asphalt, etc.) More specifically, the invention is an improved device for the gamma ray spetcrometery of gelogical deposits as a tool for petroleum exploration, geologic research and monitoring of radio-active materials such as in uranium mill tailings and the like. Improvement consists in enlarging the area of the receptor face and without any necessarily substantial increase in the volume of the receptor crystal over the current cylindrical shapes. The invention also provides, as a corollary of the increase in area receptor crystal face, a reduction in the weight of the amount of material necessary to provide effective shielding of the crystal from atmospheric radiation and radiation from deposits not under examination. The area of the receptor crystal face is increased by forming the crystal as a truncated cone with the shielding shaped as a hollow frustrum of a cone. A photomultiplier device is secured to the smaller face of the crystal. The improved detector shape can also be used in scintillometers which measure total gamma radiation.

  4. RADSAT Benchmarks for Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Kimberly A.; Gesh, Christopher J.

    2011-07-01

    The accurate and efficient simulation of coupled neutron-photon problems is necessary for several important radiation detection applications. Examples include the detection of nuclear threats concealed in cargo containers and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for nondestructive determination of elemental composition of unknown samples. High-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers are used in these applications to measure the spectrum of the emitted photon flux, which consists of both continuum and characteristic gamma rays with discrete energies. Monte Carlo transport is the most commonly used simulation tool for this type of problem, but computational times can be prohibitively long. This work explores the use of multi-group deterministic methods for the simulation of coupled neutron-photon problems. The main purpose of this work is to benchmark several problems modeled with RADSAT and MCNP to experimental data. Additionally, the cross section libraries for RADSAT are updated to include ENDF/B-VII cross sections. Preliminary findings show promising results when compared to MCNP and experimental data, but also areas where additional inquiry and testing are needed. The potential benefits and shortcomings of the multi-group-based approach are discussed in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency.

  5. Neutron detection by measuring capture gammas in a calorimetric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pausch, Guntram; Herbach, Claus-Michael; Kong, Yong; Lentering, Ralf; Plettner, Cristina; Roemer, Katja; Scherwinski, Falko; Stein, Juergen; Schotanus, Paul; Wilpert, Thomas

    2011-10-01

    The neutron capture detector (NCD) is introduced as a novel detection scheme for thermal and epithermal neutrons that could provide large-area neutron counters by using common detector materials and proven technologies. The NCD is based on the fact that neutron captures are usually followed by prompt gamma cascades, where the sum energy of the gammas equals to the total excitation energy of typically 6-9 MeV. This large sum energy is measured in a calorimetric approach and taken as the signature of a neutron capture event. An NCD consists of a neutron converter, comprising of constituents with large elemental neutron capture cross-section like cadmium or gadolinium, which is embedded in common scintillator material. The scintillator must be large and dense enough to absorb with reasonable probability a portion of the sum energy that exceeds the energy of gammas emitted by common (natural, medical, industrial) radiation sources. An energy window, advantageously complemented with a multiplicity filter, then discriminates neutron capture signals against background. The paper presents experimental results obtained at the cold-neutron beam of the BER II research reactor, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, and at other neutron sources with a prototype NCD, consisting of four BGO crystals with embedded cadmium sheets, and with a benchmark configuration consisting of two separate NaI(Tl) detectors. The detector responses are in excellent agreement with predictions of a simulation model developed for optimizing NCD configurations. NCDs could be deployed as neutron detectors in radiation portal monitors (RPMs). Advanced modular scintillation detector systems could even combine neutron and gamma sensitivity with excellent background suppression at minimum overall expense.

  6. Consistent Small-Sample Variances for Six Gamma-Family Measures of Ordinal Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-family measures are bivariate ordinal correlation measures that form a family because they all reduce to Goodman and Kruskal's gamma in the absence of ties (1954). For several gamma-family indices, more than one variance estimator has been introduced. In previous research, the "consistent" variance estimator described by Cliff and…

  7. Optimization of the imaging response of scanning microwave microscopy measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sardi, G. M.; Lucibello, A.; Proietti, E.; Marcelli, R.; Kasper, M.; Gramse, G.; Kienberger, F.

    2015-07-20

    In this work, we present the analytical modeling and preliminary experimental results for the choice of the optimal frequencies when performing amplitude and phase measurements with a scanning microwave microscope. In particular, the analysis is related to the reflection mode operation of the instrument, i.e., the acquisition of the complex reflection coefficient data, usually referred as S{sub 11}. The studied configuration is composed of an atomic force microscope with a microwave matched nanometric cantilever probe tip, connected by a λ/2 coaxial cable resonator to a vector network analyzer. The set-up is provided by Keysight Technologies. As a peculiar result, the optimal frequencies, where the maximum sensitivity is achieved, are different for the amplitude and for the phase signals. The analysis is focused on measurements of dielectric samples, like semiconductor devices, textile pieces, and biological specimens.

  8. Measurement of Branching Fractions in Radiative BDecays to eta K gamma and Search for B Decays to eta' K gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-03-31

    The authors present measurements of the B {yields} {eta}K{gamma} branching fractions and upper limits for the B {yields} {eta}'K{gamma} branching fractions. For B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma} they also measure the time-integrated charge asymmetry. The data sample, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represents 232 x 10{sup 6} produced B{bar B} pairs. The results for branching fractions and upper limits at 90% C.L. in units of 10{sup -6} are: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}{gamma}) = 11.3{sub -2.6}{sup +2.8} {+-} 0.6, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma}) = 10.0 {+-} 1.3 {+-} 0.5, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'K{sup 0}{gamma}) < 6.6, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}'K{sup +}{gamma}) < 4.2. The charge asymmetry in the decay B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma} is {Alpha}{sub ch} = -0.09 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.01. The first errors are statistical and the second systematic.

  9. Guide to plutonium isotopic measurements using gamma-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lemming, J.F.; Rakel, D.A.

    1982-08-26

    Purpose of this guide is to assist those responsible for plutonium isotopic measurements in the application of gamma-ray spectrometry. Objectives are to promote an understanding of the measurement process, including its limitations and applicability, by reviewing the general features of a plutonium spectrum and identifying the quantities which must be extracted from the data; to introduce state-of-the-art analysis techniques by reviewing four isotopic analysis packages and identifying their differences; to establish the basis for measurement control and assurance by discussing means of authenticating the performance of a measurement system; and to prepare for some specific problems encountered in plutonium isotopic analyses by providing solutions from the practical experiences of several laboratories. 29 references, 12 figures, 17 tables.

  10. A broadband toolbox for scanning microwave microscopy transmission measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucibello, Andrea; Sardi, Giovanni Maria; Capoccia, Giovanni; Proietti, Emanuela; Marcelli, Romolo; Kasper, Manuel; Gramse, Georg; Kienberger, Ferry

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present in detail the design, both electromagnetic and mechanical, the fabrication, and the test of the first prototype of a Scanning Microwave Microscope (SMM) suitable for a two-port transmission measurement, recording, and processing the high frequency transmission scattering parameter S21 passing through the investigated sample. The S21 toolbox is composed by a microwave emitter, placed below the sample, which excites an electromagnetic wave passing through the sample under test, and is collected by the cantilever used as the detector, electrically matched for high frequency measurements. This prototype enhances the actual capability of the instrument for a sub-surface imaging at the nanoscale. Moreover, it allows the study of the electromagnetic properties of the material under test obtained through the measurement of the reflection (S11) and transmission (S21) parameters at the same time. The SMM operates between 1 GHz and 20 GHz, current limit for the microwave matching of the cantilever, and the high frequency signal is recorded by means of a two-port Vector Network Analyzer, using both contact and no-contact modes of operation, the latter, especially minded for a fully nondestructive and topography-free characterization. This tool is an upgrade of the already established setup for the reflection mode S11 measurement. Actually, the proposed setup is able to give richer information in terms of scattering parameters, including amplitude and phase measurements, by means of the two-port arrangement.

  11. Modified Differential Scanning Calorimeter for Direct Electrocaloric Measurements.

    PubMed

    Sanlialp, Mehmet; Molin, Christian; Shvartsman, Vladimir V; Gebhardt, Sylvia; Lupascu, Doru C

    2016-10-01

    Solid-state refrigeration using the electrocaloric effect (ECE) in ferroelectric materials is a promising alternative to the conventional vapor-compression technology. In spite of growing interest to the investigation of the ECE, direct measurements of the effect are still rare. In this paper, we report on a modification of a differential scanning calorimeter for direct ECE measurements. The importance of proper estimation of the thermal correction factor and use of proper values of the heat capacitance for correct ECE measurements is discussed. The ECE measurements were performed for Ba(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 and Ba(Zr0.12Ti0.88)O3 bulk ceramics. Large electrocaloric temperature changes of 0.54 and 0.34 K are achieved under the application of an electric field of 2 kV/mm for the Ba(Zr0.12Ti0.88)O3 and Ba(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 samples, respectively. The relation between the directly measured ECE values and frequently used indirect estimation based on Maxwell's relations is discussed.

  12. Abrasion of 6 dentifrices measured by vertical scanning interference microscopy

    PubMed Central

    PASCARETTI-GRIZON, Florence; MABILLEAU, Guillaume; CHAPPARD, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The abrasion of dentifrices is well recognized to eliminate the dental plaque. The aims of this study were to characterize the abrasive powders of 6 dentifrices (3 toothpastes and 3 toothpowders) and to measure the abrasion on a test surface by Vertical Scanning Interference microscopy (VSI). Material and Methods Bright field and polarization microscopy were used to identify the abrasive particles on the crude dentifrices and after prolonged washes. Scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis characterized the shape and nature of the particles. Standardized and polished blocks of poly(methylmethacrylate) were brushed with a commercial electric toothbrush with the dentifrices. VSI quantified the mean roughness (Ra) and illustrated in 3D the abraded areas. Results Toothpastes induced a limited abrasion. Toothpowders induced a significantly higher roughness linked to the size of the abrasive particles. One powder (Gencix® produced a high abrasion when used with a standard testing weight. However, the powder is based on pumice particles covered by a plant homogenate that readily dissolves in water. When used in the same volume, or after dispersion in water, Ra was markedly reduced. Conclusion Light and electron microscopy characterize the abrasive particles and VSI is a new tool allowing the analysis of large surface of abraded materials. PMID:24212995

  13. Ligand-Receptor Binding Measured by Laser-Scanning Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuck, Paul; Lao, Zhege; Skwish, Stephen; Fraser Glickman, J.; Yang, Ke; Burbaum, Jonathan; Inglese, James

    1999-09-01

    This report describes the integration of laser-scanning fluorometric cytometry and nonseparation ligand-binding techniques to provide new assay methods adaptable to miniaturization and high-throughput screening. Receptor-bound, cyanine dye-labeled ligands, [Cy]ligands, were discriminated from those free in solution by measuring the accumulated fluorescence associated with a receptor-containing particle. To illustrate the various binding formats accommodated by this technique, saturation- and competition-binding analyses were performed with [Cy]ligands and their cognate receptors expressed in CHO cells or as fusion proteins coated on polystyrene microspheres. We have successfully applied this technique to the analysis of G protein-coupled receptors, cytokine receptors, and SH2 domains. Multiparameter readouts from ligands labeled separately with Cy5 and Cy5.5 demonstrate the simultaneous analysis of two target receptors in a single well. In addition, laser-scanning cytometry has been used to assay enzymes such as phosphatases and in the development of single-step fluorescent immunoassays.

  14. Non-linear optical measurements using a scanned, Bessel beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Bradley B.; Awasthi, Samir; Lieu, Deborah K.; Chan, James W.

    2015-03-01

    Oftentimes cells are removed from the body for disease diagnosis or cellular research. This typically requires fluorescent labeling followed by sorting with a flow cytometer; however, possible disruption of cellular function or even cell death due to the presence of the label can occur. This may be acceptable for ex vivo applications, but as cells are more frequently moving from the lab to the body, label-free methods of cell sorting are needed to eliminate these issues. This is especially true of the growing field of stem cell research where specialized cells are needed for treatments. Because differentiation processes are not completely efficient, cells must be sorted to eliminate any unwanted cells (i.e. un-differentiated or differentiated into an unwanted cell type). In order to perform label-free measurements, non-linear optics (NLO) have been increasingly utilized for single cell analysis because of their ability to not disrupt cellular function. An optical system was developed for the measurement of NLO in a microfluidic channel similar to a flow cytometer. In order to improve the excitation efficiency of NLO, a scanned Bessel beam was utilized to create a light-sheet across the channel. The system was tested by monitoring twophoton fluorescence from polystyrene microbeads of different sizes. Fluorescence intensity obtained from light-sheet measurements were significantly greater than measurements made using a static Gaussian beam. In addition, the increase in intensity from larger sized beads was more evident for the light-sheet system.

  15. Centromeric index measurement by slit-scan flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, J.N.; Gray, J.W.; Peters, D.C.; Van Dilla, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    A report is given of the application of slit-scan flow cytometry (SSFCM) in the classification of muntjac, Chinese hamster, and human chromosomes according to centromeric index (CI) and total fluorescence. Chromosomes were isolated from mitotic cells, stained with propidium iodide and processed through the SSFCM where fluorescence profiles were measured. The centromere for each profile was taken as the point of maximum difference between the measured profile and a standard profile having no centromeric dip. The areas under the profile on either side of the centromere were then calculated and the CI was calculated as the ratio of the larger area to the total area under the profile. Relative DNA contents for each chromosome were taken to be proportional to the total fluorescence. Mean CI's for muntjac chromosomes 1, 2, and X + 3 were 0.52, 0.88, and 0.73, respectively; CI's for Chinese hamster M3-1 chromosomes 1, 2, 5, 8, and M2 were 0.53, 0.55, 0.57, 0.77, and 0.86, respectively; and average CI's for chromosome groups 4 + t (X;5), 6 + 7 + Y, 9 + M1, and 10 + 11 were 0.56, 0.82, 0.58, and 0.60, respectively. These results were, on average, within 4.4% of CI measurements made by image cytometry. CI's measured for human chromosomes 9 through 12, were, on average, within 2.0% of those made by image cytometry.

  16. Flow structure measurement by beam scan type LDV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, M.; Nadaoka, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Hironaga, K.; Muramoto, T.

    1987-05-01

    A new type of laser Doppler velocimeter called SLV (Scan-Type Laser-Doppier Velocimeter) which can measure the velocity field almost continuously and simultaneously has been developed and tested. The principle of the apparatus is to traverse the focal point of split laser beams by reflecting them with a rotating polygon mirror or an oscillating mirror which is driven (and controlled) by a stepping motor and to receive the scattered Doppler signals by a photomultiplier by focusing them through a cylindrical lens. The signals from the photomultiplier and the driving pulse of the stepping motor were transmitted to a persona] computer and processed on-line. Experiments on the oscillatory boundary layer, Kármán vortices, and vortex rings were carried out to check the performance.

  17. Electric Field Change Measurements of a Terrestrial Gamma Ray Flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Thomas; Karunarathne, Sumedhe; Stolzenburg, Maribeth

    2016-04-01

    Cummer et al. [GRL, 2014] reported on two terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) detected by the Gamma ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi satellite. At a range of 632 km we detected an electric field change pulse associated with the first of these TGFs. The sensor bandwidth was 0.16 Hz - 2.6 MHz and was sampled at 5 MS/s. The measured zero-to-peak amplitude was 3.1 V/m. Assuming a 1/R range dependence, the amplitude range normalized to 100 km would be about 20 V/m. However, a little more than half of the path from the TGF to the sensor was over land rather than ocean, which should cause the attenuation to be greater than 1/R. Based on recent measurements of Kolmasova et al. (2015 AGU Fall Meeting), we estimate that the real peak amplitude was 40 - 50 V/m. The detected pulse was bipolar with a leading positive peak and had an overall duration of about 50 μs; these characteristics are typical of initial breakdown pulses (IBPs) that occur at the beginning of intracloud (IC) flashes. However, the pulse amplitude is an order of magnitude larger than typical IBPs. These data support the notion that IBPs of IC flashes cause TGFs [e.g., Shao et al., JGR 2010; Lu et al., GRL 2010; Cummer et al., GRL 2014].

  18. An efficient protocol for radiochromic film dosimetry combining calibration and measurement in a single scan

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, David; Micke, Andre; Yu Xiang; Chan, Maria F.

    2012-10-15

    since the dose for one of the films could be zero. Using the Gamma test criterion of 2%/2 mm to evaluate the measurements, similar passing rates ranging between about 95% and 99% for the fields studied were obtained from application films digitized under a variety of conditions all of them different than the conditions under which the calibration films were scanned. Conclusions: The authors have developed a simplified and efficient protocol to measure doses delivered by an IMRT or VMAT plan using only the patient film, one calibration film, one unexposed film, and applying a single scan to acquire a digital image for calculation and analysis. The simplification and timesaving offer a potential practical solution for using radiochromic film for routine treatment plan quality assurance without sacrificing spatial resolution for convenience.

  19. Measurement of Gamma Knife registered helmet factors using MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Kurjewicz, Laryssa; Berndt, Anita

    2007-03-15

    The relative dose rate for the different Gamma Knife registered helmets (4, 8, 14, and 18 mm) is characterized by their respective helmet factors. Since the plateau of the dose profile for the 4 mm helmet is at most 1 mm wide, detector choices are limited. Traditionally helmet factors have been measured using 1x1x1 mm{sup 3} thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). However, these are time-consuming, cumbersome measurements. This article investigates the use of metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) (active area of 0.2x0.2 mm{sup 2}) as a more accurate and convenient dosimeter. Their suitability for these measurements was confirmed by basic characterization measurements. Helmet factors were measured using both MOSFETs and the established TLD approach. A custom MOSFET cassette was designed in analogy to the Elekta TLD cassette (Elekta Instruments AB) for use with the Elekta dosimetry sphere. Although both dosimeters provided values within 3% of the manufacturer's suggestion, MOSFETs provided superior accuracy and precision, in a fraction of the time required for the TLD measurements. Thus, MOSFETs proved to be a reasonable alternative to TLDs for performing helmet factor measurements.

  20. Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy for living cell membrane potential measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, Namuna

    Recently, the existence of multiple micro-domains of extracellular potential around individual cells have been revealed by voltage reporter dye using fluorescence microscopy. One hypothesis is that these long lasting potential patterns play a vital role in regulating important cell activities such as embryonic patterning, regenerative repair and reduction of cancerous disorganization. We used multifunctional Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy (SICM) to study these extracellular potential patterns of single cell with higher spatial resolution. To validate this novel technique, we compared the extracellular potential distribution on the fixed HeLa cell surface and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface and found significant difference. We then measured the extracellular potential distributions of living melanocytes and melanoma cells and found both the mean magnitude and spatial variation of extracellular potential of the melanoma cells are bigger than those of melanocytes. As compared to the voltage reporter dye based fluorescence microscope method, SICM can achieve quantitative potential measurements of non-labeled living cell membranes with higher spatial resolution.

  1. Measuring Cosmological Parameters with Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amati, Lorenzo; Valle, Massimo Della

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) emit in a few dozen of seconds up to ~1054 erg, in terms of isotropic equivalent radiated energy Eiso, therefore they can be observed up to z ~ 10 and appear very promising tools to describe the expansion rate history of the Universe. In this paper we review the use of the Ep,i-Eiso correlation of Gamma-Ray Bursts to measure ΩM. We show that the present data set of GRBs, coupled with the assumption that we live in a flat universe, can provide indipendent evidence, from other probes, that ΩM~0.3. We show that current (e.g., Swift, Fermi/GBM, Konus-WIND) and next GRB experiments (e.g., CALET/GBM, SVOM, Lomonosov/UFFO, LOFT/WFM) will allow us, within a few years, to constrain ΩM and the evolution of dark energy with time, with an accuracy comparable to that currently exhibited by SNe-Ia.

  2. 137 Ba Double Gamma Decay Measurement with GAMMASPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Merchán, E.; Moran, K.; Lister, C. J.; Chowdhury, P.; McCutchan, E. A.; Greene, J. P.; Zhu, S.; Lauritsen, T.; Carpenter, M. P.; Shearman, R.

    2015-05-28

    The study of the electromagnetic moments (EM), and decay probability, provides detailed information about nuclear wave functions. The well-know properties of EM interactions are good for extracting information about the motion of nucleons. Higher order EM processes always occur, but are usually too weak to be measured. In the case of a 0+ → 0+ transitions, where a single gamma transition is forbidden, the simultaneous emission of two γ-rays has been studied. An interesting opportunity to further investigate 2-photon emission phenomena is by using a standard 137Cs source populating, via β-decay, the Jπ = 11/2- isomeric state at 662 keV in 137Ba. In this case, two photon process can have contributions from quadrupole-quadrupole or dipole-octupole multipolarities in direct competition with the high multipolarity M4 decay. Since the yield of the double gamma decay is around six orders of magnitude less than the first order transition, very good statistics are needed in order to observe the phenomena and great care must be taken to suppress the first-order decay. The Gammasphere array is ideal since its configuration allows a good coverage of the angular distribution and the Compton events can be suppressed. Nevertheless the process to understand and eliminate the Compton background is a challenge. Geant4 simulations were carried out to help understand and correct for those factors.

  3. 137 Ba Double Gamma Decay Measurement with GAMMASPHERE

    DOE PAGES

    Merchán, E.; Moran, K.; Lister, C. J.; ...

    2015-05-28

    The study of the electromagnetic moments (EM), and decay probability, provides detailed information about nuclear wave functions. The well-know properties of EM interactions are good for extracting information about the motion of nucleons. Higher order EM processes always occur, but are usually too weak to be measured. In the case of a 0+ → 0+ transitions, where a single gamma transition is forbidden, the simultaneous emission of two γ-rays has been studied. An interesting opportunity to further investigate 2-photon emission phenomena is by using a standard 137Cs source populating, via β-decay, the Jπ = 11/2- isomeric state at 662 keVmore » in 137Ba. In this case, two photon process can have contributions from quadrupole-quadrupole or dipole-octupole multipolarities in direct competition with the high multipolarity M4 decay. Since the yield of the double gamma decay is around six orders of magnitude less than the first order transition, very good statistics are needed in order to observe the phenomena and great care must be taken to suppress the first-order decay. The Gammasphere array is ideal since its configuration allows a good coverage of the angular distribution and the Compton events can be suppressed. Nevertheless the process to understand and eliminate the Compton background is a challenge. Geant4 simulations were carried out to help understand and correct for those factors.« less

  4. Measurements of longitudinal gamma ray distribution using a multichannel fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, S. H.; Jeon, D.; Kim, J. S.; Jang, J. S.; Jang, K. W.; Yoo, W. J.; Moon, J. H.; Park, B. G.; Kim, S.; Lee, B.

    2014-11-01

    Cerenkov radiation occurs when charged particles are moving faster than the speed of light in a transparent dielectric medium. In optical fibers, Cerenkov radiation can also be generated due to the fiber’s dielectric components. Accordingly, the radiation-induced light signals can be obtained using the optical fibers without any scintillating material. In this study, we fabricated a multichannel, fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor (FOCRS) system using silica optical fibers (SOFs), plastic optical fibers (POFs), an optical spectrometer, multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MA-PMTs) and a scanning system to measure the light intensities of Cerenkov radiation induced by gamma rays. To evaluate the fading effects in optical fibers, the spectra of Cerenkov radiation generated in the SOFs and POFs were measured based on the irradiation time by using an optical spectrometer. In addition, we measured the longitudinal distribution of gamma rays emitted from the cylindrical type Co-60 source by using MA-PMTs. The result was also compared with the distribution of the electron flux calculated by using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNPX).

  5. Gamma II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Thurburn; Castelaz, M.; Cline, J.; Owen, L.; Boehme, J.; Rottler, L.; Whitworth, C.; Clavier, D.

    2011-05-01

    GAMMA II is the Guide Star Automatic Measuring MAchine relocated from STScI to the Astronomical Photographic Data Archive (APDA) at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI). GAMMA II is a multi-channel laser-scanning microdensitometer that was used to measure POSS and SERC plates to create the Guide Star Catalog and the Digital Sky Survey. The microdensitometer is designed with submicron accuracy in x and y measurements using a HP 5507 laser interferometer, 15 micron sampling, and the capability to measure plates as large as 0.5-m across. GAMMA II is a vital instrument for the success of digitizing the direct, objective prism, and spectra photographic plate collections in APDA for research. We plan several targeted projects. One is a collaboration with Drs. P.D. Hemenway and R. L. Duncombe who plan to scan 1000 plates of 34 minor planets to identify systematic errors in the Fundamental System of celestial coordinates. Another is a collaboration with Dr. R. Hudec (Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic) who is working within the Gaia Variability Unit CU7 to digitize objective prism spectra on the Henize plates and Burrell-Schmidt plates located in APDA. These low dispersion spectral plates provide optical counterparts of celestial high-energy sources and cataclysmic variables enabling the simulation of Gaia BP/RP outputs. The astronomical community is invited to explore the more than 140,000 plates from 20 observatories now archived in APDA, and use GAMMA II. The process of relocating GAMMA to APDA, re-commissioning, and starting up the production scan programs will be described. Also, we will present planned research and future upgrades to GAMMA II.

  6. OPERATION DOMINIC, FISH BOWL SERIES. Project Officer’s Report. Project 6.2. Gamma-Ray Scanning of Debris Cloud

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    magnetic west on Figure 3.35. This is most likely due to an error in the assumed instrument pointing direction. If the beta flux recorded as being...desirable. Manual calibration is slow 166 and laborious, and three calibration points before and after a run are not sufficient to prevent errors ...locations 72 2.8 Gamma telescope field of view - - 73 2.9 Plan view of detector output versus azimuth scanning angle 73 2.10 Gamma scanner block

  7. Measurement of gamma field parameters in core with LEU fuel IRT-4M using TL detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bily, T.

    2008-07-15

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters represent very useful tool for gamma fields parameters measurements at nuclear research reactors, especially at zero power ones. {sup 7}LiF:Mg,Ti and {sup 7}LiF:Mg,Cu,P type TL dosimeters enable determination of only gamma component in mixed neutron - gamma field. At VR-1 reactor operated within the Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering at the Czech Technical University in Prague the integral characteristics of gamma rays field were investigated, especially its spatial distribution and time behaviour, i.e. the non-saturated delayed gamma ray emission influence. Measured spatial distributions were compared with monte carlo code MCNP5 calculations. Although MCNP cannot generate delayed gamma rays from fission, the relative gamma dose rate distribution is within {+-} 15% with measured values. The experiments were carried out with core configuration C1 consisting of LEU fuel IRT-4M (19.7 %). (author)

  8. ICF Gamma-Ray Yield Measurements on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; Hoffman, N. M.; Stoeffl, W. S.; Watts, P. W.; Carpenter, A. C.; Church, J. A.; Liebman, J.; Grafil, E.

    2011-10-01

    The primary objective of the NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic is to provide bang time and burn width information in order to constrain implosion simulation parameters such as shell velocity and confinement time. This is accomplished by measuring DT fusion γ-rays with energy-thresholded Gas Cherenkov detectors that convert MeV γ-rays into UV/visible photons for high-bandwidth optical detection. For yield determination, absolute uncertainties associated with the d(t,n) α/d(t,γ)5He branching ratio and detector response are removed by cross-calibrating the GRH signal against independent neutron yield measurements of directly-driven DT exploding pushers with negligible neutron downscatter. The GRH signal can then be used to make Total DTn Yield inferences on indirectly-driven, cryogenically-layered DT implosions which achieve high areal density and hence scatter a significant fraction of DTn out of the 14 MeV primary peak. By comparing the Total DTn Yield from γ-ray measurements with the Primary DTn Yield (13-15 MeV) from neutron measurements, the Total Downscatter Fraction (TDSF) can be inferred. Results of recent measurements will be presented. This work supported by US DOE under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  9. 102Pd(n, {gamma}) Cross Section Measurement Using DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Hatarik, R.; Alpizar-Vicente, A. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Esch, E.-I.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Greife, U.

    2006-03-13

    The neutron capture cross section of the proton rich nucleus 102Pd was measured with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The target was a 2 mg Pd foil with 78% enriched 102Pd. It was held by a 0.9 {mu}m thick Mylar bag which was selected after comparing different thicknesses of Kapton and Mylar for their scattering background. To identify the contribution of the other Pd isotopes the data of a natural Pd sample was compared to the data of the 102Pd enriched sample. A 12C sample was used to determine the scattering background. The 102Pd(n, {gamma}) rate is of importance for the p-process nucleosynthesis.

  10. EGAF: Measurement and Analysis of Gamma-ray Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, R. B.; Abusaleem, K.; Basunia, M. S.; Bečvář, F.; Belgya, T.; Bernstein, L. A.; Choi, H. D.; Escher, J. E.; Genreith, C.; Hurst, A. M.; Krtička, M.; Renne, P. R.; Révay, Zs.; Rogers, A. M.; Rossbach, M.; Siem, S.; Sleaford, B.; Summers, N. C.; Szentmiklosi, L.; van Bibber, K.; Wiedeking, M.

    2014-05-01

    The Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF) is the result of a 2000-2007 IAEA Coordinated Research Project to develop a database of thermal, prompt γ-ray cross sections, σγ, for all elemental and selected radioactive targets. No previous database of this kind had existed. EGAF was originally based on measurements using guided neutron beams from the Budapest Reactor on all elemental targets from Z=1-82, 90 and 92, except for He and Pm. The EGAF σγ data were published in the Database of Prompt Gamma Rays from Slow Neutron Capture for Elemental Analysis [1]. An international collaboration has formed to continue the EGAF measurements with isotopically enriched targets, derive total radiative thermal neutron cross sections, σ0, extend the σγ data from thermal to 20 MeV neutrons, compile a completed activation data file, improve sections of the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL) with more complete and up to date level and γ-ray data, evaluate statistical γ-ray data from reaction studies, and determine recommended neutron separations energies, Sn, for atomic mass evaluations. A new guided neutron beam facility has become available at the Garching (Munich) FRM II Reactor, and high energy neutron experimental facilities are being developed by a Berkeley area collaboration where 5-33 MeV neutron beams are available at the LBNL 88” cyclotron, 2.5 and 14 MeV beams at the University of California, Berkeley neutron generator laboratory, and high flux, 10 nṡcmṡ-2 s-1, neutron pulses available from the LLNL National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  11. Statistical analysis of plasma thermograms measured by differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Fish, Daniel J; Brewood, Greg P; Kim, Jong Sung; Garbett, Nichola C; Chaires, Jonathan B; Benight, Albert S

    2010-11-01

    Melting curves of human plasma measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), known as thermograms, have the potential to markedly impact diagnosis of human diseases. A general statistical methodology is developed to analyze and classify DSC thermograms to analyze and classify thermograms. Analysis of an acquired thermogram involves comparison with a database of empirical reference thermograms from clinically characterized diseases. Two parameters, a distance metric, P, and correlation coefficient, r, are combined to produce a 'similarity metric,' ρ, which can be used to classify unknown thermograms into pre-characterized categories. Simulated thermograms known to lie within or fall outside of the 90% quantile range around a median reference are also analyzed. Results verify the utility of the methods and establish the apparent dynamic range of the metric ρ. Methods are then applied to data obtained from a collection of plasma samples from patients clinically diagnosed with SLE (lupus). High correspondence is found between curve shapes and values of the metric ρ. In a final application, an elementary classification rule is implemented to successfully analyze and classify unlabeled thermograms. These methods constitute a set of powerful yet easy to implement tools for quantitative classification, analysis and interpretation of DSC plasma melting curves.

  12. Effects of gamma radiation on hard dental tissues of albino rats using scanning electron microscope - Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Faramawy, Nabil; Ameen, Reham; El-Haddad, Khaled; Maghraby, Ahmed; El-Zainy, Medhat

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, 40 adult male albino rats were used to study the effect of gamma radiation on the hard dental tissues (enamel surface, dentinal tubules and the cementum surface). The rats were irradiated at 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 and 6.0 Gy gamma doses. The effects of irradiated hard dental tissues samples were investigated using a scanning electron microscope. For doses up to 0.5 Gy, there was no evidence of the existence of cracks on the enamel surface. With 1 Gy irradiation dose, cracks were clearly observed with localized erosive areas. At 2 Gy irradiation dose, the enamel showed morphological alterations as disturbed prismatic and interprismatic areas. An increase in dentinal tubules diameter and a contemporary inter-tubular dentine volume decrease were observed with higher irradiation dose. Concerning cementum, low doses,<0.5 Gy, showed surface irregularities and with increase in the irradiation dose to≥1 Gy, noticeable surface irregularities and erosive areas with decrease in Sharpey's fiber sites were observed. These observations could shed light on the hazardous effects of irradiation fields to the functioning of the human teeth.

  13. 241Am (n,gamma) isomer ratio measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Evelyn M; Vieira, David J; Moody, Walter A; Slemmons, Alice K

    2011-01-05

    The objective of this project is to improve the accuracy of the {sup 242}Cm/{sup 241}Am radiochemistry ratio. We have performed an activation experiment to measure the {sup 241}Am(n,{gamma}) cross section leading to either the ground state of {sup 242g}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 16 hr) which decays to {sup 242}Cm (t{sub 1/2} = 163 d) or the long-lived isomer {sup 242m}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 141 yr). This experiment will develop a new set of americium cross section evaluations that can be used with a measured {sup 242}Cm/{sup 241}Am radiochemical measurement for nuclear forensic purposes. This measurement is necessary to interpret the {sup 242}Cm/{sup 241}Am ratio because a good measurement of this neutron capture isomer ratio for {sup 241}Am does not exist. The targets were prepared in 2007 from {sup 241}Am purified from LANL stocks. Gold was added to the purified {sup 241}Am as an internal neutron fluence monitor. These targets were placed into a holder, packaged, and shipped to Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, where they were irradiated at their Van de Graff facility in February 2008. One target was irradiated with {approx}25 keV quasimonoenergetic neutrons produced by the {sup 7}Li(p,n) reaction for 3 days and a second target was also irradiated for 3 days with {approx}500 keV neutrons. Because it will be necessary to separate the {sup 242}Cm from the {sup 241}Am in order to measure the amount of {sup 242}Cm by alpha spectrometry, research into methods for americium/curium separations were conducted concurrently. We found that anion exchange chromatography in methanol/nitric acid solutions produced good separations that could be completed in one day resulting in a sample with no residue. The samples were returned from Germany in July 2009 and were counted by gamma spectrometry. Chemical separations have commenced on the blank sample. Each sample will be spiked with {sup 244}Cm, dissolved and digested in nitric acid solutions. One third of each sample will be processed at a time

  14. Reproducible strain measurement in electronic devices by applying integer multiple to scanning grating in scanning moiré fringe imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suhyun Jung, Younheum; Kim, Joong Jung; Lee, Sunyoung; Lee, Haebum; Kondo, Yukihito

    2014-10-15

    Scanning moiré fringe (SMF) imaging by high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to measure the strain field in the channel of a transistor with a CoSi{sub 2} source and drain. Nanometer-scale SMFs were formed with a scanning grating size of d{sub s} at integer multiples of the Si crystal lattice spacing d{sub l} (d{sub s} ∼ nd{sub l}, n = 2, 3, 4, 5). The moiré fringe formula was modified to establish a method for quantifying strain measurement. We showed that strain fields in a transistor measured by SMF images were reproducible with an accuracy of 0.02%.

  15. In-flight measurements of Terrestrial Gamma-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Deursen, Alexander; Kochkin, Pavlo; de Boer, Alte; Bardet, Michiel; Boissin, Jean-Francois

    2014-05-01

    Thunderstorms emit bursts of energetic radiation. Moreover, lightning stepped leader produces X-ray pulses. The phenomena, their interrelation and impact on Earth's atmosphere and near space are not fully understood yet. In-flight Lightning Strike Damage Assessment System ILDAS is developed in a EU FP6 project ( http://ildas.nlr.nl/ ) to provide information on threat that lightning poses to aircraft. It consists of 2 E-field sensors, and a varying number of H-field sensors. It has recently been modified to include two LaBr3 scintillation detectors. The scintillation detectors are sensitive to x- and gamma-rays above 30 keV. The entire system is installed on A-350 aircraft and digitizes data with 100 MSamples/sec rate when triggered by lightning. A continuously monitoring channel counts the number of occurrences that the X-ray signal exceeds a set of trigger levels. In the beginning of 2014 the aircraft flies through thunderstorm cells collecting the data from the sensors. The X-rays generated by the lightning flash are measured in synchronization with the lightning current information during a period of 1 second around the strike. The continuous channel stores x-ray information with less time and amplitude resolution during the whole flight. That would allow x-rays from TGFs and continuous gamma-ray glow of thundercloud outside that 1 s time window. We will give an overview of the ILDAS system and show that the X-ray detection works as intended. The availability of the lightning associated data depends on the flight schedule. If available, these data will be discussed at the conference.

  16. Gamma Knife output factor measurements using VIP polymer gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Moutsatsos, A.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Karaiskos, P.; Papagiannis, P.; Georgiou, E.; Dardoufas, K.; Sandilos, P.; Torrens, M.; Pantelis, E.; Kantemiris, I.; Sakelliou, L.; Seimenis, I.

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: Water equivalent polymer gel dosimeters and magnetic resonance imaging were employed to measure the output factors of the two smallest treatment fields available in a Gamma Knife model C radiosurgery unit, those formed employing the 4 and 8 mm final collimator helmets. Methods: Three samples of the VIP normoxic gel formulation were prepared and irradiated so that a single shot of the field whose output factor is to be measured and a single shot of the reference 18 mm field were delivered in each one. Emphasis is given to the development and benchmarking of a refined data processing methodology of reduced uncertainty that fully exploits the 3D dose distributions registered in the dosimeters. Results: Polymer gel results for the output factor of the 8 mm collimator helmet are found to be in close agreement with the corresponding value recommended by the vendor (0.955{+-}0.007 versus 0.956, respectively). For the 4 mm collimator helmet, however, polymer gel results suggest an output factor 3% lower than the value recommended by the vendor (0.841{+-}0.009 versus 0.870, respectively). Conclusions: A comparison with corresponding measurements published in the literature indicates that output factor results of this work are in agreement with those obtained using dosimetric systems which, besides fine spatial resolution and lack of angular and dose rate dependence of the dosimeter's response, share with polymer gels the favorable characteristic of minimal radiation field perturbation.

  17. Electronic Single Molecule Measurements with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Jong One

    Richard Feynman said "There's plenty of room at the bottom". This inspired the techniques to improve the single molecule measurements. Since the first single molecule study was in 1961, it has been developed in various field and evolved into powerful tools to understand chemical and biological property of molecules. This thesis demonstrates electronic single molecule measurement with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and two of applications of STM; Break Junction (BJ) and Recognition Tunneling (RT). First, the two series of carotenoid molecules with four different substituents were investigated to show how substituents relate to the conductance and molecular structure. The measured conductance by STM-BJ shows that Nitrogen induces molecular twist of phenyl distal substituents and conductivity increasing rather than Carbon. Also, the conductivity is adjustable by replacing the sort of residues at phenyl substituents. Next, amino acids and peptides were identified through STM-RT. The distribution of the intuitive features (such as amplitude or width) are mostly overlapped and gives only a little bit higher separation probability than random separation. By generating some features in frequency and cepstrum domain, the classification accuracy was dramatically increased. Because of large data size and many features, supporting vector machine (machine learning algorithm for big data) was used to identify the analyte from a data pool of all analytes RT data. The STM-RT opens a possibility of molecular sequencing in single molecule level. Similarly, carbohydrates were studied by STM-RT. Carbohydrates are difficult to read the sequence, due to their huge number of possible isomeric configurations. This study shows that STM-RT can identify not only isomers of mono-saccharides and disaccharides, but also various mono-saccharides from a data pool of eleven analytes. In addition, the binding affinity between recognition molecule and analyte was investigated by comparing with

  18. Mobile gamma-ray scanning system for detecting radiation anomalies associated with /sup 226/Ra-bearing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Myrick, T.E.; Blair, M.S.; Doane, R.W.; Goldsmith, W.A.

    1982-11-01

    A mobile gamma-ray scanning system has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in the Department of Energy's remedial action survey programs. The unit consists of a NaI(T1) detection system housed in a specially-equipped van. The system is operator controlled through an on-board mini-computer, with data output provided on the computer video screen, strip chart recorders, and an on-line printer. Data storage is provided by a floppy disk system. Multichannel analysis capabilities are included for qualitative radionuclide identification. A /sup 226/Ra-specific algorithm is employed to identify locations containing residual radium-bearing materials. This report presents the details of the system description, software development, and scanning methods utilized with the ORNL system. Laboratory calibration and field testing have established the system sensitivity, field of view, and other performance characteristics, the results of which are also presented. Documentation of the instrumentation and computer programs are included.

  19. Scanning laser differential-heterodyne interferometer for flying-height measurement.

    PubMed

    Ngoi, B K; Venkatakrishnan, K; Tan, B

    2000-02-01

    With conventional optical interferometry flying-height testing, a stationary measurement beam and a two-axis moving stage are used to measure slider-disk spacing at different points on the slider. Pitch angle or roll angle is calculated on the basis of the measurement results. We report on a scanning differential-heterodyne interferometer, which measures the continuous flying-height variation along the edge of a slider with two continuously scanning laser beams. Pitch angle or roll angle can be obtained directly from the scanning measurement. The system can also measure points individually to obtain the absolute flying height at different locations on the slider. Experiments were performed to demonstrate the concept of scanning measurement. The flying-height variation along the slider edge was measured by continuous scan and by point-to-point moving. The measurement results from continuous scan coincided with those of conventional methods.

  20. Fission prompt gamma-ray multiplicity distribution measurements and simulations at DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chyzh, A; Wu, C Y; Ullmann, J; Jandel, M; Bredeweg, T; Couture, A; Norman, E

    2010-08-24

    The nearly energy independence of the DANCE efficiency and multiplicity response to {gamma} rays makes it possible to measure the prompt {gamma}-ray multiplicity distribution in fission. We demonstrate this unique capability of DANCE through the comparison of {gamma}-ray energy and multiplicity distribution between the measurement and numerical simulation for three radioactive sources {sup 22}Na, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 88}Y. The prospect for measuring the {gamma}-ray multiplicity distribution for both spontaneous and neutron-induced fission is discussed.

  1. Measurement of the {gamma} cross section at D0 using dimuons

    SciTech Connect

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.

    1995-07-01

    The D0 experiment has measured the {gamma} differential cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV for {vert_bar}y{sup {gamma}}{vert_bar} < 0.7. We find the measured cross section to be a factor of five larger than the O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 3}) QCD prediction for p{sub T}{sup {gamma}} > 5 GeV/c.

  2. Software for Control and Measuring Instrumentation of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-telescope Fast Scintillator Detector System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, P. P.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Runtso, M. F.; Solodovnikov, A. A.

    Currently, the final stage of the ground tests for the technological detector of the high-energy gamma-ray telescope (GRT) GAMMA-400 are finished. The new space GRT will accept the gamma-rays with energy more than 400 MeV and is aimed to open our eyes for so-called "dark matter" problem in the Universe. The high-speed scintillation detectors system (SDS) is used one of the main GRT particle detectors and the good ground test measurements will let the future space mission to get the reliable data. This paper describes the software and hardware of the laboratory control and calibration systems for physical measurements of GRT STDS properties.

  3. Measurements of Gamma Rays from 7 Be Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S. L.; Ahn, T.; Allen, J.; Bardayan, D. W.; Caprio, M. A.; Constantinou, Ch.; Fasano, P.; Frentz, B.; Hall, M.; Jensen, L.; Kolata, J. J.; Li, X.; McCoy, A. E.; Moylan, S.; O'Malley, P.; Re, C. S.; Riggins, J.; Simon, A.; Torres-Isea, R.; Strauss, S.

    2016-09-01

    Ab-initio methods have been successful in describing the structure of light nuclei using realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions, but more experimental data is needed in the light unstable nuclei region. No-core configuration interaction calculations have made predictions for the M1 and a lower limit for the E2 electromagnetic transition strengths of the decay of the first excited state of 7Be where the latter has never before been measured. To measure the E2 transition strength, a Coulomb Excitation experiment was performed using TwinSol at the University of Notre Dame. A beam of 7Be ions were scattered off a gold target, and gamma rays from inelastically scattered ions were detected using clover Ge detectors. Preliminary results for the E2 transition strength and its comparison to the no-core configuration interaction approach will be shown. Extensions of this experimental method to other light unstable nuclei will be discussed. This work has been supported by US NSF Grant No. PHY 14-19765 and DOE Grant Number DE-FG02-95ER-40934.

  4. Is bone mineral density measurement using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry affected by gamma rays?

    PubMed

    Xie, Liang-Jun; Li, Jian-Fang; Zeng, Feng-Wei; Jiang, Hang; Cheng, Mu-Hua; Chen, Yi

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the gamma rays emitted from the radionuclide effect bone mineral density (BMD) measurement. Nine subjects (mean age: 56 ± 17.96 yr) scheduled for bone scanning underwent BMD measurement using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) (Hologic/Discovery A) before and 1, 2, and 4 h after injection of technetium-99m-methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP). Ten subjects (mean age: 41 ± 15.47 yr) scheduled for therapy of differentiated thyroid carcinoma with iodine-131 underwent BMD measurement before and 2 h after therapeutic radionuclide administration. All patients were given whole body BMD measurement, including head, arm, ribs, lumbar spine, pelvis, and leg sites. Besides, patients who referred to radioiodine therapy were given total hip and femoral neck BMD measurement as well. No statistically significant changes in BMD values were detected after 99mTc-MDP and iodine-131 administration for all measurement sites (p > 0.05), and individual difference of BMD before and after radionuclide imaging or therapy was less than the least significant change in lumbar spine, total hip, and femoral neck. In conclusion, BMD measurements are not influenced by the gamma rays emitted from technetium-99m and iodine-131. DXA bone densitometry may be performed simultaneously with bone scanning and radioiodine therapy.

  5. FOOD SURFACE TEXTURE MEASUREMENT USING REFLECTIVE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used in the reflection mode to characterize the surface texture (roughness) of sliced food surfaces. Sandpapers of grit size between 150 and 600 were used as the height reference to standardize the CLSM hardware settings. Sandpaper particle sizes were v...

  6. Optimizing a three-stage Compton camera for measuring prompt gamma rays emitted during proton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, S. W.; Robertson, D.; Polf, J.

    2010-11-01

    In this work, we investigate the use of a three-stage Compton camera to measure secondary prompt gamma rays emitted from patients treated with proton beam radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was (1) to develop an optimal three-stage Compton camera specifically designed to measure prompt gamma rays emitted from tissue and (2) to determine the feasibility of using this optimized Compton camera design to measure and image prompt gamma rays emitted during proton beam irradiation. The three-stage Compton camera was modeled in Geant4 as three high-purity germanium detector stages arranged in parallel-plane geometry. Initially, an isotropic gamma source ranging from 0 to 15 MeV was used to determine lateral width and thickness of the detector stages that provided the optimal detection efficiency. Then, the gamma source was replaced by a proton beam irradiating a tissue phantom to calculate the overall efficiency of the optimized camera for detecting emitted prompt gammas. The overall calculated efficiencies varied from ~10-6 to 10-3 prompt gammas detected per proton incident on the tissue phantom for several variations of the optimal camera design studied. Based on the overall efficiency results, we believe it feasible that a three-stage Compton camera could detect a sufficient number of prompt gammas to allow measurement and imaging of prompt gamma emission during proton radiotherapy.

  7. Optimizing a three-stage Compton camera for measuring prompt gamma rays emitted during proton radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Peterson, S W; Robertson, D; Polf, J

    2010-11-21

    In this work, we investigate the use of a three-stage Compton camera to measure secondary prompt gamma rays emitted from patients treated with proton beam radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was (1) to develop an optimal three-stage Compton camera specifically designed to measure prompt gamma rays emitted from tissue and (2) to determine the feasibility of using this optimized Compton camera design to measure and image prompt gamma rays emitted during proton beam irradiation. The three-stage Compton camera was modeled in Geant4 as three high-purity germanium detector stages arranged in parallel-plane geometry. Initially, an isotropic gamma source ranging from 0 to 15 MeV was used to determine lateral width and thickness of the detector stages that provided the optimal detection efficiency. Then, the gamma source was replaced by a proton beam irradiating a tissue phantom to calculate the overall efficiency of the optimized camera for detecting emitted prompt gammas. The overall calculated efficiencies varied from ∼ 10(-6) to 10(-3) prompt gammas detected per proton incident on the tissue phantom for several variations of the optimal camera design studied. Based on the overall efficiency results, we believe it feasible that a three-stage Compton camera could detect a sufficient number of prompt gammas to allow measurement and imaging of prompt gamma emission during proton radiotherapy.

  8. Estimates of rates and errors for measurements of direct-. gamma. and direct-. gamma. + jet production by polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Beddo, M.E.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.G.

    1992-08-14

    Studies of inclusive direct-{gamma} production by pp interactions at RHIC energies were performed. Rates and the associated uncertainties on spin-spin observables for this process were computed for the planned PHENIX and STAR detectors at energies between {radical}s = 50 and 500 GeV. Also, rates were computed for direct-{gamma} + jet production for the STAR detector. The goal was to study the gluon spin distribution functions with such measurements. Recommendations concerning the electromagnetic calorimeter design and the need for an endcap calorimeter for STAR are made.

  9. Using gamma-ray emission to measure areal density of ICF capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Nelson M; Wilson, Douglas C; Hermann, Hans W; Young, Carlton S

    2010-01-01

    Fusion neutrons streaming from a burning ICF capsule generate gamma rays via nuclear inelastic scattering in the ablator of the capsule. The intensity of gamma-ray emission is proportional to the product of the ablator areal density ('{rho}R') and the yield of fusion neutrons, so by detecting the gamma rays we can infer the ablator areal density, provided we also have a measurement of the capsule's total neutron yield. In plastic-shell capsules, for example, {sup 12}C nuclei emit gamma rays at 4.44 MeV after excitation by 14.1-MeV neutrons from D+T fusion. These gamma rays can be measured by the Gamma Reaction History (GRH) experiment being built at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A linear error analysis indicates the chief sources of uncertainty in inferred areal density.

  10. Retrievals of cloud microphysical properties from the Research Scanning Polarimeter measurements made during PODEX field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, M. D.; Cairns, B.; Sinclair, K.

    2013-12-01

    We present the retrievals of cloud droplet size distribution parameters (effective radius and variance) from the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) measurements made during NASA's POlarimeter Definition EXperiment (PODEX), which was based in Palmdale, California in January - February 2013. The RSP is an airborne prototype for the Aerosol Polarimetery Sensor (APS), which was built for the NASA Glory Mission project. This instrument measures both polarized and total reflectances in 9 spectral channels with center wavelengths of 410, 470, 555, 670, 865, 960, 1590, 1880 and 2250 nm. The RSP is a push broom scanner making samples at 0.8 degree intervals within 60 degrees from nadir in both forward and backward directions. The data from actual RSP scans is aggregated into "virtual" scans, each consisting of all reflectances (at a variety of scattering angles) from a single point on the ground or at the cloud top. In the case of water clouds the rainbow is observed in the polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135 and 170 degrees. It has a unique signature that is being used to accurately determine the droplet size and is not affected by cloud morphology. Simple parametric fitting algorithm applied to these polarized reflectances provides retrievals of the droplet effective radius and variance assuming a prescribed size distribution shape (gamma distribution). In addition to this, we use a non-parametric method, Rainbow Fourier Transform (RFT), which allows to retrieve the droplet size distribution a parametric model. Of particular interest is the information contained in droplet size distribution width, which is indicative of cloud life cycle. The absorbing band method is also applied to RSP total reflectance observations. The difference in the retrieved droplet size between polarized and absorbing band techniques is expected to reflect the strength of the vertical gradient in cloud liquid water content. In addition to established retrieval

  11. Thick target measurement of the 40Ca(alpha,gamma)44Ti reaction rate

    SciTech Connect

    Sheets, S A; Burke, J T; Scielzo, N D; Phair, L; Bleuel, D; Norman, E B; Grant, P G; Hurst, A M; Tumey, S; Brown, T A; Stoyer, M

    2009-02-06

    The thick-target yield for the {sup 40}Ca({alpha},{gamma}){sup 44}Ti reaction has been measured for E{sub beam} = 4.13, 4.54, and 5.36 MeV using both an activation measurement and online {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. The results of the two measurements agree. From the measured yield a reaction rate is deduced that is smaller than statistical model calculations. This implies a smaller {sup 44}Ti production in supernova compared to recently measured {sup 40}Ca({alpha},{gamma}){sup 44}Ti reaction rates.

  12. Security Problems of Scan Design and Accompanying Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasizzo, Anton; Novak, Franc

    2016-05-01

    The paper deals with the security problems of scan design and investigates currently proposed solutions. A solution based on data encryption to protect the data in scan chains is discussed and problems related to the block-based encoding are outlined. Next, security extension for IEEE Std. 1149.1 providing a locking mechanism is analysed. The mechanism prevents unauthorised users to interfere via test bus with the system normal operation. Possible attack scenario is considered and the probabilities of successful attack within a given time interval are calculated for different lengths of the Lock register. The paper concludes with the description of current work focused on improvements the security of the locking mechanism, in particular by using simplified public key infrastructure.

  13. Substituting EMC emission measurement by field and cable scan method using measured transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinas, D.; Jia, J.; Zeichner, A.; Frei, S.

    2013-07-01

    Today EMC emissions of automotive components are often measured in anechoic chambers by an antenna at fixed position according to CISPR 25 (ALSE-method). The antenna voltage often cannot sufficiently describe the behaviour of the measured electronic components and systems. Furthermore space requirements and costs are very high for the ALSE-method. Field- and cable-scan methods combined with near-field to far-field transformation techniques might be a good alternative. Residual reflections from the walls, the metallic floor, the measuring table, interaction of the antenna with the environment, and other factors affect the measurements. Thus, models which only regard the current distribution for near- and far field calculation cannot produce results equal to a chamber measurement. In this paper methods for computing transfer functions for the substitution of EMC antenna measurements with field- and cable scans in a specified calibration area are introduced. To consider influences of the environment, the environment is characterized in a first step and included with transfer functions in the calculation process for the equivalent ALSE-field.

  14. Gamma ray bursts: A review of recent high-precision measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    Recent measurements and discoveries in gamma ray bursts and transients are reviewed including observations of the red shifted annihilation line in two kinds of slow transients (in 'classical' gamma ray bursts and in the unique 1979 March 5th event); of red shifted nuclear lines in a slow transient and in one gamma ray burst; and of the positions of precise source locations of gamma ray bursts and of the March 5th event, within the supernova remnant N49 in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  15. Application of gamma-ray radiography and gravimetric measurements after accelerated corrosion tests of steel embedded in mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Duffó, Gustavo; Gaillard, Natalia; Mariscotti, Mario; Ruffolo, Marcelo

    2015-08-15

    The accelerated corrosion by the impressed current technique is widely used in studies of concrete durability since it has the advantage that tests can be carried out within reasonable periods of time. In the present work the relationship between the applied current density and the resulting damage on the reinforcing steel, by applying optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, gamma-ray radiography and gravimetric measurements, was studied by means of the implementation of accelerated corrosion tests on reinforced mortar. The results show that the efficiency of the applied current is between 1 and 77%, regardless of the applied current density, the water/cement ratio and the mortar cover depth of the specimens. The results show the applicability of the gamma-ray radiography technique to detect localized corrosion of steel rebars in laboratory specimens.

  16. Measurements of gamma-ray production cross sections for shielding materials of space nuclear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orphan, V. J.; John, J.; Hoot, C. G.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of secondary gamma ray production from neutron interactions have been made over the entire energy range of interest in shielding applications. The epithermal capture gamma ray yields for both resolved gamma ray lines and continuum have been measured from thermal energies to 100 KeV for natural tungsten and U-238, two important candidate shield materials in SNAP reactor systems. Data are presented to illustrate the variation of epithermal capture gamma ray yields with neutron energy. The gamma ray production cross sections from (n,xy) reactions have been measured for Fe and Al from the threshold energies for inelastic scattering to approximately 16 MeV. Typical Fe and Al cross sections obtained with high-neutron energy resolution and averaged over broad neutron-energy groups are presented.

  17. TL detectors for gamma ray dose measurements in criticality accidents.

    PubMed

    Miljanić, Saveta; Zorko, Benjamin; Gregori, Beatriz; Knezević, Zeljka

    2007-01-01

    Determination of gamma ray dose in mixed neutron+gamma ray fields is still a demanding task. Dosemeters used for gamma ray dosimetry are usually in some extent sensitive to neutrons and their response variations depend on neutron energy i.e., on neutron spectra. Besides, it is necessary to take into account the energy dependence of dosemeter responses to gamma rays. In this work, several types of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) placed in different holders used for gamma ray dose determination in the mixed fields were examined. Dosemeters were from three different institutions: Ruder Bosković Institute (RBI), Croatia, JoZef Stefan Institute (JSI), Slovenia and Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), Argentina. All dosemeters were irradiated during the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002. Three accidental scenarios were reproduced and in each irradiation the dosemeters were exposed placed on the front of phantom and 'free in air'. Following types of TLDs were used: 7LiF (TLD-700), CaF2:Mn and Al2O3:Mg,Y-all from RBI; CaF2:Mn from JSI and 7LiF (TLD-700) from ARN. Reported doses were compared with the reference values as well as with the values obtained from the results of all participants. The results show satisfactory agreement with other dosimetry systems used in the Intercomparison. The influence of different types of holders and applied corrections of dosemeters' readings are discussed.

  18. Fermi Large Area Telescope Measurements of the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at Intermediate Galactic Latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; /more authors..

    2012-04-11

    The diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission is produced by cosmic rays (CRs) interacting with the interstellar gas and radiation field. Measurements by the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory indicated excess {gamma}-ray emission {ge}1 GeV relative to diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission models consistent with directly measured CR spectra (the so-called 'EGRET GeV excess'). The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has measured the diffuse {gamma}-ray emission with improved sensitivity and resolution compared to EGRET. We report on LAT measurements for energies 100 MeV to 10 GeV and galactic latitudes 10{sup o} {le} |b| {le} 20{sup o}. The LAT spectrum for this region of the sky is well reproduced by a diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission model that is consistent with local CR spectra and inconsistent with the EGRET GeV excess.

  19. Density fluctuation measurements by using the Fraunhofer diffraction method in GAMMA10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morikawa, Y.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Hasegawa, Y.; Sakamoto, M.; Imai, T.; Ichimura, M.

    2013-12-01

    We applied Fraunhofer diffraction (FD) method to GAMMA10 plasma. The FD method can measure the density fluctuation in detail and the wave number of the fluctuation. We successfully obtained the density fluctuation spectra in GAMMA 10. Analyzing the FD method signals of radial fluctuation intensity profile, we can successfully obtain the wave number and the phase velocity of the low frequency density fluctuation.

  20. Measurement of Radon concentration by Xenon gamma-ray spectrometer for seismic monitoring of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, A.; Ulin, S.; Dmitrenko, V.; Vlasik, K.; Bychkova, O.; Petrenko, D.; Uteshev, Z.; Shustov, A.

    2016-02-01

    A method for earthquake precursors search based on variations of 222Rn concentration determined via intensity measurement of 222Rn daughter nuclei gamma ray emission lines by means of xenon gamma-ray spectrometer is discussed. The equipment description as well as the first experimental data are presented.

  1. Independent predictors of neuronal adaptation in human primary visual cortex measured with high-gamma activity.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Naoyuki; Nagasawa, Tetsuro; Juhász, Csaba; Sood, Sandeep; Asano, Eishi

    2012-01-16

    Neuronal adaptation is defined as a reduced neural response to a repeated stimulus and can be demonstrated by reduced augmentation of event-related gamma activity. Several studies reported that variance in the degree of gamma augmentation could be explained by pre-stimulus low-frequency oscillations. Here, we measured the spatio-temporal characteristics of visually-driven amplitude modulations in human primary visual cortex using intracranial electrocorticography. We determined if inter-stimulus intervals or pre-stimulus oscillations independently predicted local neuronal adaptation measured with amplitude changes of high-gamma activity at 80-150 Hz. Participants were given repetitive photic stimuli with a flash duration of 20 μs in each block; the inter-stimulus interval was set constant within each block but different (0.2, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0s) across blocks. Stimuli elicited augmentation of high-gamma activity in the occipital cortex at about 30 to 90 ms, and high-gamma augmentation was most prominent in the medial occipital region. High-gamma augmentation was subsequently followed by lingering beta augmentation at 20-30 Hz and high-gamma attenuation. Neuronal adaptation was demonstrated as a gradual reduction of high-gamma augmentation over trials. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that a larger number of prior stimuli, shorter inter-stimulus interval, and pre-stimulus high-gamma attenuation independently predicted a reduced high-gamma augmentation in a given trial, while pre-stimulus beta amplitude or delta phase had no significant predictive value. Association between pre-stimulus high-gamma attenuation and a reduced neural response suggests that high-gamma attenuation represents a refractory period. The local effects of pre-stimulus beta augmentation and delta phase on neuronal adaptation may be modest in primary visual cortex.

  2. Research on high precision equal-angle scanning method in rotary kiln temperature measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shaosheng; Guo, Zhongyuan; You, Changhui; Liu, Jinsong; Cheng, Yang; Tang, Huaming

    2016-05-01

    Aiming at traditional horizontal equal-angle scanning method's disadvantage of measurement error, a high precision equal-angle scanning method is proposed, the proposed method establishes a tilt scanning model by the following steps: introducing height variable, precisely calculating the viewing angle, building scanning model. The model is used to calculate scanning position on rotary kiln's surface, which helps to locate and track temperature variation. The experiment shows that the proposed method can effectively improve the precision of temperature spots' location on the rotary kiln surface.

  3. Interactive Tools for Measuring Visual Scanning Performance and Reaction Time

    PubMed Central

    Seeanner, Julia; Hennessy, Sarah; Manganelli, Joseph; Crisler, Matthew; Rosopa, Patrick; Jenkins, Casey; Anderson, Michael; Drouin, Nathalie; Belle, Leah; Truesdail, Constance; Tanner, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Occupational therapists are constantly searching for engaging, high-technology interactive tasks that provide immediate feedback to evaluate and train clients with visual scanning deficits. This study examined the relationship between two tools: the VISION COACH™ interactive light board and the Functional Object Detection© (FOD) Advanced driving simulator scenario. Fifty-four healthy drivers, ages 21–66 yr, were divided into three age groups. Participants performed braking response and visual target (E) detection tasks of the FOD Advanced driving scenario, followed by two sets of three trials using the VISION COACH Full Field 60 task. Results showed no significant effect of age on FOD Advanced performance but a significant effect of age on VISION COACH performance. Correlations showed that participants’ performance on both braking and E detection tasks were significantly positively correlated with performance on the VISION COACH (.37 < r < .40, p < .01). These tools provide new options for therapists. PMID:28218598

  4. Measurement of the direct CP asymmetry in b-->s gamma Decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Lynch, G; Merchant, A M; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, C; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, S; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Rubin, A E; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-07-09

    We describe a measurement of the direct CP asymmetry between inclusive b-->s gamma and b-->s gamma decays. This asymmetry is expected to be less than 0.01 in the standard model, but could be enhanced up to about 0.10 by new physics contributions. We use a sample of 89 x 10(6) BB pairs recorded with the BABAR detector at SLAC PEP-II, from which we reconstruct a set of 12 exclusive b-->s gamma final states containing one charged or neutral kaon and one to three pions. We measure an asymmetry of A(CP)(b-->s gamma)=0.025+/-0.050(stat)+/-0.015(syst), corresponding to an allowed range of -0.06s gamma)<+0.11 at 90% confidence level.

  5. Neutron and gamma dose and spectra measurements on the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Hoots, S.; Wadsworth, D.

    1984-06-01

    The radiation-measurement team of the Weapons Engineering Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) measured neutron and gamma dose and spectra on the Little Boy replica at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in April 1983. This assembly is a replica of the gun-type atomic bomb exploded over Hiroshima in 1945. These measurements support the National Academy of Sciences Program to reassess the radiation doses due to atomic bomb explosions in Japan. Specifically, the following types of information were important: neutron spectra as a function of geometry, gamma to neutron dose ratios out to 1.5 km, and neutron attenuation in the atmosphere. We measured neutron and gamma dose/fission from close-in to a kilometer out, and neutron and gamma spectra at 90 and 30/sup 0/ close-in. This paper describes these measurements and the results. 12 references, 13 figures, 5 tables.

  6. Laser scanning measurements on trees for logging harvesting operations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yili; Liu, Jinhao; Wang, Dian; Yang, Ruixi

    2012-01-01

    Logging harvesters represent a set of high-performance modern forestry machinery, which can finish a series of continuous operations such as felling, delimbing, peeling, bucking and so forth with human intervention. It is found by experiment that during the process of the alignment of the harvesting head to capture the trunk, the operator needs a lot of observation, judgment and repeated operations, which lead to the time and fuel losses. In order to improve the operation efficiency and reduce the operating costs, the point clouds for standing trees are collected with a low-cost 2D laser scanner. A cluster extracting algorithm and filtering algorithm are used to classify each trunk from the point cloud. On the assumption that every cross section of the target trunk is approximate a standard circle and combining the information of an Attitude and Heading Reference System, the radii and center locations of the trunks in the scanning range are calculated by the Fletcher-Reeves conjugate gradient algorithm. The method is validated through experiments in an aspen forest, and the optimized calculation time consumption is compared with the previous work of other researchers. Moreover, the implementation of the calculation result for automotive capturing trunks by the harvesting head during the logging operation is discussed in particular.

  7. Laser Scanning Measurements on Trees for Logging Harvesting Operations

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yili; Liu, Jinhao; Wang, Dian; Yang, Ruixi

    2012-01-01

    Logging harvesters represent a set of high-performance modern forestry machinery, which can finish a series of continuous operations such as felling, delimbing, peeling, bucking and so forth with human intervention. It is found by experiment that during the process of the alignment of the harvesting head to capture the trunk, the operator needs a lot of observation, judgment and repeated operations, which lead to the time and fuel losses. In order to improve the operation efficiency and reduce the operating costs, the point clouds for standing trees are collected with a low-cost 2D laser scanner. A cluster extracting algorithm and filtering algorithm are used to classify each trunk from the point cloud. On the assumption that every cross section of the target trunk is approximate a standard circle and combining the information of an Attitude and Heading Reference System, the radii and center locations of the trunks in the scanning range are calculated by the Fletcher-Reeves conjugate gradient algorithm. The method is validated through experiments in an aspen forest, and the optimized calculation time consumption is compared with the previous work of other researchers. Moreover, the implementation of the calculation result for automotive capturing trunks by the harvesting head during the logging operation is discussed in particular. PMID:23012543

  8. Hierarchical, Three-Dimensional Measurement System for Crime Scene Scanning.

    PubMed

    Marcin, Adamczyk; Maciej, Sieniło; Robert, Sitnik; Adam, Woźniak

    2017-02-02

    We present a new generation of three-dimensional (3D) measuring systems, developed for the process of crime scene documentation. This measuring system facilitates the preparation of more insightful, complete, and objective documentation for crime scenes. Our system reflects the actual requirements for hierarchical documentation, and it consists of three independent 3D scanners: a laser scanner for overall measurements, a situational structured light scanner for more minute measurements, and a detailed structured light scanner for the most detailed parts of tscene. Each scanner has its own spatial resolution, of 2.0, 0.3, and 0.05 mm, respectively. The results of interviews we have conducted with technicians indicate that our developed 3D measuring system has significant potential to become a useful tool for forensic technicians. To ensure the maximum compatibility of our measuring system with the standards that regulate the documentation process, we have also performed a metrological validation and designated the maximum permissible length measurement error EMPE for each structured light scanner. In this study, we present additional results regarding documentation processes conducted during crime scene inspections and a training session.

  9. Frequency-scanning interferometry for dynamic absolute distance measurement using Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Tao, Long; Liu, Zhigang; Zhang, Weibo; Zhou, Yangli

    2014-12-15

    We propose a frequency-scanning interferometry using the Kalman filtering technique for dynamic absolute distance measurement. Frequency-scanning interferometry only uses a single tunable laser driven by a triangle waveform signal for forward and backward optical frequency scanning. The absolute distance and moving speed of a target can be estimated by the present input measurement of frequency-scanning interferometry and the previously calculated state based on the Kalman filter algorithm. This method not only compensates for movement errors in conventional frequency-scanning interferometry, but also achieves high-precision and low-complexity dynamic measurements. Experimental results of dynamic measurements under static state, vibration and one-dimensional movement are presented.

  10. SCANNING VOLTA POTENTIALS MEASUREMENTS OF METALS IN IRRADIATED AIR.

    SciTech Connect

    ISAACS, H.S.; ADZIC, G.; AND ENERGY SCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT; JEFFCOATE, C.S.

    2000-10-22

    A method for direct dc measurement of the Volta potential is presented. High intensity synchrotron x-ray beams were used to locally irradiate the atmosphere adjacent to the metal surface and produce a conducting path between a sample and a reference probe. The direct measurements of potential in the ionized air could be made at probe heights of around 1 mm compared to less than 0.1 mm for the Kelvin probe. The measurements were similar to traditional Kelvin probe measurements, but had a poorer spatial resolution. In contrast to the Kelvin probe methods, the approach described allows observation of the current as a function of impressed voltage. Methods to improve the special resolution of the technique and applications to corrosion under coating will be presented.

  11. Measure and Control Technology Based on DSP for HighPrecision Scanning Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, N.; Yang, X. Y.; Wu, B.; Ye, S. H.

    2006-10-01

    A welding seam tracking visual sensor based on laser scanning is designed to solve the problems, such as indistinct image, difficulty in processing image etc., caused by serious arc light interference during welding. This visual sensor is mainly composed of a scanning motor, a linear-array CCD, a scanning rotating mirror and a semiconductor laser. Because the sensor measurement precision relies dramatically on the rotate speed stability of the scanning motor, the crux in the sensor design is to control the rotate speed of the scanning motor. Selecting a brushless direct current motor as the scanning motor and using TMS320F2812 DSP to drive it, we adopted fuzzy algorithm to control the motor rotate speed and made the steadiness error of the rotate speed less than 0.5%, which guarantees the sensor measurement precision and is of great importance for enhancing the welding quality of the industry welding robot.

  12. Shaped scintillation detector systems for measurements of gamma ray flux anisotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trombka, J. I.; Vette, J. I.; Stecker, F. W.; Eller, E. L.; Wildes, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    The detection efficiencies of cylindrical detectors for various gamma ray photon angular distributions were studied in the energy range from .10 Mev to 15 Mev. These studies indicate that simple detector systems on small satellites can be used to measure flux anisotropy of cosmic gamma rays and the angular distribution of albedo gamma rays produced in planetary atmospheres. The results indicate that flat cylindrical detectors are most suitable for measuring flux anisotropy because of their angular response function. A general method for calculating detection efficiencies for such detectors is presented.

  13. Scanning instrumentation for measuring magnetic field trapping in high Tc superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisk, R. C.; Helton, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    Computerized scanning instrumentation measures and displays trapped magnetic fields across the surface of high Tc superconductors at 77 K. Data are acquired in the form of a raster scan image utilizing stepping motor stages for positioning and a cryogenic Hall probe for magnetic field readout. Flat areas up to 45 mm in diameter are scanned with 0.5-mm resolution and displayed as false color images.

  14. Measurement of Branching Fractions and CP and Isospin Asymmetry in B->K*(892)gamma Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2009-06-19

    We present an analysis of the decays B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}(892){gamma} and B{sup +} {yields} K*{sup +}(892){gamma} using a sample of about 383 million B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy B factory. We measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.47 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.16) x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K*{sup +}{gamma}) = (4.22 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.16) x 10{sup -5}. We constrain the direct CP asymmetry to be -0.033 < {Alpha}(B {yields} K*{gamma}) < 0.028 and the isospin asymmetry to be 0.017 < {Delta}{sub 0-} < 0.116, where the limits are determined by the 90% confidence interval and include both the statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  15. Measurement of B --> K*gamma branching fractions and charge asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Palano, A; Chen, G P; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Reinertsen, P L; Stugu, B; Abbott, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kluth, S; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Liu, T; Lynch, G; Meyer, A B; Momayezi, M; Oddone, P J; Perazzo, A; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Zisman, M S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; O'Neale, S W; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Krug, J; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Andress, J C; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; De Groot, N; Dyce, N; Foster, B; McFall, J D; Wallom, D; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Tinslay, J; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Salnikov, A A; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Telnov, V I; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Ahsan, A; Arisaka, K; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; Branson, J G; MacFarlane, D B; Prell, S; Rahatlou, Sh; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Witherell, M; Yellin, S; Beringer, J; Dorfan, D E; Eisner, A M; Frey, A; Grillo, A A; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Johnson, R P; Kroeger, W; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Sadrozinski, H; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Devmal, S; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Bloom, P; Dima, M O; Fahey, S; Ford, W T; Johnson, D R; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Park, H; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Sen, S; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Wagner, D L; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dahlinger, G; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Behr, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; Roussot, E; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Falbo, M; Borean, C; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Folegani, M; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Musenich, R; Pallavicini, M; Parodi, R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Priano, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P-A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Benkebil, M; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Lacker, H M; Laplace, S; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Valassi, A; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V V; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Shi, X; van Bibber, K; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Potter, R J L; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Scott, I; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Forti, A C; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Weatherall, J H; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R G; Gabriel, T A; Handler, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de La Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F; Leruste, Ph; Lory, J; Roos, L; Stark, J; Versillé, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J H; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Bula, C; Elmer, P; Lu, C; McDonald, K T; Miftakov, V; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J S; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Fratini, K; Lamanna, E; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; De Domenico, G; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Copty, N; Purohit, M V; Singh, H; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Anthony, P L; Aston, D; Baird, K; Berger, J P; Bloom, E; Boyarski, A M; Bulos, F; Calderini, G; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Coward, D H; Dorfan, J; Doser, M; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G L; Gowdy, S J; Grosso, P; Himel, T; Hryn'ova, T; Huffer, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Mount, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Quinn, H; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Rochester, L S; Roodman, A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Seeman, J T; Serbo, V V; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J R; Wienands, U; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Cheng, C H; Kirkby, D; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; De Silva, A; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Weidemann, A W; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Turcotte, M; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Di Girolamo, B; Gamba, D; Smol, A; Zanin, D; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Di Lodovico, F; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Nielsen, J; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Zobernig, H; Kordich, T M B; Neal, H

    2002-03-11

    The branching fractions of the exclusive decays B0-->K(*0)gamma and B+-->K(*+)gamma are measured from a sample of (22.74+/-0.36)x10(6) BB decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric e(+)e(-) collider. We find B (B0-->K(*0)gamma) = [4.23+/-0.40(stat)+/-0.22(syst)]x10(-5), B(B+-->K(*+)gamma) = [3.83+/-0.62(stat)+/-0.22(syst)]x10(-5) and constrain the CP-violating charge asymmetry to be -0.170K(*)gamma)<0.082 at 90% C.L.

  16. Gamma ray measurements during deuterium and /sup 3/He discharges on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, F.E.; Medley, S.S.

    1987-05-01

    Gamma ray count rates and energy spectra have been measured in TFTR deuterium plasmas during ohmic heating and during injection of deuterium neutral beams for total neutron source strengths up to 6 x 10/sup 15/ neutrons per second. The gamma ray measurements for the deuterium plasmas are in general agreement with predictions obtained using simplified transport models. The 16.6 MeV fusion gamma ray from the direct capture reaction D(/sup 3/He,..gamma..)/sup 5/Li was observed during deuterium neutral beam injection into /sup 3/He plasmas for beam powers up to 7 MW. The measured yield of the 16.6 MeV gamma ray is consistent with the predicted yield. The observation of this capture gamma ray establishes the spectroscopy of the fusion gamma rays from the D-/sup 3/He reactions as a viable diagnostic of total fusion reaction rates and benchmarks the modeling for extension of the technique to D-T plasmas. 21 refs., 12 figs.

  17. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetry in B0 --> KS pi0 gamma Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-10-20

    The authors measure the time-dependent CP asymmetry in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} decays for two regions of K{sub S}{sup 0}-{pi}{sup 0} invariant mass, m(K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}), using the final BABAR data set of 467 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. They find 339 {+-} 24 B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}{gamma} candidates and measure S{sub K*{gamma}} = -0.03 {+-} 0.29 {+-} 0.03 and C{sub K*{gamma}} = -0.14 {+-} 0.16 {+-} 0.03. In the range 1.1 < m(K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) < 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2} they find 133 {+-} 20 B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} candidates and measure S{sub K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}} = -0.78 {+-} 0.59 {+-} 0.09 and C{sub K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}} = -0.36 {+-} 0.33 {+-} 0.04. The uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  18. TRYAD: a Pair of CubeSats to Measure Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, M. S.; Wersinger, J. M.; Fogle, M., Jr.; Biaz, S.; Jenke, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Terrestrial RaYs Analysis and Detection (TRYAD) mission is designed to measure the beam profiles and tilts of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) using a pair of CubeSats separated by several hundred km in low Earth orbit. Until now, all TGF gamma-ray measurements have been made from single locations so that there is substantial degeneracy in modeling TGF beams. TRYAD will sample the gamma-ray beam at two locations. Additionally, for many TGFs the source location will be determined using networks of ground-based very low frequency (VLF) radio receivers. With gamma-ray measurements at two positions of known location relative to the TGF source, we will be able to test and distinguish between TGF beam models. Control of satellite separation is essential to the TRYAD mission. Separation control is achieved by using ionospheric differential drag on the two satellites.

  19. Strain measurement in semiconductor heterostructures by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Müller, Knut; Rosenauer, Andreas; Schowalter, Marco; Zweck, Josef; Fritz, Rafael; Volz, Kerstin

    2012-10-01

    This article deals with the measurement of strain in semiconductor heterostructures from convergent beam electron diffraction patterns. In particular, three different algorithms in the field of (circular) pattern recognition are presented that are able to detect diffracted disc positions accurately, from which the strain in growth direction is calculated. Although the three approaches are very different as one is based on edge detection, one on rotational averages, and one on cross correlation with masks, it is found that identical strain profiles result for an In x Ga1-x N y As1-y /GaAs heterostructure consisting of five compressively and tensile strained layers. We achieve a precision of strain measurements of 7-9·10-4 and a spatial resolution of 0.5-0.7 nm over the whole width of the layer stack which was 350 nm. Being already very applicable to strain measurements in contemporary nanostructures, we additionally suggest future hardware and software designs optimized for fast and direct acquisition of strain distributions, motivated by the present studies.

  20. Optical scanning extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer for absolute microdisplacement measurement.

    PubMed

    Li, T; May, R G; Wang, A; Claus, R O

    1997-12-01

    We report an optical-scanning, dual-fiber, extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer system for absolute measurement of microdisplacement. The system involves two air-gapped Fabry-Perot cavities, formed by fiber end faces, functioning as sensing and reference elements. Taking the scanning wavelength as an interconverter to compare the gap length of the sensing head with the reference-cavity length yields the absolute measurement of the sensing-cavity length. The measurement is independent of the wavelength-scanning accuracy, and the reference-cavity length can be self-calibrated simply by one's changing the sensing-head length by an accurate value.

  1. Measurement of W-gamma and Z-gamma production in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-07-01

    A measurement of W-gamma and Z-gamma production in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV is presented. Results are based on a data sample recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. The electron and muon decay channels of the W and Z are used. The total cross sections are measured for photon transverse energy >10 GeV and spatial separation from charged leptons in the plane of pseudorapidity and azimuthal angle >0.7, and with an additional dilepton invariant mass requirement of > 50 GeV for the Z-gamma process. The following cross section times branching fraction values are found: sigma(pp to W-gamma+X) B(W to lepton neutrino) = 56.3 +/- 5.0 (stat.) +/- 5.0 (syst.) +/- 2.3 (lumi.) pb and sigma(pp to Z-gamma+X) B}(Z to lepton lepton) = 9.4 +/- 1.0 (stat.) +/- 0.6 (syst.) +/- 0.4 (lumi.) pb. These measurements are in agreement with standard model predictions. The first limits on anomalous WW gamma, ZZ gamma, and Z gamma gamma trilinear gauge couplings at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV are set

  2. Environmental gamma radiation measurement in district Swat, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Jabbar, T; Khan, K; Subhani, M S; Akhter, P; Jabbar, A

    2008-01-01

    External exposure to environmental gamma ray sources is an important component of exposure to the public. A survey was carried out to determine activity concentration levels and associated doses from (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs by means of high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry in the Swat district, famous for tourism. The mean concentrations for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were found to be 50.4 +/- 0.7, 34.8 +/- 0.7 and 434.5 +/- 7.4 Bq kg(-1), respectively, in soil samples, which are slightly more than the world average values. However, (137)Cs was only found in the soil sample of Barikot with an activity concentration of 34 +/- 1.2 Bq kg(-1). Only (40)K was determined in vegetation samples with an average activity of 172.2 +/- 1.7 Bq kg(-1), whereas in water samples, all radionuclides were found below lower limits of detection. The radium equivalent activity in all soil samples is lower than the limit set in the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development report (370 Bq kg(-1)). The value of the external exposure dose has been determined from the content of these radionuclides in soil. The average terrestrial gamma air absorbed dose rate was observed to be 62.4 nGy h(-1), which yields an annual effective dose of 0.08 mSv. The average value of the annual effective dose lies close to the global range of outdoor radiation exposure given in United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. However, the main component of the radiation dose to the population residing in the study area arises from cosmic ray due to high altitude.

  3. Rapid In-Situ Measurement of Gamma Activity in Soil for Environmental Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeycutt, T. K.

    2003-12-01

    In-situ measurements of gamma radiation in soil are used as a rapid, low-cost, non-intrusive alternative to conventional sampling and analysis methods in the preliminary assessment of environmental impacts to watersheds at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The method resolves the ambient gamma-radiation field near ground surface into background and residual components and provides radionuclide-specific soil activity determination. The efficacy of the method has been evaluated and compares favorably with conventional gamma-PHA soil analyses and aerial survey data. The method has garnered regulatory approval and is being successfully deployed to evaluate the impact of Cs-137 contamination from CERCLA sites.

  4. A system for the measurement of delayed neutrons and gammas from special nuclear materials

    DOE PAGES

    Andrews, M. T.; Corcoran, E. C.; Goorley, J. T.; ...

    2014-11-27

    The delayed neutron counting (DNC) system at the Royal Military College of Canada has been upgraded to accommodate concurrent delayed neutron and gamma measurements. This delayed neutron and gamma counting (DNGC) system uses a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor to irradiate fissile materials before their transfer to a counting arrangement consisting of six ³He and one HPGe detector. The application of this system is demonstrated in an example where delayed neutron and gamma emissions are used in complement to examine ²³³U content and determine fissile mass with an average relative error and accuracy of -2.2 and 1.5 %, respectively.

  5. Gwyscan: a library to support non-equidistant scanning probe microscope measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapetek, Petr; Yacoot, Andrew; Grolich, Petr; Valtr, Miroslav; Nečas, David

    2017-03-01

    We present a software library and related methodology for enabling easy integration of adaptive step (non-equidistant) scanning techniques into metrological scanning probe microscopes or scanning probe microscopes where individual x, y position data are recorded during measurements. Scanning with adaptive steps can reduce the amount of data collected in SPM measurements thereby leading to faster data acquisition, a smaller amount of data collection required for a specific analytical task and less sensitivity to mechanical and thermal drift. Implementation of adaptive scanning routines into a custom built microscope is not normally an easy task: regular data are much easier to handle for previewing (e.g. levelling) and storage. We present an environment to make implementation of adaptive scanning easier for an instrument developer, specifically taking into account data acquisition approaches that are used in high accuracy microscopes as those developed by National Metrology Institutes. This includes a library with algorithms written in C and LabVIEW for handling data storage, regular mesh preview generation and planning the scan path on basis of different assumptions. A set of modules for Gwyddion open source software for handling these data and for their further analysis is presented. Using this combination of data acquisition and processing tools one can implement adaptive scanning in a relatively easy way into an instrument that was previously measuring on a regular grid. The performance of the presented approach is shown and general non-equidistant data processing steps are discussed.

  6. Measuring planetary neutron albedo fluxes by remote gamma-ray sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, E. L.; Metzger, A. E.

    In order to measure the planetary neutron albedo fluxes, a neutron-absorbing shield which emits gamma rays of characteristic energy and serves as a neutron detector, is added to a gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS). The gamma rays representing the neutron flux are observed against interference consisting of cosmic gamma rays, planetary continuum and line emission, and gamma rays arising from the interaction of cosmic rays with the GRS and the spacecraft. The uncertainty and minimum detection limits in neutron albedo fluxes are calculated for two missions, a lunar orbiter and a comet nucleus rendezvous. A GRS on a lunar orbiter at 100 km altitude detects a thermal neutron albedo flux as low as 0.002/sq cm/s and an expected flux of about 0.6/sq cm/s is measured with an uncertainty of 0.001/sq cm/s, for a 100 h observation period. For the comet nucleus, again in a 100 h observing period, a thermal neutron albedo flux is detected at a level of 0.006/sq cm/s and an expected flux of about 0.4/sq cm/s is measured with an uncertainty of 0.004/sq cm/s. The expanded geological capabilities made possible by this technique include improvements in H sensitivity, spatial resolution, and measurement depth; and an improved model of induced gamma-ray emission.

  7. Radon emanation and soil moisture effects on airborne gamma-ray measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Grasty, R.L.

    1997-09-01

    A theoretical model is developed to explain variations in airborne gamma-ray measurements over a calibration range near Ottawa, Ontario. The gamma-ray flux from potassium and the thorium decay series showed an expected decrease with increasing soil moisture. However, the gamma-ray flux from the uranium decay series was highest in the spring when the ground was water-saturated and even covered with snow. These results are explained through the build-up of radon and its associated gamma-ray-emitting decay products in the clay soil of the calibration range with increasing soil moisture. Similar results were found from airborne measurements over other clay soils. However, measurements over sandy soils showed that the count rates from all three radio elements increased with decreasing soil moisture. This difference between soil types was attributed to the lower radon emanation of the more coarse-grained sandy soils compared to finer-grained clay soils. The theoretical and experimental results demonstrate that any estimate of the natural gamma-ray field caused by radium in the ground must take into consideration the radon emanation coefficient of the soil. The radon diffusion coefficient of the soil must also be considered since it depends strongly on soil moisture. This has significant implications for the assessment of outdoor radiation doses using laboratory analyses of soil samples and the use of ground and airborne gamma-ray measurements for radon potential mapping.

  8. Precision measurements of the total and partial widths of the psi(2S) charmonium meson with a new complementary-scan technique in anti-p p annihilations

    SciTech Connect

    Andreotti, M.; Bagnasco, S.; Baldini, W.; Bettoni, D.; Borreani, G.; Buzzo, A.; Calabrese, R.; Cester, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Dalpiaz, P.; Garzoglio, G.

    2007-03-01

    We present new precision measurements of the {Psi}(2S) total and partial widths from excitation curves obtained in antiproton-proton annihilations by Fermilab experiment E835 at the Antiproton Accumulator in the year 2000. A new technique of complementary scans was developed to study narrow resonances with stochastically cooled antiproton beams. It relies on precise revolution-frequency and orbit-length measurements, while making the analysis of the excitation curve almost independent of machine lattice parameters. For the {Psi}(2S) meson, by studying the processes {bar p}p {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} and {bar p}p {yields} J/{Psi} + X {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} + X, we measure the width {Gamma} = 290 {+-} 25(sta) {+-} 4(sys) keV and the combination of partial widths {Gamma}{sub e{sup +}e{sup -}}{Gamma}{sub {bar p}p}/{Gamma} = 579 {+-} 38(sta) {+-} 36(sys) meV, which represent the most precise measurements to date.

  9. Nonmechanical scanning laser Doppler velocimeter for cross-sectional two-dimensional velocity measurement.

    PubMed

    Maru, Koichi; Hata, Takahiro

    2012-12-01

    We propose a two-dimensional scanning laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) that does not require any moving mechanisms in its probe. In the proposed LDV, the measurement position can be scanned in two dimensions on a cross-sectional plane perpendicular to the direction of flow. The combination of the change in wavelength and change in port of the fiber array input to the probe is utilized for the scan. The experimental results using a sensor probe setup indicate that the measurement position can be scanned in two dimensions using the proposed method. The scanning range was estimated to be 39.7 mm in the axial direction over the wavelength range of 1536-1554 nm and 26.1 mm in the transverse direction for the use of 22 ports of the fiber array.

  10. Electroweak physics: measurement of w gamma and z gamma production in pp-bar collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 tev

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-02-02

    The Standard Model predictions for W{gamma} and Z{gamma} production are tested using an integrated luminosity of 200 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The cross sections are measured by selecting leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons, and photons with transverse energy E{sub T} > 7 GeV that are well separated from leptons. The production cross sections and kinematic distributions for the W{gamma} and Z{gamma} data are compared to SM predictions.

  11. Reliability, agreement, and validity of digital weighing scale with MatScan in limb load measurement.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Senthil N S; Omar, Baharudin; Htwe, Ohnmar; Joseph, Leonard H; Krishnan, Jagannathan; Jafarzedah Esfehani, Ali; Min, Lee L

    2014-01-01

    Limb loading measurements serve as an objective evaluation of asymmetrical weight bearing in the lower limb. Digital weighing scales (DWSs) could be used in clinical settings for measurement of static limb loading. However, ambiguity exists whether limb loading measurements of DWSs are comparable with a standard tool such as MatScan. A cross-sectional study composed of 33 nondisabled participants was conducted to investigate the reliability, agreement, and validity of DWSs with MatScan in static standing. Amounts of weight distribution and plantar pressure on the individual lower limb were measured using two DWSs (A, B) and MatScan during eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) conditions. The results showed that intra- and interrater reliability (3, 1) were excellent (0.94-0.97) within and between DWS A and B. Bland-Altman plot revealed good agreement between DWS and MatScan in EO and EC conditions. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was significant and identified as 0.68 (p = 0.01). The measurements obtained with DWSs are valid and in agreement with MatScan measurements. Hence, DWSs could be used interchangeably with MatScan and could provide clinicians an objective measurement of limb loading suitable for clinical settings.

  12. Measurement of Branching Fractions and Mass Spectra of B to K pi pi gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-12

    The authors present a measurement of the partial branching fractions and mass spectra of the exclusive radiative penguin processes B {yields} K{pi}{pi}{gamma} in the range m{sub K{pi}{pi}} < 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2}. They reconstruct four final states: K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}, K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}, and K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, where K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Using 232 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage ring, they measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}) = (2.95 {+-} 0.13(stat.) {+-} 0.20(syst)) x 10{sup -5}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.07 {+-} 0.22(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma}) = (1.85 {+-} 0.21(stat.) {+-} 0.12(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}, and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.56 {+-} 0.42(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}.

  13. COMBINED GAMMA-RAY AND NEUTRON DETECTOR FOR MEASURING THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF AIRLESS PLANETARY BODIES.

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, David J. ,; Barraclough, B. L.; Feldman, W. C.; Prettyman, T. H.; Wiens, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) constant1,y itnpinge all planetary bodies and produce characteristic gamma-ray lines and leakage neutrons as reaction products. Together with gamma-ray lines produced by radioactive decay, these nuclear emissions provide a powerful technique for remotely measuring the chemical composition of airless planetary surfaces. While lunar gamma-ray spectroscopy was first demonstrated with Apollo Gamma-Ray measurements, the full value of combined gamma-ray and neutron spectroscopy was shown for the first time with the Lunar Prospector Gamma-Ray (LP-GRS) and Neutron Spectrometers (LP-NS). Any new planetary mission will likely have the requirement that instrument mass and power be kept to a minimum. To satisfy such requirements, we have been designing a GR/NS instrument which combines all the functionality of the LP-GRS and LP-NS for a fraction of the mass and power. Specifically, our design uses a BGO scintillator crystal to measure gamma-rays from 0.5-10 MeV. A borated plastic scintillator and a lithium gliiss scintillator are used to separately measure thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons as well as serve as an anticoincidence shield for the BGO. All three scintillators are packaged together in a compact phoswich design. Modifications to this design could include a CdZnTe gamma-ray detector for enhanced energy resolution at low energies (0.5-3 MeV). While care needs to be taken to ensure that an adequate count rate is achieved for specific mission designs, previous mission successes demonstrate that a cornbined GR/NS provides essential information about planetary surfaces.

  14. Proposed experiment to measure {gamma}-rays from the thermal neutron capture of gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Takatomi; Ou, I.; Izumi, T.; Yamaguchi, R.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.

    2012-11-12

    Gadolinium-157 ({sup 157}Gd) has the largest thermal neutron capture cross section among any stable nuclei. The thermal neutron capture yields {gamma}-ray cascade with total energy of about 8 MeV. Because of these characteristics, Gd is applied for the recent neutrino detectors. Here, we propose an experiment to measure the multiplicity and the angular correlation of {gamma}-rays from the Gd neutron capture. With these information, we expect the improved identification of the Gd neutron capture.

  15. Unfolding the fission prompt gamma-ray energy and multiplicity distribution measured by DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chyzh, A; Wu, C Y; Bredeweg, T; Couture, A; Jandel, M; Ullmann, J; Laptev, A

    2010-10-16

    The nearly energy independence of the {gamma}-ray efficiency and multiplicity response for the DANCE array, the unusual characteristic elucidated in our early technical report (LLNL-TR-452298), gives one a unique opportunity to derive the true prompt {gamma}-ray energy and multiplicity distribution in fission from the measurement. This unfolding procedure for the experimental data will be described in details and examples will be given to demonstrate the feasibility of reconstruction of the true distribution.

  16. Time-integrated measurements of $\\gamma$ at the Tevatron and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Squillacioti, Paola

    2010-12-01

    The measurement of CP-violating asymmetries and branching ratios of B {yields} DK modes allows a theoretically-clean extraction of the CKM angle {gamma}. We report recent CDF measurements with Cabibbo suppressed ({pi}{pi}, KK) or doubly Cabibbo suppressed (K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) D decays. These measurements are performed for the first time in hadron collisions.

  17. Measuring the activity of a 51Cr neutrino source based on the gamma-radiation spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, V. V.; Gavrin, V. N.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Malyshkin, Yu. M.; Shikhin, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    A technique for the measurement of activities of intense β sources by measuring the continuous gamma-radiation (internal bremsstrahlung) spectra is developed. A method for reconstructing the spectrum recorded by a germanium semiconductor detector is described. A method for the absolute measurement of the internal bremsstrahlung spectrum of 51Cr is presented.

  18. Analysis of measurement deviations for the patient-specific quality assurance using intensity-modulated spot-scanning particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongqiang; Hsi, Wen C.

    2017-04-01

    To analyze measurement deviations of patient-specific quality assurance (QA) using intensity-modulated spot-scanning particle beams, a commercial radiation dosimeter using 24 pinpoint ionization chambers was utilized. Before the clinical trial, validations of the radiation dosimeter and treatment planning system were conducted. During the clinical trial 165 measurements were performed on 36 enrolled patients. Two or three fields of particle beam were used for each patient. Measurements were typically performed with the dosimeter placed at special regions of dose distribution along depth and lateral profiles. In order to investigate the dosimeter accuracy, repeated measurements with uniform dose irradiations were also carried out. A two-step approach was proposed to analyze 24 sampling points over a 3D treatment volume. The mean value and the standard deviation of each measurement did not exceed 5% for all measurements performed on patients with various diseases. According to the defined intervention thresholds of mean deviation and the distance-to-agreement concept with a Gamma index analysis using criteria of 3.0% and 2 mm, a decision could be made regarding whether the dose distribution was acceptable for the patient. Based measurement results, deviation analysis was carried out. In this study, the dosimeter was used for dose verification and provided a safety guard to assure precise dose delivery of highly modulated particle therapy. Patient-specific QA will be investigated in future clinical operations.

  19. Distance measurement using frequency scanning interferometry with mode-hoped laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhat, M.; Sobee, M.; Hussein, H. M.; Terra, O.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, frequency scanning interferometry is implemented to measure distances up to 5 m absolutely. The setup consists of a Michelson interferometer, an external cavity tunable diode laser, and an ultra-low expansion (ULE) Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity to measure the frequency scanning range. The distance is measured by acquiring simultaneously the interference fringes from, the Michelson and the FP interferometers, while scanning the laser frequency. An online fringe processing technique is developed to calculate the distance from the fringe ratio while removing the parts result from the laser mode-hops without significantly affecting the measurement accuracy. This fringe processing method enables accurate distance measurements up to 5 m with measurements repeatability ±3.9×10-6 L. An accurate translation stage is used to find the FP cavity free-spectral-range and therefore allow accurate measurement. Finally, the setup is applied for the short distance calibration of a laser distance meter (LDM).

  20. Spent-fuel cooling curve for safeguard applications of gross-gamma measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rinard, P.

    1983-04-01

    Gross-gamma detectors can be used to gather data from spent-fuel assemblies in a simple and rapid manner. Using these data, inspectors can generate a power-law curve to check the consistency of the declared values with the measured values; points outside the curve indicate erroneously declared values or removal of material. Simple types of erroneously declared values can be detected immediately, whereas subtle types may require a second measurement and more subtle types may escape detection. If measurements of passive emissions of neutrons from the assemblies are made in addition to the gamma measurements, the values of the exposures and cooling times can be estimated independent of the operator-declared values. Although not yet demonstrated, it may be possible to obtain crude estimates of the exposures and cooling times from the gamma measurments alone.

  1. Nuclear data production, calculation and measurement: a global overview of the gamma heating issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombier, A.-C.; Amharrak, H.; Fourmentel, D.; Ravaux, S.; Régnier, D.; Gueton, O.; Hudelot, J.-P.; Lemaire, M.

    2013-03-01

    The gamma heating evaluation in different materials found in current and future generations of nuclear reactor (EPRTM, GENIV, MTR-JHR), is becoming an important issue especially for the design of many devices (control rod, heavy reflector, in-core & out-core experiments…). This paper deals with the works started since 2009 in the Reactor Studies Department of CEA Cadarache in ordre to answer to several problematic which have been identified as well for nuclear data production and calculation as for experimental measurement methods. The selected subjects are: Development of a Monte Carlo code (FIFRELIN) to simulate the prompt fission gamma emission which represents the major part of the gamma heating production inside the core Production and qualification of new evaluations of nuclear data especially for radiative capture and inelastic neutron scattering which are the main sources of gamma heating out-core Development and qualification of a recommended method for the total gamma heating calculation using the Monte Carlo simulation code TRIPOLI-4 Development, test and qualification of new devices dedicated to the in-core gamma heating measurement as well in MTR-JHR as in zero power facilities (EOLE-MINERVE) of CEA, Cadarache to increase the experimental measurement accuracy.

  2. Modeled Martian subsurface elemental composition measurements with the Probing In situ with Neutron and Gamma ray instrument: Gamma and Neutron Measurements on Mars

    DOE PAGES

    Nowicki, Suzanne F.; Evans, Larry G.; Starr, Richard D.; ...

    2017-02-01

    Here, the Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument is an innovative application of active neutron-induced gamma-ray technology. The objective of PING is to measure the elemental composition of the Martian regolith. As part 2 of a two-part submission, this manuscript presents PING's sensitivities as a function of the Martian regolith depth and PING's uncertainties in the measurements as a function of observation time in passive and active mode. Part 1 of our submission models the associated regolith types. The modeled sensitivities show that in PING's active mode, where both a Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG) and amore » Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) are used, PING can interrogate the material below the rover to about 20 cm due to the penetrating nature of the high-energy neutrons and the resulting secondary gamma rays observed with the GRS. PING is capable of identifying most major and minor rock-forming elements, including H, O, Na, Mn, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, Cr, K, Ca, Ti, Fe and Th. The modeled uncertainties show that PING's use of a PNG reduces the required observation times by an order of magnitude over a passive operating mode where the PNG is turned off. While the active mode allows for more complete elemental inventories with higher sensitivity, the gamma-ray signatures of some elements are strong enough to detect in passive mode. We show that PING can detect changes in key marker elements and make thermal neutron measurements in about 1 minute that are sensitive to H and Cl.« less

  3. Development of a hybrid atomic force microscopic measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tong; Wang, Siming; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid atomic force microscopic (AFM) measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry for micro/nanometer dimensional measurement is developed. The system is based on a high precision large-range positioning platform with nanometer accuracy on which a white light scanning interferometric module and an AFM head are built. A compact AFM head is developed using a self-sensing tuning fork probe. The head need no external optical sensors to detect the deflection of the cantilever, which saves room on the head, and it can be directly fixed under an optical microscopic interferometric system. To enhance the system's dynamic response, the frequency modulation (FM) mode is adopted for the AFM head. The measuring data can be traceable through three laser interferometers in the system. The lateral scanning range can reach 25 mm × 25 mm by using a large-range positioning platform. A hybrid method combining AFM and white light scanning interferometry is proposed to improve the AFM measurement efficiency. In this method, the sample is measured firstly by white light scanning interferometry to get an overall coarse morphology, and then, further measured with higher resolution by AFM. Several measuring experiments on standard samples demonstrate the system's good measurement performance and feasibility of the hybrid measurement method.

  4. Gamma-glutamyltransferase: value of its measurement in paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Abreu, Jose C; Green, Anne

    2002-01-01

    Gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) is a microsomal enzyme that is widely distributed in human tissues involved in secretory and absorptive processes, particularly the bile canaliculi. Serum GGT is elevated in liver diseases affecting the biliary system, such as extrahepatic biliary atresia, sclerosing cholangitis and progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) type 3. Conversely, two other subtypes of PFIC have normal or low serum GGT activity, discordant with the degree of cholestasis. GGT is also useful in detecting cholestasis associated with parenteral nutrition and assessing the efficacy of ursodeoxycholic acid in its treatment. GGT may also help screening for biliary complications on patients that have undergone orthotopic liver transplantation. The reference range for GGT is age dependent. In normal full-term neonates the activity at birth is approximately six to seven times the upper limit of the adult reference range. The activity then declines, reaching adult levels by the age of 5-7 months.

  5. Measurement of Gamma Decay Strengths in Scandium -41 and CARBON-11.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKamy, Jerry Neal

    1982-03-01

    Two different investigations were undertaken that involve the study of gamma decay from nuclei produced in nuclear reactions. In one experiment, the structure of an unusual intermediate structure state in ('41)Sc was investigated; the second experiment sought to determine the gamma decay strength of ('11)C at an excitation energy of astrophysical significance. A cluster of intermediate structure states is known to exist in ('41)Sc centered around an excitation energy of 7.2 MeV. These states are thought to be formed from the relatively pure coupling of a 2p(, 1/2) proton to the. (DIAGRAM, TABLE OR GRAPHIC OMITTED...PLEASE SEE DAI). excited state of the ('40)Ca core. If this interpretation is correct, there should be a reasonable probability for the 2p(, 1/2) proton dropping into the d(,3/2) hole with the emission of a 7.2 MeV E1 gamma ray leaving the ('41)Sc nucleus in its ground state. The study of the ('40)Ca(p,(gamma))('41)Sc reaction was undertaken to measure the anticipated enhancement of the gamma decay widths of these states. Seven states, including a state of ambiguous spin which is not a member of the intermediate structure, were examined for capture gamma ray decay to the ground state of ('41)Sc. The lowest of these states occurred at E(,p) = 6.035 MeV and the highest state occurred at 6.405 MeV. No gamma decay enhancement was observed. Indeed, only upper limits of (TURN)10(' -3) w.u. for the E1 transitions from the 5/2('+) states and (TURN)10('-2) w.u. for the expected M1 transitions from the intruder state were set. The lack of enhancement may arise either from a cancellation of the transition amplitude due to configuration mixing with collective states of the core or a radial wave function mismatch. The second experiment sought to measure the gamma decay width of the 8.105 MeV state in ('11)C. This state, if it has a sufficiently large gamma decay width, could influence the stellar nucleosynthesis of ('11)B and ('12)C. This state can be populated by

  6. Measurement of the branching fraction and photon energy moments of B-->Xs gamma and A(CP)(B --> X(s+d gamma)).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Tinslay, J S; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-10-27

    The photon spectrum in B-->Xs gamma decay, where Xs is any strange hadronic state, is studied using a data sample of 88.5 x 10(6) e+ e- --> Upsilon(4S) --> BB decays collected by the BABAR experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The partial branching fraction, DeltaB(B --> Xs gamma) = (3.67+/-0.29(stat)+/-0.34(syst)+/-0.29(model)) x 10(-4), the first moment gamma> = 2.288+/-0.025+/-0.017+/-0.015 GeV, and the second moment E2(gamma) = 0.0328+/-0.0040+/-0.0023+/-0.0036 GeV2 are measured for the photon energy range 1.9 GeV < E gamma < 2.7 GeV. They are also measured for narrower E gamma ranges. The moments are then fit to recent theoretical calculations to extract the heavy quark expansion parameters m(b) and mu2(pi) and to extrapolate the partial branching fraction to E gamma > 1.6 GeV. In addition, the direct CP asymmetry A(CP)(B-->X(s+d gamma) is measured to be -0.110+/-0.115(stat)+/-0.017(syst).

  7. FFTF reactor-characterization program: gamma-ray measurements and shield characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Bunch, W.L.; Moore, F.S. Jr.

    1983-02-01

    A series of experiments is to be made during the acceptance test program of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to measure the gamma ray characteristics of the Fast Test Reactor (FTR) and to establish the performance characteristics of the reactor shield. These measurements are a part of the FFTF Reactor Characterization Program (RCP). Detailed plans have been developed for these experiments. During the initial phase of the Characteristics Program, which will be carried out in the In-Reactor Thimble (IRT), both active and passive measurement methods will be employed to obtain as much information concerning the gamma ray environment as is practical. More limited active gamma ray measurements also will be made in the Vibration Open Test Assembly (VOTA).

  8. Some correlations between measurements by the Apollo gamma-ray spectrometer and other lunar observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trombka, J. I.; Arnold, J. R.; Reedy, R. C.; Peterson, L. E.; Metzger, A. E.

    1973-01-01

    Observations by the Apollo 15 and 16 gamma-ray spectrometers are compared with those of a number of other experiments, both compositional and noncompositional. A general correspondence with topography is seen. The Van de Graaff area is a unique farside region with respect to observations by the laser altimeter, the subsatellite magnetometer, and the gamma-ray spectrometer. X-ray and alpha particle orbital measurements show a broad general agreement with gamma-ray data, although results from additional elements in the gamma-ray spectrum are needed to extend the comparison with X-ray data. A comparison of Th concentrations with those found at various landing sites shows generally good agreement, with the orbital values tending to be somewhat higher.

  9. SU-E-T-561: Development of Depth Dose Measurement Technique Using the Multilayer Ionization Chamber for Spot Scanning Method

    SciTech Connect

    Takayanagi, T; Fujitaka, S; Umezawa, M; Ito, Y; Nakashima, C; Matsuda, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a measurement technique which suppresses the difference between profiles obtained with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) and with a water phantom. Methods: The developed technique multiplies the raw MLIC data by a correction factor that depends on the initial beam range and water equivalent depth. The correction factor is derived based on a Bragg curve calculation formula considering range straggling and fluence loss caused by nuclear reactions. Furthermore, the correction factor is adjusted based on several integrated depth doses measured with a water phantom and the MLIC. The measured depth dose profiles along the central axis of the proton field with a nominal field size of 10 by 10 cm were compared between the MLIC using the new technique and the water phantom. The spread out Bragg peak was 20 cm for fields with a range of 30.6 cm and 6.9 cm. Raw MLIC data were obtained with each energy layer, and integrated after multiplying by the correction factor. The measurements were performed by a spot scanning nozzle at Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Japan. Results: The profile measured with the MLIC using the new technique is consistent with that of the water phantom. Moreover, 97% of the points passed the 1% dose /1mm distance agreement criterion of the gamma index. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that the new technique suppresses the difference between profiles obtained with the MLIC and with the water phantom. It was concluded that this technique is useful for depth dose measurement in proton spot scanning method.

  10. High-precision absolute distance and vibration measurement with frequency scanned interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.-J.; Deibel, Jason; Nyberg, Sven; Riles, Keith

    2005-07-01

    We report high-precision absolute distance and vibration measurements performed with frequency scanned interferometry using a pair of single-mode optical fibers. Absolute distance was determined by counting the interference fringes produced while scanning the laser frequency. A high-finesse Fabry-Perot interferometer was used to determine frequency changes during scanning. Two multiple-distance-measurement analysis techniques were developed to improve distance precision and to extract the amplitude and frequency of vibrations. Under laboratory conditions, measurement precision of {approx}50 nm was achieved for absolute distances ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 m by use of the first multiple-distance-measurement technique. The second analysis technique has the capability to measure vibration frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 100 Hz with an amplitude as small as a few nanometers without a priori knowledge.

  11. High-precision absolute distance and vibration measurement with frequency scanned interferometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-Jun; Deibel, Jason; Nyberg, Sven; Riles, Keith

    2005-07-01

    We report high-precision absolute distance and vibration measurements performed with frequency scanned interferometry using a pair of single-mode optical fibers. Absolute distance was determined by counting the interference fringes produced while scanning the laser frequency. A high-finesse Fabry-Perot interferometer was used to determine frequency changes during scanning. Two multiple-distance-measurement analysis techniques were developed to improve distance precision and to extract the amplitude and frequency of vibrations. Under laboratory conditions, measurement precision of approximately 50 nm was achieved for absolute distances ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 m by use of the first multiple-distance-measurement technique. The second analysis technique has the capability to measure vibration frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 100 Hz with an amplitude as small as a few nanometers without a priori knowledge.

  12. Measuring vibration of cylindrical surfaces using a continuous-scan LDV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanbridge, Anthony B.; Ind, P. R.; Ewins, David J.

    2004-06-01

    Measurement of vibration "operating deflection shapes" (ODSs) on cylindrical or conical surfaces is difficult with optical techniques, because of the restricted angle of view. Point measurement transducers such as accelerometers, on the other hand, can provide extensive coverage, but with poor spatial resolution. This paper proposes two techniques using a continuous-scan LDV which can be used to give full area coverage on such components. In the first technique, the structure is mounted on a stand which is oscillated, typically, at 0.3 Hz, over +/-180°, to provide a scan in the circumferential direction, with a straight line scan parallel to the axis of rotation. Analysis is identical to that for a rectangular scan, and gives the ODS as a 2D polynomial series. The second technique uses a fixed-point LDV with a continuously-rotating 45° mirror to provide a circumferential scan, the mirror being simultaneously translated, sinusoidally, along the axis to give a scan on the inside of the structure. Analysis is the same as that for a spiral, circular scan on a vibrating disc, and gives the ODS as a Fourier series in the circumferential direction and a polynomial in the axial direction.

  13. Line scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for three-dimensional microfluidic flow velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaotao; Shi, Xianke; Korzh, Vladimir; Yu, Hanry; Wohland, Thorsten

    2009-03-01

    The flow direction of microfluidics in biological applications is not limited to two dimensions, but often extends to three dimensions. Currently there are optical methods available for the measurement of 3-D microfluidic flow vectors, but with low spatial resolution. Line scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was proposed to determine flow directions in 2-D within microchannels and small blood vessels in our previous work. Importantly, its spatial resolution was demonstrated to be as good as 0.5 μm. In this work, we extend line scan FCS to the third dimension for the characterization of 3-D flow velocity vectors. The spatial resolution is close to the diffraction limit using a scan length of 0.5 μm in all three dimensions. The feasibility of line scan FCS for 3-D microfluidic flow is verified by measurements in microchannels and small blood vessels of zebrafish embryos.

  14. A beam-scan type laser Doppler velocimeter for simultaneous and continuous measurement of velocity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, M.; Nadaoka, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Sato, Y.; Muramoto, T.

    A beam-scan-type LDV (SLV) with high spatial resolving power has been developed for the continuous measurement of nearly simultaneous velocity profiles in the cross sections of various flows. The SLV consists of a forward-scatter LDV and a beam-scan unit, using a reversed-scan method, capable of high-speed scanning of the measuring volume. An autofocusing device using an image sensor is employed to simplify the alignment of the receiving optics needed to match the transmitting optics. The SLV performance was validated by comparison of experimental results (for a wake flow of a circular cylinder, a reciprocally oscillatory flow, and a Karman vortex street flow) with flow visualization and computational results.

  15. Decay Heat Measurements Using Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, S.; Valencia, E.; Algora, A.; Taín, J. L.; Regan, P. H.; Podolyák, Z.; Agramunt, J.; Gelletly, W.; Nichols, A. L.

    2012-09-01

    A knowledge of the decay heat emitted by thermal neutron-irradiated nuclear fuel is an important factor in ensuring safe reactor design and operation, spent fuel removal from the core, and subsequent storage prior to and after reprocessing, and waste disposal. Decay heat can be readily calculated from the nuclear decay properties of the fission products, actinides and their decay products as generated within the irradiated fuel. Much of the information comes from experiments performed with HPGe detectors, which often underestimate the beta feeding to states at high excitation energies. This inability to detect high-energy gamma emissions effectively results in the derivation of decay schemes that suffer from the pandemonium effect, although such a serious problem can be avoided through application of total absorption γ-ray spectroscopy (TAS). The beta decay of key radionuclei produced as a consequence of the neutron-induced fission of 235U and 239Pu are being re-assessed by means of this spectroscopic technique. A brief synopsis is given of the Valencia-Surrey (BaF2) TAS detector, and their method of operation, calibration and spectral analysis.

  16. A planar near-field scanning technique for bistatic radar cross section measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuhela-Reuning, S.; Walton, E. K.

    1990-01-01

    A progress report on the development of a bistatic radar cross section (RCS) measurement range is presented. A technique using one parabolic reflector and a planar scanning probe antenna is analyzed. The field pattern in the test zone is computed using a spatial array of signal sources. It achieved an illumination pattern with 1 dB amplitude and 15 degree phase ripple over the target zone. The required scan plane size is found to be proportional to the size of the desired test target. Scan plane probe sample spacing can be increased beyond the Nyquist lambda/2 limit permitting constant probe sample spacing over a range of frequencies.

  17. Comparison of a novel surface laser scanning anthropometric technique to traditional methods for facial parameter measurements.

    PubMed

    Joe, Paula S; Ito, Yasushi; Shih, Alan M; Oestenstad, Riedar K; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if three-dimensional (3D) laser scanning techniques could be used to collect accurate anthropometric measurements, compared with traditional methods. The use of an alternative 3D method would allow for quick collection of data that could be used to change the parameters used for facepiece design, improving fit and protection for a wider variety of faces. In our study, 10 facial dimensions were collected using both the traditional calipers and tape method and a Konica-Minolta Vivid9i laser scanner. Scans were combined using RapidForm XOR software to create a single complete facial geometry of the subject as a triangulated surface with an associated texture image from which to obtain measurements. A paired t-test was performed on subject means in each measurement by method. Nine subjects were used in this study: five males (one African-American and four Caucasian females) and four females displaying a range of facial dimensions. Five measurements showed significant differences (p<0.05), with most accounted for by subject movements or amended by scanning technique modifications. Laser scanning measurements showed high precision and accuracy when compared with traditional methods. Significant differences found can be very small changes in measurements and are unlikely to present a practical difference. The laser scanning technique demonstrated reliable and quick anthropometric data collection for use in future projects in redesigning respirators.

  18. Snowpack snow water equivalent measurement using the attenuation of cosmic gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Osterhuber, R.; Fehrke, F.; Condreva, K.

    1998-05-01

    Incoming, background cosmic radiation constantly fluxes through the earth`s atmosphere. The high energy gamma portion of this radiation penetrates many terrestrial objects, including the winter snowpack. The attenuation of this radiation is exponentially related to the mass of the medium through which it penetrates. For the past three winters, a device measuring cosmic gamma radiation--and its attenuation through snow--has been installed at the Central Sierra Snow Laboratory, near Donner Pass, California. This gamma sensor, measuring energy levels between 5 and 15 MeV, has proved to be an accurate, reliable, non-invasive, non-mechanical instrument with which to measure the total snow water equivalent of a snowpack. This paper analyzes three winters` worth of data and discusses the physics and practical application of the sensor for the collection of snow water equivalent data from a remote location.

  19. Multi-frequency, 3D ODS measurement by continuous scan laser Doppler vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekes, Ben; Ewins, David

    2015-06-01

    Continuous scan laser Doppler vibrometry (CSLDV) is a technique which has been described and explored in the literature for over two decades, but remains niche compared to SLDV inspection by a series of discrete-point measurements. This is in part because of the unavoidable phenomenon of laser speckle, which deteriorates signal quality when velocity data is captured from a moving spot measurement. Further, applicability of CSLDV has typically been limited to line scans and rectangular areas by the application of sine, step, or ramp functions to the scanning mirrors which control the location of the measurement laser spot. In this paper it is shown that arbitrary functions to scan any area can easily be derived from a basic calibration routine, equivalent to the calibration performed in conventional discrete-point laser vibrometry. This is extended by performing the same scan path upon a test surface from three independent locations of the laser head, and decomposing the three sets of one-dimensional deflection shapes into a single set of three-dimensional deflection shapes. The test was performed with multi-sine excitation, yielding 34 operating deflection shapes from each scan.

  20. Porosity measurement of solid pharmaceutical dosage forms by gamma-ray transmission.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, José Martins; Andréo Filho, Newton; Chaud, Marco Vinícius; Angiolucci, Tatiana; Aranha, Norberto; Martins, Antonio César Germano

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the present work is the determination of porosity in tablets by using the gamma-ray transmission technique. Tablet dissolution depends on some inherent characteristics of the manufacturing process, such as compression force, tablet volume, density and porosity, nature of excipients, preparation methods and its physical-chemical properties. Porosity is a measure of empty spaces in a material and can be determined by various techniques. In this paper, we propose the use of a gamma-ray transmission technique to obtain the porosity of experimental formulation of tablets. The results of porosity were compared with those obtained by using conventional methodology (density and mercury intrusion). The experimental setup for gamma-ray transmission consists of a gamma-ray source of (241)Am (photons of 59.6 keV and an activity of 3.7 × 10(9)Bq), an NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, collimators and a standard gamma-ray spectrometry electronics. Our results suggest that the gamma-ray transmission technique is a powerful tool for non-destructive porosity quantification of solid pharmaceutical forms and presents smaller errors than those obtained with conventional methodologies.

  1. Design of a Non-scanning Lidar for Wind Velocity and Direction Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Peng, Zhangxian

    2016-06-01

    A Doppler lidar system for wind velocity and direction measurement is presented. The lidar use a wide field of view (FOV) objective lens as an optical antenna for both beam transmitting and signal receiving. By four fibers coupled on different position on the focal plane, the lidar can implement wind vector measurement without any scanning movement.

  2. Active Well Coincidence Counter measurements of enriched uranium fuel assemblies in scanning and stationary modes

    SciTech Connect

    Krick, M.S.; Cowder, L. ); Maltsev, V.; Chernikov, A.; Mokeenko, P.; D'yadkov, K.; Ivanov, V. Nuclear Power Plant, Zarechnyy ); Lagattu, A.; Lopatin, Y.; Czock, K.; Rundquist, D.; Pedraza, L. )

    1991-01-01

    Enriched uranium fuel assemblies were measured with an Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) at the Beloyarskaya Nuclear Power Plant. Special AWCC inserts, electronics, and software were used. Stationary and scanning measurements were performed to establish calibrations and performance specifications for the assay of {sup 235}U and {sub 235}U/cm for BN600 fuel. 6 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. On Orbit Measurement of Response vs. Scan Angle for the Infrared Bands on TRMM/VIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, William L.; Lyu, Cheng-Hsuan; Barnes, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    The Visible and Infrared Scanner on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM/VIRS) is a whiskbroom imaging radiometer with two reflected solar bands and three emissive infrared bands. All five detectors are on a single cooled focal plane. This configuration necessitated the use of a paddlewheel scan mirror to avoid the effects of focal plane rotation that arise when using a scan mirror that is inclined to its axis of rotation. System radiometric requirements led to the need for protected silver as the mirror surface. Unfortunately, the SiO(x) coatings currently used to protect silver from oxidation introduce a change in reflectance with angle of incidence (AOI). This AOI dependence results in a modulation of system level response with scan angle. Measurement of system response vs. scan angle (RVS) was not difficult for the VIRS reflected solar bands, but attaining the required accuracy for the IR bands in the laboratory was not possible without a large vacuum chamber and a considerable amount of custom designed testing apparatus. Therefore, the decision was made to conduct the measurement on-orbit. On three separate occasions, the TRMM spacecraft was rotated about its pitch axis and, after the nadir view passed over the Earth's limb, the VIRS performed several thousand scans while viewing deep space. The resulting data has been analyzed and the RVS curves generated for the three IR bands are being used in the VIRS radiometric calibration algorithm. This, to our knowledge, the first time this measurement has been made on-orbit. Similar measurements are planned for the EOS-AM and EOS-PM MODIS sensors and are being considered for several systems under development. The VIRS on-orbit results will be compared to VIRS and MODIS system level laboratory measurements, MODIS scan mirror witness sample measurements and modeled data.

  4. A new centering method of the measuring probe for spiral scanning-based surface profile measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Hui-Lin; Zeng, Pei-Yang; Ju, Bing-Feng; Zhou, Zhao-Zhong; Xu, Shaoning; Sun, Anyu

    2017-02-01

    Spiral scanning is a high-efficiency scanning mode for surface profile measurement systems. The most important priority to realize the spiral scanning mode is to accurately align the measuring probe with the rotational centre of the spindle. This paper proposes a novel centre alignment method of the measuring probe, which is considered to be suitable for any type of spiral scanning surface measurement systems. The proposed method, which only needs a tilted flat mirror as the artefact, makes the time-consuming centre alignment process of the measuring probe become much easier and faster. The operational steps of the proposed method are presented. Experiments have also been carried out based on a self-developed optical profiler with spiral scanning operation to verity the feasibility of the proposed method. The experimental results show that the proposed method is capable of conducting a fast alignment (only takes 3 min) while maintaining a high alignment accuracy. Evaluation of the alignment accuracy shows that the centering error is less than 10 µm on the mechanical guide rail stage and about 1.7 µm on the air-bearing stage.

  5. Collimated prompt gamma TOF measurements with multi-slit multi-detector configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimmer, J.; Chevallier, M.; Constanzo, J.; Dauvergne, D.; De Rydt, M.; Dedes, G.; Freud, N.; Henriquet, P.; La Tessa, C.; Létang, J. M.; Pleskač, R.; Pinto, M.; Ray, C.; Reithinger, V.; Richard, M. H.; Rinaldi, I.; Roellinghoff, F.; Schuy, C.; Testa, E.; Testa, M.

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal prompt-gamma ray profiles have been measured with a multi-slit multi-detector configuration at a 75 MeV/u 13C beam and with a PMMA target. Selections in time-of-flight and energy have been applied in order to discriminate prompt-gamma rays produced in the target from background events. The ion ranges which have been extracted from each individual detector module agree amongst each other and are consistent with theoretical expectations. In a separate dedicated experiment with 200 MeV/u 12C ions the fraction of inter-detector scattering has been determined to be on the 10%-level via a combination of experimental results and simulations. At the same experiment different collimator configurations have been tested and the shielding properties of tungsten and lead for prompt-gamma rays have been measured.

  6. Initial recommendations for restricting gamma-ray spectrometry measurements of radionuclides for on-site inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, W F; Kreek, S A; Wild, J F

    1998-11-06

    The US paper "Radionuclide Sampling, Sample Handling and Analytical Laboratory Equipment for Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty On-Site Inspections," CTBT/PC/V/OSI/WSII/PR/29 identified the radionuclides of interest to an OS1 as 144Ce, 147Nd, 141Ce, 149Ba140La), 95 Zr(95Nb), 131mXe, 133mXe, 133gXe, 135gXe, and 37Ar. All of these nuclides (except 37Ar) can be measured via some form of conventional or coincidence-based gamma-ray spectrometry. The non-gaseous radionuclides [144Ce, 147Nd, 141Ce, 140Ba(140La), and 95Zr(95Nb)] can be measured via conventional high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry using a shielded, high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The gaseous radionuclides 131mXe, 133mXe, 133gXe, and 135gXe are best measured (after separation from their homologous elements) via a gamma & beta/electron coincidence technique such as that described in CTBT/WGB/TL-11/5 which could utilize either a HPGe or low-resolution (NaI(TI)) gamma-ray spectrometer to detect the gamma-ray/x-ray and a plastic scintillator to detect the beta particle/electron from the decay of the various Xe isotopes. The US paper CTBT/PC/V/IOSI/WSII/PR/29 (and other papers) identified a need to limit the information that can be extracted from high-resolution gamma-ray spectra to ensure that only information relevant to an OSI is accessible. The term "blinding" has been used to describe the need to limit the information available to the Inspection Team from the high-resolution gamma-ray measurement. A better term is "measurement restriction"; the need for restricting the information is particularly relevant to conventional high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry measurements, but not to the gamma & beta/electron coincidence-type measurements

  7. A novel scanning system using an industrial robot and the workspace measurement and positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ziyue; Zhu, Jigui; Yang, Linghui; Lin, Jiarui

    2015-10-01

    The present scanning system consists of an industrial robot and a line-structured laser sensor which uses the industrial robot as a position instrument to guarantee the accuracy. However, the absolute accuracy of an industrial robot is relatively poor compared with the good repeatability in the manufacturing industry. This paper proposes a novel method using the workspace measurement and positioning system (wMPS) to remedy the lack of accuracy of the industrial robot. In order to guarantee the positioning accuracy of the system, the wMPS which is a laser-based measurement technology designed for large-volume metrology applications is brought in. Benefitting from the wMPS, this system can measure different cell-areas by the line-structured laser sensor and fuse the measurement data of different cell-areas by using the wMPS accurately. The system calibration which is the procedure to acquire and optimize the structure parameters of the scanning system is also stated in detail in this paper. In order to verify the feasibility of the system for scanning the large free-form surface, an experiment is designed to scan the internal surface of the door of a car-body in white. The final results show that the measurement data of the whole measuring areas have been jointed perfectly and there is no mismatch in the figure especially in the hole measuring areas. This experiment has verified the rationality of the system scheme, the correctness and effectiveness of the relevant methods.

  8. Measurement of blood viscosity using a pressure-scanning capillary viscometer.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sehyun; Ku, Yunhee; Park, Myung-Su; Suh, Jang-Soo

    2004-01-01

    A newly designed pressure-scanning capillary viscometer is extended to measure the viscosity of whole blood over a range of shear rates without the use of anticoagulants in a clinical setting. In the present study, a single measurement of pressure variation with time replaces the flow rate and pressure drop measurements that are usually required for the operation of a capillary tube viscometer. Using a pressure transducer and capillary, we measured the variation of pressure flowing through capillary tube with respect to time, p(t), from which viscosity and the shear rate were mathematically calculated. For water and anticoagulant-added bloods, there was an excellent agreement found between the results from the pressure scanning capillary viscometer and those from a commercially available rotating viscometer. Also, the pressure-scanning capillary viscometer measured the viscosity of whole blood without heparin or EDTA. This new method overcomes the drawbacks of conventional viscometers in the measurement of whole blood viscosity. First, the pressure-scanning capillary viscometer can accurately and consistently measure the whole blood viscosity over a range of shear rates in less than 2 min without any anticoagulants. Second, this design provides simplicity (i.e., ease of operation, no moving parts, and disposable) and low cost.

  9. Note: long range and accurate measurement of deep trench microstructures by a specialized scanning tunneling microscope.

    PubMed

    Ju, Bing-Feng; Chen, Yuan-Liu; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Wule; Jin, Chao; Fang, F Z

    2012-05-01

    A compact but practical scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with high aspect ratio and high depth capability has been specially developed. Long range scanning mechanism with tilt-adjustment stage is adopted for the purpose of adjusting the probe-sample relative angle to compensate the non-parallel effects. A periodical trench microstructure with a pitch of 10 μm has been successfully imaged with a long scanning range up to 2.0 mm. More innovatively, a deep trench with depth and step height of 23.0 μm has also been successfully measured, and slope angle of the sidewall can approximately achieve 67°. The probe can continuously climb the high step and exploring the trench bottom without tip crashing. The new STM could perform long range measurement for the deep trench and high step surfaces without image distortion. It enables accurate measurement and quality control of periodical trench microstructures.

  10. Validation of high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography for quantitative gas holdup measurements in centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieberle, André; Schäfer, Thomas; Neumann, Martin; Hampel, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    In this article, the capability of high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography (HireCT) for quantitative gas-liquid phase distribution measurements in commercially available industrial pumps is experimentally investigated. The object of interest thereby operates under two-phase flow conditions. HireCT System comprises a collimated 137Cs isotopic source, a radiation detector arc with a multi-channel signal processing unit, and a rotary unit enabling CT scans of objects with diameters of up to 700 mm. The accuracy of gas holdup measurements was validated on a sophisticated modular test mockup replicating defined gas-liquid distributions, which are expected in impeller chambers of industrial centrifugal pumps under two-phase operation. Stationary as well as rotation-synchronized CT scanning techniques have been analyzed, which are both used to obtain sharply resolved gas phase distributions in rotating structures as well as non-rotating zones. A measuring accuracy of better than 1% absolute for variously distributed static gas holdups in the rotating frame has been verified with the modular test mockup using HireCT.

  11. The Probing In-Situ With Neutron and Gamma Rays (PING) Instrument for Planetary Composition Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.

    2012-01-01

    The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument (formerly named PNG-GRAND) [I] experiment is an innovative application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth over many decades. The objective of our active neutron-gamma ray technology program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) is to bring PING to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Venus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets and measure their bulk surface and subsurface elemental composition without the need to drill into the surface. Gamma-Ray Spectrometers (GRS) have been incorporated into numerous orbital planetary science missions. While orbital measurements can map a planet, they have low spatial and elemental sensitivity due to the low surface gamma ray emission rates reSUlting from using cosmic rays as an excitation source, PING overcomes this limitation in situ by incorporating a powerful neutron excitation source that permits significantly higher elemental sensitivity elemental composition measurements. PING combines a 14 MeV deuterium-tritium Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG) with a gamma ray spectrometer and two neutron detectors to produce a landed instrument that can determine the elemental composition of a planet down to 30 - 50 cm below the planet's surface, The penetrating nature of .5 - 10 MeV gamma rays and 14 MeV neutrons allows such sub-surface composition measurements to be made without the need to drill into or otherwise disturb the planetary surface, thus greatly simplifying the lander design, We are cun'ently testing a PING prototype at a unique outdoor neutron instrumentation test facility at NASA/GSFC that provides two large (1.8 m x 1.8 m x ,9 m) granite and basalt test formations placed outdoors in an empty field, Since an independent trace elemental analysis has been performed on both these

  12. Determination of activity of 51Cr on gamma radiation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, V. V.; Gavrin, V. N.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Malyshkin, Yu. M.; Shikhin, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    A method of determining the activity of intensive distributed -sources on the measurement of the continuous spectrum of radiation, for example the internal bremsstrahlung, is developed. The recurrent formula for reconstructing of a continuous spectrum, registered in a Ge detector, at distorting it in the detector. The method of precise measurements of the spectrum of 51Cr internal bremsstrahlung using two point sources of low activity is described.

  13. The remote measurement of tornado-like flows employing a scanning laser Doppler system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffreys, H. B.; Bilbro, J. W.; Dimarzio, C.; Sonnenschein, C.; Toomey, D.

    1977-01-01

    The paper deals with a scanning laser Doppler velocimeter system employed in a test program for measuring naturally occurring tornado-like phenomena, known as dust devils. A description of the system and the test program is followed by a discussion of the data processing techniques and data analysis. The system uses a stable 15-W CO2 laser with the beam expanded and focused by a 12-inch telescope. Range resolution is obtained by focusing the optical system. The velocity of each volume of air (scanned in a horizontal plane) is determined from spectral analysis of the heterodyne signal. Results derived from the measurement program and data/system analyses are examined.

  14. In vitro dose measurements in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Da; Padole, Atul; Li, Xinhua; Singh, Sarabjeet; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Lira, Diego; Shi, Jim Q.; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Liu, Bob; Liu, Tianyu; Xu, X. George

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To present a study of radiation dose measurements with a human cadaver scanned on a clinical CT scanner. Methods: Multiple point dose measurements were obtained with high-accuracy Thimble ionization chambers placed inside the stomach, liver, paravertebral gutter, ascending colon, left kidney, and urinary bladder of a human cadaver (183 cm in height and 67.5 kg in weight) whose abdomen/pelvis region was scanned repeatedly with a multidetector row CT. The flat energy response and precision of the dosimeters were verified, and the slight differences in each dosimeter's response were evaluated and corrected to attain high accuracy. In addition, skin doses were measured for radiosensitive organs outside the scanned region with OSL dosimeters: the right eye, thyroid, both nipples, and the right testicle. Three scan protocols were used, which shared most scan parameters but had different kVp and mA settings: 120-kVp automA, 120-kVp 300 mA, and 100-kVp 300 mA. For each protocol three repeated scans were performed. Results: The tube starting angle (TSA) was found to randomly vary around two major conditions, which caused large fluctuations in the repeated point dose measurements: for the 120-kVp 300 mA protocol this angle changed from approximately 110° to 290°, and caused 8% − 25% difference in the point dose measured at the stomach, liver, colon, and urinary bladder. When the fluctuations of the TSA were small (within 5°), the maximum coefficient of variance was approximately 3.3%. The soft tissue absorbed doses averaged from four locations near the center of the scanned region were 27.2 ± 3.3 and 16.5 ± 2.7 mGy for the 120 and 100-kVp fixed-mA scans, respectively. These values were consistent with the corresponding size specific dose estimates within 4%. The comparison of the per-100-mAs tissue doses from the three protocols revealed that: (1) dose levels at nonsuperficial locations in the TCM scans could not be accurately deduced by simply scaling the

  15. In vitro dose measurements in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Da; Padole, Atul; Li, Xinhua; Singh, Sarabjeet; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Lira, Diego; Liu, Tianyu; Shi, Jim Q.; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Xu, X. George; Liu, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present a study of radiation dose measurements with a human cadaver scanned on a clinical CT scanner. Methods: Multiple point dose measurements were obtained with high-accuracy Thimble ionization chambers placed inside the stomach, liver, paravertebral gutter, ascending colon, left kidney, and urinary bladder of a human cadaver (183 cm in height and 67.5 kg in weight) whose abdomen/pelvis region was scanned repeatedly with a multidetector row CT. The flat energy response and precision of the dosimeters were verified, and the slight differences in each dosimeter's response were evaluated and corrected to attain high accuracy. In addition, skin doses were measured for radiosensitive organs outside the scanned region with OSL dosimeters: the right eye, thyroid, both nipples, and the right testicle. Three scan protocols were used, which shared most scan parameters but had different kVp and mA settings: 120-kVp automA, 120-kVp 300 mA, and 100-kVp 300 mA. For each protocol three repeated scans were performed. Results: The tube starting angle (TSA) was found to randomly vary around two major conditions, which caused large fluctuations in the repeated point dose measurements: for the 120-kVp 300 mA protocol this angle changed from approximately 110° to 290°, and caused 8% − 25% difference in the point dose measured at the stomach, liver, colon, and urinary bladder. When the fluctuations of the TSA were small (within 5°), the maximum coefficient of variance was approximately 3.3%. The soft tissue absorbed doses averaged from four locations near the center of the scanned region were 27.2 ± 3.3 and 16.5 ± 2.7 mGy for the 120 and 100-kVp fixed-mA scans, respectively. These values were consistent with the corresponding size specific dose estimates within 4%. The comparison of the per-100-mAs tissue doses from the three protocols revealed that: (1) dose levels at nonsuperficial locations in the TCM scans could not be accurately deduced by simply scaling the

  16. High-precision gamma-ray total cross-section measurements between 3.45 and 12 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Frankle, Christen M.; Moss, Calvin E.

    2008-12-01

    A Compton-backscatter capability has recently become available at the Duke University Free Electron Laser Laboratory. This capability allows one to produce high fluxes of tunable, nearly monoenergetic gamma rays. Using these gamma-ray beams, we have made high-precision (~0.5%) measurements of the gamma-ray total cross section at 3.45, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, and 12 MeV. The nuclei measured were Be, C, Cu, Ta, W, Pb, and U

  17. Gamma-Ray Attenuation Measurements as a Laboratory Experiment: Some Remarks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamides, E.; Koutroubas, S. K.; Moshonas, N.; Yiasemides, K.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we make some significant remarks on the experimental study of the absorption of gamma radiation passing through matter. These remarks have to do with the seemingly unexpected trend of the measured intensity of radiation versus the thickness of the absorber, which puzzles students and its explanation eludes many laboratory…

  18. GeMini Plus: A Versatile Gamma-Ray Spectrometer for Planetary Composition Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burks, M. T.; Heffern, L. E.; Lawrence, D. J.; Goldsten, J. O.; Peplowski, P. N.

    2016-10-01

    GeMini Plus is a high-resolution, low-resource, gamma-ray spectrometer for planetary composition measurements. The core of the instrument has a mass of 3 kg and requires 10 watts power, making it well suited for both landed and orbital missions.

  19. Measurements of gamma-ray dose from a moderated /sup 252/Cf source

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Griffith, R.V.; Plato, P.; Miklos, J.

    1983-06-01

    The gamma-ray dose fraction from a moderated /sup 252/Cf source was determined by using three types of dosimetry systems. Measurements were carried out in air at a distance of 35 cm from the surface of the moderating sphere (50 cm from the source which is at the center of the sphere) to the geometrical center of each detector. The moderating sphere is 0.8-mm-thick stainless steel shell filled with D/sub 2/O and covered with 0.5 mm of cadmium. Measurements were also carried out with instruments and dosimeters positioned at the surface of a 40 cm x 40 cm x 15 cm plexiglass irradiation phantom whose front surface was also 35 cm from the surface of the moderating sphere. A-150 tissue-equivalent (TE) plastic ionization chambers and a TE proportional counter (TEPC) were used to measure tissue dose, from which the neutron dose equivalent was computed. The ratio of gamma-ray dose to the neutron dose equivalent was determined by using a relatively neutron-insensitive Geiger-Mueller (GM) counter and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). In addition, the event-size spectrum measured by the TEPC was also used to compute the gamma-ray dose fraction. The average value for the ratio of gamma-ray dose to neutron dose equivalent was found to be 0.18 with an uncertainty of about +-18%.

  20. Determining the solar-flare photospheric scale height from SMM gamma-ray measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    A connected series of Monte Carlo programs was developed to make systematic calculations of the energy, temporal and angular dependences of the gamma-ray line and neutron emission resulting from such accelerated ion interactions. Comparing the results of these calculations with the Solar Maximum Mission/Gamma Ray Spectrometer (SMM/GRS) measurements of gamma-ray line and neutron fluxes, the total number and energy spectrum of the flare-accelerated ions trapped on magnetic loops at the Sun were determined and the angular distribution, pitch angle scattering, and mirroring of the ions on loop fields were constrained. Comparing the calculations with measurements of the time dependence of the neutron capture line emission, a determination of the He-3/H ratio in the photosphere was also made. The diagnostic capabilities of the SMM/GRS measurements were extended by developing a new technique to directly determine the effective photospheric scale height in solar flares from the neutron capture gamma-ray line measurements, and critically test current atmospheric models in the flare region.

  1. 10 CFR 35.635 - Full calibration measurements on gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... radiosurgery units. 35.635 Section 35.635 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT... authorized to use a gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit for medical use shall perform full calibration measurements on each unit— (1) Before the first medical use of the unit; (2) Before medical use under...

  2. Fast Scanning Single Collector ICP-MS for Low Level Isotope Ratio Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, K.; Georg, B.

    2010-12-01

    Multiple collector (MC)-ICP-MS is recognized as a workhorse in the field of isotope ratio measurements. With its unrivalled precision, high sample throughput and multi-element coverage, MC-ICPMS has opened up new areas of study in earth, environmental and biological sciences. However, SC-ICP-MS is fit for purpose for many applications where sample amount is limited and fractionations are relatively large. To compensate for the inherent ion beam instability associated with the ICP ion source, fast scanning magnetic sector instruments are used. Here, we describe and discuss the use of the Nu Attom SC-ICP-MS for low level isotope ratio measurements. The Nu Attom is a double focusing magnetic sector mass spectrometer with unique fast scanning capabilities. Deflectors located at the entrance and exit of the flight tube are used to alter the effective magnet radius by changing the ion trajectory. This enables a fast electrostatic scan over a mass range of approximately 40%. In contrast to other fast scanning magnetic sector instruments, there is no change in the ion energy which may introduce additional mass bias effects. The Nu Attom also has fully adjustable source and collector slits. This facilitates measurements in medium mass resolution (R=1500-2500), whilst maintaining a flat topped peak necessary for precise isotope ratio measurements. The potential applications of the Nu Attom in isotope ratio measurements will be explored.

  3. Target asymmetry measurements of {gamma} p{r_arrow}{pi} {sup +}n with Phoenics at ELSA

    SciTech Connect

    Althoff, K.; Anton, G.; Arends, J.; Beulertz, W.; Bock, A.; Breuer, M.; Detemple, P.; Dutz, H.; Gehring, R.; Gemander, M.; Goertz, S.; Helbing, K.; Hey, J.; Kraemer, D.; Meyer, W.; Noeldeke, G.; Reicherz, G.; Thomas, A.; Zucht, B.

    1995-05-10

    The target asymmetry T of the reaction {gamma} p{r_arrow}{pi} {sup +}n has been measured with the Phoenics detector in combination with the Bonn frozen spin target at ELSA. For the first time the polarization observable T has been determined simultaneously over a large photon energy range (E{sub {gamma}}=220--800 MeV) and pion angles ({Theta}{sub {pi}}{sup m}=35{degree}--135{degree}) with a tagged photon facility. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  4. The influence of exogenous conditions on mobile measured gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierke, C.; Werban, U.; Dietrich, P.

    2012-12-01

    In the past, gamma ray measurements have been used for geological surveys and exploration using airborne and borehole logging systems. For these applications, the relationships between the measured physical parameter - the concentration of natural gamma emitters 40K, 238U and 232Th - and geological origin or sedimentary developments are well described. Based on these applications and knowledge in combination with adjusted sensor systems, gamma ray measurements are used to derive soil parameters to create detailed soil maps e.g., in digital soil mapping (DSM) and monitoring of soils. Therefore, not only qualitative but also quantitative comparability is necessary. Grain size distribution, type of clay minerals and organic matter content are soil parameters which directly influence the gamma ray emitter concentration. Additionally, the measured concentration is influenced by endogenous processes like soil moisture variation due to raining events, foggy weather conditions, or erosion and deposition of material. A time series of gamma ray measurements was used to observe changes in gamma ray concentration on a floodplain area in Central Germany. The study area is characterised by high variations in grain size distribution and occurrence of flooding events. For the survey, we used a 4l NaI(Tl) detector with GPS connection mounted on a sledge, which is towed across the field sites by a four-wheel-vehicle. The comparison of data from different time steps shows similar structures with minor variation between the data ranges and shape of structures. However, the data measured during different soil moisture contents differ in absolute value. An average increase of soil moisture of 36% leads to a decrease of Th (by 20%), K (by 29%), and U (by 41%). These differences can be explained by higher attenuation of radiation during higher soil moisture content. The different changes in nuclide concentration will also lead to varying ratios. We will present our experiences concerning

  5. Analyzing Space-Based Interferometric Measurements of Stars and Network Measurements of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taff, L. G.

    1998-01-01

    Since the announcement of the discovery of sources of bursts of gamma-ray radiation in 1973, hundreds more reports of such bursts have now been published. Numerous artificial satellites have been equipped with gamma-ray detectors including the very successful Compton Gamma Ray Observatory BATSE instrument. Unfortunately, we have made no progress in identifying the source(s) of this high energy radiation. We suspected that this was a consequence of the method used to define gamma-ray burst source "error boxes." An alternative procedure to compute gamma-ray burst source positions, with a purely physical underpinning, was proposed in 1988 by Taff. Since then we have also made significant progress in understanding the analytical nature of the triangulation problem and in computing actual gamma-ray burst positions and their corresponding error boxes. For the former, we can now mathematically illustrate the crucial role of the area occupied by the detectors, while for the latter, the Atteia et al. (1987) catalog has been completely re-reduced. There are very few discrepancies in locations between our results and those of the customary "time difference of arrival" procedure. Thus, we have numerically demonstrated that the end result, for the positions, of these two very different-looking procedures is the same. Finally, for the first time, we provide a sample of realistic "error boxes" whose non-simple shapes vividly portray the difficulty of burst source localization.

  6. 207Pb(n,2n{gamma})206Pb Cross-Section Measurements by In-Beam Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, P.; Kerveno, M.; Rudolf, G.; Borcea, C.; Jericha, E.; Jokic, S.; Lukic, S.; Mihailescu, L. C.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Pavlik, A.

    2006-03-13

    207Pb(n,2n{gamma})206Pb cross section were measured for incident neutron energies between 6 and 20 MeV with the white neutron beam produced at GELINA. The {gamma}-ray production cross section for the main transition (803 keV, 2+{yields} 0+) in 206Pb is compared to results obtained at Los Alamos and to the TALYS and EMPIRE-II code predictions.

  7. Properties of a large NaI(Tl) spectrometer for the energy measurement of high-energy gamma rays on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, E. B.; Finman, L. C.; Hofstadter, R.; Lepetich, J. E.; Lin, Y. C.

    1986-01-01

    A large NaI(Tl) spectrometer is expected to play a crucial role in the measurement of the energy spectra from an all-sky survey of high-energy celestial gamma rays on the Gamma Ray Observatory. The crystal size and requirements of space flight have resulted in a novel crystal-packaging and optics combination. The structure of this spectrometer and the operating characteristics determined in a test program using high energy positrons are described.

  8. Coarse-fine vertical scanning based optical profiler for structured surface measurement with large step height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Liu, Xiaojun; Lei, Zili; Li, Qian; Yang, Xiao; Chen, Liangzhou; Lu, Wenlong

    2015-02-01

    White light interference (WLI) optical profiler had been used widely for structured surface measurement. To achieve high measuring accuracy, piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) was usually used as the vertical scanning unit, which was normally less than 100um and only for small range structured surface measurement. With the development of advanced manufacturing technology, precision structured surfaces with large step height were appearing. To satisfy the measurement requirements of this kind of precision structured surfaces, WLI optical profiler with large range had to be developed. In this paper, an optical profiler was proposed, in which a coarse-fine vertical scanning system was adopted to expand its measurement range to 10mm while its resolution still at nanometer level.

  9. Measurements of the Martian Gamma/Neutron Spectra with MSL/RAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, J.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Ehresmann, B.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Hassler, D.; Reitz, G.; Brinza, D.; Weigle, E.; Boettcher, S.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Boehm, E.; Posner, A.; Rafkin, S. C.; Kortmann, O.

    2013-12-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) onboard Mars Science Laboratory's rover curiosity measures the energetic charged and neutral particle spectra and the radiation dose rate on the Martian surface. An important factor for determining the biological impact of the Martian surface radiation is the specific contribution of neutrons, which possess a high biological effectiveness. In contrast to charged particles, neutrons and gamma rays are generally only measured indirectly. Their measurement is the result of a complex convolution of the incident particle spectrum with the measurement process. We apply an inversion method to calculate the gamma/neutron spectra from the RAD neutral particle measurements. Here we show first measurements of the Martian gamma/neutron spectra and compare them to theoretical predictions. We find that the shape of the gamma spectrum is very similar to the predicted one, but with a ~50% higher intensity. The measured neutron spectrum agrees well with prediction up to ~100 MeV, but shows a considerably increased intensity for higher energies. The measured neutron spectrum translates into a radiation dose rate of 25 μGy/day and a dose equivalent rate of 106 μSv/day. This corresponds to 10% of the total surface dose rate, and 15% of the biological relevant surface dose equivalent rate on Mars. Measuring the Martian neutron spectra is an essential step for determining the mutagenic influences to past or present life at or beneath the Martian surface as well as the radiation hazard for future human exploration, including the shielding design of a potential habitat. The contribution of neutrons to the dose equivalent increases considerably with shielding thickness, so our measurements provide an important figure to mitigate cancer risk.

  10. Statistical Measurement of the Gamma-Ray Source-count Distribution as a Function of Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechlin, Hannes-S.; Cuoco, Alessandro; Donato, Fiorenza; Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Statistical properties of photon count maps have recently been proven as a new tool to study the composition of the gamma-ray sky with high precision. We employ the 1-point probability distribution function of six years of Fermi-LAT data to measure the source-count distribution dN/dS and the diffuse components of the high-latitude gamma-ray sky as a function of energy. To that aim, we analyze the gamma-ray emission in five adjacent energy bands between 1 and 171 GeV. It is demonstrated that the source-count distribution as a function of flux is compatible with a broken power law up to energies of ˜50 GeV. The index below the break is between 1.95 and 2.0. For higher energies, a simple power-law fits the data, with an index of {2.2}-0.3+0.7 in the energy band between 50 and 171 GeV. Upper limits on further possible breaks as well as the angular power of unresolved sources are derived. We find that point-source populations probed by this method can explain {83}-13+7% ({81}-19+52%) of the extragalactic gamma-ray background between 1.04 and 1.99 GeV (50 and 171 GeV). The method has excellent capabilities for constraining the gamma-ray luminosity function and the spectra of unresolved blazars.

  11. 232Th(n,{gamma})233Th Thermal Reaction Cross-Section Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Maidana, Nora L.; Vanin, Vito R.; Pascholati, Paulo R.; Helene, Otaviano; Castro, Ruy M.; Dias, Mauro S.; Koskinas, Marina F.

    2005-05-24

    The 232Th(n,{gamma})233Th thermal neutron-capture reaction cross section was measured using targets of {approx} 1.5 mg of high-purity metallic thorium irradiated in the IPEN IEA-R1m 5 MW pool research reactor. The 197Au(n,{gamma})198Au reaction was used to monitor the thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes in the irradiation position, which was found using the Westcott formalism. The residual gamma-ray activity was followed with an HPGe detector. The detector efficiency curve was fitted by the least-squares method applying covariance analysis to all uncertainties involved. The experimental result is {sigma}0 =7.20{+-}0.20 b, in agreement with previous published values.

  12. Continuous Scan, a method for performing modal testing using meaningful measurement parameters; Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Maio, D.; Ewins, D. J.

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents the first part of a work about modal testing using meaningful measurement parameters. Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer (SLDV) systems are becoming largely used both in industry and university for performing vibration measurements. A reason for the success of SLDV systems can be found in their capability of measuring vibration remotely and under different environmental conditions which, when hostile, can inhibit other transducers to work correctly. Hence, SLDV system can be very practical and useful in many engineering applications. SLDV systems are being used as a contactless transducer measuring vibrations from a discrete number of measurement positions marked on the specimen whenever an optical access to it is available. Hence, the advantage of a modal test carried out using accelerometers and one carried out using a SLDV system can be: (i) the automation of the measurements and (ii) the increase of the spatial resolution of the measured modes. This suggests that SLDV systems can be used as a practical replacement of accelerometers operating the same measurement method. Continuous Scanning method is a novel approach of using contactless transducers for measuring vibrations. The most important difference between a discrete and a continuous approach is the method of measuring a vibration pattern. A discrete method measures the level of vibrations at discrete positions on a structure whereas a continuous method captures the modulation of the vibrations produced by the excited modes. This is possible when a transducer can travel across a vibrating surface. This first part of the work presents a new approach of continuous scanning measurement method using a multi-tonal excitation waveform. The paper starts from a comparison between a step and continuous scan mode to introduce a novel approach of continuous scan and multi-tonal excitation waveform. The objective of this first part of work is to present and understand that measurement parameters

  13. A simple focal-length measurement technique for adaptive microlenses using z-scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelaziez, Yasser; Banerjee, Partha P.

    2004-10-01

    A simple technique for focal length measurements of adaptive micro-lenses using z-scan is reported. Focal length is one of the most important parameters of any lens. The effective focal length is measured with reference to the principal points that are not easy to find especially for micro-lenses. In addition, variable focal length microlenses pose a different challenge that makes the process of determining their exact focal length a tedious and difficult process. Classical methods such as nodal slide and magnification have been used for focal length determination. Also, advanced Interference techniques such as Talbot, Moire, Digital Speckle, Zygo and Joint Fourier Transform were used for focal length measurements. These techniques require more elaborate setups and difficult to implement, especially for microlenses. Recently a power meter was used to find the focal length of an unknown lens. Most of the techniques mentioned above proof to be not simple for microlens characterization. The z-scan technique has been implemented, for quite sometimes, to characterize the third-order effects of a nonlinear optical material. The z-scan provides information on both the sign and magnitude of the non-linear refractive index and offer advantage of simplicity. We have used a regular lens to collimate and focus light unto the lens under test. By scanning the lens under test and measuring the on-axis intensity, one can find the focal length. This is because the on-axis intensity is proportional to the phase of the lens and therefore the focal length. In the case of an adaptive lens with its focal length is a function of the applied voltage, the scanning occurs for each voltage value that will correspond to the on-axis refractive index change and therefore the far field on-axis intensity. This described technique above is easy to implement and can achieve good accuracy due to the inherent sensitivity of the z-scan.

  14. Display MTF measurements based on scanning and imaging technologies and its importance in the application space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Balvinder; Olson, Jeff; Flug, Eric A.

    2016-05-01

    Measuring the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) of a display monitor is necessary for many applications such as: modeling end-to-end systems, conducting perception experiments, and performing targeting tasks in real-word scenarios. The MTF of a display defines the resolution properties and quantifies how well the spatial frequencies are displayed on a monitor. Many researchers have developed methods to measure display MTFs using either scanning or imaging devices. In this paper, we first present methods to measure display MTFs using two separate technologies and then discuss the impact of a display MTF on a system's performance. The two measurement technologies were scanning with a photometer and imaging with a CMOS based camera. To estimate a true display MTF, measurements made with the photometer were backed out for the scanning optics aperture. The developed methods were applied to measure MTFs of the two types of monitors, Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) and Liquid Crystal Display (LCD). The accuracy of the measured MTFs was validated by comparing MTFs measured with the two systems. The methods presented here are simple and can be easily implemented employing either a Prichard photometer or an imaging device. In addition, the impact of a display MTF on the end-to-end performance of a system was modeled using NV-IPM.

  15. Radiative Penguin Decays of B Mesons: Measurements of B to K* gamma, B to K2* gamma, and Search for B0 to phi gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, J.

    2005-01-03

    Electromagnetic radiative penguin decays of the B meson were studied with the BaBar detector at SLAC's PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory. Branching fractions and isospin asymmetry of the decay B {yields} K*{gamma}, branching fractions of B {yields} K*{sub 2}(1430){gamma}, and a search for B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{gamma} are presented. The decay rates may be enhanced by contributions from non-standard model processes.

  16. Measurement of U-235 Fission Neutron Spectra Using a Multiple Gamma Coincidence Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Chuncheng; Kegel, G.H.R.; Egan, J.J.; DeSimone, D.J.; Alimeti, A.; Roldan, C.F.; McKittrick, T.M.; Kim, D.-S.; Chen, X.; Tremblay, S.E.

    2005-05-24

    The Los Alamos Model of Madland and Nix predicts the shape of the fission neutron energy spectrum for incident primary neutrons of different energies. Verifications of the model normally are limited to measurements of the fission neutron spectra for energies higher than that of the primary neutrons because the low-energy spectrum is distorted by the admixture of elastically and inelastically scattered neutrons. This situation can be remedied by using a measuring technique that separates fission from scattering events. One solution consists of using a fissile sample so thin that fission fragments can be observed indicating the occurrence of a fission event. A different approach is considered in this paper. It has been established that a fission event is accompanied by the emission of between seven and eight gamma rays, while in a scattering interaction, between zero and two gammas are emitted, so that a gamma multiplicity detector should supply a datum to distinguish a fission event from a scattering event. We proceed as follows: A subnanosecond pulsed and bunched proton beam from the UML Van de Graaff generates nearly mono-energetic neutrons by irradiating a thin metallic lithium target. The neutrons irradiate a 235U sample. Emerging neutron energies are measured with a time-of-flight spectrometer. A set of four BaF2 detectors is located close to the 235U sample. These detectors together with their electronic components identify five different events for each neutron detected, i.e., whether four, three, two, one, or none of the BaF2 detectors received one (or more) gamma rays. We present work, preliminary to the final measurements, involving feasibility considerations based on gamma-ray coincidence measurements with four BaF2 detectors, and the design of a Fission-Scattering Discriminator under construction.

  17. Automatic measurement extraction for apparel from a three-dimensional body scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pargas, Roy P.; Staples, Nancy J.; Davis, J. Steve

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes a project involving computer assisted measurement extraction from a three-dimensional (3D) noncontact fullbody scan. It explains the motivation behind the project, describes briefly the research plan and provides details on the measurement extraction software currently being developed. The software provides the user with tools to take measurements from a digitized image. In addition, a measurement extraction language allows the user to develop macros, or short programs, designed to automate the measurement extraction process. The paper concludes with a description of the current status of the project.

  18. Testing a Light-weight Compact Gamma Ray Detector for Measuring Snow Water Equivalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiet, E., II; Solie, D. J.; Sturm, M.

    2014-12-01

    The use of gamma ray to measure snow water equivalent (SWE) trace back to the 1970s during the Soviet Union hydrology program. Over the years research has shown that gamma detectors could be used to monitor SWE, and their use significantly expanded. In the 1980s several airborne campaigns were launched in North America to measure SWR; these gamma flights are still in use today. However, these airborne flights require a twin-engine aircraft and a detector with a computer that weighs 250 kg, which is unsuitable for use with unmanned airborne systems (UAS), our primary interest. Here we describe results of tests of a compact gamma detector weighing 2 kg. The envisioned deployment of this detector is on a small quad-copter UAS that can hover low over remote clearings in the boreal forest of interior Alaska. Such a technique may allow SWE estimates in places that otherwise would be difficult to measure. We tested the detector over snow and water bodies and found for SWE between 0 and 50 cm a sensitivity of ± 2 cm SWE, which is sufficient to resolve any significant snowfall in the region. In this presentation we will discuss our preliminary results and our future strategy for deploying the sensor on a UAS.

  19. Anisotropies in the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Background Measured by the Fermi LAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrara, E. C.; McEnery, J. E.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of unresolved sources to the diffuse gamma-ray background could induce anisotropies in this emission on small angular scales. We analyze the angular power spectrum of the diffuse emission measured by the Fermi LAT at Galactic latitudes absolute value of b > 30 deg in four energy bins spanning 1 to 50 GeV. At multipoles l >= 155, corresponding to angular scales approx < 2 deg, angular power above the photon noise level is detected at > 99.99% CL in the 1-2 GeV, 2- 5 GeV, and 5- 10 GeV energy bins, and at > 99% CL at 10-50 GeV. Within each energy bin the measured angular power takes approximately the same value at all multipoles l >= 155, suggesting that it originates from the contribution of one or more unclustered source populations. The amplitude of the angular power normalized to the mean intensity in each energy bin is consistent with a constant value at all energies, C(sub p) / (I)(exp 2) = 9.05 +/- 0.84 x 10(exp -6) sr, while the energy dependence of C(sub p) is consistent with the anisotropy arising from one or more source populations with power-law photon spectra with spectral index Gamma (sub s) = 2.40 +/- 0.07. We discuss the implications of the measured angular power for gamma-ray source populations that may provide a contribution to the diffuse gamma-ray background.

  20. Process dependent morphology of the Si/SiO2 interface measured with scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, Michael H.; Bell, L. D.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1988-01-01

    A new experimental technique to determine Si/SiO2 interface morphology is described. Thermal oxides of silicon are chemically removed, and the resulting surface topography is measured with scanning tunneling microscopy. Interfaces prepared by oxidation of Si (100) and (111) surfaces, followed by postoxidation anneal (POA) at different temperatures, have been characterized. Correlations between interface structure, chemistry, and electrical characteristics are described.

  1. Real-Time Measurement of Material Elastic Properties in a High Gamma Irradiation Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Telschow; Rob Schley; Dave Cottle

    2006-05-01

    This paper describes the first noncontact elastic vibration measurements of an object in a high gamma radiation field. Using a laser-coupled resonant ultrasound technique, the vibration modes of an Inconel hollow capped cylinder were measured as the gamma radiation field was increased to 104 Gy/h. This measurement technique allowed shifts in the resonant frequency of the sample’s vibration modes to be tracked over a 170-h period. The vibration mode frequencies changed in a manner consistent with the temperature dependence of the elastic stiffness coefficients of the material. These results demonstrate the efficacy of the laser approach for real-time resonant ultrasound measurements in this severely hostile nuclear environment.

  2. A new natural gamma radiation measurement system for marine sediment and rock analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, M. A.; Blum, P.; Chubarian, G.; Olsen, R.; Bennight, C.; Cobine, T.; Fackler, D.; Hastedt, M.; Houpt, D.; Mateo, Z.; Vasilieva, Y. B.

    2011-11-01

    A new high-efficiency and low-background system for the measurement of natural gamma radioactivity in marine sediment and rock cores retrieved from beneath the seabed was designed, built, and installed on the JOIDES Resolution research vessel. The system includes eight large NaI(Tl) detectors that measure adjacent intervals of the core simultaneously, maximizing counting times and minimizing statistical error for the limited measurement times available during drilling expeditions. Effect to background ratio is maximized with passive lead shielding, including both ordinary and low-activity lead. Large-area plastic scintillator active shielding filters background associated with the high-energy part of cosmic radiation. The new system has at least an order of magnitude higher statistical reliability and significantly enhances data quality compared to other offshore natural gamma radiation (NGR) systems designed to measure geological core samples. Reliable correlations and interpretations of cored intervals are possible at rates of a few counts per second.

  3. Neutron and gamma-ray dose measurements at various distances from the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Huntzinger, C.J.; Hankins, D.E.

    1984-08-01

    We measured neutron and gamma-ray dose rates at various distances from the Little Boy-Comet Critical Assembly at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in April of 1983. The Little Boy-Comet Assembly is a replica of the atomic weapon detonated over Hiroshima, designed to be operated at various steady-state power levels. The selected distances for measurement ranged from 107 m to 567 m. Gamma-ray measurements were made with a Reuter-Stokes environmental ionization chamber which has a sensitivity of 1.0 ..mu..R/hour. Neutron measurements were made with a pulsed-source remmeter which has a sensitivity of 0.1 ..mu..rem/hour, designed and built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). 12 references, 7 figures, 6 tables.

  4. Nonlinear analysis and dynamic compensation of stylus scanning measurement with wide range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Heiyang; Liu, Xiaojun; Lu, Wenlong

    2011-12-01

    Surface topography is an important geometrical feature of a workpiece that influences its quality and functions such as friction, wearing, lubrication and sealing. Precision measurement of surface topography is fundamental for product quality characterizing and assurance. Stylus scanning technique is a widely used method for surface topography measurement, and it is also regarded as the international standard method for 2-D surface characterizing. Usually surface topography, including primary profile, waviness and roughness, can be measured precisely and efficiently by this method. However, by stylus scanning method to measure curved surface topography, the nonlinear error is unavoidable because of the difference of horizontal position of the actual measured point from given sampling point and the nonlinear transformation process from vertical displacement of the stylus tip to angle displacement of the stylus arm, and the error increases with the increasing of measuring range. In this paper, a wide range stylus scanning measurement system based on cylindrical grating interference principle is constructed, the originations of the nonlinear error are analyzed, the error model is established and a solution to decrease the nonlinear error is proposed, through which the error of the collected data is dynamically compensated.

  5. Gamma Astrometric Measurement Experiment (GAME) - Implementation and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Mario; Gai, Mario; Vecchiato, Alberto; Lattanzi, Mario G.; Ligori, Sebastiano; Loreggia, Davide

    The GAME mission concept is aimed at test of the General Relativity, through very precise measurement of the gravitational deflection of light by the Sun, by means of an optimised telescope operating in the visible and launched in orbit on a small class satellite. We recall the science motivations, discussed in detail in a separate contribution by Vecchiato et al., and describe the mission requirements derivation, the proposed mission profile, the preliminary payload design and the expected performance. The targeted precision on the "γ" parameter of the Parametrised Post-Newtonian formulation of General Relativity is in the range 10-6 to 10-7 or better, with an improvement of one or two orders of magnitude with respect to the best currently available experimental results. Such precision is suitable to detect possible deviations of γ from the unity value, associated to generalised Einstein models for gravitation, with potentially huge impacts on the cosmological distribution of dark matter and dark energy. The measurement principle is based on the differential astrometric signature on the stellar positions, i.e. on the spatial component of the gravitational effect, rather than the temporal component as in the most recent experiments based on radio link delay timing. Calibration is based on frequent measurement of angular separation of bright sources in stellar fields affected by negligible deflection. The instrument concept is based on a dual field, multiple aperture Fizeau interferometer, observing simultaneously two sky regions close to the Solar limb. A split flat mirror is used to fold the telescope line of sight on two different directions on the sky, separated by a base angle of about 4 degrees, which represents the gauge applied on the sky to measure the desired angular value of deflection. Stability or calibration of the base angle is the key to fulfilling the GAME science goals. An internal laser metrology option is considered for both on ground

  6. MEASUREMENT OF THE EXPANSION RATE OF THE UNIVERSE FROM {gamma}-RAY ATTENUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Alberto; Prada, Francisco

    2013-07-10

    A measurement of the expansion rate of the universe (that is, the Hubble constant, H{sub 0}) is derived here using the {gamma}-ray attenuation observed in the spectra of {gamma}-ray sources produced by the interaction of extragalactic {gamma}-ray photons with the photons of the extragalactic background light (EBL). The Hubble constant determined with our technique, for a {Lambda}CDM cosmology, is H{sub 0}=71.8{sub -5.6}{sup +4.6}(stat){sub -13.8}{sup +7.2}(syst) km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}. This value is compatible with present-day measurements using well-established methods such as local distance ladders and cosmological probes. The recent detection of the cosmic {gamma}-ray horizon (CGRH) from multiwavelength observations of blazars, together with the advances in the knowledge of the EBL, allow us to measure the expansion rate of the universe. This estimate of the Hubble constant shows that {gamma}-ray astronomy has reached a mature enough state to provide cosmological measurements, which may become more competitive in the future with the construction of the Cherenkov Telescope Array. We find that the maximum dependence of the CGRH on the Hubble constant is approximately between redshifts 0.04 and 0.1, thus this is a smoking gun for planning future observational efforts. Other cosmological parameters, such as the total dark matter density {Omega}{sub m} and the dark energy equation of state w, are explored as well.

  7. Full-field step profile measurement with sinusoidal wavelength scanning interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Samuel; Sasaki, Osami; Suzuki, Takamasa

    2014-05-01

    A sinusoidal wavelength scanning interferometer is proposed for 3-D profile measurement. The interference phase-shift signal generated by the sinusoidal wavelength scanning contains information of optical path difference (OPD) covering nm-mm scale structure. The interference phase-shift signal was obtained by the four-step phase shifting method. The sinusoidal wavelength shifting bandwidth of 5.7 nm with a frequency of approximately 180 Hz was performed by the Littman-Metcalf external resonator-type tunable laser with a center of 772.1 nm. The full-field step-height surface profile measurement and 3-D surface measurement were conducted by a CCD image sensor with an accuracy of few tens nm. The surface profile of gauge blocks with a step-height of up to 10 μm was successfully measured.

  8. Fast range measurement of spot scanning proton beams using a volumetric liquid scintillator detector

    PubMed Central

    Hui, CheukKai; Robertson, Daniel; Alsanea, Fahed; Beddar, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Accurate confirmation and verification of the range of spot scanning proton beams is crucial for correct dose delivery. Current methods to measure proton beam range using ionization chambers are either time-consuming or result in measurements with poor spatial resolution. The large-volume liquid scintillator detector allows real-time measurements of the entire dose profile of a spot scanning proton beam. Thus, liquid scintillator detectors are an ideal tool for measuring the proton beam range for commissioning and quality assurance. However, optical artefacts may decrease the accuracy of measuring the proton beam range within the scintillator tank. The purpose of the current study was to 1) develop a geometric calibration system to accurately calculate physical distances within the liquid scintillator detector, taking into account optical artefacts; and 2) assess the accuracy, consistency, and robustness of proton beam range measurement using the liquid scintillator detector with our geometric calibration system. The range of the proton beam was measured with the calibrated liquid scintillator system and was compared to the nominal range. Measurements were made on three different days to evaluate the setup robustness from day to day, and three sets of measurements were made for each day to evaluate the consistency from delivery to delivery. All proton beam ranges measured using the liquid scintillator system were within half a millimeter of the nominal range. The delivery-to-delivery standard deviation of the range measurement was 0.04 mm, and the day-to-day standard deviation was 0.10 mm. In addition to the accuracy and robustness demonstrated by these results when our geometric calibration system was used, the liquid scintillator system allowed the range of all 94 proton beams to be measured in just two deliveries, making the liquid scintillator detector a perfect tool for range measurement of spot scanning proton beams. PMID:27274863

  9. Using Solar Gamma Rays to Measure Heavy Accelerated Particles at the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Share, G. H.; Murphy, R. J.

    2008-05-01

    Solar flare gamma-ray spectra contain information on heavy (>He) accelerated particle spectra and composition through measurement of highly Doppler broadened (~10%) lines. These gamma-rays are emitted when the nuclei de-excite following their interaction with chromospheric H and He; these are called inverse reactions in contrast to the direct reactions from accelerated p and α-particles that produce narrower lines. The ability to distinguish and measure the broadened features is complicated by their large number, the narrow lines, the presence of strong solar bremsstrahlung and nuclear continua, as well as by instrumental effects. The instrumental continuum from Compton scattering is minimized when the gamma-ray detector has a high photopeak efficiency and is relatively well shielded, as was the case for the Solar Maximum Mission spectrometer (GRS). It is also important that the detector response be well determined. We have constructed a new GRS response matrix based on a Monte Carlo calculation and apply it to spectra from strong nuclear-line flares. We use new theoretical gamma-ray templates derived from nuclear physics calculations for elements such as C, O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe to fit the spectra and derive information on the heavy-accelerated ions. This technique can also be applied to data from the RHESSI spectrometer, with its larger Compton continuum, if the instrument response is well determined. This work was supported under NASA Grants NNX07AH81G, NNX07AO74G, and NNG06GG14G.

  10. Sinusoidal-wavelength-scanning interferometer with double feedback control for real-time distance measurement.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Osami; Akiyama, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Takamasa

    2002-07-01

    In addition to a conventional phase a the interference signal of a sinusoidal-wavelength-scanning interferometer has a phase-modulation amplitude Zb that is proportional to the optical path difference L and amplitude b of the wavelength scan. L and b are controlled by a double feedback system so that the phase alpha and the amplitude Zb are kept at 3pi/2 and pi, respectively. The voltage applied to a device that displaces a reference mirror to change the optical path difference becomes a ruler with scales smaller than a wavelength. Voltage applied to a device that determines the amplitude of the wavelength scan becomes a ruler marking every wavelength. These two rulers enable one to measure an absolute distance longer than a wavelength in real time.

  11. The use of an active coded aperture for improved directional measurements in high energy gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, A.; Beron, B. L.; Campbell, L.; Eichler, R.; Hofstadter, R.; Hughes, E. B.; Wilson, S.; Gorodetsky, P.

    1980-01-01

    The coded aperture, a refinement of the scatter-hole camera, offers a method for the improved measurement of gamma-ray direction in gamma-ray astronomy. Two prototype coded apertures have been built and tested. The more recent of these has 128 active elements of the heavy scintillator BGO. Results of tests for gamma-rays in the range 50-500 MeV are reported and future application in space discussed.

  12. Properties of accelerated particles at the Sun from gamma-ray and neutron measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Share, Gerald; Murphy, Ronald

    The properties of accelerated ions and electrons that interact in the solar atmosphere and photosphere can be revealed through measurements of the resulting hard X-ray and gamma-ray emissions. These properties provide information on the acceleration processes and particle transport. Comparison of these properties with those measured in solar energetic particles in space indicates whether the two particle populations have a common origin. These studies require both good spectral measurements and a sound theoretical basis for understanding the processes related to gamma-ray production. We discuss advances in the calculation of gamma-ray spectra from proton, alpha-particle and heavy-ion interactions that are used in determining the spectra and composition of the accelerated particles. We focus on intense flares observed by the Solar Maximum Mission gamma-ray spectrometer and on the remarkable 2005 January 20 flare and Ground Level Event observed by RHESSI and Coronas. Our studies suggest that in most of the flares the heavy interacting particles at the Sun have a composition that is similar to gradual SEP events (i.e. a coronal composition) but that in at least one flare they have a composition close to that observed in impulsive SEP events. We are also finding evidence that the interacting particles may be enhanced in alpha particles and heavier nuclei relative to protons. We discuss details of the 2005 January 20 flare in which we find clear evidence for two distinct acceleration processes occurring within two minutes that produce significantly different particle spectra. Gamma-ray emission from this event was evident up to 4 hours after flare onset. We discuss the implications of these observations. This work was supported by NASA under grants to the University of Maryland and DPRs to NRL.

  13. Properties of Accelerated Particles at the Sun from Gamma-Ray and Neutron Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Ronald; Share, G.; Kozlovsky, B.

    2010-05-01

    The properties of accelerated ions and electrons that interact in the solar atmosphere and photosphere can be revealed through measurements of the resulting hard X-ray and gamma-ray emissions. These properties provide information on the acceleration processes and particle transport. Comparison of these properties with those measured for solar energetic particles in space indicates whether the two particle populations have a common origin. These studies require both good spectral measurements and a sound theoretical basis for understanding the processes related to gamma-ray production. We discuss advances in the calculation of gamma-ray spectra from proton, alpha-particle and heavy-ion interactions that are used to determine the spectra and composition of the accelerated particles. We focus on intense flares observed by the Solar Maximum Mission gamma-ray spectrometer and on the remarkable 2005 January 20 flare and Ground Level Event observed by RHESSI and Coronas. Our studies suggest that in most of these flares the heavy interacting particles at the Sun have a composition that is similar to gradual SEP events (i.e. a coronal composition), but that in at least one flare they have a composition close to that observed in impulsive SEP events. We are also finding evidence that the interacting particles may be enhanced in alpha particles and heavier nuclei relative to protons. We discuss details of the 2005 January 20 flare in which we find clear evidence for two distinct acceleration processes occurring within two minutes that produce significantly different particle spectra. Gamma-ray emission from this event was evident for up to 4 hours after flare onset. We discuss the implications of these observations. This work was supported by NASA under DPRs to NRL and grants to the University of Maryland.

  14. Spatial coherence measurement of a scanning laser system and applicability of the Zernike's approximation to the exit pupil on the scan mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Shigeo

    2012-11-01

    Spatial coherence of the scanning laser beam was observed on the Young's experimental set up using 50-μm-wide, 200-μm-separation double slits, which measured the less than unity fringe visibility in the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of the double slits illuminated by the scanning laser beam at horizontal scan frequency 21 kHz, while approximately unity in case of the illumination by the laser beam at rest. This fact allow us to use the Zernike's approximation when applying the van Cittert Zernike theorem to the scanning laser system such as the laser pico-projectors in order to estimate its speckle contrast in the projected image on the screen diffuser. The predicted and measured speckle contrasts showed excellent agreement on the screen illuminated by the laser projector.

  15. Development of a scanning touch probe with 5-axis measuring functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chih-Liang; Lai, Kuan-Wen; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a five-axis scanning touch probe with high precision and low contact force. The development of scanning touch probe is consisted of three parts: mechanism design, optical path design, and rotation structure design. The mechanism design contains three parts, Z-axis system, XY-axis system, and probe mechanism. The Z-axis system applies the characteristic of the thin sheet spring to move vertically. In the design of XY-axis system, a micro-beam is employed, through which length, width, and thickness of the micro-beam and corresponding dimensions of the leaf spring are designed according to the selected contact force. The freedom degree is limited to three. And the center of the mechanism is equipped with a stylus to inhibit displacement of the Z-axis. The contact between the probe and the work piece only leads to change in the angles of X- and Y-axes, achieving the feature of 2-degree freedom. To enable rapid change for the probes, this study designs a probe mechanism, reliability of which is analyzed and validated with ANSYS software, so that the design of 3-degree freedom mechanism is completed. The sensor has a laser diode to coordinate with Position Sensor Detector (PSD) which works with the optical path designed to measure placement of Z-axis and angle placement of XY-axis. The rotation structure refers to the principle of 5-axis machining design, and the two rotary axes (A- and C-axis) to join the self-developed scanning probe. This design can achieve independent measurements and eliminate the dynamic measurement error that three-axis scanning systems typically have. By validation through an experiment, the three-dimensional scanning touch probe developed by this study has a measuring range of +/-1mm×+/-1mm×1mm, and unidirectional repeatability of 0.6μm.

  16. Integral measurements of neutron and gamma-ray leakage fluxes from the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1984-03-01

    This report presents integral measurements of neutron and gamma-ray leakage fluxes from a critical mockup of the Hiroshima bomb Little Boy at Los Alamos National Laobratory with detector systems developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Bonner ball detectors were used to map the neutron fluxes in the horizontal midplane at various distances from the mockup and for selected polar angles, keeping the source-detector separation constant. Gamma-ray energy deposition measurements were made with thermoluminescent detectors at several locations on the iron shell of the source mockup. The measurements were performed as part of a larger progam to provide benchmark data for testing the methods used to calculate the radiation released from the Little Boy bomb over Hiroshima. 3 references, 10 figures.

  17. A reanalysis of radioisotope measurements of the $^9$Be$(\\gamma,n)^8$Be cross-section

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Alan E.

    2016-02-18

    The $^9$Be$(\\gamma,n)^8$Be reaction is enhanced by a near threshold $1/2^+$ state. Contradictions between existing measurements of this reaction cross-section affect calculations of astrophysical r-process yields, dark matter detector calibrations, and the theory of the nuclear structure of $^9$Be. Select well-documented radioisotope $^9$Be$(\\gamma,n)$ source yield measurements have been reanalyzed, providing a set of high-accuracy independently measured cross sections. A Breit-Wigner fit of these corrected measurements yields $E_R=1738.8\\pm1.9$ keV, $\\Gamma_\\gamma=0.771\\pm0.021$ eV, and $\\Gamma_n=268\\pm15$ keV for the $1/2^+$ state. A virtual $1/2^+$ state is excluded with 99.3\\% confidence.

  18. A reanalysis of radioisotope measurements of the $^9$Be$$(\\gamma,n)^8$$Be cross-section

    DOE PAGES

    Robinson, Alan E.

    2016-02-18

    Themore » $^9$Be$$(\\gamma,n)^8$$Be reaction is enhanced by a near threshold $1/2^+$ state. Contradictions between existing measurements of this reaction cross-section affect calculations of astrophysical r-process yields, dark matter detector calibrations, and the theory of the nuclear structure of $^9$Be. Select well-documented radioisotope $^9$Be$$(\\gamma,n)$$ source yield measurements have been reanalyzed, providing a set of high-accuracy independently measured cross sections. A Breit-Wigner fit of these corrected measurements yields $$E_R=1738.8\\pm1.9$$ keV, $$\\Gamma_\\gamma=0.771\\pm0.021$$ eV, and $$\\Gamma_n=268\\pm15$$ keV for the $1/2^+$ state. A virtual $1/2^+$ state is excluded with 99.3\\% confidence.« less

  19. Morphometric measurements of dragonfly wings: the accuracy of pinned, scanned and detached measurement methods

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Laura; Mantle, Beth L.; Gardner, Janet L.; Backwell, Patricia R. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Large-scale digitization of museum specimens, particularly of insect collections, is becoming commonplace. Imaging increases the accessibility of collections and decreases the need to handle individual, often fragile, specimens. Another potential advantage of digitization is to make it easier to conduct morphometric analyses, but the accuracy of such methods needs to be tested. Here we compare morphometric measurements of scanned images of dragonfly wings to those obtained using other, more traditional, methods. We assume that the destructive method of removing and slide-mounting wings provides the most accurate method of measurement because it eliminates error due to wing curvature. We show that, for dragonfly wings, hand measurements of pinned specimens and digital measurements of scanned images are equally accurate relative to slide-mounted hand measurements. Since destructive slide-mounting is unsuitable for museum collections, and there is a risk of damage when hand measuring fragile pinned specimens, we suggest that the use of scanned images may also be an appropriate method to collect morphometric data from other collected insect species. PMID:23794818

  20. Morphometric measurements of dragonfly wings: the accuracy of pinned, scanned and detached measurement methods.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Laura; Mantle, Beth L; Gardner, Janet L; Backwell, Patricia R Y

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale digitization of museum specimens, particularly of insect collections, is becoming commonplace. Imaging increases the accessibility of collections and decreases the need to handle individual, often fragile, specimens. Another potential advantage of digitization is to make it easier to conduct morphometric analyses, but the accuracy of such methods needs to be tested. Here we compare morphometric measurements of scanned images of dragonfly wings to those obtained using other, more traditional, methods. We assume that the destructive method of removing and slide-mounting wings provides the most accurate method of measurement because it eliminates error due to wing curvature. We show that, for dragonfly wings, hand measurements of pinned specimens and digital measurements of scanned images are equally accurate relative to slide-mounted hand measurements. Since destructive slide-mounting is unsuitable for museum collections, and there is a risk of damage when hand measuring fragile pinned specimens, we suggest that the use of scanned images may also be an appropriate method to collect morphometric data from other collected insect species.

  1. Estimation of bias and variance of measurements made from tomography scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Robert S.

    2016-09-01

    Tomographic imaging modalities are being increasingly used to quantify internal characteristics of objects for a wide range of applications, from medical imaging to materials science research. However, such measurements are typically presented without an assessment being made of their associated variance or confidence interval. In particular, noise in raw scan data places a fundamental lower limit on the variance and bias of measurements made on the reconstructed 3D volumes. In this paper, the simulation-extrapolation technique, which was originally developed for statistical regression, is adapted to estimate the bias and variance for measurements made from a single scan. The application to x-ray tomography is considered in detail and it is demonstrated that the technique can also allow the robustness of automatic segmentation strategies to be compared.

  2. PING Gamma Ray and Neutron Measurements of a Meter-Sized Carbonaceous Asteroid Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodnarik, J.; Burger, D.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Parsons, A.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2011-01-01

    Determining the elemental composition of carbonaceous (spectral type C) asteroids is still one of the basic problems when studying these objects. The only main source of elemental composition information for asteroids is from their optical, NIR and IR properties, which include their spectral reflectance characteristics, albedo, polarization, and the comparison of optical spectroscopy with meteorite groups corresponding to asteroids of every spectral type. Unfortunately, these sources reflect observations from widely contrasting spatial scales that presently yield a void in the continuum of microscopic and macroscopic evidence, a lack of in situ measurement confirmation, and require deeper sensing techniques to discern the nature of these asteroids. The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument is ideally suited to address this problem because it can be used to determine the bulk elemental composition, H and C content, the average atomic weight and density of the surface and subsurface layers of C-type asteroids, and can provide measurements used to determine the difference between and distinguish between different types of asteroids. We are currently developing the PING instrument that combines gamma ray and neutron detectors with a 14 Me V pulsed neutron generator to determine the in-situ bulk elemental abundances and geochemistry of C-type asteroids with a spatial resolution of 1 m down to depths of tens of cm to 1 m. One aspect of the current work includes experimentally testing and optimizing PING on a known meter-sized Columbia River basalt C-type asteroid analog sample that has a similar composition and the same neutron response as that of a C-type asteroid. An important part of this effort focuses on utilizing timing measurements to isolate gamma rays produced by neutron inelastic scattering, neutron capture and delayed activation processes. Separating the gamma ray spectra by nuclear processes results in higher precision and sensitivity

  3. Three-dimensional measurement of multilayer thin films based on scanning white light interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhendong; Zhang, Lin; Ren, Huan; Yuan, Quan; Yang, Yi; Ma, Hua

    2016-09-01

    For multilayer films system, in order to obtain the thickness and surface profile in each layer of thin film, a method to measure the 3D morphology of a multilayer films system based on scanning white light interferometer has been proposed in this article. At first, the mathematical relationship between reflection phase and thickness of each film layer has been obtained by using the electromagnetic field boundary conditions. Then, a nonlinear least square algorithm has been used to fit the reflection phase which had been found through a scanning white light interferometer, in this way the linear and nonlinear terms of the reflection phase have been separated, which made it possible to measure top-layer surface profile and thickness of each thin film layer respectively and avoided the interference with each other, because the linear term is related to the top layer's surface profile but the nonlinear term is correlated to the thickness of each film layer in multilayer thin films system. Thus, the three-dimensional morphology of multilayer thin films system could be reconstructed. Experimental results showed this method was effective in the three-dimensional morphology measurement for multilayer thin films. And the measurement could be completed just using the existing commercial scanning white light interferometer, as a consequence the measurement cost is low, and the operation will be quite simple.

  4. The study of frequency-scan photothermal reflectance technique for thermal diffusivity measurement

    DOE PAGES

    Hua, Zilong; Ban, Heng; Hurley, David H.

    2015-05-05

    A frequency scan photothermal reflectance technique to measure thermal diffusivity of bulk samples is studied in this manuscript. Similar to general photothermal reflectance methods, an intensity-modulated heating laser and a constant intensity probe laser are used to determine the surface temperature response under sinusoidal heating. The approach involves fixing the distance between the heating and probe laser spots, recording the phase lag of reflected probe laser intensity with respect to the heating laser frequency modulation, and extracting thermal diffusivity using the phase lag – (frequency)1/2 relation. The experimental validation is performed on three samples (SiO2, CaF2 and Ge), which havemore » a wide range of thermal diffusivities. The measured thermal diffusivity values agree closely with literature values. Lastly, compared to the commonly used spatial scan method, the experimental setup and operation of the frequency scan method are simplified, and the uncertainty level is equal to or smaller than that of the spatial scan method.« less

  5. The study of frequency-scan photothermal reflectance technique for thermal diffusivity measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Zilong; Ban, Heng; Hurley, David H.

    2015-05-05

    A frequency scan photothermal reflectance technique to measure thermal diffusivity of bulk samples is studied in this manuscript. Similar to general photothermal reflectance methods, an intensity-modulated heating laser and a constant intensity probe laser are used to determine the surface temperature response under sinusoidal heating. The approach involves fixing the distance between the heating and probe laser spots, recording the phase lag of reflected probe laser intensity with respect to the heating laser frequency modulation, and extracting thermal diffusivity using the phase lag – (frequency)1/2 relation. The experimental validation is performed on three samples (SiO2, CaF2 and Ge), which have a wide range of thermal diffusivities. The measured thermal diffusivity values agree closely with literature values. Lastly, compared to the commonly used spatial scan method, the experimental setup and operation of the frequency scan method are simplified, and the uncertainty level is equal to or smaller than that of the spatial scan method.

  6. Accurate measurement of interferometer group delay using field-compensated scanning white light interferometer.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaoke; Wang, Ji; Ge, Jian

    2010-10-10

    Interferometers are key elements in radial velocity (RV) experiments in astronomy observations, and accurate calibration of the group delay of an interferometer is required for high precision measurements. A novel field-compensated white light scanning Michelson interferometer is introduced as an interferometer calibration tool. The optical path difference (OPD) scanning was achieved by translating a compensation prism, such that even if the light source were in low spatial coherence, the interference stays spatially phase coherent over a large interferometer scanning range. In the wavelength region of 500-560 nm, a multimode fiber-coupled LED was used as the light source, and high optical efficiency was essential in elevating the signal-to-noise ratio of the interferogram signal. The achromatic OPD scanning required a one-time calibration, and two methods using dual-laser wavelength references and an iodine absorption spectrum reference were employed and cross-verified. In an experiment measuring the group delay of a fixed Michelson interferometer, Fourier analysis was employed to process the interferogram data. The group delay was determined at an accuracy of 1×10(-5), and the phase angle precision was typically 2.5×10(-6) over the wide wavelength region.

  7. Z-Scan Measurement of the Nonlinear Absorption of a Thin Gold Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Yoon, Youngkwon; Boyd, Robert W.; Campbell, Joseph K.; Baker, Lane A.; Crooks, Richard M.; George, Michael

    1999-01-01

    We have used the z-scan technique at a wavelength (532 nm) near the transmission window of bulk gold to measure the nonlinear absorption coefficient of continuous approximately 50-Angstrom-thick gold films, deposited onto surface-modified quartz substrates. For highly absorbing media such as metals, we demonstrate that determination of either the real or imaginary part of the third-order susceptibility requires a measurement of both nonlinear absorption and nonlinear refraction, i.e. both open- and closed-aperture z-scans must be performed. Closed-aperture z-scans did not yield a sufficient signal for the determination of the nonlinear refraction. However, open-aperture z-scans yielded values ranging from Beta = 1.9 x 10(exp -3) to 5.3 x 10(exp -3) cm/W in good agreement with predictions which ascribe the nonlinear response to a Fermi smearing mechanism. We note that the sign of the nonlinearity is reversed from that of gold nanoparticle composites, in accordance with the predictions of mean field theories.

  8. Determination of stature from skeletal and skull measurements by CT scan evaluation.

    PubMed

    Giurazza, Francesco; Del Vescovo, Riccardo; Schena, Emiliano; Battisti, Sofia; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Grasso, Francesco Rosario; Silvestri, Sergio; Denaro, Vincenzo; Zobel, Bruno Beomonte

    2012-10-10

    The aim of this article is to find a correlation between height and femur/skull measurements through Computed Tomography (CT) scans and derive regression equations for total skeletal height estimation in the Caucasian population. We selected 200 Caucasian patients from March 2010 to July 2011 who had to perform a CT scan for cancer restaging. The mean age is 64.5 years. Both sexes are represented by the same number of persons. Patients have executed a total body CT scan with contrast; once scan accomplished, we measured height through a digital scales. We analyzed CT scans of each patient, obtaining multiplanar reconstruction in sagittal and coronal planes with 1mm of thickness, and we measured 10 diameters of skull and femur. Then we performed a single and a multiple regression analysis considering the three diameters that better correlated with height. The skeletal diameters with the highest correlation coefficients with stature were femur lengths, length of cranial base (Ba-N), and distance from the posterior extremity of the cranial base to the inferior point of the nasal bone (Ba-NB). Although both femur and skull are skeletal segments used for stature estimation, in our sample femur gave stronger correlation with height than skull. h=35.7+1.48·BaN+2.32·BaNB+2.53·FEM and h=3.06·FEM+72.6 are the formulae that provided the most accurate stature assessment using multiple and single regression analysis respectively.

  9. Scanning laser measure of optical quality of the cultured crystalline lens.

    PubMed

    Weerheim, J A; Sivak, J G

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus has been designed to automate the laser measuring technique and make it possible to monitor lens refractive function (spherical aberration) as well as change in lens transmittance during lens culture. A scanning laser beam (helium-neon) is used so that a number of beams pass through different spots on the lens to determine lens spherical aberration compared over time. Each refracted beam, received by two video cameras (X and Y directions), is digitized. The system first locates the optical centre of the lens by determining the beam position providing the least deflection for both the X and Y directions. The beam is then moved in predetermined steps on either side of the centre, and focal lengths are determined relative to the optic axis for each position. A measure of beam scatter is noted from post-refraction pixel excitation for each beam position. Improvements to the scanning laser system have led to greater accuracy and speed as well as to improved culture cells. Accuracy was increased by using high resolution (1 micron) stepping motors to move the scanning helium-neon laser. A new alignment process involving the superposition of the incident beam reflected on itself ensures that the incident beam is perpendicular to the lens equatorial axis. Scanning speed has been improved through a variety of hardware and software changes. Scanning time for a lens, including locating the optical centre and measuring focal length for 20 lens positions along the X and Y directions, takes about 60 seconds. Long-term studies on the degradation of lens optical performance frequency yield diffuse beams of very low intensity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Comparison of electrical capacitance tomography & gamma densitometer measurement in viscous oil-gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibong Eso, A.; Zhao, Yabin; Yeung, Hoi

    2014-04-01

    Multiphase flow is a common occurrence in industries such as nuclear, process, oil & gas, food and chemical. A prior knowledge of its features and characteristics is essential in the design, control and management of such processes due to its complex nature. Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) and Gamma Densitometer (Gamma) are two promising approaches for multiphase visualization and characterization in process industries. In two phase oil & gas flow, ECT and Gamma are used in multiphase flow monitoring techniques due to their inherent simplicity, robustness, and an ability to withstand wide range of operational temperatures and pressures. High viscous oil (viscosity > 100 cP) is of interest because of its huge reserves, technological advances in its production and unlike conventional oil (oil viscosity < 100 cP) and gas flows where ECT and Gamma have been previously used, high viscous oil and gas flows comes with certain associated concerns which include; increased entrainment of gas bubbles dispersed in oil, shorter and more frequent slugs as well as oil film coatings on the walls of flowing conduits. This study aims to determine the suitability of both devices in the visualization and characterization of high-viscous oil and gas flow. Static tests are performed with both devices and liquid holdup measurements are obtained. Dynamic experiments were also conducted in a 1 & 3 inch facility at Cranfield University with a range of nominal viscosities (1000, 3000 & 7500 cP). Plug, slug and wavy annular flow patterns were identified by means of Probability Mass Function and time series analysis of the data acquired from Gamma and ECT devices with high speed camera used to validate the results. Measured Liquid holdups for both devices were also compared.

  11. Comparison of electrical capacitance tomography and gamma densitometer measurement in viscous oil-gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Archibong Eso, A.; Zhao, Yabin; Yeung, Hoi

    2014-04-11

    Multiphase flow is a common occurrence in industries such as nuclear, process, oil and gas, food and chemical. A prior knowledge of its features and characteristics is essential in the design, control and management of such processes due to its complex nature. Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) and Gamma Densitometer (Gamma) are two promising approaches for multiphase visualization and characterization in process industries. In two phase oil and gas flow, ECT and Gamma are used in multiphase flow monitoring techniques due to their inherent simplicity, robustness, and an ability to withstand wide range of operational temperatures and pressures. High viscous oil (viscosity > 100 cP) is of interest because of its huge reserves, technological advances in its production and unlike conventional oil (oil viscosity < 100 cP) and gas flows where ECT and Gamma have been previously used, high viscous oil and gas flows comes with certain associated concerns which include; increased entrainment of gas bubbles dispersed in oil, shorter and more frequent slugs as well as oil film coatings on the walls of flowing conduits. This study aims to determine the suitability of both devices in the visualization and characterization of high-viscous oil and gas flow. Static tests are performed with both devices and liquid holdup measurements are obtained. Dynamic experiments were also conducted in a 1 and 3 inch facility at Cranfield University with a range of nominal viscosities (1000, 3000 and 7500 cP). Plug, slug and wavy annular flow patterns were identified by means of Probability Mass Function and time series analysis of the data acquired from Gamma and ECT devices with high speed camera used to validate the results. Measured Liquid holdups for both devices were also compared.

  12. Action levels for automatic gamma-measurements based on probabilistic radionuclide transport calculations.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Bent; Hedemann-Jensen, Per

    2005-12-01

    In the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency resulting in an atmospheric release of radioactive materials, stationary gamma-measurements, for example obtained from distributed, automatic monitoring stations, may provide a first assessment of exposures resulting from airborne and deposited activity. Decisions on the introduction of countermeasures for the protection of the public can be based on such off-site gamma measurements. A methodology is presented for calculation of gamma-radiation action levels for the introduction of specific countermeasures, based on probabilistic modelling of the dispersion of radionuclides and the radiation exposure. The methodology is applied to a nuclear accident situation with long-range atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides, and action levels of dose rate measured by a network of monitoring stations are estimated for sheltering and foodstuff restrictions. It is concluded that the methodology is applicable to all emergency countermeasures following a nuclear accident but measurable quantities other than ambient dose equivalent rate are needed for decisions on the introduction of foodstuff countermeasures.

  13. Measurement and calculation of characteristic prompt gamma ray spectra emitted during proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Polf, J C; Peterson, S; McCleskey, M; Roeder, B T; Spiridon, A; Beddar, S; Trache, L

    2009-11-21

    In this paper, we present results of initial measurements and calculations of prompt gamma ray spectra (produced by proton-nucleus interactions) emitted from tissue equivalent phantoms during irradiations with proton beams. Measurements of prompt gamma ray spectra were made using a high-purity germanium detector shielded either with lead (passive shielding), or a Compton suppression system (active shielding). Calculations of the spectra were performed using a model of both the passive and active shielding experimental setups developed using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit. From the measured spectra it was shown that it is possible to distinguish the characteristic emission lines from the major elemental constituent atoms (C, O, Ca) in the irradiated phantoms during delivery of proton doses similar to those delivered during patient treatment. Also, the Monte Carlo spectra were found to be in very good agreement with the measured spectra providing an initial validation of our model for use in further studies of prompt gamma ray emission during proton therapy.

  14. Variation in the measurement of cranial volume and surface area using 3D laser scanning technology.

    PubMed

    Sholts, Sabrina B; Wärmländer, Sebastian K T S; Flores, Louise M; Miller, Kevin W P; Walker, Phillip L

    2010-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) laser scanner models of human crania can be used for forensic facial reconstruction, and for obtaining craniometric data useful for estimating age, sex, and population affinity of unidentified human remains. However, the use of computer-generated measurements in a casework setting requires the measurement precision to be known. Here, we assess the repeatability and precision of cranial volume and surface area measurements using 3D laser scanner models created by different operators using different protocols for collecting and processing data. We report intraobserver measurement errors of 0.2% and interobserver errors of 2% of the total area and volume values, suggesting that observer-related errors do not pose major obstacles for sharing, combining, or comparing such measurements. Nevertheless, as no standardized procedure exists for area or volume measurements from 3D models, it is imperative to report the scanning and postscanning protocols employed when such measurements are conducted in a forensic setting.

  15. NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor and Clouds During IHOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Demoz, Belay; DiGirolamo, Paolo; Comer, Joe; Wang, Zhien; Lin, Rei-Fong; Evans, Keith; Veselovskii, Igor

    2004-01-01

    The NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) participated in the International H2O Project (IHOP) that occurred in May and June, 2002 in the midwestern part of the U.S. The SRL acquired measurements of water vapor, aerosols, cloud liquid and ice water, and temperature for more than 200 hours during IHOP. Here we report on the SRL water vapor and cirrus cloud measurements with particular emphasis being given to the measurements of June 19-20, 2002, which are motivating cirrus cloud model comparison studies.

  16. Image Analysis Program for Measuring Particles with the Zeiss CSM 950 Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    7 𔄁 . ,: 1& *U _’ ś TECHNICAL REPORT AD NATICK/TR-90/014 (V) N* IMAGE ANALYSIS PROGRAM FOR MEASURING PARTICLES < WITH THE ZEISS CSM 950 SCANNING... image analysis program for measuring particles using the Zeiss CSM 950/Kontron system is as follows: A>CSM calls the image analysis program. Press D to...27 vili LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE 1. Image Analysis Program for Measuring 29 Spherical Particles 14 2. Printout of Statistical Data Frcm Table 1 16 3

  17. Exclusive Measurements of the b to s gamma Transition Rate and Photon Energy Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V.E.; Buzykaev, A.R.; /more authors..

    2012-08-30

    We use 429 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector to measure the radiative transition rate of b {yields} s{gamma} with a sum of 38 exclusive final states. The inclusive branching fraction with a minimum photon energy of 1.9 GeV is found to be {Beta}({bar B} {yields} Xs{gamma}) = (3.29 {+-} 0.19 {+-} 0.48) x 10{sup -4} where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We also measure the first and second moments of the photon energy spectrum and extract the best fit values for the heavy-quark parameters, m{sub b} and {mu}{sub {pi}}{sup 2}, in the kinetic and shape function models.

  18. An industrial radiography exposure device based on measurement of transmitted gamma-ray intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polee, C.; Chankow, N.; Srisatit, S.; Thong-Aram, D.

    2015-05-01

    In film radiography, underexposure and overexposure may happen particularly when lacking information of specimen material and hollowness. This paper describes a method and a device for determining exposure in industrial gamma-ray radiography based on quick measurement of transmitted gamma-ray intensity with a small detector. Application software was developed for Android mobile phone to remotely control the device and to display counting data via Bluetooth communication. Prior to film exposure, the device is placed behind a specimen to measure transmitted intensity which is inversely proportional to the exposure. Unlike in using the conventional exposure curve, correction factors for source decay, source-to- film distance, specimen thickness and kind of material are not needed. The developed technique and device make radiographic process economic, convenient and more reliable.

  19. Experimental determination of the self-absorption factor for MTR plates by passive gamma spectrometric measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, R.; Mortreau, P.

    2011-07-01

    The measurement of the absolute activity or the mass of radioactive substances by gamma spectrometry needs to include a correction for the radiation absorption inside the source volume, the so-called self-absorption factor. It depends on geometry and material composition of the source, the detector geometry and on the geometrical arrangement of source and gamma radiation detector; it can be calculated if full information about all that is available. This article however describes how to determine the self-absorption factor from measurements if the radiation sources are plates of uranium fuel with typical parameters of nuclear fuel for MTR reactors and without using detail information on the source geometry, thus allowing easy inspection without relying on - potentially falsified - declarations on the internal properties of the fuel objects and without calculation.

  20. Measurements of Differential Z/gamma*+jet+X Cross Sections with the D0 Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lammers, Sabine

    2009-11-01

    We present measurements of differential cross sections in inclusive Z/{gamma}* plus jet production in a data sample of 1 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector in proton antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Measured variables include the Z/{gamma}* transverse momentum (p{sub T}{sup Z}) and rapidity (y{sup Z}), the leading jet transverse momentum (p{sub T}{sup jet}) and rapidity (y{sup jet}), as well as various angles of the Z+jet system. We compare the results to different Monte Carlo event generators and next-to-leading order perturbative QCD (NLO pQCD) predictions, with non-perturbative corrections applied.

  1. Ultrahigh Energy Resolution Gamma-ray Spectrometers for Precision Measurements of Uranium Enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S; Hau, I D; Niedermayr, T R; Friedrich, S

    2006-06-09

    Superconducting Gamma-ray detectors offer an order of magnitude higher energy resolution than conventional high-purity germanium detectors. This can significantly increase the precision of non-destructive isotope analysis for nuclear samples where line overlap affects the errors of the measurement. We have developed Gamma-detectors based on superconducting molybdenum-copper sensors and bulk tin absorbers for nuclear science and national security applications. They have, depending on design, an energy resolution between {approx}50 and {approx}150 eV FWHM at {approx}100 keV. Here we apply this detector technology to the measurement of uranium isotope ratios, and discuss the trade-offs between energy resolution and quantum efficiency involved in detector design.

  2. Gamma ray facilities at the University of Maryland cyclotron. [data acquisition and radiation measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornyak, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    A special beam line was set up in a separate shielded experimental room to provide a low background station for gamma-ray measurements at the University of Maryland cyclotron. The transmitted beam leaving the target is gathered in by a magnetic quadrupole lens located 1.8 m further downstream and focused on a Faraday cup located on the far side of the 2.5 m thick concrete shielding wall of the experimental room. A software computer program permits timing information ot be obtained using the cyclotron beam fine structure as a time reference for the observed gamma-ray events. Measurements indicate a beam fine structure width of less than 1.2 nanoseconds repeated, for example, in the case of 140 MeV alpha particles every 90 nanoseconds. Twelve contiguous time channels of adjustable width may be set as desired with reference to the RF signal. This allows the creation of 12 separate 8192 channel analyzers.

  3. A simple program to measure and analyse tree rings using Excel, R and SigmaScan.

    PubMed

    Hietz, Peter

    I present a new software that links a program for image analysis (SigmaScan), one for spreadsheets (Excel) and one for statistical analysis (R) for applications of tree-ring analysis. The first macro measures ring width marked by the user on scanned images, stores raw and detrended data in Excel and calculates the distance to the pith and inter-series correlations. A second macro measures darkness along a defined path to identify latewood-earlywood transition in conifers, and a third shows the potential for automatic detection of boundaries. Written in Visual Basic for Applications, the code makes use of the advantages of existing programs and is consequently very economic and relatively simple to adjust to the requirements of specific projects or to expand making use of already available code.

  4. Development of a Portable Gamma-ray Survey System for the Measurement of Air Dose Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Jun; Shobugawa, Yugo; Kawano, Yoh; Amaya, Yoshihiro; Izumikawa, Takuji; Katsuragi, Yoshinori; Shiiya, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Tsubasa; Takahashi, Takeshi; Takahashi, Toshihiro; Yoshida, Hidenori; Naito, Makoto

    BIo-Safety Hybrid Automatic MOnitor-Niigata (BISHAMON), a portable gamma-ray survey system, was developed to support victims of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. BISHAMON is capable of constructing a map of the distribution of ambient dose equivalent rates using vehicle-mounted or on-foot survey methods. In this study, we give an overview of BISHAMON and its measurement results including a comparison with those of other systems such as KURAMA.

  5. Unveiling the Nature of Soft Gamma Repeaters and Magnetars: Scientists Measure the Most Powerful Magnet Known

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, Jean (Technical Monitor); Parke, William

    2002-01-01

    This newsletter from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) announces measurements of the magnetic field of a magnetar. The magnetic field was approx. 10(exp 15) gauss, up to 10 times more powerful than previous estimates. The newsletter also describes how the star's magnetic field slows its rotation, and how starquakes emit protons, which are trapped in this neutron star's magnetic field, and make it a soft gamma repeater (SGR).

  6. Gamma-ray measurements of a soviet cruise-missile warhead.

    PubMed

    Fetter, S; Cochran, T B; Grodzins, L; Lynch, H L; Zucker, M S

    1990-05-18

    A portable germanium detector was used to detect gamma-ray emissions from a nuclear warhead aboard the Soviet cruiser Slava. Measurements taken on the missile launch tube indicated the presence of uranium-235 and plutonium-239-the essential ingredients of nuclear weapons. With the use of this equipment, these isotopes probably could have been identified at a distance of 4 meters from the warhead. Such inspections do not reveal detailed information about the design of the warhead.

  7. Aircraft and satellite measurement of ocean wave directional spectra using scanning-beam microwave radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.; Walton, W. T.; Baker, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    A microwave radar technique for remotely measuring the vector wave number spectrum of the ocean surface is described. The technique, which employs short-pulse, noncoherent radars in a conical scan mode near vertical incidence, is shown to be suitable for both aircraft and satellite application, the technique was validated at 10 km aircraft altitude, where we have found excellent agreement between buoy and radar-inferred absolute wave height spectra.

  8. Direct measurement of the surface dynamics of supercooled liquid-glycerol by optical scanning a film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Guo-Feng; Dong, Shuang-Li; Sun, Jian-Hu; Chen, Rui-Yun; Xiao, Lian-Tuan; Jia, Suo-Tang

    2009-09-01

    The surface dynamics of supercooled liquid-glycerol is studied by scanning the thickness of the glycerol film with single photon detection. Measurements are performed at room temperature well above the glycerol's glass transition temperature. It is shown that the surface dynamics of the glycerol film is very sensitive to the temperature. The linear relationship between the thickness of the film and the viscosity predicted by the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTH) law is also presented experimentally.

  9. Non-scanning measurement of convex and concave curvature with an annular array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Michael; Kühnicke, Elfgard

    2012-05-01

    The paper describes a novel ultrasonic method for measuring local object curvature radii without scanning. For the measurements, an ultrasonic annular array is used, where the phase and amplitude differences on the different receivers are used to determine the object curvature radius and its distance from the transducer simultaneously. The method aims at measurements of spherical or oval inclusions in fluids and solids in general, and of the curvature radius of eye lens and retina in particular. It is intended to work as a supplement to conventional imaging applications. To verify the measurement method, theoretical and experimental results with steel spheres as reflectors are presented. After measuring and taking into account the acoustically effective size of the single transducer elements, good agreement between measurements and simulations could be achieved.

  10. Gamma radiation measurements and dose rates in commercially-used natural tiling rocks (granites).

    PubMed

    Tzortzis, Michalis; Tsertos, Haralabos; Christofides, Stelios; Christodoulides, George

    2003-01-01

    The gamma radiation in samples of a variety of natural tiling rocks (granites) imported in Cyprus for use in the building industry was measured, employing high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. The rock samples were pulverised, sealed in 1-l plastic Marinelli beakers, and measured in the laboratory with an accumulating time between 10 and 14 h each. From the measured gamma-ray spectra, activity concentrations were determined for (232)Th (range from 1 to 906 Bq kg(-1)), (238)U (from 1 to 588 Bq kg(-1)) and (40)K (from 50 to 1606 Bq kg(-1)). The total absorbed dose rates in air calculated from the concentrations of the three radionuclides ranged from 7 to 1209 nGy h(-1) for full utilization of the materials, from 4 to 605 nGy h(-1) for half utilization and from 2 to 302 nGy h(-1) for one quarter utilization. The total effective dose rates per person indoors were determined to be between 0.02 and 2.97 mSv y(-1) for half utilization of the materials. Applying dose criteria recently recommended by the EU for superficial materials, 25 of the samples meet the exemption dose limit of 0.3 mSv y(-1), two of them meet the upper dose limit of 1 mSv y(-1) and only one clearly exceeds this limit.

  11. High-resolution atmospheric water vapor measurements with a scanning differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, F.; Behrendt, A.; Muppa, S. K.; Metzendorf, S.; Riede, A.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    2014-11-01

    The scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) is presented. The UHOH DIAL is equipped with an injection-seeded frequency-stabilized high-power Ti:sapphire laser operated at 818 nm with a repetition rate of 250 Hz. A scanning transceiver unit with a 80 cm primary mirror receives the atmospheric backscatter signals. The system is capable of water vapor measurements with temporal resolutions of a few seconds and a range resolution between 30 and 300 m at daytime. It allows to investigate surface-vegetation-atmosphere exchange processes with high resolution. In this paper, we present the design of the instrument and illustrate its performance with recent water vapor measurements taken in Stuttgart-Hohenheim and in the frame of the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE). HOPE was located near research center Jülich, in western Germany, in spring 2013 as part of the project "High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction" (HD(CP)2). Scanning measurements reveal the 3-dimensional structures of the water vapor field. The influence of uncertainties within the calculation of the absorption cross-section at wavelengths around 818 nm for the WV retrieval is discussed. Radiosonde intercomparisons show a very small bias between the instruments of only (-0.04 ± 0.11) g m-3 or (-1.0 ± 2.3) % in the height range of 0.5 to 3 km.

  12. Advanced Scintillator-Based Compton Telescope for Solar Flare Gamma-Ray Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, James Michael; Bloser, Peter; McConnell, Mark; Legere, Jason; Bancroft, Christopher; Murphy, Ronald; de Nolfo, Georgia

    2015-04-01

    A major goal of future Solar and Heliospheric Physics missions is the understanding of the particle acceleration processes taking place on the Sun. Achieving this understanding will require detailed study of the gamma-ray emission lines generated by accelerated ions in solar flares. Specifically, it will be necessary to study gamma-ray line ratios over a wide range of flare intensities, down to small C-class flares. Making such measurements over such a wide dynamic range, however, is a serious challenge to gamma-ray instrumentation, which must deal with large backgrounds for faint flares and huge counting rates for bright flares. A fast scintillator-based Compton telescope is a promising solution to this instrumentation challenge. The sensitivity of Compton telescopes to solar flare gamma rays has already been demonstrated by COMPTEL, which was able to detect nuclear emission from a C4 flare, the faintest such detection to date. Modern fast scintillators, such as LaBr3, and CeBr3, are efficient at stopping MeV gamma rays, have sufficient energy resolution (4% or better above 0.5 MeV) to resolve nuclear lines, and are fast enough (~15 ns decay times) to record at very high rates. When configured as a Compton telescope in combination with a modern organic scintillator, such as p-terphenyl, sub-nanosecond coincidence resolving time allows dramatic suppression of background via time-of-flight (ToF) measurements, allowing both faint and bright gamma-ray line flares to be measured. The use of modern light readout devices, such as silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), eliminates passive mass and permits a more compact, efficient instrument. We have flown a prototype Compton telescope using modern fast scintillators with SiPM readouts on a balloon test flight, achieving good ToF and spectroscopy performance. A larger balloon-borne instrument is currently in development. We present our test results and estimates of the solar flare sensitivity of a possible full-scale instrument

  13. Dose-Dependent Z-Scan Measurements on GAFCHROMIC® Dosimetry Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulouklidis, A.; Karava, K.; Kalef-Ezra, J.; Cohen, S.

    2010-11-01

    The open- and closed-aperture z-scan techniques are applied for investigating the non-linear optical response of GAFCHROMIC® docimetry films, irradiated by 60Co γ-rays. Upon irradiation the films active diacetylene layers undergo radiation-Dose-dependent polymerization to the so-called blue polydiacetylene form. A cw He/Ne laser is used as the light source. Open-aperture z-scan measurements reveal reverse saturable absorption while Dose-dependent thermal effects become apparent with increasing laser intensity. Those effects are tentatively attributed to the transition from the blue form to the conformer red form of the active layer (thermochromic transition) which, for the highest available power, appears to be irreversible. For minimizing the importance of thermal effects the closed aperture z-scan technique is applied with a chopped laser beam. The z-scan curves recorded under those conditions reveal a sensitivity on absorbed Dose which is comparable to that of the films linear absorbance.

  14. High-resolution gamma-ray measurement systems using a compact electro- mechanically cooled detector system and intelligent software

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, W.M.; Carlson, J.B.; Neufeld, K.W.

    1995-09-27

    Obtaining high-resolution gamma-ray measurements using high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors in the field has been of limited practicality due to the need to use and maintain a supply of liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}). This same constraint limits high-resolution gamma measurements in unattended safeguards or treaty Verification applications. We are developing detectors and software to greatly extend the applicability of high-resolution germanium-based measurements for these situations.

  15. Measurement and Control of the Variability of Scanning Pressure Transducer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl, David D.; Everhart, Joel L.; Hallissy, James B.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the new wall pressure measurement system and data-quality monitoring software installed at 14x22 Ft subsonic tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. The monitoring software was developed to enable measurement and control of the variability of the reference pressures and approximately 400 tunnel wall pressure measurements. Variability of the system, based upon data acquired over a year of wind tunnel tests and calibrations, is presented. The level of variation of the wall pressure measurements is shown to be predictable.

  16. Inference of total DT fusion neutron yield from prompt gamma-ray measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, J. A.; Herrmann, H. W.; Stoeffl, W.; Caggiano, J. A.; Cerjan, C.; Sayre, D.

    2014-10-01

    Prompt D-T fusion gamma-rays measured at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) with the Gamma-ray Reaction History detector (GRH) have been used recently to infer the total DT fusion neutron yield of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. DT fusion produces energetic gamma-rays (16.75 MeV) with a small branching ratio of approximately (4.2 +/- 2.0)e-5 γ/n. While the large error bar precludes use of the branching ratio for an accurate yield determination, the gamma-rays themselves provide the most unperturbed measure of fusion burn and can be used for such a purpose. A cross-calibration for the DT fusion gamma-ray to neutron signal is obtained via low areal density exploding pusher implosions which have mostly unperturbed neutron and gamma-ray signals. The calibration is then used to infer total DT neutron yield from gamma-ray measurements on high areal-density, cryogenically layered implosions in which neutrons are heavily down-scattered (up to 30%). Furthermore, the difference between the gamma-ray inferred total DT yield and the primary neutron yield (unscattered neutrons) can be used to estimate the total down-scatter fraction. Error analysis and comparison of yield values will be presented. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, LLNL-ABS-657694.

  17. Gamma ray and fair weather electric field measurements during thunderstorms: indications for TGEs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuveni, Yuval; Yair, Yoav; Steinitz, Gideon; Price, Colin; Pustil'nik, Lev; Yaniv, Roy; Hamiel, Yariv; Katz, Evgeni

    2016-04-01

    We report coincidences of ground-level gamma-ray enhancements with strong electric fields typical of lightning discharges, measured at a mountainous site in northern Israel. High-energy emissions detected on the Earth's surface during thunderstorms supposedly initiate Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs) of fluxes of electrons, neutrons and gamma rays that can last tens of minutes. Such enhancements are thought to be related to Extensive Cloud Showers (ECSs) initiated between the main negative charge center and the lower positive charge pocket in mature thunderstorms (Chilingarian et al., 2015). The Cosmic Ray and Space Weather Center located at Mt. Hermon hosts a gamma ray detector alongside a continuous multi-parametric array consisting of a Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) geodetic receiver (for measuring Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) and ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC)), vertical atmospheric electric field (Ez) and current (Jz) and a neutron super monitor (for cosmic ray measurements). The diurnal variations in fair-weather conditions exhibit a clear 24-hour periodicity, related to the diurnal variation of atmospheric parameters. During several severe thunderstorms that occurred over Israel and near the Mt. Hermon station in October and November 2015, we recorded several instantaneous enhancements in the counts of Gamma rays, which lasted ten of minutes, and that coincided with peaks in the vertical electric field and current. Lightning data obtained from the Israeli Lightning Detection Network (ILDN) show that these peaks match the occurrences of close-by CG lightning discharges. This talk will present correlations between the properties of parent flashes and the observed peaks, and discuss possible mechanisms.

  18. Accuracy improvement in laser stripe extraction for large-scale triangulation scanning measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Wei; Li, Xiaodong; Yang, Fan; Gao, Peng; Jia, Zhenyuan

    2015-10-01

    Large-scale triangulation scanning measurement systems are widely used to measure the three-dimensional profile of large-scale components and parts. The accuracy and speed of the laser stripe center extraction are essential for guaranteeing the accuracy and efficiency of the measuring system. However, in the process of large-scale measurement, multiple factors can cause deviation of the laser stripe center, including the spatial light intensity distribution, material reflectivity characteristics, and spatial transmission characteristics. A center extraction method is proposed for improving the accuracy of the laser stripe center extraction based on image evaluation of Gaussian fitting structural similarity and analysis of the multiple source factors. First, according to the features of the gray distribution of the laser stripe, evaluation of the Gaussian fitting structural similarity is estimated to provide a threshold value for center compensation. Then using the relationships between the gray distribution of the laser stripe and the multiple source factors, a compensation method of center extraction is presented. Finally, measurement experiments for a large-scale aviation composite component are carried out. The experimental results for this specific implementation verify the feasibility of the proposed center extraction method and the improved accuracy for large-scale triangulation scanning measurements.

  19. Measurement of relative output factors for the 8 and 4 mm collimators of Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion by film dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Novotny, Josef Jr.; Bhatnagar, Jagdish P.; Quader, Mubina A.; Bednarz, Greg; Lunsford, L. Dade; Huq, M. Saiful

    2009-05-15

    Three types of films, Kodak EDR2, Gafchromic EBT, and Gafchromic MD-V2-55, were used to measure relative output factors of 4 and 8 mm collimators of the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion. The optical density to dose calibration curve for each of the film types was obtained by exposing the films to a range of known doses. Ten data points were acquired for each of the calibration curves in the dose ranges from 0 to 4 Gy, 0 to 8 Gy, and 0 to 80 Gy for Kodak EDR2, Gafchromic EBT, and Gafchromic MD-V2-55 films, respectively. For the measurement of relative output factors, five films of each film type were exposed to a known dose. All films were scanned using EPSON EXPRESSION 10000 XL scanner with 200 dpi resolution in 16 bit gray scale for EDR2 film and 48 bit color scale for Gafchromic films. The scanned images were imported in the red channel for both Gafchromic films. The background corrections from an unexposed film were applied to all films. The output factors obtained from film measurements were in a close agreement both with the Monte Carlo calculated values of 0.924 and 0.805 for 8 and 4 mm collimators, respectively. These values are provided by the vendor and used as default values in the vendor's treatment planning system. The largest differences were noted for the Kodak EDR 2 films (-2.1% and -4.5% for 8 and 4 mm collimators, respectively). The best agreement observed was for EBT Gafchromic film (-0.8% and +0.6% differences for 8 and 4 mm collimators, respectively). Based on the present values, no changes in the default relative output factor values were made in the treatment planning system.

  20. Precision neutron flux measurements and applications using the Alpha Gamma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Eamon; Alpha Gamma; BL2 Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Alpha Gamma device is a totally-absorbing 10 B neutron detector designed to measure the absolute detection efficiency of a thin-film lithium neutron monitor on a monoenergetic neutron beam. The detector has been shown to measure neutron fluence with an absolute accuracy of 0.06%. This capability has been used to perform the first direct, absolute measurement of the 6Li(n , t) 4He cross section at sub-thermal energy, improve the neutron fluence determination in a past beam neutron lifetime measurement by a factor of five, and is being used to calibrate the neutron monitors for use in the upcoming beam neutron lifetime measurement BL2 (NIST Beam Lifetime 2). The principle of the measurement method will presented and the applications will be discussed. We would like to acknowledge support of this research through the NSF-PHY-1068712 grant as well as the NIST Precision Measurement Grant program.

  1. Precision neutron flux measurements and applications using the Alpha Gamma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Eamon

    2016-03-01

    The Alpha Gamma device is a totally-absorbing 10 B neutron detector designed to measure the absolute detection efficiency of a thin-film lithium neutron monitor on a monoenergetic neutron beam. The detector has been shown to measure neutron fluence with an absolute accuracy of 0.06%. This capability has been used to perform the first direct, absolute measurement of the 6Li(n,t) 4He cross section at sub-thermal energy, improve the neutron fluence determination in a past beam neutron lifetime measurement by a factor of five, and is being used to calibrate the neutron monitors for use in the upcoming beam neutron lifetime measurement BL2 (NIST Beam Lifetime 2). The principle of the measurement method will presented and the applications will be discussed. We would like to acknowledge support of this research through the NSF-PHY-1068712 Grant as well as the NIST Precision Measurement Grant program.

  2. Measurement of the K{sup +{yields}{pi}0{mu}+{nu}}{sub {mu}{gamma}}branching ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, S.; Chiang, I-H.; Diwan, M. V.; Frank, J. S.; Haggerty, J. S.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jain, V.; Kettell, S. H.; Li, K. K.; Littenberg, L. S.; Ng, C.; Strand, R. C.; Witzig, C.; Bazarko, A. O.; Ito, M. M.; Meyers, P. D.; Shoemaker, F. C.; Stone, J. R.; Bergbusch, P. C.; Bryman, D. A.

    2010-05-01

    A measurement of the decay K{sup +{yields}{pi}0{mu}+{nu}}{sub {mu}{gamma}}has been performed with the E787 detector at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Forty events were observed in the signal region with the background expectation of (16.5{+-}2.7) events. The branching ratio was measured to be (1.58{+-}0.46(stat.){+-}0.08(syst.))x10{sup -5} in the kinematic region E{sub {gamma}>}30 MeV and {theta}{sub {mu}{gamma}>}20 deg., where E{sub {gamma}}is the energy of the emitted photon and {theta}{sub {mu}{gamma}}is the angle between the muon and the photon in the K{sup +} rest frame. The results were consistent with theoretical predictions.

  3. A new form measurement system based on subaperture stitching with a line-scanning interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubach, Sören; Ehret, Gerd; Riebeling, Jörg; Lehmann, Peter

    2016-12-01

    A new optical form measurement system for almost rotational symmetric surfaces has been set up. It is based on an interferometric line sensor applying sinusoidal path length modulation in combination with a movement system. With this system, ring-shaped subapertures of the specimens are measured. The system is especially suitable for measuring spheres and aspheres with a broad range of radii (r>50 mm). The individual subapertures are stitched together to yield the full 3D topography. Because the rotation of the specimen by more than 360° has to yield the same results, inherent consistency tests are possible. Example measurements of a sphere are shown and discussed. Reproducibility measurements for one ring scan performed with the system show a standard deviation of 14 nm. The system can be set up at a moderate price as off-the-shelf mechanical and optoelectronic devices can be used. Future improvements of the system are discussed.

  4. Decoupling criterion based on limited energy loss condition for groove measurement using optical scanning microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Li, Mengzhou; Li, Qiang; Tan, Jiubin

    2016-12-01

    In confocal metrology, the lateral and axial responses are coupled in narrow regions near groove edges. This coupling results in an area with an uncertain profile, particularly for measurements of tight structures or deep grooves. In this paper, to delineate the area with measurement accuracy loss, an analytical model depicting the coupling relationships between the groove depth, the coupled portions and the NA of the objective used is introduced. Based on this model, the limited energy lost (LEL) decoupling criterion is presented that can enable users to choose suitable numerical apertures before performing measurements, predict the extents of the areas with measurement accuracy loss, and identify readout areas that yield accurate height measurements. The theory was verified by using confocal microscopes and is also applicable to far-field optical scanning metrology.

  5. An efficient method of measuring the 4 mm helmet output factor for the Gamma Knife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lijun; Li, X. Allen; Yu, Cedric X.

    2000-03-01

    It is essential to have accurate measurements of the 4 mm helmet output factor in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia patients using the Gamma Knife. Because of the small collimator size and the sharp dose gradient at the beam focus, this measurement is generally tedious and difficult. We have developed an efficient method of measuring the 4 mm helmet output factor using regular radiographic films. The helmet output factor was measured by exposing a single Kodak XV film in the standard Leksell spherical phantom using the 18 mm helmet with 30-40 of its plug collimators replaced by the 4 mm plug collimators. The 4 mm helmet output factor was measured to be 0.876 ± 0.009. This is in excellent agreement with our EGS4 Monte Carlo simulated value of 0.876 ± 0.005. This helmet output factor value also agrees with more tedious TLD, diode and radiochromic film measurements that were each obtained using two separate measurements with the 18 mm helmet and the 4 mm helmet respectively. The 4 mm helmet output factor measured by the diode was 0.884 ± 0.016, and the TLD measurement was 0.890 ± 0.020. The radiochromic film measured value was 0.870 ± 0.018. Because a single-exposure measurement was performed instead of a double-exposure measurement, most of the systematic errors that appeared in the double-exposure measurements due to experimental setup variations were cancelled out. Consequently, the 4 mm helmet output factor is more precisely determined by the single-exposure approach. Therefore, routine measurement and quality assurance of the 4 mm helmet output factor of the Gamma Knife could be efficiently carried out using the proposed single-exposure technique.

  6. In vivo measurements of skin barrier: comparison of different methods and advantages of laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patzelt, A.; Sterry, W.; Lademann, J.

    2010-12-01

    A major function of the skin is to provide a protective barrier at the interface between external environment and the organism. For skin barrier measurement, a multiplicity of methods is available. As standard methods, the determination of the transepidermal water loss (TEWL) as well as the measurement of the stratum corneum hydration, are widely accepted, although they offer some obvious disadvantages such as increased interference liability. Recently, new optical and spectroscopic methods have been introduced to investigate skin barrier properties in vivo. Especially, laser scanning microscopy has been shown to represent an excellent tool to study skin barrier integrity in many areas of relevance such as cosmetology, occupation, diseased skin, and wound healing.

  7. Reliable strain measurement in transistor arrays by robust scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suhyun; Kim, Joong Jung; Jung, Younheum; Lee, Kyungwoo; Byun, Gwangsun; Hwang, KyoungHwan; Lee, Sunyoung; Lee, Kyupil

    2013-09-15

    Accurate measurement of the strain field in the channels of transistor arrays is critical for strain engineering in modern electronic devices. We applied atomic-resolution high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy to quantitative measurement of the strain field in transistor arrays. The quantitative strain profile over 20 transistors was obtained with high reliability and a precision of 0.1%. The strain field was found to form homogeneously in the channels of the transistor arrays. Furthermore, strain relaxation due to the thin foil effect was quantitatively investigated for thicknesses of 35 to 275 nm.

  8. Convective cloud top vertical velocity estimated from geostationary satellite rapid-scan measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Atsushi; Takayabu, Yukari N.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that the rate of development of cumulus clouds, as inferred from the so-called geostationary satellite "rapid-scan" measurements, is a good proxy for convective cloud top vertical velocity related to deep convective clouds. Convective cloud top vertical velocity is estimated from the decreasing rate of infrared brightness temperature observed by the Multi-functional Transport SATellite-1R (MTSAT-1R) over the ocean south of Japan during boreal summer. The frequency distribution of the estimated convective cloud top vertical velocity at each height is shown to distribute lognormally, and it is consistent with the statistical characteristics of direct measurements acquired in previous studies.

  9. Tensile strain measurements of ceramic fibers using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Renee M.; Vary, Alex

    1992-08-01

    A noncontacting technique using scanning laser acoustic microscopy for making in situ tensile strain measurements of small diameter fibers was implemented for the tensile strain analysis of individual Nicalon SiC fibers (nominal diameter 15 microns). Stress vs strain curves for the fibers were plotted from the experimental data. The mean elastic modulus of the fibers was determined to be 185.3 GPa. Similar measurements were made for Carborundum SiC fibers (nominal diameter 28 microns) and Saphikon sapphire fibers (nominal diameter 140 microns).

  10. ``Super'' Gas Cherenkov Detector for Gamma Ray Measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Hans W.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Lopez, F. E.; Griego, J. R.; Fatherley, V. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H.; Stoeffl, W.; Church, J. A.; Carpenter, A.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Gales, S.; Leatherland, A.; Hilsabeck, T.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Malone, R. M.; Shmayda, W. T.

    2015-11-01

    New requirements to improve reaction history and ablator areal density measurements at the NIF necessitate improvements in sensitivity, temporal and spectral response relative to the existing Gamma Reaction History diagnostic (GRH-6m) located 6 meters from target chamber center (TCC). A new DIM-based ``Super'' Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) will ultimately provide ~ 200x more sensitivity to DT fusion gamma rays, reduce the effective temporal resolution from ~ 100 to ~ 10 ps and lower the energy threshold from 2.9 to 1.8 MeV, relative to GRH-6m. The first phase is to insert the existing coaxial GCD-3 detector into a reentrant well on the NIF chamber which will put it within 4 meters of TCC. This diagnostic platform will allow assessment of the x-ray radiation background environment within the well which will be fed into the shielding design for the follow-on ``Super'' GCD. It will also enable use of a pulse-dilation PMT which has the potential to improve the effective measurement bandwidth by ~ 10x relative to current PMT technology. GCD-3 has been thoroughly tested at the OMEGA Laser Facility and characterized at the High Intensity Gamma Ray Source (HIgS).

  11. Measurements of neutron distribution in neutrons-gamma-rays mixed field using imaging plate for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2010-01-01

    The imaging plate (IP) technique is tried to be used as a handy method to measure the spatial neutron distribution via the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction for neutron capture therapy (NCT). For this purpose, IP is set in a water phantom and irradiated in a mixed field of neutrons and gamma-rays. The Hiroshima University Radiobiological Research Accelerator is utilized for this experiment. The neutrons are moderated with 20-cm-thick D(2)O to obtain suitable neutron field for NCT. The signal for IP doped with Gd as a neutron-response enhancer is subtracted with its contribution by gamma-rays, which was estimated using IP without Gd. The gamma-ray response of Gd-doped IP to non-Gd IP is set at 1.34, the value measured for (60)Co gamma-rays, in estimating the gamma-ray contribution to Gd-doped IP signal. Then measured distribution of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate agrees within 10% with the calculated value based on the method that has already been validated for its reproducibility of Au activation. However, the evaluated distribution of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate is so sensitive to gamma-ray energy, e.g. the discrepancy of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate between measurement and calculation becomes 30% for the photon energy change from 33keV to 1.253MeV.

  12. Robust automatic measurement of 3D scanned models for the human body fat estimation.

    PubMed

    Giachetti, Andrea; Lovato, Christian; Piscitelli, Francesco; Milanese, Chiara; Zancanaro, Carlo

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic tool for estimating geometrical parameters from 3-D human scans independent on pose and robustly against the topological noise. It is based on an automatic segmentation of body parts exploiting curve skeleton processing and ad hoc heuristics able to remove problems due to different acquisition poses and body types. The software is able to locate body trunk and limbs, detect their directions, and compute parameters like volumes, areas, girths, and lengths. Experimental results demonstrate that measurements provided by our system on 3-D body scans of normal and overweight subjects acquired in different poses are highly correlated with the body fat estimates obtained on the same subjects with dual-energy X-rays absorptiometry (DXA) scanning. In particular, maximal lengths and girths, not requiring precise localization of anatomical landmarks, demonstrate a good correlation (up to 96%) with the body fat and trunk fat. Regression models based on our automatic measurements can be used to predict body fat values reasonably well.

  13. Factor structure of the B-Scan 360: a measure of corporate psychopathy.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Cynthia; Hare, Robert D; Jones, Daniel N; Babiak, Paul; Neumann, Craig S

    2013-03-01

    Psychopathy is a clinical construct defined by a cluster of personality traits and behaviors, including grandiosity, egocentricity, deceptiveness, shallow emotions, lack of empathy or remorse, irresponsibility, impulsivity, and a tendency to ignore or violate social norms. The majority of empirical research on psychopathy involves forensic populations most commonly assessed with the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R), a 20-item rating scale that measures 4 related factors or dimensions (Interpersonal, Affective, Lifestyle, and Antisocial) that underpin the superordinate construct of psychopathy. Recently, researchers have turned their attention to the nature and implications of psychopathic features in the workplace. This research has been hampered by the lack of an assessment tool geared to the corporate/organizational world. Here we describe the B-Scan 360, an instrument that uses ratings of others to measure psychopathic features in workplace settings. In this study, large samples of participants used an online survey system to rate their supervisors on the B-Scan 360. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a reliable 20-item, 4-factor model that is consistent with the PCL-R 4-factor model of psychopathy. Although more research is needed before the B-Scan 360 can be used in organizational settings, we believe that these results represent an important step forward in the study of corporate psychopathy.

  14. Stellar and primordial nucleosynthesis of 7Be: measurement of 3He(alpha,gamma)7Be.

    PubMed

    Di Leva, A; Gialanella, L; Kunz, R; Rogalla, D; Schürmann, D; Strieder, F; De Cesare, M; De Cesare, N; D'Onofrio, A; Fülöp, Z; Gyürky, G; Imbriani, G; Mangano, G; Ordine, A; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Romano, M; Somorjai, E; Terrasi, F

    2009-06-12

    The 3He(alpha,gamma)7Be reaction presently represents the largest nuclear uncertainty in the predicted solar neutrino flux and has important implications on the big bang nucleosynthesis, i.e., the production of primordial 7Li. We present here the results of an experiment using the recoil separator ERNA (European Recoil separator for Nuclear Astrophysics) to detect directly the 7Be ejectiles. In addition, off-beam activation and coincidence gamma-ray measurements were performed at selected energies. At energies above 1 MeV a large discrepancy compared to previous results is observed both in the absolute value and in the energy dependence of the cross section. Based on the available data and models, a robust estimate of the cross section at the astrophysical relevant energies is proposed.

  15. Measurement of the branching fraction of Gamma(4S) --> B0B0.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Mohapatra, A K; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Thompson, J; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Ricca, G Della; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-07-22

    We report the first measurement of the branching fraction f(00) for Gamma(4S) --> B(0)B(0). The data sample consists of 81.7 fb(-1) collected at the Gamma(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e(+)e(-) storage ring. Using partial reconstruction of the decay B(0) --> D(*+) l(-)nu(l) in which only the charged lepton and the soft pion from the decay D(*+) --> D(0)pi(+) are reconstructed, we obtain f(00) = 0.487 +/- 0.010(stat) +/- 0.008(syst). Our result does not depend on the branching fractions of B(0) --> D(*+)l(-)nu(l) and D(*+) --> D(0)pi(+) decays, on the ratio of the charged and neutral B meson lifetimes, nor on the assumption of isospin symmetry.

  16. High-bandwidth multichannel fiber optic system for measuring gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Roeske, F.; Smith, D.E.; Pruett, B.L.; Reedy, R.P.

    1984-07-01

    We describe an analog fiber optic gamma-ray diagnostic system that can transmit signals through fiber cables 600 to 700 m long with a system bandwidth exceeding 1 GHz and measure the relative timing between signals to within 0.3 ns. Gamma rays are converted to visible light via the Cerenkov process in a short length of a radiation-resistant optical fiber. A graded-index optical fiber transmits this pulse to a recording station where the broadened pulse is compensated for material dispersion and recorded using a streak camera. The streak camera can simultaneously record 20 to 30 data channels on a single piece of film. The system has been calibrated using electron linear accelerators and fielded on two experiments.

  17. GEANT4 calibration of gamma spectrometry efficiency for measurements of airborne radioactivity on filter paper.

    PubMed

    Alrefae, Tareq

    2014-11-01

    A simple method of efficiency calibration for gamma spectrometry was performed. This method, which focused on measuring airborne radioactivity collected on filter paper, was based on Monte Carlo simulations using the toolkit GEANT4. Experimentally, the efficiency values of an HPGe detector were calculated for a multi-gamma disk source. These efficiency values were compared to their counterparts produced by a computer code that simulated experimental conditions. Such comparison revealed biases of 24, 10, 1, 3, 7, and 3% for the radionuclides (photon energies in keV) of Ce (166), Sn (392), Cs (662), Co (1,173), Co (1,333), and Y (1,836), respectively. The output of the simulation code was in acceptable agreement with the experimental findings, thus validating the proposed method.

  18. Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements of hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Parigger, Christian G.; Dackman, Matthew; Hornkohl, James O

    2008-11-01

    Hydrogen emission spectroscopy results are reported following laser-induced optical breakdown with infrared Nd:YAG laser radiation focused into a pulsed methane flow. Measurements of Stark-broadened atomic hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma lines show electron number densities of 0.3 to 4x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} for time delays of 2.1 to 0.4 {mu}s after laser-induced optical breakdown. In methane flow, recombination molecular spectra of the {delta}{nu}=+2 progression of the C2 Swan system are discernable in the H{beta} and H{gamma} plasma emissions within the first few microseconds. The recorded atomic spectra indicate the occurrence of hydrogen self-absorption for pulsed CH4 flow pressures of 2.7x10{sup 5} Pa (25 psig) and 6.5x10{sup 5} Pa (80 psig)

  19. Standardization and measurement of gamma-ray probability per decay of 177Lu.

    PubMed

    Dias, Mauro S; Silva, Fabrício F V; Koskinas, Marina F

    2010-01-01

    The procedure followed by the Nuclear Metrology Laboratory (LMN), at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN), for the primary standardization of (177)Lu is described. This radionuclide is widely used in radiopharmacy due to its convenient half-life and emitted beta ray energies. The (177)Lu solution was supplied during an international comparison sponsored by BIPM in 2009 and the primary standardization has been accomplished by the 4pibeta-gamma coincidence method using a proportional counter in 4pi geometry coupled with two NaI(Tl) scintillation counters. The beta efficiency was varied by placing Collodion and aluminum absorbers over and under the radioactive source. The (177)Lu calibrated sources were also measured in a previously calibrated HPGe spectrometer, in order to obtain the emission probability per decay for the selected gamma-ray transitions. The experimental extrapolation curves were also compared with Monte Carlo simulations by means of code ESQUEMA developed at the LMN.

  20. Development and application of marine gamma-ray measurements: a review.

    PubMed

    Jones, D G

    2001-01-01

    The development of instruments to measure gamma radiation in the marine environment, particularly on the sea floor, and the range of uses to which they have been put is reviewed. Since the first steps in the late 1950s, systems have been developed in at least 10 countries with the main thrust occurring in the 1970s. Development has continued up to the present, primarily in Europe and the USA. Marine gamma-ray spectrometers have been used for a range of applications including the mapping of rocks and unconsolidated sediments, mineral exploration (mainly for heavy minerals and phosphorites), sediment transport studies and investigations in relation to discharged and dumped nuclear wastes and at nuclear weapon test sites.

  1. Radial Electron Temperature and Density Measurements Using Thomson Scattering System in GAMMA 10/PDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, M.; Ohta, K.; Wang, X.; Chikatsu, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Sakamoto, M.; Imai, T.; Nakashima, Y.; Yasuhara, R.; Yamada, I.; Funaba, H.; Minami, T.

    2015-11-01

    A Thomson scattering (TS) system in GAMMA 10/PDX has been developed for the measurement of radial profiles of electron temperature and density in a single plasma and laser shot. The TS system has a large solid angle optical collection system and high-sensitivity signal detection system. The TS signals are obtained using four-channel high-speed digital oscilloscopes controlled by a Windows PC. We designed the acquisition program for six oscilloscopes to obtain 10-Hz TS signals in a single plasma shot, following which the time-dependent electron temperatures and densities can be determined. Moreover, in order to obtain larger TS signal intensity in the edge region, we added a second collection mirror. The radial electron temperatures and densities at six radial positions in GAMMA 10/PDX were successfully obtained.

  2. Estimates of rates and errors for measurements of direct-{gamma} and direct-{gamma} + jet production by polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Beddo, M.E.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.G.

    1992-08-14

    Studies of inclusive direct-{gamma} production by pp interactions at RHIC energies were performed. Rates and the associated uncertainties on spin-spin observables for this process were computed for the planned PHENIX and STAR detectors at energies between {radical}s = 50 and 500 GeV. Also, rates were computed for direct-{gamma} + jet production for the STAR detector. The goal was to study the gluon spin distribution functions with such measurements. Recommendations concerning the electromagnetic calorimeter design and the need for an endcap calorimeter for STAR are made.

  3. Surface and thickness measurement of a transparent film using wavelength scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Muhamedsalih, Hussam; Jiang, Xiangqian

    2012-09-10

    A wavelength scanning interferometer for measuring the surface and thickness of a transparent film has been studied. A halogen light source combined with an acousto-optic tuneable filter is used to generate a sequence of filtered light in a Linnik interferometer, which leads to a sequence of interferograms captured by a CCD camera. When a transparent thin film is measured, the reflection signals from both the top and bottom surfaces of the film will interfere with the reference signal. At the same time, the multiple reflection signals between the two film surfaces will also interfere with each other. Effective separation of the interference signals from each other is the key to achieving a successful measurement. By performing a frequency-domain analysis, these interference signals can be separated. An optimized Fourier transform method is used in the analysis. Measurements of the top and bottom surface finishes of the film, as well as the film thickness map, have been achieved. The film needs to be more than 3 µm in optical path length, and must transparent with no absorption of light. The film's refractive index needs to be known as a function of wavelength. In this paper, the theoretical analysis and simulation study of wavelength scanning interferometry for transparent film measurement is discussed. Experiments on thin film layers of Parylene N coated on a glass slide surface are studied and analyzed. Comparison study results with other contact and non-contact methods are also presented.

  4. Measurements of {psi}(2S) decays into {gamma}KK{pi} and {gamma}{eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Ablikim, M.; Bai, J. Z.; Bian, J. G.; Cai, X.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. X.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, Jin; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Cui, X. Z.; Deng, Z. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, C. S.; Gu, S. D.; Guo, Y. N.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, K. L.

    2006-10-01

    Radiative decays of the {psi}(2S) into {gamma}KK{pi} and {gamma}{eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final states are studied using 14x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) events collected with the BESII detector. Branching fractions or upper limits on the branching fractions of {psi}(2S) and {chi}{sub cJ} decays are reported. No significant signal for {eta}(1405)/{eta}(1475) is observed in the KK{pi} or {eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} mass spectra, and upper limits on the branching fractions of {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}{eta}(1405)/{eta}(1475), {eta}(1405)/{eta}(1475){yields}KK{pi}, and {eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} are determined.

  5. Isotopic ratio of 129I/127I in seaweed measured by neutron activation analysis with gamma-gamma coincidence.

    PubMed

    Toh, Y; Hatsukawa, Y; Oshima, M; Shinohara, N; Hayakawa, T; Kushita, K; Ueno, T

    2002-07-01

    129I is a long-lived (1.6 x 10(7) y) radionuclide that is produced in nature as the result of spontaneous fission of heavy elements and reaction of xenon with cosmic rays. Recently, however, artificial sources from nuclear power plants and nuclear test explosions have become a significant component of environmental radioactive iodine. Coincidence gamma-ray detection using Ge detectors makes it possible to simultaneously resolve the numerous gamma-rays produced by neutron activation. In this study, the coincidence gamma-ray detection technique was combined with neutron activation analysis to determine the radioactive iodine composition of seaweed. The ratio of 129I/127I in this common Japanese food item collected from the Ibaraki prefecture has been derived without the need for radiochemical purification. The isotopic ratio of 129I/127I in Kajime algae is 3.5(5) x 10(-10).

  6. Deconvolution of detector size effect for output factor measurement for narrow Gamma Knife radiosurgery beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarz, G.; Saiful Huq, M.; Rosenow, U. F.

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements of output factors (OFs) for a model U Gamma Knife collimator, with special emphasis on the accurate determination of the OF for the 4 mm collimator (OF4). In the past, the OF4 was set to 0.800 relative to the 18 mm collimator. Recently, the manufacturer has recommended a new value of 0.870 for OF4. However, most centres still use the old value of the OF4. In the present study, the Gamma Knife OFs were measured using a commercially available miniature diamond detector and a miniature 0.006 cc ion chamber, which was especially designed for the task. The measured OF4 were corrected for spatial averaging effects by measuring dose profiles for the 4 mm collimator with the same detectors and deconvolving their response from the measured profiles. A Gaussian kernel was used to describe the detector response. The relative OFs measured with the diamond detector/ion chamber were 0.986/0.982, 0.953/0.935 and 0.812/0.765 for the 14, 8 and 4 mm collimators, respectively, as compared with the manufacturer's values of 0.984, 0.956 and 0.87. The corrected OF4 was 0.881 +/- 0.012 for the diamond detector and 0.851 +/- 0.012 for the ion chamber, supporting the manufacturer's revised value for this collimator.

  7. Direct measurement of 235U in spent fuel rods with Gamma-ray mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruz, J.; Brejnholt, N. F.; Alameda, J. B.; Decker, T. A.; Descalle, M. A.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Hill, R. M.; Kisner, R. A.; Melin, A. M.; Patton, B. W.; Soufli, R.; Ziock, K.; Pivovaroff, M. J.

    2015-03-01

    Direct measurement of plutonium and uranium X-rays and gamma-rays is a highly desirable non-destructive analysis method for the use in reprocessing fuel environments. The high background and intense radiation from spent fuel make direct measurements difficult to implement since the relatively low activity of uranium and plutonium is masked by the high activity from fission products. To overcome this problem, we make use of a grazing incidence optic to selectively reflect Kα and Kβ fluorescence of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) into a high-purity position-sensitive germanium detector and obtain their relative ratios.

  8. Comparison of modeled and measured performance of a GSO crystal as gamma detector

    SciTech Connect

    Parno, Diana Syemour; Friend, Megan Lynn; Mamyan, Vahe; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Camsonne, Alexandre; Franklin, Gregg B.; Paschke, Kent D.; Quinn, Brian Patrick

    2013-11-01

    We have modeled, tested, and installed a large, cerium-activated Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} crystal scintillator for use as a detector of gamma rays. We present the measured detector response to two types of incident photons: nearly monochromatic photons up to 40 MeV, and photons from a continuous Compton backscattering spectrum up to 200 MeV. Our GEANT4 simulations, developed to determine the analyzing power of the Compton polarimeter in Hall A of Jefferson Lab, reproduce the measured spectra well.

  9. Simulation and Measurement of Absorbed Dose from 137 Cs Gammas Using a Si Timepix Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoffle, Nicholas; Pinsky, Lawrence; Empl, Anton; Semones, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The TimePix readout chip is a hybrid pixel detector with over 65k independent pixel elements. Each pixel contains its own circuitry for charge collection, counting logic, and readout. When coupled with a Silicon detector layer, the Timepix chip is capable of measuring the charge, and thus energy, deposited in the Silicon. Measurements using a NIST traceable 137Cs gamma source have been made at Johnson Space Center using such a Si Timepix detector, and this data is compared to simulations of energy deposition in the Si layer carried out using FLUKA.

  10. Measurement of an upper limit of fission energy release in HOLOG using a germanium gamma ray detector

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.F.

    1998-01-01

    An upper limit of less than 4 mg TNT equivalent fission energy release from the HOLOG experiment was determined using a germanium {gamma}-ray detector to measure the ratio of selected fission-product and plutonium {gamma} rays. Only three hours of {gamma}-ray data collected immediately after the zero-time were analyzed to calculate the above limit. We found no peaks corresponding to the {sup 97} Zr - {sup 97} Nb fission product pair at the gamma-ray energies of E{sub {gamma}} = 743 keV and E{sub {gamma}} = 658 keV, respectively. No information on the plutonium isotopic ratios is revealed because {gamma}-ray peaks in the energy region below 100 keV are not observed due to the high absorption in the containment barrier. The measurement is relatively easy to perform and is not subject to false-positive results because specific fission product and plutonium {gamma} ray energies need to be detected.

  11. A scanning measurement method of the pitch of grating based on photoelectric microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hongtang; Wang, Zhongyu; Wang, Hao

    2015-10-01

    Grating is an important sensor widely used in CNC machine or equipment for length measurement with high precision. Special line scales with dense and micro lines are also widely used for the calibration of length measurement instrument. All the pitches of grating and spaces of dense lines of line scale are needed to be calibrated for a good measurement application. General methods for measurement of dense and micro lines include digital image processing method by CCD Microscope or line scanning method by AFM or SEM, and laser distraction method. There are some disadvantages to measure a long length grating with high precision and efficiently in these methods. A dynamic method based on Photoelectric Microscope is introduced, the lines of grating to be measured is moving uniformly when measuring, and the working distance is a bigger 65mm, the zoom of objective is low 10X. The principle of this dynamic method is discussed and the distortion of line signal is analyzed. The way to decrease the affection caused by distortion of line signal is also described. A special glass grating line scale with length 10mm, space 10μm and width 5μm is measured to verify the method. The measurement result and the uncertainty analysis demonstrate the expand measurement uncertainty (k=2) is less than 0.1μm.

  12. Gamma-ray thermoluminescence measurements: a record of fallout deposition in Hiroshima?

    PubMed

    Egbert, Stephen D; Kerr, George D

    2012-05-01

    In certain Hiroshima neighborhoods, radiation measurements using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) exceed what can be explained by the initial gamma-ray doses and uncertainties from the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02). This problem was not previously recognized as being isolated to certain parts of that city. The ratio between TLD measurements and DS02 dose calculations for gamma rays appear to grow larger than unity up to more than three with increasing ground range, but closer examination shows the excess TLD dose (0.1, 0.2, or possibly up to 0.8 Gray) is correlated with certain neighborhoods and could be due to radioactive fallout. At Nagasaki, the TLD measurements do not show this same excess, probably because there were no TLD measurements taken more than 800 m downwind (eastward) from the Nagasaki hypocenter, so that any small excess TLD dose was masked by larger initial gamma-ray doses of 25-80 Gray in the few downwind samples. The DS02 Report had noted many measurements lower than the DS02 calculation for several Nagasaki TLD samples, independent of ground range. This was explained as being the result of previously unaccounted urban shielding which was observed from Nagasaki pre-bomb aerial photos. However, the Hiroshima excess TLD dose issue was not resolved. If the excess TLD doses at Hiroshima are an indication of fallout, it may be possible to use additional TLD studies to make better estimates of the locations and radiation doses to survivors from the fallout after the bombings at both cities.

  13. 209Tl half-life and gamma-ray measurements of radionuclides belonging to the (4 n + 1) decay chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardisson, G.; Barci, V.; El Samad, O.

    1994-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectra of radiochemically separated 221Fr, 213Bi and 209Tl sources were measured using coaxial and planar HPGe detectors. The energies and emission probabilities of eight new gamma-ray transitions were observed in the decay of 209Tl; a half-life of (2.161±0.007) min was measured. Twenty-two gamma-rays have been attributed to the β-decay of 213Bi, of which 17 are new with respect to previous studies. The 213Po level scheme was determined using γ-γ coincidence measurements: eight excited states are proposed of which six are new. Preliminary measurements of the α-decay of 221Fr revealed the existence of 18 gamma-ray transitions of which eight are reported for the first time.

  14. Measured Activities of Al and Ni in gamma-(Ni) and gamma'-(Ni)3Al in the Ni-Al-Pt System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan

    2007-01-01

    Adding Pt to Ni-Al coatings is critical to achieving the required oxidation protection of Ni-based superalloys, but the nature of the Pt effect remains unresolved. This research provides a fundamental part of the answer by measuring the influence of Pt on the activities of Al and Ni in gamma-(Ni), gamma prime-(Ni)3Al and liquid in the Ni-Al-Pt system. Measurements have been made at 25 compositions in the Ni-rich corner over the temperature range, T = 1400-1750 K, by the vapor pressure technique with a multiple effusion-cell mass spectrometer (multi-cell KEMS). These measurements clearly show adding Pt (for X(sub Pt) less than 0.25) decreases a(Al) while increasing a(Ni). This solution behavior supports the idea that Pt increases Al transport to an alloy / Al2O3 interface and also limits the interaction between the coating and substrate alloys in the gamma-(Ni) + gamma prime-(Ni)3Al region. This presentation will review the progress of this study.

  15. Improving Canopy Vertical Structure Measurements with Dual-Wavelength Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Strahler, A. H.; Schaaf, C.; Jupp, D. L. B.; Howe, G.; Hewawasam, K.; Chakrabarti, S.; Cook, T.; Paynter, I.; Saenz, E. J.; Yang, X.; Yao, T.

    2015-12-01

    Forest canopy structure regulates radiation interception through the canopy, affects the canopy microclimate, and consequently influences the energy, water, and carbon fluxes between soil, vegetation and atmosphere through its interaction with leaf physiological functioning. To observe vertical canopy forest structure in finer and more accurate detail, we retrieved vertical profiles of leaf and woody components separately with a terrestrial laser scanner, the Dual-Wavelength Echidna Lidar (DWEL). DWEL scans of a hardwood site at the Harvard Forest, Petersham, Massachusetts, USA, in early May and in late September in 2014, revealed the spatial heterogeneity of the canopy vertical structure of the two vegetation components: leaves and woody materials. The DWEL collects simultaneous scans of forests with two lasers at different wavelengths, 1064 nm (NIR) and 1548 nm (SWIR). Power returned from leaves is much lower than from woody materials such as trunks and branches at the SWIR wavelength due to the liquid water absorption by leaves, whereas returned power at the NIR wavelength is similar from both leaves and woody materials. This spectral contrast between leaves and woody materials, along with spatial context information. discriminates leaves and woody materials accurately in 3-D space, thus allowing the measurement of separate leaf and woody area profiles. We also captured the change in the canopy vertical structure over the seven years by a comparison between the current measurements by the DWEL in 2014 and past measurements in 2007 at the same site by the DWEL's predecessor, a single-wavelength terrestrial lidar, the Echidna Validation Instrument. The comparison also demonstrates the advantage of dual-wavelength laser scanning by the DWEL for canopy structure measurements.

  16. A measurement-based generalized source model for Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Liu, Ransheng; Yang, Chengwen; Zhou, Li; Zhai, Hezheng; Deng, Jun

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a generalized source model for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans based solely on the measurement data without a priori knowledge of scanner specifications. The proposed generalized source model consists of an extended circular source located at x-ray target level with its energy spectrum, source distribution and fluence distribution derived from a set of measurement data conveniently available in the clinic. Specifically, the central axis percent depth dose (PDD) curves measured in water and the cone output factors measured in air were used to derive the energy spectrum and the source distribution respectively with a Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm. The in-air film measurement of fan-beam dose profiles at fixed gantry was back-projected to generate the fluence distribution of the source model. A benchmarked Monte Carlo user code was used to simulate the dose distributions in water with the developed source model as beam input. The feasibility and accuracy of the proposed source model was tested on a GE LightSpeed and a Philips Brilliance Big Bore multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners available in our clinic. In general, the Monte Carlo simulations of the PDDs in water and dose profiles along lateral and longitudinal directions agreed with the measurements within 4%/1 mm for both CT scanners. The absolute dose comparison using two CTDI phantoms (16 cm and 32 cm in diameters) indicated a better than 5% agreement between the Monte Carlo-simulated and the ion chamber-measured doses at a variety of locations for the two scanners. Overall, this study demonstrated that a generalized source model can be constructed based only on a set of measurement data and used for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of patients’ CT scans, which would facilitate patient-specific CT organ dose estimation and cancer risk management in the diagnostic and therapeutic radiology.

  17. Simultaneous measurement and quantitation of 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and dopamine with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mimi; Kaplan, Sam V; Raider, Kayla D; Johnson, Michael A

    2015-05-07

    Caged compounds have been used extensively to investigate neuronal function in a variety of preparations, including cell culture, ex vivo tissue samples, and in vivo. As a first step toward electrochemically measuring the extent of caged compound photoactivation while also measuring the release of the catecholamine neurotransmitter, dopamine, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes (FSCV) was used to electrochemically characterize 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4HPAA) in the absence and presence of dopamine. 4HPAA is a by-product formed during the process of photoactivation of p-hydroxyphenacyl-based caged compounds, such as p-hydroxyphenylglutamate (pHP-Glu). Our data suggest that the oxidation of 4HPAA occurs through the formation of a conjugated species. Moreover, we found that a triangular waveform of -0.4 V to +1.3 V to -0.4 V at 600 V s(-1), repeated every 100 ms, provided an oxidation current of 4HPAA that was enhanced with a limit of detection of 100 nM, while also allowing the detection and quantitation of dopamine within the same scan. Along with quantifying 4HPAA in biological preparations, the results from this work will allow the electrochemical measurement of photoactivation reactions that generate 4HPAA as a by-product as well as provide a framework for measuring the photorelease of electroactive by-products from caged compounds that incorporate other chromophores.

  18. Measurement of thin film interfacial surface roughness by coherence scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, H.; Abbas, A.; Kaminski, P. M.; Smith, R.; Walls, J. M.; Mansfield, D.

    2017-03-01

    Coherence Scanning Interferometry (CSI), which is also referred to as scanning white light interferometry, is a well-established optical method used to measure the surface roughness and topography with sub-nanometer precision. One of the challenges CSI has faced is extracting the interfacial topographies of a thin film assembly, where the thin film layers are deposited on a substrate, and each interface has its own defined roughness. What makes this analysis difficult is that the peaks of the interference signal are too close to each other to be separately identified. The Helical Complex Field (HCF) function is a topographically defined helix modulated by the electrical field reflectance, originally conceived for the measurement of thin film thickness. In this paper, we verify a new technique, which uses a first order Taylor expansion of the HCF function to determine the interfacial topographies at each pixel, so avoiding a heavy computation. The method is demonstrated on the surfaces of Silicon wafers using deposited Silica and Zirconia oxide thin films as test examples. These measurements show a reasonable agreement with those obtained by conventional CSI measurement of the bare Silicon wafer substrates.

  19. Spectroscopic measurements and terahertz imaging of the cornea using a rapid scanning terahertz time domain spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-Quan, Liu; Yuan-Fu, Lu; Guo-Hua, Jiao; Xian-Feng, Chen; Zhi-Sheng, Zhou; Rong-Bin, She; Jin-Ying, Li; Si-Hai, Chen; Yu-Ming, Dong; Jian-Cheng, Lv

    2016-06-01

    Spectroscopic measurements and terahertz imaging of the cornea are carried out by using a rapid scanning terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system. A voice coil motor stage based optical delay line (VCM-ODL) is developed to provide a rather simple and robust structure with both the high scanning speed and the large delay length. The developed system is used for THz spectroscopic measurements and imaging of the corneal tissue with different amounts of water content, and the measurement results show the consistence with the reported results, in which the measurement time using VCM-ODL is a factor of 360 shorter than the traditional motorized optical delay line (MDL). With reducing the water content a monotonic decrease of the complex permittivity of the cornea is observed. The two-term Debye relaxation model is employed to explain our experimental results, revealing that the fast relaxation time of a dehydrated cornea is much larger than that of a hydrated cornea and its dielectric behavior can be affected by the presence of the biological macromolecules. These results demonstrate that our THz spectrometer may be a promising candidate for tissue hydration sensing and practical application of THz technology. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61205101), the Shenzhen Municipal Research Foundation, China (Grant Nos. GJHZ201404171134305 and JCYJ20140417113130693), and the Marie Curie Actions-International Research Staff Exchange Scheme (IRSES) (Grant No. FP7 PIRSES-2013-612267).

  20. Ultra-High Rate Measurements of Spent Fuel Gamma-Ray Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Douglas; Vandevender, Brent; Wood, Lynn; Glasgow, Brian; Taubman, Matthew; Wright, Michael; Dion, Michael; Pitts, Karl; Runkle, Robert; Campbell, Luke; Fast, James

    2014-03-01

    Presently there are over 200,000 irradiated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies in the world, each containing a concerning amount of weapons-usable material. Both facility operators and safeguards inspectors want to improve composition determination. Current measurements are expensive and difficult so new methods are developed through models. Passive measurements are limited since a few specific decay products and the associated down-scatter overwhelm the gamma rays of interest. Active interrogation methods produce gamma rays beyond 3 MeV, minimizing the impact of the passive emissions that drop off sharply above this energy. New devices like the Ultra-High Rate Germanium (UHRGe) detector are being developed to advance these novel measurement methods. Designed for reasonable resolution at 106 s-1 output rates (compared to ~ 1 - 10 e 3 s-1 standards), SNF samples were directly measured using UHRGe and compared to models. Model verification further enables using Los Alamos National Laboratory SNF assembly models, developed under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, to determine emission and signal expectations. Measurement results and future application requirements for UHRGe will be discussed.

  1. Genome scan identifies a locus affecting gamma-globin expression in human beta-cluster YAC transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.D.; Cooper, P.; Fung, J.; Weier, H.U.G.; Rubin, E.M.

    2000-03-01

    Genetic factors affecting post-natal g-globin expression - a major modifier of the severity of both b-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia, have been difficult to study. This is especially so in mice, an organism lacking a globin gene with an expression pattern equivalent to that of human g-globin. To model the human b-cluster in mice, with the goal of screening for loci affecting human g-globin expression in vivo, we introduced a human b-globin cluster YAC transgene into the genome of FVB mice . The b-cluster contained a Greek hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) g allele resulting in postnatal expression of human g-globin in transgenic mice. The level of human g-globin for various F1 hybrids derived from crosses between the FVB transgenics and other inbred mouse strains was assessed. The g-globin level of the C3HeB/FVB transgenic mice was noted to be significantly elevated. To map genes affecting postnatal g-globin expression, a 20 centiMorgan (cM) genome scan of a C3HeB/F VB transgenics [prime] FVB backcross was performed, followed by high-resolution marker analysis of promising loci. From this analysis we mapped a locus within a 2.2 cM interval of mouse chromosome 1 at a LOD score of 4.2 that contributes 10.4% of variation in g-globin expression level. Combining transgenic modeling of the human b-globin gene cluster with quantitative trait analysis, we have identified and mapped a murine locus that impacts on human g-globin expression in vivo.

  2. Measurements of gamma radiation levels and spectra in the San Francisco Bay Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, B. T.; Brozek, K. P.; Angell, C. T.; Norman, E. B.

    2011-10-01

    Much of the radiation received by an average person is emitted by naturally-occurring radioactive isotopes from the thorium, actinium, and uranium decay series, or potassium. In this study, we have measured gamma radiation levels at various locations in the San Francisco Bay Area and the UC Berkeley campus from spectra taken using an ORTEC NOMAD portable data acquisition system and a large-volume coaxial HPGe detector. We have identified a large number of gamma rays originating from natural sources. The most noticeable isotopes are 214Bi, 40K, and 208Tl. We have observed variations in counting rates by factors of two to five between different locations due to differences in local conditions - such as building, concrete, grass, and soil compositions. In addition, in a number of outdoor locations, we have observed 604-, 662-, and 795-keV gamma rays from 134,137Cs, which we attribute to fallout from the recent Fukushima reactor accident. The implications of these results will be discussed. This work was supported in part by a grant from the U. S. Dept. of Homeland Security.

  3. Simulations and measurements in scanning electron microscopes at low electron energy.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher G H; Frank, Luděk; Müllerová, Ilona

    2016-11-01

    The advent of new imaging technologies in Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) using low energy (0-2 keV) electrons has brought about new ways to study materials at the nanoscale. It also brings new challenges in terms of understanding electron transport at these energies. In addition, reduction in energy has brought new contrast mechanisms producing images that are sometimes difficult to interpret. This is increasing the push for simulation tools, in particular for low impact energies of electrons. The use of Monte Carlo calculations to simulate the transport of electrons in materials has been undertaken by many authors for several decades. However, inaccuracies associated with the Monte Carlo technique start to grow as the energy is reduced. This is not simply associated with inaccuracies in the knowledge of the scattering cross-sections, but is fundamental to the Monte Carlo technique itself. This is because effects due to the wave nature of the electron and the energy band structure of the target above the vacuum energy level become important and these are properties which are difficult to handle using the Monte Carlo method. In this review we briefly describe the new techniques of scanning low energy electron microscopy and then outline the problems and challenges of trying to understand and quantify the signals that are obtained. The effects of charging and spin polarised measurement are also briefly explored. SCANNING 38:802-818, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A Nano-Scale Scanning SQUID Susceptometer for the Measurement of Isolated Magnetic Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshnick, Nicholas C.; Huber, Martin E.; Bert, Julie; Bluhm, Hendrik; Large, Jeffrey; Edwards, Hal; Moler, Kathryn A.

    2008-03-01

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) are well known as excellent magnetic field sensors. We present a scanning DC SQUID susceptometer that is designed to couple well to nanometer-sized objects. Its gradiometric design and local field coils allow for cancellation of the applied field so that dynamic range issues do not limit the SQUID's sensitivity. Integrated modulation coils linearize the signal and allow for optimal performance at all applied fields. Planar coaxial shielding, enabled by a multi-layer niobium process, results in a low inductance (100 pH) millimeter scale design where the pickup loops can be optimized independently from the junction and shunt resistor parameters. The sensor loop is on a terraced structure so that it can be scanned approximately 100 nm from the sample surface. Focused Ion Beam milling is used to fabricate pickup loops with inner diameters between 250 nm and 2 microns with line widths of approximately 200 nm. A white noise sensitivity of 0.8 μφ0/√Hz gives an estimated spin sensitivity of 80 μB/√Hz at 4 Kelvin. We will also report on on-going scanning susceptometry measurements, and on the spin sensitivity at low temperatures.

  5. Effects of Intraframe Distortion on Measures of Cone Mosaic Geometry from Adaptive Optics Scanning Light Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Robert F.; Sulai, Yusufu N.; Dubis, Adam M.; Chui, Toco Y.; Rosen, Richard B.; Michaelides, Michel; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the effects of intraframe distortion due to involuntary eye motion on measures of cone mosaic geometry derived from adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) images. Methods We acquired AOSLO image sequences from 20 subjects at 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0° temporal from fixation. An expert grader manually selected 10 minimally distorted reference frames from each 150-frame sequence for subsequent registration. Cone mosaic geometry was measured in all registered images (n = 600) using multiple metrics, and the repeatability of these metrics was used to assess the impact of the distortions from each reference frame. In nine additional subjects, we compared AOSLO-derived measurements to those from adaptive optics (AO)-fundus images, which do not contain system-imposed intraframe distortions. Results We observed substantial variation across subjects in the repeatability of density (1.2%–8.7%), inter-cell distance (0.8%–4.6%), percentage of six-sided Voronoi cells (0.8%–10.6%), and Voronoi cell area regularity (VCAR) (1.2%–13.2%). The average of all metrics extracted from AOSLO images (with the exception of VCAR) was not significantly different than those derived from AO-fundus images, though there was variability between individual images. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that the intraframe distortion found in AOSLO images can affect the accuracy and repeatability of cone mosaic metrics. It may be possible to use multiple images from the same retinal area to approximate a “distortionless” image, though more work is needed to evaluate the feasibility of this approach. Translational Relevance Even in subjects with good fixation, images from AOSLOs contain intraframe distortions due to eye motion during scanning. The existence of these artifacts emphasizes the need for caution when interpreting results derived from scanning instruments. PMID:26933523

  6. Laser Scanning in Engineering Surveying: Methods of Measurement and Modeling of Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenda, Grzegorz; Uznański, Andrzej; Strach, Michał; Lewińska, Paulina

    2016-06-01

    The study is devoted to the uses of laser scanning in the field of engineering surveying. It is currently one of the main trends of research which is developed at the Department of Engineering Surveying and Civil Engineering at the Faculty of Mining Surveying and Environmental Engineering of AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow. They mainly relate to the issues associated with tower and shell structures, infrastructure of rail routes, or development of digital elevation models for a wide range of applications. These issues often require the use of a variety of scanning techniques (stationary, mobile), but the differences also regard the planning of measurement stations and methods of merging point clouds. Significant differences appear during the analysis of point clouds, especially when modeling objects. Analysis of the selected parameters is already possible basing on ad hoc measurements carried out on a point cloud. However, only the construction of three-dimensional models provides complete information about the shape of structures, allows to perform the analysis in any place and reduces the amount of the stored data. Some structures can be modeled in the form of simple axes, sections, or solids, for others it becomes necessary to create sophisticated models of surfaces, depicting local deformations. The examples selected for the study allow to assess the scope of measurement and office work for a variety of uses related to the issue set forth in the title of this study. Additionally, the latest, forward-looking technology was presented - laser scanning performed from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (drones). Currently, it is basically in the prototype phase, but it might be expected to make a significant progress in numerous applications in the field of engineering surveying.

  7. Association Between a Quantitative CT Scan Measure of Brain Edema and Outcome After Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Metter, Robert B.; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Guyette, Francis X.; Callaway, Clifton W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cerebral edema is one physical change associated with brain injury and decreased survival after cardiac arrest. Edema appears on computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain as decreased x-ray attenuation by gray matter. This study tested whether the gray matter attenuation to white matter attenuation ratio (GWR) was associated with survival and functional recovery. Methods Subjects were patients hospitalized after cardiac arrest at a single institution between 1/1/2005 and 7/30/2010. Subjects were included if they had non-traumatic cardiac arrest and a non-contrast CT scan within 24 hours after cardiac arrest. Attenuation (Hounsfield Units) was measured in gray matter (caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus, and cortex) and in white matter (internal capsule, corpus callosum and centrum semiovale). The GWR was calculated for basal ganglia and cerebrum. Outcomes included survival and functional status at hospital discharge. Results For 680 patients, 258 CT scans were available, but 18 were excluded because of hemorrhage (10), intravenous contrast (3) or technical artifact (5), leaving 240 CT scans for analysis. Lower GWR values were associated with lower initial Glasgow Coma Scale motor score. Overall survival was 36%, but decreased with decreasing GWR. The average of basal ganglia and cerebrum GWR provided the best discrimination. Only 2/58 subjects with average GWR<1.20 survived and both were treated with hypothermia. The association of GWR with functional outcome was completely explained by mortality when GWR<1.20. Conclusions Subjects with severe cerebral edema, defined by GWR<1.20, have very low survival with conventional care, including hypothermia. GWR estimates pre-treatment likelihood of survival after cardiac arrest. PMID:21592642

  8. BrO/SO2 molar ratios from scanning DOAS measurements in the NOVAC network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübcke, P.; Bobrowski, N.; Arellano, S.; Galle, B.; Garzón, G.; Vogel, L.; Platt, U.

    2013-11-01

    The molar ratio of BrO to SO2 is, like other halogen/sulphur ratios, a~possible precursor for dynamic changes in the shallow part of a volcanic system. While the predictive significance of the BrO/SO2 ratio has not been well constrained yet, it has the major advantage that this ratio can be readily measured using the remote-sensing technique Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) in the UV. While BrO/SO2 ratios have been measured during several short-term field campaigns this article presents an algorithm that can be used to obtain long-term time series of BrO/SO2 ratios from the scanning DOAS instruments of the Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change (NOVAC) or comparable networks. Parameters of the DOAS retrieval of both trace gases are given and the influence of co-adding spectra on the retrieval error will be investigated. Difficulties in the evaluation of spectroscopic data from monitoring instruments in volcanic environments and possible solutions are discussed. The new algorithm is demonstrated by evaluating data from the NOVAC scanning DOAS systems at Nevado del Ruiz, Colombia encompassing almost four years of measurements between November 2009 and end of June 2013. This dataset shows variations of the BrO/SO2 ratio several weeks prior to the eruption on 30 June 2012.

  9. BrO/SO2 molar ratios from scanning DOAS measurements in the NOVAC network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübcke, P.; Bobrowski, N.; Arellano, S.; Galle, B.; Garzón, G.; Vogel, L.; Platt, U.

    2014-06-01

    The molar ratio of BrO to SO2 is, like other halogen/sulfur ratios, a possible precursor for dynamic changes in the shallow part of a volcanic system. While the predictive significance of the BrO/SO2 ratio has not been well constrained yet, it has the major advantage that this ratio can be readily measured using the remote-sensing technique differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) in the UV. While BrO/SO2 ratios have been measured during several short-term field campaigns, this article presents an algorithm that can be used to obtain long-term time series of BrO/SO2 ratios from the scanning DOAS instruments of the Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change (NOVAC) or comparable networks. Parameters of the DOAS retrieval of both trace gases are given. The influence of co-adding spectra on the retrieval error and influences of radiative transfer will be investigated. Difficulties in the evaluation of spectroscopic data from monitoring instruments in volcanic environments and possible solutions are discussed. The new algorithm is demonstrated by evaluating data from the NOVAC scanning DOAS systems at Nevado del Ruiz, Colombia, encompassing almost 4 years of measurements between November 2009 and end of June 2013. This data set shows variations of the BrO/SO2 ratio several weeks prior to the eruption on 30 June 2012.

  10. Simulation of interface states effect on the scanning capacitance microscopy measurement of p-n junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Kong, F. C. J.

    2002-12-01

    A two-dimensional numerical simulation model of interface states in scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) measurements of p-n junctions is presented. In the model, amphoteric interface states with two transition energies in the Si band gap are represented as fixed charges to account for their behavior in SCM measurements. The interface states are shown to cause a stretch-out and a parallel shift of the capacitance-voltage characteristics in the depletion and neutral regions of p-n junctions, respectively. This explains the discrepancy between the SCM measurement and simulation near p-n junctions, and thus modeling interface states is crucial for SCM dopant profiling of p-n junctions.

  11. Surface profile measurement in white-light scanning interferometry using a three-chip color CCD

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Suodong; Quan Chenggen; Zhu Rihong; Tay, Cho Jui; Chen Lei

    2011-05-20

    White-light scanning interferometry (WLSI) is a useful technique to measure surface profile when a test object contains discontinuous structures or microstructures. A black and white CCD camera is usually utilized to capture interferograms, and a series of corresponding algorithms is used to achieve the profile measurement. However, the color information in the interferograms is lost. A novel profile measurement method that uses phase information in different color channels (red-green-blue) of an interferogram obtained using a three-chip color CCD in WLSI is proposed. The phase values are extracted by a windowed Fourier transform algorithm. Simulation and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed method.

  12. Solid state line scan cameras for measuring strain in soft tissues and implants.

    PubMed

    Stewart, S F; Lyman, D J; Benner, R

    1989-01-01

    The line scan camera, or LSC, is an inexpensive and easily applied technique for optical strain measurement of soft biomaterials. The LSC is based on a linear array of photodiodes; in gauging applications, where measurements between dark/light interfaces are important, the digital nature of the array can be exploited. Advantages of the LSC include low cost, high frequency response, applicability to front- or back-lighted samples, insensitivity to stray and nonuniform lighting as well as to accidental overexposure, ease and linearity of calibration, and lack of temperature sensitivity. With the 1024 element arrays used herein, the relative resolution is theoretically limited to 1 part in 1024, or 0.1%; in practice, the relative resolution is somewhat poorer. LSCs have been successfully used in mechanical tests to measure the diameter of arteries and compliant vascular grafts, the longitudinal strain of vascular grafts, and the dynamic diameter of elastic tube models of graft/artery systems in pulsatile flow visualization experiments.

  13. Continuous wavelet transform for micro-component profile measurement using vertical scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Quan, C.; Tay, C. J.

    2008-10-01

    White-light interferometric techniques have been widely used in three-dimensional (3D) profiling. This paper presents a new method based on vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) for the 3D profile measurement of a micro-component that contains sharp steps. The use of a white-light source in the system overcomes the phase ambiguity problem often encountered in monochromatic interferometry and also reduces speckle noises. A new algorithm based on the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) is used to retrieve the phase of an interferogram. The algorithm accurately determines local fringe peak and improves the vertical resolution of the measurement. The proposed method is highly resistant to noise and is able to achieve high accuracy. A micro-component (lamellar grating) fabricated by sacrificial etching technique is used as a test specimen to verify the proposed method. The measurement uncertainty of the experimental results is discussed.

  14. Three-dimensional measurement of femur based on structured light scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Ouyang, Jianfei; Qu, Xinghua

    2009-12-01

    Osteometry is fundamental to study the human skeleton. It has been widely used in palaeoanthropology, bionics, and criminal investigation for more than 200 years. The traditional osteometry is a simple 1-dimensional measurement that can only get 1D size of the bones in manual step-by-step way, even though there are more than 400 parameters to be measured. For today's research and application it is significant and necessary to develop an advanced 3-dimensional osteometry technique. In this paper a new 3D osteometry is presented, which focuses on measurement of the femur, the largest tubular bone in human body. 3D measurement based on the structured light scanning is developed to create fast and precise measurement of the entire body of the femur. The cloud data and geometry model of the sample femur is established in mathematic, accurate and fast way. More than 30 parameters are measured and compared with each other. The experiment shows that the proposed method can meet traditional osteometry and obtain all 1D geometric parameters of the bone at the same time by the mathematics model, such as trochanter-lateral condyle length, superior breadth of shaft, and collo-diaphyseal angle, etc. In the best way, many important geometric parameters that are very difficult to measure by existing osteometry, such as volume, surface area, and curvature of the bone, can be obtained very easily. The overall measuring error is less than 0.1mm.

  15. Three-dimensional measurement of femur based on structured light scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Ouyang, Jianfei; Qu, Xinghua

    2010-03-01

    Osteometry is fundamental to study the human skeleton. It has been widely used in palaeoanthropology, bionics, and criminal investigation for more than 200 years. The traditional osteometry is a simple 1-dimensional measurement that can only get 1D size of the bones in manual step-by-step way, even though there are more than 400 parameters to be measured. For today's research and application it is significant and necessary to develop an advanced 3-dimensional osteometry technique. In this paper a new 3D osteometry is presented, which focuses on measurement of the femur, the largest tubular bone in human body. 3D measurement based on the structured light scanning is developed to create fast and precise measurement of the entire body of the femur. The cloud data and geometry model of the sample femur is established in mathematic, accurate and fast way. More than 30 parameters are measured and compared with each other. The experiment shows that the proposed method can meet traditional osteometry and obtain all 1D geometric parameters of the bone at the same time by the mathematics model, such as trochanter-lateral condyle length, superior breadth of shaft, and collo-diaphyseal angle, etc. In the best way, many important geometric parameters that are very difficult to measure by existing osteometry, such as volume, surface area, and curvature of the bone, can be obtained very easily. The overall measuring error is less than 0.1mm.

  16. Slice emittance measurement for photocathode RF gun with solenoid scanning and RF deflecting cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chen; Huang, WenHui; Du, YingChao; Yan, LiXin; Tang, ChuanXiang

    2011-12-01

    The radiation of high-gain short-wavelength free-electron laser depends on the slice transverse emittance of the electron bunch. This essay introduces the method of slice emittance measurement, and shows the brief setup of this experiment using the solenoid scanning and RF deflecting cavity at Tsinghua University. The preliminary experimental results show that the slice rms emittance of the electron bunch generated by photocathode RF gun has considerable variations along the bunch and is typically less than 0.55 mm mrad for the laser rms radius of 0.4 mm.

  17. Measurement of oxygen saturation in small retinal vessels with adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Lu, Jing; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2011-11-01

    We have used an adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope to assess oxygen saturation in small retinal vessels. Images of the vessels with a diameter smaller than 50 μm are recorded at oxygen sensitive and isosbestic wavelengths (680 and 796 nm, respectively). The vessel optical densities (ODs) are determined by a computer algorithm. Then, OD ratios (ODRs), which are inversely proportional to oxygen saturation, are calculated. The results show that arterial ODRs are significantly smaller than venous ODRs, indicating that oxygen saturation in the artery is higher than that in the vein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first noninvasive measurement of oxygen saturation in small retinal vessels.

  18. Adsorbate-induced quantum Hall system probed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy combined with transport measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Masutomi, Ryuichi Okamoto, Tohru

    2015-06-22

    An adsorbate-induced quantum Hall system at the cleaved InSb surfaces is investigated in magnetic fields up to 14 T using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy combined with transport measurements. We show that an enhanced Zeeman splitting in the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations is explained by an exchange enhancement of spin splitting and potential disorder, both of which are obtained from the spatially averaged density of states (DOS). Moreover, the Altshuler–Aronov correlation gap is observed in the spatially averaged DOS at 0 T.

  19. Investigating the Anisotropic Scintillation Response in Anthracene through Neutron, Gamma-Ray, and Muon Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Patricia; Brubaker, Erik

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports a series of measurements that characterize the directional dependence of the scintillation response of crystalline anthracene to incident DT neutrons, DD neutrons, Cs-137 gamma rays, and, for the first time, cosmic ray muons. The neutron measurements give the amplitude and pulse shape dependence on the proton recoil direction over one hemisphere of the crystal, confirming and extending previous results in the literature. In similar measurements using incident gamma rays, no directional effect is evident, and any anisotropy with respect to the electron recoil direction is constrained to have a magnitude of less than a tenth of that present in the proton recoil events. Cosmic muons are measured at two directions, and no anisotropy is observed. This set of observations indicates that high dE/dx is necessary for an anisotropy to be present for a given type of scintillation event, which in turn could be used to discriminate among different hypotheses for the underlying causes of the anisotropy, which are not well understood.

  20. Investigating the anisotropic scintillation response in anthracene through neutron, gamma-ray, and muon measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Patricia; Brubaker, Erik

    2016-05-05

    Our paper reports a series of measurements that characterize the directional dependence of the scintillation response of crystalline anthracene to incident DT neutrons, DD neutrons, 137Cs gamma rays, and, for the first time, cosmic ray muons. Moreover, the neutron measurements give the amplitude and pulse shape dependence on the proton recoil direction over one hemisphere of the crystal, confirming and extending previous results in the literature. In similar measurements using incident gamma rays, no directional effect is evident, and any anisotropy with respect to the electron recoil direction is constrained to have a magnitude of less than a tenth of that present in the proton recoil events. Cosmic muons are measured at two directions, and no anisotropy is observed. Our set of observations indicates that high dE/dx is necessary for an anisotropy to be present for a given type of scintillation event, which in turn could be used to discriminate among different hypotheses for the underlying causes of the anisotropy, which are not well understood.

  1. Investigating the anisotropic scintillation response in anthracene through neutron, gamma-ray, and muon measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Schuster, Patricia; Brubaker, Erik

    2016-05-05

    Our paper reports a series of measurements that characterize the directional dependence of the scintillation response of crystalline anthracene to incident DT neutrons, DD neutrons, 137Cs gamma rays, and, for the first time, cosmic ray muons. Moreover, the neutron measurements give the amplitude and pulse shape dependence on the proton recoil direction over one hemisphere of the crystal, confirming and extending previous results in the literature. In similar measurements using incident gamma rays, no directional effect is evident, and any anisotropy with respect to the electron recoil direction is constrained to have a magnitude of less than a tenth ofmore » that present in the proton recoil events. Cosmic muons are measured at two directions, and no anisotropy is observed. Our set of observations indicates that high dE/dx is necessary for an anisotropy to be present for a given type of scintillation event, which in turn could be used to discriminate among different hypotheses for the underlying causes of the anisotropy, which are not well understood.« less

  2. Measurement of proton polarization in the d({gamma},p)n reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.F.; Jackson, H.E.; Jones, C.E.

    1995-08-01

    A proposal was approved by CEBAF PAC7 to measure angular distributions of the proton polarization for the d({gamma},p)n reaction in the GeV region. This proposed measurement will test the validity of extensions of conventional nuclear-physics theories to the higher energy regime. The results of the experiment will further constrain the evidence from SLAC experiments NE8 and NE17 that asymptotic scaling was observed above a photon energy of 1.3 GeV. Photoproton polarization measurements at lower energy indicate that the magnitude of the polarization increases with energy. This is consistent with the observation that polarizations are large in high-energy processes, e.g. A{sub nn} in pp {yields} pp scattering or A{sub y} in pp {yields} {pi}{sup 0}X. However, the polarizations in hadron-hadron scattering are believed to arise from Landshoff mechanisms. The higher energy photoproton experiment will permit the first measurements of polarization for a reaction, {gamma}d {yields} pn, where there are no Landshoff terms. The experiment would make use of a polarimeter installed in either the High Resolution Spectrometer in Hall A or the Short Orbit Spectrometer in Hall C at CEBAF.

  3. On the accuracy of gamma spectrometric isotope ratio measurements of uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramebäck, H.; Lagerkvist, P.; Holmgren, S.; Jonsson, S.; Sandström, B.; Tovedal, A.; Vesterlund, A.; Vidmar, T.; Kastlander, J.

    2016-04-01

    The isotopic composition of uranium was measured using high resolution gamma spectrometry. Two acid solutions and two samples in the form of UO2 pellets were measured. The measurements were done in close geometries, i.e. directly on the endcap of the high purity germanium detector (HPGe). Applying no corrections for count losses due to true coincidence summing (TCS) resulted in up to about 40% deviation in the abundance of 235U from the results obtained with mass spectrometry. However, after correction for TCS, excellent agreement was achieved between the results obtained using two different measurement methods, or a certified value. Moreover, after corrections, the fitted relative response curves correlated excellently with simulated responses, for the different geometries, of the HPGe detector.

  4. PC/FRAM: New capabilities for the gamma-ray spectrometry measurement of plutonium isotopic composition

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, T.E.; Kelley, T.A.; Cremers, T.L.; Konkel, T.R.; Friar, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    We describe the new capability of and.present measurement results from the PC/FRAM plutonium isotopic analysis code. This new code allows data acquisition from a single coaxial germanium detector and analysis over an energy range from 120 keV to above I MeV. For the first time we demonstrate a complete isotopic analysis using only gamma rays greater than 200 keV in energy. This new capability allows the measurement of the plutonium isotopic composition of items inside shielded or heavy-walled containers without having to remove the items from the container. This greatly enhances worker safety by reducing handling and the resultant radiation exposure. Another application allows international inspectors to verify the contents of items inside sealed, long-term storage containers that may not be opened for national security or treaty compliance reasons. We present measurement results for traditional planar germanium detectors as well as coaxial detectors measuring shielded and unshielded samples.

  5. Improving peatland erosion rate measurements through the use of terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, R.; Holden, J.; Jones, R.; Lloyd, A.

    2013-12-01

    Globally peatlands account for 30-50% of all carbon stored within soils (Holden, 2005). Within the UK they represent the single largest terrestrial carbon store, with blanket bogs covering roughly 7.5% (Tallis et al., 1997); unfortunately these upland blanket bogs are often found in a degraded state. The amount of carbon being lost to erosional processes in peatlands is poorly constrained, with estimates typically being based on traditional low-tech methods. Erosion pins have been the primary method for measuring erosion rates in peatlands; however their use is prone to error due to the depth of peat and its high water content which allows both horizontal and vertical movement through time. Erosion pins can only realistically be used over a relatively small area and assume erosion remains constant between pins making any upscaling problematic. Therefore, innovative methods are required to improve estimates of peatland erosion that are capable of increasing both spatial coverage and accuracy. Terrestrial laser scanning is increasingly being used by geomorphologists to produce highly detailed 3D topographic maps. A pilot study was undertaken to assess the ability of terrestrial laser scanning to measure erosion rates within peatlands and to identify any obstacles that may need to be overcome. An actively eroding blanket bog in northern England was chosen as the test site with surveys being carried out before and after winter as active erosion is most likely during winter months. Erosion measurements were also made using erosion pins to allow comparisons between the two methods. Terrestrial laser scanning was not only found to offer vastly improved spatial coverage compared with erosion pins but was also able to provide data at a much higher resolution. Erosion rates calculated using erosion pins were significantly higher than the average rate calculated using terrestrial laser scanning (-35mm compared to +2.5mm), this overestimation by the erosion pins primarily

  6. Reliability of measurements made on scanned cast models using the 3Shape R700 scanner

    PubMed Central

    Rebello, I M C R; Vogel, C J; Barbosa, M C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In dentistry, the latest technological advancements have been incorporated primarily into diagnostic tools such as virtual dental models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of measurements made on digital cast models scanned in the 3Shape R700 scanner (3Shape, Copenhagen, Denmark) that uses a non-destructive laser beam to reproduce model surfaces so that the plaster model is not destroyed. Methods: The sample consisted of 26 cast models, and 6 linear measurements were made on the cast models and compared with the same measurements on digital models. The measurements assessed were: (1) distance between mandibular canines; (2) distance between mandibular molars; (3) distance between canine and maxillary molar; (4) buccal–lingual diameter of maxillary central incisor; (5) distance between two points of the incisive papillae of maxillary and mandibular central incisors; and (6) distance between the buccal surface of the maxillary central incisor and the buccal surface of the mandibular antagonist (overjet). The Student's t-test or Wilcoxon test was used at 5% and the Lin's concordance test at 95% confidence interval. Results: The overjet measurement was the only one that showed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05). A high level of concordance was found for all measurements. Conclusions: The digital models obtained from the 3Shape R700 scanner are reliable and can be considered an alternative to cast models for performing measurements and analyses in orthodontic practice. PMID:25651273

  7. Neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopic measurements in the actinide region

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.W.; Lougheed, R.W.; Barreau, G.; Boerner, H.; Davidson, W.F.; Schreckenbach, K.; Warner, D.D.; von Egidy, T.; White, D.H.

    1981-09-01

    From recent neutron capture gamma-ray measurements, experimental data for states involving quasiparticle-vibrational admixtures in /sup 227/Ra, /sup 231/Th, /sup 233/Th, /sup 235/U, /sup 237/U, and /sup 239/U have been compared with theoretical calculations by Soloviev's group. This analysis shows the experimental level structure is more complex than that calculated. In the levels of /sup 250/Bk, four Gallagher-Moszkowski pairs are observed. The moment of inertia for each band with antiparallel alignment of odd-nucleon momenta is systematically larger than for its parallel-aligned mate.

  8. System of Programmed Modules for Measuring Photographs with a Gamma-Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Averin, S. A.; Veselova, G. V.; Navasardyan, G. V.

    1978-01-01

    Physical experiments using tracking cameras resulted in hundreds of thousands of stereo photographs of events being received. To process such a large volume of information, automatic and semiautomatic measuring systems are required. At the Institute of Space Research of the Academy of Science of the USSR, a system for processing film information from the spark gamma-telescope was developed. The system is based on a BPS-75 projector in line with the minicomputer Elektronika 1001. The report describes this system. The various computer programs available to the operators are discussed.

  9. Measurement of gamma quantum interaction point in plastic scintillator with WLS strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyrski, J.; Alfs, D.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Czerwiński, E.; Dulski, K.; Gajos, A.; Głowacz, B.; Gupta-Sharma, N.; Gorgol, M.; Jasińska, B.; Kajetanowicz, M.; Kamińska, D.; Korcyl, G.; Kowalski, P.; Krzemień, W.; Krawczyk, N.; Kubicz, E.; Mohammed, M.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M.; Raczyński, L.; Rudy, Z.; Salabura, P.; Silarski, M.; Strzelecki, A.; Wieczorek, A.; Wiślicki, W.; Wojnarska, J.; Zgardzińska, B.; Zieliński, M.; Moskal, P.

    2017-04-01

    The feasibility of measuring the aśxial coordinate of a gamma quantum interaction point in a plastic scintillator bar via the detection of scintillation photons escaping from the scintillator with an array of wavelength-shifting (WLS) strips is demonstrated. Using a test set-up comprising a BC-420 scintillator bar and an array of sixteen BC-482A WLS strips we achieved a spatial resolution of 5 mm (σ) for annihilation photons from a 22Na isotope. The studied method can be used to improve the spatial resolution of a plastic-scintillator-based PET scanner which is being developed by the J-PET collaboration.

  10. Measurements of activation induced by environmental neutrons using ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martínez Canet, M J; Hult, M; Köhler, M; Johnston, P N

    2000-03-01

    The flux of environmental neutrons is being studied by activation of metal discs of selected elements. Near the earth's surface the total neutron flux is in the order of 10(-2) cm(-2)s(-1), which gives induced activities of a few mBq in the discs. Initial results from this technique, involving activation at ground level for several materials (W, Au, Ta, In, Re, Sm, Dy and Mn) and ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry in an underground laboratory located at 500 m.w.e., are presented. Diffusion of environmental neutrons in water is also measured by activation of gold at different depths.

  11. Neutron and gamma-ray measurements on the LANL Little Boy Comet Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, D.E.

    1983-09-01

    We measured the neutron and gamma-ray dose rates at various distances from the Little Boy Comet Assembly at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico on April 28 and 29, 1983. The distances selected varied from 350 ft to 1860 ft from the assembly, with the latter point being located at the edge of the mesa overlooking Pajarito Canyon. We varied the power levels for the various runs but we have normalized all of them to a single power-level. We also made corrections for the variations in the power-level indicators of the assembly using data provided by LANL.

  12. Measurements of B- to D(*)0 K(*)- Decays Related to gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Mancinelli, G.

    2004-11-30

    We present measurements of branching fractions and CP asymmetries of several B{sup -} {yields} D{sup (*)0} K{sup (*)-} decays, with the D{sup (*)0} decaying to CP-even, CP-odd, and flavor eigenstates, that can constrain the CP angle {gamma} as well as the amplitude ratio r{sub b} = A(B {yields} u)/A(B {yields} c), using methods proposed by Gronau, London and Wyler or Atwood, Dunietz and Sony[1]. We use data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC.

  13. Computed Tomography Scans as an Objective Measure of Disease Severity in Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Likness, Micah M.; Pallanch, John F.; Sherris, David A.; Kita, Hirohito; Mashtare, Terry L.; Ponikau, Jens U.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A truly objective method of measuring disease severity in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) has only recently existed. We evaluated computed tomography (CT) scans of CRS patients using this novel objective 3D computerized system and compared results with a novel 2D computerized analysis of a single coronal slice through the osteomeatal complex (OMC) and subjective methods including Lund-Mackay and Zinreich’s modified Lund-Mackay. Study Design Prospective multicenter study. Setting Two academic tertiary referral centers. Subjects and Methods Forty-six adults with a diagnosis of CRS underwent CT examination and received an intramuscular triamcinolone injection, dosage weight dependent, followed by CT scan 4 to 5 weeks later. Recruitment lasted 21 months. Scans were evaluated with all 4 scoring methods over 5 months. Results The Lin’s concordance class correlation (CCC) of the OMC method revealed the best correlation to the 3D volumetric computerized values (0.915), followed by the Zinreich (0.904) and Lund-Mackay methods (0.824). Posttreatment results demonstrated that both the OMC (0.824) and Zinreich’s (0.778) methods had strong agreement with the 3D volumetric methods and were very sensitive to change, whereas the Lund-Mackay (0.545) had only moderate agreement. Conclusion Computerized CT analysis provides the most comprehensive, objective, and reproducible method of measuring disease severity and is very sensitive to change induced by treatment intervention. A 2D coronal image through the OMC provides a valid, user-friendly method of assessing CRS and is representative of CRS severity in all sinuses. Zinreich’s subjective method correlated well overall, but the Lund-Mackay method lagged behind in disease representation and sensitivity to change. PMID:24301090

  14. Hollow Cathode and Keeper-region Plasma Measurements Using Ultra-fast Miniature Scanning Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.; Watkins, Ron M.; Katz, Ira

    2004-01-01

    In order to support the development of comprehensive performance and life models for future deep space missions that will utilize ion thrusters, we have undertaken a study of the plasma structure in hollow cathodes using an new pneumatic scanning probe diagnostic. This device is designed to insert a miniature probe directly into the hollow cathode orifice from either the upstream insert region in the interior of the hollow cathode, or from the downstream keeper-plasma region at the exit of the hollow cathode, to provide complete axial profiles of the discharge plasma parameters. Previous attempts to diagnose this region with probes was Limited by the melting of small probes in the intense discharge near the orifice, or caused significant perturbation of the plasma by probes large enough to survive. Our new probe is extremely compact, and when configured as a single Langmuir probe, the ceramic tube insulator is only 0.5mm in diameter and the current collecting conductor has a total area of 0.002 cm2. A series of current-voltage characteristics are obtained by applying a rapid sawtooth voltage waveform to the probe as it is scanned by the pneumatic actuator into and out of the plasma region, The bellow-sealed pneumatic drive scans the probe 4 cm in the cathode insert region and 10 cm in the anode/keeper plasmas region at average speeds of about 1 mm/msec, and the residence time at the end of the insertion stroke in the densest part of the plasma near the orifice is measured to be only 10 msec. Since the voltage sweep time is fast compared to the motion of the probe, axial profiles of the plasma density, temperature and potential with reasonable spatial resolution are obtained. Measurements of the internal cathode pressures and the axial plasma-parameter profiles for a hollow cathode operating at discharge currents of up to 35 A in xenon will be presented.

  15. Structure Measurements of Leaf and Woody Components of Forests with Dual-Wavelength Lidar Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahler, A. H.; Li, Z.; Schaaf, C.; Howe, G.; Martel, J.; Hewawasam, K.; Douglas, E. S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Cook, T.; Paynter, I.; Saenz, E. J.; Wang, Z.; Woodcock, C. E.; Jupp, D. L. B.; Schaefer, M.; Newnham, G.

    2014-12-01

    Forest structure plays a critical role in the exchange of energy, carbon and water between land and atmosphere and nutrient cycle. We can provide detailed forest structure measurements of leaf and woody components with the Dual Wavelength Echidna® Lidar (DWEL), which acquires full-waveform scans at both near-infrared (NIR, 1064 nm) and shortwave infrared (SWIR, 1548 nm) wavelengths from simultaneous laser pulses. We collected DWEL scans at a broadleaf forest stand and a conifer forest stand at Harvard Forest in June 2014. Power returned from leaves is much lower than from woody materials such as trunks and branches at the SWIR wavelength due to the liquid water absorption by leaves, whereas returned power at the NIR wavelength is similar from both leaves and woody materials. We threshold a normalized difference index (NDI), defined as the difference between returned power at the two wavelengths divided by their sum, to classify each return pulse as a leaf or trunk/branch hit. We obtain leaf area index (LAI), woody area index (WAI) and vertical profiles of leaf and woody components directly from classified lidar hits without empirical wood-to-total ratios as are commonly used in optical methods of LAI estimation. Tree heights, diameter at breast height (DBH), and stem count density are the other forest structure parameters estimated from our DWEL scans. The separation of leaf and woody components in tandem with fine-scale forest structure measurements will benefit studies on carbon allocation of forest ecosystems and improve our understanding of the effects of forest structure on ecosystem functions. This research is supported by NSF grant, MRI-0923389

  16. Investigation of three-dimensional vibration measurement by a single scanning laser Doppler vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Da-Ming; Zhu, W. D.

    2017-01-01

    A scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) has been widely used in non-contact vibration measurement. This paper presents a novel investigation of three-dimensional (3D) vibration measurement by a single SLDV sequentially placed at three different positions, where 3D vibration is defined as three vibration components along axes of a specified measurement coordinate system (MCS), which can give more precise knowledge of structural dynamic characteristics. A geometric model of the SLDV is proposed and a vibrometer coordinate system (VCS) based on the geometric model is defined and fixed on the SLDV. The pose of a SLDV with respect to a MCS is expressed in the form of a translation vector and a direction cosine matrix from the VCS to the MCS, which can be calculated by four or more target points with known coordinates in both the MCS and the VCS. An improved method based on the least squares method and singular value decomposition is proposed to obtain the pose of the SLDV. Compared with an inverse method, the proposed method can yield an orthogonal direction cosine matrix and be applicable to a two-dimensional structure. Effects of the number of target points on the accuracy and stability of the proposed method are investigated. With three direction cosine matrices of three different positions obtained by the proposed method, measured vibration velocities along laser line-of-sight directions can be transformed to vibration components along axes of the MCS. An experiment was conducted to measure 3D vibration of a target point on a beam under sinusoidal excitation by a single SLDV sequentially placed at three different positions. Vibration components along axes of the MCS obtained by the single SLDV were in good agreement with those from a commercial Polytec 3D scanning laser vibrometer PSV-500-3D.

  17. Evidence for the decay Bs0-->Ds(*)Ds(*) and a measurement of DeltaGammasCP/Gammas.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuplov, V; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vilanova, D; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-03-06

    We search for the semi-inclusive process Bs0-->Ds(*)Ds(*) using 2.8 fb(-1) of pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV recorded by the D0 detector operating at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We observe 26.6+/-8.4 signal events with a significance above background of 3.2 standard deviations yielding a branching ratio of B(Bs0-->Ds(*)Ds(*))=0.035+/-0.010(stat.)+/-0.011(syst.). Under certain theoretical assumptions, these double-charm final states saturate CP-even eigenstates in the Bs0 decays resulting in a width difference of DeltaGammasCP/Gammas=0.072+/-0.021(stat.)+/-0.022(syst.).

  18. Gas Cherenkov Detectors For Gamma Ray Measurements At The National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Hans W.; Kim, Y. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Lopez, F. E.; Griego, J.; Fatherley, V. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H.; Carpenter, A.; Khater, H.; Hernandez, J. E.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Gales, S.; Leatherland, A.; Hilsabeck, T.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Malone, R. M.; Hares, J. D.; Milnes, J.; Shmayda, W. T.

    2016-10-01

    New requirements to improve reaction history and ablator areal density measurements at the NIF necessitate diagnostic capability improvements in sensitivity, temporal and spectral response relative to the existing Gamma Reaction History diagnostic (GRH-6m) located 6 meters from target chamber center (TCC). Relative to GRH-6m, a new DIM-based ``Super'' Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) will ultimately provide 200x more sensitivity to DT fusion gamma rays, reduce the effective temporal resolution from 100 to 10 ps and lower the energy threshold from 2.9 to 1.8 MeV. Initially, the existing GCD-3 will be placed into a reentrant well, putting it within 4 meters of TCC. This diagnostic platform will allow assessment of the x-ray radiation background environment within the well which will be fed into the shielding design for the follow-on ``Super'' GCD. It will also enable use of a pulse-dilation PMT (PD-PMT) which has the potential to improve the effective measurement bandwidth by 10x relative to current PMT technology. Initial measurements of both GCD-3 on NIF and a PD-PMT prototype on ORION will be discussed.

  19. Systematic indoor radon and gamma-ray measurements in Slovenian schools

    SciTech Connect

    Vaupotic, J.; Sikovec, M.; Kobal, I.

    2000-05-01

    During the winter months of 1992/93 and 1993/94, instantaneous indoor radon concentrations and gamma dose rates were measured in 890 schools in Slovenia attended in total by about 280,000 pupils. Under closed conditions, the room to be surveyed was closed for more than 12 h prior to sampling, the air was sampled into alpha scintillation cells with a volume of 700 cm{sup 3}, and alpha activity was measured. An arithmetic mean of 168 Bq m{sup {minus}3} and a geometric mean of 82 Bq m{sup {minus}3} were obtained. In 67% of schools, indoor radon concentrations were below 100 Bq m{sup {minus}3}, and in 8.7% (77 schools with about 16,000 pupils) they exceeded 400 Bq m{sup {minus}3}, which is the proposed Slovene action level. In the majority of cases, radon concentrations were high due to the geological characteristics of the ground. Approximately 70% of schools with high radon levels were found in the Karst region. Gamma dose rates were measured using a portable scintillation counter. An arithmetic mean of 102 nGy h{sup {minus}1} and a geometric mean of 95 nGy h{sup {minus}1} were obtained. No extraordinarily high values were recorded.

  20. Measurement of gamma radiation levels in soil samples from Thanjavur using gamma-ray spectrometry and estimation of population exposure.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, B; Dhavamani, V; Ramkumar, S; Philominathan, P

    2010-01-01

    This study assesses the level of terrestrial gamma radiation and associated dose rates from the naturally occurring radionuclides (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K in 10 soil samples collected from Thanjavur (Tamil Nadu, India) using gamma-ray spectrometry. The activity profile of radionuclides has clearly showed the existence of low level activity in Thanjavur. The geometric mean activity concentrations of (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K is 42.9+/-9.4 Bq.kg(-1), 14.7+/-1.7 Bq.kg(-1) and 149.5+/-3.1 Bq.kg(-1) respectively are derived from all the soil samples studied. The activity concentration of (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K in soil is due to the presence of metamorphic rocks like shale, hornblende-biotite gneiss and quartzofeldspathic gneiss in these areas. Gamma absorbed dose rates in air outdoors were calculated to be in the range between 32 nGy.h(-1) and 59.1 nGy.h(-1) with an arithmetic mean of 43.3 +/-9 nGy.h(-1). This value is lesser than the population weighted world-averaged of 60 nGy.h(-1). Inhabitants of Thanjavur are subjected to external gamma radiation exposure (effective dose) ranging between 39.2 and 72.6 muSv.y(-1) with an arithmetic mean of 53.1+/-11 muSv.y(-1). The values of the external hazard index determined from the soil radioactivity of the study area are less than the recommended safe levels.

  1. Measuring calcium levels in Saprolegnia ferax using the two-photon laser scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilje, Osu

    2003-07-01

    xThe genus Saprolegnia in the phylum Oomycetes contains a number of parasitic species that can cause a range of important animal diseases. The aim of this study was to measure the calcium gradient, one of the growth regulating mechanisms, in Saprolegnia ferax. The two-photon laser scanning microscope allowed for detailed physiological measurements of calcium levels along the fungus-like hyphae of S.ferax. Calcium concentration was determined by making ratiometric calculation of emission levels of the calcium-sensitive fluorochrome Indo-1 at 485nm to 405nm. The calculated values were compared to the intracellular calibration values. The advantage of the two-photon laser scanning microscope is that it allows minor changes in concentration to be detected in highly localized regions of the hyphae. The technique used in this study minimized background and autofluorescence and therefore allowed for more accurate changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration to be detected. The calcium concentration at the hyphal tip and 5, 10 and 40μm distal to the tip were calculated to be 65, 17, 38 and 20nM respectively, confirming other studies that suggest a tip-high calcium gradient.

  2. Measuring Directional Wave Spectra and Wind Speed with a Scanning Radar Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.; Vandemark, D.; Wright, C. W.; Swift, R. N.; Scott, J. F.; Hines, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    The geometry for the NASA Scanning Radar Altimeter (SRA) is shown. It transmits a 8-ns duration pulse at Ka-band (8.3 mm) and measures time of flight as it scans a 1 degree (two-way) beam from left to right across the aircraft ground track. The most recent configuration determines the surface elevation at 64 points spaced at uniform angular intervals of about 0.7 across a swath whose width is about 0.8 times the aircraft altitude. The system generates these raster lines of the surface topography beneath the aircraft at about a 10 Hz rate. In postflight processing the SRA wave topographic data are transformed with a two-dimensional Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) and Doppler corrected to produce directional wave spectra. The SRA is not absolutely calibrated in power, but by measuring the relative fall-off of backscatter with increasing incidence angle, the SRA can also determine the mean square slope (mss) of the sea surface, a surrogate for wind speed. For the slope-dependent specular point model of radar sea surface scattering, an expression approximated by a geometric optics form, for the relative variation with incidence angle of the normalized backscatter radar cross section would be sigma (sup 0) (sub rel) = sec (exp 4) theta exp (-tan squared theta/mss) where theta is the off-nadir incidence angle.

  3. Radio-frequency scanning tunneling microscopy: Instrumentation and applications to physical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemiktarak, Utku

    The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) relies upon localized electron tunneling between a sharp probe tip and a conducting sample to attain atomic-scale spatial resolution. Perhaps the most serious obstacle in front of realizing the full potential of the STM is its inadequate temporal resolution, limited by the bandwidth of STM current detectors (˜1 kHz). To overcome this limitation, we developed a radically new approach: we embedded the tunnel junction into an inductor-capacitor resonant circuit and measured the reflection of radio-frequency waves from this circuit. Our new apparatus, which we call a radio-frequency scanning tunneling microscope (Rf-STM), allowed us to achieve 100-fold bandwidth increase upon the state-of-the-art. The bandwidth increase resulted in a number of ultrafast and sensitive measurements in nanoscale systems. First, the large bandwidth of the Rf-STM allowed acquisition of surface topography images at high speeds. In a conventional STM scan, it takes from minutes to hours to create a typical image. As the circuit bandwidth increases, one can shorten this time considerably. We showed that the Rf-STM images, collected at a rate of 100 line/s, had comparable resolution to conventional STM images taken at a rate of 1 line/s. Second, we used the Rf-STM to perform broadband electronic noise measurements. Intrinsic current fluctuations in a tunnel junction, called shot noise, gives important in formation about electron transport mechanisms. We used shot noise measurements as an absolute calibration tool for Rf-STM. Conversely, we also demonstrated how the Rf-STM could be used as a local primary thermometer. Finally, using the Rf-STM, we established the very high displacement sensitivity of a tunnel displacement detector. On a driven micro-mechanical membrane, we detected the first ten mechanical resonances, ranging in frequency from 1 MHz to 3 MHz. We also measured the displacements of a Au surface shaken by a calibrated piezoelectric actuator

  4. Measurements of underwater acoustic pressure fields using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Gerard P.

    2004-05-01

    Laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV) are designed to measure structural vibration velocity by sensing the phase shift in the laser signal reflected from a vibrating source. It is known that index of refraction modulations resulting from acoustic pressure distributions along a laser light path will also cause a phase shift. Simpson et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 99(4), 2521(A) (1996)] have investigated this acousto-optic phase modulation as a possible contaminating effect for underwater LDV vibration measurements. This paper will investigate acousto-optic phase modulations measured by a scanning LDV as a method for measuring pressure radiating from underwater vibrating surfaces. This is done by passing the laser beam through the radiating pressure field and measuring the backscattered laser signal which is reflected off a rigid and retroreflective surface (outside the pressure field). It is shown experimentally, using the average pressure measured with an LDV over a plane in the vicinity of a vibrating structure, that the pressure at a far-field location normal to the plane can be determined.

  5. Frequency scanning interferometry in ATLAS: remote, multiple, simultaneous and precise distance measurements in a hostile environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, P. A.; Howell, D. F.; Nickerson, R. B.

    2004-11-01

    ATLAS is the largest particle detector under construction at CERN Geneva. Frequency scanning interferometry (FSI), also known as absolute distance interferometry, will be used to monitor shape changes of the SCT (semiconductor tracker), a particle tracker in the inaccessible, high radiation environment at the centre of ATLAS. Geodetic grids with several hundred fibre-coupled interferometers (30 mm to 1.5 m long) will be measured simultaneously. These lengths will be measured by tuning two lasers and comparing the resulting phase shifts in grid line interferometers (GLIs) with phase shifts in a reference interferometer. The novel inexpensive GLI design uses diverging beams to reduce sensitivity to misalignment, albeit with weaker signals. One micrometre precision length measurements of grid lines will allow 10 µm precision tracker shape corrections to be fed into ATLAS particle tracking analysis. The technique was demonstrated by measuring a 400 mm interferometer to better than 400 nm and a 1195 mm interferometer to better than 250 nm. Precise measurements were possible, even with poor quality signals, using numerical analysis of thousands of intensity samples. Errors due to drifts in interferometer length were substantially reduced using two lasers tuned in opposite directions and the precision was further improved by linking measurements made at widely separated laser frequencies.

  6. Cephalometric Angular Measurements of the Mandible Using Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Scans in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Hyun; Kang, Seok Joo

    2016-01-01

    Background We conducted this study to analyze the values of the key cephalometric angular measurements of the mandible using 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomography scans. Methods In the 106 enrolled patients, a 3D cephalometric analysis was performed to measure the angular variables of the mandible. These values were compared between the two sides and between the two sexes. Results The frontal measurements revealed that the mandibular body curve angle was larger on the left (Lt) side (right [Rt], 141.24±7.54; Lt, 142.68±6.94; P=0.002) and the gonial angle was larger on the right side (Rt, 134.37±8.44; Lt, 131.54±7.14; P<0.001). The sagittal measurements showed that the gonial angle was larger on the right side (Rt, 134.37±8.44; Lt, 131.54±7.14; P>0.05). Further, the transverse measurements revealed that the mandibular body curve angle was larger on the right side (Rt, 140.28±7.05; Lt, 137.56±6.23; P<0.001). Conclusions These results provide an average of the mandibular angular measurements for the Korean population, establishing a standard for determining surgical patient groups and outcome evaluations in the field of mandible contour surgery. PMID:26848443

  7. Scanning Lidar Measurements of the Full-Scale RDD Field Trial Puff Plumes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaoying; Roy, Gilles

    2016-05-01

    A vertically scanning lidar (light/radar) was used to measure the time evolution of clouds generated by a small explosive device. Vertical sweeps were performed at a downwind distance of 105 m from the detonation. The measured quantity obtained from the lidar was the light extinction coefficient. This quantity is directly proportional to the aerosol concentration. The background aerosol value was set to 0.0001 m (-1) (assuming a visibility of 40 km), and assuming the scattering properties of the explosively generated cloud is the same as the background aerosol, the authors found that the instantaneous maximal local concentration of aerosol in the cloud did not exceed 500 times the background aerosol value, and the instantaneous concentration was typically less than five times the background aerosol value. In the two trials that were done, the volumes of the clouds were reasonably close at 2,700 m(3) and 4,000 m(3), respectively.

  8. In situ azimuthal rotation device for linear dichroism measurements in scanning transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Cruz, D.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Tyliszczak, T.; Rousseau, M.-E.; Pézolet, M.

    2007-03-01

    A novel miniature rotation device used in conjunction with a scanning transmission x-ray microscope is described. It provides convenient in situ sample rotation to enable measurements of linear dichroism at high spatial resolution. The design, fabrication, and mechanical characterization are presented. This device has been used to generate quantitative maps of the spatial distribution of the orientation of proteins in several different spider and silkworm silks. Specifically, quantitative maps of the dichroic signal at the C 1s→π*amide transition in longitudinal sections of the silk fibers give information about the spatial orientation, degree of alignment, and spatial distribution of protein peptide bonds. A new approach for analyzing the dichroic signal to extract orientation distributions, in addition to magnitudes of aligned components, is presented and illustrated with results from Nephila clavipes dragline spider silk measured using the in situ rotation device.

  9. Cerebral embolism: local CFBF and edema measured by CT scanning and Xe inhalation. [Baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Yamamoto, M.; Hayman, L.A.; Sakai, F.; Nakajima, S.; Armstrong, D.

    1980-01-01

    Serial CT scans were made in baboons after cerebral embolization during stable Xe inhalation for measuring local values for CBF and lambda (brain-blood partition or solubility coefficients), followed by iodine infusion for detecting blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage. Persistent zones of zero flow surrounded by reduced flow were measured predominantly in subcortical regions, which showed gross and microscopic evidence of infarction at necropsy. Overlying cortex was relatively spared. Reduced lambda values attributed to edema appeared within 3 to 5 minutes and progressed up to 60 minutes. Damage to BBB with visible transvascular seepage of iodine began to appear 1 to 1 1/2 hours after embolism. In chronic animals, lambda values were persistently reduced in areas showing histologic infarction. Contralateral hemispheric CBF increased for the first 15 minutes after embolism, followed by progressive reduction after 30 minutes (diaschisis).

  10. Microscopic imaging of residual stress using a scanning phase-measuring acoustic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeks, Steven W.; Peter, D.; Horne, D.; Young, K.; Novotny, V.

    1989-10-01

    A high-resolution scanning phase-measuring acoustic microscope (SPAM) has been developed and used to image the near-surface residual stress field around features etched in sputtered alumina via the acoustoelastic effect. This microscope operates at 670 MHz and has a resolution of 5-10 microns, depending upon the amount of defocus. Relative velocity changes of sample surface waves as small as 50 ppm are resolved. Images of the stress field at the tip of a 400-micron-wide slot etched in alumina are presented and compared with a finite element simulation. The SPAM uses an unconventional acoustic lens with an anisotropic illumination pattern which can measure anisotropic effects and map residual stress fields with several-micron resolution and a stress sensitivity of 1/3 MPa in an alumina film.

  11. Scanning transmission electron microscopy strain measurement from millisecond frames of a direct electron charge coupled device

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Knut; Rosenauer, Andreas; Ryll, Henning; Ordavo, Ivan; Ihle, Sebastian; Soltau, Heike; Strueder, Lothar; Volz, Kerstin; Zweck, Josef

    2012-11-19

    A high-speed direct electron detection system is introduced to the field of transmission electron microscopy and applied to strain measurements in semiconductor nanostructures. In particular, a focused electron probe with a diameter of 0.5 nm was scanned over a fourfold quantum layer stack with alternating compressive and tensile strain and diffracted discs have been recorded on a scintillator-free direct electron detector with a frame time of 1 ms. We show that the applied algorithms can accurately detect Bragg beam positions despite a significant point spread each 300 kV electron causes during detection on the scintillator-free camera. For millisecond exposures, we find that strain can be measured with a precision of 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, enabling, e.g., strain mapping in a 100 Multiplication-Sign 100 nm{sup 2} region with 0.5 nm resolution in 40 s.

  12. Ozone probe: UV whiskbroom scanning spectroradiometer for earth albedo measurements from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talmor, Eli T.

    1993-08-01

    An UV spectro-radiometer operating in the 0.24 - 0.30 micrometers spectral region is being devised for Earth albedo measurements from space aboard the TECHSAT-1 satellite. The sensor incorporates a four-element, wide FOV (14 degree(s)) optic with an interference wedge as a spectral dispersive element. The spatial and spectral scanning is accomplished using a single CsTe cathode photomultiplier operating in the photon-counting mode. The sensor is capable of a 2 mrad spatial and 0.01 micrometers spectral resolution. The sensor is intended to measure the Earth backscattering albedo. The spectral profile of the albedo is a function of the ozone vertical distribution. The scientific goal of this project is to investigate the long-term impact of Kuwaiti oil fires on the stratosphere above the Middle East region. An additional goal is to find out the extent of global ozone depletion over the Middle East.

  13. In situ measurements of human articular cartilage stiffness by means of a scanning force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imer, Raphaël; Akiyama, Terunobu; de Rooij, Nico F.; Stolz, Martin; Aebi, Ueli; Kilger, Robert; Friederich, Niklaus F.; Wirz, Dieter; Daniels, A. U.; Staufer, Urs

    2007-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is a painful and disabling progressive joint disease, characterized by degradation of articular cartilage. In order to study this disease at early stages, we have miniaturized and integrated a complete scanning force microscope into a standard arthroscopic device fitting through a standard orthopedic canula. This instrument will allow orthopedic surgeons to measure the mechanical properties of articular cartilage at the nanometer and micrometer scale in-vivo during a standard arthroscopy. An orthopedic surgeon assessed the handling of the instrument. First measurements of the elasticity-modulus of human cartilage were recorded in a cadaver knee non minimal invasive. Second, minimally invasive experiments were performed using arthroscopic instruments. Load-displacement curves were successfully recorded.

  14. Measurement of shear strength for HOPG with scanning tunneling microscopy by thermal excitation method.

    PubMed

    Ding, X D; Wang, Y Z; Xiong, X M; Du, X S; Zhang, J X

    2012-04-01

    An experimental observation of force interactions in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is presented. A technique for measuring force interactions between a conventional STM probe and a sample by spectra analysis of its thermal fluctuations from tunneling current in STM is developed theoretically and experimentally. Thermally excited fluctuation of the STM probe is exactly discerned in air and then force gradient is determined from its corresponding eigen-frequency with a formula similar to that for a small-amplitude atomic force microscopy (AFM). The observed force interactions are consistent with forces in dynamic AFM. Shear strength of 7 GPa for highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) under compressive stress is obtained from the experiment and using the elastic theory. We believe that this technique is of scientific significance as it enables accurate measurement of short-range force interactions at atomic scale under true STM conditions.

  15. Simultaneous scanning tunneling microscopy and stress measurements to elucidate the origins of surface forces.

    PubMed

    Narushima, Tetsuya; Kinahan, Niall T; Boland, John J

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a new combined measurement system to investigate the underlying origins of forces on solid state surfaces from the viewpoint of atomic surface morphology. This system consists of two main parts: the measurements of force based on displacements and detailed atomic resolution observations of the surface morphology. The former involves a large sample cantilever and a capacitive detection method that provide sufficient resolution to detect changes of a few meV/atom or pN/atom at surfaces. For the latter, a scanning tunneling microscope was incorporated to observe structural changes occurring on the surface of the cantilever sample. Although this combined observation is not trivial, it was accomplished by carefully designing sample dimensions while suppressing the self-oscillation of the cantilever. To demonstrate the performance of this system a preliminary study of the room temperature adsorption of Br(2) on the clean Si(111)-7x7 surface is presented.

  16. Derivation of Cumulus Cloud Dimensions and Shape from the Airborne Measurements by the Research Scanning Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Emde, Claudia; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Ottaviani, Matteo; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.

    2016-01-01

    The Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) is an airborne instrument, whose measurements have been extensively used for retrievals of microphysical properties of clouds. In this study we show that for cumulus clouds the information content of the RSP data can be extended by adding the macroscopic parameters of the cloud, such as its geometric shape, dimensions, and height above the ground. This extension is possible by virtue of the high angular resolution and high frequency of the RSP measurements, which allow for geometric constraint of the cloud's 2D cross section between a number of tangent lines of view. The retrieval method is tested on realistic 3D radiative transfer simulations and applied to actual RSP data.

  17. Measurement of beta-gamma coincidence with a multi-parameter analyzer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdanpanah-Kejani, M.; Abbasi, F.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.; Doost-Mohammadi, V.

    2017-01-01

    A new version of the Iranian Noble Gas Analyzing System (INGAS) has been improved to facilitate measurement of beta-gamma coincidence events. It employs a new prototype list-mode multi-parameter data analyzer system, MPA4300. In order to test the new version performance, it has used to obtain energy spectra from radioxenon isotopes using the detector assembly of the Iranian Noble Gas Analyzing System. The MPA4300 is able to set the coinciding parameters, extract the corresponding spectrum, and through the use of event by event list file, can replay the measurement in offline mode. A great novelty of this work is the use of internal timing circuit in MPA4300 instead of using standard pick up time modules to identify coincidence events of detectors. A detailed description of the measuring 222Rn and 131mXe is presented.

  18. Optic nerve sheath diameter measurements by CT scan in ventriculoperitoneal shunt obstruction.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Syed Javed H; Yamamoto, Loren G

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the study was to determine differences in optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) measurements taken from computed tomography (CT) scans of patients with ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) obstruction versus controls. Inpatients 0-15 years with confirmed VPS obstruction requiring neurosurgical intervention were identified using ICD9 codes. ONSDs, orbit, cranium, and foramen magnum sizes were measured on their pre-surgical CT. Controls included cases at times when their VPS was not obstructed and age and gender matched patients with a CT scan done in the emergency room for head trauma (normal CT findings). Paired T-tests were used for both case-control comparisons. In order to compare the optic nerve sheath size more accurately, the ONSD width was divided by the width of the orbit and by the foramen magnum (antero-posterior) length. Twenty patients were identified with 25 events of VPS obstruction. The right ONSD (RON) was chosen to study. RON/orbit width and RON/foramen magnum diameter for the VPS obstruction versus self-controls, were 0.22 and 0.22, compared to 0.19 and 0.18, respectively, for the non-obstructed self-controls (P = .044 and P = .008, respectively). The same measurements for the VPS obstruction versus age and gender matched controls were 0.22 and 0.21 for the VPS obstruction cases, respectively, compared to 0.17 and 0.16, respectively for the age and gender matched controls (P < .001 and P < .001, respectively). This data confirms that the optic nerve diameter increases during a VPS obstruction. ONSD measurements by ultrasound could add to the evaluation for VPS obstruction.

  19. Venus Measurements by the MESSENGER Gamma-Ray and X-Ray Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, E. A.; Starr, R. D.; Goldsten, J. O.; Schlemm, C. E.; Boynton, W. V.

    2007-12-01

    The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS), which is a part of the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer Instrument, and the X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) on the MESSENGER spacecraft made calibration measurements during the Venus flyby on June 5, 2007. The purpose of these instruments is to determine elemental abundances on the surface of Mercury. The GRS measures gamma-rays emitted from element interactions with cosmic rays impinging on the surface, while the XRS measures X-ray emissions induced on the surface by the incident solar flux. The GRS sensor is a high-resolution high-purity Ge detector cooled by a Stirling cryocooler, surrounded by a borated-plastic anticoincidence shield. The GRS is sensitive to gamma-rays up to ~10 MeV and can identify most major elements, sampling down to depths of about ten centimeters. Only the shield was powered on for this flyby in order to conserve cooler lifetime. Gamma-rays were observed coming from Venus as well as from the spacecraft. Although the Venus gamma-rays originate from its thick atmosphere rather than its surface, the GRS data from this encounter will provide useful calibration data from a source of known composition. In particular, the data will be useful for determining GRS sensitivity and pointing options for the Mercury flybys, the first of which will be in January 2008. The X-ray spectrum of a planetary surface is dominated by a combination of the fluorescence and scattered solar X-rays. The most prominent fluorescent lines are the Kα lines from the major elements Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Ti, and Fe (1-10 keV). The sampling depth is less than 100 u m. The XRS is similar in design to experiments flown on Apollo 15 and 16 and the NEAR-Shoemaker mission. Three large-area gas-proportional counters view the planet, and a small Si-PIN detector mounted on the spacecraft sunshade monitors the Sun. The energy resolution of the gas proportional counters (~850 eV at 5.9 keV) is sufficient to resolve the X-ray lines above 2 keV, but Al and Mg

  20. Design of optimal fast scanning trajectory for the mechanical scanner of measurement instruments.

    PubMed

    Ju, Bing-Feng; Bai, Xiaolong; Chen, Jian; Ge, Yaozheng

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the design of the optimal scanning mode for the family of scanning probe microscopes. Based on different values of the maximum acceleration (deceleration) rate and maximum speed of X- and Y- axes of the mechanical scanner encountered in practice due to different mechanical design and loads, the design procedure of the optimal fast scanning mode is presented, which is found to be sensitive to the specific parameters of the scanning motion. By utilizing the simultaneous motion of the two axes, the fast raster scanning mode proposed can improve the scanning efficiency by 29% when comparing with the conventional raster (CR) scanning mode, if the scanning speeds of both axes are identical. In addition, the optimal fast mode provided by us has no effects on the image accuracy such as image degradation, image distortion when the efficiency is evaluated. No further difficulties are introduced to the control of the mechanical scanner and the data acquisition process. This optimal scanning mode is useful when the response time of the probe is very fast (such as ultrasonic probe in scanning acoustic microscope (SAM)), and the main limitations are due to the mechanical scanner. By applying different loads for both axes, the experiments with different scanning areas and scanning modes are conducted in a self-developed SAM. Experimental results coincide with the theoretical analysis and confirm the validation of our proposed optimal fast scanning mode and its superiority over the CR scanning mode.

  1. Measurement of the PPN Parameter (gamma) with radio signals from the Cassini Spacecraft at X- and Ka-Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John D.; Lau, Eunice L.; Giampieri, Giacomo

    2005-01-01

    Radio Doppler data from the Cassini spacecraft during its solar conjunction in June 2002 can be used to measure the bending of light by solar gravitation. In terms of the standard post-Newtonian parameter (gamma), we find that (gamma) - 1 = (-1.3 +/- 5.2)x10^-5 in agreement with the theory of General Relativity. This result implies that the parameter (omega) in the Brans-Dicke theory is greater than 9000 at a 95% confidence level.

  2. Measuring the activity of a {sup 51}Cr neutrino source based on the gamma-radiation spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbachev, V. V. Gavrin, V. N.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Malyshkin, Yu. M.; Shikhin, A. A.

    2015-12-15

    A technique for the measurement of activities of intense β sources by measuring the continuous gamma-radiation (internal bremsstrahlung) spectra is developed. A method for reconstructing the spectrum recorded by a germanium semiconductor detector is described. A method for the absolute measurement of the internal bremsstrahlung spectrum of {sup 51}Cr is presented.

  3. Equipment for the continuous measurement and identification of gamma radioactivity on aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    De Blas, Alfredo; Tapia, Carlos; Riego, Albert; Garcia, Roger; Dies, Javier; Diaz, Pedro; Toral, Juan; Batalla, Enric

    2015-07-01

    Presentation the Equipment for the Continuous Measurement and Identification of Gamma Radioactivity on Aerosols developed by the Nuclear Engineering Research Group (NERG) from the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) and the Raditel Company. The device is based on a fixed filter of glass fiber (100% borosilicate), this allows determine the concentration of activity of gamma emitters on aerosols in air. A specifically developed Spectrometry Analysis System has been developed. The analysis of the spectra allows the identification of the emitters and determine the concentration of activity. Nowadays four Stations with this equipment are operating on the Environmental Radiological Surveillance Network of the Catalonian Generalitat (Spain): two near the Asco and Vandellos Nuclear Power Plants in the province of Tarragona and one in the city of Barcelona. Soon a fourth monitor will be incorporated at Roses (province of Girona) and a fifth in Puigcerda (province of Barcelona). We present measurements and analysis of the evolution of the emitters identified on different stations of the Network. (authors)

  4. Airborne gamma radiation measurements of soil moisture during FIFE: Activities and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, Eugene L.

    1992-01-01

    Soil moisture measurements were obtained during the summer of 1987 and 1989 near Manhattan, Kansas, using the National Weather Service (NWS) airborne gamma radiation system. A network of 24 flight lines were established over the research area. Airborne surveys were flown daily during two intensive field campaigns. The data collected was sufficient to modify the NWS standard operational method for estimating soil moisture for the Field Experiment (FIFE) flight lines. The average root mean square error of the soil moisture estimates for shorter FIFE flight lines was found to be 2.5 percent, compared with a reported value of 3.9 percent for NWS flight lines. Techniques were developed to compute soil moisture estimates for portions of the flight lines. Results of comparisons of the airborne gamma radiation soil moisture estimates with those obtained using the NASA Pushbroom Microwave Radiation (PBMR) system and hydrological model are presented. The airborne soil moisture measurements, and real averages computed using all remotely sensed and ground data, have been in support of the research of the many FIFE investigators whose overall goal was the upscale integration of models and the application of satellite remote sensing.

  5. Application of a positioning and measuring machine for metrological long-range scanning force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausotte, T.; Jaeger, G.; Manske, E.; Hofmann, N.; Dorozhovets, N.

    2005-08-01

    This article deals with a high-precision three-dimensional positioning and measuring machine and its application as a metrological long-range scanning force microscope. At the Institute of Process Measurement and Sensor Technology of the Technische Universitaet Ilmenau an interferometric nanopositioning and nanomeasuring machine has been developed. Which is able to achieve a resolution of less than 0.1 nm over the entire positioning and measurement range of 25 mm x 25 mm x 5 mm and is traceable to the length standard. The Abbe offset-free design in conjunction with a corner mirror as a reference coordinate system provides extraordinary accuracy. The integration of several probe systems and nanotools (AFM, STM, focus sensor, tactile probes) makes the nanopositioning and nanomeasuring machine suitable for various tasks in the micro- and nanotechnologies. Various probe systems have been integrated in the last few years. For example, a commercial piezo tube AFM was integrated and tested. Additionally, interferometeric measurement systems of the nanopositioning and nanomeasuring machine enables the calibration of probe systems. Also in order to achieve the best possible measurement results special probe systems have been developed and tested and are discussed briefly.

  6. A quadruple-scanning-probe force microscope for electrical property measurements of microscopic materials.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Seiji; Kubo, Osamu; Kuramochi, Hiromi; Aono, Masakazu; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2011-07-15

    Four-terminal electrical measurement is realized on a microscopic structure in air, without a lithographic process, using a home-built quadruple-scanning-probe force microscope (QSPFM). The QSPFM has four probes whose positions are individually controlled by obtaining images of a sample in the manner of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and uses the probes as contacting electrodes for electrical measurements. A specially arranged tuning fork probe (TFP) is used as a self-detection force sensor to operate each probe in a frequency modulation AFM mode, resulting in simultaneous imaging of the same microscopic feature on an insulator using the four TFPs. Four-terminal electrical measurement is then demonstrated in air by placing each probe electrode in contact with a graphene flake exfoliated on a silicon dioxide film, and the sheet resistance of the flake is measured by the van der Pauw method. The present work shows that the QSPFM has the potential to measure the intrinsic electrical properties of a wide range of microscopic materials in situ without electrode fabrication.

  7. A quadruple-scanning-probe force microscope for electrical property measurements of microscopic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Seiji; Kubo, Osamu; Kuramochi, Hiromi; Aono, Masakazu; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2011-07-01

    Four-terminal electrical measurement is realized on a microscopic structure in air, without a lithographic process, using a home-built quadruple-scanning-probe force microscope (QSPFM). The QSPFM has four probes whose positions are individually controlled by obtaining images of a sample in the manner of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and uses the probes as contacting electrodes for electrical measurements. A specially arranged tuning fork probe (TFP) is used as a self-detection force sensor to operate each probe in a frequency modulation AFM mode, resulting in simultaneous imaging of the same microscopic feature on an insulator using the four TFPs. Four-terminal electrical measurement is then demonstrated in air by placing each probe electrode in contact with a graphene flake exfoliated on a silicon dioxide film, and the sheet resistance of the flake is measured by the van der Pauw method. The present work shows that the QSPFM has the potential to measure the intrinsic electrical properties of a wide range of microscopic materials in situ without electrode fabrication.

  8. Measurement Variability of Vertical Scanning Interferometry Tool Used for Orbiter Window Defect Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo, II

    2009-01-01

    The ability to sufficiently measure orbiter window defects to allow for window recertification has been an ongoing challenge for the orbiter vehicle program. The recent Columbia accident has forced even tighter constraints on the criteria that must be met in order to recertify windows for flight. As a result, new techniques are being investigated to improve the reliability, accuracy and resolution of the defect detection process. The methodology devised in this work, which is based on the utilization of a vertical scanning interferometric (VSI) tool, shows great promise for meeting the ever increasing requirements for defect detection. This methodology has the potential of a 10-100 fold greater resolution of the true defect depth than can be obtained from the currently employed micrometer based methodology. An added benefit is that it also produces a digital elevation map of the defect, thereby providing information about the defect morphology which can be utilized to ascertain the type of debris that induced the damage. However, in order to successfully implement such a tool, a greater understanding of the resolution capability and measurement repeatability must be obtained. This work focused on assessing the variability of the VSI-based measurement methodology and revealed that the VSI measurement tool was more repeatable and more precise than the current micrometer based approach, even in situations where operator variation could affect the measurement. The analysis also showed that the VSI technique was relatively insensitive to the hardware and software settings employed, making the technique extremely robust and desirable

  9. Hurricane Wind Field Measurements with Scanning Airborne Doppler Lidar During CAMEX-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, D. R.; Howell, J. N.; Darby, L. S.; Hardesty, R. M.; Traff, D. M.; Menzies, R. T.

    2000-01-01

    During the 1998 Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3), the first hurricane wind field measurements with Doppler lidar were achieved. Wind fields were mapped within the eye, along the eyewall, in the central dense overcast, and in the marine boundary layer encompassing the inflow region. Spatial coverage was determined primarily by cloud distribution and opacity. Within optically-thin cirrus slant range of 20- 25 km was achieved, whereas no propagation was obtained during penetration of dense cloud. Measurements were obtained with the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. MACAWS was developed and operated cooperatively by the atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A pseudo-dual Doppler technique ("co-planar scanning") is used to map the horizontal component of the wind at several vertical levels. Pulses from the laser are directed out the left side of the aircraft in the desired directions using computer-controlled rotating prisms. Upon exiting the aircraft, the beam is completely eyesafe. Aircraft attitude and speed are taken into account during real-time signal processing, resulting in determination of the ground-relative wind to an accuracy of about 1 m/s magnitude and about 10 deg direction. Beam pointing angle errors are about 0.1 deg, equivalent to about 17 m at 10 km. Horizontal resolution is about 1 km (along-track) for typical signal processor and scanner settings; vertical resolution varies with range. Results from CAMEX-3 suggest that scanning Doppler wind lidar can complement airborne Doppler radar by providing wind field measurements in regions that are devoid of hydrometeors. At present MACAWS observations are being assimilated into experimental forecast models and satellite Doppler wind lidar simulations to evaluate the relative impact.

  10. A dedicated H-beta meridian scanning photometer for proton aurora measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unick, Craig W.; Donovan, Eric; Connors, Martin; Jackel, Brian

    2017-01-01

    An instrument designed to measure the location and brightness of auroral emissions from energetic proton precipitation is described. This photometer scans from the north to south horizon with a stepper motor and mirror. The scans are configured in software for a 30 s cadence with equally spaced samples along a meridian at constant altitude. Broadband light is separated into two channels with a novel optical splitter. This splitter uses a filter that has high transmission for the signal channel and high reflection on both the long- and short-wavelength sides to reflect the combined background passbands, directing each channel to its respective detector. The half-cone angle and angle of incidence of this splitter filter allow for an overall compact optical design that also provides superior sensitivity in both signal and background channels. The signal channel is 3 nm wide full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 486.1 nm, and the background channel comprises two 3 nm wide FWHM passbands at 480 nm and 495 nm created by a single filter. Both of these channels are measured with photomultiplier tubes in photon-counting mode. Calibrations indicate a response of around 1000 c/s per rayleigh. Data are currently acquired in 5 ms bins with a Nyquist frequency of 100 Hz. The first system (Forty-Eight Sixty-One (FESO)-1) has been operating at Athabasca University since February 2014, and the second system (FESO-2) was deployed at Lucky Lake, Saskatchewan, in October 2015. The improved sensitivity over legacy instruments and the simultaneous measurement of signal and background enable operation during intervals with dynamic electron aurora and scattered moonlight.

  11. Permeability measurement and scan imaging to assess clogging of pervious concrete pavements in parking lots.

    PubMed

    Kayhanian, Masoud; Anderson, Dane; Harvey, John T; Jones, David; Muhunthan, Balasingam

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes a study that used permeability measurement along with physical and hydrological characteristics of 20 pervious concrete pavements in parking lots throughout California. The permeability was measured at five locations: the main entrance, an area with no traffic, and three separate measurements within a parking space at each parking lot. Hydrological and physical site characteristics such as traffic flow, erosion, vegetation cover, sediments accumulation, maintenance practice, presence of cracking, rainfall, and temperature data were also collected for each parking lot. These data were used to perform detailed statistical analysis to determine factors influencing changes in permeability and hence assessing possible cause of clogging. In addition, seven representative core samples were obtained from four different parking lots with permeability ranging from very low to very high. Porosity profiles produced from CT scanning were used to assess the possible nature and extent of clogging. Results showed that there is a large variation in permeability within each parking lot and between different parking lots. In general, the age of the parking lot is the predominant factor influencing the permeability. Statistical analysis revealed that fine sediment (particles less than 38 μm) mass is also an important influencing factor. Other influencing factors with lower significance included number of days with a temperature greater than 30°C and the amount of vegetation next to the parking lot. The combined scanned image analysis and porosity profile of the cores showed that most clogging occurs near the surface of the pavement. While lower porosity generally appeared to be limited to the upper 25 mm, in some core samples evidence of lower porosity was found up to 100mm below the surface.

  12. Continuous measurement of radionuclide distribution off Fukushima using a towed sea-bed gamma ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Blair; Ohnishi, Seiki; Ura, Tamaki; Odano, Naoteru; Fujita, Tsuneo

    2013-09-01

    Instrumentation and data processing methods to continuously map the distribution of radionuclides on the seafloor have been developed and applied to survey radioactive discharge from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant following the M9.0 earthquake and tsunami that struck the east coast of Japan on March 11 2011. The instrument consists of a flexible rubber hose with an integrated gamma ray spectrometer that measures the full gamma spectrum between 0.1 and 1.8 MeV while being towed along the seafloor by a ship. The data processing methods described allow for quantification of 137Cs and 134Cs concentration in marine sediments, and a technique has been developed to optimize the spatial resolution of the measurements for each radioactive species for a given level of statistical uncertainty. The system was deployed during August and November 2012 to measure the distribution of radionuclides along three transects within an 80 km radius of the plant. Increased levels of 137Cs and 134Cs were recorded and their distributions mapped continuously over distances of 1.6, 12.5 and 22 km respectively. The levels of 137Cs and 134Cs were found to vary significantly with location. The in situ measurements show good agreement with laboratory analyzed samples obtained during the surveys. The results demonstrate that the instrument and data processing techniques described enable high resolution, quantitative measurements of 137Cs and 134Cs in marine sediments, and provide an effective solution for rapid, low cost monitoring of radioactive material on the seafloor.

  13. Image formation, resolution, and height measurement in scanning ion conductance microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schaeffer, Tilman E.

    2009-05-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is an emerging tool for the noncontact investigation of biological samples such as live cells. It uses an ion current through the opening of a tapered nanopipette filled with an electrolyte for topography measurements. Despite its successful application to numerous systems no systematic investigation of the image formation process has yet been performed. Here, we use finite element modeling to investigate how the scanning ion conductance microscope images small particles on a planar surface, providing a fundamental characterization of the imaging process. We find that a small particle appears with a height that is only a fraction of its actual height. This has significant consequences for the quantitative interpretation of SICM images. Furthermore, small and low particles are imaged as rings in certain cases. This can cause small, closely spaced particles to appear with a lateral orientation that is rotated by 90 deg. Considering both real space and spatial frequency space we find that a reasonable and useful definition of lateral resolution of SICM is the smallest distance at which two small particles can clearly be resolved from each other in an image. We find that this resolution is approximately equal to three times the inner radius of the pipette tip opening.

  14. Image formation, resolution, and height measurement in scanning ion conductance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schäffer, Tilman E.

    2009-05-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is an emerging tool for the noncontact investigation of biological samples such as live cells. It uses an ion current through the opening of a tapered nanopipette filled with an electrolyte for topography measurements. Despite its successful application to numerous systems no systematic investigation of the image formation process has yet been performed. Here, we use finite element modeling to investigate how the scanning ion conductance microscope images small particles on a planar surface, providing a fundamental characterization of the imaging process. We find that a small particle appears with a height that is only a fraction of its actual height. This has significant consequences for the quantitative interpretation of SICM images. Furthermore, small and low particles are imaged as rings in certain cases. This can cause small, closely spaced particles to appear with a lateral orientation that is rotated by 90°. Considering both real space and spatial frequency space we find that a reasonable and useful definition of lateral resolution of SICM is the smallest distance at which two small particles can clearly be resolved from each other in an image. We find that this resolution is approximately equal to three times the inner radius of the pipette tip opening.

  15. A near-field scanning microwave microscope based on a superconducting resonator for low power measurements.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, S E; Danilov, A V; Adamyan, A; Kubatkin, S E

    2013-02-01

    We report on the design and performance of a cryogenic (300 mK) near-field scanning microwave microscope. It uses a microwave resonator as the near-field sensor, operating at a frequency of 6 GHz and microwave probing amplitudes down to 100 μV, approaching low enough photon population (N ∼ 1000) of the resonator such that coherent quantum manipulation becomes feasible. The resonator is made out of a miniaturized distributed fractal superconducting circuit that is integrated with the probing tip, micromachined to be compact enough such that it can be mounted directly on a quartz tuning-fork, and used for parallel operation as an atomic force microscope (AFM). The resonator is magnetically coupled to a transmission line for readout, and to achieve enhanced sensitivity we employ a Pound-Drever-Hall measurement scheme to lock to the resonance frequency. We achieve a well localized near-field around the tip such that the microwave resolution is comparable to the AFM resolution, and a capacitive sensitivity down to 6.4 × 10(-20) F/Hz, limited by mechanical noise. We believe that the results presented here are a significant step towards probing quantum systems at the nanoscale using near-field scanning microwave microscopy.

  16. Testing and Performance Validation of a Sensitive Gamma Ray Camera Designed for Radiation Detection and Decommissioning Measurements in Nuclear Facilities-13044

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, John A.; Looman, Marc R.; Poundall, Adam J.; Towner, Antony C.N.; Creed, Richard; Pancake, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the measurements, testing and performance validation of a sensitive gamma ray camera designed for radiation detection and quantification in the environment and decommissioning and hold-up measurements in nuclear facilities. The instrument, which is known as RadSearch, combines a sensitive and highly collimated LaBr{sub 3} scintillation detector with an optical (video) camera with controllable zoom and focus and a laser range finder in one detector head. The LaBr{sub 3} detector has a typical energy resolution of between 2.5% and 3% at the 662 keV energy of Cs-137 compared to that of NaI detectors with a resolution of typically 7% to 8% at the same energy. At this energy the tungsten shielding of the detector provides a shielding ratio of greater than 900:1 in the forward direction and 100:1 on the sides and from the rear. The detector head is mounted on a pan/tile mechanism with a range of motion of ±180 degrees (pan) and ±90 degrees (tilt) equivalent to 4 π steradians. The detector head with pan/tilt is normally mounted on a tripod or wheeled cart. It can also be mounted on vehicles or a mobile robot for access to high dose-rate areas and areas with high levels of contamination. Ethernet connects RadSearch to a ruggedized notebook computer from which it is operated and controlled. Power can be supplied either as 24-volts DC from a battery or as 50 volts DC supplied by a small mains (110 or 230 VAC) power supply unit that is co-located with the controlling notebook computer. In this latter case both power and Ethernet are supplied through a single cable that can be up to 80 metres in length. If a local battery supplies power, the unit can be controlled through wireless Ethernet. Both manual operation and automatic scanning of surfaces and objects is available through the software interface on the notebook computer. For each scan element making up a part of an overall scanned area, the unit measures a gamma ray spectrum. Multiple

  17. Gamma-spectrometric measurement of radioactivity in agricultural soils of the Lombardia region, northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, Laura; Carini, Franca; Rossi, Riccardo; Gatti, Marina; Cenci, Roberto M; Beone, Gian Maria

    2015-04-01

    This work is part of a wider monitoring project of the agricultural soils in Lombardia, which aims to build a database of topsoil properties and the potentially toxic elements, organic pollutants and gamma emitting radionuclides that the topsoils contain. A total of 156 agricultural soils were sampled according to the LUCAS (Land Use/Cover Area frame statistical Survey) standard procedure. The aim was to provide a baseline to document the conditions present at the time of sampling. The results of the project concerning soil radioactivity are presented here. The aim was to assess the content of (238)U, (232)Th, (137)Cs and (40)K by measuring soil samples by gamma spectrometry. (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K activities range 24-231, 20-70, and 242-1434 Bq kg(-1) respectively. The geographic distribution of (238)U reflects the geophysical framework of the Lombardia region: the soils with high content of uranium are distributed for the most part in the South Alpine belt, where the presence of magmatic rocks is widespread. These soils show an higher activity of (238)U than of (232)Th. The (238)U activities become lower than (232)Th when soils are located in the plain, originating from basic sedimentary rocks. (137)Cs activity ranges 0.4-86.8 kBq m(-2). The lowest activity of (137)Cs is in the plain, whereas the highest is in the North on soils kept as lawn or pasture. The (137)Cs activity of some samples suggests the presence of accumulation processes that lead to (137)Cs enriched soils. This is the first survey of gamma emitting radionuclides in Lombardia that is based on the LUCAS standard sampling. The results from this monitoring campaign are important for the human radiation exposure and provide the zero point, which will be useful for assessing future effects due to external factors such as human activities.

  18. Measurement of direct photon emission in the K(L) ---> pi+ pi- gamma decay mode

    SciTech Connect

    Abouzaid, E.; Arenton, M.; Barker, A.R.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellavance, A.; Blucher, E.; Bock, G.J.; Cheu, E.; Coleman, R.; Corcoran, M.D.; Corti, G.; /Virginia U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-04-01

    In this paper the KTeV collaboration reports the analysis of 112.1 x 10{sup 3} candidate K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} decays including a background of 671 {+-} 41 events with the objective of determining the photon production mechanisms intrinsic to the decay process. These decays have been analyzed to extract the relative contributions of the Cp violating bremsstrahlung process and the CP conserving M1 and CP violating E1 direct photon emission processes. The M1 direct photon emission amplitude and its associated vector form factor parameterized as |{bar g}{sub M1}|(1 + a{sub 1}/a{sub 2}/(M{sub {rho}}{sup 2}-M{sub K}{sup 2}) + 2M{sub K}E{sub {gamma}}) have been measured to be |{bar g}{sub M1}| = 1.198 {+-} 0.035(stat) {+-} 0.086(syst) and a{sub 1}/a{sub 2} = =0.738 {+-} 0.007(stat) {+-} 0.018(syst) GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} respectively. An upper limit for the CP violating E1 direct emission amplitude |g{sub E1}| {le} 0.1 (90%CL) has been found. The overall ratio of direct photon emission (DE) to total photon emission including the bremsstrahlung process (IB) has been determined to be DE/(DE + IB) = 0.689 {+-} 0.021 for E{sub {gamma}} {ge} 20 MeV.

  19. Expected Characteristics of Global Wind Profile Measurements with a Scanning, Hybrid, Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Over 20 years of investigation by NASA and NOAA scientists and Doppler lidar technologists into a global wind profiling mission from earth orbit have led to the current favored concept of an instrument with both coherent- and direct-detection pulsed Doppler lidars (i.e., a hybrid Doppler lidar) and a stepstare beam scanning approach covering several azimuth angles with a fixed nadir angle. The nominal lidar wavelengths are 2 microns for coherent detection, and 0.355 microns for direct detection. The two agencies have also generated two sets of sophisticated wind measurement requirements for a space mission: science demonstration requirements and operational requirements. The requirements contain the necessary details to permit mission design and optimization by lidar technologists. Simulations have been developed that connect the science requirements to the wind measurement requirements, and that connect the wind measurement requirements to the Doppler lidar parameters. The simulations also permit trade studies within the multi-parameter space. These tools, combined with knowledge of the state of the Doppler lidar technology, have been used to conduct space instrument and mission design activities to validate the feasibility of the chosen mission and lidar parameters. Recently, the NRC Earth Science Decadal Survey recommended the wind mission to NASA as one of 15 recommended missions. A full description of the wind measurement product from these notional missions and the possible trades available are presented in this paper.

  20. Scanning electrochemical microscopy, 52. Bipolar conductance technique at ultramicroelectrodes for resistance measurements.

    PubMed

    LeSuer, Robert J; Fan, Fu-Ren F; Bard, Allen J

    2004-12-01

    The bipolar conductance, BICON, technique for the measurement of solution resistance, based on the application of microsecond current pulses, as originally described by Enke and co-workers for measurements with conventional electrodes, was extended for use with ultramicroelectrodes, with a focus on its application in scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). When the plateau time used to make the measurement lies within the BICON conditions, the solution conductance can be obtained directly from the output without the need for calibration curves. However, decreasing the size of the ultramicroelectrode decreases the range of values that satisfy these conditions, and one must resort to calibration curves to obtain solution conductance from the measured current, which was nevertheless found to be proportional to electrolyte concentration with electrodes as small as 5 mum in diameter. BICON/SECM approach curves over insulating substrates followed SECM negative feedback theory and approach curves in the presence of low (micromolar) or no added electrolyte are possible once the background conductivity is taken into account. Approach curves to a conducting substrate at open circuit potential are influenced by the solution time constant (solution resistance at the electrode tip x electrode double layer capacitance), which is a function of the tip/substrate distance, as well as the substrate size.

  1. Underwater 3D Surface Measurement Using Fringe Projection Based Scanning Devices

    PubMed Central

    Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Heinze, Matthias; Schmidt, Ingo; Kühmstedt, Peter; Notni, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    In this work we show the principle of optical 3D surface measurements based on the fringe projection technique for underwater applications. The challenges of underwater use of this technique are shown and discussed in comparison with the classical application. We describe an extended camera model which takes refraction effects into account as well as a proposal of an effective, low-effort calibration procedure for underwater optical stereo scanners. This calibration technique combines a classical air calibration based on the pinhole model with ray-based modeling and requires only a few underwater recordings of an object of known length and a planar surface. We demonstrate a new underwater 3D scanning device based on the fringe projection technique. It has a weight of about 10 kg and the maximal water depth for application of the scanner is 40 m. It covers an underwater measurement volume of 250 mm × 200 mm × 120 mm. The surface of the measurement objects is captured with a lateral resolution of 150 μm in a third of a second. Calibration evaluation results are presented and examples of first underwater measurements are given. PMID:26703624

  2. Subtropical Cirrus Properties Derived from GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements during CAMEX 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Wang, Z.; Demoz, B.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) was stationed on Andros Island, Bahamas for the third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX 3) held in August - September, 1998 and acquired an extensive set of water vapor and cirrus cloud measurements (Whiteman et al., 2001). The cirrus data studied here have been segmented by generating mechanism. Distinct differences in the optical properties of the clouds are found when the cirrus are hurricane-induced versus thunderstom-induced. Relationships of cirrus cloud optical depth, mean cloud temperature, and layer mean extinction-to-backscatter ratio (S) are presented and compared with mid-latitude and tropical results. Hurricane-induced cirrus clouds are found to generally possess lower values of S than thunderstorm induced clouds. Comparison of these measurements of S are made with other studies revealing at times large differences in the measurements. Given that S is a required parameter for spacebased retrievals of cloud optical depth using backscatter lidar, these large diffaences in S measurements present difficulties for space-based retrievals of cirrus cloud extinction and optical depth.

  3. Velocity measurements of the liquid - gas flow using gamma absorption and modified conditional averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanus, Robert; Zych, Marcin; Kowalczyk, Adam; Petryka, Leszek

    2015-05-01

    The paper presents idea and an exemplary application of gamma-absorption in the measurement of gas bubbles transportation in a gas-liquid mixture flow through a horizontal pipeline. In the tests on laboratory installation two 241Am radioactive sources and probes with NaI(Tl) scintillation crystals have been used. For analysis of electrical signals obtained from detectors the modified conditional averaging of the absolute value of delayed signal (CAAV) is proposed. The proposed method is based on the quotient of classical cross-correlation (CCF) and CAAV. Results of the time delay estimation and gas-phase velocity measurements are compared with one obtained using CCF. The combined uncertainties of the mean velocity of air bubbles evaluation in the presented experiment did not exceed 2.1% (CCF) and 1.7% (CCF/CAAV), which is a satisfactory result in industrial applications.

  4. Measurement of the CKM-Angle Gamma at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP

    2006-04-17

    The authors present the results of the measurements employed by the BABAR Collaboration, to determine the value of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) CP-violating phase {gamma} ({triple_bond} arg [-V{sub ud}V*{sub ub}/V{sub cd}V*{sub cb}]). These measurements are based on the studies performed with the charged B-decays B{sup -} {yields} {tilde D}{sup 0} K{sup -}, B{sup -} {yields} {tilde D}*{sup 0} K*{sup -}, where {tilde D}{sup 0} indicates either a D{sup 0} or a {bar D}{sup 0} meson. A sample of about 230 million B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector [1], at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC, is used.

  5. Relationship between intracranial granulomas and cerebrospinal fluid levels of gamma interferon and interleukin-10 in patients with tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Adel M; Frenck, Robert W; Darville, Toni; Nakhla, Isabelle A; Wierzba, Thomas F; Sultan, Yehia; Bassiouny, Magdy I; McCarthy, Kathryn; Jacobs, Richard F

    2005-02-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-10 levels in 39 patients with tuberculous meningitis were serially measured. Cytokine levels did not predict intracranial granuloma (IG) development, but IFN-gamma levels in the top quartile after 1 month of therapy were highly associated (odds ratio = 18) with detection of an IG by computed tomography scanning.

  6. Measurement of surface moisture using infra-red terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruessink, Gerben; Brakenhoff, Laura; van Maarseveen, Marcel

    2014-05-01

    The measured aeolian supply of sand from the beach to the foredune is generally less than the potential supply because the wetness of the beach surface limits sand entrainment and supply. The strong spatial and temporal variability in surface moisture is, however, notoriously difficult to determine, which has prevented the development of quantitatively more realistic sand-supply models. Here we test the possibility of deriving surface moisture content from the reflectance signal of an infra-red terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) in a large area (~ 100 × 100 m) with high spatial (~ 0.25 × 0.25 m) and temporal (~ 30 minutes) resolution. We deployed a RIEGL VZ-400 3D laser scanner (short-wave infra-red, wavelength = 1550 nm) from a tripod at Egmond Beach, The Netherlands, with the instrument about 2 m above beach level. The TLS collected data through 360° in the horizontal plane and 100° in the vertical, with a rate of 122,000 points/s. A full 360°/100° (panorama) scan with a 0.02° resolution in the horizontal and vertical took about 12 minutes to complete. Nine panorama scans were performed over a single tidal cycle, during which also 69 surface scrapings (thickness of a few millimetres) were taken. After each panorama scan, a cross-shore profile from the dunefoot to the shoreline was scanned 10 times per second for 2 minutes to explore the repeatability of the TLS data. The nine scans were processed into 0.25 × 0.25 m reflectance maps, while the scrapings were processed into moisture estimates using standard laboratory techniques. The RIEGL VZ-400 expresses reflectance in decibels, with a 1/R2 correction to account for the reduction of returned intensity with range R. We found that reflectance does not change for R = 15 - 60 m over beach sand with spatially invariant moisture content. Apparently, the returned reflectance is then indeed proportional to 1/R2 and independent of the angle between the laser pulse and the beach surface. For R < 15 m, the 1/R2

  7. Picosecond Z-scan measurements on bulk GaN crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Pacebutas, V.; Stalnionis, A.; Krotkus, A.; Suski, T.; Perlin, P.; Leszczynski, M.

    2001-06-25

    Bulk GaN crystals were characterized by using picosecond laser pulses at {lambda}=0.527{mu}m and Z-scan techniques. The role of the free-carrier absorption was evaluated by a dynamical, pump-and-probe-type transmitivity measurement. The values of two-photon absorption coefficient (17{endash}20 cm/GW) and refractive index changes at high optical irradiances due to bound (n{sub 2}={minus}4{times}10{sup {minus}12}esu) and free ({sigma}{sub r}={minus}1.0{times}10{sup {minus}20}cm{sup 3}) electrons in that material were determined. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Pointwise and scanning laser anemometer measurements in steady and unsteady separated turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, R. L.; Chehroudi, B.; Shivaprasad, B. G.

    1982-01-01

    The physical features of steady and unsteady freestream separating turbulent boundary layers that have been determined by pointwise laser anemometer measurements are outlined. It is seen that the large-scale structures control the outer region's backflow behavior. Near the wall, the mean backflow velocity profile for both the steady and unsteady cases is found to scale on the maximum negative mean velocity and its distance from the wall. A description is given of a scanning laser anemometer that produces nearly instantaneous velocity profiles for examing the temporal features of these large-scale structures. Also described is a 'zero-wake' seeder that supplies particles to the outer shear layer and freestream flow with a minimal disturbance.

  9. Measurement of nonlinear index by a relay-imaged top-hat Z-scan technique

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, T.; Kurnit, N.A.; Sheik-Bahae, M.

    1996-04-01

    Measurements of the nonlinear index of a number of optical materials of interest for the National Ignition Facility have been performed at 1,064 nm and 355 nm by a modified version of the ``top-hat`` technique and the results compared with the more standard gaussian-beam Z-scan technique. The top-hat technique has the advantages of higher sensitivity and smaller uncertainties introduced by beam-quality considerations. The authors have made what they feel to be an additional improvement by placing the defining aperture for the top hat at the front focal plane of the lens that focuses the beam into the sample and then reimaging the input aperture with a second lens onto a ccd camera. Reimaging eliminates diffraction fringes and provides a stationary image even for a wedged sample; recording the entire image permits minimization of spurious effects such as varying interference fringes.

  10. Multi-band automatic sun and sky scanning radiometer system for measurement of aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Slutsker, I.; Tanre, D.; Buis, J. P.; Setzer, A.; Vermote, E.; Reagan, J. A.; Kaufman, Y. A.

    1994-01-01

    A weather resistant automatic scanning Sun photometer system is assessed and demonstrated as practical for measurements of aerosol concentrations and properties at remote sites. Interfaced with a transmitter using the Geostationary Data Collection System (GDCS), the data are processed in near real time. The processing allows a time dependence of the aerosols and water vapor and an ongoing assessment of the health and calibration of the instruments. The system's automatic data acquisition, transmission, and processing offer immediate application to atmospheric monitoring and modeling on a regional to global scale and validation of satellite retrievals. It is estimated that under normal circumstances the retrieved aerosol optical thickness has a network wide accuracy of +/- 0.02 from 340 nm to 1020 nm, water vapor +/- 0.2 cm and size distribution from 0.1 to 3 micrometers.

  11. Magnetotransport in Graphene on the Nano Scale measured by Scanning Tunneling Potentiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willke, Philip; Druga, Thomas; Kotzott, Thomas; Ulbrich, Rainer; Schneider, Alexander; Wenderoth, Martin

    The method of scanning tunneling potentiometry (STP) has been introduced by Muralt and Pohl as a technique for mapping the electrochemical potential locally. Here we present a new home-built low-temperature STP setup with applicable magnetic field of up to 6T to study the spatial evolution of the voltage drop at extended defects in graphene with high-resolution. We show that the voltage drop at a monolayer-bilayer boundary in graphene clearly extends spatially up to a few nanometers into the bilayer and hence is not located strictly at the structural defect. Moreover, different scattering mechanisms can be disentangled. Besides, we perform magnetotransport STP measurements mapping the local electrochemical potential as a function of the applied magnetic field. This allows us to identify localized and delocalized contributions to the magnetoresistance in epitaxial-grown graphene and to reveal the contribution of defects. This work was supported by the priority program 1459 ``Graphene'' of the German Science Foundation.

  12. Geo-fit Approach to the Analysis of Limb-Scanning Satellite Measurements.

    PubMed

    Carlotti, M; Dinelli, B M; Raspollini, P; Ridolfi, M

    2001-04-20

    We propose a new approach to the analysis of limb-scanning measurements of the atmosphere that are continually recorded from an orbiting platform. The retrieval is based on the simultaneous analysis of observations taken along the whole orbit. This approach accounts for the horizontal variability of the atmosphere, hence avoiding the errors caused by the assumption of horizontal homogeneity along the line of sight of the observations. A computer program that implements the proposed approach has been designed; its performance is shown with a simulated retrieval analysis based on a satellite experiment planned to fly during 2001. This program has also been used for determining the size and the character of the errors that are associated with the assumption of horizontal homogeneity. A computational strategy that reduces the large number of computer resources apparently demanded by the proposed inversion algorithm is described.

  13. Measurement of Inclusive Radiative B -Meson Decay B -> X_s gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, V.E.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2006-01-06

    Radiative decays of the B meson, B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma}, proceed via virtual flavor changing neutral current processes that are sensitive to contributions from high mass scales, either within the Standard Model of electroweak interactions or beyond. In the Standard Model, these transitions are sensitive to the weak interactions of the top quark, and relatively robust predictions of the inclusive decay rate exist. Significant deviation from these predictions could be interpreted as indications for processes not included in the minimal Standard Model, like interactions of charged Higgs or SUSY particles. The analysis of the inclusive photon spectrum from B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} decays is rather challenging due to high backgrounds from photons emitted in the decay of mesons in B decays as well as e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation to low mass quark and lepton pairs. Based on 88.5 million B{bar B} events collected by the BABAR detector, the photon spectrum above 1.9 GeV is presented. By comparison of the first and second moments of the photon spectrum with QCD predictions (calculated in the kinetic scheme), QCD parameters describing the bound state of the b quark in the B meson are extracted: m{sub b} = (4.45 {+-} 0.16) GeV/c{sup 2}; {mu}{sub {pi}}{sup 2} = (0.65 {+-} 0.29) GeV{sup 2}. These parameters are useful input to non-perturbative QCD corrections to the semileptonic B decay rate and the determination of the CKM parameter |V{sub ub}|. Based on these parameters and heavy quark expansion, the full branching fraction is obtained as: {Beta}(B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma}){sup E{sub {gamma}}>1.6 GeV} = (4.05 {+-} 0.32(stat) {+-} 0.38(syst) {+-} 0.29(model)) x 10{sup -4}. This result is in good agreement with previous measurements, the statistical and systematic errors are comparable. It is also in good agreement with the theoretical Standard Model predictions, and thus within the present errors there is no indication of any interactions not accounted for in the

  14. A simple and effective method for validation and measurement of collimator output factors for Leksell Gamma Knife® Perfexion™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lijun; Kjäll, Per; Novotny, Josef Jr; Nordström, Håkan; Johansson, Jonas; Verhey, Lynn

    2009-06-01

    Accurate determination of collimator output factors is important for Leksell Gamma Knife radiosurgery. The new Leksell Gamma Knife® Perfexion™ system has a completely redesigned collimator system and the collimator output factors are different from the other Leksell Gamma Knife® models. In this study, a simple method was developed to validate the collimator output factors specifically for Leksell Gamma Knife® Perfexion™. The method uses double-shot exposures on a single film to eliminate repeated setups and the necessity to acquire dose calibration curves required for the traditional film exposure method. Using the method, the collimator output factors with respect to the 16 mm collimator were measured to be 0.929 ± 0.009 and 0.817 ± 0.012 for the 8 mm and the 4 mm collimator, respectively. These values are in agreement (within 2%) with the default values of 0.924 and 0.805 in the Leksell Gamma Plan® treatment planning system. These values also agree with recently published results of 0.917 (8 mm collimator) and 0.818 (4 mm collimator) obtained from the traditional methods. Given the efficiency of the method, measurement and validation of the collimator output factors can be readily adopted in commissioning and quality assurance of a Leksell Gamma Knife® Perfexion™ system.

  15. Fatigue damage evolution study with non-destructive magnetic properties measurement method using scanning SQUID microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae-Kyu

    The fatigue process can be precisely defined in the crack propagation stage, where the fatigue damage can be evaluated by observed cracks and where an increase of the dislocation density occurs at the first 10% of the fatigue life. But for the stages between dislocation saturation and prior to nucleation, no definition can be given due to the relative difficulty in quantifying the damage. Especially, detecting a high-cycle fatigue damage is a particularly important yet an unsolved problem in non-destructive testing. There are no reliable techniques to measure the progress of fatigue in the intermediate fatigue regime, the second stage of fatigue, where the overall dislocation density is approximately constant and the microstructural changes are subtle include about 80% of the fatigue life in high-cycle fatigue. In this study, a non-destructive evaluation method is established by continuously measuring the magnetic properties, which interact with the developing fatigue damage during cyclic loading. Dislocations and microcracks which are initiated during the fatigue act as pinning sites which impede the motion of magnetic domain walls under the applied magnetic field, thereby influencing the bulk magnetic properties. The remanence field of various fatigued steel specimens are detected using a scanning microscope based on a high transition temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). The results show the development of localized peaks in remanent magnetization prior to the formation of visible fatigue cracks. Even in the second stage of fatigue, where the macroscopic state of the sample is relatively constant, the results show that a scanning SQUID microscope is capable of detecting regions of fatigue damage both on surface and in sub-surface regions.

  16. Human body surface area: measurement and prediction using three dimensional body scans.

    PubMed

    Tikuisis, P; Meunier, P; Jubenville, C E

    2001-08-01

    The development of three dimensional laser scanning technology and sophisticated graphics editing software have allowed an alternative and potentially more accurate determination of body surface area (BSA). Raw whole-body scans of 641 adults (395 men and 246 women) were obtained from the anthropometric data base of the Civilian American and European Surface Anthropometry Resource project. Following surface restoration of the scans (i.e. patching and smoothing), BSA was calculated. A representative subset of the entire sample population involving 12 men and 12 women (G24) was selected for detailed measurements of hand surface area (SAhand) and ratios of surface area to volume (SA/VOL) of various body segments. Regression equations involving wrist circumference and arm length were used to predict SAhand of the remaining population. The overall [mean (SD)] of BSA were 2.03 (0.19) and 1.73 (0.19) m2 for men and women, respectively. Various prediction equations were tested and although most predicted the measured BSA reasonably closely, residual analysis revealed an overprediction with increasing body size in most cases. Separate non-linear regressions for each sex yielded the following best-fit equations (with root mean square errors of about 1.3%): BSA (cm2) = 128.1 x m0.44 x h0.60 for men and BSA = 147.4 x m0.47 x h0.55 for women, where m, body mass, is in kilograms and h, height, is in centimetres. The SA/VOL ratios of the various body segments were higher for the women compared to the men of G24, significantly for the head plus neck (by 7%), torso (19%), upper arms (15%), forearms (20%), hands (18%), and feet (11%). The SA/VOL for both sexes ranged from approximately 12.m-1 for the pelvic region to 104-123.m-1 for the hands, and shape differences were a factor for the torso and lower leg.

  17. Measurements of the reaction e/+/e/-/ yielding gamma-gamma at center-of-mass energies in the range 6.2-7.4 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilger, E.; Beron, B. L.; Carrington, R. L.; Ford, R. L.; Hill, W. T.; Hofstadter, R.; Hughes, E. B.; Liberman, A. D.; Martin, T. W.; Oneill, L. H.

    1977-01-01

    The cross section for the pair-annihilation reaction e(+)e(-) yields gamma-gamma were measured at center-of-mass energies in the range 6.2-7.4 GeV and at production angles close to 90 deg. The experimental apparatus consisted of two identical spectrometers which were set to view the luminous region at SPEAR-II from opposite directions at an azimuthal angle of 45 deg. In each spectrometer there was a NaI(TI) crystal 20 radiation lengths thick and 30 in. in diameter to measure the gamma-ray energies. Annihilation events were detected by an electronic trigger which required only the observation in coincidence of more than 0.2 GeV in each NaI(TI) crystal within + or - 15 nsec of the crossing beams. The observed rates of pair-annihilation events were found to be in agreement with those expected from quantum electrodynamics (QED) at all the center-of-mass energies used.

  18. Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements During the WVIOP2000 and AFWEX Field Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Evans, K. D.; Berkoff, T. B.; Demoz, B. D.; DiGirolamo, P.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) participated in the Water Vapor IOP 2000 (WVIOP2000) and ARM FIRE Water Vapor Experiment (AFWEX) at the DOE SGP CART site in northern Oklahoma. These experiments occurred during the period of September and December, 2000. The goals of both the WVIOP2000 and AFWEX were to better characterize the water vapor measurement capability of numerous sensors in the lower atmosphere and upper troposphere, respectively. The SRL received several hardware upgrades in anticipation of these experiments that permitted improved measurements of water vapor during the daytime and in the upper troposphere (UT). The daytime SRL water vapor error statistics were demonstrated a factor of 2-3 improvement compared to the permanently stationed CART Raman lidar (CARL). The performance of the SRL in the UT showed improvements as well. The technological upgrades that permitted these improved SRL measurements could also be implemented in the CARL system. Data examples demonstrating the new daytime and upper tropospheric measurement capability of the SRL will be shown at the meeting. In addition, preliminary analysis will be presented on several topics: 1) inter comparison of the water vapor measurements for several water vapor sensors including SRL, CARL, the NASA/Langley Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) flown onboard the NASA DC-8, in-situ sensors flown on the DC-8, and the Max Planck Institute Differential Absorption Lidar 2) comparison of cirrus cloud measurements using SRL and CARL and 3) case studies of meteorological events that occurred during the IOPs such as a cold frontal passage on the night of September 23.

  19. Arcsec source location measurements in gamma-ray astronomy from a lunar observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David G.; Hughes, E. B.

    1990-01-01

    The physical processes typically used in the detection of high energy gamma-rays do not permit good angular resolution, which makes difficult the unambiguous association of discrete gamma-ray sources with objects emitting at other wavelengths. This problem can be overcome by placing gamma-ray detectors on the moon and using the horizon as an occulting edge to achieve arcsec resolution. For the purpose of discussion, this concept is examined for gamma rays above about 20 MeV for which pair production dominates the detection process and locally-generated nuclear gamma rays do not contribute to the background.

  20. Measuring thermal conductivity of thin films by Scanning Thermal Microscopy combined with thermal spreading resistance analysis.

    PubMed

    Juszczyk, J; Kaźmierczak-Bałata, A; Firek, P; Bodzenta, J

    2017-01-27

    While measuring the thermal properties of a thin film, one of the most often encountered problems is the influence of the substrate thermal properties on measured signal and the need for its separation. In this work an approach for determining the thermal conductivity κ of a thin layer is presented. It bases on Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM) measurement combined with thermal spreading resistance analysis for a system consisting of a single layer on a substrate. Presented approach allows to take into account the influence of the substrate thermal properties on SThM signal and to estimate the true value of a thin film κ. It is based on analytical solution of the problem being a function of dimensionless parameters and requires numerical solution of relatively simple integral equation. As the analysis utilizes a solution in dimensionless parameters it can be used for any substrate-layer system. As an example, the method was applied for determination of the thermal conductivities of 4 different thin layers of thicknesses from 12 to 100nm. The impact of model parameters on the uncertainty of the estimated final κ value was analyzed.

  1. Simultaneous measurement of lateral and vertical size of nanoparticles using transmission scanning electron microscopy (TSEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhr, E.; Bug, M. U.; Bergmann, D.; Cizmar, P.; Frase, C. G.

    2017-03-01

    A scanning electron microscope operated in transmission mode (TSEM) enables both the measurement of the lateral and vertical size (thickness) of nanoparticles. The lateral size is measured with a previously described technique where the particle boundary is determined in the TSEM image. Particle thickness is deduced from the TSEM signal level measured at the centre of the particle, which requires prior knowledge of the expected TSEM signal level. We applied different and well-known Monte-Carlo based simulation tools (Geant4 and MCSEM) to describe the electron diffusion in solid states and to calculate the expected TSEM signals taking into account particle and instrument properties. The simulation results of the different simulation models differ slightly revealing current limits of small-angle and low-energy electron scattering modelling in solid states. Nonetheless, the method allows one to correlate lateral and vertical particle thickness and thus to obtain additional information about the 3D morphology of nanoparticles. We demonstrate the method for silica particles with sizes in the range of about 10 nm–100 nm.

  2. Improvements on Low Level Activity Gamma Measurements and X-ray Spectrometry at the CEA-MADERE Measurement Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeyeva, Victoria; Domergue, Christophe; Destouches, Christophe; Girard, Jean Michel; Philibert, Hervé; Bonora, Jonathan; Thiollay, Nicolas; Lyoussi, Abdallah

    2016-02-01

    The CEA MADERE platform (Measurement Applied to DosimEtry in REactors) is a part of the Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory (LDCI). This facility is dedicated to the specific activity measurements of solid and radioactive samples using Gamma and X-ray spectrometry. MADERE is a high-performance facility devoted to neutron dosimetry for experimental programs performed in CEA and for the irradiation surveillance programmes of PWR vessels. The MADERE platform is engaged in a continuous improvement process. Recently, two High Efficiency diodes have been integrated to the MADERE platform in order to manage the accurate low level activity measurements (few Bq per sample). This new equipment provides a good level of efficiency over the energy range from 60 keV to 2 MeV. The background continuum is reduced due to the use of a Ultra Low Background (ULB) lead shielding. Relative and absolute X-ray measurement techniques have been improved in order to facilitate absolute rhodium activity measurement (Rh103m) on solid samples. Additional efforts have been made to increase the accuracy of the relative niobium (Nb93m) activity measurement technique. The way of setting up an absolute measurement method for niobium is under investigation. After a presentation of the MADERE's measurement devices, this paper focuses on the technological options taken into account for the design of high efficiency measurement devices. Then, studies performed on X-ray measurement techniques are presented. Some details about the calculation of uncertainties and correction factors are also mentioned. Finally, future research and development axes are exposed.

  3. Operation GREENHOUSE. Scientific Director's report. Annex 1. 1. Prompt-gamma-ray measurements. Part 4. Installation drawings. Nuclear explosions 1951

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, W.C.

    1984-10-31

    This report consists of drawings and tabular data pertinent to the various measurements performed in Operation GREENHOUSE. The drawings represent the plans for the cable installations, recorder stations, power and signal lines, and other equipment used in the measurement of prompt gamma rays, alpha, transit time, neutron intensity (Tenex), and thermal radiation.

  4. Planar near-field scanning for compact range bistatic radar cross-section measurement. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuhela-Reuning, S. R.; Walton, E. K.

    1991-01-01

    The design, construction, and testing of a low cost, planar scanning system to be used in a compact range environment for bistatic radar cross-section (bistatic RCS) measurement data are discussed. This scanning system is similar to structures used for measuring near-field antenna patterns. A synthetic aperture technique is used for plane wave reception. System testing entailed comparison of measured and theoretical bistatic RCS of a sphere and a right circular cylinder. Bistatic scattering analysis of the ogival target support, target and pedestal interactions, and compact range room was necessary to determine measurement validity.

  5. Absolute cross section for the reaction /sup 3/H(p,. gamma. /sub 0/)/sup 4/He and a review of /sup 4/He(. gamma. , p/sub 0/)/sup 3/H measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Calarco, J.R.; Hanna, S.S.; Chang, C.C.; Diener, E.M.; Kuhlmann, E.; Fisher, G.A.

    1983-08-01

    Accurate differential cross sections have been measured at 90/sup 0/ for the reaction /sup 3/H(p,..gamma..)/sup 4/He at E/sub p/ = 8.34 and 13.6 MeV. Previously published results for both /sup 3/H(p,..gamma..)/sup 4/He and /sup 4/He(..gamma..,p)/sup 3/H are reviewed and compared with the present data. The theoretical implications of the results are briefly discussed.

  6. Polyethylene-reflected plutonium metal sphere : subcritical neutron and gamma measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattingly, John K.

    2009-11-01

    Numerous benchmark measurements have been performed to enable developers of neutron transport models and codes to evaluate the accuracy of their calculations. In particular, for criticality safety applications, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiment Program (ICSBEP) annually publishes a handbook of critical and subcritical benchmarks. Relatively fewer benchmark measurements have been performed to validate photon transport models and codes, and unlike the ICSBEP, there is no program dedicated to the evaluation and publication of photon benchmarks. Even fewer coupled neutron-photon benchmarks have been performed. This report documents a coupled neutron-photon benchmark for plutonium metal reflected by polyethylene. A 4.5-kg sphere of ?-phase, weapons-grade plutonium metal was measured in six reflected configurations: (1) Bare; (2) Reflected by 0.5 inch of high density polyethylene (HDPE); (3) Reflected by 1.0 inch of HDPE; (4) Reflected by 1.5 inches of HDPE; (5) Reflected by 3.0 inches of HDPE; and (6) Reflected by 6.0 inches of HDPE. Neutron and photon emissions from the plutonium sphere were measured using three instruments: (1) A gross neutron counter; (2) A neutron multiplicity counter; and (3) A high-resolution gamma spectrometer. This report documents the experimental conditions and results in detail sufficient to permit developers of radiation transport models and codes to construct models of the experiments and to compare their calculations to the measurements. All of the data acquired during this series of experiments are available upon request.

  7. Determining the radon exhalation rate from a gold mine tailings dump by measuring the gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Ongori, Joash N; Lindsay, Robert; Newman, Richard T; Maleka, Peane P

    2015-02-01

    The mining activities taking place in Gauteng province, South Africa have caused millions of tons of rocks to be taken from underground to be milled and processed to extract gold. The uranium bearing tailings are placed in an estimated 250 dumps covering a total area of about 7000 ha. These tailings dumps contain considerable amounts of radium and have therefore been identified as large sources of radon. The size of these dumps make traditional radon exhalation measurements time consuming and it is difficult to get representative measurements for the whole dump. In this work radon exhalation measurements from the non-operational Kloof mine dump have been performed by measuring the gamma radiation from the dump fairly accurately over an area of more than 1 km(2). Radon exhalation from the mine dump have been inferred from this by laboratory-based and in-situ gamma measurements. Thirty four soil samples were collected at depths of 30 cm and 50 cm. The weighted average activity concentrations in the soil samples were 308 ± 7 Bq kg(-1), 255 ± 5 Bq kg(-1) and 18 ± 1 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U, (40)K and (232)Th, respectively. The MEDUSA (Multi-Element Detector for Underwater Sediment Activity) γ-ray detection system was used for field measurements. The radium concentrations were then used with soil parameters to obtain the radon flux using different approaches such as the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) formula. Another technique the MEDUSA Laboratory Technique (MELT) was developed to map radon exhalation based on (1) recognising that radon exhalation does not affect (40)K and (232)Th activity concentrations and (2) that the ratio of the activity concentration of the field (MEDUSA) to the laboratory (HPGe) for (238)U and (40)K or (238)U and (232)Th will give a measure of the radon exhalation at a particular location in the dump. The average, normalised radon flux was found to be 0.12 ± 0.02 Bq m(-2) s(-1) for the mine dump.

  8. Measuring Fracture Properties of Meteorites: 3D Scans and Disruption Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotto-Figueroa, Desireé; Asphaug, Erik; Morris, Melissa A.; Garvie, Laurence

    2014-11-01

    The Arizona State University (ASU) Center for Meteorite Studies (CMS) houses over 30,000 specimens that represent almost every known meteorite type. A number of these are available for fragmentation experiments in small samples, but in most cases non-destructive experiments are desired in order to determine the fundamental mechanical properties of meteorites, and by extension, the Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and other planetary bodies they derive from. We present results from an ongoing suite of measurements and experiments, featuring automated 3D topographic scans of a comprehensive suite of meteorites in the CMS collection, basic mechanical studies, and culminating in catastrophic fragmentation of four representative meteorites: Tamdakht (H5), Allende (CV3), Northwest Africa 869 (L3-6) and Chelyabinsk (LL5). Results will include high-resolution 3D color-shape models of meteorites, including specimens such as the 349g oriented and fusion crusted Martian (shergottite) Tissint, and the delicately fusion crusted and oriented 131g Whetstone Mountains (H5) ordinary chondrite. The 3D color-shape models will allow us to obtain basic physical properties (such as volume to derive density) and to derive fractal dimensions of fractured surfaces. Fractal dimension is closely related to the internal structural heterogeneity and fragmentation of the material, to macroscopic optical properties, and to rubble friction and cohesion. Freshly fractured surfaces of fragments that will result from catastrophic hypervelocity impact experiments will be subsequently scanned and analyzed in order to determine whether fractal dimension is preserved or if it changes with surface maturation.

  9. Ocular torsion measured by TV- and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy during horizontal pursuit in humans and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ott, D; Eckmiller, R

    1989-12-01

    Ocular torsion during horizontal foveal pursuit and fixation was measured in five human subjects and two trained monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) by direct analysis of the ocular fundus rotation. In the monkeys the fundus images of either eye were generated with a TV-ophthalmoscope while the contralateral eye pursued an 8' visual target moving sinusoidally (0.3-0.9 Hz, +/- 5 degrees) in the horizontal plane. In the humans a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) generated the fundus image of the ipsilateral eye, which pursued the visual target (same parameters as in the monkeys) mixed electronically into the laser scan raster. The image sequences were stored on videotape and subjected to a frame-by-frame rotation analysis. In both the humans and the monkeys, torsion (fundus rotation about the visual axis) sinusoidally modulated (up to 8 degrees peak-to-peak) during foveal pursuit, approximately in phase with horizontal eye position. Intorsion (nasal movement of the upper eye pole) or extorsion was found during pursuit in the temporal or nasal direction. Torsion showed considerable intra-individual fluctuation and interindividual variability with regard to phase and modulation depth relative to the pursuit movements, and was interspersed with irregularly occurring rapid deflections. Torsion of the conjugate, nonpursing eye was similar to torsion of the pursuing eye. In contrast, torsion during fixation was only loosely correlated with horizontal eye position. Slow torsional drifts and large, rapid deflections (up to 6 degrees) occurred in either direction at a given fixation point in the horizontal plane. We conclude that ocular torsion during horizontal pursuit in primates is actively generated by a separate, neural oculomotor subsystem.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Direct measurement of the nonlinear refractive-index coefficient gamma at 355 nm in fused silica and in BK-10 glass.

    PubMed

    Iii, W T; Smith, W L; Milam, D

    1984-01-01

    We have measured the nonlinear refractive-index coefficient gamma interferometrically at 355 nm in fused silica and in BK-10, a borosilicate crown glass. These measurements are the first reported direct ultraviolet measurements of the nonlinear index of refraction in any transparent glass. Our results are gamma = (2.5 +/- 1.2) x 10(-16) cm(2)/W and gamma = (1.7 +/- 0.8) x 10(-16) cm(2)/W, respectively, for fused silica and BK-10.

  11. Gamma-emitting radionuclide measurements at the US geological survey national water quality laboratory, Denver, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    In, Che Yang; Ambats, E.

    1982-01-01

    Like sediment samples from Scofield Resevior in Utah were analyzed for 210Pb by the gamma-ray spectrometric method. The top 10 cm of surface sediment yielded excess 210Pb activity (excluding in situ 226Ra supported 210Pb) of 1.05 pCi/g dry weight and decreased to 0.25 pCi/g at a depth of 25 cm. Based on these data, sedimentation rate was approximately 0.49 cm/y for a total of 30 cm of lake sediment and a lake history of approximately 60 y. An alternative method of 210Pb measurements using wet chemical procedures followed by beta counting gave equivalent results. ?? 1982.

  12. A cosmic gamma ray burst measured by Apollo 16. [and correlated to Vela 6A data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, J. L.; Arnold, J. R.; Metzger, A. E.; Parker, R. H.; Gilman, D. A.; Trombka, J. I.; Peterson, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    A cosmic gamma ray burst at about 1058:21 UT on April 27, 1972, was detected with an omnidirectional scintillation counter on Apollo 16. The event whose energy was approximately 0.0002 erg/sq cm, was pulse height analyzed in 512 channels over the 0.067 less than or equal to E less than or equal to 5 MeV range, and shows a complex, multipeak structure on a 300 msec time scale. The burst was also measured by a collimated X-ray detector on Apollo 16, giving spectral data in the 2 to 8 keV range which, together with a simultaneous observation by Vela 6A, allows a directional determination.

  13. A review of the nationwide proficiency test on natural radioactivity measurements by gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Şahin, N K; Yeltepe, E; Yücel, Ü

    2016-03-01

    This study is the review of the first proficiency test on radioactivity measurement organized in Turkey by Sarayköy Nuclear Research and Training Center (SANAEM) of Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEK) in 2013. The objective of the test was to determine (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K activity concentrations in natural soil samples using gamma-ray spectrometry. The bulk material consisting of uranium- and thorium-rich soil and sand was milled, mixed thoroughly and sieved. Homogeneity of the final mix was tested with 6 randomly taken samples. 16 proficiency test samples were distributed to 16 participating laboratories. 12 laboratories reported results. The results were evaluated on the accuracy and precision criteria adopted by the IAEA Proficiency Testing Group. The percentage of acceptable scores was 49%. Some recommendations have been provided to the laboratories to improve the quality of their results. It is planned to extend these proficiency tests periodically for various radionuclides in various matrices.

  14. Low Level Gamma Spectroscopy Measurements of Radium and Cesium in Lucerne (Medicago Sativa)

    SciTech Connect

    Fokapic, S.; Bikit, I.; Mrda, D.; Veskovic, M.; Slivka, J.; Mihaljev, Z.; Cupic, Z.

    2007-04-23

    Nineteen years after Chernobyl nuclear accident, activity concentration of 137Cs still could be detected in food and soil samples in Central and Eastern Europe. In this paper radiation levels of radium and cesium in Lucerne will be presented. It is a perennial plant with a deep root system and it is widely grown throughout the world as forage for cattle. The samples of Lucerne were taken from twelve different locations in Vojvodina in the summer period July-September 2004. The samples were specially dried on the air and after that ground, powdered and mineralized by method of dry burning on the temperature of 450 deg. C. Gamma spectrometry measurements of the ash were performed by means of actively shielded germanium detector with maximal background reduction. For cesium 137Cs 10 mBq/kg order of magnitude detection limits were achieved.

  15. Low Level Gamma Spectroscopy Measurements of Radium and Cesium in Lucerne (Medicago Sativa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokapić, S.; Bikit, I.; Mrđa, D.; Vesković, M.; Slivka, J.; Mihaljev, Ž.; Ćupić, Ž.

    2007-04-01

    Nineteen years after Chernobyl nuclear accident, activity concentration of 137Cs still could be detected in food and soil samples in Central and Eastern Europe. In this paper radiation levels of radium and cesium in Lucerne will be presented. It is a perennial plant with a deep root system and it is widely grown throughout the world as forage for cattle. The samples of Lucerne were taken from twelve different locations in Vojvodina in the summer period July-September 2004. The samples were specially dried on the air and after that ground, powdered and mineralized by method of dry burning on the temperature of 450°C. Gamma spectrometry measurements of the ash were performed by means of actively shielded germanium detector with maximal background reduction. For cesium 137Cs 10 mBq/kg order of magnitude detection limits were achieved.

  16. Discrimination between normal and glaucomatous eyes with visual field and scanning laser polarimetry measurements

    PubMed Central

    Lauande-Pimentel, R.; Carvalho, R.; Oliveira, H.; Goncalves, D.; Silva, L.; Costa, V.

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To evaluate the ability of structural parameters (as determined by retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) measurements obtained with the scanning laser polarimeter (SLP-NFA/GDx)) and functional parameters (as determined by automated perimetry) to discriminate between normal and glaucomatous eyes.
METHODS—In a case-control study, a total of 91 normal subjects and 94 patients with glaucoma underwent automated perimetry and RNFL measurements obtained with the SLP. Three independent scans of each eye were obtained and a mean image was created and used for further analysis. Only one eye per individual was randomly included in the study. The sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of 12 RNFL parameters were calculated according to the SLP internal normative database. The Se and Sp of the visual field (VF) global indices and the glaucoma hemifield test (GHT) were also calculated according to the instrument's normative database. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves were built for each SLP parameter and VF index. Fisher's linear discriminant formulas (LDFs) were developed for VF indices (VF LDF), SLP measurements (SLP LDF), and both examinations (combined LDF).
RESULTS—According to the SLP internal database, the parameters with better Se and Sp were: superior/nasal ratio (Se = 58.5%; Sp = 86.8%), and GDx the number (Se = 43.3%; Sp = 96.7%). The construction of an ROC curve for the number resulted in Se = 84% and Sp = 79%. The creation of LDFs improved both the sensitivities and specificities when compared with isolated parameters SLP LDF (Se = 90.4%; Sp = 82.4%), VF LDF (Se = 89.4%; Sp = 89.0%), and combined LDF (Se = 93.0%; Sp = 90.1%). The sensitivity to diagnose early and moderate glaucomatous damage observed with the GHT was lower than that obtained with the number (p<0.01).
CONCLUSIONS—Creation of LDFs enhanced the Se and Sp for both VF and SLP. Integration of SLP and VF in a combined LDF reached the highest Se/Sp relation

  17. Measuring the temperature dependent thermal diffusivity of geomaterials using high-speed differential scanning calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Aulock, Felix W.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Vasseur, Jeremie; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Heat diffusion in the Earth's crust is critical to fundamental geological processes, such as the cooling of magma, heat dissipation during and following transient heating events (e.g. during frictional heating along faults), and to the timescales of contact metamorphosis. The complex composition and multiphase nature of geomaterials prohibits the accurate modeling of thermal diffusivities and measurements over a range of temperatures are sparse due to the specialized nature of the equipment and lack of instrument availability. We present a novel method to measure the thermal diffusivity of geomaterials such as minerals and rocks with high precision and accuracy using a commercially available differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). A DSC 404 F1 Pegasus® equipped with a Netzsch high-speed furnace was used to apply a step-heating program to corundum single crystal standards of varying thicknesses. The standards were cylindrical discs of 0.25-1 mm thickness with 5.2-6 mm diameter. Heating between each 50 °C temperature interval was conducted at a rate of 100 °C/min over the temperature range 150-1050 °C. Such large heating rates induces temperature disequilibrium in the samples used. However, isothermal segments of 2 minutes were used during which the temperature variably equilibrated with the furnace between the heating segments and thus the directly-measured heat-flow relaxed to a constant value before the next heating step was applied. A finite-difference 2D conductive heat transfer model was used in cylindrical geometry for which the measured furnace temperature was directly applied as the boundary condition on the sample-cylinder surfaces. The model temperature was averaged over the sample volume per unit time and converted to heat-flow using the well constrained thermal properties for corundum single crystals. By adjusting the thermal diffusivity in the model solution and comparing the resultant heat-flow with the measured values, we obtain a model

  18. Measurements of environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in three mountainous locations in the western region of Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ghorabie, Fayez H.H. . E-mail: alghorabie_f@hotmail.com

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes measurements of external gamma radiation dose rate from terrestrial gamma-rays 1 m above the ground in three different mountainous locations in the western region of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. These locations are At-Taif city, Al-Hada village, and Ash-Shafa village. CaSO{sub 4}:Dy (TLD-900) thermoluminescent dosimeters were used for the detection of terrestrial gamma radiation at 40 different places in the three locations. The values of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate measured ranged between 14 and 279 nGy h{sup -1} for the time interval from June 2001 to June 2002. The measured dose rate varied with the season of the year. The average gamma radiation dose rates were 468, 541, and 781 {mu}Gy y{sup -1} for At-Taif city, Al-Hada village, and Ash-Shafa village, respectively. The corresponding average absorbed doses to the population of the three locations were 328, 379, and 547 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}, respectively. The quality factor of 0.7 Sv Gy{sup -1} was applied in the calculations of the absorbed dose to humans.

  19. Measurement of uranium series radionuclides in rock and groundwater at the Koongarra ore deposit, Australia, by gamma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yanase, Nobuyuki; Sekine, Keiichi

    1995-12-31

    Gamma spectrometry without any self-absorption correction was developed to measure low energy gamma rays emitted by uranium and actinium series radionuclides in rock samples and groundwater residues collected at the Koongarra ore deposit, Australia. Thin samples were prepared to minimize the self-absorption by uranium in the samples. The present method gave standard deviations of 0.9 to 18% for the measurements of concentrations of uranium and actinium series radionuclides. The concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 230}Th and {sup 235}U measured by gamma spectrometry were compared with those by alpha spectrometry that requires a complicated chemical separation procedure. The results obtained by both methods were in fairly good agreement, and it was found that the gamma spectrometry is applicable to rock and groundwater samples having uranium content sup to 8.1% (10{sup 3} B1/g) and 3 Bq/l of {sup 238}U, respectively. The detection limits were calculated to be of the order of 10{sup {minus}2} Bq/g for rock samples and 10{sup {minus}1} Bq/l for groundwater samples. The concentrations of uranium and actinium series radionuclides can be determined precisely in these samples using gamma spectrometry without any self-absorption correction.

  20. SU-E-T-542: Measurement of Internal Neutrons for Uniform Scanning Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, M; Ahmad, S; Zheng, Y; Rana, S; Collums, T; Monsoon, J; Benton, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In proton radiotherapy, the production of neutrons is a wellknown problem since neutron exposure can lead to increased risk of secondary cancers later in the patient’s lifetime. The assessment of neutron exposure is, therefore, important for the overall quality of proton radiotherapy. This study investigates the secondary neutrons created inside the patient from uniform scanning proton beams. Methods: Dose equivalent due to secondary neutrons was measured outside the primary field as a function of distance from beam isocenter at three different angles, 45, 90 and 135 degree, relative to beam axis. Plastic track nuclear detector (CR-39 PNTD) was used for the measurement of neutron dose. Two experimental configurations, in-air and cylindrical-phantom, were designed. In a cylindrical-phantom configuration, a cylindrical phantom of 5.5 cm diameter and 35 cm long was placed along the beam direction and in an in-air configuration, no phantom was used. All the detectors were placed at nearly identical locations in both configurations. Three proton beams of range 5 cm, 18 cm, and 32 cm with 4 cm modulation width and a 5 cm diameter aperture were used. The contribution from internal neutrons was estimated from the differences in measured dose equivalent between in-air and cylindrical-phantom configurations at respective locations. Results: The measured ratio of neutron dose equivalent to the primary proton dose (H/D) dropped off with distance and ranged from 27 to 0.3 mSv/Gy. The contribution of internal neutrons near the treatment field edge was found to be up to 64 % of the total neutron exposure. As the distance from the field edge became larger, the external neutrons from the nozzle appear to dominate and the internal neutrons became less prominent. Conclusion: This study suggests that the contribution of internal neutrons could be significant to the total neutron dose equivalent.

  1. Dual wavelength fluorescent ratiometric pH measurement by scanning near-field optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongbo; Shinohara, Ryosuke; Iwami, Kentaro; Ohta, Yoshihiro; Umeda, Norihiro

    2010-08-01

    A novel method to observe pH distribution by dual wavelength fluorescent ratiometric pH measurement by scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) is developed. In this method, in order to investigate not only the pH of mitochondrial membrane but also its distribution in the vicinity, a pH sensitive fluorescent reagent covers mitochondria instead of injecting it to mitochondria. This method utilizes a dual-emission pH sensitive dye and SNOM with a themally-pulled and metal-coated optical fiber to improve the spatial resolution. Time-dependence of Fluorescent intensity ratio (FIR) under acid addition is investigated. As the distances between the dropped point and the SNOM probe becomes closer, the time when FIR changes becomes earlier. The response of mitochondria under supplement of nutrition is studied by using this method. While the probe is near to mitochondria, the ratio quickly becomes to increase. In conclusion, it was confirmed that the temporal variation of pH can be detected by this method, and pH distribution in the vicinity of mitochondria is able to be measured by this method.

  2. Accuracy Assessments of Cloud Droplet Size Retrievals from Polarized Reflectance Measurements by the Research Scanning Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail Dmitrievic; Cairns, Brian; Emde, Claudia; Ackerman, Andrew S.; vanDiedenhove, Bastiaan

    2012-01-01

    We present an algorithm for the retrieval of cloud droplet size distribution parameters (effective radius and variance) from the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) measurements. The RSP is an airborne prototype for the Aerosol Polarimetery Sensor (APS), which was on-board of the NASA Glory satellite. This instrument measures both polarized and total reflectance in 9 spectral channels with central wavelengths ranging from 410 to 2260 nm. The cloud droplet size retrievals use the polarized reflectance in the scattering angle range between 135deg and 165deg, where they exhibit the sharply defined structure known as the rain- or cloud-bow. The shape of the rainbow is determined mainly by the single scattering properties of cloud particles. This significantly simplifies both forward modeling and inversions, while also substantially reducing uncertainties caused by the aerosol loading and possible presence of undetected clouds nearby. In this study we present the accuracy evaluation of our algorithm based on the results of sensitivity tests performed using realistic simulated cloud radiation fields.

  3. A broad supersaturation scanning (BS2) approach for rapid measurement of aerosol particle hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, H.; Cheng, Y.; Ma, N.; Wang, Z.; Wang, X.; Pöhlker, M.; Nillius, B.; Wiedensohler, A.; Pöschl, U.

    2015-09-01

    The activation and hygroscopicity of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are key to understand aerosol-cloud interactions and their climate impact. It can be measured by scanning the particle size and supersaturation in CCN measurements. The scanning of supersaturation is often time-consuming and limits the temporal resolution and performance of CCN measurements. Here we present a new approach, termed broad supersaturation scanning (BS2) method, in which a range of supersaturation is simultaneously scanned reducing the time interval between different supersaturation scans. The practical applicability of the BS2 approach is demonstrated with nano-CCN measurements of laboratory-generated aerosol particles. Model simulations show that the BS2 approach is also applicable for measuring CCN activation of ambient mixed particles. Due to its fast response and technical simplicity, the BS2 approach may be well suited for long-term measurements. Since hygroscopicity is closely related to the fraction of organics/inorganics in aerosol particles, a BS2-CCN counter can also serve as a complementary sensor for fast detection/estimation of aerosol chemical compositions.

  4. A broad supersaturation scanning (BS2) approach for rapid measurement of aerosol particle hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hang; Cheng, Yafang; Ma, Nan; Wang, Zhibin; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Pöhlker, Mira L.; Nillius, Björn; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    The activation and hygroscopicity of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are key to the understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions and their impact on climate. They can be measured by scanning the particle size and supersaturation in CCN measurements. The scanning of supersaturation is often time-consuming and limits the temporal resolution and performance of CCN measurements. Here we present a new approach, termed the broad supersaturation scanning (BS2) method, in which a range of supersaturation is simultaneously scanned, reducing the time interval between different supersaturation scans. The practical applicability of the BS2 approach is demonstrated with nano-CCN measurements of laboratory-generated aerosol particles. Model simulations show that the BS2 approach may also be applicable for measuring CCN activation of ambient mixed particles. Due to its fast response and technical simplicity, the BS2 approach may be well suited for aircraft and long-term measurements. Since hygroscopicity is closely related to the fraction of organics/inorganics in aerosol particles, a BS2-CCN counter can also serve as a complementary sensor for fast detection/estimation of aerosol chemical compositions.

  5. First results of electron temperature measurements by the use of multi-pass Thomson scattering system in GAMMA 10

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, M. Nagasu, K.; Shimamura, Y.; Shima, Y.; Kohagura, J.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakashima, Y.; Imai, T.; Ichimura, M.; Yasuhara, R.; Yamada, I.; Funaba, H.; Kawahata, K.; Minami, T.

    2014-11-15

    A multi-pass Thomson scattering (TS) has the advantage of enhancing scattered signals. We constructed a multi-pass TS system for a polarisation-based system and an image relaying system modelled on the GAMMA 10 TS system. We undertook Raman scattering experiments both for the multi-pass setting and for checking the optical components. Moreover, we applied the system to the electron temperature measurements in the GAMMA 10 plasma for the first time. The integrated scattering signal was magnified by approximately three times by using the multi-pass TS system with four passes. The electron temperature measurement accuracy is improved by using this multi-pass system.

  6. Uncertainty of gamma-ray spectrometry measurement of environmental samples due to uncertainties in matrix composition, density and sample geometry.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, S; Jakobi, A; Wilhelm, Chr

    2014-12-01

    This paper is intended to identify the uncertainties of activities in environmental samples measured with gamma-ray spectrometry that result from uncertainties in matrix composition, density and geometrical dimensions of the sample. For that purpose efficiencies were calculated for a wide range of environmental matrices such as fresh and ashed food samples, water samples and soil samples. Compositions were mainly taken from literature. Densities and geometry parameters were varied in a range occurring in practice. Considered energies cover a range from 46.5keV to 2000keV. Finally, a couple of recommendations in respect to gamma-ray spectrometric measurements of environmental samples are given.

  7. First results of electron temperature measurements by the use of multi-pass Thomson scattering system in GAMMA 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, M.; Yasuhara, R.; Nagasu, K.; Shimamura, Y.; Shima, Y.; Kohagura, J.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakashima, Y.; Imai, T.; Ichimura, M.; Yamada, I.; Funaba, H.; Kawahata, K.; Minami, T.

    2014-11-01

    A multi-pass Thomson scattering (TS) has the advantage of enhancing scattered signals. We constructed a multi-pass TS system for a polarisation-based system and an image relaying system modelled on the GAMMA 10 TS system. We undertook Raman scattering experiments both for the multi-pass setting and for checking the optical components. Moreover, we applied the system to the electron temperature measurements in the GAMMA 10 plasma for the first time. The integrated scattering signal was magnified by approximately three times by using the multi-pass TS system with four passes. The electron temperature measurement accuracy is improved by using this multi-pass system.

  8. Analysis of classical guitars' vibrational behavior based on scanning laser vibrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowska, Marzena

    2012-06-01

    One of the main goals in musical acoustics research is to link measurable, physical properties of a musical instrument with subjective assessments of its tone quality. The aim of the research discussed in this paper was to observe the structural vibrations of different class classical guitars in relation to their quality. This work focuses on mid-low-and low-class classical (nylon-stringed) guitars. The main source of guitar body vibrations come from top and back plate vibrations therefore these were the objects of structural mode measurements and analysis. Sixteen classical guitars have been investigated, nine with cedar and seven with spruce top plate. Structural modes of top and back plates have been measured with the aid of a scanning laser vibrometer and the instruments were excited with a chirp signal transferred by bone vibrator. The issues related to excitor selection have been discussed. Correlation and descriptive statistics of top and back plates measurement results have been investigated in relation to guitar quality. The frequency range of 300 Hz to 5 kHz as well as selected narrowed frequency bands have been analyzed for cedar and spruce guitars. Furthermore, the influence of top plate wood type on vibration characteristics have been observed on three pairs of guitars. The instruments were of the same model but different top plate material. Determination and visualization of both guitar plates' modal patterns in relation to frequency are a significant attainment of the research. Scanning laser vibrometer measurements allow particular mode observation and therefore mode identification, as opposed to sound pressure response measurements. When correlating vibration characteristics of top and back plates it appears that Pearson productmoment correlation coefficient is not a parameter that associates with guitar quality. However, for best instruments with cedar top, top-back correlation coefficient has relatively greater value in 1-2 kHz band and lower in

  9. Adaptive probe trajectory scanning probe microscopy for multiresolution measurements of interface geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, Oleg S.; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2009-01-01

    An adaptive scanning method in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is developed for studies of surfaces with a highly-non-uniform information density such as nanowires or interfaces in disordered media. In path-engineered SPM, the surface is pre-scanned to locate features, and a secondary scan is acquired with the pixel density concentrated in the vicinity of the objects of interest. Here, we demonstrate this approach for piezoresponse force microscopy, and develop approaches for fractal and self-affine characterization of domain interfaces. The relationship between the variational roughness, structure factor, and correlation functions is established and resolution effects on these parameters are determined

  10. Normalization of CT scans reconstructed with different kernels to reduce variability in emphysema measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo Estrella, L.; van Ginneken, B.; va