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Sample records for gamma-thionin-like soybean se60

  1. Antimicrobial activity of {gamma}-thionin-like soybean SE60 in E. coli and tobacco plants

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yeonhee Choi, Yang Do; Lee, Jong Seob

    2008-10-17

    The SE60, a low molecular weight, sulfur-rich protein in soybean, is known to be homologous to wheat {gamma}-purothionin. To elucidate the functional role of SE60, we expressed SE60 cDNA in Escherichia coli and in tobacco plants. A single protein band was detected by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) after anti-FLAG affinity purification of the protein from transformed E. coli. While the control E. coli cells harboring pFLAG-1 showed standard growth with Isopropyl {beta}-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction, E. coli cells expressing the SE60 fusion protein did not grow at all, suggesting that SE60 has toxic effects on E. coli growth. Genomic integration and the expression of transgene in the transgenic tobacco plants were confirmed by Southern and Northern blot analysis, respectively. The transgenic plants demonstrated enhanced resistance against the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that SE60 has antimicrobial activity and play a role in the defense mechanism in soybean plants.

  2. Soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The primary vulnerability of soybean production to climate change is likely to be from the effects of drought, which may be exacerbated by high temperature events. Technological adaptation can likely take advantage of warming in some production areas and rising concentrations of atmospheric carbon ...

  3. Crystallization kinetics of Sn40Se60 thin films for phase change memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Joshua M.; Karimi, Patrick M.; Njoroge, Walter K.

    2015-06-01

    The crystallization kinetics of Sn40Se60 thin films has been successfully investigated using sheet resistance versus temperature measurements. Thermal evaporation was used to deposit the films on ordinary glass substrates. The crystallization temperature for Sn40Se60 thin film was found to be 156.6 ± 0.3 °C. In the as-deposited state, the sheet resistance was found to be 195 MΩ/□, this value declined to 1560 Ω/□ upon annealing. The value of activation energy obtained from the Kissinger plot was 0.62 ± 0.07 eV. From the results obtained, Sn40Se60 is a promising alloy for PCM application because of its high electrical contrast, high crystallization temperature, and relatively high activation energy.

  4. Coexistence of fast photodarkening and slow photobleaching in Ge19As21Se60 thin films.

    PubMed

    Khan, Pritam; Barik, A R; Vinod, E M; Sangunni, K S; Jain, H; Adarsh, K V

    2012-05-21

    We experimentally demonstrate the coexistence of two opposite photo-effects, viz. fast photodarkening (PD) and slow photobleaching (PB) in Ge(19)As(21)Se(60) thin films, when illuminated with a laser of wavelength 671 nm. PD appears to begin instantaneously upon light illumination and saturates in tens of seconds. By comparison, PB is a slower process that starts only after PD has saturated. Both PD and PB follow stretched exponential dependence on time. Modeling of overall change as a linear sum of two contributions suggests that the changes in As and Ge parts of glass network respond to light effectively independent of each other.

  5. Determination and analysis of optical constants for Ge15Se60Bi25 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atyia, H. E.; Hegab, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    Thin films of Ge15Se60Bi25 were deposited, at room temperature, on glass substrates by thermal evaporation technique. The optical reflectance and transmittance of amorphous Ge15Se60Bi25 films were measured at normal incident in the wavelength range (500-2500 nm). The optical constants, the refractive index n and the absorption index k, were determined and analyzed according to different approximate methods using the transmittance measurements only and accurate method using the transmittance and reflectance measurements. Analysis of the absorption index k data reveal the values of the optical band gap Egopt, the width of tails Ee and the type of transitions. Some optical parameters such as, high frequency dielectric constant ε∞, dispersion parameters (oscillation energy Es and the dispersion energy Ed), real and imaginary parts of complex dielectric constant (ε1 and ε2) and dielectric parameters (dissipation factor tan δ, dielectric relaxation time τ, the volume and surface energy loss functions) were estimated by analyzing the refractive index n data.The relative errors for all optical parameters depending on different approximate methods were identified and discussed.

  6. Investigation of As40Se60 chalcogenide glass in precision glass molding for high-volume thermal imaging lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huddleston, Jeremy; Novak, Jacklyn; Moreshead, William V.; Symmons, Alan; Foote, Edward

    2015-05-01

    The growing demand for thermal imaging sensors and cameras has focused attention on the need for larger volumes of lower cost optics in this infrared region. A major component of the cost of thermal imaging lenses is the germanium content. As40Se60 was developed as a moldable, germanium-free chalcogenide glass that can serve as a low cost alternative to germanium and other infrared materials. This material also has promising characteristics for improved optical performance, especially with regard to reduced thermal sensitivity. As40Se60 has found acceptance as a material to be diamond turned or polished, but it is only now emerging as a legitimate candidate for precision glass molding. This paper will review chalcogenide molding and characterize As40Se60 for widespread use in highvolume thermal imaging optics. The relative advantages and disadvantages of As40Se60 as compared to other chalcogenide glasses will also be discussed.

  7. Preparation and investigation of GaxGe25As15Se60-x (x = 1 ÷ 5) glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiryaev, V. S.; Karaksina, E. V.; Velmuzhov, A. P.; Sukhanov, M. V.; Kotereva, T. V.; Plekhovich, A. D.; Churbanov, M. F.; Filatov, A. I.

    2017-05-01

    Chalcogenide glasses of GaxGe25As15Se60-x (x = 0; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5) compositions are prepared; their transmission range, optical band gap energy, thermal properties and stability against crystallization are studied. It is shown that these glasses have a high transparency in the mid-IR region (from 0.8 to 15 μm), a high glass transition temperature (≥320 °C) and a low tendency to crystallize. The optical band gap energy of GaxGe25As15Se60-x (x = 0; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5) glasses decreases from 1.68 to 1.43 eV as the gallium content increases and the selenium decreases. Their glass network, according to IR spectroscopy data, consists of Ge(Se1/2)4 tetrahedrons and AsSe3/2 pyramids. The Ga2Ge25As15Se58 and Ga3Ge25As15Se57 glasses have highest stability against crystallization. The content of hydrogen and oxygen impurities in the purest glass samples, fabricated using a combination of chemical distillation purification method and vapor transport reaction technique, does not exceed 0.06 ppm (wt) and 0.5 ppm (wt), respectively.

  8. Soybean Overview

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soybean is a legume and oilseed as well. Its bushy plants grow annually, adapt to a wide range of soils and climates, and enrich soils with nitrogen. Its seeds are valued for unique composition and versatile end uses as food, feed, and industrial materials. Currently, the soybean is an importa...

  9. Preparation and characterization of the As40Se60 and As38.8Se61.2 glasses with high quality for the single mode IR glass fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Min-Suk; Seo, Inseok

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, high quality chalcogenide infrared-transmitting As40Se60 and As38.8Se61.2 glasses were prepared and characterized for single mode glass fibers. In order to obtain high purity glasses, the starting materials, As and Se (99.9999%), were purified using a distillation method, which required heat treatment under vacuum using silica tubes and a liquid N2 trap system. As40Se60 and As38.8Se61.2 glasses are chosen as core and cladding, respectively. From the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the As40Se60 and As38.8Se61.2 glasses was 183 °C and 173 °C, respectively. Infrared transmission of the two glasses shows good transmittance over the range of 1-12 μm. There is a slight absorption in both glasses at ∼4.4 μm which is related to Se-H bonds. In order to measure the refractive index over the range of ∼2 -12 μm, prisms of 40 mm × 40 mm × 15 mm with 20° angles were made and were carefully polished. It was found that the refractive indices of As40Se60 were slightly higher than those of the As38.8Se61.2.

  10. Utilizing soybean milk to culture soybean pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Liquid and semi-solid culture media are used to maintain and proliferate bacteria, fungi, and Oomycetes for research in microbiology and plant pathology. In this study, a comparison was made between soybean milk medium, also referred to as soymilk, and media traditionally used for culturing soybean ...

  11. Soybean irrigation management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean is an important crop and a major component of the agricultural economy in the Missouri Bootheel and throughout Missouri. USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) reported that in 2012, 960 thousand acres of soybeans were harvested in Southeast Missouri (Butler, Cape Girardeau, ...

  12. Soybean Production Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Keith R.

    These lesson plans for teaching soybean production in a secondary or postsecondary vocational agriculture class are organized in nine units and cover the following topics: raising soybeans, optimum tillage, fertilizer and lime, seed selection, pest management, planting, troubleshooting, double cropping, and harvesting. Each lesson plan contains…

  13. Soybean Production Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Keith R.

    These lesson plans for teaching soybean production in a secondary or postsecondary vocational agriculture class are organized in nine units and cover the following topics: raising soybeans, optimum tillage, fertilizer and lime, seed selection, pest management, planting, troubleshooting, double cropping, and harvesting. Each lesson plan contains…

  14. SOYBEAN.APHID.SD.2017

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infestations by soybean aphid (SA) can reduce soybean yield. Thus, SA-resistant soybean may be useful in reducing infestations and limiting yield loss. Expression of resistance was characterized among 746 soybean accessions in 56 growth chamber tests at the North Central Agricultural Research Labo...

  15. Seasonal soybean crop reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemaster, E. W. (Principal Investigator); Chance, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Data are presented from field measurements of 1980 including 5 acquisitions of handheld radiometer reflectance measurements, 7 complete sets of parameters for implementing the Suits mode, and other biophysical parameters to characterize the soybean canopy. LANDSAT calculations on the simulated Brazilian soybean reflectance are included along with data collected during the summer and fall on 1981 on soybean single leaf optical parameters for three irrigation treatments. Tests of the Suits vegetative canopy reflectance model for the full hemisphere of observer directions as well as the nadir direction show moderate agreement for the visible channels of the MSS and poor agreement in the near infrared channel. Temporal changes in the spectral characteristics of the single leaves were seen to occur as a function of maturity which demonstrates that the absorptance of a soybean single leaf is more a function of thetransmittancee characteristics than the seasonally consistent single leaf reflectance.

  16. Argentina soybean yield model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callis, S. L.; Sakamoto, C.

    1984-01-01

    A model based on multiple regression was developed to estimate soybean yields for the country of Argentina. A meteorological data set was obtained for the country by averaging data for stations within the soybean growing area. Predictor variables for the model were derived from monthly total precipitation and monthly average temperature. A trend variable was included for the years 1969 to 1978 since an increasing trend in yields due to technology was observed between these years.

  17. Protein profile of mature soybean seeds and prepared soybean milk.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Caruso, Giuseppe; Cavaliere, Chiara; Samperi, Roberto; Stampachiacchiere, Serena; Zenezini Chiozzi, Riccardo; Laganà, Aldo

    2014-10-08

    The soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) is economically the most important bean in the world, providing a wide range of vegetable proteins. Soybean milk is a colloidal solution obtained as water extract from swelled and ground soybean seeds. Soybean proteins represent about 35-40% on a dry weight basis and they are receiving increasing attention with respect to their health effects. However, the soybean is a well-recognized allergenic food, and therefore, it is urgent to define its protein components responsible for the allergenicity in order to develop hypoallergenic soybean products for sensitive people. The main aim of this work was the characterization of seed and milk soybean proteome and their comparison in terms of protein content and specific proteins. Using a shotgun proteomics approach, 243 nonredundant proteins were identified in mature soybean seeds.

  18. Soybean (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Stacey, Gary

    2016-07-12

    Gary Stacey, associate director of the National Center for Soybean Biotechnology at the University of Missouri, gives a talk simply titled "Soybean" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  19. Soybean (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, Gary

    2010-03-24

    Gary Stacey, associate director of the National Center for Soybean Biotechnology at the University of Missouri, gives a talk simply titled "Soybean" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  20. Vegetable soybean tolerance to pyroxasulfone

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    If registered for use on vegetable soybean, pyroxasulfone would fill an important gap in weed management systems in the crop. In order to determine the potential crop injury risk of pyroxasulfone on vegetable soybean, the objective of this work was to quantify vegetable soybean tolerance to pyroxasu...

  1. Soybean seed proteome rebalancing

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Eliot M.

    2014-01-01

    The soybean seed’s protein content and composition are regulated by both genetics and physiology. Overt seed protein content is specified by the genotype’s genetic framework and is selectable as a breeding trait. Within the genotype-specified protein content phenotype soybeans have the capacity to rebalance protein composition to create differing proteomes. Soybeans possess a relatively standardized proteome, but mutation or targeted engineering can induce large-scale proteome rebalancing. Proteome rebalancing shows that the output traits of seed content and composition result from two major types of regulation: genotype and post-transcriptional control of the proteome composition. Understanding the underlying mechanisms that specifies the seed proteome can enable engineering new phenotypes for the production of a high-quality plant protein source for food, feed, and industrial proteins. PMID:25232359

  2. Sunflowers versus soybeans

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, J.D.C.

    1980-10-01

    While both soybeans and sunflowers provide oil and protein, sunflowers offer the higher potential yield of oil per hectare. Research to modify vegetable oils to improve their fuel properties is suggested, particularly on improving the characteristics of the oil as a fuel for diesel engines.

  3. Management Affects Soybean Nodulation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Symbiotic dinitrogen fixation may contribute 40 – 70% of the nitrogen required by soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] during the growing season. Therefore, sustaining nitrogen input is critical for profitable grain yield and sustaining long-term soil productivity. We evaluated management practices used...

  4. Transgenic soybeans and soybean protein analysis: an overview.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Savithiry; Luthria, Devanand; Bae, Hanhong; Lakshman, Dilip; Mitra, Amitava

    2013-12-04

    To meet the increasing global demand for soybeans for food and feed consumption, new high-yield varieties with improved quality traits are needed. To ensure the safety of the crop, it is important to determine the variation in seed proteins along with unintended changes that may occur in the crop as a result various stress stimuli, breeding, and genetic modification. Understanding the variation of seed proteins in the wild and cultivated soybean cultivars is useful for determining unintended protein expression in new varieties of soybeans. Proteomic technology is useful to analyze protein variation due to various stimuli. This short review discusses transgenic soybeans, different soybean proteins, and the approaches used for protein analysis. The characterization of soybean protein will be useful for researchers, nutrition professionals, and regulatory agencies dealing with soy-derived food products.

  5. Fighting Asian Soybean Rust

    PubMed Central

    Langenbach, Caspar; Campe, Ruth; Beyer, Sebastian F.; Mueller, André N.; Conrath, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi is a biotrophic fungus provoking SBR disease. SBR poses a major threat to global soybean production. Though several R genes provided soybean immunity to certain P. pachyrhizi races, the pathogen swiftly overcame this resistance. Therefore, fungicides are the only current means to control SBR. However, insensitivity to fungicides is soaring in P. pachyrhizi and, therefore, alternative measures are needed for SBR control. In this article, we discuss the different approaches for fighting SBR and their potential, disadvantages, and advantages over other measures. These encompass conventional breeding for SBR resistance, transgenic approaches, exploitation of transcription factors, secondary metabolites, and antimicrobial peptides, RNAi/HIGS, and biocontrol strategies. It seems that an integrating approach exploiting different measures is likely to provide the best possible means for the effective control of SBR. PMID:27375652

  6. Fighting Asian Soybean Rust.

    PubMed

    Langenbach, Caspar; Campe, Ruth; Beyer, Sebastian F; Mueller, André N; Conrath, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi is a biotrophic fungus provoking SBR disease. SBR poses a major threat to global soybean production. Though several R genes provided soybean immunity to certain P. pachyrhizi races, the pathogen swiftly overcame this resistance. Therefore, fungicides are the only current means to control SBR. However, insensitivity to fungicides is soaring in P. pachyrhizi and, therefore, alternative measures are needed for SBR control. In this article, we discuss the different approaches for fighting SBR and their potential, disadvantages, and advantages over other measures. These encompass conventional breeding for SBR resistance, transgenic approaches, exploitation of transcription factors, secondary metabolites, and antimicrobial peptides, RNAi/HIGS, and biocontrol strategies. It seems that an integrating approach exploiting different measures is likely to provide the best possible means for the effective control of SBR.

  7. Soybean Growth Aboard ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a photo of soybeans growing in the Advanced Astroculture (ADVASC) Experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The ADVASC experiment was one of the several new experiments and science facilities delivered to the ISS by Expedition Five aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-111 mission. An agricultural seed company will grow soybeans in the ADVASC hardware to determine whether soybean plants can produce seeds in a microgravity environment. Secondary objectives include determination of the chemical characteristics of the seed in space and any microgravity impact on the plant growth cycle. Station science will also be conducted by the ever-present ground crew, with a new cadre of controllers for Expedition Five in the ISS Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Controllers work in three shifts around the clock, 7 days a week, in the POCC, the world's primary science command post for the Space Station. The POCC links Earth-bound researchers around the world with their experiments and crew aboard the Space Station.

  8. Soybean Growth Aboard ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a photo of soybeans growing in the Advanced Astroculture (ADVASC) Experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The ADVASC experiment was one of the several new experiments and science facilities delivered to the ISS by Expedition Five aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-111 mission. An agricultural seed company will grow soybeans in the ADVASC hardware to determine whether soybean plants can produce seeds in a microgravity environment. Secondary objectives include determination of the chemical characteristics of the seed in space and any microgravity impact on the plant growth cycle. Station science will also be conducted by the ever-present ground crew, with a new cadre of controllers for Expedition Five in the ISS Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Controllers work in three shifts around the clock, 7 days a week, in the POCC, the world's primary science command post for the Space Station. The POCC links Earth-bound researchers around the world with their experiments and crew aboard the Space Station.

  9. Soybean Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) Affects Soybean Spectral Reflectance

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Tavvs M.; Macrae, Ian V.; Koch, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is the most economically important insect pest of soybean in the north central United States. Scouting-based integrated pest management (IPM) programs could become more efficient and more widely adopted by using plant spectral reflectance to estimate soybean aphid injury. Our objective was to determine whether plant spectral reflectance is affected by soybean aphid feeding. Field trials were conducted in 2013 and 2014 using caged plots. Early-, late-, and noninfested treatments were established to create a gradient of soybean aphid pressure. Whole-plant soybean aphid densities were recorded weekly. Measurements of plant spectral reflectance occurred on two sample dates per year. Simple linear regression models were used to test the effect of cumulative aphid-days (CAD) on plant spectral reflectance at 680 nm (RED) and 800 nm (NIR), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and relative chlorophyll content. Data indicated that CAD had no effect on canopy-level RED reflectance, but CAD decreased canopy-level NIR reflectance and NDVI. Canopy- and leaf-level measurements typically indicated similar plant spectral response to increasing CAD. CAD generally had no effect on relative chlorophyll content. The present study provides the first documentation that remote sensing holds potential for detecting changes in plant spectral reflectance induced by soybean aphid. The use of plant spectral reflectance in soybean aphid management may assist future IPM programs to reduce sampling costs and prevent prophylactic insecticide sprays. PMID:26470392

  10. SOYBEAN.APHID.LH.2009

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Expression of soybean aphid (SA) resistance was characterized among 496 soybean lines in a twice-replicated field-plot test at the Eastern South Dakota Soil and Water Research Farm near Brookings, SD, in 2009. Natural infestations of SA occurred but were supplemented by placing individual stems of ...

  11. Brazil soybean yield covariance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callis, S. L.; Sakamoto, C.

    1984-01-01

    A model based on multiple regression was developed to estimate soybean yields for the seven soybean-growing states of Brazil. The meteorological data of these seven states were pooled and the years 1975 to 1980 were used to model since there was no technological trend in the yields during these years. Predictor variables were derived from monthly total precipitation and monthly average temperature.

  12. Phomopsis seed decay of soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean Phomopsis seed decay (PSD) causes poor seed quality and suppresses yield in most soybean-growing countries. The disease is caused primarily by the fungal pathogen Phomopsis longicolla along with other Phomopsis and Diaporthe spp. Infected seed range from symptomless to shriveled, elongated, ...

  13. Evaluation of Soybean Germplasm for Resistance to Soybean Rust in Vietnam

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean rust, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi Sydow, is a severe foliar disease of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] that occurs throughout most soybean producing regions of the world. Soybean rust may be managed with fungicides, but the utilization of soybean cultivars that are resistant to the path...

  14. 7 CFR 1220.614 - Soybeans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Soybeans. 1220.614 Section 1220.614 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.614 Soybeans. Soybeans means...

  15. 7 CFR 1220.128 - Soybeans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Soybeans. 1220.128 Section 1220.128 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.128 Soybeans. The...

  16. 7 CFR 1220.128 - Soybeans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Soybeans. 1220.128 Section 1220.128 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.128 Soybeans. The...

  17. 7 CFR 1220.127 - Soybean products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Soybean products. 1220.127 Section 1220.127... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.127 Soybean products. The...

  18. 7 CFR 1220.128 - Soybeans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Soybeans. 1220.128 Section 1220.128 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.128 Soybeans. The...

  19. 7 CFR 1220.128 - Soybeans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Soybeans. 1220.128 Section 1220.128 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.128 Soybeans. The...

  20. 7 CFR 1220.614 - Soybeans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Soybeans. 1220.614 Section 1220.614 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.614 Soybeans. Soybeans means...

  1. 7 CFR 1220.614 - Soybeans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Soybeans. 1220.614 Section 1220.614 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.614 Soybeans. Soybeans means...

  2. 7 CFR 1220.614 - Soybeans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Soybeans. 1220.614 Section 1220.614 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.614 Soybeans. Soybeans means...

  3. 7 CFR 1220.127 - Soybean products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Soybean products. 1220.127 Section 1220.127... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.127 Soybean products. The...

  4. 7 CFR 1220.127 - Soybean products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Soybean products. 1220.127 Section 1220.127... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.127 Soybean products. The...

  5. 7 CFR 1220.128 - Soybeans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Soybeans. 1220.128 Section 1220.128 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.128 Soybeans. The...

  6. 7 CFR 1220.127 - Soybean products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Soybean products. 1220.127 Section 1220.127... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.127 Soybean products. The...

  7. 7 CFR 1220.614 - Soybeans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Soybeans. 1220.614 Section 1220.614 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.614 Soybeans. Soybeans means...

  8. 7 CFR 1220.127 - Soybean products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Soybean products. 1220.127 Section 1220.127... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.127 Soybean products. The...

  9. Soybean aphids making their summer appearance early

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two small, soft-bodied insects have begun showing up in South Dakota soybean. One is the soybean aphid, and the other is a mealybug. Soybean aphids are yellow to yellow/green and are usually found feeding on the underside of leaves. Incidence of soybean aphid has been a bit higher than typical fo...

  10. CRYSTALLINE SOYBEAN TRYPSIN INHIBITOR

    PubMed Central

    Kunitz, M.

    1947-01-01

    A study has been made of the general properties of crystalline soybean trypsin inhibitor. The soy inhibitor is a stable protein of the globulin type of a molecular weight of about 24,000. Its isoelectric point is at pH 4.5. It inhibits the proteolytic action approximately of an equal weight of crystalline trypsin by combining with trypsin to form a stable compound. Chymotrypsin is only slightly inhibited by soy inhibitor. The reaction between chymotrypsin and the soy inhibitor consists in the formation of a reversibly dissociable compound. The inhibitor has no effect on pepsin. The inhibiting action of the soybean inhibitor is associated with the native state of the protein molecule. Denaturation of the soy protein by heat or acid or alkali brings about a proportional decrease in its inhibiting action on trypsin. Reversal of denaturation results in a proportional gain in the inhibiting activity. Crystalline soy protein when denatured is readily digestible by pepsin, and less readily by chymotrypsin and by trypsin. Methods are given for measuring trypsin and inhibitor activity and also protein concentration with the aid of spectrophotometric density measurements at 280 mµ. PMID:19873496

  11. Detection of genetically modified soybean in crude soybean oil.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Zorica; Vasiljević, Ivana; Zdjelar, Gordana; Ðorđević, Vuk; Ignjatov, Maja; Jovičić, Dušica; Milošević, Dragana

    2014-02-15

    In order to detect presence and quantity of Roundup Ready (RR) soybean in crude oil extracted from soybean seed with a different percentage of GMO seed two extraction methods were used, CTAB and DNeasy Plant Mini Kit. The amplifications of lectin gene, used to check the presence of soybean DNA, were not achieved in all CTAB extracts of DNA, while commercial kit gave satisfactory results. Comparing actual and estimated GMO content between two extraction methods, root mean square deviation for kit is 0.208 and for CTAB is 2.127, clearly demonstrated superiority of kit over CTAB extraction. The results of quantification evidently showed that if the oil samples originate from soybean seed with varying percentage of RR, it is possible to monitor the GMO content at the first stage of processing crude oil.

  12. First report of Alfalfa mosaic virus and Soybean dwarf virus on soybean in North Dakota

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) is the major oilseed crop in North Dakota with production concentrated in the eastern half of the state. Only one virus, Soybean mosaic virus, has been reported from soybean in North Dakota. In 2010, 200 soybean fields from 25 counties that have the majority of soybe...

  13. Organic foliar Milstop shows efficacy against soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) on soybean (Glycine max)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) has been produced in the United States since 1765. Soybean aphids (Aphis glycines Matsumura) were first detected on soybean in the United States in 2000 and now cause an estimated yield loss of up to US$4.9 billion annually. Organic soybean producers have few insecti...

  14. Registration of three soybean germplasm lines resistant to Phakopsora pachyrhizi (soybean rust)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean rust, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi Sydow, is one of the most important foliar diseases of soybean [Glycine max (L.)Merr.]. Development of rust resistant lines is one objective of many soybean breeding programs. Three soybean germplasm lines esignated as TGx 1987-76F (Reg. No. xxx, PI 6577...

  15. Characterization and quantitation of soybean proteins in commercial soybean products by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    García-Ruiz, C; García, M C; Torre, M; Marina, M L

    1999-07-01

    Capillary electrophoresis was applied for the first time to determine soybean proteins in commercial soybean products. The most suitable conditions for the analysis of these products in less than 7 min were 0.05 M phosphate buffer (pH 8) with 1 M urea; detection wavelength, 254 nm; applied voltage, 20 kV; and temperature, 30 degrees C. Quantitation of soybean proteins was achieved using referenced conditions by means of the method of standard additions, using as standard a soybean protein isolate. This method was validated and applied to the quantitation of soybean proteins in commercial products derived from soybean protein isolate and soybean seeds.

  16. Spectral Detection of Soybean Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and Confounding Insecticide Effects in Soybean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Tavvs Micael

    Soybean aphid, Aphis glycines (Hemiptera: Aphididae) is the primary insect pest of soybean in the northcentral United States. Soybean aphid may cause stunted plants, leaf discoloration, plant death, and decrease soybean yield by 40%. Sampling plans have been developed for supporting soybean aphid management. However, growers' perception about time involved in direct insect counts has been contributing to a lower adoption of traditional pest scouting methods and may be associated with the use of prophylactic insecticide applications in soybean. Remote sensing of plant spectral (light-derived) responses to soybean aphid feeding is a promising alternative to estimate injury without direct insect counts and, thus, increase adoption and efficiency of scouting programs. This research explored the use of remote sensing of soybean reflectance for detection of soybean aphids and showed that foliar insecticides may have implications for subsequent use of soybean spectral reflectance for pest detection. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  17. Magnesium Uptake by Soybeans

    PubMed Central

    Leggett, J. E.; Gilbert, W. A.

    1969-01-01

    Magnesium contents of soybean (Glycine max) roots increase and the K and Ca contents decrease with increased MgCl2 concentrations in ambient solutions. The Mg uptake is inhibited when both Ca and K are present in the solution, but not by K or Ca alone. Chloride uptake, which is very low from the MgCl2 solution, is greatly enhanced by the presence of K. The selectivity against Mg imparted by K + Ca appears to be at an external barrier for cation uptake as shown by its dependence on the presence of Ca in the external solution. The Ca content of roots is influenced only slightly by changes in external Ca concentrations from 10−4 to 10−2m, but that of shoots is greatly enhanced as the Ca concentration is increased or the K concentration is decreased. These effects on Ca contents are explained as arising from transport to the shoot without involvement of vacuoles of root cells. PMID:16657186

  18. Soybean, a promising health source.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Aparicio, I; Redondo Cuenca, A; Villanueva-Suárez, M J; Zapata-Revilla, M A

    2008-01-01

    Health properties and uses of soybean, as well as the different chemical and botanical characteristics of this legume are shown in this review. Soybean represents an excellent source of high quality protein, it has a low content in saturated fat, it contains a great amount of dietary fibre and its isoflavone content makes it singular among other legumes. Many researches have been carried out into the benefits of legumes: chickpeas, beans, lentils and soy, among others, but characterization and positive health effects of soybeans have been recently studied. The interest in this legume has increased because of its functional components. Most of the studies have been focused on soybean protein as a possible source of prevention against cardiovascular disease. This positive effect may be due to a decrease in serum cholesterol concentrations. In addition, there are many studies on isoflavones, non-nutritive substances, associated with prevention and treatment of different chronic diseases. Moreover, some studies have shown the health properties of soy dietary fibre. Therefore, it would be interesting to consider the replacement of animal based foods for soybean foods in order to obtain some nutritional benefits.

  19. Diseases of Soybean and Their Management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean is the sole domesticated member of the approximately 20 known Glycine spp. It is the most important oilseed crop worldwide. FAO has estimated that 180.4 x 106 t soybeans were produced on 79.7 x 106 ha worldwide in 2001-2003. An average loss of global soybean production due to disease has bee...

  20. Developing Metrics for Managing Soybean Aphids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stage-specific economic injury levels form the basis of integrated pest management for soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) in soybean (Glycine max L.). Experimental objectives were to develop a procedure for calculating economic injury levels of the soybean aphid specific to the R2 (full bloom...

  1. Tilling to detect induced mutations in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) is an important nitrogen-fixing crop that provides much of the world’s protein and oil. However, the available tools for investigation of soybean gene function are limited. Nevertheless, chemical mutagenesis can be applied to soybean followed by screening for mutations...

  2. Resistance to Phomopsis Seed Decay in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phomopsis seed decay (PSD) of soybean is caused primarily by the fungal pathogen, Phomopsis longicolla T.W. Hobbs along with other Phomopsis and Diaporthe spp. This disease causes poor seed quality and suppresses yield in most soybean-growing countries. Infected soybean seeds can be symptomless, but...

  3. Effects of selective genetic introgression from wild soybean to soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Commercial soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] breeding in the U.S. currently relies on a narrow genetic base in which more than half of the genetic contribution, calculated by pedigree analysis, comes from only 5 ancestral lines. For decades, but more intensely in recent years, efforts have been made ...

  4. Separation of soybean saponins from soybean meal by a technology of foam fractionation and resin adsorption.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianxing; Wu, Zhaoliang; Liu, Wei; Gao, Yanfei; Guo, Shenghao; Kang, Shufang

    2016-05-18

    Foam fractionation and resin adsorption were used to recover soybean saponins from the industrial residue of soybean meal. First, a two-stage foam fractionation technology was studied for concentrating soybean saponins from the leaching liquor. Subsequently, resin adsorption was used to purify soybean saponins from the foamate in foam fractionation. The results showed that the enrichment ratio, the recovery percentage, and the purity of soybean saponins by using the two-stage foam fractionation technology could reach 4.45, 74%, and 67%, respectively. After resin adsorption and desorption, the purity of soybean saponins in the freeze-dried powder from the desorption solution was 88.4%.

  5. Optimizing chlorophyll content in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Traditionally, leaf chlorophyll content has not been among the target traits for improving crop yield. However, current chlorophyll concentrations may be in excess of the amount that would maximize the season integral of photosynthesis in a crop monoculture, such as soybean, that achieves a high lea...

  6. Agriculture Education. Soybeans and Rice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuttgart Public Schools, AR.

    This curriculum guide is designed for group instruction of secondary students enrolled in one or two semester-long courses in agricultural education. The guide presents units of study in the following areas: (1) soybeans, (2) rice, and (3) orientation. Each of the 17 units of instruction follows a typical format: terminal objective, specific…

  7. Archaeophytopathology of Global Soybean Rust

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi and P. meibomiae are two rust species that infect soybean (Glycine max). A number of other hosts support the uredinial growth of these Phakopsora, including Pachyrhizus erosus, Pueraria lobata, and Vigna unguiculata, but no aecial host is known. Traditionally, these two species...

  8. Nutritional value of raw soybeans, extruded soybeans, roasted soybeans and tallow as fat sources in early lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Amanlou, H; Maheri-Sis, N; Bassiri, S; Mirza-Aghazadeh, A; Salamatdust, R; Moosavi, A; Karimi, V

    2012-01-01

    Thirty multiparous Holstein cows (29.8 ± 4.01days in milk; 671.6 ± 31.47 kg of body weight) were used in a completely randomized design to compare nutritional value of four fat sources including tallow, raw soybeans, extruded soybeans and roasted soybeans for 8 weeks. Experimental diets were a control containing 27.4 % alfalfa silage, 22.5% corn silage, and 50.1% concentrate, and four diets with either tallow, raw soybean, extruded soybean, or roasted soybean added to provide 1.93% supplemental fat. Dry matter and NEL intakes were similar among treatments, while cows fed fat diets had significantly (P<0.05) high NEL intakes when compared to control with no fat. Supplemental fat, whether tallow or full fat soybeans increased milk production (1.89-2.45 kg/d; P<0.01) and FCM production (1.05-2.79; P<0.01). Milk fat yield and percentage of cows fed fat-supplemented diets were significantly (P<0.01 and P<0.05 respectively) higher than control. Between fat-supplemented diets, roasted soybean caused highest milk fat yield and extruded soybean caused lowest milk fat yield. There was no significant effect of supplemental fat on the milk protein and lactose content and yield. Feed efficiency of fat-supplemented diets was significantly (P<0.01) higher than control. Body weight, body weight change and BCS (body condition score) of cows, as well as energy balance and energy efficiency were similar between treatments. In conclusion, while there was no significant effect of fat sources on production response of cows, fat originating from heat-treated soybean help to minimize imported RUP (rumen undegradable protein) sources level as fish meal in comparison with tallow and raw soybean oil. In the Current study, there was no statistical significance among nutritional values of oil from extruded soybeans and roasted soybeans.

  9. A 2014 nationwide survey of the distribution of Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV) and Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV) major viruses in South Korean soybean fields, and changes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2014 symptomatic soybean samples were collected throughout Korea, and were tested for the most important soybean viruses found in Korea, namely Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV), and Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV). SYMMV was most commonly detected,...

  10. Artificial Selection for Determinate Growth Habit in Soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Determinacy is an agronomically important trait associated with the domestication in soybean (Glycine max). Most soybean cultivars are classifiable into indeterminate and determinate growth habit, while Glycine soja, the wild progenitor of soybean, is indeterminate. Indeterminate (Dt1) and determina...

  11. Characterization and genetics of multiple soybean aphid biotype resistance in five soybean plant introductions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) is the most important soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] insect pest in the USA. The objectives of this study were to characterize the resistance expressed in the five plant introductions (PIs) to four soybean aphid biotypes, determine the mode of resistance in...

  12. Identification and molecular mapping of two soybean aphid resistance genes in soybean PI 587732

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] continues to be plagued by the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura: SA) in North America. New soybean resistance sources are needed to combat the four identified SA biotypes. The objectives of this study were to determine the inheritance of SA resistance in PI 58...

  13. Soybean Aphid Population Dynamics, Soybean Yield Loss and Development of Stage-Specific Economic Injury Levels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stage-specific economic injury levels form the basis of an integrated pest management approach for soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) population management in soybeans (Glycine max L.). Experimental objectives were to develop a procedure for calculating economic injury levels of the soybean a...

  14. First report of soybean vein necrosis-associated virus in Ohio soybean fields

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean vein necrosis-associated virus (SVNaV), a newly discovered tospovirus that infects soybean, was first described as widespread in a number of southern and midwestern states, but so far has not been reported in Ohio. Here we describe its occurrence in six different soybean leaf samples collect...

  15. Newly identified resistance to soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) in soybean plant introduction lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Host-plant resistance is potentially efficacious in managing the soybean aphid (SA, Aphis glycines Matsumura), a major invasive pest in northern soybean-production regions of North America. However, development of aphid-resistant soybean has been complicated by the presence of virulent SA biotypes,...

  16. Overexpression of a soybean salicylic acid methlyltransferase gene confers resistance to soybean cyst nematode

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines Ichinohe, SCN) is the most pervasive pest of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] in the USA and worldwide. SCN reduced soybean yields worldwide by an estimated billion dollars annually. These losses remained stable with the use of resistant cultivars but over ...

  17. Gene expression profiling of resistant and susceptible soybean lines infected with soybean cyst nematode

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is the most devastating pathogen of soybean. Information about the molecular basis of soybean–SCN interactions is needed to assist future development of effective management tools against this pathogen. Toward this end, soybean transcript abundance was measured using th...

  18. Detection of soybean proteins in fermented soybean products by using heating extraction.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Naoki; Matsumoto, Takashi; Morimatsu, Fumiki; Toyoda, Masatake

    2014-05-01

    Soybean is used in processed foods worldwide. Because soybean can cause adverse reactions in some atopic patients, appropriate labeling regarding its content in processed foods is needed to better protect consumers. In the previous study, we developed a reliable sandwich Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) method with high sensitivity and specificity for detecting soybean proteins by using antibody to Gly m Bd 30K, which was originally characterized as a vacuolar protein with a molecular mass of 34 kDa in soybean. The ELISA displayed satisfactory repeatability and reproducibility in an interlaboratory evaluation. However, it could not detect soybean protein in fermented soybean products. We therefore developed an extraction method combined with a heating process to inhibit soybean protein degradation by microbial proteolytic enzymes in fermented soybean products. This extraction method enables the sensitive detection of soybean protein in fermented soybean products such as natto and miso. It was able to detect with high-sensitivity soybean protein present at 10 μg/g levels in model processed foods. This method is suitable for quantifying soybean protein in processed foods without the degrading effects of microbial proteolytic enzymes. The present extraction method can be used sensitively to monitor labeling systems in a reliable manner and should be useful for the mandatory inspections required under Japanese regulations. The extraction and ELISA methods that we developed enable sensitive detection of soybean protein in soybean products, including fermented foods. These methods should be useful for reliable and sensitive monitoring of product labeling systems and should help to solve the problem of insensitive in soybean labeling of processed foods. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Potential Overwintering Locations of Soybean Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) Colonizing Soybean in Ohio and Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Michael S; Hogg, David B

    2015-04-01

    Soybean aphids, Aphis glycines Matsumura, depend on long-distance, wind-aided dispersal to complete their life cycle. Despite our general understanding of soybean aphid biology, little is explicitly known about dispersal of soybean aphids between winter and summer hosts in North America. This study compared genotypic diversity of soybean aphids sampled from several overwintering locations in the Midwest and soybean fields in Ohio and Wisconsin to test the hypothesis that these overwintering locations are sources of the soybean colonists. In addition, air parcel trajectory analyses were used to demonstrate the potential for long-distance dispersal events to occur to or from these overwintering locations. Results suggest that soybean aphids from overwintering locations along the Illinois-Iowa border and northern Indiana-Ohio are potential colonists of soybean in Ohio and Wisconsin, but that Ohio is also colonized by soybean aphids from other unknown overwintering locations. Soybean aphids in Ohio and Wisconsin exhibit a small degree of population structure that is not associated with the locations of soybean fields in which they occur, but that may be related to specific overwintering environments, multiple introductions to North America, or spatial variation in aphid phenology. There may be a limited range of suitable habitat for soybean aphid overwintering, in which case management of soybean aphids may be more effective at their overwintering sites. Further research efforts should focus on discovering more overwintering locations of soybean aphid in North America, and the relative impact of short- and long-distance dispersal events on soybean aphid population dynamics.

  20. Occurrance in Korea of three major soybean viruses, Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYCMV), and Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV) revealed by a nationwide survey of soybean fields

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV) and soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV) were recently isolated in Korea, and it hasn’t been reported how these two viruses were dispersed in Korea. In 2012, we performed a nationwide survey of subsistence soybean farms in Korea. Leaves that appeared ...

  1. Soybeans Ameliolate Diabetic Nephropathy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Eun; Ahn, Soo Kyung; Lee, Won Taek; Lee, Jong Eun; Park, Seung Hwa; Yoon, Bang Bu

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is one of the most frequent and serious complications of diabetes mellitus. Soybeans have been shown to reduce urinary albumin excretion and total cholesterol in non-diabetic patients with nephrotic syndrome. However, reports focusing specifically on diabetic nephropathy are scarce and the available results are inconsistent. It was reported that soybean consumption reduced urinary protein excretion in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy, whereas it was found to elicit an increase in urinary protein excretion when soybeans were consumed by type 2 diabetic patients. This study aims to investigate the effects of soybean in diabetic nephropathy, particularly the effects of consuming soybeans on the histopathology of diabetic nephropathy, using aquaporin (AQP) and osteopontin (OPN) expression as diagnostic markers. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of three groups: control, diabetic with red chow diet and diabetic with soybean diet. For histological examination, the expression of OPN and AQP, renal function and hemoglobin A1c were evaluated at the end of the study. Improvements in glomerular and tubulointerstitial lesions were demonstrated in the diabetic rat group given a soybean diet. OPN and AQP expression were suppressed in the kidney specimens of diabetic rats with the soybean diet. In conclusion, soybeans may prevent the weight loss and morphological disruption of the kidney associated with diabetes mellitus. Soybeans also may improve glycemic control. It seems likely that long-term control of blood glucose levels using a soybean diet could prevent the progression of diabetes mellitus, and therefore, nephropathy could be prevented. PMID:18955330

  2. Pressurized water extraction of isoflavones by experimental design from soybean flour and Soybean Protein Isolate.

    PubMed

    Moras, Benjamin; Rey, Stéphane; Vilarem, Gérard; Pontalier, Pierre-Yves

    2017-01-01

    A Doehlert experimental design was conducted and surface response methodology was used to determine the effect of temperature, contact time and solid liquid ratio on isoflavone extraction from soybean flour or Soybean Protein Isolate in pressurized water system. The optimal conditions conducted gave an extraction yield of 85% from soybean flour. For Soybean Protein Isolate compared to soybean flour, the isoflavone extraction yield is 61%. This difference could be explained by higher aglycon content, while aglycon appears to be the least extracted isoflavone by pressurized water. The solid liquid ratio in the ASE cell was the overriding factor in obtaining high yields with both soybean products, while temperature has less influence. A high temperature causes conversion of the malonyls-glucosides and glucosides isoflavone derivatives into glucosides or aglycons forms. pressurized water extraction showed a high solubilization of protein material up to 95% of inserted Soybean Protein Isolate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Involvement of Phenylpropanoids in Soybean Rust Resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Little is known about the metabolic responses of soybean plants to Phakopsora pachyrhizi (rust) attack. It is important to understand what metabolic pathways in soybean plants are involved in the disease response in order to assist in the development of cultivars with improved resistance that produc...

  4. Soybean-based surfactants and their applications

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean is an important source of two natural emulsifiers, i.e., soy lecithin and soy proteins. Crude soybean oil (SBO) contains 1 to 3% phospholipids. These phospholipids are extracted during the processing of crude SBO and are used as lecithin. Soy proteins are obtained after extraction of SBO. Ex...

  5. Analysis of soybean flowering-time genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Control of soybean flowering time is important for geographic adaptation, and maximizing yield. RT-PCR analysis was performed using primers synthesized for a number of putative flowering-time genes based on homology of soybean EST and genomic sequences to Arabidopsis genes. RNA for cDNA synthesis ...

  6. Genetics, Genomics and Breeding in Soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soybean (Glycine max) genome sequencing project began as an interagency project with the DOE’s Joint Genome Institute providing the production sequencing throughput with the NSF and USDA funded groups providing genomic resources and soybean expertise to the project (Jackson et al, 2006). The go...

  7. Quantitative genetics in soybean: Is dominance important?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In soybeans, dominance is generally considered to be non-existent or of little importance. Because genetic variation due to dominance dissipates rapidly with inbreeding, dominance would presumably not be useful in breeding soybean cultivars which are highly inbred. Yet, there is evidence for hetero...

  8. Response of soybean pathogens to glyceollin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ability to recognize pathogens and respond biochemically to prevent or inhibit pathogen invasion and colonization in plant cells is an active disease resistance response in plants. The involvement of soybean phytoalexin glyceollin in defense responses to the soybean pathogens Diaporthe phaseolor...

  9. Elevated Ozone Alters Soybean-Virus Interaction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We examine the effects of elevated O3 and elevated CO2, two major components of global change, on the interaction between soybean and Soybean Mosaic Virus (SMV) by measuring molecular, cellular, and physiological processes, in natural field conditions and in controlled environment. In natural field ...

  10. Factors Affecting Tocopherol Concentrations in Soybean Seeds.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Constanza S; Seguin, Philippe

    2016-12-21

    Soybean seeds contain several health-beneficial compounds, including tocopherols, which are used by the nutraceutical and functional food industries. Soybean tocopherol concentrations are, however, highly variable. Large differences observed in tocopherol concentrations among soybean genotypes together with the relatively simple biosynthetic pathway involving few genes support the feasibility of selecting for high-tocopherol soybean. Tocopherol concentrations are also highly influenced by environmental factors and field management. Temperature during seed filling and soil moisture appear to be the main factors affecting tocopherol concentrations; other factors such as soil fertility and solar radiation also affect concentrations and composition. Field management decisions including seeding date, row spacing, irrigation, and fertilization also affect tocopherols. Knowledge of factors affecting soybean tocopherols is essential to develop management strategies that will lead to the production of seeds with consistent target concentrations that will meet the needs of the nutraceutical and functional food industries.

  11. Genome-wide association mapping of soybean aphid resistance traits

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean aphid is the most damaging insect pest of soybean in the Upper Midwest and is primarily controlled by insecticides. Soybean aphid resistance (i.e., Rag genes) has been documented in some soybean lines at chromosomes 6, 7, 13, and 16, but more sources of resistance are needed. Genome-wide ass...

  12. Pathogenic Variation of Phakopsora pachyrhizi Infecting Soybean in Nigeria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean rust is an important disease in Nigeria and many other soybean-producing countries world-wide. To determine the geographical distribution of soybean rust in Nigeria, soybean fields were surveyed in the Derived Savanna, Northern Guinea Savanna, and Southern Guinea Savanna agroecological zones...

  13. Efficacy of inorganic compounds against soybean aphid, laboratory tests 2012

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infestations by soybean aphids can reduce the yield of soybeans, and the efficacies of various compounds need evaluation for soybean aphid control. Efficacy of various inorganic compounds was compared to that of a water check and conventional insecticides in two growth-chamber tests. Soybean test ...

  14. 21 CFR 172.723 - Epoxidized soybean oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Epoxidized soybean oil. 172.723 Section 172.723... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.723 Epoxidized soybean oil. Epoxidized soybean oil may be... reacting soybean oil in toluene with hydrogen peroxide and formic acid. (b) It meets the following...

  15. 21 CFR 172.723 - Epoxidized soybean oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Epoxidized soybean oil. 172.723 Section 172.723....723 Epoxidized soybean oil. Epoxidized soybean oil may be safely used in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The additive is prepared by reacting soybean oil in toluene with hydrogen peroxide...

  16. 21 CFR 172.723 - Epoxidized soybean oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Epoxidized soybean oil. 172.723 Section 172.723... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.723 Epoxidized soybean oil. Epoxidized soybean oil may be... reacting soybean oil in toluene with hydrogen peroxide and formic acid. (b) It meets the following...

  17. 21 CFR 172.723 - Epoxidized soybean oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Epoxidized soybean oil. 172.723 Section 172.723... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.723 Epoxidized soybean oil. Epoxidized soybean oil may be... reacting soybean oil in toluene with hydrogen peroxide and formic acid. (b) It meets the following...

  18. 21 CFR 172.723 - Epoxidized soybean oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Epoxidized soybean oil. 172.723 Section 172.723... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.723 Epoxidized soybean oil. Epoxidized soybean oil may be... reacting soybean oil in toluene with hydrogen peroxide and formic acid. (b) It meets the following...

  19. A New Soybean Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) Biotype Identified

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One of the greatest threats to soybean production in the main North American soybean production region continues to be the soybean aphid. An earlier study that identified a soybean aphid biotype that could colonize plants with the Rag1 resistance gene has raised concerns about the durability of soyb...

  20. 7 CFR 810.1601 - Definition of soybeans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definition of soybeans. 810.1601 Section 810.1601... GRAIN United States Standards for Soybeans Terms Defined § 810.1601 Definition of soybeans. Grain that consists of 50 percent or more of whole or broken soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) that will not...

  1. 7 CFR 810.1601 - Definition of soybeans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definition of soybeans. 810.1601 Section 810.1601... GRAIN United States Standards for Soybeans Terms Defined § 810.1601 Definition of soybeans. Grain that consists of 50 percent or more of whole or broken soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) that will not...

  2. 7 CFR 1220.313 - Qualified State Soybean Boards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Qualified State Soybean Boards. 1220.313 Section 1220... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN... Soybean Boards. The following State soybean promotion organizations shall be Qualified State...

  3. 7 CFR 1220.313 - Qualified State Soybean Boards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Qualified State Soybean Boards. 1220.313 Section 1220... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN... Soybean Boards. The following State soybean promotion organizations shall be Qualified State...

  4. 7 CFR 1220.313 - Qualified State Soybean Boards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualified State Soybean Boards. 1220.313 Section 1220... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN... Soybean Boards. The following State soybean promotion organizations shall be Qualified State...

  5. 7 CFR 810.1601 - Definition of soybeans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Definition of soybeans. 810.1601 Section 810.1601... GRAIN United States Standards for Soybeans Terms Defined § 810.1601 Definition of soybeans. Grain that consists of 50 percent or more of whole or broken soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) that will not...

  6. 7 CFR 810.1601 - Definition of soybeans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definition of soybeans. 810.1601 Section 810.1601... GRAIN United States Standards for Soybeans Terms Defined § 810.1601 Definition of soybeans. Grain that consists of 50 percent or more of whole or broken soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) that will not...

  7. 7 CFR 810.1601 - Definition of soybeans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Definition of soybeans. 810.1601 Section 810.1601... GRAIN United States Standards for Soybeans Terms Defined § 810.1601 Definition of soybeans. Grain that consists of 50 percent or more of whole or broken soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) that will not...

  8. 7 CFR 1220.313 - Qualified State Soybean Boards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Qualified State Soybean Boards. 1220.313 Section 1220... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN... Soybean Boards. The following State soybean promotion organizations shall be Qualified State...

  9. 7 CFR 1220.313 - Qualified State Soybean Boards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Qualified State Soybean Boards. 1220.313 Section 1220... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN... Soybean Boards. The following State soybean promotion organizations shall be Qualified State...

  10. Effects of Soybean Seed Size on Weed Competition

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Organic soybean producers must rely on various, nonherbicidal tactics for weed management. Increased soybean seed size may be one method to increase the competitiveness of the soybean canopy. Soybean varieties Hutcheson, NC-Roy, and NC-Raleigh were separated into four or five seed size classes. Seed...

  11. Soybean aphid intrabiotype variability based on colonization of specific soybean genotypes.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Michelle; Hill, Curtis B; Voegtlin, David J; Hartman, Glen L

    2015-12-01

    The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is one of the most destructive insect pests on soybeans in the United States. One method for managing this pest is through host plant resistance. Since its arrival in 2000, 4 aphid biotypes have been identified that are able to overcome soybean aphid resistance (Rag) genes. A soybean aphid isolate collected from Moline, Illinois readily colonized soybean plants with the soybean aphid resistance gene Rag2, unlike biotypes 1 and 2, but similar to soybean aphid biotype 3. Two no-choice experiments compared the virulence of the Moline isolate with biotype 3. In both experiments, differences in aphid population counts were not significant (P > 0.05) on soybean genotypes LD08-12957a (Rag2) and LD11-5413a (Rag2), but the aphid counts for the Moline isolate were significantly (P < 0.05) lower than the aphid counts for the biotype 3 isolate on the soybean genotypes Dowling (Rag1), LD05-16611 (Rag1), LD11-4576a (Rag1), and PI 567598B (rag1b and rag3). The Moline isolate was a variant of aphid biotype 3, which is the first report showing that soybean aphid isolates classified as the same biotype, based on virulence against specific Rag genes, can differ in aggressiveness or ability to colonize specific host genotypes.

  12. Improved Soybean Oil for Biodiesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Clemente; Jon Van Gerpen

    2007-11-30

    The goal of this program was to generate information on the utility of soybean germplasm that produces oil, high in oleic acid and low in saturated fatty acids, for its use as a biodiesel. Moreover, data was ascertained on the quality of the derived soybean meal (protein component), and the agronomic performance of this novel soybean germplasm. Gathering data on these later two areas is critical, with respect to the first, soybean meal (protein) component is a major driver for commodity soybean, which is utilized as feed supplements in cattle, swine, poultry and more recently aquaculture production. Hence, it is imperative that the resultant modulation in the fatty acid profile of the oil does not compromise the quality of the derived meal, for if it does, the net value of the novel soybean will be drastically reduced. Similarly, if the improved oil trait negative impacts the agronomics (i.e. yield) of the soybean, this in turn will reduce the value of the trait. Over the course of this program oil was extruded from approximately 350 bushels of soybean designated 335-13, which produces oil high in oleic acid (>85%) and low in saturated fatty acid (<6%). As predicted improvement in cold flow parameters were observed as compared to standard commodity soybean oil. Moreover, engine tests revealed that biodiesel derived from this novel oil mitigated NOx emissions. Seed quality of this soybean was not compromised with respect to total oil and protein, nor was the amino acid profile of the derived meal as compared to the respective control soybean cultivar with a conventional fatty acid profile. Importantly, the high oleic acid/low saturated fatty acids oil trait was not impacted by environment and yield was not compromised. Improving the genetic potential of soybean by exploiting the tools of biotechnology to improve upon the lipid quality of the seed for use in industrial applications such as biodiesel will aid in expanding the market for the crop. This in turn, may

  13. Genome-wide detection of genetic loci associated with soybean aphid resistance in soybean germplasm PI 603712

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) has become one of the major pests of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) in North America since 2000. At least four biotypes of soybean aphid have been confirmed in the United States. Genetic characterization of new sources of soybean aphid resistance will facil...

  14. A Standard Greenhouse Method for Assessing Soybean Cyst Nematode Resistance in Soybean: SCE08 (Standardized Cyst Evaluation 2008)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines Ichinohe, is distributed throughout the soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) production areas of the United States and Canada. SCN remains the most economically important pathogen of soybean in North America; the most recent estimate of soybean yield...

  15. First report of soybean vein necrosis disease caused by soybean vein necrosis-associated virus in Wisconsin and Iowa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several viral diseases of soybean (Glycine max) have been previously identified in the north-central U.S. soybean production area, which includes Wisconsin and Iowa (Hartman et al., 1999). In September 2012, soybean plants with symptoms similar to those reported for soybean vein necrosis disease (SV...

  16. Soybean root nodule acid phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Penheiter, A R; Duff, S M; Sarath, G

    1997-01-01

    Acid phosphatases are ubiquitous enzymes that exhibit activity against a variety of substrates in vitro, although little is known about their intracellular function. In this study, we report the isolation, characterization, and partial sequence of the major acid phosphatase from soybean (Glycine max L.) root nodules. The phosphatase was purified predominantly as a heterodimer with subunits of 28 and 31 kD; homodimers of both subunits were also observed and exhibited phosphatase activity. In addition to the general phosphatase substrate, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, the heterodimeric form of the enzyme readily hydrolyzed 5'-nucleotides, flavin mononucleotide, and O-phospho-L-Tyr. Low or negligible activity was observed with ATP or polyphosphate. Purified nodule acid phosphatase was stimulated by magnesium, inhibited by calcium and EDTA, and competitively inhibited by cGMP and cAMP with apparent Ki values of 7 and 12 microM, respectively. Partial N-terminal and internal sequencing of the nodule acid phosphatase revealed homology to the soybean vegetative storage proteins. There was a 17-fold increase in enzyme activity and a noticeable increase in protein levels detected by immunoblotting methods during nodule development. Both of these parameters were low in young nodules and reached a peak in mature, functional nodules, suggesting that this enzyme is important for efficient nodule metabolism. PMID:9193092

  17. Soybean canopy reflectance modeling data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranson, K. J.; Biehl, L. L.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1984-01-01

    Numerous mathematical models of the interaction of radiation with vegetation canopies have been developed over the last two decades. However, data with which to exercise and validate these models are scarce. During three days in the summer of 1980, experiments are conducted with the objective of gaining insight about the effects of solar illumination and view angles on soybean canopy reflectance. In concert with these experiment, extensive measurements of the soybean canopies are obtained. This document is a compilation of the bidirectional reflectance factors, agronomic, characteristics, canopy geometry, and leaf, stem, and pod optical properties of the soybean canopies. These data sets should be suitable for use with most vegetation canopy reflectance models.

  18. Soybean meal from roundup ready or conventional soybeans in diets for growing-finishing swine.

    PubMed

    Cromwell, G L; Lindemann, M D; Randolph, J H; Parker, G R; Coffey, R D; Laurent, K M; Armstrong, C L; Mikel, W B; Stanisiewski, E P; Hartnell, G F

    2002-03-01

    Dehulled soybean meal prepared from genetically modified, herbicide (glyphosate)-tolerant Roundup Ready soybeans containing the CP4 EPSPS protein and near-isogenic conventional soybeans were assessed in an experiment with growing-finishing pigs. The soybeans were grown in the yr 2000 under similar agronomic conditions except that the Roundup Ready soybeans were sprayed with Roundup herbicide. Both were processed at the same plant. The composition of the two types of soybeans and the processed soybean meal were similar. Corn-soybean meal diets containing conventional or Roundup Ready soybean meal and fortified with minerals and vitamins were fed to 100 cross-bred pigs from 24 to 111 kg BW. Diets contained approximately 0.95% lysine initially and were reduced to 0.80 and 0.65% lysine when pigs reached 55 and 87 kg BW, respectively. There were 10 pens (five pens of barrows and five pens of gilts) per treatment with five pigs per pen. All pigs were scanned at 107 kg mean BW and all barrows were killed at the end of the test for carcass measurements and tissue collection. Rate and efficiency of weight gain, scanned backfat and longissimus area, and calculated carcass lean percentage were not different (P > 0.05) for pigs fed diets containing conventional or Roundup Ready soybean meal. Gilts gained slower, but they were more efficient and leaner (P < 0.05) than barrows. Responses to the type of soybean meal were similar for the two sexes with no evidence of a diet x sex interaction for any of the traits. In most instances, carcass traits of barrows were similar for the two types of soybean meal. Longissimus muscle samples from barrows fed conventional soybean meal tended (P = 0.06) to have less fat than those fed Roundup Ready soybean meal, but water, protein, and ash were similar. Sensory scores of cooked longissimus muscles were not influenced (P > 0.05) by diet. The results indicate that Roundup Ready soybean meal is essentially equivalent in composition and

  19. Risk assessment of soybean-based phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Kwack, Seung Jun; Kim, Kyu-Bong; Kim, Hyung Sik; Yoon, Kyung Sil; Lee, Byung Mu

    2009-01-01

    Koreans generally consume high quantities of soybean-based foods that contain a variety of phytoestrogens, such as, daidzein, zenistein, and biochalin A. However, phytoestrogens are considered to be potential endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC), which interfere with the normal function of the hormonal and reproductive systems. Therefore, dietary exposure to soybean-based phytoestrogens is of concern for Koreans, and comparative dietary risk assessments are required between Japanese (high consumers) versus Americans (low consumers). In this study, a relative risk assessment was conducted based upon daily intake levels of soybean-based foods and phytoestrogens in a Korean cohort, and the risks of photoestrogens were compared with those posed by estradiol and other EDC. Koreans approximately 30-49 yr of age consume on average a total of 135.2 g/d of soy-based foods including soybean, soybean sauce, soybean paste, and soybean oil, and 0.51 mg/kg body weight (bw)/d of phytoestrogens such as daidzein and genistein. Using estimated daily intakes (EDI) and estrogenic potencies (EP), margins of safety (MOS) were calculated where 0.05 is for estradiol (MOS value <1, considered to exert a positive estrogenic effect); thus, MOS values of 1.89 for Japanese, 1.96 for Koreans, and 5.55 for Americans indicate that consumption of soybean-based foods exerted no apparent estrogenic effects, as all MOS values were all higher than 1. For other synthetic EDC used as reference values, MOS values were dieldrin 27, nonylphenol 250, butyl benzyl phthalate 321, bisphenol A 1000, biochanin A 2203, and coumesterol 2898. These results suggest that dietary exposure to phytoestrogens, such as daidzein and genistein, poses a relatively higher health risk for humans than synthetic EDC, although MOS values were all greater than 1.

  20. Control of virus diseases in soybeans.

    PubMed

    Hill, John H; Whitham, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    Soybean, one of the world's most important sources of animal feed and vegetable oil, can be infected by numerous viruses. However, only a small number of the viruses that can potentially infect soybean are considered as major economic problems to soybean production. Therefore, we consider management options available to control diseases caused by eight viruses that cause, or have the potential to cause, significant economic loss to producers. We summarize management tactics in use and suggest direction for the future. Clearly, the most important tactic is disease resistance. Several resistance genes are available for three of the eight viruses discussed. Other options include use of virus-free seed and avoidance of alternative virus hosts when planting. Attempts at arthropod vector control have generally not provided consistent disease management. In the future, disease management will be considerably enhanced by knowledge of the interaction between soybean and viral proteins. Identification of genes required for soybean defense may represent key regulatory hubs that will enhance or broaden the spectrum of basal resistance to viruses. It may be possible to create new recessive or dominant negative alleles of host proteins that do not support viral functions but perform normal cellular function. The future approach to virus control based on gene editing or exploiting allelic diversity points to necessary research into soybean-virus interactions. This will help to generate the knowledge needed for rational design of durable resistance that will maximize global production.

  1. Approaches for Increasing Soybean Use by Low-Income Brazilian Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Maria da Gloria Miotto; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes an educational/distributional campaign to increase use of soybeans by low-income Brazilian families. Initially, no families surveyed used soybeans but, after participating in a program on nutrition and soybeans, and free distribution of soybeans for one month, soybean usage by participants increased even when free soybeans were replaced…

  2. Comparison of 'Fayette' Soybean, Aldicarb, and Experimental Nematicides for Management of Heterodera glycines on Soybean.

    PubMed

    Noel, G R

    1987-10-01

    The efficacies of Heterodera glycines-resistant 'Fayene' soybean and aldicarb for managing H. glycines were compared to the experimental nematicides DS-47187 10F, DS-47357 10F, DS-48145 10F, DS-48165 10F, DS-46995 10F and 5G, and DS-38697 5G during 1981-83. Yield of Fayette was greater than yield of the H. glycines-susceptible cultivar treated with nematicide in 1981 and 1983. Yield of aldicarb-treated soybean was greater than yield of soybean treated with experimental nematicides in 1983. There were no yield differences in 1982. Fewer white females were recovered from Fayette 5 weeks after planting than from soybean treated with nematicides in 1981 and 1982, but not in 1983. Fewer white females were recovered from aldicarb-treated soybean than from experimental nematicide-treated soybean in 1983 but not in 1981 and 1982. In 1983 numbers of first generation white females at 5 weeks and the ratio of those white females to gravid cysts at planting were negatively correlated with soybean yield when soybean was severely damaged by the nematode, but the ratio of final eggs and second-stage juveniles to initial eggs and second-stage juveniles was not correlated with yield.

  3. Integrating Microarray Analysis and the Soybean Genome to Understand the Soybean's Iron Deficiency Response

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transcriptional profiles of soybean (Glycine max, L. Merr) near isogenic lines Clark (PI548553, iron efficient) and IsoClark (PI547430, iron inefficient) were analyzed and compared using the Affymetrix® GeneChip® Soybean Genome Array. A comparison of plants grown under Fe-sufficient and Fe-limited ...

  4. Infestation ratings database for soybean aphid on early-maturity wild soybean lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura; SA) is a major invasive pest of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] in northern production regions of North America. Although insecticides are currently the main method for controlling this pest, SA-resistant cultivars are being developed to sustainably manage ...

  5. The composition of glyphosate-tolerant soybean seeds is equivalent to that of conventional soybeans.

    PubMed

    Padgette, S R; Taylor, N B; Nida, D L; Bailey, M R; MacDonald, J; Holden, L R; Fuchs, R L

    1996-03-01

    One important aspect of the safety assessment of genetically engineered crops destined for food and feed uses is the characterization of the consumed portion of the crop. One crop currently under development, glyphosate-tolerant soybeans (GTS), was modified by the addition of a glyphosate-tolerance gene to a commercial soybean cultivar. The composition of seeds and selected processing fractions from two GTS lines, designated 40-3-2 and 61-67-1, was compared with that of the parental soybean cultivar, A5403. Nutrients measured in the soybean seeds included macronutrients by proximate analyses (protein, fat, fiber, ash, carbohydrates), amino acids and fatty acids. Antinutrients measured in either the seed or toasted meal were trypsin inhibitor, lectins, isoflavones, stachyose, raffinose and phytate. Proximate analyses were also performed on batches of defatted toasted meal, defatted nontoasted meal, protein isolate, and protein concentrate prepared from GTS and control soybean seeds. In addition, refined, bleached, deodorized oil was made, along with crude soybean lecithin, from GTS and control soybeans. The analytical results demonstrated the GTS lines are equivalent to the parental, conventional soybean cultivar.

  6. Interaction of soybean and Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the cause of soybean rust

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean rust, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi H. Sydow & Sydow, is a major disease limiting soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] production in many areas of the world. Yield losses of up to 80% were reported in experimental plots in Taiwan. Although the disease is not always yield limiting, it has the p...

  7. Dynamics of soybean rust epidemics in sequential plantings of soybean cultivars in Nigeria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean rust, caused by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is an important foliar disease of soybean. The disease intensity is dependent on environmental factors, although the precise conditions of most of these factors is not known. To help understand what environmental factors favor disease develop...

  8. Multiple loci condition seed transmission of Soybean mosaic virus in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infection of soybean plants with Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), which is transmitted by aphids and through seed, can cause significant reductions in seed production and quality. Because seed-borne infections are the primary sources of inoculum for SMV infections in North America, host-plant resistance ...

  9. Role of Soybean mosaic virus-encoded proteins in seed and aphid transmission in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is seed and aphid transmitted and can cause significant reductions in yield and seed quality in soybean, Glycine max. The roles in seed and aphid transmission of selected SMV-encoded proteins were investigated by constructing chimeric recombinants between SMV 413 (efficien...

  10. Preceding crop affects soybean aphid abundance and predator-prey dynamics in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop rotations alter the soil environment and physiology of the subsequent crop in ways that may affect herbivore abundance. Soybean aphids are a consistent pest of soybean throughout North America, but little work has focused on how preceding crops may affect aphid populations. In a replicated expe...

  11. Evaluation of Soybean Germplasm for Resistance to Soybean Rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi) in Nigeria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean rust, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is one of the most important constraints to soybean production worldwide. The absence of high levels of host resistance to the pathogen has necessitated the continued search and identification of sources of resistance. In one set of experiments, 178 IIT...

  12. Developing host-plant resistance for hemipteran soybean pests: lessons from soybean aphid and stink bugs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean is one of the world’s leading agricultural crops with multiple uses, including human food, animal feed, edible oil, biofuel, industrial products, cosmetics, etc. In soybean production, United States is the leading country with 33% of world’s total production of 251.5 million Metric tons. How...

  13. Effect of γ irradiation on the fatty acid composition of soybean and soybean oil.

    PubMed

    Minami, Ikuko; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Todoriki, Setsuko; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    Food irradiation is a form of food processing to extend the shelf life and reduce spoilage of food. We examined the effects of γ radiation on the fatty acid composition, lipid peroxidation level, and antioxidative activity of soybean and soybean oil which both contain a large amount of unsaturated fatty acids. Irradiation at 10 to 80 kGy under aerobic conditions did not markedly change the fatty acid composition of soybean. While 10-kGy irradiation did not markedly affect the fatty acid composition of soybean oil under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, 40-kGy irradiation considerably altered the fatty acid composition of soybean oil under aerobic conditions, but not under anaerobic conditions. Moreover, 40-kGy irradiation produced a significant amount of trans fatty acids under aerobic conditions, but not under anaerobic conditions. Irradiating soybean oil induced lipid peroxidation and reduced the radical scavenging activity under aerobic conditions, but had no effect under anaerobic conditions. These results indicate that the fatty acid composition of soybean was not markedly affected by radiation at 10 kGy, and that anaerobic conditions reduced the degradation of soybean oil that occurred with high doses of γ radiation.

  14. Validation of a hairy roots system to study soybean-soybean aphid interactions

    PubMed Central

    Morriss, Stephanie C.; Studham, Matthew E.; Tylka, Gregory L.

    2017-01-01

    The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) is one of the main insect pests of soybean (Glycine max) worldwide. Genomics approaches have provided important data on transcriptome changes, both in the insect and in the plant, in response to the plant-aphid interaction. However, the difficulties to transform soybean and to rear soybean aphid on artificial media have hindered our ability to systematically test the function of genes identified by those analyses as mediators of plant resistance to the insect. An efficient approach to produce transgenic soybean material is the production of transformed hairy roots using Agrobacterium rhizogenes; however, soybean aphids colonize leaves or stems and thus this approach has not been utilized. Here, we developed a hairy root system that allowed effective aphid feeding. We show that this system supports aphid performance similar to that observed in leaves. The use of hairy roots to study plant resistance is validated by experiments showing that roots generated from cotyledons of resistant lines carrying the Rag1 or Rag2 resistance genes are also resistant to aphid feeding, while related susceptible lines are not. Our results demonstrate that hairy roots are a good system to study soybean aphid-soybean interactions, providing a quick and effective method that could be used for functional analysis of the resistance response to this insect. PMID:28358854

  15. Assessment of the effects of Hirsutella minnesotensis on Soybean Cyst Nematode and growth of soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hirsutella minnesotensis is a fungal endoparasite of nematodes juvenile and parasitizes soybean cyst nematodes (SCN) with high frequency. In this study, the effects of two H. minnesotensis isolates on population and distribution of SCN and growth of soybean were evaluated. Experiments were conducted...

  16. Impact of developmental maturity of soybean on the seasonal abundance of soybean aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    PubMed

    Rhainds, Marc; Yoo, Ho Jung S; Bledsoe, Larry; Sadof, Clifford S; Yaninek, Steve; O'Neil, Robert J

    2010-04-01

    The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), alternates between a primary overwintering host (buckthorn, Rhamnus sp.) and a secondary summer host (soybean, Glycine max). Selection of soybean cultivars with different maturity groups may provide growers with a management tool for A. glycines, either directly through its effect on summer populations that cause economic damage or indirectly through its effect on the production of migrants that disperse to the primary host in fall. This study investigated the abundance and seasonality of A. glycines on soybean cultivars with different maturity rates in central Indiana. The abscission of soybean foliage occurred earlier for early maturing than late maturing cultivars, but no other consistent difference in development or yield was detected among the cultivars tested in this study. The abundance of aphids did not vary consistently among cultivars when soybean was most susceptible to economic damage. A laboratory assay evaluating the larviposition preference of A. glycines alate females, combined with a 7-yr survey documenting the colonization of buckthorn by winged aphids, indicated that the production of gynoparae on soybean began in mid-September and continued until leaf abscission. The abundance of aphids during this period was higher on late maturing cultivars than on early maturing cultivars in both 2006 and 2008, whereas no significant effect was detected in 2007. Altogether, these results suggest that planting early maturing soybean cultivars has little effect on damage by aphids on the current season crop but may reduce the number of fall migrants to the primary host.

  17. Transcriptional responses of tolerant and susceptible soybeans to soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) herbivory

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, was introduced in 2000 to North America and has become one of the most significant pests to soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merrill, production. Possible solutions to this problem are the use of resistant plants and the understanding of the genes involved in pl...

  18. Soybean aphid intrabiotype variability based on colonization of specific soybean genotypes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera; Aphididae) is the most destructive insect pest on soybeans in the United States. Since its arrival in 2000, four biotypes have been identified. Host resistance is the most sustainable method for managing this pest and researchers continue to su...

  19. Identificatoin and confirmation of resistance against soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) in eight wild soybean lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The development and use of aphid-resistant soybean (Glycine max) cultivars has been complicated by the presence of multiple virulent biotypes of the soybean aphid (SA, Aphis glycines Matsumura). Ultimately, a variety of unique resistance sources may be needed to develop cultivars with a broad spectr...

  20. Identification of a second Asian soybean rust resistance gene in Hyuuga soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Asian soybean rust (ASR) is an economically significant disease caused by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi. The soybean genes Rpp3 and Rpp?(Hyuuga) confer resistance to specific isolates of the pathogen. Both genes map to chromosome 6 (Gm06)(linkage group (LG) C2). We recently identified 12 additi...

  1. Registration of ‘Wyandot-14’ soybean with resistance to soybean aphid and powdery mildew

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ‘Wyandot-14’ soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] with resistance to soybean aphid biotypes 1 and 2 and resistance to powdery mildew was jointly released by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service and The Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) as a late maturity group (MG) II (2.9) foo...

  2. Soybean aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) response to soybean plant defense: stress levels, tradeoffs, and cross-virulence.

    PubMed

    Enders, Laramy; Bickel, Ryan; Brisson, Jennifer; Heng-Moss, Tiffany; Siegfried, Blair; Zera, Anthony; Miller, Nick

    2014-02-01

    A variety of management methods to control the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) have been investigated since its invasion into North America in 2000, among them plant resistance has emerged as a viable option for reducing aphid damage to soybeans and preventing outbreaks. Plant resistance methods often use natural soybean plant defenses that impose stress on aphids by reducing fitness and altering behavior. Research efforts have heavily focused on identification and development of aphid resistant soybean varieties, leaving much unknown about soybean aphid response to stressful host plant defenses. In this study, we aimed to 1) evaluate lifetime fitness consequences and phenotypic variation in response to host plant-induced stress and 2) investigate whether trade-offs involving fitness costs and/or cross-virulence to multiple antibiotic soybean varieties exists. We compared aphid survival and reproduction during and after a short period of exposure to soybeans with the Rag2 resistance gene and measured aphid clonal variation in response to Rag2 soybeans. In addition, we measured the performance of Rag2 virulent and avirulent aphids on five soybean varieties with various forms of antibiotic resistance. Our results indicate that plant defenses impose high levels of stress and have long-term fitness consequences, even after aphids are removed from resistant plants. We identified one aphid clone that was able to colonize Rag2 among the seven clones tested, suggesting that virulent genotypes may be prevalent in natural populations. Finally, although we did not find evidence of cross-virulence to multiple antibiotic soybean varieties, our results suggest independent mechanisms of aphid virulence to Rag1 and Rag2 that may involve fitness costs.

  3. Methyl salicylate attracts natural enemies and reduces populations of soybean aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in soybean agroecosystems.

    PubMed

    Mallinger, Rachel E; Hogg, David B; Gratton, Claudio

    2011-02-01

    Methyl salicylate, an herbivore-induced plant volatile, has been shown to attract natural enemies and affect herbivore behavior. In this study, methyl salicylate was examined for its attractiveness to natural enemies of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), and for its direct effects on soybean aphid population growth rates. Methyl salicylate lures were deployed in plots within organic soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] fields. Sticky card traps adjacent to and 1.5 m from the lure measured the relative abundance of natural enemies, and soybean aphid populations were monitored within treated and untreated plots. In addition, exclusion cage studies were conducted to determine methyl salicylate's effect on soybean aphid population growth rates in the absence of natural enemies. Significantly greater numbers of syrphid flies (Diptera: Syrphidae) and green lacewings (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) were caught on traps adjacent to the methyl salicylate lure, but no differences in abundance were found at traps 1.5 m from the lure. Furthermore, abundance of soybean aphids was significantly lower in methyl salicylate-treated plots. In exclusion cage studies, soybean aphid numbers were significantly reduced on treated soybean plants when all plants were open to natural enemies. When plants were caged, however, soybean aphid numbers and population growth rates did not differ between treated and untreated plants suggesting no effect of methyl salicylate on soybean aphid reproduction and implicating the role of natural enemies in depressing aphid populations. Although aphid populations were reduced locally around methyl salicylate lures, larger scale studies are needed to assess the technology at the whole-field scale.

  4. Benefits of Neonicotinoid Seed Treatments to Soybean Production

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Read about EPA’s analysis of use of the neonicotinoid seed treatments for insect control in U.S. soybean production. EPA concludes that these seed treatments provide little or no overall benefits to soybean production in most situations.

  5. 7 CFR 1220.228 - Qualified State Soybean Boards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....228 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Expenses and Assessments...

  6. Radiation processing and functional properties of soybean ( Glycine max)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pednekar, Mrinal; Das, Amit K.; Rajalakshmi, V.; Sharma, Arun

    2010-04-01

    Effect of radiation processing (10, 20 and 30 kGy) on soybean for better utilization was studied. Radiation processing reduced the cooking time of soybean and increased the oil absorption capacity of soy flour without affecting its proximate composition. Irradiation improved the functional properties like solubility, emulsification activity and foam stability of soybean protein isolate. The value addition effect of radiation processing has been discussed for the products (soy milk, tofu and tofu fortified patties) prepared from soybean.

  7. Clinorotation affects soybean seedling morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilaire, Emmanuel; Guikema, James A.; Brown, Christopher S.

    1995-01-01

    Although spaceflight does not appear to significantly affect seed germination, it can influence subsequent plant growth. On STS-3 and SL-2, decreased growth (measured as plant length, fresh weight, and dry weight) was noted for pine, oat, and mung bean. In the CHROMEX-01 and 02 experiments with Haplopappus and in the CHROMEX-03 experiment with Arabidopsis, enhanced root growth was noted in the space-grown plants. In the CHROMEX-04 experiments with wheat, both leaf fresh weight and leaf area were diminished in the space-grown plants but there was no difference in total plant height (CS Brown, HG Levine, and AD Krikorian, unpublished data). These data suggest that microgravity impacts growth by whole plant partitioning of the assimilates. The objective of the present study was to determine the influence of clinorotation on the growth and the morphology of soybean seedlings grown in the Biological Research In Canister (BRIC) flight hardware. This experiment provided baseline data for a spaceflight experiment (BRIC-3) flown on STS-63 (February 3-11, 1995).

  8. Clinorotation affects soybean seedling morphology.

    PubMed

    Hilaire, E; Guikema, J A; Brown, C S

    1995-01-01

    Although spaceflight does not appear to significantly affect seed germination, it can influence subsequent plant growth. On STS-3 and SL-2, decreased growth (measured as plant length, fresh weight and dry weight) was noted for pine, oat and mung bean. In the CHROMEX-01 and -02 experiments with Haplopappus and in the CHROMEX-03 experiment with Arabidopsis, enhanced root growth was noted in the space-grown plants. In the CHROMEX-04 experiment with wheat, both leaf fresh weight and leaf area were diminished in the space-grown plants but there was no difference in total plant height (CS Brown, HG Levine, and AD Krikorian, unpublished data). These data suggest that microgravity impacts growth by whole plant partitioning of assimilates. The objective of the present study was to determine the influence of clinorotation on the growth and morphology of soybean seedlings grown in the BRIC (Biological Research In Canister) flight hardware. This experiment provided baseline data for a spaceflight experiment (BRIC-03) flown on STS-63 (Feb. 3-11, 1995).

  9. Clinorotation affects soybean seedling morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilaire, Emmanuel; Guikema, James A.; Brown, Christopher S.

    1995-01-01

    Although spaceflight does not appear to significantly affect seed germination, it can influence subsequent plant growth. On STS-3 and SL-2, decreased growth (measured as plant length, fresh weight, and dry weight) was noted for pine, oat, and mung bean. In the CHROMEX-01 and 02 experiments with Haplopappus and in the CHROMEX-03 experiment with Arabidopsis, enhanced root growth was noted in the space-grown plants. In the CHROMEX-04 experiments with wheat, both leaf fresh weight and leaf area were diminished in the space-grown plants but there was no difference in total plant height (CS Brown, HG Levine, and AD Krikorian, unpublished data). These data suggest that microgravity impacts growth by whole plant partitioning of the assimilates. The objective of the present study was to determine the influence of clinorotation on the growth and the morphology of soybean seedlings grown in the Biological Research In Canister (BRIC) flight hardware. This experiment provided baseline data for a spaceflight experiment (BRIC-3) flown on STS-63 (February 3-11, 1995).

  10. Genome Sequence of the Palaeopolyploid soybean

    SciTech Connect

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Cannon, Steven B.; Schlueter, Jessica; Ma, Jianxin; Mitros, Therese; Nelson, William; Hyten, David L.; Song, Qijian; Thelen, Jay J.; Cheng, Jianlin; Xu, Dong; Hellsten, Uffe; May, Gregory D.; Yu, Yeisoo; Sakura, Tetsuya; Umezawa, Taishi; Bhattacharyya, Madan K.; Sandhu, Devinder; Valliyodan, Babu; Lindquist, Erika; Peto, Myron; Grant, David; Shu, Shengqiang; Goodstein, David; Barry, Kerrie; Futrell-Griggs, Montona; Abernathy, Brian; Du, Jianchang; Tian, Zhixi; Zhu, Liucun; Gill, Navdeep; Joshi, Trupti; Libault, Marc; Sethuraman, Anand; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Nguyen, Henry T.; Wing, Rod A.; Cregan, Perry; Specht, James; Grimwood, Jane; Rokhsar, Dan; Stacey, Gary; Shoemaker, Randy C.; Jackson, Scott A.

    2009-08-03

    Soybean (Glycine max) is one of the most important crop plants for seed protein and oil content, and for its capacity to fix atmospheric nitrogen through symbioses with soil-borne microorganisms. We sequenced the 1.1-gigabase genome by a whole-genome shotgun approach and integrated it with physical and high-density genetic maps to create a chromosome-scale draft sequence assembly. We predict 46,430 protein-coding genes, 70percent more than Arabidopsis and similar to the poplar genome which, like soybean, is an ancient polyploid (palaeopolyploid). About 78percent of the predicted genes occur in chromosome ends, which comprise less than one-half of the genome but account for nearly all of the genetic recombination. Genome duplications occurred at approximately 59 and 13 million years ago, resulting in a highly duplicated genome with nearly 75percent of the genes present in multiple copies. The two duplication events were followed by gene diversification and loss, and numerous chromosome rearrangements. An accurate soybean genome sequence will facilitate the identification of the genetic basis of many soybean traits, and accelerate the creation of improved soybean varieties.

  11. Nod factor enhances calcium uptake by soybean.

    PubMed

    Supanjani, S; Habib, A; Mabood, F; Lee, K D; Donnelly, D; Smith, D L

    2006-01-01

    Inoculation with rhizobia or application of Nod factors (lipo-chitooligosaccharides, LCOs) causes transient increases in cytosolic calcium concentration in root hairs of legume plants. We conducted experiments to evaluate whether application of LCO and inoculation with rhizobia improved (45)CaCl(2) uptake into soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) leaves. Roots of soybean seedlings with one developing trifoliolate were immersed in Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal liquid medium containing treatment solutions and (45)CaCl(2), and the plants were incubated under continuous light. After 24 h, leaf samples were taken, and their radioactivity levels were determined. Addition of NodBj-V (C18:1 MeFuc) at a concentration of 10(-7) M increased (45)Ca(2+) uptake. Inoculation with genistein-induced Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 532C and USDA3 also increased (45)Ca(2+) uptake; whereas, inoculation with strain Bj-168, a nodC-mutant incapable of producing LCO, did not. Rhizobia that do not normally nodulate soybean, i.e. Rhizobium leguminosarum, and Sinorhizobium meliloti did not affect calcium uptake, nor did the tetramer or pentamer of chitosan, or lumichrome. Surprisingly, Rhizobium sp. NGR234, which can nodulate some types of soybean, although without effective N(2)-fixation, also did not affect calcium uptake. This work suggests that the rhizobial symbiosis, in addition to its known role in provision of nitrogen fixation, also improves early calcium uptake into soybean plants.

  12. Zinc in soybeans. Chemical nature and bioavilability

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.

    1987-01-01

    Soybeans were grown hydroponically and intrinsically labeled with /sup 65/Zn through root absorption, stem injection and foliar application. Stem injection resulted in the greatest accumulation of /sup 65/Zn. Regardless of the labeling technique, approximately 40-45% of the seed /sup 65/Zn was associated with the subcellular organelles. The pattern of /sup 65/Zn incorporation into soybeans did not change appreciably as a result of the labelling technique. The major portion of the soluble /sup 65/Zn was either free or associated with very low molecular weight proteins, peptides, or their complexes with phytic acid rather than the major proteins of soybeans. Zinc in soybeans is ionically bound to proteins, peptides and phytic acid. Autoclaving did not affect the chemical association of zinc with soy proteins. Solubility of protein, zinc and phytic acid was studied over the pH range of 3.5-12.0. Bioavailability of zinc to rats from soybeans was lower than from casein and rats adapted to a casein basal diet absorbed more /sup 65/Zn from both casein and soy than rats adapted to a soy basal diet.

  13. Glyphosate-tolerant soybeans remain compositionally equivalent to conventional soybeans (Glycine max L.) during three years of field testing.

    PubMed

    McCann, Melinda C; Liu, Keshun; Trujillo, William A; Dobert, Raymond C

    2005-06-29

    Previous studies have shown that the composition of glyphosate-tolerant soybeans (GTS) and selected processed fractions was substantially equivalent to that of conventional soybeans over a wide range of analytes. This study was designed to determine if the composition of GTS remains substantially equivalent to conventional soybeans over the course of several years and when introduced into multiple genetic backgrounds. Soybean seed samples of both GTS and conventional varieties were harvested during 2000, 2001, and 2002 and analyzed for the levels of proximates, lectin, trypsin inhibitor, and isoflavones. The measured analytes are representative of the basic nutritional and biologically active components in soybeans. Results show a similar range of natural variability for the GTS soybeans as well as conventional soybeans. It was concluded that the composition of commercial GTS over the three years of breeding into multiple varieties remains equivalent to that of conventional soybeans.

  14. The Current Status of the Soybean-Soybean Mosaic Virus (SMV) Pathosystem

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Zhong; Fang, Yuan; Pang, Hongxi

    2016-01-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is one of the most devastating pathogens that cost huge economic losses in soybean production worldwide. Due to the duplicated genome, clustered and highly homologous nature of R genes, as well as recalcitrant to transformation, soybean disease resistance studies is largely lagging compared with other diploid crops. In this review, we focus on the major advances that have been made in identifying both the virulence/avirulence factors of SMV and mapping of SMV resistant genes in soybean. In addition, we review the progress in dissecting the SMV resistant signaling pathways in soybean, with a special focus on the studies using virus-induced gene silencing. The soybean genome has been fully sequenced, and the increasingly saturated SNP markers have been identified. With these resources available together with the newly developed genome editing tools, and more efficient soybean transformation system, cloning SMV resistant genes, and ultimately generating cultivars with a broader spectrum resistance to SMV are becoming more realistic than ever. PMID:27965641

  15. The Current Status of the Soybean-Soybean Mosaic Virus (SMV) Pathosystem.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Zhong; Fang, Yuan; Pang, Hongxi

    2016-01-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is one of the most devastating pathogens that cost huge economic losses in soybean production worldwide. Due to the duplicated genome, clustered and highly homologous nature of R genes, as well as recalcitrant to transformation, soybean disease resistance studies is largely lagging compared with other diploid crops. In this review, we focus on the major advances that have been made in identifying both the virulence/avirulence factors of SMV and mapping of SMV resistant genes in soybean. In addition, we review the progress in dissecting the SMV resistant signaling pathways in soybean, with a special focus on the studies using virus-induced gene silencing. The soybean genome has been fully sequenced, and the increasingly saturated SNP markers have been identified. With these resources available together with the newly developed genome editing tools, and more efficient soybean transformation system, cloning SMV resistant genes, and ultimately generating cultivars with a broader spectrum resistance to SMV are becoming more realistic than ever.

  16. Suitability of Soybean Meal from Insect-Resistant Soybeans for Broiler Chickens.

    PubMed

    Ortega, María A; Davis, Adam J; Boerma, H Roger; Parrott, Wayne A

    2016-03-23

    Benning(M) and Benning(MGH) are near-isogenic lines (NILs) of the soybean cultivar Benning, which contain insect-resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs) from the soybean accession PI 229358. Benning(M) contains QTL-M, which confers antibiosis and antixenosis. In addition to QTL-M, Benning(MGH) contains QTL-G, which confers antibiosis, and QTL-H, which confers antixenosis. Soybean meal was produced from Benning and the NILs. Nutritional composition, digestible amino acid content, and nitrogen-corrected true metabolizable energy (TMEN) were equivalent among soybean meals. A 21-day broiler feeding trial was carried out to determine if the QTLs affect soybean meal quality. Weight gain and feed-to-gain ratio were evaluated. No biologically significant differences were detected for broilers fed Benning, Benning(M), and Benning(MGH). This demonstrates that soybean meal produced from the insect-resistant NILs is equivalent to soybean meal produced from their non-insect-resistant parent cultivar for broiler weight gain.

  17. Accelerating yield potential in soybean: potential targets for biotechnological improvement

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean (Glycine max Merr.) is the world’s most widely grown legume and provides an important source of protein and oil. More efficient agricultural practices and breeding of improved soybean cultivars suited to many latitudes have resulted in steady increases in soybean yields over the past century...

  18. Vegetable soybean tolerance to bentazon, fomesafen, imazamox, linuron, and sulfentrazone

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Poor weed control, resulting from limited herbicide availability and undeveloped integrated weed management systems, is a major hurdle to production of vegetable soybean in the U.S. Vegetable soybean, the same species as grain-type soybean, has few registered herbicides due to unknown crop tolerance...

  19. An update of research on Phomopsis Seed Decay in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phomopsis seed decay (PSD) is one of the most important soybean diseases that causes poor seed quality and further poor germination/vigor in most soybean production areas, especially in southern states. Very few soybean cultivars currently available for planting have resistance to PSD. To identify n...

  20. Pathogenic variation of Phakopsora pachyrhizi infecting soybean in Nigeria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean rust, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is a major disease in many soybean-producing areas in Nigeria. To determine the virulence and the genetic structure of Nigerian field populations of the soybean rust pathogen, a total of 116 purified isolates established from infected leaves randomly co...

  1. 7 CFR 407.16 - Group risk plan for soybean.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Group risk plan for soybean. 407.16 Section 407.16..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GROUP RISK PLAN OF INSURANCE REGULATIONS § 407.16 Group risk plan for soybean. The provisions of the Group Risk Plan for Soybeans for the 2000 and succeeding crop years are as follows: 1...

  2. Phenomorphological characterization of vegetable soybean germplasm lines for commercial production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Growing demand for vegetable soybean has renewed interest in producing the crop in the U.S., a significant importer of vegetable soybean despite being the world’s largest producer and exporter of grain-type soybean. Field studies were conducted over three years to1) compare phenomorphological traits...

  3. Bean Pod Mottle Virus Spread in Insect Feeding Resistant Soybeans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) reduces yield and seed quality in soybeans. No qualitative resistance to this virus has been found in soybean, although some tolerance is known. To test the hypothesis that virus incidence and movement would be reduced in soybeans with resistance to feeding by the viru...

  4. Urediniospore Release and Escape from Rust-Infected Soybean Fields

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi, soybean rust, has infected soybeans in the continental United States from 2004-2006. This study monitored release, dispersal, and germination rates of soybean rust spores produced from epidemics at various stages of development using rotorods, passive traps, and water agar pl...

  5. Putatively novel sources of resistance to soybean cyst nematode

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) remains to be the most economically devastating endo-root parasite of soybean [Glycine max L. (Merrill)], in the USA and worldwide. Currently, two resistance loci, rhg1 and Rhg4 have been the main sources of resistance to SCN. Over 95% of soybean cultivars with SCN resist...

  6. A public program to evaluate commercial soybean cultivars

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The information generated through the evaluation of soybean cultivars entered into the Varietal Information Program for Soybeans (VIPS) provides an independent, objective, and unbiased assessment of hundreds of soybean cultivars used or targeted for use in maturity groups representing the majority o...

  7. 7 CFR 1220.228 - Qualified State Soybean Boards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Qualified State Soybean Boards. 1220.228 Section 1220... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Expenses and...

  8. 7 CFR 1220.122 - Qualified State Soybean Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualified State Soybean Board. 1220.122 Section 1220... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions §...

  9. 7 CFR 1220.122 - Qualified State Soybean Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Qualified State Soybean Board. 1220.122 Section 1220... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions §...

  10. 7 CFR 1220.228 - Qualified State Soybean Boards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Qualified State Soybean Boards. 1220.228 Section 1220... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Expenses and...

  11. 7 CFR 1220.228 - Qualified State Soybean Boards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Qualified State Soybean Boards. 1220.228 Section 1220... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Expenses and...

  12. 7 CFR 1220.122 - Qualified State Soybean Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Qualified State Soybean Board. 1220.122 Section 1220... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions §...

  13. 7 CFR 1220.122 - Qualified State Soybean Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Qualified State Soybean Board. 1220.122 Section 1220... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions §...

  14. 7 CFR 1220.122 - Qualified State Soybean Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Qualified State Soybean Board. 1220.122 Section 1220... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions §...

  15. 7 CFR 1220.228 - Qualified State Soybean Boards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Qualified State Soybean Boards. 1220.228 Section 1220... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Expenses and...

  16. New Plant Introductions with Resistance to the Soybean Aphid

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) (SA) was first found in the northern soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., growing regions of the USA in 2000. By 2005, the aphid had spread to 23 soybean growing states reaching as far south as Mississippi and Georgia and also north into Ontario, Canada. Th...

  17. Screening germplasm for resistance to phomopsis seed decay in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phomopsis longicolla is the primarily cause of soybean Phomopsis seed decay (PSD), a major cause of poor seed quality in the United States. To identify new sources of soybean lines resistant to PSD, field screening of 135 selected soybean germplasm lines representing 28 worldwide origins and maturit...

  18. Soybean seedlings tolerate abrasion from air-propelled grit

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    New tools for controlling weeds would be useful for soybean production in organic systems. Air-propelled abrasive grit is one such tool that performs well for in-row weed control in corn, but crop safety in soybean is unknown. We examined responses to abrasion by corn-cob grit of soybean seedlings a...

  19. A novel flavivirus in the soybean cyst nematode

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heterodera glycines, the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is a subterranean root pathogen that causes the most damaging disease of soybean in the United States. A novel nematode virus genome, soybean cyst nematode virus 5 (SbCNV5), was identified in RNASeq data from SCN eggs and second-stage juveniles. T...

  20. Assessment Of Product In Corn And Soybean Intercropping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Mohammad Mehdi; Yadegari, Mehrab

    2008-01-01

    This experiment was conducted in research station of Fars in 2004, in a piece of Land with a clay texture. In order to evaluate the different ratios of CORN and SOYBEAN intercropping, in comparison to pure culture, a randomized complete block design with 4 replications was adapted. Treatments consist of: p1 = pure corn, p2 = pure soybean, p3 = 50% corn+50% soybean, p4 = %75 corn+%25 soybean, p5 = %75 soybean+%25 corn. This Experiment was conducted by using replacement system. Evaluated factors are as the following Soybean and corn seed yield in pure culture and intercropping, Land Equivalent Ratio, Relative corn yield, Relative soybean yield, aggressively. Results showed that the treatment with %75 SOYBEAN+%25 CORN with LER = 1.19 and also the treatment with %50 soybean+%50 corn with LER—1.11 have preference %19 and %11 respectively higher yield compared to pure culture. Also in relation to the aggressively in treatment with %50corn+%50 soybean and also with %75corn+%25soybean, corn was dominant. Finally the best treatment was %75 soybean+%25corn with %19 efficiency compared to pure culture.

  1. Effect of Ultrasound in Soybean Protein Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukase, Hirokazu; Ohdaira, Etsuzo; Masuzawa, Nobuyoshi; Ide, Masao

    1994-05-01

    Application of ultrasound for accelerating the extraction of nutriments in food processing has been attempted. However, conditions of exposure to ultrasound were not clear in previous studies. This paper reports on the relationship between the ultrasonic pressure and the amount of extracted protein from soybeans. Experiments were conducted using a beaker, in which the ultrasonic fields were precisely measured. Soybean flakes suspended in water were put in the beaker and placed in a water tank. The amount of extracted protein in water upon ultrasonic exposure was calculated by the Kjeldahl method. It was found that the amount of extracted protein increased in proportion to ultrasonic pressure up to the total amount of soybean protein soluble in water. Furthermore, this paper describes the denaturation of the protein produced by the ultrasonic cavitation.

  2. Heterosis and combining ability estimates in isoflavone content using different parental soybean accessions: wild soybean, a valuable germplasm for soybean breeding.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yingdong; Li, Wei; Xiao, Jialei; Lin, Hong; Liu, Ming; Liu, Miao; Luan, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Bixian; Xie, Xuejun; Guo, Donglin; Lai, Yongcai

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavone, a group of secondary metabolites in soybean, is beneficial to human health. Improving isoflavone content in soybean seeds has become one of the most important breeding objectives. However, the narrow genetic base of soybean cultivars hampered crop improvement. Wild soybean is an extraordinarily important gene pool for soybean breeding. In order to select an optimal germplasm for breeding programs to increase isoflavone concentration, 36 F1 soybean progenies from different parental accessions (cultivars, wild, Semi-wild and Interspecific) with various total isoflavone (TIF) concentration (High, Middle, Low) were analyzed for their isoflavone content. Results showed that male parents, except for Cultivars, showed positive GCA effects. In particular, wild soybean had higher positive GCA effects for TIF concentration. Both MP and BP heterosis value declined in the hybrid in which male parents were wild soybean, semi-wild soybean, interspecific offspring and cultivar in turn. In general, combining ability and heterosis in hybrids which had relative higher TIF concentration level parents showed better performance than those which had lower TIF concentration level parents. These results indicated characteristics of isoflavone content were mainly governed by additive type of gene action, and wild relatives could be utilized for breeding of soybean cultivars with this trait. A promising combination was found as the best potential hybrid for isoflavone content improvement.

  3. Heterosis and Combining Ability Estimates in Isoflavone Content Using Different Parental Soybean Accessions: Wild Soybean, a Valuable Germplasm for Soybean Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yingdong; Li, Wei; Xiao, Jialei; Lin, Hong; Liu, Ming; Liu, Miao; Luan, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Bixian; Xie, Xuejun; Guo, Donglin; Lai, Yongcai

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavone, a group of secondary metabolites in soybean, is beneficial to human health. Improving isoflavone content in soybean seeds has become one of the most important breeding objectives. However, the narrow genetic base of soybean cultivars hampered crop improvement. Wild soybean is an extraordinarily important gene pool for soybean breeding. In order to select an optimal germplasm for breeding programs to increase isoflavone concentration, 36 F1 soybean progenies from different parental accessions (cultivars, wild, Semi-wild and Interspecific) with various total isoflavone (TIF) concentration (High, Middle, Low) were analyzed for their isoflavone content. Results showed that male parents, except for Cultivars, showed positive GCA effects. In particular, wild soybean had higher positive GCA effects for TIF concentration. Both MP and BP heterosis value declined in the hybrid in which male parents were wild soybean, semi-wild soybean, interspecific offspring and cultivar in turn. In general, combining ability and heterosis in hybrids which had relative higher TIF concentration level parents showed better performance than those which had lower TIF concentration level parents. These results indicated characteristics of isoflavone content were mainly governed by additive type of gene action, and wild relatives could be utilized for breeding of soybean cultivars with this trait. A promising combination was found as the best potential hybrid for isoflavone content improvement. PMID:25607952

  4. 78 FR 1 - Soybean Promotion and Research: Amend the Order To Adjust Representation on the United Soybean Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-02

    ... and research designed to strengthen the soybean industry's position in the marketplace, and to... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 1220 Soybean Promotion and Research: Amend the Order To Adjust... the Soybean Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Act (Act), membership is reviewed every 3...

  5. Nutritional assessment and fate of DNA of soybean meal from roundup ready or conventional soybeans using rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanzhao; Li, Defa; Wang, Fenglai; Yin, Jingdong; Jin, Hong

    2004-08-01

    This study was conducted to compare the safety of soybean meal prepared from genetically modified (GM) glyphosate-tolerant (Roundup Ready; RR) soybeans and conventional soybeans. Eighty Sprague-Dawley rats (40 males and 40 females) were randomly allotted to one of four groups according to sex and body weight for a 13-week feeding experiment. The rats were fed corn-based diets containing 60% conventional soybean meal, a mixture of 30% conventional and 30% RR soybean meal, 60% or 90% RR soybean meal. All diets were adjusted to an identical nutrient level except the 90% RR diet. The two soybean meals were similar in chemical analysis and amino acid composition. During the 13-week growth trial, body weight (P < 0.05) and feed intake (P < 0.05) decreased only in rats fed with 90% RR soybean meal at the first week. No treatment-related deaths occurred during the experiment. Gross necropsy findings, haematological or urinalysis values and clinical serum parameters showed no meaningful differences between rats fed the control and RR soybean meals. A 145 bp of cp4 epsps gene specific for the GM constructs from RR soybean meal or a 407 bp of lec gene from endogenous soybean DNA could not be detected in investigated masseter muscle samples. No adverse effects of glyphosate-tolerant soybean meal on rats were seen even at levels as high as 90% of the diet.

  6. Soybean aphid feeding on resistant soybean leads to induction of xenobiotic stress response and suppression of salivary effector genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines, poses serious challenges to soybean production in Asia, where it is native, and North-America, where it is invasive. To date, 6 major soybean genes for host plant resistance (HPR) to A. glycines have been identified, including Rag1, which is available in commercial...

  7. Weather variability, climatic change, and soybean production

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    A crop/weather model was used to determine the effect of changing climate and weather variability on soybean production in the Corn Belt. A cooling trend from the 1930s to the 1970s was accompanied by an upward trend in July plus August rainfall. There was decreased weather variability from the 1930s to 1973 and greatly increased weather variability after 1973. Improved weather from 1930 to 1972 increased soybean yields 3 bushels/acre. Higher intensity rainfalls increased in Illinois and Iowa after 1970.

  8. Ultraweak emission imagery of mitosing soybeans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, R. Q.; Usa, M.; Inaba, H.

    1989-02-01

    In the single-photon counting mode, we have obtained images of germinating soybeans and other plant tissues using only the ultraweak light emitted by the specimen. The emission described here is to be distinguished from bioluminescence and is not induced by previous exposure to light, chemical agents or other means, but is a naturally occurring emission associated with normal biochemical processes. The images of germinating soybeans show that emission is strongest in areas of active mitosis, demonstrating that the technique of singlephoton counting imaging can provide useful morphological information.

  9. Soybean-Enriched Snacks Based on African Rice

    PubMed Central

    Marengo, Mauro; Akoto, Hannah F.; Zanoletti, Miriam; Carpen, Aristodemo; Buratti, Simona; Benedetti, Simona; Barbiroli, Alberto; Johnson, Paa-Nii T.; Sakyi-Dawson, Esther O.; Saalia, Firibu K.; Bonomi, Francesco; Pagani, Maria Ambrogina; Manful, John; Iametti, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Snacks were produced by extruding blends of partially-defatted soybean flour with flours from milled or parboiled African-grown rice. The interplay between composition and processing in producing snacks with a satisfactory sensory profile was addressed by e-sensing, and by molecular and rheological approaches. Soybean proteins play a main role in defining the properties of the protein network in the products. At the same content in soybean flour, use of parboiled rice flour increases the snack’s hardness. Electronic nose and electronic tongue discriminated samples containing a higher amount of soybean flour from those with a lower soybean flour content. PMID:28231133

  10. Phytophthora Resistance of Soybean Germplasm with High Potential for Asian Soybean Rust Resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multiple disease resistance is an important component of production agriculture. Major challenges include resistance to Phytophthora root rot caused by evolving Phytophthora sojae races and the recently introduced invasive Asian soybean rust (ASBR) caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi. The diseases cause...

  11. Influence of Herbicide Application to Soybeans on Soybean Cyst Nematode Egg Hatching

    PubMed Central

    Levene, Brian C.; Owen, Micheal D. K; Tylka, Gregory L.

    1998-01-01

    The hatching of Heterodera glycines eggs in soybean root exudates collected after postemergence application of three herbicides, and the hatching potential of H. glycines eggs from females feeding on herbicide-treated plants, were measured in vitro. Hatching in all root exudate solutions (RES) was greater than in deionized water but less than in 0.003 M ZnSO₄ solution. Filtering RES with a 0.22-μm-filter increased H. glycines hatching in RES. Application of acifluorfen, bentazon, and lactofen to foliage of soybean plants inhibited hatching of H. glycines eggs from the same plants. Hatching in RES from the different herbicide-treated soybeans was similar. Application of crop oil concentrate and non-ionic surfactant adjuvant to foliage did not affect hatching of H. glycines eggs from soybean plants. PMID:19274227

  12. Hypolipidaemic effects of dietary whole soybean curd (jeondubu) in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keong Hee; Jeong, Yeon Ho; Lee, Beomgoo; Kang, Wisoo; Choi, Yong Soon

    2011-10-01

    The characteristic of whole soybean curd is that it includes the soybean residue that is discarded as waste in the manufacture of usual soybean curd (known as tofu). In this study the effect of dietary whole soybean curd on lipid profiles in rats was compared with that of usual soybean curd. Rats were fed for 4 weeks with diets differing only in the source of protein, namely casein, whole soybean curd or usual soybean curd. There were no significant differences in growth parameters due to diet differences. However, the two groups fed with curds had significantly lower levels of serum cholesterol and triglyceride than the group fed with casein, the greatest reduction in lipid profiles being observed in the group fed with whole soybean curd. The serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol/total cholesterol ratio was higher in rats fed with whole soybean curd. The results suggest the possibility that whole soybean curd may have more beneficial effects in controlling serum lipid profiles than usual soybean curd that is normally consumed. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Allergenicity of an enzymatic hydrolysate of soybean 2S protein.

    PubMed

    Sung, Dongeun; Ahn, Kang Mo; Lim, Seung-Yong; Oh, Sangsuk

    2014-09-01

    This study was performed to examine how the characteristics of soybean 2S protein influence allergenicity after enzymatic hydrolysis. Soybean 2S protein was extracted and enzymatic hydrolysis was performed using pepsin and chymotrypsin. Allergenicity was observed using soybean-sensitive patients' sera. Only 13.3% (6/45) of soybean-sensitive patients reacted to soybean Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (SKTI), known as the major allergen of soybean 2S protein. After peptic hydrolysis for 90 min at pH 1.2, the intensity of SKTI decreased to 25% but was still visible on SDS-PAGE. Chymotryptic hydrolysis following peptic hydrolysis at pH 8 for 60 min showed a limited hydrolytic effect on soybean 2S protein. Peptic hydrolysis of soybean 2S protein partially reduced the allergenicity of soybean 2S protein, while chymotryptic hydrolysis following peptic hydrolysis increased slightly the allergenicity. Food allergy caused by soybean 2S protein occurred in part of the soybean-sensitive patients. SKTI was partially digested after peptic hydrolysis for 90 min. The allergenicity was decreased with peptic hydrolysis, while subsequent treatment of chymotrypsin increased slightly the allergenicity. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Multiplex single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay for detection of soybean mosaic virus resistance genes in soybean.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ainong; Chen, Pengyin; Vierling, Richard; Zheng, Cuming; Li, Dexiao; Dong, Dekun; Shakiba, Ehsan; Cervantez, Innan

    2011-02-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is one of the most destructive viral diseases in soybean (Glycine max). Three independent loci for SMV resistance have been identified in soybean germplasm. The use of genetic resistance is the most effective method of controlling this disease. Marker assisted selection (MAS) has become very important and useful in the effort of selecting genes for SMV resistance. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), because of its abundance and high-throughput potential, is a powerful tool in genome mapping, association studies, diversity analysis, and tagging of important genes in plant genomics. In this study, a 10 SNPs plus one insert/deletion (InDel) multiplex assay was developed for SMV resistance: two SNPs were developed from the candidate gene 3gG2 at Rsv1 locus, two SNPs selected from the clone N11PF linked to Rsv1, one 'BARC' SNP screened from soybean chromosome 13 [linkage group (LG) F] near Rsv1, two 'BARC' SNPs from probe A519 linked to Rsv3, one 'BARC' SNP from chromosome 14 (LG B2) near Rsv3, and two 'BARC' SNPs from chromosome 2 (LG D1b) near Rsv4, plus one InDel marker from expressed sequence tag (EST) AW307114 linked to Rsv4. This 11 SNP/InDel multiplex assay showed polymorphism among 47 diverse soybean germplasm, indicating this assay can be used to investigate the mode of inheritance in a SMV resistant soybean line carrying Rsv1, Rsv3, and/or Rsv4 through a segregating population with phenotypic data, and to select a specific gene or pyramid two or three genes for SMV resistance through MAS in soybean breeding program. The presence of two SMV resistance genes (Rsv1 and Rsv3) in J05 soybean was confirmed by the SNP assay.

  15. Compositional differences in soybeans on the market: glyphosate accumulates in Roundup Ready GM soybeans.

    PubMed

    Bøhn, T; Cuhra, M; Traavik, T; Sanden, M; Fagan, J; Primicerio, R

    2014-06-15

    This article describes the nutrient and elemental composition, including residues of herbicides and pesticides, of 31 soybean batches from Iowa, USA. The soy samples were grouped into three different categories: (i) genetically modified, glyphosate-tolerant soy (GM-soy); (ii) unmodified soy cultivated using a conventional "chemical" cultivation regime; and (iii) unmodified soy cultivated using an organic cultivation regime. Organic soybeans showed the healthiest nutritional profile with more sugars, such as glucose, fructose, sucrose and maltose, significantly more total protein, zinc and less fibre than both conventional and GM-soy. Organic soybeans also contained less total saturated fat and total omega-6 fatty acids than both conventional and GM-soy. GM-soy contained high residues of glyphosate and AMPA (mean 3.3 and 5.7 mg/kg, respectively). Conventional and organic soybean batches contained none of these agrochemicals. Using 35 different nutritional and elemental variables to characterise each soy sample, we were able to discriminate GM, conventional and organic soybeans without exception, demonstrating "substantial non-equivalence" in compositional characteristics for 'ready-to-market' soybeans. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Stability of isoflavone isomers in steamed black soybeans and black soybean koji stored under different conditions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ru-Yue; Chou, Cheng-Chun

    2009-03-11

    Steamed black soybeans and black soybean koji, a potentially functional food additive, were stored at 4 or 25 degrees C with or without deoxidant and desiccant for 120 days. After storage, steamed black soybeans and koji showed various extents of reduction in isoflavone contents dependent on storage temperature, packaging condition, and the kind of isoflavone isomer. Generally, black soybeans and koji showed the highest residual of isoflavone when they were stored at 4 degrees C with deoxidant and desiccant. Under this storage condition, beta-glucosides (daidzin, glycitin, and genistein), acetyl glucosides (acetyldaidzin, acetylglycitin, and acetylgenistin), manlonyl glucosides (malonyldaidzin, malonglycitin, and malonylgenistin), and aglycones (daidzein, glycitein, and genistin) in steamed black soybeans exhibited residuals of 100.1-100.9, 92.0-99.4, 90.0-94.0, and 77.2-78.8%, respectively, of their original contents after 120 days of storage. Meanwhile, the residuals found in black soybean koji were 77.8-90.0, 13.1-88.9, 66.7-85.5, and 76.4-80.6%, respectively.

  17. Radar backscatter properties of milo and soybeans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, T. F.; Ulaby, F. T.; Metzler, T.

    1975-01-01

    The radar backscatter from fields of milo and soybeans was measured with a ground based radar as a function of frequency (8-18 GHz), polarization (HH and VV) and angle of incidence (0 deg-70 deg) during the summer of 1974. Supporting ground truth was gathered contemporaneously with the backscatter data. At nadir sigma deg of milo correlated highly, r = 0.96, with soil moisture in the milo field at 8.6 GHz but decreased to a value of r = 0.78 at a frequency of 17.0 GHz. Correlation studies of the variations of sigma deg with soil moisture in the soybean fields were not possible due to a lack of a meaningful soil moisture dynamic range. At the larger angles of incidence, however, sigma deg of soybeans did appear to be dependent on precipitation. It is suggested this phenomenon was caused by the rain altering plant geometry. In general sigma deg of both milo and soybeans had a relatively small dynamic range at the higher angles of incidence and showed no significant dependence on the measured crop parameters.

  18. Hydrolysis of soybean protein improves iron bioavailability

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Iron is an important trace metal element in human body. Iron deficiency affects human health, especially pregnant women and children. Soybean protein is a popular food in Asia and can contain a high amount of iron (145.70±0.74 ug/g); however, it is usually reported as an inhibitor of iron absorption...

  19. Organogel formation of soybean oil with waxes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many waxes including plant waxes and animal waxes were evaluated for the gelation ability toward soybean oil (SBO) and compared with hydrogenated vegetable oils, petroleum waxes and commercial non-edible gelling agents to understand factors affecting the gelation ability of a gelator. Sunflower wax...

  20. Waxes as organogelator for soybean oil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This research reveals that a small amount of a food grade plant wax may replace a large amount of the hardstock containing trans-fat or saturated fat. Natural waxes including plant waxes and animal waxes were evaluated for the gelation ability toward soybean oil (SBO) and compared with hydrogenated ...

  1. US corn and soybeans exploratory experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, J. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The results from the U.S. corn/soybeans exploratory experiment which was completed during FY 1980 are summarized. The experiment consisted of two parts: the classification procedures verification test and the simulated aggregation test. Evaluations of labeling, proportion estimation, and aggregation procedures are presented.

  2. Sudden death syndrome of soybean in Argentina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is one of the most common and widely spread root disease affecting soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] in Argentina where it is an economically important crop. This disease was first discovered in this country in 1992 in the Pampas Region, and the following year in Northwest...

  3. Elevated ozone alters soybean-virus interaction.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Damla D; Aldea, Mihai; O'Neill, Bridget F; Benitez, Marisol; Li, Min; Clough, Steven J; DeLucia, Evan H

    2008-10-01

    Increasing concentrations of ozone (O(3)) in the troposphere affect many organisms and their interactions with each other. To analyze the changes in a plant-pathogen interaction, soybean plants were infected with Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) while they were fumigated with O(3). In otherwise natural field conditions, elevated O(3) treatment slowed systemic infection and disease development by inducing a nonspecific resistance against SMV for a period of 3 weeks. During this period, the negative effect of virus infection on light-saturated carbon assimilation rate was prevented by elevated O(3) exposure. To identify the molecular basis of a soybean nonspecific defense response, high-throughput gene expression analysis was performed in a controlled environment. Transcripts of fungal, bacterial, and viral defense-related genes, including PR-1, PR-5, PR-10, and EDS1, as well as genes of the flavonoid biosynthesis pathways (and concentrations of their end products, quercetin and kaempherol derivatives) increased in response to elevated O(3). The drastic changes in soybean basal defense response under altered atmospheric conditions suggest that one of the elements of global change may alter the ecological consequences and, eventually, coevolutionary relationship of plant-pathogen interactions in the future.

  4. Registration of ‘Prohio’ Soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ‘Prohio’ soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]) was developed jointly by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service and The Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) in Wooster, OH and was released as a high-protein high-yielding maturity group IV (relative maturity 4.1) non Roundup Ready® cu...

  5. Automotive gear oil lubricant from soybean oil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of lubricants that are based on renewable materials is rapidly increasing. Vegetable oils have good lubricity, wear protection and low volatility which are desired properties for automotive gear lubricant applications. Soybean oil is used widely in the lubricant industry due to its properti...

  6. Barium toxicity effects in soybean plants.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Ryuichi; Jayachandran, Krish; Nguyen, Nguyen Tran; Boulenouar, Abdellah; Fujita, Kounosuke; Saneoka, Hirofumi

    2008-10-01

    Barium (Ba)-induced phytotoxicity at 100, 1000, or 5000 microM Ba in soybean plants (Glycine max) was investigated under hydroponic culture conditions. Soybean growth and leaf photosynthetic activity were significantly inhibited by all three levels of Ba treatments. In the case of photosynthetic activity, 5000 microM Ba treatment shutdown stomatal opening and perturbed carbon fixation metabolism and translocation. However, 100 and 1000 microM Ba treatments shut down stomatal opening and inhibited carbon fixation, but without perturbation of leaf carbon fixation-related metabolism. Potassium (K) absorption by soybean roots was also reduced in all three Ba treatments. This decreased K absorption reduced K localization at guard cells. Barium accumulation in guard cells also inhibited K transport from epidermal cells to guard cells. This lack of K in guard cells resulted in stomatal closure. As a result of inhibition of K transport into guard cells and stomatal shutdown, photosynthetic activity and plant productivity were inhibited. Our experiment indicates that Ba has phytotoxic effects on soybean plants by inhibiting photosynthesis.

  7. Tolerance of Soybean Crops to Soil Waterlogging

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Monoculture of irrigated paddy rice, common in the Mississippi delta of the United States and in Asia, diminishes soil nutrients, compacts soils, contaminates water supplies, and increases pest and diseases. While the addition of soybean crops to this cropping ecosystem can attenuate many of these p...

  8. The U.S. Soybean Industry. Agricultural Economic Report Number 588.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaub, James; And Others

    This report describes the U.S. soybean industry from producers to consumers and provides a single source of economic and statistical information on soybeans. Highlights are as follows: U.S. soybean production has increased sevenfold since 1950, making soybeans the second highest valued crop after corn. Soybean production has risen in response to…

  9. Methods and evaluation of soybean genotypes for resistance to Colletotrichum truncatum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anthracnose of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] occurs throughout the soybean production areas of the world. The fungal species that cause soybean anthracnose infect all parts of the soybean plant. There is little information on standardizing an inoculation technique or on evaluating soybean germpla...

  10. Geographic distribution of soybean aphid biotypes in USA and Canada during 2008 - 2010

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) is a native pest of soybean in eastern Asia and was detected on soybeans in North America in 2000. In 2004, the soybean variety ‘“Dowling”’ was described to be resistant to soybean aphids with the Rag1 gene for resistance. In 2006, a virulent biotype of s...

  11. Development of Soybean Aphid Genomic and EST-SSR Markers using Next Generation Sequencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) has become the most damaging insect pest of soybean in most of North American soybean growing regions. Biotypes of soybean aphid capable of breaking down the resistance of newly developed aphid resistant soybean cultivars were discovered recently. But gen...

  12. Disruption of Rpp1-mediated soybean rust resistance by virus-induced gene silencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean rust is a fungus that causes disease on soybeans. The discovery of soybean genes and proteins that are important for disease resistance to soybean rust may help improve soybean cultivars through breeding or transgenic technology. Proteins previously discovered in the cell nucleus of soybea...

  13. Overexpression of a soybean salicylic acid methyltransferase gene confers resistance to soybean cyst nematode.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jingyu; Mazarei, Mitra; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Junwei J; Zhuang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Wusheng; Pantalone, Vincent R; Arelli, Prakash R; Stewart, Charles N; Chen, Feng

    2013-12-01

    Salicylic acid plays a critical role in activating plant defence responses after pathogen attack. Salicylic acid methyltransferase (SAMT) modulates the level of salicylic acid by converting salicylic acid to methyl salicylate. Here, we report that a SAMT gene from soybean (GmSAMT1) plays a role in soybean defence against soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines Ichinohe, SCN). GmSAMT1 was identified as a candidate SCN defence-related gene in our previous analysis of soybean defence against SCN using GeneChip microarray experiments. The current study started with the isolation of the full-length cDNAs of GmSAMT1 from a SCN-resistant soybean line and from a SCN-susceptible soybean line. The two cDNAs encode proteins of identical sequences. The GmSAMT1 cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli. Using in vitro enzyme assays, E. coli-expressed GmSAMT1 was confirmed to function as salicylic acid methyltransferase. The apparent Km value of GmSAMT1 for salicylic acid was approximately 46 μM. To determine the role of GmSAMT1 in soybean defence against SCN, transgenic hairy roots overexpressing GmSAMT1 were produced and tested for SCN resistance. Overexpression of GmSAMT1 in SCN-susceptible backgrounds significantly reduced the development of SCN, indicating that overexpression of GmSAMT1 in the transgenic hairy root system could confer resistance to SCN. Overexpression of GmSAMT1 in transgenic hairy roots was also found to affect the expression of selected genes involved in salicylic acid biosynthesis and salicylic acid signal transduction.

  14. Whole cottonseeds or a combination of soybeans and soybeans hulls in the diets of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Abel-Caines, S F; Grant, R J; Haddad, S G

    1997-07-01

    Whole raw soybeans and soybean hulls were evaluated as a dietary replacement for whole cottonseed as determined by rumination and total chewing activity, milk fat percentage, and efficiency of 4% fat-corrected milk (FCM) production. Twenty-six Holstein dairy cows (14 multiparous; 35 +/- 12 d of lactation) were assigned randomly to one of two total mixed rations (TMR) for 15 wk. The whole cottonseed TMR and the soybean plus soybean hull TMR contained 40% of a 45:55 mixture of alfalfa and corn silages (dry matter basis) and either 15% cottonseed or 15% soybeans, 8% soybean hulls, and 0.7% sodium bicarbonate. Both TMR provided 60% of dietary neutral detergent fiber from forage. The TMR, fed twice daily, were isonitrogenous (17.5% crude protein) and equal in neutral detergent fiber (30%). The TMR had no effect on dry matter intake (24.8 kg/d). The cottonseed TMR stimulated greater rumination and total chewing activity. Although milk production was greater for cows fed the cottonseed TMR (35.7 vs. 34.1 kg/d), milk fat production was unaffected by TMR (3.72%). The efficiency of 4% FCM production was similar for cows fed the cottonseed and soybean plus soybean hull TMR (1.33), and both TMR resulted in a positive net energy balance (10.9 Mcal/d). A combination of soybeans, soybean hulls, and sodium bicarbonate was an effective alternative to whole cottonseed as measured by the efficiency of FCM production.

  15. Heating affects the content and distribution profile of isoflavones in steamed black soybeans and black soybean koji.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ru-Yue; Chou, Cheng-Chun

    2008-09-24

    Steamed black soybeans and black soybean koji, a potentially functional food additive, were subjected to heating at 40-100 degrees C for 30 min. It was found that steamed black soybeans and black soybean koji after heating at 80 degrees C or higher generally showed reduced contents of malonylglucoside, acetylglucoside, and aglycone isoflavone and an increased content of beta-glucoside. A lower reduction in malonylglucoside and acetylglucoside isoflavone but greater reduction in aglycone content was noted in steamed black soybeans compared to black soybean koji after a similar heat treatment. After 30 min of heating at 100 degrees C, steamed black soybean retained ca. 90.3 and 83.8%, respectively, of its original malonylglucoside and acetylglucoside isoflavone, compared to lower residuals of 80.9 and 78.8%, respectively, for black soybean koji. In contrast, the heated black soybeans showed an aglycone residual of 68.0%, which is less than the 80.0% noted with the heated black soybean koji.

  16. Genetically modified and wild soybeans: an immunologic comparison.

    PubMed

    Yum, Hye-Yung; Lee, Soo-Young; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Sohn, Myung-Hyun; Kim, Kyu-Earn

    2005-01-01

    Most traits introduced into genetically engineered crops result from the expression of new proteins. As the first step toward assessing the allergenic potential of genetically modified organism (GMO) food, immunologic and physicochemical characterizations are needed. We prepared crude extract from GMO soybeans, wild soybeans, curd, and soy milk and then performed sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). After acidification with HCl, the samples were separated to globulin and whey. To evaluate changes in protein composition, either the samples were heated or pepsin was added. Polymerase chain reaction with primer encoding the 35S-promotor and the 3-enol-pyruvyl-shikimat-5-phosphat-synthase gene were performed, respectively, to detect the GMO component. SDS-PAGE results showed definite protein bands at 80 kDa in GMO soybean, 50 kDa in wild soybean, and a similar distribution of protein bands was noticed below 40 kDa. It was difficult to observe protein distribution because of modifications that occurred during processing in soybean-processed products. After heating, proteins of GMO and wild soybeans showed similar distributions and no distinct bands were detected at 50 and 80 kDa. Although SDS-PAGE analyses of raw GMO and wild soybeans differed, the same protein bands of 68, 37, and 20 kDa were observed in the globulin fraction after acidification. After adding pepsin, 20- and 68-kDa bands were found preserved in GMO and wild soybeans. The polymerase chain reaction procedures with primers specific to GMO soybeans showed that GMO soybeans and some curd samples included a GMO component. The skin test results of 49 patients showed 13 positive results to wild soybeans and 8 positive results to GMO soybeans. One patient had a positive skin test result to GMO soybeans only. Sera from nine patients with positive skin tests to the crude extract and a positive capsulated allergen product test to the soybean antigen were used for the immunoblotting

  17. Beta-conglycinins among sources of bioactives in soybean hydrolysates that inhibited leukemia cells in vitro

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean is a complex matrix containing several potentially bioactive components. The objective was to build a statistical model to predict the anticancer potential of soybean based on the composition of bioactive components in soybean hydrolysates produced by simulated gastrointestinal digestion. ...

  18. Rapid Release of Protease Inhibitors from Soybeans

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, David L.; Yang, Wen-Kuang; Foard, Donald E.; Lin, K.-T. -Davis

    1978-01-01

    Specific antisera were prepared against the Bowman-Birk trypsin inhibitor and four other trypsin inhibitors of low molecular weight isolated from soybeans (Glycine max L. cv. Tracy). These antisera were used to detect the presence and amount of the inhibitors in: (a) seeds and protein extracts of soybean meal; (b) seedlings; and (c) the water surrounding the seeds and roots of seedlings. Lectin activities in seeds, seedlings, and water were also determined at the same time as the protease inhibitor activities. By competitive inhibition of immunoprecipitation, the combined five low molecular weight protease inhibitors were found to constitute the following percentages of proteins (w/w): 6.3% in defatted soybean meal; 8.1% of the protein extracted from the meal by a buffer of pH 8.6; 8.3, 14.7, 15.2, 16.1, 17.2, and 18.9% of the protein in a lyophilisate of water in which seeds were incubated for 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 hours, respectively; 8.2% in a lyophilisate of water in which roots of seedlings grew for 20 days; 1.5% in cotyledons; and less than 0.1% in epicotyls, hypocotyls, and roots of 12-day-old seedlings. Hemagglutination activities, expressed as the lowest amount of protein required to give a positive agglutination of 0.2 ml of 2% rabbit red blood cells, were as follows: purified soybean lectin, 0.08 μg; lyophilisate of water in which seeds were incubated for 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 hours, 10, 2.5, 5, 5, and 2.5 μg, respectively; lyophilisate of water in which roots grew for 20 days, 5 μg; 12-day-old cotyledons, roots, epicotyls, and hypocotyls, 12.5, 100, >1,000, and >500 μg, respectively. The results indicate that a large amount of protease inhibitors as well as lectins are released from seeds during the first 8 hours of imbibition. Neither lima bean trypsin inhibitor (mol wt, 10,000) nor Kunitz soybean trypsin inhibitor (mol wt, 21,500) showed competitive inhibition in tests with antisera against low molecular weight soybean protease inhibitors

  19. Preparation and characterization of fine powdered whole soybean curd

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Junghee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Efficacy and comparative characteristics of fine powdered whole soybean curd. [Methods] Ground dried soybean to a fine powder (700 mesh) containing bean components in its entirety, and then produced whole soybean curd. Analysed its nutritive components, bioactive substances, antioxidant activities and texture compared with pressed soybean curd. [Results] Compared with pressed soybean curd, the nutrients and isoflavone in whole soybean curd were slightly decreased, but antioxidant activities, dietary fibers and moisture content were increased. Also, the yield rate of the total process was improved 1.9 times. [Conclusion] Fine powdered whole bean curd has antioxidant effects, contains dietary fiber and possesses soft characteristics, hence has development potential in the diet market and as food for patients. PMID:27274462

  20. Comparison of different strategies for soybean antioxidant extraction.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyun; Ji, Xiangming; Canning, Corene; Sun, Shi; Zhou, Kequan

    2010-04-14

    Three extraction strategies including Soxhlet extraction, conventional solid-liquid extraction, and ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE) were compared for their efficiency to extract phenolic antioxidants from Virginia-grown soybean seeds. Five extraction solvents were evaluated in UAE and the conventional extraction. The soybean extracts were compared for their total phenolic contents (TPC), oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH(*)) scavenging activities. The results showed that UAE improved the extraction of soybean phenolic compounds by >54% compared to the conventional and Soxhlet extractions. Among the tested solvents, 50% acetone was the most efficient for extracting soybean phenolic compounds. There was no significant correlation between the TPC and antioxidant activities of the soybean extracts. The extracts prepared by 70% ethanol had the highest ORAC values. Overall, UAE with 50% acetone or 70% ethanol is recommended for extracting soybean antioxidants on the basis of the TPC and ORAC results.

  1. Preparation and characterization of fine powdered whole soybean curd.

    PubMed

    Shin, Junghee

    2015-12-31

    Efficacy and comparative characteristics of fine powdered whole soybean curd. Ground dried soybean to a fine powder (700 mesh) containing bean components in its entirety, and then produced whole soybean curd. Analysed its nutritive components, bioactive substances, antioxidant activities and texture compared with pressed soybean curd. Compared with pressed soybean curd, the nutrients and isoflavone in whole soybean curd were slightly decreased, but antioxidant activities, dietary fibers and moisture content were increased. Also, the yield rate of the total process was improved 1.9 times. Fine powdered whole bean curd has antioxidant effects, contains dietary fiber and possesses soft characteristics, hence has development potential in the diet market and as food for patients.

  2. Overexpression of four Arabidopsis thaliana NHLgenes in soybean (Glycine max) roots and their effect over resistance to the soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the US, the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is the most destructive pathogen of soybean. Currently grown soybean varieties are not resistant to all field populations of SCN. We genetically engineered soybean roots so they expressed genes from the model plant, Arabidopsis. When the Arabidopsis genes, ...

  3. Soybean Aphid Infestation Induces Changes in Fatty Acid Metabolism in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Kanobe, Charles; McCarville, Michael T.; O’Neal, Matthew E.; Tylka, Gregory L.; MacIntosh, Gustavo C.

    2015-01-01

    The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) is one of the most important insect pests of soybeans in the North-central region of the US. It has been hypothesized that aphids avoid effective defenses by inhibition of jasmonate-regulated plant responses. Given the role fatty acids play in jasmonate-induced plant defenses, we analyzed the fatty acid profile of soybean leaves and seeds from aphid-infested plants. Aphid infestation reduced levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in leaves with a concomitant increase in palmitic acid. In seeds, a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids was associated with an increase in stearic acid and oleic acid. Soybean plants challenged with the brown stem rot fungus or with soybean cyst nematodes did not present changes in fatty acid levels in leaves or seeds, indicating that the changes induced by aphids are not a general response to pests. One of the polyunsaturated fatty acids, linolenic acid, is the precursor of jasmonate; thus, these changes in fatty acid metabolism may be examples of “metabolic hijacking” by the aphid to avoid the induction of effective defenses. Based on the changes in fatty acid levels observed in seeds and leaves, we hypothesize that aphids potentially induce interference in the fatty acid desaturation pathway, likely reducing FAD2 and FAD6 activity that leads to a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Our data support the idea that aphids block jasmonate-dependent defenses by reduction of the hormone precursor. PMID:26684003

  4. Ultrasound Assisted Synthesis of Hydroxylated Soybean Lecithin from Crude Soybean Lecithin as an Emulsifier.

    PubMed

    Chiplunkar, Pranali P; Pratap, Amit P

    2017-09-15

    Soybean lecithin is a by-product obtained during degumming step of crude soybean oil refining. Crude soybean lecithin (CSL) contains major amount of phospholipids (PLs) along with minor amount of acylglycerols, bioactive components, etc. Due to presence of PLs, CSL can be used as an emulsifier. Crude soybean lecithin (CSL) was utilized to synthesize hydroxylated soybean lecithin (HSL) by hydroxylation using hydrogen peroxide and catalytic amount of lactic acid to enhance the hydrophilicity and emulsifying properties of CSL. To reduce the reaction time and to increase rate of reaction, HSL was synthesized under ultrasound irradiation. The effect of different operating parameters such as lactic acid, hydrogen peroxide, temperature, ultrasonic power and duty cycle in synthesis of HSL were studied and optimized. The surface tension (SFT), interfacial tension (IFT) and the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the HSL (26.11 mN/m, 2.67 mN/m, 112 mg/L) were compared to CSL (37.53 mN/m, 6.22 mN/m, 291 mg/L) respectively. The HSL has better emulsion stability and low foaming characteristics as compared to CSL. Therefore, the product as an effective emulsifier can be used in food, pharmacy, lubricant, cosmetics, etc.

  5. Rag1 aphid resistant soybeans alter the movement and distribution of soybean aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    PubMed

    Whalen, Rebecca; Harmon, Jason P

    2012-12-01

    Herbivorous insects often move and distribute according to the quality of the plant they are on, and this behavior could influence interactions with plants bred for herbivore resistance. However, when an insect is normally considered sedentary, less is known about the potential importance of movement. We performed experiments to determine if a resistant soybean variety alters the movement and distribution, both within and between plants, of the soybean aphid Aphis glycines Matsumura. We did this by counting apterous aphids on leaves of resistant and susceptible soybean plants across several days. In individual plant tests aphid distribution was different between susceptible and resistant soybeans. Most notably aphids on resistant plants were quickly found off the original leaf on which they were placed and were ultimately distributed throughout the resistant soybean. Aphids on susceptible plants, however, tended to stay on their initial leaf of placement. Follow up experiments indicated this was primarily because of the movement of individuals and not differential demography on various plant parts. In experiments where aphids were able to walk to an adjacent plant there appeared to be a net movement of aphids off resistant plants and on to susceptible plants. Aphid populations on susceptible plants were higher when the plant was adjacent to a resistant plant than when adjacent to another susceptible plant. The effect of resistant plants on aphid movement and distribution could lead to unintended side-effects such as greater spread of plant viruses or altered effectiveness of biological control agents.

  6. Soybean Knowledge Base (SoyKB): a Web Resource for Soybean Translational Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Trupti; Patil, Kapil; Fitzpatrick, Michael R.; Franklin, Levi D.; Yao, Qiuming; Cook, Jeffrey R.; Wang, Zhem; Libault, Marc; Brechenmacher, Laurent; Valliyodan, Babu; Wu, Xiaolei; Cheng, Jianlin; Stacey, Gary; Nguyen, Henry T.; Xu, Dong

    2012-01-17

    Background: Soybean Knowledge Base (SoyKB) is a comprehensive all-inclusive web resource for soybean translational genomics. SoyKB is designed to handle the management and integration of soybean genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics data along with annotation of gene function and biological pathway. It contains information on four entities, namely genes, microRNAs, metabolites and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Methods: SoyKB has many useful tools such as Affymetrix probe ID search, gene family search, multiple gene/ metabolite search supporting co-expression analysis, and protein 3D structure viewer as well as download and upload capacity for experimental data and annotations. It has four tiers of registration, which control different levels of access to public and private data. It allows users of certain levels to share their expertise by adding comments to the data. It has a user-friendly web interface together with genome browser and pathway viewer, which display data in an intuitive manner to the soybean researchers, producers and consumers. Conclusions: SoyKB addresses the increasing need of the soybean research community to have a one-stop-shop functional and translational omics web resource for information retrieval and analysis in a user-friendly way. SoyKB can be publicly accessed at http://soykb.org/.

  7. Overexpression of Soybean Isoflavone Reductase (GmIFR) Enhances Resistance to Phytophthora sojae in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qun; Li, Ninghui; Dong, Lidong; Zhang, Dayong; Fan, Sujie; Jiang, Liangyu; Wang, Xin; Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Shuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavone reductase (IFR) is an enzyme involved in the biosynthetic pathway of isoflavonoid phytoalexin in plants. IFRs are unique to the plant kingdom and are considered to have crucial roles in plant response to various biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. Here, we report the characterization of a novel member of the soybean isoflavone reductase gene family GmIFR. Overexpression of GmIFR transgenic soybean exhibited enhanced resistance to Phytophthora sojae. Following stress treatments, GmIFR was significantly induced by P. sojae, ethephon (ET), abscisic acid (placeCityABA), salicylic acid (SA). It is located in the cytoplasm when transiently expressed in soybean protoplasts. The daidzein levels reduced greatly for the seeds of transgenic plants, while the relative content of glyceollins in transgenic plants was significantly higher than that of non-transgenic plants. Furthermore, we found that the relative expression levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of transgenic soybean plants were significantly lower than those of non-transgenic plants after incubation with P. sojae, suggesting an important role of GmIFR might function as an antioxidant to reduce ROS in soybean. The enzyme activity assay suggested that GmIFR has isoflavone reductase activity. PMID:26635848

  8. Overexpression of Soybean Isoflavone Reductase (GmIFR) Enhances Resistance to Phytophthora sojae in Soybean.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qun; Li, Ninghui; Dong, Lidong; Zhang, Dayong; Fan, Sujie; Jiang, Liangyu; Wang, Xin; Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Shuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavone reductase (IFR) is an enzyme involved in the biosynthetic pathway of isoflavonoid phytoalexin in plants. IFRs are unique to the plant kingdom and are considered to have crucial roles in plant response to various biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. Here, we report the characterization of a novel member of the soybean isoflavone reductase gene family GmIFR. Overexpression of GmIFR transgenic soybean exhibited enhanced resistance to Phytophthora sojae. Following stress treatments, GmIFR was significantly induced by P. sojae, ethephon (ET), abscisic acid (placeCityABA), salicylic acid (SA). It is located in the cytoplasm when transiently expressed in soybean protoplasts. The daidzein levels reduced greatly for the seeds of transgenic plants, while the relative content of glyceollins in transgenic plants was significantly higher than that of non-transgenic plants. Furthermore, we found that the relative expression levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of transgenic soybean plants were significantly lower than those of non-transgenic plants after incubation with P. sojae, suggesting an important role of GmIFR might function as an antioxidant to reduce ROS in soybean. The enzyme activity assay suggested that GmIFR has isoflavone reductase activity.

  9. Profitability Analysis of Soybean Oil Processes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ming-Hsun; Rosentrater, Kurt A

    2017-10-07

    Soybean oil production is the basic process for soybean applications. Cash flow analysis is used to estimate the profitability of a manufacturing venture. Besides capital investments, operating costs, and revenues, the interest rate is the factor to estimate the net present value (NPV), break-even points, and payback time; which are benchmarks for profitability evaluation. The positive NPV and reasonable payback time represent a profitable process, and provide an acceptable projection for real operating. Additionally, the capacity of the process is another critical factor. The extruding-expelling process and hexane extraction are the two typical approaches used in industry. When the capacities of annual oil production are larger than 12 and 173 million kg respectively, these two processes are profitable. The solvent free approach, known as enzyme assisted aqueous extraction process (EAEP), is profitable when the capacity is larger than 17 million kg of annual oil production.

  10. Bioactive Proteins and Peptides from Soybeans.

    PubMed

    Agyei, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Dietary proteins from soybeans have been shown to offer health benefits in vivo and/or in vitro either as intact proteins or in partially digested forms also called bioactive peptides. Upon oral administration and absorption, soy-derived bioactive peptides may induce several physiological responses such as antioxidative, antimicrobial, antihypertensive, anticancer and immunomodulatory effects. There has therefore been a mounting research interest in the therapeutic potential of soy protein hydrolysates and their subsequent incorporation in functional foods and 'Food for Specified Health Uses' (FOSHU) related products where their biological activities may assist in the promotion of good health or in the control and prevention of diseases. This mini review discusses relevant patents and gives an overview on bioactive proteins and peptides obtainable from soybeans. Processes for the production and formulation of these peptides are given, together with specific examples of their therapeutic potential and possible areas of application.

  11. Microwave backscattering from an anisotropic soybean canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R. H.; Saatchi, S.; Levine, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    Electromagnetic backscattering from a soybean canopy is modeled in the L band region of the spectrum. Mature soybean plants are taken as an ensemble of leaves and stems which are represented by lossy dielectric disks and rods respectively. Field data indicated that leaves and stems are not distributed uniformly in the azimuth coordinate. The plant has a tendency to grow out into the area between the rows. The effects on backscattered radar waves was computed by the distorted Born approximation. Results for look directions along the rows and perpendicular to the rows show that only a modest difference occurs in the L band frequency range. The use of another nonuniform distribution, different from those observed experimentally, results in a significant effect due to vegetation asymmetry.

  12. Natural variability in abundance of prevalent soybean proteins.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Savithiry S

    2010-12-01

    Soybean is an inexpensive source of protein for humans and animals. Genetic modifications (GMO) to soybean have become inevitable on two fronts, both quality and yield will need to improve to meet increasing global demand. To ensure the safety of the crop for consumers it is important to determine the natural variation in seed protein constituents as well as any unintended changes that may occur in the GMO as a result of genetic modification. Understanding the natural variation of seed proteins in wild and cultivated soybeans that have been used in conventional soybean breeding programs is critical for determining unintended protein expression in GMO soybeans. In recent years, proteomic technologies have been used as an effective analytical tool for examining modifications of protein profiles. We have standardized and applied these technologies to determine and quantify the spectrum of proteins present in soybean seed. We used two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for the separation, quantification, and identification of different classes of soybean seed proteins. We have observed significant variations in different classes of proteins, including storage, allergen and anti-nutritional protein profiles, between non-GMO cultivated and wild soybean varieties. This information is useful for scientists and regulatory agencies to determine whether the unintended expression of proteins found in transgenic soybean is within the range of natural variation.

  13. Verification and rapid identification of soybean rhizobia in Indian soils.

    PubMed

    Annapurna, K; Balakrishnan, N; Vital, L

    2007-04-01

    Sixty root nodule isolates of soybean rhizobia indigenous to eight field sites in India were characterized using PCR-RFLP for repeated sequence RSalpha a 1195-bp DNA fragment, indole acetic acid production, and nitrogenase activity. Site-dependent variations were observed in terms of IAA production and nitrogenase activities. RSalpha was conserved in slow-growing soybean rhizobia across locations and sites and was absent in other Rhizobiaceae members and other bacterial genera. The results suggest that RSalpha can be a useful molecular marker for slow-growing soybean rhizobia. The study also showed the low presence of soybean nodulating fast growers in Indian soils.

  14. Arthropod abundance and diversity in transgenic Bt soybean.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huilin; Li, Yunhe; Li, Xiangju; Wu, Kongming

    2014-08-01

    Before the commercialization of any insect-resistant genetically modified crop, it must be subjected to a rigorous premarket risk assessment. Here, possible effects of growing of transgenic Cry1Ac soybean on arthropod communities under field conditions were assessed for 2 yr and quantified in terms of arthropod community indices including the Shannon-Weaver diversity index, richness index, and dominance index. Our results showed no significant differences of diversity, richness, or dominant indices for Bt soybean compared with the recipient cultivar, conventional soybean, or sprayed conventional soybean. Conventional soybean treatment with insecticide had an adverse effect on the arthropod community after spraying, but arthropod community diversity recovered quickly. Bt soybean had no negative effect on the dominant distribution of subcommunities, including sucking pests, other pests, predators, parasitoids, and others except for lepidopteran pests. The dominance distribution of lepidopteran pests decreased significantly in Bt soybean because of the significant decrease in the numbers of Spodoptera litura (F.) and Ascotis selenaria Schiffermüller et Denis compared with the recipient cultivar. Our results showed that there were no negative effects of Cry1Ac soybean on the arthropod community in soybean field plots in the short term.

  15. Engineering of soybean mosaic virus as a versatile tool for studying protein–protein interactions in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jang-Kyun; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Transient gene expression approaches are valuable tools for rapid introduction of genes of interest and characterization of their functions in plants. Although agroinfiltration is the most effectively and routinely used method for transient expression of multiple genes in various plant species, this approach has been largely unsuccessful in soybean. In this study, we engineered soybean mosaic virus (SMV) as a dual-gene delivery vector to simultaneously deliver and express two genes in soybean cells. We further show the application of the SMV-based dual vector for a bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay to visualize in vivo protein–protein interactions in soybean and for a co-immunoprecipitation assay to identify cellular proteins interacting with SMV helper component protease. This approach provides a rapid and cost-effective tool for transient introduction of multiple traits into soybean and for in vivo characterization of the soybean cellular protein interaction network. PMID:26926710

  16. Genetic Characterization of Soybean Rhizobia in Paraguay†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu Shi; Figueredo, Antonio; Pedrosa, Fábio O.; Hungria, Mariangela

    2000-01-01

    The soybean is an exotic plant introduced in Paraguay in this century; commercial cropping expanded after the 1970s. Inoculation is practiced in just 15 to 20% of the cropping areas, but root nodulation occurs in most sites where soybeans grow. Little is known about rhizobial diversity in South America, and no study has been performed in Paraguay until this time. Therefore, in this study, the molecular characterization of 78 rhizobial isolates from soybean root nodules, collected under field conditions in 16 sites located in the two main producing states, Alto Paraná and Itapúa, was undertaken. A high level of genetic diversity was detected by an ERIC-REP-PCR analysis, with the majority of the isolates representing unique strains. Most of the 58 isolates characterized by slow growth and alkaline reactions in a medium containing mannitol as a carbon source were clustered with strains representative of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Bradyrhizobium elkanii species, and the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences of 5 of those isolates confirmed the species identities. However, slow growers were highly polymorphic in relation to the reference strains, including five carried in commercial inoculants in neighboring countries, thus indicating that the Paraguayan isolates might represent native bradyrhizobia. Twenty isolates highly polymorphic in the ERIC-REP-PCR profiles were characterized by fast growth and acid reactions in vitro, and two of them showed high 16S rDNA identities with Rhizobium genomic species Q. However, two other fast growers showed high 16S rDNA identity with Agrobacterium spp., and both of these strains established efficient symbioses with soybean plants. PMID:11055970

  17. Rat and poultry feeding studies with soybean meal produced from imidazolinone-tolerant (CV127) soybeans.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoyun; de Brum, Paulo A R; Chukwudebe, Amechi; Privalle, Laura; Reed, Andrew; Wang, Yanqing; Zhou, Cui; Wang, Cuiyan; Lu, Jing; Huang, Kunlun; Contri, Daniela; Nakatani, Andreia; de Avila, Valdir S; Klein, Claudete H; de Lima, Gustavo J M M; Lipscomb, Elizabeth A

    2016-02-01

    The safety and nutritional properties of CV127 soybeans were evaluated in rat and broiler feeding studies. Some episodic differences were observed between rats fed CV127, Conquista, and the standard diet for the endpoints examined. None of these differences were considered treatment related, adverse, or biologically meaningful. In general, birds fed diets containing CV127, Conquista, or Monsoy 8001 showed no significant differences in growth and performance response variables. Chickens fed diets containing Coodetec 217 had lower body weight and weight gain for all developmental periods compared to CV127, but no significant differences were found in feed conversion for the two diets during any development period. The results of both feeding studies demonstrate that CV127 soybeans are as safe, wholesome, and nutritionally valuable as the other soybean meals tested, including those varieties for which histories of safe use have been established and well documented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reniform Nematode Resistance in Selected Soybean Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, R. T.; Rakes, L.; Jackson, L. E.; Dombek, D. G.

    1999-01-01

    Two hundred eighty-two soybean cultivars from the variety testing programs of Arkansas and Mississippi were tested in greenhouse pot experiments during summer 1998 to identify soybean cultivars with resistance to the reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis. Also included in the tests were the resistant cultivars Forrest and Hartwig, the susceptible control Braxton, and fallow infested soil, which were used as controls. Numbers of reniform nematode extracted from the soil and roots and the ratio of the numbers reproducing on each cultivar compared to the number reproducing on Forrest are reported. Cultivars with reproduction not significantly different from Forrest were classified resistant, whereas those with greater reproductive indices were considered susceptible. One of the 18 cultivars of relative maturity group (RMG) ≤4.4 was classified as resistant. For the 86 cultivars of RMG 4.5-4.9, 18 were found to be resistant. Of the 43 cultivars of RMG 5.0-5.4, 16 were resistant, while 43 of the 91 cultivars of RMG 5.5-5.9 were resistant. Fifteen of the cultivars with an RMG of ≥6.0 were classed as resistant. These data will be useful in the selection of soybean cultivars to use in rotation with cotton to help control the reniform nematode. PMID:19270934

  19. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Soybean Biodiesel and Diesel ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Biotransformation of soybean biodiesel and the inhibitory effect of petrodiesel were studied under methanogenic conditions. Biodiesel removal efficiency of more than 95% was achieved in a chemostat with influent biodiesel concentrations up to 2.45 g/L. The kinetics of anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel B100 (biodiesel only) with different petrodiesel loads were studied using biomass pre-acclimated to B100 and B80 (80% biodiesel and 20 petrodiesel). The results indicated that the biodiesel fraction of the blend could be effectively biodegraded, whereas petrodiesel was not biodegraded at all under methanogenic conditions. The presence of petrodiesel in blends with biodiesel had a greater inhibitory effect on the rate of biodegradation than the biodegradation efficiency (defined as the efficiency of methane production). Both the biodegradation rate coefficient and the methane production efficiency increased almost linearly with the increasing fraction of biodiesel. With the increasing fraction of petrodiesel, the biodegradation rate and efficiency were correlated with the concentration of soluble FAMEs in the water. The objective of this study was to investigate the anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel blends under methanogenic conditions. Biological methane potential (BMP) tests were conducted in serum bottles to determine the anaerobic biodegradation kinetics of biodiesel in the absence and presence of different concentrations of petrod

  20. Ureide degradation pathways in intact soybean leaves.

    PubMed

    Vadez, V; Sinclair, T R

    2000-08-01

    Ureides dramatically accumulate in shoots of N(2)-fixing soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) under water deficit and this accumulation is higher in cultivars that have N(2) fixation that is sensitive to water deficit. One possible explanation is that ureide accumulation is associated with a feedback inhibition of nitrogenase activity. A critical factor involved in ureide accumulation is likely to be the rate of ureide degradation in the leaves. There exists, however, a controversy concerning the pathway of allantoic acid degradation in soybean. Allantoate amidinohydrolase was reported to be the pathway of degradation in studies using the cultivar Maple Arrow and allantoate amidohydrolase was the pathway that existed in the cultivar Williams. This investigation was undertaken to resolve the existence of these two pathways. An in situ technique was developed to examine the response of ureide degradation in leaf tissue to various treatments. In addition, the response of ureide accumulation and N(2) fixation activity was measured for intact plants in response to treatments that differentially influenced the two degradation pathways. The results from these studies confirmed that Maple Arrow and Williams degraded allantoic acid by different pathways as originally reported. The existence of two degradation pathways within the soybean germplasm opens the possibility of modifying ureide degradation to minimize the influence of soil water deficits on N(2) fixation activity.

  1. Astronaut Whitson Displays Soybean Growth Aboard ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition Five crewmember and flight engineer Peggy Whitson displays the progress of soybeans growing in the Advanced Astroculture (ADVASC) Experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The ADVASC experiment was one of the several new experiments and science facilities delivered to the ISS by Expedition Five aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-111 mission. An agricultural seed company will grow soybeans in the ADVASC hardware to determine whether soybean plants can produce seeds in a microgravity environment. Secondary objectives include determination of the chemical characteristics of the seed in space and any microgravity impact on the plant growth cycle. Station science will also be conducted by the ever-present ground crew, with a new cadre of controllers for Expedition Five in the ISS Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Controllers work in three shifts around the clock, 7 days a week, in the POCC, the world's primary science command post for the Space Station. The POCC links Earth-bound researchers around the world with their experiments and crew aboard the Space Station.

  2. Astronaut Whitson Displays Soybean Growth Aboard ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition Five crewmember and flight engineer Peggy Whitson displays the progress of soybeans growing in the Advanced Astroculture (ADVASC) Experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The ADVASC experiment was one of the several new experiments and science facilities delivered to the ISS by Expedition Five aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-111 mission. An agricultural seed company will grow soybeans in the ADVASC hardware to determine whether soybean plants can produce seeds in a microgravity environment. Secondary objectives include determination of the chemical characteristics of the seed in space and any microgravity impact on the plant growth cycle. Station science will also be conducted by the ever-present ground crew, with a new cadre of controllers for Expedition Five in the ISS Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Controllers work in three shifts around the clock, 7 days a week, in the POCC, the world's primary science command post for the Space Station. The POCC links Earth-bound researchers around the world with their experiments and crew aboard the Space Station.

  3. [Effects of maize plant types on dry matter accumulation characteristics and yield of soybean in maize-soybean intercropping systems].

    PubMed

    Cui, Liang; Yang, Wen-yu; Huang, Ni; Liu, Jiang; Wang, Yan-ling; Wang, Xiao-hui; Liu, Yang; Yan, Shou

    2015-08-01

    In order to explore the effects of maize plant types on dry matter accumulation and yield of soybean, a field experiment was conducted in 2013, including three maize-soybean relay strip intercropping systems. The relay strip intercropping systems were designed as soybean (Gongxuan 1) intercropped with Denghai 605 (RI1), Chuandan 418 (RI2) or Yayu 13 ( RI3), and the monocultured soybean was used as control. The results demonstrated that the dry matter accumulation rates of intercropped soybean in RI2 and RI3 treatments were lower than in RI1 treatment, and the leaf, stem and pod dry matter accumulation of intercropped soybean in RI1 treatment was 17.6%, 16.5% and 13.7% higher than that in RI2 treatment, and 34.6%, 33.1% and 28.4% higher than that in RI3 treatment, respectively. The distribution proportion of leaf and stem of intercropped soybean was in the order of RI1 > RI2 > RI3. However, the trend of the distribution proportion of pod was opposite. Compared with RI2 and RI3, the dry matter translocation amount, translocation proportion, contribution proportion of soybean vegetative organs to pod of soybean were improved in RI, treatment, and the pod per plant, seeds per plant, seeds per pod, yield per plant and yield of soybean in RI, were higher than RI2 and RI3 by 6.8%, 11.5%, 4.4%, 15.9%, 15.6% and 14.3%, 22.2%, 6.7%, 33.4%, 36.8%, respectively. The results showed that the yield was positively related with the accumulation rate of dry matter, dry matter translocation, dry matter translocation ratio and the contribution of dry matter accumulation, and these indices were highest in RI treatment. The results indicated that the compact maize relay intercropped with soybean could effectively regulate the dry matter accumulation, translocation and distribution, and improve the yield of soybean.

  4. [Distribution of soybean mosaic virus antigen in the leaves of soybean plants with different reaction to virus infection].

    PubMed

    Sapotskiĭ, M V; Andreeva, I V; Kakareka, N N; Poliakova, A M; Malinovskiĭ, V I

    2002-01-01

    The distribution and accumulation of soybean mosaic virus antigen in the leaves of sensitive plants with well expressed mosaic symptoms and symptomless tolerant soybean plants Glycine max (L.) Merr. were similar. Low concentration of virus antigen was found in extremely resistant soybean plants in mechanically inoculated leaves and those of the 2-4 circles two-three weeks after inoculation but 5 weeks later the virus antigen was detected only in the top leaves.

  5. Major Soybean Maturity Gene Haplotypes Revealed by SNPViz Analysis of 72 Sequenced Soybean Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Langewisch, Tiffany; Zhang, Hongxin; Vincent, Ryan; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Bilyeu, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    In this Genomics Era, vast amounts of next-generation sequencing data have become publicly available for multiple genomes across hundreds of species. Analyses of these large-scale datasets can become cumbersome, especially when comparing nucleotide polymorphisms across many samples within a dataset and among different datasets or organisms. To facilitate the exploration of allelic variation and diversity, we have developed and deployed an in-house computer software to categorize and visualize these haplotypes. The SNPViz software enables users to analyze region-specific haplotypes from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) datasets for different sequenced genomes. The examination of allelic variation and diversity of important soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] flowering time and maturity genes may provide additional insight into flowering time regulation and enhance researchers' ability to target soybean breeding for particular environments. For this study, we utilized two available soybean genomic datasets for a total of 72 soybean genotypes encompassing cultivars, landraces, and the wild species Glycine soja. The major soybean maturity genes E1, E2, E3, and E4 along with the Dt1 gene for plant growth architecture were analyzed in an effort to determine the number of major haplotypes for each gene, to evaluate the consistency of the haplotypes with characterized variant alleles, and to identify evidence of artificial selection. The results indicated classification of a small number of predominant haplogroups for each gene and important insights into possible allelic diversity for each gene within the context of known causative mutations. The software has both a stand-alone and web-based version and can be used to analyze other genes, examine additional soybean datasets, and view similar genome sequence and SNP datasets from other species. PMID:24727730

  6. Early-season soybean as a trap crop for stink bugs (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) in Arkansas' changing system of soybean production.

    PubMed

    Smith, J F; Luttrell, R G; Greene, J K; Tingle, C

    2009-04-01

    Early-season soybean, Glycine max L. Merrill, was evaluated in Arkansas soybean fields as a trap crop for a complex of stink bug species that included Nezara viridula L., Acrosternum hilare (Say), and Euschistus servus (Say). Early-season soybean production systems (ESPSs) are composed of indeterminate soybean cultivars planted in April. In the first year of a 2-yr study, field-scale trap crops ( approximately 0.5-1.0 ha) of maturity group (MG) III and IV soybean were planted adjacent to production fields of MG V soybean. Stink bugs were attracted first to the ESPS trap crops and were twice treated with insecticide, yet damaging populations developed later in the MG V soybean adjacent to the trap crops. General sampling and observations of low stink bug densities in commercial fields of soybean and corn across the study area suggested that stink bugs were widely distributed across the agricultural landscape. These observations and the subsequent discovery of additional ESPS fields outside the study area suggested that developing populations in the adjacent MG V soybean probably did not originate from the trap crops. However the source of the populations colonizing MG V soybean could not be determined, and we concluded that the scale of future experiments should be increased to better control stink bugs dispersing from other ESPSs outside the study area. In the second year of the study, the experiment was expanded in size to a farm- or community-scale project where entire fields of ESPSs (8-32 ha) were used as trap crops. Insecticide was applied to the trap-crop fields and other fields of ESPSs within a 0.8-km radius of targeted response fields, yet again there was no apparent effect on subsequent populations of stink bugs in the MG V response fields. With the recent expansion of ESPSs in Arkansas, it may be difficult to use ESPSs as a trap crop to lower stink bug populations across large enough areas to suppress populations in late-season soybean. Also, multiple

  7. Hybridization between GM soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. et Zucc.) under field conditions in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mizuguti, Aki; Ohigashi, Kentaro; Yoshimura, Yasuyuki; Kaga, Akito; Kuroda, Yosuke; Matsuo, Kazuhito

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of information about natural hybridization between GM soybean (Glycine max) and wild soybean (Glycine soja) is required for risk assessment evaluation and to establish biosafety regulations in Japan. This is particularly important in areas where wild relatives of cultivated soybean are grown (i.e. East Asia including Japan). To collect information on temporal and spatial factors affecting variation in hybridization between wild and GM soybean, a two year hybridization experiment was established that included one wild soybean and five GM soybean cultivars with different maturity dates. Hybridization frequencies ranged from 0 to 0.097%. The maximum hybridization frequency (0.097%) was obtained from wild soybean crossed with GM soybean cv. AG6702RR, which were adjacently cultivated with wild soybean, with 25 hybrids out of 25 741 seedlings tested. Cultivar AG6702RR had the most synchronous flowering period with wild soybean. Ten hybrids out of 25 741 were produced by crossing with cv. AG5905RR, which had the second most synchronous flowering period with wild soybean. Most hybrids were found where GM and wild soybeans were adjacently cultivated, whereas only one hybrid was detected from wild soybean plants at 2 m, 4 m and 6 m from a pollen source (GM soybean). Differences in flowering phenology, isolation distance and presence of buffer plants accounted for half of the variation in hybridization frequency in this study. Temporal and spatial isolation will be effective strategies to minimize hybridization between GM and wild soybean.

  8. Fluorescence imaging of soybean flavonol isolines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Edward H.; Mulchi, Charles L.; McMurtrey, James E., III; Chappelle, Emmett W.; Rowland, Randy A.

    1998-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to characterize the fluorescence emission of leaves from four soybean ('Harosoy') plants containing different concentrations of flavonols (kaempferol glycosides). The investigation utilized genetically mutated soybean flavonol isolines grown in a constant environment, thus limiting factors known to affect fluorescence emission characteristics other than different kaempferol glycosides concentrations. Flavonol isolines included OX922, OX941, OX942, OX944. The first two isolines contain kaempferol (K) glycosides; K3, K6, and K9, and the latter two did not have K3, K6, and K9. A fluorescence imaging system (FIS) was used to characterize steady state florescence images of the sample leaves measured at wavelengths centered at 450, 550, 680, and 740 nm with an excitation at 360 nm. Images taken with FIS greatly complement non-imaging fluorescence measurements by characterizing the spatial variation of fluorescence within leaves. We also acquired fluorescence emission spectra to characterize spectral features of the soybean flavonol isolines. The emission spectral shape of the fluorescence emission characteristics were not significantly different between the soybeans that contain kaempferol glycosides and the ones that do not contain kaempferol glycosides. Typical emission maxima of green vegetation in the blue, green, red, and far-red bands were noticed in all four soybean isolines. However, plants containing kaempferol glycosides, OX922 and OX941 had significantly lower intensities throughout the wavelength regions. These results imply that fluorescence emission intensities in the fluorescence emission bands studied are significantly affected by the presence and absence of kaempferol glycosides concentrations (UV radiation screening compounds). Pure kaempferol glycoside dissolved in solution show minimal fluorescence emission when excited with the absorption maximum radiation at 365 nm. However, a broad band emission can be seen in the green

  9. Evaluating the Allergic Risk of Genetically Modified Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Ha; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Ye, Young-Min; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Nahm, Dong-Ho; Ryu, Sang-Ryeol; Lee, Bou-Oung

    2006-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) soybean (carrying the EPSPS transgene) is the most common GM food in Korea. In order to assess whether genetic modification increases the allergenic risk of soybeans, the allergenicity and IgE-reactive components of wild-type and GM soybean extracts were compared in allergic adults who had been sensitized to soybeans. We enrolled 1,716 adult allergy patients and 40 healthy, non-atopic controls. Skin prick tests and IgE enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were performed using wild-type and GM soybean extracts, along with other common inhaled allergens. The specificities of serum IgE antibodies from allergic patients and the identities of the IgE-reactive components of the soybean extracts were compared using ELISA inhibition testing, 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and IgE immunoblotting. To evaluate the effects of digestive enzymes and heat treatment, the soybean extracts were heated or pre- incubated with or without simulated gastric and intestinal fluids. The IgE sensitization rates to wild-type and GM soybeans were identical (3.8% of allergic adults), and circulating IgE antibodies specific for the two extracts were comparable. The results of the ELISA inhibition test, SDS-PAGE, and IgE immunoblotting showed a similar composition of IgE-binding components within the wild-type and GM extracts, which was confirmed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, IgE immunoblotting, and amino acid sequencing. None of the subjects had a positive response to purified EPSPS protein in the skin prick test, ELISA, or IgE immunoblot analysis. These findings suggest that the IgE sensitization rate to GM soybean extracts is identical to that of wild-type soybean extracts in adult allergy patients. In addition, based on both in vivo and in vitro methods, the allergenicity of wild type and GM soybean extracts was identical. PMID:16941740

  10. Soybean Cyst Nematode in North America - 55 Years Later

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines, was first discovered in North America in 1954 in Hanover County, North Carolina, USA, when it was found on soybean in a field that had been planted to Easter lilies obtained from Japan prior to World War II. The nematode is now distributed throughout soybe...

  11. A roadmap for functional structural variants in the soybean genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gene structural variation (SV) has recently emerged as a key genetic mechanism underlying several important phenotypic traits in crop species. We screened a panel of 41 soybean accessions serving as parents in a soybean nested association mapping population for deletions and duplications in over 53...

  12. Management of Hoplolaimus columbus with Tolerant Soybean and Nematicides.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, D P; Imbriani, J L

    1987-10-01

    Two experiments, one site per year, were conducted in Scotland County, North Carolina, to determine the usefulness of selected cultivars and nematicides for limiting soybean losses due to Hoplolaimus columbus. Coker 317 was relatively tolerant to this nematode, and Coker 156, Centennial, Dehapine 105, and Gordon were generally intolerant. Most nematicides significantly increased soybean yields, and many gave an economic return.

  13. Research on soybean curd coagulated by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jianming, Wang; Qiuqian, Lin; Yiyun, Wang; Xi, Chen

    2013-12-01

    Chinese traditional soybean curd is coagulated by calcium salt. In order to investigate the feasibility of soybean curd coagulation by lactic acid bacteria, we studied the effective factors in soybean curd coagulation when using common soybean curd strains. In soybean curd concentration, incubating time and temperature as well as the inoculated amount and the edible gum additives were studied as the coagulating factors of soybean curd fermented by lactic acid bacteria. Based on the single factor and orthogonal experiment design, the optimized conditions of lactic acid bacteria fermentation curd was determined as follows: soybean curd concentration 12.5%(v/v)and the fermentation conducted at 42°C for 5 hours when the inoculating amount was 4.0% and edible gum additives was 1.4% (carrageenan 1.0% (m/v), soluble starch 0.4% (m/v)). Under the optimum conditions, the water-holding rate of the bean curd was measured as 69.82%, and the gel strength was 25.6 g/cm(2). Compared with the traditional tofu coagulated by calcium salt, our products has less off-flavor and softer texture, which was accepted as new type of soybean curd according to the overall sensory evaluation.

  14. Evaluation of soybean genotypes for resistance to charcoal rot

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Charcoal rot caused by Macrophomina phaseolina causes more yield loss in soybean than most other diseases in the southern U.S.A. There are no commercial genotypes marketed as resistant to charcoal rot of soybean. Reactions of 27 maturity group (MG) III, 29 Early MG IV, 34 Late MG IV, and 59 MG V gen...

  15. Effects of antidepressants and soybean association in depressive menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Rose E Nina; Landa, Adriana I; Lafuente, José Vicente; Gargiulo, Pascual A

    2014-01-01

    Depression in menopausal women has been widely described for many years ago and is related to hormonal decrease, mainly estrogens. The use of soy has been proposed as a possible coadjutant alternative to treat menopausal depressive disorder. In the present pilot clinical trial the effect of soybean, antidepressants and the association of soybean with antidepressants was studied in 40 depressive menopausal women for three months. Patients were divided in four groups of 10 women: fluoxetine (10 mg), soybean (100 mg), sertraline (50 mg), and sertraline (50 mg) plus soybean (100 mg). The Hamilton and Zung Depression Scales were used to measure the treatment effects. Values at the beginning and at the end of the study were compared. In all cases a significant difference was observed when the treated groups were compared vs. their untreated situation in both scales (p < 0.001). When a comparison between pre- minus post-treatment Zung scale scores was done, the effect induced by the association of sertraline and soybean was significantly higher than the other groups (p < 0.05). These effects were also seen using the Hamilton scale scores, showing significant differences between the association vs. soybean (p < 0.05) and setraline (p < 0.05) groups, but not vs. fluoxetine group. We conclude that soybean has an antidepressant effect per se, and the association of soybean and antidepressants increases their effects.

  16. New soybean accessions evaluated for reaction to Heterodera glycines populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean Cyst Nematode (SCN, Heterodera glycines Ichinohe) is a serious pest of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] in the USA and worldwide. Annual yield losses in the USA are estimated to be over $1 billion. These losses have remained stable with the use of resistant cultivars but over time nematode...

  17. New soybean accessions identified with resistance to Heterodera glycines populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean Cyst Nematode (SCN, Heterodera glycines Ichinohe) is a serious root-parasite of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], in USA and worldwide. Annual yield losses in USA are estimated to be nearly $1 billion. These losses have remained stable at current levels with the use of resistant cultivars bu...

  18. Resistance to charcoal rot identified in ancestral soybean germplasm

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Charcoal rot, caused by the fungal pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina, is an economically important disease on soybean and other crops including maize, sorghum, and sunflowers. Without effective cultural or chemical options to control charcoal rot in soybean, finding sources of genetic resistance is o...

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Pararetrovirus Isolated from Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Han, Junping; Domier, Leslie L.; Dorrance, Anne

    2012-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of soybean Putnam virus (SPuV), a new pararetrovirus isolated from a soybean field in Putnam County, OH. Comparison of SPuV with other plant-infecting pararetroviruses places it in the genus Caulimovirus of the family Caulimoviridae. PMID:22879623

  20. Ozone's suffocating effect on soybean physiology, growth and yield

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is damaging air pollutant that is currently costing U.S. farmers hundreds of millions of dollars in yield losses each year. The detrimental effect of O3 on soybean production has been recognized over the past 30 to 40 years, yet there has been little effort to improve soybean...

  1. Framing the issues of resistance management in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soybean insect-pest complex consists of both long-established and new invasive pests. Management of these pests has been achieved by various means, but often relies heavily on the application of insecticides and the development of insect-resistant soybean varieties. Pest management practitione...

  2. Starch Metabolism in Space-Grown Soybean Seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guikema, James A.; Leach, Jan E.; Brown, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    The research conducted during this grant is described. There were three major areas of study: These were: (1) the interaction of gravity and sugar metabolism in soybean; (2) the effects of gravity on the photosynthetic activity of Brassica rapa; (3) investigation as to the effects of microgravity on the interaction of a fungal root pathogen with soybean.

  3. Fingerprinting Soybean Germplasm and Its Utility in Genomic Research

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qijian; Hyten, David L.; Jia, Gaofeng; Quigley, Charles V.; Fickus, Edward W.; Nelson, Randall L.; Cregan, Perry B.

    2015-01-01

    The United States Department of Agriculture, Soybean Germplasm Collection includes 18,480 domesticated soybean and 1168 wild soybean accessions introduced from 84 countries or developed in the United States. This collection was genotyped with the SoySNP50K BeadChip containing greater than 50K single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Redundant accessions were identified in the collection, and distinct genetic backgrounds of soybean from different geographic origins were observed that could be a unique resource for soybean genetic improvement. We detected a dramatic reduction of genetic diversity based on linkage disequilibrium and haplotype structure analyses of the wild, landrace, and North American cultivar populations and identified candidate regions associated with domestication and selection imposed by North American breeding. We constructed the first soybean haplotype block maps in the wild, landrace, and North American cultivar populations and observed that most recombination events occurred in the regions between haplotype blocks. These haplotype maps are crucial for association mapping aimed at the identification of genes controlling traits of economic importance. A case-control association test delimited potential genomic regions along seven chromosomes that most likely contain genes controlling seed weight in domesticated soybean. The resulting dataset will facilitate germplasm utilization, identification of genes controlling important traits, and will accelerate the creation of soybean varieties with improved seed yield and quality. PMID:26224783

  4. Enzymatic Products from Modified Soybean Oil Containing Hydrazinoester

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We use soybean oil to produce new, non-petroleum based products. The starting material is the ene reaction product of soybean oil and diethyl azodicarboxylate (DEAD), which can then be hydrolyzed chemically and enzymatically. Chemical hydrolysis gives hydrazino-fatty acids, whereas enzymatic hydro...

  5. A new virus of soybean confirmed in Wisconsin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This week our laboratory confirmed the presence of Soybean vein necrosis-associated virus (SVNaV) in soybeans sampled in Wisconsin. Samples were taken at several times during September and processed in our laboratory. Symptoms of the disease caused by the virus include yellowing (chlorosis) of the ...

  6. Identification of genes that mediate protection against soybean pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the last twenty years, over 40 resistance genes (R-genes) have been cloned and characterized from plants. Of these, only three have been cloned in soybean. Cloning of resistance genes in soybean has been hampered by a complex, duplicated genome, clustering of R-genes, and lack of tools to charac...

  7. Association of green stem disorder with agronomic traits in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Green stem disorder of soybean (GSD) is the occurrence of non-senescent, fleshy green stems of plants with normal, fully mature pods and seeds. Data on GSD incidence based on a percentage of plants in plots showing symptoms were collected for soybean cultivars in 86 trials from 2009 to 2012 at seven...

  8. Fingerprinting soybean germplasm and its utility in genomic research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The annual accessions in the United States Department of Agriculture, Soybean Germplasm Collection including 18,480 domesticated and 1,168 wild soybeans introduced from 84 countries or developed in the U.S. were genotyped with the SoySNP50K BeadChip containing >50K single nucleotide polymorphism (SN...

  9. Chemical, physical and tribological investigation of polymercaptanized soybean oil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polymercaptanized soybean oil (PMSO) was investigated for its chemical, physical and tribological properties relative to soybean oil (SO) and also as a potential multi-functional lubricant additive in high oleic sunflower oil (HOSuO). Analytical investigations showed that PMSO is obtained by convers...

  10. Polymercaptanized soybean oil – properties and tribological characterization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polymercaptanized vegetable oils are produced in industrial scale by the addition of hydrogen sulfide across double bonds or epoxides of vegetable oils, in the presence of UV-light. To date, soybean oil, epoxidized soybean oil, and castor oil has been mercaptanized using such a procedure. Depending ...

  11. A Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization System for Karyotyping Soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The development of a universal soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) cytogenetic map that associates classical genetic linkage groups, molecular linkage groups and a sequence-based physical map with the karyotype has been impeded due to the soybean chromosomes themselves, which are tiny and morphological...

  12. Complete genome sequence of a novel pararetrovirus isolated from soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We report the complete genome sequence of Soybean Putnam pararetrovirus (SPPRV), a new pararetrovirus isolated from a soybean field in Putnam County, Ohio, USA. Comparison of SPPRV with other plant-infecting pararetroviruses places it in the genus Caulimovirus of the family Caulimoviridae....

  13. Mapping Eight Male-Sterile, Female-Sterile Soybean Mutants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In soybean, mutations in genes involved in meiosis can lead to altered chromosome pairing and result in non-functional gametes.Mutability of the w4 flower color locus in soybean is due to an unstable allele designated w4-m (mutable). Several germinal revertant studies using the w4-m system resulted ...

  14. Reaction of Drought Tolerant Soybean Genotypes to Macrophomina phaseolina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Charcoal rot caused by Macrophomina phaseolina is a common disease of soybean, and resistant genotypes are not available. Level of soybean genotype resistance and susceptibility to M. phaseolina is most frequently measured by determining colony forming units of M. phaseolina/g root, but using this ...

  15. [Effect of soybean lipoxygenae on baking properties of wheat flour].

    PubMed

    Permiakova, M D; Trufanov, V A

    2011-01-01

    Changes in bread-baking properties of wheat flour caused by soybean lipoxygenase and polyunsaturated fatty acids were studied. A positive effect of soybean flour added during dough kneading in an amount of 2% was demonstrated. A method for dough fermentation increasing the loaf volume and improving organoleptic characteristics and total bread-baking estimate is recommended.

  16. Pest Control in Corn and Soybeans: Weeds - Insects - Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doersch, R. E.; And Others

    This document gives the characteristics and application rates for herbicides used to control annual weeds in corn, annual and perennial broadleaf weeds in corn, quackgrass and yellow nutsedge in corn, and annual weeds in soybeans. It also gives insecticide use information for corn and soybeans. A brief discussion of disease control in corn and…

  17. Nuclear proteomic changes linked to soybean rust resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Approximately 4,975 proteins from nuclear preparations of soybean leaves were detected using a high-throughput liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. Statistics of summed spectral counts revealed sets of proteins with differential accumulation changes between isogenic soybeans susceptible ...

  18. Genetic Diversity and Soybean Yield: Finding the Balance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Based on national production statistics since 1924, average soybean yield in the U.S. has increased at a nearly steady rate of 22 kg ha-1 year-1. It is possible to show some changes in this rate depending on how these past 85 years are divided, but two conclusions seem evident. Soybean yield has not...

  19. Evaluating Natural Variability of Soybean proteins by Proteomic Tools

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean is an inexpensive source of protein for humans and animals. Genetic modifications (GMO) to soybean have become inevitable on two fronts, both quality and yield will need to improve to meet increasing global demand. To ensure the safety of the crop for consumers it is important to determine...

  20. Dynamics of water droplet impact and spread on soybean leaves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybeans are often sprayed to prevent significant yield loss from damage by insect pests and plant diseases. Understanding interactions of spray droplet reactions on soybean plant surfaces can lead to development of improved application strategies to enhance efficacy of pesticides. In this research,...

  1. Predicting potential ecological impact of soybean aphid biological control introductions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soybean aphid, APHIS GLYCINES, was first reported in the US in 2000; since then, it has spread to 22 states, putting >24 million hectares of soybean at risk. In China, APHIS GLYCINES rarely reaches damaging levels and has a diverse complex of predators and parasitoids. In the US, parasitoids are...

  2. Soybean response to poultry litter in a rotation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean yield response to annual poultry litter rates (0, 1.0 and 3.4 tons/acre) on a Leeper silty clay loam soil in corn (M), cotton (C) and soybean (B) rotation system were evaluated. The rotation systems from 2010-2014 were: CMBBMR; CMCBM and CCMMB. This study site had high levels of soil test Ph...

  3. Identifying molecular markers for ozone tolerance in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is damaging air pollutant that is currently costing U.S. farmers hundreds of millions of dollars in yield losses each year. The detrimental effect of O3 on soybean production has been recognized over the past 30 to 40 years, yet there has been little effort to improve soybean...

  4. Change in oligosaccharides during processing of soybean sheet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiushuang; Ke, Leqin; Yang, Dongmei; Bao, Bili; Jiang, Jianmei; Ying, Tiejin

    2007-01-01

    Oligosaccharides have been credited with many health-promoting functions, which had been identified in many clinical studies, such as promoting the growth of Bifidobacterium in human intestine and balance of intestinal bacteria, modulating the immune response, inhibition of cancer and tumor, stimulation of mineral absorption. In this study the effect of processing unit operations on the levels of soybean oligosaccharides during production of soybean sheet were investigated. The concentrations of oligosaccharide in initial raw soybean were: sucrose 43.05 g/kg, raffinose 7.52 g/kg and stachyose 41.32 g/kg (in dry matter). Oligosaccharide losses in the soaking water, in the first filtrating stage, in the second filtrating stage and finally in the sheet formation stage were 0.68, 10.3, 8.15 and 47.22 g/kg (initial dry soybean) respectively, representing 0.74, 11.21, 8.87 and 51.39% of the total oligosaccharides present in the initial soybeans. The recovery of oligosaccharides in the final soybean sheet from the initial soybean was 27.92%. The loss of soybean oligosaccharides in different processing stages, especially in the by-product, the sweet slurry, was considerable. The loss of oligosaccharides was mainly associated with water/matter removal in production process. The analysis of loss profile implied possible ways to improve the technology for production of oligosaccharides-enriched soy-sheets.

  5. Biological Networks Underlying Soybean Seed Oil Composition and Content

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean is the most important oil crop in the United States. Production of soybean seed oil requires coordinated expression of many biological components and pathways, which is further regulated by seed development and phyto-hormones. A new research project is initiated in my laboratory to delineat...

  6. Confirmation of a seed yield QTL in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Exotic germplasm can be an important source of genetic diversity for soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] improvement. Previously, four yield quantitative trait loci (QTL) had been identified in a cross between the exotic soybean plant introduction (PI) 68658 and the U.S. cultivar Lawrence. The confirma...

  7. Bacillus paralicheniformis sp. nov., isolated from fermented soybean paste

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An isolate of a Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, motile, rod-shaped, endospore forming bacterium was recovered from soybean-based fermented paste. It was isolated from cheonggukjang, a Korean fermented soybean food product. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that the strain ...

  8. Application Technology Research for Asian Soybean Rust Management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fungicides are currently the only means for managing potentially devastating Asian Soybean Rust (ASR) infection in the U.S. ASR is likely to first infection those portions of the soybean canopy closer to the ground. Infection is most likely to occur once the canopy is nearly fully developed and mo...

  9. Functionality of soybean CBF/DREB1 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Yuji; Randall, Stephen K

    2016-05-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) is considered to be cold intolerant and is not able to significantly acclimate to cold/freezing stress. In most cold tolerant plants, the C-repeat/DRE Binding Factors (CBF/DREBs) are critical contributors to successful cold-responses; rapidly increasing following cold treatment and regulating the induction of many cold responsive genes. In soybean vegetative tissue, we found strong, transient accumulation of CBF transcripts in response to cold stress; however, the soybean transcripts of typical cold responsive genes (homologues to Arabidopsis genes such as dehydrins, ADH1, RAP2.1, and LEA14) were not significantly altered. Soybean CBFs were found to be functional, as when expressed constitutively in Arabidopsis they increased the levels of AtCOR47 and AtRD29a transcripts and increased freezing tolerance as measured by a decrease in leaf freezing damage and ion leakage. Furthermore the constitutive expression of GmDREB1A;2 and GmDREB1B;1 in Arabidopsis led to stronger up-regulation of downstream genes and more freezing tolerance than GmDREB1A;1, the gene whose transcript is the major contributor to total CBF/DREB1 transcripts in soybean. The inability for the soybean CBFs to significantly up regulate the soybean genes that contribute to cold tolerance is consistent with poor acclimation capability and the cold intolerance of soybean.

  10. [Mapping and cloning of low phosphorus tolerance genes in soybeans].

    PubMed

    Dan, Zhang; Haina, Song; Hao, Cheng; Deyue, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Soybean is a major source of edible oil and phytoprotein. Low phosphorus available in soil is an important factor limiting the current soybean production. Effective ways to solve the problem include identification of germplasms and genes tolerant to low-phosphorus stress, and cultivation of soybean varieties with high phosphorus efficiency. Recently many researches have been carrying out investigations to map and clone genes related to phosphorus efficiency in soybeans. However, due to the complexity of the soybean genome and little knowledge of functional genes, it has been difficult to understand the mechanism of soybean tolerance to low phosphorus. Although quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping related to low phosphorus tolerance has made some progress, it remains elusive to obtain accurate candidate genes for molecular breeding applications, due to the limited accuracy of QTL. Even for the cloned soybean low phosphorus tolerance genes, the molecular mechanisms are largely unknown, further limiting the application to breeding. In this review, we summarize the progresses on mapping, cloning and functional characterization of soybean low phosphorus tolerance genes.

  11. Management Practices of Soybean Producers in Marion County, Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, William A.; And Others

    The purposes of the study were to: (1) determine some major characteristics of Marion County soybean producers and their farms; (2) more accurately determine which recommended production practices soybean producers were using in 1968 and 1969; (3) study the relation between use of recommended production practices and yield levels; and (4) identify…

  12. Adhesion Properties of Plywood Glue Containing Soybean Meal as Extender

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of soybean meal as protein extender in plywood adhesive intended for sprayline coaters. Ground soybean meal, with 51.5% (dry basis, db) crude protein and 1.5% (db) residual oil, replaced the current industry extender, wheat flour, in the standard ...

  13. Phytophthora root rot resistance in soybean E00003

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phytophthora root rot (PRR), caused by the oomycete Phytophthora sojae, is a devastating disease in soybean production. Using resistant cultivars has been suggested as the best solution for disease management. Michigan elite soybean E00003 is resistant to P. sojae and has been used as a PRR resist...

  14. Utilization of Molecular Detection Techniques to Find Soybean Pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybeans continue to rise in prominence as a source of feed, food, oil, and renewable energy. Of many factors impacting yield, microbial pathogens alone can cause significant losses in production. Management of soybean diseases and pests involves many approaches including cultural aspects like crop ...

  15. Mammalian cell cytotoxicity analysis of soybean rust fungicides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The identification of soybean rust, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, in the United States has increased the concerns of the impact of the pathogen on U.S. soybean production. The rapid spread of P. pachyrhizi and its potential to cause severe yield losses makes this among the most destructive folia...

  16. Utility of Proteomic tools for assessing protein expression in soybeans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean is the second most important cash crop in the U.S. with an estimated value of $19.8 billion in 2006. Genetically modified (GM) crops are commonly grown globally to enhance quality, productivity, and disease resistance. Some of the examples are, herbicide resistance (Roundup Ready soybeans)...

  17. Synthesis of lubrication fluids and surfactant precursors from soybean oil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Starting with soybean oil or soybean oil derived methyl oleate, a variety of compounds have been synthesized. The epoxidation of oleochemicals is a simple way to use the unsaturation naturally available in the vegetable oil and convert it into a variety of other useful chemicals. Epoxidized methyl...

  18. Feeding value of frost-damaged soybeans for lambs.

    PubMed

    Loesche, J A; Pritchard, R H; Reecy, J M; Wicks, Z W

    1992-07-01

    Three experiments were conducted to determine the relative feeding value of frost-damaged soybeans (FDS) for ruminants. Frost-damaged soybean ether-extract content was variable and differed (P less than .05) from mature soybeans. Isonitrogenous supplementation of corn silage diets with soybean meal (SBM), SBM+soybean oil (SBO), mature raw soybeans (MSB), and FDS was compared in sheep. Acid detergent fiber and apparent N digestion were lower (P less than .001) for supplements containing oil. Nitrogen retention was reduced (P less than .07) only for raw soybean supplements. Ruminal NH3 N and branched-chain VFA concentrations differed (P less than .01) between SBM and supplements containing oil. Maximum tolerable inclusion level of FDS in corn silage diets was tested in wethers using diets containing 0, 7, 14, or 21% FDS. Dry matter and ADF digestibility declined linearly (P less than .01) with increasing dietary FDS. Ether extract digestibility was unchanged due to treatment, but GE digestibility decreased quadratically (P less than .01). The most pronounced decline in GE digestibility occurred when FDS increased from 14 to 21% of the diet. The effects of FDS on corn silage utilization were similar to MSB effects. Oil content and antinutritional factors contributed to detrimental effects. Frost-damaged soybeans should not exceed 14% of corn silage diets fed to growing wethers.

  19. Population genetic structure of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) is an invasive pest of cultivated soybean [Glycine max (L.)] in North America. After the initial invasion in 2000, the aphid has quickly spread across most of the U.S. and Canada, suggesting large scale dispersals and rapid adaptations to new environment...

  20. Bacillus glycinifermentans sp. nov., isolated from fermented soybean paste

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two independent isolates of a Gram-positive, aerobic, motile rod-shaped bacterium were recovered from soybean-based fermented foodstuffs. Two were isolated from cheonggukjang, a Korean fermented soybean food product. Multilocus sequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and 5 protein coding genes indi...

  1. Delivering More Nutritious Soybeans After Molecular Genetic Detective Work

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean oil is an important, but hidden, component of the American diet. Both positive and negative impacts from the fatty acid components of oils have been demonstrated for human nutrition needs. The objective of this research was to identify soybean genes that underlie important oil quality trai...

  2. Gaining insight into soybean defense responses using functional genomics approaches

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean pathogens significantly impact yield, resulting in over 4 billion dollars in lost revenue annually in the United States alone as a result of disease. Despite the deployment of improved soybean cultivars, pathogens continue to evolve to evade plant defense responses. Thus, there is an urgent ...

  3. Saccharin-Mediated Systemic Protection of Soybean Against Infection by Soybean Rust

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a widely distributed plant defense system that confers broad-spectrum disease resistance. Saccharin is known to induce a SAR response in many plant species. To evaluate the potentiating capability of saccharin in this respect, soybean (Glycine max) plants were i...

  4. The soybean GmSNAP18 gene underlies two types of resistance to soybean cyst nematode

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shiming; Kandoth, Pramod K.; Lakhssassi, Naoufal; Kang, Jingwen; Colantonio, Vincent; Heinz, Robert; Yeckel, Greg; Zhou, Zhou; Bekal, Sadia; Dapprich, Johannes; Rotter, Bjorn; Cianzio, Silvia; Mitchum, Melissa G.; Meksem, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Two types of resistant soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) sources are widely used against soybean cyst nematode (SCN, Heterodera glycines Ichinohe). These include Peking-type soybean, whose resistance requires both the rhg1-a and Rhg4 alleles, and PI 88788-type soybean, whose resistance requires only the rhg1-b allele. Multiple copy number of PI 88788-type GmSNAP18, GmAAT, and GmWI12 in one genomic segment simultaneously contribute to rhg1-b resistance. Using an integrated set of genetic and genomic approaches, we demonstrate that the rhg1-a Peking-type GmSNAP18 is sufficient for resistance to SCN in combination with Rhg4. The two SNAPs (soluble NSF attachment proteins) differ by only five amino acids. Our findings suggest that Peking-type GmSNAP18 is performing a different role in SCN resistance than PI 88788-type GmSNAP18. As such, this is an example of a pathogen resistance gene that has evolved to underlie two types of resistance, yet ensure the same function within a single plant species. PMID:28345654

  5. Comparison of Ground Raw Soybean and Soybean Meal Diets on Carcass Traits of Gilts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As part of an ongoing reproductive efficiency study with gilts fed a raw soybean (RSB) diet, an assessment of carcass traits was performed to measure the effect of antinutritional factors present in RSB. Yorkshire × Landrace crossbred gilts (n = 20) were assigned to balanced isonitrogenous (crude pr...

  6. Direct Effects of Soybean Varietal Selection and Aphis Glycines-Resistant Soybeans on Natural Enemies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The direct effects of three soybean base genetics, each represented by an Aphis glycines-resistant and susceptible variety, on the fitness and performance of two key predators (Orius insidiosus and Harmonia axyridis) were evaluated in the laboratory. Predators were reared from hatch through adulthoo...

  7. Evaluation of late vegetative and reproductive stage soybeans for resistance to soybean aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    PubMed

    Prochaska, T J; Pierson, L M; Baldin, E L L; Hunt, T E; Heng-Moss, T M; Reese, J C

    2013-04-01

    The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, has become the most significant soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] insect pest in the north central soybean production region of North America. The objectives of this research were to measure selected genotypes for resistance to the soybean aphid in the later vegetative and reproductive stages under field conditions, and confirm the presence of tolerance in KS4202. The results from 2007 to 2011 indicate that KS4202 can support aphid populations with minimal yield loss at levels where significant yield loss would be expected in most other genotypes. The common Nebraska cultivar, 'Asgrow 2703', appears to show signs of tolerance as well. None of the yield parameters were significantly different between the aphid infested and noninfested treatments. Based on our results, genotypes may compensate for aphid feeding in different ways. Asgrow 2703 appears to produce a similar number of seeds as its noninfested counterpart, although the seeds produced are slightly smaller. Field evaluation of tolerance in KS4202 indicated a yield loss of only 13% at 34,585-53,508 cumulative aphid-days, when 24-36% yield loss would have been expected.

  8. Shifts in Buchnera aphidicola density in soybean aphids (Aphis glycines) feeding on virus-infected soybean.

    PubMed

    Cassone, Bryan J; Redinbaugh, Margaret G; Dorrance, Anne E; Michel, Andrew P

    2015-08-01

    Vertically transmitted bacterial symbionts are common in arthropods. Aphids undergo an obligate symbiosis with Buchnera aphidicola, which provides essential amino acids to its host and contributes directly to nymph growth and reproduction. We previously found that newly adult Aphis glycines feeding on soybean infected with the beetle-transmitted Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) had significantly reduced fecundity. We hypothesized that the reduced fecundity was attributable to detrimental impacts of the virus on the aphid microbiome, namely Buchnera. To test this, mRNA sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR were used to assay Buchnera transcript abundance and titre in A. glycines feeding on Soybean mosaic virus-infected, BPMV-infected, and healthy soybean for up to 14 days. Our results indicated that Buchnera density was lower and ultimately suppressed in aphids feeding on virus-infected soybean. While the decreased Buchnera titre may be associated with reduced aphid fecundity, additional mechanisms are probably involved. The present report begins to describe how interactions among insects, plants, and plant pathogens influence endosymbiont population dynamics.

  9. Overexpression of a soybean salicylic acid methyltransferase gene confers resistance to soybean cyst nematode

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salicylic acid plays a critical role in activating plant defence responses after pathogen attack. Salicylic acid methyltransferase (SAMT) modulates the level of salicylic acid by converting salicylic acid to methyl salicylate. Here, we report that a SAMT gene from soybean (GmSAMT1) plays a role in s...

  10. New fermentation technique for complete digestion of soybean protein.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Ok; Park, Mi Hwa; Choi, Yung Hyun; Ha, Yeong Lae; Ryu, Chung Ho

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new fermentation method in order to improve the digestion of soybean protein, and to promote normal fermentation of soybean. A proximate composition, such as moisture, pH, and reducing sugar, of fermented soybeans by the new fermentation was similar to those of controls. Neutral protease activity, the most important factor for fermented soybean products, was the highest, having about 636 U/g at 54 h fermentation. The content of total free amino acid was almost 3-18 times higher than controls. The three-step fermented soybeans can be used as a functional food ingredient for human consumption, with higher protein digestibility.

  11. Divergence and differential expression of soybean actin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Hightower, R C; Meagher, R B

    1985-01-01

    DNA sequence analysis as well as genomic blotting experiments using cloned soybean actin DNA sequences as probes show that large sequence heterogeneity exists among members of the soybean actin multigene family. This heterogeneity suggested that the members of this family might be diverged in function and/or regulation. Five of the six soybean actin gene family members examined are shown to be significantly more diverged from one another than members of other known actin gene families. This high level of divergence was utilized in the preparation of actin gene-specific probes in the analysis of the complexity and expression of these members of the soybean actin gene family. Hybridization studies indicate that the six soybean actin genes fall into three classes with a pair of genes in each class. These six genes account for all but two actin gene fragments detected in the soybean genome. We have compared the relative steady state mRNA levels of these classes of soybean actin genes in three organs of soybean. We find that actin genes SAc6 and SAc7 are most highly expressed accounting for 80% of all actin mRNA with respect to the six soybean actin genes examined. Actin genes SAc3 and SAc1 are expressed at intermediate and low levels respectively; and SAc2 and SAc4 are expressed at barely detectable levels. Four of the six soybean actin genes appear to be expressed at the same level in root, shoot and hypocotyl. SAc3 and SAc7 genes appear to be more highly expressed in shoot and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-induced hypocotyl than in root and hypocotyl.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2410251

  12. Molecular characterization of resistance to soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd. & Syd.) in soybean cultivar DT 2000 (PI 635999)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Resistance to soybean rust (SBR), caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd.& Syd., has been identified in many soybean germplasm accessions and is conferred by either dominant or recessive genes that have been mapped to six independent loci (Rpp1 – Rpp6), but No U.S. cultivars are resistant to SBR. The c...

  13. Diversity of parasitic fungi from soybean cyst nematode associated with long-term continuous cropping of soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is a major yield-limiting pest of soybean. In this study, experiments were conducted to examine the parasitic fungi from SCN associated with disease-suppressive and non-suppressive soil fields in Northeast China. Soil samples were collected from three fields under dif...

  14. 77 FR 40529 - Soybean Promotion and Research: Amend the Order To Adjust Representation on the United Soybean Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ...) provides for the establishment of a coordinated program of promotion and research designed to strengthen...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 1220 Soybean Promotion and Research... Board was last reapportioned in 2009. As required by the Soybean Promotion, Research, and Consumer...

  15. Registration of G07-6012 and G07-6029 soybean germplasm which derive 50% pedigree from wild soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two soybean germplasm lines, G07-6012 and G07-6029 were developed and released by the Univ. of Georgia Agricultural Experiment Stations. Both G07-6012 and G07-6029 are agronomic F4-derived lines from the hybridization of cultivar ‘N7103’ x Plant Introduction (PI) 366122, a wild soybean accession [G....

  16. Proposal for a Standard Greenhouse Method for Assessing Soybean Cyst Nematode Resistance in Soybean: SCE08 (Standardized Cyst Evaluation 2008)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) remains the most economically important pathogen of soybean in North America. Most farmers do not sample for SCN believing instead that the use of SCN-resistant varieties is sufficient to avoid yield losses due to the nematode according to surveys conducted in Illino...

  17. Host Adaptation of Soybean Dwarf Virus Following Serial Passages on Pea (Pisum sativum) and Soybean (Glycine max).

    PubMed

    Tian, Bin; Gildow, Frederick E; Stone, Andrew L; Sherman, Diana J; Damsteegt, Vernon D; Schneider, William L

    2017-06-21

    Soybean Dwarf Virus (SbDV) is an important plant pathogen, causing economic losses in soybean. In North America, indigenous strains of SbDV mainly infect clover, with occasional outbreaks in soybean. To evaluate the risk of a US clover strain of SbDV adapting to other plant hosts, the clover isolate SbDV-MD6 was serially transmitted to pea and soybean by aphid vectors. Sequence analysis of SbDV-MD6 from pea and soybean passages identified 11 non-synonymous mutations in soybean, and six mutations in pea. Increasing virus titers with each sequential transmission indicated that SbDV-MD6 was able to adapt to the plant host. However, aphid transmission efficiency on soybean decreased until the virus was no longer transmissible. Our results clearly demonstrated that the clover strain of SbDV-MD6 is able to adapt to soybean crops. However, mutations that improve replication and/or movement may have trade-off effects resulting in decreased vector transmission.

  18. Comparing biofuels obtained from pyrolysis, of soybean oil or soapstock, with traditional soybean biodiesel: Density, kinematic viscosity, and surface tensions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A product with diesel like properties was synthesized by a pyrolysis method, from either edible soybean oil, or an inedible soybean soapstock starting material (PD and SD, respectively). Some physical properties of the material were studied, neat, and in blends; with both high sulfur and low sulfur...

  19. Impact of Rag1 aphid resistant soybeans on Binodoxys communis (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a parasitoid of soybean aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    PubMed

    Ghising, Kiran; Harmon, Jason P; Beauzay, Patrick B; Prischmann-Voldseth, Deirdre A; Helms, Ted C; Ode, Paul J; Knodel, Janet J

    2012-04-01

    Multiple strategies are being developed for pest management of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura; however, there has been little published research thus far to determine how such strategies may influence each other, thereby complicating their potential effectiveness. A susceptible soybean (Glycine max L.) variety without the Rag1 gene and a near isogenic resistant soybean variety with the Rag1 gene were evaluated in the laboratory for their effects on the fitness of the soybean aphid parasitoid, Binodoxys communis (Gahan). The presence or absence of the Rag1 gene was verified by quantifying soybean aphid growth. To test for fitness effects, parasitoids were allowed to attack soybean aphids on either a susceptible or resistant plant for 24 h and then aphids were kept on the same plant throughout parasitoid development. Parasitoid fitness was measured by mummy and adult parasitoid production, adult parasitoid emergence, development time, and adult size. Parasitoids that attacked soybean aphids on susceptible plants produced more mummies, more adult parasitoids, and had a higher emergence rate compared with those on resistant plants. Adult parasitoids that emerged from resistant plants took 1 d longer and were smaller compared with those from susceptible plants. This study suggests that biological control by B. communis may be compromised when host plant resistance is widely used for pest management of soybean aphids.

  20. Feeding and maturation by soybean looper (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae on soybean affected by weed, fungus, and nematode pests.

    PubMed

    Carter-Wientjes, Carol H; Russin, John S; Boethel, David J; Griffin, James L; McGawley, Eduward C

    2004-02-01

    Feeding and maturation by the soybean looper, Pseudoplusia includens (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), were investigated in a 2-yr study on 'Davis' soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., grown alone and combined with the weed hemp sesbania, Sesbania exaltata (Raf.) Rybd. ex. A. W. Hill, the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid & White) Chitwood, and the charcoal rot fungus, Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid. Of the three pests, hemp sesbania had the greatest effects on plant growth and insect feeding and maturation. When fed foliage from soybean stressed by hemp sesbania, soybean looper larvae remained longer in feeding stages, consumed more foliage, and showed altered weight gain compared with larvae fed control foliage. Results suggest that nutrient (s) critical for proper development of larvae may have been limited in weed-stressed soybean foliage. Less dramatic results were observed when larvae fed on foliage from soybean with roots colonized by the charcoal rot fungus. Such larvae consumed more foliage, weighed more, and showed a slight increase in larval feeding period, but only in 1 yr of the study. Colonization of soybean roots by the root-knot nematode had no consistent effects on either the soybean host or insect.

  1. Controlled environments alter nutrient content of soybeans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurgonski, L. J.; Smart, D. J.; Bugbee, B.; Nielsen, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    Information about compositional changes in plants grown in controlled environments is essential for developing a safe, nutritious diet for a Controlled Ecological Life-Support System (CELSS). Information now is available for some CELSS candidate crops, but detailed information has been lacking for soybeans. To determine the effect of environment on macronutrient and mineral composition of soybeans, plants were grown both in the field and in a controlled environment where the hydroponic nutrient solution, photosynthetic flux (PPF), and CO_2 level were manipulated to achieve rapid growth rates. Plants were harvested at seed maturity, separated into discrete parts, and oven dried prior to chemical analysis. Plant material was analyzed for proximate composition (moisture, protein, lipid, ash, and carbohydrate), total nitrogen (N), nonprotein N (NPN), nitrate, minerals, amino acid composition, and total dietary fiber. The effect of environment on composition varied by cultivar and plant part. Chamber-grown plants generally exhibited the following characteristics compared with field-grown plants: 1) increased total N and protein N for all plant parts, 2) increased nitrate in leaves and stems but not in seeds, 3) increased lipids in seeds, and 4) decreased Ca:P ratio for stems, pods, and leaves. These trends are consistent with data for other CELSS crops. Total N, protein N, and amino acid contents for 350 ppm CO_2 and 1000 ppm CO_2 were similar for seeds, but protein N and amino acid contents for leaves were higher at 350 ppm CO_2 than at 1000 ppm CO_2. Total dietary fiber content of soybean leaves was higher with 350 ppm CO_2 than with 1000 ppm CO_2. Such data will help in selecting of crop species, cultivars, and growing conditions to ensure safe, nutritious diets for CELSS.

  2. Analysis of isoflavone contents in vegetable soybeans.

    PubMed

    Mebrahtu, T; Mohamed, A; Wang, C Y; Andebrhan, T

    2004-01-01

    In addition to oil and soyfoods, soybean is also produced for vegetable use. The importance of consuming vegetable soybean for the prevention of chronic diseases is well documented. The objectives of this study were to determine the magnitude of genotype x year interactions for isoflavone concentration and pattern, estimate heritabilities, and identify genotypes with a stable isoflavone concentration and pattern. Thirty-one soybean genotypes from maturity groups (MGs) III to VI were grown at Randolph Research Farm of Virginia State University, Petersburg, Virginia, during 3 years. The genotypes were harvested at immature green pod stage (R6-R7) and analyzed for isoflavone contents. Significant (P < 0.05) differences among the genotypes were found for genistein, daidzein, glycitein, and total isoflavones. The genotype x year interactions were also significant (P < 0.05) for the seed traits analyzed, indicating that the performance of the genotype changes from year to year. However, genotypes Pella and Aoda consistently showed with higher means than the overall means for all the seed traits throughout the 3 years. MG differences were also observed for genistein, daidzein, and total isoflavone content. Low- to moderate-heritability estimates of 54, 45, 58, and 64% were observed for genistein, daidzein, glycitein, and total isoflavone content, respectively, suggesting that the seed traits are equally influenced by environments and genetic variations. In general, for all seed traits with the exception of daidzein, the percentage contribution of genotype to the total sum of square was higher than the genotype x year interaction. The seed traits were interdependent and the associations among them were positive and significant suggesting that simultaneous selection and improvements are possible.

  3. Controlled environments alter nutrient content of soybeans.

    PubMed

    Jurgonski, L J; Smart, D J; Bugbee, B; Nielsen, S S

    1997-01-01

    Information about compositional changes in plants grown in controlled environments is essential for developing a safe, nutritious diet for a Controlled Ecomological Life-Support System (CELSS). Information now is available for some CELSS candidate crops, but detailed information has been lacking for soybeans. To determine the effect of environment on macronutrient and mineral composition of soybeans, plants were grown both in the field and in a controlled environment where the hydroponic nutrient solution, photosynthetic flux (PPF), and CO2 level were manipulated to achieve rapid growth rates. Plants were harvested at seed maturity, separated into discrete parts, and oven dried prior to chemical analysis. Plant material was analyzed for proximate composition (moisture, protein, lipid, ash, and carbohydrate), total nitrogen (N), nonprotein N (NPN), nitrate, minerals, amino acid composition, and total dietary fiber. The effect of environment on composition varied by cultivar and plant part. Chamber-grown plants generally exhibited the following characteristics compared with field-grown plants: 1) increased total N and protein N for all plant parts, 2) increased nitrate in leaves and stems but not in seeds, 3) increased lipids in seeds, and 4) decreased Ca:P ratio for stems, pods, and leaves. These trends are consistent with data for other CELSS crops. Total N, protein N, and amino acid contents for 350 ppm CO2 and 1000 ppm CO2 were similar for seeds, but protein N and amino acid contents for leaves were higher at 350 ppm CO2 than at 1000 ppm CO2. Total dietary fiber content of soybean leaves was higher with 350 ppm CO2 than with 1000 ppm CO2. Such data will help in selecting of crop species, cultivars, and growing conditions to ensure safe, nutritious diets for CELSS.

  4. Protein and quality analyses of accessions from the USDA soybean germplasm collection for tofu production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Food-grade soybeans with large seed size, uniformity, clear hilum, and high 11S/7S ratio are favored by the food industry for making tofu. In order to search for soybean lines with desirable characteristics for making foods, twenty-two soybean lines were selected from the USDA-Soybean Germplasm Coll...

  5. Performance and prospects of Rag genes for management of soybean aphid

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, is an invasive insect pest of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] in North America, and it has led to extensive insecticide use in northern soybean-growing regions there. Host-plant resistance is one potential alternative strategy for managing soybean aphid...

  6. Dynamic proteome analysis of roots of soybean compatible and incompatible to Heterodera glycines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To gain new insights into the mechanism of soybean (Glycine max) interaction with the soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines), we compared protein expression profiles of soybean roots infected by the soybean cyst nematode. Proteins were extracted from roots of 3 and 8 days post-inoculation (dpi)...

  7. From climate change to molecular response: redox proteomics of ozone-induced responses in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ozone (O3) causes significant agricultural losses with soybean being highly sensitive to this oxidant. Here we assess the effect of elevated seasonal O3 exposure on the total and redox proteomes of soybean. To understand the molecular responses to O3 exposure, soybean grown at the Soybean Free Air C...

  8. Evaluation of a novel soybean oil-based surfactant for fine emulsion preparation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean oil is currently the world’s second largest source of vegetable oil. The growth in soybean oil production and the concerns over petrochemical surfactants have promoted the development of soybean oil-based surfactants. In this paper, we briefly describe the synthesis and properties of soybean...

  9. The Utilization of Soybean Wild Relatives: How Can It Be Effective?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wild soybean (G. soja Sieb. & Zucc.) is the progenitor of soybean and is native to China, Taiwan, Japan, eastern Russia and the Korean peninsula. Research has repeatedly demonstrated that wild soybean is more genetically diverse than the cultivated soybean. There are 26 perennial Glycine species tha...

  10. Resistance to phomopsis seed decay identified in maturity group V soybean plant introductions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phomopsis seed decay (PSD) of soybean is the major cause of poor seed quality in most soybean-growing countries. This disease is primarily caused by the fungus Phomopsis longicolla. Few soybean cultivars currently available for planting in the U.S. have resistance to PSD. To identify soybean lines w...

  11. Anaerobic Biodegradation of soybean biodiesel and diesel ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Biotransformation of soybean biodiesel and its biodiesel/petrodiesel blends were investigated under sulfate-reducing conditions. Three blends of biodiesel, B100, B50, and B0, were treated using microbial cultures pre-acclimated to B100 (biodiesel only) and B80 (80% biodiesel and 20% petrodiesel). Results indicate that the biodiesel could be effectively biodegraded in the presence or absence of petrodiesel, whereas petrodiesel could not be biodegraded at all under sulfate-reducing conditions. The kinetics of biodegradation of individual Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) compounds and their accompanying sulfate-reduction rates were studied using a serum bottle test. As for the biodegradation of individual FAME compounds, the biodegradation rates for the saturated FAMEs decreased with increasing carbon chain length. For unsaturated FAMEs, biodegradation rates increased with increasing number of double bonds. The presence of petrodiesel had a greater effect on the rate of biodegradation of biodiesel than on the extent of removal. The objective of this study was to investigate anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel and petrodiesel blends in a sulfate-reducing environment, which is a prevalent condition in anaerobic sediments.

  12. Soybean peroxidase as an industrial catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Pokora, A.R.

    1995-12-01

    Peroxidases are a large class of enzymes which are very efficient at catalysing oxidation reactions. Horseradish peroxidase, the most abundant and commercially available peroxidase, has been utilized for many years in medical diagnostic test kits but has never been used successfully in an industrial application. One of the major drawbacks associated with the peroxidases cost and has been their lack of the thermal stability required in an industrial process. Recently, we isolated has been their lack of the peroxidase from soybean seed coats. Soybean seed coats are a commodity product available year round in very large volumes. The useful operational temperature for the soy peroxidase is 40{degrees}C higher than for horseradish peroxidase resulting in shorter reaction times and greater reactor efficiency. This process can be used to produce formaldehyde-free polyphenols as well as numerous phenolic dimers used in the manufacture of anti-oxidants, U-V absorbers, epoxies as well as other materials. The process to manufacture resins and dimers will be discussed.

  13. Photosynthate Partitioning into Starch in Soybean Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Chatterton, N. Jerry; Silvius, John E.

    1979-01-01

    Photosynthesis, photosynthate partitioning into foliar starch, and translocation were investigated in soybean plants (Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Amsoy 71), grown under different photoperiods and photosynthetic periods to determine the controls of leaf starch accumulation. Starch accumulation rates in soybean leaves were inversely related to the length of the daily photosynthetic period under which the plants were grown. Photosynthetic period and not photoperiod per se appears to be the important factor. Plants grown in a 14-hour photosynthetic period partitioned approximately 60% of the daily foliar accumulation into starch whereas 7-hour plants partitioned about 90% of their daily foliar accumulation into starch. The difference in starch accumulation resulted from a change in photosynthate partitioning between starch and leaf residual dry weight. Residual dry weight is defined as leaf dry weight minus the weight of total nonstructural carbohydrates. Differences in photosynthate partitioning into starch were also associated with changes in photosynthetic and translocation rates, as well as with leaf and whole plant morphology. It is concluded that leaf starch accumulation is a programmed process and not simply the result of a limitation in translocation. PMID:16661047

  14. Reduction of soybean yield components by Megacopta cribraria (Hemiptera: Plataspidae).

    PubMed

    Seiter, Nicholas J; Greene, Jeremy K; Reay-Jones, Francis P F

    2013-08-01

    ABSTRACT Since its discovery in the United States, the invasive plataspid Megacopta cribraria (F.) (Hemiptera: Plataspidae) has infested soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] fields in often alarming numbers in parts of the southeastern United States. Although a known feeder on soybean, reports of its pest status in its native Asian range are conflicting, and little information exists documenting its impact on soybean yields. Our objective was to examine the relationship between M. cribraria density and soybean yield loss. M. cribraria adults and nymphs were confined to small soybean plots by using walk-in field cages from late vegetative stage to harvest in 2011 and 2012. Adults (0, 5, or 25 per plant) were added at late vegetative stages, and their progeny were allowed to complete a full generation within the caged plots. Densities reached as high as 182.5 +/- 23.1 (SEM) nymphs and adults per plant, and soybean yield was reduced by as much as 59.6% at the highest density treatment. The yield components seeds per pod and individual seed weight were reduced as M. cribraria densities increased, but pods per plant and protein and oil content were not affected. Preliminary economic injury level curves for a range of grain prices and management costs were calculated based on 2012 yield loss data combined with population monitoring. M. cribraria is capable of causing severe reductions in soybean yields at densities that are relevant within its invasive U.S. range.

  15. Compositional analysis of glyphosate-tolerant soybeans treated with glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Taylor, N B; Fuchs, R L; MacDonald, J; Shariff, A R; Padgette, S R

    1999-10-01

    The compositional analyses and safety assessment of glyphosate-tolerant soybeans (GTS) were previously described. These analyses were extensive and included addressing the potential effects on seed composition from the genetic modification. Detailed compositional analyses established that GTS, which had not been treated with glyphosate, were comparable to the parental soybean line and to other conventional soybeans. In this study, two GTS lines, 40-3-2 and 61-67-1, were treated with commercial levels of glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup herbicide. The composition of the seed from soybeans sprayed with glyphosate was compared to that of a nonsprayed parental control cultivar, A5403. The nutrients measured in the seed included protein, oil, ash, fiber, carbohydrates, and amino acids. The concentration of isoflavones (also referred to as phytoestrogens) was also measured as these compounds are derived from the same biochemical pathway that was engineered for glyphosate tolerance. The analytical results from these studies demonstrate that the GTS soybeans treated with glyphosate were comparable to the parental soybean cultivar, A5403, and other conventional soybean varieties.

  16. The induction of proteinases in corn and soybean by anoxia

    SciTech Connect

    VanToai, T.; Hwang, Shihying )

    1989-04-01

    This study characterized the anaerobic changes in proteinase activities in corn and soybean roots and to investigate the possibility that these changes might contribute to the differential anaerobiosis tolerance of the two species. After 24 h of anoxia, crude protein extracts from H60 corn and Keller soybean root tips (10cm) were assayed for proteinase activities at pH range from 4.5 to 9.5. Turnover of aberrant proteins was studied in seedlings labelled with {sup 3}H-leucine for 12 h under: (a) puromycin (0.64 mM) in air, (b) ethanol (1%) in air, (c) nitrogen and (d) air. After the treatment, the labelled proteins remaining in roots were determined every 2 h for 6 h. In both corn and soybean, activities of alkali proteinases increased, and activities of acid proteinases declined under anoxia. Neutral proteinases increase in anoxic corn roots, but decline in anoxic soybean roots. The protein turnover rate in corn treated with puromycin, ethanol and nitrogen was much higher than in control roots. The protein turnover rate in soybean roots treated with puromycin, ethanol was similar to the rate of the control. The results indicated that: (a) anoxic corn can degrade aberrant proteins, but anoxic soybean cannot, (b) the degradation of aberrant proteins in anoxic corn is accomplished by neutral proteinases, and (c) the accumulation of aberrant proteins in soybean might contribute to the susceptibility of this species to anoxia.

  17. Archaeological Soybean (Glycine max) in East Asia: Does Size Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gyoung-Ah; Crawford, Gary W.; Liu, Li; Sasaki, Yuka; Chen, Xuexiang

    2011-01-01

    The recently acquired archaeological record for soybean from Japan, China and Korea is shedding light on the context in which this important economic plant became associated with people and was domesticated. This paper examines archaeological (charred) soybean seed size variation to determine what insight can be gained from a comprehensive comparison of 949 specimens from 22 sites. Seed length alone appears to represent seed size change through time, although the length×width×thickness product has the potential to provide better size change resolution. A widespread early association of small seeded soybean is as old as 9000–8600 cal BP in northern China and 7000 cal BP in Japan. Direct AMS radiocarbon dates on charred soybean seeds indicate selection resulted in large seed sizes in Japan by 5000 cal BP (Middle Jomon) and in Korea by 3000 cal BP (Early Mumun). Soybean seeds recovered in China from the Shang through Han periods are similar in length to the large Korean and Japanese specimens, but the overall size of the large Middle and Late Jomon, Early Mumun through Three Kingdom seeds is significantly larger than any of the Chinese specimens. The archaeological record appears to disconfirm the hypothesis of a single domestication of soybean and supports the view informed by recent phyologenetic research that soybean was domesticated in several locations in East Asia. PMID:22073186

  18. Lady Beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Communities in Soybean and Maize.

    PubMed

    Prescott, K K; Andow, D A

    2016-02-01

    Coccinellids provide the most effective natural control of soybean aphid, but outbreaks remain common. Previous work suggests that native coccinellids are rare in soybean, potentially limiting soybean aphid control. We compared the coccinellid community in soybean with that of maize to identify differences in how coccinellid species use these habitats. As maize has long been used by coccinellids in the Americas, we hypothesized that coccinellids native to the Americas would use maize habitats, while exotic coccinellids would be more common in soybean. We identified and quantified aphids and all species and stages of coccinellids in a randomized complete block experiment with four blocks of 10 by 10 -m plots of soybean and maize in central Minnesota during 2008 and 2009. Coccinellid egg masses were identified by hatching in the laboratory. We used repeated-measures ANOVA to identify the dominant species in each habitat and compared species richness and Shannon's diversity with a paired t-test. Aphids and coccinellids had a similar phenology across habitats, but the coccinellid species composition differed significantly between soybean and maize. In soybean, the exotic, Harmonia axyridis Pallas, was the dominant species, while in maize, H. axyridis and the native, Coleomegilla maculata De Geer, were co-dominant. Eggs of H. axyridis were abundant in both habitats. In contrast, C. maculata eggs were very rare in soybean, despite being abundant in adjacent plots of maize. Species diversity was higher in maize. These findings were consistent with other published studies of coccinellid communities in these habitats. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Novel and conserved microRNAs in soybean floral whorls.

    PubMed

    Kulcheski, F R; Molina, L G; da Fonseca, G C; de Morais, G L; de Oliveira, L F V; Margis, R

    2016-01-10

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) correspond to a class of endogenous small non-coding RNAs (19-24 nt) that regulates the gene expression, through mRNA target cleavage or translation inhibition. In plants, miRNAs have been shown to play pivotal roles in a wide variety of metabolic and biological processes like plant growth, development, and response to biotic and abiotic stress. Soybean is one of the most important crops worldwide, due to the production of oil and its high protein content. The reproductive phase is considered the most important for soybean yield, which is mainly intended to produce the grains. The identification of miRNAs is not yet saturated in soybean, and there are no studies linking them to the different floral organs. In this study, three different mature soybean floral whorls were used in the construction of sRNA libraries. The sequencing of petal, carpel and stamen libraries generated a total of 10,165,661 sequences. Subsequent analyses identified 200 miRNAs sequences, among which, 41 were novel miRNAs, 80 were conserved soybean miRNAs, 31 were new antisense conserved soybean miRNAs and 46 were soybean miRNAs isoforms. We also found a new miRNA conserved in other plant species, and finally one miRNA-sibling of a soybean conserved miRNA. Conserved and novel miRNAs were evaluated by RT-qPCR. We observed a differential expression across the three whorls for six miRNAs. Computational predicted targets for miRNAs analyzed by RT-qPCR were identified and present functions related to reproductive process in plants. In summary, the increased accumulation of specific and novel miRNAs in different whorls indicates that miRNAs are an important part of the regulatory network in soybean flower.

  20. 7 CFR 1220.312 - Remittance of assessments and submission of reports to United Soybean Board or Qualified State...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... to United Soybean Board or Qualified State Soybean Board. 1220.312 Section 1220.312 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND... of reports to United Soybean Board or Qualified State Soybean Board. (a) Each first purchaser...

  1. 7 CFR 1220.312 - Remittance of assessments and submission of reports to United Soybean Board or Qualified State...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to United Soybean Board or Qualified State Soybean Board. 1220.312 Section 1220.312 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND... of reports to United Soybean Board or Qualified State Soybean Board. (a) Each first purchaser...

  2. 7 CFR 1220.312 - Remittance of assessments and submission of reports to United Soybean Board or Qualified State...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to United Soybean Board or Qualified State Soybean Board. 1220.312 Section 1220.312 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND... of reports to United Soybean Board or Qualified State Soybean Board. (a) Each first purchaser...

  3. 7 CFR 1220.312 - Remittance of assessments and submission of reports to United Soybean Board or Qualified State...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to United Soybean Board or Qualified State Soybean Board. 1220.312 Section 1220.312 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND... of reports to United Soybean Board or Qualified State Soybean Board. (a) Each first purchaser...

  4. Soybean biomass produced in Argentina: Myths and realities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semino, S.; Paul, H.; Tomei, J.; Joensen, L.; Monti, M.; Jelsøe, E.

    2009-11-01

    Soybean biomass for biodiesel, produced in Argentina amongst other places, is considered by some to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate climate change when compared with fossil fuel alternatives. To ensure that the production of biofuels is 'sustainable', EU institutions and national governments are designing certification schemes for the sustainable production of biomass. In this paper, we question the validity of these proposed environmental standards, using the production of Argentine soybean as a case study. We highlight the negative environmental and social impacts of intensive soybean production, and conclude that certification schemes are unlikely to be able to address the detrimental impacts of increased biofuel production and trade.

  5. Activity of rubidium and cesium in soybean looper (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae): insect feeding on cotton and soybean measured by elemental markers.

    PubMed

    Jost, Douglas J; Pitre, Henry N

    2002-04-01

    Uptake and translocation of the elemental markers rubidium (Rb) and cesium (Cs) within adult soybean looper, Pseudoplusia includens (Walker), were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry in the laboratory in various feeding and mating treatments. Neonates were tested to determine marker transfer from male and female adults fed rubidium chloride (RbCl)-treated artificial nectar, cesium chloride (CsCI)-treated artificial nectar, or both. All females contained detectable levels of Rb, Cs, or both, which were obtained either through direct feeding or via spermatophores. Rubidium was present in females at significantly greater levels than Cs. No significant differences in Rb levels were observed between feeding or spermatophore acquisitions. Most neonates had significantly higher levels of Rb than Cs. In a field cage study to evaluate adult feeding and oviposition behavior on blooming cotton and blooming soybean treated with RbCl and CsCl, respectively, more eggs contained Rb than Cs, indicating greater feeding on cotton nectar than soybean nectar, regardless of the host plant upon which eggs were laid. Females laid more eggs on blooming soybean than on blooming cotton. Higher levels of Rb in cotton than Cs in soybean were recorded and may be attributed to initial elemental marker quantities available to the insects. This study provides the support for the generalized observations that soybean looper infestations in soybean can be related to feeding activities by adults in cotton.

  6. Effect of Sinorhizobium fredii strain Sneb183 on the biological control of soybean cyst nematode in soybean.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Chen, Lijie; Duan, Yuxi

    2014-11-01

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN; Heterodera glycines) is a major detriment to soybean production. The endophytic bacterium Sinorhizobium fredii strain Sneb183 is known to inhibit the activity of SCN. In the present study, soybean seedlings were inoculated with Sneb183, to study the penetration juveniles, and their development inside the roots. The number of cysts in the soybean roots was also examined. The induced systemic resistance in soybean was also examined through the split-root system. Our results revealed that the number of juveniles and cysts significantly decreased as a result of Sneb183 inoculation. Sneb183 also prolonged the developmental stage of SCN in the root to 30 days as compared to 27 days in the control. Furthermore, the number of nematodes in each stage was lower in the Sneb183 treated plants than control plants. We also used a split-root system to show that the S. fredii strain Sneb183 induced a systemic resistance to SCN infection in soybean. The repression rate of SCN penetration was 38.75%. Our study showed that Sneb183 can be an effective biocontrol agent for managing SCN infestation in soybean. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Comparison of soybean cultivars for enhancement of the polyamine contents in the fermented soybean natto using Bacillus subtilis (natto).

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Horii, Yuichiro; Watanabe, Satoshi; Kubo, Yuji; Koguchi, Kumiko; Hoshi, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichi; Soda, Kuniyasu

    2017-03-01

    Polyamines have beneficial properties to prevent aging-associated diseases. Raw soybean has relatively high polyamine contents; and the fermented soybean natto is a good source of polyamines. However, detailed information of diversity of polyamine content in raw soybean is lacking. The objectives of this study were to evaluate differences of polyamines among raw soybeans and select the high polyamine-containing cultivar for natto production. Polyamine contents were measured chromatographically in 16 samples of soybean, which showed high variation among soybeans as follows: 93-861 nmol/g putrescine, 1055-2306 nmol/g spermidine, and 177-578 nmol/g spermine. We then confirmed the high correlations of polyamine contents between raw soybean and natto (r = 0.96, 0.95, and 0.94 for putrescine, spermidine, and spermine, respectively). Furthermore, comparison of the polyamine contents among 9 Japanese cultivars showed that 'Nakasen-nari' has the highest polyamine contents, suggesting its suitability for enhancement of polyamine contents of natto.

  8. Genetics and Adaptation of Soybean Cyst Nematode to Broad Spectrum Soybean Resistance.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Michael; Heinz, Robert; Wang, Jianying; Mitchum, Melissa G

    2017-03-10

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) Heterodera glycines is a major threat to soybean production, made more challenging by the current limitations of natural resistance for managing this pathogen. The use of resistant host cultivars is effective, but, over time, results in the generation of virulent nematode populations able to robustly parasitize the resistant host. In order to understand how virulence develops in SCN, we utilized a single backcross BC1F2 strategy to mate a highly virulent inbred population (TN20), capable of reproducing on all current sources of resistance, with an avirulent one (PA3), unable to reproduce on any of the resistant soybean lines. The offspring were then investigated to determine how virulence is inherited on the main sources of SCN resistance, derived from soybean lines Peking, PI 88788, PI 90763, and the broad spectrum resistance source PI 437654. Significantly, our results suggest virulence on PI 437654 is a multigenic recessive trait that allows the nematode to reproduce on all current sources of resistance. In addition, we examined how virulence on different sources of resistance interact by placing virulent SCN populations under secondary selection, and identified a strong counter-selection between virulence on PI 88788- and PI 90763-derived resistances, while no such counter-selection existed between virulence on Peking and PI 88788 resistance sources. Our results suggest that the genes responsible for virulence on PI 88788 and PI 90763 may be different alleles at a common locus. If so, rotation of cultivars with resistance from these two sources may be an effective management protocol.

  9. Genetics and Adaptation of Soybean Cyst Nematode to Broad Spectrum Soybean Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Michael; Heinz, Robert; Wang, Jianying; Mitchum, Melissa G.

    2017-01-01

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) Heterodera glycines is a major threat to soybean production, made more challenging by the current limitations of natural resistance for managing this pathogen. The use of resistant host cultivars is effective, but, over time, results in the generation of virulent nematode populations able to robustly parasitize the resistant host. In order to understand how virulence develops in SCN, we utilized a single backcross BC1F2 strategy to mate a highly virulent inbred population (TN20), capable of reproducing on all current sources of resistance, with an avirulent one (PA3), unable to reproduce on any of the resistant soybean lines. The offspring were then investigated to determine how virulence is inherited on the main sources of SCN resistance, derived from soybean lines Peking, PI 88788, PI 90763, and the broad spectrum resistance source PI 437654. Significantly, our results suggest virulence on PI 437654 is a multigenic recessive trait that allows the nematode to reproduce on all current sources of resistance. In addition, we examined how virulence on different sources of resistance interact by placing virulent SCN populations under secondary selection, and identified a strong counter-selection between virulence on PI 88788- and PI 90763-derived resistances, while no such counter-selection existed between virulence on Peking and PI 88788 resistance sources. Our results suggest that the genes responsible for virulence on PI 88788 and PI 90763 may be different alleles at a common locus. If so, rotation of cultivars with resistance from these two sources may be an effective management protocol. PMID:28064187

  10. Particle size of roasted soybeans and the effect on milk production of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, T R; Korevaar, A C; Satter, L D

    1997-08-01

    Fifteen cows were used in an experiment with a 5 x 5 replicated Latin square design to quantify the effect of particle size of roasted soybeans on milk production and fecal excretion of soybeans. The five experimental periods were each 2 wk long. Diets contained (percentage of dry matter) 33% alfalfa silage, 17% corn silage, 30.6% high moisture ear corn, 18% soybeans, and 1.4% mineral supplement. The five dietary treatments included raw whole soybeans or roasted soybeans in four particle sizes (whole and half, half and quarter, quarter and smaller, and coarsely ground). Mean particle sizes of the raw soybeans and of the roasted soybeans in whole and half sizes were > 4.75 mm. Mean particle sizes of the roasted soybeans in half and quarter, quarter and smaller, and coarsely ground roasted soybeans were 2.92, 2.01, and 1.59, respectively. During the normal handling of roasted soybeans, a large number of seeds was broken into halves in the treatment with whole and half sizes (36%, wt/wt basis). Production of 3.5% fat-corrected milk was 35.4, 37.7, 37.2, 35.1, and 35.4 kg/d for cows fed raw soybeans; roasted soybeans in whole and half, half and quarter, and quarter and smaller sizes; and ground roasted soybeans, respectively. Cows that were fed raw soybeans excreted the largest amount of visible soybean particles in feces, and cows that were fed ground roasted soybeans had the least amount of soybeans in the feces (61.3 vs. 10.6 g of soybeans/kg of fecal dry matter). Roasted soybeans in half and quarter sizes are optimal for milk production.

  11. Identification of a major QTL allele from wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc.) for increasing alkaline salt tolerance in soybean.

    PubMed

    Tuyen, D D; Lal, S K; Xu, D H

    2010-07-01

    Salt-affected soils are generally classified into two main categories, sodic (alkaline) and saline. Our previous studies showed that the wild soybean accession JWS156-1 (Glycine soja) from the Kinki area of Japan was tolerant to NaCl salt, and the quantitative trait locus (QTL) for NaCl salt tolerance was located on soybean linkage group N (chromosome 3). Further investigation revealed that the wild soybean accession JWS156-1 also had a higher tolerance to alkaline salt stress. In the present study, an F(6) recombinant inbred line mapping population (n = 112) and an F(2) population (n = 149) derived from crosses between a cultivated soybean cultivar Jackson and JWS156-1 were used to identify QTL for alkaline salt tolerance in soybean. Evaluation of soybean alkaline salt tolerance was carried out based on salt tolerance rating (STR) and leaf chlorophyll content (SPAD value) after treatment with 180 mM NaHCO(3) for about 3 weeks under greenhouse conditions. In both populations, a significant QTL for alkaline salt tolerance was detected on the molecular linkage group D2 (chromosome 17), which accounted for 50.2 and 13.0% of the total variation for STR in the F(6) and the F(2) populations, respectively. The wild soybean contributed to the tolerance allele in the progenies. Our results suggest that QTL for alkaline salt tolerance is different from the QTL for NaCl salt tolerance found previously in this wild soybean genotype. The DNA markers closely associated with the QTLs might be useful for marker-assisted selection to pyramid tolerance genes in soybean for both alkaline and saline stresses.

  12. Has photosynthetic capacity increased with 80 years of soybean breeding? An examination of historical soybean cultivars.

    PubMed

    Koester, Robert P; Nohl, Brittany M; Diers, Brian W; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Crop biomass production is a function of the efficiencies with which sunlight can be intercepted by the canopy and then converted into biomass. Conversion efficiency has been identified as a target for improvement to enhance crop biomass and yield. Greater conversion efficiency in modern soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars was documented in recent field trials, and this study explored the physiological basis for this observation. In replicated field trials conducted over three successive years, diurnal leaf gas exchange and photosynthetic CO2 response curves were measured in 24 soybean cultivars with year of release dates (YOR) from 1923 to 2007. Maximum photosynthetic capacity, mesophyll conductance and nighttime respiration have not changed consistently with cultivar release date. However, daily carbon gain was periodically greater in more recently released cultivars compared with older cultivars. Our analysis suggests that this difference in daily carbon gain primarily occurred when stomatal conductance and soil water content were high. There was also evidence for greater chlorophyll content and greater sink capacity late in the growing season in more recently released soybean varieties. Better understanding of the mechanisms that have improved conversion efficiency in the past may help identify new, promising targets for the future.

  13. Differential reactions of soybean isolines with combinations of aphid resistance genes Rag1, Rag2, and Rag3 to four soybean aphid biotypes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With the discovery of the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) as a devastating insect pest of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) in the United States, host resistance was recognized as an important management option. However, the identification of soybean aphid isolates exhibiting strong virulenc...

  14. Identification of a new soybean Kunitz trypsin inhibitor mutation and its effect on Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor content in soybean seed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean seeds possess anti-nutritional compounds which inactivate digestive proteases, principally corresponding to two families: Kunitz Trypsin Inhibitors (KTi) and Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBI). High levels of raw soybeans/soybean meal in feed mixtures can cause poor weight gain and pancreatic abno...

  15. Transgenic soybean overexpressing GmSamT1 exhibits resistance to multiple-HG types of soybean cysts nematode heterodera glycines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) salicylic acid methyl transferase (GmSAMT1) catalyzes the conversion of salicylic acid to methyl salicylate. Prior results showed that when GmSAMT1 was overexpressed in transgenic soybean hairy roots, resistance is conferred against soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heter...

  16. Improvement of Soybean Products Through the Response Mechanism Analysis Using Proteomic Technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Komatsu, Setsuko

    Soybean is rich in protein/vegetable oil and contains several phytochemicals such as isoflavones and phenolic compounds. Because of the predominated nutritional values, soybean is considered as traditional health benefit food. Soybean is a widely cultivated crop; however, its growth and yield are markedly affected by adverse environmental conditions. Proteomic techniques make it feasible to map protein profiles both during soybean growth and under unfavorable conditions. The stress-responsive mechanisms during soybean growth have been uncovered with the help of proteomic studies. In this review, the history of soybean as food and the morphology/physiology of soybean are described. The utilization of proteomics during soybean germination and development is summarized. In addition, the stress-responsive mechanisms explored using proteomic techniques are reviewed in soybean. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. VISCOELASTIC PROPERTIES OF A BIOLOGICAL HYDROGEL PRODUCED FROM SOYBEAN OIL

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hydrogels formed from biopolymers or natural sources have special advantages because of their biodegradable and biocompatible properties. The viscoelastic properties of a newly developed biological hydrogel made from modified vegetable oil, epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) were investigated. The mater...

  18. Lignans as antioxidants for soybean oil at frying temperature

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lignans including nordihydroguaiaretic acid, (+)-pinoresinol, (-)-secoisolariciresinol, enterodiol, two sesame lignans (sesamol, sesamin), and four model compounds were investigated for their antipolymerization activities for soybean oil at frying temperature (180 °C). GPC (gel permeation chromatogr...

  19. Soybean Tissue Culture - Apollo 15 Lunar Material Growth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-10-01

    S71-51315 (1 Oct. 1971) --- A close-up view of soybean tissue culture growing in a synthetic medium and Apollo 15 lunar material. Note the greening occurring in areas in contact with the soil particles.

  20. Relationship between asparagine metabolism and protein concentration in soybean seed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The relationship between asparagine metabolism and protein concentration was investigated in soybean seed. Phenotyping of a population of recombinant inbred lines adapted to Illinois confirmed a positive correlation between free asparagine levels in developing seeds and protein concentration at matu...

  1. Obligatory Reduction of Ferric Chelates in Iron Uptake by Soybeans

    PubMed Central

    Chaney, Rufus L.; Brown, John C.; Tiffin, Lee O.

    1972-01-01

    The contrasting Fe2+ and Fe3+ chelating properties of the synthetic chelators ethylenediaminedi (o-hydroxyphenylacetate) (EDDHA) and 4,7-di(4-phenylsulfonate)-1, 10-phenanthroline (bathophenanthrolinedisulfonate) (BPDS) were used to determine the valence form of Fe absorbed by soybean roots supplied with Fe3+-chelates. EDDHA binds Fe3+ strongly, but Fe2+ weakly; BPDS binds Fe2+ strongly but Fe3+ weakly. Addition of an excess of BPDS to nutrient solutions containing Fe3+-chelates inhibited soybean Fe uptake-translocation by 99+%; [Fe(II) (BPDS)3]4− accumulated in the nutrient solution. The addition of EDDHA caused little or no inhibition. These results were observed with topped and intact soybeans. Thus, separation and absorption of Fe from Fe3+-chelates appear to require reduction of Fe3+-chelate to Fe2+-chelate at the root, with Fe2+ being the principal form of Fe absorbed by soybean. PMID:16658143

  2. Nonhost Root Penetration by Soybean Cyst Nematode

    PubMed Central

    Riggs, R. D.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 66 plants in 50 species were inoculated with eggs and juveniles of soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines. Roots were stained and observed for penetration and development of the nematode. Twenty-six plants were not penetrated; twenty-three were penetrated, but there was no development of the nematode; eight were penetrated with some nematode development; two were penetrated and had considerable nematode development, but few nematodes, if any, matured; and seven were penetrated with many nematodes maturing. The penetration of nonhosts may imply some susceptibility and that populations eventually would build up on the penetrated plants. Plants not penetrated may be useful as rotation plants because no reproduction would occur. PMID:19290137

  3. Evaluation of a new high protein variety of soybeans as a source of protein and energy for dairy cows.

    PubMed

    McNiven, M A; Robinson, P H; MacLeod, J A

    1994-09-01

    Twenty Holstein cows in midlactation were used in a Latin square design to evaluate the nutritional quality of a high protein soybean (CP 45%) fed raw or roasted. Treatments were 1) control (soybean meal); 2) conventional soybean (Maple Isle), raw; 3) conventional soybean, roasted; 4) high protein soybean (AC Proteus), raw; and 5) high protein soybean, roasted. Diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous and consisted of approximately 10% whole crop barley silage, 15% corn silage, 19% alfalfa silage, 31% rolled barley, 17% cracked corn, and from 6.5 to 8.6% of the appropriate protein source on a DM basis. Replacement of conventional soybean with the high protein soybean increased milk and milk component yields. All soybean treatments lowered milk protein percentages versus soybean meal although milk protein yield was only reduced for the raw Maple Isle soybean treatment. Milk fat percentage was reduced for the roasted AC Proteus soybean treatment versus soybean meal and both Maple Isle soybean treatments, although total milk fat yield did not differ among treatments. Heat treatment by roasting tended to affect total milk yield positively for both types of soybeans, but only the increase for Maple Isle was significant. Milk from cows fed full fat soybeans had more long-chain fatty acids than milk from cows fed soybean meal. Roasting the soybeans further increased the amounts of long-chain fatty acids. The new high protein soybean, AC Proteus, appears to be an excellent source of supplemental protein and energy for lactating dairy cows.

  4. Genome organization and characteristics of soybean microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background microRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression and play important roles in many aspects of plant biology. The role(s) of miRNAs in nitrogen-fixing root nodules of leguminous plants such as soybean is not well understood. We examined a library of small RNAs from Bradyrhizobium japonicum-inoculated soybean roots and identified novel miRNAs. In order to enhance our understanding of miRNA evolution, diversification and function, we classified all known soybean miRNAs based on their phylogenetic conservation (conserved, legume- and soybean-specific miRNAs) and examined their genome organization, family characteristics and target diversity. We predicted targets of these miRNAs and experimentally validated several of them. We also examined organ-specific expression of selected miRNAs and their targets. Results We identified 120 previously unknown miRNA genes from soybean including 5 novel miRNA families. In the soybean genome, genes encoding miRNAs are primarily intergenic and a small percentage were intragenic or less than 1000 bp from a protein-coding gene, suggesting potential co-regulation between the miRNA and its parent gene. Difference in number and orientation of tandemly duplicated miRNA genes between orthologous genomic loci indicated continuous evolution and diversification. Conserved miRNA families are often larger in size and produce less diverse mature miRNAs than legume- and soybean-specific families. In addition, the majority of conserved and legume-specific miRNA families produce 21 nt long mature miRNAs with distinct nucleotide distribution and regulate a more conserved set of target mRNAs compared to soybean-specific families. A set of nodule-specific target mRNAs and their cognate regulatory miRNAs had inverse expression between root and nodule tissues suggesting that spatial restriction of target gene transcripts by miRNAs might govern nodule-specific gene expression in soybean. Conclusions Genome organization of soybean mi

  5. From Soybean residue to advanced supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, G. A.; Fuertes, A. B.; Sevilla, M.

    2015-01-01

    Supercapacitor technology is an extremely timely area of research with fierce international competition to develop cost-effective, environmentally friendlier EC electrode materials that have real world application. Herein, nitrogen-doped carbons with large specific surface area, optimized micropore structure and surface chemistry have been prepared by means of an environmentally sound hydrothermal carbonization process using defatted soybean (i.e., Soybean meal), a widely available and cost-effective protein-rich biomass, as precursor followed by a chemical activation step. When tested as supercapacitor electrodes in aqueous electrolytes (i.e. H2SO4 and Li2SO4), they demonstrate excellent capacitive performance and robustness, with high values of specific capacitance in both gravimetric (250–260 and 176 F g−1 in H2SO4 and Li2SO4 respectively) and volumetric (150–210 and 102 F cm−3 in H2SO4 and Li2SO4 respectively) units, and remarkable rate capability (>60% capacitance retention at 20 A g−1 in both media). Interestingly, when Li2SO4 is used, the voltage window is extended up to 1.7 V (in contrast to 1.1 V in H2SO4). Thus, the amount of energy stored is increased by 50% compared to H2SO4 electrolyte, enabling this environmentally sound Li2SO4-based supercapacitor to deliver ~12 Wh kg−1 at a high power density of ~2 kW kg−1. PMID:26568473

  6. A First Law Thermodynamic Analysis of Biodiesel Production from Soybean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patzek, Tad W.

    2009-01-01

    A proper First Law energy balance of the soybean biodiesel cycle shows that the overall efficiency of biodiesel production is 0.18, i.e., only 1 in 5 parts of the solar energy sequestered as soya beans, plus the fossil energy inputs, becomes biodiesel. Soybean meal is produced with an overall energetic efficiency of 0.38, but it is not a fossil…

  7. Rag Virulence Among Soybean Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Michael S; Hogg, David B

    2015-02-01

    Soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, a pest of soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., and native of Asia, invaded North America sometime before 2000 and rapidly became the most significant insect pest of soybean in the upper Midwest. Plant resistance, a key component of integrated pest management, has received significant attention in the past decade, and several resistance (Rag) genes have been identified. However, the efficacy of Rag (Resistance to Aphis glycines) genes in suppressing aphid abundance has been challenged by the occurrence of soybean aphids capable of overcoming Rag gene-mediated resistance. Although the occurrence of these Rag virulent biotypes poses a serious threat to effective and sustainable management of soybean aphid, little is known about the current abundance of biotypes in North America. The objective of this research was to determine the distribution of Rag virulent soybean aphids in Wisconsin. Soybean aphids were collected from Wisconsin during the summers of 2012 and 2013, and assayed for Rag1, Rag2, and Rag1+2 virulence using no-choice tests in a greenhouse. One clone from Monroe County in 2012 reacted like biotype 4, three clones in different counties in 2013 responded like biotype 2, and eight others expressed varying degrees of Rag virulence. Rag virulence in 2013 was observed in aphids from 33% of the sampled sites and was accounted for by just 4.5% of sampled clones, although this is likely a conservative estimate. No-choice test results are discussed in light of current questions on the biology, ecology, and population genetics of soybean aphid. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. A First Law Thermodynamic Analysis of Biodiesel Production from Soybean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patzek, Tad W.

    2009-01-01

    A proper First Law energy balance of the soybean biodiesel cycle shows that the overall efficiency of biodiesel production is 0.18, i.e., only 1 in 5 parts of the solar energy sequestered as soya beans, plus the fossil energy inputs, becomes biodiesel. Soybean meal is produced with an overall energetic efficiency of 0.38, but it is not a fossil…

  9. Kinetics of catalytic transfer hydrogenation of soybean lecithin

    SciTech Connect

    Naglic, M.; Smidovnik, A.; Koloini, T.

    1997-12-01

    Catalytic transfer hydrogenation of soybean lecithin has been studied using aqueous sodium formate solution as hydrogen donor and palladium on carbon as catalyst. Kinetic constants and selectivity have been determined at intensive stirring. Hydrogenation reactions followed the first-order kinetics with respect to fatty acids. In addition to short reaction time, this method offers safe and easy handling. Hydrogenated soybean lecithin provides products with increased stability with respect to oxidation.

  10. Domestication footprints anchor genomic regions of agronomic importance in soybeans.

    PubMed

    Han, Yingpeng; Zhao, Xue; Liu, Dongyuan; Li, Yinghui; Lightfoot, David A; Yang, Zhijiang; Zhao, Lin; Zhou, Gang; Wang, Zhikun; Huang, Long; Zhang, Zhiwu; Qiu, Lijuan; Zheng, Hongkun; Li, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Present-day soybeans consist of elite cultivars and landraces (Glycine max, fully domesticated (FD)), annual wild type (Glycine soja, nondomesticated (ND)), and semi-wild type (semi-domesticated (SD)). FD soybean originated in China, although the details of its domestication history remain obscure. More than 500 diverse soybean accessions were sequenced using specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) to address fundamental questions regarding soybean domestication. In total, 64,141 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with minor allele frequencies (MAFs) > 0.05 were found among the 512 tested accessions. The results indicated that the SD group is not a hybrid between the FD and ND groups. The initial domestication region was pinpointed to central China (demarcated by the Great Wall to the north and the Qinling Mountains to the south). A total of 800 highly differentiated genetic regions and > 140 selective sweeps were identified, and these were three- and twofold more likely, respectively, to encompass a known quantitative trait locus (QTL) than the rest of the soybean genome. Forty-three potential quantitative trait nucleotides (QTNs; including 15 distinct traits) were identified by genome-wide association mapping. The results of the present study should be beneficial for soybean improvement and provide insight into the genetic architecture of traits of agronomic importance. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. Using genomic information to improve soybean adaptability to climate change.

    PubMed

    Li, Man-Wah; Xin, Dawei; Gao, Yishu; Li, Kwan-Pok; Fan, Kejing; Muñoz, Nacira Belen; Yung, Wai-Shing; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2016-09-22

    Climate change has brought severe challenges to agriculture. It is anticipated that there will be a drop in crop yield - including that of soybean - due to climatic stress factors that include drastic fluctuations in temperature, drought, flooding and high salinity. Genomic information on soybean has been accumulating rapidly since initial publication of its reference genome, providing a valuable tool for the improvement of cultivated soybean. Not only are many molecular markers that are associated with important quantitative trait loci now identified, but we also have a more detailed picture of the genomic variations among soybean germplasms, enabling us to utilize these as tools to assist crop breeding. In this review, we will summarize and discuss the currently available soybean genomic approaches, including whole-genome sequencing, sequencing-based genotyping, functional genomics, proteomics, and epigenomics. The information uncovered through these techniques will help further pinpoint important gene candidates and genomic loci associated with adaptive traits, as well as achieving a better understanding of how soybeans cope with the changing climate.

  12. Safety Analysis of Soybean Processing for Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hentges, Dawn L.

    1999-01-01

    Soybeans (cv. Hoyt) is one of the crops planned for food production within the Advanced Life Support System Integration Testbed (ALSSIT), a proposed habitat simulation for long duration lunar/Mars missions. Soybeans may be processed into a variety of food products, including soymilk, tofu, and tempeh. Due to the closed environmental system and importance of crew health maintenance, food safety is a primary concern on long duration space missions. Identification of the food safety hazards and critical control points associated with the closed ALSSIT system is essential for the development of safe food processing techniques and equipment. A Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) model was developed to reflect proposed production and processing protocols for ALSSIT soybeans. Soybean processing was placed in the type III risk category. During the processing of ALSSIT-grown soybeans, critical control points were identified to control microbiological hazards, particularly mycotoxins, and chemical hazards from antinutrients. Critical limits were suggested at each CCP. Food safety recommendations regarding the hazards and risks associated with growing, harvesting, and processing soybeans; biomass management; and use of multifunctional equipment were made in consideration of the limitations and restraints of the closed ALSSIT.

  13. From sulfur to homoglutathione: thiol metabolism in soybean.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hankuil; Ravilious, Geoffrey E; Galant, Ashley; Krishnan, Hari B; Jez, Joseph M

    2010-10-01

    Sulfur is an essential plant nutrient and is metabolized into the sulfur-containing amino acids (cysteine and methionine) and into molecules that protect plants against oxidative and environmental stresses. Although studies of thiol metabolism in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) have expanded our understanding of these dynamic processes, our knowledge of how sulfur is assimilated and metabolized in crop plants, such as soybean (Glycine max), remains limited in comparison. Soybean is a major crop used worldwide for food and animal feed. Although soybeans are protein-rich, they do not contain high levels of the sulfur-containing amino acids, cysteine and methionine. Ultimately, unraveling the fundamental steps and regulation of thiol metabolism in soybean is important for optimizing crop yield and quality. Here we review the pathways from sulfur uptake to glutathione and homoglutathione synthesis in soybean, the potential biotechnology benefits of understanding and modifying these pathways, and how information from the soybean genome may guide the next steps in exploring this biochemical system.

  14. Stepwise extraction of proteins and carbohydrates from soybean seed.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Naoya; Ikehara, Hiroko

    2005-05-18

    The stepwise hot water extraction of soybeans, which were extractions in a series of procedures of whole soybean seeds, dehulled and sliced ones, and pressed ones carried out by autoclaving, was investigated to study the localization in the seed and their characteristics. The characteristics of each extraction were studied by HPLC, SDS-PAGE, components analysis, microscopic observation, and effect for some enzymes. Carbohydrates were easier to extract than protein. In the extractions, the ratio of uronic acid per total sugar was constantly about 0.3. A comparison of these extracts, soybean milk, extraction from defatted soybean meal, and soybean milk residues was also carried out, and the characteristics and the localization were investigated. Mid-sized proteins in soybean milk were easy to extract. However, hardly any high molecular weight proteins or high molecular weight carbohydrates were extracted. The proteins and carbohydrates were considered to be localized in the middle lamella and in the protein and/or oil bodies of the cell, and the proteins and carbohydrates were gradually extracted through seed and cell breaking. Gelation was observed only in the boiled extracts from whole seeds. Pepsin and trypsin digests of the high molecular weight protein had inhibitory activity against the angiotensin I converting enzyme.

  15. Gene expression profiling of the green seed problem in Soybean.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Renake N; Ligterink, Wilco; França-Neto, José de B; Hilhorst, Henk W M; da Silva, Edvaldo A A

    2016-02-01

    Due to the climate change of the past few decades, some agricultural areas in the world are now experiencing new climatic extremes. For soybean, high temperatures and drought stress can potentially lead to the "green seed problem", which is characterized by chlorophyll retention in mature seeds and is associated with lower oil and seed quality, thus negatively impacting the production of soybean seeds. Here we show that heat and drought stress result in a "mild" stay-green phenotype and impaired expression of the STAY-GREEN 1 and STAY-GREEN 2 (D1, D2), PHEOPHORBIDASE 2 (PPH2) and NON-YELLOW COLORING 1 (NYC1_1) genes in soybean seeds of a susceptible soybean cultivar. We suggest that the higher expression of these genes in fully mature seeds of a tolerant cultivar allows these seeds to cope with stressful conditions and complete chlorophyll degradation. The gene expression results obtained in this study represent a significant advance in understanding chlorophyll retention in mature soybean seeds produced under stressful conditions. This will open new research possibilities towards finding molecular markers for breeding programs to produce cultivars which are less susceptible to chlorophyll retention under the hot and dry climate conditions which are increasingly common in the largest soybean production areas of the world.

  16. Drought Stress Responses in Soybean Roots and Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Kunert, Karl J.; Vorster, Barend J.; Fenta, Berhanu A.; Kibido, Tsholofelo; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Foyer, Christine H.

    2016-01-01

    Drought is considered to be a major threat to soybean production worldwide and yet our current understanding of the effects of drought on soybean productively is largely based on studies on above-ground traits. Although the roots and root nodules are important sensors of drought, the responses of these crucial organs and their drought tolerance features remain poorly characterized. The symbiotic interaction between soybean and rhizobia facilitates atmospheric nitrogen fixation, a process that provides essential nitrogen to support plant growth and development. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is important for sustainable agriculture, as it sustains plant growth on nitrogen-poor soils and limits fertilizer use for crop nitrogen nutrition. Recent developments have been made in our understanding of the drought impact on soybean root architecture and nodule traits, as well as underpinning transcriptome, proteome and also emerging metabolome information, with a view to improve the selection of more drought-tolerant soybean cultivars and rhizobia in the future. We conclude that the direct screening of root and nodule traits in the field as well as identification of genes, proteins and also metabolites involved in such traits will be essential in order to gain a better understanding of the regulation of root architecture, bacteroid development and lifespan in relation to drought tolerance in soybean. PMID:27462339

  17. An evaluation of corn earworm damage and thresholds in soybean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Brian Patrick

    Interactions between corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), and soybean, Glycine max L. (Merrill), were investigated in the Mid-South to evaluate thresholds and damage levels. Field studies were conducted in both indeterminate and determinate modern cultivars to evaluate damage, critical injury levels, and soybean response to simulated corn earworm injury. Field studies were also conducted to evaluate the response of indeterminate cultivars to infestations of corn earworm. Field studies were also conducted to investigate the relationship between pyrethroid insecticide application and corn earworm oviposition in soybean. Results of field studies involving simulated corn earworm damage indicated the need for a dynamic threshold that becomes more conservative as soybean phenology progressed through the reproductive growth stages. This suggested that soybean was more tolerant to fruit loss during the earlier reproductive stages and was able to compensate for fruit loss better during this time than at later growth stages. Results of field studies involving infestations of corn earworm indicated that current thresholds are likely too liberal. This resulted in economic injury level tables being constructed based upon a range of crop values and control costs, however, a general action threshold was also recommended for indeterminate soybean in the Mid-South. Field study results investigating the relationship of pyrethroid application and corn earworm oviposition indicated that even in the presence of an insecticide, corn earworm prefers to oviposit in the upper portion of the canopy, as well as on the leaves as opposed to all other plant parts, consistent with all previous literature.

  18. Differential responses of B vitamins in black soybean seeds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gi-Ppeum; Lee, Jinwook; Ahn, Kyung-Geun; Hwang, Young-Sun; Choi, Youngmin; Chun, Jiyeon; Chang, Woo-Suk; Choung, Myoung-Gun

    2014-06-15

    This study was aimed to determine the contents and the association of B vitamins from seeds of 10 black and one yellow soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) varieties with either green or yellow cotyledon. Thiamine, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), riboflavin and total riboflavin were found highest in 'Chengjakong', while flavin mononucleotide (FMN) was greatest in 'Mirang'. Nicotinic acid and total vitamin B3 were highest in 'Shingi' as a yellow soybean variety but pantothenic acid and pyridoxine contents were greatest in 'Tawon' and 'Mirang', respectively. These content variations of B vitamins directly reflected the wide segregation of soybean varieties on the principal component analysis (PCA) scores plot, indicating that these 4 soybean varieties appeared to be least associated with other soybean varieties based on the different responses of B vitamins. The results of cluster and correlation analyses presented that the cotyledon colour of soybean seed contributed to a variation of B vitamin contents. Overall, the results suggest that a wide range of B vitamin contents would be affected by genotypic factors alongside the difference of cotyledon colour. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Diurnal Oscillations of Soybean Circadian Clock and Drought Responsive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Marcolino-Gomes, Juliana; Rodrigues, Fabiana Aparecida; Fuganti-Pagliarini, Renata; Bendix, Claire; Nakayama, Thiago Jonas; Celaya, Brandon; Molinari, Hugo Bruno Correa; de Oliveira, Maria Cristina Neves; Harmon, Frank G.; Nepomuceno, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Rhythms produced by the endogenous circadian clock play a critical role in allowing plants to respond and adapt to the environment. While there is a well-established regulatory link between the circadian clock and responses to abiotic stress in model plants, little is known of the circadian system in crop species like soybean. This study examines how drought impacts diurnal oscillation of both drought responsive and circadian clock genes in soybean. Drought stress induced marked changes in gene expression of several circadian clock-like components, such as LCL1-, GmELF4- and PRR-like genes, which had reduced expression in stressed plants. The same conditions produced a phase advance of expression for the GmTOC1-like, GmLUX-like and GmPRR7-like genes. Similarly, the rhythmic expression pattern of the soybean drought-responsive genes DREB-, bZIP-, GOLS-, RAB18- and Remorin-like changed significantly after plant exposure to drought. In silico analysis of promoter regions of these genes revealed the presence of cis-elements associated both with stress and circadian clock regulation. Furthermore, some soybean genes with upstream ABRE elements were responsive to abscisic acid treatment. Our results indicate that some connection between the drought response and the circadian clock may exist in soybean since (i) drought stress affects gene expression of circadian clock components and (ii) several stress responsive genes display diurnal oscillation in soybeans. PMID:24475115

  20. Safety Analysis of Soybean Processing for Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hentges, Dawn L.

    1999-01-01

    Soybeans (cv. Hoyt) is one of the crops planned for food production within the Advanced Life Support System Integration Testbed (ALSSIT), a proposed habitat simulation for long duration lunar/Mars missions. Soybeans may be processed into a variety of food products, including soymilk, tofu, and tempeh. Due to the closed environmental system and importance of crew health maintenance, food safety is a primary concern on long duration space missions. Identification of the food safety hazards and critical control points associated with the closed ALSSIT system is essential for the development of safe food processing techniques and equipment. A Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) model was developed to reflect proposed production and processing protocols for ALSSIT soybeans. Soybean processing was placed in the type III risk category. During the processing of ALSSIT-grown soybeans, critical control points were identified to control microbiological hazards, particularly mycotoxins, and chemical hazards from antinutrients. Critical limits were suggested at each CCP. Food safety recommendations regarding the hazards and risks associated with growing, harvesting, and processing soybeans; biomass management; and use of multifunctional equipment were made in consideration of the limitations and restraints of the closed ALSSIT.

  1. Diurnal oscillations of soybean circadian clock and drought responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Marcolino-Gomes, Juliana; Rodrigues, Fabiana Aparecida; Fuganti-Pagliarini, Renata; Bendix, Claire; Nakayama, Thiago Jonas; Celaya, Brandon; Molinari, Hugo Bruno Correa; de Oliveira, Maria Cristina Neves; Harmon, Frank G; Nepomuceno, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Rhythms produced by the endogenous circadian clock play a critical role in allowing plants to respond and adapt to the environment. While there is a well-established regulatory link between the circadian clock and responses to abiotic stress in model plants, little is known of the circadian system in crop species like soybean. This study examines how drought impacts diurnal oscillation of both drought responsive and circadian clock genes in soybean. Drought stress induced marked changes in gene expression of several circadian clock-like components, such as LCL1-, GmELF4- and PRR-like genes, which had reduced expression in stressed plants. The same conditions produced a phase advance of expression for the GmTOC1-like, GmLUX-like and GmPRR7-like genes. Similarly, the rhythmic expression pattern of the soybean drought-responsive genes DREB-, bZIP-, GOLS-, RAB18- and Remorin-like changed significantly after plant exposure to drought. In silico analysis of promoter regions of these genes revealed the presence of cis-elements associated both with stress and circadian clock regulation. Furthermore, some soybean genes with upstream ABRE elements were responsive to abscisic acid treatment. Our results indicate that some connection between the drought response and the circadian clock may exist in soybean since (i) drought stress affects gene expression of circadian clock components and (ii) several stress responsive genes display diurnal oscillation in soybeans.

  2. In Vitro Plant Regeneration from Commercial Cultivars of Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Ghulam; Singh, Mohan B.

    2017-01-01

    Soybean, a major legume crop, is the source of vegetable oil and protein. There is a need for transgenic approaches to breeding superior soybean varieties to meet future climate challenges. Efficient plant regeneration is a prerequisite for successful application of genetic transformation technology. Soybean cultivars are classified into different maturity groups based on photoperiod requirements. In this study, nine soybean varieties belonging to different maturity group were regenerated successfully from three different explants: half split hypocotyl, complete hypocotyl, and cotyledonary node. All the genotypes and explant types responded by producing adventitious shoots. Shoot induction potential ranged within 60–87%, 50–100%, and 75–100%, and regeneration rate ranged within 4.2–10, 2.7–4.2, and 2.6–10.5 shoots per explant using half split hypocotyl, complete hypocotyl, and cotyledonary explants, respectively, among all the tested genotypes. Bunya variety showed the best regeneration response using half split and complete hypocotyl explants and the PNR791 with cotyledonary node. The regenerated shoots were successfully rooted and acclimatized to glasshouse conditions. This study shows that commercial varieties of soybean are amenable to shoot regeneration with high regeneration frequencies and could be exploited for genetic transformation. Further, our results show no correlation between shoots regeneration capacity with the maturity grouping of the soybean cultivars tested. PMID:28691031

  3. Complete nucleotide sequences of seven soybean mosaic viruses (SMV), isolated from wild soybeans (Glycine soja) in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Xia; Wu, Mian; Ma, Fang-Fang; Chen, Jian-Qun; Wang, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is a devastating plant virus classified in the family Potyviridae, and known to infect cultivated soybeans (Glycine max). In this study, seven new SMVs were isolated from wild soybean samples and analyzed by whole-genome sequencing. An updated SMV phylogeny was built with the seven new and 83 known SMV genomic sequences. Results showed that three northeastern SMV isolates were distributed in clade III and IV, while four southern SMVs were grouped together in clade II and all contained a recombinant BCMV fragment (~900 bp) in the upstream part of the genome. This work revealed that wild soybeans in China also act as important SMV hosts and play a role in the transmission and diversity of SMVs.

  4. Comparative Feeding and Development of Pseudoplusia includens (Lepidoptera Noctuidae) on Kudzu and Soybean Foliage

    SciTech Connect

    Kidd, K.A.; Orr, D.B.

    2000-04-10

    Kudzu is a close relative of soybean and is a widely distributed exotic weed in the southern U.S. The biology of the soybean looper was studied to better understand the foraging behavior of this species on kudzu. Insects feeding on kudzu had higher mortality, longer development and lower pupal weights than those fed on soybean. Foliage consumption did not differ between treatments and nutritional quality between soybean and kudzu did not differ. In an oviposition test, females readily used kudzu if it was the only species available, but when soybean was provided more eggs were deposited on soybean.

  5. Transgenic soybean overexpressing GmSAMT1 exhibits resistance to multiple-HG types of soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jingyu; Mazarei, Mitra; Zhao, Nan; Hatcher, Catherine N; Wuddineh, Wegi A; Rudis, Mary; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Pantalone, Vincent R; Arelli, Prakash R; Hewezi, Tarek; Chen, Feng; Stewart, Charles Neal

    2016-11-01

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) salicylic acid methyl transferase (GmSAMT1) catalyses the conversion of salicylic acid to methyl salicylate. Prior results showed that when GmSAMT1 was overexpressed in transgenic soybean hairy roots, resistance is conferred against soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines Ichinohe. In this study, we produced transgenic soybean overexpressing GmSAMT1 and characterized their response to various SCN races. Transgenic plants conferred a significant reduction in the development of SCN HG type 1.2.5.7 (race 2), HG type 0 (race 3) and HG type 2.5.7 (race 5). Among transgenic lines, GmSAMT1 expression in roots was positively associated with SCN resistance. In some transgenic lines, there was a significant decrease in salicylic acid titer relative to control plants. No significant seed yield differences were observed between transgenics and control soybean plants grown in one greenhouse with 22 °C day/night temperature, whereas transgenic soybean had higher yield than controls grown a warmer greenhouse (27 °C day/23 °C night) temperature. In a 1-year field experiment in Knoxville, TN, there was no significant difference in seed yield between the transgenic and nontransgenic soybean under conditions with negligible SCN infection. We hypothesize that GmSAMT1 expression affects salicylic acid biosynthesis, which, in turn, attenuates SCN development, without negative consequences to soybean yield or other morphological traits. Thus, we conclude that GmSAMT1 overexpression confers broad resistance to multiple SCN races, which would be potentially applicable to commercial production. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Transgenic soybean overexpressing GmSAMT1 exhibits resistance to multiple-HG types of soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Jingyu; Mazarei, Mitra; Zhao, Nan; ...

    2016-05-23

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) salicylic acid methyl transferase (GmSAMT1) catalyses the conversion of salicylic acid to methyl salicylate. Prior results showed that when GmSAMT1 was overexpressed in transgenic soybean hairy roots, resistance is conferred against soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines Ichinohe. In this study, we produced transgenic soybean overexpressing GmSAMT1 and characterized their response to various SCN races. Transgenic plants conferred a significant reduction in the development of SCN HG type 1.2.5.7 (race 2), HG type 0 (race 3) and HG type 2.5.7 (race 5). Among transgenic lines, GmSAMT1 expression in roots was positively associated with SCN resistance.more » In some transgenic lines, there was a significant decrease in salicylic acid titer relative to control plants. No significant seed yield differences were observed between transgenics and control soybean plants grown in one greenhouse with 22 °C day/night temperature, whereas transgenic soybean had higher yield than controls grown a warmer greenhouse (27 °C day/23 °C night) temperature. In a 1-year field experiment in Knoxville, TN, there was no significant difference in seed yield between the transgenic and nontransgenic soybean under conditions with negligible SCN infection. We hypothesize that GmSAMT1 expression affects salicylic acid biosynthesis, which, in turn, attenuates SCN development, without negative consequences to soybean yield or other morphological traits. Furthermore, we conclude that GmSAMT1 overexpression confers broad resistance to multiple SCN races, which would be potentially applicable to commercial production.« less

  7. Influence of the application of three different elicitors on soybean plants on the concentrations of several isoflavones in soybean seeds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Hettiarachchy, Navam; Chen, Pengyin; Horax, Ronny; Cornelious, Brian; Zhu, Danhua

    2006-07-26

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is a rich source of isoflavones that are often affected by biotic and abiotic factors. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of various concentrations of three natural elicitors applied at different soybean growth stages on isoflavone content and to compare the efficiency of several solvent systems in isoflavone extraction and quantification. The isoflavones extracted from R96-3444 soybean using eight solvent systems were separated, identified, and quantified by a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure. The soybean plants were sprayed with salicylic acid, methyl salicylate, or ethyl acetate at 0, 10(-6), 10(-3), and 10(-1) M at R1 (blooming) or R4 (full pods) growth stage. Results showed that 10(-3) M ethyl acetate sprayed at the R1 stage significantly increased total isoflavone content and the levels of some individual isoflavones in soybean seeds. With all the elicitors that were tested, concentration was a more important factor than application time with respect to isoflavone content with lower concentrations being more effective on most isoflavones. A 53% acetonitrile solvent system was the best solvent system for extracting total isoflavone, malonyl glucosides, genistein, glycitin, genistin, acetyl-daidzin, and acetyl-genistin. The results of this study will be useful for increasing the isoflavone content in desirable soybean varieties and improving isoflavone concentration during extraction.

  8. Profile of the contents of different forms of soybean isoflavones and the effect of germination time on these compounds and the physical parameters in soybean sprouts.

    PubMed

    Quinhone Júnior, A; Ida, E I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the profile of the contents of different forms of soybean isoflavones and the effect of germination time on these compounds and the physical parameters in BRS 284 soybean sprouts. Soybean seeds were germinated for 168 h, and the sprouts were collected every 24 h. The physical parameters and contents of different forms of isoflavones of the seeds and soybean sprouts were evaluated, and the data were subjected to regression analysis. The soybean seeds contained 26.0% β-glucosides, 72.9% malonylglucosides and 1.2% aglycones. The yield of soybean sprouts was 632.4%. The effect of germination time was quadratic on the length, moisture and on the daidzin, genistin and genistein content; linear on the fresh weight and on the malonyldaidzin content. The dry matter and malonylglycitin content was constant, and glycitin and glycitein were not detected in the soybean sprouts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Aboveground Feeding by Soybean Aphid, Aphis glycines, Affects Soybean Cyst Nematode, Heterodera glycines, Reproduction Belowground

    PubMed Central

    McCarville, Michael T.; Soh, David H.; Tylka, Gregory L.; O’Neal, Matthew E.

    2014-01-01

    Heterodera glycines is a cyst nematode that causes significant lost soybean yield in the U.S. Recent studies observed the aphid Aphis glycines and H. glycines interacting via their shared host, soybean, Glycine max. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to discern the effect of A. glycines feeding on H. glycines reproduction. An H. glycines-susceptible cultivar, Kenwood 94, and a resistant cultivar, Dekalb 27–52, were grown in H. glycines-infested soil for 30 and 60 d. Ten days after planting, plants were infested with either zero, five, or ten aphids. At 30 and 60 d, the number of H. glycines females and cysts (dead females) and the number of eggs within were counted. In general, H. glycines were less abundant on the resistant than the susceptible cultivar, and H. glycines abundance increased from 30 to 60 d. At 30 d, 33% more H. glycines females and eggs were produced on the resistant cultivar in the ten-aphid treatment compared to the zero-aphid treatment. However, at 30 d the susceptible cultivar had 50% fewer H. glycines females and eggs when infested with ten aphids. At 60 d, numbers of H. glycines females and cysts and numbers of eggs on the resistant cultivar were unaffected by A. glycines feeding, while numbers of both were decreased by A. glycines on the susceptible cultivar. These results indicate that A. glycines feeding improves the quality of soybean as a host for H. glycines, but at higher herbivore population densities, this effect is offset by a decrease in resource quantity. PMID:24466080

  10. Association mapping of soybean seed germination under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Kan, Guizhen; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Wenming; Ma, Deyuan; Zhang, Dan; Hao, Derong; Hu, Zhenbin; Yu, Deyue

    2015-12-01

    Soil salinity is a serious threat to agriculture sustainability worldwide. Seed germination is a critical phase that ensures the successful establishment and productivity of soybeans in saline soils. However, little information is available regarding soybean salt tolerance at the germination stage. The objective of this study was to identify the genetic mechanisms of soybean seed germination under salt stress. One natural population consisting of 191 soybean landraces was used in this study. Soybean seeds produced in four environments were used to evaluate the salt tolerance at their germination stage. Using 1142 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the molecular markers associated with salt tolerance were detected by genome-wide association analysis. Eight SNP-trait associations and 13 suggestive SNP-trait associations were identified using a mixed linear model and the TASSEL 4.0 software. Eight SNPs or suggestive SNPs were co-associated with two salt tolerance indices, namely (1) the ratio of the germination index under salt conditions to the germination index under no-salt conditions (ST-GI) and (2) the ratio of the germination rate under salt conditions to the germination rate under no-salt conditions (ST-GR). One SNP (BARC-021347-04042) was significantly associated with these two traits (ST-GI and ST-GR). In addition, nine possible candidate genes were located in or near the genetic region where the above markers were mapped. Of these, five genes, Glyma08g12400.1, Glyma08g09730.1, Glyma18g47140.1, Glyma09g00460.1, and Glyma09g00490.3, were verified in response to salt stress at the germination stage. The SNPs detected could facilitate a better understanding of the genetic basis of soybean salt tolerance at the germination stage, and the marker BARC-021347-04042 could contribute to future breeding for soybean salt tolerance by marker-assisted selection.

  11. Soybean kinome: functional classification and gene expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinyi; Chen, Nana; Grant, Joshua N; Cheng, Zong-Ming Max; Stewart, C Neal; Hewezi, Tarek

    2015-04-01

    The protein kinase (PK) gene family is one of the largest and most highly conserved gene families in plants and plays a role in nearly all biological functions. While a large number of genes have been predicted to encode PKs in soybean, a comprehensive functional classification and global analysis of expression patterns of this large gene family is lacking. In this study, we identified the entire soybean PK repertoire or kinome, which comprised 2166 putative PK genes, representing 4.67% of all soybean protein-coding genes. The soybean kinome was classified into 19 groups, 81 families, and 122 subfamilies. The receptor-like kinase (RLK) group was remarkably large, containing 1418 genes. Collinearity analysis indicated that whole-genome segmental duplication events may have played a key role in the expansion of the soybean kinome, whereas tandem duplications might have contributed to the expansion of specific subfamilies. Gene structure, subcellular localization prediction, and gene expression patterns indicated extensive functional divergence of PK subfamilies. Global gene expression analysis of soybean PK subfamilies revealed tissue- and stress-specific expression patterns, implying regulatory functions over a wide range of developmental and physiological processes. In addition, tissue and stress co-expression network analysis uncovered specific subfamilies with narrow or wide interconnected relationships, indicative of their association with particular or broad signalling pathways, respectively. Taken together, our analyses provide a foundation for further functional studies to reveal the biological and molecular functions of PKs in soybean. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  12. Genomic expression profiling of mature soybean (Glycine max) pollen

    PubMed Central

    Haerizadeh, Farzad; Wong, Chui E; Bhalla, Prem L; Gresshoff, Peter M; Singh, Mohan B

    2009-01-01

    Background Pollen, the male partner in the reproduction of flowering plants, comprises either two or three cells at maturity. The current knowledge of the pollen transcriptome is limited to the model plant systems Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa which have tri-cellular pollen grains at maturity. Comparative studies on pollen of other genera, particularly crop plants, are needed to understand the pollen gene networks that are subject to functional and evolutionary conservation. In this study, we used the Affymetrix Soybean GeneChip® to perform transcriptional profiling on mature bi-cellular soybean pollen. Results Compared to the sporophyte transcriptome, the soybean pollen transcriptome revealed a restricted and unique repertoire of genes, with a significantly greater proportion of specifically expressed genes than is found in the sporophyte tissue. Comparative analysis shows that, among the 37,500 soybean transcripts addressed in this study, 10,299 transcripts (27.46%) are expressed in pollen. Of the pollen-expressed sequences, about 9,489 (92.13%) are also expressed in sporophytic tissues, and 810 (7.87%) are selectively expressed in pollen. Overall, the soybean pollen transcriptome shows an enrichment of transcription factors (mostly zinc finger family proteins), signal recognition receptors, transporters, heat shock-related proteins and members of the ubiquitin proteasome proteolytic pathway. Conclusion This is the first report of a soybean pollen transcriptional profile. These data extend our current knowledge regarding regulatory pathways that govern the gene regulation and development of pollen. A comparison between transcription factors up-regulated in soybean and those in Arabidopsis revealed some divergence in the numbers and kinds of regulatory proteins expressed in both species. PMID:19265555

  13. Biobased composites from thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer and cross-linked acrylated-epoxidized soybean oil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean oil is an important sustainable material. Crosslinked acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) is brittle without flexibility and the incorporation of thermoplastic polyurethane improves its toughness for industrial applications. The hydrophilic functional groups from both oil and polyurethan...

  14. Mapping of quantitative trait loci for canopy wilting trait in soybean (Glycine max L.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Drought stress adversely affects [Glycine max (L.) Merr] soybean at most developmental stages, which collectively results in yield reduction. Little information is available on relative contribution and chromosomal locations of quantitative trait loci (QTL) conditioning drought tolerance in soybean...

  15. In Vitro assessment of the nutritive value of expanded soybean meal for dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Elwakeel, Eman A; Titgemeyer, Evan C; Cheng, Zongjia J; Nour, Abdelaziz M; Nasser, Mohamed Ea

    2012-03-20

    Little information is available about the nutritive value of expanded soybean meal, which is produced by expansion of soybeans prior to solvent extraction of the oil. During processing, expanded soybean meal is subjected to additional heat, which might increase the concentration of ruminally undegraded protein. Processing of soybeans with heat during oil extraction could affect lysine availability by increasing ruminally undegraded protein or by impairing intestinal digestion. Our objective was to compare solvent and expanded soybeans with regard to chemical composition and nutritive value for dairy cattle. Samples of expanded soybean meal (n = 14) and solvent-extracted soybean meal (n = 5) were obtained from People's Republic of China to study effects of the expansion process on nutritive value for dairy cattle. Solvent-extracted soybean meal (n = 2) and mechanically extracted (heated) soybean meal (n = 2) from the United States served as references for comparison. Samples were analyzed for crude fat, long-chain fatty acids, crude protein, amino acids, chemically available lysine, in situ ruminal protein degradation, and in vitro intestinal digestibility. No differences were found between solvent-extracted soybean meals from China and expanded soybean meals from China for crude fat, crude protein, amino acids, or chemically available lysine. In situ disappearance of nitrogen, ruminally undegraded protein content, and in vitro intestinal digestion of the ruminally undegraded protein were generally similar between solvent-extracted soybean meals made in China and expanded soybean meals made in China; variation among soybean meals was small. Results indicate that the additional heat from the expansion process was not great enough to affect the nutritive value of soybean meal protein for ruminants. Although expansion may improve the oil extraction process, the impact on the resulting soybean meal is minimal and does not require consideration when formulating ruminant

  16. In Vitro assessment of the nutritive value of expanded soybean meal for dairy cattle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Little information is available about the nutritive value of expanded soybean meal, which is produced by expansion of soybeans prior to solvent extraction of the oil. During processing, expanded soybean meal is subjected to additional heat, which might increase the concentration of ruminally undegraded protein. Processing of soybeans with heat during oil extraction could affect lysine availability by increasing ruminally undegraded protein or by impairing intestinal digestion. Our objective was to compare solvent and expanded soybeans with regard to chemical composition and nutritive value for dairy cattle. Samples of expanded soybean meal (n = 14) and solvent-extracted soybean meal (n = 5) were obtained from People's Republic of China to study effects of the expansion process on nutritive value for dairy cattle. Solvent-extracted soybean meal (n = 2) and mechanically extracted (heated) soybean meal (n = 2) from the United States served as references for comparison. Samples were analyzed for crude fat, long-chain fatty acids, crude protein, amino acids, chemically available lysine, in situ ruminal protein degradation, and in vitro intestinal digestibility. No differences were found between solvent-extracted soybean meals from China and expanded soybean meals from China for crude fat, crude protein, amino acids, or chemically available lysine. In situ disappearance of nitrogen, ruminally undegraded protein content, and in vitro intestinal digestion of the ruminally undegraded protein were generally similar between solvent-extracted soybean meals made in China and expanded soybean meals made in China; variation among soybean meals was small. Results indicate that the additional heat from the expansion process was not great enough to affect the nutritive value of soybean meal protein for ruminants. Although expansion may improve the oil extraction process, the impact on the resulting soybean meal is minimal and does not require consideration when formulating ruminant

  17. High performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis in the analysis of soybean proteins and peptides in foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Saz, José María; Marina, María Luisa

    2007-03-01

    The increasing interest in functional and healthy food products has promoted the use of soybean in the manufacture of foods for human consumption. Soybean basic products (soybeans, textured soybean, soybean flour, soybean protein concentrate and soybean protein isolate) as well as soybean derivatives (soybean dairy-like products, soybean drinks with fruits, meat analogues, etc.) are commercially available. In addition, due to the interesting nutritional and functional properties of soybean proteins, they are usually employed as ingredient in the elaboration of a large number of food products such as bakery or meat products among others. In spite of the good characteristics of soybean proteins, their addition to some products is forbidden or allowed up to a certain limit. Therefore, analytical methodologies to achieve the determination of soybean proteins in foods are necessary in order to make possible adequate quality control and to prove that legal regulations controlling their addition are accomplished. However, this is not an easy task due to the diversity and complexity of the food matrices and the technological treatments to which some of these foods are submitted during their elaboration. This article presents for the first time a comprehensive review on the analytical methodologies developed using HPLC and CE to characterize soybeans and to analyse soybean proteins in meals. Moreover, the use of HPLC and CE in the characterization of soybean protein fractions and their hydrolyzates, and a study of their relationships to nutritional, functional and biomedical properties are included. Finally, the application of proteomic methodologies in soybean food technology is also reviewed.

  18. Soybean hulls as a dietary fiber source for dogs.

    PubMed

    Cole, J T; Fahey, G C; Merchen, N R; Patil, A R; Murray, S M; Hussein, H S; Brent, J L

    1999-04-01

    In Exp. 1, soybean hull samples were obtained from nine sources across the United States and analyzed for nutrient content to determine their suitability for inclusion in dog diets. Compositional data revealed variation in both the amount of total dietary fiber (TDF; 63.8 to 81.2%) in the soybean hulls and the ratio of insoluble:soluble fiber (5.0:1 to 15.4:1). Crude protein content varied widely among sources, ranging from 9.2 to 18.7%. An in vivo trial (Exp. 2) was conducted using a premium dog diet containing 3.0, 4.5, 6.0, 7.5, or 9.0% soybean hulls (DM basis). There was a negative linear effect (P < .05) of soybean hull inclusion in the diet on DM, OM, TDF, and GE total-tract digestibilities, as well as on calculated ME. Crude protein and fat digestibilities were unaffected by treatment. Based on these results, ileally cannulated dogs were fed diets containing 6.0, 7.5, or 9.0% soybean hulls (DM basis) in addition to diets containing either 0% supplemental fiber or 7.5% beet pulp (Exp. 3). Nutrient digestion at the ileum was unaffected by inclusion of supplemental fiber. Total tract digestion of DM, OM, and GE was lower ( P < .05) for diets containing supplemental fiber when compared with the diet containing 0% fiber. Crude protein and fat digestibilities were unaffected by treatment. There was no difference in nutrient digestibility between those diets containing soybean hulls and a diet containing beet pulp. Soybean hull inclusion in the diet resulted in a negative linear effect (P < .05) on calculated ME, in addition to lowering ME (P < .05) when compared with the 0% fiber control diet. Calculated ME for dogs fed a 7.5% beet pulp-containing diet was lower (P < .05) than that for dogs fed the soybean hull-containing diets. Results indicate that soybean hulls can be an effective dietary fiber source in dog diets.

  19. Selenium in soybeans: bioavailability and form

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments are presented which evaluate the bioavailability of different forms of selenium from intrinsically and extrinsically labeled isolated soy protein and soy flour. The bioavailability of selenium from soy and egg is compared and some characteristics of selenium are described as it exists in soybeans. The metabolism of selenium was measured by whole-body and tissue radioactivity retention and selenium excretion. Selenium-75 was well absorbed from an isolated soy protein diet by rats. Selenium-75 from isolated soy protein labeled intrinsically and extrinsically with /sup 75/Se selenate was better absorbed than from protein labeled extrinsically with /sup 75/Se selenite or /sup 75/Se selenomethionine. Bioavailability of selenium from soy flour and egg was measured by whole-body and tissue radioactivity retention and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity regeneration. Selenium-75 from soy flour intrinsically labeled with selenite was better absorbed than /sup 75/Se from flour intrinsically labeled with selenate. GSH-Px levels in the liver, kidney, platelets and heart fell when rats were fed a selenium deficient diet, but were not significantly raised on 0.0825 ppm Se repletion diets.

  20. Chemiluminescence of adzuki bean and soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Iida, T; Kawane, M; Ashikaga, K; Yoshiki, Y; Okubo, K

    2000-01-01

    The chemiluminescence of extracts from leguminous seedlings (adzuki bean and soybean) was investigated. In an H(2)O(2)/gallic acid/water extract system, the photon intensities of adzuki bean seedlings were increased after germination and in the hypocotyls it reached a maximum level during the first 4 days of germination. On day 4 after germination, chemiluminescence in the primary leaf part exhibited the strongest intensity. Emission spectra showed a main peak at 510 nm, with shoulders at 660 nm. Mechanical injuries to the stems and cotyledons resulted in about a 1.5- and 6.8-fold increase of chemiluminescence, respectively. In an H(2)O(2)/70% EtOH extract/HRP system, photon intensities increased after germination and reached a maximum level during the first 2 days of germination. On day 4 after germination, chemiluminescence in the root and leaf area was stronger than in any other area. Emission spectra showed a main peak at around 570 nm, with shoulders at around 660 nm. The photon intensities of stems and cotyledons after mechanical injuries resulted in about an 0.72-fold decrease and an 8.8-fold increase in the presence of H(2)O(2) and acetaldehyde (MeCHO), respectively.

  1. Soybean physiology and gene expression during drought.

    PubMed

    Stolf-Moreira, R; Medri, M E; Neumaier, N; Lemos, N G; Pimenta, J A; Tobita, S; Brogin, R L; Marcelino-Guimarães, F C; Oliveira, M C N; Farias, J R B; Abdelnoor, R V; Nepomuceno, A L

    2010-10-05

    Soybean genotypes MG/BR46 (Conquista) and BR16, drought-tolerant and -sensitive, respectively, were compared in terms of morphophysiological and gene-expression responses to water stress during two stages of development. Gene-expression analysis showed differential responses in Gmdreb1a and Gmpip1b mRNA expression within 30 days of water-deficit initiation in MG/BR46 (Conquista) plants. Within 45 days of initiating stress, Gmp5cs and Gmpip1b had relatively higher expression. Initially, BR16 showed increased expression only for Gmdreb1a, and later (45 days) for Gmp5cs, Gmdefensin and Gmpip1b. Only BR16 presented down-regulated expression of genes, such as Gmp5cs and Gmpip1b, 30 days after the onset of moisture stress, and Gmgols after 45 days of stress. The faster perception of water stress in MG/BR46 (Conquista) and the better maintenance of up-regulated gene expression than in the sensitive BR16 genotype imply mechanisms by which the former is better adapted to tolerate moisture deficiency.

  2. Phoma-like fungi on soybeans.

    PubMed

    Kövics, György János; Sándor, Erzsébet; Rai, Mahendra K; Irinyi, László

    2014-02-01

    Numerous coelomycetous fungi classified in Ascochyta, Phoma and Phyllosticta, and lately established and/or re-classified genera and species, namely Boeremia and Peyronellaea have been recorded from spots on leaves and pods of soybeans. These rarely observed pathogens are cosmopolitan, ubiquitous species on diseased and dead plant materials, and define frequently as weak or opportunistic parasites. Based on the Genealogical Concordance Phylogenetic Species Recognition, the authors summarize the re-evaluation of the taxonomic status of Phoma sojicola (syn. Ascochyta sojicola) and Phyllosticta sojicola. Inspite of the former delimitation of Ph. sojicola based on small differences in morphological features, it has proved to be identical to Peyronellaea pinodella (syn. Phoma pinodella). Similarly, it was also confirmed that Ph. sojicola was identical to Boeremia exigua var. exigua (syn. Phoma exigua var. exigua). The authors and co-workers contributed to the identification of Phoma-like fungi by combined conventional and molecular methods. Protein-encoding genes (TEF1 and β-tubulin) were successfully applied within the Phoma genus to infer phylogenetic relationships.

  3. Genome Duplication in Soybean (Glycine Subgenus Soja)

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, R. C.; Polzin, K.; Labate, J.; Specht, J.; Brummer, E. C.; Olson, T.; Young, N.; Concibido, V.; Wilcox, J.; Tamulonis, J. P.; Kochert, G.; Boerma, H. R.

    1996-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism mapping data from nine populations (Glycine max X G. soja and G. max X G. max) of the Glycine subgenus soja genome led to the identification of many duplicated segments of the genome. Linkage groups contained up to 33 markers that were duplicated on other linkage groups. The size of homoeologous regions ranged from 1.5 to 106.4 cM, with an average size of 45.3 cM. We observed segments in the soybean genome that were present in as many as six copies with an average of 2.55 duplications per segment. The presence of nested duplications suggests that at least one of the original genomes may have undergone an additional round of tetraploidization. Tetraploidization, along with large internal duplications, accounts for the highly duplicated nature of the genome of the subgenus. Quantitative trait loci for seed protein and oil showed correspondence across homoeologous regions, suggesting that the genes or gene families contributing to seed composition have retained similar functions throughout the evolution of the chromosomes. PMID:8878696

  4. Soybean-fragmented proteoglycans against skin aging.

    PubMed

    Barba, Clara; Alonso, Cristina; Sánchez, Isabel; Suñer, Elisa; Sáez-Martín, L C; Coderch, Luisa

    2017-08-01

    The majority of age-dependent skin changes happen in the dermis layer inducing changes in skin collagen and in the proteoglycans. The main aim of this work is to study the efficacy of a Proteum serum, containing soybean-fragmented proteoglycans, against skin aging. In vitro tests were performed to evaluate the Proteum serum ability on activating the production of collagen and proteoglycans. An in vivo long-term study was performed to determine the efficacy of the Proteum serum when applied on skin. Protection of healthy skin against detergent-induced dermatitis and the antioxidant properties of the applied Proteum serum were also studied. The in vitro tests demonstrated that the Proteum serum was able to elevate the production of molecules which are essential for supporting the dermal extracellular matrix organization. These results were correlated by the in vivo measurements where a clear trend on improving the measured skin parameters due to the Proteum serum application was found. A beneficial effect of the Proteum serum was demonstrated with an improvement in the skin roughness and a reinforcement of the skin barrier function. Moreover, a significant protector effect on human stratum corneum against lipids peroxides (LPO) was demonstrated.

  5. A Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization System for Karyotyping Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Findley, Seth D.; Cannon, Steven; Varala, Kranthi; Du, Jianchang; Ma, Jianxin; Hudson, Matthew E.; Birchler, James A.; Stacey, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The development of a universal soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) cytogenetic map that associates classical genetic linkage groups, molecular linkage groups, and a sequence-based physical map with the karyotype has been impeded due to the soybean chromosomes themselves, which are small and morphologically homogeneous. To overcome this obstacle, we screened soybean repetitive DNA to develop a cocktail of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes that could differentially label mitotic chromosomes in root tip preparations. We used genetically anchored BAC clones both to identify individual chromosomes in metaphase spreads and to complete a FISH-based karyotyping cocktail that permitted simultaneous identification of all 20 chromosome pairs. We applied these karyotyping tools to wild soybean, G. soja Sieb. and Zucc., which represents a large gene pool of potentially agronomically valuable traits. These studies led to the identification and characterization of a reciprocal chromosome translocation between chromosomes 11 and 13 in two accessions of wild soybean. The data confirm that this translocation is widespread in G. soja accessions and likely accounts for the semi-sterility found in some G. soja by G. max crosses. PMID:20421607

  6. Soyfoods and soybean products: from traditional use to modern applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-I; Erh, Mei-Hui; Su, Nan-Wei; Liu, Wen-Hsiung; Chou, Cheng-Chun; Cheng, Kuan-Chen

    2012-10-01

    Soybean products (soyfoods), reported as potential functional foods, are implicated in several health-enhancing properties, such as easing the symptoms of postmenopausal women, reducing the risk of osteoporosis, preventing cardiovascular disease, and antimutagenic effects. Isoflavone, for example, is one of the most important compounds abundantly found in soybean, mainly accounting for the health-enhancing properties as mentioned earlier. However, most biological activities of isoflavones are mainly attributed to their aglycone forms. It has also been demonstrated that isoflavone aglycones are absorbed faster and in greater amount than their glycosides in human intestines. Fortunately, deglycosylation of isoflavones can be achieved during fermentation process by several strains such as lactic acid bacteria, basidiomycetes, filamentous fungus, and Bacillus subtilis with their β-glucosidase activity. This article presents an overview of soybean's chemistry, application, state-of-the-art advances in soybean fermentation processing and products as well as their applications in food and pharmaceutical industries. Different compounds, such as isoflavone, dietary fibers, and proteins which exhibit significant bioactivities, are summarized. The roles of different microorganisms in bioconversion and enhancement of bioactivities of fermented soybean are also discussed.

  7. Soybean proteome database: a data resource for plant differential omics.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Katsumi; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Nobori, Hiroya; Nakamura, Takuji; Hashiguchi, Akiko; Nanjo, Yohei; Mikami, Yoji; Yunokawa, Harunobu; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2009-07-01

    The Soybean Proteome Database aims to be a data repository for functional analyses of soybean responses to flooding injury, recognized as a major constraint for establishment and production of this plant. The current release contains 21 reference maps of soybean (Glycine max cv. Enrei) proteins electrophoresed on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels of which the samples were collected from several organs, tissues and organelles. These reference maps include 7311 detected proteins and 532 identified proteins, or proteins for which a sequence or peptide peak has been determined. The database is searchable by protein properties such as accession number, description and isoelectric point and molecular weight range. The Soybean Proteome Database also integrates multiple "omes". An omics table reveals relationships among 106 mRNAs, 51 proteins and 89 metabolites that vary over time under flooding stress. The tabulated metabolites are anchored to a metabolome network. A unified temporal-profile tag attached to the mRNAs, proteins and metabolites facilitates retrieval of the data based on the temporal expression profiles. A graphical user interface based on dynamic HTML facilitates viewing the metabolome network as well as the profiles of multiple omes in a uniform manner. The entire database is available at http://proteome.dc.affrc.go.jp/Soybean/.

  8. Alfalfa living mulch advances biological control of soybean aphid.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Nicholas P; O'neal, Matthew E; Singer, Jeremy W

    2007-04-01

    Despite evidence for biological control in North America, outbreaks of the invasive soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), continue to occur on soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.). Our objectives were to determine whether natural enemies delay aphid establishment and limit subsequent population growth and whether biological control can be improved by altering the within-field habitat. We hypothesized that a living mulch would increase the abundance of the aphidophagous community in soybean and suppress A. glycines establishment and population growth. We measured natural enemy and A. glycines abundance in soybean grown with and without an alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) living mulch. Soybean grown with an alfalfa living mulch had 45% more natural enemies and experienced a delay in A. glycines establishment that resulted in lower peak populations. From our experiments, we concluded that the current natural enemy community in Iowa can delay A. glycines establishment, and an increase in aphidophagous predator abundance lowered the rate of A. glycines population growth preventing economic populations (i.e., below the current economic threshold) from occurring. Incorporation of a living mulch had an unexpected impact on A. glycines population growth, lowering the aphids' intrinsic rate of growth, thus providing a bottom-up suppression of A. glycines. We suggest future studies of living mulches or cover crops for A. glycines management should address both potential sources of suppression. Furthermore, our experience suggests that more consistent biological control of A. glycines may be possible with even partial resistance that slows but does not prevent reproduction.

  9. Monitoring glyphosate residues in transgenic glyphosate-resistant soybean.

    PubMed

    Arregui, María C; Lenardón, Argelia; Sanchez, Daniel; Maitre, María I; Scotta, Roberto; Enrique, Susana

    2004-02-01

    The availability of Roundup Ready (RR) varieties of soybean has increased the use of glyphosate for weed control in Argentina. Glyphosate [(N-phosphonomethyl)glycine] is employed for the eradication of previous crop vegetation and for weed control during the soybean growing cycle. Its action is effective, and low environmental impact has been reported so far. No residues have been observed in soil or water, either of glyphosate or its metabolite, AMPA (aminomethylphosphonic acid). The objective of this work was to monitor glyphosate and AMPA residues in soybean plants and grains in field crops in Santa Fe Province, Argentina. Five sites were monitored in 1997, 1998 and 1999. Individual soybean plants were sampled from emergence to harvest, dried and ground. Analysis consisted in residue extraction with organic solvents and buffers, agitation, centrifugation, clean-up and HPLC with UV detection. In soybean leaves and stems, glyphosate residues ranged from 1.9 to 4.4 mg kg(-1) and from 0.1 to 1.8 mg kg(-1) in grains. Higher concentrations were detected when glyphosate was sprayed several times during the crop cycle, and when treatments approached the flowering stage. AMPA residues were also detected in leaves and in grains, indicating metabolism of the herbicide.

  10. Soybean yield in relation to distance from the Itaipu reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Faria, Rogério Teixeira; Junior, Ruy Casão; Werner, Simone Silmara; Junior, Luiz Antônio Zanão; Hoogenboom, Gerrit

    2016-07-01

    Crops close to small water bodies may exhibit changes in yield if the water mass causes significant changes in the microclimate of areas near the reservoir shoreline. The scientific literature describes this effect as occurring gradually, with higher intensity in the sites near the shoreline and decreasing intensity with distance from the reservoir. Experiments with two soybean cultivars were conducted during four crop seasons to evaluate soybean yield in relation to distance from the Itaipu reservoir and determine the effect of air temperature and water availability on soybean crop yield. Fifteen experimental sites were distributed in three transects perpendicular to the Itaipu reservoir, covering an area at approximately 10 km from the shoreline. The yield gradient between the site closest to the reservoir and the sites farther away in each transect did not show a consistent trend, but varied as a function of distance, crop season, and cultivar. This finding indicates that the Itaipu reservoir does not affect the yield of soybean plants grown within approximately 10 km from the shoreline. In addition, the variation in yield among the experimental sites was not attributed to thermal conditions because the temperature was similar within transects. However, the crop water availability was responsible for higher differences in yield among the neighboring experimental sites related to water stress caused by spatial variability in rainfall, especially during the soybean reproductive period in January and February.

  11. Expanding Omics Resources for Improvement of Soybean Seed Composition Traits.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Juhi; Patil, Gunvant B; Sonah, Humira; Deshmukh, Rupesh K; Vuong, Tri D; Valliyodan, Babu; Nguyen, Henry T

    2015-01-01

    Food resources of the modern world are strained due to the increasing population. There is an urgent need for innovative methods and approaches to augment food production. Legume seeds are major resources of human food and animal feed with their unique nutrient compositions including oil, protein, carbohydrates, and other beneficial nutrients. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) together with "omics" technologies have considerably strengthened soybean research. The availability of well annotated soybean genome sequence along with hundreds of identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with different seed traits can be used for gene discovery and molecular marker development for breeding applications. Despite the remarkable progress in these technologies, the analysis and mining of existing seed genomics data are still challenging due to the complexity of genetic inheritance, metabolic partitioning, and developmental regulations. Integration of "omics tools" is an effective strategy to discover key regulators of various seed traits. In this review, recent advances in "omics" approaches and their use in soybean seed trait investigations are presented along with the available databases and technological platforms and their applicability in the improvement of soybean. This article also highlights the use of modern breeding approaches, such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS), genomic selection (GS), and marker-assisted recurrent selection (MARS) for developing superior cultivars. A catalog of available important resources for major seed composition traits, such as seed oil, protein, carbohydrates, and yield traits are provided to improve the knowledge base and future utilization of this information in the soybean crop improvement programs.

  12. Transgenic Soybean Production of Bioactive Human Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF)

    PubMed Central

    He, Yonghua; Schmidt, Monica A.; Erwin, Christopher; Guo, Jun; Sun, Raphael; Pendarvis, Ken; Warner, Brad W.; Herman, Eliot M.

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating condition of premature infants that results from the gut microbiome invading immature intestinal tissues. This results in a life-threatening disease that is frequently treated with the surgical removal of diseased and dead tissues. Epidermal growth factor (EGF), typically found in bodily fluids, such as amniotic fluid, salvia and mother’s breast milk, is an intestinotrophic growth factor and may reduce the onset of NEC in premature infants. We have produced human EGF in soybean seeds to levels biologically relevant and demonstrated its comparable activity to commercially available EGF. Transgenic soybean seeds expressing a seed-specific codon optimized gene encoding of the human EGF protein with an added ER signal tag at the N’ terminal were produced. Seven independent lines were grown to homozygous and found to accumulate a range of 6.7 +/- 3.1 to 129.0 +/- 36.7 μg EGF/g of dry soybean seed. Proteomic and immunoblot analysis indicates that the inserted EGF is the same as the human EGF protein. Phosphorylation and immunohistochemical assays on the EGF receptor in HeLa cells indicate the EGF protein produced in soybean seed is bioactive and comparable to commercially available human EGF. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using soybean seeds as a biofactory to produce therapeutic agents in a soymilk delivery platform. PMID:27314851

  13. Biosurfactant production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown in residual soybean oil.

    PubMed

    de Lima, C J B; Ribeiro, E J; Sérvulo, E F C; Resende, M M; Cardoso, V L

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PACL strain, isolated from oil-contaminated soil taken from a lagoon, was used to investigate the efficiency and magnitude of biosurfactant production, using different waste frying soybean oils, by submerged fermentation in stirred tank reactors of 6 and 10 l capacities. A complete factorial experimental design was used, with the goal of optimizing the aeration rate (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 vvm) and agitation speed (300, 550, and 800 rpm). Aeration was identified as the primary variable affecting the process, with a maximum rhamnose concentration occurring at an aeration rate of 0.5 vvm. At optimum levels, a maximum rhamnose concentration of 3.3 g/l, an emulsification index of 100%, and a minimum surface tension of 26.0 dynes/cm were achieved. Under these conditions, the biosurfactant production derived from using a mixture of waste frying soybean oil (WFSO) as a carbon source was compared to production when non-used soybean oil (NUSO), or waste soybean oils used to fry specific foods, were used. NUSO produced the highest level of rhamnolipids, although the waste soybean oils also resulted in biosurfactant production of 75-90% of the maximum value. Under ideal conditions, the kinetic behavior and the modeling of the rhamnose production, nutrient consumption, and cellular growth were established. The resulting model predicted data points that corresponded well to the empirical information.

  14. Soybean yield in relation to distance from the Itaipu reservoir.

    PubMed

    de Faria, Rogério Teixeira; Junior, Ruy Casão; Werner, Simone Silmara; Junior, Luiz Antônio Zanão; Hoogenboom, Gerrit

    2016-07-01

    Crops close to small water bodies may exhibit changes in yield if the water mass causes significant changes in the microclimate of areas near the reservoir shoreline. The scientific literature describes this effect as occurring gradually, with higher intensity in the sites near the shoreline and decreasing intensity with distance from the reservoir. Experiments with two soybean cultivars were conducted during four crop seasons to evaluate soybean yield in relation to distance from the Itaipu reservoir and determine the effect of air temperature and water availability on soybean crop yield. Fifteen experimental sites were distributed in three transects perpendicular to the Itaipu reservoir, covering an area at approximately 10 km from the shoreline. The yield gradient between the site closest to the reservoir and the sites farther away in each transect did not show a consistent trend, but varied as a function of distance, crop season, and cultivar. This finding indicates that the Itaipu reservoir does not affect the yield of soybean plants grown within approximately 10 km from the shoreline. In addition, the variation in yield among the experimental sites was not attributed to thermal conditions because the temperature was similar within transects. However, the crop water availability was responsible for higher differences in yield among the neighboring experimental sites related to water stress caused by spatial variability in rainfall, especially during the soybean reproductive period in January and February.

  15. Accumulation of oxytetracycline and norfloxacin from saline soil by soybeans.

    PubMed

    Boonsaner, M; Hawker, D W

    2010-03-01

    Soil of former shrimp aquaculture facilities in Thailand may be contaminated by antibiotics (e.g. oxytetracycline and norfloxacin) and have elevated salinity. Therefore, reuse of this land can be problematic. The utility of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) for phytoremediation was investigated. The rate of germination and seedling emergence in prepared contaminated soil (conductivity 17.7 dS m(-1) from adding 70 mg sodium chloride g(-1) dry weight, 105 mg kg(-1) dry weight oxytetracycline and 55 mg kg(-1) dry weight norfloxacin) in sunlight was approximately 80% that of uncontaminated soil. This reduction was largely due to the high salinity. The antibiotics of interest degraded relatively rapidly in soil (half-life <10h for both) but loss was slower in deionised water. Accumulation of the antibiotics from deionised water by soybean resulted in little effect on growth rate and maximum levels in plants were observed after two days exposure, followed by declining concentrations. For soybean plants grown in saline soil, 90% removal of NaCl from soil adjacent to plant roots was observed, most within two days. Wilting and defoliation occurred, but plants recovered after 10 days and maximum salt levels in plants exceeded 20,000 mg g(-1) dry weight with translocation from root to shoot tissue noted. Soybean plants also accumulated the antibiotics from prepared contaminated saline soil, but translocation from the roots was not observed. The results showed that soybean can be valuable for phytoremediation in these situations.

  16. The Methylome of Soybean Roots during the Compatible Interaction with the Soybean Cyst Nematode1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rambani, Aditi; Liu, Jinyi; Ranjan, Priya; Mazarei, Mitra; Pantalone, Vince; Stewart, C. Neal; Hewezi, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN; Heterodera glycines) induces the formation of a multinucleated feeding site, or syncytium, whose etiology includes massive gene expression changes. Nevertheless, the genetic networks underlying gene expression control in the syncytium are poorly understood. DNA methylation is a critical epigenetic mark that plays a key role in regulating gene expression. To determine the extent to which DNA methylation is altered in soybean (Glycine max) roots during the susceptible interaction with SCN, we generated whole-genome cytosine methylation maps at single-nucleotide resolution. The methylome analysis revealed that SCN induces hypomethylation to a much higher extent than hypermethylation. We identified 2,465 differentially hypermethylated regions and 4,692 hypomethylated regions in the infected roots compared with the noninfected control. In addition, 703 and 1,346 unique genes were identified as overlapping with hyper- or hypomethylated regions, respectively. The differential methylation in genes apparently occurs independently of gene size and GC content but exhibits strong preference for recently duplicated paralogs. Furthermore, a set of 278 genes was identified as specifically syncytium differentially methylated genes. Of these, we found genes associated with epigenetic regulation, phytohormone signaling, cell wall architecture, signal transduction, and ubiquitination. This study provides, to our knowledge, new evidence that differential methylation is part of the regulatory mechanisms controlling gene expression changes in the nematode-induced syncytium. PMID:26099268

  17. Chemical composition of glyphosate-tolerant soybean 40-3-2 grown in Europe remains equivalent with that of conventional soybean (Glycine max L.).

    PubMed

    Harrigan, George G; Ridley, William P; Riordan, Susan G; Nemeth, Margaret A; Sorbet, Roy; Trujillo, William A; Breeze, Matthew L; Schneider, Ronald W

    2007-07-25

    The composition of glyphosate-tolerant (Roundup Ready) soybean 40-3-2 was compared with that of conventional soybean grown in Romania in 2005 as part of a comparative safety assessment program. Samples were collected from replicated field trials, and compositional analyses were performed to measure proximates (moisture, fat, ash, protein, and carbohydrates by calculation), fiber, amino acids, fatty acids, isoflavones, raffinose, stachyose, phytic acid, trypsin inhibitor, and lectin in grain as well as proximates and fiber in forage. The mean values for all biochemical components assessed for Roundup Ready soybean 40-30-2 were similar to those of the conventional control and were within the published range observed for commercial soybean. The compositional profile of Roundup Ready soybean 40-3-2 was also compared to that of conventional soybean varieties grown in Romania by calculating a 99% tolerance interval to describe compositional variability in the population of traditional soybean varieties already on the marketplace. These comparisons, together with the history of the safe use of soybean as a common component of animal feed and human food, lead to the conclusion that Roundup Ready soybean 40-3-2 is compositionally equivalent to and as safe and nutritious as conventional soybean varieties grown commercially.

  18. Pathogenic diversity of Phytophthora sojae and breeding strategies to develop Phytophthora-resistant soybeans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phytophthora stem and root rot disease, caused by Phytophthora sojae, is one of the most destructive diseases of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.), and has been increasing in several soybean-producing areas around the world. This disease induces serious limitations on soybean production, with yield l...

  19. Metabolic profiles of soybean roots during early stages of Fusarium tucumaniae infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean germplasm exhibits various levels of resistance to Fusarium tucumaniae, the main causal agent of sudden death syndrome (SDS) of soybean in Argentina. In this study, two soybean genotypes, one susceptible (NA 4613) and one partially resistant (DM 4670) to SDS infection, were inoculated with F...

  20. Isolation and characterization of a male fertility gene (Ms4) in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Identifying a stable male-sterility system is crucial for the development of hybrid soybean. In soybean, eleven male-sterile, female-fertile mutants (ms1, ms2, ms3, ms4, ms5, ms6, ms7, ms8, ms9, msMOS, and msp) have been identified and some of which have been mapped to soybean chromosomes. The objec...

  1. Corn and soybean rotation under reduced tillage management: impacts on soil properties, yield, and net return

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A 4-yr field study was conducted from 2007 to 2010 at Stoneville, MS to examine the effects of rotating corn and soybean under reduced tillage conditions on soil properties, yields, and net return. The six rotation systems were continuous corn (CCCC), continuous soybean (SSSS), corn-soybean (CSCS),...

  2. Evaluation of Glyphosate-Resistant Soybean Cultivars for Resistance to Bacterial Pustule

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines causes bacterial pustule of soybean, which is a common disease in many soybean-growing areas of the world and is controlled by a single recessive gene that was commonly found in many conventional glyphosate-sensitive soybean cultivars. Since glyphosate-resistant c...

  3. Corn and soybean grain yields in a long-term tillage and cropping systems study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Reports on the long-term effects of tillage and cropping systems on corn and soybean yields are limited. Yields have been measured in a long-term experiment (30+ years) with three cropping systems [continuous corn (CC), continuous soybean (CSB), and soybean-corn (SB-C)] in six primary tillage system...

  4. Identification of soybean accessions resistant to macrophomina phaseolina by field screening and laboratory validation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Charcoal rot of soybean, caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goidanich, has been a problem for soybean farmers in the U. S. A. for many years. There are no strategies for managing the population density of this pathogen in the soil, and no commercial resistant soybean variety is available for...

  5. Velvetbean and Bahiagrass as Rotation Crops for Management of Meloidogyne spp. and Heterodera glycines in Soybean.

    PubMed

    Weaver, D B; Rodríguez-Kábana, R; Carden, E L

    1998-12-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) yield often is limited by the phytoparasitic nematodes Meloidogyne spp. and Heterodera glycines in the southeastern United States. We studied the effects of rotation with bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum), velvetbean (Mucuna pruiens), or continuous soybean, aldicarb, and soybean cultivar on yield and population densities in two fields infested with a mixture of Meloidogyne spp. and H. glycines. Velvetbean and bahiagrass reduced population levels of both nematode species to near zero prior to planting soybean. At harvest, both nematode populations were equal in soybean following bahiagrass and continuous soybean but were lower following velvetbean. Both bahiagrass and velvetbean as previous crops were equal in producing significantly (P < 0.003) higher yield than continuous soybean. Velvetbean increased subsequent soybean yield by 98% and bahiagrass increased subsequent soybean yield by 85% as previous crops compared to continuous soybean. The major differences between the two rotation crops were yield response of the nematode-susceptible cultivars and at-harvest nematode populations. Velvetbean tended to mask genetic differences among cultivars more so than bahiagrass. Velvetbean also produced a more long-term effect on nematode populations, with numbers of both Meloidogyne spp. and H. glycines lower in soybean following velvethean than following bahiagrass or continuous soybean.

  6. Colletotrichum incanum sp. nov., a curved-conidial species causing soybean anthracnose in USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean anthracnose is caused by a number of species of Colletotrichum that as a group represent an important disease that results in significant economic losses. In the present study, Colletotrichum species were isolated from soybean petioles and stems with anthracnose symptoms from soybean fields ...

  7. Establishment of a soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) transposon-based mutagenesis repository

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean is a major crop species providing valuable feedstock for food, feed and biofuel. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in developing genomic resources for soybean, including on-going efforts to sequence the genome. These efforts have identified a large number of soybean genes...

  8. Inclusion of various amounts of steam-flaked soybeans in lactating dairy cattle diets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While most soybean feedstuffs have been extensively investigated for use in ruminant diets, there is a lack of information regarding steam-flaked soybeans. This research evaluated various inclusion rates of steam-flaked soybeans (SFSB) in lactating dairy cattle diets. Twelve multiparous Holstein cow...

  9. Pathogenicity of diaporthe spp. isolates recovered from soybean (glycine max) seeds in Paraguay

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phomopsis seed decay (PSD) caused by Diaporthe longicolla (Hobbs) J.M. Santos, Vrandecic & A.J.L. Phillips has been documented as part of a soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] fungal disease complex that affects the quality of soybean seed. In 2006, 16 isolates of Diaporthe were recovered from soybean...

  10. Evaluating soybean cultivars for resistance to Phomopsis seed decay in Mississippi

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phomopsis seed decay (PSD) of soybean reduces seed quality, germination and seedling vigor. PSD has been problematic in most soybean production areas including Mississippi (MS). Planting resistant cultivars is one of the most effective means to control PSD. However, very few soybean cultivars resis...

  11. Genetic diversity and population structure of Korean and Chinese soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] accessions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Korean and Chinese cultivated soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] populations are major soybean gene pools. Information has been reported comparing genetic diversity between soybeans from the two countries using an unequal number of accessions and only 6 to 35 genetic markers. This study compares diffe...

  12. Microsatellite Diversity of Soybean Genotypes Differing in Bean Pod Mottle Virus Leaf Symptom

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr, is the most important source of vegetable oil and protein meal in the world. Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) is a threat to soybean yield and productivity in most soybean growing states of the USA. In the absence of complete resistance to BPMV, partial resistance of so...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10210 - Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products with diethanolamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10210 Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products... chemical substance identified as soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products with diethanolamine (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10210 - Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products with diethanolamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10210 Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products... chemical substance identified as soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products with diethanolamine (PMN...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10210 - Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products with diethanolamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10210 Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products... chemical substance identified as soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products with diethanolamine (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10210 - Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products with diethanolamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10210 Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products... chemical substance identified as soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products with diethanolamine (PMN...

  17. Organically grown soybean production in the USA: Constraints and management of pathogens and insect pests

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean is the most produced and consumed oil seed crop worldwide. In 2013, 226 million metric tons were produced in over 70 countries. Organically produced soybean represented less than 0.1% of total world production. In the USA in 2011, the soybean crop was grown on about 32 million ha with 53 tho...

  18. 49 CFR 1039.10 - Exemption of agricultural commodities except grain, soybeans, and sunflower seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., soybeans, and sunflower seeds. 1039.10 Section 1039.10 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS § 1039.10 Exemption of agricultural commodities except grain, soybeans, and sunflower... (STCC) number are: 01 Farm products, with the exception of grain (STCC No. 0113), soybeans (STCC...

  19. 49 CFR 1039.10 - Exemption of agricultural commodities except grain, soybeans, and sunflower seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., soybeans, and sunflower seeds. 1039.10 Section 1039.10 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS § 1039.10 Exemption of agricultural commodities except grain, soybeans, and sunflower... (STCC) number are: 01 Farm products, with the exception of grain (STCC No. 0113), soybeans (STCC...

  20. An analysis of spectral discrimination between corn and soybeans using a row crop reflectance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suits, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Reflectance calculations of soybeans and corn crops at two times during the growing season indicate that the high sensitivity of the thematic mapper mid-infrared band to exposed bare soil between soybean rows is most likely responsible for early season spectral discrimination of corn and soybean crops by this band.

  1. 7 CFR 810.1604 - Grades and grade requirements for soybeans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Grades and grade requirements for soybeans. 810.1604... OFFICIAL UNITED STATES STANDARDS FOR GRAIN United States Standards for Soybeans Principles Governing the Application of Standards § 810.1604 Grades and grade requirements for soybeans. Grading factors Grades...

  2. 49 CFR 1039.10 - Exemption of agricultural commodities except grain, soybeans, and sunflower seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., soybeans, and sunflower seeds. 1039.10 Section 1039.10 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS § 1039.10 Exemption of agricultural commodities except grain, soybeans, and sunflower... (STCC) number are: 01 Farm products, with the exception of grain (STCC No. 0113), soybeans (STCC...

  3. 7 CFR 810.1604 - Grades and grade requirements for soybeans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Grades and grade requirements for soybeans. 810.1604... OFFICIAL UNITED STATES STANDARDS FOR GRAIN United States Standards for Soybeans Principles Governing the Application of Standards § 810.1604 Grades and grade requirements for soybeans. Grading factors Grades...

  4. 49 CFR 1039.10 - Exemption of agricultural commodities except grain, soybeans, and sunflower seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., soybeans, and sunflower seeds. 1039.10 Section 1039.10 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS § 1039.10 Exemption of agricultural commodities except grain, soybeans, and sunflower... (STCC) number are: 01 Farm products, with the exception of grain (STCC No. 0113), soybeans (STCC...

  5. 7 CFR 810.1604 - Grades and grade requirements for soybeans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Grades and grade requirements for soybeans. 810.1604... OFFICIAL UNITED STATES STANDARDS FOR GRAIN United States Standards for Soybeans Principles Governing the Application of Standards § 810.1604 Grades and grade requirements for soybeans. Grading factors Grades...

  6. 49 CFR 1039.10 - Exemption of agricultural commodities except grain, soybeans, and sunflower seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., soybeans, and sunflower seeds. 1039.10 Section 1039.10 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS § 1039.10 Exemption of agricultural commodities except grain, soybeans, and sunflower... (STCC) number are: 01 Farm products, with the exception of grain (STCC No. 0113), soybeans (STCC...

  7. An analysis of spectral discrimination between corn and soybeans using a row crop reflectance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suits, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    Reflectance calculations of soybeans and corn crops at two times during the growing season indicate that the high sensitivity of the thematic mapper mid-infrared band to exposed bare soil between soybean rows is most likely responsible for early season spectral discrimination of corn and soybean crops by this band.

  8. An analysis of spectral discrimination between corn and soybeans using a row crop reflectance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suits, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Reflectance calculations of soybeans and corn crops at two times during the growing season indicate that the high sensitivity of the thematic mapper mid-infrared band to exposed bare soil between soybean rows is most likely responsible for early season spectral discrimination of corn and soybean crops by this band.

  9. Genome-wide association mapping of flowering time and maturity dates in early mature soybean germplasm

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) is a photoperiod-sensitive and short-day major crop grown worldwide. Days to flowering (DTF) and maturity (DTM) are two traits affecting soybean adaptability and yield. Some genes conditioning soybean flowering and maturity have been recently characterized. However, ...

  10. Low-Cost Soybean Protein Products as Extenders in Plywood Adhesives

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean flour and meal were evaluated as alternate protein extenders in plywood adhesives. This research is part of our laboratory’s efforts to develop new uses for the proteinaceous co-products from soybean and cereal processing. Ground soybean meal was tested as replacement for wheat flour in gl...

  11. Low-cost Soybean Protein Products as Extenders in Plywood Adhesives

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean flour and meal were evaluated as alternate protein extenders in plywood adhesives. This research is part of our laboratory’s efforts to develop new uses for the proteinaceous co-products from soybean and cereal processing. Ground soybean meal was tested as replacement for wheat flour in glu...

  12. Molecular mapping and genomics of soybean seed protein: A review and perspective for the future

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Meal protein derived from soybean [Glycine max (L) Merr.] seed is the primary source of protein in poultry and livestock feed. Protein is a key factor that determines the nutritional and economical value of soybean. Genetic improvement of soybean seed protein content is highly desirable, and major q...

  13. Evaluation of soybean commercial varieties for resistance to Phomopsis seed decay in the Mississippi Delta, 2012

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean Phomopsis seed decay (PSD), primarily caused by Phomopsis longicolla, is a major cause of poor seed quality in the United States, especially in the mid-southern region. To identify new sources of soybean lines resistant to PSD, 16 commercial soybean varieties (MG IV and MGV) were planted on ...

  14. Evaluating soybean germplasm and commercial varieties for resistance to Phomopsis seed decay

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean Phomopsis seed decay (PSD) is the major cause of poor seed quality in most soybean production areas of the United States. Very few soybean cultivars currently available for planting in the US have resistance to PSD. To identify new sources of resistance to PSD, a multistate and multiyear res...

  15. Research Update on Screening Germplasm and Breeding for Resistance to Phomopsis Seed Decay in Soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean Phomopsis seed decay (PSD), caused by Phomopsis longicolla, is the major cause of poor seed quality in the United States, especially in the mid-southern USA. To identify soybean lines resistant to PSD, field screening of 135 selected soybean germplasm lines representing 28 worldwide origins ...

  16. Evaluation of diverse soybean germplasm for resistance to Phomopsis Seed Decay

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phomopsis seed decay (PSD) is a major cause of poor quality soybean seeds. The disease is caused primarily by the fungal pathogen, Phomopsis longicolla. To identify soybean lines with resistance to PSD, a total of 135 selected soybean germplasm accessions originally from 28 countries and in maturity...

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Bradyrhizobium japonicum J5, Isolated from a Soybean Nodule in Hokkaido, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kanehara, Kazuma

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Soybean bradyrhizobia form root nodules on soybean plants and symbiotically fix N2. Strain J5 is phylogenetically far from well-known representatives within the Bradyrhizobium japonicum linage. The complete genome showed the largest single chromosomal (10.1 Mb) and symbiosis island (998 kb) among complete genomes of soybean bradyrhizobia. PMID:28183772

  18. Life history and morphological plasticity of three biotypes of soybean aphid (Aphis glycines)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is a pest of soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr. (Fabaceae), from eastern Asia that was first reported in North America in 2000. The influence of temperature on plasticity of life history and morphological traits of the soybean aphid ha...

  19. First report of Phakopsora pachyrhizi on soybean causing rust in Tanzania

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd. was reported on legume hosts other than soybean in Tanzania as early as 1979. Soybean rust (SBR), caused by P. pachyrhizi, was first reported on soybean in Africa in Uganda in 1996, and its introduction into Africa was proposed to occur through urediniospores blowing from ...

  20. Genome-wide association mapping of quantitative resistance to sudden death syndrome in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is a serious threat to soybean production that can be controlled by host plant resistance. To dissect the genetic architecture of quantitative resistance to the disease in soybean, two independent association panels of soybean elite cultivar, consisting of 392 and 300 uni...

  1. Evaluation of soybean breeding lines for resistance to phomopsis seed decay in stoneville mississippi 2014

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phomopsis seed decay (PSD) of soybean is a major cause of poor seed quality in most soybean production areas, especially in the mid-southern region of the United States. Breeding for PSD-resistance is the most effective long-term strategy to control this disease. To breed soybean lines with resistan...

  2. From George Washington Carver to the genome: leveraging genetics and molecular biology to improve soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 1904, George Washington Carver studying the composition of soybeans concluded that they are a valuable source of protein and oil. He proposed that rotating soybeans with other crops would replenish the soil with nitrogen and minerals for 2 years. His findings brought soybeans into the mainstream ...

  3. Velvetbean and Bahiagrass as Rotation Crops for Management of Meloidogyne spp. and Heterodera glycines in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, D. B.; Rodríguez-Kábana, R.; Carden, E. L.

    1998-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) yield often is limited by the phytoparasitic nematodes Meloidogyne spp. and Heterodera glycines in the southeastern United States. We studied the effects of rotation with bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum), velvetbean (Mucuna pruiens), or continuous soybean, aldicarb, and soybean cultivar on yield and population densities in two fields infested with a mixture of Meloidogyne spp. and H. glycines. Velvetbean and bahiagrass reduced population levels of both nematode species to near zero prior to planting soybean. At harvest, both nematode populations were equal in soybean following bahiagrass and continuous soybean but were lower following velvetbean. Both bahiagrass and velvetbean as previous crops were equal in producing significantly (P < 0.003) higher yield than continuous soybean. Velvetbean increased subsequent soybean yield by 98% and bahiagrass increased subsequent soybean yield by 85% as previous crops compared to continuous soybean. The major differences between the two rotation crops were yield response of the nematode-susceptible cultivars and at-harvest nematode populations. Velvetbean tended to mask genetic differences among cultivars more so than bahiagrass. Velvetbean also produced a more long-term effect on nematode populations, with numbers of both Meloidogyne spp. and H. glycines lower in soybean following velvethean than following bahiagrass or continuous soybean. PMID:19274247

  4. Effect of substitution of high stearic low linolenic acid soybean oil for hydrogenated soybean oil on fatty acid intake.

    PubMed

    DiRienzo, Maureen A; Lemke, Shawna L; Petersen, Barbara J; Smith, Kim M

    2008-05-01

    High stearic, low alpha-linolenic acid soybean oil (HSLL) has been developed via traditional breeding to serve as a substitute for partially hydrogenated soybean oils used in food manufacturing. The purpose of this study was to estimate the impact on fatty acid intake in the United States if HSLL were substituted for partially hydrogenated soybean oils used in several food categories, including baked goods, shortenings, fried foods, and margarines. Using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data (1999-2002), baseline intakes of five fatty acids and trans fatty acids (TFA) were determined at the mean and 90th percentile of fat consumption. Then intakes of these fatty acids were determined after HSLL was substituted for 100% of the partially hydrogenated soybean oils used in these four food categories. The results show that baseline intake of stearic acid is 3.0% energy at the mean and 3.3% energy at the 90th percentile. Use of HSLL could increase stearic acid intake to about 4-5% energy. Mean intakes of TFA could decrease from 2.5 to 0.9% energy, and intake of palmitic acid would remain unchanged. Use of HSLL as a substitute for partially hydrogenated soybean oils would result in changes in the fatty acid composition of the US diet consistent with current dietary recommendations.

  5. Ectopic expression of AtPAD4 broadens resistance of soybean to soybean cyst and root-knot nematodes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The gene encoding PAD4 (PHYTOALEXIN-DEFICIENT4) is required in Arabidopsis for expression of several genes involved in the defense response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola. AtPAD4 (Arabidopsis thaliana PAD4) encodes a lipase-like protein that plays a regulatory role mediating salicylic acid signaling. Results We expressed the gene encoding AtPAD4 in soybean roots of composite plants to test the ability of AtPAD4 to deter plant parasitic nematode development. The transformed roots were challenged with two different plant parasitic nematode genera represented by soybean cyst nematode (SCN; Heterodera glycines) and root-knot nematode (RKN; Meloidogyne incognita). Expression of AtPAD4 in soybean roots decreased the number of mature SCN females 35 days after inoculation by 68 percent. Similarly, soybean roots expressing AtPAD4 exhibited 77 percent fewer galls when challenged with RKN. Conclusions Our experiments show that AtPAD4 can be used in an economically important crop, soybean, to provide a measure of resistance to two different genera of nematodes. PMID:23617694

  6. Host-Derived Artificial MicroRNA as an Alternative Method to Improve Soybean Resistance to Soybean Cyst Nematode

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Bin; Li, Jiarui; Oakley, Thomas R.; Todd, Timothy C.; Trick, Harold N.

    2016-01-01

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines, is one of the most important pests limiting soybean production worldwide. Novel approaches to managing this pest have focused on gene silencing of target nematode sequences using RNA interference (RNAi). With the discovery of endogenous microRNAs as a mode of gene regulation in plants, artificial microRNA (amiRNA) methods have become an alternative method for gene silencing, with the advantage that they can lead to more specific silencing of target genes than traditional RNAi vectors. To explore the application of amiRNAs for improving soybean resistance to SCN, three nematode genes (designated as J15, J20, and J23) were targeted using amiRNA vectors. The transgenic soybean hairy roots, transformed independently with these three amiRNA vectors, showed significant reductions in SCN population densities in bioassays. Expression of the targeted genes within SCN eggs were downregulated in populations feeding on transgenic hairy roots. Our results provide evidence that host-derived amiRNA methods have great potential to improve soybean resistance to SCN. This approach should also limit undesirable phenotypes associated with off-target effects, which is an important consideration for commercialization of transgenic crops. PMID:27941644

  7. Functional significance of bioactive peptides derived from soybean.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brij Pal; Vij, Shilpa; Hati, Subrota

    2014-04-01

    Biologically active peptides play an important role in metabolic regulation and modulation. Several studies have shown that during gastrointestinal digestion, food processing and microbial proteolysis of various animals and plant proteins, small peptides can be released which possess biofunctional properties. These peptides are to prove potential health-enhancing nutraceutical for food and pharmaceutical applications. The beneficial health effects of bioactive peptides may be several like antihypertensive, antioxidative, antiobesity, immunomodulatory, antidiabetic, hypocholesterolemic and anticancer. Soybeans, one of the most abundant plant sources of dietary protein, contain 36-56% of protein. Recent studies showed that soy milk, an aqueous extract of soybean, and its fermented product have great biological properties and are a good source of bioactive peptides. This review focuses on bioactive peptides derived from soybean; we illustrate their production and biofunctional attributes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Developmental and nutritional regulation of isoflavone secretion from soybean roots.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Akifumi; Yamazaki, Yumi; Yamashita, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Seiji; Nakayama, Toru; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavones play important roles in plant-microbe interactions in rhizospheres. Soybean roots secrete daidzein and genistein to attract rhizobia. Despite the importance of isoflavones in plant-microbe interactions, little is known about the developmental and nutritional regulation of isoflavone secretion from soybean roots. In this study, soybeans were grown in hydroponic culture, and isoflavone contents in tissues, isoflavone secretion from the roots, and the expression of isoflavone conjugates hydrolyzing beta-glucosidase (ICHG) were investigated. Isoflavone contents did not show strong growth-dependent changes, while secretion of daidzein from the roots dramatically changed, with higher secretion during vegetative stages. Coordinately, the expression of ICHG also peaked at vegetative stages. Nitrogen deficiency resulted in 8- and 15-fold increases in secretion of daidzein and genistein, respectively, with no induction of ICHG. Taken together, these results suggest that large amounts of isoflavones were secreted during vegetative stages via the hydrolysis of (malonyl)glucosides with ICHG.

  9. Pyrosequencing assessment of rhizosphere fungal communities from a soybean field.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Akifumi; Ueda, Yoshikatsu; Takase, Hisabumi; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2014-10-01

    Soil fungal communities play essential roles in soil ecosystems, affecting plant growth and health. Rhizosphere bacterial communities have been shown to undergo dynamic changes during plant growth. This study utilized 454 pyrosequencing to analyze rhizosphere fungal communities during soybean growth. Members of the Ascomycota and Basiodiomycota dominated in all soils. There were no statistically significant changes at the phylum level among growth stages or between bulk and rhizosphere soils. In contrast, the relative abundance of small numbers of operational taxonomic units, 4 during growth and 28 between bulk and rhizosphere soils, differed significantly. Clustering analysis revealed that rhizosphere fungal communities were different from bulk fungal communities during growth stages of soybeans. Taken together, these results suggest that in contrast to rhizosphere bacterial communities, most constituents of rhizosphere fungal communities remained stable during soybean growth.

  10. Hydrolysis of soybean isoflavonoid glycosides by Dalbergia beta-glucosidases.

    PubMed

    Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Rimlumduan, Thipwarin; Svasti, Jisnuson; Cairns, James R Ketudat

    2007-03-21

    Two beta-glucosidases from the legumes Dalbergia cochinchinensis and Dalbergia nigrescens were compared for their ability to hydrolyze isoflavonoid glycosides from soybean. Both D. nigrescens and D. cochinchinensis beta-glucosidases could hydrolyze conjugated soybean glycosides, but D. nigrescens beta-glucosidase hydrolyzed both conjugated and nonconjugated glycosides in crude soybean extract more rapidly. The kinetic properties Km, kcat, and kcat/Km of the Dalbergia beta-glucosidases toward conjugated isoflavonoid glycosides, determined using high-performance liquid chromatography, confirmed the higher efficiency of the D. nigrescens beta-glucosidase in hydrolyzing these substrates. The D. nigrescens beta-glucosidase could also efficiently hydrolyze isoflavone glycosides in soy flour suspensions, suggesting its application to increase free isoflavones in soy products.

  11. Top note compounds of Chinese traditional bacteria-fermented soybean.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ai-Nong; Sun, Bao-Guo; Hu, Wei-Bing

    2008-01-01

    Top note compounds of Chinese traditional bacteria-fermented soybean were analysed by using headspace sampler, GC and GC-MS. Thirty-three note compounds were identified in Chinese traditional bacteria-fermented soybean. Among them, 28 compounds are responsible for the Chinese traditional bacteria-fermented soybean top note. 3-Methylbutanal (6.690%), amyl nitrite (12.976%), 2-methylpropanoic acid (4.014%), 2,3-butanediol (2.171%), 3-methylbutanoic acid (14.273%), 2-methylbutanoic acid (11.866%), benzeneacetaldehyde (1.422%), nonadecane (3.195%), eicosane (5.331%), heneicosane (23.418%) and docosane (5.011%) were all found in concentrations higher than 1.0% (calculated as % peak area of GC analysis using a DB-5 column).

  12. Amino acid quantification in bulk soybeans by transmission Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schulmerich, Matthew V; Gelber, Matthew K; Azam, Hossain M; Harrison, Sandra K; McKinney, John; Thompson, Dennis; Owen, Bridget; Kull, Linda S; Bhargava, Rohit

    2013-12-03

    Soybeans are a commodity crop of significant economic and nutritional interest. As an important source of protein, buyers of soybeans are interested in not only the total protein content but also in the specific amino acids that comprise the total protein content. Raman spectroscopy has the chemical specificity to measure the twenty common amino acids as pure substances. An unsolved challenge, however, is to quantify varying levels of amino acids mixed together and bound in soybeans at relatively low concentrations. Here we report the use of transmission Raman spectroscopy as a secondary analytical approach to nondestructively measure specific amino acids in intact soybeans. With the employment of a transmission-based Raman instrument, built specifically for nondestructive measurements from bulk soybeans, spectra were collected from twenty-four samples to develop a calibration model using a partial least-squares approach with a random-subset cross validation. The calibration model was validated on an independent set of twenty-five samples for oil, protein, and amino acid predictions. After Raman measurements, the samples were reduced to a fine powder and conventional wet chemistry methods were used for quantifying reference values of protein, oil, and 18 amino acids. We found that the greater the concentrations (% by weight component of interest), the better the calibration model and prediction capabilities. Of the 18 amino acids analyzed, 13 had R(2) values greater than 0.75 with a standard error of prediction c.a. 3-4% by weight. Serine, histidine, cystine, tryptophan, and methionine showed poor predictions (R(2) < 0.75), which were likely a result of the small sampling range and the low concentration of these components. It is clear from the correlation plots and root-mean-square error of prediction that Raman spectroscopy has sufficient chemical contrast to nondestructively quantify protein, oil, and specific amino acids in intact soybeans.

  13. Ketocarotenoid Production in Soybean Seeds through Metabolic Engineering.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Emily C; LaFayette, Peter R; Ortega, María A; Joyce, Blake L; Kopsell, Dean A; Parrott, Wayne A

    2015-01-01

    The pink or red ketocarotenoids, canthaxanthin and astaxanthin, are used as feed additives in the poultry and aquaculture industries as a source of egg yolk and flesh pigmentation, as farmed animals do not have access to the carotenoid sources of their wild counterparts. Because soybean is already an important component in animal feed, production of these carotenoids in soybean could be a cost-effective means of delivery. In order to characterize the ability of soybean seed to produce carotenoids, soybean cv. Jack was transformed with the crtB gene from Pantoea ananatis, which codes for phytoene synthase, an enzyme which catalyzes the first committed step in the carotenoid pathway. The crtB gene was engineered together in combinations with ketolase genes (crtW from Brevundimonas sp. strain SD212 and bkt1 from Haematococcus pluvialis) to produce ketocarotenoids; all genes were placed under the control of seed-specific promoters. HPLC results showed that canthaxanthin is present in the transgenic seeds at levels up to 52 μg/g dry weight. Transgenic seeds also accumulated other compounds in the carotenoid pathway, such as astaxanthin, lutein, β-carotene, phytoene, α-carotene, lycopene, and β-cryptoxanthin, whereas lutein was the only one of these detected in non-transgenic seeds. The accumulation of astaxanthin, which requires a β-carotene hydroxylase in addition to a β-carotene ketolase, in the transgenic seeds suggests that an endogenous soybean enzyme is able to work in combination with the ketolase transgene. Soybean seeds that accumulate ketocarotenoids could potentially be used in animal feed to reduce or eliminate the need for the costly addition of these compounds.

  14. Accelerating yield potential in soybean: potential targets for biotechnological improvement.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, Elizabeth A; Yendrek, Craig R; Skoneczka, Jeffrey A; Long, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max Merr.) is the world's most widely grown legume and provides an important source of protein and oil. Global soybean production and yield per hectare increased steadily over the past century with improved agronomy and development of cultivars suited to a wide range of latitudes. In order to meet the needs of a growing world population without unsustainable expansion of the land area devoted to this crop, yield must increase at a faster rate than at present. Here, the historical basis for the yield gains realized in the past 90 years are examined together with potential metabolic targets for achieving further improvements in yield potential. These targets include improving photosynthetic efficiency, optimizing delivery and utilization of carbon, more efficient nitrogen fixation and altering flower initiation and abortion. Optimization of investment in photosynthetic enzymes, bypassing photorespiratory metabolism, engineering the electron transport chain and engineering a faster recovery from the photoprotected state are different strategies to improve photosynthesis in soybean. These potential improvements in photosynthetic carbon gain will need to be matched by increased carbon and nitrogen transport to developing soybean pods and seeds in order to maximize the benefit. Better understanding of control of carbon and nitrogen transport along with improved knowledge of the regulation of flower initiation and abortion will be needed to optimize sink capacity in soybean. Although few single targets are likely to deliver a quantum leap in yields, biotechnological advances in molecular breeding techniques that allow for alteration of the soybean genome and transcriptome promise significant yield gains. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Integrating omic approaches for abiotic stress tolerance in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Rupesh; Sonah, Humira; Patil, Gunvant; Chen, Wei; Prince, Silvas; Mutava, Raymond; Vuong, Tri; Valliyodan, Babu; Nguyen, Henry T.

    2014-01-01

    Soybean production is greatly influenced by abiotic stresses imposed by environmental factors such as drought, water submergence, salt, and heavy metals. A thorough understanding of plant response to abiotic stress at the molecular level is a prerequisite for its effective management. The molecular mechanism of stress tolerance is complex and requires information at the omic level to understand it effectively. In this regard, enormous progress has been made in the omics field in the areas of genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics. The emerging field of ionomics is also being employed for investigating abiotic stress tolerance in soybean. Omic approaches generate a huge amount of data, and adequate advancements in computational tools have been achieved for effective analysis. However, the integration of omic-scale information to address complex genetics and physiological questions is still a challenge. In this review, we have described advances in omic tools in the view of conventional and modern approaches being used to dissect abiotic stress tolerance in soybean. Emphasis was given to approaches such as quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and genomic selection (GS). Comparative genomics and candidate gene approaches are also discussed considering identification of potential genomic loci, genes, and biochemical pathways involved in stress tolerance mechanism in soybean. This review also provides a comprehensive catalog of available online omic resources for soybean and its effective utilization. We have also addressed the significance of phenomics in the integrated approaches and recognized high-throughput multi-dimensional phenotyping as a major limiting factor for the improvement of abiotic stress tolerance in soybean. PMID:24917870

  16. Ketocarotenoid Production in Soybean Seeds through Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Emily C.; LaFayette, Peter R.; Ortega, María A.; Joyce, Blake L.; Kopsell, Dean A.; Parrott, Wayne A.

    2015-01-01

    The pink or red ketocarotenoids, canthaxanthin and astaxanthin, are used as feed additives in the poultry and aquaculture industries as a source of egg yolk and flesh pigmentation, as farmed animals do not have access to the carotenoid sources of their wild counterparts. Because soybean is already an important component in animal feed, production of these carotenoids in soybean could be a cost-effective means of delivery. In order to characterize the ability of soybean seed to produce carotenoids, soybean cv. Jack was transformed with the crtB gene from Pantoea ananatis, which codes for phytoene synthase, an enzyme which catalyzes the first committed step in the carotenoid pathway. The crtB gene was engineered together in combinations with ketolase genes (crtW from Brevundimonas sp. strain SD212 and bkt1 from Haematococcus pluvialis) to produce ketocarotenoids; all genes were placed under the control of seed-specific promoters. HPLC results showed that canthaxanthin is present in the transgenic seeds at levels up to 52 μg/g dry weight. Transgenic seeds also accumulated other compounds in the carotenoid pathway, such as astaxanthin, lutein, β-carotene, phytoene, α-carotene, lycopene, and β-cryptoxanthin, whereas lutein was the only one of these detected in non-transgenic seeds. The accumulation of astaxanthin, which requires a β-carotene hydroxylase in addition to a β-carotene ketolase, in the transgenic seeds suggests that an endogenous soybean enzyme is able to work in combination with the ketolase transgene. Soybean seeds that accumulate ketocarotenoids could potentially be used in animal feed to reduce or eliminate the need for the costly addition of these compounds. PMID:26376481

  17. SoyXpress: a database for exploring the soybean transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kei Chin Christine; Strömvik, Martina V

    2008-08-01

    Experiments using whole transcriptome microarrays produce massive amounts of data. To gain a comprehensive understanding of this gene expression data it needs to be integrated with other available information such as gene function and metabolic pathways. Bioinformatics tools are essential to handle, organize and interpret the results. To date, no database provides whole transcriptome analysis capabilities integrated with terms describing biological functions for soybean (Glycine max (L) Merr.). To this end we have developed SoyXpress, a relational database with a suite of web interfaces to allow users to easily retrieve data and results of the microarray experiment with cross-referenced annotations of expressed sequence tags (EST) and hyperlinks to external public databases. This environment makes it possible to explore differences in gene expression, if any, between for instance transgenic and non-transgenic soybean cultivars and to interpret the results based on gene functional annotations to determine any changes that could potentially alter biological processes. SoyXpress is a database designed for exploring the soybean transcriptome. Currently SoyXpress houses 380,095 soybean Expressed Sequence Tags (EST), linked with metabolic pathways, Gene Ontology terms, SwissProt identifiers and Affymetrix gene expression data. Array data is presently available from an experiment profiling global gene expression of three conventional and two genetically engineered soybean cultivars. The microarray data is linked with the sequence data, for maximum knowledge extraction. SoyXpress is implemented in MySQL and uses a Perl CGI interface. SoyXpress is designed for the purpose of exploring potential transcriptome differences in different plant genotypes, including genetically modified crops. Soybean EST sequences, microarray and pathway data as well as searchable and browsable gene ontology are integrated and presented. SoyXpress is publicly accessible at http://soyxpress.agrenv.mcgill.ca.

  18. [A 104-week feeding study of genetically modified soybeans in F344 rats].

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yoshimitsu; Tada, Yukie; Fukumori, Nobutaka; Tayama, Kuniaki; Ando, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Kubo, Yoshikazu; Nagasawa, Akemichi; Yano, Norio; Yuzawa, Katsuhiro; Ogata, Akio

    2008-08-01

    A chronic feeding study to evaluate the safety of genetically modified glyphosate-tolerant soybeans (GM soybeans) was conducted using F344 DuCrj rats. The rats were fed diet containing GM soybeans or Non-GM soybeans at the concentration of 30% in basal diet. Non-GM soybeans were a closely related strain to the GM soybeans. These two diets were adjusted to an identical nutrient level. In this study, the influence of GM soybeans in rats was compared with that of the Non-GM soybeans, and furthermore, to assess the effect of soybeans themselves, the groups of rats fed GM and Non-GM soybeans were compared with a group fed commercial diet (CE-2). General conditions were observed daily and body weight and food consumption were recorded. At the termination (104 weeks), animals were subjected to hematology, serum biochemistry, and pathological examinations. There were several differences in animal growth, food intake, organ weights and histological findings between the rats fed the GM and/or Non-GM soybeans and the rats fed CE-2. However, body weight and food intake were similar for the rats fed the GM and Non-GM soybeans. Gross necropsy findings, hematological and serum biochemical parameters, and organ weights showed no meaningful difference between rats fed the GM and Non-GM soybeans. In pathological observation, there was neither an increase in incidence nor any specific type of nonneoplastic or neoplastic lesions in the GM soybeans group in each sex. These results indicate that long-term intake of GM soybeans at the level of 30% in diet has no apparent adverse effect in rats.

  19. Assessment of common soybean-infecting viruses in Ohio, USA, through multisite sampling and high-throughput sequencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To assess the scope of virus disease problems of soybean in Ohio, USA, a survey was conducted during 2011 and 2012 soybean growing seasons. A total of 259 samples were collected from 80 soybean fields distributed in 42 Ohio counties, accounting for more than 90% of major soybean-growing counties in ...

  20. Evaluation of disease and pest damage on soybean cultivars released from 1923 through 2008 under field conditions in Central Illinois

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Diseases and pests of soybean often reduce soybean yields. Targeted breeding that incorporates known genes for resistance and non-targeted breeding that eliminates susceptible plants in breeding populations reduces the impact of soybean pathogens and pests. Maturity group III soybean cultivars relea...

  1. 7 CFR 1220.312 - Remittance of assessments and submission of reports to United Soybean Board or Qualified State...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND... Louisiana Mississippi Maryland North Carolina North Dakota Tennessee Nebraska Wisconsin New JerseyOhio... month or quarter in which the soybeans, processed soybeans, or soybean products were marketed and shall...

  2. Proteases of Stored Product Insects and Their Inhibition by Specific Protease Inhibitors from Soybeans and Wheat Grain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-16

    Tenebria molitor MIDGUT PROTEASES; LOCUST CAECAL PROTEASES; BOWMAN-BIRK TRYPSIN-CHMOTRYPSIN INHIBITOR (SOYBEANS) CHICKPEAS TRYPSIN-CHYMOTRYPSIN...and Kunitz (STI) from soybeans, CI from chickpeas , chicken ovomucoid and turkey ovomucoid. It was Jnactivated by phenylemthvsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF...soybeans and Cl from chickpeas , by chicken ovomucoid and turkey overmucoid, as well as by the Kunitz (STI) soybean trypsin inhibitor that hardly

  3. Genetic mapping and confirmation of quantitative trait loci for seed protein and oil contents and seed weight in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Demand for soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] meal has increased worldwide and soybean importers often offer premiums for soybean containing higher contents of protein and oil. Objectives were to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with soybean seed protein, oil, and seed weight in a soyb...

  4. Cultural strategies for managing weeds and soil moisture in cover crop based no-till soybean production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A four site-year study was conducted in North Carolina to evaluate the effects of soybean planting timing and row spacing on soil moisture, weed density, soybean lodging, and yield in a cover crop-based no-till organic soybean production system. Soybean planting timing included roll-kill/planting a...

  5. Two new 'legumoviruses' (genus Begomovirus) naturally infecting soybean in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Alabi, Olufemi J; Kumar, P Lava; Mgbechi-Ezeri, J U; Naidu, Rayapati A

    2010-05-01

    Two new 'legumoviruses' (genus Begomovirus; family Geminiviridae) naturally infecting soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) in Nigeria were molecularly characterized. Based on characteristic symptoms in soybean, the two viruses are provisionally designated as Soybean mild mottle virus (SbMMV) and Soybean chlorotic blotch virus (SbCBV). SbCBV has a bipartite genome, whereas SbMMV has only a DNA A component. The DNA A component of SbMMV is 2,768 nucleotides (nt) long and the DNA A and DNA B components of SbCBV are 2,708 and 2,647 nt long, respectively. In pairwise comparisons, the DNA A component of SbMMV and SbCBV showed 62% nt sequence identity, indicating that these two viruses are distinct. Whereas the DNA A of SbMMV contains two virion- and four complementary-sense open reading frames, that of SbCBV lacks the virus-sense AV2, a signature gene present in 'Old World' begomoviruses. A pairwise comparison with the corresponding nucleotide sequence of other begomoviruses in the databases indicated that SbCBV had a maximum of 74% identity with cowpea golden mosaic virus and SbMMV had a maximum of 65% identity with mungbean yellow mosaic India virus and kudzu mosaic virus. Phylogenetic analysis of the DNA A component of SbCBV and SbMMV together with those of other begomoviruses available in the databases showed clustering of the two viruses within the 'legumovirus' clade of the begomovirus phylogenetic tree. In addition, the DNA A and B components of SbCBV from Centrosema pubescens Benth were found to be identical to those from soybean, indicating that leguminous wild species are a potential alternative host for the virus. Since soybean is an introduced crop, the identification of two distinct begomoviruses naturally infecting soybean in Nigeria suggests the occurrence of 'legumoviruses' in plant species indigenous to Africa and underscores their potential threat to sustainable cultivation of soybean on the African continent.

  6. Starch Metabolism in Space-Grown Soybean Seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guikema, James A.; Leach, Jan E.; Brown, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    The focus of this research was the study of sugar metabolism in soybean plants that had been in a clinorotation condition. The scope of activities was broadened greatly after the onset of the award. This broadening added two major research foci: 1) B-PAC: Photosynthetic activity of Brassica rapa; and 2) SOYPAT: The effects of microgravity on the interaction of a fungal root pathogen with soybean. Substantial investment and activity was also focused on the training of the astronaut team to conduct these experiments during orbital spaceflight.

  7. Soybean hulls as an alternative feed for horses.

    PubMed

    Coverdale, J A; Moore, J A; Tyler, H D; Miller-Auwerda, P A

    2004-06-01

    Soybean hulls have been successfully fed to ruminant animals as an economical substitute for hay. This feedstuff is a source of highly digestible fiber that does not contain starch. The purpose of this trial was to evaluate soybean hulls as a replacement fiber in horse diets. Four cecally cannulated Quarter Horse geldings, aged 6 to 10 yr and averaging 502 kg, were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design with 21-d periods. Diets consisted of alfalfa/bromegrass hay (14.4% CP, 58.1% NDF, 39.1% ADF; DM basis) with the replacement of either 0, 25, 50, or 75% (as-fed basis) unpelleted soybean hulls (13.1% CP, 60.6% NDF, 43.7% ADF; DM basis). Diets were offered at 1.8% of BW (DM) daily and body weights were measured weekly. Cecal samples (90 min after feeding) and total fecal collections (3 d) were taken at the end of each treatment period. Fecal collection bags were emptied every 6 h and 10% of the total amount was frozen for later analysis. Total cecal VFA production increased linearly (P = 0.02) from 70 mM to 109 mM as proportions of soybean hulls in diets increased. Proportions of propionate increased linearly (P < 0.01) with means of 15.7, 18.0, 16.6, and 21.9 mol/100 mol total VFA for the 0, 25, 50, and 75% soybean hulls diets respectively. Proportions of butyrate decreased linearly (P < 0.01) from 5.3 to 3.9 mol/100 mol total VFA. The acetate:propionate ratio decreased linearly (P = 0.02) and cubically (P = 0.03) with means of 4.9, 4.2, 4.9, and 3.3. Apparent digestibility of DM (P = 0.95), OM (P = 0.70), NDF (P = 0.34), ADF (P = 0.31), cellulose (P = 0.93), and hemicellulose (P = 0.25) did not differ among treatments. Apparent digestibility of N decreased linearly (P < 0.01) as concentrations of soybean hulls increased in the diet, and this response was associated with increased cecal fermentation and microbial biomass production. Cecal pH decreased linearly (P = 0.01) from 7.00 to 6.45 as the level of soybean hulls increased, but there was no change (P = 0.68 for

  8. Assessing the greenhouse gas emissions of Brazilian soybean biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Cerri, Carlos Eduardo Pellegrino; You, Xin; Cherubin, Maurício Roberto; Moreira, Cindy Silva; Raucci, Guilherme Silva; Castigioni, Bruno de Almeida; Alves, Priscila Aparecida; Cerri, Domingos Guilherme Pellegrino; Mello, Francisco Fujita de Castro; Cerri, Carlos Clemente

    2017-01-01

    Soybean biodiesel (B100) has been playing an important role in Brazilian energy matrix towards the national bio-based economy. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is the most widely used indicator for assessing the environmental sustainability of biodiesels and received particular attention among decision makers in business and politics, as well as consumers. Former studies have been mainly focused on the GHG emissions from the soybean cultivation, excluding other stages of the biodiesel production. Here, we present a holistic view of the total GHG emissions in four life cycle stages for soybean biodiesel. The aim of this study was to assess the GHG emissions of Brazilian soybean biodiesel production system with an integrated life cycle approach of four stages: agriculture, extraction, production and distribution. Allocation of mass and energy was applied and special attention was paid to the integrated and non-integrated industrial production chain. The results indicated that the largest source of GHG emissions, among four life cycle stages, is the agricultural stage (42-51%) for B100 produced in integrated systems and the production stage (46-52%) for B100 produced in non-integrated systems. Integration of industrial units resulted in significant reduction in life cycle GHG emissions. Without the consideration of LUC and assuming biogenic CO2 emissions is carbon neutral in our study, the calculated life cycle GHG emissions for domestic soybean biodiesel varied from 23.1 to 25.8 gCO2eq. MJ-1 B100 and those for soybean biodiesel exported to EU ranged from 26.5 to 29.2 gCO2eq. MJ-1 B100, which represent reductions by 65% up to 72% (depending on the delivery route) of GHG emissions compared with the EU benchmark for diesel fuel. Our findings from a life cycle perspective contributed to identify the major GHG sources in Brazilian soybean biodiesel production system and they can be used to guide mitigation priority for policy and decision-making. Projected scenarios in this

  9. Soybeans Growing inside the Advanced Astroculture Plant Growth Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This composite image shows soybean plants growing in the Advanced Astroculture experiment aboard the International Space Station during June 11-July 2, 2002. DuPont is partnering with NASA and the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to grow soybeans aboard the Space Station to find out if they have improved oil, protein, carbohydrates or secondary metabolites that could benefit farmers and consumers. Principal Investigators: Dr. Tom Corbin, Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc., a Dupont Company, with headquarters in Des Moines, Iowa, and Dr. Weijia Zhou, Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR), University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  10. Soybeans Growing inside the Advanced Astroculture Plant Growth Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This composite image shows soybean plants growing in the Advanced Astroculture experiment aboard the International Space Station during June 11-July 2, 2002. DuPont is partnering with NASA and the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to grow soybeans aboard the Space Station to find out if they have improved oil, protein, carbohydrates or secondary metabolites that could benefit farmers and consumers. Principal Investigators: Dr. Tom Corbin, Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc., a Dupont Company, with headquarters in Des Moines, Iowa, and Dr. Weijia Zhou, Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR), University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  11. Assessing the greenhouse gas emissions of Brazilian soybean biodiesel production

    PubMed Central

    You, Xin; Cherubin, Maurício Roberto; Moreira, Cindy Silva; Raucci, Guilherme Silva; Castigioni, Bruno de Almeida; Alves, Priscila Aparecida; Cerri, Domingos Guilherme Pellegrino; Mello, Francisco Fujita de Castro; Cerri, Carlos Clemente

    2017-01-01

    Soybean biodiesel (B100) has been playing an important role in Brazilian energy matrix towards the national bio-based economy. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is the most widely used indicator for assessing the environmental sustainability of biodiesels and received particular attention among decision makers in business and politics, as well as consumers. Former studies have been mainly focused on the GHG emissions from the soybean cultivation, excluding other stages of the biodiesel production. Here, we present a holistic view of the total GHG emissions in four life cycle stages for soybean biodiesel. The aim of this study was to assess the GHG emissions of Brazilian soybean biodiesel production system with an integrated life cycle approach of four stages: agriculture, extraction, production and distribution. Allocation of mass and energy was applied and special attention was paid to the integrated and non-integrated industrial production chain. The results indicated that the largest source of GHG emissions, among four life cycle stages, is the agricultural stage (42–51%) for B100 produced in integrated systems and the production stage (46–52%) for B100 produced in non-integrated systems. Integration of industrial units resulted in significant reduction in life cycle GHG emissions. Without the consideration of LUC and assuming biogenic CO2 emissions is carbon neutral in our study, the calculated life cycle GHG emissions for domestic soybean biodiesel varied from 23.1 to 25.8 gCO2eq. MJ-1 B100 and those for soybean biodiesel exported to EU ranged from 26.5 to 29.2 gCO2eq. MJ-1 B100, which represent reductions by 65% up to 72% (depending on the delivery route) of GHG emissions compared with the EU benchmark for diesel fuel. Our findings from a life cycle perspective contributed to identify the major GHG sources in Brazilian soybean biodiesel production system and they can be used to guide mitigation priority for policy and decision-making. Projected scenarios in

  12. Arginine metabolism in developing soybean cotyledons

    SciTech Connect

    Micallef, B.J.; Shelp, B.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Tracerkinetic experiments were performed using L-(guanidino-{sup 14}C)arginine, L-(U-{sup 14}C)arginine, L-(ureido-{sup 14}C)citrulline, and L-(1-{sup 14}C)ornithine to investigate arginine utilization in developing cotyledons of Gycine max (L.) Merrill. Excised cotyledons were injected with carrier-free {sup 14}C compounds and incubated in sealed vials containing a CO{sub 2} trap. The free and protein amino acids were analyzed using higher performance liquid chromatography and arginine-specific enzyme-linked assays. After 4 hours, 75% and 90% of the {sup 14}C metabolized from (guanidino-{sup 14}C)arginine and (U-{sup 14}C)arginine, respectively, was in protein arginine. The net protein arginine accumulation rate, calculated from the depletion of nitrogenous solutes in the cotyledon during incubation, was 17 nanomoles per cotyledon per hour. The data indicated that arginine was also catabolized by the arginase-urease reactions at a rate of 5.5 nanomoles per cotyledon per hour. Between 2 and 4 hours {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was also evolved from carbons other than C-6 of arginine at a rate of 11.0 nanomoles per cotyledon per hour. It is suggested that this extra {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was evolved during the catabolism of ornithine-derived glutamate; {sup 14}C-ornithine was a product of the arginase reaction. A model for the estimated fluxes associated with arginine utilization in developing soybean cotyledons is presented.

  13. Identification of a new soybean kunitz trypsin inhibitor mutation and its effect on bowman-birk protease inhibitor content in soybean seed.

    PubMed

    Gillman, Jason D; Kim, Won-Seok; Krishnan, Hari B

    2015-02-11

    Soybean seed contains antinutritional compounds that inactivate digestive proteases, principally corresponding to two families: Kunitz trypsin inhibitors (KTi) and Bowman-Birk inhibitors (BBI). High levels of raw soybean/soybean meal in feed mixtures can cause poor weight gain and pancreatic abnormalities via inactivation of trypsin/chymotrypsin enzymes. Soybean protein meal is routinely heat-treated to inactivate inhibitors, a practice that is energy-intensive and costly and can degrade certain essential amino acids. In this work, we screened seed from 520 soybean accessions, using a combination of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblots with anti-Kunitz trypsin inhibitor antibodies. A soybean germplasm accession was identified with a mutation affecting an isoform annotated as nonfunctional (KTi1), which was determined to be synergistic with a previously identified mutation (KTi3-). We observed significant proteome rebalancing in all KTi mutant lines, resulting in dramatically increased BBI protein levels.

  14. Water Stress Modulates Soybean Aphid Performance, Feeding Behavior, and Virus Transmission in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Nachappa, Punya; Culkin, Christopher T.; Saya, Peter M.; Han, Jinlong; Nalam, Vamsi J.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how water stress including drought and flooding modifies the ability of plants to resist simultaneous attack by insect feeding and transmission of insect-vectored pathogen. We analyzed insect population growth, feeding behaviors, virus transmission, and plant amino acid profiles and defense gene expression to characterize mechanisms underlying the interaction between water stress, soybean aphid and aphid-transmitted, Soybean mosaic virus, on soybean plants. Population growth of non-viruliferous aphids was reduced under drought stress and saturation, likely because the aphids spent less time feeding from the sieve element on these plants compared to well-watered plants. Water stress did not impact population growth of viruliferous aphids. However, virus incidence and transmission rate was lowest under drought stress and highest under saturated conditions since viruliferous aphids took the greatest amount time to puncture cells and transmit the virus under saturated conditions and lowest time under drought stress. Petiole exudates from drought-stressed plants had the highest level of total free amino acids including asparagine and valine that are critical for aphid performance. Aphids did not benefit from improved phloem sap quality as indicated by their lower densities on drought-stressed plants. Saturation, on the other hand, resulted in low amino acid content compared to all of the other treatments. Drought and saturation had significant and opposing effects on expression of marker genes involved in abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. Drought alone significantly increased expression of ABA marker genes, which likely led to suppression of salicylic acid (SA)- and jasmonic acid (JA)-related genes. In contrast, ABA marker genes were down-regulated under saturation, while expression of SA- and JA-related genes was up-regulated. We propose that the apparent antagonism between ABA and SA/JA signaling pathways contributed to an increase in aphid

  15. Effect of substitution of low linolenic acid soybean oil for hydrogenated soybean oil on fatty acid intake.

    PubMed

    DiRienzo, Maureen A; Astwood, James D; Petersen, Barbara J; Smith, Kim M

    2006-02-01

    Low linolenic acid soybean oil (LLSO) has been developed as a substitute for hydrogenated soybean oil to reduce intake of trans FA while improving stability and functionality in processed foods. We assessed the dietary impact of substitution of LLSO for hydrogenated soybean oil (HSBO) used in several food categories. All substitutions were done using an assumption of 100% market penetration. The impact of this substitution on the intake of five FA and trans FA was assessed. Substitution of LLSO for current versions of HSBO resulted in a 45% decrease in intake of trans FA. Impacts on other FA intakes were within the realm of typical dietary intakes. No decrease in intake of alpha-linolenic acid was associated with the use of LLSO in place of HSBO because LLSO substitutes for HSBO that are already low in alpha-linolenic acid.

  16. Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression in Soybean Roots Susceptible to the Soybean Cyst Nematode Two Days Post Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Khan, R.; Alkharouf, N.; Beard, H.; MacDonald, M.; Chouikha, I.; Meyer, S.; Grefenstette, J.; Knap, H.; Matthews, B.

    2004-01-01

    Soybean root cells undergo dramatic morphological and biochemical changes during the establishment of a feeding site in a compatible interaction with the soybean cyst nematode (SCN). We constructed a cDNA microarray with approximately 1,300 cDNA inserts targeted to identify differentially expressed genes during the compatible interaction of SCN with soybean roots 2 days after infection. Three independent biological replicates were grown and inoculated with SCN, and 2 days later RNA was extracted for hybridization to microarrays and compared to noninoculated controls. Statistical analysis indicated that approximately 8% of the genes monitored were induced and more than 50% of these were genes of unknown function. Notable genes that were more highly expressed 2 days after inoculation with SCN as compared to noninoculated roots included the repetitive proline-rich glycoprotein, the stress-induced gene SAM22, ß-1,3-endoglucanase, peroxidase, and those involved in carbohydrate metabolism, plant defense, and signaling. PMID:19262812

  17. Response of soybean to seed inoculation with Bradyrhizobium japonicum and with mixed inoculants of B. japonicum and Azotobacter chroococcum.

    PubMed

    Kozieł, Monika; Gebala, Barbara; Martyniuk, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Effects of pre-sowing soybean seed inoculation with Bradyrhizobium japonicum alone or with mixed inoculants containing soybean rhizobia and Azotobacter chroococcum were compared. In the pot experiment all the tested strains of soybean rhizobia in pure cultures or in mixtures with A. chroococcum significantly improved nodulation of soybean plants and seed yields of this crop. In micro-plot experiments pre-sowing soybean seeds treatment with the inoculant containing the most effective strain 94P of B. japonicum alone or with the mixed inoculant of strain 94P and A. chroococcum were equally effective in improving nodulation intensity and seed yields of soybean in comparison to the uninoculated soybean.

  18. Characterization of Natural and Simulated Herbivory on Wild Soybean (Glycine soja Seib. et Zucc.) for Use in Ecological Risk Assessment of Insect Protected Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Hidetoshi; Shimada, Hiroshi; Horak, Michael J.; Ahmad, Aqeel; Baltazar, Baltazar M.; Perez, Tim; McPherson, Marc A.; Stojšin, Duška; Shimono, Ayako; Ohsawa, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Insect-protected soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) was developed to protect against foliage feeding by certain Lepidopteran insects. The assessment of potential consequences of transgene introgression from soybean to wild soybean (Glycine soja Seib. et Zucc.) is required as one aspect of the environmental risk assessment (ERA) in Japan. A potential hazard of insect-protected soybean may be hypothesized as transfer of a trait by gene flow to wild soybean and subsequent reduction in foliage feeding by Lepidopteran insects that result in increased weediness of wild soybean in Japan. To assess this potential hazard two studies were conducted. A three-year survey of wild soybean populations in Japan was conducted to establish basic information on foliage damage caused by different herbivores. When assessed across all populations and years within each prefecture, the total foliage from different herbivores was ≤ 30%, with the lowest levels of defoliation (< 2%) caused by Lepidopteran insects. A separate experiment using five levels of simulated defoliation (0%, 10%, 25%, 50% and 100%) was conducted to assess the impact on pod and seed production and time to maturity of wild soybean. The results indicated that there was no decrease in wild soybean plants pod or seed number or time to maturity at defoliation rates up to 50%. The results from these experiments indicate that wild soybean is not limited by lepidopteran feeding and has an ability to compensate for defoliation levels observed in nature. Therefore, the potential hazard to wild soybean from the importation of insect-protected soybean for food and feed into Japan is negligible. PMID:26963815

  19. Characterization of Natural and Simulated Herbivory on Wild Soybean (Glycine soja Seib. et Zucc.) for Use in Ecological Risk Assessment of Insect Protected Soybean.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hidetoshi; Shimada, Hiroshi; Horak, Michael J; Ahmad, Aqeel; Baltazar, Baltazar M; Perez, Tim; McPherson, Marc A; Stojšin, Duška; Shimono, Ayako; Ohsawa, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Insect-protected soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) was developed to protect against foliage feeding by certain Lepidopteran insects. The assessment of potential consequences of transgene introgression from soybean to wild soybean (Glycine soja Seib. et Zucc.) is required as one aspect of the environmental risk assessment (ERA) in Japan. A potential hazard of insect-protected soybean may be hypothesized as transfer of a trait by gene flow to wild soybean and subsequent reduction in foliage feeding by Lepidopteran insects that result in increased weediness of wild soybean in Japan. To assess this potential hazard two studies were conducted. A three-year survey of wild soybean populations in Japan was conducted to establish basic information on foliage damage caused by different herbivores. When assessed across all populations and years within each prefecture, the total foliage from different herbivores was ≤ 30%, with the lowest levels of defoliation (< 2%) caused by Lepidopteran insects. A separate experiment using five levels of simulated defoliation (0%, 10%, 25%, 50% and 100%) was conducted to assess the impact on pod and seed production and time to maturity of wild soybean. The results indicated that there was no decrease in wild soybean plants pod or seed number or time to maturity at defoliation rates up to 50%. The results from these experiments indicate that wild soybean is not limited by lepidopteran feeding and has an ability to compensate for defoliation levels observed in nature. Therefore, the potential hazard to wild soybean from the importation of insect-protected soybean for food and feed into Japan is negligible.

  20. Comparison of broiler performance and carcass parameters when fed diets containing soybean meal produced from glyphosate-tolerant (MON 89788), control, or conventional reference soybeans.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M; Hartnell, G; Lucas, D; Davis, S; Nemeth, M

    2007-12-01

    A 42-d floor pen study was conducted to compare broiler (Ross x Ross 308) performance and carcass measurements when fed diets containing meal produced from glyphosate-tolerant soybeans (MON 89788) with those of broilers fed diets containing meal produced from control soybean (A3244) that has similar genetic background to MON 89788. Soybean meal produced from 6 conventional soybean varieties was included in the study to provide comparison measurements for broilers fed meal derived from conventional soybeans. It has been found that MON 89788 produces the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase protein from Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4 (cp4 epsps), which confers tolerance to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup agricultural herbicides. Broilers were fed starter diets (approximately 33% wt/wt dehulled soybean meal) from d 0 to 21 and grower-finisher diets (approximately 30% wt/wt dehulled soybean meal) from d 21 to 42. The study utilized a randomized complete block design with 8 dietary treatments assigned randomly within 5 blocks of 16 pens each (8 male and 8 female) with 10 birds per pen. There were 10 pens per treatment group (5 male and 5 female). No treatment differences (P > 0.05) were detected among dietary treatments for feed intake, weight gain, adjusted feed conversion, or any measured carcass and meat quality parameters. Comparison of all performance, carcass, and meat quality parameters measured showed no differences (P > 0.05) between birds fed the MON 89788 soybean meal diet and the population of birds fed the control and 6 conventional reference soybean meal diets. It is concluded that the diets containing soybean meal produced from MON 89788 were nutritionally equivalent to diets containing soybean meal produced from the control and conventional reference soybean varieties when fed to broilers.