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Sample records for gamma system regulates

  1. Dictyostelium possesses highly diverged presenilin/gamma-secretase that regulates growth and cell-fate specification and can accurately process human APP: a system for functional studies of the presenilin/gamma-secretase complex.

    PubMed

    McMains, Vanessa C; Myre, Michael; Kreppel, Lisa; Kimmel, Alan R

    2010-01-01

    Presenilin (PS) is the catalytic moiety of the gamma-secretase complex. PS and other gamma-secretase components are well conserved among metazoa, but their presence and function in more-distant species are not resolved. Because inappropriate gamma-secretase processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in humans is associated with familial Alzheimer's disease, understanding essential elements within each gamma-secretase component is crucial to functional studies. Diverged proteins have been identified in primitive plants but experiments have failed to demonstrate gamma-secretase activity. We have identified highly diverged orthologs for each gamma-secretase component in the ancient eukaryote Dictyostelium, which lacks equivalents of APP, Notch and other characterized PS/gamma-secretase substrates. We show that wild-type (WT) Dictyostelium is capable of amyloidogenic processing of ectopically expressed human APP to generate amyloid-beta peptides Abeta(40) and Abeta(42); strains deficient in gamma-secretase cannot produce Abeta peptides but accumulate processed intermediates of APP that co-migrate with the C-terminal fragments alpha- and beta-CTF of APP that are found in mammalian cells. We further demonstrate that Dictyostelium requires PS for phagocytosis and cell-fate specification in a cell-autonomous manner, and show that regulation of phagocytosis requires an active gamma-secretase, a pathway suggested, but not proven, to occur in mammalian and Drosophila cells. Our results indicate that PS signaling is an ancient process that arose prior to metazoan radiation, perhaps independently of Notch. Dictyostelium might serve to identify novel PS/gamma-secretase signaling targets and provide a unique system for high-throughput screening of small-molecule libraries to select new therapeutic targets for diseases associated with this pathway. PMID:20699477

  2. Interferon-gamma regulates nucleoside transport systems in macrophages through signal transduction and activator of transduction factor 1 (STAT1)-dependent and -independent signalling pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Concepció; Felipe, Antonio; García-Manteiga, José; Serra, Maria; Guillén-Gómez, Elena; Casado, F Javier; MacLeod, Carol; Modolell, Manuel; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal; Celada, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    The expressions of CNT and ENT (concentrative and equilibrative nucleoside transporters) in macrophages are differentially regulated by IFN-gamma (interferon-gamma). This cytokine controls gene expression through STAT1-dependent and/or -independent pathways (where STAT1 stands for signal transduction and activator of transcription 1). In the present study, the role of STAT1 in the response of nucleoside transporters to IFN-gamma was studied using macrophages from STAT1 knockout mice. IFN-gamma triggered an inhibition of ENT1-related nucleoside transport activity through STAT1-dependent mechanisms. Such inhibition of macrophage growth and ENT1 activity by IFN-gamma is required for DNA synthesis. Interestingly, IFN-gamma led to an induction of the CNT1- and CNT2-related nucleoside transport activities independent of STAT1, thus ensuring the supply of extracellular nucleosides for the STAT1-independent RNA synthesis. IFN-gamma up-regulated CNT2 mRNA and CNT1 protein levels and down-regulated ENT1 mRNA in both wild-type and STAT1 knockout macrophages. This is consistent with a STAT1-independent, long-term-mediated, probably transcription-dependent, regulation of nucleoside transporter genes. Moreover, STAT1-dependent post-transcriptional mechanisms are implicated in the regulation of ENT1 activity. Although nitric oxide is involved in the regulation of ENT1 activity in B-cells at a post-transcriptional level, our results show that STAT1-dependent induction of nitric oxide by IFN-gamma is not implicated in the regulation of ENT1 activity in macrophages. Our results indicate that both STAT1-dependent and -independent pathways are involved in the regulation of nucleoside transporters by IFN-gamma in macrophages. PMID:12868960

  3. Regulation of PPAR{gamma} function by TNF-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Jianping

    2008-09-26

    The nuclear receptor PPAR{gamma} is a lipid sensor that regulates lipid metabolism through gene transcription. Inhibition of PPAR{gamma} activity by TNF-{alpha} is involved in pathogenesis of insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and cancer cachexia. PPAR{gamma} activity is regulated by TNF-{alpha} at pre-translational and post-translational levels. Activation of serine kinases including IKK, ERK, JNK, and p38 may be involved in the TNF-regulation of PPAR{gamma}. Of the four kinases, IKK is a dominant signaling molecule in the TNF-regulation of PPAR{gamma}. IKK acts through at least two mechanisms: inhibition of PPAR{gamma} expression and activation of PPAR{gamma} corepressor. In this review article, literature is reviewed with a focus on the mechanisms of PPAR{gamma} inhibition by TNF-{alpha}.

  4. PPAR{gamma} regulates the expression of cholesterol metabolism genes in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Anna D.; Malur, Anagha; Barna, Barbara P.; Kavuru, Mani S.; Malur, Achut G.; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2010-03-19

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) is a nuclear transcription factor involved in lipid metabolism that is constitutively expressed in the alveolar macrophages of healthy individuals. PPAR{gamma} has recently been implicated in the catabolism of surfactant by alveolar macrophages, specifically the cholesterol component of surfactant while the mechanism remains unclear. Studies from other tissue macrophages have shown that PPAR{gamma} regulates cholesterol influx, efflux, and metabolism. PPAR{gamma} promotes cholesterol efflux through the liver X receptor-alpha (LXR{alpha}) and ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1). We have recently shown that macrophage-specific PPAR{gamma} knockout (PPAR{gamma} KO) mice accumulate cholesterol-laden alveolar macrophages that exhibit decreased expression of LXR{alpha} and ABCG1 and reduced cholesterol efflux. We hypothesized that in addition to the dysregulation of these cholesterol efflux genes, the expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis and influx was also dysregulated and that replacement of PPAR{gamma} would restore regulation of these genes. To investigate this hypothesis, we have utilized a Lentivirus expression system (Lenti-PPAR{gamma}) to restore PPAR{gamma} expression in the alveolar macrophages of PPAR{gamma} KO mice. Our results show that the alveolar macrophages of PPAR{gamma} KO mice have decreased expression of key cholesterol synthesis genes and increased expression of cholesterol receptors CD36 and scavenger receptor A-I (SRA-I). The replacement of PPAR{gamma} (1) induced transcription of LXR{alpha} and ABCG1; (2) corrected suppressed expression of cholesterol synthesis genes; and (3) enhanced the expression of scavenger receptors CD36. These results suggest that PPAR{gamma} regulates cholesterol metabolism in alveolar macrophages.

  5. Portable compton gamma-ray detection system

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Oldaker, Mark E.

    2008-03-04

    A Compton scattered gamma-ray detector system. The system comprises a gamma-ray spectrometer and an annular array of individual scintillators. The scintillators are positioned so that they are arrayed around the gamma-ray spectrometer. The annular array of individual scintillators includes a first scintillator. A radiation shield is positioned around the first scintillator. A multi-channel analyzer is operatively connected to the gamma-ray spectrometer and the annular array of individual scintillators.

  6. Structure and regulation of the murine gamma-casein gene.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Andreas F

    2002-12-12

    The murine casein locus consists of five genes, which are coordinately regulated during mammary development. The levels of casein-specific mRNAs in mammary epithelial cells increase during the second half of pregnancy and remain high during lactation. The murine gamma-casein gene, which corresponds to the alphaS2-casein gene in ruminants, was isolated from a mouse bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library (strain 129SV). The gene contains 14 exons, which are distributed over 14 kb of DNA sequence. The expression pattern of the murine gamma-casein gene mimics that of the neighbouring beta-casein gene in terms of developmental induction in vivo. In cell culture, both the beta- and gamma-casein promoter are synergistically induced by prolactin and glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoid induction is critically dependent on prolactin-mediated activation of STAT5 in both promoters. Several consensus STAT5 binding sites were identified in the gamma-casein promoter, some of which may have an additive effect on prolactin induction. mRNA levels of gamma- and beta-casein are similar in lactating mammary tissue. However, promoter segments derived from the gamma-casein gene are significantly less active in cell culture than comparable fragments of the beta-casein promoter. Promoter hybrids between the gamma- and beta-casein promoters revealed that the critical sequences which are responsible for the different in vitro activity are located in a short promoter proximal region.

  7. Regulation of gamma-Secretase in Alzheimer's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Shuxia; Zhou, Hua; Walian, Peter; Jap, Bing

    2007-02-07

    The {gamma}-secretase complex is an intramembrane aspartyl protease that cleaves its substrates along their transmembrane regions. Sequential proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein by {beta}- and {gamma}-secretase produces amyloid {beta}-peptides, which are the major components of amyloid plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. The {gamma}-secretase complex is therefore believed to be critical in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Here we review the range of factors found to affect the nature and degree of {gamma}-secretase complex activity; these include {gamma}-secretase complex assembly and activation, the integral regulatory subunit CD147, transient or weak binding partners, the levels of cholesterol and sphingolipids in cell membranes, and inflammatory cytokines. Integrated knowledge of the molecular mechanisms supporting the actions of these factors is expected to lead to a comprehensive understanding of the functional regulation of the {gamma}-secretase complex, and this, in turn, should facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Gamma beam system at ELI-NP

    SciTech Connect

    Ur, Calin Alexandru

    2015-02-24

    The Gamma Beam System of ELI-NP will produce brilliant, quasi-monochromatic gamma-ray beams via Inverse Compton Scattering of short laser pulses on relativistic electron beam pulses. The scattered radiation is Doppler upshifted by more than 1,000,000 times and is forward focused in a narrow, polarized, tunable, laser-like beam. The gamma-ray beam at ELI-NP will be characterized by large spectral density of about 10{sup 4} photons/s/eV, narrow bandwidth (< 0.5%) and tunable energy from 200 keV up to about 20 MeV. The Gamma Beam System is a state-of-the-art equipment employing techniques and technologies at the limits of the present-day's knowledge.

  9. A Gamma Memory Neural Network for System Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motter, Mark A.; Principe, Jose C.

    1992-01-01

    A gamma neural network topology is investigated for a system identification application. A discrete gamma memory structure is used in the input layer, providing delayed values of both the control inputs and the network output to the input layer. The discrete gamma memory structure implements a tapped dispersive delay line, with the amount of dispersion regulated by a single, adaptable parameter. The network is trained using static back propagation, but captures significant features of the system dynamics. The system dynamics identified with the network are the Mach number dynamics of the 16 Foot Transonic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The training data spans an operating range of Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.3.

  10. Regulation of hepatic PPAR{gamma}2 and lipogenic gene expression by melanocortin

    SciTech Connect

    Poritsanos, Nicole J.; Wong, Davie; Vrontakis, Maria E.; Mizuno, Tooru M.

    2008-11-14

    The central melanocortin system regulates hepatic lipid metabolism. Hepatic lipogenic gene expression is regulated by transcription factors including sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c), carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}2 (PPAR{gamma}2). However, it is unclear if central melanocortin signaling regulates hepatic lipogenic gene expression through the activation of these transcription factors. To delineate the molecular mechanisms by which the melanocortin system regulates hepatic lipid metabolism, we examined the effect of intracerebroventricular injection of SHU9119, a melanocortin receptor antagonist, on hepatic expression levels of genes involved in lipid metabolism in mice. SHU9119 treatment increased hepatic triglyceride content and mRNA levels of lipogenic genes, SREBP-1c, and PPAR{gamma}2, whereas it did not cause any changes in hepatic ChREBP mRNA levels. These findings suggest that reduced central melanocortin signaling increases hepatic lipid deposition by stimulating hepatic lipogenic gene expression at least partly through the activation of SREBP-1c and PPAR{gamma}2.

  11. Gamma ray observations of the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Two general categories are discussed concerning the evolution of the solar system: the dualistic view, the planetesimal approach; and the monistic view, the nebular hypothesis. The major points of each view are given and the models that are developed from these views are described. Possible applications of gamma ray astronomical observations to the question of the dynamic evolution of the solar system are discussed.

  12. Gamma ray observations of the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Two general categories are discussed concerning the evolution of the solar system: the dualistic view, the planetesimal approach and the monistic view, the nebular hypothesis. The major points of each view are given and the models that are developed from these views are described. Possible applications of gamma ray astronomical observations to the question of the dynamic evolution of the solar system are discussed.

  13. Novel regulation of p38gamma by dopamine D2 receptors during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Conrad, P W; Millhorn, D E; Beitner-Johnson, D

    2000-07-01

    The p38 signalling pathway is part of the MAPK superfamily and is activated by various stressors. Our previous results have shown that two p38 isoforms, p38alpha and p38gamma, are activated by hypoxia in the neural-like PC12 cell line. PC12 cells also synthesize and secrete catecholamines, including dopamine, in response to hypoxia. We have now used this system to study the interaction between D2-dopamine receptor signalling and the p38 stress-activated protein kinases. Our results show that two D2 receptor antagonists, butaclamol and sulpiride, enhance hypoxia-induced phosphorylation of p38gamma, but not p38. This effect persists in protein kinase A (PKA)-deficient PC12 cells, demonstrating that p38gamma modulation by the D2 receptor is independent of the cAMP/PKA signalling system. We further show that removal of extracellular calcium blocks the hypoxia-induced increase in p38gamma activity. These results are the first to demonstrate that p38gamma can be regulated by the D2 receptor and calcium following hypoxic exposure. PMID:10989281

  14. Color gamma camera system for radiation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Zhiping; Deng, Jingkang; Wang, Yanfeng

    2000-11-01

    Radiation monitoring systems are desired in many places where radioactive materials are utilized. In this paper, a color gamma camera system developed in Tsinghua University (P.C. China) is reported. The system consist of a compact X - (gamma) ray detector system, a single hole collimator, the scanning mechanism and computer system. The MLEM method is implemented for image reconstruction, which enables one to generate images of high resolution with relatively big aperture. With the associated software, several scanning modes, which work with different speeds and resolutions, are provided and can be selected in the operations. In addition, the system can detect radioactive sources emitting rays of different energies and display them with color images. Experiments were made using Am-241 (59.5 KeV) and Na-22 (511 KeV) to test the performance of the system. The results are presented which show that the resolution of this system can be as high as 1.5 degrees. Furthermore, simulations using Matlab were made to examine the capability of imaging point sources with a small number of counts and imaging distributed sources. Promising results were obtained and are reported. Discussions about camera design and further improvements are given at the end.

  15. Gamma Band Activity in the Reticular Activating System

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Francisco J.; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James; Simon, Christen; Beck, Paige; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in three regions of the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the mechanisms behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms behind this ceiling effect have been recently elucidated. We describe recent findings showing that every cell in the PPN have high-threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential, while N-type calcium channels are permissive, to gamma band activity. Every cell in the Pf also showed that P/Q-type and N-type calcium channels are responsible for this activity. On the other hand, every SubCD cell exhibited sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep–wake control based on well-known transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. The data presented here on inherent gamma band activity demonstrates the global nature of sleep–wake oscillation that is orchestrated by brainstem–thalamic mechanism, and questions the undue importance given to the hypothalamus for regulation of sleep–wakefulness. The discovery of gamma band activity in the RAS follows recent reports of such activity in other subcortical regions like the hippocampus and cerebellum. We hypothesize that, rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as seen in the cortex, gamma band activity manifested in the RAS may help stabilize coherence related to arousal, providing a stable activation state during waking and paradoxical sleep. Most of our thoughts and actions are driven by pre-conscious processes. We speculate that continuous sensory input will induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the processes of

  16. Activation of PPAR{gamma} negatively regulates O-GlcNAcylation of Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sung Soo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Ho Seon; Choi, Hye Hun; Lee, Kyeong Won; Cho, Young Min; Lee, Hong Kyu; Park, Kyong Soo

    2008-08-08

    O-GlcNAcylation is a kind of post-translational modification and many nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins are O-GlcNAcylated. In this study, we demonstrated that thiazolidinediones (TZDs), which are used as insulin sensitizer, specifically inhibited the O-GlcNAcylation of Sp1 but did not affect the O-GlcNAcylation of the total proteins in cell culture systems and mouse models. This effect was mediated by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) activation and probably by synthesis of a specific protein induced by PPAR{gamma} activation. In addition, we demonstrated that the O-GlcNAcylation sites in the zinc-finger domain were involved in the transcriptional activation of Sp1 and that rosiglitazone, a member of TZDs, affected Sp1 transcriptional activity partially by regulating the O-GlcNAcylation level of these sites. Considering the role of hexosamine biosynthesis pathway in hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance and Sp1 in the hyperglycemia-induced gene expression, the regulation of Sp1 O-GlcNAcylation by TZDs may help to explain the function of TZDs as a treatment for insulin resistance and diabetes.

  17. Post-transcriptional regulation of macrophage ABCA1, an early response gene to IFN-{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Alfaro Leon, Martha Leticia; Evans, Glenn F.; Farmen, Mark W.; Zuckerman, Steven H. . E-mail: Zuckerman_Steven@Lilly.com

    2005-07-29

    Interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) down-regulates receptors associated with reverse cholesterol transport including ABCA1. In the present study, the kinetics and mechanism of ABCA1 down-regulation were determined in mouse peritoneal macrophages. IFN-{gamma} decreased ABCA1 mRNA 1 h following IFN-{gamma} addition and was maximally reduced by 3 h. Down-regulation was protein synthesis dependent and involved post-transcriptional processes. ABCA1 message had a T {sub 1/2} of 115 min in actinomycin treated cells that was reduced to a T {sub 1/2} of 37 min by IFN-{gamma}. The decrease in message stability was also associated with a rapid loss of ABCA1 protein, significant 3 h following IFN-{gamma} addition. The kinetics of ABCA1 message and protein decrease was consistent with the early IFN-{gamma}-induced changes in Stat1 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation observed in these cells. Therefore, ABCA1 can be considered as an early response gene to macrophage activation by IFN-{gamma} with down-regulation occurring by message destabilization.

  18. Regulation of Interferon Gamma Signaling by Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Joseph; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Wilson, Tenisha D.; Johnson, Howard M.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an indispensable role in the prevention of autoimmune disease, as interferon gamma (IFNγ) mediated, lethal auto-immunity occurs (in both mice and humans) in their absence. In addition, Tregs have been implicated in preventing the onset of autoimmune and auto-inflammatory conditions associated with aberrant IFNγ signaling such as type 1 diabetes, lupus, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediated endotoxemia. Notably, suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 deficient (SOCS1−/−) mice also succumb to a lethal auto-inflammatory disease, dominated by excessive IFNγ signaling and bearing similar disease course kinetics to Treg deficient mice. Moreover SOCS1 deficiency has been implicated in lupus progression, and increased susceptibility to LPS mediated endotoxemia. Although it has been established that Tregs and SOCS1 play a critical role in the regulation of IFNγ signaling, and the prevention of lethal auto-inflammatory disease, the role of Treg/SOCS1 cross-talk in the regulation of IFNγ signaling has been essentially unexplored. This is especially pertinent as recent publications have implicated a role of SOCS1 in the stability of peripheral Tregs. This review will examine the emerging research findings implicating a critical role of the intersection of the SOCS1 and Treg regulatory pathways in the control of IFN gamma signaling and immune system function. PMID:24391643

  19. Magnetostrictive Pressure Regulating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A. (Inventor); Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A magnetostrictive pressure regulating system includes a magnetostrictive valve that incorporates a magnetostrictive actuator with at least one current-carrying coil disposed thereabout. A pressure force sensor, in fluid communication with the fluid exiting the valve, includes (i) a magnetostrictive material, (ii) a magnetic field generator in proximity to the magnetostrictive material for inducing a magnetic field in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material wherein lines of magnetic flux passing through the magnetostrictive material are defined, and (iii) a sensor positioned adjacent to the magnetostrictive material and in the magnetic field for measuring changes in at least one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux. The pressure of the fluid exiting the valve causes the applied force. A controller coupled to the sensor and to the current-carrying coil adjusts a current supplied to the current-carrying coil based on the changes so-measured.

  20. VERITAS Observations of Gamma-ray Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, Jamie; VERITAS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray emitting binary systems constitute a small fraction of the high-energy catalogue, with only five objects confirmed to emit photons above 100 GeV. They comprise a compact object (black hole or neutron star) and a high-mass stellar companion, with gamma-ray emission arising as the result of particle acceleration within the system. The details of how and where this acceleration takes place, and the mechanisms which modulate the subsequent emission, remain unclear. We report here on recent observations of gamma-ray binary systems with the VERITAS observatory.

  1. A brain-computer interface based on self-regulation of gamma-oscillations in the superior parietal cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse-Wentrup, Moritz; Schölkopf, Bernhard

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems are often based on motor- and/or sensory processes that are known to be impaired in late stages of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We propose a novel BCI designed for patients in late stages of ALS that only requires high-level cognitive processes to transmit information from the user to the BCI. Approach. We trained subjects via EEG-based neurofeedback to self-regulate the amplitude of gamma-oscillations in the superior parietal cortex (SPC). We argue that parietal gamma-oscillations are likely to be associated with high-level attentional processes, thereby providing a communication channel that does not rely on the integrity of sensory- and/or motor-pathways impaired in late stages of ALS. Main results. Healthy subjects quickly learned to self-regulate gamma-power in the SPC by alternating between states of focused attention and relaxed wakefulness, resulting in an average decoding accuracy of 70.2%. One locked-in ALS patient (ALS-FRS-R score of zero) achieved an average decoding accuracy significantly above chance-level though insufficient for communication (55.8%). Significance. Self-regulation of gamma-power in the SPC is a feasible paradigm for brain-computer interfacing and may be preserved in late stages of ALS. This provides a novel approach to testing whether completely locked-in ALS patients retain the capacity for goal-directed thinking.

  2. Pioglitazone reverses down-regulation of cardiac PPAR{gamma} expression in Zucker diabetic fatty rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pelzer, Theo . E-mail: pelzer_t@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de; Jazbutyte, Virginija; Arias-Loza, Paula Anahi; Segerer, Stephan; Lichtenwald, Margit; Law, Marilyn P.; Schaefers, Michael; Ertl, Georg; Neyses, Ludwig

    2005-04-08

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) plays a critical role in peripheral glucose homeostasis and energy metabolism, and inhibits cardiac hypertrophy in non-diabetic animal models. The functional role of PPAR{gamma} in the diabetic heart, however, is not fully understood. Therefore, we analyzed cardiac gene expression, metabolic control, and cardiac glucose uptake in male Zucker diabetic fatty rats (ZDF fa/fa) and lean ZDF rats (+/+) treated with the high affinity PPAR{gamma} agonist pioglitazone or placebo from 12 to 24 weeks of age. Hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hypertriglyceridemia as well as lower cardiac PPAR{gamma}, glucose transporter-4 and {alpha}-myosin heavy chain expression levels were detected in diabetic ZDF rats compared to lean animals. Pioglitazone increased body weight and improved metabolic control, cardiac PPAR{gamma}, glut-4, and {alpha}-MHC expression levels in diabetic ZDF rats. Cardiac [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake was not detectable by micro-PET studies in untreated and pioglitazone treated ZDF fa/fa rats but was observed after administration of insulin to pioglitazone treated ZDF fa/fa rats. PPAR{gamma} agonists favorably affect cardiac gene expression in type-2 diabetic rats via activation and up-regulation of cardiac PPAR{gamma} expression whereas improvement of impaired cardiac glucose uptake in advanced type-2 diabetes requires co-administration of insulin.

  3. Gamma Ray Imaging System (GRIS) GammaCam{trademark}. Final report, January 3, 1994--May 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This report describes the activities undertaken during the development of the Gamma Ray Imaging System (GRIS) program now referred to as the GammaCam{trademark}. The purpose of this program is to develop a 2-dimensional imaging system for gamma-ray energy scenes that may be present in nuclear power plants. The report summarizes the overall accomplishments of the program and the most recent GammaCam measurements made at LANL and Estonia. The GammaCam is currently available for sale from AIL Systems as an off-the-shelf instrument.

  4. Gamma-ray tracking method for pet systems

    DOEpatents

    Mihailescu, Lucian; Vetter, Kai M.

    2010-06-08

    Gamma-ray tracking methods for use with granular, position sensitive detectors identify the sequence of the interactions taking place in the detector and, hence, the position of the first interaction. The improved position resolution in finding the first interaction in the detection system determines a better definition of the direction of the gamma-ray photon, and hence, a superior source image resolution. A PET system using such a method will have increased efficiency and position resolution.

  5. Bidirectional Pressure-Regulator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth; Miller, John R.

    2008-01-01

    A bidirectional pressure-regulator system has been devised for use in a regenerative fuel cell system. The bidirectional pressure-regulator acts as a back-pressure regulator as gas flows through the bidirectional pressure-regulator in one direction. Later, the flow of gas goes through the regulator in the opposite direction and the bidirectional pressure-regulator operates as a pressure- reducing pressure regulator. In the regenerative fuel cell system, there are two such bidirectional regulators, one for the hydrogen gas and another for the oxygen gas. The flow of gases goes from the regenerative fuel cell system to the gas storage tanks when energy is being stored, and reverses direction, flowing from the storage tanks to the regenerative fuel cell system when the stored energy is being withdrawn from the regenerative fuel cell system. Having a single bidirectional regulator replaces two unidirectional regulators, plumbing, and multiple valves needed to reverse the flow direction. The term "bidirectional" refers to both the bidirectional nature of the gas flows and capability of each pressure regulator to control the pressure on either its upstream or downstream side, regardless of the direction of flow.

  6. Carbonic anhydrase III regulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}2

    SciTech Connect

    Mitterberger, Maria C.; Kim, Geumsoo; Rostek, Ursula; Levine, Rodney L.; Zwerschke, Werner

    2012-05-01

    Carbonic anhydrase III (CAIII) is an isoenzyme of the CA family. Because of its low specific anhydrase activity, physiological functions in addition to hydrating CO{sub 2} have been proposed. CAIII expression is highly induced in adipogenesis and CAIII is the most abundant protein in adipose tissues. The function of CAIII in both preadipocytes and adipocytes is however unknown. In the present study we demonstrate that adipogenesis is greatly increased in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from CAIII knockout (KO) mice, as demonstrated by a greater than 10-fold increase in the induction of fatty acid-binding protein-4 (FABP4) and increased triglyceride formation in CAIII{sup -/-} MEFs compared with CAIII{sup +/+} cells. To address the underlying mechanism, we investigated the expression of the two adipogenic key regulators, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}2 (PPAR{gamma}2) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-{alpha}. We found a considerable (approximately 1000-fold) increase in the PPAR{gamma}2 expression in the CAIII{sup -/-} MEFs. Furthermore, RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous CAIII in NIH 3T3-L1 preadipocytes resulted in a significant increase in the induction of PPAR{gamma}2 and FABP4. When both CAIII and PPAR{gamma}2 were knocked down, FABP4 was not induced. We conclude that down-regulation of CAIII in preadipocytes enhances adipogenesis and that CAIII is a regulator of adipogenic differentiation which acts at the level of PPAR{gamma}2 gene expression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We discover a novel function of Carbonic anhydrase III (CAIII). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that CAIII is a regulator of adipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that CAIII acts at the level of PPAR{gamma}2 gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our data contribute to a better understanding of the role of CAIII in fat tissue.

  7. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Simulation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, G.; Buckley, J.; Bugaev, V.; Fegan, S.; Funk, S.; Konopelko, A.; Vassiliev, V.V.; /UCLA

    2011-06-14

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a next-generation ground-based gamma-ray observatory being planned in the U.S. The anticipated sensitivity of AGIS is about one order of magnitude better than the sensitivity of current observatories, allowing it to measure gamma-ray emission from a large number of Galactic and extra-galactic sources. We present here results of simulation studies of various possible designs for AGIS. The primary characteristics of the array performance - collecting area, angular resolution, background rejection, and sensitivity - are discussed.

  8. NEDD4-2 associates with {gamma}{sub c} and regulates its degradation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Malarde, Valerie; Proust, Richard; Dautry-Varsat, Alice; Gesbert, Franck

    2009-09-18

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a cytokine that regulates proliferation, differentiation and survival of various lymphoid cell subsets. Its actions are mediated through its binding to the IL-2 receptor which is composed of three subunits (IL-2R{alpha}, IL-2R{beta} and {gamma}{sub c}). Only {beta} and {gamma}{sub c} have been shown to transduce intra cellular signals. The {gamma}{sub c} chain is shared by the interleukin-2, 4, 7, 9, 15 and 21 receptors, and is essential for lymphocyte functions. The regulation of {gamma}{sub c} expression level is therefore critical for the ability of cells to respond to these cytokines. In the present work, we show that the IL-2R constitutively associates with the ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-2, and to a lesser extent NEDD4-1. We identified the specific binding site on {gamma}{sub c}. And we show that the loss of NEDD4 association on {gamma}{sub c} is accompanied by a dramatic increase of the half-life of the receptor subunit.

  9. PPAR{gamma} transcriptionally regulates the expression of insulin-degrading enzyme in primary neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Jing; Zhang, Lang; Liu, Shubo; Zhang, Chi; Huang, Xiuqing; Li, Jian; Zhao, Nanming; Wang, Zhao

    2009-06-12

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that has been demonstrated to play a key role in degrading both A{beta} and insulin and deficient in IDE function is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) pathology. However, little is known about the cellular and molecular regulation of IDE expression. Here we show IDE levels are markedly decreased in DM2 patients and positively correlated with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) levels. Further studies show that PPAR{gamma} plays an important role in regulating IDE expression in rat primary neurons through binding to a functional peroxisome proliferator-response element (PPRE) in IDE promoter and promoting IDE gene transcription. Finally, we demonstrate that PPAR{gamma} participates in the insulin-induced IDE expression in neurons. These results suggest that PPAR{gamma} transcriptionally induces IDE expression which provides a novel mechanism for the use of PPAR{gamma} agonists in both DM2 and AD therapies.

  10. Homeostatic regulation of intestinal epithelia by intraepithelial gamma delta T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Komano, H; Fujiura, Y; Kawaguchi, M; Matsumoto, S; Hashimoto, Y; Obana, S; Mombaerts, P; Tonegawa, S; Yamamoto, H; Itohara, S

    1995-01-01

    Although T cells bearing gamma delta T-cell receptors have long been known to be present in the epithelial lining of many organs, their specificity and function remain elusive. In the present study, we examined the intestinal epithelia of T-cell-receptor mutant mice, which were deficient in either gamma delta T cells or alpha beta T cells, and of normal littermates. The absence of gamma delta T cells was associated with a reduction in epithelial cell turnover and a downregulation of the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. No such effects were observed in alpha beta T-cell-deficient mice. These findings indicate that intraepithelial gamma delta T cells regulate the generation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7597094

  11. Modeling of gamma/gamma-prime phase equilibrium in the nickel-aluminum system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, J. M.; Barefoot, J. R.; Jarrett, R. N.; Tien, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model is proposed for the determination of phase equilibrium in alloys, taking into consideration dissimilar lattice parameters. Volume-dependent pair interactions are introduced by means of phenomenological Lennard-Jones potentials and the configurational entropy of the system is treated in the tetrahedron approximation of the cluster variation method. The model is applied to the superalloy-relevant, nickel-rich, gamma/gamma-prime phase region of the Ni-Al phase diagram. The model predicts reasonable values for the lattice parameters and the enthalpy of formation as a function of composition, and the calculated phase diagram closely approximates the experimental diagram.

  12. Gamma detectors in explosives and narcotics detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystritsky, V. M.; Zubarev, E. V.; Krasnoperov, A. V.; Porohovoi, S. Yu.; Rapatskii, V. L.; Rogov, Yu. N.; Sadovskii, A. B.; Salamatin, A. V.; Salmin, R. A.; Slepnev, V. M.; Andreev, E. I.

    2013-11-01

    Gamma detectors based on BGO crystals were designed and developed at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. These detectors are used in explosives and narcotics detection systems. Key specifications and design features of the detectors are presented. A software temperature-compensation method that makes it possible to stabilize the gamma detector response and operate the detector in a temperature range from -20 to 50°C is described.

  13. Cytoprotective effect of Podophyllum hexandrum against gamma radiation is mediated via hemopoietic system stimulation and up-regulation of heme-oxygenase-1 and the prosurvival multidomain protein Bcl-2.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Arora; Sagar, R; Singh, S; Kumar, R; Sharma, A K; Prasad, J; Singh, S; Gupta, M; Sharma, R K; Puri, S C; Krishna, B; Siddiqui, M S; Lahiri, S S; Tripathi, R P; Qazi, G N

    2007-03-01

    The radioprotective effect of a hydroalcoholic extracted material (REC-2000) from the rhizome of Podophyllum hexandrum was studied in mice exposed to lethal gamma radiation (10 Gy). The extract (REC-2000) was found to restore the hemoglobin content (14.73 +/- 0.33) and total leukocyte count (TLC) (4166.66 +/- 0.02) in lethally (10 Gy) gamma-irradiated mice on the 15th day in comparison to the radiation control mice. The hemoglobin content of the drug + radiation group was observed to be significantly (21.25%) higher than the radiation control group on the 10th day. Similarly, the TLC was significantly increased (83.33 times) in the drug + radiation group as compared to a radiation (10 Gy) only group on the 10th day. Enhanced expression of heme-oxygenase-1 and Bcl-2 protein observed by Western blotting further supports the observation of hemopoietic recovery in irradiated mice. These findings indicate that the bioactive constituents present in REC-2000 exert the radioprotective effect by modulating the hemopoietic system.

  14. Gamma-Glutamyl Transpeptidase: Redox Regulation and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hanigan, Marie H.

    2015-01-01

    Expression of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) is essential to maintaining cysteine levels in the body. GGT is a cell surface enzyme that hydrolyzes the gamma-glutamyl bond of extracellular reduced and oxidized glutathione, initiating their cleavage into glutamate, cysteine (cystine) and glycine. GGT is normally expressed on the apical surface of ducts and glands, salvaging the amino acids from glutathione in the ductal fluids. GGT in tumors is expressed over the entire cell membrane and provides tumors with access to additional cysteine and cystine from reduced and oxidized glutathione in the blood and interstitial fluid. Cysteine is rate-limiting for glutathione synthesis in cells under oxidative stress. Induction of GGT is observed in tumors with elevated levels of intracellular glutathione. Studies in models of hepatocarcinogenesis show that GGT expression in foci of preneoplastic hepatocytes provides a selective advantage to the cells during tumor promotion with agents that deplete intracellular glutathione. Similarly, expression of GGT in tumors enables cells to maintain elevated levels of intracellular glutathione and to rapidly replenish glutathione during treatment with pro-oxidant anti-cancer therapy. In the clinic, expression of GGT in tumors is correlated with drug resistance. Inhibitors of GGT block GGT-positive tumors from accessing the cysteine in extracellular glutathione. They also inhibit GGT activity in the kidney, which results in excretion of GSH in the urine, and a rapid decrease in blood cysteine levels, leading to depletion of intracellular GSH in both GGT-positive and GGT-negative tumors. GGT inhibitors are being developed for clinical use to sensitize tumors to chemotherapy. PMID:24974180

  15. Inhibition of hormonally regulated adenylate cyclase by the beta gamma subunit of transducin.

    PubMed Central

    Bockaert, J; Deterre, P; Pfister, C; Guillon, G; Chabre, M

    1985-01-01

    Transducin (T), the GTP-binding protein of the retina activates the cGMP phosphodiesterase system, and presents analogies with the proteins GS and Gi which respectively mediate adenylate cyclase activation and inhibition by hormone receptors. These proteins are all comprised of an alpha subunit carrying the GTP-binding site and a beta gamma subunit made of two peptides. The beta peptide (35 kd) appears similar in the three proteins. We demonstrate here that purified T beta gamma inhibits adenylate cyclase from human platelet membranes. This inhibition was observed when adenylate cyclase was stimulated by GTP, prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), NaF and forskolin, but not when stimulated by GTP(gamma)S. In the presence of GTP and forskolin, the T beta gamma-induced maximal inhibition was not additive with the alpha 2-receptor-induced adenylate cyclase inhibition mediated by Gi. Both inhibitions were suppressed at high Mg2+ concentrations, which as also known to dissociate T beta gamma from T alpha-GDP. This suggests that these adenylate cyclase inhibitions are due to the formation of inactive complexes of GS alpha-GDP with T beta gamma or Gi beta gamma. T beta gamma-induced inhibition did not require detergent and could be suppressed by simple washing. T beta gamma effects are dependent on its concentration rather than on its total amount. This suggests that T beta gamma can operate in solution with no integration into the membrane. Similar inhibitory effects of T beta gamma are observed on adenylate cyclase from anterior pituitary and lymphoma S49 cell lines. PMID:3861319

  16. SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer System software design description

    SciTech Connect

    Femec, D.A.; Killian, E.W.

    1994-08-01

    To assist in the characterization of the radiological contents of contract-handled waste containers at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP), the SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SGRS) System has been developed by the Radiation Measurements and Development Unit of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SGRS system software controls turntable and detector system activities. In addition to determining the concentrations of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, this software also calculates attenuation-corrected isotopic mass ratios of-specific interest. This document describes the software design for the data acquisition and analysis software associated with the SGRS system.

  17. On the capacity of MISO FSO systems over gamma-gamma and misalignment fading channels.

    PubMed

    Boluda-Ruiz, Rubén; García-Zambrana, Antonio; Castillo-Vázquez, Beatriz; Castillo-Vázquez, Carmen

    2015-08-24

    In this work, the ergodic capacity performance for multiple-input/single-output (MISO) free-space optical (FSO) communications system with equal gain combining (EGC) reception is analyzed over gamma-gamma and misalignment fading channels, which are modeled as statistically independent, but not necessarily identically distributed (i.n.i.d.). Novel and analytical closed-form ergodic capacity expression is obtained in terms of H-Fox function by using the well-known inequality between arithmetic and geometric mean of positive random variables (RV) in order to obtain an approximate closed-form expression of the distribution of the sum of M gamma-gamma with pointing errors variates. In addition, we present an asymptotic ergodic capacity expression at high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the ergodic capacity of MISO FSO systems. It can be concluded that the use of MISO technique can significantly reduce the effect of the atmospheric turbulence as well as pointing errors and, hence, provide significant capacity gain over the direct path link (DL). The impact of pointing errors on the MISO FSO system is also analyzed, which only depends on the number of laser sources and pointing error parameters. Moreover, it can be also concluded that the ergodic capacity performance is dramatically reduced as a consequence of the severity of pointing error effects. Simulation results are further demonstrated to confirm the analytical results.

  18. Gamma spectrometry of the minor bodies of the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Surkov, Yu.A.; Moskaleva, L.P.; Manvelyan, O.S.

    1987-01-01

    The authors investigate the possibility of determining the elemental composition of the surfaces of minor bodies of the solar system (asteroids, the Martian satellites Phobos and Deimos, etc.) using spacecraft-based ..gamma..-spectrometry. The dependence of ..gamma..-photon flux on altitude above the body was calculated for body radii from 13 to 500 km. Estimates were made of the sensitivity of the determination of basic rock-forming elements with respect to changes in geometry of a factor of two, using ..gamma..-spectrometry with a 100 mm by 100 mm crystal of NaI(Tl). Finally, the time required to determine the stipulated characteristic ..gamma..-radiation of surface rocks with the given precision was derived as a function of altitude.

  19. The UCR gamma ray telescope data acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, T. J.; Sweeney, W. E.; Tumer, O. T.; Zych, A. D.; White, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of an electronics system based on the DEC Falcon SBC-11/23+, which has been designed and built to support a balloon-borne double Compton gamma-ray telescope. The system provides support for commands, data acquisition, data routing and compression, and photomultiplier tube gain control. The software consists of a number of interrupt-driven routines of differing priorities to handle each system task. This includes two circular buffers for onboard processing and bit encoding before transmission of the information to the ground computer. Acquisition of gamma-ray events at rates above the 200-Hz telemetry constraint is easily achieved.

  20. Osmotic pressure regulates alpha beta gamma-rENaC expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ji, H L; Fuller, C M; Benos, D J

    1998-11-01

    The hypothesis that amiloride-sensitive Na+ channels (ENaC) are involved in cell volume regulation was tested. Anisosmotic ND-20 media (ranging from 70 to 450 mosM) were used to superfuse Xenopus oocytes expressing alpha beta gamma-rat ENaC (alpha beta gamma-rENaC). Whole cell currents were reversibly dependent on external osmolarity. Under conditions of swelling (70 mosM) or shrinkage (450 mosM), current amplitude decreased and increased, respectively. In contrast, there was no change in current amplitude of H2O-injected oocytes to the above osmotic insults. Currents recorded from alpha beta gamma-rENaC-injected oocytes were not sensitive to external Cl- concentration or to the K+ channel inhibitor BaCl2. They were sensitive to amiloride. The concentration of amiloride necessary to inhibit one-half of the maximal rENaC current expressed in oocytes (Ki; apparent dissociation constant) decreased in swollen cells and increased in shrunken oocytes. The osmotic pressure-induced Na+ currents showed properties similar to those of stretch-activated channels, including inhibition by Gd3+ and La3+, and decreased selectivity for Na+. alpha beta gamma-rENaC-expressing oocytes maintained a nearly constant cell volume in hypertonic ND-20. The present study is the first demonstration that alpha beta gamma-rENaC heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes may contribute to oocyte volume regulation following shrinkage. PMID:9814964

  1. Gamma-ray Albedo of Small Solar System Bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, I.V.

    2008-03-25

    We calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo flux from cosmic-ray (CR) interactions with the solid rock and ice in Main Belt asteroids and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) using the Moon as a template. We show that the {gamma}-ray albedo for the Main Belt and KBOs strongly depends on the small-body mass spectrum of each system and may be detectable by the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). If detected, it can be used to derive the mass spectrum of small bodies in the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt and to probe the spectrum of CR nuclei at close-to-interstellar conditions. The orbits of the Main Belt asteroids and KBOs are distributed near the ecliptic, which passes through the Galactic center and high Galactic latitudes. Therefore, the {gamma}-ray emission by the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt has to be taken into account when analyzing weak {gamma}-ray sources close to the ecliptic. The asteroid albedo spectrum also exhibits a 511 keV line due to secondary positrons annihilating in the rock. This may be an important and previously unrecognized celestial foreground for the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) observations of the Galactic 511 keV line emission including the direction of the Galactic center. For details of our calculations and references see [1].

  2. In Situ Underwater Gamma Spectroscopy System. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    2001-06-01

    The baseline approach to characterize underwater objects is to use radiation sensors on an extendable pole or the Remote Underwater Characterization System to detect gamma radiation and to collect samples for laboratory analysis to determine concentrations of specific radionuclides. The In-Situ Underwater Gamma Spectroscopy (ISUGS) System is essentially a submersible In-Situ Object Counting System from Canberra that can determine both the total gamma radiation and quantify the specific radionuclides contributing to the radiation. ISUGS was demonstrated to characterize objects in the canal of the Materials Test Reactor in INEEL's Test Reactor Area. Cost analysis based on demonstration data revealed that ISUGS reduced costs by 80% for characterization of ten objects compared to the baseline approach. Frammatome provides ISUGS as part of its characterization services. Based on these promising results, INEEL and other DOE sites plan to use ISUGS to characterize their reactor fuel pools.

  3. Voltage Regulators for Photovoltaic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, R.

    1986-01-01

    Two simple circuits developed to provide voltage regulation for highvoltage (i.e., is greater than 75 volts) and low-voltage (i.e., is less than 36 volts) photovoltaic/battery power systems. Use of these circuits results in voltage regulator small, low-cost, and reliable, with very low power dissipation. Simple oscillator circuit controls photovoltaic-array current to regulate system voltage and control battery charging. Circuit senses battery (and system) voltage and adjusts array current to keep battery voltage from exceeding maximum voltage.

  4. Differential regulation of cathepsin S and cathepsin L in interferon gamma-treated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Beers, Courtney; Honey, Karen; Fink, Susan; Forbush, Katherine; Rudensky, Alexander

    2003-01-20

    Cathepsin S (catS) and cathepsin L (catL) mediate late stages of invariant chain (Ii) degradation in discrete antigen-presenting cell types. Macrophages (Mphis) are unique in that they express both proteases and here we sought to determine the relative contribution of each enzyme. We observe that catL plays no significant role in Ii cleavage in interferon (IFN)-gamma-stimulated Mphis. In addition, our studies show that the level of catL activity is significantly decreased in Mphis cultured in the presence of IFN-gamma whereas catS activity increases. The decrease in catL activity upon cytokine treatment occurs despite the persistence of high levels of mature catL protein, suggesting that a specific inhibitor of the enzyme is up-regulated in IFN-gamma-stimulated peritoneal Mphis. Similar inhibition of activity is observed in dendritic cells engineered to overexpress catL. Such enzymatic inhibition in Mphis exhibits only partial dependence upon Ii and therefore, other mechanisms of catL inhibition are regulated by IFN-gamma. Thus, during a T helper cell type 1 immune response catL inhibition in Mphis results in preferential usage of catS, such that major histocompatibility complex class II presentation by all bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting cell is regulated by catS. PMID:12538657

  5. Gamma-telescopes Fermi/LAT and GAMMA-400 Trigger Systems Event Recognizing Methods Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Murchenko, A. E.; Chasovikov, E. N.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Kheymits, M. D.

    Usually instruments for high-energy γ-quanta registration consists of converter (where γ-quanta produced pairs) and calorimeter for particles energy measurements surrounded by anticoincidence shield used to events identification (whether incident particle was charged or neutral). The influence of pair formation by γ-quanta in shield and the backsplash (moved in the opposite direction particles created due high energy γ-rays interact with calorimeter) should be taken into account. It leads to decrease both effective area and registration efficiency at E>10 GeV. In the presented article the event recognizing methods used in Fermi/LAT trigger system is considered in comparison with the ones applied in counting and triggers signals formation system of gamma-telescope GAMMA-400. The GAMMA-400 (Gamma Astronomical Multifunctional Modular Apparatus) will be the new high-apogee space γ-observatory. The GAMMA-400 consist of converter-tracker based on silicon-strip coordinate detectors interleaved with tungsten foils, imaging calorimeter make of 2 layers of double (x, y) silicon strip coordinate detectors interleaved with planes of CsI(Tl) crystals and the electromagnetic calorimeter CC2 consists only of CsI(Tl) crystals. Several plastics detections systems used as anticoincidence shield, for particles energy and moving direction estimations. The main differences of GAMMA-400 constructions from Fermi/LAT one are using the time-of-flight system with base of 50 cm and double layer structure of plastic detectors provides more effective particles direction definition and backsplash rejection. Also two calorimeters in GAMMA-400 composed the total absorbtion spectrometer with total thickness ∼ 25 X0 or ∼1.2 λ0 for vertical incident particles registration and 54 X0 or 2.5 λ0 for laterally incident ones (where λ0 is nuclear interaction length). It provides energy resolution 1-2% for 10 GeV-3.0×103 GeV events while the Fermi/LAT energy resolution does not reach such a

  6. A large-area gamma-ray imaging telescope system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    The concept definition of using the External Tank (ET) of the Space Shuttle as the basis for constructing a large area gamma ray imaging telescope in space is detailed. The telescope will be used to locate and study cosmic sources of gamma rays of energy greater than 100 MeV. Both the telescope properties and the means whereby an ET is used for this purpose are described. A parallel is drawn between those systems that would be common to both a Space Station and this ET application. In addition, those systems necessary for support of the telescope can form the basis for using the ET as part of the Space Station. The major conclusions of this concept definition are that the ET is ideal for making into a gamma ray telescope, and that this telescope will provide a substantial increase in collecting area.

  7. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) - Simulation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, G.; Buckley, J.; Bugaev, V.; Fegan, S.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Funk, S.; Konopelko, A.

    2008-12-24

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a US-led concept for a next-generation instrument in ground-based very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The most important design requirement for AGIS is a sensitivity of about 10 times greater than current observatories like Veritas, H.E.S.S or MAGIC. We present results of simulation studies of various possible designs for AGIS. The primary characteristics of the array performance, collecting area, angular resolution, background rejection, and sensitivity are discussed.

  8. Mini gamma camera, camera system and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randolph F.

    2001-01-01

    A gamma camera comprising essentially and in order from the front outer or gamma ray impinging surface: 1) a collimator, 2) a scintillator layer, 3) a light guide, 4) an array of position sensitive, high resolution photomultiplier tubes, and 5) printed circuitry for receipt of the output of the photomultipliers. There is also described, a system wherein the output supplied by the high resolution, position sensitive photomultipiler tubes is communicated to: a) a digitizer and b) a computer where it is processed using advanced image processing techniques and a specific algorithm to calculate the center of gravity of any abnormality observed during imaging, and c) optional image display and telecommunications ports.

  9. A gamma-ray verification system for special nuclear material

    SciTech Connect

    Lanier, R.G.; Prindle, A.L.; Friensehner, A.V.; Buckley, W.M.

    1994-07-01

    The Safeguards Technology Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a gamma-ray screening system for use by the Materials Management Section of the Engineering Sciences Division at LLNL for verifying the presence or absence of special nuclear material (SNM) in a sample. This system facilitates the measurements required under the ``5610`` series of US Department of Energy orders. MMGAM is an intelligent, menu driven software application that runs on a personal computer and requires a precalibrated multi-channel analyzer and HPGe detector. It provides a very quick and easy-to-use means of determining the presence of SNM in a sample. After guiding the operator through a menu driven set-up procedure, the system provides an on-screen GO/NO-GO indication after determining the system calibration status. This system represents advances over earlier used systems in the areas of ease-of use, operator training requirements, and quality assurance. The system records the gamma radiation from a sample using a sequence of measurements involving a background measurement followed immediately by a measurement of the unknown sample. Both spectra are stored and available for analysis or output. In the current application, the presence of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 208}Tl isotopes are indicated by extracting, from the stored spectra, four energy ``windows`` preset around gamma-ray lines characteristic of the radioactive decay of these nuclides. The system is easily extendible to more complicated problems.

  10. Geraniin down regulates gamma radiation-induced apoptosis by suppressing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bing, So Jin; Ha, Danbee; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Eunjin; Ahn, Ginnae; Kim, Dae Seung; Ko, Ryeo Kyeong; Park, Jae Woo; Lee, Nam Ho; Jee, Youngheun

    2013-07-01

    Gamma ray irradiation triggers DNA damage and apoptosis of proliferating stem cells and peripheral immune cells, resulting in the destruction of intestinal crypts and lymphoid system. Geraniin is a natural compound extracts from an aquatic plant Nymphaea tetragona and possesses good antioxidant property. In this study, we demonstrate that geraniin rescues radiosensitive splenocytes and jejunal crypt cells from radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Isolated splenocytes from C57BL/6 mice treated with geraniin were protected against radiation injury of 2 Gy irradiation through the enhancement of the proliferation and attenuation of DNA damage. Also, geraniin inhibited apoptosis in radiosensitive splenocytes by reducing the expression level and immunoreactivity of proapoptotic p53 and Bax and increasing those of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. In mice exposed to radiation, geraniin treatment protected splenocytes and intestinal crypt cells from radiation-induced cell death. Our results suggest that geraniin presents radioprotective effects by regulating DNA damage on splenocytes, exerting immunostimulatory capacities and inhibiting apoptosis of radiosensitive immune cells and jejunal crypt cells. Therefore, geraniin can be a radioprotective agent against γ-irradiation exposure.

  11. Geraniin down regulates gamma radiation-induced apoptosis by suppressing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bing, So Jin; Ha, Danbee; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Eunjin; Ahn, Ginnae; Kim, Dae Seung; Ko, Ryeo Kyeong; Park, Jae Woo; Lee, Nam Ho; Jee, Youngheun

    2013-07-01

    Gamma ray irradiation triggers DNA damage and apoptosis of proliferating stem cells and peripheral immune cells, resulting in the destruction of intestinal crypts and lymphoid system. Geraniin is a natural compound extracts from an aquatic plant Nymphaea tetragona and possesses good antioxidant property. In this study, we demonstrate that geraniin rescues radiosensitive splenocytes and jejunal crypt cells from radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Isolated splenocytes from C57BL/6 mice treated with geraniin were protected against radiation injury of 2 Gy irradiation through the enhancement of the proliferation and attenuation of DNA damage. Also, geraniin inhibited apoptosis in radiosensitive splenocytes by reducing the expression level and immunoreactivity of proapoptotic p53 and Bax and increasing those of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. In mice exposed to radiation, geraniin treatment protected splenocytes and intestinal crypt cells from radiation-induced cell death. Our results suggest that geraniin presents radioprotective effects by regulating DNA damage on splenocytes, exerting immunostimulatory capacities and inhibiting apoptosis of radiosensitive immune cells and jejunal crypt cells. Therefore, geraniin can be a radioprotective agent against γ-irradiation exposure. PMID:23541438

  12. Ubiquitination of the common cytokine receptor {gamma}{sub c} and regulation of expression by an ubiquitination/deubiquitination machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Gesbert, Franck; Malarde, Valerie; Dautry-Varsat, Alice . E-mail: adautry@pasteur.fr

    2005-08-26

    The common cytokine receptor {gamma}{sub c} is shared by the interleukin-2, -4, -7, -9, -15, and -21 receptors, and is essential for lymphocyte proliferation and survival. The regulation of {gamma}{sub c} receptor expression level is therefore critical for the ability of cells to respond to these cytokines. We previously reported that {gamma}{sub c} is efficiently constitutively internalized and addressed towards a degradation endocytic compartment. We show that {gamma}{sub c} is ubiquitinated and also associated to ubiquitinated proteins. We report that the ubiquitin-ligase c-Cbl induces {gamma}{sub c} down-regulation. In addition, the ubiquitin-hydrolase, DUB-2, counteracts the effect of c-Cbl on {gamma}{sub c} expression. We show that an increase in DUB-2 expression correlates with an increased {gamma}{sub c} half-life, resulting in the up-regulation of the receptor. Altogether, we show that {gamma}{sub c} is the target of an ubiquitination mechanism and its expression level can be regulated through the activities of a couple of ubiquitin-ligase/ubiquitin-hydrolase enzymes, namely c-Cbl/DUB-2.

  13. Acceptance test report for the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver Gamma Detector System

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, J.L.

    1995-02-17

    This Acceptance Test Report is for the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver Gamma Detector System. This test verified that the data logger and data converter for the gamma detector system functions as intended.

  14. Positively regulated bacterial expression systems

    PubMed Central

    Brautaset, Trygve; Lale, Rahmi; Valla, Svein

    2009-01-01

    Summary Regulated promoters are useful tools for many aspects related to recombinant gene expression in bacteria, including for high‐level expression of heterologous proteins and for expression at physiological levels in metabolic engineering applications. In general, it is common to express the genes of interest from an inducible promoter controlled either by a positive regulator or by a repressor protein. In this review, we discuss established and potentially useful positively regulated bacterial promoter systems, with a particular emphasis on those that are controlled by the AraC‐XylS family of transcriptional activators. The systems function in a wide range of microorganisms, including enterobacteria, soil bacteria, lactic bacteria and streptomycetes. The available systems that have been applied to express heterologous genes are regulated either by sugars (l‐arabinose, l‐rhamnose, xylose and sucrose), substituted benzenes, cyclohexanone‐related compounds, ε‐caprolactam, propionate, thiostrepton, alkanes or peptides. It is of applied interest that some of the inducers require the presence of transport systems, some are more prone than others to become metabolized by the host and some have been applied mainly in one or a limited number of species. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the AraC‐XylS family of regulators contains a large number of different members (currently over 300), but only a small fraction of these, the XylS/Pm, AraC/PBAD, RhaR‐RhaS/rhaBAD, NitR/PnitA and ChnR/Pb regulator/promoter systems, have so far been explored for biotechnological applications. PMID:21261879

  15. Positively regulated bacterial expression systems.

    PubMed

    Brautaset, Trygve; Lale, Rahmi; Valla, Svein

    2009-01-01

    Regulated promoters are useful tools for many aspects related to recombinant gene expression in bacteria, including for high-level expression of heterologous proteins and for expression at physiological levels in metabolic engineering applications. In general, it is common to express the genes of interest from an inducible promoter controlled either by a positive regulator or by a repressor protein. In this review, we discuss established and potentially useful positively regulated bacterial promoter systems, with a particular emphasis on those that are controlled by the AraC-XylS family of transcriptional activators. The systems function in a wide range of microorganisms, including enterobacteria, soil bacteria, lactic bacteria and streptomycetes. The available systems that have been applied to express heterologous genes are regulated either by sugars (L-arabinose, L-rhamnose, xylose and sucrose), substituted benzenes, cyclohexanone-related compounds, ε-caprolactam, propionate, thiostrepton, alkanes or peptides. It is of applied interest that some of the inducers require the presence of transport systems, some are more prone than others to become metabolized by the host and some have been applied mainly in one or a limited number of species. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the AraC-XylS family of regulators contains a large number of different members (currently over 300), but only a small fraction of these, the XylS/Pm, AraC/P(BAD), RhaR-RhaS/rhaBAD, NitR/PnitA and ChnR/Pb regulator/promoter systems, have so far been explored for biotechnological applications.

  16. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonist rosiglitazone attenuates postincisional pain by regulating macrophage polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa-Moriyama, Maiko; Ohnou, Tetsuya; Godai, Kohei; Kurimoto, Tae; Nakama, Mayo; Kanmura, Yuichi

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rosiglitazone attenuated postincisional pain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rosiglitazone alters macrophage polarization to F4/80{sup +}CD206{sup +} M2 macrophages at the incisional sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transplantation of rosiglitazone-treated macrophages produced analgesic effects. -- Abstract: Acute inflammation triggered by macrophage infiltration to injured tissue promotes wound repair and may induce pain hypersensitivity. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR){gamma} signaling is known to regulate heterogeneity of macrophages, which are often referred to as classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. M1 macrophages have considerable antimicrobial activity and produce a wide variety of proinflammatory cytokines. In contrast, M2 macrophages are involved in anti-inflammatory and homeostatic functions linked to wound healing and tissue repair. Although it has been suggested that PPAR{gamma} agonists attenuate pain hypersensitivity, the molecular mechanism of macrophage-mediated effects of PPAR{gamma} signaling on pain development has not been explored. In this study, we investigated the link between the phenotype switching of macrophage polarization induced by PPAR{gamma} signaling and the development of acute pain hypersensitivity. Local administration of rosiglitazone significantly ameliorated hypersensitivity to heat and mechanical stimuli, and paw swelling. Consistent with the down-regulation of nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF{kappa}B) phosphorylation by rosiglitazone at the incisional sites, the number of F4/80{sup +}iNOS{sup +} M1 macrophages was decreased whereas numbers of F4/80{sup +}CD206{sup +} M2 macrophages were increased in rosiglitazone-treated incisional sites 24 h after the procedure. In addition, gene induction of anti-inflammatory M2-macrophage-associated markers such as arginase1, FIZZ1 and interleukin (IL)-10 were significantly increased, whereas

  17. Gamma scintillator system using boron carbide for neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Galim, Y.; Wengrowicz, U.; Raveh, A.; Orion, I.

    2014-08-01

    A new approach for neutron detection enhancement to scintillator gamma-ray detectors is suggested. By using a scintillator coupled with a boron carbide (B4C) disc, the 478 keV gamma-photon emitted from the excited Li in 94% of the 10B(n,α)7Li interactions was detected. This suggests that the performance of existing gamma detection systems in Homeland security applications can be improved. In this study, a B4C disc (2 in. diameter, 0.125 in. thick) with ~19.8% 10B was used and coupled with a scintillator gamma-ray detector. In addition, the neutron thermalization moderator was studied in order to be able to increase the neutron sensitivity. An improvement in the detector which is easy to assemble, affordable and efficient was demonstrated. Furthermore, a tailored Monte-Carlo code written in MATLAB was developed for validation of the proposed application through efficiency estimation for thermal neutrons. Validation of the code was accomplished by showing that the MATLAB code results were well correlated to a Monte-Carlo MCNP code results. The measured efficiency of the assembled experimental model was observed to be in agreement with both models calculations.

  18. Photomultiplier tube gain regulating system

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Wayne F.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved system for regulating the gain of a photomultiplier tube, and was designed for use with the photomultiplier tubes of a GeMSAEC fast analyzers. It has the following advantages over the prior system: noise is virtually eliminated; sample analysis can begin after 3 to 4 revolutions of the rotor; fluorescent and light scattering solutions can be used as a reference; and the reference solution can be in any cuvette on the rotor.

  19. Autocrine secretion of interferon gamma negatively regulates homing of immature B cells.

    PubMed

    Flaishon, L; Hershkoviz, R; Lantner, F; Lider, O; Alon, R; Levo, Y; Flavell, R A; Shachar, I

    2000-11-01

    The mechanism by which immature B cells are sequestered from encountering foreign antigens present in lymph nodes or sites of inflammation, before their final maturation in the spleen, has not been elucidated. We show here that immature B cells fail to home to the lymph nodes. These cells can actively exclude themselves from antigen-enriched sites by downregulating their integrin-mediated adhesion to the extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin. This inhibition is mediated by interferon gamma secretion. Perturbation of interferon gamma activity in vivo leads to the homing of immature B cells to the lymph nodes. This is the first example of autocrine regulation of immune cell migration to sites of foreign antigen presentation. PMID:11067886

  20. PI3K{gamma} activation by CXCL12 regulates tumor cell adhesion and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Monterrubio, Maria; Mellado, Mario; Carrera, Ana C.

    2009-10-16

    Tumor dissemination is a complex process, in which certain steps resemble those in leukocyte homing. Specific chemokine/chemokine receptor pairs have important roles in both processes. CXCL12/CXCR4 is the most commonly expressed chemokine/chemokine receptor pair in human cancers, in which it regulates cell adhesion, extravasation, metastatic colonization, angiogenesis, and proliferation. All of these processes require activation of signaling pathways that include G proteins, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), JAK kinases, Rho GTPases, and focal adhesion-associated proteins. We analyzed these pathways in a human melanoma cell line in response to CXCL12 stimulation, and found that PI3K{gamma} regulates tumor cell adhesion through mechanisms different from those involved in cell invasion. Our data indicate that, following CXCR4 activation after CXCL12 binding, the invasion and adhesion processes are regulated differently by distinct downstream events in these signaling cascades.

  1. Neutron monitoring systems including gamma thermometers and methods of calibrating nuclear instruments using gamma thermometers

    DOEpatents

    Moen, Stephan Craig; Meyers, Craig Glenn; Petzen, John Alexander; Foard, Adam Muhling

    2012-08-07

    A method of calibrating a nuclear instrument using a gamma thermometer may include: measuring, in the instrument, local neutron flux; generating, from the instrument, a first signal proportional to the neutron flux; measuring, in the gamma thermometer, local gamma flux; generating, from the gamma thermometer, a second signal proportional to the gamma flux; compensating the second signal; and calibrating a gain of the instrument based on the compensated second signal. Compensating the second signal may include: calculating selected yield fractions for specific groups of delayed gamma sources; calculating time constants for the specific groups; calculating a third signal that corresponds to delayed local gamma flux based on the selected yield fractions and time constants; and calculating the compensated second signal by subtracting the third signal from the second signal. The specific groups may have decay time constants greater than 5.times.10.sup.-1 seconds and less than 5.times.10.sup.5 seconds.

  2. Photodetectors for the Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Robert G.; Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System AGIS Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a concept for the next generation very high energy gamma-ray observatory. Design goals include an order of magnitude better sensitivity, better angular resolution, and a lower energy threshold than existing Cherenkov telescopes. Each telescope is equipped with a camera that detects and records the Cherenkov-light flashes from air showers. The camera is comprised of a pixelated focal plane of blue sensitive and fast (nanosecond) photon detectors that detect the photon signal and convert it into an electrical one. Given the scale of AGIS, the camera must be reliable and cost effective. The Schwarzschild-Couder optical design yields a smaller plate scale than present-day Cherenkov telescopes, enabling the use of more compact, multi-pixel devices, including multianode photomultipliers or Geiger avalanche photodiodes. We present the conceptual design of the focal plane for the camera and results from testing candidate! focal plane sensors.

  3. Endocannabinoid Regulation of Neuroendocrine Systems.

    PubMed

    Tasker, Jeffrey G; Chen, Chun; Fisher, Marc O; Fu, Xin; Rainville, Jennifer R; Weiss, Grant L

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a part of the brain that is critical for sustaining life through its homeostatic control and integrative regulation of the autonomic nervous system and neuroendocrine systems. Neuroendocrine function in mammals is mediated mainly through the control of pituitary hormone secretion by diverse neuroendocrine cell groups in the hypothalamus. Cannabinoid receptors are expressed throughout the hypothalamus, and endocannabinoids have been found to exert pronounced regulatory effects on neuroendocrine function via modulation of the outputs of several neuroendocrine systems. Here, we review the physiological regulation of neuroendocrine function by endocannabinoids, focusing on the role of endocannabinoids in the neuroendocrine regulation of the stress response, food intake, fluid homeostasis, and reproductive function. Cannabis sativa (marijuana) has a long history of recreational and/or medicinal use dating back to ancient times. It was used as an analgesic, anesthetic, and antianxiety herb as early as 2600 B.C. The hedonic, anxiolytic, and mood-elevating properties of cannabis have also been cited in ancient records from different cultures. However, it was not until 1964 that the psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, was isolated and its chemical structure determined (Gaoni & Mechoulam, 1964). PMID:26638767

  4. Negative transcriptional regulation of the interferon-gamma promoter by glucocorticoids and dominant negative mutants of c-Jun.

    PubMed

    Cippitelli, M; Sica, A; Viggiano, V; Ye, J; Ghosh, P; Birrer, M J; Young, H A

    1995-05-26

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is an immunoregulatory cytokine expressed in large granular lymphocytes and T cells. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying IFN-gamma gene transcription have not been fully defined. Here, we analyze the mechanisms responsible for the inhibition of IFN-gamma promoter activity by the glucocorticoid hormone dexamethasone. Cotransfection assays performed in Jurkat T cells demonstrated that the activity of the initial 108 base pairs of the IFN-gamma promoter was down-regulated in the presence of dexamethasone. Furthermore, utilizing electrophoretic mobility shift analysis, we identified activator protein 1 AP-1-cAMP response element binding protein-activating transcription factor (CREB-ATF) binding elements situated in positions of the IFN-gamma promoter previously identified as essential for promoter activity. Moreover, dominant negative mutants of the c-Jun proto-oncogene were able to mimic the same down-regulatory effect exerted by dexamethasone, and mutations that abolished the binding of the AP-1 CREB-ATF factors were able to block the glucocorticoid effect. These results suggest a model involving the inhibition of IFN-gamma AP-1 CREB-ATF DNA binding complexes as one of the mechanisms involved in the negative regulatory action of glucocorticoids on IFN-gamma gene expression and support the relevance of AP-1 CREB-ATF binding factors during the transcriptional activation of the IFN-gamma promoter in T cells. PMID:7759501

  5. 21 CFR 862.1360 - Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1360 Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and isoenzymes test system....

  6. 21 CFR 862.1360 - Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1360 Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and isoenzymes test system....

  7. Laser System for Livermore's Mono Energetic Gamma-Ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D; Albert, F; Bayramian, A; Marsh, R; Messerly, M; Ebbers, C; Hartemann, F

    2011-03-14

    A Mono-energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source, based on Compton scattering of a high-intensity laser beam off a highly relativistic electron beam, requires highly specialized laser systems. To minimize the bandwidth of the {gamma}-ray beam, the scattering laser must have minimal bandwidth, but also match the electron beam depth of focus in length. This requires a {approx}1 J, 10 ps, fourier-transform-limited laser system. Also required is a high-brightness electron beam, best provided by a photoinjector. This electron source requires a second laser system with stringent requirements on the beam including flat transverse and longitudinal profiles and fast rise times. Furthermore, these systems must be synchronized to each other with ps-scale accuracy. Using a novel hyper-dispersion compressor configuration and advanced fiber amplifiers and diode-pumped Nd:YAG amplifiers, we have designed laser systems that meet these challenges for the X-band photoinjector and Compton-scattering source being built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  8. Gamma-quanta onboard identification in the GAMMA-400 experiment using the counting and triggers signals formation system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Chasovikov, E. N.; Galper, A. M.; Kheymits, M. D.; Murchenko, A. E.; Yurkin, Y. T.

    2016-02-01

    GAMMA-400 (Gamma Astronomical Multifunctional Modular Apparatus) will be the new generation satellite gamma-observatory. Gamma-telescope GAMMA-400 consists of anticoincidence system (top and lateral sections - ACtop and AClat), the converter-tracker (C), time-of-flight system (2 sections S1 and S2), position-sensitive calorimeter CC1 makes of 2 strips layers and 2 layers of CsI(Tl) detectors, electromagnetic calorimeter CC2 composed of CsI(Tl) crystals, neutron detector ND, scintillation detectors of the calorimeter (S3 and S4) and lateral detectors of the calorimeter (LD). All detector systems ACtop, AClat, S1-S4, LD consist of two BC-408 based sensitive layers of 1 cm thickness each. Three apertures provide events registration both from upper and lateral directions. The main aperture provides the best angular (all strip layers information analysis) and energy (energy deposition in the all detectors studying) resolution. Gamma-telescope GAMMA-400 is optimized for the gamma-quanta and charged particles with energy 100 GeV detection with the best parameters in the main aperture. Triggers in the main aperture will be formed using information about particle direction provided by time of flight system and presence of charged particle or backsplash signal formed according to analysis of energy deposition in combination of both layers anticoincidence systems ACtop and AClat individual detectors. For double-layer ACtop taking into account both amplitude and temporal trigger marker onboard analysis only 2.8% photons will be wrongly recognized as electrons or protons for 100 GeV particles. The part of charged particles mistakenly identified as gammas is ∼10-5 using described algorithms. For E∼3 GeV less than 3% photons will be wrongly recognized as charged particles and fraction of wrongly identified charged particles will be also ∼10-5. In the additional aperture the particles identification is provided by analysis of signals corresponding to energy deposition in the

  9. Minimum Detectable Activity for Tomographic Gamma Scanning System

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataraman, Ram; Smith, Susan; Kirkpatrick, J. M.; Croft, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    For any radiation measurement system, it is useful to explore and establish the detection limits and a minimum detectable activity (MDA) for the radionuclides of interest, even if the system is to be used at far higher values. The MDA serves as an important figure of merit, and often a system is optimized and configured so that it can meet the MDA requirements of a measurement campaign. The non-destructive assay (NDA) systems based on gamma ray analysis are no exception and well established conventions, such the Currie method, exist for estimating the detection limits and the MDA. However, the Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) technique poses some challenges for the estimation of detection limits and MDAs. The TGS combines high resolution gamma ray spectrometry (HRGS) with low spatial resolution image reconstruction techniques. In non-imaging gamma ray based NDA techniques measured counts in a full energy peak can be used to estimate the activity of a radionuclide, independently of other counting trials. However, in the case of the TGS each “view” is a full spectral grab (each a counting trial), and each scan consists of 150 spectral grabs in the transmission and emission scans per vertical layer of the item. The set of views in a complete scan are then used to solve for the radionuclide activities on a voxel by voxel basis, over 16 layers of a 10x10 voxel grid. Thus, the raw count data are not independent trials any more, but rather constitute input to a matrix solution for the emission image values at the various locations inside the item volume used in the reconstruction. So, the validity of the methods used to estimate MDA for an imaging technique such as TGS warrant a close scrutiny, because the pair-counting concept of Currie is not directly applicable. One can also raise questions as to whether the TGS, along with other image reconstruction techniques which heavily intertwine data, is a suitable method if one expects to measure samples whose activities

  10. A mobile tomographic gamma camera system for acute studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, S.; Holmberg, M.; Larsson, H.

    1997-04-01

    A mobile tomographic gamma camera system, called Cardiotom Mark 1, has been developed for imaging the myocardium and other small organs. The Cardiotom system is based on a tomographic technique, ectomography, which is a limited view angle method using a rotating slant hole collimator (RSHC) and a stationary detector to produce projection images. This enables the ectomographic system to be implemented as a mobile system. With the system developed, almost 200 perfusion studies have been performed. The system is based on a second-hand detector and a 30{degree} RSHC. By segmenting the collimator, total system efficiency is increased and acquisition time can be reduced by a factor equal to the number of segments. The system developed is PC-based and totally self-contained with data acquisition, reconstruction, and image presentation. The mobility of the system and the fact that the examination requires no patient cooperation enable acute studies of myocardial perfusion in the critically ill patient, either in the intensive care unit or the emergency room. A mobile system with three-dimensional imaging can offer new possibilities in cardiological research and diagnosis.

  11. A Mobile Automated Tomographic Gamma Scanning System - 13231

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, J.M.; LeBlanc, P.J.; Nakazawa, D.; Petroka, D.L.; Kane Smith, S.; Venkataraman, R.; Villani, M.

    2013-07-01

    Canberra Industries have recently designed and built a new automated Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) system for mobile deployment. The TGS technique combines high-resolution gamma spectroscopy with low spatial resolution 3-dimensional image reconstruction to provide increased accuracy over traditional approaches for the assay of non-uniform source distributions in low-to medium-density, non-heterogeneous matrices. Originally pioneered by R. Estep at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the TGS method has been further developed and commercialized by Canberra Industries in recent years. The present system advances the state of the art on several fronts: it is designed to be housed in a standard cargo transport container for ease of transport, allowing waste characterization at multiple facilities under the purview of a single operator. Conveyor feed, drum rotator, and detector and collimator positioning mechanisms operated by programmable logic control (PLC) allow automated batch mode operation. The variable geometry settings can accommodate a wide range of waste packaging, including but not limited to standard 220 liter drums, 380 liter overpack drums, and smaller 20 liter cans. A 20 mCi Eu-152 transmission source provides attenuation corrections for drum matrices up to 1 g/cm{sup 3} in TGS mode; the system can be operated in Segmented Gamma Scanning (SGS) mode to measure higher density drums. To support TGS assays at higher densities, the source shield is sufficient to house an alternate Co-60 transmission source of higher activity, up to 250 mCi. An automated shutter and attenuator assembly is provided for operating the system with a dual intensity transmission source. The system's 1500 kg capacity rotator turntable can handle heavy containers such as concrete lined 380 liter overpack drums. Finally, data acquisition utilizes Canberra's Broad Energy Germanium (BEGE) detector and Lynx MCA, with 32 k channels, providing better than 0.1 keV/channel resolution to

  12. Shunt regulation electric power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, W. H.; Bless, J. J. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A regulated electric power system having load and return bus lines is described. A plurality of solar cells interconnected in a power supplying relationship and having a power shunt tap point electrically spaced from the bus lines is provided. A power dissipator is connected to the shunt tap point and provides for a controllable dissipation of excess energy supplied by the solar cells. A dissipation driver is coupled to the power dissipator and controls its conductance and dissipation and is also connected to the solar cells in a power taping relationship to derive operating power therefrom. An error signal generator is coupled to the load bus and to a reference signal generator to provide an error output signal which is representative of the difference between the electric parameters existing at the load bus and the reference signal generator. An error amplifier is coupled to the error signal generator and the dissipation driver to provide the driver with controlling signals.

  13. Gamma ray bursts as a signature for entangled gravitational systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basini, Giuseppe; Capozziello, Salvatore; Longo, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    Gamma ray bursts (GRBs), due to their features, can be considered not only extremely energetic, but also as the most relativistic astrophysical objects discovered. Their phenomenology is still matter of debate and, till now, no fully satisfactory model has been formulated to explain the nature of their origin. In the framework of a recently developed new theory, where general conservation laws are always and absolutely conserved in nature, we propose an alternative model where an ``entangled'' gravitational system, dynamically constituted by a black holes connected to a white hole through a worm hole, seems capable of explaining most of the properties inferred for the GRB engine. In particular, it leads to a natural explanation of energetics, beaming, polarization, and, very likely, distribution. On the other hand, GRBs can be considered a signature of such entangled gravitational systems.

  14. IFN gamma regulates proliferation and neuronal differentiation by STAT1 in adult SVZ niche.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Leticia; Medina, Rebeca; Baena, Miguel; Planas, Anna M; Pozas, Esther

    2015-01-01

    The adult subventricular zone (SVZ) is the main neurogenic niche in normal adult brains of mice and rats. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) has somewhat controversially been associated with SVZ progenitor proliferation and neurogenesis. The in vivo involvement of IFNγ in the physiology of the adult SVZ niche is not fully understood and its intracellular mediators are unknown. Here we show that IFNγ, through activation of its canonical signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) pathway, acts specifically on Nestin+ progenitors by decreasing both progenitor proliferation and the number of cycling cells. In addition, IFNγ increases the number of neuroblasts generated without shifting glial fate determination. The final result is deficient recruitment of newborn neurons to the olfactory bulb (OB), indicating that IFNγ-induced stimulation of neuronal differentiation does not compensate for its antiproliferative effect. We conclude that IFNγ signaling via STAT1 in the SVZ acts dually as an antiproliferative and proneurogenic factor, and thereby regulates neurogenesis in normal adult brains.

  15. Automatic pneumatic source-control system for positioning gamma and neutron calibration sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, G.F.

    1980-10-17

    A microcomputer-based source-control system was developed to move gamma and neutron calibration sources into position for sample irradiation. In addition to monitoring interlocks and system status, the computer calculates for gamma sources the time required for a requested exposure at a specified distance. All system use data is stored, and monthly reports are generated.

  16. Method and System for Gamma-Ray Localization Induced Spacecraft Navigation Using Celestial Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheikh, Suneel I. (Inventor); Hisamoto, Chuck (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and system for spacecraft navigation using distant celestial gamma-ray bursts which offer detectable, bright, high-energy events that provide well-defined characteristics conducive to accurate time-alignment among spatially separated spacecraft. Utilizing assemblages of photons from distant gamma-ray bursts, relative range between two spacecraft can be accurately computed along the direction to each burst's source based upon the difference in arrival time of the burst emission at each spacecraft's location. Correlation methods used to time-align the high-energy burst profiles are provided. The spacecraft navigation may be carried out autonomously or in a central control mode of operation.

  17. Operational Management System for Regulated Water Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loenen, A.; van Dijk, M.; van Verseveld, W.; Berger, H.

    2012-04-01

    Most of the Dutch large rivers, canals and lakes are controlled by the Dutch water authorities. The main reasons concern safety, navigation and fresh water supply. Historically the separate water bodies have been controlled locally. For optimizating management of these water systems an integrated approach was required. Presented is a platform which integrates data from all control objects for monitoring and control purposes. The Operational Management System for Regulated Water Systems (IWP) is an implementation of Delft-FEWS which supports operational control of water systems and actively gives advice. One of the main characteristics of IWP is that is real-time collects, transforms and presents different types of data, which all add to the operational water management. Next to that, hydrodynamic models and intelligent decision support tools are added to support the water managers during their daily control activities. An important advantage of IWP is that it uses the Delft-FEWS framework, therefore processes like central data collection, transformations, data processing and presentation are simply configured. At all control locations the same information is readily available. The operational water management itself gains from this information, but it can also contribute to cost efficiency (no unnecessary pumping), better use of available storage and advise during (water polution) calamities.

  18. The agile alert system for gamma-ray transients

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgarelli, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Gianotti, F.; Fioretti, V.; Chen, A. W.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Santolamazza, P.; Fanari, G.; Giommi, P.; Pellizzoni, A.; and others

    2014-01-20

    In recent years, a new generation of space missions has offered great opportunities for discovery in high-energy astrophysics. In this article we focus on the scientific operations of the Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) on board the AGILE space mission. AGILE-GRID, sensitive in the energy range of 30 MeV-30 GeV, has detected many γ-ray transients of both galactic and extragalactic origin. This work presents the AGILE innovative approach to fast γ-ray transient detection, which is a challenging task and a crucial part of the AGILE scientific program. The goals are to describe (1) the AGILE Gamma-Ray Alert System, (2) a new algorithm for blind search identification of transients within a short processing time, (3) the AGILE procedure for γ-ray transient alert management, and (4) the likelihood of ratio tests that are necessary to evaluate the post-trial statistical significance of the results. Special algorithms and an optimized sequence of tasks are necessary to reach our goal. Data are automatically analyzed at every orbital downlink by an alert pipeline operating on different timescales. As proper flux thresholds are exceeded, alerts are automatically generated and sent as SMS messages to cellular telephones, via e-mail, and via push notifications from an application for smartphones and tablets. These alerts are crosschecked with the results of two pipelines, and a manual analysis is performed. Being a small scientific-class mission, AGILE is characterized by optimization of both scientific analysis and ground-segment resources. The system is capable of generating alerts within two to three hours of a data downlink, an unprecedented reaction time in γ-ray astrophysics.

  19. The AGILE Alert System for Gamma-Ray Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Gianotti, F.; Tavani, M.; Parmiggiani, N.; Fioretti, V.; Chen, A. W.; Vercellone, S.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Santolamazza, P.; Fanari, G.; Giommi, P.; Beneventano, D.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.; Scalise, E.; Longo, F.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pucella, G.; Colafrancesco, S.; Conforti, V.; Tempesta, P.; Cerone, M.; Sabatini, P.; Annoni, G.; Valentini, G.; Salotti, L.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a new generation of space missions has offered great opportunities for discovery in high-energy astrophysics. In this article we focus on the scientific operations of the Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) on board the AGILE space mission. AGILE-GRID, sensitive in the energy range of 30 MeV-30 GeV, has detected many γ-ray transients of both galactic and extragalactic origin. This work presents the AGILE innovative approach to fast γ-ray transient detection, which is a challenging task and a crucial part of the AGILE scientific program. The goals are to describe (1) the AGILE Gamma-Ray Alert System, (2) a new algorithm for blind search identification of transients within a short processing time, (3) the AGILE procedure for γ-ray transient alert management, and (4) the likelihood of ratio tests that are necessary to evaluate the post-trial statistical significance of the results. Special algorithms and an optimized sequence of tasks are necessary to reach our goal. Data are automatically analyzed at every orbital downlink by an alert pipeline operating on different timescales. As proper flux thresholds are exceeded, alerts are automatically generated and sent as SMS messages to cellular telephones, via e-mail, and via push notifications from an application for smartphones and tablets. These alerts are crosschecked with the results of two pipelines, and a manual analysis is performed. Being a small scientific-class mission, AGILE is characterized by optimization of both scientific analysis and ground-segment resources. The system is capable of generating alerts within two to three hours of a data downlink, an unprecedented reaction time in γ-ray astrophysics.

  20. Instructions for calibrating gamma detectors using the Canberra-Nuclear Data Genie Gamma Spectroscopy System

    SciTech Connect

    Brunk, J.L.

    1995-09-01

    A straight forward protocol provides a way to guide the calibration of a gamma detector for a particular geometry and material. Several programs have used the Low Level Gamma Counting Facility of the Health and Ecological Assessment Division of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to count a variety of large environmental samples contained in several unique geometries. The equipment and calibration requirements needed to analyze these types of samples are explained. This document describes the calibration protocol that has been developed and describes how it is used to calibrate the detectors.

  1. The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS): Science Highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, J.; Coppi, P.; Digel, S.; Funk, S.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Pohl, M.; Romani, R.; Vassiliev, V.; /UCLA

    2011-11-21

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS), a future gamma-ray telescope consisting of an array of {approx}50 atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes distributed over an area of {approx}1 km{sup 2}, will provide a powerful new tool for exploring the high-energy universe. The order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity and improved angular resolution could provide the first detailed images of {gamma}-ray emission from other nearby galaxies or galaxy clusters. The large effective area will provide unprecedented sensitivity to short transients (such as flares from AGNs and GRBs) probing both intrinsic spectral variability (revealing the details of the acceleration mechanism and geometry) as well as constraining the high-energy dispersion in the velocity of light (probing the structure of spacetime and Lorentz invariance). A wide field of view ({approx}4 times that of current instruments) and excellent angular resolution (several times better than current instruments) will allow for an unprecedented survey of the Galactic plane, providing a deep unobscured survey of SNRs, X-ray binaries, pulsar-wind nebulae, molecular cloud complexes and other sources. The differential flux sensitivity of {approx}10{sup -13} erg cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} will rival the most sensitive X-ray instruments for these extended Galactic sources. The excellent capabilities of AGIS at energies below 100 GeV will provide sensitivity to AGN and GRBs out to cosmological redshifts, increasing the number of AGNs detected at high energies from about 20 to more than 100, permitting population studies that will provide valuable insights into both a unified model for AGN and a detailed measurement of the effects of intergalactic absorption from the diffuse extragalactic background light. A new instrument with fast-slewing wide-field telescopes could provide detections of a number of long-duration GRBs providing important physical constraints from this new spectral component. The new array will also have excellent

  2. Molecular characterization, transcriptional activity and nutritional regulation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    He, An-Yuan; Liu, Cai-Zhi; Chen, Li-Qiao; Ning, Li-Jun; Qin, Jian-Guang; Li, Jia-Ming; Zhang, Mei-Ling; Du, Zhen-Yu

    2015-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a master regulator in lipid metabolism and widely exists in vertebrates. However, the molecular structure and transcriptional activity of PPARγ in fish are still unclear. This study cloned PPARγ from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) referred as NtPPARγ and transfected the NtPPARγ plasmids into HEK-293 cells to explore its mechanism of transcriptional regulation in fish. The expression of NtPPARγ was compared in fed and fasted fish. Two transcripts of NtPPARγ varied at the 5'-untranslated region and the DNA binding domain was highly conserved. Thirty-nine amino acid residues in the ligand binding domain in Nile tilapia were different from those in human. Two transcripts showed different expression profiles in 11 tissues, but both were highly expressed in liver, intestine and kidney. The transcriptional activity assay showed that NtPPARγ collaborates with retinoid X-receptor α (NtRXRα) to regulate the expression of Nile tilapia fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), the compartment of which have been identified as the target gene of PPARγ in human. In the fish fasting trial, the mRNA expression of NtPPARγ1 and NtPPARγ2 in intestine and liver at 3h post-feeding (HPF) was lower than those at 8 HPF, 24 HPF and in fish fasted for 36h, but was relatively stable in kidney among different feeding treatments. In conclusion, the DNA binding domain in PPARγ was highly conserved, while the ligand binding domain was moderately conserved. In Nile tilapia, the PPARγ collaborates with RXRα to perform transcriptional regulation of FABP4 at least in vitro. The plasmid system established in this study along with a cell line from Nile tilapia will be useful tools for the further functional study of PPARγ in fish.

  3. Molecular characterization, transcriptional activity and nutritional regulation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    He, An-Yuan; Liu, Cai-Zhi; Chen, Li-Qiao; Ning, Li-Jun; Qin, Jian-Guang; Li, Jia-Ming; Zhang, Mei-Ling; Du, Zhen-Yu

    2015-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a master regulator in lipid metabolism and widely exists in vertebrates. However, the molecular structure and transcriptional activity of PPARγ in fish are still unclear. This study cloned PPARγ from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) referred as NtPPARγ and transfected the NtPPARγ plasmids into HEK-293 cells to explore its mechanism of transcriptional regulation in fish. The expression of NtPPARγ was compared in fed and fasted fish. Two transcripts of NtPPARγ varied at the 5'-untranslated region and the DNA binding domain was highly conserved. Thirty-nine amino acid residues in the ligand binding domain in Nile tilapia were different from those in human. Two transcripts showed different expression profiles in 11 tissues, but both were highly expressed in liver, intestine and kidney. The transcriptional activity assay showed that NtPPARγ collaborates with retinoid X-receptor α (NtRXRα) to regulate the expression of Nile tilapia fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), the compartment of which have been identified as the target gene of PPARγ in human. In the fish fasting trial, the mRNA expression of NtPPARγ1 and NtPPARγ2 in intestine and liver at 3h post-feeding (HPF) was lower than those at 8 HPF, 24 HPF and in fish fasted for 36h, but was relatively stable in kidney among different feeding treatments. In conclusion, the DNA binding domain in PPARγ was highly conserved, while the ligand binding domain was moderately conserved. In Nile tilapia, the PPARγ collaborates with RXRα to perform transcriptional regulation of FABP4 at least in vitro. The plasmid system established in this study along with a cell line from Nile tilapia will be useful tools for the further functional study of PPARγ in fish. PMID:26002036

  4. The importance of glutamate, glycine, and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid transport and regulation in manganese, mercury and lead neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Fitsanakis, Vanessa A.; Aschner, Michael . E-mail: michael.aschner@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-05-01

    Historically, amino acids were studied in the context of their importance in protein synthesis. In the 1950s, the focus of research shifted as amino acids were recognized as putative neurotransmitters. Today, many amino acids are considered important neurochemicals. Although many amino acids play a role in neurotransmission, glutamate (Glu), glycine (Gly), and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are among the more prevalent and better understood. Glu, the major excitatory neurotransmitter, and Gly and GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitters, in the central nervous system, are known to be tightly regulated. Prolonged exposure to environmental toxicants, such as manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), or lead (Pb), however, can lead to dysregulation of these neurochemicals and subsequent neurotoxicity. While the ability of these metals to disrupt the regulation of Glu, Gly and GABA have been studied, few articles have examined the collective role of these amino acids in the respective metal's mechanism of toxicity. For each of the neurotransmitters above, we will provide a brief synopsis of their regulatory function, including the importance of transport and re-uptake in maintaining their optimal function. Additionally, the review will address the hypothesis that aberrant homeostasis of any of these amino acids, or a combination of the three, plays a role in the neurotoxicity of Mn, Hg, or Pb.

  5. A Case Study Correlating Innovative Gamma Ray Scanning Detection Systems Data to Surface Soil Gamma Spectrometry Results - 13580

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Shannon; Rodriguez, Rene; Billock, Paul; Lit, Peter

    2013-07-01

    HydroGeoLogic (HGL), Inc. completed a United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) study to characterize radiological contamination at a site near Canoga Park, California. The characterized area contained 470 acres including the site of a prototype commercial nuclear reactor and other nuclear design, testing, and support operations from the 1950's until 1988 [1]. The site history included radiological releases during operation followed by D and D activities. The characterization was conducted under an accelerated schedule and the results will support the project remediation. The project has a rigorous cleanup to background agenda and does not allow for comparison to risk-based guidelines. To target soil sample locations, multiple lines of evidence were evaluated including a gamma radiation survey, geophysical surveys, historical site assessment, aerial photographs, and former worker interviews. Due to the time since production and decay, the primary gamma emitting radionuclide remaining is cesium-137 (Cs-137). The gamma ray survey covered diverse, rugged terrain using custom designed sodium iodide thallium-activated (NaI(Tl)) scintillation detection systems. The survey goals included attaining 100% ground surface coverage and detecting gamma radiation as sensitively as possible. The effectiveness of innovative gamma ray detection systems was tested by correlating field Cs-137 static count ratios to Cs-137 laboratory gamma spectrometry results. As a case study, the area encompassing the former location of the first nuclear power station in the U. S. was scanned, and second by second global positioning system (GPS)-linked gamma spectral data were evaluated by examining total count rate and nuclide-specific regions of interest. To compensate for Compton scattering from higher energy naturally occurring radionuclides (U-238, Th-232 and their progeny, and K-40), count rate ratios of anthropogenic nuclide-specific regions of interest to the total count rate were

  6. Up-regulation of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activity in growth perturbed C6 astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mares, V; Malík, R; Lisá, V; Sedo, A

    2005-05-20

    Activity of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) was studied in astrocyte-like C6 glial cells modulated in growth and maturation by different concentration of serum and dibutyryl cyclic AMP (Db-cAMP) supplement in culture medium. After reduction of serum concentration from 10% to 0.1%, the number of GGT positive cells determined histochemically increased 3.1 times and the GGT activity/mg protein in whole cell lysates was 5.1 times higher. In cultures with 0.1% serum + Db-cAMP, the histochemically and biochemically assayed GGT activity exceeded 5.1 and 7.9 times the values measured in control 10% serum cultures, respectively. The up-regulation of GGT was accompanied by an inhibition of proliferation, enhanced differentiation and hypertrophy of cells. In addition, the process of metabolic perturbation and/or cellular stress was revealed in these cultures by the (i) growth-support release followed by shrinkage and death of a small number of cells and (ii) higher oxidation of 2'7'dichlorofluorescein diacetate to its fluorescent form in the adherent/viable cells. The observed up-regulation of GGT is considered to primarily reflect increased metabolism of glutathione and/or the maintenance of the redox potential in cells stressed by sub-optimal concentration of serum and Db-cAMP supplement. The concomitant cellular hypertrophy and differentiation and their relationship to increased activity of GGT await further investigation. The study suggests that up-regulation of GGT can contribute to adaptation of astrocytic cells to metabolic and/or oxidative perturbances occurring under various pathological conditions, including radiation- and drug-induced toxicity. PMID:15893589

  7. Identification of artificial gamma-emitting nuclides using a scintillator-based gamma-ray spectral logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Conaway, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    The standard spectral gamma ray logging system used at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) contains a large sodium iodide detector which provides high efficiency but low energy resolution. To enhance the capabilities of this system for identifying artificial gamma-emitting nuclides, I developed and implemented a simple procedure for extracting artificial components from low-resolution gamma-ray spectra. This procedures uses three bias spectra, developed by a consultant using numerical modeling, representing the spectral response of the downhole instrument to naturally occurring potassium, uranium and thorium family gamma rays in a large-diameter air-filled borehole. To extract the artificial spectral components, the three basis spectra are first scaled to the recorded field spectrum using the usual spectral windows for K, U and Th; these windows bracket the photopeaks at 1.46, 1.76 and 2.61 MeV. Since most of the contribution from artificial nuclides will fall below 1.26 MeV (the lower limit of the potassium window) this scaling process should be insensitive to the presence of artificial nuclides. The scaled basis spectra are then subtracted from the field data, leaving a residual spectrum consisting of noise plus the contribution of any artificial gamma-emitting nuclides. This process is repeated for each spectrum in the log, or the spectra can be accumulated over any desired depth range for better statistics. Rather than inspect each spectrum visually, a parameter can be computed which indicates the presence of artificial nuclides; this parameter can be plotted along with the usual K, U and Th concentration estimates as a function of depth. These techniques have been used successfully on field data and provide us with an inexpensive screening tool to detect artificial nuclides along boreholes. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Measurements of alpha-gamma coincidences with an optimized dual-parameter multichannel system.

    PubMed

    Jurado Vargas, M; Caro Marroyo, B; Martín Sánchez, A

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of alpha-gamma coincidences have usually been carried out using a single channel to detect alpha-particles of a given energy, and a multichannel analyser for the detection of the corresponding coincident gamma-rays. An alpha-gamma coincidence chamber coupled to the electronic chain ending with a dual-parameter multichannel analyser has been developed and optimized. This system simultaneously stores alpha-particle, gamma-ray, and alpha-gamma coincidence spectra, which allows a general analysis to be made of the degree of coincidence between each alpha-particle and each gamma-ray emission. With this technique, a two-dimensional spectrum was obtained and analysed using "contour graphics". An application to the study of the decay scheme of (241)Am is described. PMID:24140879

  9. Estrogen-related receptor gamma regulates dopaminergic neuronal phenotype by activating GSK3β/NFAT signaling in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Juhee; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Choi, Hyun Jin

    2015-05-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) is highly expressed in the nervous system during embryogenesis and in adult brains, but its physiological role in neuronal development remains unknown. In this study, we evaluated the relevance of ERRγ in regulating dopaminergic (DAergic) phenotype and the corresponding signaling pathway. We used retinoic acid (RA) to differentiate human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. RA induced neurite outgrowth of SH-SY5Y cells with an increase in DAergic neuron-like properties, including up-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine transporter, and vesicular monoamine transporter 2. ERRγ, but not ERRα, was up-regulated by RA, and participated in RA effect on SH-SY5Y cells. ERRγ over-expression enhanced mature DAergic neuronal phenotype with neurite outgrowth as with RA treatment; and RA-induced increase in DAergic phenotype was attenuated by silencing ERRγ expression. ERRγ appears to have a crucial role in morphological and functional regulation of cells that is selective for DAergic neurons. Polo-like kinase 2 was up-regulated in ERRγ-over-expressing SH-SY5Y cells, which was involved in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and resulting downstream activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells. The likely involvement of ERRγ in regulating the DAergic neuronal phenotype makes this orphan nuclear receptor a novel target for understanding DAergic neuronal differentiation. We propose the relevance of estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) in regulating dopaminergic neuronal phenotype: ERRγ is up-regulated by retinoic acid in SH-SY5Y cells, and enhances dopaminergic phenotypes and induces neurite outgrowth; Polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta/nuclear factor of activated T cells (GSK3β/NFAT) signaling are responsible for the ERRγ effect. Our findings provide the first insights into the role of ERRγ in the brain, as a novel approach toward understanding

  10. SER Analysis of MPPM-Coded MIMO-FSO System over Uncorrelated and Correlated Gamma-Gamma Atmospheric Turbulence Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khallaf, Haitham S.; Garrido-Balsells, José M.; Shalaby, Hossam M. H.; Sampei, Seiichi

    2015-12-01

    The performance of multiple-input multiple-output free space optical (MIMO-FSO) communication systems, that adopt multipulse pulse position modulation (MPPM) techniques, is analyzed. Both exact and approximate symbol-error rates (SERs) are derived for both cases of uncorrelated and correlated channels. The effects of background noise, receiver shot-noise, and atmospheric turbulence are taken into consideration in our analysis. The random fluctuations of the received optical irradiance, produced by the atmospheric turbulence, is modeled by the widely used gamma-gamma statistical distribution. Uncorrelated MIMO channels are modeled by the α-μ distribution. A closed-form expression for the probability density function of the optical received irradiance is derived for the case of correlated MIMO channels. Using our analytical expressions, the degradation of the system performance with the increment of the correlation coefficients between MIMO channels is corroborated.

  11. IFN gamma regulates proliferation and neuronal differentiation by STAT1 in adult SVZ niche

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Leticia; Medina, Rebeca; Baena, Miguel; Planas, Anna M.; Pozas, Esther

    2015-01-01

    The adult subventricular zone (SVZ) is the main neurogenic niche in normal adult brains of mice and rats. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) has somewhat controversially been associated with SVZ progenitor proliferation and neurogenesis. The in vivo involvement of IFNγ in the physiology of the adult SVZ niche is not fully understood and its intracellular mediators are unknown. Here we show that IFNγ, through activation of its canonical signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) pathway, acts specifically on Nestin+ progenitors by decreasing both progenitor proliferation and the number of cycling cells. In addition, IFNγ increases the number of neuroblasts generated without shifting glial fate determination. The final result is deficient recruitment of newborn neurons to the olfactory bulb (OB), indicating that IFNγ-induced stimulation of neuronal differentiation does not compensate for its antiproliferative effect. We conclude that IFNγ signaling via STAT1 in the SVZ acts dually as an antiproliferative and proneurogenic factor, and thereby regulates neurogenesis in normal adult brains. PMID:26217191

  12. Innovative Gamma Ray Spectrometer Detection Systems for Conducting Scanning Surveys on Challenging Terrain - 13583

    SciTech Connect

    Palladino, Carl; Mason, Bryan; Engle, Matt; LeVangie, James; Dempsey, Gregg; Klemovich, Ron

    2013-07-01

    The Santa Susana Field Laboratory located near Simi Valley, California was investigated to determine the nature and extent of gamma radiation anomalies. The primary objective was to conduct gamma scanning surveys over 100 percent of the approximately 1,906,000 square meters (471 acre) project site with the most sensitive detection system possible. The site had challenging topography that was not conducive to traditional gamma scanning detection systems. Terrain slope varied from horizontal to 48 degrees and the ground surface ranged from flat, grassy meadows to steep, rocky hillsides. In addition, the site was home to many protected endangered plant and animal species, and archaeologically significant sites that required minimal to no disturbance of the ground surface. Therefore, four innovative and unique gamma ray spectrometer detection systems were designed and constructed to successfully conduct gamma scanning surveys of approximately 1,076,000 square meters (266 acres) of the site. (authors)

  13. Neutron interrogation system using high gamma ray signature to detect contraband special nuclear materials in cargo

    DOEpatents

    Slaughter, Dennis R.; Pohl, Bertram A.; Dougan, Arden D.; Bernstein, Adam; Prussin, Stanley G.; Norman, Eric B.

    2008-04-15

    A system for inspecting cargo for the presence of special nuclear material. The cargo is irradiated with neutrons. The neutrons produce fission products in the special nuclear material which generate gamma rays. The gamma rays are detecting indicating the presence of the special nuclear material.

  14. Granule cell excitability regulates gamma and beta oscillations in a model of the olfactory bulb dendrodendritic microcircuit.

    PubMed

    Osinski, Bolesław L; Kay, Leslie M

    2016-08-01

    Odors evoke gamma (40-100 Hz) and beta (20-30 Hz) oscillations in the local field potential (LFP) of the mammalian olfactory bulb (OB). Gamma (and possibly beta) oscillations arise from interactions in the dendrodendritic microcircuit between excitatory mitral cells (MCs) and inhibitory granule cells (GCs). When cortical descending inputs to the OB are blocked, beta oscillations are extinguished whereas gamma oscillations become larger. Much of this centrifugal input targets inhibitory interneurons in the GC layer and regulates the excitability of GCs, which suggests a causal link between the emergence of beta oscillations and GC excitability. We investigate the effect that GC excitability has on network oscillations in a computational model of the MC-GC dendrodendritic network with Ca(2+)-dependent graded inhibition. Results from our model suggest that when GC excitability is low, the graded inhibitory current mediated by NMDA channels and voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) is also low, allowing MC populations to fire in the gamma frequency range. When GC excitability is increased, the activation of NMDA receptors and other VDCCs is also increased, allowing the slow decay time constants of these channels to sustain beta-frequency oscillations. Our model argues that Ca(2+) flow through VDCCs alone could sustain beta oscillations and that the switch between gamma and beta oscillations can be triggered by an increase in the excitability state of a subpopulation of GCs. PMID:27121582

  15. Networked gamma radiation detection system for tactical deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Smith, Ethan; Guss, Paul; Mitchell, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    A networked gamma radiation detection system with directional sensitivity and energy spectral data acquisition capability is being developed by the National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory to support the close and intense tactical engagement of law enforcement who carry out counterterrorism missions. In the proposed design, three clusters of 2″ × 4″ × 16″ sodium iodide crystals (4 each) with digiBASE-E (for list mode data collection) would be placed on the passenger side of a minivan. To enhance localization and facilitate rapid identification of isotopes, advanced smart real-time localization and radioisotope identification algorithms like WAVRAD (wavelet-assisted variance reduction for anomaly detection) and NSCRAD (nuisance-rejection spectral comparison ratio anomaly detection) will be incorporated. We will test a collection of algorithms and analysis that centers on the problem of radiation detection with a distributed sensor network. We will study the basic characteristics of a radiation sensor network and focus on the trade-offs between false positive alarm rates, true positive alarm rates, and time to detect multiple radiation sources in a large area. Empirical and simulation analyses of critical system parameters, such as number of sensors, sensor placement, and sensor response functions, will be examined. This networked system will provide an integrated radiation detection architecture and framework with (i) a large nationally recognized search database equivalent that would help generate a common operational picture in a major radiological crisis; (ii) a robust reach back connectivity for search data to be evaluated by home teams; and, finally, (iii) a possibility of integrating search data from multi-agency responders.

  16. Olfactory system gamma oscillations: the physiological dissection of a cognitive neural system

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Líbano, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Oscillatory phenomena have been a focus of dynamical systems research since the time of the classical studies on the pendulum by Galileo. Fast cortical oscillations also have a long and storied history in neurophysiology, and olfactory oscillations have led the way with a depth of explanation not present in the literature of most other cortical systems. From the earliest studies of odor-evoked oscillations by Adrian, many reports have focused on mechanisms and functional associations of these oscillations, in particular for the so-called gamma oscillations. As a result, much information is now available regarding the biophysical mechanisms that underlie the oscillations in the mammalian olfactory system. Recent studies have expanded on these and addressed functionality directly in mammals and in the analogous insect system. Sub-bands within the rodent gamma oscillatory band associated with specific behavioral and cognitive states have also been identified. All this makes oscillatory neuronal networks a unique interdisciplinary platform from which to study neurocognitive and dynamical phenomena in intact, freely behaving animals. We present here a summary of what has been learned about the functional role and mechanisms of gamma oscillations in the olfactory system as a guide for similar studies in other cortical systems. PMID:19003484

  17. In vivo regulation of gene transcription by alpha- and gamma-Tocopherol in murine T lymphocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Of the 8 different analogues (alpha-, beta-, gamma-, delta-tocopherols and tocotrienols) designated as vitamin E, alpha-tocopherol (a-T) has been mostly studied, together with gamma-tocopherol (g-T) which is abundant in the US diet. We compared the effect of dietary supplementation with adequate or ...

  18. A system for the measurement of delayed neutrons and gammas from special nuclear materials

    DOE PAGES

    Andrews, M. T.; Corcoran, E. C.; Goorley, J. T.; Kelly, D. G.

    2014-11-27

    The delayed neutron counting (DNC) system at the Royal Military College of Canada has been upgraded to accommodate concurrent delayed neutron and gamma measurements. This delayed neutron and gamma counting (DNGC) system uses a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor to irradiate fissile materials before their transfer to a counting arrangement consisting of six ³He and one HPGe detector. The application of this system is demonstrated in an example where delayed neutron and gamma emissions are used in complement to examine ²³³U content and determine fissile mass with an average relative error and accuracy of -2.2 and 1.5 %, respectively.

  19. A system for the measurement of delayed neutrons and gammas from special nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, M. T.; Corcoran, E. C.; Goorley, J. T.; Kelly, D. G.

    2015-03-01

    The delayed neutron counting (DNC) system at the Royal Military College of Canada has been upgraded to accommodate concurrent delayed neutron and gamma measurements. This delayed neutron and gamma counting (DNGC) system uses a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor to irradiate fissile materials before their transfer to a counting arrangement consisting of six ³He and one HPGe detector. The application of this system is demonstrated in an example where delayed neutron and gamma emissions are used in complement to examine ²³³U content and determine fissile mass with an average relative error and accuracy of -2.2 and 1.5 %, respectively.

  20. Development of gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid system for simultaneous imaging of I-131 radionuclide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Suzuki, Mayumi; Kato, Katsuhiko; Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Ogata, Yoshimune; Hatazawa, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Although iodine 131 (I-131) is used for radionuclide therapy, high resolution images are difficult to obtain with conventional gamma cameras because of the high energy of I-131 gamma photons (364 keV). Cerenkov-light imaging is a possible method for beta emitting radionuclides, and I-131 (606 MeV maximum beta energy) is a candidate to obtain high resolution images. We developed a high energy gamma camera system for I-131 radionuclide and combined it with a Cerenkov-light imaging system to form a gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system to compare the simultaneously measured images of these two modalities. The high energy gamma imaging detector used 0.85-mm×0.85-mm×10-mm thick GAGG scintillator pixels arranged in a 44×44 matrix with a 0.1-mm thick reflector and optical coupled to a Hamamatsu 2 in. square position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT: H12700 MOD). The gamma imaging detector was encased in a 2 cm thick tungsten shield, and a pinhole collimator was mounted on its top to form a gamma camera system. The Cerenkov-light imaging system was made of a high sensitivity cooled CCD camera. The Cerenkov-light imaging system was combined with the gamma camera using optical mirrors to image the same area of the subject. With this configuration, we simultaneously imaged the gamma photons and the Cerenkov-light from I-131 in the subjects. The spatial resolution and sensitivity of the gamma camera system for I-131 were respectively ~3 mm FWHM and ~10 cps/MBq for the high sensitivity collimator at 10 cm from the collimator surface. The spatial resolution of the Cerenkov-light imaging system was 0.64 mm FWHM at 10 cm from the system surface. Thyroid phantom and rat images were successfully obtained with the developed gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system, allowing direct comparison of these two modalities. Our developed gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system will be useful to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of these two

  1. Evaluation of 3D Gamma index calculation implemented in two commercial dosimetry systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Aitang; Arumugam, Sankar; Deshpande, Shrikant; George, Armia; Vial, Philip; Holloway, Lois; Goozee, Gary

    2015-01-01

    3D Gamma index is one of the metrics which have been widely used for clinical routine patient specific quality assurance for IMRT, Tomotherapy and VMAT. The algorithms for calculating the 3D Gamma index using global and local methods implemented in two software tools: PTW- VeriSoft® as a part of OCTIVIUS 4D dosimeter systems and 3DVHTM from Sun Nuclear were assessed. The Gamma index calculated by the two systems was compared with manual calculated for one data set. The Gamma pass rate calculated by the two systems was compared using 3%/3mm, 2%/2mm, 3%/2mm and 2%/3mm for two additional data sets. The Gamma indexes calculated by the two systems were accurate, but Gamma pass rates calculated by the two software tools for same data set with the same dose threshold were different due to the different interpolation of raw dose data by the two systems and different implementation of Gamma index calculation and other modules in the two software tools. The mean difference was -1.3%±3.38 (1SD) with a maximum difference of 11.7%.

  2. Multi-gamma-source CT imaging system: a feasibility study with the Poisson noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wi, Sunhee; Cho, Seungryong

    2016-03-01

    This study was performed to test the feasibility of multi-gamma-source CT imaging system. Gamma-source CT employs radioisotopes that emit monochromatic energy gamma-rays. The advantages of gamma-source CT include its immunity to beam hardening artifacts, its capacity of quantitative CT imaging, and its higher performance in low contrast imaging compared to the conventional x-ray CT. Radioisotope should be shielded by use of a pin-hole collimator so as to make a fine focal spot. Due to its low gamma-ray flux in general, the reconstructed image from a single gamma-source CT would suffer from high noise in data. To address this problem, we proposed a multi-gamma source CT imaging system and developed an iterative image reconstruction algorithm accordingly in this work. Conventional imaging model assumes a single linear imaging system typically represented by Mf = g. In a multi-gamma-source CT system however, the inversion problem is not any more based on a single linear system since one cannot separate a detector pixel value into multiple ones that are corresponding to each rays from the sources. Instead, the imaging model can be constructed by a set of linear system models each of which assumes an estimated measurement g. Based on this model, the proposed algorithm has a weighting step which distributes each projection data into multiple estimated measurements. We used two gamma sources at various positions and with varying intensities in this numerical study to demonstrate its feasibility. Therefore, the measured projection data(g) is separated into each estimated projection data(g1, g2) in this study. The proposed imaging protocol is believed to contribute to both medical and industrial applications.

  3. Determination of the optimal positions for installing gamma ray detection systems at Tehran Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayyah, A.; Rahmani, F.; Khalafi, H.

    2015-09-01

    Dosimetric instruments must constantly monitor radiation dose levels in different areas of nuclear reactor. Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) has seven beam tubes for different research purposes. All the beam tubes extend from the reactor core to Beam Port Floor (BPF) of the reactor facility. During the reactor operation, the gamma rays exiting from each beam tube outlet produce a specific gamma dose rate field in the space of the BPF. To effectively monitor the gamma dose rates on the BPF, gamma ray detection systems must be installed in optimal positions. The selection of optimal positions is a compromise between two requirements. First, the installation positions must possess largest gamma dose rates and second, gamma ray detectors must not be saturated in these positions. In this study, calculations and experimental measurements have been carried out to identify the optimal positions of the gamma ray detection systems. Eight three dimensional models of the reactor core and related facilities corresponding to eight scenarios have been simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code to calculate the gamma dose equivalent rate field in the space of the BPF. These facilities are beam tubes, thermal column, pool, BPF space filled with air, facilities such as neutron radiography facility, neutron powder diffraction facility embedded in the beam tubes as well as biological shields inserted into the unused beam tubes. According to the analysis results of the combined gamma dose rate field, three positions on the north side and two positions on the south side of the BPF have been recognized as optimal positions for installing the gamma ray detection systems. To ensure the consistency of the simulation data, experimental measurements were conducted using TLDs (600 and 700) pairs during the reactor operation at 4.5 MW.

  4. [Role of the fusimotor system in regulating shivering].

    PubMed

    Lupandin, Iu V

    1979-10-01

    Spontaneously active gamma-motoneurons were found in muscles of the cat during shivering. The activity of these gamma-motoneurons could be increased by stimulation of thermoreceptors of the subcutaneous vessels and nociceptors. Administration of oxotremorine, nicotin, phentolamine, isoprenaline, and seduxene into the 3rd brain ventricle suppressed the shivering but did not change the firing rate of the gamma-motoneurons. The fusomotor system seems to participate in the segmentary activation of shivering, but not in its supraspinal control. PMID:228996

  5. Real time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials from HPGe gamma-ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Howard, Douglas E.; Wong, James L.; Jessup, James L.; Bianchini, Greg M.; Miller, Wayne O.

    2007-10-23

    A real-time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials which collects gamma count rates from a HPGe gamma-radiation detector to produce a high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum. A library of nuclear material definitions ("library definitions") is provided, with each uniquely associated with a nuclide or isotope material and each comprising at least one logic condition associated with a spectral parameter of a gamma-ray energy spectrum. The method determines whether the spectral parameters of said high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum satisfy all the logic conditions of any one of the library definitions, and subsequently uniquely identifies the material type as that nuclide or isotope material associated with the satisfied library definition. The method is iteratively repeated to update the spectrum and identification in real time.

  6. Measurements of gamma-ray production cross sections for shielding materials of space nuclear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orphan, V. J.; John, J.; Hoot, C. G.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of secondary gamma ray production from neutron interactions have been made over the entire energy range of interest in shielding applications. The epithermal capture gamma ray yields for both resolved gamma ray lines and continuum have been measured from thermal energies to 100 KeV for natural tungsten and U-238, two important candidate shield materials in SNAP reactor systems. Data are presented to illustrate the variation of epithermal capture gamma ray yields with neutron energy. The gamma ray production cross sections from (n,xy) reactions have been measured for Fe and Al from the threshold energies for inelastic scattering to approximately 16 MeV. Typical Fe and Al cross sections obtained with high-neutron energy resolution and averaged over broad neutron-energy groups are presented.

  7. The Role of PPAR Gamma in Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Andréa Tavares; Pereira, Michelly Cristiny; de Melo Rego, Moacyr Jesus Barreto; da Rocha, Laurindo Ferreira; Pitta, Ivan da Rocha; Marques, Cláudia Diniz Lopes; Duarte, Angela Luzia Branco Pinto; Pitta, Maira Galdino da Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Fibrosis is recognized as an important feature of many chronic diseases, such as systemic sclerosis (SSc), an autoimmune disease of unknown etiology, characterized by immune dysregulation and vascular injury, followed by progressive fibrosis affecting the skin and multiple internal organs. SSc has a poor prognosis because no therapy has been shown to reverse or arrest the progression of fibrosis, representing a major unmet medical need. Recently, antifibrotic effects of PPARγ ligands have been studied in vitro and in vivo and some theories have emerged leading to new insights. Aberrant PPARγ function seems to be implicated in pathological fibrosis in the skin and lungs. This antifibrotic effect is mainly related to the inhibition of TGF-β/Smad signal transduction but other pathways can be involved. This review focused on recent studies that identified PPARγ as an important novel pathway with critical roles in regulating connective tissue homeostasis, with emphasis on skin and lung fibrosis and its role on systemic sclerosis. PMID:26064084

  8. A Common Variant in the Adaptor Mal Regulates Interferon Gamma Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ní Cheallaigh, Clíona; Sheedy, Frederick J; Harris, James; Muñoz-Wolf, Natalia; Lee, Jinhee; West, Kim; McDermott, Eva Palsson; Smyth, Alicia; Gleeson, Laura E; Coleman, Michelle; Martinez, Nuria; Hearnden, Claire H A; Tynan, Graham A; Carroll, Elizabeth C; Jones, Sarah A; Corr, Sinéad C; Bernard, Nicholas J; Hughes, Mark M; Corcoran, Sarah E; O'Sullivan, Mary; Fallon, Ciara M; Kornfeld, Hardy; Golenbock, Douglas; Gordon, Stephen V; O'Neill, Luke A J; Lavelle, Ed C; Keane, Joseph

    2016-02-16

    Humans that are heterozygous for the common S180L polymorphism in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) adaptor Mal (encoded by TIRAP) are protected from a number of infectious diseases, including tuberculosis (TB), whereas those homozygous for the allele are at increased risk. The reason for this difference in susceptibility is not clear. We report that Mal has a TLR-independent role in interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) receptor signaling. Mal-dependent IFN-γ receptor (IFNGR) signaling led to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 phosphorylation and autophagy. IFN-γ signaling via Mal was required for phagosome maturation and killing of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The S180L polymorphism, and its murine equivalent S200L, reduced the affinity of Mal for the IFNGR, thereby compromising IFNGR signaling in macrophages and impairing responses to TB. Our findings highlight a role for Mal outside the TLR system and imply that genetic variation in TIRAP may be linked to other IFN-γ-related diseases including autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:26885859

  9. A Common Variant in the Adaptor Mal Regulates Interferon Gamma Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ní Cheallaigh, Clíona; Sheedy, Frederick J; Harris, James; Muñoz-Wolf, Natalia; Lee, Jinhee; West, Kim; McDermott, Eva Palsson; Smyth, Alicia; Gleeson, Laura E; Coleman, Michelle; Martinez, Nuria; Hearnden, Claire H A; Tynan, Graham A; Carroll, Elizabeth C; Jones, Sarah A; Corr, Sinéad C; Bernard, Nicholas J; Hughes, Mark M; Corcoran, Sarah E; O'Sullivan, Mary; Fallon, Ciara M; Kornfeld, Hardy; Golenbock, Douglas; Gordon, Stephen V; O'Neill, Luke A J; Lavelle, Ed C; Keane, Joseph

    2016-02-16

    Humans that are heterozygous for the common S180L polymorphism in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) adaptor Mal (encoded by TIRAP) are protected from a number of infectious diseases, including tuberculosis (TB), whereas those homozygous for the allele are at increased risk. The reason for this difference in susceptibility is not clear. We report that Mal has a TLR-independent role in interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) receptor signaling. Mal-dependent IFN-γ receptor (IFNGR) signaling led to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 phosphorylation and autophagy. IFN-γ signaling via Mal was required for phagosome maturation and killing of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The S180L polymorphism, and its murine equivalent S200L, reduced the affinity of Mal for the IFNGR, thereby compromising IFNGR signaling in macrophages and impairing responses to TB. Our findings highlight a role for Mal outside the TLR system and imply that genetic variation in TIRAP may be linked to other IFN-γ-related diseases including autoimmunity and cancer.

  10. Solar System Gamma Ray observations using Fermi-LAT detector

    SciTech Connect

    Giglietto, N.

    2009-04-08

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, launched in June 2008, is an international space mission dedicated to the study of the high-energy gamma rays from the Universe. The main instrument aboard Fermi is the Large Area Telescope (LAT), a pair conversion telescope equipped with the state-of-the art in gamma-ray detectors technology, and operating at energies >30 MeV. During first two months of data taking, Fermi has detected high-energy gamma rays from the quiet Sun and the Moon. This emission is produced by interactions of cosmic rays; by nucleons with the solar and lunar surface, and electrons with solar photons in the heliosphere. While the Moon was detected by EGRET on CGRO with low statistics, Fermi provides high-sensitivity measurements on a daily basis allowing both short- and long-term variability to be studied. Since Galactic cosmic rays are at their maximum flux at solar minimum we expect that the quiescent solar and lunar emission to be a maximum during the period covered by this report. Fermi is the only mission capable of monitoring the Sun at energies above several hundred MeV over the full 24th solar cycle. We present first analysis showing images of Moon and the quiet emission of the solar disk, giving a description of the analysis tools used.

  11. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Telescope Optical System Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliev, Vladimir; Buckley, Jim; Falcone, Abe; Fegan, Steven; Finley, John; Gaurino, Victor; Hanna, David; Kaaret, Philip; Konopelko, Alex; Krawczynski, Henric; Romani, Roger; Weekes, Trevor

    2008-04-01

    AGIS is a conceptual design for a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory based on an array of ˜100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) with a sensitivity to gamma-rays in the energy range 40 GeV-100 TeV. The anticipated improvement of AGIS sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of the IACTs. In this submission we focus on the optical system (OS) of the AGIS telescopes and consider options which include traditional Davies-Cotton and the other prime- focus telescope designs, as well as a novel two-mirror aplanatic OS originally proposed by Schwarzschild. Emerging new mirror production technologies based on replication processes such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured CFRP, and electroforming provide new opportunities for cost effective solutions for the design of the OS. We evaluate the capabilities of these mirror fabrication methods for the AGIS project.

  12. Development of a high resolution gamma camera system using finely grooved GAGG scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Kataoka, Jun; Oshima, Tsubasa; Ogata, Yoshimune; Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Hatazawa, Jun

    2016-06-01

    High resolution gamma cameras require small pixel scintillator blocks with high light output. However, manufacturing a small pixel scintillator block is difficult when the pixel size becomes small. To solve this limitation, we developed a high resolution gamma camera system using a finely grooved Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (GAGG) plate. Our gamma camera's detector consists of a 1-mm-thick finely grooved GAGG plate that is optically coupled to a 1-in. position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The grooved GAGG plate has 0.2×0.2 mm pixels with 0.05-mm wide slits (between the pixels) that were manufactured using a dicing saw. We used a Hamamatsu PSPMT with a 1-in. square high quantum efficiency (HQE) PSPMT (R8900-100-C12). The energy resolution for the Co-57 gamma photons (122 keV) was 18.5% FWHM. The intrinsic spatial resolution was estimated to be 0.7-mm FWHM. With a 0.5-mm diameter pinhole collimator mounted to its front, we achieved a high resolution, small field-of-view gamma camera. The system spatial resolution for the Co-57 gamma photons was 1.0-mm FWHM, and the sensitivity was 0.0025%, 10 mm from the collimator surface. The Tc-99m HMDP administered mouse images showed the fine structures of the mouse body's parts. Our developed high resolution small pixel GAGG gamma camera is promising for such small animal imaging.

  13. Gamma interferon expression during acute and latent nervous system infection by herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, E M; Hinton, D R; Chen, J; Openshaw, H

    1995-01-01

    This study was initiated to evaluate a role for gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. At the acute stage of infection in mice, HSV-1 replication in trigeminal ganglia and brain stem tissue was modestly but consistently enhanced in mice from which IFN-gamma was by ablated monoclonal antibody treatment and in mice genetically lacking the IFN-gamma receptor (Rgko mice). As determined by reverse transcriptase PCR, IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor alpha transcripts were present in trigeminal ganglia during both acute and latent HSV-1 infection. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected initially in trigeminal ganglia at day 5 after HSV-1 inoculation, and these cells persisted for 6 months into latency. The T cells were focused around morphologically normal neurons that showed no signs of active infection, but many of which expressed HSV-1 latency-associated transcripts. Secreted IFN-gamma was present up to 6 months into latency in areas of the T-cell infiltration. By 9 months into latency, both the T-cell infiltrate and IFN-gamma expression had cleared, although there remained a slight increase in macrophage levels in trigeminal ganglia. In HSV-1-infected brain stem tissue, T cells and IFN-gamma expression were present at 1 month but were gone by 6 months after infection. Our hypothesis is that the persistence of T cells and the sustained IFN-gamma expression occur in response to an HSV-1 antigen(s) in the nervous system. This hypothesis is consistent with a new model of HSV-1 latency which suggests that limited HSV-1 antigen expression occurs during latency (M. Kosz-Vnenchak, J. Jacobson, D.M. Coen, and D.M. Knipe, J. Virol. 67:5383-5393, 1993). We speculate that prolonged secretion of IFN-gamma during latency may modulate a reactivated HSV-1 infection. PMID:7609058

  14. Photoreceptor System for Melatonin Regulation and Phototherapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, George (Inventor); Glickman, Gena (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention involves a light system for stimulating or regulating neuroendocrine, circadian, and photoneural systems in mammals based upon the discovery of peak sensitivity ranging from 425-505 nm; a light meter system for quantifying light which stimulates or regulates mammalian circadian, photoneural, and neuroendocrine systems. The present invention also relates to translucent and transparent materials, and lamps or other light sources with or without filters capable of stimulating or regulating neuroendocrine, circadian, and photoneural systems in mammals. Additionally, the present invention involves treatment of mammals with a wide variety of disorders or deficits, including light responsive disorders, eating disorders, menstrual cycle disorders, non-specific alerting and performance deficits, hormone-sensitive cancers, and cardiovascular disorders.

  15. Radiation detection system for portable gamma-ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Howard, Douglas E.; Wong, James L.; Jessup, James L.; Bianchini, Greg M.; Miller, Wayne O.

    2006-06-20

    A portable gamma ray detection apparatus having a gamma ray detector encapsulated by a compact isolation structure having at least two volumetrically-nested enclosures where at least one is a thermal shield. The enclosures are suspension-mounted to each other to successively encapsulate the detector without structural penetrations through the thermal shields. A low power cooler is also provided capable of cooling the detector to cryogenic temperatures without consuming cryogens, due to the heat load reduction by the isolation structure and the reduction in the power requirements of the cooler. The apparatus also includes a lightweight portable power source for supplying power to the apparatus, including to the cooler and the processing means, and reducing the weight of the apparatus to enable handheld operation or toting on a user's person.

  16. System biology of gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Baitaluk, Michael

    2009-01-01

    ) questions of biological relevance. Thus systems biology could be treated as such a socioscientific phenomenon and a new approach to both experiments and theory that is defined by the strategy of pursuing integration of complex data about the interactions in biological systems from diverse experimental sources using interdisciplinary tools and personnel. PMID:19623486

  17. An alpha–gamma coincidence spectrometer based on the Photon–Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS®) system

    DOE PAGES

    Cadieux, J. R.; Fugate, G. A.; King, III, G. S.

    2015-02-07

    Here, an alpha–gamma coincidence spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of selected actinide isotopes in the presence of high beta/gamma fields. The system is based on a PERALS® liquid scintillation counter for beta/alpha discrimination and was successfully tested with both high purity germanium and bismuth germanate, gamma-ray detectors using conventional analog electronics.

  18. Experimental approaches for the development of gamma spectroscopy well logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jehyun; Hwang, Seho; Kim, Jongman; Won, Byeongho

    2015-03-10

    This article discusses experimental approaches for the development of gamma spectroscopy well logging system. Considering the size of borehole sonde, we customize 2 x 2 inches inorganic scintillators and the system including high voltage, preamplifier, amplifier and multichannel analyzer (MCA). The calibration chart is made by test using standard radioactive sources so that the measured count rates are expressed by energy spectrum. Optimum high-voltage supplies and the measurement parameters of each detector are set up by experimental investigation. Also, the responses of scintillation detectors have been examined by analysis according to the distance between source and detector. Because gamma spectroscopy well logging needs broad spectrum, high sensitivity and resolution, the energy resolution and sensitivity as a function of gamma ray energy are investigated by analyzing the gamma ray activities of the radioactive sources.

  19. Up-regulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter I mediates ethanol sensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, J-H; Ma, Y-H; Yang, N; Mei, Z-T; Zhang, M-H; Fei, J; Guo, L-H

    2004-01-01

    Ethanol is among the most widely abused drugs in the world. Chronic ethanol consumption leads to ethanol tolerance and addiction, and impairs learning and memory. Na+/Cl- dependent GABA transporters play an important role in controlling the concentration of GABA in the synaptic cleft, and thus they control the intensity and duration of synaptic transmission of GABA. It has been suggested that GABAergic system is involved in ethanol consumption, tolerance and addiction, because chronic ethanol consumption alters the expression of GABAA receptors and drugs on GABA receptors affect ethanol actions. The results of the present study reveal that that activity of GABA transporters in mouse brain after 15-min acute ethanol injection or after chronic ethanol consumption is increased. Moreover, mice pre-injected with a competitive or a noncompetitive antagonist of gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter subtype 1 (GAT1) showed high sensitivity to the sedative/hypnotic effects of ethanol. In contrast, transgenic mice overexpressing GAT1 displayed low sensitivity to ethanol, as shown by the righting reflex test. Mice overexpressing GAT1 survived a lethal dose of ethanol (9 g/kg, i.p.) longer, maintained locomotor activity longer after a sub-lethal dose (1.75 g/kg, i.p.) and exhibited a higher median lethal dose than wild-type littermates. These results suggest that GAT1 plays an important role in sensitivity to ethanol, and might be a therapeutic target for alcoholism prevention and treatment. Acute and chronic ethanol administration resulted in the increase of GABA transporter function. Use of GAT1 selective inhibitors and GAT1 overexpressing mice thus demonstrate that GAT1 should be an important protein mediating sensitivity to ethanol in mice.

  20. Estimability and Regulability of Linear Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baram, Yoram; Kailath, Thomas

    1988-01-01

    A linear state-space system will be said to be estimable if in estimating its state from its output the posterior error covariance matrix is strictly smaller than the prior covariance matrix. It will be said to be regulable if the quadratic cost of state feedback control is strictly smaller than the cost when no feedback is used. Estimability and regulability are shown to be dual properties, equivalent to the nonreducibility of the Kalman filter and of the optimal linear quadratic regulator, respectively.

  1. TGF-beta and IL-10 regulation of IFN-gamma produced in Th2-type schistosome granulomas requires IL-12.

    PubMed

    Qadir, K; Metwali, A; Blum, A M; Li, J; Elliott, D E; Weinstock, J V

    2001-10-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) regulate CD4+ T cell interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) secretion in schistosome granulomas. The role of IL-12 was determined using C57BL/6 and CBA mice. C57BL/6 IL-4-/- granuloma cells were stimulated to produce IFN-gamma when cultured with IL-10 or TGF-beta neutralizing monoclonal antibody. In comparison, C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) control granuloma cells produced less IFN-gamma. IL-12, IL-18, and soluble egg antigen stimulated IFN-gamma release from C57BL/6 IL-4-/- and WT mice. IFN-gamma production in C57 IL-4-/- and WT granulomas was IL-12 dependent, because IL-12 blockade partly abrogated IFN-gamma secretion after stimulation. All granuloma cells released IL-12 (p70 and p40), and IL-12 production remained constant after anti-TGF-beta, anti-IL-10, recombinant IL-18, or antigen stimulation. C57 WT and IL-4-/- mouse granuloma cells expressed IL-12 receptor (IL-12R) beta1-subunit mRNA but little beta2 mRNA. TGF-beta or IL-10 blockade did not influence beta1 or beta2 mRNA expression. CBA mouse dispersed granuloma cells released no measurable IFN-gamma, produced IL-12 p70 and little p40, and expressed IL-12R beta2 and little beta1 mRNA. In T helper 2 (Th2) granulomas of C57BL/6 WT and IL-4-/- mice, cells produce IL-12 (for IFN-gamma production) and IL-10 and TGF-beta modulate IFN-gamma secretion via mechanisms independent of IL-12 and IL-12R mRNA regulation. We found substantial differences in control of granuloma IFN-gamma production and IL-12 circuitry in C57BL/6 and CBA mice.

  2. The time-of-flight system on the Goddard medium energy gamma-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R. W.; Chesney, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    A scintillation counter time of flight system, incorporated into the Goddard 50 cm by 50 cm spark chamber gamma ray telescope is described. The system, which utilizes constant fractions timing and particle position compensation and digitizes up to 10 ns time differences to six bit accuracy in less than 500 ns is analyzed. The performance of this system during balloon flight is discussed.

  3. gamma-Linolenic acid blocks cell cycle progression by regulating phosphorylation of p27kip1 and p57kip2 and their interactions with other cycle regulators in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, W G; Bryce, R P; Horrobin, D F; Mansel, R E

    1998-09-01

    gamma-Linolenic acid (gamma-LA), a n-6 essential fatty acid, has been previously shown to affect cell cycle and growth of cancer cells. This study examined the effects of gamma-LA on the cell cycle and cycle regulators in human colon cancer HT115 and breast cancer MCF7 cells. Brief treatment of cancer cells (<2 h) with gamma-LA resulted in a decrease in the phosphorylation of both cell cycle inhibitors, p27kip1 and p57kip2 as shown by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting. Protein levels of both inhibitors were increased following a prolonged culture of cells with the fatty acid. A co-precipitation study showed that in cells treated with gamma-LA there was an increase in the binding of these inhibitors with CDK4, CDC2, and cyclin E. Flow cytometry study indicated an inhibition of cell cycle progression by gamma-LA (G0/G1 -45.4%, S - 34.6%, G2+M - 20.0% in control, and 70.5%, 21.0%, and 8.5%, respectively, in gamma-LA treated cells). It is concluded that gamma-linolenic acid inhibits cell cycle progression in the cancer cell lines investigated, via its regulation of the phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of p27kip1 and p57kip2 and their interactions with other cycle regulators. PMID:9683802

  4. GammaScorpion: mobile gamma-ray tomography system for early detection of basal stem rot in oil palm plantations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Jaafar; Hassan, Hearie; Shari, Mohamad Rabaie; Mohd, Salzali; Mustapha, Mahadi; Mahmood, Airwan Affendi; Jamaludin, Shahrizan; Ngah, Mohd Rosdi; Hamid, Noor Hisham

    2013-03-01

    Detection of the oil palm stem rot disease Ganoderma is a major issue in estate management and production in Malaysia. Conventional diagnostic techniques are difficult and time consuming when using visual inspection, and destructive and expensive when based on the chemical analysis of root or stem tissue. As an alternative, a transportable gamma-ray computed tomography system for the early detection of basal stem rot (BSR) of oil palms due to Ganoderma was developed locally at the Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Kajang, Malaysia. This system produces high quality tomographic images that clearly differentiate between healthy and Ganoderma infected oil palm stems. It has been successfully tested and used to detect the extent of BSR damage in oil palm plantations in Malaysia without the need to cut down the trees. This method offers promise for in situ inspection of oil palm stem diseases compared to the more conventional methods.

  5. Detection system for high-resolution gamma radiation spectroscopy with neutron time-of-flight filtering

    DOEpatents

    Dioszegi, Istvan; Salwen, Cynthia; Vanier, Peter

    2014-12-30

    A .gamma.-radiation detection system that includes at least one semiconductor detector such as HPGe-Detector, a position-sensitive .alpha.-Detector, a TOF Controller, and a Digitizer/Integrator. The Digitizer/Integrator starts to process the energy signals of a .gamma.-radiation sent from the HPGe-Detector instantly when the HPGe-Detector detects the .gamma.-radiation. Subsequently, it is determined whether a coincidence exists between the .alpha.-particles and .gamma.-radiation signal, based on a determination of the time-of-flight of neutrons obtained from the .alpha.-Detector and the HPGe-Detector. If it is determined that the time-of-flight falls within a predetermined coincidence window, the Digitizer/Integrator is allowed to continue and complete the energy signal processing. If, however, there is no coincidence, the Digitizer/Integrator is instructed to be clear and reset its operation instantly.

  6. System to quantify gamma-ray radial energy deposition in semiconductor detectors

    DOEpatents

    Kammeraad, Judith E.; Blair, Jerome J.

    2001-01-01

    A system for measuring gamma-ray radial energy deposition is provided for use in conjunction with a semiconductor detector. The detector comprises two electrodes and a detector material, and defines a plurality of zones within the detecting material in parallel with the two electrodes. The detector produces a charge signal E(t) when a gamma-ray interacts with the detector. Digitizing means are provided for converting the charge signal E(t) into a digitized signal. A computational means receives the digitized signal and calculates in which of the plurality of zones the gamma-ray deposited energy when interacting with the detector. The computational means produces an output indicating the amount of energy deposited by the gamma-ray in each of the plurality of zones.

  7. Implementation of gamma-ray instrumentation for solid solar system bodies using neutron activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, M. L.; Golovin, D. V.; Jun, I.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Sanin, A. B.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Zontikov, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present the results of ground tests performed with a flight model and with industry prototypes of passive and active gamma ray spectrometers with the objective of understanding their capability to distinguish the elemental composition of planetary bodies in the solar system. The gamma instrumentation, which was developed for future space missions was used in the measurements at a special ground test facility where a simulant of planetary material was fabricated with a martian-like composition. In this study, a special attention was paid to the gamma lines from activation reaction products generated by a pulsed neutron generator. The instrumentation was able to detect and identify gamma lines attributed to O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca and Fe.

  8. Improved readout system for multi-crystal gamma cameras

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, S.E.

    1985-08-21

    A radioisotope camera having an array of scintillation crystals arranged in N rows and M columns and adapted to be struck by gamma-rays from a subject, a separate solid state photodetector optically coupled to each crystal, and N + M amplifiers connected to the photodetectors to distinguish the particular row and column of an activated photodetector. One of the anode or cathode leads of each photodetector is coupled to the row amplifier associated with the row containing that photodetector while the other of the two leads is coupled to the column amplifier associated with the column containing that photodetector.

  9. EBT-P gamma-ray shielding system

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.

    1981-12-01

    An elaborate study was carried out for the coil and biological shield of the ELMO Bumpy Torus proof-of-principle (EBT-P) device. A three-dimensional scoping study for the coil shield was performed for four different shielding options to define the heat load for each component and check the compliance with the design criterion of 10 watts maximum heat per coil from the gamma ray sources. Also, a detailed biological dose survey was performed which included: (a) the dose equivalent inside and outside the building, (b) the dose equivalent from the two mazes of the machine room, and (c) the skyshine contribution to the dose equivalent.

  10. A simultaneous beta and coincidence-gamma imaging system for plant leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, Homayoon; Wen, Jie; Mathews, Aswin J.; Komarov, Sergey; Wang, Qiang; Li, Ke; O’Sullivan, Joseph A.; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2016-05-01

    Positron emitting isotopes, such as 11C, 13N, and 18F, can be used to label molecules. The tracers, such as 11CO2, are delivered to plants to study their biological processes, particularly metabolism and photosynthesis, which may contribute to the development of plants that have a higher yield of crops and biomass. Measurements and resulting images from PET scanners are not quantitative in young plant structures or in plant leaves due to poor positron annihilation in thin objects. To address this problem we have designed, assembled, modeled, and tested a nuclear imaging system (simultaneous beta–gamma imager). The imager can simultaneously detect positrons ({β+} ) and coincidence-gamma rays (γ). The imaging system employs two planar detectors; one is a regular gamma detector which has a LYSO crystal array, and the other is a phoswich detector which has an additional BC-404 plastic scintillator for beta detection. A forward model for positrons is proposed along with a joint image reconstruction formulation to utilize the beta and coincidence-gamma measurements for estimating radioactivity distribution in plant leaves. The joint reconstruction algorithm first reconstructs beta and gamma images independently to estimate the thickness component of the beta forward model and afterward jointly estimates the radioactivity distribution in the object. We have validated the physics model and reconstruction framework through a phantom imaging study and imaging a tomato leaf that has absorbed 11CO2. The results demonstrate that the simultaneously acquired beta and coincidence-gamma data, combined with our proposed joint reconstruction algorithm, improved the quantitative accuracy of estimating radioactivity distribution in thin objects such as leaves. We used the structural similarity (SSIM) index for comparing the leaf images from the simultaneous beta–gamma imager with the ground truth image. The jointly reconstructed images yield SSIM indices of 0.69 and 0.63, whereas

  11. A simultaneous beta and coincidence-gamma imaging system for plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Homayoon; Wen, Jie; Mathews, Aswin J; Komarov, Sergey; Wang, Qiang; Li, Ke; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2016-05-01

    Positron emitting isotopes, such as (11)C, (13)N, and (18)F, can be used to label molecules. The tracers, such as (11)CO2, are delivered to plants to study their biological processes, particularly metabolism and photosynthesis, which may contribute to the development of plants that have a higher yield of crops and biomass. Measurements and resulting images from PET scanners are not quantitative in young plant structures or in plant leaves due to poor positron annihilation in thin objects. To address this problem we have designed, assembled, modeled, and tested a nuclear imaging system (simultaneous beta-gamma imager). The imager can simultaneously detect positrons ([Formula: see text]) and coincidence-gamma rays (γ). The imaging system employs two planar detectors; one is a regular gamma detector which has a LYSO crystal array, and the other is a phoswich detector which has an additional BC-404 plastic scintillator for beta detection. A forward model for positrons is proposed along with a joint image reconstruction formulation to utilize the beta and coincidence-gamma measurements for estimating radioactivity distribution in plant leaves. The joint reconstruction algorithm first reconstructs beta and gamma images independently to estimate the thickness component of the beta forward model and afterward jointly estimates the radioactivity distribution in the object. We have validated the physics model and reconstruction framework through a phantom imaging study and imaging a tomato leaf that has absorbed (11)CO2. The results demonstrate that the simultaneously acquired beta and coincidence-gamma data, combined with our proposed joint reconstruction algorithm, improved the quantitative accuracy of estimating radioactivity distribution in thin objects such as leaves. We used the structural similarity (SSIM) index for comparing the leaf images from the simultaneous beta-gamma imager with the ground truth image. The jointly reconstructed images yield SSIM indices of 0

  12. A simultaneous beta and coincidence-gamma imaging system for plant leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, Homayoon; Wen, Jie; Mathews, Aswin J.; Komarov, Sergey; Wang, Qiang; Li, Ke; O'Sullivan, Joseph A.; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2016-05-01

    Positron emitting isotopes, such as 11C, 13N, and 18F, can be used to label molecules. The tracers, such as 11CO2, are delivered to plants to study their biological processes, particularly metabolism and photosynthesis, which may contribute to the development of plants that have a higher yield of crops and biomass. Measurements and resulting images from PET scanners are not quantitative in young plant structures or in plant leaves due to poor positron annihilation in thin objects. To address this problem we have designed, assembled, modeled, and tested a nuclear imaging system (simultaneous beta-gamma imager). The imager can simultaneously detect positrons ({β+} ) and coincidence-gamma rays (γ). The imaging system employs two planar detectors; one is a regular gamma detector which has a LYSO crystal array, and the other is a phoswich detector which has an additional BC-404 plastic scintillator for beta detection. A forward model for positrons is proposed along with a joint image reconstruction formulation to utilize the beta and coincidence-gamma measurements for estimating radioactivity distribution in plant leaves. The joint reconstruction algorithm first reconstructs beta and gamma images independently to estimate the thickness component of the beta forward model and afterward jointly estimates the radioactivity distribution in the object. We have validated the physics model and reconstruction framework through a phantom imaging study and imaging a tomato leaf that has absorbed 11CO2. The results demonstrate that the simultaneously acquired beta and coincidence-gamma data, combined with our proposed joint reconstruction algorithm, improved the quantitative accuracy of estimating radioactivity distribution in thin objects such as leaves. We used the structural similarity (SSIM) index for comparing the leaf images from the simultaneous beta-gamma imager with the ground truth image. The jointly reconstructed images yield SSIM indices of 0.69 and 0.63, whereas the

  13. Performance degradation of QAM based inter-satellite optical communication system under gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Zhao, Shanghong; Gong, Zizheng; Zhao, Jing; Li, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Main devices in quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) based inter-satellite optical communication system were irradiated to a total dose of 20 krad with the dose rate of 5 rad/s using a Co60 radiation source. Gamma irradiation impacts on devices were analyzed and on the basis, system performance degradation was simulated. Variety of system BER along with onboard working time for different inter-satellite links was presented. In addition, some adaption methods were proposed to reduce gamma irradiation induced degradation.

  14. Regulation of longevity by the reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Antebi, Adam

    2013-07-01

    Pioneering work in model organisms reveals that the reproductive system is involved not only in propagation of the species but also regulates organismal metabolism and longevity. In C. elegans, prevention of germline stem cell proliferation results in a 60% extension of lifespan, termed gonadal longevity. Gonadal longevity relies on the transcriptional activities of steroid nuclear receptor DAF-12, the FOXO transcription factor homolog DAF-16, the FOXA transcription factor homolog PHA-4, and the HNF-4-like nuclear receptor NHR-80. These transcription factors work in an integrated transcriptional network to regulate fatty acid lipolysis, autophagy, stress resistance and other processes, which altogether enhance homeostasis and extend life. Because the reproductive system also regulates longevity in other species, studies in C. elegans may shed light on ancient mechanisms governing reproduction and survival.

  15. Intraocular pressure reduction and regulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F.; Burnett, J. E.; Felder, S. F.; Mcgannon, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    An intraocular pressure reduction and regulation system is described and data are presented covering performance in: (1) reducing intraocular pressure to a preselected value, (2) maintaining a set minimum intraocular pressure, and (3) reducing the dynamic increases in intraocular pressure resulting from external loads applied to the eye.

  16. The gene encoding gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase II in the fission yeast is regulated by oxidative and metabolic stress.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Byung-Chul; Park, Eun-Hee; Ahn, Kisup; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2005-09-30

    gamma-Glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, EC 2.3.2.2.) catalyzes the transfer of the gamma-glutamyl moiety from gamma-glutamylcontaining compounds, notably glutathione (GSH), to acceptor amino acids and peptides. A second gene (GGTII) encoding GGT was previously isolated and characterized from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In the present work, the GGTII-lacZ fusion gene was constructed and used to study the transcriptional regulation of the S. pombe GGTII gene. The synthesis of beta-galactosidase from the GGTII-lacZ fusion gene was significantly enhanced by NO-generating SNP and hydrogen peroxide in the wildtype yeast cells. The GGTII mRNA level was increased in the wild-type S. pombe cells treated with SNP. However, the induction by SNP was abolished in the Pap1-negative S. pombe cells, implying that the induction by SNP of GGTII is mediated by Pap1. Fermentable carbon sources, such as glucose (at low concentrations), lactose and sucrose, as a sole carbon source, enhanced the synthesis of beta-galactosidase from the GGTII-lacZ fusion gene in wildtype KP1 cells but not in Pap1-negative cells. Glycerol, a non-fermentable carbon source, was also able to induce the synthesis of beta-galactosidase from the fusion gene, but other non-fermentable carbon sources such as acetate and ethanol were not. Transcriptional induction of the GGTII gene by fermentable carbon sources was also confirmed by increased GGTII mRNA levels in the yeast cells grown with them. Nitrogen starvation was also able to induce the synthesis of beta-galactosidase from the GGTII-lacZ fusiongene in a Pap1-dependent manner. On the basis of the results, it is concluded that the S. pombe GGTII gene is regulated by oxidative and metabolic stress.

  17. A compact neutron beam generator system designed for prompt gamma nuclear activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghassoun, J; Mostacci, D

    2011-08-01

    In this work a compact system was designed for bulk sample analysis using the technique of PGNAA. The system consists of (252)Cf fission neutron source, a moderator/reflector/filter assembly, and a suitable enclosure to delimit the resulting neutron beam. The moderator/reflector/filter arrangement has been optimised to maximise the thermal neutron component useful for samples analysis with a suitably low level of beam contamination. The neutron beam delivered by this compact system is used to irradiate the sample and the prompt gamma rays produced by neutron reactions within the sample elements are detected by appropriate gamma rays detector. Neutron and gamma rays transport calculations have been performed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP5).

  18. 21 CFR 862.1360 - Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1360 Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and isoenzymes test system. (a... alcoholic cirrhosis and primary and secondary liver tumors. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  19. A coded aperture imaging system optimized for hard X-ray and gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Cline, T. L.; Huters, A. F.; Leventhal, M.; Maccallum, C. J.; Reber, J. D.; Stang, P. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Tueller, J.

    1985-01-01

    A coded aperture imaging system was designed for the Gamma-Ray imaging spectrometer (GRIS). The system is optimized for imaging 511 keV positron-annihilation photons. For a galactic center 511-keV source strength of 0.001 sq/s, the source location accuracy is expected to be + or - 0.2 deg.

  20. Readout system for multi-crystal gamma cameras

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.

    1987-01-01

    A radioisotope camera (10) having an array (12) of scintillation crystals (13) arranged in N rows and M columns and adapted to be struck by gamma-rays from a subject, a separate solid state photodetector (15 ) optically coupled to each crystal (13), and N+M amplifiers (24) connected to the photodetectors (15) to distinguish the particular row and column of an activated photodetector. One of the anode or cathode leads (33 or 34) of each photodetector (15) is coupled to the row amplifier (24) associated with the row containing that photodetector while the other of the two leads (34 or 33) is coupled to the column amplifier (24) associated with the column containing that photodetector.

  1. Development of an all-in-one gamma camera/CCD system for safeguard verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Il; An, Su Jung; Chung, Yong Hyun; Kwak, Sung-Woo

    2014-12-01

    For the purpose of monitoring and verifying efforts at safeguarding radioactive materials in various fields, a new all-in-one gamma camera/charged coupled device (CCD) system was developed. This combined system consists of a gamma camera, which gathers energy and position information on gamma-ray sources, and a CCD camera, which identifies the specific location in a monitored area. Therefore, 2-D image information and quantitative information regarding gamma-ray sources can be obtained using fused images. A gamma camera consists of a diverging collimator, a 22 × 22 array CsI(Na) pixelated scintillation crystal with a pixel size of 2 × 2 × 6 mm3 and Hamamatsu H8500 position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The Basler scA640-70gc CCD camera, which delivers 70 frames per second at video graphics array (VGA) resolution, was employed. Performance testing was performed using a Co-57 point source 30 cm from the detector. The measured spatial resolution and sensitivity were 4.77 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) and 7.78 cps/MBq, respectively. The energy resolution was 18% at 122 keV. These results demonstrate that the combined system has considerable potential for radiation monitoring.

  2. SWEPP gamma-ray spectrometer system software user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Femec, D.A.

    1994-08-01

    The SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SGRS) System has been developed by the Radiation Measurement and Development Unit of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to assist in the characterization of the radiological contents of contact-handled waste containers at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP). In addition to determining the concentrations of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, the software also calculates attenuation-corrected isotopic mass ratios of specific interest, and provides controls for SGRS hardware as required. This document serves as a user`s guide for the data acquisition and analysis software associated with the SGRS system.

  3. Shigella Iron Acquisition Systems and their Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yahan; Murphy, Erin R.

    2016-01-01

    Survival of Shigella within the host is strictly dependent on the ability of the pathogen to acquire essential nutrients, such as iron. As an innate immune defense against invading pathogens, the level of bio-available iron within the human host is maintained at exceeding low levels, by sequestration of the element within heme and other host iron-binding compounds. In response to sequestration mediated iron limitation, Shigella produce multiple iron-uptake systems that each function to facilitate the utilization of a specific host-associated source of nutrient iron. As a mechanism to balance the essential need for iron and the toxicity of the element when in excess, the production of bacterial iron acquisition systems is tightly regulated by a variety of molecular mechanisms. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on the iron-uptake systems produced by Shigella species, their distribution within the genus, and the molecular mechanisms that regulate their production. PMID:26904516

  4. Development of polarization-controlled multi-pass Thomson scattering system in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, M.; Morimoto, M.; Shima, Y.; Kohagura, J.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakashima, Y.; Imai, T.; Yasuhara, R.; Yamada, I.; Kawahata, K.; Funaba, H.; Minami, T.

    2012-10-15

    In the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror, the typical electron density is comparable to that of the peripheral plasma of torus-type fusion devices. Therefore, an effective method to increase Thomson scattering (TS) signals is required in order to improve signal quality. In GAMMA 10, the yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG)-TS system comprises a laser, incident optics, light collection optics, signal detection electronics, and a data recording system. We have been developing a multi-pass TS method for a polarization-based system based on the GAMMA 10 YAG TS. To evaluate the effectiveness of the polarization-based configuration, the multi-pass system was installed in the GAMMA 10 YAG-TS system, which is capable of double-pass scattering. We carried out a Rayleigh scattering experiment and applied this double-pass scattering system to the GAMMA 10 plasma. The integrated scattering signal was made about twice as large by the double-pass system.

  5. Total Measurement Uncertainty for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Segmented Gamma Scan Assay System

    SciTech Connect

    WESTSIK, G.A.

    2001-06-06

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU) for the Canberra manufactured Segmented Gamma Scanner Assay System (SGSAS) as employed at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). In this document, TMU embodies the combined uncertainties due to all of the individual random and systematic sources of measurement uncertainty. It includes uncertainties arising from corrections and factors applied to the analysis of transuranic waste to compensate for inhomogeneities and interferences from the waste matrix and radioactive components. These include uncertainty components for any assumptions contained in the calibration of the system or computation of the data. Uncertainties are propagated at 1 sigma. The final total measurement uncertainty value is reported at the 95% confidence level. The SGSAS is a gamma assay system that is used to assay plutonium and uranium waste. The SGSAS system can be used in a stand-alone mode to perform the NDA characterization of a container, particularly for low to medium density (0-2.5 g/cc) container matrices. The SGSAS system provides a full gamma characterization of the container content. This document is an edited version of the Rocky Flats TMU Report for the Can Scan Segment Gamma Scanners, which are in use for the plutonium residues projects at the Rocky Flats plant. The can scan segmented gamma scanners at Rocky Flats are the same design as the PFP SGSAS system and use the same software (with the exception of the plutonium isotopics software). Therefore, all performance characteristics are expected to be similar. Modifications in this document reflect minor differences in the system configuration, container packaging, calibration technique, etc. These results are supported by the Quality Assurance Objective (QAO) counts, safeguards test data, calibration data, etc. for the PFP SGSAS system. Other parts of the TMU analysis utilize various modeling techniques such as Monte Carlo N

  6. Kernel Integration Code System--Multigroup Gamma-Ray Scattering.

    1988-02-15

    GGG (G3) is the generic designation for a series of computer programs that enable the user to estimate gamma-ray scattering from a point source to a series of point detectors. Program output includes detector response due to each source energy, as well as a grouping by scattered energy in addition to a simple, unscattered beam result. Although G3 is basically a single-scatter program, it also includes a correction for multiple scattering by applying a buildupmore » factor for the path segment between the point of scatter and the detector point. Results are recorded with and without the buildup factor. Surfaces, defined by quadratic equations, are used to provide for a full three-dimensional description of the physical geometry. G3 evaluates scattering effects in those situations where more exact techniques are not economical. G3 was revised by Bettis and the name was changed to indicate that it was no longer identical to the G3 program. The name S3 was chosen since the scattering calculation has three steps: calculation of the flux arriving at the scatterer from the point source, calculation of the differential scattering cross section, and calculation of the scattered flux arriving at the detector.« less

  7. NRF Based Nondestructive Inspection System for SNM by Using Laser-Compton-Backscattering Gamma-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohgaki, H.; Omer, M.; Negm, H.; Daito, I.; Zen, H.; Kii, T.; Masuda, K.; Hori, T.; Hajima, R.; Hayakawa, T.; Shizuma, T.; Kando, M.

    2015-10-01

    A non-destructive inspection system for special nuclear materials (SNMs) hidden in a sea cargo has been developed. The system consists of a fast screening system using neutron generated by inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device and an isotope identification system using nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements with laser Compton backscattering (LCS) gamma-rays has been developed. The neutron flux of 108 n/sec has been achieved by the IEC in static mode. We have developed a modified neutron reactor noise analysis method to detect fission neutron in a short time. The LCS gamma-rays has been generated by using a small racetrack microtoron accelerator and an intense sub-nano second laser colliding head-on to the electron beam. The gamma-ray flux has been achieved more than 105 photons/s. The NRF gamma-rays will be measured using LaBr3(Ce) scintillation detector array whose performance has been measured by NRF experiment of U-235 in HIGS facility. The whole inspection system has been designed to satisfy a demand from the sea port.

  8. Regulation of transferrin receptor expression and ferritin content in human mononuclear phagocytes. Coordinate upregulation by iron transferrin and downregulation by interferon gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, T F; Horwitz, M A

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of key human iron binding proteins in mononuclear phagocytes by IFN gamma and iron transferrin. In a previous study, we demonstrated that IFN gamma downregulates the expression on human monocytes of transferrin receptors, the major source of iron for the cell. In the present study, we show that IFN gamma also downregulates the intracellular concentration of ferritin, the major iron storage protein in the cell. By radioimmunoassay, the mean ferritin content of nonactivated monocytes was 361 +/- 107 fg/monocyte (mean +/- SEM) whereas the mean ferritin content of IFN gamma-activated monocytes was 64 +/- 13 fg/monocyte, an 82% reduction with activation (P < 0.01, t test). Consistent with its downregulating effect on these iron proteins, IFN gamma treatment also results in decreased iron incorporation. IFN gamma-activated monocytes incorporated 33% less iron from 59Fe-transferrin than nonactivated monocytes (P < 0.05, t test). Gel filtration chromatography revealed that incorporated iron is located primarily in ferritin in both nonactivated and IFN gamma-activated monocytes. Ferritin in IFN gamma-activated monocytes is saturated with approximately three times as much 59Fe as ferritin in nonactivated monocytes. We have also explored the effect of iron transferrin on transferrin receptor expression and intracellular ferritin content in human monocytes. We have found that iron transferrin markedly upregulates both transferrin receptor expression and intracellular ferritin content in both nonactivated (2.3- and 1.3-fold, respectively) and IFN gamma-activated (3.4- and 2.9-fold, respectively) monocytes. This study demonstrates that transferrin receptor expression and intracellular ferritin content in human monocytes is unidirectionally and coordinately upregulated by iron transferrin and unidirectionally and coordinately downregulated by IFN gamma. PMID:8450071

  9. Towards systems biology of mycotoxin regulation.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Rajagopal; Rampitsch, Christof

    2013-04-01

    Systems biology is a scientific approach that integrates many scientific disciplines to develop a comprehensive understanding of biological phenomena, thus allowing the prediction and accurate simulation of complex biological behaviors. It may be presumptuous to write about toxin regulation at the level of systems biology, but the last decade of research is leading us closer than ever to this approach. Past research has delineated multiple levels of regulation in the pathways leading to the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, including mycotoxins. At the top of this hierarchy, the global or master transcriptional regulators perceive various environmental cues such as climatic conditions, the availability of nutrients, and the developmental stages of the organism. Information accumulated from various inputs is integrated through a complex web of signalling networks to generate the eventual outcome. This review will focus on adapting techniques such as chemical and other genetic tools available in the model system Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to disentangle the various biological networks involved in the biosynthesis of mycotoxins in the Fusarium spp.

  10. Operability test report for the TK-900 beta/gamma liquid effluent monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Weissenfels, R.D.

    1995-04-10

    This operability test report will verify that the 221-B beta/gamma liquid effluent monitoring system installed near the east end of the six inch chemical sewer header, functions as intended by design. An off-line, skid mounted, beta/gamma radiation monitor and pH monitor was installed near stairwell three in the 221-B electrical gallery by Project W-007H. The skid mounted monitoring system includes two radiation detectors and a pH meter, both with local digital displays. Output signals from each monitor are also received and displayed by the Facility Process Monitor and Control System (FPMCS). Pumps, motors, gauges, valves and transport lines complement the skid monitoring system. The system is part of BAT/AKART for the BCE liquid effluent system.

  11. Operability test procedure for the TK-900 beta/gamma liquid effluent monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Weissenfels, R.D.

    1995-02-24

    This operability test procedure will verify that the 221-B beta/gamma liquid effluent monitoring system, installed near the east end of the six inch chemical sewer header, functions as intended by design. An off-line, skid mounted, beta/gamma radiation monitor and pH monitor was installed near stairwell three in the 221-B electrical gallery by Project W-007H. The skid mounted monitoring system includes two radiation detectors and a pH meter, both with local digital displays. Output signals from each monitor are also received and displayed by the Facility Process Monitor and Control System (FPMCS). Pumps, motors, gauges, valves and transport lines complement the skid monitoring system. The system is part of BAT/AKART for the BCE liquid effluent system.

  12. Interferon gamma regulation of de novo protein synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts in culture is anatomic site dependent.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Higgins, P J

    1993-03-01

    The propensity of the skin of the lower anterior leg to be involved in Graves' dermopathy prompted an examination of the specific protein synthesis and response to interferon gamma in cultured fibroblasts from this area. Confluent cultures from normal skin of the lower leg and from the abdomen of the same three donors were pulse labeled with [35S]methionine for 3 h and subjected to two-dimensional protein gel electrophoresis and fluorography. Protein spots were mapped using a computer-driven program and the relative densities of the resolvable spots analyzed. Fibroblasts from the two anatomic sites display distinct patterns of de novo protein synthesis. Of the 157 abundant spots arbitrarily chosen for analysis, 31% varied substantially in levels of expression between the sites. A number of proteins appear to be expressed only in cultures derived from one of the two anatomic sites. Interferon gamma (100 U/ml) present in the culture medium for 48 h influenced the abundance of a number of proteins in a site-specific manner. Among them, plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 was induced three to five times in the leg cultures, whereas this same polypeptide was down-regulated in abdominal fibroblasts. A 54-kD protein was induced in interferon-treated cultures from both sites at least 50 times. It appears that fibroblasts from different regions of the integument are intrinsically distinct in terms of both their protein synthetic programs and their responses to cytokines.

  13. Functions of gamma-band synchronization in cognition: from single circuits to functional diversity across cortical and subcortical systems.

    PubMed

    Bosman, Conrado A; Lansink, Carien S; Pennartz, Cyriel M A

    2014-06-01

    Gamma-band activity (30-90 Hz) and the synchronization of neural activity in the gamma-frequency range have been observed in different cortical and subcortical structures and have been associated with different cognitive functions. However, it is still unknown whether gamma-band synchronization subserves a single universal function or a diversity of functions across the full spectrum of cognitive processes. Here, we address this question reviewing the mechanisms of gamma-band oscillation generation and the functions associated with gamma-band activity across several cortical and subcortical structures. Additionally, we raise a plausible explanation of why gamma rhythms are found so ubiquitously across brain structures. Gamma band activity originates from the interplay between inhibition and excitation. We stress that gamma oscillations, associated with this interplay, originate from basic functional motifs that conferred advantages for low-level system processing and multiple cognitive functions throughout evolution. We illustrate the multifunctionality of gamma-band activity by considering its role in neural systems for perception, selective attention, memory, motivation and behavioral control. We conclude that gamma-band oscillations support multiple cognitive processes, rather than a single one, which, however, can be traced back to a limited set of circuit motifs which are found universally across species and brain structures.

  14. System gamma as a function of image- and monitor-dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Kane, David; Bertalmío, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    System gamma is the end-to-end exponent that describes the relationship between the relative luminance values at capture and the reproduced image. The system gamma preferred by subjects is known to vary with the background luminance condition and the image in question. We confirm the previous two findings using an image database with both high and low dynamic range images (from 102 to 107), but also find that the preferred system gamma varies with the dynamic range of the monitor (CRT, LCD, or OLED). We find that the preferred system gamma can be predicted in all conditions and for all images by a simple model that searches for the value that best flattens the lightness distribution, where lightness is modeled as a power law of onscreen luminance. To account for the data, the exponent must vary with the viewing conditions. The method presented allows the inference of lightness perception in natural scenes without direct measurement and makes testable predictions for how lightness perception varies with the viewing condition and the distribution of luminance values in a scene. The data from this paper has been made available online. PMID:27271806

  15. Documentation of the data analysis system for the gamma ray monitor aboard OSO-H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croteau, S.; Buck, A.; Higbie, P.; Kantauskis, J.; Foss, S.; Chupp, D.; Forrest, D. J.; Suri, A.; Gleske, I.

    1973-01-01

    The programming system is presented which was developed to prepare the data from the gamma ray monitor on OSO-7 for scientific analysis. The detector, data, and objectives are described in detail. Programs presented include; FEEDER, PASS-1, CAL1, CAL2, PASS-3, Van Allen Belt Predict Program, Computation Center Plot Routine, and Response Function Programs.

  16. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) Telescope Optical System Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Bugaev, V.; Buckley, J.; Krawczynski, H.; Diegel, S.; Romani, R.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S.; Vassiliev, V.; Finley, J.; Guarino, V.; Hanna, D.; Kaaret, P.; Konopelko, A.; Ramsey, B.; Weekes, T.

    2008-12-24

    AGIS is a conceptual design for a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory operating in the energy range 25 GeV-100 TeV, which is based on an array of {approx}20-100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). The desired improvement in sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation of AGIS imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of the IACTs. We are considering several options for the optical system (OS) of the AGIS telescopes, which include the traditional Davies-Cotton design as well as novel two-mirror design. Emerging mirror production technologies based on replication processes such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP), and electroforming provide new opportunities for cost-effective solutions for the design of the OS.

  17. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Telescope Optical System Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, David S.; Buckley, J. H.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S.; Finley, J.; Guarino, V.; Kaaret, P.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Konopelko, A.; Romani, R.; Vassilliev, V.; Optical System Working Group; AGIS Collaboration

    2008-03-01

    The concept of a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory, AGIS, in the energy range 20 GeV-200 TeV is based on an array of 50-200 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). The anticipated improvement of AGIS sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of IACTs. In this submission we will focus on the optical system (OS) of AGIS telescopes and consider options which include traditional Davies-Cotton and the other prime-focus telescope designs, as well as the novel two-mirror aplanatic OS originally proposed by Schwarzschild. The emerging new mirror production technologies based on replication processes, such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured CFRP, and electroforming, provide new opportunities for cost effective solutions for the design of the OS. We initially evaluate capabilities of these mirror fabrication methods for the AGIS project.

  18. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) Telescope Optical System Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaev, V.; Buckley, J.; Diegel, S.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S.; Finley, J.; Guarino, V.; Hanna, D.; Kaaret, P.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Ramsey, B.; Romani, R.; Vassiliev, V.; Weekes, T.

    2008-12-01

    AGIS is a conceptual design for a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory operating in the energy range 25 GeV-100 TeV, which is based on an array of ~20-100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). The desired improvement in sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation of AGIS imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of the IACTs. We are considering several options for the optical system (OS) of the AGIS telescopes, which include the traditional Davies-Cotton design as well as novel two-mirror design. Emerging mirror production technologies based on replication processes such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP), and electroforming provide new opportunities for cost-effective solutions for the design of the OS.

  19. [Complement system regulation and C3 glomerulopathy].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hui-jie; He, Rui-juan

    2013-04-18

    Complement system is a key system for immune surveillance and homeostasis. Excessive activation of complement system,especially the activation of alternative pathway may play a very important role in the pathogenesis of primary and secondary glomerulonephritis. C3 glomerulopathy is a newly named disease characterized by evident C3 deposition in the glomeruli with little or no immunoglobulin under immunofluorescence (IF). Its clinical and pathological manifestations vary a lot. The decreased plasma C3 and Factor H(FH)suggest that abnormal regulation of complement system plays an importment role in its pathogenesis. C3 glomerulopathy varies a lot as to its clinical manifestation, treatment and prognosis. The inhibition of excessive complement activation might be the key to treating C3 glomerulopathy.

  20. Performance analysis of relay-aided free-space optical communication system over gamma-gamma fading channels with pointing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hui-hua; Wang, Ping; Wang, Ran-ran; Liu, Xiao-xia; Guo, Li-xin; Yang, Yin-tang

    2016-07-01

    The average bit error rate ( ABER) performance of a decode-and-forward (DF) based relay-assisted free-space optical (FSO) communication system over gamma-gamma distribution channels considering the pointing errors is studied. With the help of Meijer's G-function, the probability density function (PDF) and cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the aggregated channel model are derived on the basis of the best path selection scheme. The analytical ABER expression is achieved and the system performance is then investigated with the influence of pointing errors, turbulence strengths and structure parameters. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is also provided to confirm the analytical ABER expression.

  1. Magnetic field regulation control system analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Badelt, Steven W.

    1996-05-01

    This study comprises (1) an analytical characterization of the Cameca ion microscope`s magnetic field regulation circuitry and (2) comparisons between the analytical predictions and the measured performance of the control system. It is the first step in a project to achieve routine field regulation better than 10ppm. The control loop was decomposed into functional subcircuits and simulated in SPICE to determine DC, AC, and transient response. Transfer functions were extracted from SPICE, simplified, and analyzed in MATLAB. Both SPICE and MATLAB simulations were calculated for step inputs, and these results were compared to actual measurements. Magnetic field fluctuations were measured at high mass resolving power. The frequency spectrum of the fluctuations was analyzed by FFT. Difficulties encountered and implications for future work are discussed.

  2. Systems for increasing the sensitivity of gamma-ray imagers

    DOEpatents

    Mihailescu, Lucian; Vetter, Kai M.; Chivers, Daniel H.

    2012-12-11

    Systems that increase the position resolution and granularity of double sided segmented semiconductor detectors are provided. These systems increase the imaging resolution capability of such detectors, either used as Compton cameras, or as position sensitive radiation detectors in imagers such as SPECT, PET, coded apertures, multi-pinhole imagers, or other spatial or temporal modulated imagers.

  3. A simultaneous beta and coincidence-gamma imaging system for plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Homayoon; Wen, Jie; Mathews, Aswin J; Komarov, Sergey; Wang, Qiang; Li, Ke; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2016-05-01

    Positron emitting isotopes, such as (11)C, (13)N, and (18)F, can be used to label molecules. The tracers, such as (11)CO2, are delivered to plants to study their biological processes, particularly metabolism and photosynthesis, which may contribute to the development of plants that have a higher yield of crops and biomass. Measurements and resulting images from PET scanners are not quantitative in young plant structures or in plant leaves due to poor positron annihilation in thin objects. To address this problem we have designed, assembled, modeled, and tested a nuclear imaging system (simultaneous beta-gamma imager). The imager can simultaneously detect positrons ([Formula: see text]) and coincidence-gamma rays (γ). The imaging system employs two planar detectors; one is a regular gamma detector which has a LYSO crystal array, and the other is a phoswich detector which has an additional BC-404 plastic scintillator for beta detection. A forward model for positrons is proposed along with a joint image reconstruction formulation to utilize the beta and coincidence-gamma measurements for estimating radioactivity distribution in plant leaves. The joint reconstruction algorithm first reconstructs beta and gamma images independently to estimate the thickness component of the beta forward model and afterward jointly estimates the radioactivity distribution in the object. We have validated the physics model and reconstruction framework through a phantom imaging study and imaging a tomato leaf that has absorbed (11)CO2. The results demonstrate that the simultaneously acquired beta and coincidence-gamma data, combined with our proposed joint reconstruction algorithm, improved the quantitative accuracy of estimating radioactivity distribution in thin objects such as leaves. We used the structural similarity (SSIM) index for comparing the leaf images from the simultaneous beta-gamma imager with the ground truth image. The jointly reconstructed images yield SSIM indices of 0

  4. Radial Electron Temperature and Density Measurements Using Thomson Scattering System in GAMMA 10/PDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, M.; Ohta, K.; Wang, X.; Chikatsu, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Sakamoto, M.; Imai, T.; Nakashima, Y.; Yasuhara, R.; Yamada, I.; Funaba, H.; Minami, T.

    2015-11-01

    A Thomson scattering (TS) system in GAMMA 10/PDX has been developed for the measurement of radial profiles of electron temperature and density in a single plasma and laser shot. The TS system has a large solid angle optical collection system and high-sensitivity signal detection system. The TS signals are obtained using four-channel high-speed digital oscilloscopes controlled by a Windows PC. We designed the acquisition program for six oscilloscopes to obtain 10-Hz TS signals in a single plasma shot, following which the time-dependent electron temperatures and densities can be determined. Moreover, in order to obtain larger TS signal intensity in the edge region, we added a second collection mirror. The radial electron temperatures and densities at six radial positions in GAMMA 10/PDX were successfully obtained.

  5. 21 CFR 870.5900 - Thermal regulating system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thermal regulating system. 870.5900 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Therapeutic Devices § 870.5900 Thermal regulating system. (a) Identification. A thermal regulating system is an external system consisting of a device...

  6. 21 CFR 870.5900 - Thermal regulating system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Thermal regulating system. 870.5900 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Therapeutic Devices § 870.5900 Thermal regulating system. (a) Identification. A thermal regulating system is an external system consisting of a device...

  7. 21 CFR 870.5900 - Thermal regulating system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thermal regulating system. 870.5900 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Therapeutic Devices § 870.5900 Thermal regulating system. (a) Identification. A thermal regulating system is an external system consisting of a device...

  8. 21 CFR 870.5900 - Thermal regulating system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thermal regulating system. 870.5900 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Therapeutic Devices § 870.5900 Thermal regulating system. (a) Identification. A thermal regulating system is an external system consisting of a device...

  9. 21 CFR 870.5900 - Thermal regulating system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thermal regulating system. 870.5900 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Therapeutic Devices § 870.5900 Thermal regulating system. (a) Identification. A thermal regulating system is an external system consisting of a device...

  10. A General-Purpose Monte Carlo Gamma-Ray Transport Code System for Minicomputers.

    1981-08-27

    Version 00 The OGRE code system was designed to calculate, by Monte Carlo methods, any quantity related to gamma-ray transport. The system is represented by two codes which treat slab geometry. OGRE-P1 computes the dose on one side of a slab for a source on the other side, and HOTONE computes energy deposition in addition. The source may be monodirectional, isotropic, or cosine distributed.

  11. Feasibility tests of a dual modality system for imaging using gamma rays and NIR light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunov, Nikolay; Atroshchenko, Kostiantyn; Baneva, Yanka; Bello, Michele; De Rosa, Matteo; Fontana, Cristiano Lino; Moschini, Giuliano; Rossi, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    We are developing a dual system for small-animal imaging in multimodality studies, which consists of a highspatial resolution gamma-camera and a scanner for Near-Infra-Red (NIR) light. The gamma-camera is assembled from a position-sensitive photomultiplier and a scintillation-crystal with parallel-hole collimator. On the other hand, the NIR imaging is designed for near-object scanning, and features two operational modes: Transmission and Fluorescence. In the Transmission mode, the NIR light, coming from five different wavelength LEDs, crosses the sample and is subsequently measured by an array sensor. In the Fluorescence mode, the emission from nanoparticles, such as singlewalled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) administered in the imaged object, is excited using the laser. The gamma-camera energy and spatial resolutions have been measured. This latter has been assessed by using specially-designed phantoms like capillary tubes or volumes with cavities filled with a radioactive solution. The NIR-scanner spatial resolution has been determined along two perpendicular directions using standards, placed at different distances from the sensor. The results show that both the NIR scanning-system and the gamma-camera feature good imaging-parameters and can be applied to multimodality studies.

  12. Design of suboptimal regulators for nonlinear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balaram, J.; Saridis, G. N.

    1985-01-01

    An optimal feedback control law is preferred for the regulation of a deterministic nonlinear system. In this paper, a practical, iterative design method leading to a sequence of suboptimal control laws with successively improved performance is presented. The design method requires the determination of an upper bound to the performance of each successive control law. This is obtained by solving a partial differential inequality by means of a linear programming technique. Robustness properties and the application of the design method to the control of a robot manipulator arm are also presented.

  13. Study of Comet Nucleus Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Penetration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, G. L.; Amundsen, R. J.; Beardsley, R. W.; Cash, R. H.; Clark, B. C.; Knight, T. C. D.; Martin, J. P.; Monti, P.; Outteridge, D. A.; Plaster, W. D.

    1986-01-01

    A penetrator system has been suggested as an approach for making in situ measurements of the composition and physical properties of the nucleus of a comet. This study has examined in detail the feasibility of implementing the penetrator concept. The penetrator system and mission designs have been developed and iterated in sufficient detail to provide a high level of confidence that the concept can be implemented within the constraints of the Mariner Mark 2 spacecraft.

  14. Safety and efficacy of recombinant gamma interferon in the treatment of systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Vlachoyiannopoulos, P G; Tsifetaki, N; Dimitriou, I; Galaris, D; Papiris, S A; Moutsopoulos, H M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of recombinant gamma interferon (rIFN gamma) in the treatment of patients with systemic sclerosis. METHODS: Sixteen patients with systemic sclerosis were treated with r-IFN gamma, 60 micrograms m-2 (low dose, n = 10) and 150 micrograms m-2 (high dose, n = 6), three times weekly in an open phase I/II trial of eight months duration. The patients were stratified in low and high dose according to the severity and the extent of scleroderma; the two groups were comparable. RESULTS: The treatment was well tolerated. The most common side effects, almost certainly related to r-IFN gamma, were fever, chills, dizziness, headache, and severe flu-like syndrome with decreasing intensity with the time of treatment. Severe aphthous stomatitis (n = 1), ventricular tachycardia (n = 1), severe oesophageal ulcers due to gastro-oesophageal reflux (n = 1), disease exacerbation alone with frank arthritis and slight pericardial effusion (n = 1), and inability to conform to the requirements of the study (n = 1) were the reasons for discontinuing treatment. Side effects and degree of response were evident during the first five months of treatment. A significant decrease in mean skin thickness score was observed and was higher in the high dose group. Reactive oxygen species of peripheral neutrophils and soluble interleukin-2 receptor serum concentrations were higher than those of normal individuals at study entry and decreased in parallel with clinical improvement. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of systemic sclerosis patients with r-IFN gamma was relatively safe and well tolerated for doses as high as 150 micrograms m-2 three times weekly. Side effects and the degree of response can be seen during the first months of therapy and can be used as predictors of ultimate toxicity or response. The drug seems to be effective in treating cutaneous scleroderma. PMID:8984943

  15. System and method for resolving gamma-ray spectra

    DOEpatents

    Gentile, Charles A.; Perry, Jason; Langish, Stephen W.; Silber, Kenneth; Davis, William M.; Mastrovito, Dana

    2010-05-04

    A system for identifying radionuclide emissions is described. The system includes at least one processor for processing output signals from a radionuclide detecting device, at least one training algorithm run by the at least one processor for analyzing data derived from at least one set of known sample data from the output signals, at least one classification algorithm derived from the training algorithm for classifying unknown sample data, wherein the at least one training algorithm analyzes the at least one sample data set to derive at least one rule used by said classification algorithm for identifying at least one radionuclide emission detected by the detecting device.

  16. Cholinergic regulation of the vasopressin neuroendocrine system

    SciTech Connect

    Michels, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    To clarify the physical and functional relationship between the cholinergic system, and the neurodocrine cells of the supraoptic nucleus, a combination of experiments on receptor binding, localization and function were carried out. The putative nicotinic receptor probe (/sup 125/I)alpha bungarotoxin ((/sup 125/I)alpha BTX) bound with high affinity and specificity to the vasopressin and oxytocin magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus, nucleus circularis, and paraventricular nucleus. Binding of (/sup 125/I)alpha BTX within the neural lobe was very low. In contrast, the muscarinic cholinergic receptor probe (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinylbenzilate ((/sup 3/H)QNB) did not bind to magnocellular vasopressin and oxytocin cell groups. The median eminence, which contains the neurosecretory axons, and the neural lobe of the pituitary contain low levels of (/sup 3/H)QNB binding. The physiological significance of these cholinergic receptors in regulation of vasopressin release was tested using an in vitro preparation of the supraoptic - neural lobe system.

  17. System and method for regulating resonant inverters

    DOEpatents

    Stevanovic, Ljubisa Dragoljub; Zane, Regan Andrew

    2007-08-28

    A technique is provided for direct digital phase control of resonant inverters based on sensing of one or more parameters of the resonant inverter. The resonant inverter control system includes a switching circuit for applying power signals to the resonant inverter and a sensor for sensing one or more parameters of the resonant inverter. The one or more parameters are representative of a phase angle. The resonant inverter control system also includes a comparator for comparing the one or more parameters to a reference value and a digital controller for determining timing of the one or more parameters and for regulating operation of the switching circuit based upon the timing of the one or more parameters.

  18. Interferon-gamma differentially regulates CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2/B70) expression on human Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Yokozeki, H; Katayama, I; Ohki, O; Arimura, M; Takayama, K; Matsunaga, T; Satoh, T; Umeda, T; Azuma, M; Okumura, K; Nishioka, K

    1997-06-01

    CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2/B70) have recently been identified in cultured human Langerhans cells (LCs), although their role and regulatory properties remain unclear. We present our comparison of the expression of the molecules, mRNAs and the function between CD80 and CD86 in human LCs treated by interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). We examined the regulatory properties of CD80 and CD86 expression in human LCs pretreated with IFN-gamma. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that the mean fluorescence intensity of CD86 but not CD80 was enhanced. However, the percentage modulation of both CD80 and CD86 positive cells were significantly up-regulated in a dose-dependent manner, after 48-h culturing with IFN-gamma. The regulatory properties of CD80 and CD86 mRNA expressions in human LC were studied using polymerase chain reaction methods. We found that both CD80 and CD86 mRNA of enriched LCs following IFN-gamma pretreatment for 12 h were higher than those without pretreatment. We have demonstrated that the primary allogeneic mixed epidermal cell-lymphocyte reaction induced by human LCs treated by IFN-gamma increased in a dose-dependent manner. There was a 61.5% inhibition by anti-CD86 monoclonal antibody and a 32.5% inhibition by anti-CD80 monoclonal antibody. These data indicate that the CD80 and CD86 expression of human LCs may be differently regulated by IFN-gamma.

  19. Cortically projecting basal forebrain parvalbumin neurons regulate cortical gamma band oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae; Thankachan, Stephen; McKenna, James T.; McNally, James M.; Yang, Chun; Choi, Jee Hyun; Chen, Lichao; Kocsis, Bernat; Deisseroth, Karl; Strecker, Robert E.; Basheer, Radhika; McCarley, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical gamma band oscillations (GBO, 30–80 Hz, typically ∼40 Hz) are involved in higher cognitive functions such as feature binding, attention, and working memory. GBO abnormalities are a feature of several neuropsychiatric disorders associated with dysfunction of cortical fast-spiking interneurons containing the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV). GBO vary according to the state of arousal, are modulated by attention, and are correlated with conscious awareness. However, the subcortical cell types underlying the state-dependent control of GBO are not well understood. Here we tested the role of one cell type in the wakefulness-promoting basal forebrain (BF) region, cortically projecting GABAergic neurons containing PV, whose virally transduced fibers we found apposed cortical PV interneurons involved in generating GBO. Optogenetic stimulation of BF PV neurons in mice preferentially increased cortical GBO power by entraining a cortical oscillator with a resonant frequency of ∼40 Hz, as revealed by analysis of both rhythmic and nonrhythmic BF PV stimulation. Selective saporin lesions of BF cholinergic neurons did not alter the enhancement of cortical GBO power induced by BF PV stimulation. Importantly, bilateral optogenetic inhibition of BF PV neurons decreased the power of the 40-Hz auditory steady-state response, a read-out of the ability of the cortex to generate GBO used in clinical studies. Our results are surprising and novel in indicating that this presumptively inhibitory BF PV input controls cortical GBO, likely by synchronizing the activity of cortical PV interneurons. BF PV neurons may represent a previously unidentified therapeutic target to treat disorders involving abnormal GBO, such as schizophrenia. PMID:25733878

  20. Initial results from a multiple monoenergetic gamma radiography system for nuclear security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Day, Buckley E.; Hartwig, Zachary S.; Lanza, Richard C.; Danagoulian, Areg

    2016-10-01

    The detection of assembled nuclear devices and concealed special nuclear materials (SNM) such as plutonium or uranium in commercial cargo traffic is a major challenge in mitigating the threat of nuclear terrorism. Currently available radiographic and active interrogation systems use ∼1-10 MeV bremsstrahlung photon beams. Although simple to build and operate, bremsstrahlung-based systems deliver high radiation doses to the cargo and to potential stowaways. To eliminate problematic issues of high dose, we are developing a novel technique known as multiple monoenergetic gamma radiography (MMGR). MMGR uses ion-induced nuclear reactions to produce two monoenergetic gammas for dual-energy radiography. This allows us to image the areal density and effective atomic number (Zeff) of scanned cargo. We present initial results from the proof-of-concept experiment, which was conducted at the MIT Bates Research and Engineering Center. The purpose of the experiment was to assess the capabilities of MMGR to measure areal density and Zeff of container cargo mockups. The experiment used a 3.0 MeV radiofrequency quadrupole accelerator to create sources of 4.44 MeV and 15.11 MeV gammas from the 11B(d,nγ)12C reaction in a thick natural boron target; the gammas are detected by an array of NaI(Tl) detectors after transmission through cargo mockups . The measured fluxes of transmitted 4.44 MeV and 15.11 MeV gammas were used to assess the areal density and Zeff. Initial results show that MMGR is capable of discriminating the presence of high-Z materials concealed in up to 30 cm of iron shielding from low- and mid-Z materials present in the cargo mockup.

  1. An automated system for gamma radiation field mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Robert; Tarpinian, James E.; Kenney, Edward S.

    1990-12-01

    Remote radiation survey equipment was sorely needed at Chernobyl but adequate systems did not exist. The current state of the art still consists of a survey meter mounted on a robotic carriage, which scans an area at many points on a grid. This process is both time consuming and somewhat inaccurate. The system we have developed will overcome these limitations, and would provide significant savings in man-hours and man-rem over manual survey techniques. The system we have developed consists of a collimated ionization chamber mounted in a scanning head. The measurement process is similar to that used in medical computed tomography (CT) imaging and consists of a series of collimator rotations and translations. The key to this work is the use of a collimator to provide position information with a position insensitive detector. In addition, an inverse filter image reconstruction technique has been used to reduce the distortion effects due to the scanner and scanning process in the resulting maps. This technique models the distortion as a linear, space invariant degrading function which is removed in a deconvolution process. We have constructed first- and second-generation prototype scanners, and developed software to produce three-dimensional radiation field "iso-dose" maps. The iso-dose maps will be superimposed on three-dimensional computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) drawings of the radiation area, aiding in the characterization of the source of radiation.

  2. Gamma-gamma colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Sessler, A.

    1996-06-01

    Gamma-gamma colliders make intense beams of gamma rays and have them collide so as to make elementary particles. The authors show, in this article, that constructing a gamma-gamma collider as an add-on to an electron-positron linear collider is possible with present technology and that it does not require much additional cost. Furthermore, they show that the resulting capability is very interesting from a particle physics point of view. An overview of a linear collider, with a second interaction region devoted to {gamma}{gamma} collisions is shown.

  3. Networked alpha and gamma spectral acquisition and analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, C.M.; Gross, J.M.

    1993-10-01

    This manual assumes a knowledge of (terminology used and a working familiarity with) the windowing system and mouse of the Sun computer workstation. See the appropriate Sun manuals for additional information. ALDO, the alpha detector control program, is used to control, monitor, and edit log information associated with the collection of alpha spectra. Actual data collection and control functions are performed by Mizar Real-Time computers for which ALDO acts as a friendly user command interface and status display. It is normally started as part of your login procedure, but may also be started from the ``NETSPEC Utilities`` submenu of the root menu. The root menu is obtained by pushing the right mouse button when the cursor is over the root window (background picture). To become a user of ALDO and the other programs in the NETSPEC system, contact the person who performs systems administration tasks for the Sun computers. Most user interaction with ALDO is by means of mouse manipulation of screen items such as buttons, checkboxes, and sliders. The action of pushing the left mouse button when the cursor is over an item is called selecting that item. The left mouse button is therefore called the select button. The right mouse button is the menu button because a limited number of options may be displayed when that button is pressed when the cursor is over an item with a triangle (inverted delta). In this document, names of selectable items are printed in bold when they are first mentioned or when emphasis is helpful. In general, items which do not apply to the current context are either disabled or made invisible in order to prevent selection.

  4. System of Programmed Modules for Measuring Photographs with a Gamma-Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Averin, S. A.; Veselova, G. V.; Navasardyan, G. V.

    1978-01-01

    Physical experiments using tracking cameras resulted in hundreds of thousands of stereo photographs of events being received. To process such a large volume of information, automatic and semiautomatic measuring systems are required. At the Institute of Space Research of the Academy of Science of the USSR, a system for processing film information from the spark gamma-telescope was developed. The system is based on a BPS-75 projector in line with the minicomputer Elektronika 1001. The report describes this system. The various computer programs available to the operators are discussed.

  5. Ultra-wide Range Gamma Detector System for Search and Locate Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Odell, D. Mackenzie Odell; Harpring, Larry J.; Moore, Frank S. Jr.; French, Phillip J.; Gordon, John R.

    2005-10-26

    Collecting debris samples following a nuclear event requires that operations be conducted from a considerable stand-off distance. An ultra-wide range gamma detector system has been constructed to accomplish both long range radiation search and close range hot sample collection functions. Constructed and tested on a REMOTEC Andros platform, the system has demonstrated reliable operation over six orders of magnitude of gamma dose from 100's of uR/hr to over 100 R/hr. Functional elements include a remotely controlled variable collimator assembly, a NaI(Tl)/photomultiplier tube detector, a proprietary digital radiation instrument, a coaxially mounted video camera, a digital compass, and both local and remote control computers with a user interface designed for long range operations. Long range sensitivity and target location, as well as close range sample selection performance are presented.

  6. Measurements with Pinhole and Coded Aperture Gamma-Ray Imaging Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Raffo-Caiado, Ana Claudia; Solodov, Alexander A; Abdul-Jabbar, Najeb M; Hayward, Jason P; Ziock, Klaus-Peter

    2010-01-01

    From a safeguards perspective, gamma-ray imaging has the potential to reduce manpower and cost for effectively locating and monitoring special nuclear material. The purpose of this project was to investigate the performance of pinhole and coded aperture gamma-ray imaging systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). With the aid of the European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC), radiometric data will be combined with scans from a three-dimensional design information verification (3D-DIV) system. Measurements were performed at the ORNL Safeguards Laboratory using sources that model holdup in radiological facilities. They showed that for situations with moderate amounts of solid or dense U sources, the coded aperture was able to predict source location and geometry within ~7% of actual values while the pinhole gave a broad representation of source distributions

  7. Regulation of retinoid X receptor gamma expression by fed state in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sangkyu; Lee, Yoo Jeong; Ko, Eun Hee; Kim, Jae-woo

    2015-02-27

    Glucose metabolism is balanced by glycolysis and gluconeogenesis with precise control in the liver. The expression of genes related to glucose metabolism is regulated primarily by glucose and insulin at transcriptional level. Nuclear receptors play important roles in regulating the gene expression of glucose metabolism at transcriptional level. Some of these nuclear receptors form heterodimers with RXRs to bind to their specific regulatory elements on the target promoters. To date, three isotypes of RXRs have been identified; RXRα, RXRβ and RXRγ. However, their involvement in the interactions with other nuclear receptors in the liver remains unclear. In this study, we found RXRγ is rapidly induced after feeding in the mouse liver, indicating a potential role of RXRγ in controlling glucose or lipid metabolism in the fasting–feeding cycle. In addition, RXRγ expression was upregulated by glucose in primary hepatocytes. This implies that glucose metabolism governed by RXRγ in conjunction with other nuclear receptors. The luciferase reporter assay showed that RXRγ as well as RXRα increased SREBP-1c promoter activity in hepatocytes. These results suggest that RXRγ may play an important role in tight control of glucose metabolism in the fasting–feeding cycle. - Highlights: • Refeeding increases the RXRγ expression level in mouse liver. • RXRγ expression is induced by high glucose condition in primary hepatocytes. • RXRγ and LXRα have synergistic effect on SREBP-1c promoter activity. • RXRγ binds to LXRE(-299/-280) located within SREBP-1c promoter region and interacts with LXRα.

  8. Gamma-actin is involved in regulating centrosome function and mitotic progression in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Po'uha, Sela T; Kavallaris, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton during mitosis is crucial for regulating cell division. A functional role for γ-actin in mitotic arrest induced by the microtubule-targeted agent, paclitaxel, has recently been demonstrated. We hypothesized that γ-actin plays a role in mitosis. Herein, we investigated the effect of γ-actin in mitosis and demonstrated that γ-actin is important in the distribution of β-actin and formation of actin-rich retraction fibers during mitosis. The reduced ability of paclitaxel to induce mitotic arrest as a result of γ-actin depletion was replicated with a range of mitotic inhibitors, suggesting that γ-actin loss reduces the ability of broad classes of anti-mitotic agents to induce mitotic arrest. In addition, partial depletion of γ-actin enhanced centrosome amplification in cancer cells and caused a significant delay in prometaphase/metaphase. This prolonged prometaphase/metaphase arrest was due to mitotic defects such as uncongressed and missegregated chromosomes, and correlated with an increased presence of mitotic spindle abnormalities in the γ-actin depleted cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate a previously unknown role for γ-actin in regulating centrosome function, chromosome alignment and maintenance of mitotic spindle integrity.

  9. X-ray and gamma ray detector readout system

    DOEpatents

    Tumer, Tumay O; Clajus, Martin; Visser, Gerard

    2010-10-19

    A readout electronics scheme is under development for high resolution, compact PET (positron emission tomography) imagers based on LSO (lutetium ortho-oxysilicate, Lu.sub.2SiO.sub.5) scintillator and avalanche photodiode (APD) arrays. The key is to obtain sufficient timing and energy resolution at a low power level, less than about 30 mW per channel, including all required functions. To this end, a simple leading edge level crossing discriminator is used, in combination with a transimpedance preamplifier. The APD used has a gain of order 1,000, and an output noise current of several pA/ Hz, allowing bipolar technology to be used instead of CMOS, for increased speed and power efficiency. A prototype of the preamplifier and discriminator has been constructed, achieving timing resolution of 1.5 ns FWHM, 2.7 ns full width at one tenth maximum, relative to an LSO/PMT detector, and an energy resolution of 13.6% FWHM at 511 keV, while operating at a power level of 22 mW per channel. Work is in progress towards integration of this preamplifier and discriminator with appropriate coincidence logic and amplitude measurement circuits in an ASIC suitable for a high resolution compact PET instrument. The detector system and/or ASIC can also be used for many other applications for medical to industrial imaging.

  10. NADP Regulates the Yeast GAL Induction System

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar,P.; Yao, Y.; Sternglanz, R.; Johnston, S.; Joshua-Tor, L.

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of the galactose-metabolizing genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on three core proteins: Gal4p, the transcriptional activator that binds to upstream activating DNA sequences (UASGAL); Gal80p, a repressor that binds to the carboxyl terminus of Gal4p and inhibits transcription; and Gal3p, a cytoplasmic transducer that, upon binding galactose and adenosine 5'-triphosphate, relieves Gal80p repression. The current model of induction relies on Gal3p sequestering Gal80p in the cytoplasm. However, the rapid induction of this system implies that there is a missing factor. Our structure of Gal80p in complex with a peptide from the carboxyl-terminal activation domain of Gal4p reveals the existence of a dinucleotide that mediates the interaction between the two. Biochemical and in vivo experiments suggests that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) plays a key role in the initial induction event.

  11. Load-dependent regulation of neuromuscular system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohira, Yoshinobu; Kawano, Fuminori; Stevens, James L.; Wang, Xiao D.; Ishihara, Akihiko

    2004-01-01

    Roles of gravitational loading, sarcomere length, and/or tension development on the electromyogram (EMG) of soleus and afferent neurogram recorded at the L5 segmental level of spinal cord were investigated during parabolic flight of a jet airplane or hindlimb suspension in conscious rats. Both EMG and neurogram levels were increased when the gravity levels were elevated from 1-G to 2-G during the parabolic flight. They were decreased when the hindlimbs were unloaded by exposure to actual microgravity or by suspension. These phenomena were related to passive shortening of muscle fibers and/or sarcomeres. Unloading-related decrease in sarcomere length was greater at the central rather than the proximal and distal regions of fibers. These activities and tension development were not detected when the mean sarcomere length was less than 2.03 micrometers. It is suggested that load-dependent regulation of neuromuscular system is related to the tension development which is influenced by sarcomere length.

  12. Production of gamma-ray bursts in massive binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joss, Paul C.

    Long γ-ray bursts may be produced by hypernova events in the rapidly rotating cores of massive stars. A serious problem that must be confronted in this scenario is how the core of the hypernova progenitor retains or acquires sufficient angular momentum to produce the requisite axisymmetric collapse. Physical processes during the evolution of an isolated massive star will tend to extract any initial angular momentum from the stellar core, rendering it difficult for such a star to become a hypernova. However, a substantial fraction of massive stars are members of binary systems. Tidal locking, mass transfer, and/or stellar merger in an evolved massive binary may transfer orbital angular momentum to the core of one of the stars (or the merged star), sufficient to produce the progenitor of a hypernova. To investigate this issue, we have substantially refined a binary stellar evolution code that we had previously developed. The code includes the effects of mass and angular momentum transfer between the component stars and the subsequent transport of angular momentum through one of the stars. This transport is effected by dynamical and secular shear instabilities, convective motions, the critical layer instability, and gravity waves. Our code treats in a self-consistent way the dynamical distortion of the star resulting from the induced rapid differential rotation. The results of numerical computations with our refined code indicate that late main-sequence or early post-main-sequence accretion from a binary companion onto a star with an initial mass greater than ˜ 20 solar masses produces a rapidly rotating core within the accretor. The rotation will often be sufficiently rapid to provide the initial conditions necessary for a hypernova event, and the concomitant emission of a γ-ray burst, when the core collapses. We also find that the merger of a late post-main-sequence star with its binary companion may lead to a hypernova event in the stellar core, but is unlikely

  13. Verification of Gamma Knife extend system based fractionated treatment planning using EBT2 film

    SciTech Connect

    Natanasabapathi, Gopishankar; Bisht, Raj Kishor

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This paper presents EBT2 film verification of fractionated treatment planning with the Gamma Knife (GK) extend system, a relocatable frame system for multiple-fraction or serial multiple-session radiosurgery.Methods: A human head shaped phantom simulated the verification process for fractionated Gamma Knife treatment. Phantom preparation for Extend Frame based treatment planning involved creating a dental impression, fitting the phantom to the frame system, and acquiring a stereotactic computed tomography (CT) scan. A CT scan (Siemens, Emotion 6) of the phantom was obtained with following parameters: Tube voltage—110 kV, tube current—280 mA, pixel size—0.5 × 0.5 and 1 mm slice thickness. A treatment plan with two 8 mm collimator shots and three sectors blocking in each shot was made. Dose prescription of 4 Gy at 100% was delivered for the first fraction out of the two fractions planned. Gafchromic EBT2 film (ISP Wayne, NJ) was used as 2D verification dosimeter in this process. Films were cut and placed inside the film insert of the phantom for treatment dose delivery. Meanwhile a set of films from the same batch were exposed from 0 to 12 Gy doses for calibration purposes. An EPSON (Expression 10000 XL) scanner was used for scanning the exposed films in transparency mode. Scanned films were analyzed with inhouse written MATLAB codes.Results: Gamma index analysis of film measurement in comparison with TPS calculated dose resulted in high pass rates >90% for tolerance criteria of 1%/1 mm. The isodose overlay and linear dose profiles of film measured and computed dose distribution on sagittal and coronal plane were in close agreement.Conclusions: Through this study, the authors propose treatment verification QA method for Extend frame based fractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery using EBT2 film.

  14. 1990 yearly calibration of Pacific Northwest Laboratory's gross-gamma borehole geophysical logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, R.J.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the 1990 yearly calibration of a gross-gamma geophysical pulse logging system owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The calibration was conducted to permit the continued use of this system for geological and hydrologic studies associated with remedial investigation at the Hanford Site. Primary calibrations to equivalent uranium units were conducted in borehole model standards that were recently moved to the Hanford Site from the DOE field calibration facility in Spokane, Washington. The calibrations were performed in borehole models SBL/SBH and SBA/SBB, which contain low equivalent-uranium concentrations. The integrity of the system throughout the previous year from gamma-ray monitoring was demonstrated using the before- and after-logging field calibration readings with the field source in calibration Positions 1 and 2. Most of the Position 1 readings are within an 8% limit that is set by the governing PNL technical reference procedure as a critical value above which the instrument is considered suspect. Many of the Position 2 readings exceed the 8% limit; however, the fluctuation was traced to field-source geometry variability that affected Position 1 count rates by up to 6% and Position 2 count rates by as much as 16%. Correlations were established based on two similar approaches for relating observed count rate in before- and after-logging field calibrations to equivalent uranium concentrations. The temperature drift of the gamma-ray probe was documented and amounts to less than 0.1%/{degree}C within the temperature range 0{degree}C to 42{degree}C. The low-energy cutoff for the gross gamma-ray probe was determined to be between 46.5 and 59.5 keV. 10 refs., 4 figs., 13 tabs.

  15. Imaging system for cardiac planar imaging using a dedicated dual-head gamma camera

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Umeno, Marc M.

    2011-09-13

    A cardiac imaging system employing dual gamma imaging heads co-registered with one another to provide two dynamic simultaneous views of the heart sector of a patient torso. A first gamma imaging head is positioned in a first orientation with respect to the heart sector and a second gamma imaging head is positioned in a second orientation with respect to the heart sector. An adjustment arrangement is capable of adjusting the distance between the separate imaging heads and the angle between the heads. With the angle between the imaging heads set to 180 degrees and operating in a range of 140-159 keV and at a rate of up to 500kHz, the imaging heads are co-registered to produce simultaneous dynamic recording of two stereotactic views of the heart. The use of co-registered imaging heads maximizes the uniformity of detection sensitivity of blood flow in and around the heart over the whole heart volume and minimizes radiation absorption effects. A normalization/image fusion technique is implemented pixel-by-corresponding pixel to increase signal for any cardiac region viewed in two images obtained from the two opposed detector heads for the same time bin. The imaging system is capable of producing enhanced first pass studies, bloodpool studies including planar, gated and non-gated EKG studies, planar EKG perfusion studies, and planar hot spot imaging.

  16. Antiepileptic potential of matrine via regulation the levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamic acid in the brain.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jun; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-12-05

    Our present study aimed to determine the antiepileptic activity of matrine, and explore the possible molecular mechanism. To evaluate the antiepileptic activity of matrine, seizures in mice induced by PTZ and MES were established, then the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests in mice were also carried out. For the molecular mechanism investigations, contents of aspartic acid (Asp), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid (Glu), glycine (Gly) in seizures mice were determined; then, the chronic seizures rats induced by PTZ were prepared, and western blotting was used to determine the expressions of GAD 65, GABAA and GABAB in the brains. In the results, matrine showed significant antiepileptic effects on seizures mice induced by MES and PTZ. Moreover, the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests were also demonstrated that matrine had obvious antiepileptic effects. Additionally, our results revealed that after treatment with matrine, contents of GABA can be elevated, and the contents of Glu were obviously decreased. Furthermore, western blotting revealed that the mechanism regarding the antiepileptic effect of may be related to the up-regulations of GAD 65 and GABAA in the brain. Collectively, we suggested that matrine can be developed as an effective antiseptic drug.

  17. Antiepileptic Potential of Matrine via Regulation the Levels of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid and Glutamic Acid in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jun; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-01-01

    Our present study aimed to determine the antiepileptic activity of matrine, and explore the possible molecular mechanism. To evaluate the antiepileptic activity of matrine, seizures in mice induced by PTZ and MES were established, then the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests in mice were also carried out. For the molecular mechanism investigations, contents of aspartic acid (Asp), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid (Glu), glycine (Gly) in seizures mice were determined; then, the chronic seizures rats induced by PTZ were prepared, and western blotting was used to determine the expressions of GAD 65, GABAA and GABAB in the brains. In the results, matrine showed significant antiepileptic effects on seizures mice induced by MES and PTZ. Moreover, the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests were also demonstrated that matrine had obvious antiepileptic effects. Additionally, our results revealed that after treatment with matrine, contents of GABA can be elevated, and the contents of Glu were obviously decreased. Furthermore, western blotting revealed that the mechanism regarding the antiepileptic effect of may be related to the up-regulations of GAD 65 and GABAA in the brain. Collectively, we suggested that matrine can be developed as an effective antiseptic drug. PMID:24317434

  18. Camera Concepts for the Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepomuk Otte, Adam

    2009-05-01

    The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a concept for the next generation observatory in ground-based very high energy gamma-ray astronomy. Design goals are ten times better sensitivity, higher angular resolution, and a lower energy threshold than existing Cherenkov telescopes. Each telescope is equipped with a camera that detects and records the Cherenkov-light flashes from air showers. The camera is comprised of a pixelated focal plane of blue sensitive and fast (nanosecond) photon detectors that detect the photon signal and convert it into an electrical one. The incorporation of trigger electronics and signal digitization into the camera are under study. Given the size of AGIS, the camera must be reliable, robust, and cost effective. We are investigating several directions that include innovative technologies such as Geiger-mode avalanche-photodiodes as a possible detector and switched capacitor arrays for the digitization.

  19. Magnetic levitation self-regulating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tozoni, O.

    1993-06-08

    A magnet levitation self-regulating system is described comprising monotypic magnetic devices combined together by rigid nonmagnetic couplers; said magnetic device comprising two cylindrical parts extended along a cylinder generatrix: a. an iron core having a symmetrical C-shaped cross section and an air gap between its core shoes; and b. a permanent magnet having a rectangular cross-section disposed in said air gap; wherein all the iron cores of said magnetic devices are fixed on a common foundation by a first plurality of rigid nonmagnetic couplers and formed a stator assembly; all the permanent magnets of said magnetic devices are connected together by a second plurality of rigid non-magnetic couplers and form a levitator assembly; said permanent magnets of said levitator generate an original magnetic field and magnetize the stator cores; said stator cores create a secondary magnetic field; both said original and secondary magnetic fields create a magnetic levitation force that provides a stable hovering of said levitator in a resulting magnetic field of said system.

  20. Ubiquitin/proteasome pathway regulates levels of retinoic acid receptor gamma and retinoid X receptor alpha in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Boudjelal, M; Wang, Z; Voorhees, J J; Fisher, G J

    2000-04-15

    Repeated exposure of human skin to solar UV radiation leads to premature aging (photoaging) and skin cancer. UV-induced skin damage can be ameliorated by all-trans retinoic acid treatment. The actions of retinoic acid in skin keratinocytes are mediated primarily by nuclear retinoic acid receptor gamma (RARgamma) and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha). We found that exposure of cultured primary human keratinocytes to UV irradiation (30 mJ/cm2) substantially reduced (50-90%) RARgamma and RXRalpha mRNA and protein within 8 h. The rates of disappearance of RARgamma and RXRalpha proteins after UV exposure or treatment with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide were similar. UV irradiation did not increase the rate of breakdown of RARgamma or RXRalpha but rather reduced their rate of synthesis. The addition of proteasome inhibitors MG132 and LLvL, but not the lysosomal inhibitor E64, prevented loss of RARgamma and RXRalpha proteins after exposure of keratinocytes to either UV radiation or cycloheximide. Soluble extracts from nonirradiated or UV-irradiated keratinocytes possessed similar levels of proteasome activity that degraded RARgamma and RXRalpha proteins in vitro. Furthermore, RARgamma and RXRalpha were polyubiquitinated in intact cells. RXRalpha was found to contain two proline, glutamate/aspartate, serine, and threonine (PEST) motifs, which confer rapid turnover of many short-lived regulatory proteins that are degraded by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. However, the PEST motifs in RXRalpha did not function to regulate its stability, because deletion of the PEST motifs individually or together did not alter ubiquitination or proteasome-mediated degradation of RXRalpha. These results demonstrate that loss of RARgamma and RXRalpha proteins after UV irradiation results from degradation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Taken together, the data here indicate that ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated breakdown is an important mechanism regulating the levels of

  1. First results of electron temperature measurements by the use of multi-pass Thomson scattering system in GAMMA 10

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, M. Nagasu, K.; Shimamura, Y.; Shima, Y.; Kohagura, J.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakashima, Y.; Imai, T.; Ichimura, M.; Yasuhara, R.; Yamada, I.; Funaba, H.; Kawahata, K.; Minami, T.

    2014-11-15

    A multi-pass Thomson scattering (TS) has the advantage of enhancing scattered signals. We constructed a multi-pass TS system for a polarisation-based system and an image relaying system modelled on the GAMMA 10 TS system. We undertook Raman scattering experiments both for the multi-pass setting and for checking the optical components. Moreover, we applied the system to the electron temperature measurements in the GAMMA 10 plasma for the first time. The integrated scattering signal was magnified by approximately three times by using the multi-pass TS system with four passes. The electron temperature measurement accuracy is improved by using this multi-pass system.

  2. Measured Activities of Al and Ni in gamma-(Ni) and gamma'-(Ni)3Al in the Ni-Al-Pt System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan

    2007-01-01

    Adding Pt to Ni-Al coatings is critical to achieving the required oxidation protection of Ni-based superalloys, but the nature of the Pt effect remains unresolved. This research provides a fundamental part of the answer by measuring the influence of Pt on the activities of Al and Ni in gamma-(Ni), gamma prime-(Ni)3Al and liquid in the Ni-Al-Pt system. Measurements have been made at 25 compositions in the Ni-rich corner over the temperature range, T = 1400-1750 K, by the vapor pressure technique with a multiple effusion-cell mass spectrometer (multi-cell KEMS). These measurements clearly show adding Pt (for X(sub Pt) less than 0.25) decreases a(Al) while increasing a(Ni). This solution behavior supports the idea that Pt increases Al transport to an alloy / Al2O3 interface and also limits the interaction between the coating and substrate alloys in the gamma-(Ni) + gamma prime-(Ni)3Al region. This presentation will review the progress of this study.

  3. MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (MCU) GAMMA MONITORS SYSTEM FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, V

    2005-12-15

    The Department of Energy (DOE) selected Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) as the preferred technology for the removal of radioactive cesium from High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Before the full-scale Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) becomes operational, the Closure Business Unit (CBU) plans to process a portion of dissolved saltcake waste through a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). This work was derived from Technical Task Request SP-TTR-2004-00013, ''Gamma Monitor for MCU''. The deliverables for this task are the hardware and software for the gamma monitors and a report summarizing the testing and acceptance of this equipment for use in the MCU. Gamma-ray monitors are required to: (1) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the decontaminated salt solution before entering the DSS (Decontaminated Salt Solution) Hold Tank, (2) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the strip effluent before entering the Strip Effluent Hold Tank, (3) Verify proper operation of the solvent extraction system by verifying material balance within the process (The DSS Hold Tank Cs-137 concentration will be very low and the Cs-137 concentration in the Strip Effluent Hold Tank will be fifteen times higher than the Cs-137 concentration in the Feed Tank.) Sodium iodide monitors are used to measure the Cs-137 concentration in the piping before the DSS Hold tank, while GM monitors are used for Cs-137 measurements before the Strip Effluent Hold Tank. Tungsten shields were designed using Monte Carlo calculations and fabricated to reduce the process background radiation at the detector positions. These monitors were calibrated with NIST traceable standards that were specially made to be the same as the piping being monitored. Since this gamma ray monitoring system is unique, specially designed software was written and acceptance tested by Savannah River National Laboratory personnel. The software is a LabView-based application that serves as a unified interface for controlling

  4. Distribution System Voltage Regulation by Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Ceylan, Oguzhan; Liu, Guodong; Xu, Yan; Tomsovic, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a control method to regulate voltages in 3 phase unbalanced electrical distribution systems. A constrained optimization problem to minimize voltage deviations and maximize distributed energy resource (DER) active power output is solved by harmony search algorithm. IEEE 13 Bus Distribution Test System was modified to test three different cases: a) only voltage regulator controlled system b) only DER controlled system and c) both voltage regulator and DER controlled system. The simulation results show that systems with both voltage regulators and DER control provide better voltage profile.

  5. A Single Tower Configuration of the Modular Gamma Box Counter System - 13392

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, K.; Nakazawa, D.; Francalangia, J.; Gonzalez, H.

    2013-07-01

    Canberra's Standard Gamma Box Counter System is designed to perform accurate quantitative assays of gamma emitting nuclides for a wide range of large containers including B-25 crates and ISO shipping containers. Using a modular building-block approach, the system offers tremendous flexibility for a variety of measurement situations with wide ranges of sample activities and throughput requirements, as well as the opportunity to modify the configuration for other applications at a later date. The typical configuration consists of two opposing towers each equipped with two high purity germanium detectors, and an automated container trolley. This paper presents a modified configuration, consisting of a single tower placed inside a measurement trailer with three detector assemblies, allowing for additional vertical segmentation as well as a viewing a container outside the trailer through the trailer wall. An automatic liquid nitrogen fill system is supplied for each of the detectors. The use of a forklift to move the container for horizontal segmentation is accommodated by creating an additional operational and calibration set-up in the NDA 2000 software to allow for the operator to rotate the container and assay the opposite side, achieving the same sensitivity as a comparable two-tower system. This Segmented Gamma Box Counter System retains the core technologies and design features of the standard configuration. The detector assemblies are shielded to minimize interference from environmental and plant background, and are collimated to provide segmentation of the container. The assembly positions can also be modified in height and distance from the container. The ISOCS calibration software provides for a flexible approach to providing the calibrations for a variety of measurement geometries. The NDA 2000 software provides seamless operation with the current configuration, handling the data acquisition and analysis. In this paper, an overview of this system is discussed

  6. A simple way of obtaining a composite video output signal from the GAMMA-11 computing system.

    PubMed

    Richardson, R L

    1978-08-01

    Many departments of nuclear medicine are currently using the GAMMA-11 computer to process clinical images. Often practitioners would like to display the output pictures on conventional cathode-ray monitors that they already have. Some may want to record the images on a video tape recorder. Both of these devices require a composite video signal, which the computer does not provide. Such a signal can be obtained, however, by combining two signals that the system does produce. A number of relatively complicated systems for doing this have been suggested. The desired result can be obtained, however, by using two ten-cent resistors in the simple circuit described in this paper.

  7. Computer Assisted Gamma and X-Ray Tomography: Applications to Multiphase Flow Systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sailesh B.; Dudukovic, Milorad P.; Toseland, Bernard A.

    1997-03-01

    The application of X-ray and gamma ray transmission tomography to the study of process engineering systems is reviewed. The fundamental principles of tomography, the algorithms for image reconstruction, the measurement method and the possible sources of error are discussed in detail. A case study highlights the methodology involved in designing a scanning system for the study of a given process unit, e.g., reactor, separations column etc. Results obtained in the authors` laboratory for the gas holdup distribution in bubble columns are also presented. Recommendations are made for the Advanced Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) in LaPorte, TX.

  8. High and low energy gamma beam dump designs for the gamma beam delivery system at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Zafar; Matei, Catalin; Ur, Calin A.; Mitu, Iani-Octavian; Udup, Emil; Petcu, Cristian

    2016-03-01

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) is under construction in Magurele, Bucharest, Romania. The facility will use two 10 PW lasers and a high intensity, narrow bandwidth gamma beam for stand-alone and combined laser-gamma experiments. The accurate estimation of particle doses and their restriction within the limits for both personel and general public is very important in the design phase of any nuclear facility. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations are performed using FLUKA and MCNPX to design 19.4 and 4 MeV gamma beam dumps along with shielding of experimental areas. Dose rate contour plots from both FLUKA and MCNPX along with numerical values of doses in experimental area E8 of the facility are performed. The calculated doses are within the permissible limits. Furthermore, a reasonable agreement between both codes enhances our confidence in using one or both of them for future calculations in beam dump designs, radiation shielding, radioactive inventory, and other calculations releated to radiation protection. Residual dose rates and residual activity calculations are also performed for high-energy beam dump and their effect is negligible in comparison to contributions from prompt radiation.

  9. Monte Carlo modeling of neutron and gamma-ray imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J.

    1996-04-01

    Detailed numerical prototypes are essential to design of efficient and cost-effective neutron and gamma-ray imaging systems. We have exploited the unique capabilities of an LLNL-developed radiation transport code (COG) to develop code modules capable of simulating the performance of neutron and gamma-ray imaging systems over a wide range of source energies. COG allows us to simulate complex, energy-, angle-, and time-dependent radiation sources, model 3-dimensional system geometries with ``real world`` complexity, specify detailed elemental and isotopic distributions and predict the responses of various types of imaging detectors with full Monte Carlo accuray. COG references detailed, evaluated nuclear interaction databases allowingusers to account for multiple scattering, energy straggling, and secondary particle production phenomena which may significantly effect the performance of an imaging system by may be difficult or even impossible to estimate using simple analytical models. This work presents examples illustrating the use of these routines in the analysis of industrial radiographic systems for thick target inspection, nonintrusive luggage and cargoscanning systems, and international treaty verification.

  10. How the ubiquitin proteasome system regulates the regulators of transcription.

    PubMed

    Ee, Gary; Lehming, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system plays an important role in transcription. Monoubiquitination of activators is believed to aid their function, while the 26S proteasomal degradation of repressors is believed to restrict their function. What remains controversial is the question of whether the degradation of activators aids or restricts their function.

  11. Induced ICER I{gamma} down-regulates cyclin A expression and cell proliferation in insulin-producing {beta} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Akari; Weir, Gordon C.; Bonner-Weir, Susan . E-mail: susan.bonner-weir@joslin.harvard.edu

    2005-04-15

    We have previously found that cyclin A expression is markedly reduced in pancreatic {beta}-cells by cell-specific overexpression of repressor inducible cyclic AMP early repressor (ICER I{gamma}) in transgenic mice. Here we further examined regulatory effects of ICER I{gamma} on cyclin A gene expression using Min6 cells, an insulin-producing cell line. The cyclin A promoter luciferase assay showed that ICER I{gamma} directly repressed cyclin A gene transcription. In addition, upon ICER I{gamma} overexpression, cyclin A mRNA levels markedly decreased, thereby confirming an inhibitory effect of ICER I{gamma} on cyclin A expression. Suppression of cyclin A results in inhibition of BrdU incorporation. Under normal culture conditions endogenous cyclin A is abundant in these cells, whereas ICER is hardly detectable. However, serum starvation of Min6 cells induces ICER I{gamma} expression with a concomitant very low expression level of cyclin A. Cyclin A protein is not expressed unless the cells are in active DNA replication. These results indicate a potentially important anti-proliferative effect of ICER I{gamma} in pancreatic {beta} cells. Since ICER I{gamma} is greatly increased in diabetes as well as in FFA- or high glucose-treated islets, this effect may in part exacerbate diabetes by limiting {beta}-cell proliferation.

  12. The AMPK gamma1 R70Q mutant regulates multiple metabolic and growth pathways in neonatal cardiac myocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although mutations in the gamma-subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) can result in excessive glycogen accumulation and cardiac hypertrophy, the mechanisms by which this occurs have not been well defined. Because >65% of cardiac AMPK activity is associated with the gamma1-subunit of AMPK, w...

  13. The MEGA (Muon decays into an Electron and a GAmma ray) hardware trigger system

    SciTech Connect

    Szymanski, J.J.; Amann, J.F.; Black, J.K.; Cooper, M.D.; Wright, S.C.; Crocker, J.; Sanders, H.

    1988-01-01

    The MEGA experiment is designed to search for the rare decay ..mu.. ..-->.. e ..gamma.. with a branching ratio sensitivity of /approximately/10/sup -13/. As is typical of rare-decay experiments, extensive, online filtering of the data is required for MEGA. The MEGA experiment uses a hardware pattern-recognition system based on Programmable Array Logic (PAL) devices. Additional events are eliminated in an online ACP system before data are written to tape. The MEGA trigger system is generally applicable where high-rate, short-propagation-delay trigger systems are required. This report contains an introduction to the MEGA experiment, a discussion of the MEGA hardware trigger system and a discussion of the system's measured performance. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Electron temperature measurements by the use of multi-pass Thomson scattering system in GAMMA 10/PDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, M.; Ohta, K.; Wang, X.; Morishita, M.; Chikatsu, M.; Shima, Y.; Kohagura, J.; Yasuhara, R.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakashima, Y.; Imai, T.; Ichimura, M.; Yamada, I.; Funaba, H.; Kawataha, K.; Minami, T.

    2015-08-01

    A multi-pass (MP) Thomson scattering (TS) system modeled on the GAMMA 10/PDX TS system was constructed for enhancing the Thomson scattered signals. The MPTS system has a polarization-based configuration with an image relaying system. The former MPTS system in GAMMA 10/PDX can measure only four passing signals. We changed the larger aperture polarization control device for improving the MP laser confinement and obtaining the over four passing MPTS signals. The integrated MPTS signals increased about 1.2 times larger than that in the former system.

  15. MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT GAMMA MONITORS SYSTEM FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, V

    2007-06-25

    The Department of Energy (DOE) selected Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) as the preferred technology for the removal of radioactive cesium from High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Before the full-scale Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) becomes operational, the liquid Waste Organization (LWO) plans to process a portion of dissolved saltcake waste through a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). This work was derived from Technical Task Request SP-TTR-2004-00013, ''Gamma Monitor for MCU.'' The deliverables for this task are the hardware and software for the gamma monitors and a report summarizing the testing and acceptance of this equipment for use in the MCU. Revision of this report is a deliverable in Technical Task Report SP-TTR-2006-00010, ''NaI Shield Box Testing.'' Gamma-ray monitors were developed to: {lg_bullet} Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the decontaminated salt solution before entering the DSS (Decontaminated Salt Solution) Hold Tank, {lg_bullet} Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the strip effluent before entering the Strip Effluent Hold Tank, {lg_bullet} Verify proper operation of the solvent extraction system by verifying material balance within the process (The DSS Hold Tank Cs-137 concentration will be very low and the Cs-137 concentration in the Strip Effluent Hold Tank will be approximately fifteen times higher than the Cs-137 concentration in the Feed Tank.)

  16. Distribution of gamma exposure rates in a reactor effluent stream flood plain system.

    PubMed

    Gladden, J B; Brown, K L; Smith, M H; Towns, A

    1985-01-01

    Ground-level gamma dosimetry surveys were conducted along the length of a radiocesium-contaminated reactor effluent stream flood plain system to determine the extent and patterns of isotope distribution over a decade after reactor releases were stopped. The maximum mean exposure rates were found at upstream locations near the source of the contamination and in a downstream sedimentary delta. Gamma exposure rates were not uniformly distributed and high exposure rates were generally restricted to small areas of the flood plain. There was little similarity in either the spatial distribution or magnitudes of maximum gamma exposure rates across flood plains along the stream. Frequency the measured exposure rates tended to be highly skewed and most closely approximated the log-normal distribution in most areas along the stream. However, the complex and changing patterns of dose distributions strongly affected the ability to predict the probability of encountering unusually high exposure rates. Complex statistical and distributional models are required to provide precise descriptions of the dosimetry environment in such complex ecosystems and different models could be required on a site-by-site basis.

  17. Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

    2013-02-12

    A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

  18. A clinical gamma camera-based pinhole collimated system for high resolution small animal SPECT imaging.

    PubMed

    Mejia, J; Galvis-Alonso, O Y; Castro, A A de; Braga, J; Leite, J P; Simões, M V

    2010-12-01

    The main objective of the present study was to upgrade a clinical gamma camera to obtain high resolution tomographic images of small animal organs. The system is based on a clinical gamma camera to which we have adapted a special-purpose pinhole collimator and a device for positioning and rotating the target based on a computer-controlled step motor. We developed a software tool to reconstruct the target's three-dimensional distribution of emission from a set of planar projections, based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. We present details on the hardware and software implementation. We imaged phantoms and heart and kidneys of rats. When using pinhole collimators, the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the imaging system depend on parameters such as the detector-to-collimator and detector-to-target distances and pinhole diameter. In this study, we reached an object voxel size of 0.6 mm and spatial resolution better than 2.4 and 1.7 mm full width at half maximum when 1.5- and 1.0-mm diameter pinholes were used, respectively. Appropriate sensitivity to study the target of interest was attained in both cases. Additionally, we show that as few as 12 projections are sufficient to attain good quality reconstructions, a result that implies a significant reduction of acquisition time and opens the possibility for radiotracer dynamic studies. In conclusion, a high resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system was developed using a commercial clinical gamma camera, allowing the acquisition of detailed volumetric images of small animal organs. This type of system has important implications for research areas such as Cardiology, Neurology or Oncology.

  19. A performance study of an electron-tracking Compton camera with a compact system for environmental gamma-ray observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumoto, T.; Tomono, D.; Takada, A.; Tanimori, T.; Komura, S.; Kubo, H.; Matsuoka, Y.; Mizumura, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, S.; Oda, M.; Parker, J. D.; Sawano, T.; Bando, N.; Nabetani, A.

    2015-06-01

    An electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) is a detector that can determine the arrival direction and energy of incident sub-MeV/MeV gamma-ray events on an event-by-event basis. It is a hybrid detector consisting of a gaseous time projection chamber (TPC), that is the Compton-scattering target and the tracker of recoil electrons, and a position-sensitive scintillation camera that absorbs of the scattered gamma rays, to measure gamma rays in the environment from contaminated soil. To measure of environmental gamma rays from soil contaminated with radioactive cesium (Cs), we developed a portable battery-powered ETCC system with a compact readout circuit and data-acquisition system for the SMILE-II experiment [1,2]. We checked the gamma-ray imaging ability and ETCC performance in the laboratory by using several gamma-ray point sources. The performance test indicates that the field of view (FoV) of the detector is about 1 sr and that the detection efficiency and angular resolution for 662 keV gamma rays from the center of the FoV is (9.31 ± 0.95) × 10-5 and 5.9° ± 0.6°, respectively. Furthermore, the ETCC can detect 0.15 μSv/h from a 137Cs gamma-ray source with a significance of 5σ in 13 min in the laboratory. In this paper, we report the specifications of the ETCC and the results of the performance tests. Furthermore, we discuss its potential use for environmental gamma-ray measurements.

  20. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase by celecoxib oppositely regulates survivin and gamma-H2AX in human colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, P.-W.; Chang, C.-C.; Liu, H.-F.; Tsai, C.-M.; Chiu, Ted H.; Chao, J.-I . E-mail: chaoji@mail.tcu.edu.tw

    2007-07-01

    Cancer cells express survivin that facilitates tumorigenesis. Celecoxib has been shown to reduce human colorectal cancers. However, the role and regulation of survivin by celecoxib in colorectal carcinoma cells remain unclear. Treatment with 40-80 {mu}M celecoxib for 24 h induced cytotoxicity and proliferation inhibition via a concentration-dependent manner in RKO colorectal carcinoma cells. Celecoxib blocked the survivin protein expression and increased the phosphorylation of H2AX at serine-193 ({gamma}-H2AX). The survivin gene knockdown by transfection with a survivin siRNA revealed that the loss of survivin correlated with the expression of {gamma}-H2AX. Meanwhile, celecoxib increased caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. Celecoxib activated the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. The phosphorylated proteins of p38 MAP kinase and {gamma}-H2AX were observed in the apoptotic cells. SB203580, a specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, protected the survivin protein expression and decreased the levels of {gamma}-H2AX and apoptosis in the celecoxib-exposed cells. The blockade of survivin expression increased the celecoxib-induced cytotoxicity; conversely, overexpression of survivin by transfection with a survivin-expressing vector raised the cancer cell proliferation and resisted the celecoxib-induced cell death. Our results provide for the first time that p38 MAP kinase participates in the down-regulation of survivin and subsequently induces the activation of {gamma}-H2AX for mediating apoptosis following treatment with celecoxib in human colorectal cancer cells.

  1. Swine leukocyte antigen-DQ expression and its regulation by interferon-gamma at the maternal-fetal interface in pigs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mingoo; Seo, Heewon; Choi, Yohan; Shim, Jangsoo; Bazer, Fuller W; Ka, Hakhyun

    2012-02-01

    Successful pregnancy requires an appropriate intrauterine immune response to the conceptus, which is a semiallograft within the uterus. We reported that swine leukocyte antigen-DQA (SLA-DQA), a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II gene, is expressed in the uterine endometrium at the time of conceptus implantation in pigs. Because MHC molecules play critical roles in the immune system, SLA-DQ was hypothesized to be involved in immune regulation during pregnancy. Therefore, we examined expression of SLA-DQ in uterine endometrial tissues obtained during the estrous cycle and pregnancy. SLA-DQA and SLA-DQB mRNAs were detected as 1.3-kb and 1.2-kb bands, respectively. Real-time RT-PCR analysis indicated that SLA-DQA and SLA-DQB mRNA expression was affected by day and pregnancy status, with the highest expression on Day 15 of pregnancy. SLA-DQ was localized primarily to subepithelial stromal cells and endothelial cells of the uterus. Using endometrial explant cultures from Day 12 of the estrous cycle, we determined that expression of SLA-DQA and SLA-DQB mRNAs increased in response to interferon-gamma (IFNG), which is produced by pig conceptus trophectoderm between Days 14 and 18 of pregnancy. The abundance of SLA-DQ protein was less in endometria from gilts with conceptuses resulting from somatic cell nuclear transfer compared with endometria from gilts with conceptuses resulting from natural mating. These results support our hypothesis that SLA-DQ is expressed in response to IFNG from the conceptus, and likely regulates immune response at the maternal-fetal interface to support the maintenance of pregnancy in pigs.

  2. Low-frequency switching voltage regulators for terrestrial photovoltaic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, R.

    1984-01-01

    The photovoltaic technology project and the stand alone applications project are discussed. Two types of low frequency switching type regulators were investigated. The design, operating characteristics and field application of these regulators is described. The regulators are small in size, low in cost, very low in power dissipation, reliable and allow considerable flexibility in system design.

  3. Construction and testing of a neutron and gamma spectrometry system using pulse shape discrimination with an organic scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Robert S.

    1993-03-01

    The goal of this thesis was to construct and test a neutron detector to measure the energy spectrum of 1 to 14-MeV neutrons in the presence of gammas. A spectrometer based on the process of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) was constructed, in which the scintillator NE-213 was used. The primary neutron/gamma sources used were 78-mCi and 4.7-Ci Pu-239Be sources, while 4.7-micro-Ci and 97.6-micro-Ci Na-22 gamma sources were used for energy calibration and additional testing of the detector. Proton recoil spectra and Compton electron spectra were unfolded with the neutron and gamma unfolding code FORIST to generate the incident neutron and gamma spectra, respectively. FORIST, which was written for a CDC computer, was modified to run on a VAX 6420. The experimental spectra were compared to those in the literature. The locations of the peaks in the Pu-239Be spectrum agreed with the literature to within 8.3%, the Pu-239Be gamma spectrum agreed to within 0.7%, while the Na-22 gamma spectrum agreed exactly. Uncertainties in the detection system and unfolding procedure are on the order of 5-10%. This thesis is intended to be a summary of the relevant literature and a user's guide to the PSD spectrometer.

  4. Target and peripheral dose during patient repositioning with the Gamma Knife automatic positioning system (APS) device.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tuan-Anh; Stanley, Thomas R; Malhotra, Harish K; De Boer, Steven F; Prasad, Dheerendra; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2010-01-28

    The GammaPlan treatment planning system does not account for the leakage and scatter dose during APS repositioning. In this study, the dose delivered to the target site and its periphery from the defocus stage and intershot couch transit (couch motion from the focus to defocus position and back) associated with APS repositioning are measured for the Gamma Knife model 4C. A stereotactic head-frame was attached to a Leksell 16 cm diameter spherical phantom with a calibrated ion chamber at its center. Using a fiducial box, CT images of the phantom were acquired and registered in the GammaPlan treatment planning system to determine the coordinates of the target (center of the phantom). An absorbed dose of 10 Gy to the 50% isodose line was prescribed to the target site for all measurements. Plans were generated for the 8, 14 and 18 mm collimator helmets to determine the relationship of measured dose to the number of repositions of the APS system and to the helmet size. The target coordinate was identical throughout entire study and there was no movement of the APS between various shots. This allowed for measurement of intershot transit dose at the target site and its periphery. The couch was paused in the defocus position, allowing defocus dose measurements at the intracranial target and periphery. Measured dose increases with frequency of repositioning and with helmet collimator size. During couch transit, the target receives more dose than peripheral regions; however, in the defocus position, the greatest dose is superior to the target site. The automatic positioning system for the Leksell Gamma Knife model 4C results in an additional dose of up to 3.87 +/- 0.07%, 4.97 +/- 0.04%, and 5.71 +/- 0.07% to the target site; its periphery receives additional dose that varies depending on its position relative to the target. There is also dose contribution to the patient in the defocus position, where the APS repositions the patient from one treatment coordinate to another

  5. A data acquisition and control system for high-speed gamma-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjertaker, B. T.; Maad, R.; Schuster, E.; Almås, O. A.; Johansen, G. A.

    2008-09-01

    A data acquisition and control system (DACS) for high-speed gamma-ray tomography based on the USB (Universal Serial Bus) and Ethernet communication protocols has been designed and implemented. The high-speed gamma-ray tomograph comprises five 500 mCi 241Am gamma-ray sources, each at a principal energy of 59.5 keV, which corresponds to five detector modules, each consisting of 17 CdZnTe detectors. The DACS design is based on Microchip's PIC18F4550 and PIC18F4620 microcontrollers, which facilitates an USB 2.0 interface protocol and an Ethernet (IEEE 802.3) interface protocol, respectively. By implementing the USB- and Ethernet-based DACS, a sufficiently high data acquisition rate is obtained and no dedicated hardware installation is required for the data acquisition computer, assuming that it is already equipped with a standard USB and/or Ethernet port. The API (Application Programming Interface) for the DACS is founded on the National Instrument's LabVIEW® graphical development tool, which provides a simple and robust foundation for further application software developments for the tomograph. The data acquisition interval, i.e. the integration time, of the high-speed gamma-ray tomograph is user selectable and is a function of the statistical measurement accuracy required for the specific application. The bandwidth of the DACS is 85 kBytes s-1 for the USB communication protocol and 28 kBytes s-1 for the Ethernet protocol. When using the iterative least square technique reconstruction algorithm with a 1 ms integration time, the USB-based DACS provides an online image update rate of 38 Hz, i.e. 38 frames per second, whereas 31 Hz for the Ethernet-based DACS. The off-line image update rate (storage to disk) for the USB-based DACS is 278 Hz using a 1 ms integration time. Initial characterization of the high-speed gamma-ray tomograph using the DACS on polypropylene phantoms is presented in the paper.

  6. Selective activation of p38alpha and p38gamma by hypoxia. Role in regulation of cyclin D1 by hypoxia in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Conrad, P W; Rust, R T; Han, J; Millhorn, D E; Beitner-Johnson, D

    1999-08-13

    Hypoxic/ischemic trauma is a primary factor in the pathology of a multitude of disease states. The effects of hypoxia on the stress- and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways were studied in PC12 cells. Exposure to moderate hypoxia (5% O(2)) progressively stimulated phosphorylation and activation of p38gamma in particular, and also p38alpha, two stress-activated protein kinases. In contrast, hypoxia had no effect on enzyme activity of p38beta, p38beta(2), p38delta, or on c-Jun N-terminal kinase, another stress-activated protein kinase. Prolonged hypoxia also induced phosphorylation and activation of p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase, although this activation was modest compared with nerve growth factor- and ultraviolet light-induced activation. Hypoxia also dramatically down-regulated immunoreactivity of cyclin D1, a gene that is known to be regulated negatively by p38 at the level of gene expression (Lavoie, J. N., L'Allemain, G., Brunet, A., Muller, R., and Pouyssegur, J. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 20608-20616). This effect was partially blocked by SB203580, an inhibitor of p38alpha but not p38gamma. Overexpression of a kinase-inactive form of p38gamma was also able to reverse in part the effect of hypoxia on cyclin D1 levels, suggesting that p38alpha and p38gamma converge to regulate cyclin D1 during hypoxia. These studies demonstrate that an extremely typical physiological stress (hypoxia) causes selective activation of specific p38 signaling elements; and they also identify a downstream target of these pathways. PMID:10438538

  7. Phospholipase C gamma mediates endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor-regulated calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in colitis-induced visceral pain

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Fiza; Liu, Miao; Shen, Shanwei

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral hypersensitivity is a complex pathophysiological paradigm with unclear mechanisms. Primary afferent neuronal plasticity marked by alterations in neuroactive compounds such as calcitonin gene-related peptide is suggested to underlie the heightened sensory responses. Signal transduction that leads to calcitonin gene-related peptide expression thereby sensory neuroplasticity during colitis remains to be elucidated. Results In a rat model with colitis induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid, we found that endogenously elevated brain-derived neurotrophic factor elicited an up-regulation of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the lumbar L1 dorsal root ganglia. At seven days of colitis, neutralization of brain-derived neurotrophic factor with a specific brain-derived neurotrophic factor antibody reversed calcitonin gene-related peptide up-regulation in the dorsal root ganglia. Colitis-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide transcription was also inhibited by brain-derived neurotrophic factor antibody treatment. Signal transduction studies with dorsal root ganglia explants showed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide expression was mediated by the phospholipase C gamma, but not the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt or the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase pathway. Application of PLC inhibitor U73122 in vivo confirmed that colitis-induced and brain-derived neurotrophic factor-mediated calcitonin gene-related peptide up-regulation in the dorsal root ganglia was regulated by the phospholipase C gamma pathway. In contrast, suppression of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity in vivo had no effect on colitis-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide expression. During colitis, calcitonin gene-related peptide also co-expressed with phospholipase C gamma but not with p-Akt. Calcitonin gene-related peptide up-regulation during colitis correlated to the activation

  8. Gamma radiation impact on performance of OOK, DPSK and homodyne BPSK based optical inter-satellite communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Zhao, Shanghong; Gong, Zizheng; Hou, Rui; Qiang, Ruoxin

    2015-09-01

    Performance of optical inter-satellite communication system is influenced by the harsh space radiation environment. Gamma radiation effects on main devices of communication system are analyzed and on the basis of existing experimental data, performance degradation of on off keying (OOK), differential phase shift keying (DPSK) and homodyne binary phase shift keying (BPSK) based system under 1 kGy gamma irradiation is simulated. Variation of Q factors and bit error ratio of these systems with different radiation position are achieved and discussed. The result shows that it is more urgent to improve the radiation hardness of transmitter, and the introduction of local laser is a considerable method to reduce gamma radiation impact on system performance.

  9. Modulated gamma-ray emission from compact millisecond pulsar binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarek, W.

    2014-01-01

    Context. A significant number of the millisecond pulsars (MSPs) have been discovered within binary systems. Tens of these MSPs emit γ-rays that are modulated with the pulsar period since this emission is produced in the inner pulsar magnetosphere. In several such binary systems, the masses of the companion stars have been derived allowing two classes of objects to be distinguished, which are called the black widow and the redback binaries. Pulsars in these binary systems are expected to produce winds that create conditions for acceleration of electrons, when colliding with stellar winds. These electrons should interact with the anisotropic radiation from the companion stars producing γ-ray emission modulated with the orbital period of the binary system, similar to what is observed in the massive TeV γ-ray binary systems. Aims: We consider the interaction of a MSP wind with a very inhomogeneous stellar wind from the companion star within binary systems of the black widow and redback types. Our aim is to determine the features of γ-ray emission produced in the collision region of the winds from a few typical MSP binary systems. Methods: It is expected that the pulsar wind should mix efficiently with the inhomogeneous stellar wind. The mixed winds move outside the binary with relatively low velocity. Electrons accelerated in such mixed, turbulent winds can interact with the magnetic field and strong radiation from the companion star, producing not only synchrotron radiation but also γ-rays in the inverse Compton process, fluxes of which are expected to be modulated on the periods of the binary systems. Applying numerical methods, we calculated the GeV-TeV gamma-ray spectra and the light curves expected from some MSP binary systems. Results: Gamma-ray emission, produced within the binary systems, is compared with the sensitivities of the present and future gamma-ray telescopes. It is concluded that energetic MSP binary systems create a new class of TeV

  10. Quality assurance for gamma knives

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.D.; Banks, W.W.; Fischer, L.E.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes and summarizes the results of a quality assurance (QA) study of the Gamma Knife, a nuclear medical device used for the gamma irradiation of intracranial lesions. Focus was on the physical aspects of QA and did not address issues that are essentially medical, such as patient selection or prescription of dose. A risk-based QA assessment approach was used. Sample programs for quality control and assurance are included. The use of the Gamma Knife was found to conform to existing standards and guidelines concerning radiation safety and quality control of external beam therapies (shielding, safety reviews, radiation surveys, interlock systems, exposure monitoring, good medical physics practices, etc.) and to be compliant with NRC teletherapy regulations. There are, however, current practices for the Gamma Knife not covered by existing, formalized regulations, standards, or guidelines. These practices have been adopted by Gamma Knife users and continue to be developed with further experience. Some of these have appeared in publications or presentations and are slowly finding their way into recommendations of professional organizations.

  11. Evidence for an Inducible Repair-Recombination System in the Female Germ Line of Drosophila Melanogaster. II. Differential Sensitivity to Gamma Rays

    PubMed Central

    Laurencon, A.; Bregliano, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    In a previous paper, we reported that the reactivity level, which regulates the frequency of transposition of I factor, a LINE element-like retrotransposon, is enhanced by the same agents that induce the SOS response in Escherichia coli. In this report, we describe experimental evidence that, for identical genotypes, the reactivity levels correlate with the sensitivity of oogenesis to gamma rays, measured by the number of eggs laid and by frequency of dominant lethals. This strongly supports the hypothesis that the reactivity level is one manifestation of an inducible DNA repair system taking place in the female germ line of Drosophila melanogaster. The implications of this finding for the understanding of the regulation of I factor are discussed and some other possible biological roles of this system are outlined. PMID:8647394

  12. Optimization of measure parameters for an X- and gamma-ray spectrometry portable system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Jaquiel S.; Appoloni, Carlos R.

    2008-01-01

    In order to optimize the use of a system for in situ gamma ( γ)- and X-ray spectrometry composed of a 3×3×1 mm 3 Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detector with respect to the detection of low-activity radioactive sources, a two level factorial planning was accomplished, involving three factors that could modify the system response. This planning was made with a 137Cs punctual source, analyzing the X-ray energy line of 32 keV from 137mBa. It was concluded that, for the system optimization, the best configuration for the involved parameters was to work with the detector at temperature of -22 °C, shaping time of 3 μs and rise time discrimination (RTD) with value 3.

  13. A Topological Array Trigger for AGIS, the Advanced Gamma ray Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Krennrich, F.; Anderson, J.; Byrum, K.; Dawson, J.; Drake, G.; Haberichter, W.; Kreps, A.; Smith, A.; Buckley, J.; Krawczynski, H.; Imran, A.; Schroedter, M.

    2008-12-24

    Next generation ground based {gamma}-ray observatories such as AGIS{sup 1} and CTA{sup 2} are expected to cover a 1 km{sup 2} area with 50-100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The stereoscopic view ol air showers using multiple view points raises the possibility to use a topological array trigger that adds substantial flexibility, new background suppression capabilities and a reduced energy threshold. In this paper we report on the concept and technical implementation of a fast topological trigger system, that makes use of real time image processing of individual camera patterns and their combination in a stereoscopic array analysis. A prototype system is currently under construction and we discuss the design and hardware of this topological array trigger system.

  14. Bixin regulates mRNA expression involved in adipogenesis and enhances insulin sensitivity in 3T3-L1 adipocytes through PPAR{gamma} activation

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Taimatsu, Aki; Egawa, Kahori; Katoh, Sota; Kusudo, Tatsuya; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Ohyane, Chie; Lee, Joo-Young; Kim, Young-il; Uemura, Taku; Hirai, Shizuka; Kawada, Teruo

    2009-12-25

    Insulin resistance is partly due to suppression of insulin-induced glucose uptake into adipocytes. The uptake is dependent on adipocyte differentiation, which is controlled at mRNA transcription level. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor, is involved in the differentiation. Many food-derived compounds serve as ligands to activate or inactivate PPAR. In this study, we demonstrated that bixin and norbixin (annatto extracts) activate PPAR{gamma} by luciferase reporter assay using GAL4-PPAR chimera proteins. To examine the effects of bixin on adipocytes, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with bixin or norbixin. The treatment induced mRNA expression of PPAR{gamma} target genes such as adipocyte-specific fatty acid-binding protein (aP2), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and adiponectin in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes and enhanced insulin-dependent glucose uptake. The observations indicate that bixin acts as an agonist of PPAR{gamma} and enhances insulin sensitivity in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, suggesting that bixin is a valuable food-derived compound as a PPAR ligand to regulate lipid metabolism and to ameliorate metabolic syndrome.

  15. A Visualization Code System for Gamma and Neutron Shielding Calculations, Version 2.0

    2008-08-01

    EASYQAD, Version 2.0, is a standalone Windows XP or Windows 7 code system which facilitates gamma and neutron shielding calculations with user friendly graphical interfaces. It is used to analyze radiation shielding problems and includes: - 8 kinds of geometry types - Various flexible source options - Common material library - Various detector types The update contents of EASYQAD Version 2.0 are below: - Addition of starting option with ‘P-code’ files - Addition of multi-sourcemore » calculation function - Expansion of source geometries - Addition of warning message - Modifications of EASYQAD program errors a. Coordination application problem in source division b. Source position error c. Rotation problem of source geometry d. Program running error in using more than six gamma energy distribution e. EASYQAD display problem of the right elliptic cylinder, ellipsoid and truncated right cone geometries Through intuitive windows and their interactions inside EASYQAD, the user can specify the dimensions of 3D-shapes, their material compositions, their densities, the type of radioactive sources, the locations of the sources, the type and positions of detectors. With the ease of using these sequences, shielding problems will become simpler and more clearly understandable to the analyzer. Furthermore, the error checking system can prevent users from making mistakes by automatically debugging the user inputs and giving modal dialog windows. The included AECL implementation of QAD-CGGP-A, Version 95.2 (C00645MNYCP00), is run from the user interface.« less

  16. Effect of gamma radiation on chlorobutyl rubber vulcanized by three different crosslinking systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scagliusi, Sandra R.; Cardoso, Elisabeth L. C.; Lugao, Ademar B.

    2012-09-01

    The development of halogenated butyl rubber (chlorobutyl) in the 1950s and 1960s greatly extended the usefulness of butyl. Their properties allowed the development of more durable tubeless tires with the air retaining innerliner, chemically bonded to the body of the tire. Tire innerliners are by far the largest application for halobutyl. When polymers are subjected to high energy radiation, a number of chemical reactions may occur following the initial ionization and excitation events. These reactions lead to changes in the molecular weight of the polymer through scission (S) and crosslinking (X) of the molecules and affect the physical and mechanical properties. In the halobutyl rubbers the chain scission may predominate. This work aims to show effects of gamma radiation in properties of chlorobutyl rubbers vulcanized with sulfur, sulfur donor and phenolic resin. The butyl rubber has been already studied by us previously. The samples were characterized before and after irradiation. Gamma radiation doses used were: 25 kGy, 50 kGy, 100 kGy, 150 kGy and 200 kGy, in order to identify which cure system is the most stable under irradiation. In this study we observed that the properties of all samples were affected irrespective of the vulcanization system.

  17. Remote Gamma Scanning System for Characterization of BWR and PWR Fuel Rod Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, Shannon L.; Alzheimer, James M.

    2011-08-08

    Sometimes challenges with the design and deployment of automated equipment in remote environments deals more with the constraints imposed by the remote environment than it does with the details of the automation. This paper discusses the development of a scanning system used to provide gamma radiation profiles of irradiated fuel rod segments. The system needed the capability to provide axial scans of cut segments of BWR and PWR fuel rods. The scanning location is A-Cell at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Hanford site in Washington State. The criteria for the scanning equipment included axial scanning increments of a tenth of an inch or less, ability to scan fuel rods with diameters ranging from 3/8 inch to 5/8 inch in diameter, and fuel rod segments up to seven feet in length. Constraints imposed by the environment included having the gamma detector and operator controls on the outside of the hot cell and the scanning hardware on the inside of the hot cell. This entailed getting a narrow, collimated beam of radiation from the fuel rod to the detector on the outside of the hot cell while minimizing the radiation exposure caused by openings for the wires and cables traversing the hot cell walls. Setup and operation of all of the in-cell hardware needed to accommodate limited access ports and use of hot cell manipulators. The radiation levels inside the cell also imposed constraints on the materials used.

  18. Rehabilitation of gamma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poynton, Charles A.

    1998-07-01

    Gamma characterizes the reproduction of tone scale in an imaging system. Gamma summarizes, in a single numerical parameter, the nonlinear relationship between code value--in an 8-bit system, from 0 through 255--and physical intensity. Nearly all image coding systems are nonlinear, and so involve values of gamma different from unity. Owing to poor understanding of tone scale reproduction, and to misconceptions about nonlinear coding, gamma has acquired a terrible reputation in computer graphics and image processing. In addition, the world-wide web suffers from poor reproduction of grayscale and color images, due to poor handling of nonlinear image coding. This paper aims to make gamma respectable again.

  19. Developing Self-Regulated Learners through an Intelligent Tutoring System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Kim; Heffernan, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Intelligent tutoring systems have been developed to help students learn independently. However, students who are poor self-regulated learners often struggle to use these systems because they lack the skills necessary to learn independently. The field of psychology has extensively studied self-regulated learning and can provide strategies to…

  20. Gamma Knife

    MedlinePlus

    ... results are sent to the Gamma Knife®'s planning computer system. Together, physicians ( radiation oncologists and neurosurgeons) and medical physicists delineate targets and normal anatomical structures. They use a planning computer program to determine the exact spatial relationship between ...

  1. Integrated Operation of the GАММА-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope Scintillation Detector Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runtso, Mikhail

    In this paper the question of integrated operation of scintillation detector systems AC (anticoincidence system) and SDC (scintillation detector system of calorimeter) in the GАММА-400 gamma-ray telescope is discussed. The main problem is the presence of so-called «backsplash current» (BSC) of particles from massive telescope calorimeter when detecting of very high-energy gamma-rays is provided. BSC is a low energy particle flux, moving up from the calorimeter and producing triggering of the AC detector, imitating detection of a charged particle. It is offered to record all events accompanied by BSC that should not result in to overload of the gamma-ray telescope in frequency of triggering. As an indicator to the number of BSC particles in the AC detector we offer the value of energy release in the C3 scintillation detector placing between two parts of the calorimeter (KK1 and KK2). Using mathematical simulation, the threshold on energy release in the C3 detector equal to 280 GeV was determined, at which the losses of gamma-quanta number in events with BSC do not exceed 10%. When detecting protons there are also events with BSC, which will be accompanied by exceeding of the indicated threshold of energy release in the С3 detector for proton energies above 30 GeV. However, counting rate for such protons will not exceed 200 Hz, that is reasonable for the GAMMA-400 data acquisition system.

  2. Recent Developments: The Gamma Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) Imaging and Detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Nicole; Shih, A. Y.; Hurford, G. J.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Bain, H.; Zoglauer, A.; Lin, R. P.; Boggs, S. E.

    2013-07-01

    In two of the best-observed flares of the last cycle, the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) satellite found the centroids of ion and relativistic electron emission to have a significant displacement. This result is surprising; co-spatially accelerated ions and electrons are thought to be transported along the same field lines, implying they would enter the chromosphere together and have similar emission locations. The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) balloon instrument will investigate particle transport in solar flares by providing enhanced imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry of gamma/HXR flare emission (20keV - 10MeV). GRIPS’ key technological improvements over the solar state of the art in HXR/gamma ray energies (RHESSI) include three-dimensional position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs) and a single-grid modulating collimator, the multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM). The 3D-GeDs allow GRIPS to Compton track energy deposition within the crystal. This capability (1) enables the MPRM design by acting as a second modulation grid, (2) provides significant background rejection and (3) makes solar polarization measurements possible. The MPRM imager provides quasi-continuous resolution from 12.5 - 162 arcsecs with 2x the throughput of a dual grid collimator system like RHESSI. This spatial resolution can resolve the separate footpoints of many flare sizes. In comparison, RHESSI images with a minimum of 35 arcsecs for gamma-rays, making these footpoints resolvable in only the largest flares. Here, we present the intial calibration of GRIPS’ 3D-GED detectors using laboratory radioactive sources. We evaluate charge sharing between adjacent strips, the detection of coincidences and preliminary depth measurements. The detectors have been shown to have a linear response and resolve line emission. The MPRM modulation grid is constructed and we present initial results from calibration. GRIPS is scheduled for a

  3. Scientific and Service Data Acquisition System for the GAMMA-400 Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunov, Maxim

    The data acquisition system for scientific information (ASSI) is the key part of the scientific GAMMA-400 apparatus. The functions of the ASSI are the acquisition of the data and the service information and the space flight control. It consists of 16 SpaceWire data channels for obtaining the data from detectors, the command driving channel (CDC) for transmission commands, the service information and on-board time for detectors, mainframe processing unit (CPU) for the primary data collection. The ASSI is based on 1907VM038, 1907VM014, 1907VM028 microprocessors and 1907KX018 switch, which are designed by Scientific Research Institute of System Analysis, Russian Academy of Sciences (SRISA). These chips are fabricated at scientific 0.25 μm SOI CMOS technology and provide the high level of radiation hardness and fault-tolerance. The high-speed data channels are based on SpaceWire and RapidIO standards.

  4. Radiation decomposition of trichlorofluoromethane in flow system under 60Co gamma-ray irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Ootsuka, N

    1982-12-01

    Irradiation experiments of CCl3F were carried out with 60Co gamma-rays using the irradiation facility of the flow system. In the system, CCl3F was irradiated at 5.7 kGg/h (5.7 X 10(5) rad/h) and -30 degrees C. The decomposition behavior of CCl3F and the influence of impurities in the circulating gas on the decomposition were examined. The result was compared with that of ampoule scale. The decomposition yield of CCl3F and the yields of radiolytic products (fluorocarbons) increased in proportion to the absorbed dose. The decomposition yield per Mrad of CCl3F was 0.0246 mol%/Mrad (G = 2.9). This value was equal to 1.8 times that of the ampoule scale. The marked influence of impurities (air, CH4, I2) was recognized for the yields of halogen ions. PMID:7170349

  5. Robustness properties of discrete time regulators, LOG regulators and hybrid systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, G.; Athans, M.

    1979-01-01

    Robustness properites of sample-data LQ regulators are derived which show that these regulators have fundamentally inferior uncertainty tolerances when compared to their continuous-time counterparts. Results are also presented in stability theory, multivariable frequency domain analysis, LQG robustness, and mathematical representations of hybrid systems.

  6. Is the Stellar System WR 11 a Gamma-Ray Source?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaglia, Paula

    2016-04-01

    Many early-type stars are in systems; some of them have been indicated as putative high-energy emitters. The radiation would be produced at the region where two stellar winds collide. Compelling evidence of such emission was found only for the colliding-wind binary (CWB) Eta Car, which was associated to a GeV source. Very recently, the closest CWB, WR 11, was proposed as a counterpart of a 6σ emission excess, measured with the Fermi LAT satellite. We sought evidence to support or reject the hypothesis that WR 11 is responsible of the gamma-ray excess. Archive radio interferometric data at 1.4 and 2.5 GHz taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array along 16 dates were reduced. The sizes of the field-of-view at 2.5 GHz and of the central region of the Fermi LAT excess are alike. We analysed the emission of the WR 11 field, characterised the radio sources detected and derived their spectral indices, to investigate their nature. Eight sources with fluxes above 10 mJy were detected at both frequencies. All but one (WR 11) showed negative spectral indices. Four of them were identified with known objects, including WR 11. A fifth source, labeled here S6, is a promising candidate to produce gamma-ray emission, besides the CWB WR 11.

  7. Focal Plane Detectors for the Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Otte, A. N.; Williams, D. A.; Byrum, K.; Drake, G.; Horan, D.; Smith, A.; Wagner, R. G.; Falcone, A.; Funk, S.; Tajima, H.; Mukherjee, R.

    2008-12-24

    The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a concept for the next generation observatory in ground-based very high energy gamma-ray astronomy. Design goals are ten times better sensitivity, higher angular resolution, and a lower energy threshold than existing Cherenkov telescopes. Simulations show that a substantial improvement in angular resolution may be achieved if the pixel diameter is reduced to the order of 0.05 deg, i.e. two to three times smaller than the pixel diameter of current Cherenkov telescope cameras. At these dimensions, photon detectors with smaller physical dimensions can be attractive alternatives to the classical photomultiplier tube (PMT). Furthermore, the operation of an experiment with the size of AGIS requires photon detectors that are among other things more reliable, more durable, and possibly higher efficiency photon detectors. Alternative photon detectors we are considering for AGIS include both silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) and multi-anode photomultipliers (MAPMTs). Here we present results from laboratory testing of MAPMTs and SiPMs along with results from the first incorporation of these devices into cameras on test bed Cherenkov telescopes.

  8. A Model for Short Gamma-Ray Bursts: Heated Neutron Stars in Close Binary Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Salmonson, J.D.; Wilson, J.R.

    2001-12-17

    In this paper we present a model for the short (< second) population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this model heated neutron stars in a close binary system near their last stable orbit emit neutrinos at large luminosities ({approx} 10{sup 53} ergs/sec). A fraction of these neutrinos will annihilate to form an e{sup +}e{sup -} pair plasma wind which will, in turn, expand and recombine to photons which make the gamma-ray burst. We study neutrino annihilation and show that a substantial fraction ({approx}1/2) of energy deposited comes from inter-star neutrinos, where each member of the neutrino pair originates from each neutron star. Thus, in addition to the annihilation of neutrinos blowing off of a single star, we have a new source of baryon free energy that is deposited between the stars. To model the e{sup +}e{sup -} pair plasma wind between stars, we do three-dimensional relativistic numerical hydrodynamic calculations. Preliminary results are also presented of new, fully general relativistic calculations of gravitationally attracting stars falling from infinity with no angular momentum. These simulations exhibit a compression effect.

  9. Development of array-type prompt gamma measurement system for in vivo range verification in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Chul Hee; Lee, Han Rim; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Lee, Se Byeong

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: In vivo range verification is one of the most important parts of proton therapy to fully utilize its benefits delivering high radiation dose to tumor, while sparing the normal tissue with the so-called Bragg peak. Currently, however, range verification method is not used in clinics. The purpose of the present study is to optimize and evaluate the configuration of an array-type prompt gamma measurement system on determining distal dose edge for in vivo range verification of proton therapy. Methods: To effectively measure the prompt gammas against the background gammas, the Monte Carlo simulations with the MCNPX code were employed in optimizing the configuration of the measurement system, and the Monte Carlo method was also used to understand the effect of the background gammas, mainly neutron capture gammas, in the measured gamma distribution. To reduce the effect of the background gammas, the optimized energy window of 4-10 MeV in measuring the prompt gammas was employed. A parameterized source was used to maximize computation speed in the optimization study. A simplified test measurement system, using only one detector moving from one measurement location to the next, was constructed and applied to therapeutic proton beams of 80-220 MeV. For accurate determination of the distal dose edge, the sigmoidal curve-fitting method was applied to the measured distributions of the prompt gammas, and then, the location of the half-value between the maximum and minimum value in the curve-fitting was determined as the distal dose edge and compared with the beam range assessed by the proton dose distribution. Results: The parameterized source term employed in optimization process improved the calculation speed by up to {approx}300 times. The optimization study indicates that an array-type measurement system with 3, 2, 2, and 150 mm for scintillator thickness, slit width, septal thickness, and slit length, respectively, can effectively measure the prompt gamma

  10. 1991 Yearly calibration of Pacific Northwest Laboratory's gross gamma-ray borehole geophysical logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, R.J.

    1991-08-01

    This report describes the 1991 yearly calibration of a gross gamma-ray geophysical pulse logging system owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and operated by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The calibration was conducted to permit the continued use of this system for geologic and hydrologic studies associated with remedial investigations at the Hanford Site. Primary calibrations to equivalent uranium units were conducted in DOE borehole model standards that reside on the Hanford Site. The calibrations were performed in borehole models SBL/SBH and SBA/SBB, which contain low-equivalent uranium concentrations. Correlations were established based on two similar approaches for relating observed count rate in before- and after-logging field calibrations to equivalent uranium concentrations. A new field source (Ra-20S-82) was fabricated to replace the old source (Ra-20S-204), whose activity led to variable field calibration results previously caused by a nonfixed geometry. A cross-calibration study was performed to compare the operation of the new source relative to the old source. A digitally based collection/recording system was recently acquired, so that many of the procedures were performed with the old analog system and the new digital system to compare the performance of the digital system. 7 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. The mouse CCR2 gene is regulated by two promoters that are responsive to plasma cholesterol and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yiming; Green, Simone R.; Ho, Jessica; Li, Andrew; Almazan, Felizidad; Quehenberger, Oswald . E-mail: oquehenberger@ucsd.edu

    2005-06-24

    We have previously shown that the expression of monocyte CCR2, the receptor for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, is induced by plasma cholesterol. The present study examines the mechanisms that regulate monocyte CCR2 expression in hypercholesterolemia using a mouse model. Our data demonstrate that in the mouse, CCR2 expression in circulating monocytes is controlled by two promoters P1 and P2. The two distinct transcripts, which encode the same protein, are produced by alternative splicing in the 5'-untranslated region. Both promoters are constitutively active, but only P2 is stimulated by cholesterol. However, both promoters are repressed by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}.

  12. LYNX: An unattended sensor system for detection of gamma-ray and neutron emissions from special nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Runkle, Robert C.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Kiff, Scott D.; Sidor, Daniel E.; Morris, Scott J.; Rohrer, John S.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Pfund, David M.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Bowler, Ryan S.; Mullen, Crystal A.

    2009-01-21

    This manuscript profiles an unattended and fully autonomous detection system sensitive to gamma-ray and neutron emissions from special nuclear material. The LYNX design specifically targets applications that require radiation detection capabilities but possess little or no infrastructure. In these settings, users need the capability to deploy sensors for extended periods of time that analyze whatever signal-starved data can be captured, since little or no control may be exerted over measurement conditions. The fundamental sensing elements of the LYNX system are traditional NaI(Tl) and 3He detectors. The new developments reported here center on two themes: low-power electronics and computationally simple analysis algorithms capable of discriminating gamma-ray signatures indicative of special nuclear materials from those of naturally occurring radioactive material. Incorporating tripwire-detection algorithms based on gamma-ray spectral signatures into a low-power electronics package significantly improves performance in environments where sensors encounter nuisance sources.

  13. Design and operation of gamma scan and fission gas sampling systems for characterization of irradiated commercial nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, C.A.; Thornhill, R.E.; Mellinger, G.B.

    1989-09-01

    One of the primary objectives of the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) is to acquire and characterize spent fuels used in waste form testing related to nuclear waste disposal. The initial steps in the characterization of a fuel rod consist of gamma scanning the rod and sampling the gas contained in the fuel rod (referred to as fission gas sampling). The gamma scan and fission gas sampling systems used by the MCC are adaptable to a wide range of fuel types and have been successfully used to characterize both boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rods. This report describes the design and operation of systems used to gamma scan and fission gas sample full-length PWR and BWR fuel rods. 1 ref., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Mobile neutron/gamma waste assay system for characterization of waste containing transuranics, uranium, and fission/activation products

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, D.R.; Haggard, D.; Lemons, C.

    1994-12-31

    A new integrated neutron/gamma assay system has been built for measuring 55-gallon drums at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The system is unique because it allows simultaneous measurement of neutrons and gamma-rays. This technique also allows measurement of transuranics (TRU), uranium, and fission/activation products, screening for shielded Special Nuclear Material prior to disposal, and critically determinations prior to transportation. The new system is positioned on a platform with rollers and installed inside a trailer or large van to allow transportation of the system to the waste site instead of movement of the drums to the scanner. The ability to move the system to the waste drums is particularly useful for drum retrieval programs common to all DOE sites and minimizes transportation problems on the site. For longer campaigns, the system can be moved into a facility. The mobile system consists of two separate subsystems: a passive Segmented Gamma Scanner (SGS) and a {open_quotes}clam-shell{close_quotes} passive neutron counter. The SGS with high purity germanium detector and {sup 75}Se transmission source simultaneously scan the height of the drum allowing identification of unshieled {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes} in the drum or segments where the matrix is too dense for the transmission source to penetrate. Dense segments can flag shielding material that could be used to hide plutonium or uranium during the gamma analysis. The passive nuetron counter with JSR-12N Neutron Coincidence Analyzer measures the coincident neutrons from the spontaneous fission of even isotopes of plutonium. Because high-density shielding produces minimal absorption of neutrons, compared to gamma rays, the passive neutron portion of the system can detect shielded SNM. Measurements to evaluate the performance of the system are still underway at Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

  15. A quality survey on different shielding configurations of gamma ray detector used with a portable PGNAA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, E.; Afarideh, H.; Davani, F. Abbasi; Ghal-Eh, N.

    2016-03-01

    The appropriate gamma-ray detector shielding configuration is critical for a precise prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) measurement. The shielding material has to prevent the radiation damage to the detector crystal and it must produce less activation gamma rays, whether prompt or delayed, which may interfere the gamma ray spectrum of the sample. In this research, using common shielding materials, a number of combinations have been studies to form a 50 cm long shield for portable PGNAA system against both fast and slow neutrons as well as gamma rays emitted by 20Ci Am-Be source. The measurement results show that in contrast with conventional shadow cone in which the shielding material starts with 20 cm heavy metals such as iron and ends with 30 cm polymer materials, in portable PGNAA systems, the shielding material gives better results if it starts with about 40 cm borated polymer material and ends with an appropriate thickness (7 cm to 10 cm) of heavy metal such as tungsten.

  16. A gamma ray observatory ground attitude error analysis study using the generalized calibration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketchum, E.

    1988-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) will be responsible for performing ground attitude determination for Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) support. The study reported in this paper provides the FDD and the GRO project with ground attitude determination error information and illustrates several uses of the Generalized Calibration System (GCS). GCS, an institutional software tool in the FDD, automates the computation of the expected attitude determination uncertainty that a spacecraft will encounter during its mission. The GRO project is particularly interested in the uncertainty in the attitude determination using Sun sensors and a magnetometer when both star trackers are inoperable. In order to examine the expected attitude errors for GRO, a systematic approach was developed including various parametric studies. The approach identifies pertinent parameters and combines them to form a matrix of test runs in GCS. This matrix formed the basis for this study.

  17. Localization of Fc gamma receptors in the human central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Nyland, H; Nilsen, R

    1982-08-01

    Immune complexes of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and rabbit IgG antibodies to HRP were used to study the Fc gamma receptors in the human central nervous system (CNS). The peroxidase activity was demonstrated with 3,3'-diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride and H2O2. The majority of the pia and arachnoid cells of the leptomeninges, the stroma cells of the arachnoid granulations and the adventitial cells in the perivascular spaces of the nervous tissue were stained. The villi of the choroid plexus were also stained. By electron microscopy the reaction products were localized to the plasma membranes of the stroma cells and at the basal aspects of the epithelial cells in the choroid villi. In addition, reaction product was demonstrated on pericytes of some of the brain capillaries. The immune complexes did not bind to the brain parenchyma.

  18. A multiparametric HPGe-NaI acquisition system for low gamma activity measurements of meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taricco, C.; Bhandari, N.; Colombetti, P.; Mariani, I.; Verma, N.; Vivaldo, G.

    The study of long-term solar activity variations in the past requires the use of radioisotopic data planetary reservoirs. At the Laboratory of Monte dei Cappuccini in Torino (IFSI-Torino, INAF) for many years we have been studying radioisotopes in meteorites, because their production, which is related to galactic cosmic ray flux in the heliosphere, is anticorrelated with the heliospheric magnetic field variations. We have developed very sensitive gamma detection techniques, in particular to measure 44Ti activity in meteorites; due to its half-life (t1/2=59.2 years), this radioisotope is an ideal index to reveal the imprint of solar activity variations on the centennial scale. Recently we have improved the spectrometer by a new multiparametric acquisition system, which allows to extract efficiently the 44Ti peak from the natural background.

  19. How gamma radiation processing systems are benefiting from the latest advances in information technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Wayne H.; Levesque, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    This paper discusses how gamma irradiation plants are putting the latest advances in computer and information technology to use for better process control, cost savings, and strategic advantages. Some irradiator operations are gaining significant benefits by integrating computer technology and robotics with real-time information processing, multi-user databases, and communication networks. The paper reports on several irradiation facilities that are making good use of client/server LANs, user-friendly graphics interfaces, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems, distributed I/O with real-time sensor devices, trending analysis, real-time product tracking, dynamic product scheduling, and automated dosimetry reading. These plants are lowering costs by fast and reliable reconciliation of dosimetry data, easier validation to GMP requirements, optimizing production flow, and faster release of sterilized products to market. There is a trend in the manufacturing sector towards total automation using "predictive process control". Real-time verification of process parameters "on-the-run" allows control parameters to be adjusted appropriately, before the process strays out of limits. Applying this technology to the gamma radiation process, control will be based on monitoring the key parameters such as time, and making adjustments during the process to optimize quality and throughput. Dosimetry results will be used as a quality control measurement rather than as a final monitor for the release of the product. Results are correlated with the irradiation process data to quickly and confidently reconcile variations. Ultimately, a parametric process control system utilizing responsive control, feedback and verification will not only increase productivity and process efficiency, but can also result in operating within tighter dose control set points.

  20. 1992 Yearly calibration of Pacific Northwest Laboratory's gross gamma-ray borehole geophysical logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, R. J.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes the 1992 yearly calibration of a gross gamma-ray geophysical pulse logging system owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The calibration was conducted to permit the continued use of this system for geologic and hydrologic studies associated with remedial investigation at the Hanford Site. The calibration is limited to the probe identified as CG27A-97. Primary calibrations to equivalent-uranium units were conducted in DOE borehole model standards that reside on the Hanford Site. The calibrations were performed in borehole models SBL/SBH and SBA/SBB, which contain low equivalent-uranium concentrations. A previous correlation for relating observed count rate in before- and after-logging field calibrations to equivalent-uranium concentrations was confirmed for field source Ra-20S-82. A computer-based digital collection/recording system was used simultaneously on many of the procedures with the original analog system so that the performance of the two collection systems could be correlated and compared at some future date.

  1. Gamma aminobutyric acid B and 5-hydroxy tryptamine 2A receptors functional regulation during enhanced liver cell proliferation by GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticles treatment.

    PubMed

    Shilpa, Joy; Pretty, Mary Abraham; Anitha, Malat; Paulose, Cheramadathikudyil Skaria

    2013-09-01

    Liver is one of the major organs in vertebrates and hepatocytes are damaged by many factors. The liver cell maintenance and multiplication after injury and treatment gained immense interest. The present study investigated the role of Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) coupled with chitosan nanoparticles in the functional regulation of Gamma aminobutyric acid B and 5-hydroxy tryptamine 2A receptors mediated cell signaling mechanisms, extend of DNA methylation and superoxide dismutase activity during enhanced liver cell proliferation. Liver injury was achieved by partial hepatectomy of male Wistar rats and the GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticles treatments were given intraperitoneally. The experimental groups were sham operated control (C), partially hepatectomised rats with no treatment (PHNT), partially hepatectomised rats with GABA chitosan nanoparticle (GCNP), 5-HT chitosan nanoparticle (SCNP) and a combination of GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticle (GSCNP) treatments. In GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticle treated group there was a significant decrease (P<0.001) in the receptor expression of Gamma aminobutyric acid B and a significant increase (P<0.001) in the receptor expression of 5-hydroxy tryptamine 2A when compared to PHNT. The cyclic adenosine monophosphate content and its regulatory protein, presence of methylated DNA and superoxide dismutase activity were decreased in GCNP, SCNP and GSCNP when compared to PHNT. The Gamma aminobutyric acid B and 5-hydroxy tryptamine 2A receptors coupled signaling elements played an important role in GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticles induced liver cell proliferation which has therapeutic significance in liver disease management.

  2. The Endocannabinoid System: Role in Energy Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Gamage, Thomas F.; Lichtman, Aron H.

    2013-01-01

    Cannabis sativa has been used since antiquity to treat many ailments, including eating disorders. The primary psychoactive constituent of this plant, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is an FDA approved medication to treat nausea and emesis caused by cancer chemotherapeutic agents as well as to stimulate appetite in AIDS patients suffering from cachexia. The effects of THC are mediated through the endocannabinoid system (ECS), which promotes a positive energy balance through stimulation of appetite as well as shifting homeostatic mechanisms toward energy storage. Here we discuss the physiological function of the ECS in energy balance and the therapeutic potential of targeting this system. PMID:22076835

  3. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS)--Science Highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, J.; Krawczynski, H.; Coppi, P.; Digel, S.; Funk, S.; Krennrich, F.; Pohl, M.; Romani, R.; Vassiliev, V.

    2008-12-24

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS), a future gamma-ray telescope consisting of an array of {approx}50 atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes distributed over an area of {approx}1 km{sup 2}, will provide a powerful new tool for exploring the high-energy universe. The order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity and improved angular resolution could provide the first detailed images of {gamma}-ray emission from other nearby galaxies or galaxy clusters. The large effective area will provide unprecedented sensitivity to short transients (such as flares from AGNs and GRBs) probing both intrinsic spectral variability (revealing the details of the acceleration mechanism and geometry) as well as constraining the high-energy dispersion in the velocity of light (probing the structure of spacetime and Lorentz invariance). A wide field of view ({approx}4 times that of current instruments) and excellent angular resolution (several times better than current instruments) will allow for an unprecedented survey of the Galactic plane, providing a deep unobscured survey of SNRs, X-ray binaries, pulsar-wind nebulae, molecular cloud complexes and other sources. The differential flux sensitivity of {approx}10{sup -13} erg cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} will rival the most sensitive X-ray instruments for these extended Galactic sources. The excellent capabilities of AGIS at energies below 100 GeV will provide sensitivity to AGN and GRBs out to cosmological redshifts, increasing the number of AGNs detected at high energies from about 20 to more than 100, permitting population studies that will provide valuable insights into both a unified model for AGN and a detailed measurement of the effects of intergalactic absorption from the diffuse extragalactic background light. A new instrument with fast-slewing wide-field telescopes could provide detections of a number of long-duration GRBs providing important physical constraints from this new spectral component. The new array will also have excellent

  4. A transportable high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer and analysis system applicable to mobile, autonomous or unattended applications

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, W.M.; Neufeld, K.W.

    1995-07-01

    The Safeguards Technology Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing systems based on a compact electro-mechanically cooled high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. This detector system broadens the practicality of performing high- resolution gamma-ray spectrometry in the field. Utilizing portable computers, multi-channel analyzers and software these systems greatly improve the ease of performing mobile high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. Using industrial computers, we can construct systems that will run autonomously for extended periods of time without operator input or maintenance. These systems can start or make decisions based on sensor inputs rather than operator interactions. Such systems can provide greater capability for wider domain of safeguards, treaty verification application, and other unattended, autonomous or in-situ applications.

  5. Gamma rays and neutrinos from dense environment of massive binary systems in open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarek, Włodek; Pabich, Jerzy; Sobczak, Tomasz

    2014-11-01

    TeV gamma-ray emission has been recently observed from the direction of a few open clusters containing massive stars. We consider the high energy processes occurring within massive binary systems and in their dense environment by assuming that nuclei, from the stellar winds of massive stars, are accelerated at the collision region of the stellar winds. We calculate the rates of injection of protons and neutrons from fragmentation of these nuclei in collisions with stellar radiation and matter of the winds from the massive companions in a binary system. Protons and neutrons can interact with the matter, within the stellar wind cavity, and within the open cluster, producing pions which decay into γ rays and neutrinos. We discuss the detectability of such γ -ray emission by the present and future Cherenkov telescopes for the case of two binary systems Eta Carinae, within the Carina Nebula, and WR 20a, within the Westerlund 2 open cluster. We also calculate the neutrino fluxes produced by protons around the binary systems and within the open clusters. This neutrino emission is confronted with ANTARES upper limits on the neutrino fluxes from discrete sources and with the sensitivity of IceCube.

  6. Characterization of HPGe gamma spectrometric detectors systems for Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) at the Colombian Geological Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, O.; Parrado, G.; Cañón, Y.; Porras, A.; Alonso, D.; Herrera, D. C.; Peña, M.; Orozco, J.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the progress made by the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) laboratory at the Colombian Geological Survey (SGC in its Spanish acronym), towards the characterization of its gamma spectrometric systems for Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA), with the aim of introducing corrections to the measurements by variations in sample geometry. Characterization includes the empirical determination of the interaction point of gamma radiation inside the Germanium crystal, through the application of a linear model and the use of a fast Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) software to estimate correction factors for differences in counting efficiency that arise from variations in sample density between samples and standards.

  7. Small Field of View Scintimammography Gamma Camera Integrated to a Stereotactic Core Biopsy Digital X-ray System

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Weisenberger; Fernando Barbosa; T. D. Green; R. Hoefer; Cynthia Keppel; Brian Kross; Stanislaw Majewski; Vladimir Popov; Randolph Wojcik

    2002-10-01

    A small field of view gamma camera has been developed for integration with a commercial stereotactic core biopsy system. The goal is to develop and implement a dual-modality imaging system utilizing scintimammography and digital radiography to evaluate the reliability of scintimammography in predicting the malignancy of suspected breast lesions from conventional X-ray mammography. The scintimammography gamma camera is a custom-built mini gamma camera with an active area of 5.3 cm /spl times/ 5.3 cm and is based on a 2 /spl times/ 2 array of Hamamatsu R7600-C8 position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. The spatial resolution of the gamma camera at the collimator surface is < 4 mm full-width at half-maximum and a sensitivity of /spl sim/ 4000 Hz/mCi. The system is also capable of acquiring dynamic scintimammographic data to allow for dynamic uptake studies. Sample images of preliminary clinical results are presented to demonstrate the performance of the system.

  8. Receptor-selective retinoids implicate retinoic acid receptor alpha and gamma in the regulation of bmp-2 and bmp-4 in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rogers, M B

    1996-01-01

    The effect of retinoids on malignant cells and embryos indicates that retinoids influence the expression of growth factors or alter the response of cells to growth factors. The bone morphogenetic proteins, Bmp-2 and Bmp-4, are candidates for such growth factors because retinoic acid (RA) treatment of F9 embryonal carcinoma cells induced Bmp-2 mRNA, while simultaneously repressing Bmp-4 levels. Also, recombinant Bmp-2 affected the growth and differentiation of these cells. Regulation of each gene was concentration dependent and required continuous RA treatment. The short half-lives of the Bmp-2 (75 +/- 11 min) and Bmp-4 (70 +/- 4 min) mRNAs suggest that their abundance is primarily controlled at the transcriptional level. To determine which RA receptor (RAR) controls bmp-2 and bmp-4 expression, F9 cells were exposed to various receptor-selective retinoids. RAR alpha- and gamma-selective retinoids induced Bmp-2 and repressed Bmp-4 equally as well as all-trans RA. In contrast, a RAR beta-selective retinoid had little effect on Bmp-2 induction but repressed Bmp-4. A RAR alpha-selective antagonist inhibited all-trans RA stimulation of Bmp-2, although not as dramatically as a RAR beta gamma-selective antagonist. No differences were observed between Bmp levels in all-trans RA and 9-cis RA-treated cells, indicating that the RXRs play little part in controlling these genes. The results are consistent with RAR alpha and gamma-controlled Bmp-2 and Bmp-4 regulation.

  9. [Neuropharmacological regulation of pituitary hormones. Role of acetylcholine, gamma-aminobutyric acid, histamine and endorphins (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Martin-du Pan, R; Gomez, F

    1981-01-01

    The secretion of pituitary hormones is controlled by hypothalamic hormones which are synthetized by neurosecreting cells whose activity is modulated by different neurotransmitters as dopamine and serotonin. Centrally acting drugs interfere with the activity of these neurotransmitters. Thus they may influence the secretion of pituitary hormones. Acetylcholine, gamma-aminobutyric acid, histamine and endorphins seem also to influence the pituitary secretion. The endocrine effects of drugs (opiates, antiparkinson, antiepileptic, and antihistaminic agents) acting on these neurotransmitters is reviewed.

  10. Experimental investigation of silicon photomultipliers as compact light readout systems for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications in fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Nocente, M; Fazzi, A; Tardocchi, M; Cazzaniga, C; Lorenzoli, M; Pirovano, C; Rebai, M; Uboldi, C; Varoli, V; Gorini, G

    2014-11-01

    A matrix of Silicon Photo Multipliers has been developed for light readout from a large area 1 in. × 1 in. LaBr3 crystal. The system has been characterized in the laboratory and its performance compared to that of a conventional photo multiplier tube. A pulse duration of 100 ns was achieved, which opens up to spectroscopy applications at high counting rates. The energy resolution measured using radioactive sources extrapolates to 3%-4% in the energy range Eγ = 3-5 MeV, enabling gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at good energy resolution. The results reported here are of relevance in view of the development of compact gamma-ray detectors with spectroscopy capabilities, such as an enhanced gamma-ray camera for high power fusion plasmas, where the use of photomultiplier is impeded by space limitation and sensitivity to magnetic fields. PMID:25430287

  11. Experimental investigation of silicon photomultipliers as compact light readout systems for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nocente, M. Gorini, G.; Fazzi, A.; Lorenzoli, M.; Pirovano, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M.; Uboldi, C.; Varoli, V.

    2014-11-15

    A matrix of Silicon Photo Multipliers has been developed for light readout from a large area 1 in. × 1 in. LaBr{sub 3} crystal. The system has been characterized in the laboratory and its performance compared to that of a conventional photo multiplier tube. A pulse duration of 100 ns was achieved, which opens up to spectroscopy applications at high counting rates. The energy resolution measured using radioactive sources extrapolates to 3%–4% in the energy range E{sub γ} = 3–5 MeV, enabling gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at good energy resolution. The results reported here are of relevance in view of the development of compact gamma-ray detectors with spectroscopy capabilities, such as an enhanced gamma-ray camera for high power fusion plasmas, where the use of photomultiplier is impeded by space limitation and sensitivity to magnetic fields.

  12. Signal regulators of systemic acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qing-Ming; Zhu, Shifeng; Kachroo, Pradeep; Kachroo, Aardra

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays a vital role in a number of physiological responses, including plant defense. The last two decades have witnessed a number of breakthroughs related to biosynthesis, transport, perception and signaling mediated by SA. These findings demonstrate that SA plays a crictical role in both local and systemic defense responses. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is one such SA-dependent response. SAR is a long distance signaling mechanism that provides broad spectrum and long-lasting resistance to secondary infections throughout the plant. This unique feature makes SAR a highly desirable trait in crop production. This review summarizes the recent advances in the role of SA in SAR and discusses its relationship to other SAR inducers. PMID:25918514

  13. The negative regulators Foxj1 and Foxo3a are up-regulated by a peptide that inhibits systemic lupus erythematosus-associated T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Sela, Uri; Dayan, Molly; Hershkoviz, Rami; Cahalon, Liora; Lider, Ofer; Mozes, Edna

    2006-11-01

    A peptide (hCDR1) based on the complementarity determining region-1 of an anti-DNA antibody ameliorates systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in induced and spontaneous lupus models. Our objectives were to determine the effects of hCDR1 on TCR signaling and on its negative regulators, Foxj1 and Foxo3a. BALB/c mice were immunized with the SLE-inducing anti-DNA antibody, designated 16/6Id, and treated with hCDR1. hCDR1 treatment specifically inhibited IFN-gamma secretion by T cells in association with down-regulated T-bet expression and NF-kappaB activation; however, GATA-3 expression was not affected. Furthermore, TCR signaling (ZAP-70 phosphorylation) was inhibited, and the mRNA expression of the two modulators of Th1 activation, Foxj1 and Foxo3a, was significantly up-regulated. The latter were also elevated in SLE-afflicted (NZBxNZW)F1 mice that were treated with hCDR1. Addition of TGF-beta, which was elevated following treatment with hCDR1, to T cells from 16/6Id immunized mice, up-regulated Foxj1 and Foxo3a mRNA expression, similarly to hCDR1. In contrast, anti-TGF-beta antibodies added to hCDR1-treated T cells abrogated its effect. Thus, hCDR1 elevates TGF-beta, which contributes to the up-regulation of T cell Foxj1 and Foxo3a expression, leading to inhibition of NF-kappaB activation and IFN-gamma secretion, which is required for the maintenance of SLE. PMID:17051618

  14. Gamma-ray pulse height spectrum analysis on systems with multiple Ge detectors using spectrum summing

    SciTech Connect

    Killian, E.W.

    1997-11-01

    A technique has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to sum high resolution gamma-ray pulse spectra from systems with multiple Ge detectors. Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company operates a multi-detector spectrometer configuration at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant facility which is used to characterize the radionuclide contents in waste drums destined for shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This summing technique was developed to increase the sensitivity of the system, reduce the count times required to properly quantify the radio-nuclides and provide a more consistent methodology for combining data collected from multiple detectors. In spectrometer systems with multiple detectors looking at non homogeneous waste forms it is often difficult to combine individual spectrum analysis results from each detector to obtain a meaningful result for the total waste container. This is particularly true when the counting statistics in each individual spectrum are poor. The spectrum summing technique adds the spectra collected by each detector into a single spectrum which has better counting statistics than each individual spectrum. A normal spectral analysis program can then be used to analyze the sum spectrum to obtain radio-nuclide values which have smaller errors and do not have to be further manipulated to obtain results for the total waste container. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Force regulation in multiple-manipulator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.; Murphy, Steve H.

    1992-01-01

    A new intuitively appealing interpretation of the internal force in a multiple-arm system is presented. The static gravity-free case is considered where internal force has a well-founded physical meaning. The case is extended to the general dynamic case by removing the inertial force through balancing it with the minimum amount of contact force. The remaining component in the contact force is considered to be the sole contributor to the inertial force. Existing techniques for force control can be used to obtain various stabilizing force set point control laws. Particular attention is given to the motion control strategy for multiple arm systems. Three types of control laws, feedback linearization, arms-as-actuators, and passive control, are addressed. The first two techniques provide simplified control tuning but require much model information. The latter approach is considered to be very robust with respect to the model, but good transient performance is more challenging to obtain. It is suggested to combine one of the model-based approaches with the passive control approach.

  16. Size effects on the open probability of two-state ion channel system in cell membranes using microcanonical formalism based on gamma function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Riza; Aydiner, Ekrem

    2016-08-01

    Ion channel systems are a class of proteins that reside in the membranes of all biological cells and forms conduction pores that regulate the transport of ions into and out of cells. They can be investigated theoretically in the microcanonical formalism since the number of accessible states can be easily evaluated by using the Stirling approximation to deal with factorials. In this work, we have used gamma function (Γ (n)) to solve the two-state or open-close channel model without any approximation. New values are calculated for the open probability (p0) and the relative error between our numerical results and the approximate one using Stirling formula is presented. This error (p0 app — p0)/p0 is significant for small channel systems.

  17. Analysis of effective capacity for free-space optical communication systems over gamma-gamma turbulence channels with pointing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, You-quan; Chi, Xue-fen; Shi, Jia-lin; Zhao, Lin-lin

    2015-05-01

    To facilitate the efficient support of quality-of-service (QoS) for promising free-space optical (FSO) communication systems, it is essential to model and analyze FSO channels in terms of delay QoS. However, most existing works focus on the average capacity and outage capacity for FSO, which are not enough to characterize the effective transmission data rate when delay-sensitive service is applied. In this paper, the effective capacity of FSO communication systems under statistical QoS provisioning constraints is investigated to meet heterogeneous traffic demands. A novel closed-form expression for effective capacity is derived under the combined effects of atmospheric turbulence conditions, pointing errors, beam widths, detector sizes and QoS exponents. The obtained results reveal the effects of some significant parameters on effective capacity, which can be used for the design of FSO systems carrying a wide range of services with diverse QoS requirements.

  18. Individual versus systemic risk and the Regulator's Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Beale, Nicholas; Rand, David G; Battey, Heather; Croxson, Karen; May, Robert M; Nowak, Martin A

    2011-08-01

    The global financial crisis of 2007-2009 exposed critical weaknesses in the financial system. Many proposals for financial reform address the need for systemic regulation--that is, regulation focused on the soundness of the whole financial system and not just that of individual institutions. In this paper, we study one particular problem faced by a systemic regulator: the tension between the distribution of assets that individual banks would like to hold and the distribution across banks that best supports system stability if greater weight is given to avoiding multiple bank failures. By diversifying its risks, a bank lowers its own probability of failure. However, if many banks diversify their risks in similar ways, then the probability of multiple failures can increase. As more banks fail simultaneously, the economic disruption tends to increase disproportionately. We show that, in model systems, the expected systemic cost of multiple failures can be largely explained by two global parameters of risk exposure and diversity, which can be assessed in terms of the risk exposures of individual actors. This observation hints at the possibility of regulatory intervention to promote systemic stability by incentivizing a more diverse diversification among banks. Such intervention offers the prospect of an additional lever in the armory of regulators, potentially allowing some combination of improved system stability and reduced need for additional capital.

  19. Validation of Non-Invasive Waste Assay System (Gamma Box Counter) Performance at AECL Whiteshell Laboratories - 13136

    SciTech Connect

    Attas, E.M.; Bialas, E.; Rhodes, M.J.

    2013-07-01

    Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) in solid form, resulting from decommissioning and operations activities at AECL's Whiteshell Laboratories (WL), is packaged in B-25 and B-1000 standard waste containers and characterized before it is shipped to an on-site interim storage facility, pending AECL decisions on long term management of its LLW. Assay of the waste packages before shipment contributes to an inventory of the interim storage facility and provides data to support acceptance at a future repository. A key characterization step is a gamma spectrometric measurement carried out under standard conditions using an automated, multi-detector Waste Assay System (WAS), purchased from Antech Corporation. A combination of ORTEC gamma acquisition software and custom software is used in this system to incorporate multiple measurements from two collimated high-resolution detectors. The software corrects the intensities of the gamma spectral lines for geometry and attenuation, and generates a table of calculated activities or limits of detection for a user-defined list of radioisotopes that may potentially be present. Validation of WAS performance was a prerequisite to routine operation. Documentation of the validation process provides assurance of the quality of the results produced, which may be needed one or two decades after they were generated. Aspects of the validation included setting up a quality control routine, measurements of standard point sources in reproducible positions, study of the gamma background, optimization of user-selectable software parameters, investigation of the effect of non-uniform distribution of materials and radionuclides, and comparison of results with measurements made using other gamma detector systems designed to assay bulk materials. The following key components of the validation process have been established. A daily quality control routine has been instituted, to verify stability of the gamma detector operation and the background levels

  20. Code System to Determine Pu Isotope Abundances from Multichannel Analyzer Gamma Spectra.

    2008-09-26

    Version 00 The MGA (Multiple Group Analysis) program determines the relative abundances of plutonium and other actinide isotopes in different materials. The program analyzes spectra taken of such samples using a 4096-channel germanium (Ge) gamma-ray spectrometer. The code can be run in a one or two detector mode. The first spectrum, which is required and must be taken at a gain of 0.075 Kev/channel with a high resolution planar detector, contains the 0-300Kev energy region.more » The second spectrum, which is optional, must be taken at a gain of 0.25 Kev/channel; it becomes important when analyzing high burnup samples (concentration of Pu241 greater than one percent). Isotopic analysis precisions of one percent or better can be obtained, and no calibrations are required. The system also measures the abundances of U235, U238, Np237, and Am241. A special calibration option is available to perform a one-time peak-shape characterization when first using a new detector system.« less

  1. Reflight of the Gamma-Ray Arcminute Telescope Imaging System (GRATIS) Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hailey, Charles J.

    2000-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Arcminute Telescope Imaging System (GRATIS) balloon payload was prepared for reflight. This involved repair of damage caused in the previous flight to structural members of the payload (the gondola support structure) as well as damage to some of the pointing system elements and electronics modules. This work was successfully completed. An extensive pre-calibration of the CsI(Na) imaging detectors was then done. The plan was to take several months to calibrate the 36 detectors and to compare the results with the post-calibration from the previous flight in Alice Springs Australia. During the course of the pre-calibrations it was noted that the light output of the crystals was severely degraded in more than half the detectors compared to the values recorded 1.5 years earlier. Subsequent investigation revealed that the light yield degradation was not unreasonable. The CsI crystals had in fact performed well past their rated life from hygroscopic contamination. The crystals had spent the majority of their life either in the desert or in the extremely low humidity conditions of Livermore California. where the GRATIS payload had been based prior to transfer to Columbia. The extreme summer humidity of New York simply exacerbated a degradation process that had been artificially delayed by dry conditions. Because such a large part of the detector array had been degraded we did not feel it was appropriate to refly the payload because the scientific performance would have been compromised.

  2. A numerical method for the calibration of in situ gamma ray spectroscopy systems.

    PubMed

    Dewey, S C; Whetstone, Z D; Kearfott, K J

    2010-05-01

    High purity germanium in situ gamma ray spectroscopy systems are typically calibrated using pre-calculated tables and empirical formulas to estimate the response of a detector to an exponentially distributed source in a soil matrix. Although this method is effective, it has estimated uncertainties of 10-15%, is limited to only a restricted set of measurement scenarios, and the approach only applies to an exponentially distributed source. In addition, the only soil parameters that can be varied are density and moisture content, while soil attenuation properties are fixed. This paper presents a more flexible method for performing such calibrations. For this new method, a three- or four-dimensional analytical expression is derived that is a combination of a theoretical equation and experimentally measured data. Numerical methods are used to integrate this expression, which approximates the response of a detector to a large variety of source distributions within any soil, concrete, or other matrix. The calculation method is flexible enough to allow for the variation of multiple parameters, including media attenuation properties and the measurement geometry. The method could easily be adapted to horizontally non-uniform sources as well. Detector responses are calculated analytically and Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations are used to verify the results. Results indicate that the method adds an uncertainty of only approximately 5% to the other uncertainties typically associated with the calibration of a detector system. PMID:20386196

  3. Code System to Calculate Neutron and Gamma-Ray Skyshine Doses Using the Integral Line-Beam Method.

    2000-11-16

    Version 03 This package includes the SKYNEUT 1.1, SKYDOSE 2.3, MCSKY 2.3 and SKYCONES 1.1 codes plus the DLC-188/SKYDATA library to form a comprehensive system for calculating skyshine doses. See the author's web site for related information: http://athena.mne.ksu.edu/~jks/ SKYNEUT evaluates the neutron and neutron-induced secondary gamma-ray skyshine doses from an isotropic, point, neutron source collimated by three simple geometries: an open silo, a vertical black (perfectly absorbing) wall, and a rectangular building. The source maymore » emit monoenergetic neutrons or neutrons with an arbitrary multigroup spectrum of energies. SKYDOSE evaluates the gamma-ray skyshine dose from an isotropic, monoenergetic, point gamma-photon source collimated by three simple geometries: (1) a source in a silo, (2) a source behind an infinitely long, vertical, black wall, and (3) a source in a rectangular building. In all three geometries an optional overhead slab shield may be specified. MCSKY evaluates the gamma-ray skyshine dose from an isotropic, monoenergetic, point gamma-photon source collimated into either a vertical cone (i.e., silo geometry) or into a vertically oriented structure with an N-sided polygon cross section. An overhead laminate shield composed of two different materials is assumed, although shield thicknesses of zero may be specified to model an unshielded SKYSHINE source. SKYCONES evaluates the skyshine doses produced by a point neutron or gamma-photon source emitting, into the atmosphere, radiation that is collimated into an upward conical annulus between two arbitrary polar angles. The source is assumed to be axially (azimuthally) symmetric about a vertical axis through the source and can have an arbitrary polyenergetic spectrum. Nested contiguous annular cones can thus be used to represent the energy and polar-angle dependence of a skyshine source emitting radiation into the atmosphere.« less

  4. Interferon-gamma inhibits central nervous system remyelination through a process modulated by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wensheng; Kemper, April; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Harding, Heather P; Ron, David; Popko, Brian

    2006-05-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is believed to play a deleterious role in the immune-mediated demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis. Here we have exploited transgenic mice that ectopically express IFN-gamma in a temporally controlled manner in the CNS to specifically study its effects on remyelination in the cuprizone-induced demyelination model and in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. CNS delivery of IFN-gamma severely suppressed remyelination in both models and impaired the clinical recovery of the mice experiencing EAE. These observations correlated with a dramatic reduction of oligodendroglial repopulation in the demyelinated lesions. Moreover, we found that in cuprizone-treated mice the detrimental actions of IFN-gamma were associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in remyelinating oligodendrocytes. Compared with a wild-type genetic background, the presence of IFN-gamma in mice heterozygous for a loss of function mutation in the pancreatic ER kinase (PERK), a kinase that responds specifically to ER stress, further reduced the percentage of remyelinated axons and oligodendrocyte numbers in cuprizone-induced demyelinated lesions. Thus, these data suggest that IFN-gamma is capable of inhibiting remyelination in demyelinated lesions and that ER stress modulates the response of remyelinating oligodendrocytes to this cytokine. PMID:16504972

  5. GAMMA-RAY SIGNAL FROM THE PULSAR WIND IN THE BINARY PULSAR SYSTEM PSR B1259-63/LS 2883

    SciTech Connect

    Khangulyan, Dmitry; Bogovalov, Sergey V.; Ribo, Marc E-mail: felix.aharonian@dias.ie E-mail: mribo@am.ub.es

    2011-12-01

    Binary pulsar systems emit potentially detectable components of gamma-ray emission due to Comptonization of the optical radiation of the companion star by relativistic electrons of the pulsar wind, both before and after termination of the wind. The recent optical observations of binary pulsar system PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 revealed radiation properties of the companion star which differ significantly from previous measurements. In this paper, we study the implications of these observations for the interaction rate of the unshocked pulsar wind with the stellar photons and the related consequences for fluxes of high energy and very high energy (VHE) gamma rays. We show that the signal should be strong enough to be detected with Fermi close to the periastron passage, unless the pulsar wind is strongly anisotropic or the Lorentz factor of the wind is smaller than 10{sup 3} or larger than 10{sup 5}. The higher luminosity of the optical star also has two important implications: (1) attenuation of gamma rays due to photon-photon pair production and (2) Compton drag of the unshocked wind. While the first effect has an impact on the light curve of VHE gamma rays, the second effect may significantly decrease the energy available for particle acceleration after termination of the wind.

  6. Functional asymmetry of posture and body system regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boloban, V. N.; Otsupok, A. P.

    1980-01-01

    The manifestation of functional asymmetry during the regulation of an athlete's posture and a system of bodies and its effect on the execution of individual and group acrobatic exercises were studied. Functional asymmetry of posture regulation was recorded in acrobats during the execution of individual and group exercises. It was shown that stability is maintained at the expense of bending and twisting motions. It is important to consider whether the functional asymmetry of posture regulation is left or right sided in making up pairs and groups of acrobats.

  7. Advanced helium regulator for a fluorine propellant system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichmann, H.; Yankura, G.

    1976-01-01

    The space storable propulsion module is an advanced high performance (375 seconds Isp minimum) planetary spacecraft propulsion system with a mission life of 5-10 years. The propellants used are liquid fluorine and amine fuel. This application requires high pressure regulator accuracy to optimize propellant depletion characteristics. An advanced regulator concept was prepared which is compatible with both fuel and oxidizer and which features design concepts such as redundant bellows, all-metallic/ceramic construction, friction-free guidance of moving parts and gas damping. Computer simulation of the propulsion module performance over two mission profiles indicated satisfactory minimization of those propellant residual requirements imposed by regulator performance variables.

  8. Involvement of the orexin system in sympathetic nerve regulation.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Manabu; Ohba, Takayoshi; Kushikata, Testuya; Niwa, Hidetoshi; Kurose, Akira; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Yanagisawa, Teruyuki; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Ono, Kyoichi; Hirota, Kazuyoshi

    2015-05-15

    Orexin, also known as hypocretin, is a secreted neuropeptide implicated in the regulation of sleep and food intake. In the present study, we examined the importance of orexin in regulation of the sympathetic nervous system using an orexin/ataxin-3 transgenic (OXTg) rat, which has a minimal number of orexin neurons. RT-PCR analysis identified expression of prepro-orexin and orexin receptor-1 (OX1R) in the superior cervical ganglion (SCG), and expression of another receptor (OX2R) was marginal in the wild-type rat. The orexin/ataxin-3 transgenic rat showed increased expression of OX1R and OX2R, whereas expression of prepro-orexin was undetectable, suggesting a compensatory increase in both receptors. In the ECG recording (R-R interval), orexin/ataxin-3 transgenic rats showed decreased responsiveness to the β-adrenergic blocker propranolol. Furthermore, OXTg rats had deteriorated R-R interval regulation, indicating involvement of the orexin system in sympathetic nerve regulation. This was accompanied by decreased baroreflex and responsiveness to β-adrenergic blocker in blood pressure recording, also suggesting involvement of the orexin system in sympathetic nerve regulation. Histological examination revealed hypotrophic changes in the transgenic heart, suggesting involvement of the orexin system in cardiac development. Taken together, our present results indicate involvement of the orexin system in sympathetic nerve control.

  9. Abnormal Default System Functioning in Depression: Implications for Emotion Regulation.

    PubMed

    Messina, Irene; Bianco, Francesca; Cusinato, Maria; Calvo, Vincenzo; Sambin, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Depression is widely seen as the result of difficulties in regulating emotions. Based on neuroimaging studies on voluntary emotion regulation, neurobiological models have focused on the concept of cognitive control, considering emotion regulation as a shift toward involving controlled processes associated with activation of the prefrontal and parietal executive areas, instead of responding automatically to emotional stimuli. According to such models, the weaker executive area activation observed in depressed patients is attributable to a lack of cognitive control over negative emotions. Going beyond the concept of cognitive control, psychodynamic models describe the development of individuals' capacity to regulate their emotional states in mother-infant interactions during childhood, through the construction of the representation of the self, others, and relationships. In this mini-review, we link these psychodynamic models with recent findings regarding the abnormal functioning of the default system in depression. Consistently with psychodynamic models, psychological functions associated with the default system include self-related processing, semantic processes, and implicit forms of emotion regulation. The abnormal activation of the default system observed in depression may explain the dysfunctional aspects of emotion regulation typical of the condition, such as an exaggerated negative self-focus and rumination on self-esteem issues. We also discuss the clinical implications of these findings with reference to the therapeutic relationship as a key tool for revisiting impaired or distorted representations of the self and relational objects.

  10. Abnormal Default System Functioning in Depression: Implications for Emotion Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Irene; Bianco, Francesca; Cusinato, Maria; Calvo, Vincenzo; Sambin, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Depression is widely seen as the result of difficulties in regulating emotions. Based on neuroimaging studies on voluntary emotion regulation, neurobiological models have focused on the concept of cognitive control, considering emotion regulation as a shift toward involving controlled processes associated with activation of the prefrontal and parietal executive areas, instead of responding automatically to emotional stimuli. According to such models, the weaker executive area activation observed in depressed patients is attributable to a lack of cognitive control over negative emotions. Going beyond the concept of cognitive control, psychodynamic models describe the development of individuals’ capacity to regulate their emotional states in mother-infant interactions during childhood, through the construction of the representation of the self, others, and relationships. In this mini-review, we link these psychodynamic models with recent findings regarding the abnormal functioning of the default system in depression. Consistently with psychodynamic models, psychological functions associated with the default system include self-related processing, semantic processes, and implicit forms of emotion regulation. The abnormal activation of the default system observed in depression may explain the dysfunctional aspects of emotion regulation typical of the condition, such as an exaggerated negative self-focus and rumination on self-esteem issues. We also discuss the clinical implications of these findings with reference to the therapeutic relationship as a key tool for revisiting impaired or distorted representations of the self and relational objects. PMID:27375536

  11. Abnormal Default System Functioning in Depression: Implications for Emotion Regulation.

    PubMed

    Messina, Irene; Bianco, Francesca; Cusinato, Maria; Calvo, Vincenzo; Sambin, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Depression is widely seen as the result of difficulties in regulating emotions. Based on neuroimaging studies on voluntary emotion regulation, neurobiological models have focused on the concept of cognitive control, considering emotion regulation as a shift toward involving controlled processes associated with activation of the prefrontal and parietal executive areas, instead of responding automatically to emotional stimuli. According to such models, the weaker executive area activation observed in depressed patients is attributable to a lack of cognitive control over negative emotions. Going beyond the concept of cognitive control, psychodynamic models describe the development of individuals' capacity to regulate their emotional states in mother-infant interactions during childhood, through the construction of the representation of the self, others, and relationships. In this mini-review, we link these psychodynamic models with recent findings regarding the abnormal functioning of the default system in depression. Consistently with psychodynamic models, psychological functions associated with the default system include self-related processing, semantic processes, and implicit forms of emotion regulation. The abnormal activation of the default system observed in depression may explain the dysfunctional aspects of emotion regulation typical of the condition, such as an exaggerated negative self-focus and rumination on self-esteem issues. We also discuss the clinical implications of these findings with reference to the therapeutic relationship as a key tool for revisiting impaired or distorted representations of the self and relational objects. PMID:27375536

  12. A feasibility study on gamma-ray tomography by Monte Carlo simulation for development of portable tomographic system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongbum; Jung, Sunghee; Moon, Jinho; Cho, Gyuseong

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam X-ray tomographic scanner has been used in industrial and medical field since it was developed two decades ago. However, X-ray electron beam tomography has remained as indoor equipment because of its bulky hardware of X-ray generation devices. By replacing X-ray devices of electron beam CT with a gamma-ray source, a tomographic system can be a portable device. This paper introduces analysis and simulation results on industrial gamma-ray tomographic system with scanning geometry similar to electron beam CT. The gamma-ray tomographic system is introduced through the geometrical layout and analysis on non-uniformly distributed problem. The proposed system adopts clamp-on type device to actualize portable industrial system. MCNPx is used to generate virtual experimental data. Pulse height spectra from F8 tally of MCNPx are obtained for single channel counting data of photo-peak and gross counting. Photo-peak and gross counting data are reconstructed for the cross-sectional image of simulation phantoms by ART, Total Variation algorithm and ML-EM. Image reconstruction results from Monte Carlo simulation show that the proposed tomographic system can provide the image solution for industrial objects. Those results provide the preliminary data for the tomographic scanner, which will be developed in future work. PMID:22079959

  13. 41 CFR 109-1.101 - Federal Property Management Regulations System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Management Regulations System. 109-1.101 Section 109-1.101 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL 1-INTRODUCTION 1.1-Regulation System § 109-1.101 Federal Property Management Regulations System....

  14. 41 CFR 109-1.101 - Federal Property Management Regulations System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Management Regulations System. 109-1.101 Section 109-1.101 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL 1-INTRODUCTION 1.1-Regulation System § 109-1.101 Federal Property Management Regulations System....

  15. TNF-alpha, but not IFN-gamma, regulates CCN2 (CTGF), collagen type I, and proliferation in mesangial cells: possible roles in the progression of renal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cooker, Laurinda A; Peterson, Darryl; Rambow, Joann; Riser, Melisa L; Riser, Rebecca E; Najmabadi, Feridoon; Brigstock, David; Riser, Bruce L

    2007-07-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) is a profibrotic factor acting downstream and independently of TGF-beta to mediate renal fibrosis. Although inflammation is often involved in the initiation and/or progression of fibrosis, the role of inflammatory cytokines in regulation of glomerular CCN2 expression, cellular proliferation, and extracellular matrix accumulation is unknown. We studied two such cytokines, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma, for their effects on cultured mesangial cells in the presence or absence of TGF-beta, as a model for progressive renal fibrosis. Short-term treatment with TNF-alpha, like TGF-beta, significantly increased secreted CCN2 per cell, but unlike TGF-beta inhibited cellular replication. TNF-alpha combined with TGF-beta further increased CCN2 secretion and mRNA levels and reduced proliferation. Surprisingly, however, TNF-alpha treatment decreased baseline collagen type I protein and mRNA levels and largely blocked their stimulation by TGF-beta. Long-term treatment with TGF-beta or TNF-alpha alone no longer increased CCN2 protein levels. However, the combination synergistically increased CCN2. IFN-gamma had no effect on either CCN2 or collagen activity and produced a mild inhibition of TGF-beta-induced collagen only at a high concentration (500 U/ml). In summary, we report a strong positive regulatory role for TNF-alpha, but not IFN-gamma, in CCN2 production and secretion, including that driven by TGF-beta. The stimulation of CCN2 release by TNF-alpha, unlike TGF-beta, is independent of cellular proliferation and not linked to increased collagen type I accumulation. This suggests that the paradigm of TGF-beta-driven CCN2 with subsequent collagen production may be overridden by an as yet undefined inhibitory mechanism acting either directly or indirectly on matrix metabolism. PMID:17376761

  16. Second biannaul recalibration of two spectral gamma-ray logging systems used for baseline characterization measurements in the Hanford Tank Farms

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, C.J.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) is establishing an initial, or baseline, characterization of gamma-ray-emitting contaminants in the subsurface of the Tank Farms at the DOE Hanford Site in the State of Washington. These baseline data are gathered by logging existing monitoring boreholes with two high-resolution passive spectral gamma-ray logging systems (SGLSs) informally known as Gamma 1 and Gamma 2. Calibration of the logging systems is crucial to the assurance of data quality. The project document Vadose Zone Monitoring Project at the Hanford Tank Farms, Spectral Gamma-Ray Borehole Geophysical Logging Characterization and Baseline Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Single-Shell Tanks specifies that both systems must be recalibrated, using the calibration standards at the Hanford borehole logging calibration center, every 6 months. DOE presents a description of the first recalibrations.

  17. E-cadherin and alpha-, beta-, and gamma-catenin protein expression is up-regulated in ovarian carcinoma cells in serous effusions.

    PubMed

    Davidson, B; Berner, A; Nesland, J M; Risberg, B; Berner, H S; Tropè, C G; Kristensen, G B; Bryne, M; Ann Florenes, V

    2000-12-01

    The aims of this study were firstly, to investigate the expression of E-cadherin complex proteins in ovarian carcinoma cells in serous effusions and in primary and metastatic lesions; and secondly to study the value of these four proteins and calretinin, a mesothelial marker, in the differential diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma cells from reactive mesothelial cells in effusions. Sixty-seven malignant effusions and 97 corresponding primary (n=36) and metastatic (n=61) lesions were immunohistochemically stained for E-cadherin and alpha-, beta-, and gamma-catenin. Staining extent and intensity were scored. Effusion specimens were additionally analysed for calretinin immunoreactivity. Membrane immunoreactivity for E-cadherin and alpha-, beta-, and gamma-catenin was detected on carcinoma cells in the majority of the effusions, but rarely on reactive mesothelial cells (p<0.001 for all markers). Calretinin immunoreactivity was confined to mesothelial cells (p<0.001). An association was seen between E-cadherin and alpha-catenin expression, in both effusions and solid tumours, and for beta-catenin in solid tumours (range p<0. 001 to p=0.014). Up-regulation of all four cadherin complex proteins was seen in carcinoma cells in effusions, when compared with corresponding primary tumours (range p<0.001 to p=0.028). As with effusions, metastatic lesions showed up-regulation of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-catenin when compared with primary carcinomas (p=0.002-0. 015). Carcinoma cells in effusions showed in addition elevated levels of E-cadherin when compared with metastatic lesions (p<0.001). Staining results in effusions showed no association with effusion site, tumour type or histological grade. Immunoblotting on 29 malignant effusions confirmed the presence of all four proteins in the majority of samples and co-precipitation of E-cadherin and beta-catenin was seen in ten specimens examined. E-cadherin complex proteins are widely expressed in ovarian carcinoma cells. Together with

  18. Increased expression of CCL18, CCL19, and CCL17 by dendritic cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and regulation by Fc gamma receptors

    PubMed Central

    Radstake, T; van der Voort, R; ten, B; de Waal, Malefijt M; Looman, M; Figdor, C; van den Berg, W B; Barrera, P; Adema, G

    2005-01-01

    Background: Dendritic cells (DC) have a role in the regulation of immunity and tolerance, attracting inflammatory cells by the production of various chemokines (CK). Fc gamma receptors (FcγR) may be involved in regulation of the DC function. Objective: To assess the expression of CK by immature (iDC) and mature DC (mDC) and its regulation by FcγR in patients with RA and healthy donors (HC). Methods: Expression of CK by DC from patients with RA and from HC was determined by real time quantitative PCR and ELISA. DC were derived from monocytes following standardised protocols. To study the potential regulation by FcγR, iDC were stimulated with immune complexes (IC) during lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced maturation. The presence of CK was studied in synovial tissue from patients with RA, osteoarthritis, and healthy subjects by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results: iDC from patients with RA had markedly increased mRNA levels of the CK CCL18 and CXCL8. Upon maturation with LPS, expression of CCL18, CCL19, CXCL8, CCL3, and CCL17 increased dramatically, reaching significantly higher levels in patients with RA. Monocytes failed to express these CK, except for CXCL8 and CCL3. IC-mediated triggering of the FcγR on DC from patients with highly active RA down regulated all CK, whereas the reverse was seen when DC from patients with low disease activity and healthy donors were stimulated. CCL18 was significantly increased in RA synovial tissue. Conclusion: Increased CK expression by DC was found in patients with RA. This expression is partly regulated by FcγR triggering and results in an inhibitory DC subtype in RA upon FcγR-mediated triggering. PMID:15331393

  19. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) Telescope Mechanical and Optical System Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarino, V.; Vassiliev, V.; Buckley, J.; Byrum, K.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S.; Finley, J.; Hanna, D.; Kaaret, P.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Romani, R.; Wagner, R.; Woods, M.

    2009-05-01

    The concept of a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory, AGIS, in the energy range 20 GeV to 200 TeV is based on an array of 50-100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). The anticipated improvement of AGIS sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of IACTs. In this submission, we focus on the optical and mechanical systems for a novel Schwarzschild-Couder two-mirror aplanatic optical system originally proposed by Schwarzschild. Emerging new mirror production technologies based on replication processes, such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured CFRP, and electroforming, provide new opportunities for cost effective solutions for the design of the optical system. We explore capabilities of these mirror fabrication methods for the AGIS project and alignment methods for optical systems. We also study a mechanical structure which will provide support points for mirrors and camera design driven by the requirement of minimizing the deflections of the mirror support structures.

  20. Evaluation of a digital data acquisition system and optimization of n-{gamma} discrimination for a compact neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Zimbal, A.; Reginatto, M.; Tittelmeier, K.

    2011-01-15

    A compact NE213 liquid scintillation neutron spectrometer with a new digital data acquisition (DAQ) system is now in operation at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). With the DAQ system, developed by ENEA Frascati, neutron spectrometry with high count rates in the order of 5x10{sup 5} s{sup -1} is possible, roughly an order of magnitude higher than with an analog acquisition system. To validate the DAQ system, a new data analysis code was developed and tests were done using measurements with 14-MeV neutrons made at the PTB accelerator. Additional analysis was carried out to optimize the two-gate method used for neutron and gamma (n-{gamma}) discrimination. The best results were obtained with gates of 35 ns and 80 ns. This indicates that the fast and medium decay time components of the NE213 light emission are the ones that are relevant for n-{gamma} discrimination with the digital acquisition system. This differs from what is normally implemented in the analog pulse shape discrimination modules, namely, the fast and long decay emissions of the scintillating light.

  1. Crosstalk between chloroplast thioredoxin systems in regulation of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Nikkanen, Lauri; Toivola, Jouni; Rintamäki, Eevi

    2016-08-01

    Thioredoxins (TRXs) mediate light-dependent activation of primary photosynthetic reactions in plant chloroplasts by reducing disulphide bridges in redox-regulated enzymes. Of the two plastid TRX systems, the ferredoxin-TRX system consists of ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and multiple TRXs, while the NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase (NTRC) contains a complete TRX system in a single polypeptide. Using Arabidopsis plants overexpressing or lacking a functional NTRC, we have investigated the redundancy and interaction between the NTRC and Fd-TRX systems in regulation of photosynthesis in vivo. Overexpression of NTRC raised the CO2 fixation rate and lowered non-photochemical quenching and acceptor side limitation of PSI in low light conditions by enhancing the activation of chloroplast ATP synthase and TRX-regulated enzymes in Calvin-Benson cycle (CBC). Overexpression of NTRC with an inactivated NTR or TRX domain partly recovered the phenotype of knockout plants, suggesting crosstalk between the plastid TRX systems. NTRC interacted in planta with fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, phosphoribulokinase and CF1 γ subunit of the ATP synthase and with several chloroplast TRXs. These findings indicate that NTRC-mediated regulation of the CBC and ATP synthesis occurs both directly and through interaction with the ferredoxin-TRX system and is crucial when availability of light is limiting photosynthesis.

  2. Crosstalk between chloroplast thioredoxin systems in regulation of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Nikkanen, Lauri; Toivola, Jouni; Rintamäki, Eevi

    2016-08-01

    Thioredoxins (TRXs) mediate light-dependent activation of primary photosynthetic reactions in plant chloroplasts by reducing disulphide bridges in redox-regulated enzymes. Of the two plastid TRX systems, the ferredoxin-TRX system consists of ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and multiple TRXs, while the NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase (NTRC) contains a complete TRX system in a single polypeptide. Using Arabidopsis plants overexpressing or lacking a functional NTRC, we have investigated the redundancy and interaction between the NTRC and Fd-TRX systems in regulation of photosynthesis in vivo. Overexpression of NTRC raised the CO2 fixation rate and lowered non-photochemical quenching and acceptor side limitation of PSI in low light conditions by enhancing the activation of chloroplast ATP synthase and TRX-regulated enzymes in Calvin-Benson cycle (CBC). Overexpression of NTRC with an inactivated NTR or TRX domain partly recovered the phenotype of knockout plants, suggesting crosstalk between the plastid TRX systems. NTRC interacted in planta with fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, phosphoribulokinase and CF1 γ subunit of the ATP synthase and with several chloroplast TRXs. These findings indicate that NTRC-mediated regulation of the CBC and ATP synthesis occurs both directly and through interaction with the ferredoxin-TRX system and is crucial when availability of light is limiting photosynthesis. PMID:26831830

  3. Individual versus systemic risk and the Regulator's Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Beale, Nicholas; Rand, David G.; Battey, Heather; Croxson, Karen; May, Robert M.; Nowak, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    The global financial crisis of 2007–2009 exposed critical weaknesses in the financial system. Many proposals for financial reform address the need for systemic regulation—that is, regulation focused on the soundness of the whole financial system and not just that of individual institutions. In this paper, we study one particular problem faced by a systemic regulator: the tension between the distribution of assets that individual banks would like to hold and the distribution across banks that best supports system stability if greater weight is given to avoiding multiple bank failures. By diversifying its risks, a bank lowers its own probability of failure. However, if many banks diversify their risks in similar ways, then the probability of multiple failures can increase. As more banks fail simultaneously, the economic disruption tends to increase disproportionately. We show that, in model systems, the expected systemic cost of multiple failures can be largely explained by two global parameters of risk exposure and diversity, which can be assessed in terms of the risk exposures of individual actors. This observation hints at the possibility of regulatory intervention to promote systemic stability by incentivizing a more diverse diversification among banks. Such intervention offers the prospect of an additional lever in the armory of regulators, potentially allowing some combination of improved system stability and reduced need for additional capital. PMID:21768387

  4. Design of Dual-Road Transportable Portal Monitoring System for Visible Light and Gamma-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Cunningham, Mark F; Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Cheriyadat, Anil M; Hornback, Donald Eric; Fabris, Lorenzo; Kerekes, Ryan A; Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Bradley, Eric Craig; Chesser, Joel B; Marchant, William

    2010-01-01

    The use of radiation sensors as portal monitors is increasing due to heightened concerns over the smuggling of fissile material. Transportable systems that can detect significant quantities of fissile material that might be present in vehicular traffic are of particular interest, especially if they can be rapidly deployed to different locations. To serve this application, we have constructed a rapid-deployment portal monitor that uses visible-light and gamma-ray imaging to allow simultaneous monitoring of multiple lanes of traffic from the side of a roadway. The system operation uses machine vision methods on the visible-light images to detect vehicles as they enter and exit the field of view and to measure their position in each frame. The visible-light and gamma-ray cameras are synchronized which allows the gamma-ray imager to harvest gamma-ray data specific to each vehicle, integrating its radiation signature for the entire time that it is in the field of view. Thus our system creates vehicle-specific radiation signatures and avoids source confusion problems that plague non-imaging approaches to the same problem. Our current prototype instrument was designed for measurement of upto five lanes of freeway traffic with a pair of instruments, one on either side of the roadway. Stereoscopic cameras are used with a third alignment camera for motion compensation and are mounted on a 50 deployable mast. In this paper we discuss the design considerations for the machine-vision system, the algorithms used for vehicle detection and position estimates, and the overall architecture of the system. We also discuss system calibration for rapid deployment. We conclude with notes on preliminary performance and deployment.

  5. A Robotic System Discovers Contemporaneous Optical Radiation from a Gamma-Ray Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, J. J.; Akerlof, C.; Balsano, R.; Barthelmy, S.; Butterworth, P.; Casperson, D.; Cline, T.; Fletcher, S.; Frontera, F.; Gisler, G.; Heise, J.; Hills, J.; Kehoe, R.; Lee, B.; Marshall, S.; McKay, T.; Miller, R. S.; Piro, L.; Priedhorsky, W.; Szymanski, J.; Wren, J.; ROTSE Team

    2000-05-01

    Since their discovery more than 25 years ago (Klebesadel et al, 1973), the origin of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has been profoundly enigmatic. This situation improved radically in 1997 when coordinates provided by the BeppoSAX satellite enabled the delayed detection of faint optical afterglows associated with GRBs which demonstrated that these phenomena are at truly cosmological distances. However the brief duration of gamma-ray bursts has hitherto precluded optical detection while the burst was still in progress. We report here the first discovery of such a signal from GRB 990123, a remarkably bright and distant event using a robotic observation system. The light curve was sampled 7 times in the interval between 22 and 600 seconds following the burst onset. Over this time span, the brightness increased by 3 magnitudes to mv ~ 9 in 25 seconds and then waned by 5 magnitudes 8 minutes later before falling below detection threshold. The absolute magnitude of this object at peak brightness is <= -36.4, about 6 x 106 times as bright as a type Ia supernova, making this the most luminous object ever detected. The discovery reported here was performed with ROTSE-I, a four-fold robotic array of 35 mm camera telephoto lenses coupled to large format CCD imagers mounted on a rapidly slewing platform and having a composite FOV of 16° x 16° . The instrument is directly connected to the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN). The apparatus is installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in northern New Mexico and runs autonomously. When ROTSE-I is not responding to GRBs, it is automatically recording the visible sky twice every night down to a limiting magnitude of mv ~ 14-15. Over 2 TBytes of sky data has been collected since ROTSE-I began operations. This talk will describe the details and implications of this remarkable detection and the instrumentation used to obtain it. It will also discuss the next generation instrumentation (ROTSE-II,III) that the project will produce and field at

  6. Two-photon absorption cross section measurement in the gamma band system of nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, J.F. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A dye laser with a single longitudinal mode and very stable spatial mode structure has been constructed. With this laser system a four-wave mixing experiment was done in the gamma bands of nitric oxide using two photon resonance. Another four-wave mixing experiment was done in nitrogen using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and the two signals ratioed. Using accurately known values of the Raman scattering cross section, the third order susceptibility in NO was determined without needing to know the spatial and temporal properties of the dye lasers. From this susceptibility, the two photon absorption cross section was calculated with the explicit dependence of sigma/sup (2)/ upon X/sup (3)/ shown. For the R/sub 22/ + S/sub 12/(J'' = 9 1/2) (A/sup 2/..sigma..+(v' = 0) -- X/sup 2/..pi..(v'' = 0)) line, sigma/sup (2)/ = (1.0 +/- 0.6) x 10/sup -38/cm/sup 4/g(2/sub 1/-Vertical Barsub f/ is the normalized lineshape. Branching ratios for the A/sup 2/..sigma..+(v' = n) ..-->.. X/sup 2/..omega..(v'' = n)(n = o,...9) transitions of NO were also measured, Franck-Condon factors calculated and the lifetime of the A state determined.

  7. Thin film deployable reflector model for ET gamma ray imaging telescope system (ET-GRITS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huegele, Vinson B.

    1989-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center is developing a thin film reflector for a Gamma Ray Imaging Telescope System (GRITS) using the Shuttle External Tank (ET). The concept is to install an inflatable reflector in the ET that could be transferred from the orbiter in orbit. This is a study of a scale model reflector for the ET GRITS application. The approach is to form 1/2 mil film into a spherical mirror mounted on a seven-foot diameter metal ring. The ring mount is sealed and slightly evacuated to pressurize the film into shape. Several different fabrication techniques were investigated using seamed gore designs to form the reflector. Also studied was casting a film into a seamless circular sheet. The goal for this model was to achieve a one milliradian (rms) surface curvature error over 90 percent of the reflector area. This curvature was measured by a laser scanning instrument. The results show how different reflector designs and fabrication techniques contribute to surface curvature and focusing errors.

  8. Computer assisted gamma and X-ray tomography: Applications to multiphase flow systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.B.; Dudukovic, M.

    1998-01-01

    In process vessels, involving two or three phases it is often important not only to know the volume fraction (holdup) of each phase but also the spatial distribution of such holdups. This information is needed in control, trouble shooting and assessment of flow patterns and can be observed noninvasively by the application of Computed Tomography (CT). This report presents a complete overview of X-ray and gamma ray transmission tomography principles, equipment design to specific tasks and application in process industry. The fundamental principles of tomography, the algorithms for image reconstruction, the measurement method and the possible sources of error are discussed in detail. A case study highlights the methodology involved in designing a scanning system for the study of a given process unit, e.g., reactor, separations column etc. Results obtained in the authors` laboratory for the gas holdup distribution in bubble columns are also presented. Recommendations are made for the Advanced Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) in LaPorte, TX.

  9. Gamma ray transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, Thomas L.

    1987-01-01

    The discovery of cosmic gamma ray bursts was made with systems designed at Los Alamos Laboratory for the detection of nuclear explosions beyond the atmosphere. HELIOS-2 was the first gamma ray burst instrument launched; its initial results in 1976, seemed to deepen the mystery around gamma ray transients. Interplanetary spacecraft data were reviewed in terms of explaining the behavior and source of the transients.

  10. Sympathetic nervous system regulation of the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.; Nagaraja, Archana S.; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Green, Paige A.; Sood, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral autonomic nervous system (ANS) is known to regulate gene expression in primary tumours and their surrounding microenvironment. Activation of the sympathetic division of the ANS in particular modulates gene expression programs that promote metastasis of solid tumours by stimulating macrophage infiltration, inflammation, angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and tumour invasion, and by inhibiting cellular immune responses and programmed cell death. Haematological cancers are modulated by sympathetic nervous system (SNS) regulation of stem cell biology and hematopoietic differentiation programs. In addition to identifying a molecular basis for physiologic stress effects on cancer, these findings have also identified new pharmacologic strategies to inhibit cancer progression in vivo. PMID:26299593

  11. Robust output regulation problem for linear time-delay systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Maobin; Huang, Jie

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we study the robust output regulation problem for linear systems with input time-delay. By extending the internal model design method to linear time-delay systems, we have established solvability conditions for the problem by both dynamic state feedback control and dynamic output feedback control. The advantages of internal model approach over the feedforward design approach are that it can handle perturbations of the uncertain parameters in the plant and the control law, and it does not need to solve the regulator equations.

  12. Motor Control and Regulation for a Flywheel Energy Storage System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Barbara; Lyons, Valerie

    2003-01-01

    This talk will focus on the motor control algorithms used to regulate the flywheel system at the NASA Glenn Research Center. First a discussion of the inner loop torque control technique will be given. It is based on the principle of field orientation and is implemented without a position or speed sensor (sensorless control). Then the outer loop charge and discharge algorithm will be presented. This algorithm controls the acceleration of the flywheel during charging and the deceleration while discharging. The algorithm also allows the flywheel system to regulate the DC bus voltage during the discharge cycle.

  13. A dual neutron/gamma source for the Fissmat Inspection for Nuclear Detection (FIND) system.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; King, Michael; Rossi, Paolo; McDaniel, Floyd Del; Morse, Daniel Henry; Antolak, Arlyn J.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Raber, Thomas N.

    2008-12-01

    Shielded special nuclear material (SNM) is very difficult to detect and new technologies are needed to clear alarms and verify the presence of SNM. High-energy photons and neutrons can be used to actively interrogate for heavily shielded SNM, such as highly enriched uranium (HEU), since neutrons can penetrate gamma-ray shielding and gamma-rays can penetrate neutron shielding. Both source particles then induce unique detectable signals from fission. In this LDRD, we explored a new type of interrogation source that uses low-energy proton- or deuteron-induced nuclear reactions to generate high fluxes of mono-energetic gammas or neutrons. Accelerator-based experiments, computational studies, and prototype source tests were performed to obtain a better understanding of (1) the flux requirements, (2) fission-induced signals, background, and interferences, and (3) operational performance of the source. The results of this research led to the development and testing of an axial-type gamma tube source and the design/construction of a high power coaxial-type gamma generator based on the {sup 11}B(p,{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction.

  14. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the TRA Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System

    SciTech Connect

    K. Winterholler

    2007-01-31

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the Test Reactor Area Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System, located in Building TRA-641 at the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under the Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Action Plan for Tank System TRA-009. The tank system to be closed is identified as VCO-SITE-TANK-005 Tank System TRA-009. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods for achieving those standards.

  15. Gamma ray astronomy in perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A brief overview of the development of gamma ray astronomy is presented. Gamma ray telescopes and other optical measuring instruments are highlighted. Emphasis is placed on findings that were unobtainable before gamma ray astronomy. Information on evolution of the solar system, the relationship of the solar system to the galaxy, and the composition of interstellar matter is discussed.

  16. Characterization of system-related geometric distortions in MR images employed in Gamma Knife radiosurgery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, E. P.; Seimenis, I.; Moutsatsos, A.; Georgiou, E.; Nomikos, P.; Karaiskos, P.

    2016-10-01

    This work provides characterization of system-related geometric distortions present in MRIs used in Gamma Knife (GK) stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment planning. A custom-made phantom, compatible with the Leksell stereotactic frame model G and encompassing 947 control points (CPs), was utilized. MR images were obtained with and without the frame, thus allowing discrimination of frame-induced distortions. In the absence of the frame and following compensation for field inhomogeneities, measured average CP disposition owing to gradient nonlinearities was 0.53 mm. In presence of the frame, contrarily, detected distortion was greatly increased (up to about 5 mm) in the vicinity of the frame base due to eddy currents induced in the closed loop of its aluminum material. Frame-related distortion was obliterated at approximately 90 mm from the frame base. Although the region with the maximum observed distortion may not lie within the GK treatable volume, the presence of the frame results in distortion of the order of 1.5 mm at a 7 cm distance from the center of the Leksell space. Additionally, severe distortions observed outside the treatable volume could possibly impinge on the delivery accuracy mainly by adversely affecting the registration process (e.g. the position of the lower part of the N-shaped fiducials used to define the stereotactic space may be miss-registered). Images acquired with a modified version of the frame developed by replacing its front side with an acrylic bar, thus interrupting the closed aluminum loop and reducing the induced eddy currents, were shown to benefit from relatively reduced distortion. System-related distortion was also identified in patient MR images. Using corresponding CT angiography images as a reference, an offset of 1.1 mm was detected for two vessels lying in close proximity to the frame base, while excellent spatial agreement was observed for a vessel far apart from the frame base.

  17. [Exercise and aging: regulation of mitochondrial function and redox system].

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Juan; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Jian-Kang

    2014-10-01

    Evidence shows that aging is closely related to mitochondrial decay and redox imbalance. With aging, both mitochondrial content and protein synthesis declined and free radicals, the by-products of mitochondrial metabolism and their oxidation to lipids, proteins and nuclear acids increased. The age-related declines in mitochondrial function and redox imbalance affect physical function, induce insulin resistance and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, thus, play a major role in regulation of life span. Therefore, mitochondrion may be the most important determinant of life span. Increasing evidence demonstrates that long-term aerobic exercise could prevent age-related diseases and improve life quality of aged people. Exercise may possibly stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and phase II antioxidant defense system to regulate mitochondrial function and balance of redox system. Therefore, regular aerobic exercise may prevent age-related diseases, increase life quality and prolong life span through regulation of mitochondrial function and redox balance. PMID:25764789

  18. Small systems and regulator dependence in relativistic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaliński, Michał

    2016-10-01

    Consistent theories of hydrodynamics necessarily include nonhydrodynamic modes, which can be viewed as a regulator necessary to ensure causality. Under many circumstances the choice of regulator is not relevant, but this is not always the case. In particular, for sufficiently small systems (such as those arising in pA or pp collisions) such dependence may be inevitable. We address this issue in the context of the modern version of Müller-Israel-Stewart theory of relativistic hydrodynamics. In this case, by demanding that the nonhydrodynamic modes do not dominate, we find that regulator dependence becomes inevitable only for multiplicities d N /d Y of the order of a few. This conclusion supports earlier studies based on hydrodynamic simulations of small systems, at the same time providing a simple physical picture of how hydrodynamics can be reliable even in such seemingly extreme conditions.

  19. Dual-head gamma camera system for intraoperative localization of radioactive seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenali, B.; de Jong, H. W. A. M.; Viergever, M. A.; Dickerscheid, D. B. M.; Beijst, C.; Gilhuijs, K. G. A.

    2015-10-01

    Breast-conserving surgery is a standard option for the treatment of patients with early-stage breast cancer. This form of surgery may result in incomplete excision of the tumor. Iodine-125 labeled titanium seeds are currently used in clinical practice to reduce the number of incomplete excisions. It seems likely that the number of incomplete excisions can be reduced even further if intraoperative information about the location of the radioactive seed is combined with preoperative information about the extent of the tumor. This can be combined if the location of the radioactive seed is established in a world coordinate system that can be linked to the (preoperative) image coordinate system. With this in mind, we propose a radioactive seed localization system which is composed of two static ceiling-suspended gamma camera heads and two parallel-hole collimators. Physical experiments and computer simulations which mimic realistic clinical situations were performed to estimate the localization accuracy (defined as trueness and precision) of the proposed system with respect to collimator-source distance (ranging between 50 cm and 100 cm) and imaging time (ranging between 1 s and 10 s). The goal of the study was to determine whether or not a trueness of 5 mm can be achieved if a collimator-source distance of 50 cm and imaging time of 5 s are used (these specifications were defined by a group of dedicated breast cancer surgeons). The results from the experiments indicate that the location of the radioactive seed can be established with an accuracy of 1.6 mm  ±  0.6 mm if a collimator-source distance of 50 cm and imaging time of 5 s are used (these experiments were performed with a 4.5 cm thick block phantom). Furthermore, the results from the simulations indicate that a trueness of 3.2 mm or less can be achieved if a collimator-source distance of 50 cm and imaging time of 5 s are used (this trueness was achieved for all 14 breast phantoms which

  20. A photon detector system for the search for the rare muon decay {mu} {yields} e{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Van Ausdeln, L.A.

    1993-11-01

    An innovative and state of the art pair spectrometer system to measure the photon component of {mu}{sup +} decay to obtain an improved branching ratio limit for the decay {mu} {yields} e{gamma} is investigated. Analysis algorithms are developed and an experimental inner bremsstrahlung spectrum is obtained and agrees well with Monte Carlo simulations. Background sources are investigated and found to be highly suppressed at various stages of acquisition and analysis.

  1. Use of a Shielded High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry System to Segregate LLW from Contact Handleable ILW Containing Plutonium - 13046

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, Rosemary; Wilkins, Colin; Chard, Patrick; Jaederstroem, Henrik; LeBlanc, Paul; Mowry, Rick; MacDonald, Sanders; Gunn, William

    2013-07-01

    Dounreay Site Restoration Limited (DSRL) have a number of drums of solid waste that may contain Plutonium Contaminated Material. These are currently categorised as Contact Handleable Intermediate Level Waste (CHILW). A significant fraction of these drums potentially contain waste that is in the Low Level Waste (LLW) category. A Canberra Q2 shielded high resolution gamma spectrometry system is being used to quantify the total activity of drums that are potentially in the LLW category in order to segregate those that do contain LLW from CHILW drums and thus to minimise the total volume of waste in the higher category. Am-241 is being used as an indicator of the presence of plutonium in the waste from its strong 59.54 keV gamma-ray; a knowledge of the different waste streams from which the material originates allows a pessimistic waste 'fingerprint' to be used in order to determine an upper limit to the activities of the weak and non-gamma-emitting plutonium and associated radionuclides. This paper describes the main features of the high resolution gamma spectrometry system being used by DSRL to perform the segregation of CHILW and LLW and how it was configured and calibrated using the Canberra In-Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS). It also describes how potential LLW drums are selected for assay and how the system uses the existing waste stream fingerprint information to determine a reliable upper limit for the total activity present in each measured drum. Results from the initial on-site commissioning trials and the first measurements of waste drums using the new monitor are presented. (authors)

  2. An International Perspective on Regulated Family Day Care Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elise; Freeman, Ramona; Doherty, Gillian; Karlsson, Malene; Everiss, Liz; Couch, Jane; Foote, Lyn; Murray, Patricia; Modigliani, Kathy; Owen, Sue; Griffin, Sue; Friendly, Martha; McDonald, Grace; Bohanna, India; Corr, Lara; Smyth, Lisa; Morkeseth, Elisabeth Ianke; Morreaunet, Sissel; Ogi, Mari; Fukukawa, Sumi; Hinke-Rahnau, Jutta

    2012-01-01

    Despite emerging evidence of the contributors to high-quality family day care, a comprehensive comparison of international family day care systems has not been undertaken. The aim of this paper is to compare regulated family day care (FDC) in Australia, Canada, England and Wales, Germany, Ireland, Japan, Norway, New Zealand, Sweden, and the USA,…

  3. Systemic regulation of photosynthetic function in field-grown sorghum.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Liu, Yujun; Shi, Lei; Jiang, Chuangdao

    2015-09-01

    The photosynthetic characteristics of developing leaves of plants grown under artificial conditions are, to some extent, regulated systemically by mature leaves; however, whether systemic regulation of photosynthesis occurs in field-grown crops is unclear. To explore this question, we investigated the effects of planting density on growth characteristics, gas exchange, leaf nitrogen concentration and chlorophyll a fluorescence in field-grown sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.). Our results showed that close planting resulted in a marked decline in light intensity in lower canopy. Sorghum plants grown at a high planting density had lower net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (Gs), and transpiration rate (E) than plants grown at a low planting density. Moreover, in the absence of mineral deficiency, close planting induced a slight increase in leaf nitrogen concentration. The decreased photosynthesis in leaves of the lower canopy at high planting density was caused mainly by the low light. However, newly developed leaves exposed to high light in the upper canopy of plants grown at high planting density also exhibited a distinct decline in photosynthesis relative to plants grown at low planting density. Based on these results, the photosynthetic function of the newly developed leaves in the upper canopy was not determined fully by their own high light environment. Accordingly, we suggest that the photosynthetic function of newly developed leaves in the upper canopy of field-grown sorghum plants is regulated systemically by the lower canopy leaves. The differences in systemic regulation of photosynthesis were also discussed between field conditions and artificial conditions.

  4. Gamma Oscillation in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Brian F.; Youn, Soyoung; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2011-01-01

    Dysfunctional neural circuitry has been found to be involved in abnormalities of perception and cognition in patients with schizophrenia. Gamma oscillations are essential for integrating information within neural circuits and have therefore been associated with many perceptual and cognitive processes in healthy human subjects and animals. This review presents an overview of the neural basis of gamma oscillations and the abnormalities in the GABAergic interneuronal system thought to be responsible for gamma-range deficits in schizophrenia. We also review studies of gamma activity in sensory and cognitive processes, including auditory steady state response, attention, object representation, and working memory, in animals, healthy humans and patients with schizophrenia. PMID:22216037

  5. The cytosolic termini of the beta- and gamma-ENaC subunits are involved in the functional interactions between cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and epithelial sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Ji, H L; Chalfant, M L; Jovov, B; Lockhart, J P; Parker, S B; Fuller, C M; Stanton, B A; Benos, D J

    2000-09-01

    Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are co-localized in the apical membrane of many epithelia. These channels are essential for electrolyte and water secretion and/or reabsorption. In cystic fibrosis airway epithelia, a hyperactivated epithelial Na(+) conductance operates in parallel with defective Cl(-) secretion. Several groups have shown that CFTR down-regulates ENaC activity, but the mechanisms and the regulation of CFTR by ENaC are unknown. To test the hypothesis that ENaC and CFTR regulate each other, and to identify the region(s) of ENaC involved in the interaction between CFTR and ENaC, rENaC and its mutants were co-expressed with CFTR in Xenopus oocytes. Whole cell macroscopic sodium currents revealed that wild type (wt) alphabetagamma-rENaC-induced Na(+) current was inhibited by co-expression of CFTR, and further inhibited when CFTR was activated with a cAMP-raising mixture (CKT). Conversely, alphabetagamma-rENaC stimulated CFTR-mediated Cl(-) currents up to approximately 6-fold. Deletion mutations in the intracellular tails of the three rENaC subunits suggested that the carboxyl terminus of the beta subunit was required both for the down-regulation of ENaC by activated CFTR and the up-regulation of CFTR by ENaC. However, both the carboxyl terminus of the beta subunit and the amino terminus of the gamma subunit were essential for the down-regulation of rENaC by unstimulated CFTR. Interestingly, down-regulation of rENaC by activated CFTR was Cl(-)-dependent, while stimulation of CFTR by rENaC was not dependent on either cytoplasmic Na(+) or a depolarized membrane potential. In summary, there appear to be at least two different sites in ENaC involved in the intermolecular interaction between CFTR and ENaC. PMID:10821834

  6. Derivation of a Multiparameter Gamma Model for Analyzing the Residence-Time Distribution Function for Nonideal Flow Systems as an Alternative to the Advection-Dispersion Equation

    DOE PAGES

    Embry, Irucka; Roland, Victor; Agbaje, Oluropo; Watson, Valetta; Martin, Marquan; Painter, Roger; Byl, Tom; Sharpe, Lonnie

    2013-01-01

    A new residence-time distribution (RTD) function has been developed and applied to quantitative dye studies as an alternative to the traditional advection-dispersion equation (AdDE). The new method is based on a jointly combined four-parameter gamma probability density function (PDF). The gamma residence-time distribution (RTD) function and its first and second moments are derived from the individual two-parameter gamma distributions of randomly distributed variables, tracer travel distance, and linear velocity, which are based on their relationship with time. The gamma RTD function was used on a steady-state, nonideal system modeled as a plug-flow reactor (PFR) in the laboratory to validate themore » effectiveness of the model. The normalized forms of the gamma RTD and the advection-dispersion equation RTD were compared with the normalized tracer RTD. The normalized gamma RTD had a lower mean-absolute deviation (MAD) (0.16) than the normalized form of the advection-dispersion equation (0.26) when compared to the normalized tracer RTD. The gamma RTD function is tied back to the actual physical site due to its randomly distributed variables. The results validate using the gamma RTD as a suitable alternative to the advection-dispersion equation for quantitative tracer studies of non-ideal flow systems.« less

  7. In Search of a Human Self-Regulation System

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, William M.; Wagner, Dylan D.; Heatherton, Todd F.

    2015-01-01

    The capacity for self-regulation allows people to control their thoughts, behaviors, emotions, and desires. In spite of this impressive ability, failures of self-regulation are common and contribute to numerous societal problems, from obesity to drug addiction. Such failures frequently occur following exposure to highly tempting cues, during negative moods, or after self-regulatory resources have been depleted. Here we review the available neuroscientific evidence regarding self-regulation and its failures. At its core, self-regulation involves a critical balance between the strength of an impulse and an individual’s ability to inhibit the desired behavior. Although neuroimaging and patient studies provide consistent evidence regarding the reward aspects of impulses and desires, the neural mechanisms that underlie the capacity for control have eluded consensus, with various executive control regions implicated in different studies. We outline the necessary properties for a self-regulation control system and suggest that the use of resting-state functional connectivity analyses may be useful for understanding how people regulate their behavior and why they sometimes fail in their attempts. PMID:25938728

  8. Glial regulation of neuronal function: from synapse to systems physiology.

    PubMed

    Tasker, J G; Oliet, S H R; Bains, J S; Brown, C H; Stern, J E

    2012-04-01

    Classically, glia have been regarded as non-excitable cells that provide nourishment and physical scaffolding for neurones. However, it is now generally accepted that glia are active participants in brain function that can modulate neuronal communication via several mechanisms. Investigations of anatomical plasticity in the magnocellular neuroendocrine system of the hypothalamic paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei led the way in the development of much of our understanding of glial regulation of neuronal activity. In this review, we provide an overview of glial regulation of magnocellular neurone activity from a historical perspective of the development of our knowledge of the morphological changes that are evident in the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei. We also focus on recent data from the authors' laboratories presented at the 9th World Congress on Neurohypophysial Hormones that have contributed to our understanding of the multiple mechanisms by which glia modulate the activity of neurones, including: gliotransmitter modulation of synaptic transmission; trans-synaptic modulation by glial neurotransmitter transporter regulation of neurotransmitter spillover; and glial neurotransmitter transporter modulation of excitability by regulation of ambient neurotransmitter levels and their action on extrasynaptic receptors. The magnocellular neuroendocrine system secretes oxytocin and vasopressin from the posterior pituitary gland to control birth, lactation and body fluid balance, and we finally speculate as to whether glial regulation of individual magnocellular neurones might co-ordinate population activity to respond appropriately to altered physiological circumstances.

  9. Fragmentation and Flow Regulation of the World's Large River Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidy, C.; Nilsson, C.; Dynesius, M.; Revenga, C.

    2005-12-01

    Humans have extensively altered river systems through impoundments and diversions to meet their water, energy and transportation needs. Here we present a global overview of flow regulation and channel fragmentation by dams in the world's large river systems (LRSs), which comprise a total virgin mean annual discharge (the discharge before any significant human manipulations) of some 790,000 m3s-1, or 60% of the world's river runoff. Over half of the systems (172 out of 292) are impacted by dams, including the eight most biogeographically diverse. In terms of summed LRS discharge and catchment area, the proportions of impacted rivers are 84% and 88%, respectively. The greatest flow regulation (428%) is reported for the Volta river system in Africa, and regulation is beyond 250% in both the Manicougan and Colorado systems in North and Central America. Dam-impacted catchments experience higher irrigation pressure and about 25 times as much economic activity per unit of water as do unaffected catchments. In view of projected changes in climate, land use and water stress, these findings can be used to identify ecohydrological risks associated with further impacts on large river systems.

  10. Regulation of gamma-secretase activating protein by the 5Lipoxygenase: in vitro and in vivo evidence

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jin; Li, Jian-Guo; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Stough, Alexandra M.; Madesh, Muniswamy; Praticò, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    The formation of Aβ is directly controlled by the γ-secretase complex and its activator, γ-secretase activating protein (GSAP). GSAP derives from a C-terminal fragment of a larger precursor protein via a caspase-3 mediated cleavage. However, the mechanism regulating this process remains unknown. Here we provide in vitro experimental evidence that 5-Lipoxygenase (5LO) is as an endogenous regulator for GSAP formation, but not for other known γ-secretase modulators, by directly and specifically activating caspase-3. These results were confirmed in vivo by using transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease in which 5LO level and activity were modulated genetically or pharmacologically. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that GSAP cleavage via caspase-3 is regulated and depend upon the availability of 5LO further establishing this protein as an attractive and viable therapeutic target for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26076991

  11. Reconstructing a network of stress-response regulators via dynamic system modeling of gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Sheng; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2008-02-10

    Unicellular organisms such as yeasts have evolved mechanisms to respond to environmental stresses by rapidly reorganizing the gene expression program. Although many stress-response genes in yeast have been discovered by DNA microarrays, the stress-response transcription factors (TFs) that regulate these stress-response genes remain to be investigated. In this study, we use a dynamic system model of gene regulation to describe the mechanism of how TFs may control a gene's expression. Then, based on the dynamic system model, we develop the Stress Regulator Identification Algorithm (SRIA) to identify stress-response TFs for six kinds of stresses. We identified some general stress-response TFs that respond to various stresses and some specific stress-response TFs that respond to one specific stress. The biological significance of our findings is validated by the literature. We found that a small number of TFs is probably sufficient to control a wide variety of expression patterns in yeast under different stresses. Two implications can be inferred from this observation. First, the response mechanisms to different stresses may have a bow-tie structure. Second, there may be regulatory cross-talks among different stress responses. In conclusion, this study proposes a network of stress-response regulators and the details of their actions.

  12. Effect of gamma irradiation on the reproductive system of the pond snail Physa acuta

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, S.; Egami, N.

    1984-05-01

    Changes in the survival rate in adults and embryos of the pond snail Physa acuta were studied after acute whole-body ..gamma.. irradiation. The LD/sub 50/ value of the adult snails was about 40 kR. The LD/sub 50/ values of the embryos irradiated 0 and 1 day after oviposition were about 0.9 and 2 kR, respectively. Histological changes in the ovotestis, the number of eggs laid, and their hatchability were examined in the irradiated adult snails. A fall and a subsequent recovery were observed for these characteristics after irradiation with 8 kR of ..gamma.. rays. The relative constitution of the germ-cell populations was greatly changed by the same dose of ..gamma.. rays. After depletion, the ovotestis was first repopulated with gonia, and then with oocytes, spermatocytes, and spermatids.

  13. SU-E-T-104: Development of 3 Dimensional Dosimetry System for Gamma Knife

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, K; Kwak, J; Cho, B; Lee, D; Ahn, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a new 3 dimensional dosimetry system to verify the dosimetric accuracy of Leksell Gamma Knife-Perfexion™ (LGK) (Elekta, Norcross, GA). Methods: We designed and manufactured a lightweight dosimetry instrument to be equipped with the head frame to LGK. It consists of a head phantom, a scintillator, a CCD camera and a step motor. The 10×10 cm2 sheet of Gd2O3;Tb phosphor or Gafchromic EBT3 film was located at the center of the 16 cm diameter hemispherical PMMA, the head phantom. The additional backscatter compensating material of 1 cm thick PMMA plate was placed downstream of the phosphor sheet. The backscatter plate was transparent for scintillation lights to reach the CCD camera with 1200×1200 pixels by 5.2 um pitch. With This equipment, 300 images with 0.2 mm of slice gap were acquired under three collimator setups (4mm, 8mm and 16mm), respectively. The 2D projected doses from 3D distributions were compared with the exposured film dose. Results: As all doses normalized by the maximum dose value in 16 mm setup, the relative differences between the equipment dose and film dose were 0.2% for 4mm collimator and 0.5% for 8mm. The acquisition of 300 images by the equipment took less than 3 minutes. Conclusion: The new equipment was verified to be a good substitute to radiochromic film, with which required more time and resources. Especially, the new methods was considered to provide much convenient and faster solution in the 3D dose acquisition for LGK.

  14. Regulated Expression Systems for Mycobacteria and Their Applications

    PubMed Central

    Schnappinger, Dirk; Ehrt, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    For bacterial model organisms like Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis genetic tools to experimentally manipulate the activity of individual genes existed for decades. But for genetically less tractable yet medically important bacteria such as M. tuberculosis such tools have rarely been available. More recently several groups developed genetic switches that function efficiently in M. tuberculosis and other mycobacteria. Together these systems utilize six different transcription factors, eight different regulated promoters, and three different regulatory principles. Here we describe their design features, review their main applications, and discuss advantages and disadvantages of regulating transcription, translation, or protein stability for controlling gene activities in bacteria. PMID:25485177

  15. A system for Cre-regulated RNA interference in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Patrick; Astrof, Sophie; Erkeland, Stefan J.; Schustak, Joshua; Sharp, Phillip A.; Hynes, Richard O.

    2008-01-01

    We report a system for Cre-regulated expression of RNA interference in vivo. Expression cassettes comprise selectable and FACS-sortable markers in tandem with additional marker genes and shRNAs in the antisense orientation. The cassettes are flanked by tandem LoxP sites arranged so that Cre expression inverts the marker–shRNA construct, allowing its regulated expression (and, at the same time, deletes the original selection/marker genes). The cassettes can be incorporated into retroviral or lentiviral vectors and delivered to cells in culture or used to generate transgenic mice. We describe cassettes incorporating various combinations of reporter genes, miRNA-based RNAi (including two shRNA constructs at once), and oncogenes and demonstrate the delivery of effective RNA interference in cells in culture, efficient transduction into hematopoietic stem cells with cell-type-specific knockdown in their progeny, and rapid generation of regulated shRNA knockdown in transgenic mice. These vector systems allow regulated combinatorial manipulation (both overexpression and loss of function) of gene expression in multiple systems in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18779577

  16. Towards a deep characterization of a 64-fold-pixelated position sensitive detector for a new {gamma}-scanning system of HPGe segmented detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Prieto, A.; Quintana, B.

    2011-07-01

    Characterization of the electrical response of the HPGe segmented detectors is one of the current goals for the Nuclear Physics community in order to perform {gamma}-ray tracking or even imaging with these detectors. For this purpose, scanning devices have to be developed to achieve the signal-position association with the highest precision. In this laboratory, a new scanning system, SALSA (Salamanca Lyso-based Scanning Array), consisting on a high spatial resolution {gamma} camera, is a under development. In this work the whole scanning system is presented and first results for the characterization of the {gamma} camera are shown. (authors)

  17. General Purpose Kernel Integration Shielding Code System-Point and Extended Gamma-Ray Sources.

    1981-06-11

    PELSHIE3 calculates dose rates from gamma-emitting sources with different source geometries and shielding configurations. Eight source geometries are provided and are called by means of geometry index numbers. Gamma-emission characteristics for 134 isotopes, attenuation coefficients for 57 elements or shielding materials and Berger build-up parameters for 17 shielding materials can be obtained from a direct access data library by specifying only the appropriate library numbers. A different option allows these data to be read frommore » cards. For extended sources, constant source strengths as well as exponential and Bessel function source strength distributions are allowed in most cases.« less

  18. Resonance production in. gamma gamma. collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Renard, F.M.

    1983-04-01

    The processes ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. hadrons can be depicted as follows. One photon creates a q anti q pair which starts to evolve; the other photon can either (A) make its own q anti q pair and the (q anti q q anti q) system continue to evolve or (B) interact with the quarks of the first pair and lead to a modified (q anti q) system in interaction with C = +1 quantum numbers. A review of the recent theoretical activity concerning resonance production and related problems is given under the following headings: hadronic C = +1 spectroscopy (q anti q, qq anti q anti q, q anti q g, gg, ggg bound states and mixing effects); exclusive ..gamma gamma.. processes (generalities, unitarized Born method, VDM and QCD); total cross section (soft and hard contributions); q/sup 2/ dependence of soft processes (soft/hard separation, 1/sup +- +/ resonances); and polarization effects. (WHK)

  19. Feasibility study of a low-energy gamma ray system for measuring quantity and flow rate of slush hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Shen, Chih-Ping; Sprinkle, Danny R.

    1992-01-01

    As part of a study to demonstrate the suitability of an X-ray or gamma ray probe for monitoring the quality and flow rate of slush hydrogen, mass attenuation coefficients for Cd-109 X- and gamma radiation in five chemical compounds were measured. The Ag-109 K rays were used for water and acetic acid, whereas E3 transition from the first excited state at 87.7 keV in Ag-109 provided the probe radiation for bromobenzene, alpha (exp 2) chloroisodurene, and cetyl bromide. Measurements were made for a single phase (gas, liquid, solid) as well as mixed phases (liquid plus solid) in all cases. It was shown that the mass attenuation coefficient for the selected radiations is independent of the phase of the test fluids or phase ratios in the case of mixed phase fluids. Described here are the procedure and the results for the five fluid systems investigated.

  20. Feasibility study of a low-energy gamma ray system for measuring quantity and flow rate of slush hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Shen, Chih-Ping; Sprinkle, Danny R.

    1992-04-01

    As part of a study to demonstrate the suitability of an X-ray or gamma ray probe for monitoring the quality and flow rate of slush hydrogen, mass attenuation coefficients for Cd-109 X- and gamma radiation in five chemical compounds were measured. The Ag-109 K rays were used for water and acetic acid, whereas E3 transition from the first excited state at 87.7 keV in Ag-109 provided the probe radiation for bromobenzene, alpha (exp 2) chloroisodurene, and cetyl bromide. Measurements were made for a single phase (gas, liquid, solid) as well as mixed phases (liquid plus solid) in all cases. It was shown that the mass attenuation coefficient for the selected radiations is independent of the phase of the test fluids or phase ratios in the case of mixed phase fluids. Described here are the procedure and the results for the five fluid systems investigated.

  1. [Psychoneuroimmunology--regulation of immunity at the systemic level].

    PubMed

    Boranić, Milivoj; Sabioncello, Ante; Gabrilovac, Jelka

    2008-01-01

    Innate and acquired immune reactions are controlled by their intrinsic regulatory mechanisms, ie. by an array of cytokines that mediate communication among cells of the immune system itself and with other cells and tissues, e. g. in areas of inflammation. In addition, the immune system is also subjected to systemic regulation by the vegetative and endocrine systems since immune cells express receptors for neurotransmitters and hormones. Neuroendocrine signals may enhance or suppress the immune reaction, accelerate or slow it, but do not affect specificity. Various stressful factors, including the psychosocial ones, affect immunity. In turn, cytokines generated by the immune system influence hormonal secretion and central nervous system, producing specific behavioral changes (the "sickness behavior") accompanying infectious and inflammatory diseases. That includes somnolence, loss of apetite, depression or anxiety and decrease of cognitive abilities, attention and memory. Local immune systems in skin and mucosa are also subjected to systemic neuroendocrine regulation and possess intrinsic neuroregulatory networks as well. These mechanisms render skin and respiratory and digestive tracts responsive to various forms of stress. Examples are neurodermitis, asthma and ulcerative colitis. In children, the immune and the neuroendocrine systems are still developing, particularly in fetal, neonatal and early infant periods, and exposure to stressful experiences at that time may result in late consequences in the form of deficient immunity or greater risks for allergic or autoimmune reactions. Recognition of the participation of neuroendocrine mechanisms in regulation of immunity helps us understand alterations and disturbances of immune reactions under the influence of stressful factors but so far has not produced reliable therapeutic implications. Psychosocial interventions involving the child and its family may be useful. PMID:18592962

  2. Macrophage-Lineage Cells Negatively Regulate the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Pool in Response to Interferon Gamma at Steady State and During Infection.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Amanda; Zhang, Yubin; Thai, Vinh; Jones, Maura; Jordan, Michael B; MacNamara, Katherine C

    2015-07-01

    Bone marrow (BM) resident macrophages (Mϕs) regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization; however, their impact on HSC function has not been investigated. We demonstrate that depletion of BM resident Mϕs increases HSC proliferation as well as the pool of quiescent HSCs. At the same time, during bacterial infection where BM resident Mϕs are selectively increased we observe a decrease in HSC numbers. Moreover, strategies that deplete or reduce Mϕs during infection prevent HSC loss and rescue HSC function. We previously found that the transient loss of HSCs during infection is interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-dependent. We now demonstrate that IFNγ signaling specifically in Mϕs is critical for both the diminished HSC pool and maintenance of BM resident Mϕs during infection. In addition to the IFNγ-dependent loss of BM HSC and progenitor cells (HSPCs) during infection, IFNγ reduced circulating HSPC numbers. Importantly, under infection conditions AMD3100 or G-CSF-induced stem cell mobilization was impaired. Taken together, our data show that IFNγ acts on Mϕs, which are a negative regulator of the HSC pool, to drive the loss in BM and peripheral HSCs during infection. Our findings demonstrate that modulating BM resident Mϕ numbers can impact HSC function in vivo, which may be therapeutically useful for hematologic conditions and refinement of HSC transplantation protocols.

  3. Air-flow regulation system for a coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1984-01-01

    An improved air-flow regulator for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which allows close air-flow regulation from a compressor source even though the pressure variations are too rapid for a single primary control loop to respond. The improved system includes a primary controller to control a valve in the main (large) air supply line to regulate large slow changes in flow. A secondary controller is used to control a smaller, faster acting valve in a secondary (small) air supply line parallel to the main line valve to regulate rapid cyclic deviations in air flow. A low-pass filter with a time constant of from 20 to 50 seconds couples the output of the secondary controller to the input of the primary controller so that the primary controller only responds to slow changes in the air-flow rate, the faster, cyclic deviations in flow rate sensed and corrected by the secondary controller loop do not reach the primary controller due to the high frequency rejection provided by the filter. This control arrangement provides at least a factor of 5 improvement in air-flow regulation for a coal gasifier in which air is supplied by a reciprocating compressor through a surge tank.

  4. The contribution of nitric oxide and interferon gamma to the regulation of the neuro-inflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Willenborg, David O; Staykova, Maria; Fordham, Sue; O'Brien, Nikki; Linares, David

    2007-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key messenger involved in physiological functions including endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation, inhibition of platelet adhesion and aggregation and regulation of inflammatory and immune responses. Here we briefly introduce NO and its functions and then describe our work over the past several years examining the role of NO in EAE in both the rat and the mouse. We show that NO plays a significant role in determining the resistance or susceptibility to EAE in various strains and or sexes of animals. We demonstrate that NO down-regulates several aspects of CNS inflammation but also has a dual role in that it is required for inflammation in some situations. PMID:17904645

  5. GSH1, which encodes gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, is a target gene for yAP-1 transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, A L; Moye-Rowley, W S

    1994-01-01

    Changes in gene dosage of the YAP1 gene, encoding the yAP-1 transcriptional regulatory protein, cause profound alterations in cellular drug and metal resistance. Previous studies on yAP-1 action in yeast cells have used the AP-1 response element (ARE) from simian virus 40 as an artificial site for yAP-1-mediated transcriptional activation. No authentic yeast target sites for control of gene expression by yAP-1 are known. Here we show that the GSH1 gene, encoding gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, is transcriptionally responsive to the yAP-1 protein. GSH1 encodes the rate-limiting step in yeast glutathione biosynthesis and contains within its promoter region a DNA element that matches the ARE in 11 of 12 positions. The GSH1 yAP-1 response element (YRE) was recognized by yAP-1 protein in vitro. Northern (RNA) blot analysis showed that GSH1 mRNA levels were responsive to YAP1 gene dosage. A site-directed mutation in the YRE that blocked yAP-1 binding in vitro prevented the mutant GSH1 promoter from responding to elevation in YAP1 gene dosage. A delta gsh1 mutant strain was constructed and unable to grow in the absence of exogenous glutathione. A mutant GSH1 gene lacking the YRE was unable to confer normal cadmium tolerance, although other yAP-1-mediated phenotypes remained normal. Thus, GSH1 is one of several genes that are transcriptionally controlled by yAP-1 and influence drug resistance. Images PMID:7915005

  6. High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K.

    2011-05-17

    A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

  7. Stability evaluation and correction of a pulsed neutron generator prompt gamma activation analysis system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Source output stability is important for accurate measurement in prompt gamma neutron activation. This is especially true when measuring low-concentration elements such as in vivo nitrogen (~2.5% of body weight). We evaluated the stability of the compact DT neutron generator within an in vivo nitrog...

  8. Sea Buckthorn Leaf Extract Protects Jejunum and Bone Marrow of 60Cobalt-Gamma-Irradiated Mice by Regulating Apoptosis and Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Madhu; Gupta, Manish; Saini, Manu; Abdin, M. Z.; Prasad, Jagdish

    2015-01-01

    A single dose (30 mg/kg body weight) of standardized sea buckthorn leaf extract (SBL-1), administered 30 min before whole body 60Co-gamma-irradiation (lethal dose, 10 Gy), protected >90% of mice population. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of action of SBL-1 on jejunum and bone marrow, quantify key bioactive compounds, and analyze chemical composition of SBL-1. Study with 9-week-old inbred male Swiss albino Strain ‘A' mice demonstrated that SBL-1 treatment before 60Co-gamma-irradiation (10 Gy) significantly (p < 0.05) countered radiation induced decreases in jejunum crypts (1.27-fold), villi number (1.41-fold), villus height (1.25-fold), villus cellularity (2.27-fold), cryptal Paneth cells (1.89-fold), and Bcl2 level (1.54-fold). It countered radiation induced increases in cryptal apoptotic cells (1.64-fold) and Bax levels (1.88-fold). It also countered radiation (2 Gy and 3 Gy) induced bone marrow apoptosis (1.59-fold and 1.85-fold) and micronuclei frequency (1.72-fold and 2.6-fold). SBL-1 rendered radiation protection by promoting cryptal stem cells proliferation, by regulating apoptosis, and by countering radiation induced chromosomal damage. Quercetin, Ellagic acid, Gallic acid, high contents polyphenols, tannins, and thiols detected in SBL-1 may have contributed to radiation protection by neutralization of radiation induced oxidative species, supporting stem cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. PMID:26421051

  9. Sea Buckthorn Leaf Extract Protects Jejunum and Bone Marrow of (60)Cobalt-Gamma-Irradiated Mice by Regulating Apoptosis and Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bala, Madhu; Gupta, Manish; Saini, Manu; Abdin, M Z; Prasad, Jagdish

    2015-01-01

    A single dose (30 mg/kg body weight) of standardized sea buckthorn leaf extract (SBL-1), administered 30 min before whole body (60)Co-gamma-irradiation (lethal dose, 10 Gy), protected >90% of mice population. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of action of SBL-1 on jejunum and bone marrow, quantify key bioactive compounds, and analyze chemical composition of SBL-1. Study with 9-week-old inbred male Swiss albino Strain 'A' mice demonstrated that SBL-1 treatment before (60)Co-gamma-irradiation (10 Gy) significantly (p < 0.05) countered radiation induced decreases in jejunum crypts (1.27-fold), villi number (1.41-fold), villus height (1.25-fold), villus cellularity (2.27-fold), cryptal Paneth cells (1.89-fold), and Bcl2 level (1.54-fold). It countered radiation induced increases in cryptal apoptotic cells (1.64-fold) and Bax levels (1.88-fold). It also countered radiation (2 Gy and 3 Gy) induced bone marrow apoptosis (1.59-fold and 1.85-fold) and micronuclei frequency (1.72-fold and 2.6-fold). SBL-1 rendered radiation protection by promoting cryptal stem cells proliferation, by regulating apoptosis, and by countering radiation induced chromosomal damage. Quercetin, Ellagic acid, Gallic acid, high contents polyphenols, tannins, and thiols detected in SBL-1 may have contributed to radiation protection by neutralization of radiation induced oxidative species, supporting stem cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. PMID:26421051

  10. A novel IFN-gamma regulated human melanoma associated antigen gp33-38 defined by monoclonal antibody Me14/D12. I. Identification and immunochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Giuffré, L; Isler, P; Mach, J P; Carrel, S

    1988-09-15

    A novel melanoma-associated differentiation Ag whose surface expression can be enhanced or induced by IFN-gamma was identified by mAb Me14/D12. Testing of numerous tumor cell lines and tumor tissue sections showed that Me14/D12-defined Ag was present not only on melanoma but also on other tumor lines of neuroectodermal origin such as gliomas and neuroblastomas and on some lymphoblastic B cell lines, on monocytes and macrophages. Immunoprecipitation by mAb Me14/D12 of lysates from [35S]methionine-labeled melanoma cells analyzed by SDS-PAGE revealed two polypeptide chains of 33 and 38 KDa, both under reducing and nonreducing conditions. Cross-linking experiments indicated that the two chains were present at the cell surface as a dimeric structure. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that the two chains of 33 and 38 KDa had isoelectric points of 6.2 and 5.7, respectively. Treatment of the melanoma cells with tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-linked glycosylation, resulted in a reduction of the Mr from 33 to 24 KDa and from 38 to 26 KDa. Peptide maps obtained after Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestion showed no shared peptides between the two chains. Although biochemical data indicate that Me14/D12 molecules do not correspond to any known MHC class II Ag, their dimeric structure, tissue distribution, and regulation of IFN-gamma suggest that they could represent a new member of the MHC class II family. PMID:3139751

  11. Efficiency calibration and minimum detectable activity concentration of a real-time UAV airborne sensor system with two gamma spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Bin; Meng, Jia; Wang, Peng; Cao, Ye; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng; Chen, Da

    2016-04-01

    A small-sized UAV (NH-UAV) airborne system with two gamma spectrometers (LaBr3 detector and HPGe detector) was developed to monitor activity concentration in serious nuclear accidents, such as the Fukushima nuclear accident. The efficiency calibration and determination of minimum detectable activity concentration (MDAC) of the specific system were studied by MC simulations at different flight altitudes, different horizontal distances from the detection position to the source term center and different source term sizes. Both air and ground radiation were considered in the models. The results obtained may provide instructive suggestions for in-situ radioactivity measurements of NH-UAV.

  12. Efficiency calibration and minimum detectable activity concentration of a real-time UAV airborne sensor system with two gamma spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Bin; Meng, Jia; Wang, Peng; Cao, Ye; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng; Chen, Da

    2016-04-01

    A small-sized UAV (NH-UAV) airborne system with two gamma spectrometers (LaBr3 detector and HPGe detector) was developed to monitor activity concentration in serious nuclear accidents, such as the Fukushima nuclear accident. The efficiency calibration and determination of minimum detectable activity concentration (MDAC) of the specific system were studied by MC simulations at different flight altitudes, different horizontal distances from the detection position to the source term center and different source term sizes. Both air and ground radiation were considered in the models. The results obtained may provide instructive suggestions for in-situ radioactivity measurements of NH-UAV. PMID:26773821

  13. Regulation of cadherin expression in nervous system development

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Alicia F; Prasad, Maneeshi S; Thuringer, Amanda Henke; Manzerra, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses our current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms for classical cadherin expression during development of the vertebrate nervous system. The complexity of the spatial and temporal expression patterns is linked to morphogenic and functional roles in the developing nervous system. While the regulatory networks controlling cadherin expression are not well understood, it is likely that the multiple signaling pathways active in the development of particular domains also regulate the specific cadherins expressed at that time and location. With the growing understanding of the broader roles of cadherins in cell–cell adhesion and non-adhesion processes, it is important to understand both the upstream regulation of cadherin expression and the downstream effects of specific cadherins within their cellular context. PMID:24526207

  14. Occurrence of regulated and non-regulated disinfection by-products in small drinking water systems.

    PubMed

    Guilherme, Stéphanie; Rodriguez, Manuel J

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of regulated and non-regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs) was investigated in the drinking water of small systems in two provinces in Canada, Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) and Quebec (QC), through an intensive sampling program. Sixteen DBPs were studied: four trihalomethanes (THMs), five haloacetic acids (HAAs), four haloacetonitriles (HANs), one halonitromethane, chloropikrin (CPK) and two haloketones (HKs). Average measured concentrations of these compounds were much higher than those reported in the literature for medium and large systems. The measured average value for THMs was 75 μg L(-1) (Stdv=69μgL(-1)); HAAs, 77 μg L(-1) (Stdv=75 μg L(-1)); HANs, 2.5 μg L(-1) (Stdv=1.8 μg L(-1)); CPK, 0.4 μg L(-1) (Stdv=0.3 μg L(-1)) and HKs, 6.0 μg L(-1) (Stdv=4.5 μg L(-1)). The gap (some 10 times difference) between the average levels of regulated DBPs (THMs, HAAs) and non-regulated DBPs (HANs, CPK and HKs) is comparable to that observed in large systems where the occurrence of the same compounds has been reported. Generally, investigated DBPs followed a comparable seasonal evolution during the year: they decreased between the fall and winter and then increased to eventually reach a maximum in late summer. This trend was less observable in NL than in QC. However, observed seasonal fluctuations of DBPs were less considerable than those observed in medium and large systems located in similar temperate environments reported in the literature. Spatial variations from the plant to the extremities were high and comparable to those observed in large systems, which is surprising, considering the smaller size of distribution networks supplying small communities. Generally speaking, the results support the premise that problems associated with implementing treatment that removes DBP precursors in water submitted to chlorination can increase population exposure to these contaminants in small systems.

  15. The cAMP signaling system inhibits the repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage by promoting Epac1-mediated proteasomal degradation of XRCC1 protein in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Eun-Ah; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system inhibits repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system inhibits DNA damage repair by decreasing XRCC1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system decreases XRCC1 expression by promoting its proteasomal degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The promotion of XRCC1 degradation by cAMP signaling system is mediated by Epac1. -- Abstract: Cyclic AMP is involved in the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, cellular growth and proliferation. Recently, the cAMP signaling system was found to modulate DNA-damaging agent-induced apoptosis by regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins and inhibitors of apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the cAMP signaling may modulate DNA repair activity, and we investigated the effects of the cAMP signaling system on {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage repair in lung cancer cells. Transient expression of a constitutively active mutant of stimulatory G protein (G{alpha}sQL) or treatment with forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator, augmented radiation-induced DNA damage and inhibited repair of the damage in H1299 lung cancer cells. Expression of G{alpha}sQL or treatment with forskolin or isoproterenol inhibited the radiation-induced expression of the XRCC1 protein, and exogenous expression of XRCC1 abolished the DNA repair-inhibiting effect of forskolin. Forskolin treatment promoted the ubiquitin and proteasome-dependent degradation of the XRCC1 protein, resulting in a significant decrease in the half-life of the protein after {gamma}-ray irradiation. The effect of forskolin on XRCC1 expression was not inhibited by PKA inhibitor, but 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, an Epac-selective cAMP analog, increased ubiquitination of XRCC1 protein and decreased XRCC1 expression. Knockdown of Epac1 abolished the effect of 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP and restored XRCC1 protein level following {gamma}-ray irradiation. From

  16. Early-time observations of gamma-ray burst error boxes with the Livermore optical transient imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G G

    2000-08-01

    Despite the enormous wealth of gamma-ray burst (GRB) data collected over the past several years the physical mechanism which causes these extremely powerful phenomena is still unknown. Simultaneous and early time optical observations of GRBs will likely make an great contribution t o our understanding. LOTIS is a robotic wide field-of-view telescope dedicated to the search for prompt and early-time optical afterglows from gamma-ray bursts. LOTIS began routine operations in October 1996 and since that time has responded to over 145 gamma-ray burst triggers. Although LOTIS has not yet detected prompt optical emission from a GRB its upper limits have provided constraints on the theoretical emission mechanisms. Super-LOTIS, also a robotic wide field-of-view telescope, can detect emission 100 times fainter than LOTIS is capable of detecting. Routine observations from Steward Observatory's Kitt Peak Station will begin in the immediate future. During engineering test runs under bright skies from the grounds of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Super-LOTIS provided its first upper limits on the early-time optical afterglow of GRBs. This dissertation provides a summary of the results from LOTIS and Super-LOTIS through the time of writing. Plans for future studies with both systems are also presented.

  17. Rice heterotrimeric G-protein gamma subunits (RGG1 and RGG2) are differentially regulated under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Dinesh Kumar; Islam, S M Shahinul; Tuteja, Narendra

    2012-07-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (α, β and γ subunits) are primarily involved in diverse signaling processes by transducing signals from an activated transmembrane G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) to appropriate downstream effectors within cells. The role of α and β G-protein subunits in salinity and heat stress has been reported but the regulation of γ subunit of plant G-proteins in response to abiotic stress has not heretofore been described. In the present study we report the isolation of full-length cDNAs of two isoforms of Gγ [RGG1(I), 282 bp and RGG2(I), 453 bp] from rice (Oryza sativa cv Indica group Swarna) and described their transcript regulation in response to abiotic stresses. Protein sequence alignment and pairwise comparison of γ subunits of Indica rice [RGG(I)] with other known plant G-protein γ subunits demonstrated high homology to barley (HvGs) while soybean (GmG2) and Arabidopsis (AGG1) were least related. The numbers of the exons and introns were found to be similar between RGG1(I) and RGG2(I), but their sizes were different. Analyses of promoter sequences of RGG(I) confirmed the presence of stress-related cis-regulatory signature motifs suggesting their active and possible independent roles in abiotic stress signaling. The transcript levels of RGG1(I) and RGG2(I) were upregulated following NaCl, cold, heat and ABA treatments. However, in drought stress only RGG1(I) was upregulated. Strong support by transcript profiling suggests that γ subunits play a critical role via cross talk in signaling pathways. These findings provide first direct evidence for roles of Gγ subunits of rice G-proteins in regulation of abiotic stresses. These findings suggest the possible exploitation of γ subunits of G-protein machinery for promoting stress tolerance in plants.

  18. Nesfatin-1 as a New Potent Regulator in Reproductive System

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinhee; Yang, Hyunwon

    2012-01-01

    Nesfatin-1 is a recently discovered anorexigenic peptide which is distributed in several brain areas implicated in the feeding and metabolic regulation. Recently, it has been reported that nesfatin-1 is expressed not only in brain, but also in peripheral organs such as digestive organs, adipose tissues, heart, and reproductive organs. Nesfatin-1 is markedly expressed in the pancreas, stomach and duodenum. Eventually, the nesfatin-1 expression in the digestive organs may be regulated by nutritional status, which suggests a regulatory role of peripheral nesfatin-1 in energy homeostasis. Nesfatin-1 is also detected in the adipose tissues of humans and rodents, indicating that nesfatin-1 expression in the fat may regulate food intake independently, rather than relying on leptin. In addition, nesfatin-1 is expressed in the heart as a cardiac peptide. It suggests that nesfatin-1 may regulate cardiac function and encourage clinical potential in the presence of nutrition-dependent physio-pathologic cardiovascular diseases. Currently, only a few studies demonstrate that nesfatin-1 is expressed in the reproductive system. However, it is not clear yet what function of nesfatin-1 is in the reproductive organs. Here, we summarize the expression of nesfatin-1 and its roles in brain and peripheral organs and discuss the possible roles of nesfatin-1 expressed in reproductive organs, including testis, epididymis, ovary, and uterus. We come to the conclusion that nesfatin-1 as a local regulator in male and female reproductive organs may regulate the steroidogenesis in the testis and ovary and the physiological activity in epididymis and uterus. PMID:25949098

  19. Regulation of bacterial virulence by Csr (Rsm) systems.

    PubMed

    Vakulskas, Christopher A; Potts, Anastasia H; Babitzke, Paul; Ahmer, Brian M M; Romeo, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Most bacterial pathogens have the remarkable ability to flourish in the external environment and in specialized host niches. This ability requires their metabolism, physiology, and virulence factors to be responsive to changes in their surroundings. It is no surprise that the underlying genetic circuitry that supports this adaptability is multilayered and exceedingly complex. Studies over the past 2 decades have established that the CsrA/RsmA proteins, global regulators of posttranscriptional gene expression, play important roles in the expression of virulence factors of numerous proteobacterial pathogens. To accomplish these tasks, CsrA binds to the 5' untranslated and/or early coding regions of mRNAs and alters translation, mRNA turnover, and/or transcript elongation. CsrA activity is regulated by noncoding small RNAs (sRNAs) that contain multiple CsrA binding sites, which permit them to sequester multiple CsrA homodimers away from mRNA targets. Environmental cues sensed by two-component signal transduction systems and other regulatory factors govern the expression of the CsrA-binding sRNAs and, ultimately, the effects of CsrA on secretion systems, surface molecules and biofilm formation, quorum sensing, motility, pigmentation, siderophore production, and phagocytic avoidance. This review presents the workings of the Csr system, the paradigm shift that it generated for understanding posttranscriptional regulation, and its roles in virulence networks of animal and plant pathogens.

  20. Regulation of Bacterial Virulence by Csr (Rsm) Systems

    PubMed Central

    Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Potts, Anastasia H.; Babitzke, Paul; Ahmer, Brian M. M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Most bacterial pathogens have the remarkable ability to flourish in the external environment and in specialized host niches. This ability requires their metabolism, physiology, and virulence factors to be responsive to changes in their surroundings. It is no surprise that the underlying genetic circuitry that supports this adaptability is multilayered and exceedingly complex. Studies over the past 2 decades have established that the CsrA/RsmA proteins, global regulators of posttranscriptional gene expression, play important roles in the expression of virulence factors of numerous proteobacterial pathogens. To accomplish these tasks, CsrA binds to the 5′ untranslated and/or early coding regions of mRNAs and alters translation, mRNA turnover, and/or transcript elongation. CsrA activity is regulated by noncoding small RNAs (sRNAs) that contain multiple CsrA binding sites, which permit them to sequester multiple CsrA homodimers away from mRNA targets. Environmental cues sensed by two-component signal transduction systems and other regulatory factors govern the expression of the CsrA-binding sRNAs and, ultimately, the effects of CsrA on secretion systems, surface molecules and biofilm formation, quorum sensing, motility, pigmentation, siderophore production, and phagocytic avoidance. This review presents the workings of the Csr system, the paradigm shift that it generated for understanding posttranscriptional regulation, and its roles in virulence networks of animal and plant pathogens. PMID:25833324

  1. DC Bus Regulation with a Flywheel Energy Storage System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Kascak, Peter E.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the DC bus regulation control algorithm for the NASA flywheel energy storage system during charge, charge reduction and discharge modes of operation. The algorithm was experimentally verified with results given in a previous paper. This paper presents the necessary models for simulation with detailed block diagrams of the controller algorithm. It is shown that the flywheel system and the controller can be modeled in three levels of detail depending on the type of analysis required. The three models are explained and then compared using simulation results.

  2. Regulation of System xc(-) by Pharmacological Manipulation of Cellular Thiols.

    PubMed

    Albano, Rebecca; Raddatz, Nicholas J; Hjelmhaug, Julie; Baker, David A; Lobner, Doug

    2015-01-01

    The cystine/glutamate exchanger (system xc (-)) mediates the transport of cystine into the cell in exchange for glutamate. By releasing glutamate, system xc (-) can potentially cause excitotoxicity. However, through providing cystine to the cell, it regulates the levels of cellular glutathione (GSH), the main endogenous intracellular antioxidant, and may protect cells against oxidative stress. We tested two different compounds that deplete primary cortical cultures containing both neurons and astrocytes of intracellular GSH, L-buthionine-sulfoximine (L-BSO), and diethyl maleate (DEM). Both compounds caused significant concentration and time dependent decreases in intracellular GSH levels. However; DEM caused an increase in radiolabeled cystine uptake through system xc (-), while unexpectedly BSO caused a decrease in uptake. The compounds caused similar low levels of neurotoxicity, while only BSO caused an increase in oxidative stress. The mechanism of GSH depletion by these two compounds is different, DEM directly conjugates to GSH, while BSO inhibits γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, a key enzyme in GSH synthesis. As would be expected from these mechanisms of action, DEM caused a decrease in intracellular cysteine, while BSO increased cysteine levels. The results suggest that negative feedback by intracellular cysteine is an important regulator of system xc (-) in this culture system.

  3. High time resolved electron temperature measurements by using the multi-pass Thomson scattering system in GAMMA 10/PDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Yasuhara, Ryo; Ohta, Koichi; Chikatsu, Masayuki; Shima, Yoriko; Kohagura, Junko; Sakamoto, Mizuki; Nakashima, Yousuke; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Ichimura, Makoto; Yamada, Ichihiro; Funaba, Hisamichi; Minami, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    High time resolved electron temperature measurements are useful for fluctuation study. A multi-pass Thomson scattering (MPTS) system is proposed for the improvement of both increasing the TS signal intensity and time resolution. The MPTS system in GAMMA 10/PDX has been constructed for enhancing the Thomson scattered signals for the improvement of measurement accuracy. The MPTS system has a polarization-based configuration with an image relaying system. We optimized the image relaying optics for improving the multi-pass laser confinement and obtaining the stable MPTS signals over ten passing TS signals. The integrated MPTS signals increased about five times larger than that in the single pass system. Finally, time dependent electron temperatures were obtained in MHz sampling.

  4. Development of microwave interferometer system for divertor simulation experiments in GAMMA 10/PDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohagura, J.; Wang, X.; Kanno, S.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kuwahara, D.; Nagayama, Y.; Shima, Y.; Chikatsu, M.; Nojiri, K.; Sakamoto, M.; Imai, T.; Nakashima, Y.; Mase, A.

    2015-12-01

    Microwave interferometer has newly been installed on GAMMA 10/PDX for divertor simulation study. A divertor simulation experimental module (D-module) is used to investigate the physics of divertor in the end-cell of GAMMA 10/PDX where an open magnetic field configuration is formed. D-module has a rectangular chamber with an inlet aperture. Two tungsten target plates are mounted in V-shape inside the chamber. In order to develop understandings of divertor simulation experiments the microwave interferometer using heterodyne scheme and a 1D horn-antenna mixer array (HMA) is applied to obtain electron density and density distribution inside the V-shaped target plates. Line-averaged electron density distributions inside D-module are first observed in H2 gas injection experiments.

  5. Early peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma regulated genes involved in expansion of pancreatic beta cell mass

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The progression towards type 2 diabetes depends on the allostatic response of pancreatic beta cells to synthesise and secrete enough insulin to compensate for insulin resistance. The endocrine pancreas is a plastic tissue able to expand or regress in response to the requirements imposed by physiological and pathophysiological states associated to insulin resistance such as pregnancy, obesity or ageing, but the mechanisms mediating beta cell mass expansion in these scenarios are not well defined. We have recently shown that ob/ob mice with genetic ablation of PPARγ2, a mouse model known as the POKO mouse failed to expand its beta cell mass. This phenotype contrasted with the appropriate expansion of the beta cell mass observed in their obese littermate ob/ob mice. Thus, comparison of these models islets particularly at early ages could provide some new insights on early PPARγ dependent transcriptional responses involved in the process of beta cell mass expansion Results Here we have investigated PPARγ dependent transcriptional responses occurring during the early stages of beta cell adaptation to insulin resistance in wild type, ob/ob, PPARγ2 KO and POKO mice. We have identified genes known to regulate both the rate of proliferation and the survival signals of beta cells. Moreover we have also identified new pathways induced in ob/ob islets that remained unchanged in POKO islets, suggesting an important role for PPARγ in maintenance/activation of mechanisms essential for the continued function of the beta cell. Conclusions Our data suggest that the expansion of beta cell mass observed in ob/ob islets is associated with the activation of an immune response that fails to occur in POKO islets. We have also indentified other PPARγ dependent differentially regulated pathways including cholesterol biosynthesis, apoptosis through TGF-β signaling and decreased oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:22208362

  6. Nonlinear closed-loop control system for intracranial pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Coté, G L; Durai, R; Zoghi, B

    1995-01-01

    A nonlinear closed-loop control system with flat pressure-versus-flow characteristics that is aimed at regulating intracranial pressure (ICP) by adjusting the volume of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) was designed, built, and tested. The control system design allows both the pressure setpoint and hysteresis to be adjusted to overcome the difficulties inherent in differential pressure-activated, fixed resistance, open-loop shunts. A dynamic six-compartment bench-top fluid system, which mimics the cerebral spinal fluid system, was designed, built, and tested. A computer simulation was developed which included the nonlinear on-off controller with hysteresis and a sixth-order, linear, multicompartmental model of the CSF system. The computer model and in vitro system results showed the ability of the system to track and compensate for pressure variations above and below normal as well as for spurious outputs that mimic such in vivo problems as blood pressure changes, sneezing, or coughing. There was one discrepancy between the simulated and in vitro results. The in vitro system had a higher rate of increase in pressure due to the more rigid compliance of the materials used, whereas the computer model compliance, based on the basal in vivo compliance of the CSF system, was less rigid. Based on these findings, the controller was modified to account for short-duration, extremely elevated pressures. PMID:8572426

  7. Multigroup Neutron/Gamma-Ray Direct Integration Transport Code System for Two-Dimensional Cylindrical Geometry.

    1980-10-15

    Version 00 PALLAS-2DCY-FX is a code for direct integration of the transport equation in two-dimensional (r,z) geometry. It solves the energy and angular-dependent Boltzmann transport equation with general anisotropic scattering in cylindrical geometry. Its principal applications are to neutron or gamma-ray transport problems in the forward mode. The code is particularly designed for and suited to the solution of deep penetration radiation transport problems with an external (fixed) source.

  8. Atomic mechanisms of. gamma. ' precipitate plate growth in the Al-Ag system

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, J.M.

    1985-03-01

    Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy results that the precipitates have the composition Ag/sub 2/Al. High-resolution electron microscopy of ..gamma..' precipitates in both <110>//<1120> and <111>//<0001> orientations shows that all interfaces of the precipitate are largely coherent with the matrix and are faceted along low-energy (111) and (110) matrix plans, due to the influence of surface and elastic strain energies on the transformation. Further comparison between experimental and calculated high-resolution images of the precipitate/matrix interface and of Shockley partial dislocation ledges on the precipitate faces demonstrates that both thickening and lengthening of ..gamma..' precipitate plates occurs by the passage of the Shockley partial dislocations along alternate (111) matrix planes by a terrace-ledge-kink mechanism. These images and electron diffraction information also indicate that the ..gamma..' precipitates are ordered, where the A-planes in the precipitate contain nearly pure Ag and the B-planes have the composition Al/sub 2/Ag, and that the limiting reaction in the growth process is the substitutional diffusion of Ag cross kinks in the Shockley partial dislocations, which terminate in the Ag-rich A-planes. The terraces between ledges are atomically flat and ledges are uniformly stepped-down from the centers to the edges of isolated precipitates. Convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) analyses of ..gamma..' precipitates indicate that they have the space group P6/sub 3//mmc. Effect of specimen thickness on symmetry determinations by CBED was also examined for an ..cap alpha..-titanium sample. Results show that the symmetries observed in CBED patterns from thin specimens may be due to the limited thickness of the specimen, rather than to the actual space group of the material.

  9. [Development of a high-resolution pinhole SPECT system using dual-head gamma camera for small animal studies].

    PubMed

    Yokoi, T; Kishi, H

    1998-11-01

    We developed a high-resolution pinhole SPECT system using dual-head gamma camera (PRISM-2000XP) for small animal, and evaluated the performance of this system. Two pinhole-inserts (Pb) were mounted on the same unit, and it was not attached to the detector but the gantry of gamma camera. We designed two kinds of pinhole collimators with different rotating radii, 40 mm (Type-I) and 50 mm (Type-II). The diameter of the pinhole is 1 mm for both types. The field of view (FOV) and magnification were 45.8 mm phi and 4.25 for Type-I, 57.4 mm phi and 3.40 for Type-II, respectively. We measured full width at half maximum (FWHM) of line spread function using a 99mTc line source. Measured FWHM values were 1.65 mm using Type-I and 1.91 mm using Type-II at the center of FOV in the center slice. The volume sensitivity of this system was 8.54 kcps/MBq/ml (Type-I) and 5.68 kcps/MBq/ml (Type-II). We could observed 1.2 mm phi cold spot in the resolution phantom using Type-I. In conclusion, this system is available for SPECT measurement of small animal studies.

  10. A celestial gamma-ray foreground due to the albedo of small solar system bodies and a remote probe of the interstellar cosmic ray spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.; Digel, Seth W.; Michelson, Peter F.; Ormes, Jonathan F.

    2007-12-17

    We calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo flux from cosmic-ray (CR) interactions with the solid rock and ice in Main Belt asteroids and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) using the Moon as a template. We show that the {gamma}-ray albedo for the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt strongly depends on the small-body mass spectrum of each system and may be detectable by the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). The orbits of the Main Belt asteroids and KBOs are distributed near the ecliptic, which passes through the Galactic center and high Galactic latitudes. If detected, the {gamma}-ray emission by the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt has to be taken into account when analyzing weak {gamma}-ray sources close to the ecliptic, especially near the Galactic center and for signals at high Galactic latitudes, such as the extragalactic {gamma}-ray emission. Additionally, it can be used to probe the spectrum of CR nuclei at close-to-interstellar conditions, and the mass spectrum of small bodies in the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt. The asteroid albedo spectrum also exhibits a 511 keV line due to secondary positrons annihilating in the rock. This may be an important and previously unrecognized celestial foreground for the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) observations of the Galactic 511 keV line emission including the direction of the Galactic center.

  11. Structure and Regulation of the Type VI Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Julie M.; Brunet, Yannick R.; Cascales, Eric; Mougous, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a complex and widespread gram-negative export pathway with the capacity to translocate protein effectors into a diversity of target cell types. Current structural models of the T6SS indicate that the apparatus is composed of at least two complexes, a dynamic bacteriophage-like structure and a cell envelope-spanning membrane-associated assembly. How these complexes interact to promote effector secretion and cell targeting remains a major question in the field. As a contact-dependent pathway with specific cellular targets, the T6SS is subject to tight regulation. Thus, the identification of regulatory elements that control T6S expression continues to shape our understanding of the environmental circumstances relevant to its function. This review discusses recent progress toward characterizing T6S structure and regulation. PMID:22746332

  12. Yersinia Type III Secretion System Master Regulator LcrF

    PubMed Central

    Schwiesow, Leah; Lam, Hanh

    2015-01-01

    Many Gram-negative pathogens express a type III secretion (T3SS) system to enable growth and survival within a host. The three human-pathogenic Yersinia species, Y. pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, and Y. enterocolitica, encode the Ysc T3SS, whose expression is controlled by an AraC-like master regulator called LcrF. In this review, we discuss LcrF structure and function as well as the environmental cues and pathways known to regulate LcrF expression. Similarities and differences in binding motifs and modes of action between LcrF and the Pseudomonas aeruginosa homolog ExsA are summarized. In addition, we present a new bioinformatics analysis that identifies putative LcrF binding sites within Yersinia target gene promoters. PMID:26644429

  13. Metabolic Master Regulators: Sharing Information among Multiple Systems

    PubMed Central

    Corkey, Barbara E.; Shirihai, Orian

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are caused by defects in metabolically sensitive tissues. Attention has been paid to insulin resistance as the key relevant pathosis, with a detailed focus on signal transduction pathways in metabolic tissues. Evidence exists to support an important role for each tissue in metabolic homeostasis and a potential causative role in both diabetes and obesity. The redox metabolome, that coordinates tissue responses and reflects shared control and regulation, is our focus. Consideration is given to the possibility that pathosis results from contributions of all relevant tissues, by virtue of a circulating communication system. Validation of this model would support simultaneous regulation of all collaborating metabolic organs through changes in the circulation, regardless of whether change was initiated exogenously or by a single organ. PMID:22939743

  14. STAT1 regulates IFN-alpha beta- and IFN-gamma-dependent control of infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae by nonhemopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti; Trumstedt, Christian; Mattei, Fabrizio; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Hidmark, Asa; Wigzell, Hans; Rottenberg, Martín E

    2006-06-01

    STAT1 mediates signaling in response to IFN-alpha, -beta, and -gamma, cytokines required for protective immunity against several viral, bacterial, and eukaryotic pathogens. The protective role of STAT1 in the control of intranasal infection with the obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia pneumoniae was analyzed. IFN-gamma-/- or IFN-gamma receptor (R)-/- mice were highly susceptible to infection with C. pneumoniae. We found that STAT1-/- mice were even more susceptible to C. pneumoniae than IFN-gamma-/- or IFN-gammaR-/- mice. Phosphorylation of STAT1 was detected in the lungs of C. pneumoniae-infected wild-type, IFN-gammaR-/-, and IFN-alphabetaR-/- mice, but not in mice lacking both IFN-alphabetaR and IFN-gammaR. In line with this, IFN-alphabetaR-/-/IFN-gammaR-/- mice showed increased susceptibility to infection compared with IFN-gammaR-/- mice. However, C. pneumoniae-infected IFN-alphabetaR-/- or IFN regulatory factor 3-/- mice showed no increased susceptibility and similar IFN-gamma expression compared with wild-type mice. CD4+ or CD8+ cells released IFN-gamma in vivo and conferred protection against C. pneumoniae in a STAT1-independent manner. In contrast, STAT1 mediated a nonredundant protective role of nonhemopoietic cells but not of hemopoietic cells. Nonhemopoietic cells accounted for the expression of STAT1-mediated indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase and the p47 GTPase LRG-47, but not inducible NO synthase mRNA. In summary, we demonstrate that STAT1 mediates a cooperative effect of IFN-alphabeta and IFN-gamma on nonhemopoietic cells, resulting in protection against C. pneumoniae. PMID:16709859

  15. Characterization of multiple prompt gamma-ray analysis (MPGA) system at JAEA for elemental analysis of geological and cosmochemical samples.

    PubMed

    Islam, M A; Ebihara, M; Toh, Y; Murakami, Y; Harada, H

    2012-08-01

    The newly installed multiple prompt gamma-ray analysis (MPGA) system at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was characterized for nondestructive multi-element analysis of geological and cosmochemical samples. Analysis of the hydrogenous meteorite Orgueil by both MPGA and PGA implies that MPGA can be used for elemental determination with sufficient accuracy. For some elements which cannot be determined by conventional PGA due to the spectral interference or lower sensitivity, it was shown that they could be determined by MPGA. PMID:22732386

  16. Combination of PTEN and {gamma}-Ionizing Radiation Enhances Cell Death and G{sub 2}/M Arrest Through Regulation of AKT Activity and p21 Induction in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong Kuk; Jung, Hae-Yun; Park, Seon Ho; Kang, Seung Yi; Yi, Mi-Rang; Um, Hong Duck; Hong, Sung Hee

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To identify the role of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) during {gamma}-ionizing radiation ({gamma}-IR) treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Wild-type PTEN or mutant forms of PTEN plasmids were transfected to construct stable transfectants of the NCI-H1299 non-small-cell lung cancer cell line. Combined effects of PTEN expression and IR treatment were tested using immunoblot, clonogenic, and cell-counting assays. Related signaling pathways were studied with immunoblot and kinase assays. Results: At steady state, stable transfectants showed almost the same proliferation rate but had different AKT phosphorylation patterns. When treated with {gamma}-IR, wild-type PTEN transfectants showed higher levels of cell death compared with mock vector or mutant transfectants, and showed increased G{sub 2}/M cell-cycle arrest accompanied by p21 induction and CDK1 inactivation. NCI-H1299 cells were treated with phosphosinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway inhibitor (LY29002), resulting in reduced AKT phosphorylation levels. Treatment of NCI-H1299 cells with LY29002 and {gamma}-IR resulted in increased cell-cycle arrest and p21 induction. Endogenous wild-type PTEN-containing NCI-H460 cells were treated with PTEN-specific siRNA and then irradiated with {gamma}-IR: however reduced PTEN levels did not induce cell-cycle arrest or p21 expression. Conclusions: Taken together, these findings indicate that PTEN may modulate cell death or the cell cycle via AKT inactivation by PTEN and {gamma}-IR treatment. We also propose that a PTEN-PI3K/AKT-p21-CDK1 pathway could regulate cell death and the cell cycle by {gamma}-IR treatment.

  17. Analysis of T cells bearing different isotypic forms of the gamma/delta T cell receptor in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Gerli, R; Agea, E; Bertotto, A; Tognellini, R; Flenghi, L; Spinozzi, F; Velardi, A; Grignani, F

    1991-10-01

    The expression of gamma/delta T cell receptor (TCR) on peripheral blood CD3+ cells circulating in 74 patients with different systemic autoimmune diseases was evaluated. There was a significant increase in the gamma/delta T cell number only in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and in untreated patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Unlike healthy subjects, a subgroup of patients with SLE and SS displayed a marked increase in gamma/delta T cells. Immunosuppressive treatment of patients with active SLE led to a normalization of the gamma/delta T cell number. Analysis of surface phenotype showed that when patient gamma/delta T cells were expanded in the peripheral blood, they were not activated but bore "memory" markers. In addition, they preferentially expressed the disulfide linked form of the TCR, except in progressive systemic sclerosis where the nondisulfide form was displayed. Serial determinations in single patients demonstrated that the gamma/delta T cell increase is a persistent immunological feature in these patient subgroups. PMID:1837314

  18. Vibrio cholerae Response Regulator VxrB Controls Colonization and Regulates the Type VI Secretion System.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Andrew T; Ottemann, Karen M; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2015-05-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS) are used by bacteria to sense and respond to their environment. TCS are typically composed of a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR). The Vibrio cholerae genome encodes 52 RR, but the role of these RRs in V. cholerae pathogenesis is largely unknown. To identify RRs that control V. cholerae colonization, in-frame deletions of each RR were generated and the resulting mutants analyzed using an infant mouse intestine colonization assay. We found that 12 of the 52 RR were involved in intestinal colonization. Mutants lacking one previously uncharacterized RR, VCA0566 (renamed VxrB), displayed a significant colonization defect. Further experiments showed that VxrB phosphorylation state on the predicted conserved aspartate contributes to intestine colonization. The VxrB regulon was determined using whole genome expression analysis. It consists of several genes, including those genes that create the type VI secretion system (T6SS). We determined that VxrB is required for T6SS expression using several in vitro assays and bacterial killing assays, and furthermore that the T6SS is required for intestinal colonization. vxrB is encoded in a four gene operon and the other vxr operon members also modulate intestinal colonization. Lastly, though ΔvxrB exhibited a defect in single-strain intestinal colonization, the ΔvxrB strain did not show any in vitro growth defect. Overall, our work revealed that a small set of RRs is required for intestinal colonization and one of these regulators, VxrB affects colonization at least in part through its regulation of T6SS genes.

  19. The multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) tumor suppressor regulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-dependent adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dreijerink, Koen M A; Varier, Radhika A; van Beekum, Olivier; Jeninga, Ellen H; Höppener, Jo W M; Lips, Cornelis J M; Kummer, J Alain; Kalkhoven, Eric; Timmers, H T Marc

    2009-09-01

    Menin, the product of the MEN1 (multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1) tumor suppressor gene, is involved in activation of gene transcription as part of an MLL1 (mixed-lineage leukemia 1)/MLL2 (KMT2A/B)-containing protein complex which harbors methyltransferase activity for lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4). As MEN1 patients frequently develop lipomas and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) is expressed in several MEN1-related tumor types, we investigated regulation of PPARgamma activity by menin. We found that menin is required for adipocyte differentiation of murine 3T3-L1 cells and PPARgamma-expressing mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Menin augments PPARgamma target gene expression through recruitment of H3K4 methyltransferase activity. Menin interacts directly with the activation function 2 transcription activation domain of PPARgamma in a ligand-independent fashion. Ligand-dependent coactivation, however, is dependent on the LXXLL motif of menin and the intact helix 12 of PPARgamma. We propose that menin is an important factor in PPARgamma-mediated adipogenesis and that loss of PPARgamma function may contribute to lipoma development in MEN1 patients.

  20. Cis-vaccenic acid induces differentiation and up-regulates gamma globin synthesis in K562, JK1 and transgenic mice erythroid progenitor stem cells.

    PubMed

    Aimola, Idowu A; Inuwa, Hajiya M; Nok, Andrew J; Mamman, Aisha I; Bieker, James J

    2016-04-01

    Gamma globin induction remains a promising pharmacological therapeutic treatment mode for sickle cell anemia and beta thalassemia, however Hydroxyurea remains the only FDA approved drug which works via this mechanism. In this regard, we assayed the γ-globin inducing capacity of Cis-vaccenic acid (CVA). CVA induced differentiation of K562, JK1 and transgenic mice primary bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor stem cells. CVA also significantly up-regulated γ-globin gene expression in JK-1 and transgenic mice bone marrow erythroid progenitor stem cells (TMbmEPSCs) but not K562 cells without altering cell viability. Increased γ-globin expression was accompanied by KLF1 suppression in CVA induced JK-1 cells. Erythropoietin induced differentiation of JK-1 cells 24h before CVA induction did not significantly alter CVA induced differentiation and γ-globin expression in JK-1 cells. Inhibition of JK-1 and Transgenic mice bone marrow erythroid progenitor stem cells Fatty acid elongase 5 (Elovl5) and Δ(9) desaturase suppressed the γ-globin inductive effects of CVA. CVA treatment failed to rescue γ-globin expression in Elovl5 and Δ(9)-desaturase inhibited cells 48 h post inhibition in JK-1 cells. The data suggests that CVA directly modulates differentiation of JK-1 and TMbmEPSCs, and indirectly modulates γ-globin gene expression in these cells. Our findings provide important clues for further evaluations of CVA as a potential fetal hemoglobin therapeutic inducer. PMID:26879870

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Phosphate Uptake System Component PstA2 Is Not Required for Gene Regulation or Virulence.

    PubMed

    Tischler, Anna D; Leistikow, Rachel L; Ramakrishnan, Pavithra; Voskuil, Martin I; McKinney, John D

    2016-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes two complete high-affinity Pst phosphate-specific transporters. We previously demonstrated that a membrane-spanning component of one Pst system, PstA1, was essential both for M. tuberculosis virulence and for regulation of gene expression in response to external phosphate availability. To determine if the alternative Pst system is similarly required for virulence or gene regulation, we constructed a deletion of pstA2. Transcriptome analysis revealed that PstA2 is not required for regulation of gene expression in phosphate-replete growth conditions. PstA2 was also dispensable for replication and virulence of M. tuberculosis in a mouse aerosol infection model. However, a ΔpstA1ΔpstA2 double mutant was attenuated in mice lacking the cytokine interferon-gamma, suggesting that M. tuberculosis requires high-affinity phosphate transport to survive phosphate limitation encountered in the host. Surprisingly, ΔpstA2 bacteria were more resistant to acid stress in vitro. This phenotype is intrinsic to the alternative Pst transporter since a ΔpstS1 mutant exhibited similar acid resistance. Our data indicate that the two M. tuberculosis Pst transporters have distinct physiological functions, with the PstA1 transporter being specifically involved in phosphate sensing and gene regulation while the PstA2 transporter influences survival in acidic conditions. PMID:27557082

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Phosphate Uptake System Component PstA2 Is Not Required for Gene Regulation or Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Leistikow, Rachel L.; Ramakrishnan, Pavithra; Voskuil, Martin I.; McKinney, John D.

    2016-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes two complete high-affinity Pst phosphate-specific transporters. We previously demonstrated that a membrane-spanning component of one Pst system, PstA1, was essential both for M. tuberculosis virulence and for regulation of gene expression in response to external phosphate availability. To determine if the alternative Pst system is similarly required for virulence or gene regulation, we constructed a deletion of pstA2. Transcriptome analysis revealed that PstA2 is not required for regulation of gene expression in phosphate-replete growth conditions. PstA2 was also dispensable for replication and virulence of M. tuberculosis in a mouse aerosol infection model. However, a ΔpstA1ΔpstA2 double mutant was attenuated in mice lacking the cytokine interferon-gamma, suggesting that M. tuberculosis requires high-affinity phosphate transport to survive phosphate limitation encountered in the host. Surprisingly, ΔpstA2 bacteria were more resistant to acid stress in vitro. This phenotype is intrinsic to the alternative Pst transporter since a ΔpstS1 mutant exhibited similar acid resistance. Our data indicate that the two M. tuberculosis Pst transporters have distinct physiological functions, with the PstA1 transporter being specifically involved in phosphate sensing and gene regulation while the PstA2 transporter influences survival in acidic conditions. PMID:27557082

  3. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco: molecular characterization, mRNA expression and transcriptional regulation by insulin in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jia-Lang; Zhuo, Mei-Qin; Luo, Zhi; Pan, Ya-Xiong; Song, Yu-Feng; Huang, Chao; Zhu, Qing-Ling; Hu, Wei; Chen, Qi-Liang

    2015-02-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is ligand-inducible transcription factor and has important roles in lipid metabolism, cell proliferation and inflammation. In the present study, yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco PPARγ cDNA was isolated from liver by RT-PCR and RACE, and its molecular characterization and transcriptional regulation by insulin in vivo and in vitro were determined. The generation of PPARγ1 and PPARγ2 was due to alternative promoter of PPARγ gene. PPARγ1 and PPARγ2 mRNA covered 2426 bp and 2537 bp, respectively, with an open reading frame (ORF) of 1584 bp encoding 527 amino acid residues. Yellow catfish PPARγ gene was organized in a manner similar to that of their mammalian homologs, implying a modular organization of the protein's domains. A comparison between the yellow catfish PPARγ amino acid sequence and the correspondent sequences of several other species revealed the identity of 55-76.2%. Two PPARγ transcripts (PPARγ1 and PPARγ2) mRNAs were expressed in a wide range of tissues, but the abundance of each PPARγ mRNA showed the tissue- and developmental stage-dependent expression patterns. Intraperitoneal injection of insulin in vivo significantly stimulated the mRNA expression of total PPARγ and PPARγ1, but not PPARγ2 in the liver of yellow catfish. In contrast, incubation of hepatocytes with insulin in vitro increased the mRNA levels of PPARγ1, PPARγ2 and total PPARγ. To our knowledge, for the first time, the present study provides evidence that PPARγ1 and PPARγ2 are differentially expressed with and among tissues during different developmental stages and also regulated by insulin both in vivo and in vitro, which serves to increase our understanding on PPARγ physiological function in fish. PMID:25637673

  4. Dual role of G-runs and hnRNP F in the regulation of a mutation-activated pseudoexon in the fibrinogen gamma-chain transcript.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Valeria; Soldà, Giulia; Asselta, Rosanna; Spena, Silvia; Stuani, Cristiana; Buratti, Emanuele; Duga, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Most pathological pseudoexon inclusion events originate from single activating mutations, suggesting that many intronic sequences are on the verge of becoming exons. However, the precise mechanisms controlling pseudoexon definition are still largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the cis-acting elements and trans-acting regulatory factors contributing to the regulation of a previously described fibrinogen gamma-chain (FGG) pseudoexon, which is activated by a deep-intronic mutation (IVS6-320A>T). This pseudoexon contains several G-run elements, which may be bound by heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) F and H. To explore the effect of these proteins on FGG pseudoexon inclusion, both silencing and overexpression experiments were performed in eukaryotic cells. While hnRNP H did not significantly affect pseudoexon splicing, hnRNP F promoted pseudoexon inclusion, indicating that these two proteins have only partially redundant functions. To verify the binding of hnRNP F and the possible involvement of other trans-acting splicing modulators, pulldown experiments were performed on the region of the pseudoexon characterized by both a G-run and enrichment for exonic splicing enhancers. This 25-bp-long region strongly binds hnRNP F/H and weakly interacts with Serine/Arginine-rich protein 40, which however was demonstrated to be dispensable for FGG pseudoexon inclusion in overexpression experiments. Deletion analysis, besides confirming the splicing-promoting role of the G-run within this 25-bp region, demonstrated that two additional hnRNP F binding sites might instead function as silencer elements. Taken together, our results indicate a major role of hnRNP F in regulating FGG pseudoexon inclusion, and strengthen the notion that G-runs may function either as splicing enhancers or silencers of the same exon.

  5. Regulation of Myogenesis by Fibroblast Growth Factors Requires Beta-Gamma Subunits of Pertussis Toxin-Sensitive G Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fedorov, Yuri V.; Jones, Nathan C.; Olwin, Bradley B.

    1998-01-01

    Terminal differentiation of skeletal muscle cells in culture is inhibited by a number of different growth factors whose subsequent intracellular signaling events are poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the role of heterotrimeric G proteins in mediating fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-dependent signals that regulate myogenic differentiation. Pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates and inactivates susceptible G proteins, promotes terminal differentiation in the presence of FGF-2, suggesting that Gα or Gβγ subunits or both are involved in transducing the FGF-dependent signal(s) that inhibits myogenesis. We found that Gβγ subunits are likely to be involved since the expression of the C terminus of β-adrenergic receptor kinase 1, a Gβγ subunit-sequestering agent, promotes differentiation in the presence of FGF-2, and expression of the free Gβγ dimer can replace FGF-2, rescuing cells from pertussis toxin-induced differentiation. Addition of pertussis toxin also blocked FGF-2-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Ectopic expression of dominant active mutants in the Ras/MAPK pathway rescued cells from pertussis toxin-induced terminal differentiation, suggesting that the Gβγ subunits act upstream of the Ras/MAPK pathway. It is unlikely that the pertussis toxin-sensitive pathway is activated by other, as yet unidentified FGF receptors since PDGF (platelet-derived growth factor)-stimulated MM14 cells expressing a chimeric receptor containing the FGF receptor-1 intracellular domain and the PDGF receptor extracellular domain were sensitive to pertussis toxin. Our data suggest that FGF-mediated signals involved in repression of myogenic differentiation are transduced by a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein-coupled mechanism. This signaling pathway requires the action of Gβγ subunits and activation of MAPKs to repress skeletal muscle differentiation. PMID:9742095

  6. Iron acquisition and regulation systems in Streptococcus species.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ruiguang; Sun, Xuesong

    2014-05-01

    Gram-positive Streptococcus species are responsible for millions of cases of meningitis, bacterial pneumonia, endocarditis, erysipelas and necrotizing fasciitis. Iron is essential for the growth and survival of Streptococcus in the host environment. Streptococcus species have developed various mechanisms to uptake iron from an environment with limited available iron. Streptococcus can directly extract iron from host iron-containing proteins such as ferritin, transferrin, lactoferrin and hemoproteins, or indirectly by relying on the employment of specialized secreted hemophores (heme chelators) and small siderophore molecules (high affinity ferric chelators). This review presents the most recent discoveries in the iron acquisition system of Streptococcus species - the transporters as well as the regulators.

  7. Output feedback regulator design for jet engine control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A multivariable control design procedure based on the output feedback regulator formulation is described and applied to turbofan engine model. Full order model dynamics, were incorporated in the example design. The effect of actuator dynamics on closed loop performance was investigaged. Also, the importance of turbine inlet temperature as an element of the dynamic feedback was studied. Step responses were given to indicate the improvement in system performance with this control. Calculation times for all experiments are given in CPU seconds for comparison purposes.

  8. Gamma-ray spectrometry data collection and reduction by simple computing systems.

    PubMed

    Op de Beeck, J

    1975-12-01

    The review summarizes the present state of the involvement of relatively small computing devices in the collection and processing of gamma-ray spectrum data. An economic and utilitarian point of view has been chosen with regard to data collection in order to arrive at practically valuable conclusions in terms of feasibility of possible configurations with respect to their eventual application. A unified point of view has been adopted with regard to data processing by developing an information theoretical approach on a more or less intuitive level in an attempt to remove the largest part of the virtual disparity between the several processing methods described in the literature. A synoptical introduction to the most important mathematical methods has been incorporated, together with a detailed theoretical description of the concept gamma-ray spectrum. In accordance with modern requirements, the discussions are mainly oriented towards high-resolution semiconductor detector-type spectra. The critical evaluation of the processing methods reviewed is done with respect to a set of predefined criteria. Smoothing, peak detection, peak intensity determination, overlapping peak resolving and detection and upper limits are discussed in great detail. A preferred spectrum analysis method combining powerful data reduction properties with extreme simplicity and speed of operation is suggested. The general discussion is heavily oriented towards activation analysis application, but other disciplines making use of gamma-ray spectrometry will find the material presented equally useful. Final conclusions are given pointing to future developments and shifting their centre of gravity towards improving the quality of the measurements rather than expanding the use of tedious and sophisticated mathematical techniques requiring the limits of available computational power.

  9. Self-Regulating Water-Separator System for Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Arturo; McCurdy, Kerri; Bradley, Karla F.

    2007-01-01

    proposed system would perform multiple coordinated functions in regulating the pressure of the oxidant gas (usually, pure oxygen) flowing to a fuelcell stack and in removing excess product water that is generated in the normal fuel-cell operation. The system could function in the presence or absence of gravitation, and in any orientation in a gravitational field. Unlike some prior systems for removing product water, the proposed system would not depend on hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity of surfaces that are subject to fouling and, consequently, to gradual deterioration in performance. Also unlike some prior systems, the proposed system would not include actively controlled electric motors for pumping; instead, motive power for separation and pumping away of product water would be derived primarily from the oxidant flow and perhaps secondarily from the fuel flow. The net effect of these and other features would be to make the proposed system more reliable and safer, relative to the prior systems. The proposed system (see figure) would include a pressure regulator and sensor in the oxidant supply just upstream from an ejector reactant pump. The pressure of the oxidant supply would depend on the consumption flow. In one of two control subsystems, the pressure of oxidant flowing from the supply to the ejector would be sensed and used to control the speed of a set of a reciprocating constant-displacement pump so that the volumetric flow of nominally incompressible water away from the system would slightly exceed the rate at which water was produced by the fuel cell(s). The two-phase (gas/liquid water) outlet stream from the fuel cell(s) would enter the water separator, a turbinelike centrifugal separator machine driven primarily by the oxidant gas stream. A second control subsystem would utilize feedback derived from the compressibility of the outlet stream: As the separator was emptied of liquid water, the compressibility of the pumped stream would increase. The

  10. Genetics and environmental regulation of Shigella iron transport systems.

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, Elizabeth E; Boulette, Megan L; Payne, Shelley M

    2009-02-01

    Shigella spp. have transport systems for both ferric and ferrous iron. The iron can be taken up as free iron or complexed to a variety of carriers. All Shigella species have both the Feo and Sit systems for acquisition of ferrous iron, and all have at least one siderophore-mediated system for transport of ferric iron. Several of the transport systems, including Sit, Iuc/IutA (aerobactin synthesis and transport), Fec (ferric di-citrate uptake), and Shu (heme transport) are encoded within pathogenicity islands. The presence and the genomic locations of these islands vary considerably among the Shigella species, and even between isolates of the same species. The expression of the iron transport systems is influenced by the concentration of iron and by environmental conditions including the level of oxygen. ArcA and FNR regulate iron transport gene expression as a function of oxygen tension, with the sit and iuc promoters being highly expressed in aerobic conditions, while the feo ferrous iron transporter promoter is most active under anaerobic conditions. The effects of oxygen are also seen in infection of cultured cells by Shigella flexneri; the Sit and Iuc systems support plaque formation under aerobic conditions, whereas Feo allows plaque formation anaerobically.

  11. Gamma-Ray Signatures for State-Of-Health Analysis and Monitoring of Widely-Arrayed Radiation Portal Monitor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Woodring, Mitchell L.; Ely, James H.; Angel, Linda K.; Wright, Ingrid H.; Eslinger, Melany A.; Pospical, A. Jill; Ellis, John E.

    2008-05-15

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has deployed a large array of radiation portal monitors for the Department of Homeland Security U.S. Customs and Border Protection. These portal monitors scan incoming vehicles crossing the U.S. border and shipping containers leaving international ports for radioactive material via gamma-ray and neutron detection. Data produced and captured by these systems are recorded for every vehicle related to radiation signature, sensor/system status, and local background, as well as a host of other variables. Within the Radiation Portal Monitor Project at PNNL, state-of-health observation and analysis for the whole RPM system using these data to determine functionality and performance is being developed. (PIET-43741-TM-492)

  12. Mathematical Investigation of Gamma Ray and Neutron Absorption Grid Patterns for Homeland Defense Related Fourier Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boccio, Dona

    2003-01-01

    Terrorist suitcase nuclear devices typically using converted Soviet tactical nuclear warheads contain several kilograms of plutonium. This quantity of plutonium emits a significant number of gamma rays and neutrons as it undergoes radioactive decay. These gamma rays and neutrons normally penetrate ordinary matter to a significant distance. Unfortunately this penetrating quality of the radiation makes imaging with classical optics impractical. However, this radiation signature emitted by the nuclear source may be sufficient to be imaged from low-flying aerial platforms carrying Fourier imaging systems. The Fourier imaging system uses a pair of co-aligned absorption grids to measure a selected range of spatial frequencies from an object. These grids typically measure the spatial frequency in only one direction at a time. A grid pair that looks in all directions simultaneously would be an improvement over existing technology. A number of grid pairs governed by various parameters were investigated to solve this problem. By examining numerous configurations, it became apparent that an appropriate spiral pattern could be made to work. A set of equations was found to describe a grid pattern that produces straight fringes. Straight fringes represent a Fourier transform of a point source at infinity. An inverse Fourier transform of this fringe pattern would provide an accurate image (location and intensity) of a point source.

  13. Understanding carbon regulation in aquatic systems - Bacteriophages as a model

    PubMed Central

    Sanmukh, Swapnil; Khairnar, Krishna; Paunikar, Waman; Lokhande, Satish

    2015-01-01

    The bacteria and their phages are the most abundant constituents of the aquatic environment, and so represent an ideal model for studying carbon regulation in an aquatic system. The microbe-mediated interconversion of bioavailable organic carbon (OC) into dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by the microbial carbon pump (MCP) has been suggested to have the potential to revolutionize our view of carbon sequestration. It is estimated that DOC is the largest pool of organic matter in the ocean and, though a major component of the global carbon cycle, its source is not yet well understood. A key element of the carbon cycle is the microbial conversion of DOC into inedible forms. The primary aim of this study is to understand the phage conversion from organic to inorganic carbon during phage-host interactions. Time studies of phage-host interactions under controlled conditions reveal their impact on the total carbon content of the samples and their interconversion of organic and inorganic carbon compared to control samples. A total organic carbon (TOC) analysis showed an increase in inorganic carbon content by 15-25 percent in samples with bacteria and phage compared to samples with bacteria alone. Compared to control samples, the increase in inorganic carbon content was 60-70-fold in samples with bacteria and phage, and 50-55-fold for samples with bacteria alone. This study indicates the potential impact of phages in regulating the carbon cycle of aquatic systems. PMID:26213615

  14. IMPACT OF NEUTRON AND GAMMA RADIATION ON THE DESIGN OF DIAGNOSTICS AND OTHER TARGET-BAY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Eder, D C; Song, P M; Latkowski, J F; Reyes, S; O'Brien, D W; Lee, F D; Young, B K; Koch, J A; Watts, P W; Kimbrough, J R; Ng, E W; Landen, O L; MacGowan, B J

    2005-09-01

    The design of a wide range of components in and near the target bay of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) must allow for significant radiation from neutrons and gammas. Detailed 3D Monte Carlo simulations are critical to determine neutron and gamma fluxes for all target-bay components to allow optimization of location and auxiliary shielding. Demonstration of ignition poses unique challenges because of the large range ({approx}3 orders of magnitude) in the yield for any given attempt at ignition. Some diagnostics will provide data independent of yield, while others will provide data for lower yields and only survive high yields with little or no damage. In addition, for a given yield there is a more than 10 orders of magnitude range in neutron and gamma fluxes depending on location in the facility. For example, sensitive components in the diagnostic mezzanines and switchyards require auxiliary shielding for high-yield shots even though they are greater than 17 meters from target chamber center (TCC) and shielded by the 2 m-thick target-bay wall. In contrast, there are components 0.2 to 2 m from TCC with little or no shielding. For these components, particular attention is being made to use low-activation material because of the extremely high neutron loading levels. Many of the components closest to target center are designed to be single use to reduce worker dose from having to refurbish highly activated components. The cryogenic target positioner is an example where activation and ease of component replacement is an important part of the design. We are developing a design process for all target-bay systems that will assure reliable operation for the full range of planned yields.

  15. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and 5 regulate system Xc- and redox balance in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Linher-Melville, Katja; Haftchenary, Sina; Gunning, Patrick; Singh, Gurmit

    2015-07-01

    System Xc- is a cystine/glutamate antiporter that contributes to the maintenance of cellular redox balance. The human xCT (SLC7A11) gene encodes the functional subunit of system Xc-. Transcription factors regulating antioxidant defense mechanisms including system Xc- are of therapeutic interest, especially given that aggressive breast cancer cells exhibit increased system Xc- function. This investigation provides evidence that xCT expression is regulated by STAT3 and/or STAT5A, functionally affecting the antiporter in human breast cancer cells. Computationally analyzing two kilobase pairs of the xCT promoter/5' flanking region identified a distal gamma-activated site (GAS) motif, with truncations significantly increasing luciferase reporter activity. Similar transcriptional increases were obtained after treating cells transiently transfected with the full-length xCT promoter construct with STAT3/5 pharmacological inhibitors. Knock-down of STAT3 or STAT5A with siRNAs produced similar results. However, GAS site mutation significantly reduced xCT transcriptional activity, suggesting that STATs may interact with other transcription factors at more proximal promoter sites. STAT3 and STAT5A were bound to the xCT promoter in MDA-MB-231 cells, and binding was disrupted by pre-treatment with STAT inhibitors. Pharmacologically suppressing STAT3/5 activation significantly increased xCT mRNA and protein levels, as well as cystine uptake, glutamate release, and total levels of intracellular glutathione. Our data suggest that STAT proteins negatively regulate basal xCT expression. Blocking STAT3/5-mediated signaling induces an adaptive, compensatory mechanism to protect breast cancer cells from stress, including reactive oxygen species, by up-regulating xCT expression and the function of system Xc-. We propose that targeting system Xc- together with STAT3/5 inhibitors may heighten therapeutic anti-cancer effects.

  16. SELF-REGULATED SHOCKS IN MASSIVE STAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Parkin, E. R.; Sim, S. A. E-mail: s.sim@qub.ac.uk

    2013-04-20

    In an early-type, massive star binary system, X-ray bright shocks result from the powerful collision of stellar winds driven by radiation pressure on spectral line transitions. We examine the influence of the X-rays from the wind-wind collision shocks on the radiative driving of the stellar winds using steady-state models that include a parameterized line force with X-ray ionization dependence. Our primary result is that X-ray radiation from the shocks inhibits wind acceleration and can lead to a lower pre-shock velocity, and a correspondingly lower shocked plasma temperature, yet the intrinsic X-ray luminosity of the shocks, L{sub X}, remains largely unaltered, with the exception of a modest increase at small binary separations. Due to the feedback loop between the ionizing X-rays from the shocks and the wind driving, we term this scenario as self-regulated shocks. This effect is found to greatly increase the range of binary separations at which a wind-photosphere collision is likely to occur in systems where the momenta of the two winds are significantly different. Furthermore, the excessive levels of X-ray ionization close to the shocks completely suppress the line force, and we suggest that this may render radiative braking less effective. Comparisons of model results against observations reveal reasonable agreement in terms of log (L{sub X}/L{sub bol}). The inclusion of self-regulated shocks improves the match for kT values in roughly equal wind momenta systems, but there is a systematic offset for systems with unequal wind momenta (if considered to be a wind-photosphere collision).

  17. Emerging role of neurotensin in regulation of the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Osadchii, Oleg E

    2015-09-01

    There is increasing evidence in support of an important role played by neurotensin (NT), a tridecapeptide originally found in bovine hypothalamus, in regulation of cardiovascular system. Elevated systemic levels of NT may contribute to pathogenesis of acute circulatory disoders, and predict the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in population-based studies. Within cardiovascular system, NT-containing neural fibers are found in close contact with atrial and ventricular cardiac myocytes, cardiac conduction system, intracardiac ganglia, as well as coronary vessels in humans and various animal species. The density of NT-immunoreactive innervation is reduced in cardiac disease. NT produces a variety of cardiovascular actions including effects on heart rate, myocardial contractility, systemic blood pressure, coronary vascular tone, venous smooth muscle tone, and regional blood flow in gastrointestinal tract, cutaneous and adipose tissue. NT could trigger cardiovascular reflexes by stimulating primary visceral afferents synaptically connected with preganglionic sympathetic neurons at the spinal cord. Structural determinants of biological activity of NT reside primarily in the C-terminal portion of its molecule which is responsible for receptor activation. NT effects are mediated via activation of NT receptors, or produced indirectly via stimulation of release of various endogenous neuromodulators/neurotransmitters such as histamine, catecholamines and prostaglandins. Three subtypes of NT receptor (NTS1, NTS2 and NTS3) have been shown to be expressed in the myocardium. NTS1, a high-affinity NT binding site coupled to phospholipase C-inositoltrisphosphate transduction pathway, is thought to mediate NT-induced cardiovascular responses.

  18. Transcriptional regulation using the Q system in transgenic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A; Halpern, M E

    2016-01-01

    Methods to label cell populations selectively or to modify their gene expression are critical tools in the study of developmental or physiological processes in vivo. A variety of approaches have been applied to the zebrafish model, capitalizing on Tol2 transposition to generate transgenic lines with high efficiency. Here we describe the adoption of the Q system of Neurospora crassa, which includes the QF transcription factor and the upstream activating sequence (QUAS) to which it binds. These components function as a bipartite regulatory system similar to that of yeast Gal4/UAS, producing robust expression in transient assays of zebrafish embryos injected with plasmids and in stable transgenic lines. An important advantage, however, is that QUAS-regulated transgenes appear far less susceptible to transcriptional silencing even after seven generations. This chapter describes some of the Q system reagents that have been developed for zebrafish, as well as the use of the QF transcription factor for isolation of tissue-specific driver lines from gene/enhancer trap screens. Additional strategies successfully implemented in invertebrate models, such as a truncated QF transcription factor (QF2) or the reassembly of a split QF, are also discussed. The provided information, and available Gateway-based vectors, should enable those working with the zebrafish model to implement the Q system with minimal effort or to use it in combination with Gal4, Cre, or other regulatory systems for further refinement of transcriptional control. PMID:27443927

  19. Management of the Spring Snowmelt Recession in Regulated Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarnell, S. M.; Lind, A.; Epke, G.; Viers, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    In unregulated rivers in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California, the spring snowmelt recession links high winter flows to low summer baseflow and is a consistent and predictable portion of the annual hydrograph. Consequently, it is an important resource to both riverine ecosystems and California's water supply. In regulated river systems where the spring snowmelt recession is often captured behind dams or diverted for hydropower, restoration of a more natural spring flow regime can provide distinct ecological benefits, such as breeding and migration cues for native species, increased habitat availability, and greater hydraulic habitat diversity. However, knowledge of how to create and manage an ecologically beneficial spring snowmelt recession in a regulated river system has been lacking. This study defined a methodology by which spring flow regimes can be modeled in regulated systems from the quantifiable characteristics of spring snowmelt recessions in unregulated rivers. Using fundamental flow components such as magnitude, timing, and rate of change, the spring snowmelt recession in eight unregulated rivers across the Sierra Nevada range was quantified to gain a better understanding of the predictability and variability across watersheds. The analysis found that unregulated Sierran systems behaved similarly with respect to seasonal patterns and flow recession shape (i.e., recession limb curvature), and thus flows could be modeled in a manner that mimics those predictable characteristics. Using this methodology that quantifies spring recession flows in terms of a daily percent decrease in flow, a series of flow recession scenarios were then created for application on a regulated Sierran river. Four scenarios, ranging from a slow natural recession to a short fast recession typically observed in regulated rivers following cessation of high flow spills, were evaluated within a 2D hydrodynamic model. The effects of the flows on suitable habitat for Foothill yellow

  20. Distributed Cooperative Regulation for Multiagent Systems and Its Applications to Power Systems: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaping; Yong, Taiyou; Yu, Jie; Mao, Wenbo

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative regulation of multiagent systems has become an active research area in the past decade. This paper reviews some recent progress in distributed coordination control for leader-following multiagent systems and its applications in power system and mainly focuses on the cooperative tracking control in terms of consensus tracking control and containment tracking control. Next, methods on how to rank the network nodes are summarized for undirected/directed network, based on which one can determine which follower should be connected to leaders such that partial followers can perceive leaders' information. Furthermore, we present a survey of the most relevant scientific studies investigating the regulation and optimization problems in power systems based on distributed strategies. Finally, some potential applications in the frequency tracking regulation of smart grids are discussed at the end of the paper. PMID:25243199

  1. On Some Properties of Gamma Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumais, Jean-Francois

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the problem of the order, reducibility, and equivalence of systems of Dirac gamma matrices. Gives a simple systematic method for finding the matrices connecting different systems of 4 x 4 gamma matrices. (MLH)

  2. Data Processing for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR), X-ray and Gamma-ray Spectrometer (XGRS) Ground System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, Timothy P.; Mikheeva, I.; Trombka, J. I.; Floyd, S. R.; Boynton, W. V.; Bailey, H.; Bhangoo, J.; Starr, R.; Clark, P. E.; Evans, L. G.

    1999-01-01

    An X-ray and Gamma-ray spectrometer (XGRS) is onboard the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft to determine the elemental composition of the surface of the asteroid 433Eros. The Eros asteroid is highly non-spherical in physical shape and the development of data management and analysis methodologies are in several areas a divergence from traditional remotely sensed geographical information systems techniques. Field of view and asteroid surface geometry must be derived virtually and then combined with real measurements of solar, spectral and instrument calibration information to derive meaningful scientific results. Spatial resolution of planned geochemical maps will be improved from the initial conditions of low statistical significance per integration by repeated surface flyovers and regional spectral accumulation. This paper describes the results of a collaborative effort of design and development of the NEAR XGRS instrument ground system undertaken by participants at the Goddard Space Flight Center, University of Arizona, Cornell University, Applied Physics Laboratory, and Max Plank institute.

  3. Data Processing for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR), X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) Ground System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, Timothy P.; Mikheeva, I.; Trombka, J. I.; Floyd, S. R.; Boynton, W. V.; Bailey, H.; Bhangoo, J.; Starr, R.; Clark, P. E.; Evans, L. G.

    1999-01-01

    An X-ray and Gamma-ray spectrometer (XGRS) is onboard the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft to determine the elemental composition of the surface of the asteroid 433Eros. The Eros asteroid is highly non-spherical in physical shape and the development of data management and analysis methodologies are in several areas a divergence from traditional remotely sensed geographical information systems techniques. Field of view and asteroid surface geometry must be derived virtually and then combined with real measurements of solar, spectral and instrument calibration information to derive meaningful scientific results. Spatial resolution of planned geochemical maps will be improved from the initial conditions of low statistical significance per integration by repeated surface flyovers and regional spectral accumulation. This paper describes the results of a collaborative effort of design and development of the NEAR XGRS instrument ground system undertaken by participants at the Goddard Space Flight Center, University of Arizona, Cornell University, Applied Physics Laboratory, and Max Plank institute.

  4. The spectra program library: A PC based system for gamma-ray spectra analysis and INAA data reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedecker, P.A.; Grossman, J.N.

    1995-01-01

    A PC based system has been developed for the analysis of gamma-ray spectra and for the complete reduction of data from INAA experiments, including software to average the results from mulitple lines and multiple countings and to produce a final report of analysis. Graphics algorithms may be called for the analysis of complex spectral features, to compare the data from alternate photopeaks and to evaluate detector performance during a given counting cycle. A database of results for control samples can be used to prepare quality control charts to evaluate long term precision and to search for systemic variations in data on reference samples as a function of time. The entire software library can be accessed through a user-friendly menu interface with internal help.

  5. An acetoin-regulated expression system of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Silbersack, Jörg; Jürgen, Britta; Hecker, Michael; Schneidinger, Bernd; Schmuck, Rainer; Schweder, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    An expression system, which is based on the promoter of the acoABCL operon of Bacillus subtilis was developed and characterized. The acoABCL operon codes for the acetoin dehydrogenase complex, which is the major enzyme system responsible for the catabolism of acetoin in B. subtilis. Besides weak organic acids, the neutral overflow metabolite acetoin is metabolized by the cells in the early stationary phase. Transcription of reporter gene fusions with the acoA promoter of this operon is strongly repressed by glucose but induced by acetoin as soon as the preferred carbon source glucose is exhausted. The co-expression of an additional copy of the regulator gene acoR led to more than twofold higher activity of the acoA promoter. It is demonstrated that the induction of this promoter in growing cells with acetoin is possible with non-phosphotransferase system sugars as carbon and energy source and in a ccpA mutant background. Moreover, it could be shown that the activity of the acoA-directed expression system correlates with the level of acetoin in the medium. During glucose limitation, the utilization of the alternative energy source acetoin keeps the protein synthesis machinery of B. subtilis cells active and thus allows for a long lasting acoA-controlled expression of recombinant genes.

  6. SU-E-T-594: Out-Of-Field Neutron and Gamma Dose Estimated Using TLD-600/700 Pairs in the Wobbling Proton Therapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Lin, Y; Tsai, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Secondary fast neutrons and gamma rays are mainly produced due to the interaction of the primary proton beam with the beam delivery nozzle. These secondary radiation dose to patients and radiation workers are unwanted. The purpose of this study is to estimate the neutron and gamma dose equivalent out of the treatment volume during the wobbling proton therapy system. Methods: Two types of thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters, TLD-600 ({sup 6}LiF: Mg, Ti) and TLD-700 ({sup 7}LiF: Mg, Ti) were used in this study. They were calibrated in the standard neutron and gamma sources at National Standards Laboratory. Annealing procedure is 400°C for 1 hour, 100°C for 2 hours and spontaneously cooling down to the room temperature in a programmable oven. Two-peak method (a kind of glow curve analysis technique) was used to evaluate the TL response corresponding to the neutron and gamma dose. The TLD pairs were placed outside the treatment field at the neutron-gamma mixed field with 190-MeV proton beam produced by the wobbling system through the polyethylene plate phantom. The results of TLD measurement were compared to the Monte Carlo simulation. Results: The initial experiment results of calculated dose equivalents are 0.63, 0.38, 0.21 and 0.13 mSv per Gy outside the field at the distance of 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm. Conclusion: The TLD-600 and TLD-700 pairs are convenient to estimate neutron and gamma dosimetry during proton therapy. However, an accurate and suitable glow curve analysis technique is necessary. During the wobbling system proton therapy, our results showed that the neutron and gamma doses outside the treatment field are noticeable. This study was supported by the grants from the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CMRPD1C0682)

  7. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma regulates expression of the anti-lipolytic G-protein-coupled receptor 81 (GPR81/Gpr81).

    PubMed

    Jeninga, Ellen H; Bugge, Anne; Nielsen, Ronni; Kersten, Sander; Hamers, Nicole; Dani, Christian; Wabitsch, Martin; Berger, Ruud; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Mandrup, Susanne; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2009-09-25

    The ligand-inducible nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) plays a key role in the differentiation, maintenance, and function of adipocytes and is the molecular target for the insulin-sensitizing thiazoledinediones (TZDs). Although a number of PPARgamma target genes that may contribute to the reduction of circulating free fatty acids after TZD treatment have been identified, the relevant PPARgamma target genes that may exert the anti-lipolytic effect of TZDs are unknown. Here we identified the anti-lipolytic human G-protein-coupled receptor 81 (GPR81), GPR109A, and the (human-specific) GPR109B genes as well as the mouse Gpr81 and Gpr109A genes as novel TZD-induced genes in mature adipocytes. GPR81/Gpr81 is a direct PPARgamma target gene, because mRNA expression of GPR81/Gpr81 (and GPR109A/Gpr109A) increased in mature human and murine adipocytes as well as in vivo in epididymal fat pads of mice upon rosiglitazone stimulation, whereas small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of PPARgamma in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes showed a significant decrease in Gpr81 protein expression. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analysis in differentiated 3T3-L1 cells revealed a conserved PPAR:retinoid X receptor-binding site in the proximal promoter of the Gpr81 gene, which was proven to be functional by electromobility shift assay and reporter assays. Importantly, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Gpr81 partly reversed the inhibitory effect of TZDs on lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The coordinated PPARgamma-mediated regulation of the GPR81/Gpr81 and GPR109A/Gpr109A genes (and GPR109B in humans) presents a novel mechanism by which TZDs may reduce circulating free fatty acid levels and perhaps ameliorate insulin resistance in obese patients.

  8. Application of the Double-Tangent Construction of Coexisting Phases to Any Type of Phase Equilibrium for Binary Systems Modeled with the Gamma-Phi Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaubert, Jean-Noël; Privat, Romain

    2014-01-01

    The double-tangent construction of coexisting phases is an elegant approach to visualize all the multiphase binary systems that satisfy the equality of chemical potentials and to select the stable state. In this paper, we show how to perform the double-tangent construction of coexisting phases for binary systems modeled with the gamma-phi…

  9. Development of the imaging system of the balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope Máscara Codificada (MASCO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Joa~O.; D'Amico, Flavio; Villela, Thyrso; Mejía, Jorge; Fonseca, Raphael A.; Rinke, Elisete

    2002-10-01

    We report laboratory imaging results of a balloon-borne gamma-ray imaging telescope, Máscara Codificada (Portuguese for ``coded mask,'') designed to obtain high angular resolution (~14 arcmin) images of the sky in the 50 keV-1.8 MeV energy range. The instrument incorporates a coded mask with an aperture pattern based on a 19×19-element modified uniformly redundant array (MURA). This pattern belongs to a subclass of MURAs that are almost completely antisymmetrical for 90° rotations with respect to the lower-right corner of the central element, which allows the implementation of an antimask by a single rotation of the whole mask by 90°. The symmetry properties of the MURAs are discussed. The algorithm for determining the position of the gamma-ray interactions on the instrument's main detector is described and the results of laboratory tests of the imaging system are presented. The mask-antimask subtraction, applied after a flat-fielding procedure, produced a 60% increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of a strong (~100σ) point source (662 keV photons coming from a 137Cs radioactive source) image by eliminating systematic distortions in the instrumental background measured over the detector plane.

  10. Characterization Studies of Radioactive Waste Drums Using High Resolution Gamma Spectrometric Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Toma, M.; Cristache, C.; Done, L.; Dragolici, F.; Sima, O.

    2010-01-21

    The problem of radioactive waste has become a critical issue in the country and worldwide. The radioactive waste containers, containing different radioactive materials, have to be characterized before their final disposal. Destructive methods, although being the most precise, are also the most expensive and not the easiest ones from the radioprotection point of view. In this situation, high resolution gamma spectrometry proved to be a reliable method for the non destructive assay method. However, the non-homogenous composition of the radioactive waste inside the drum makes the quantitative characterization of the radioactive waste drum a difficult task. Experimental studies and computed results, combined with Monte Carlo simulations using GESPECOR, are presented in this paper as a possibility to achieve this task.

  11. GAMMA IRRADIATION TESTING OF MONTAN WAX FOR USE IN WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    SOO,P.; HEISER,J.; HART,A.

    1996-09-08

    A field demonstration was funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to quantify the potential use of montan wax as a subsurface barrier material for nuclear waste management applications. As part of that demonstration, a study was completed to address some of the characteristics of the wax. Of particular interest is its resistance to chemical and structural changes that would influence its integrity as a barrier to minimize the migration of contaminants from their storage or disposal locations. Properties that were evaluated included hardness, melting point, molecular weight, and biodegradation as a function of gamma radiation dose. Based on the data obtained to date the wax is extremely resistant to radiation-induced change. Coupled with low permeability, the material shows promise as a subsurface barrier material.

  12. Performance evaluation of a small CZT pixelated semiconductor gamma camera system with a newly designed stack-up parallel-hole collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngjin; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-09-01

    Gamma ray imaging techniques that use a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) or cadmium telluride (CdTe) pixelated semiconductor detectors have rapidly gained popularity as a key tool for nuclear medicine research. By using a pinhole collimator with a pixelated semiconductor gamma camera system, better spatial resolution can be achieved. However, this improvement in spatial resolution is accomplished with a decrease in the sensitivity due to the small collimator hole diameter. Furthermore, few studies have been conducted for novel parallel-hole collimator geometric designs with pixelated semiconductor gamma camera systems. A gamma camera system which combines a CZT pixelated semiconductor detector with a newly designed stack-up parallel-hole collimator was developed and evaluated. The eValuator-2500 CZT pixelated semiconductor detector (eV product, Saxonburg, PA) was selected for the gamma camera system. This detector consisted of a row of four CZT crystals of 12.8 mm in length with 3 mm in thickness. The proposed parallel-hole collimator consists of two layers. The upper layer results in a fourfold increase in hole size compared to a matched square hole parallel-hole collimator with an equal hole and pixel size, while the lower layer also consisted of fourfold holes size and pretty acts as a matched square hole parallel-hole collimator. The overlap ratios of these collimators were 1:1, 1:2, 2:1, 1:5, and 5:1. These collimators were mounted on the eValuator-2500 CZT pixelated semiconductor detector. The basic performance of the imaging system was measured for a 57Co gamma source (122 keV). The measured averages of sensitivity and spatial resolution varied depending on the overlap ratios of the proposed parallel-hole collimator and source-to-collimator distances. One advantage of our system is the use of stacked collimators that can select the best combination of system sensitivity and spatial resolution. With low counts, we can select a high sensitivity collimator with a 1

  13. Mobile gamma-ray scanning system for detecting radiation anomalies associated with /sup 226/Ra-bearing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Myrick, T.E.; Blair, M.S.; Doane, R.W.; Goldsmith, W.A.

    1982-11-01

    A mobile gamma-ray scanning system has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in the Department of Energy's remedial action survey programs. The unit consists of a NaI(T1) detection system housed in a specially-equipped van. The system is operator controlled through an on-board mini-computer, with data output provided on the computer video screen, strip chart recorders, and an on-line printer. Data storage is provided by a floppy disk system. Multichannel analysis capabilities are included for qualitative radionuclide identification. A /sup 226/Ra-specific algorithm is employed to identify locations containing residual radium-bearing materials. This report presents the details of the system description, software development, and scanning methods utilized with the ORNL system. Laboratory calibration and field testing have established the system sensitivity, field of view, and other performance characteristics, the results of which are also presented. Documentation of the instrumentation and computer programs are included.

  14. The ubiquitin-proteasome system regulates plant hormone signaling

    PubMed Central

    Santner, Aaron; Estelle, Mark

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Plants utilize the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) to modulate nearly every aspect of growth and development. Ubiquitin is covalently attached to target proteins through the action of three enzymes known as E1, E2, and E3. The ultimate outcome of this post-translational modification depends on the nature of the ubiquitin linkage and the extent of polyubiquitination. In most cases, ubiquitination results in degradation of the target protein in the 26S proteasome. During the last 10 years it has become clear that the UPS plays a prominent regulatory role in hormone biology. E3 ubiquitin ligases in particular actively participate in hormone perception, de-repression of hormone signaling pathways, degradation of hormone specific transcription factors, and regulation of hormone biosynthesis. It is certain that additional functions will be discovered as more of the nearly 1200 potential E3s in plants are elucidated. PMID:20409276

  15. The Zinc Transport Systems and Their Regulation in Pathogenic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Jung, Won Hee

    2015-09-01

    Zinc is an essential micronutrient required for many enzymes that play essential roles in a cell. It was estimated that approximately 3% of the total cellular proteins are required for zinc for their functions. Zinc has long been considered as one of the key players in host-pathogen interactions. The host sequesters intracellular zinc by utilizing multiple cellular zinc importers and exporters as a means of nutritional immunity. To overcome extreme zinc limitation within the host environment, pathogenic microbes have successfully evolved a number of mechanisms to secure sufficient concentrations of zinc for their survival and pathogenesis. In this review, we briefly discuss the zinc uptake systems and their regulation in the model fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in major human pathogenic fungi such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans, and Cryptococcus gattii.

  16. Regulation of stem cells in the zebra fish hematopoietic system.

    PubMed

    Huang, H-T; Zon, L I

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been used extensively as a model for stem cell biology. Stem cells share the ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple cell types, making them ideal candidates for tissue regeneration or replacement therapies. Current applications of stem cell technology are limited by our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that control their proliferation and differentiation, and various model organisms have been used to fill these gaps. This chapter focuses on the contributions of the zebra fish model to our understanding of stem cell regulation within the hematopoietic system. Studies in zebra fish have been valuable for identifying new genetic and signaling factors that affect HSC formation and development with important implications for humans, and new advances in the zebra fish toolbox will allow other aspects of HSC behavior to be investigated as well, including migration, homing, and engraftment.

  17. Systemic inflammation regulates microglial responses to tissue damage in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gyoneva, Stefka; Davalos, Dimitrios; Biswas, Dipankar; Swanger, Sharon A.; Garnier-Amblard, Ethel; Loth, Francis; Akassoglou, Katerina; Traynelis, Stephen F.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia, the resident immune cells of the central nervous system, exist in either a “resting” state associated with physiological tissue surveillance or an “activated” state in neuroinflammation. We recently showed that ATP is the primary chemoattractor to tissue damage in vivo and elicits opposite effects on the motility of activated microglia in vitro through activation of adenosine A2A receptors. However, whether systemic inflammation affects microglial responses to tissue damage in vivo remains largely unknown. Using in vivo two-photon imaging of mice, we show that injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at levels that can produce both clear neuroinflammation and some features of sepsis significantly reduced the rate of microglial response to laser-induced ablation injury in vivo. Under pro-inflammatory conditions, microglial processes initially retracted from the ablation site, but subsequently moved toward and engulfed the damaged area. Analyzing the process dynamics in 3D cultures of primary microglia indicated that only A2A, but not A1 or A3 receptors, mediate process retraction in LPS-activated microglia. The A2A receptor antagonists caffeine and preladenant reduced adenosine-mediated process retraction in activated microglia in vitro. Finally, administration of preladenant before induction of laser ablation in vivo accelerated the microglial response to injury following systemic inflammation. The regulation of rapid microglial responses to sites of injury by A2A receptors could have implications for their ability to respond to the neuronal death occurring under conditions of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24807189

  18. Stabilization and set-point regulation of underactuated mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loccufier, Mia

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical systems are referred to as underactuated if the number of independent actuators are fewer than the number of degrees of freedom, a general encountered problem in engineering applications. The considered mechanical systems belong to the class of Euler- Lagrange systems where both kinetic energy and potential energy are modeled in their most general form and energy dissipation is modeled according to the dissipation function of Rayleigh, i.e. viscous damping forces are assumed. The control objectives are stabilization and set-point regulation. The structure of the controller is a parallel combination of static output feedback with dynamic output feedback where nonlinear amplifiers are included. An energy based approach with Liapunov functions and the Kalman-Yacubovich-Popov main lemma yields alternative stability theorems. A number of conditions are introduced with respect to the controller's structure in order to guarantee stability. However, sufficient design freedom is left to choose a proper tuning principle and obtain the specified control objectives such as fast convergence to a set-point combined with disturbance rejection. A restriction on the control input energy can be incorporated as well. The applicability of the method will be illustrated with planar manipulators. The main contribution is that a methodology is developed which incorporates many controllers and tuning facilities.

  19. CRISPR-Cas systems for editing, regulating and targeting genomes.

    PubMed

    Sander, Jeffry D; Joung, J Keith

    2014-04-01

    Targeted genome editing using engineered nucleases has rapidly gone from being a niche technology to a mainstream method used by many biological researchers. This widespread adoption has been largely fueled by the emergence of the clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) technology, an important new approach for generating RNA-guided nucleases, such as Cas9, with customizable specificities. Genome editing mediated by these nucleases has been used to rapidly, easily and efficiently modify endogenous genes in a wide variety of biomedically important cell types and in organisms that have traditionally been challenging to manipulate genetically. Furthermore, a modified version of the CRISPR-Cas9 system has been developed to recruit heterologous domains that can regulate endogenous gene expression or label specific genomic loci in living cells. Although the genome-wide specificities of CRISPR-Cas9 systems remain to be fully defined, the power of these systems to perform targeted, highly efficient alterations of genome sequence and gene expression will undoubtedly transform biological research and spur the development of novel molecular therapeutics for human disease.

  20. Dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Shuang; Swanson, Nathan; Chen, Zhe; Ma, Lijun

    2009-03-01

    Gamma knife has been the treatment of choice for various brain tumors and functional disorders. Current gamma knife radiosurgery is planned in a 'ball-packing' approach and delivered in a 'step-and-shoot' manner, i.e. it aims to 'pack' the different sized spherical high-dose volumes (called 'shots') into a tumor volume. We have developed a dynamic scheme for gamma knife radiosurgery based on the concept of 'dose-painting' to take advantage of the new robotic patient positioning system on the latest Gamma Knife C™ and Perfexion™ units. In our scheme, the spherical high dose volume created by the gamma knife unit will be viewed as a 3D spherical 'paintbrush', and treatment planning reduces to finding the best route of this 'paintbrush' to 'paint' a 3D tumor volume. Under our dose-painting concept, gamma knife radiosurgery becomes dynamic, where the patient moves continuously under the robotic positioning system. We have implemented a fully automatic dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery treatment planning system, where the inverse planning problem is solved as a traveling salesman problem combined with constrained least-square optimizations. We have also carried out experimental studies of dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery and showed the following. (1) Dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery is ideally suited for fully automatic inverse planning, where high quality radiosurgery plans can be obtained in minutes of computation. (2) Dynamic radiosurgery plans are more conformal than step-and-shoot plans and can maintain a steep dose gradient (around 13% per mm) between the target tumor volume and the surrounding critical structures. (3) It is possible to prescribe multiple isodose lines with dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery, so that the treatment can cover the periphery of the target volume while escalating the dose for high tumor burden regions. (4) With dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery, one can obtain a family of plans representing a tradeoff between the delivery time and the

  1. Method and system for the combination of non-thermal plasma and metal/metal oxide doped .gamma.-alumina catalysts for diesel engine exhaust aftertreatment system

    DOEpatents

    Aardahl, Christopher L.; Balmer-Miller, Mari Lou; Chanda, Ashok; Habeger, Craig F.; Koshkarian, Kent A.; Park, Paul W.

    2006-07-25

    The present disclosure pertains to a system and method for treatment of oxygen rich exhaust and more specifically to a method and system that combines non-thermal plasma with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina catalyst. Current catalyst systems for the treatment of oxygen rich exhaust are capable of achieving only approximately 7 to 12% NO.sub.x reduction as a passive system and only 25 40% reduction when a supplemental hydrocarbon reductant is injected into the exhaust stream. It has been found that treatment of an oxygen rich exhaust initially with a non-thermal plasma and followed by subsequent treatment with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina prepared by the sol gel method is capable of increasing the NO.sub.x reduction to a level of approximately 90% in the absence of SO.sub.2 and 80% in the presence of 20 ppm of SO.sub.2. Especially useful metals have been found to be indium, gallium, and tin.

  2. Homeostatic Regulation of Memory Systems and Adaptive Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Mizumori, Sheri JY; Jo, Yong Sang

    2013-01-01

    While it is clear that many brain areas process mnemonic information, understanding how their interactions result in continuously adaptive behaviors has been a challenge. A homeostatic-regulated prediction model of memory is presented that considers the existence of a single memory system that is based on a multilevel coordinated and integrated network (from cells to neural systems) that determines the extent to which events and outcomes occur as predicted. The “multiple memory systems of the brain” have in common output that signals errors in the prediction of events and/or their outcomes, although these signals differ in terms of what the error signal represents (e.g., hippocampus: context prediction errors vs. midbrain/striatum: reward prediction errors). The prefrontal cortex likely plays a pivotal role in the coordination of prediction analysis within and across prediction brain areas. By virtue of its widespread control and influence, and intrinsic working memory mechanisms. Thus, the prefrontal cortex supports the flexible processing needed to generate adaptive behaviors and predict future outcomes. It is proposed that prefrontal cortex continually and automatically produces adaptive responses according to homeostatic regulatory principles: prefrontal cortex may serve as a controller that is intrinsically driven to maintain in prediction areas an experience-dependent firing rate set point that ensures adaptive temporally and spatially resolved neural responses to future prediction errors. This same drive by prefrontal cortex may also restore set point firing rates after deviations (i.e. prediction errors) are detected. In this way, prefrontal cortex contributes to reducing uncertainty in prediction systems. An emergent outcome of this homeostatic view may be the flexible and adaptive control that prefrontal cortex is known to implement (i.e. working memory) in the most challenging of situations. Compromise to any of the prediction circuits should result

  3. 1992 Yearly calibration of Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s gross gamma-ray borehole geophysical logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, R J

    1992-07-01

    This report describes the 1992 yearly calibration of a gross gamma-ray geophysical pulse logging system owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The calibration was conducted to permit the continued use of this system for geologic and hydrologic studies associated with remedial investigation at the Hanford Site. The calibration is limited to the probe identified as CG27A-97. Primary calibrations to equivalent-uranium units were conducted in DOE borehole model standards that reside on the Hanford Site. The calibrations were performed in borehole models SBL/SBH and SBA/SBB, which contain low equivalent-uranium concentrations. A previous correlation for relating observed count rate in before- and after-logging field calibrations to equivalent-uranium concentrations was confirmed for field source Ra-20S-82. A computer-based digital collection/recording system was used simultaneously on many of the procedures with the original analog system so that the performance of the two collection systems could be correlated and compared at some future date.

  4. Effects of traditionally used anxiolytic botanicals on enzymes of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system.

    PubMed

    Awad, R; Levac, D; Cybulska, P; Merali, Z; Trudeau, V L; Arnason, J T

    2007-09-01

    In Canada, the use of botanical natural health products (NHPs) for anxiety disorders is on the rise, and a critical evaluation of their safety and efficacy is required. The purpose of this study was to determine whether commercially available botanicals directly affect the primary brain enzymes responsible for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism. Anxiolytic plants may interact with either glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or GABA transaminase (GABA-T) and ultimately influence brain GABA levels and neurotransmission. Two in vitro rat brain homogenate assays were developed to determine the inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of aqueous and ethanolic plant extracts. Approximately 70% of all extracts that were tested showed little or no inhibitory effect (IC50 values greater than 1 mg/mL) and are therefore unlikely to affect GABA metabolism as tested. The aqueous extract of Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) exhibited the greatest inhibition of GABA-T activity (IC50 = 0.35 mg/mL). Extracts from Centella asiatica (gotu kola) and Valeriana officinalis (valerian) stimulated GAD activity by over 40% at a dose of 1 mg/mL. On the other hand, both Matricaria recutita (German chamomile) and Humulus lupulus (hops) showed significant inhibition of GAD activity (0.11-0.65 mg/mL). Several of these species may therefore warrant further pharmacological investigation. The relation between enzyme activity and possible in vivo mode of action is discussed. PMID:18066140

  5. Neuroendocrine mechanisms for immune system regulation during stress in fish.

    PubMed

    Nardocci, Gino; Navarro, Cristina; Cortés, Paula P; Imarai, Mónica; Montoya, Margarita; Valenzuela, Beatriz; Jara, Pablo; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Fernández, Ricardo

    2014-10-01

    In the last years, the aquaculture crops have experienced an explosive and intensive growth, because of the high demand for protein. This growth has increased fish susceptibility to diseases and subsequent death. The constant biotic and abiotic changes experienced by fish species in culture are challenges that induce physiological, endocrine and immunological responses. These changes mitigate stress effects at the cellular level to maintain homeostasis. The effects of stress on the immune system have been studied for many years. While acute stress can have beneficial effects, chronic stress inhibits the immune response in mammals and teleost fish. In response to stress, a signaling cascade is triggered by the activation of neural circuits in the central nervous system because the hypothalamus is the central modulator of stress. This leads to the production of catecholamines, corticosteroid-releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone and glucocorticoids, which are the essential neuroendocrine mediators for this activation. Because stress situations are energetically demanding, the neuroendocrine signals are involved in metabolic support and will suppress the "less important" immune function. Understanding the cellular mechanisms of the neuroendocrine regulation of immunity in fish will allow the development of new pharmaceutical strategies and therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of diseases triggered by stress at all stages of fish cultures for commercial production. PMID:25123831

  6. Modeling Systems-Level Regulation of Host Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Thakar, Juilee; Pilione, Mylisa; Kirimanjeswara, Girish; Harvill, Eric T; Albert, Réka

    2007-01-01

    Many pathogens are able to manipulate the signaling pathways responsible for the generation of host immune responses. Here we examine and model a respiratory infection system in which disruption of host immune functions or of bacterial factors changes the dynamics of the infection. We synthesize the network of interactions between host immune components and two closely related bacteria in the genus Bordetellae. We incorporate existing experimental information on the timing of immune regulatory events into a discrete dynamic model, and verify the model by comparing the effects of simulated disruptions to the experimental outcome of knockout mutations. Our model indicates that the infection time course of both Bordetellae can be separated into three distinct phases based on the most active immune processes. We compare and discuss the effect of the species-specific virulence factors on disrupting the immune response during their infection of naive, antibody-treated, diseased, or convalescent hosts. Our model offers predictions regarding cytokine regulation, key immune components, and clearance of secondary infections; we experimentally validate two of these predictions. This type of modeling provides new insights into the virulence, pathogenesis, and host adaptation of disease-causing microorganisms and allows systems-level analysis that is not always possible using traditional methods. PMID:17559300

  7. Extracellular RNAs: A Secret Arm of Immune System Regulation.

    PubMed

    de Candia, Paola; De Rosa, Veronica; Casiraghi, Maurizio; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    The immune system has evolved to protect multicellular organisms from the attack of a variety of pathogens. To exert this function efficiently, the system has developed the capacity to coordinate the function of different cell types and the ability to down-modulate the response when the foreign attack is over. For decades, immunologists believed that these two characteristics were primarily related to cytokine/chemokine-based communication and cell-to-cell direct contact. More recently, it has been shown that immune cells also communicate by transferring regulatory RNAs, microRNAs in particular, from one cell to the other. Several studies have suggested a functional role of extracellular regulatory RNAs in cell-to-cell communication in different cellular contexts. This minireview focuses on the potential role of extracellular RNA transfer in the regulation of adaptive immune response, also contextualizing it in a broader field of what is known of cell-free RNAs in communication among different organisms in the evolutionary scale.

  8. 41 CFR 101-1.101 - Federal Property Management Regulations System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Federal Property Management Regulations System. 101-1.101 Section 101-1.101 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL 1-INTRODUCTION...

  9. 75 FR 25165 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Cost and Software Data Reporting System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... Regulation Supplement; Cost and Software Data Reporting System AGENCY: Defense Acquisition Regulations System... the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) to set forth DoD Cost and Software Data... Software Data Reporting (CSDR) process offerors intend to use to satisfy the requirements of the...

  10. Study on detecting spatial distribution of neutrons and gamma rays using a multi-imaging plate system.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Endo, Satoru; Takada, Jun

    2014-06-01

    In order to measure the spatial distributions of neutrons and gamma rays separately using the imaging plate, the requirement for the converter to enhance specific component was investigated with the PHITS code. Consequently, enhancing fast neutrons using recoil protons from epoxy resin was not effective due to high sensitivity of the imaging plate to gamma rays. However, the converter of epoxy resin doped with (10)B was found to have potential for thermal and epithermal neutrons, and graphite for gamma rays.

  11. 75 FR 32635 - Defense Acquisition Regulations System; Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... Regulation Supplement; Balance of Payments Program Exemption for Commercial Information Technology... Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) to implement the exemption from the Balance of... implement in the clauses at 252.225-7044, Balance of Payments Program--Construction Material, and...

  12. Legal regulations on occupational health system in Poland.

    PubMed

    Dawydzik, L T

    2001-01-01

    Occupational health care has a long tradition in Poland. It has evolved from the industrial health care system established in the post-war period to a modern system defined in the Occupational Health Services Act of 1997. When the process of political and economic transformation began in Poland in 1989, the reforms of the workers' health care became inevitable. The process of introducing and implementing new legal regulations comprised three phases: 1. Introduction of amendments to the Polish Labor Code, according to which employers are now committed to provide their workers with occupational health services (OHS) appropriate to given working conditions. 2. Incorporation into the 1991 Health Care Institutions Act the provisions which allow for the establishment of alternative non-public structures responsible for the health care of the working population. 3. Adoption of the Occupational Health Services Act in 1997, the most important law providing grounds for establishing a most comprehensive system of occupational health services. The Occupational Health Services Act introduces, for the first time, the concept of the OHS system that encompasses the whole working population. The Act outlines a broad range of OHS competences; defines individual tasks; and provides the up-to-date definition of the OHS structure with its two organizational levels, consisting of primary and regional occupational health centers. In addition, the Act specifies the sources of finance for the accomplishment of the defined tasks. Pursuant to the provisions of the Act, OHS units co-operate with employers and employees, bodies supervising working conditions and other organizations involved in occupational health that become their partners in activities aimed at protecting and promoting health of workers. In order to further develop the workers' health care system its constant adaptation to changing conditions is absolutely necessary through: developing modern training for specialists in the

  13. Legal regulations on occupational health system in Poland.

    PubMed

    Dawydzik, L T

    2001-01-01

    Occupational health care has a long tradition in Poland. It has evolved from the industrial health care system established in the post-war period to a modern system defined in the Occupational Health Services Act of 1997. When the process of political and economic transformation began in Poland in 1989, the reforms of the workers' health care became inevitable. The process of introducing and implementing new legal regulations comprised three phases: 1. Introduction of amendments to the Polish Labor Code, according to which employers are now committed to provide their workers with occupational health services (OHS) appropriate to given working conditions. 2. Incorporation into the 1991 Health Care Institutions Act the provisions which allow for the establishment of alternative non-public structures responsible for the health care of the working population. 3. Adoption of the Occupational Health Services Act in 1997, the most important law providing grounds for establishing a most comprehensive system of occupational health services. The Occupational Health Services Act introduces, for the first time, the concept of the OHS system that encompasses the whole working population. The Act outlines a broad range of OHS competences; defines individual tasks; and provides the up-to-date definition of the OHS structure with its two organizational levels, consisting of primary and regional occupational health centers. In addition, the Act specifies the sources of finance for the accomplishment of the defined tasks. Pursuant to the provisions of the Act, OHS units co-operate with employers and employees, bodies supervising working conditions and other organizations involved in occupational health that become their partners in activities aimed at protecting and promoting health of workers. In order to further develop the workers' health care system its constant adaptation to changing conditions is absolutely necessary through: developing modern training for specialists in the

  14. The Gamma-ray Sky with Fermi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David

    2012-01-01

    Gamma rays reveal extreme, nonthermal conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been exploring the gamma-ray sky for more than four years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, novae, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as dark matter annihilation. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge gamma-ray structure associated with the center of our galaxy, surprising behavior from some gamma-ray binary systems, and a possible constraint on some WIMP models for dark matter.

  15. New readout and data-acquisition system in an electron-tracking Compton camera for MeV gamma-ray astronomy (SMILE-II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumoto, T.; Matsuoka, Y.; Mizumura, Y.; Tanimori, T.; Kubo, H.; Takada, A.; Iwaki, S.; Sawano, T.; Nakamura, K.; Komura, S.; Nakamura, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Oda, M.; Miyamoto, S.; Takemura, T.; Parker, J. D.; Tomono, D.; Sonoda, S.; Miuchi, K.; Kurosawa, S.

    2015-11-01

    For MeV gamma-ray astronomy, we have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) as a MeV gamma-ray telescope capable of rejecting the radiation background and attaining the high sensitivity of near 1 mCrab in space. Our ETCC comprises a gaseous time-projection chamber (TPC) with a micro pattern gas detector for tracking recoil electrons and a position-sensitive scintillation camera for detecting scattered gamma rays. After the success of a first balloon experiment in 2006 with a small ETCC (using a 10×10×15 cm3 TPC) for measuring diffuse cosmic and atmospheric sub-MeV gamma rays (Sub-MeV gamma-ray Imaging Loaded-on-balloon Experiment I; SMILE-I), a (30 cm)3 medium-sized ETCC was developed to measure MeV gamma-ray spectra from celestial sources, such as the Crab Nebula, with single-day balloon flights (SMILE-II). To achieve this goal, a 100-times-larger detection area compared with that of SMILE-I is required without changing the weight or power consumption of the detector system. In addition, the event rate is also expected to dramatically increase during observation. Here, we describe both the concept and the performance of the new data-acquisition system with this (30 cm)3 ETCC to manage 100 times more data while satisfying the severe restrictions regarding the weight and power consumption imposed by a balloon-borne observation. In particular, to improve the detection efficiency of the fine tracks in the TPC from ~10% to ~100%, we introduce a new data-handling algorithm in the TPC. Therefore, for efficient management of such large amounts of data, we developed a data-acquisition system with parallel data flow.

  16. Role of gamma carboxylated Glu47 in connexin 26 hemichannel regulation by extracellular Ca{sup 2+}: Insight from a local quantum chemistry study

    SciTech Connect

    Zonta, Francesco; Mammano, Fabio; Torsello, Mauro; Fortunati, Nicola; Orian, Laura; Polimeno, Antonino

    2014-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • QM calculations show that Ca{sup 2+} binds to γGlu47 in connexin hemichannels. • Molecular models of increasing size are employed in hybrid DFT calculations. • Ca{sup 2+} binding affects the interaction between γGlu47 and Arg75, Arg184. • Ca{sup 2+} binding alters the structure in a critical region of connexin hemichannels. - Abstract: Connexin hemichannels are regulated by several gating mechanisms, some of which depend critically on the extracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub e}). It is well established that hemichannel activity is inhibited at normal (∼1 mM) [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub e}, whereas lowering [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub e} to micromolar levels fosters hemichannel opening. Atomic force microscopy imaging shows significant and reversible changes of pore diameter at the extracellular mouth of Cx26 hemichannels exposed to different [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub e}, however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Analysis of the crystal structure of connexin 26 (Cx26) gap junction channels, corroborated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, suggests that several negatively charged amino acids create a favorable environment for low-affinity Ca{sup 2+} binding within the extracellular vestibule of the Cx26 hemichannel. In particular a highly conserved glutammic acid, found in position 47 in most connexins, is thought to undergo post translational gamma carboxylation (γGlu47), and is thus likely to play an important role in Ca{sup 2+} coordination. γGlu47 may also form salt bridges with two conserved arginines (Arg75 and Arg184 in Cx26), which are considered important in stabilizing the structure of the extracellular region. Using a combination of quantum chemistry methods, we analyzed the interaction between γGlu47, Arg75 and Arg184 in a Cx26 hemichannel model both in the absence and in the presence of Ca{sup 2+}. We show that Ca{sup 2+} imparts significant local structural changes and speculate

  17. Vertical organization of gamma-aminobutyric acid-accumulating intrinsic neuronal systems in monkey cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    DeFelipe, J.; Jones, E.G.

    1985-12-01

    Light and electron microscopic methods were used to examine the neurons in the monkey cerebral cortex labeled autoradiographically following the uptake and transport of (/sup 3/H)-gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Nonpyramidal cell somata in the sensory-motor areas and primary visual area (area 17) were labeled close to the injection site and at distances of 1 to 1.5 mm beyond the injection site, indicating labeling by retrograde axoplasmic transport. This labeling occurred preferentially in the vertical dimension of the cortex. Prior injections of colchicine, an inhibitor of axoplasmic transport, abolished all labeling of somata except those within the injection site. In each area, injections of superficial layers (I to III) produced labeling of clusters of cell somata in layer V, and injections of the deep layers (V and VI) produced labeling of clusters of cell somata in layers II and III. In area 17, injections of the superficial layers produced dense retrograde cell labeling in three bands: in layers IVC, VA, and VI. Vertically oriented chains of silver grains linked the injection sites with the resulting labeled cell clusters. In all areas, the labeling of cells in the horizontal dimension was insignificant. Electron microscopic examination of labeled neurons confirms that the neurons labeled at a distance from an injection site are nonpyramidal neurons, many with somata so small that they would be mistaken for neuroglial cells light microscopically. They receive few axosomatic synapses, most of which have symmetric membrane thickenings. The vertical chains of silver grains overlie neuronal processes identifiable as both dendrites and myelinated axons, but unmyelinated axons may also be included. The clusters of (/sup 3/H)GABA-labeled cells are joined to one another and to adjacent unlabeled cells by junctional complexes, including puncta adherentia and multi-lamellar cisternal complexes.

  18. Gamma-ray emission from globular clusters. Shock high energy emission from the Be-Star/Pulsar System PSR 1259-63. Echoes in x-ray novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1995-01-01

    This grant covers work on the Compton phase 3 investigation, 'Shock High Energy Emission from the Be- Star/Pulsar System PSR 1259-63' and cycle 4 investigations 'Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at High Latitudes' and 'Echoes in X-Ray Novae'. Work under the investigation 'Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at High Latitudes' has lead to the publication of a paper (attached), describing gamma-ray emissivity variations in the northern galactic hemisphere. Using archival EGRET data, we have found a large irregular region of enhanced gamma-ray emissivity at energies greater 100 MeV. This is the first observation of local structure in the gamma-ray emissivity. Work under the investigation 'Echoes in X-Ray Novae' is proceeding with analysis of data from OSSE from the transient source GRO J1655-40. The outburst of this source last fall triggered this Target of Opportunity investigation. Preliminary spectral analysis shows emission out to 600 keV and a pure power low spectrum with no evidence of an exponential cutoff. Work is complete on the analysis of BATSE data from the Be-Star/Pulsar Sustem PSR 1259-63.

  19. The Monsoon as a Self-regulating Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, P. J.; Clark, C.; Cherikova, G.; Fasullo, J.; Han, W.; Loschnigg, J.; Sahami, K.

    INTRODUCTION REGULATION OF THE MONSOON ANNUAL CYCLE The Climatological Annual Cycle Processes Determining the Annual Cycle of the Monsoon Role of Ocean Dynamics in the Annual Heat Balance of the Indian - Ocean Regulation of the Annual Cycle of the Monsoon: an Ocean-Atmosphere - Feedback System INTERANNUAL VARIABILITY OF THE MONSOON Modes of Interannual Variability in the Monsoon Interannual Modes in Ocean Heat Transport Interannual Regulation of the Monsoon GENERAL THEORY OF REGULATION OF THE COUPLED OCEAN-ATMOSPHERIC MONSOON - SYSTEM CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES

  20. Negative regulation of quorum-sensing systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by ATP-dependent Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Akiko; Tabuchi, Fumiaki; Tsuchiya, Hiroko; Isogai, Emiko; Yamamoto, Tomoko

    2008-06-01

    Lon protease, a member of the ATP-dependent protease family, regulates numerous cellular systems by degrading specific substrates. Here, we demonstrate that Lon is involved in the regulation of quorum-sensing (QS) signaling systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic human pathogen. The organism has two acyl-homoserine lactone (HSL)-mediated QS systems, LasR/LasI and RhlR/RhlI. Many reports have demonstrated that these two systems are regulated and interconnected by global regulators. We found that lon-disrupted cells overproduce pyocyanin, the biosynthesis of which depends on the RhlR/RhlI system, and show increased levels of a transcriptional regulator, RhlR. The QS systems are organized hierarchically: the RhlR/RhlI system is subordinate to LasR/LasI. To elucidate the mechanism by which Lon negatively regulates RhlR/RhlI, we examined the effect of lon disruption on the LasR/LasI system. We found that Lon represses the expression of LasR/LasI by degrading LasI, an HSL synthase, leading to negative regulation of the RhlR/RhlI system. RhlR/RhlI was also shown to be regulated by Lon independently of LasR/LasI via regulation of RhlI, an HSL synthase. In view of these findings, it is suggested that Lon protease is a powerful negative regulator of both HSL-mediated QS systems in P. aeruginosa.

  1. General Purpose Monte Carlo Multigroup Neutron and Gamma-Ray Transport Code System with Array Geometry Capability. We recommend C00474/ALLCP/02 MORSE-CGA.

    1991-05-01

    Version 00 MORSE-CGA was developed to add the capability of modelling rectangular lattices for nuclear reactor cores or for multipartitioned structures. It thus enhances the capability of the MORSE code system. The MORSE code is a multipurpose neutron and gamma-ray transport Monte Carlo code. It has been designed as a tool for solving most shielding problems. Through the use of multigroup cross sections, the solution of neutron, gamma-ray, or coupled neutron-gamma-ray problems may be obtainedmore » in either the forward or adjoint mode. Time dependence for both shielding and criticality problems is provided. General three-dimensional geometry may be used with an albedo option available at any material surface. Isotropic or anisotropic scattering up to a P16 expansion of the angular distribution is allowed.« less

  2. New hazardous waste management system: regulation of wastes or wasted regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, S.I.

    1981-01-01

    The unsound management of hazardous wastes, as exemplified by Love Canal, causes a variety of environmental and health problems. A review of present state controls reveals the need for the Federal regulation that was incorporated in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). A detailed description of RCRA, however, faults the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for deferring regulation and for its failure to meet deadlines, issue standards, or include many dangerous wastes in the prohibited list. EPA's interim standards of essentially voluntary guidelines will offer little protection from contamination until final permit regulations are established. 326 references. (DCK)

  3. Mechanism of interferon-gamma production by monocytes stimulated with myeloperoxidase and neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Kawata, Jin; Yamamoto, Toshitaka; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ono, Tomomichi; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have an important role in antimicrobial innate immunity and release substances that may modulate the immune response. We investigated the effects of soluble factors from NETs and neutrophil granule proteins on human monocyte function by using the Transwell system to prevent cell-cell contact. NET formation was induced by exposing human neutrophils to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). When monocytes were incubated with PMA alone, expression of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha mRNA was upregulated, but IL-10, IL-12, and interferon (IFN)-gamma mRNA were not detected. Incubation of monocytes with NETs enhanced the expression of IL-10 and IFN-gamma mRNA, but not IL-12 mRNA. Myeloperoxidase stimulated IFN-gamma production by monocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Both a nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitor (PDTC) and an intracellular calcium antagonist (TMB-8) prevented upregulation of IFN-gamma production. Neither a combined p38alpha and p38beta inhibitor (SB203580) nor an extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitor (PD98059) suppressed IFN-gamma production. Interestingly, a combined p38gamma and p38delta inhibitor (BIRB796) significantly decreased IFN-gamma production. These findings suggest that myeloperoxidase induces IFN-gamma production by monocytes via p38gamma/delta mitogen-activated protein kinase.

  4. System Regulates the Water Contents of Fuel-Cell Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Arturo; Lazaroff, Scott

    2005-01-01

    An assembly of devices provides for both humidification of the reactant gas streams of a fuel cell and removal of the product water (the water generated by operation of the fuel cell). The assembly includes externally-sensing forward-pressure regulators that supply reactant gases (fuel and oxygen) at variable pressures to ejector reactant pumps. The ejector supply pressures depend on the consumption flows. The ejectors develop differential pressures approximately proportional to the consumption flow rates at constant system pressure and with constant flow restriction between the mixer-outlet and suction ports of the ejectors. For removal of product water from the circulating oxygen stream, the assembly includes a water/gas separator that contains hydrophobic and hydrophilic membranes. The water separator imposes an approximately constant flow restriction, regardless of the quality of the two-phase flow that enters it from the fuel cell. The gas leaving the water separator is nearly 100 percent humid. This gas is returned to the inlet of the fuel cell along with a quantity of dry incoming oxygen, via the oxygen ejector, thereby providing some humidification.

  5. The Mucosal Immune System and Its Regulation by Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Kabat, Agnieszka M.; Pott, Johanna; Maloy, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract presents a unique challenge to the mucosal immune system, which has to constantly monitor the vast surface for the presence of pathogens, while at the same time maintaining tolerance to beneficial or innocuous antigens. In the intestinal mucosa, specialized innate and adaptive immune components participate in directing appropriate immune responses toward these diverse challenges. Recent studies provide compelling evidence that the process of autophagy influences several aspects of mucosal immune responses. Initially described as a “self-eating” survival pathway that enables nutrient recycling during starvation, autophagy has now been connected to multiple cellular responses, including several aspects of immunity. Initial links between autophagy and host immunity came from the observations that autophagy can target intracellular bacteria for degradation. However, subsequent studies indicated that autophagy plays a much broader role in immune responses, as it can impact antigen processing, thymic selection, lymphocyte homeostasis, and the regulation of immunoglobulin and cytokine secretion. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of mucosal immune cells and discuss how autophagy influences many aspects of their physiology and function. We focus on cell type-specific roles of autophagy in the gut, with a particular emphasis on the effects of autophagy on the intestinal T cell compartment. We also provide a perspective on how manipulation of autophagy may potentially be used to treat mucosal inflammatory disorders. PMID:27446072

  6. Peripheral nervous system plasmalogens regulate Schwann cell differentiation and myelination

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Tiago Ferreira; Eira, Jessica; Lopes, André T.; Malheiro, Ana R.; Sousa, Vera; Luoma, Adrienne; Avila, Robin L.; Wanders, Ronald J.A.; Just, Wilhelm W.; Kirschner, Daniel A.; Sousa, Mónica M.; Brites, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP) is a developmental disorder characterized by hypotonia, cataracts, abnormal ossification, impaired motor development, and intellectual disability. The underlying etiology of RCDP is a deficiency in the biosynthesis of ether phospholipids, of which plasmalogens are the most abundant form in nervous tissue and myelin; however, the role of plasmalogens in the peripheral nervous system is poorly defined. Here, we used mouse models of RCDP and analyzed the consequence of plasmalogen deficiency in peripheral nerves. We determined that plasmalogens are crucial for Schwann cell development and differentiation and that plasmalogen defects impaired radial sorting, myelination, and myelin structure. Plasmalogen insufficiency resulted in defective protein kinase B (AKT) phosphorylation and subsequent signaling, causing overt activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) in nerves of mutant mice. Treatment with GSK3β inhibitors, lithium, or 4-benzyl-2-methyl-1,2,4-thiadiazolidine-3,5-dione (TDZD-8) restored Schwann cell defects, effectively bypassing plasmalogen deficiency. Our results demonstrate the requirement of plasmalogens for the correct and timely differentiation of Schwann cells and for the process of myelination. In addition, these studies identify a mechanism by which the lack of a membrane phospholipid causes neuropathology, implicating plasmalogens as regulators of membrane and cell signaling. PMID:24762439

  7. The Mucosal Immune System and Its Regulation by Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kabat, Agnieszka M; Pott, Johanna; Maloy, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract presents a unique challenge to the mucosal immune system, which has to constantly monitor the vast surface for the presence of pathogens, while at the same time maintaining tolerance to beneficial or innocuous antigens. In the intestinal mucosa, specialized innate and adaptive immune components participate in directing appropriate immune responses toward these diverse challenges. Recent studies provide compelling evidence that the process of autophagy influences several aspects of mucosal immune responses. Initially described as a "self-eating" survival pathway that enables nutrient recycling during starvation, autophagy has now been connected to multiple cellular responses, including several aspects of immunity. Initial links between autophagy and host immunity came from the observations that autophagy can target intracellular bacteria for degradation. However, subsequent studies indicated that autophagy plays a much broader role in immune responses, as it can impact antigen processing, thymic selection, lymphocyte homeostasis, and the regulation of immunoglobulin and cytokine secretion. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of mucosal immune cells and discuss how autophagy influences many aspects of their physiology and function. We focus on cell type-specific roles of autophagy in the gut, with a particular emphasis on the effects of autophagy on the intestinal T cell compartment. We also provide a perspective on how manipulation of autophagy may potentially be used to treat mucosal inflammatory disorders. PMID:27446072

  8. Regulation of metabolism by the innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Lackey, Denise E; Olefsky, Jerrold M

    2016-01-01

    Low-grade tissue inflammation induced by obesity can result in insulin resistance, which in turn is a key cause of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cells of the innate immune system produce cytokines and other factors that impair insulin signalling, which contributes to the connection between obesity and the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here, we review the innate immune cells involved in secreting inflammatory factors in the obese state. In the adipose tissue, these cells include proinflammatory adipose tissue macrophages and natural killer cells. We also discuss the role of innate immune cells, such as anti-inflammatory adipose tissue macrophages, eosinophils, group 2 innate lymphoid cells and invariant natural killer T cells, in maintaining an anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitive environment in the lean state. In the liver, both Kupffer cells and recruited hepatic macrophages can contribute to decreased hepatic insulin sensitivity. Proinflammatory macrophages might also adversely affect insulin sensitivity in the skeletal muscle and pancreatic β-cell function. Finally, this Review provides an overview of the mechanisms for regulating proinflammatory immune responses that could lead to future therapeutic opportunities to improve insulin sensitivity.

  9. The Mucosal Immune System and Its Regulation by Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kabat, Agnieszka M; Pott, Johanna; Maloy, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract presents a unique challenge to the mucosal immune system, which has to constantly monitor the vast surface for the presence of pathogens, while at the same time maintaining tolerance to beneficial or innocuous antigens. In the intestinal mucosa, specialized innate and adaptive immune components participate in directing appropriate immune responses toward these diverse challenges. Recent studies provide compelling evidence that the process of autophagy influences several aspects of mucosal immune responses. Initially described as a "self-eating" survival pathway that enables nutrient recycling during starvation, autophagy has now been connected to multiple cellular responses, including several aspects of immunity. Initial links between autophagy and host immunity came from the observations that autophagy can target intracellular bacteria for degradation. However, subsequent studies indicated that autophagy plays a much broader role in immune responses, as it can impact antigen processing, thymic selection, lymphocyte homeostasis, and the regulation of immunoglobulin and cytokine secretion. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of mucosal immune cells and discuss how autophagy influences many aspects of their physiology and function. We focus on cell type-specific roles of autophagy in the gut, with a particular emphasis on the effects of autophagy on the intestinal T cell compartment. We also provide a perspective on how manipulation of autophagy may potentially be used to treat mucosal inflammatory disorders.

  10. Bioelectrical Regulation of Cell Cycle and the Planarian Model System

    PubMed Central

    Barghouth, Paul G.; Thiruvalluvan, Manish; Oviedo, Néstor J.

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle regulation through the manipulation of endogenous membrane potentials offers tremendous opportunities to control cellular processes during tissue repair and cancer formation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which biophysical signals modulate the cell cycle remain underappreciated and poorly understood. Cells in complex organisms generate and maintain a constant voltage gradient across the plasma membrane known as the transmembrane potential. This potential, generated through the combined efforts of various ion transporters, pumps and channels, is known to drive a wide range of cellular processes such as cellular proliferation, migration and tissue regeneration while its deregulation can lead to tumorigenesis. These cellular regulatory events, coordinated by ionic flow, correspond to a new and exciting field termed molecular bioelectricity. We aim to present a brief discussion on the biophysical machinery involving membrane potential and the mechanisms mediating cell cycle progression and cancer transformation. Furthermore, we present the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea as a tractable model system for understanding principles behind molecular bioelectricity at both the cellular and organismal level. PMID:25749155

  11. Orexin Receptor Activation Generates Gamma Band Input to Cholinergic and Serotonergic Arousal System Neurons and Drives an Intrinsic Ca2+-Dependent Resonance in LDT and PPT Cholinergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Masaru; Gumenchuk, Iryna; Kang, Bryan; Steger, Catherine; Lynn, Elizabeth; Molina, Nancy E.; Eisenberg, Leonard M.; Leonard, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of the waking state is a shift in EEG power to higher frequencies with epochs of synchronized intracortical gamma activity (30–60 Hz) – a process associated with high-level cognitive functions. The ascending arousal system, including cholinergic laterodorsal (LDT) and pedunculopontine (PPT) tegmental neurons and serotonergic dorsal raphe (DR) neurons, promotes this state. Recently, this system has been proposed as a gamma wave generator, in part, because some neurons produce high-threshold, Ca2+-dependent oscillations at gamma frequencies. However, it is not known whether arousal-related inputs to these neurons generate such oscillations, or whether such oscillations are ever transmitted to neuronal targets. Since key arousal input arises from hypothalamic orexin (hypocretin) neurons, we investigated whether the unusually noisy, depolarizing orexin current could provide significant gamma input to cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, and whether such input could drive Ca2+-dependent oscillations. Whole-cell recordings in brain slices were obtained from mice expressing Cre-induced fluorescence in cholinergic LDT and PPT, and serotonergic DR neurons. After first quantifying reporter expression accuracy in cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, we found that the orexin current produced significant high frequency, including gamma, input to both cholinergic and serotonergic neurons. Then, by using a dynamic clamp, we found that adding a noisy orexin conductance to cholinergic neurons induced a Ca2+-dependent resonance that peaked in the theta and alpha frequency range (4–14 Hz) and extended up to 100 Hz. We propose that this orexin current noise and the Ca2+ dependent resonance work synergistically to boost the encoding of high-frequency synaptic inputs into action potentials and to help ensure cholinergic neurons fire during EEG activation. This activity could reinforce thalamocortical states supporting arousal, REM sleep, and intracortical gamma. PMID

  12. EVOLUTIONS OF STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLE HYPERACCRETION SYSTEMS IN THE CENTER OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Cui-Ying; Liu, Tong; Gu, Wei-Min; Lu, Ju-Fu; Hou, Shu-Jin; Tian, Jian-Xiang E-mail: jxtian@dlut.edu.cn

    2015-12-10

    A neutrino-dominated accretion disk around a stellar-mass black hole (BH) can power a gamma-ray burst (GRB) via annihilation of neutrinos launched from the disk. For the BH hyperaccretion system, high accretion rate should trigger the violent evolution of the BH’s characteristics, which further leads to the evolution of the neutrino annihilation luminosity. In this paper, we consider the evolution of the accretion system to analyze the mean time-dependent neutrino annihilation luminosity with the different mean accretion rates and initial BH parameters. By time-integrating the luminosity, the total neutrino annihilation energy with the reasonable initial disk mass can satisfy most short-duration GRBs and about half of long-duration GRBs. Moreover, the extreme Kerr BH should exist in the cental engines of some high-luminosity GRBs. GRBs with higher energy have to request the alternative magnetohydrodynamics processes in the centers, such as the Blandford–Znajek jet from the accretion system or the millisecond magnetar.

  13. Evolutions of Stellar-mass Black Hole Hyperaccretion Systems in the Center of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Cui-Ying; Liu, Tong; Gu, Wei-Min; Hou, Shu-Jin; Tian, Jian-Xiang; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2015-12-01

    A neutrino-dominated accretion disk around a stellar-mass black hole (BH) can power a gamma-ray burst (GRB) via annihilation of neutrinos launched from the disk. For the BH hyperaccretion system, high accretion rate should trigger the violent evolution of the BH’s characteristics, which further leads to the evolution of the neutrino annihilation luminosity. In this paper, we consider the evolution of the accretion system to analyze the mean time-dependent neutrino annihilation luminosity with the different mean accretion rates and initial BH parameters. By time-integrating the luminosity, the total neutrino annihilation energy with the reasonable initial disk mass can satisfy most short-duration GRBs and about half of long-duration GRBs. Moreover, the extreme Kerr BH should exist in the cental engines of some high-luminosity GRBs. GRBs with higher energy have to request the alternative magnetohydrodynamics processes in the centers, such as the Blandford-Znajek jet from the accretion system or the millisecond magnetar.

  14. Gamma-ray pulse height spectrum analysis on systems with multiple Ge detectors using a spectrum summing

    SciTech Connect

    Killian, E.W.

    1997-05-01

    A technique has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to sum high resolution gamma-ray pulse spectra from systems with multiple Ge detectors. Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company operates a multi-detector spectrometer configuration at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant facility which is used to characterize the radio nuclide contents in waste drums destined for shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This summing technique was developed to increase the sensitivity of the system, reduce the count times required to properly quantify the radionuclides and provide a more consistent methodology for combining data collected from multiple detectors. In spectrometer systems with multiple detectors looking at non homogenous waste forms it is often difficult to combine individual spectrum analysis results from each detector to obtain a meaningful result for the total waste container. This is particularly true when the counting statistics in each individual spectrum are poor. The spectrum summing technique adds the spectra collected by each detector into a single spectrum which has better counting statistics than each individual spectrum. A normal spectral analysis program can then be used to analyze the sum spectrum to obtain radio nuclide values which have smaller errors and do not have to be further manipulated to obtain results for the total waste container.

  15. Adolescents' Self-Regulation Development via the Sensory Room System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalimullin, Aydar M.; Kuvaldina, Elana A.; Koinova-Zoellner, Julia

    2016-01-01

    The urgency of the issue stated in this article is caused by the need for mastering skills and patterns of self-regulation when being an adolescent since this time is sensitive for developing processes of personal understanding and evolution. Thus, mastering skills and patterns of self-regulation as a necessary part of the whole ability of…

  16. 75 FR 64148 - General Regulation: National Park System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ... park areas for public enjoyment. (48 FR 30252, 30272) Among other things, these two NPS regulations... in 73 FR 46217 (2008), this one year time frame allows applicants to be better able to determine the... definition already provided in the preamble to the 1983 final regulation. 48 FR 30272 (June 30, 1983)....

  17. Differential expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid type B receptor subunit mRNAs in the developing nervous system and receptor coupling to adenylyl cyclase in embryonic neurons.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stella C; Steiger, Janine L; Gravielle, María Clara; Lyons, Helen R; Russek, Shelley J; Farb, David H

    2004-05-17

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid type B receptors (GABA(B)Rs) mediate both slow inhibitory synaptic activity in the adult nervous system and motility signals for migrating embryonic cortical cells. Previous papers have described the expression of GABA(B)Rs in the adult brain, but the expression and functional significance of these gene products in the embryo are largely unknown. Here we examine GABA(B)R expression from rat embryonic day 10 (E10) to E18 compared with adult and ask whether embryonic cortical neurons contain functional GABA(B)R. GABA(B)R1 transcript levels greatly exceed GABA(B)R2 levels in the developing neural tube at E11, and olfactory bulb and striatum at E17 but equalize in most regions of adult nervous tissue, except for the glomerular and granule cell layers of the main olfactory bulb and the striatum. Consistent with expression differences, the binding affinity of GABA for GABA(B)Rs is significantly lower in adult striatum compared with cerebellum. Multiple lines of evidence from in situ hybridization, RNase protection, and real-time PCR demonstrate that GABA(B)R1a, GABA(B)R1b, GABA(B)R1h (a subunit subtype, lacking a sushi domain, that we have identified in embryonic rat brain), GABA(B)R2, and GABA(B)L transcript levels are not coordinately regulated. Despite the functional requirement for a heterodimer of GABA(B)R subunits, the expression of each subunit mRNA is under independent control during embryonic development, and, by E18, GABA(B)Rs are negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase in neocortical neurons. The presence of embryonic GABA(B)R transcripts and protein and functional receptor coupling indicates potentially important roles for GABA(B)Rs in modulation of synaptic transmission in the developing embryonic nervous system.

  18. 1993 yearly calibration of Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s gross gamma-ray borehole geophysical logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, R.J.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the 1993 yearly calibration of a gross gamma-ray geophysical pulse logging system owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The calibration was conducted to permit the continued use of this system for geologic and hydrologic studies associated with remedial investigation at the Hanford Site. The calibration is limited to the probe identified as CG27A-97 and applies to a new probe detector crystal that replaced the former detector in January 1993, after a crack was discovered. Primary calibrations to equivalent-uranium units were conducted in DOE borehole model standards that reside on the Hanford Site. The calibrations were performed in borehole models SBL/SBH and SBA/SBB, which both contain sections with relatively low equivalent-uranium concentrations. Model SBH/SBL has now been countersunk at the site so that data were taken by suspending the probe downhole. Model SBA/SBB is still lying horizontally above ground at the site, so data were logged as in previous calibrations at the Hanford site by pushing the probe into the hole and drawing it out with the logging equipment. A previous correlation for relating observed count rate in before- and after-logging field calibrations to equivalent-uranium concentrations was confirmed for field source Ra-20S-82. A computer-based digital collection/recording system was used simultaneously on many of the procedures with the original analog system so that the performance of the two collection systems could be correlated and compared. The digital system was calibrated this year to confirm its linearity and to establish correlation with the analog data (i.e., chart-recorder output).

  19. Nitrogen-source regulation of yeast gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase synthesis involves the regulatory network including the GATA zinc-finger factors Gln3, Nil1/Gat1 and Gzf3.

    PubMed Central

    Springael, Jean-Yves; Penninckx, Michel J

    2003-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the CIS2 gene encodes gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT; EC 2.3.2.2), the main GSH-degrading enzyme. The promoter region of CIS2 contains one stress-response element (CCCCT) and eight GAT(T/A)A core sequences, probably involved in nitrogen-regulated transcription. We show in the present study that expression of CIS2 is indeed regulated according to the nature of the nitrogen source. Expression is highest in cells growing on a poor nitrogen source such as urea. Under these conditions, the GATA zinc-finger transcription factors Nil1 and Gln3 are both required for CIS2 expression, Nil1 appearing as the more important factor. We further show that Gzf3, another GATA zinc-finger protein, acts as a negative regulator in nitrogen-source control of CIS2 expression. During growth on a preferred nitrogen source like NH(4)(+), CIS2 expression is repressed through a mechanism involving (at least) the Gln3-binding protein Ure2/GdhCR. Induction of CIS2 expression during nitrogen starvation is dependent on Gln3 and Nil1. Furthermore, rapamycin causes similar CIS2 activation, indicating that the target of rapamycin signalling pathway controls CIS2 expression via Gln3 and Nil1 in nitrogen-starved cells. Finally, our results show that CIS2 expression is induced mainly by nitrogen starvation but apparently not by other types of stress. PMID:12529169

  20. Molecular recognition of nitrated fatty acids by PPAR[gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yong; Zhang, Jifeng; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Martynowski, Dariusz; Garcia-Barrio, Minerva T.; Kovach, Amanda; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Baker, Paul R.S.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Chen, Y. Eugene; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-03-08

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) regulates metabolic homeostasis and adipocyte differentiation, and it is activated by oxidized and nitrated fatty acids. Here we report the crystal structure of the PPAR{gamma} ligand binding domain bound to nitrated linoleic acid, a potent endogenous ligand of PPAR{gamma}. Structural and functional studies of receptor-ligand interactions reveal the molecular basis of PPAR{gamma} discrimination of various naturally occurring fatty acid derivatives.

  1. Production of levulinic acid, furfural, and gamma valerolactone from C.sub.5 and C.sub.6 carbohydrates in mono- and biphasic systems using gamma-valerolactone as a solvent

    DOEpatents

    Dumesic, James A.; Alonso, David Martin; Gurbuz, Elif I.; Wettstein, Stephanie G.

    2013-03-19

    A method to make levulinic acid (LA), furfural, or gamma-valerolactone (GVL). React cellulose (and/or other C.sub.6 carbohydrates) or xylose (and/or other C.sub.5 carbohydrates) or combinations thereof in a monophasic reaction medium comprising GVL and an acid; or (ii) a biphasic reaction system comprising an organic layer comprising GVL, and a substantially immiscible aqueous layer. At least a portion of the cellulose (and/or other C.sub.6 carbohydrates), if present, is converted to LA and at least a portion of the xylose (and/or other C.sub.5 carbohydrates), if present, is converted into furfural.

  2. 75 FR 2457 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Business Systems-Definition and Administration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Business Systems--Definition and Administration (DFARS Case... Regulation Supplement (DFARS) to improve the effectiveness of DoD oversight of contractor business systems.... Background Contractor business systems and internal controls are the first line of defense against...

  3. Impacts of recent environmental regulations on pipeline systems

    SciTech Connect

    Irion, K.S.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years pipeline facilities have been subjected to an increasing variety of interpretations by state and regional agencies concerning agency jurisdiction over the regulation of environmental activities at breakout tanks, pump stations, and terminals. The focus of agency interpretation is not on the pipelines themselves, but on loading and unloading activities and on auxiliary tankage. Loading and unloading activities can be to truck, railcar or barge. Tanks are used in a variety of pipeline operations. Tanks are used to collect from gathering lines and transport to a refinery. Tanks can be used to gather and offload to a truck, railcar or vessel. Other tanks are receipt for unloading by ship or barge, which is then transferred by pipeline to a refining or distribution facility. Pipelines, like other industries, were regulated solely by a single agency prior to the establishment of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Until recently, pipelines and their connecting tankage were regulated as transportation facilities under the Department of Transportation (DOT). Although the prevention of pollution of surface water by oil and petroleum products is one of the earliest environmental regulations, dating back to 1970, most of the pipeline facilities remained exempt from most environmental regulation by EPA until very recently. Within the last decade, and accelerating within the last five years, pipeline facilities have been increasingly affected by several burgeoning environmental regulations. A summary of the effects and consequences, as well as suggestions for avoiding unnecessary regulation, are presented.

  4. Drug repurposing: sulfasalazine sensitizes gliomas to gamma knife radiosurgery by blocking cystine uptake through system Xc-, leading to glutathione depletion.

    PubMed

    Sleire, L; Skeie, B S; Netland, I A; Førde, H E; Dodoo, E; Selheim, F; Leiss, L; Heggdal, J I; Pedersen, P-H; Wang, J; Enger, P Ø

    2015-12-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are aggressive brain tumors that always recur after radiotherapy. Cystine, mainly provided by the system X(c)(-) antiporter, is a requirement for glioma cell synthesis of glutathione (GSH) which has a critical role in scavenging free radicals, for example, after radiotherapy. Thus, we hypothesized that the X(c)(-)-inhibitor sulfasalazine (SAS) could potentiate the efficacy of radiotherapy against gliomas. Here, we show that the catalytic subunit of system X(c)(-), xCT, was uniformly expressed in a panel of 30 human GBM biopsies. SAS treatment significantly reduced cystine uptake and GSH levels, whereas it significantly increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in glioma cells in vitro. Furthermore, SAS and radiation synergistically increased DNA double-strand breaks and increased glioma cell death, whereas adding the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) reversed cell death. Moreover, SAS and gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) synergistically prolonged survival in nude rats harboring human GBM xenografts, compared with controls or either treatment alone. In conclusion, SAS effectively blocks cystine uptake in glioma cells in vitro, leading to GSH depletion and increased ROS levels, DNA damage and cell death. Moreover, it potentiates the anti-tumor efficacy of GKRS in rats with human GBM xenografts, providing a survival benefit. Thus, SAS may have a role as a radiosensitizer to enhance the efficacy of current radiotherapies for glioma patients.

  5. Regulation of power pools and system operators: An international comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, J. Jr.; Tenenbaum, B.; Woolf, F.

    1997-12-31

    This paper focuses on the governance and regulation of power pools outside the United States. The current governance and regulatory arrangements for four power pools, as developed in pool documents and government regulations and laws, are compared and contrasted. The power pools analyzed are located in England and Wales, Australia, Canada, and Scandinavia. Topics discussed in relation to these pools are the effects of structure on governance, how each pool has dealt with a number of basic governance decisions, how the pools monitor the markets, ways in which regulators and other institutions control pools, and self-governance issues.

  6. A state-of-the-art passive gamma-ray assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, T.E.; Parker, J.L.; Cowder, L.R.; Kern, E.A.; Garcia, D.L.; Ensslin, N.

    1987-01-01

    We report details of the development of a high-accuracy, high-precision system for the non-destructive assay of /sup 235/U in solution. The system can measure samples with concentrations ranging from 0.0001 to 500 g /sup 235/U/l using 200-ml samples at low concentrations, 30-ml samples at high concentrations, and 1000-s measurement times. The accuracy and precision goals of 0.1% were essentially attained for concentrations above 100 g/l. This at-line system, designed for a production plant environment, represents a significant improvement in the state of the art.

  7. Improved pulse shape discriminator for fast neutron-gamma ray detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, J. A.; St. Onge, R.

    1969-01-01

    Discriminator in nuclear particle detection system distinguishes nuclear particle type and energy among many different nuclear particles. Discriminator incorporates passive, linear circuit elements so that it will operate over a wide dynamic range.

  8. [Role of histaminergic system in the regulation of nutrition].

    PubMed

    Khanfer'ian, R A; Mil'chenko, N O; Solntseva, T N; Gabueva, Zh V; Radzhabkadiev, R M

    2013-01-01

    In the review modern data on a role of various humoral factors (neuromediators, hormones, adipocytokines etc.) in regulation of appetite, food consumption and obesity are presented. The special attention is paid to the role of histamine and histamine receptors of H3-type in processes of regulation of a food intake. Interaction of various humoral factors is discussed at obesity and other alimentary-dependent diseases.

  9. Dual mechanisms regulating glutamate decarboxylases and accumulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid in tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves exposed to multiple stresses.

    PubMed

    Mei, Xin; Chen, Yiyong; Zhang, Lingyun; Fu, Xiumin; Wei, Qing; Grierson, Don; Zhou, Ying; Huang, Yahui; Dong, Fang; Yang, Ziyin

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the major inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. It has multiple positive effects on mammalian physiology and is an important bioactive component of tea (Camellia sinensis). GABA generally occurs at a very low level in plants but GABA content increases substantially after exposure to a range of stresses, especially oxygen-deficiency. During processing of tea leaves, a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage are essential for the high accumulation of GABA. This is believed to be initiated by a change in glutamate decarboxylase activity, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In the present study we characterized factors regulating the expression and activity of three tea glutamate decarboxylase genes (CsGAD1, 2, and 3), and their encoded enzymes. The results suggests that, unlike the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there are dual mechanisms regulating the accumulation of GABA in tea leaves exposed to multiple stresses, including activation of CsGAD1 enzymatic activity by calmodulin upon the onset of the stress and accumulation of high levels of CsGAD2 mRNA induced by a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage. PMID:27021285

  10. Dual mechanisms regulating glutamate decarboxylases and accumulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid in tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves exposed to multiple stresses

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Xin; Chen, Yiyong; Zhang, Lingyun; Fu, Xiumin; Wei, Qing; Grierson, Don; Zhou, Ying; Huang, Yahui; Dong, Fang; Yang, Ziyin

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the major inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. It has multiple positive effects on mammalian physiology and is an important bioactive component of tea (Camellia sinensis). GABA generally occurs at a very low level in plants but GABA content increases substantially after exposure to a range of stresses, especially oxygen-deficiency. During processing of tea leaves, a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage are essential for the high accumulation of GABA. This is believed to be initiated by a change in glutamate decarboxylase activity, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In the present study we characterized factors regulating the expression and activity of three tea glutamate decarboxylase genes (CsGAD1, 2, and 3), and their encoded enzymes. The results suggests that, unlike the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there are dual mechanisms regulating the accumulation of GABA in tea leaves exposed to multiple stresses, including activation of CsGAD1 enzymatic activity by calmodulin upon the onset of the stress and accumulation of high levels of CsGAD2 mRNA induced by a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage. PMID:27021285

  11. Gamma watermarking

    DOEpatents

    Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Wood, Lowell L.; Lougheed, Ronald W.; Moody, Kenton J.; Wang, Tzu-Fang

    2004-05-25

    A covert, gamma-ray "signature" is used as a "watermark" for property identification. This new watermarking technology is based on a unique steganographic or "hidden writing" digital signature, implemented in tiny quantities of gamma-ray-emitting radioisotopic material combinations, generally covertly emplaced on or within an object. This digital signature may be readily recovered at distant future times, by placing a sensitive, high energy-resolution gamma-ray detecting instrument reasonably precisely over the location of the watermark, which location may be known only to the object's owner; however, the signature is concealed from all ordinary detection means because its exceedingly low level of activity is obscured by the natural radiation background (including the gamma radiation naturally emanating from the object itself, from cosmic radiation and material surroundings, from human bodies, etc.). The "watermark" is used in object-tagging for establishing object identity, history or ownership. It thus may serve as an aid to law enforcement officials in identifying stolen property and prosecuting theft thereof. Highly effective, potentially very low cost identification-on demand of items of most all types is thus made possible.

  12. The Predator becomes the Prey: Regulating the Ubiquitin System by Ubiquitylation and Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, Allan M.; Shabek, Nitzan; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitylation (also known as ubiquitination) regulates essentially all intracellular processes in eukaryotes through highly specific, and often tightly spatially and temporally regulated, modification of numerous cellular proteins. Although most often associated with proteasomal degradation, ubiquitylation frequently serves non-proteolytic functions. In light of its central roles in cellular regulation, it has not been surprising to find that many of the components of the ubiquitin system itself are regulated by ubiquitylation. This observation has broad implications for pathophysiology. PMID:21860393

  13. Monte Carlo based calibration of an air monitoring system for gamma and beta+ radiation.

    PubMed

    Sarnelli, A; Negrini, M; D'Errico, V; Bianchini, D; Strigari, L; Mezzenga, E; Menghi, E; Marcocci, F; Benassi, M

    2015-11-01

    Marinelli beaker systems are used to monitor the activity of radioactive samples. These systems are usually calibrated with water solutions and the determination of the activity in gases requires correction coefficients accounting for the different mass-thickness of the sample. For beta+ radionuclides the different distribution of the positrons annihilation points should be also considered. In this work a Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4 is used to compute correction coefficients for the measurement of the activity of air samples. PMID:26356044

  14. The Gamma-ray Universe through Fermi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Gamma rays, the most powerful form of light, reveal extreme conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and its smaller cousin AGILE have been exploring the gamma-ray sky for several years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, novae, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as dark matter annihilation. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge ga.nuna-ray structure associated with the center of our galaxy, surprising behavior from some gamma-ray binary systems, and a possible constraint on some WIMP models for dark matter.

  15. Proficiency test: a quality assurance method for high-purity gamma spectrometry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulescu, Ileana; Romeo Calin, Marian

    2014-03-01

    As part of the implementation of the quality system on ISO 17025 and accreditation, SALROM laboratory participated in the last year in intercomparison exercises, national and international, for determination of natural and man-made radionuclides. This paper describes results obtained in intercomparison exercise organized by IAEA in 2011. The reported values were mostly in good agreement with the resulting reference values.

  16. Evaluation of a gamma camera system for the RITS-6 accelerator using the self-magnetic pinch diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Timothy J.; Kiefer, Mark L.; Gignac, Raymond; Baker, Stuart A.

    2015-08-01

    The self-magnetic pinch (SMP) diode is an intense radiographic source fielded on the Radiographic Integrated Test Stand (RITS-6) accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. The accelerator is an inductive voltage adder (IVA) that can operate from 2-10 MV with currents up to 160 kA (at 7 MV). The SMP diode consists of an annular cathode separated from a flat anode, holding the bremsstrahlung conversion target, by a vacuum gap. Until recently the primary imaging diagnostic utilized image plates (storage phosphors) which has generally low DQE at these photon energies along with other problems. The benefits of using image plates include a high-dynamic range, good spatial resolution, and ease of use. A scintillator-based X-ray imaging system or "gamma camera" has been fielded in front of RITS and the SMP diode which has been able to provide vastly superior images in terms of signal-to-noise with similar resolution and acceptable dynamic range.

  17. Effects of vegetable containing gamma-aminobutyric acid on the cardiac autonomic nervous system in healthy young people.

    PubMed

    Okita, Yoshimitsu; Nakamura, Harunobu; Kouda, Katsuyasu; Takahashi, Isao; Takaoka, Terumi; Kimura, Motohiko; Sugiura, Toshifumi

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of vegetable tablets containing Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) intake on cardiovascular response and the autonomic nervous system in young adults. In a double-blind, randomized controlled trial, 7 healthy subjects were assigned to take vegetable tablets (10 g/trial) or control tablets (10 g/trial). We measured heart rate (HR), systolic and diastolic blood pressure, stroke volume, cardiac output, total peripheral resistance index, and the low- and high-frequency oscillatory components of heart rate variability (HRV). Two major spectral components were examined at low-frequency (LF: 0.04-0.15 Hz) and high-frequency (HF: 0.15-0.4 Hz) bands to indicate HRV. There were significant interactions in HR (p<0.01) and in LF/HF of HRV (p<0.05). HR increased after intake of control tablets, but not after that of vegetable tablets. LF/HF increased rapidly after intake of control tablets and rose slightly after vegetable tablet intake. There was no significant difference between the vegetable and control tablet trials in stroke volume, cardiac output, total peripheral resistance, systolic or diastolic blood pressure, HF, or LF. In conclusion, these results suggest the possibility that single administration of vegetable tablets containing GABA suppresses the sympathetic nervous activity leading to an elevation of blood pressure.

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists in the prevention and treatment of murine systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Aprahamian, Tamar R; Bonegio, Ramon G; Weitzner, Zachary; Gharakhanian, Raffi; Rifkin, Ian R

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists are known to have many immunomodulatory effects. We have previously shown that the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone is beneficial when used early in prevention of disease in murine models of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and SLE-related atherosclerosis. In this report, we demonstrate that another PPARγ agonist, pioglitazone is also beneficial as a treatment for early murine lupus, indicating that this is a class effect and not agent-specific. We further attempt to define the ability of PPARγ agonists to ameliorate established or severe autoimmune disease using two mouse models: the MRL.lpr SLE model and the gld.apoE−/− model of accelerated atherosclerosis and SLE. We demonstrate that, in contrast to the marked amelioration of disease seen when PPARγ agonist treatment was started before disease onset, treatment with rosiglitazone after disease onset in MRL.lpr or gld.apoE−/− mice had minimal beneficial effect on the development of the autoimmune phenotype; however, rosiglitazone treatment remained highly effective at reducing lupus-associated atherosclerosis in gld.apoE−/− mice after disease onset or when mice were maintained on a high cholesterol Western diet. These results suggest that beneficial effects of PPARγ agonists on the development of autoimmunity might be limited to the early stages of disease, but that atherosclerosis, a major cause of death in SLE patients, may be ameliorated even in established or severe disease. PMID:24456224

  19. Analysis of position error by time constant in read-out resistive network for gamma-ray imaging detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Su-Jin; Park, Chang-In; Son, Byung-Hee; Jung, Mi; Jang, Teak-Jin; Lee, Chun-Sik; Choi, Young-Wan

    2016-03-01

    Position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs) in array are used as gamma ray position detector. Each PMT converts the light of wide spectrum range (100 nm ~ 2500 nm) to electrical signal with amplification. Because detection system size is determined by the number of output channels in the PSPMTs, resistive network has been used for reducing the number of output channels. The photo-generated current is distributed to the four output current pulses according to a ratio by resistance values of resistive network. The detected positions are estimated by the peak value of the distributed current pulses. However, due to parasitic capacitance of PSPMTs in parallel with resistor in the resistive network, the time constants should be considered. When the duration of current pulse is not long enough, peak value of distributed pulses is reduced and detected position error is increased. In this paper, we analyzed the detected position error in the resistive network and variation of time constant according to the input position of the PSPMTs.

  20. Usefulness of systematic in situ gamma-ray surveys in the radiometric characterization of natural systems with poorly contrasting geological features (examples from NE of Portugal).

    PubMed

    Duarte, Pedro; Mateus, António; Paiva, Isabel; Trindade, Romão; Santos, Pedro

    2011-02-01

    This paper focuses on the starting point of various studies that are being carried out in two possible locations being considered to host a hypothetical site for a repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) produced in Portugal in compliance with international requirements on the long-term safety of this kind of repository. Previous studies concerning the geology of the much larger geographical areas where these locations are included were fundamental in the choice of these locations and for the design of the survey strategy. One of the fundamental assessment studies during the site-selection is the overall radiological characterization of the locations and its relation to the geology. This paper pretends to show the adequability of using a fast and reasonably inexpensive survey technique such as in situ gamma-ray portable detectors, to access the radiometric response of the systems in study by providing the radiometric mapping of the areas. The existence of adequate radiometric maps represents a critical pre-requisite to constrain both the number and spatial distribution of samples to be collected for further analysis, sustaining as well the subsequent extrapolation of results needed to fully characterise the surveyed system. Both areas were surveyed using portable gamma-ray spectrometers with NaI(Tl) detectors. In situ gamma-ray measurements have clearly shown not only the poorly contrasting geological features, but also their differences representing: (i) a deformed/metamorphosed ophiolite complex and (ii) a monotonous meta-sedimentary sequence. The radiometric maps obtained have show heterogeneities that reflect mostly changes in rock-forming mineral assemblages, even in the presence of small variations of gamma radiation. These maps support objective criteria about the number/distribution of samples to be collected for subsequent comprehensive studies and reinforce the valuable contribution of in situ gamma spectrometry to assess, in

  1. Hand-held, mechanically cooled, radiation detection system for gamma-ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Burks, Morgan Thomas; Eckels, Joel Del

    2010-06-08

    In one embodiment, a radiation detection system is provided including a radiation detector and a first enclosure encapsulating the radiation detector, the first enclosure including a low-emissivity infra-red (IR) reflective coating used to thermally isolate the radiation detector. Additionally, a second enclosure encapsulating the first enclosure is included, the first enclosure being suspension mounted to the second enclosure. Further, a cooler capable of cooling the radiation detector is included. Still yet, a first cooling interface positioned on the second enclosure is included for coupling the cooler and the first enclosure. Furthermore, a second cooling interface positioned on the second enclosure and capable of coupling the first enclosure to a cooler separate from the radiation detection system is included. Other embodiments are also presented.

  2. Drive-Control System for the TACTIC Gamma-Ray Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tickoo, A. K.; Koul, R.; Kaul, S. K.; Kaul, I. K.; Bhat, C. L.; Bhatt, N. G.; Kothari, M. K.; Goyal, H. C.; Agarwal, N. K.; Kaul, S. R.

    A PC-based drive-control system has been developed for the altitude-azimuth mounted TACTIC γ-ray telescope to control the speed and direction of motion of its 2-axes. Details of various hardware components chosen for the telescope, including hybrid-stepper motor, 16-bit absolute encoder and CAMAC-based programmable stepper motor controller, are discussed in this paper. The telescope-control strategy, based on the position-loop with a proportional type control for the source-seek mode and the on/off type control for the tracking mode, is explained in detail. Some important performance features of the telescope, including its blind-spot size, drive-system backlash and encoder-error compensation, are also presented. The drive system has been extensively field-tested and has been operating satisfactorily during observation campaigns carried out since March 1997 with the TACTIC Imaging Element. A tracking accuracy of +/-3 arc-minutes has been achieved. A test report of its performance, with regard to its tracking accuracy on the basis of successful detection of TeV γ-rays from the active galaxy Markarian 501 in April-May 1997, is also presented.

  3. Design of a spreader bar crane-mounted gamma-ray radiation detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grypp, Matthew D.; Marianno, Craig M.; Poston, John W.; Hearn, Gentry C.

    2014-04-01

    Over 95% of imports entering the United States from outside North America arrive by sea at 329 ports of entry. These imports are packaged in more than 11 million cargo containers. Radiation portals monitors routinely scan cargo containers leaving port on specially-designed trucks. To accelerate the process, some commercial entities have placed detection systems on the spreader-bar cranes (SBCs) used to offload. Little is known about the radiation background profiles of systems operating on these cranes. To better understand the operational characteristics of these radiation detection systems; a research team from Texas A&M University (TAMU) mounted three thallium-doped sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] detectors on an SBC at the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office's (DNDO) test track facility at the Port of Tacoma (PoT). These detectors were used to monitor background radiation levels and continuously recorded data during crane operations using a custom-built software package. Count rates and spectral data were recorded for various crane heights over both land and water. The results of this research created a background profile in which count rate was heavily dependent on position demonstrating how detector readings changed in the operational environment.

  4. Histamine regulation of microglia: Gene-environment interaction in the regulation of central nervous system inflammation.

    PubMed

    Frick, Luciana; Rapanelli, Maximiliano; Abbasi, Eeman; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Pittenger, Christopher

    2016-10-01

    Microglia mediate neuroinflammation and regulate brain development and homeostasis. Microglial abnormalities are implicated in a range of neuropsychiatric pathology, including Tourette syndrome (TS) and autism. Histamine (HA) is both a neurotransmitter and an immune modulator. HA deficiency has been implicated as a rare cause of TS and may contribute to other neuropsychiatric conditions. In vitro studies suggest that HA can regulate microglia, but this has never been explored in vivo. We used immunohistochemistry to examine the effects of HA deficiency in histidine decarboxylase (Hdc) knockout mice and of HA receptor stimulation in wild-type animals. We find HA to regulate microglia in vivo, via the H4 receptor. Chronic HA deficiency in Hdc knockout mice reduces ramifications of microglia in the striatum and (at trend level) in the hypothalamus, but not elsewhere in the brain. Depletion of histaminergic neurons in the hypothalamus has a similar effect. Microglia expressing IGF-1 are particularly reduced, However, the microglial response to challenge with lipopolysacchariade (LPS) is potentiated in Hdc knockout mice. Genetic abnormalities in histaminergic signaling may produce a vulnerability to inflammatory challenge, setting the state for pathogenically dysregulated neuroimmune responses.

  5. Instrumentation of LOTIS: Livermore Optical Transient Imaging System; a fully automated wide field of view telescope system searching for simultaneous optical counterparts of gamma ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.S.; Ables, E.; Barthelmy, S.D.; Bionta, R.M.; Ott, L.L.; Parker, E.L.; Williams, G.G.

    1998-03-06

    LOTIS is a rapidly slewing wide-field-of-view telescope which was designed and constructed to search for simultaneous gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical counterparts. This experiment requires a rapidly slewing ({lt} 10 sec), wide-field-of-view ({gt} 15{degrees}), automatic and dedicated telescope. LOTIS utilizes commercial tele-photo lenses and custom 2048 x 2048 CCD cameras to view a 17.6 x 17.6{degrees} field of view. It can point to any part of the sky within 5 sec and is fully automated. It is connected via Internet socket to the GRB coordinate distribution network which analyzes telemetry from the satellite and delivers GRB coordinate information in real-time. LOTIS started routine operation in Oct. 1996. In the idle time between GRB triggers, LOTIS systematically surveys the entire available sky every night for new optical transients. This paper will describe the system design and performance.

  6. Methods, systems and apparatus for synchronous current regulation of a five-phase machine

    DOEpatents

    Gallegos-Lopez, Gabriel; Perisic, Milun

    2012-10-09

    Methods, systems and apparatus are provided for controlling operation of and regulating current provided to a five-phase machine when one or more phases has experienced a fault or has failed. In one implementation, the disclosed embodiments can be used to synchronously regulate current in a vector controlled motor drive system that includes a five-phase AC machine, a five-phase inverter module coupled to the five-phase AC machine, and a synchronous current regulator.

  7. System and method for regulating EGR cooling using a rankine cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Morris, Dave

    2015-12-22

    This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and method for regulating exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooling, and more particularly, to a Rankine cycle WHR system and method, including a recuperator bypass arrangement to regulate EGR exhaust gas cooling for engine efficiency improvement and thermal management. This disclosure describes other unique bypass arrangements for increased flexibility in the ability to regulate EGR exhaust gas cooling.

  8. Self-regulating control of parasitic loads in a fuel cell power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Arturo (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A fuel cell power system comprises an internal or self-regulating control of a system or device requiring a parasitic load. The internal or self-regulating control utilizes certain components and an interconnection scheme to produce a desirable, variable voltage potential (i.e., power) to a system or device requiring parasitic load in response to varying operating conditions or requirements of an external load that is connected to a primary fuel cell stack of the system. Other embodiments comprise a method of designing such a self-regulated control scheme and a method of operating such a fuel cell power system.

  9. Hypoxia differentially regulates the mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases. Role of Ca2+/CaM in the activation of MAPK and p38 gamma.

    PubMed

    Conrad, P W; Millhorn, D E; Beitner-Johnson, D

    2000-01-01

    Hypoxic/ischemic trauma is a primary factor in the pathology of various vascular, pulmonary, and cerebral disease states. Yet, the signaling mechanisms by which cells respond and adapt to changes in oxygen levels are not clearly established. The effects of hypoxia on the stress- and mitogen-activated protein kinase (SAPK and MAPK) signaling pathways were studied in PC12 cells. Exposure to moderate hypoxia (5% O2) was found to progressively stimulate phosphorylation and activation of p38 gamma in particular, and also p38 alpha, two isoforms of the p38 family of stress-activated protein kinases. In contrast, hypoxia had no effect on enzyme activity of p38 beta, p38 beta 2, p38 delta, or on JNK, another stress-activated protein kinase. Prolonged hypoxia also induced phosphorylation and activation of p42/p44 MAPK, although this activation was modest when compared to NGF and UV-induced activation. We further showed that activation of p38 gamma and MAPK during hypoxia requires calcium, as treatment with Ca(2+)-free media or the calmodulin antagonist, W13, blocked the activation of p38 gamma and MAPK, respectively. These studies demonstrate that an extremely typical physiological stress (hypoxia) causes selective activation of specific elements of the SAPKs and MAPKs, and identifies Ca+2/CaM as a critical upstream activator. PMID:10849670

  10. 78 FR 17673 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Contractors' Purchasing Systems Reviews

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE... Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Contractors' Purchasing Systems Reviews AGENCY: Department of Defense... previously approved information collection requirement concerning contractors' purchasing systems reviews....

  11. 75 FR 6669 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Contractors' Purchasing Systems Reviews

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE... Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Contractors' Purchasing Systems Reviews AGENCIES: Department of... contractors' purchasing systems reviews. A request for public comments was published in the Federal...

  12. Electronics System for the GammaTracker Handheld CdZnTe Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Myjak, Mitchell J.; Morris, Scott J.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; McCann, Jason M.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Rohrer, John S.; Burghard, Brion J.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

    2007-12-31

    We are currently developing a handheld radioisotope identifier containing eighteen position-sensitive CdZnTe crystals. In addition to isotope identification, the device performs basic Compton imaging to determine the location of suspected sources. This paper gives an overview of the electronics system we have designed for this instrument. We use specialized application-specific integrated circuits to preprocess the outputs of each CdZnTe crystal. A low-power microprocessor running Windows CE drives the user interface and implements the isotope identification and directionality computations. Finally, we use a field-programmable gate array to perform the computationally intensive imaging tasks in real time.

  13. Real time wide area radiation surveillance system (REWARD) based on 3d silicon and (CD,ZN)Te for neutron and gamma-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disch, C.

    2014-09-01

    Mobile surveillance systems are used to find lost radioactive sources and possible nuclear threats in urban areas. The REWARD collaboration [1] aims to develop such a complete radiation monitoring system that can be installed in mobile or stationary setups across a wide area. The scenarios include nuclear terrorism threats, lost radioactive sources, radioactive contamination and nuclear accidents. This paper will show the performance capabilities of the REWARD system in different scnarios. The results include both Monte Carlo simulations as well as neutron and gamma-ray detection performances in terms of efficiency and nuclide identification. The outcomes of several radiation mapping survey with the entire REWARD system will also be presented.

  14. Optimizing Assurance: The Risk Regulation System in Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Sandra L.; Holmes, John G.; Collins, Nancy L.

    2006-01-01

    A model of risk regulation is proposed to explain how people balance the goal of seeking closeness to a romantic partner against the opposing goal of minimizing the likelihood and pain of rejection. The central premise is that confidence in a partner's positive regard and caring allows people to risk seeking dependence and connectedness. The risk…

  15. A Review of Emotion Regulation in Intelligent Tutoring Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malekzadeh, Mehdi; Mustafa, Mumtaz Begum; Lahsasna, Adel

    2015-01-01

    Having improved emotional (affective) state may have several benefits on learners, such as promoting higher cognitive flexibility and opens the learner to discovery of new ideas and possibilities. On other side, negative emotional states like boredom and frustration have been linked with less use of self-regulation and cognitive strategies for…

  16. A temperature regulating circuit for experimental localized current field hyperthermia systems.

    PubMed

    Astrahan, M A; George, F W

    1980-01-01

    Interest in localized current field (LCF) hyperthermia tumor therapy is rapidly increasing. As yet, however, there is no integral LCF system commercially available. An experimental LCF system may be readily assembled from discrete, general purpose components, except for the tumor temperature regulating circuitry. In this article we present an LCF system designed around general purpose components and a simple circuit for temperature regulation. Comments on system safety, calibration, and performance are also included.

  17. The orphan nuclear receptor DAX-1 acts as a novel transcriptional corepressor of PPAR{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Gwang Sik; Lee, Gha Young; Nedumaran, Balachandar; Park, Yun-Yong; Kim, Kyung Tae; Park, Sang Chul; Lee, Young Chul; Kim, Jae Bum Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2008-05-30

    DAX-1 is an atypical nuclear receptor (NR) which functions primarily as a transcriptional corepressor of other NRs via heterodimerization. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {gamma} is a ligand-dependent NR which performs a key function in adipogenesis. In this study, we evaluated a novel cross-talk mechanism between DAX-1 and PPAR{gamma}. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that DAX-1 inhibits the transactivity of PPAR{gamma} in a dose-dependent manner. DAX-1 directly competed with the PPAR{gamma} coactivator (PGC)-1{alpha} for binding to PPAR{gamma}. Endogenous levels of DAX-1 were significantly lower in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes as compared to preadipocytes. Using a retroviral expression system, we demonstrated that DAX-1 overexpression downregulates the expression of PPAR{gamma} target genes, resulting in an attenuation of adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells. Our results suggest that DAX-1 acts as a corepressor of PPAR{gamma} and performs a potential function in the regulation of PPAR{gamma}-mediated cellular differentiation.

  18. Early-time Observations of Gamma-ray Burst Error Boxes with the Livermore Optical Transient Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, George Grant

    2000-08-01

    Approximately three times per day a bright flash of high energy radiation from the depths of the universe encounters the Earth. These gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) were discovered circa 1970 yet their origin remains a mystery. Traditional astronomical observations of GRBs are hindered by their transient nature. They have durations of only a few seconds and occur at random times from unpredictable directions. In recent years, precise GRB localizations and rapid coordinate dissemination have permitted sensitive follow-up observations. These observations resulted in the identification of long wavelength counterparts within distant galaxies. Despite the wealth of data now available the physical mechanism which produces these extremely energetic phenomena is still unknown. In the near future, simultaneous and early-time optical observations of GRBs will aid in constraining the theoretical models. The Livermore Optical Transient Imaging System (LOTIS) is an automated robotic wide field-of-view telescope dedicated to the search for prompt and early-time optical emission from GRBs. Since routine operations began in October 1996 LOTIS has responded to over 145 GRB triggers. LOTIS has not yet detected optical emission from a GRB but upper limits provided by the telescope constrain the theoretical emission mechanisms. Super-LOTIS, also a robotic wide field-of-view telescope, is 100 times more sensitive than LOTIS. Routine observations from Steward Observatory's Kitt Peak Station will begin in the immediate future. During engineering test runs Super-LOTIS obtained its first upper limit on the early-time optical afterglow of GRBs. An overview of the history and current state of GRBs is presented. Theoretical models are reviewed briefly. The LOTIS and Super-LOTIS hardware and operating procedures are discussed. A summary of the results from both LOTIS and Super-LOTIS and an interpretation of those results is presented. Plans for future studies with both systems are briefly stated.

  19. Neutron dosimetry in the containment of a pressurized water reactor using a neutron-sensitive beta/gamma dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Kralick, S.C.; Watson, J.E. Jr.; Croslin, S.W.

    1986-06-01

    In this study the Panasonic UD-802 dosimeter was evaluated as a potential neutron dosimeter for use in the containment of a pressurized water reactor by comparing the results from the UD-802 with remmeter readings. The Panasonic UD-802 dosimeter is used routinely as a beta and gamma dosimeter but due to the natural Li and B in the thermoluminescent materials, it is also sensitive to neutrons. Since a dosimeter's response to neutrons is energy-dependent, proper calibration of the UD-802 in the environment for which it is to be used was an important consideration of the study. To calibrate the system, UD-802 dosimeters were mounted on polyethylene phantoms and irradiated to reference doses at selected locations in containment. The reference doses were determined based on remmeter dose-rate measurements and stay times. The thermoluminescent response of the dosimeters and the reference measurements were used to obtain a response ratio at each location. The average response ratio (unit of dosimeter response per millirem) was 3.7 and all response ratios were within +/-30% of this mean value. Specific characteristics of the UD-802 were also investigated, that is, the effects that dosimeter distance from the phantom and a person's movement through containment have on response. The dosimeter distance from the phantom was found to have a minimal effect on response, but the system was found to be dependent upon the angle of the phantom relative to the reactor core, necessitating a correction in the calibration factor. The overall conclusion of this study was that the Panasonic UD-802 dosimeter can be used for neutron dosimetry in containment of a pressurized water reactor.

  20. Environmental measurement-while-drilling-gamma ray spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system technology demonstration plan for use at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.V.; Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Gruebel, R.D.

    1996-08-01

    The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling-Gamma Ray Spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides the capability of producing real-time environmental and drillbit data during drilling operations. This demonstration plan presents information on the EMWD-GRS technology, demonstration design, Cs-137 contamination at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin, responsibilities of demonstration participants, and the policies and procedures for the demonstration to be conducted at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin. The EMWD-GRS technology demonstration will consist of continuously monitoring for gamma-radiation contamination while drilling two horizontal boreholes below the backfilled retention basin. These boreholes will pass near previously sampled vertical borehole locations where concentrations of contaminant levels are known. Contaminant levels continuously recorded by the EMWD-GRS system during drilling will be compared to contaminant levels previously determined through quantitative laboratory analysis of soil samples.