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Sample records for gammarus tigrinus sexton

  1. The Influence of the Disturbed Continuity of the River and the Invasive Species— Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843), Gammarus tigrinus (Sexton, 1939) on Benthos Fauna: A Case Study on Urban Area in the River Ruda (Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyra, Aneta; Kubicka, Justyna; Strzelec, Małgorzata

    2015-07-01

    The progressive degradation of aquatic ecosystems and ecohydrological role of rivers is one of the most important global environmental issues. The loss of the ability of rivers to self-purify waters due to the disturbances of river continuity cause a lack of biological life in parts of rivers or even in an entire river. The appearance of alien species in degraded aquatic environments is an increasingly common phenomenon and constitutes one of the threats to biodiversity. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possible impact of alien species Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843) and Gammarus tigrinus (Sexton, 1939) on native invertebrates as well as the influence of environmental factors on the occurrence benthos fauna including also alien species. The study conducted in industrial area, in the River Ruda (Poland), showed that at the sites at which the occurrence of the two alien species was observed, the density of native benthos and diversity decreased significantly. CCA analysis showed that non-native species occurred in fast water velocity and that their presence was associated with high values of conductivity, hardness, and a high chloride content. The arrival of new species from other geographical areas is one of the factors that influences the species balance in native aquatic fauna. The number of alien species in freshwater ecosystems probably will increase in the future as new aliens are moved outside of their native ranges.

  2. The Influence of the Disturbed Continuity of the River and the Invasive Species--Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843), Gammarus tigrinus (Sexton, 1939) on Benthos Fauna: A Case Study on Urban Area in the River Ruda (Poland).

    PubMed

    Spyra, Aneta; Kubicka, Justyna; Strzelec, Małgorzata

    2015-07-01

    The progressive degradation of aquatic ecosystems and ecohydrological role of rivers is one of the most important global environmental issues. The loss of the ability of rivers to self-purify waters due to the disturbances of river continuity cause a lack of biological life in parts of rivers or even in an entire river. The appearance of alien species in degraded aquatic environments is an increasingly common phenomenon and constitutes one of the threats to biodiversity. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possible impact of alien species Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843) and Gammarus tigrinus (Sexton, 1939) on native invertebrates as well as the influence of environmental factors on the occurrence benthos fauna including also alien species. The study conducted in industrial area, in the River Ruda (Poland), showed that at the sites at which the occurrence of the two alien species was observed, the density of native benthos and diversity decreased significantly. CCA analysis showed that non-native species occurred in fast water velocity and that their presence was associated with high values of conductivity, hardness, and a high chloride content. The arrival of new species from other geographical areas is one of the factors that influences the species balance in native aquatic fauna. The number of alien species in freshwater ecosystems probably will increase in the future as new aliens are moved outside of their native ranges.

  3. High fecundity and predation pressure of the invasive Gammarus tigrinus cause decline of indigenous gammarids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jänes, Holger; Kotta, Jonne; Herkül, Kristjan

    2015-11-01

    The North American amphipod Gammarus tigrinus is one of the most aggressive invaders recently expanding its distribution in the European waters. The species was detected in the north-eastern Baltic Sea in 2003 and has rapidly expanded its distribution ever since. This invasive amphipod has been notably successful in shallow, soft and mixed bottom habitats becoming one of the most abundant gammarid colonizing such environments. This study carried out two experiments: (1) an outdoor aquarium experiment to assess interspecific competition among the invasive G. tigrinus and the native Gammarus duebeni and compare their reproductive potential, and (2) an in situ meshbag experiment to determine the effect of adult G. tigrinus and native gammarids on juvenile gammarid amphipods. These demonstrated that the adult G. tigrinus had no effects on the adult G. duebeni; however, the invasive amphipod had higher reproductive potential compared to the native species such as G. duebeni. Moreover, almost all adult gammarids exerted a significant predation pressure on juvenile amphipods. Thus, the combined effect of predation on juvenile amphipods and large brood production of G. tigrinus could be plausible explanations describing increased abundance of G. tigrinus and decrease of local gammarid populations in the north-eastern Baltic Sea but plausibly in similar shallow water habitats in other seas.

  4. SEXTON'S HOUSE. 200 NORTH N STREET (895 EAST), SALT LAKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SEXTON'S HOUSE. 200 NORTH N STREET (895 EAST), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW OF THE NORTHEAST. REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 18996, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  5. [Modification of wood lignin by the fungus Panus tigrinus].

    PubMed

    Revin, V V; Kadimaliev, D A; Shutova, V V; Samuilov, V D

    2002-01-01

    The treatment of sawdust with the fungus Panus tigrinus VKM F-3616 D changed the contents of functional groups in lignin from wood raw material. These changes are accompanied by the release of carboxyl and phenyl hydroxyl groups involved in chemical bond formation between wood particles in pressed materials manufactured from wood wastes.

  6. Ovarian response to repeated administration of alternating exogenous gonadotropin regimens in the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) and tigrinus (Leopardus tigrinus).

    PubMed

    da Paz, Regina Celia Rodrigues; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; Adania, Cristina Harumi; Barnabe, Valquíria Hippólito; Barnabe, Renato Campanarut

    2006-10-01

    Exogenous gonadotropins are used to stimulate ovarian follicular growth and ovulation in mammalian species, including wild cats. However, successes in application of assisted reproduction techniques in nondomestic felids have been sparse. Our objectives were to assess the effectiveness of alternating gonadotropin regimens on ovarian responses. Five adult female ocelots and four adult female tigrinus were treated four to six times, using alternating eCG/hCG and pFSH/pLH at 4-month intervals. Laparoscopies were done to assess follicular development and to collect oocytes from matures follicles. The average number of follicles and corpus luteum (CL) per stimulation was higher in ocelots (7.0 +/- 0.8; mean +/- S.E.M.) than in tigrinus (2.5 +/- 0.4; P < 0.05), but the percentage of mature oocytes did not differ between the two species (mean range, 54-55%). Within species, both gonadotropin regimens were equally effective in inducing follicular growth and oocyte maturation. The total number of ovarian structures and oocyte maturation percentages did not decrease in either species with sequential stimulations. In summary, female ocelots and tigrinus continued to respond to repeated alternating ovarian stimulation protocols. In conclusion, the use of alternating gonadotropin regimens may permit more intensive reproductive management in these endangered cats.

  7. Isolation and properties of peroxidase produced by the fungus Panus tigrinus.

    PubMed

    Revin, V V; Cadimaliev, D A; Atykyan, N A; Sitkin, B V; Samuilov, V D

    2000-11-01

    Synthesis of peroxidase and laccase by the fungus Panus tigrinus was significantly stimulated by addition of the lignocellulose substrate to the culture media. Peroxidase was isolated from the culture liquid and some properties of the enzyme were investigated. P. tigrinus peroxidase belongs to a group of extracellular peroxidases similar to the plant type peroxidases.

  8. Extracellular oxidases of the lignin-degrading fungus Panus tigrinus.

    PubMed

    Cadimaliev, D A; Revin, V V; Atykyan, N A; Samuilov, V D

    2005-06-01

    Two extracellular oxidases (laccases) were isolated from the extracellular fluid of the fungus Panus (Lentinus) tigrinus cultivated in low-nitrogen medium supplemented with birch sawdust. The enzymes were purified by successive chromatography on columns with TEAE-cellulose and DEAE-Toyopearl 650M. Both oxidases catalyze oxidation of pyrocatechol and ABTS. Moreover, oxidase 1 also catalyzes oxidation of guaiacol, o-phenylenediamine, and syringaldazine. The enzymes have identical pH (7.0) and temperature (60-65 degrees C) optimums. Absorption spectra of the oxidases differ from the spectra of typical "blue" laccases and are similar to the spectrum of yellow oxidase.

  9. Antioxidant and antibacterial activities of acetonitrile and hexane extracts of Lentinus tigrinus and Pleurotus djamour

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper highlighted the antioxidant and antibacterial activities of Lentinus tigrinus and Pleurotus djamour. Extracts of mushroom fruiting bodies were obtained using hexane and acetonitrile solvents. Acetonitrile extracts of both mushrooms exhibited higher biological activities than hexane extrac...

  10. Crystallization and preliminary structure analysis of the blue laccase from the ligninolytic fungus Panus tigrinus

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraroni, Marta; Duchi, Ilaria; Myasoedova, Nina M.; Leontievsky, Alexey A.; Golovleva, Ludmila A.; Scozzafava, Andrea; Briganti, Fabrizio

    2005-02-01

    Blue laccase from the white-rot basidiomycete P. tigrinus, an enzyme involved in lignin biodegradation, has been crystallized. The crystals obtained give diffraction data at 1.4 Å, the best resolution to date for this class of enzymes, which may assist in further elucidation of the catalytic mechanism of multicopper oxidases.

  11. Pathologies of Oligacanthorhynchus pardalis (Acanthocephala, Oligacanthorhynchidae) in Leopardus tigrinus (Carnivora, Felidae) in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gallas, Moisés; da Silveira, Eliane Fraga; da Silvera, Eliane Fraga

    2012-01-01

    In Brazil, Oligacanthorhynchus pardalis (Westrumb, 1821) Schmidt, 1972 has been observed in five species of wild felines. In the present study, five roadkilled oncillas (Leopardus tigrinus Schreber, 1775) were collected in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Chronic lesions caused by O. pardalis were observed in the small intestine of one of the specimens. Histological examination identified a well-defined leukocyte infiltration and an area of collagenous fibrosis. Only males parasites (n = 5) were found, with a prevalence of 20%. The life cycle of Oligacanthorhynchus species is poorly known, although arthropods may be their intermediate hosts. The low prevalence encountered may be related to the small number of hosts examined, and the reduced ingestion of arthropods infected by larvae of O. pardalis. This is the first report of O. pardalis parasitizing L. tigrinus in the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul.

  12. Panus tigrinus strains used in delignification of sugarcane bagasse prior to kraft pulping.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Adilson R; Costa, Sirlene M; Esposito, Elisa

    2002-01-01

    Three strains of the white-rot fungus Panus tigrinus (FTPT-4741, FTPT-4742, and FTPT-4745) were cultivated on sugarcane bagasse prior to kraft pulping. Pulp yields, kappa number, and viscosity of all pulps were determined and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra from the samples were recorded. The growth of P. tigrinus strains in plastic bags increased the manganese peroxide and xylanase activities. Lignin peroxidase was not detected in the three systems (shaken and nonshaken flasks and plastic bags). FTIR spectra were reduced to their principal components, and a clear separation between FTPT-4742 and the control was observed. Strain FTPT-4745 decayed lignin more selectively in the three systems utilized. Yields of kraft pulping were low, ranging from 20 to 45% for the plastic bag samples and from 12 to 38% for the flask samples. Kappa numbers were 1-18 and viscosity ranged from 2.3 to 6.8 cP.

  13. Redescription of Gammarus pseudosyriacus (Karaman & Pinkster, 1977) and description of a new subspecies from southern Iran (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Gammaridae).

    PubMed

    Semsar-Kazerooni, Maryam; Zamanpoore, Mehrdad; Sadeghi, Saber

    2016-01-01

    The present study focused on redescription of Gammarus pseudosyriacus (Karaman & Pinkster, 1977) based on new materials from Zagros Mountains and describes a new subspecies of freshwater amphipod, Gammarus pseudosyriacus issatisi subsp. n., from the southern Zagros Mountains. The work is based on morphological and morphometric comparisons. This new subspecies has features similar to Gammarus pseudosyriacus. The distinct features that distinguish Gammarus pseudosyriacus issatisi subsp. n. from Gammarus pseudosyriacus are the smaller eyes, shorter body length, and shorter flagellum of antenna 1 and 2.

  14. Studies on the life-cycle of Ganeo tigrinus Mehra & Negi, 1928 (Digenea).

    PubMed

    Brinesh, R; Janardanan, K P

    2012-05-01

    The life-history stages of Ganeo tigrinus Mehra & Negi, 1928 infecting the Indian bull frog Hoplobatrachus tigerinus (Daudin) are described, those from cercaria to egg-producing adult having been established in the laboratory. Non-virgulate xiphidiocercariae are released by the planorbid snail Indoplanorbis exustus (Deshayes). Metacercariae occur in the haemocoel of dragonfly nymphs and become infective to the frog H. tigerinus within 15 days. The pre-patent period is 45 days. Growth and development of both metacercariae and adults are described in detail. Comments on the systematic position of Ganeo Klein, 1905 are included.

  15. Time budget and activity patterns of oncilla cats (Leopardus tigrinus) in captivity.

    PubMed

    Resende, Letícia de Souza; Neto, Glauce Lima e; Carvalho, Patrícia Gonçalves Duarte; Landau-Remy, Gabriella; Ramos-Júnior, Valdir de Almeida; Andriolo, Artur; Genaro, Gelson

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have reported on the diet of Leopardus tigrinus and ecological aspects, but studies of behavior are scarce. The aims of this study were to describe the time budget and activity patterns of 10 captive Leopardus tigrinus individuals. The group had an activity budget of 66% resting, 20.66% moving, 6.08% vigilant, 3.12% feeding, and 4.14% other activities during 720 hr of observations. The activity budgets of the males and females did not differ significantly; however, males ate more than did females. The nonhuman animals spent more time resting during the day than during the night. Moving, socializing, maintenance, and vigilance showed statistically higher mean values at night. Group analysis of the temporal pattern of behavior showed bimodal peaks. Activity levels were high from 5 a.m. to 6 a.m. and decreased through the day only to peak again at 7 p.m. Stereotypic pacing peaked at dawn and at dusk. Patterns of vigilance, feeding, and maintenance were also determined for the group during a 24-hr period. These results may be useful for the development of management plans and effective conservation strategies for captive cats.

  16. [Use of Panus tigrinus fungi for production of pressed materials from cotton plant waste].

    PubMed

    Kadimaliev, D A; Revin, V V; Shutova, V V; Samuilov, V D

    2004-01-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of cotton plant stems used as a substrate for solid-phase cultivation of the fungus Panus tigrinus were studied as well as the effect of these changes on properties of the pressed materials made of these stems. During the first 3 days of growth, the fungus better consumed cellulose; then, the rate of cellulose consumption was comparable with that of lignin. Intensity and pattern of these changes depended on the age of inoculum. The rate of cotton plant waste biodegradation was higher when a 3-day-old incoculum was used. The pressed materials made of the raw stuff treated with a 3-day-old inoculum of P. tigrinus for 2-3 days displayed better characteristics. Annually, large amounts of lignocellulose stuff is lost while processing of agricultural waste: straw, awn, plant stems, etc. In the countries with developed cotton growing, the annual amount of only guza-paya (dry cotton plant stems) reaches several million tons. To solve this problem, bioconversion of these wastes is studied to manufacture useful products and materials.

  17. First report of Strongyloides sp. (Nematoda, Strongyloididae) in Leopardus tigrinus (Carnivora: Felidae) in the municipality of Botucatu, State of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Karina R; Faciulli, Paula; Paparotto, Telma; Takahira, Regina K; Lopes, Raimundo S; da Silva, Reinaldo J

    2009-12-01

    The present study reports the first case of infection by Strongyloides sp. in Leopardus tigrinus in the municipality of Botucatu, State of São Paulo, Brazil. Feces of the infected L. tigrinus specimen were cultivated in sterilized equine feces and a cat (Felis catus domesticus) was experimentally infected with three thousand infective L3 subcutaneous route, in order to identify the Strongyloides species involved in the parasitism. Parthenogenetic females recovered from the experimental animals were analyzed but comparison between the biometric data found and the data in the literature did not enable identification of the species. This is the first report on the occurrence of Strongyloides sp. in L. tigrinus.

  18. A Laccase with HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activity from the Broth of Mycelial Culture of the Mushroom Lentinus tigrinus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, LiJing; Wang, HeXiang; Ng, TziBun

    2012-01-01

    A 59 kDa laccase with inhibitory activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (IC50 = 2.4 μM) was isolated from the broth of mycelial culture of the mushroom Lentinus tigrinus. The isolation procedure involved ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and CM-cellulose, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The laccase was adsorbed on both types of ion exchangers. About 95-fold purification was achieved with a 25.9% yield of the enzyme. The procedure resulted in a specific enzyme activity of 76.6 U/mg. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was GIPDLHDLTV, which showed little similarity to other mushroom laccase and other Lentinus tigrinus strain laccase. Its characteristics were different from previously reported laccase of other Lentinus tigrinus strain. Maximal laccase activity was observed at a pH of 4 and at a temperature of 60°C, respectively. This study yielded the information about the potentially exploitable activities of Lentinus tigrinus laccase. PMID:22536022

  19. Influence of cinnamon and catnip on the stereotypical pacing of oncilla cats (Leopardus tigrinus) in captivity.

    PubMed

    Resende, Letícia de S; Pedretti Gomes, Karla C; Andriolo, Artur; Genaro, Gelson; Remy, Gabriella L; Almeida Ramos, Valdir de

    2011-01-01

    Nonhuman animals in captivity can experience environmental privation that results in their exhibiting abnormal behaviors. Environmental enrichment techniques can help improve their welfare. This study investigated the behavior of 8 zoo-housed oncilla cats (Leopardus tigrinus) in response to 2 odors (catnip and cinnamon) introduced individually into the animals' enclosures for 3 consecutive days. Proportion of scans spent engaging in stereotypical pacing were compared before, during, and after treatments. The addition of cinnamon reduced the proportion of pacing during and after enrichment (Wilcoxon: Z = 3.16, p < .001; Z = 3.16, p < .001, respectively), indicating a prolonged effect of the enrichment on the animals' behavior. Catnip appears to have elicited no significant difference in the stereotypic pacing before, during, or after the enrichment (Friedman: X(2) = 2.69; p = .260). The results highlight the potential use of cinnamon as a method of environmental enrichment for small captive-housed cats.

  20. Proximate composition and functionality of the culinary-medicinal tiger sawgill mushroom, Lentinus tigrinus (higher Basidiomycetes), from the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Dulay, Rich Milton R; Arenas, Minerva C; Kalaw, Sofronio P; Reyes, Renato G; Cabrera, Esperanza C

    2014-01-01

    The proximate composition and functionality of Lentinus tigrinus were evaluated to establish and popularize this mushroom as functional food source. The evaluation of functionality focused on the antibacterial and hypoglycemic activities of the mushroom extracts. An acute single oral dose toxicity test in mice was used for its biosafety analysis. The pileus contained higher amounts of protein (25.9%), fat (2.1%), and ash (7.4%) and a higher energetic value (142.1 kcal/100 g) than the corresponding stipe, whereas the stipe contained higher amounts of total carbohydrates (67.7%), which consist of dietary fiber (63.0%) and reducing sugar (4.7%), than the pileus. Biosafety analysis confirmed that L. tigrinus is an edible mushroom species; it was found to be toxicologically safe in imprinting control region mice. The administration of lyophilized hot water extract of the fruiting body (both 100 and 250 mg/ kg doses) to diabetic mice significantly lowered the glucose level by 26.9% in the third week, which was significantly comparable to the results of the antidiabetic agent glibenclamide, which was used as a positive control. In vitro antibacterial assay showed that the ethanolic extract of the fruiting body and the immobilized secondary mycelia had high antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus but not on Escherichia coli. Combining its useful nutrients and significant biological properties, L. tigrinus can be considered a natural source of safe nutraceuticals.

  1. Redescription of Gammarus pseudosyriacus (Karaman & Pinkster, 1977) and description of a new subspecies from southern Iran (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Gammaridae)

    PubMed Central

    Semsar-Kazerooni, Maryam; Zamanpoore, Mehrdad; Sadeghi, Saber

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The present study focused on redescription of Gammarus pseudosyriacus (Karaman & Pinkster, 1977) based on new materials from Zagros Mountains and describes a new subspecies of freshwater amphipod, Gammarus pseudosyriacus issatisi subsp. n., from the southern Zagros Mountains. The work is based on morphological and morphometric comparisons. This new subspecies has features similar to Gammarus pseudosyriacus. The distinct features that distinguish Gammarus pseudosyriacus issatisi subsp. n. from Gammarus pseudosyriacus are the smaller eyes, shorter body length, and shorter flagellum of antenna 1 and 2. PMID:27408590

  2. Bioaugmentation of a historically contaminated soil by polychlorinated biphenyls with Lentinus tigrinus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Several species belonging to the ecological group of white-rot basidiomycetes are able to bring about the remediation of matrices contaminated by a large variety of anthropic organic pollutants. Among them, polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) are characterized by a high recalcitrance due to both their low bioavailability and the inability of natural microbial communities to degrade them at significant rates and extents. Objective of this study was to assess the impact of a maize stalk-immobilized Lentinus tigrinus CBS 577.79 inoculant combined with soybean oil (SO), as a possible PCB-mobilizing agent, on the bioremediation and resident microbiota of an actual Aroclor 1260 historically contaminated soil under unsaturated solid-phase conditions. Results Best overall PCB depletions (33.6 ± 0.3%) and dechlorination (23.2 ± 1.3%) were found after 60 d incubation in the absence of SO where, however, the fungus appeared to exert adverse effects on both the growth of biphenyl- and chlorobenzoate-degrading bacteria and the abundance of genes coding for both biphenyl dioxygenase (bph) and catechol-2,3-dioxygenase. A significant (P < 0.001) linear inverse relationship between depletion yields and degree of chlorination was observed in both augmented and control microcosms in the absence of SO; conversely, this negative correlation was not evident in SO-amended microcosms where the additive inhibited the biodegradation of low chlorinated congeners. The presence of SO, in fact, resulted in lower abundances of both biphenyl-degrading bacteria and bph. Conclusions The PCB depletion extents obtained in the presence of L. tigrinus are by far higher than those reported in other remediation studies conducted under unsaturated solid phase conditions on actual site soils historically contaminated by Aroclor 1260. These results suggest that the bioaugmentation strategy with the maize stalk-immobilized mycelium of this species might be promising in the reclamation of PCB

  3. Stages and duration of the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium in oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus, Schreber, 1775).

    PubMed

    Balarini, Maytê Koch; de Paula, Tarcízio Antônio Rego; da Matta, S L Pinto; Peixoto, J Vogas; Guião-Leite, F Lima; Rossi Júnior, J L; Czermak Junior, A C; Walker, N J

    2012-03-15

    Six adult Leopardus tigrinus (oncilla) were studied to characterize stages of the seminiferous epithelium cycle and its relative frequency and duration, as well as morphometric parameters of the testes. Testicular fragments were obtained (incisional biopsy), embedded (glycol methacrylate), and histologic sections examined with light microscopy. The cycle of the seminiferous epithelium was categorized into eight stages (based on the tubular morphology method). The duration of one seminiferous epithelium cycle was 9.19 d, and approximately 41.37 d were required for development of sperm from spermatogonia. On average, diameter of the seminiferous tubules was 228.29 μm, epithelium height was 78.86 μm, and there were 16.99 m of testicular tubules per gram of testis. Body weight averaged 2.589 kg, of which 0.06 and 0.04% were attributed to the testis and seminiferous tubules, respectively. In conclusion, there were eight distinct stages in the seminiferous epithelium, the length of the seminiferous epithelium cycle was close to that in domestic cats and cougars, and testicular and somatic indexes were similar to those of other carnivores of similar size.

  4. Genotype Reconstruction of Paternity in European Lobsters (Homarus gammarus)

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Charlie D.; Hodgson, David J.; André, Carl; Sørdalen, Tonje K.; Knutsen, Halvor; Griffiths, Amber G. F.

    2015-01-01

    Decapod crustaceans exhibit considerable variation in fertilisation strategies, ranging from pervasive single paternity to the near-ubiquitous presence of multiple paternity, and such knowledge of mating systems and behaviour are required for the informed management of commercially-exploited marine fisheries. We used genetic markers to assess the paternity of individual broods in the European lobster, Homarus gammarus, a species for which paternity structure is unknown. Using 13 multiplexed microsatellite loci, three of which are newly described in this study, we genotyped 10 eggs from each of 34 females collected from an Atlantic peninsula in the south-western United Kingdom. Single reconstructed paternal genotypes explained all observed progeny genotypes in each of the 34 egg clutches, and each clutch was fertilised by a different male. Simulations indicated that the probability of detecting multiple paternity was in excess of 95% if secondary sires account for at least a quarter of the brood, and in excess of 99% where additional sire success was approximately equal. Our results show that multiple paternal fertilisations are either absent, unusual, or highly skewed in favour of a single male among H. gammarus in this area. Potential mechanisms upholding single paternal fertilisation are discussed, along with the prospective utility of parentage assignments in evaluations of hatchery stocking and other fishery conservation approaches in light of this finding. PMID:26566271

  5. [Effect of wood modification on lignin consumption and synthesis of lignolytic enzymes by the fungus Panus (Lentinus) tigrinus].

    PubMed

    Kadimaliev, D A; Revin, V V; Atykian, N A; Samuilov, V D

    2003-01-01

    Lignin consumption and synthesis of lignolytic enzymes by the fungus Panus (Lentinus) tigrinus cultivated on solid phase (modified and unmodified birch and pine sawdusts) were studied. The fungus grew better and consumed more readily the birch lignin than the pine wood. Peroxidase activity was higher in the case of pine sawdust; laccase and lignolytic activities, in the case of birth sawdust. Treatment with ammonia or sulfuric acid decreased lignin consumption by the fungus cultivated on either medium. Modification of sawdust by ultrasound increased lignin consumption and may be recommended for accelerating biodegradation of lignocellulose substrates.

  6. Biobleaching of Acacia kraft pulp with extracellular enzymes secreted by Irpex lacteus KB-1.1 and Lentinus tigrinus LP-7 using low-cost media.

    PubMed

    Afrida, Sitompul; Tamai, Yutaka; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Osaki, Mitsuru

    2014-08-01

    The white-rot fungi Irpex lacteus KB-1.1 and Lentinus tigrinus LP-7 have been shown in previous studies to have high biobleaching activity in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate the activities and stabilities of extracellular enzymes, prepared from I. lacteus and L. tigrinus culture grown in three types of economical media of agricultural and forestry wastes, for biobleaching of Acacia oxygen-delignified kraft pulp using kappa number reduction as an indicator of delignification. After 3 days of incubation, the extracellular enzymes preparations from I. lacteus and L. tigrinus cultures in media of Acacia mangium wood powder supplemented with rice bran and addition 1 % glucose (WRBG), resulted in significant decrease of 4.4 and 6.7 %, respectively. A slightly higher kappa number reduction (7.4 %) was achieved with the combine extracellular enzymes from I. lacteus and L. tigrinus. One of the strategies for reducing the cost of enzyme production for treatment processes in the pulp and paper industry is the utilization of agricultural and forestry waste. Thus, WRBG has potential as a culture medium for producing stable lignolytic enzymes simply and economically.

  7. Amylase Variation in the Salt Marsh Amphipod, GAMMARUS PALUSTRIS

    PubMed Central

    Borowsky, Richard; Borowsky, Betty; Milani, Haleh; Greenberg, Pietra

    1985-01-01

    There are two common alleles at the Amylase-2 locus in populations of Gammarus palustris, the salt marsh amphipod. Intensive sampling of individuals from two localities at Jamaica Bay revealed a consistent pattern of heterozygote deficiency.—Five possible sources of heterozygote deficiency were examined in this study. Four of them—selection against heterozygotes, null alleles at the locus, assortative mating for amylase genotype and inbreeding—are inconsistent with the evidence and are rejected. The fifth possibility, Wahlund effects due to genetic differentiation of the population, is tentatively accepted. Although there is no direct evidence for differentiation within this population, separate populations along the Eastern seaboard are highly differentiated in a nonclinal pattern. Furthermore, the Wahlund hypothesis is consistent with observations on differences in degree of deficiency exhibited among collections at Jamaica Bay.—Animals from this population exhibit feeding preferences correlated with genotype. Given the choice of two green algae, Enteromorpha or Ulva, the frequency of the slow allele among individuals choosing Enteromorpha was higher than among those choosing Ulva. This suggests that the animals assort themselves in the field into subpopulations with different allelic frequencies. This assortment could contribute to the maintenance of the polymorphism and to the observed heterozygote deficiency. We hypothesize that genotype influences behavior in this system through the action of enzyme on substrate, which determines the nature of the oligosaccharide pool liberated early in amylolysis. PMID:17246300

  8. Ten new Gammarus species (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Gammaridae) from Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Hou, Zhonge; Li, Junbo; Li, Shuqiang

    2013-01-01

    Ten new species of the genus Gammarus are described from Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau, Southwest China, including Gammarus amabilis sp. nov., G. citatus sp. nov., G. echinatus sp. nov., G. egregius sp. nov., G. eliquatus sp. nov., G. hirtellussp. nov., G. margcomosus sp. nov., G. rivalis sp. nov., G. silendus sp. nov. and G. tranquillus sp. nov. Four of them are stygobite and with no eyes. Detailed illustrations and comparisons with related species are presented. A key to all species from Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau are given.

  9. Microplastics affect assimilation efficiency in the freshwater amphipod Gammarus fossarum.

    PubMed

    Blarer, Pascal; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    An important issue in assessing microplastics is whether this newly emerging type of pollution affects freshwater invertebrates. This study was designed to examine the interactions between the amphipod Gammarus fossarum and two types of microplastics. To determine the ingestion and egestion of polyamide (PA) fibres (500 × 20 μm), amphipods were exposed to four concentrations (100, 540, 2680, 13,380 PA fibres cm(-2) base area of glass beakers) and four exposure times (0.5, 2, 8, 32 h) as well as four post-exposure times (1, 2, 4, 16 h). We demonstrate a positive correlation between concentration and ingestion of PA fibres. Fibres were found in the gut after 0.5 h of exposure. Egestion was rapid and the digestive tract was empty 16 h after exposure ended. To investigate whether polystyrene (PS) beads (1.6 μm) can be taken up in the epithelial cells of the gut and the midgut glands, four concentrations (500, 2500, 12,500, 60,000 PS beads mL(-1)) were tested. Cryosections exhibited fluorescent PS beads only within the gut lumen. In a 28-day feeding experiment with both, fibres and beads, we studied the amphipod's feeding rate, assimilation efficiency and wet weight change. The exposure to PA fibres (2680 PA fibres cm(-2) base area of glass beakers) significantly reduced the assimilation efficiency of the animals. While both tested polymer types are ingested and egested, PA fibres can impair the health and ecological functions of freshwater amphipods under continuous exposure.

  10. Mechanisms of parasite-induced sex reversal in Gammarus duebeni.

    PubMed

    Rodgers-Gray, Trevor P; Smith, Judith E; Ashcroft, Alison E; Isaac, R Elwyn; Dunn, Alison M

    2004-05-01

    The amphipod Gammarus duebeni is host to the feminising microsporidian parasite Nosema granulosis that converts males into functional females. To test the hypothesis that the parasite acts through endocrine disruption we compared the morphology of the gonad and activity of the androgenic gland, which coordinates male sexual differentiation, in infected and uninfected animals. Male gonad consisted of testis, seminal vesicle and vas deferens that was anchored to the genital papilla on segment 7. The androgenic gland was associated with the distal end of the vas deferens. In female and intersex animals the bi-lobed ovary opened into the oviduct at segment 5, vestigial vas deferens and vestigial androgenic gland were retained. The majority of parasitised individuals (38/39) were either phenotypic females or intersexes with fully developed ovaries and an undifferentiated androgenic gland. Our data suggest that the parasite prevents differentiation of the androgenic gland. In further support of this hypothesis, mass spectrometry of a single androgenic gland from males revealed a dominant molecular ion with a mass/charge ratio of 4818.4+H, corresponding to a peptide of androgenic gland hormone from Armadillidium vulgare. In contrast the vestigial androgenic gland from parasitised and unparasitised females showed only low intensity peaks. Our observations demonstrate that the parasite manipulates host sex by preventing androgenic gland differentiation, androgenic gland hormone production and consequently male differentiation. This is in agreement with observations of A. vulgare with inherited Wolbachia infection, suggesting that phylogenetically distant feminisers manipulate hosts through a common mechanism. The high frequency of infection in intersexes (89.3%) suggests that this phenotype results from incomplete feminisation by the parasite.

  11. Gammarus spp. in aquatic ecotoxicology and water quality assessment: toward integrated multilevel tests.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Petra Y; Kienle, Cornelia; Gerhardt, Almut

    2010-01-01

    The amphipod genus Gammarus is widespread and is structurally and functionally important in epigean freshwaters of the Northern Hemisphere. Its presence is crucial, because macroinvertebrate feeding is a major rate-limiting step in the processing of stream detrius. In addition, Gammarus interacts with multiple trophic levels bu functioning as prey, predator, herbivore, detritivore, and shredder. Such a broad span of ecosystem participation underlines the importance of Gammarus to pollutants and other disturbances may render it a valuable indicator for ecosystem health. This review summarizes the vast number of studies conducted with Gammarus spp. for evaluating aquatic ecotoxicology endpoints and examines the suitability of this native invertabrate species for the assessment of stream ecosystem health in the Northern Hemisphere. Numerous papers have been published on how pollutants affect gammarind behavior (i.e., mating, predator avoidance), reproduction, development, feeding activity, population structure, as well as the consequences of pollution on host-parasite, predator-prey, or native-invasive species interactions. Some biochemical and molecular biomarkers have already been established, such as the measurement of vitellogenin-like proteins, metallothioneins, alkali-labile phosphates (in proteins), and lipogenic enzyme activities for assessing endocrine distribution and detoxification mechanisms.

  12. Biodegradation potential and ligninolytic enzyme activity of two locally isolated Panus tigrinus strains on selected agro-industrial wastes.

    PubMed

    Ruqayyah, Tijani I D; Jamal, Parveen; Alam, Md Zahangir; Mirghani, Md Elwathig S

    2013-03-30

    The degradation potential and ligninolytic enzyme production of two isolated Panus tigrinus strains (M609RQY and M109RQY) were evaluated in this study. These strains were grown on three selected abundant agro-industrial wastes (rice straw; rice husk and cassava peel) under solid-state fermentation conditions. Degradation potential was determined by analyzing the chemical composition of the selected substrates before and after fermentation along with ligninolytic enzyme production. The strain M609RQY led to the highest lignin degradation of 40.81% on cassava peel, 11.25% on rice husk and 67.96% on rice straw. Both strains significantly increased the protein content of cassava peel. Rice husk stimulated maximum laccase (2556 U/L) and lignin peroxidase (24 U/L) production by the strains M109RQY and M609RQY, respectively. Furthermore, cassava peel stimulated maximum manganese-dependent peroxidase (141 U/L) production by the strain M109RQY. The de-lignified rice straw and the nutritionally-improved cassava peel could serve as potential animal feed supplements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. COMPARISON BETWEEN DEXMEDETOMIDINE-S-KETAMINE AND MIDAZOLAM-S-KETAMINE IN IMMOBILIZATION OF ONCILLA (LEOPARDUS TIGRINUS).

    PubMed

    Lima, Caio Filipe da Motta; Cortopassi, Silvia Renata Gaido; de Moura, Claudio Alves; de Mattos, Ewaldo; das Candeias, Isis Zanini; Pedron, Bruno Gregnanin; Teixeira, Rodrigo Hidalgo Friciello; Dias Neto, Ramiro das Neves

    2016-03-01

    Established immobilization protocols are required for safe procedures on wildlife and zoo animals. This study evaluated the cardiovascular, respiratory, and anesthetic effects of dexmedetomidine (40 μg/kg) with S-ketamine (5 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) with S-ketamine (5 mg/kg) in 12 specimens of oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus) at Quinzinho de Barros Municipal Zoo Park in Sorocaba, São Paulo, Brazil, between January and March 2010. Each animal underwent both protocols, totaling 24 anesthetic procedures. The dexmedetomidine-S-ketamine group (DK) showed a decrease in heart rate compared to initial values and significantly lower heart rate and oxyhemoglobin saturation values compared to Midazolam-S-Ketamine Group (MK). Four animals in DK had episodes of sinus pauses. Systemic blood pressure, respiratory frequency, and rectal temperature showed no significant differences between groups. The dexmedetomidine-S-ketamine group showed a greater degree of muscle relaxation and allowed for more thorough and longer oral evaluations. The dexmedetomidine-S-ketamine group had a shorter period of recumbency, longer period to return of muscle tone, and shorter recovery time. Two animals in MK did not reach recumbency. The dexmedetomidine-S-ketamine group had better qualities of induction and recovery. It may be concluded that both protocols can be safely used in oncillas. Midazolam-S-ketamine promotes effective chemical restraint for quick and minimally invasive procedures and dexmedetomidine-S-ketamine promotes effective chemical restraint for prolonged and more invasive procedures.

  14. Effect of Tween 80 and Acetone on the Secretion, 
Structure and Antioxidant Activities of Exopolysaccharides from Lentinus tigrinus.

    PubMed

    He, Peixin; Wu, Shuangshuang; Pan, Lige; Sun, Siwen; Mao, Duobin; Xu, Chunping

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the effects of the addition of Tween 80 and acetone on secretion, structure and antioxidant activities of Lentinus tigrinus exopolysaccharides (EPS) were investigated. It was found that Tween 80 and acetone displayed a stimulatory effect on EPS secretion. The EPS obtained by the addition of Tween 80 (EPS-T), acetone (EPS-A) and control (EPS--C) were purified by Sepharose CL-6B gel filtration chromatography and molecular mass of purified fractions was estimated to be 22.1, 137 and 12 kDa, respectively. Monosaccharide composition analysis indicated that EPS-T, EPS-A and EPS-C were mainly composed of glucose and mannose. Congo Red test indicated that EPS-T and EPS-A had a highly ordered conformation of triple helix, while EPS-C had a random coil conformation. Furthermore, EPS-A exhibited higher DPPH scavenging and antiproliferative activities than EPS--C and EPS-T, which might be attributed to the molecular mass.

  15. Effect of Tween 80 and Acetone on the Secretion, 
Structure and Antioxidant Activities of Exopolysaccharides from Lentinus tigrinus

    PubMed Central

    He, Peixin; Wu, Shuangshuang; Pan, Lige; Sun, Siwen; Mao, Duobin

    2016-01-01

    Summary In this study, the effects of the addition of Tween 80 and acetone on secretion, structure and antioxidant activities of Lentinus tigrinus exopolysaccharides (EPS) were investigated. It was found that Tween 80 and acetone displayed a stimulatory effect on EPS secretion. The EPS obtained by the addition of Tween 80 (EPS-T), acetone (EPS-A) and control (EPS--C) were purified by Sepharose CL-6B gel filtration chromatography and molecular mass of purified fractions was estimated to be 22.1, 137 and 12 kDa, respectively. Monosaccharide composition analysis indicated that EPS-T, EPS-A and EPS-C were mainly composed of glucose and mannose. Congo Red test indicated that EPS-T and EPS-A had a highly ordered conformation of triple helix, while EPS-C had a random coil conformation. Furthermore, EPS-A exhibited higher DPPH scavenging and antiproliferative activities than EPS--C and EPS-T, which might be attributed to the molecular mass. PMID:27956860

  16. Phylogeography and environmental diversification of a highly adaptable marine amphipod, Gammarus duebeni.

    PubMed

    Rock, J; Ironside, J; Potter, T; Whiteley, N M; Lunt, D H

    2007-07-01

    Genetic diversity and phylogeographic population structure in the gammarid amphipod, Gammarus duebeni, were investigated across its broad latitudinal distribution in the NE and NW Atlantic by analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequence. Gammarus duebeni has exceptional tolerance of salinity change and inhabits environments ranging from marine to freshwater. The longstanding debate on whether there are distinct marine and freshwater subspecies was assessed by sampling populations from sites characterized by different salinities. Our sequence data demonstrates that there are two major lineages, with little internal geographic structuring. Evidence is provided to suggest a pre-glacial divergence of these two clades, involving segregation between a region historically associated with the freshwater form and the majority of the marine localities on both sides of the Atlantic. A modern contact zone between the marine and freshwater forms is proposed in western Britain.

  17. [Interrelation between the composition of lipids and products of their peroxidation and the secretion of ligninolytic enzymes during growth of Lentinus (Panus) tigrinus].

    PubMed

    Kadimaliev, D A; Nadezhina, O S; Atykian, N A; Revin, V V; Samuilov, V D

    2006-01-01

    Lipid composition, intracellular products of lipid peroxidation (LPO), and the activities of extracellular enzymes were studied during submerged cultivation of the xylotrophic fungus Lentinus (Panus) tigrinus VKM F-3616D. The maximum secretion of ligninolytic enzymes during the phase of active mycelium growth correlated with increased content of readily oxidized phospholipids and unsaturated fatty acids and with low content of the LPO products. In the idiophase, which was characterized by lower excretion of extracellular ligninolytic enzymes, the content of more stable phospholipids, saturated fatty acids, and LPO products increased. A relationship between the composition of mycelial lipids and the secretion of ligninolytic enzymes was revealed.

  18. Ecological modeling for the extrapolation of ecotoxicological effects measured during in situ assays in Gammarus.

    PubMed

    Coulaud, Romain; Geffard, Olivier; Coquillat, Amandine; Quéau, Hervé; Charles, Sandrine; Chaumot, Arnaud

    2014-06-03

    Evaluating the effects of chemical contamination on populations and ecological communities still constitutes a challenging necessity in environmental management. However, the toxic effects of contaminants are commonly measured by means of organism-level responses. Linking such effects measures with ecological models is a promising way to determine population-level impacts. In this way, population models are currently increasingly used in predictive risk assessment procedures, but their use in environmental diagnostic framework remains limited due to their lack of ecological realism. The present study with the crustacean Gammarus fossarum, a sentinel species in freshwater monitoring, combines a dual field and laboratory experimental approach with a population modeling framework. In this way, we developed an ecologically relevant periodic matrix population model for Gammarus. This model allowed us to capture the population dynamics in the field, and to understand the particular pattern of demographic sensitivities induced by Gammarus life-history phenology. The model we developed provided a robust population-level assessment of in situ-based effects measures recorded during a biomonitoring program on a French watershed impacted by past mining activities. Thus, our study illustrates the potential of population modeling when seeking to decipher the role of environmental toxic contamination in ecological perturbations.

  19. Metabolic activity and behavior of the invasive amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus and two common Central European gammarid species (Gammarus fossarum, Gammarus roeselii): Low metabolic rates may favor the invader.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jochen; Ortmann, Christian; Wetzel, Markus A; Koop, Jochen H E

    2016-01-01

    The Ponto-Caspian amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus is one of the most successful invaders in Central European rivers. Contrary to studies on its ecology, ecophysiological studies comparing the species' physiological traits are scarce. In this context, in particular the metabolic activity of the invasive species has rarely been considered and, moreover, the few existing studies on this species report strongly deviating results. The purpose of this study was to assess the metabolic activity and behavior of D. villosus and other common European amphipod species (Gammarus fossarum, Gammarus roeselii) in relation to temperatures covering the thermal regime of the invaded habitats. Based on direct calorimetric measurements of metabolic heat dissipation at three temperature levels (5°C, 15°C and 25°C), we found the routine metabolic rate of D. villosus to be significantly lower than that of the other studied gammarid species at the medium temperature level. The estimated resting metabolic rate indicated a similar trend. At 5°C and 25°C, both routine and resting metabolic rate did not differ between species. Compared to G. fossarum and G. roeselii, D. villosus exhibited lower locomotor activity at the low and medium temperatures (5°C and 15°C). In contrast, its locomotor activity increased at the high experimental temperature (25°C). G. fossarum and G. roeselii were apparently more active than D. villosus at all studied temperatures. We conclude that D. villosus has both physiological and behavioral adaptations that lead to a reduction in metabolic energy expenditure, which is assumed to be beneficial and might contribute to its invasive success. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Overview and quantification of the factors affecting the upstream and downstream movements of Gammarus pulex (Amphipoda).

    PubMed

    Dedecker, Andy P; Goethals, Peter L; De Pauw, Niels

    2003-01-01

    Human activities have severely deteriorated the Flemish river systems, and many functions such as drinking water supply, fishing, ... are threatened. Because their restoration entails drastic social (e.g. change in habits with regard to water use and discharge, urban planning) and economical (e.g. investment in nature restoration, wastewater treatment system installation) consequences, the decisions should be taken with enough forethought. Ecosystem models can act as interesting tools to support decision-making in river restoration management. In particular models that can predict the habitat requirements of organisms are of considerable importance to ensure that the planned actions have the desired effects on the aquatic ecosystems. In preliminary studies, Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models were tested and optimized to obtain the best model configuration for the prediction of the habitat suitability for Gammarus pulex based on the abiotic characteristics of their aquatic environment in the Zwalm river basin (Flanders, Belgium). Although, these ANN models are in general quite robust with a rather high predictive reliability, the model performance has to be increased with regard to simulations for river restoration management. In particular, spatial-temporal expert-rules have to be included. Migration kinetics (downstream drift and upstream migration) of the organism and migration barriers along the river (weirs, impounded river sections, ...) can deliver important additional information on the effectiveness of the restoration plans, and also on the timing of the expected effects. This paper presents an overview and quantification of the factors affecting the upstream and downstream movements of Gammarus pulex. During further research, ANN models will be used to predict the habitat suitability for Gammarus pulex after several restoration options. The migration models, implemented in a Geographical Information System (GIS), are applied to calculate the migration

  1. Distribution of Amphipods (Gammarus nipponensis Ueno) Among Mountain Headwater Streams with Different Legacies of Debris Flow Occurrence

    EPA Science Inventory

    To understand the impacts of debris flows on the distribution of an amphipod with limited dispersal ability in the context of stream networks, we surveyed the presence of Gammarus nipponensis in 87 headwater streams with different legacies of debris flow occurrence within an 8.5-...

  2. Distribution of Amphipods (Gammarus nipponensis Ueno) Among Mountain Headwater Streams with Different Legacies of Debris Flow Occurrence

    EPA Science Inventory

    To understand the impacts of debris flows on the distribution of an amphipod with limited dispersal ability in the context of stream networks, we surveyed the presence of Gammarus nipponensis in 87 headwater streams with different legacies of debris flow occurrence within an 8.5-...

  3. Effect studies of human pharmaceuticals on Fucus vesiculosus and Gammarus spp.

    PubMed

    Oskarsson, Hanna; Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin; Lindh, Karolina; Kumblad, Linda

    2012-03-01

    In two experiments, the human pharmaceutical propranolol negatively affected the physiology of two test organisms, Fucus vesiculosus and Gammarus spp. from a Baltic Sea littoral community in a concentration of 1000 μg l⁻¹. Some effects were also observed for the lower, more ecologically relevant concentrations (10 μg l⁻¹ and 100 μg l⁻¹). The effects on F. vesiculosus not only increased with increasing concentration, but also with exposure time; while the effects on Gammarus spp. were more inconsistent over time. No clear effects of the pharmaceuticals diclofenac and ibuprofen were observed for any of the organisms. Physiological parameters measured were GP:R-ratio, chlorophyll fluorescence and release of coloured dissolved organic matter, respiration and ammonium excretion. Pharmaceutical substances are repeatedly detected in the Baltic Sea which is the recipient for STP effluents from more than 85 million people living in the catchment area, but the knowledge of their effects on non-target organisms is still very limited.

  4. Ovary and embryo proteogenomic dataset revealing diversity of vitellogenins in the crustacean Gammarus fossarum.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Judith; Gaillard, Jean-Charles; Chaumot, Arnaud; Geffard, Olivier; Pible, Olivier; Armengaud, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Ovaries and embryos from sexually mature Gammarus fossarum were sampled at different stages of the reproductive cycle. The soluble proteome was extracted for five biological replicates and samples were subjected to trypsin digestion. The resulting peptides were analyzed by high resolution tandem mass spectrometry with a LTQ-Orbitrap XL instrument. The MS/MS spectra were assigned with a previously described RNAseq-derived G. fossarum database. The proteins highlighted by proteogenomics were monitored and their abundance kinetics over the different stages revealed a large panel of vitellogenins. Criteria were i) accumulation during oogenesis, ii) decrease during embryogenesis, iii) classified as female-specific, and iv) sequence similarity and phylogenetic analysis. The data accompanying the manuscript describing the database searches and comparative analysis ("High-throughput proteome dynamics for discovery of key proteins in sentinel species: unsuspected vitellogenins diversity in the crustacean Gammarus fossarum" by Trapp et al. [1]) have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange via the PRIDE repository with identifiers PRIDE: PXD001002.

  5. Influence of molting and starvation on digestive enzyme activities and energy storage in Gammarus fossarum.

    PubMed

    Charron, Laetitia; Geffard, Olivier; Chaumot, Arnaud; Coulaud, Romain; Jaffal, Ali; Gaillet, Véronique; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Geffard, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Among the many biological responses studied in ecotoxicology, energy-based biomarkers such as digestive enzyme activities and energy reserves appear to be useful predictive tools for detecting physiological disturbances in organisms. However, the use of these biological responses as biomarkers could be limited by the effects of confounding factors (biotic and abiotic) and physiological processes, such as the reproductive cycle. Thus, the optimal use of these biomarkers will be facilitated by understanding the effects of these factors on the energy metabolism of the sentinel species being studied. We considered abiotic factors (temperature and conductivity) in a previous study, whereas the present study investigated the effects of gender, the female reproductive stage, and food availability on the digestive enzyme activities and energy storage of Gammarus fossarum. The results indicated that, during the female reproductive cycle, the activities of digestive enzymes (amylase, cellulase, and trypsin) decreased significantly, whereas the levels of reserves (proteins, lipids, and sugar) increased until the last premolt stage. Restricted food diets only led to decreased amylase activities in both sexes. Food starvation also induced a decrease in the energy outcomes in females, whereas there were no effects in males. In general, the biochemical (digestive enzyme activities) and physiological (energy reserves) responses were more stable in males than in females. These results support the use of males fed ad libitum to limit the effects of confounding factors when using these energy biomarkers in Gammarus fossarum during biomonitoring programs.

  6. Natural porous and nano fiber chitin structure from Gammarus argaeus (Gammaridae Crustacea)

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Murat; Tozak, Kabil Özcan; Baran, Talat; Sezen, Göksal; Sargin, Idris

    2013-01-01

    Chitin and its derivatives are commercially important biopolymers due to their applications in medicine, agriculture, water treatment, cosmetics and various biotechnological areas. Since chitin and its derivatives exhibit different chemical and physical properties depending on the source and isolation method, there is a growing demand for new chitin sources other than crab and shrimp worldwide. In this study Gammarus, a Crustacea, was investigated as a novel chitin source. Gammarus, which belongs to the family Gammaridae Crustacea, lives in the bottom of aquatic ecosystems. More than 200 species are known worldwide. One of these species, G. argaeus was investigated for chitin isolation. The alpha chitin isolated from G. argaeus was characterized by using analysis techniques such as infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All these analyses confirmed that the isolated chitin from G. argaeus was in the alpha form. Furthermore, we described that dry weight of this species contained 11-12 % chitin. SEM examination of the isolated α-chitin revealed that it was composed of nanofibrils (15-55 nm) and pores (about 150 nm). PMID:26966425

  7. Influence of Molting and Starvation on Digestive Enzyme Activities and Energy Storage in Gammarus fossarum

    PubMed Central

    Charron, Laetitia; Geffard, Olivier; Chaumot, Arnaud; Coulaud, Romain; Jaffal, Ali; Gaillet, Véronique; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Geffard, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Among the many biological responses studied in ecotoxicology, energy-based biomarkers such as digestive enzyme activities and energy reserves appear to be useful predictive tools for detecting physiological disturbances in organisms. However, the use of these biological responses as biomarkers could be limited by the effects of confounding factors (biotic and abiotic) and physiological processes, such as the reproductive cycle. Thus, the optimal use of these biomarkers will be facilitated by understanding the effects of these factors on the energy metabolism of the sentinel species being studied. We considered abiotic factors (temperature and conductivity) in a previous study, whereas the present study investigated the effects of gender, the female reproductive stage, and food availability on the digestive enzyme activities and energy storage of Gammarus fossarum. The results indicated that, during the female reproductive cycle, the activities of digestive enzymes (amylase, cellulase, and trypsin) decreased significantly, whereas the levels of reserves (proteins, lipids, and sugar) increased until the last premolt stage. Restricted food diets only led to decreased amylase activities in both sexes. Food starvation also induced a decrease in the energy outcomes in females, whereas there were no effects in males. In general, the biochemical (digestive enzyme activities) and physiological (energy reserves) responses were more stable in males than in females. These results support the use of males fed ad libitum to limit the effects of confounding factors when using these energy biomarkers in Gammarus fossarum during biomonitoring programs. PMID:24788197

  8. The validity of the Gammarus:Asellus ratio as an index of organic pollution: abiotic and biotic influences.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, Calum; Dick, Jaimie T A; Bigsby, Ewan; Elwood, Robert W; Montgomery, W Ian; Gibbins, Chris N; Kelly, David W

    2002-01-01

    In freshwaters. Gammarus spp. are more sensitive to organic pollution than Asellus spp. and the relative abundance of the two taxa has been proposed as a pollution index. We tested the validity of this by examining the relationship between the Gammarus: Asellus (G : A) ratio and (1) a suite of physico-chemical variables. (2) established biotic (average score per taxon, ASPT) and richness (species richness (S) and Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera families richness (EPT family richness)) indices generated from the macroinvertebrate community. In addition, we investigated a suspected biotic interaction, predation, between Gammarus and Asellus. Both univariate and multivariate analyses showed that the G: A ratio was sometimes responsive to changes in parameters linked to organic pollution, such as BOD5 and nitrate levels. However, the G : A ratio also appeared responsive to variables not directly linked to organic pollution, such as conductivity and distance from source. There were significant positive correlations among the G : A ratio and the ASPT, S and EPT, indicating that changes in the relative abundances of Gammarus and Asellus were reflected in changes in the pollution sensitivity and richness of the wider macroinvertebrate community. A laboratory experiment revealed significant predation of Asellus aquaticus juveniles by Gammarus duebeni celticus adults, but no reciprocal predation. We propose that the G: A ratio may be useful as a crude measure of organic pollution that could supplement more complex indices in a multimetric approach to pollution monitoring or be used for monitoring individual sites, where a simple technique is required for monitoring purposes over a period of time. Also, we urge recognition of the possible role of biotic interactions among taxa used in the generation of pollution indices.

  9. Effects of water hardness, water temperature, and size of the test organism on the susceptibility of the freshwater shrimp, Gammarus pulex (L. ), to toxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, R.R.

    1983-10-01

    In this study the authors examined the effects of water hardness, water temperature, size of test organism and duration of exposure on the acute toxicity of four substances to Gammarus pulex (L.), the freshwater shrimp.

  10. Seasonal drift and feeding periodicity during summer of the amphipod, Gammarus psuedolimnaeus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Downstream drift of aquatic invertebrates is an important ecological process that varies temporally. Seasonal patterns of diel drift and diel feeding periodicity during summer of the amphipod Gammarus pseudolimnaeus were examined in a small stream in central New York. Seasonal trends in drift were similar with peak drift occurring from 2000 to 0400 h. Very little drift occurred during the day. Feeding intensity of G. pseudolimnaeus was greatest from 2000 to 0400 h and was significantly greater than at 0400 to 0800 h and 0800 to 1200 h. Previous research on feeding periodicity of this species found no evidence of periods of increased food consumption. Conflicting results between this study and earlier studies may be due to sampling drifting versus non-drifting amphipods.

  11. Responses of Niphargus montellianus and Gammarus balcanicus (Crustacea, Amphipoda) from karst waters to heavy metal exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppellotti Krupa, O.; Guidolin, L.

    2003-05-01

    The response to some heavy metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn) was examined in two amphipods, Niphargus montellianus and Gammarus balcanicus, living in karst waters and endowed with different ecological characteristics. Exposure experiments were made, in the controlled conditions of a biospeleology laboratory, to increasing concentrations of metals in the range 0.1 10 μg ml^{-1} for up to 10 days. Hypogean and epigean amphipods differed in their responses, G. balcanicus being more sensitive to the toxic effects of heavy metals than the hypogean N montellianus. The degree of tolerance was Cu

  12. Effects of two PBDE congeners on the moulting enzymes of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex.

    PubMed

    Gismondi, Eric; Thomé, Jean-Pierre

    2014-08-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are abundant in aquatic environment. However, only few studies have investigated their impacts on freshwater invertebrates. This work aimed to study the effects of BDE-47 and BDE-99 congeners on the chitobiase and chitinolytic enzymes activities of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex, according to gender, PBDE concentration and time of exposure. In addition, the bioaccumulation of BDE-47 and BDE-99 were measured. Results revealed that females have bioaccumulated more PBDE than males, and BDE-99 was more accumulated than BDE-47. PBDE exposures for 96 h have caused chitobiase and chitinolytic enzymes inhibition. This study not only indicate the importance of taking into account various confounding factors (gender, congeners, concentration) to understand PBDE effects, but underline also disruptions of molting enzymes activities. These disturbances suggest effects on the gammarid development and reproduction, and consequently effects on the gammarid population, and on a larger scale, a dysfunction of the ecosystem.

  13. Silver nanoparticles impact the functional role of Gammarus roeseli (Crustacea Amphipoda).

    PubMed

    Andreï, Jennifer; Pain-Devin, Sandrine; Felten, Vincent; Devin, Simon; Giambérini, Laure; Mehennaoui, Kahina; Cambier, Sebastien; Gutleb, Arno C; Guérold, François

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (nAg) are widely used in consumer products and the risk associated with their potential release into freshwater ecosystems needs to be addressed using environmentally realistic exposure concentrations. Here, the effects of low concentrations (0.5-5 μg L(-1)) of two different sized nAg (10 and 60 nm) and a silver nitrate positive control were evaluated in Gammarus roeseli following exposure for 72 h. Cellular, individual and functional endpoints were independently studied and the most striking results were reported for functional endpoints. Indeed, without a change in their feeding activity, the gammarids produced significantly fewer fine particles of organic matter when exposed to nAg, even at 0.5 μg L(-1) of 10 nm nAg. These functional endpoints seem to be efficient markers for detecting the early effects of nAg on G. roeseli.

  14. Heavy metals and arsenic fixation into freshwater organic matter under Gammarus pulex L. influence.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Joerg; Mkandawire, Martin; Gert Dudel, E

    2010-07-01

    Organic sediments are a main sink for metal pollutants in aquatic systems. However, factors that make sediments a sink of metals and metalloids are still not clear. Consequently, we investigate the role of invertebrate shredders (Gammarus pulex L.) on quality of metal and arsenic fixation into organic partitions of sediment in the course of litter decay with laboratory microcosm experiments. During the decomposition of leaf litter, G. pulex significantly facilitated the development of small particles of organic matter. The capacity of metal fixation was significantly higher in smaller particles than leaf litter and litter residuals. Thus, G. pulex enhanced metal fixation into the organic partition of sediments by virtue of increasing the amount smaller particles in the aquatic system. Furthermore, invertebrates have a significant effect on formation of dissolved organic matter and remobilization of cobalt, molybdenum and cesium, but no significant effect on remobilization of all other measured elements.

  15. Bioaccumulation kinetics of organic xenobiotic pollutants in the freshwater invertebrate Gammarus pulex modeled with prediction intervals.

    PubMed

    Ashauer, Roman; Caravatti, Ivo; Hintermeister, Anita; Escher, Beate I

    2010-07-01

    Uptake and elimination rate constants, bioaccumulation factors, and elimination times in the freshwater arthropod Gammarus pulex were measured for 14 organic micropollutants covering a wide range of hydrophobicity (imidacloprid, aldicarb, ethylacrylate, 4,6-dinitro-o-cresol, carbofuran, malathion, 4-nitrobenzyl-chloride, 2,4-dichloroaniline, Sea-Nine, 2,4-dichlorophenol, diazinon, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene, and hexachlorobenzene; all 14C-labeled). The toxicokinetic parameters were determined by least-square fitting of a one-compartment first-order toxicokinetic model, followed by Markov Chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation. The parameter estimation methods used here account for decreasing aqueous concentrations during the exposure phase or increasing aqueous concentrations during the elimination phase of bioaccumulation experiments. It is not necessary to keep exposure concentrations constant or zero during uptake and elimination, respectively. Neither is it required to achieve steady state during the exposure phase; hence, tests can be shorter. Prediction intervals, which take the between-parameter correlation into account, were calculated for bioaccumulation factors and simulations of internal concentrations under variable exposure. The lipid content of Gammarus pulex was 1.3% of wet weight, consisting of 25% phospholipids and 75% triglycerides. Size-dependent bioaccumulation was observed for eight compounds, although the magnitudes of the relationships were too small to be of practical relevance. Elimination times ranged from 0.45 to 20 d, and bioaccumulation factors ranged from 1.7 to 4,449 L/kg. The identified compounds with unexpectedly long elimination times should be given priority in future studies investigating the biotransformation of these compounds.

  16. Responses of the brackish-water amphipod Gammarus duebeni (crustacea) to saline sewage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. B.; Johnson, I.

    Soon after the openiing of the Looe sewage treatment works (Cornwall, southwest England) in 1973, it became colonized by the brackish-water amphipod Gammarus duebeni Liljeborg. The works is unusual as it operates with saline sewage and has a tidally-based pattern of salinity fluctuation (S=13 to 34). Various responses of this unique amphipod population (sewage amphipods) have been compared with G. duebeni from the adjacent Looe River estuary (estuarine amphipods) in an attempt to identify long-term responses to sewage. Sewage amphipods were significantly smaller than their estuarine equivalents; the sewage population was biased significantly to males, whereas the sex ratio of the estuarine population significantly favours females. Compared with the estuary, the consistently lower oxygen levels in the works were reflected in significant differences in metabolism. Sewage amphipods maintained high levels of activity under hypoxia ( e.g. swimming), and the higher survival and lower rates of lactic acid accumulation under anoxia than estuarine individuals. In addition, sewage amphipods recovered more rapidly from anoxia and had a lower critical oxygen tension (p c) than estuarine amphipods. Sewage amphipods are exposed to higher levels of heavy metals associated with the domestic sewage and zinc concentrations are particularly elevated in the works. Exposure to elevated zinc concentrations resulted in similar patterns of body zinc uptake for sewage and estuarine Gammarus at high (30) and low (10) salinity, with zinc regulation apparently occuring to an external threshold of 200 γmgZn·dm -3. No consistent interpopulational differences in the effect ofzinc on zinc uptake or on osmoregulation have been identified. However, sewage amphipods had higher survival at all zinc/salinity combinations compared with estuarine individuals. These indicate that sewage amphipods are adapted to the unusual combination of conditions prevailing in the treatment works and, if reproductive

  17. A transmission electron microscope investigation of the effect of lead acetate on the hepatopancreatic ceca of Gammarus pulex.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Mehtap; Düzen, Ayla; Bayçu, Cengiz; Ozata, Ahmet

    2002-10-01

    The freshwater Amphipod Gammarus pulex is a sensitive indicator organism for environmental contamination. In this study, effects of heavy metal lead acetate were investigated by using electron microscopy techniques. Control group was not expose to lead acetate but experimental group was for 96 h. The ultrastructural changes of hepatopancreatic ceca cells were studied in these two groups by electron microscopy techniques analysing cellular structure, structure of organelles and vacuolization. The number of cells based on the toxic effects of lead acetate was increased compared with the control group. The number and length of cell microvilli was decreased. Additionally degenerated mitocondria, dilation of golgi vesicules and cytoplasmic vacuolization were observed. The results of present study suggest that the exposure to the lead acetate may cause some ultrastructural changes on hepatopancreatic ceca of digestive system in Gammarus pulex. The significance of this change in terms of environmental toxicology needs to be further studied.

  18. An integrated study on Gammarus elvirae (Crustacea, Amphipoda): perspectives for toxicology of arsenic-contaminated freshwater.

    PubMed

    Davolos, Domenico; Chimenti, Claudio; Ronci, Lucilla; Setini, Andrea; Iannilli, Valentina; Pietrangeli, Biancamaria; De Matthaeis, Elvira

    2015-10-01

    The Italian region Latium is characterized by extensive quaternary volcanic systems that contribute greatly to arsenic (As) contamination of freshwater, including drinking water supplies. However, knowledge of the possible toxic effects in these aquatic environments is, despite being highly relevant to public health, still limited. In this paper, we approach this issue using Gammarus elvirae, an amphipod species that inhabits rivers and streams in central Italy, including Latium. We explored the possibility of using G. elvirae in the toxicology of freshwater by addressing the most relevant issues. First, we tested the usefulness of hemocytes from G. elvirae in determining non-specific DNA damage by means of the Comet assay after exposure (24 h and 7 days) to different river water samples in Latium; second, we provided an interpretative overview of the usefulness of hepatopancreatic epithelial cells of G. elvirae as a means of assessing toxicity after long-term exposure to As and other pollutants; third, the LC (50-240 h) value for G. elvirae was estimated for arsenate, which is usually the dominant arsenic species in surface waters. Our study sheds light on G. elvirae at different levels, providing a background for future toxicological research of freshwater.

  19. The toxicological effects of thiamethoxam on Gammarus kischineffensis (Schellenberg 1937) (Crustacea: Amphipoda).

    PubMed

    Uğurlu, Pelin; Ünlü, Erhan; Satar, Elif İpek

    2015-03-01

    Neonicotinoids are a new group of insecticides, and little is known about their toxicity to nontarget freshwater organisms an potential effects on freshwater ecosystems. The aim of this study is to establish the acute toxicity and histopathological effects of thiamethoxam-based pesticide on the gill tissue of Gammarus kischineffensis. In this study G. kischineffensis samples were exposed to 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100mg/l of commercial grade thiamethoxam for 96 h. The 24, 48, 72 and 96 h LC50 values were determined as 75.619, 23.505, 8.048 and 3.751 mg/l respectively. In histopathological study the individuals were exposed to 0.004, 0.04 and 0.4 mg/l thiamethoxam concentrations for 14 days. The results showed that the most common changes at all doses of thiamethoxam were vacuolization and hemostatic infiltration in the gill tissue of G. kischineffensis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Seasonal variability of antioxidant biomarkers and energy reserves in the freshwater gammarid Gammarus roeseli.

    PubMed

    Sroda, Sophie; Cossu-Leguille, Carole

    2011-04-01

    In gammarids, behavioural and biochemical biomarkers are commonly used in ecotoxicological studies. In our study, we have investigated seasonal variations of several biochemical biomarkers in Gammarus roeseli, a freshwater species. Organisms were sampled monthly over a 1-year period. Gender was distinguished to measure antioxidant enzyme activities like total glutathione peroxidase (GPxtot), selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (SeGPx) and catalase enzymes, lipoperoxidation end-product (malondialdehyde, MDA), and energy reserves with protein and lipid contents. In the same time, usual water physico-chemical parameters were measured at the sampling site. A based-gender difference was observed for parameters related to oxidative stress. Females showed higher antioxidant enzyme activities and lower MDA level than males. Parameters related to oxidative stress and energy reserves appeared correlated with temperature and physiological status of organisms. Females GPx activities were lower in autumn and winter when no breeding occurred. In both gender, MDA levels were correlated with temperature with an increase of lipoperoxidation in summer. Lipid contents were the lowest in summer and the highest in winter, probably due to the reproductive status of organisms and their feeding behaviour. Gender-based differences of biochemical parameters suggest a specific sensitivity of males and females in ecotoxicological experiments. Moreover, organisms could be more vulnerable in summer when MDA levels are high and energy reserves low. Deleterious effect of xenobiotics would be different with gender and season.

  1. Comparison of arsenate and cadmium toxicity in a freshwater amphipod (Gammarus pulex).

    PubMed

    Vellinger, Céline; Parant, Marc; Rousselle, Philippe; Immel, Françoise; Wagner, Philippe; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium is largely documented on freshwater organisms while arsenic, especially arsenate, is rarely studied. The kinetic of the LC50s values for both metals was realized on Gammarus pulex. Physiological [i.e. metal concentration in body tissues, bioconcentration factor (BCF)] effects and behavioural responses (via pleopods beats) were investigated after 240-h exposure. Arsenate LC50 value was 100 fold higher than Cd-LC50 value after 240-h exposure, while concentrations in gammarids were similar for both metals at their respective LC50s. BCF decreased with increasing cadmium concentration while BCF remained stable with increasing arsenate concentration. Moreover, BCF was between 148 and 344 times lower for arsenate than cadmium. A significant hypoventilation was observed for cadmium concentrations exceeding or close to the 240h-LC50(Cd), while gammarids hyperventilated for the lowest arsenate concentrations and hypoventilated for the highest arsenate concentrations. We discussed the relationships between potential action mechanisms of these two metals and observed results.

  2. Bioaccumulation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers by the freshwater benthic amphipod Gammarus pulex.

    PubMed

    Tlili, Khawla; Labadie, Pierre; Bourges, Catherine; Desportes, Annie; Chevreuil, Marc

    2012-07-01

    This study reports on the relationship between polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) levels in water, sediment, and the benthic macroinvertebrate Gammarus pulex, which plays a major ecological role in freshwater ecosystems. Samples were taken in a periurban watershed (near Paris, France), and PBDEs were systematically detected in sediment (≤727 ng g(-1) OC) and G. pulex (≤264 ng g(-1) lipids). PBDEs were also occasionally detected in the water column at low levels (∑ PBDEs < 1.5 ng L(-1)). The log values of bioaccumulation factors were in the range 7.8 ± 0.1-8.3 ± 0.4 L kg(-1) for tetra- and penta-BDEs, which were the only ones quantified in the dissolved phase of river water. Meanwhile, levels of individual tri- to hepta-PBDE congeners in G. pulex generally positively correlated with sediment levels, suggesting an equilibrium situation. Biota-to-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) of tri-hepta BDEs were congener specific and were in the range 0.5 ± 0.3-2.6 ± 1.2. For several PBDEs, BSAF values deviated from the expected range, likely because of in vivo metabolism.

  3. Spatial Distribution of Cryptic Species Diversity in European Freshwater Amphipods (Gammarus fossarum) as Revealed by Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Westram, Anja Marie; Jokela, Jukka; Baumgartner, Caroline; Keller, Irene

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand and protect ecosystems, local gene pools need to be evaluated with respect to their uniqueness. Cryptic species present a challenge in this context because their presence, if unrecognized, may lead to serious misjudgement of the distribution of evolutionarily distinct genetic entities. In this study, we describe the current geographical distribution of cryptic species of the ecologically important stream amphipod Gammarus fossarum (types A, B and C). We use a novel pyrosequencing assay for molecular species identification and survey 62 populations in Switzerland, plus several populations in Germany and eastern France. In addition, we compile data from previous publications (mainly Germany). A clear transition is observed from type A in the east (Danube and Po drainages) to types B and, more rarely, C in the west (Meuse, Rhone, and four smaller French river systems). Within the Rhine drainage, the cryptic species meet in a contact zone which spans the entire G. fossarum distribution range from north to south. This large-scale geographical sorting indicates that types A and B persisted in separate refugia during Pleistocene glaciations. Within the contact zone, the species rarely co-occur at the same site, suggesting that ecological processes may preclude long-term coexistence. The clear phylogeographical signal observed in this study implies that, in many parts of Europe, only one of the cryptic species is present. PMID:21909373

  4. Crustacean hyperglycemic and vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormones in the lobster Homarus gammarus.

    PubMed

    Ollivaux, Céline; Vinh, Joëlle; Soyez, Daniel; Toullec, Jean-Yves

    2006-05-01

    Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) and vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH), produced by the X organ-sinus gland neurosecretory complex, belong to a peptide group referred to as the CHH family, which is widely distributed in arthropods. In this study, genetic variants and post-translationally modified isoforms of CHH and VIH were characterized in the European lobster Homarus gammarus. With the use of RP-HPLC and ELISA with specific antibodies that discriminate between stereoisomers of CHH and VIH, two groups of CHH-immunoreactive peaks were characterized from HPLC fractions of sinus gland extract (CHH A and CHH B); each group contained two variants (CHH and D-Phe3CHH). In the same way, two VIH-immunoreactive peaks (VIH and D-Trp4VIH) were demonstrated in HPLC fractions from sinus gland extract. The masses of these different neuropeptides were determined by FT-ICR MS: CHH A and CHH B spectra exhibited monoisotopic ions at 8557.05 Da and 8527.04 Da, respectively, and both VIH isomers displayed an m/z value of 9129.19 Da. Two full-length cDNAs encoding preprohomones of CHH A and CHH B and only one cDNA for VIH precursor were cloned and sequenced from X organ RNA. Comparison of CHH sequences between European lobster and other Astacoidea suggests that the most hydrophobic form appeared first during crustacean evolution.

  5. Quantifying diet-borne metal uptake in Gammarus pulex using stable isotope tracers.

    PubMed

    Pellet, Bastien; Ayrault, Sophie; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine

    2014-12-01

    Gammarids are aquatic amphipods widely used for water quality monitoring. To investigate the copper and cadmium diet-borne metal uptake in Gammarus pulex, we adapted the pulse-chase stable isotopes-based approach to determine the food ingestion rate (IR), the gut retention time (GRT) and the metal assimilation efficiencies (AE). G. pulex were fed with (65)Cu-, (106)Cd-, and (53)Cr-labeled alder leaves for 7.5h and then with unlabeled leaves for 5d. The metal stable isotope contents in the gammarids, leaves, filtered water and periodically collected feces were determined. Chromium was poorly assimilated by the gammarids; thus, Cr was used as an unassimilated tracer. The first tracer defecation occurred before the first feces harvest, indicating a gut passage time of less than 9h. A 24-h GRT and a 0.69gg(-1)d(-1) IR were estimated. The Cd AE value was estimated as 5-47%, depending on the assimilation determination method applied. The Cu AE value could not be evaluated regardless of the determination method used, most likely because of the rapid Cu regulation in gammarids in addition to analytical uncertainties when determining the Cu content in leaves. Application of the Cd AE value in the framework of the biodynamic bioaccumulation model shows that the diet-borne uptake of Cd significantly contributes (66-95%) to the metal bioaccumulation in G. pulex fed with alder leaves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Proteomic investigation of male Gammarus fossarum, a freshwater crustacean, in response to endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Judith; Armengaud, Jean; Pible, Olivier; Gaillard, Jean-Charles; Abbaci, Khedidja; Habtoul, Yassine; Chaumot, Arnaud; Geffard, Olivier

    2015-01-02

    While the decrease in human sperm count in response to pollutants is a worldwide concern, little attention is being devoted to its causes and occurrence in the biodiversity of the animal kingdom. Arthropoda is the most species-rich phyla, inhabiting all aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. During evolution, key molecular players of the arthropod endocrine system have diverged from the vertebrate counterparts. Consequently, arthropods may have different sensitivities toward endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Here alteration of sperm quality in a crustacean, Gammarus fossarum, a popular organism in freshwater risk assessment, was investigated after laboratory exposure to various concentrations of three different xenobiotics: cadmium, methoxyfenozide, and pyriproxyfen. The integrity of the reproductive process was assessed by means of sperm-quality markers. For each substance, semiquantitative/relative proteomics based on spectral counting procedure was carried out on male gonads to observe the biological impact. The changes in a total of 871 proteins were monitored in response to toxic pressure. A drastic effect was observed on spermatozoon production, with a dose-response relationship. While exposure to EDCs leads to strong modulations of male-specific proteins in testis, no induction of female-specific proteins was noted. Also, a significant portion of orphans proved to be sensitive to toxic stress.

  7. Development of Ascarophis sp. (Nematoda: Cystidicolidae) to maturity in Gammarus deubeni (Amphipoda).

    PubMed

    Appy, Ralph G; Butterworth, Eric W

    2011-12-01

    Experimentally transmitted Ascarophis sp. (Spirurida) developed to adult worms in the invertebrate host, Gammarus deubeni (Amphipoda), collected in the intertidal zone in Passamaquoddy Bay, New Brunswick, Canada. The morphological development and growth of larval stages is very similar to other cystidicolids, which are found as adults in fish. Unlike virtually all other Spirurida, which require a vertebrate definitive host, infective larvae of Ascarophis sp. migrate from the invertebrate host musculature into the hemocoel where they molt twice to become adults. Gravid females appear at 80 days and 69 days post-infection at 10-12 C and 18-20 C, respectively. While there is little evident host reaction to the parasite within the muscle tissue, within the hemocoel there is hemocytic reaction to shed nematode cuticles, released eggs, and sometimes the worm itself, including some melanization. The worms are morphologically similar to Ascarophis sp. from G. oceanicus in the Baltic and White seas and among Ascarophis species from fish is most similar to A. arctica. It is suggested that Ascarophis sp. no longer requires a vertebrate host and is transmitted between amphipods either through death and disintegration of infected amphipods and dispersal of the nematode eggs, or more likely through cannibalism or necrophagy.

  8. Enrichment of uranium in particulate matter during litter decomposition affected by Gammarus pulex L.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Jörg; Weiske, Arndt; Mkandawire, Martin; Dudel, E Gert

    2008-12-01

    Plant litter and organic matter of aquatic sediments provide a significant sink of soluble inorganic uranium species in contaminated ecosystems. The uranium content in detritus has been observed to increase significantly during decomposition. However, the influence of the decomposer community on uranium fixation remains unclear. In view of this, we investigated the influence of a shredder (the freshwater shrimp Gammarus pulex L) on uranium fixation and mobilization during the degradation of plant litter. Leaf litter from Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn. with 1152 mg kg(-1) U of dry biomass (DM) and without uranium was used in a 14-day laboratory experiment. The uranium concentration in the particulate organic material (POM) at the end of experiment was 1427 mg kg(-1) DM. After 14 days of decay, the residues of the leaves show a uranium concentration of 644 mg kg(-1) DM. Uranium concentrations in the media initially increased reaching up to 63.9 microg L(-1) but finally decreased to an average value of 34.3 microg L(-1). Atthe same time, DOC levels increased from 2.43 mg L(-1) up to 11.4 mg L(-1) in the course of the experiment Hence, inorganic uranium fixation onto particulate organic matter was enhanced by the activity of G. pulex.

  9. Proteogenomics of Gammarus fossarum to Document the Reproductive System of Amphipods*

    PubMed Central

    Trapp, Judith; Geffard, Olivier; Imbert, Gilles; Gaillard, Jean-Charles; Davin, Anne-Hélène; Chaumot, Arnaud; Armengaud, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Because of their ecological importance, amphipod crustacea are employed worldwide as test species in environmental risk assessment. Although proteomics allows new insights into the molecular mechanisms related to the stress response, such investigations are rare for these organisms because of the lack of comprehensive protein sequence databases. Here, we propose a proteogenomic approach for identifying specific proteins of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus fossarum, a keystone species in European freshwater ecosystems. After deep RNA sequencing, we created a comprehensive ORF database. We identified and annotated the most relevant proteins detected through a shotgun tandem mass spectrometry analysis carried out on the proteomes from three major tissues involved in the organism's reproductive function: the male and female reproductive systems, and the cephalon, where different neuroendocrine glands are present. The 1,873 mass-spectrometry-certified proteins represent the largest crustacean proteomic resource to date, with 218 proteins being lineage specific. Comparative proteomics between the male and female reproductive systems indicated key proteins with strong sexual dimorphism. Protein expression profiles during spermatogenesis at seven different stages highlighted the major gammarid proteins involved in the different facets of reproduction. PMID:25293947

  10. The subtle effects of sea water acidification on the amphipod Gammarus locusta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauton, C.; Tyrrell, T.; Williams, J.

    2009-01-01

    We report an investigation of the effects of increases in pCO2 on the growth and molecular physiology of the neritic amphipod Gammarus locusta, which has a cosmopolitan distribution in estuaries. Amphipods were reared from juvenile to mature adult in laboratory microcosms at three different levels of pH in nominal range 8.1-7.6. Growth rate was estimated from weekly measures of body length. At sexual maturity the amphipods were sacrificed and assayed for changes in the expression of genes coding for a heat shock protein (hsp70 gene) and the metabolic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapdh gene). The data show that the growth and survival rate of this species is not significantly impacted by a decrease in sea water pH of up to 0.5 units. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that there was no significant effect of growth in acidified sea water on the expression of the hsp70 gene. However, there was a consistent and significant increase in the expression of the gapdh gene at a pH of ~7.5 which indicated a possible disruption to oxidative metabolic processes. It was concluded that future predicted changes in sea water pH may have subtle effects on the physiology and metabolism of coastal and marine species which may be overlooked in studies of whole organism response.

  11. Bisphenol A in artificial indoor streams: II. Stress response and gonad histology in Gammarus fossarum (Amphipoda).

    PubMed

    Schirling, Martin; Jungmann, Dirk; Ladewig, Vanessa; Ludwichowski, Kai-Uwe; Nagel, Roland; Köhler, Heinz-R; Triebskorn, Rita

    2006-03-01

    The effects of the world wide-distributed chemical bisphenol A (BPA) on the endocrine system of vertebrates have been demonstrated in several studies. Here, we report on the impact of BPA (0, 5, 50 and 500 microg/l nominally, deduced effective concentrations 0, 0.24, 2.4, and 24.1 microg/l, respectively, all at 15 degrees C) on the 70 kD stress protein family (hsp70), the 90 kD stress protein family (hsp90), and gonad histology of the crustacean Gammarus fossarum exposed in artificial indoor streams. The animals were exposed for a maximum of 103 days and samples were taken at the beginning and at days 34, 69 and 103 of the experiment. Exposure to BPA resulted in accelerated maturation of oocytes in females and in a decline in the number and size of early vitellogenic oocytes. The level of hsp90, which plays a pivotal role in vertebrate sex steroid signal transduction, was significantly reduced by BPA. In all five streams, measured parameters did not indicate any captivity stress for a period of 69 days. Beyond this time, the mortality rate and proteotoxic effects, the latter measured by hsp70 expression, were found to be elevated.

  12. Effects of feminizing microsporidia on the masculinizing function of the androgenic gland in Gammarus duebeni.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Martin; Smith, Judith E; Dubuffet, Aurore; Dunn, Alison M

    2013-02-01

    Feminizing parasites enhance their vertical transmission to the host offspring by converting genetic male hosts into phenotypic females. Crustacea are the only invertebrates where sexual differentiation is controlled by a specialised endocrine organ, the androgenic gland, rather than by the gonads. We showed that a feminizing microsporidian Microsporidium sp. inhibits androgenic gland differentiation. We investigated the effect of Microsporidium sp. and a second feminizing microsporidium, Nosema granulosis, on the masculinizing function of the androgenic gland in Gammarus duebeni. Androgenic gland implants had a masculinizing effect on the sexual characteristics and sexual behaviour of recipient female hosts, reflecting the masculinizing function of the androgenic gland. Individuals that had received androgenic glands showed changed morphology in comparison with controls; they were bigger overall, they lost their oostegite marginal setae, developed calceoli and acquired a male-like behaviour. This effect was observed in uninfected females, as well as in females infected with the Microsporidium sp. The masculinizing effect of androgenic gland implants was smaller in N. granulosis infected individuals. N. granulosis and Microsporidium sp. fall into distinct clades of the Microspora. It appears that these divergent parasites both act by inhibiting the development of the androgenic gland. However, they differ in their ability to inhibit the host's response to the hormone that controls male sexual differentiation.

  13. Salinity modulates thermotolerance, energy metabolism and stress response in amphipods Gammarus lacustris

    PubMed Central

    Vereshchagina, Kseniya P.; Lubyaga, Yulia A.; Shatilina, Zhanna; Bedulina, Daria; Gurkov, Anton; Axenov-Gribanov, Denis V.; Baduev, Boris; Kondrateva, Elizaveta S.; Gubanov, Mikhail; Zadereev, Egor; Sokolova, Inna

    2016-01-01

    Temperature and salinity are important abiotic factors for aquatic invertebrates. We investigated the influence of different salinity regimes on thermotolerance, energy metabolism and cellular stress defense mechanisms in amphipods Gammarus lacustris Sars from two populations. We exposed amphipods to different thermal scenarios and determined their survival as well as activity of major antioxidant enzymes (peroxidase, catalase, glutathione S-transferase) and parameters of energy metabolism (content of glucose, glycogen, ATP, ADP, AMP and lactate). Amphipods from a freshwater population were more sensitive to the thermal challenge, showing higher mortality during acute and gradual temperature change compared to their counterparts from a saline lake. A more thermotolerant population from a saline lake had high activity of antioxidant enzymes. The energy limitations of the freshwater population (indicated by low baseline glucose levels, downward shift of the critical temperature of aerobic metabolism and inability to maintain steady-state ATP levels during warming) was observed, possibly reflecting a trade-off between the energy demands for osmoregulation under the hypo-osmotic condition of a freshwater environment and protection against temperature stress. PMID:27896024

  14. Chronic effects of triclocarban in the amphipod Gammarus locusta: Behavioural and biochemical impairment.

    PubMed

    Barros, Susana; Montes, Rosa; Quintana, José Benito; Rodil, Rosario; Oliveira, Jorge M A; Santos, Miguel M; Neuparth, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Triclocarban (TCC), a common antimicrobial agent widely used in many household and personal care products, has been widely detected in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Due to its high lipophilicity and persistence in the aquatic ecosystems, TCC is of emerging environmental concern. Despite the frequently reported detection of TCC in the environment and significant uncertainties about its long term effects on aquatic ecosystems, few studies have addressed the chronic effects of TCC in aquatic organisms at ecologically relevant concentrations. Therefore, we aimed at testing a broad range of biological responses in the amphipod Gammarus locusta following a chronic (60 days) exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of TCC (100, 500 and 2500ng/L). This work integrated biochemical markers of oxidative stress (catalase (CAT), glutathione-s-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation (LPO)) and neurotransmission (acetylcholinesterase (AChE)) with several key ecological endpoints, i.e. behaviour, survival, individual growth and reproduction. Significant alterations were observed in all biochemical markers. While AChE showed a dose-response curve (with a significant increased activity at a TCC concentration of 2500ng/L), oxidative stress markers did not follow a dose-response curve, with significant increase at 100 and/or 500ng/L and a decreased activity in the highest concentration (2500ng/L). The same effect was observed in the females' behavioural response, whereas males' behaviour was not affected by TCC exposure. The present study represents a first approach to characterize the hazard of TCC to crustaceans.

  15. The effect of salinity on transovarial transmission of a microsporidian infecting Gammarus duebeni.

    PubMed

    Dunn, A M; Hatcher, M J

    1997-10-01

    This is an investigation of the impact of salinity on transovarial transmission and burden of a microsporidian sex ratio distorter in the inter-tidal crustacean Gammarus duebeni. Exposure of parasitized mothers to increased salinity during the gonotrophic cycle caused an increase in parasite burden in the follicle cells and a decrease in burden in the oocytes. It appears that salinity impedes parasite transmission from the follicle cells to the oocytes during host oogenesis. A lower proportion of the young were infected in broods from elevated salinity and, in infected offspring, parasite burden was lower than in control embryos. Parasite replication occurred during embryogenesis. However, the pattern of parasite growth did not differ between salinities, indicating that differences in parasite burden could be attributed to a reduction in the initial parasite burden transmitted to the gamete, rather than to a reduction in parasite replication during host embryogenesis. We discuss our findings with respect to parasite/host dynamics and the ecology of the host.

  16. Suspension feeding in adult Nephrops norvegicus (L.) and Homarus gammarus (L.) (decapoda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, Lars-Ove; Pihl Baden, Susanne; Ulmestrand, Mats

    Suspension feeding in adults of the Norway lobster Nephrops norvegicus (40-74 g) and the European lobster Homarus gammarus (280-350 g) was tested in experiments offering planktonic food items of different sizes from 200 to 600 μm and measuring the clearing capacity. Both lobster species were found to effectively clear water of food particles comprising nauplii of the brine shrimp Artemia salina of about 600 μm in size. These were reduced to 50% of the initial concentration within 5 h and to 90% within 12 h. When N. norvegicus was offered food particles averaging 200 μm, a significant reduction in average size occurred, indicating that the minimum retention size is around 200 μm. Fluorescently dyed Artemia salina were recovered in the stomach and intestine of lobsters proving that the filtered particles are passed to the digestive tract. Results from other experiments, using the blood pigment (haemocyanin) concentration as an index of nutritional state, indicated that the lobsters can get some nutritional advantage from suspension feeding. Suspension feeding in larger decapods has not been described previously, so the significance of this finding is discussed with respect to changes in behavioural and ecological role.

  17. Effect of water quality and confounding factors on digestive enzyme activities in Gammarus fossarum.

    PubMed

    Charron, L; Geffard, O; Chaumot, A; Coulaud, R; Queau, H; Geffard, A; Dedourge-Geffard, O

    2013-12-01

    The feeding activity and subsequent assimilation of the products resulting from food digestion allow organisms to obtain energy for growth, maintenance and reproduction. Among these biological parameters, we studied digestive enzymes (amylase, cellulase and trypsin) in Gammarus fossarum to assess the impact of contaminants on their access to energy resources. However, to enable objective assessment of a toxic effect of decreased water quality on an organisms' digestive capacity, it is necessary to establish reference values based on its natural variability as a function of changing biotic and abiotic factors. To limit the confounding influence of biotic factors, a caging approach with calibrated male organisms from the same population was used. This study applied an in situ deployment at 23 sites of the Rhone basin rivers, complemented by a laboratory experiment assessing the influence of two abiotic factors (temperature and conductivity). The results showed a small effect of conductivity on cellulase activity and a significant effect of temperature on digestive enzyme activity but only at the lowest temperature (7 °C). The experimental conditions allowed us to define an environmental reference value for digestive enzyme activities to select sites where the quality of the water impacted the digestive capacity of the organisms. In addition to the feeding rate, this study showed the relevance of digestive enzymes as biomarkers to be used as an early warning tool to reflect organisms' health and the chemical quality of aquatic ecosystems.

  18. Life history of the amphipod Gammarus locusta in the Sado estuary (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Filipe O.; Costa, Maria Helena

    1999-07-01

    A 2-year study was conducted on the life history of the amphipod Gammarus locusta (L.) in the Sado estuary, which comprised the analysis of distribution, abundance, dynamics and reproduction. Sampling was performed monthly at low tide by collecting the macroalgae within a 0.25-m 2 area. G. locusta is distributed along the euhaline and polihaline areas of the Sado estuary and it is usually found among macroalgae and under small stones. The lowest and highest population densities were recorded in the first and last quarter of the year, respectively. The density fluctuations were tightly coupled with the algal biomass, particularly Ulva sp. The females are iteroparous and reproduce for the first time when they reach 6-mm total length. Comparatively to other gammaridean amphipods, G. locusta has a high fecundity. Reproduction takes place throughout the year. The population is semi-annual and the reproductive cycle is of the multivoltine type. The sum of these characteristics revealed an adaptive type `r' strategy. These results are in general agreement with the current models of latitudinal variations in gammaridean life histories.

  19. Proteogenomics of Gammarus fossarum to document the reproductive system of amphipods.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Judith; Geffard, Olivier; Imbert, Gilles; Gaillard, Jean-Charles; Davin, Anne-Hélène; Chaumot, Arnaud; Armengaud, Jean

    2014-12-01

    Because of their ecological importance, amphipod crustacea are employed worldwide as test species in environmental risk assessment. Although proteomics allows new insights into the molecular mechanisms related to the stress response, such investigations are rare for these organisms because of the lack of comprehensive protein sequence databases. Here, we propose a proteogenomic approach for identifying specific proteins of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus fossarum, a keystone species in European freshwater ecosystems. After deep RNA sequencing, we created a comprehensive ORF database. We identified and annotated the most relevant proteins detected through a shotgun tandem mass spectrometry analysis carried out on the proteomes from three major tissues involved in the organism's reproductive function: the male and female reproductive systems, and the cephalon, where different neuroendocrine glands are present. The 1,873 mass-spectrometry-certified proteins represent the largest crustacean proteomic resource to date, with 218 proteins being lineage specific. Comparative proteomics between the male and female reproductive systems indicated key proteins with strong sexual dimorphism. Protein expression profiles during spermatogenesis at seven different stages highlighted the major gammarid proteins involved in the different facets of reproduction.

  20. Ontogeny of intracellular isosmotic regulation in the european lobster Homarus gammarus (L.).

    PubMed

    Haond, C; Bonnal, L; Sandeaux, R; Charmantier, G; Trilles, J P

    1999-01-01

    Intracellular free amino acids were measured in the abdominal muscle of the three larval instars, postlarvae, and juveniles of the lobster Homarus gammarus, acclimated to seawater (35 per thousand) and to a dilute medium (22 per thousand), to study intracellular isosmotic regulation throughout the development of this species. Transfer to low salinity was followed by a highly significant drop of free amino acids level in all developmental stages. The main regulated amino acids were glycine, proline, and alanine. The level of regulation of total free amino acids changed at metamorphosis: the decrease in total free amino acids at low salinity was 46% in the three larval instars, but it was only 29% in postlarvae and 20% in juveniles. These results suggest that free amino acids, mainly glycine, proline, and alanine, are involved in intracellular isosmotic regulation in the lobster, with different levels of involvement in pre- and postmetamorphic stages. The ontogenetic changes in intracellular isosmotic regulation are discussed in relation to the changes in extracellular regulation (osmoregulation) in the lobster.

  1. Changes in amino acids and lipids during embryogenesis of European lobster, Homarus gammarus (Crustacea: Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Rosa, R; Calado, R; Andrade, A M; Narciso, L; Nunes, M L

    2005-02-01

    We studied the amino acid and lipid dynamics during embryogenesis of Homarus gammarus. Major essential amino acids (EAA) in the last stage of embryonic development were arginine, lysine and leucine; major nonessential amino acids (NEAA) were glutamic acid, aspartic acid, valine and glycine. The highest percent of utilization occurred in respect to EAA (27.8%), mainly due to a significant decrease (p<0.05) of methionine (38.3%) and threonine (36.0%). NEAA also decreased significantly (p<0.05, 11.4%), namely serine (38.1%), tyrosine (26.4%) and glutamic acid (25.7%). In contrast, the free amino acid content increased significantly (p<0.05) during embryonic development, especially the free nonessential amino acids (FNEAA). In the last stage, the most abundant FNEAA were glycine, proline, alanine and taurine, and the major free essential amino acids (FEAA) were arginine, lysine and leucine. Lipid content decreased significantly (p<0.05) during embryonic development. A substantial decrease in all neutral lipid classes was observed (>80% of utilization). Major fatty acids were 16:0, 18:0, 18:1n-9, 18:2n-6, 18:3n-3, 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3. Unsaturated (UFA) and saturated fatty acids (SFA) were used up at similar rates (76.5% and 76.3%, respectively). Within UFA, monounsaturates (MUFA) were consumed more than polyunsaturates (PUFA) (82.9% and 67.5%, respectively).

  2. Microbial proliferation on gill structures of juvenile European lobster ( Homarus gammarus) during a moult cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlemiss, Karen L.; Urbina, Mauricio A.; Wilson, Rod W.

    2015-12-01

    The morphology of gill-cleaning structures is not well described in European lobster ( Homarus gammarus). Furthermore, the magnitude and time scale of microbial proliferation on gill structures is unknown to date. Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate development of setae in zoea, megalopa and juvenile stages (I-V). Microbes were classified and quantified on gill structures throughout a moult cycle from megalopa (stage IV) to juvenile (stage V). Epipodial serrulate setae, consisting of a naked proximal setal shaft with the distal portion possessing scale-like outgrowths (setules), occur only after zoea stage III. After moulting to megalopa (stage IV), gill structures were completely clean and no microbes were visible on days 1 or 5 postmoult. Microbial proliferation was first evident on day 10 postmoult, with a significant 16-fold increase from day 10 to 15. Rod-shaped bacteria were initially predominant (by day 10); however, by day 15 the microbial community was dominated by cocci-shaped bacteria. This research provides new insights into the morphology of gill-grooming structures, the timing of their development, and the magnitude, timescale and characteristics of gill microbial proliferation during a moult cycle. To some degree, the exponential growth of epibionts on gills found during a moult cycle will likely impair respiratory (gas exchange) and ion regulatory function, yet further research is needed to evaluate the physiological effects of the exponential bacterial proliferation documented here.

  3. The southwestern Carpathians as an ancient centre of diversity of freshwater gammarid amphipods: insights from the Gammarus fossarum species complex.

    PubMed

    Copilaş-Ciocianu, Denis; Petrusek, Adam

    2015-08-01

    Gammarus fossarum is a diverse species complex of epigean freshwater amphipods throughout Europe. Due to their poor dispersal capabilities and ubiquity, these crustaceans may serve as a model for investigating the influence of historical factors on the contemporary distribution and diversity patterns of freshwater macrozoobenthos. Here, we investigate the fine-scale phylogeographic structure of this complex across its range in the southwestern Carpathian Mountains, which comprises two areas that are geographically isolated from its main European distribution area as well as from each other. Given the Tertiary age of many freshwater Gammarus species, we hypothesize that the southwestern Carpathian populations reflect a relict distribution pattern. We used two mitochondrial and three nuclear markers from 32 localities to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships and estimate the timings of divergence among southwestern Carpathian and non-Carpathian lineages. Cryptic diversity was evaluated from mitochondrial markers by employing phylogenetic and distance-based methods. We distinguished at least 16 cryptic microendemic taxa, some of them coexisting, distributed in the southwestern Carpathians in a mosaic-like pattern. These lineages form a monophyletic group together with several lineages from southeastern Europe. Estimated divergence times indicate a Middle Miocene origin of this clade, with many deep splits dating back to more than 10 Ma. This time frame corresponds with a period of intense geological subsidence in the region that gave birth to the Pannonian Basin. We conclude that subsidence could have been an important driver of diversification in freshwater Gammarus and that the southwestern Carpathians represent an ancient centre of diversity for these crustaceans.

  4. Copper sulphate reduces the metabolic activity of Gammarus fossarum in laboratory and field experiments.

    PubMed

    Schmidlin, Lara; von Fumetti, Stefanie; Nagel, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The specialised fauna of freshwater springs is affected by contamination of the water with xenobiotics from human activities in the surrounding landscape. We assessed the effects of exposure to toxins in laboratory and field experiments by using copper sulphate as a model substance and Gammarus fossarum Koch, 1836, as the model organism. This amphipod is a common representative of the European spring fauna and copper is a widespread contaminant, mainly from agricultural practice. The experiments were conducted in test chambers placed in flow channels and directly in a spring. The gammarids were fed with conditioned beech leaf discs, which had been exposed to a 0.8 mg Cu/L solution for 96 h. The feeding activity of the amphipods was quantified on the level of the organism; and the respiratory electron transport system (ETS) assay was conducted in order to determine changes on the cellular level in the test organisms. The results show that the feeding activity, when the leaf discs were contaminated with copper, was not significantly different from the control. The ETS activity of the gammarids, which had been feeding on the copper contaminated leaf discs was however significantly reduced. The results followed the same pattern for gammarids from both the laboratory and the spring. By conducting the experiments not only in a laboratory but also directly in a spring in the field, we took a crucial step towards a more realistic approach when examining environmental pollutants on an organism. Our findings demonstrate the importance of conducting experiments out in the field, in natural conditions, as well as in the laboratory.

  5. The Insecticide Imidacloprid Causes Mortality of the Freshwater Amphipod Gammarus pulex by Interfering with Feeding Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Nyman, Anna-Maija; Hintermeister, Anita; Schirmer, Kristin; Ashauer, Roman

    2013-01-01

    If an organism does not feed, it dies of starvation. Even though some insecticides which are used to control pests in agriculture can interfere with feeding behavior of insects and other invertebrates, the link from chemical exposure via affected feeding activity to impaired life history traits, such as survival, has not received much attention in ecotoxicology. One of these insecticides is the neonicotinoid imidacloprid, a neurotoxic substance acting specifically on the insect nervous system. We show that imidacloprid has the potential to indirectly cause lethality in aquatic invertebrate populations at low, sublethal concentrations by impairing movements and thus feeding. We investigated feeding activity, lipid content, immobility, and survival of the aquatic arthropod Gammarus pulex under exposure to imidacloprid. We performed experiments with 14 and 21 days duration, both including two treatments with two high, one day pulses of imidacloprid and one treatment with a low, constant concentration. Feeding of G. pulex as well as lipid content were significantly reduced under exposure to the low, constant imidacloprid concentration (15 µg/L). Organisms were not able to move and feed – and this caused high mortality after 14 days of constant exposure. In contrast, feeding and lipid content were not affected by repeated imidacloprid pulses. In these treatments, animals were mostly immobilized during the chemical pulses but did recover relatively fast after transfer to clean water. We also performed a starvation experiment without exposure to imidacloprid which showed that starvation alone does not explain the mortality in the constant imidacloprid exposure. Using a multiple stressor toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic modeling approach, we showed that both starvation and other toxic effects of imidacloprid play a role for determining mortality in constant exposure to the insecticide. PMID:23690941

  6. Bioconcentration, biotransformation and elimination of pyrene in the arctic crustacean Gammarus setosus (Amphipoda) at two temperatures.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Navarro, V; Jæger, I; Honkanen, J O; Kukkonen, J V K; Carroll, JoLynn; Camus, Lionel

    2015-09-01

    The influence of temperature on the bioaccumulation, toxicokinetics, biotransformation and depuration of pyrene was studied in the arctic marine amphipod Gammarus setosus. A two-compartment model was used to fit experimental values of total body burden, total metabolites and parent pyrene concentrations and to calculate toxicokinetic variables derived for two experimental treatments (2 and 8 °C). No statistically significant differences were observed with temperature for these toxicokinetic variables or bioconcentration factors. Contrarily, the Q10 values suggested that the toxicokinetic variables ke and km were temperature-dependent. This may be explained by the high standard deviation of the Q10 values. Q10 is the variation in the rate of a metabolic reaction with a 10 °C increase in temperature. Depuration rate constants were calculated from linear best fit equations applied to measured pyrene concentrations over time during the depuration phase of the experiment. During depuration, the parent pyrene was eliminated in two stages with faster elimination observed at 8 °C compared to 2 °C. This finding was also indicated by the Q10. No changes in total body burdens of metabolite concentrations were observed during the monitoring of depuration over a period of 96 h. The biotransformation pathway of pyrene in G. setosus was also investigated in this study with two main phase II biotransformation products discovered by liquid chromatography. These products are conditionally identified as the sulphate and glucose conjugates of 1-hydroxy-pyrene. Overall, the study contributes new knowledge to the understanding of the fate of PAHs in arctic biota. In particular, the study provides valuable insight into the bioaccumulation and biotransformation of an important PAH and its metabolites in a species that serves as both a predator and prey in the arctic ecosystem.

  7. The subtle effects of sea water acidification on the amphipod Gammarus locusta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauton, C.; Tyrrell, T.; Williams, J.

    2009-08-01

    We report an investigation of the effects of increases in pCO2 on the survival, growth and molecular physiology of the neritic amphipod Gammarus locusta which has a cosmopolitan distribution in estuaries. Amphipods were reared from juvenile to mature adult in laboratory microcosms at three different levels of pH in nominal range 8.1-7.6. Growth rate was estimated from weekly measures of body length. At sexual maturity the amphipods were sacrificed and assayed for changes in the expression of genes coding for a heat shock protein (hsp70 gene) and the metabolic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapdh gene). The data show that the growth and survival of this species is not significantly impacted by a decrease in sea water pH of up to 0.5 units. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that there was no significant effect of growth in acidified sea water on the sustained expression of the hsp70 gene. There was a consistent and significant increase in the expression of the gapdh gene at a pH of ~7.5 which, when combined with observations from other workers, suggests that metabolic changes may occur in response to acidification. It is concluded that sensitive assays of tissue physiology and molecular biology should be routinely employed in future studies of the impacts of sea water acidification as subtle effects on the physiology and metabolism of coastal marine species may be overlooked in conventional gross "end-point" studies of organism growth or mortality.

  8. Acute marine sediment toxicity: a potential new test with the amphipod Gammarus locusta.

    PubMed

    Costa, F O; Correia, A D; Costa, M H

    1998-01-01

    Although amphipod toxicity tests have been successfully used in the United States to assess coastal sediment toxicity, few tests have been developed with European species. The authors have been working with the amphipod Gammarus locusta, a widely spread species along European coastal areas that is particularly abundant in the Portuguese Sado estuary. This amphipod fulfills the most important requirements of a test species. It can be easily reproduced in laboratory and it is tolerant to a broad range of sediment types. A series of tests demonstrated its sensitivity to copper and gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (lindane) in the sediment (LC50 = 6.8 mg Cu/dry kg, 0.9% total volatile solids; LC50 = 60.5 micrograms HCH/dry kg, 2% total volatile solids) and to some heavily contaminated field sediments. After assessment of the species sensitivity to several noncontaminant variables, an experimental protocol was designed to conduct acute sediment toxicity tests that are briefly described. Proposed is a 10-day static toxicity test at 15 degrees C and 33-34/1000 salinity, with laboratory-produced juveniles and mortality as the endpoint. General assay performance is identical to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard for sediment toxicity tests with marine and estuarine amphipods. The results previously obtained revealed a strong potential for this amphipod to be used in toxicological testing. Considering the wide geographic distribution of this species and its amenability for culturing, it may be an alternative or complementary test for ecotoxicological studies in other European coastal systems where the existing tests cannot be applied or do not offer a definitive solution.

  9. Parasites, pathogens and commensals in the "low-impact" non-native amphipod host Gammarus roeselii.

    PubMed

    Bojko, Jamie; Bącela-Spychalska, Karolina; Stebbing, Paul D; Dunn, Alison M; Grabowski, Michał; Rachalewski, Michał; Stentiford, Grant D

    2017-04-20

    Whilst vastly understudied, pathogens of non-native species (NNS) are increasingly recognised as important threats to native wildlife. This study builds upon recent recommendations for improved screening for pathogens in NNS by focusing on populations of Gammarus roeselii in Chojna, north-western Poland. At this location, and in other parts of continental Europe, G. roeselii is considered a well-established and relatively 'low-impact' invader, with little understanding about its underlying pathogen profile and even less on potential spill-over of these pathogens to native species. Using a combination of histological, ultrastructural and phylogenetic approaches, we define a pathogen profile for non-native populations of G. roeselii in Poland. This profile comprised acanthocephalans (Polymorphus minutus Goese, 1782 and Pomphorhynchus sp.), digenean trematodes, commensal rotifers, commensal and parasitic ciliated protists, gregarines, microsporidia, a putative rickettsia-like organism, filamentous bacteria and two viral pathogens, the majority of which are previously unknown to science. To demonstrate potential for such pathogenic risks to be characterised from a taxonomic perspective, one of the pathogens, a novel microsporidian, is described based upon its pathology, developmental cycle and SSU rRNA gene phylogeny. The novel microsporidian Cucumispora roeselii n. sp. displayed closest morphological and phylogenetic similarity to two previously described taxa, Cucumispora dikerogammari (Ovcharenko & Kurandina, 1987), and Cucumispora ornata Bojko, Dunn, Stebbing, Ross, Kerr & Stentiford, 2015. In addition to our discovery extending the host range for the genus Cucumispora Ovcharenko, Bacela, Wilkinson, Ironside, Rigaud & Wattier, 2010 outside of the amphipod host genus Dikerogammarus Stebbing, we reveal significant potential for the co-transfer of (previously unknown) pathogens alongside this host when invading novel locations. This study highlights the importance of

  10. Linking feeding inhibition with reproductive impairment in Gammarus confirms the ecological relevance of feeding assays in environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Coulaud, Romain; Geffard, Olivier; Vigneron, Amandine; Quéau, Hervé; François, Adeline; Chaumot, Arnaud

    2015-05-01

    The in situ feeding bioassay in Gammarus fossarum is recognized as a reliable tool for monitoring the toxicity of freshwater contamination. However, whether recorded feeding inhibitions can potentially provoke population-level adverse outcomes remains an open question. In the present study, the authors present an experimental study in G. fossarum, which contributes to the quantitative description of the links between feeding inhibitions and impacts on female reproductive performance. The authors studied the impacts of food deprivation on reproductive endpoints (i.e., fecundity, fertility, molt cycle) during 2 successive molting cycles. Among the main results, the authors found that food deprivation triggered a slowdown of the molting process and a reduction in fertility but no alteration to embryonic development. These reproductive impairments appeared for feeding inhibition values usually recorded in monitoring programs of environmental pollution. Using a population model translating Gammarus life-history, the authors predicted that the observed reproductive alterations predict a strong degradation of population dynamics. The present study underlines the importance of feeding inhibition in population-level risk assessment and discusses how establishing upscaling schemes based on quantitative mechanistic links between impacts at different levels of biological organization can be applied in environmental monitoring to propose an ecotoxicological assessment of water quality, which would be sensitive, specific, and ecologically relevant. © 2015 SETAC.

  11. Habitat segregation mediates predation by the benthic fish Cottus gobio on the exotic amphipod species Gammarus roeseli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaldonski, Nicolas; Lagrue, Clément; Motreuil, Sébastien; Rigaud, Thierry; Bollache, Loïc

    2008-09-01

    Predation is often considered as one of the most important biotic factor determining the success of exotic species. The freshwater amphipod Gammarus roeseli has widely colonized Western Europe, where it is frequently found in sympatry with the native species ( Gammarus pulex). Previous laboratory experiments revealed that G. roeseli may have an advantage over G. pulex through differential predation by native fish (brown trout). Morphological anti-predator defences (spines) were found responsible for lower rates of predation on the invasive G. roeseli. Here, using both field surveys and laboratory experiments, we tested if a differential of predation exists with other fish predators naturally encountered by gammarids. The main predators present in our field site were nocturnal benthic feeders (mainly bullheads, Cottus gobio). Fish diet analysis showed that, compared to its global availability in the river, G. roeseli was less consumed than G. pulex. In the field, however, G. roeseli was found mainly in the aquatic vegetation whereas G. pulex was found in all habitat types. Laboratory experiments in microcosms revealed that G. roeseli was less prone to predation by C. gobio only when vegetation was present. Depending on the type of predator, the differential of predation could therefore be mediated by antipredator behaviour, and a better usage of refuges, rather than by morphological defences.

  12. Effect of CO2-related acidification on aspects of the larval development of the European lobster, Homarus gammarus (L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, K. E.; Findlay, H. S.; Spicer, J. I.; Daniels, C. L.; Boothroyd, D.

    2009-03-01

    Oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 results in a reduction in pH termed "Ocean Acidification" (OA). Comparatively little attention has been given to the effect of OA on the early life history stages of marine animals. Consequently, we investigated the effect of culture in CO2-acidified sea water (approx. 1200 ppm, i.e. average values predicted using IPCC 2007 A1F1 emissions scenarios for year 2100) on early larval stages of an economically important crustacean, the European lobster Homarus gammarus. Culture in CO2-acidified sea water did not significantly affect carapace length or development of H. gammarus. However, there was a reduction in carapace mass during the final stage of larval development in CO2-acidified sea water. This co-occurred with a reduction in exoskeletal mineral (calcium and magnesium) content of the carapace. As the control and high CO2 treatments were not undersaturated with respect to any of the calcium carbonate polymorphs measured, the physiological alterations we record are most likely the result of acidosis or hypercapnia interfering with normal homeostatic function, and not a direct impact on the carbonate supply-side of calcification per se. Thus despite there being no observed effect on survival, carapace length, or zoeal progression, OA related (indirect) disruption of calcification and carapace mass might still adversely affect the competitive fitness and recruitment success of larval lobsters with serious consequences for population dynamics and marine ecosystem function.

  13. Effect of CO2-related acidification on aspects of the larval development of the European lobster, Homarus gammarus (L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, K. E.; Findlay, H. S.; Spicer, J. I.; Daniels, C. L.; Boothroyd, D.

    2009-08-01

    Oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 results in a reduction in pH termed "Ocean Acidification" (OA). Comparatively little attention has been given to the effect of OA on the early life history stages of marine animals. Consequently, we investigated the effect of culture in CO2-acidified sea water (approx. 1200 ppm, i.e. average values predicted using IPCC 2007 A1F1 emissions scenarios for year 2100) on early larval stages of an economically important crustacean, the European lobster Homarus gammarus. Culture in CO2-acidified sea water did not significantly affect carapace length of H. gammarus. However, there was a reduction in carapace mass during the final stage of larval development in CO2-acidified sea water. This co-occurred with a reduction in exoskeletal mineral (calcium and magnesium) content of the carapace. As the control and high CO2 treatments were not undersaturated with respect to any of the calcium carbonate polymorphs measured, the physiological alterations we record are most likely the result of acidosis or hypercapnia interfering with normal homeostatic function, and not a direct impact on the carbonate supply-side of calcification per se. Thus despite there being no observed effect on survival, carapace length, or zoeal progression, OA related (indirect) disruption of calcification and carapace mass might still adversely affect the competitive fitness and recruitment success of larval lobsters with serious consequences for population dynamics and marine ecosystem function.

  14. Homarus gammarus (Crustacea: Decapoda) larvae under an ocean acidification scenario: Responses across different levels of biological organization.

    PubMed

    Rato, Lénia D; Novais, Sara C; Lemos, Marco F L; Alves, Luís M F; Leandro, Sérgio M

    2017-09-17

    The present study evaluated the effects of exposure to different target pCO2 levels: control (C: 370μatm, pH = 8.15) and ocean acidification (OA: 710μatm, pH=7.85) on development and biochemical responses related with oxidative stress and energy metabolism during the crustacean Homarus gammarus (L.) larval development, integrating different levels of biological organization. After hatching in the laboratory, larvae from the same female brood were exposed to the described conditions from hatching until reaching Stage III (last larval stage - 11 days). H. gammarus larvae demonstrated some susceptibility when addressing the predicted pCO2 levels for 2100. Further analysis at the biochemical and physiological level highlighted the occurrence of oxidative stress in the OA scenario (Superoxide Dismutase reduction and higher DNA damage) that was followed by developmental effects, increased inter-moult period from SII to SIII and reduced growth. The extended exposure to these conditions may affect organisms' key life-cycle functions such as physiological resistance, growth, sexual maturation, or reproduction with implications in their future fitness and population dynamics. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Impact of an estrogenic sewage treatment plant effluent on life-history traits of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ilona; Oehlmann, Jörg; Oetken, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Despite efforts to upgrade sewage treatment plants (STPs) in the last decades, STPs are still a major source for the contamination of surface waters, including emerging pollutants such as pesticides, pharmaceuticals, personal care products and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Because many of these substances are not completely removed in conventional STPs they are regularly detected in surface waters where they have the potential to affect local macroinvertebrate communities. The objective of the current work was to investigate the impact of an estrogenic wastewater effluent on the key life-history traits of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex. G. pulex was exposed in artificial indoor flow-channels under constant conditions to different wastewater concentrations (0%, 33%, 66%, 100%). In parallel the estrogenic activity of wastewater samples was determined using the yeast estrogen screen (YES). Estrogenic activities in the STP effluent were up to 38.6 ng/L estradiol equivalents (EEQ). Amphipods exhibited an increasing body length with increasing wastewater concentrations. Furthermore, we observed a shift of the sex ratio in favour of females, a significantly increased fraction of brooding females and increased fecundity indices with increasing wastewater concentrations. The increased body length is likely to be attributed to the additional nutrient supply while the occurrence of EDCs in the wastewater is the probable cause for the altered sex ratio and fecundity in exposed Gammarus cohorts.

  16. Metal release from contaminated leaf litter and leachate toxicity for the freshwater crustacean Gammarus fossarum.

    PubMed

    Maunoury-Danger, Florence; Felten, Vincent; Bojic, Clément; Fraysse, Fabrice; Cosin Ponce, Mar; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Geffard, Alain; Guérold, François; Danger, Michael

    2017-06-18

    Industrialization has left large surfaces of contaminated soils, which may act as a source of pollution for contiguous ecosystems, either terrestrial or aquatic. When polluted sites are recolonized by plants, dispersion of leaf litter might represent a non-negligible source of contaminants, especially metals. To evaluate the risks associated to contaminated leaf litter dispersion in aquatic ecosystems, we first measured the dynamics of metal loss from leaf litter during a 48-h experimental leaching. We used aspen (Populus tremula L.), a common tree species on these polluted sites, and collected leaf litter on three polluted sites (settling pond of a former steel mill) and three control sites situated in the same geographic area. Then, toxicity tests were carried out on individuals of a key detritivore species widely used in ecotoxicology tests, Gammarus fossarum (Crustacea, Amphipoda), with uncontaminated and contaminated leaf litter leachates, using a battery of biomarkers selected for their sensitivity to metallic stress. Leaf litters collected on polluted sites exhibited not only significantly higher cadmium and zinc concentrations but also lower lignin contents. All leaf litters released high amounts of chemical elements during the leaching process, especially potassium and magnesium, and, in a lesser extent, phosphorus, calcium, and trace metals (copper, cadmium, and zinc but not lead). Toxicity tests revealed that the most important toxic effects measured on G. fossarum were due to leaf litter leachates by themselves, whatever the origin of litter (from polluted or control sites), confirming the toxicity of such substances, probably due to their high content in phenolic compounds. Small additional toxic effects of leachates from contaminated leaf litters were only evidenced on gammarid lipid peroxidation, indicating that contaminated leaf litter leachates might be slightly more toxic than uncontaminated ones, but in a very reduced manner. Further studies will

  17. Gammarus fossarum (Crustacea, Amphipoda) as a model organism to study the effects of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mehennaoui, Kahina; Georgantzopoulou, Anastasia; Felten, Vincent; Andreï, Jennifer; Garaud, Maël; Cambier, Sébastien; Serchi, Tommaso; Pain-Devin, Sandrine; Guérold, François; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Giambérini, Laure; Gutleb, Arno C

    2016-10-01

    Amphipods are one of the most important components of freshwater ecosystems. Among them, gammarids are the most widespread group in Europe and are often used as bioindicators and model organisms in ecotoxicology. However, their use, especially of Gammarus fossarum for the study of the environmental impact of nanoparticles, has been rather limited so far. G. fossarum was selected to assess effects of well-characterized chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs 20nm and 200nm) and "green" laboratory synthetized (from plant leaf extracts) AgNPs (AgNPs 23nm and 27nm). AgNO3 was used as a positive control to compare AgNPs effects and silver ions effects. A multibiomarker approach was used to investigate the sub-lethal effects of AgNPs on physiological and behavioural responses of G. fossarum. Two different experiments were carried out. In a preliminary experiment, two populations of G. fossarum (G.f1 and G.f2) were tested for sensitivity differences and the most sensitive one was exposed, in a final experiment, to sub-lethal concentrations of AgNO3 and the most toxic AgNPs. AgNO3 and AgNPs 23nm led to a significant decrease in survival rates, osmoregulation and locomotor activity. Ag internalisation, performed with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), showed the presence of silver in gills of G.f2 exposed to AgNPs 23 and 27nm. This study highlighted the influence of method of synthesis on ion release, uptake and toxic effects of AgNPs on G. fossarum. Osmoregulation appeared to be an effective biomarker indicating the physiological health status of G. fossarum. Locomotor activity, which was the most impacted response, reflects the potential effects of released ions from AgNPs 23nm at the population level as locomotion is necessary for foraging, finding mates and escaping from predators. Therefore, we propose G. fossarum as a suitable model for environmental nanotoxicology, providing information both at individual and population levels. Copyright © 2016

  18. Is fatter fitter? Body storage and reproduction in ten populations of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus minus.

    PubMed

    Glazier, D S

    2000-02-01

    Relationships between body storage (estimated as fat content and residuals of body mass regressed against body length) and offspring investment [brood mass, brood size (number of embryos per brood) and embryo mass] were examined within and among populations of the amphipod Gammarus minus in ten cold springs in central Pennsylvania, USA. Two major hypotheses and six corollary hypotheses were tested. Total reproductive investment (brood mass and brood size) was usually strongly positively correlated with maternal body length and body storage both within and among populations. These positive associations between reproductive and somatic investments are expected if individual variation in resource acquisition exceeds that of resource allocation. That is, individuals or populations that are able to acquire more resources should also be able to allocate more resources to both reproduction and somatic reserves than those acquiring fewer resources. This hypothesis is consistent with evidence showing that individual differences in body storage in G. minus and other amphipods are related to differences in resource acquisition. Positive associations between reproductive and somatic investments do not mean that energy costs of reproduction do not exist in G. minus. Evidence for reproductive energy costs included the lower body-fat contents of brooding versus nonbrooding females and the relatively low body mass per length of females who had just deposited eggs in their brood pouch. Unlike brood mass and brood size, individual embryo mass was usually unrelated to maternal body length and body storage. This pattern is largely consistent with optimal offspring investment theory, which predicts that offspring size should be insensitive to variation in parental resource status. However, in contrast to theory, embryo mass increased in winter when brooding females were significantly "fatter", presumably due to the availability of autumn-shed leaf food. This seasonal change in

  19. Response of Gammarus pulex and Baetis rhodani to springtime acid episodes in humic brooks.

    PubMed

    Andrén, C M; Eriksson Wiklund, A-K

    2013-10-01

    While chronic acidification of water bodies has been steadily decreasing, episodic acidification continues to affect stream biology by temporarily decreasing pH and mobilizing aluminum. These events are becoming more common as climate change renders more frequent and intense storms and flooding. Throughout Scandinavia, the effects of acidification have been mitigated by liming since the 1980s, but remediation efforts can now be reduced. While transient acidity may reduce fish populations, also other species in streams are affected. In this in-stream study, two macro-invertebrates (Gammarus pulex and Baetis rhodani), both known as salmonid prey organisms, were exposed to snowmelt in six humic brooks with a natural gradient of pH and inorganic monomeric Al (Al(i)). We hypothesize that acid toxicity thresholds can be defined using lethal (mortality) and sublethal (changes in body elemental content) metrics. Periodic observations were made of mortality and whole body concentrations of base cations (BC: Ca, Mg, Na and K) and metals (Al, Fe, Zn and Mn). Mortality increased dramatically at pH<6.0 and Al(i)>15 μg/L for G. pulex and at pH<5.7 and Al(i)>20 μg/L for B. rhodani. No accumulation of Al was found. The invertebrate body Na concentration decreased when pH dropped, suggesting that osmoregulation in both species was affected. In contrast to general BC pattern, Ca concentration in G. pulex and Mg concentration in B. rhodani increased when pH decreased. Although Al(i) strongly correlates to pH, the Al composition of soil and bedrock also influences Al availability, potentially contributing to toxic Al(i) episodes. The estimated values calculated in this study can be used to improve water quality criteria and as thresholds to adjust doses of lime compared to old recommendations in ongoing liming programs. Such adjustments may be critical since both Al(i) and pH levels have to be balanced to mitigate damage to recovering stream ecosystems.

  20. A biodynamic model predicting waterborne lead bioaccumulation in Gammarus pulex: Influence of water chemistry and in situ validation.

    PubMed

    Urien, N; Uher, E; Billoir, E; Geffard, O; Fechner, L C; Lebrun, J D

    2015-08-01

    Metals bioaccumulated in aquatic organisms are considered to be a good indicator of bioavailable metal contamination levels in freshwaters. However, bioaccumulation depends on the metal, the species, and the water chemistry that influences metal bioavailability. In the laboratory, a kinetic model was used to describe waterborne Pb bioaccumulated in Gammarus pulex. Uptake and elimination rate constants were successfully determined and the effect of Ca(2+) on Pb uptake was integrated into the model. Thereafter, accumulated Pb concentrations in organisms were predicted with the model and compared with those measured in native populations from the Seine watershed (France). The predictions had a good agreement with the bioaccumulation levels observed in native gammarids and particularly when the effect of calcium was considered. To conclude, kinetic parameters experimentally derived for Pb in G. pulex are applicable in environmental conditions. Moreover, the consideration of the water's chemistry is crucial for a reliable interpretation of bioaccumulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of the copepod parasite Nicothoë astaci on haemolymph chemistry of the European lobster Homarus gammarus.

    PubMed

    Davies, Charlotte E; Vogan, Claire L; Rowley, Andrew F

    2015-03-09

    The gills of the European lobster Homarus gammarus (L.) are susceptible to parasitization by the copepod Nicothoë astaci, the lobster louse. This copepod feeds on haemolymph of the host and can damage the gills, potentially affecting gaseous exchange capabilities. To investigate the host response to the parasite, haemolymph levels of total protein, haemocyanin, glucose and ammonia were quantified in adult lobsters carrying varying parasite loads. Parasite loads correlated positively with total haemolymph protein and haemocyanin concentrations but not with glucose or ammonia concentrations. The data suggest that lobsters with gills damaged by the feeding activities of N. astaci respond by producing higher levels of haemocyanin, which is both a key defence response and may compensate for their decreased respiratory functioning.

  2. Evolution of cadmium tolerance and associated costs in a Gammarus fossarum population inhabiting a low-level contaminated stream.

    PubMed

    Vigneron, A; Geffard, O; Coquery, M; François, A; Quéau, H; Chaumot, A

    2015-08-01

    Deciphering evolutionary processes occurring within long-term contaminated wild populations is essential for the ecological risk assessment of persistent chemical contaminations. Using field populations of Gammarus, a commonly-used genus in aquatic ecotoxicology, the present study sought to gain insights into the extent to which long-term exposure to metals in the field could effectively lead to shifts in toxicological sensitivities. For this, we identified a Gammarus population inhabiting a stream contaminated by cadmium (Cd). We compared the Cd-exposure and Cd-sensitivity of this population to those of five reference populations. Active biomonitoring determined in different years and seasons that significant levels of Cd were bioavailable in the contaminated site. Laboratory sensitivity tests under common garden conditions established that this long-term field exposure led to the development of a moderate Cd tolerance, which was maintained after a 3-week acclimatization in the laboratory, and transmitted to offspring produced under clean conditions. The potential physiological costs of tolerance were assessed by means of feeding rate measurements (in the laboratory and in situ). They revealed that, unlike for reference populations, the feeding activity of organisms from the tolerant population was greatly decreased when they were maintained under laboratory conditions, potentially indicating a high population vulnerability to environmental perturbations. Because dissolved Cd concentrations in water from the contaminated site were low (averaging 0.045 µg L(-1)) and below the current European environmental quality standard for Cd for inland surface waters (fixed at 0.08 µg L(-1) in soft water environments), this case study sheds light onto the extent to which current environmental quality standards are protective against potential adverse outcomes of adaptive and micro-evolutionary processes occurring in contaminated environments.

  3. Waterborne toxicity and diet-related effects of fungicides in the key leaf shredder Gammarus fossarum (Crustacea: Amphipoda).

    PubMed

    Zubrod, J P; Englert, D; Wolfram, J; Wallace, D; Schnetzer, N; Baudy, P; Konschak, M; Schulz, R; Bundschuh, M

    2015-12-01

    Animals involved in leaf litter breakdown (i.e., shredders) play a central role in detritus-based stream food webs, while their fitness and functioning can be impaired by anthropogenic stressors. Particularly fungicides can affect shredders via both waterborne exposure and their diet, namely due to co-ingestion of adsorbed fungicides and shifts in the leaf-associated fungal community, on which shredders' nutrition heavily relies. To understand the relevance of these effect pathways, we used a full 2×2-factorial test design: the leaf material serving as food was microbially colonized for 12 days either in a fungicide-free control or exposed to a mixture of five current-use fungicides (sum concentration of 62.5μg/L). Similarly, the amphipod shredder Gammarus fossarum was subjected to the same treatments but for 24 days. Waterborne exposure reduced leaf consumption by ∼20%, which did not fully explain the reduction in feces production (∼30%), indicating an enhanced utilization of food to compensate for detoxification mechanisms. This may also explain the reduced feces production (∼10%) of gammarids feeding on fungicide-exposed leaves. The reduction may, however, also be caused by a decreased nutritious quality of the leaves indicated by a reduced species richness (∼40%) of leaf-associated fungi. However, compensation for these effects by Gammarus was seemingly incomplete, since both waterborne exposure and the consumption of the fungicide-affected diet drastically reduced gammarid growth (∼110% and ∼40%, respectively). Our results thus indicate that fungicide mixtures have the potential for detrimental implications in aquatic ecosystem functioning by affecting shredders via both effect pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Widely distributed and regionally isolated! Drivers of genetic structure in Gammarus fossarum in a human-impacted landscape.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Martina; Leese, Florian

    2016-07-29

    The actual connectivity between populations of freshwater organisms is largely determined by species biology, but is also influenced by many area- and site-specific factors, such as water pollution and habitat fragmentation. Therefore, the prediction of effective gene flow, even for well-studied organisms, is difficult. The amphipod crustacean Gammarus fossarum is a key invertebrate in freshwater ecosystems and contains many cryptic species. One of these species is the broadly distributed G. fossarum clade 11 (type B). In this study, we tested for factors driving the genetic structure of G. fossarum clade 11 in a human-impacted landscape at local and regional scales. To determine population structure, we analyzed the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 (CO1) gene of 2,086 specimens from 54 sampling sites and microsatellite loci of 420 of these specimens from ten sites. We detected strong overall genetic differentiation between populations at regional and local scales with both independent marker systems, often even within few kilometers. Interestingly, we observed only a weak correlation of genetic distances with geographic distances or catchment boundaries. Testing for factors explaining the observed population structure revealed, that it was mostly the colonization history, which has influenced the structure rather than any of the chosen environmental factors. Whereas the number of in-stream barriers did not explain population differentiation, the few large water reservoirs in the catchment likely act as dispersal barriers. We showed that populations of Gammarus fossarum clade 11 are strongly isolated even at local scales in the human-impacted region. The observed genetic structure was best explained by the effects of random genetic drift acting independently on isolated populations after historical colonization events. Genetic drift in isolated populations was probably further enhanced by anthropogenic impacts, as G. fossarum is sensitive to many anthropogenic

  5. Epibiotic rotifers of Gammarus pulex (L.) (Crustacea, Amphipoda), with descriptions of two new species and notes on the terminology of the trophi.

    PubMed

    Smet, Willem H De; Verolet, Michel

    2016-05-03

    The epibiotic rotifers of a Gammarus pulex (L.) collection from the Ardèche, France are reported. Four species were found, of which Cephalodella jersabeki n. sp. and Proales gammaricola n. sp. are new to science and described. The other species, Dicranophorus cambari Wulfert and Embata laticeps (Murray), are commented upon. SEM micrographs of the trophi are presented, and a new or amended terminology is proposed for some diagnostic trophi parts.

  6. Limited prevalence of gaffkaemia (Aerococcus viridans var. homari) isolated from wild-caught European lobsters Homarus gammarus in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Stebbing, P D; Pond, M J; Peeler, E; Small, H J; Greenwood, S J; Verner-Jeffreys, D

    2012-08-27

    Gaffkaemia, caused by Aerococcus viridans var. homari, causes fatal infections in Homarus spp. (clawed lobsters). Despite its high economic significance to the lobster fisheries in the USA and northern Europe, data on its prevalence in captured and wild populations, particularly in Europe, is scarce. Following an outbreak of gaffkaemia in a European lobster holding facility in South Wales (UK), a base-line survey was conducted for gaffkaemia in wild populations of European lobster Homarus gammarus around the coast of England and Wales. In addition, isolates recovered from the original outbreak and the survey were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and compared with previously characterised isolates from the USA, UK and Canada. Locally caught H. gammarus were sampled at 30 sites from around the coast of England and Wales between March 2006 and October 2008. Results confirmed that the prevalence of gaffkaemia in populations of H. gammarus was low, with only 9 positive isolates recovered from 952 samples examined. PFGE analysis showed that the isolates from the outbreak investigation shared the same pulsotype as A. viridans var. homari isolates from the USA, Norway and Canada, as well as an isolate (NCIMB 1119) reportedly recovered from an outbreak of European lobsters in England in the 1960s. This confirms earlier studies that suggest virulent strains of A. viridans var. homari show very limited geographical or temporal genetic variation and were introduced into the UK with American lobsters H. americanus.

  7. Effects of current-use fungicides and their mixtures on the feeding and survival of the key shredder Gammarus fossarum.

    PubMed

    Zubrod, J P; Baudy, P; Schulz, R; Bundschuh, M

    2014-05-01

    Fungicides are frequently applied in agriculture and are subsequently detected in surface waters in total concentrations of up to several tens of micrograms per liter. These concentrations imply potential effects on aquatic communities and fundamental ecosystem functions such as leaf litter breakdown. In this context, the present study investigates sublethal and lethal effects of organic (azoxystrobin, carbendazim, cyprodinil, quinoxyfen, and tebuconazole) and inorganic (three copper (Cu)-based substances and sulfur) current-use fungicides and their mixtures on the key leaf-shredding invertebrate Gammarus fossarum. The feeding activity of fungicide-exposed gammarids was quantified as sublethal endpoint using a static (organic fungicides; 7 d test duration) or a semi-static (inorganic fungicides; 6 d test duration with a water exchange after 3 d) approach (n=30). EC50-values of organic fungicides were generally observed at concentrations resulting in less than 20% mortality, with the exception of carbendazim. With regard to feeding, quinoxyfen was the most toxic organic fungicide, followed by cyprodinil, carbendazim, azoxystrobin, and tebuconazole. Although all tested organic fungicides have dissimilar (intended) modes of action, a mixture experiment revealed a synergistic effect on gammarids' feeding at high concentrations when using "independent action" as the reference model (∼35% deviation between predicted and observed effect). This may be explained by the presence of a synergizing azole fungicide (i.e. tebuconazole) in this mixture. Furthermore, lethal concentrations of all Cu-based fungicides assessed in this study were comparable amongst one another. However, they differed markedly in their effective concentrations when using feeding activity as the endpoint, with Cu-sulfate being most toxic, followed by Cu-hydroxide and Cu-octanoate. In contrast, sulfur neither affected survival nor the feeding activity of gammarids (up to ∼5 mg/L) but reduced Cu

  8. Investigation of the soluble metals in tissue as biological response pattern to environmental pollutants (Gammarus fossarum example).

    PubMed

    Filipović Marijić, Vlatka; Dragun, Zrinka; Sertić Perić, Mirela; Matoničkin Kepčija, Renata; Gulin, Vesna; Velki, Mirna; Ečimović, Sandra; Hackenberger, Branimir K; Erk, Marijana

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, Gammarus fossarum was used to investigate the bioaccumulation and toxic effects of aquatic pollutants in the real environmental conditions. The novelty of the study is the evaluation of soluble tissue metal concentrations in gammarids as indicators in early assessment of metal exposure. In the Sutla River, industrially/rurally/agriculturally influenced catchment in North-Western Croatia, physico-chemical water properties pointed to disturbed ecological status, which was reflected on population scale as more than 50 times lower gammarid density compared to the reference location, Črnomerec Stream. Significantly higher levels of soluble toxic metals (Al, As, Cd, Pb, Sb, Sn, Sr) were observed in gammarids from the Sutla River compared to the reference site and reflected the data on higher total dissolved metal levels in the river water at that site. The soluble metal estimates were supplemented with the common multibiomarker approach, which showed significant biological responses for decreased acetylcholinesterase activity and increased total soluble protein concentrations, confirming stressed environmental conditions for biota in the Sutla River. Biomarker of metal exposure, metallothionein, was not induced and therefore, toxic effect of metals was not confirmed on molecular level. Comparable between-site pattern of soluble toxic metals in gammarids and total dissolved metal levels in water suggests that prior to biomarker response and observed toxic impact, soluble metals in tissue might be used as early warning signs of metal impact in the aquatic environment and improve the assessment of water quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Modeling the contribution of toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic processes to the recovery of Gammarus pulex populations after exposure to pesticides.

    PubMed

    Galic, Nika; Ashauer, Roman; Baveco, Hans; Nyman, Anna-Maija; Barsi, Alpar; Thorbek, Pernille; Bruns, Eric; Van den Brink, Paul J

    2014-07-01

    Because aquatic macroinvertebrates may be exposed regularly to pesticides in edge-of-the-field water bodies, an accurate assessment of potential adverse effects and subsequent population recovery is essential. Standard effect risk assessment tools are not able to fully address the complexities arising from multiple exposure patterns, nor can they properly address the population recovery process. In the present study, we developed an individual-based model of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex to evaluate the consequences of exposure to 4 compounds with different modes of action on individual survival and population recovery. Effects on survival were calculated using concentration-effect relationships and the threshold damage model (TDM), which accounts for detailed processes of toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics. Delayed effects as calculated by the TDM had a significant impact on individual survival and population recovery. We also evaluated the standard assessment of effects after short-term exposures using the 96-h concentration-effect model and the TDM, which was conservative for very short-term exposure. An integration of a TKTD submodel with a population model can be used to explore the ecological relevance of ecotoxicity endpoints in different exposure environments. © 2014 SETAC.

  10. Variation and covariation in infectivity, virulence and immunodepression in the host–parasite association Gammarus pulex–Pomphorhynchus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Cornet, Stéphane; Franceschi, Nathalie; Bollache, Loïc; Rigaud, Thierry; Sorci, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    Parasites often manipulate host immunity for their own benefit, either by exacerbating or suppressing the immune response and this may directly affect the expression of parasite virulence. However, genetic variation in immunodepression, which is a prerequisite to its evolution, and the relationship between immunodepression and virulence, have rarely been studied. Here, we investigated the variation among sibships of the acanthocephalan parasite, Pomphorhynchus laevis, in infecting and in immunodepressing its amphipod host, Gammarus pulex. We also assessed the covariation between infectivity, parasite-induced immune depression and host mortality (parasite virulence). We found that infectivity, the intensity of immunodepression and virulence were variable among parasite sibships. Infectivity and the level of immunodepression were not correlated across parasite sibships. Whereas infectivity was unrelated to host mortality, we found that gammarids that were exposed to the parasite sibships that immunodepressed their hosts the most survived better. This positive covariation between host survival and immunodepression suggests that gammarids exposed to the less immunodepressive parasites could suffer from damage imposed by a higher activity of the phenoloxidase. PMID:19726474

  11. An Enriched Environment Promotes Shelter-Seeking Behaviour and Survival of Hatchery-Produced Juvenile European Lobster (Homarus gammarus)

    PubMed Central

    Aspaas, Stian; Grefsrud, Ellen Sofie; Fernö, Anders; Jensen, Knut Helge; Trengereid, Henrik; Agnalt, Ann-Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    The high loss of newly released hatchery-reared European lobster (Homarus gammarus) juveniles for stock enhancement is believed to be the result of maladaptive anti-predator behaviour connected to deprived stimuli in the hatchery environment. Our objective was to learn if an enriched hatchery environment enhances shelter-seeking behaviour and survival. In the “naïve” treatment, the juveniles were raised in single compartments without substrate and shelter whereas juveniles in the “exposed” treatment experienced substrate, shelter and interactions with conspecifics. Three experiments with increasing complexity were conducted. Few differences in shelter-seeking behaviour were found between treatments when one naïve or one exposed juvenile were observed alone. When observing interactions between one naïve and one exposed juvenile competing for shelter, naïve juveniles more often initiated the first aggressive encounter. The third experiment was set up to simulate a release for stock enhancement. Naïve and exposed juveniles were introduced to a semi-natural environment including substrate, a limited number of shelters and interactions with conspecifics. Shelter occupancy was recorded three times during a period of 35 days. Exposed juveniles occupied more shelters, grew larger and had higher survival compared with naïve juveniles. Our results demonstrate that experience of environmental complexity and social interactions increase shelter-seeking ability and survival in hatchery reared lobster juveniles. PMID:27560932

  12. Modulatory effects of the serotonergic and histaminergic systems on reaction to light in the crustacean Gammarus pulex.

    PubMed

    Perrot-Minnot, Marie-Jeanne; Dion, Emilie; Cézilly, Frank

    2013-12-01

    Serotonin modulates reaction to light in many animals. In the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex, exogenous administration of serotonin induces a transient reversal of photic behaviour from strong photophobia to photophily. We have elucidated further the neuromodulation of photic behaviour in G. pulex by using in vivo pharmacology and behavioural testing. Using several mammalian 5-HT receptor antagonists and agonists, we provide evidence for a role of serotonin receptors in the 5-HT-dependent regulation of G. pulex photic behaviour, possibly involving 5-HTR2 subtype. Serotonin-induced photophily was blocked by the 5-HT receptor antagonists, mianserin, cyproheptadine, and ritanserin, but not by ketanserin and methiothepin. In addition, two agonists at 5-HT receptor, mCPP and α-methylserotonin, partially mimicked 5-HT-induced photophily. The natural photophobia of G. pulex was also decreased by exogenous administration of the histamine receptor antagonist cimetidine, suggesting that photic behaviour may be controlled by more complex interactions between serotonergic and histaminergic systems.

  13. Unexpected toxic interactions in the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex (L.) exposed to binary copper and nickel mixtures.

    PubMed

    Charles, Jérémie; Crini, Grégorio; Degiorgi, François; Sancey, Bertrand; Morin-Crini, Nadia; Badot, Pierre-Marie

    2014-01-01

    To document the toxicity of copper and nickel in binary mixtures, freshwater amphipods Gammarus pulex were exposed to the metals given independently or as mixtures. Toxicity to Cu alone was relatively high: 96-h LC10 and LC50 were found at 91 and 196 μg L(-1), respectively. Toxicity to Ni alone was very low, with 96-h LC10 and LC50 of 44,900 and 79,200 μg L(-1), respectively. Mixture toxicities were calculated from single toxicity data using conventional models. Modeled toxicity was then compared with the measured toxicity of the binary mixture. Two kinds of mixtures were tested. Type I mixtures were designed as combinations of Cu and Ni given at the same effect concentrations, when taken independently, to identify possible interactions between copper and nickel. In type II mixtures, Cu concentrations varied from 0 to 600 μg L(-1) while the nickel concentration was kept constant at 500 μg L(-1) to mimic conditions of industrial wastewater discharges. Ni and Cu showed synergic effects in type I mixtures while type II mixtures revealed antagonistic effects. Low doses of Ni reduced Cu toxicity towards G. pulex. These results show that even for simple binary mixtures of contaminants with known chemistry and toxicity, unexpected interactions between the contaminants may occur. This reduces the reliability of conventional additivity models.

  14. Consequences of lower food intake on the digestive enzymes activities, the energy reserves and the reproductive outcome in Gammarus fossarum.

    PubMed

    Charron, Laetitia; Geffard, Olivier; Chaumot, Arnaud; Coulaud, Romain; Jaffal, Ali; Gaillet, Véronique; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Geffard, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Digestive enzyme activity is often used as a sensitive response to environmental pollution. However, only little is known about the negative effects of stress on digestive capacities and their consequences on energy reserves and reproduction, although these parameters are important for the maintenance of populations. To highlight if changes in biochemical responses (digestive enzymes and reserves) led to impairments at an individual level (fertility), Gammarus fossarum were submitted to a lower food intake throughout a complete female reproductive cycle (i.e. from ovogenesis to offspring production). For both males and females, amylase activity was inhibited by the diet stress, whereas trypsin activity was not influenced. These results underline similar sensitivity of males and females concerning their digestive capacity. Energy reserves decreased with food starvation in females, and remained stable in males. The number of embryos per female decreased with food starvation. Lower digestive activity in males and females therefore appears as an early response. These results underline the ecological relevance of digestive markers, as they make it possible to anticipate upcoming consequences on reproduction in females, a key biological variable for population dynamics.

  15. Effects of endosulfan, thiamethoxam, and indoxacarb in combination with atrazine on multi-biomarkers in Gammarus kischineffensis.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Özlem; Güven, Kemal; Asma, Dilek; Öğüt, Serdal; Uğurlu, Pelin

    2017-09-21

    Studies addressing the toxicity of pesticides towards non-target organisms focus on the median lethal concentration and biochemical response of individual pesticides. However, when determining environmental risks, it is important to test the combined effects of pesticides, such as insecticides and herbicides, which are frequently used together in agricultural areas. Here we aimed to investigate the toxic effects of the combined use of the herbicide atrazine and the insecticides, endosulfan, indoxacarb, and thiamethoxam on Gammarus kischineffensis. To do this, we tested the activities of oxidative stress, detoxification, and neurotoxicity biomarkers. Compared to atrazine alone, we detected higher glutathione-S-transferase, catalase and superoxide dismutase activities (oxidative stress biomarkers) when atrazine was combined with either endosulfan or indoxacarb. However, higher IBR values were determined in organisms where pesticide mixtures were used according to individual use. Based on these results, mixtures of atrazine and other pesticides may cause synergistic effects and may be evidence of increased toxicity and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An Enriched Environment Promotes Shelter-Seeking Behaviour and Survival of Hatchery-Produced Juvenile European Lobster (Homarus gammarus).

    PubMed

    Aspaas, Stian; Grefsrud, Ellen Sofie; Fernö, Anders; Jensen, Knut Helge; Trengereid, Henrik; Agnalt, Ann-Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    The high loss of newly released hatchery-reared European lobster (Homarus gammarus) juveniles for stock enhancement is believed to be the result of maladaptive anti-predator behaviour connected to deprived stimuli in the hatchery environment. Our objective was to learn if an enriched hatchery environment enhances shelter-seeking behaviour and survival. In the "naïve" treatment, the juveniles were raised in single compartments without substrate and shelter whereas juveniles in the "exposed" treatment experienced substrate, shelter and interactions with conspecifics. Three experiments with increasing complexity were conducted. Few differences in shelter-seeking behaviour were found between treatments when one naïve or one exposed juvenile were observed alone. When observing interactions between one naïve and one exposed juvenile competing for shelter, naïve juveniles more often initiated the first aggressive encounter. The third experiment was set up to simulate a release for stock enhancement. Naïve and exposed juveniles were introduced to a semi-natural environment including substrate, a limited number of shelters and interactions with conspecifics. Shelter occupancy was recorded three times during a period of 35 days. Exposed juveniles occupied more shelters, grew larger and had higher survival compared with naïve juveniles. Our results demonstrate that experience of environmental complexity and social interactions increase shelter-seeking ability and survival in hatchery reared lobster juveniles.

  17. Morphology and pathology of the ectoparasitic copepod, Nicothoë astaci ('lobster louse') in the European lobster, Homarus gammarus.

    PubMed

    Wootton, Emma C; Pope, Edward C; Vogan, Claire L; Roberts, Emily C; Davies, Charlotte E; Rowley, Andrew F

    2011-09-01

    Ectoparasitic copepods have been reported in a wide range of aquatic animals, including crustacean shellfish. However, with the exception of the salmon louse, Lepeophtheirus salmonis, our knowledge of such parasites in commercial species is rudimentary. The current study examines the morphology and pathology of the parasitic copepod, Nicothoë astaci (the 'lobster louse') in its host, the European lobster, Homarus gammarus. Lobsters were sampled from waters surrounding Lundy Island (Bristol Channel, UK) and all individuals collected were found to harbour female adult N. astaci in their gills, with a mean of 47·3 parasites/lobster. The majority of N. astaci were found in the basal region of pleurobranch gills. The parasite was found to attach to gill filaments via its oral sucker, maxillae and maxillipeds, and to feed on host haemolymph (blood) through a funnel-like feeding channel. It caused varying degrees of damage to the host gill, including occlusion of gill filaments and disruption to the vascular system in the central axis. Although there was evidence of extensive host response (haemocytic infiltration) to the parasite, it was displaced from the parasite attachment site and thus was observed in the central gill axis below. The region of gill filament immediately underlying the parasite feeding channel was devoid of such activity suggesting that the parasite interferes with the cellular defence and haemostatic mechanisms of the lobster in order to maintain invasion of the host.

  18. Contribution of aqueous and dietary uptakes to lead (Pb) bioaccumulation in Gammarus pulex: From multipathway modeling to in situ validation.

    PubMed

    Hadji, Rym; Urien, Nastassia; Uher, Emmanuelle; Fechner, Lise C; Lebrun, Jérémie D

    2016-07-01

    Although dynamic approaches are nowadays used increasingly to describe metal bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms, the validation of such laboratory-derived modeling is rarely assessed under environmental conditions. Furthermore, information on bioaccumulation kinetics of Pb and the significance of its uptake by dietary route is scarce in freshwater species. This study aims at modeling aqueous and dietary uptakes of Pb in the litter-degrader Gammarus pulex and assessing the predictive quality of multipathway modeling from in situ bioaccumulation data. In microcosms, G. pulex were exposed to environmentally realistic concentrations of Pb (from 0.1 to 10µg/L) in the presence of Pb-contaminated poplar leaves, which were enclosed or not in a net to distinguish aqueous and dietary uptakes. Results show that water and food both constitute contamination sources for gammarids. Establishing biodynamic parameters involved in Pb aqueous and dietary uptake and elimination rates enabled to construct a multipathway model to describe Pb bioaccumulation in gammarids. This laboratory-derived model successfully predicted bioaccumulation measured in native populations of G. pulex collected in situ when local litter was used as dietary exposure source. This study demonstrates not only the suitable applicability of biodynamic parameters for predicting Pb bioaccumulation but also the necessity of taking dietary uptake into account for a better interpretation of the gammarids' contamination in natural conditions.

  19. Population responses of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex (L.) to an environmental estrogen, 17alpha-ethinylestradiol.

    PubMed

    Watts, Matthew M; Pascoe, David; Carroll, Kathleen

    2002-02-01

    The effects of the environmental estrogen 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE) on mixed populations of 90 individual Gammarus pulex were examined following a 100-d exposure in a flow-through system. Counts of total animal numbers revealed that, in all treatment groups, population size dramatically increased due to recruitment, with neonate and juvenile gammarids the most abundant. At concentrations of 1 and 10 microg/L EE, the recorded mean population sizes of 385 and 411, respectively, were significantly greater (p = 0.018) than the control (169). Mean population sizes in the solvent control (257) and 100 ng/L EE treatment (267) were not significantly different (p > 0.05) from the control. In addition to total counts, detailed image analysis of each individual animal allowed the assessment of length-frequency distributions, adult sex ratio, number of precopula pairs/ovigerous females, and measurement of secondary antenna and gnathopod length (secondary sex characteristics). The sex ratio of adults at 100 ng, 1 microg, and 10 microg/L EE was greater than 2:1 (female:male), and significantly more females (p = 0.008) were recorded at these concentrations compared with the control. The number of male adults, precopula guarding pairs, and ovigerous females did not differ between treatments (p > 0.05). Secondary antennal and gnathopod length in males was consistently greater than in females (p < or = 0.001), but comparison between groups revealed no difference in these parameters.

  20. Effects of Microphallus papillorobustus (Platyhelminthes: Trematoda) on serotonergic immunoreactivity and neuronal architecture in the brain of Gammarus insensibilis (Crustacea: Amphipoda).

    PubMed Central

    Helluy, S; Thomas, F

    2003-01-01

    The larval flatworm Microphallus papillorobustus encysts in the protocerebrum of its intermediate host, Gammarus insensibilis, and changes the gammarid's responses to mechanical and photic stimuli. The resulting aberrant escape behaviour renders infected gammarids more susceptible to predation by birds, the definitive hosts of the parasite. We used immunocytochemical methods to explore the mechanisms underlying these subtle behavioural modifications. Whole mounts of gammarid brains were labelled with fluorescent anti-serotonin and anti-synapsin antibodies and viewed using confocal microscopy. Two types of change were observed in infected brains: the intensity of the serotonergic label was altered in specific regions of the brain, and the architecture of some serotonergic tracts and neurons was affected. A morphometric analysis of the distribution of the label showed that serotonergic immunoreactivity was decreased significantly (by 62%) in the optic neuropils, but not in the olfactory lobes, in the presence of the parasite. In addition, the optic tracts and the tritocerebral giant neurons were stunted in parasitized individuals. Published evidence demonstrates changes in serotonin levels in hosts ranging from crustaceans to mammals infected by parasites as diverse as protozoans and helminths. The present study suggests that the degeneration of discrete sets of serotonergic neurons might underlie the serotonergic imbalance and thus contribute to host manipulation. PMID:12769454

  1. Development of ecotoxicoproteomics on the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex: identification of PCB biomarkers in glycolysis and glutamate pathways.

    PubMed

    Leroy, D; Haubruge, E; De Pauw, E; Thomé, J P; Francis, F

    2010-03-01

    PCBs are persistent organic pollutants largely distributed in the biosphere. Although their effects on vertebrates are well described, little is known about their action on freshwater invertebrate's metabolism. Gammarus pulex (Linné) was selected as an indicator model to develop a proteomic approach in order to characterize the effects of PCBs on the protein profile of this freshwater crustacean. Sublethal coplanar PCBs exposition and related 2D gel were performed. More than 560 spots were detected and a total of 21 proteins exhibiting significant expression differences in PCB exposed to G. pulex were identified by mass spectrometry. Database searches were conducted to relate the results to well-known metabolic pathways (pentose phosphate, cytoskeleton, energy, etc.). In particular, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and arginine kinase were found to be sensitive to the PCB exposition of G. pulex. The aim of the present study was to assess the biochemical responses and the metabolic changes in G. pulex following intoxication to coplanar PCB congeners CB77 and CB169 by a proteomic approach. This approach allowed us, by the identification of key proteins, to highlight important biochemical mechanisms disturbed by the presence of these contaminants in G. pulex.

  2. Sublethal effects of copper on some biological traits of the amphipod Gammarus aequicauda reared under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Prato, E; Parlapiano, I; Biandolino, F

    2013-10-01

    The common and widespread copper contamination in marine coastal environments make toxicity data necessary to assess the aquatic hazard and risk of this metal. In the present study, the sublethal effects of copper on survival, growth and reproduction of Gammarus aequicauda were investigated. Amphipods were exposed for 77d to 2 nominal copper concentrations (50, 100 μg L(-1)). Survival was the most sensitive measure of effect and was significantly reduced, especially during early life stage (juveniles). Growth of amphipods was also negatively affected by copper and the growth impairment in G. aequicauda increases with increasing metal concentration. The reproductive traits were impaired by each of the copper concentrations, even if there were not any significant differences between control and copper treatments. The size at maturity increased with increasing copper, so the smallest ovigerous females in the control and copper treatments were 0.83 mm and 1.35 mm head length, respectively. There was a positive correlation between the brood size and the body size of the female in all treatments, whilst the fecundity (n°juveniles/female) decreased in the order control, 50 and 100 μg Cu L(-1). Copper demonstrates chronic toxicity to G. aequicauda at realistic environmental concentrations. The results of this study entail that the understanding of chronic toxicity of a substance, especially on population level effects, is crucial to assess the long-term effect of the substance in the ecosystem.

  3. Enhanced metal and metalloid concentrations in the gut system comparing to remaining tissues of Gammarus pulex L.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Jörg; Dharamshi, Jennah; Dudel, E Gert

    2011-04-01

    Invertebrate shredders such as Gammarus pulex are key species in contaminated stream ecosystems. Although a number of previous studies examining differences in metal accumulation between the gut system and remaining tissues of invertebrates exist, few focus on wide range of metals and metalloids that are relevant to contaminated systems. This study compared accumulation of the commonest (at study site) 15 metals and metalloids between the gut system including feces and remaining tissues of G. pulex. All metals and metalloids measured were significantly higher (p<0.001, except Cu p<0.005) in the gut system including feces than remaining tissues of G. pulex. Metals and metalloids in body tissues without the gut system including feces were significantly lower (Al, Cr, Fe and Mn (p<0.005), Sr and U (p<0.01), Co (p<0.05)) in content for a number of elements when compared to washed, whole G. pulex specimens. As well, all elements measured were significantly higher (all elements (p<0.005) except Cu and Co (p<0.05)) in gut system including feces than washed, whole G. pulex specimens. These results indicate that in G. pulex the uptake of all 15 metals and metalloids examined across the gut epithelium is minimalized or that sequestration of these elements in gut epithelial cells may occur.

  4. Consequences of Lower Food Intake on the Digestive Enzymes Activities, the Energy Reserves and the Reproductive Outcome in Gammarus fossarum

    PubMed Central

    Charron, Laetitia; Geffard, Olivier; Chaumot, Arnaud; Coulaud, Romain; Jaffal, Ali; Gaillet, Véronique; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Geffard, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Digestive enzyme activity is often used as a sensitive response to environmental pollution. However, only little is known about the negative effects of stress on digestive capacities and their consequences on energy reserves and reproduction, although these parameters are important for the maintenance of populations. To highlight if changes in biochemical responses (digestive enzymes and reserves) led to impairments at an individual level (fertility), Gammarus fossarum were submitted to a lower food intake throughout a complete female reproductive cycle (i.e. from ovogenesis to offspring production). For both males and females, amylase activity was inhibited by the diet stress, whereas trypsin activity was not influenced. These results underline similar sensitivity of males and females concerning their digestive capacity. Energy reserves decreased with food starvation in females, and remained stable in males. The number of embryos per female decreased with food starvation. Lower digestive activity in males and females therefore appears as an early response. These results underline the ecological relevance of digestive markers, as they make it possible to anticipate upcoming consequences on reproduction in females, a key biological variable for population dynamics. PMID:25880985

  5. Ecophysiological responses to temperature of the "killer shrimp" Dikerogammarus villosus: is the invader really stronger than the native Gammarus pulex?

    PubMed

    Maazouzi, C; Piscart, C; Legier, F; Hervant, F

    2011-07-01

    With global climate changes, biological invasions are considered to be one of the main causes of the decline of freshwater biodiversity. In this context, predicted increases in global temperature may alter the geographical distributions of native and invasive species. The purpose of our study was to examine the metabolic, behavioral and physiological responses to short-term temperature acclimation of two widely distributed species (the most successful European invader, Dikerogammarus villosus, and its main victim, Gammarus pulex), in order to estimate the potential effect of global warming on its invasion of freshwater ecosystems. Our results show that D. villosus is more vulnerable to high temperatures than G. pulex. The native species seems to be best adapted to intermediate temperatures (10-20°C) with a possibility of adjustment to "extreme" temperatures (5-27°C), whereas the "killer shrimp" D. villosus seems best adapted to lower temperatures (5-10°C) with a limited possibility of adjustment above 20°C. In the light of our results, global warming is likely to be less favorable to the invasive species. However, D. villosus showed reduced metabolic and activity rates, associated with higher glycogen content. This adaptive strategy was interpreted as having functional advantages, allowing D. villosus to successfully invade harsh and/or unpredictable biotopes. In addition, our results show that glycogen stores may be used as a powerful indicator of the optimal thermal window for aquatic ectotherms.

  6. Transfer across the human gut of environmental technetium in lobsters (Homarus gammarus L.) from the Irish Sea.

    PubMed

    Hunt, G J; Young, A K; Bonfield, R A

    2001-03-01

    Few data are available on the uptake by the human gut of the element technetium. Of current radiological interest in connection with discharges of technetium-99 in liquid discharges from BNFL, Sellafield, is uptake from European lobsters (Homarus gammarus), whose edible parts are known to concentrate technetium. In this study, a group of eight adult volunteers (six males and two females) ate samples of edible flesh from lobsters caught off the west Cumbrian coast and provided 24 h samples of urine and faeces for analysis. Detection of uptake from the gut by difference between intake and faecal measurements proved insensitive, suggesting a low value of the gut transfer factor (f1 value) of up to 0.1 with a maximum (two standard deviations) level of about 0.3. In urine, technetium was detectable at a relatively low level compared with the intakes, consistent with a low absorption across the gut. Values for f1 were derived with the aid of literature data for excretion following intravenous administration of technetium-95 m as pertechnetate, and gave averaged data for f1 in the range 0.046 to 0.23. These results are in broad conformity with those derived from the faecal measurements, and suggest a lower value than the 0.5 used by ICRP.

  7. High-throughput proteome dynamics for discovery of key proteins in sentinel species: Unsuspected vitellogenins diversity in the crustacean Gammarus fossarum.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Judith; Armengaud, Jean; Gaillard, Jean-Charles; Pible, Olivier; Chaumot, Arnaud; Geffard, Olivier

    2016-09-02

    In environmental science, omics-based approaches are widely used for the identification of gene products related to stress response. However, when dealing with non-model species, functional prediction of genes is challenging. Indeed, functional predictions are often obtained by sequence similarity searches and functional data from phylogenetically distant organisms, which can lead to inaccurate predictions due to quite different evolutionary scenarios. In oviparous females, vitellogenin production is vital for embryonic development, ensuring population viability. Its abnormal presence in fish male organisms is commonly employed as a biomarker of exposure to xenoestrogens, named endocrine disruptors. Here, in the freshwater amphipod Gammarus fossarum, we identified vitellogenin proteins by means of a proteome temporal dynamics analysis during oogenesis and embryogenesis. This exhaustive approach allows several functional molecular hypotheses in the oogenesis process to be drawn. Moreover, we revealed an unsuspected diversity of molecular players involved in yolk formation as eight proteins originating from different families of the large lipid transfer protein superfamily were identified as "true vitellogenins". In non-model species, next generation sequencing technologies development enables quickly deciphering gene and protein sequences but accuracy of associated functional prediction remains to be established. Here, in the crustacean Gammarus fossarum, a key sentinel species in freshwater biomonitoring, we identified key molecular players involved in the female reproduction by studying the proteome dynamics of ovaries and embryos. An unsuspected diversity of vitellogenin proteins was evidenced. These proteins being vital for offspring development, their high diversity may be advantageous for the organism's reproduction. Phylogenetic analysis showed that some forms are true vitellogenin orthologs while others are included in the apolipoprotein family, a paralogous

  8. A rhythmic modulatory gating system in the stomatogastric nervous system of Homarus gammarus. III. Rhythmic control of the pyloric CPG.

    PubMed

    Cardi, P; Nagy, F

    1994-06-01

    1. Two modulatory neurons, P and commissural pyloric (CP), known to be involved in the long-term maintenance of pyloric central pattern generator operation in the rock lobster Homarus gammarus, are members of the commissural pyloric oscillator (CPO), a higher-order oscillator influencing the pyloric network. 2. The CP neuron was endogenously oscillating in approximately 30% of the preparations in which its cell body was impaled. Rhythmic inhibitory feedback from the pyloric pacemaker anterior burster (AB) neuron stabilized the CP neuron's endogenous rhythm. 3. The organization of the CPO is described. Follower commissural neurons, the F cells, and the CP neuron receive a common excitatory postsynaptic potential from another commissural neuron, the large exciter (LE). When in oscillatory state, CP in turn excites the LE neuron. This positive feedback may maintain long episodes of CP oscillations. 4. The pyloric pacemaker neurons follow the CPO rhythm with variable coordination modes (i.e., 1:1, 1:2) and switch among these modes when their membrane potential is modified. The CPO inputs strongly constrain the pyloric period, which as a result may adopt only a few discrete values. This effect is based on mechanisms of entrainment between the CPO and the pyloric oscillator. 5. Pyloric constrictor neurons show differential sensitivity from the pyloric pacemaker neurons with respect to the CPO inputs. Consequently, their bursting period can be a shorter harmonic of the bursting period of the pyloric pacemakers neurons. 6. The CPO neurons seem to be the first example of modulatory gating neurons that also give timing cues to a rhythmic pattern generating network.

  9. Altered exoskeleton composition and vitellogenesis in the crustacean Gammarus sp. collected at polluted sites in the Saguenay Fjord, Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Gagné, F; Blaise, C; Pellerin, J

    2005-05-01

    Gammarus sp. individuals were collected at four intertidal sites subjected to direct sources of pollution (marinas, ferry traffic, and harbors) and at one site with no direct source of pollution. Levels of vitellogenin-like proteins (Vtg), metallothioneins (MT), alkali-labile phosphates (ALPs) in proteins, and lipogenic enzyme activities (i.e., glucose-6-dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and malate enzyme) were measured in whole soft tissues. In exoskeletons, levels of pH-dependent extractable protein and chitin were determined to assess the possible impacts of pollution on exoskeleton integrity and the molting process. Results show that males were consistently heavier than females regardless of site quality but that the whole-body weight of both sexes was significantly lower at polluted sites. Females displayed either induced or decreased Vtg-like proteins at polluted sites, indicating significant changes in gametogenesis activity. MT levels were not sex dependent and tended to be induced at all impacted sites. ALP levels in acetone-fractionated proteins indicate altered phosphate mobilization at some impacted sites, where females tended to display higher ALP levels. Lipogenic enzyme activities did not vary by sex but were readily increased at impacted sites, suggesting a delay in gonad maturation rates. Exoskeleton protein characteristics revealed that the proportion of chitin in exoskeletons was a lower at most impacted site, suggesting disruption of chitin and pH-dependent protein mobilization. Principal component analysis revealed that gammarids collected at affected sites displayed substantial changes in the proportion of chitin, arthropodin, sclerotin, MTs, and intermediary glucose metabolism (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase in soft tissues) and thus suffered from disturbed gametogenesis and exoskeleton integrity.

  10. Bioaccumulation of Toxoplasma and Cryptosporidium by the freshwater crustacean Gammarus fossarum: Involvement in biomonitoring surveys and trophic transfer.

    PubMed

    Bigot-Clivot, Aurélie; Palos Ladeiro, Mélissa; Lepoutre, Alexandra; Bastien, Fanny; Bonnard, Isabelle; Dubey, Jitender P; Villena, Isabelle; Aubert, Dominique; Geffard, Olivier; François, Adeline; Geffard, Alain

    2016-11-01

    The protozoa Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum are public health priorities because their oocysts can persist in recreational, surface, drinking, river, and sea water sources for a long time. To evaluate the capacity of the freshwater crustacean Gammarus fossarum to accumulate T. gondii and C. parvum oocysts, gammarids were exposed to 200, 2000 or 20,000 oocysts per gammarid and per day for 21 days followed by 5 days of depuration. C. parvum DNA was detected by qPCR in G. fossarum in only one out of four pools for the highest concentration and after 14 days of exposure, and T. gondii DNA was detected after 7 days of exposure to the two highest concentrations. Our results document the capacity of G. fossarum to accumulate T. gondii in its tissues proportionally to the ambient concentration; the maximum number of oocysts was detected in gammarid tissues after exposure to 20,000 oocysts per day. Mean values of 3.26 (±3), 21.71 (±15.18), and 17.41 (±10.89) oocysts were detected in gammarids after 7, 14, and 21 days, respectively, and after 5 days of depuration, T. gondii oocysts were still present in gammarid tissues. These results show for the first time that a freshwater crustacean can bioaccumulate T. gondii oocysts, suggesting that G. fossarum is a potential effective bioindicator of protozoan contamination in biomonitoring studies. Moreover, due to its key position in freshwater food webs, G. fossarum could also play a role in the trophic transfer of protozoa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Behavioural and Physiological Responses of Gammarus pulex Exposed to Cadmium and Arsenate at Three Temperatures: Individual and Combined Effects

    PubMed Central

    Vellinger, Céline; Felten, Vincent; Sornom, Pascal; Rousselle, Philippe; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating both the individual and combined effects of cadmium (Cd) and arsenate (AsV) on the physiology and behaviour of the Crustacean Gammarus pulex at three temperatures (5, 10 and15°C). G. pulex was exposed during 96 h to (i) two [Cd] alone, (ii) two [AsV] alone, and (iii) four combinations of [Cd] and [AsV] to obtain a complete factorial plane. After exposure, survival, [AsV] or [Cd] in body tissues, behavioural (ventilatory and locomotor activities) and physiological responses (iono-regulation of [Na+] and [Cl−] in haemolymph) were examined. The interactive effects (antagonistic, additive or synergistic) of binary mixtures were evaluated for each tested temperature using a predictive model for the theoretically expected interactive effect of chemicals. In single metal exposure, both the internal metal concentration in body tissues and the mortality rate increased along metallic gradient concentration. Cd alone significantly impaired both [Na+] and [Cl−] while AsV alone had a weak impact only on [Cl−]. The behavioural responses of G. pulex declined with increasing metal concentration suggesting a reallocation of energy from behavioural responses to maintenance functions. The interaction between AsV and Cd was considered as ‘additive’ for all the tested binary mixtures and temperatures (except for the lowest combination at 10°C considered as “antagonistic”). In binary mixtures, the decrease in both ventilatory and locomotor activities and the decline in haemolymphatic [Cl−] were amplified when respectively compared to those observed with the same concentrations of AsV or Cd alone. However, the presence of AsV decreased the haemolymphatic [Na+] loss when G. pulex was exposed to the lowest Cd concentration. Finally, the observed physiological and behavioural effects (except ventilation) in G. pulex exposed to AsV and/or Cd were exacerbated under the highest temperature. The discussion encompasses both the toxicity

  12. Behavioural and physiological responses of Gammarus pulex exposed to cadmium and arsenate at three temperatures: individual and combined effects.

    PubMed

    Vellinger, Céline; Felten, Vincent; Sornom, Pascal; Rousselle, Philippe; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating both the individual and combined effects of cadmium (Cd) and arsenate (AsV) on the physiology and behaviour of the Crustacean Gammarus pulex at three temperatures (5, 10 and 15 °C). G. pulex was exposed during 96 h to (i) two [Cd] alone, (ii) two [AsV] alone, and (iii) four combinations of [Cd] and [AsV] to obtain a complete factorial plane. After exposure, survival, [AsV] or [Cd] in body tissues, behavioural (ventilatory and locomotor activities) and physiological responses (iono-regulation of [Na(+)] and [Cl(-)] in haemolymph) were examined. The interactive effects (antagonistic, additive or synergistic) of binary mixtures were evaluated for each tested temperature using a predictive model for the theoretically expected interactive effect of chemicals. In single metal exposure, both the internal metal concentration in body tissues and the mortality rate increased along metallic gradient concentration. Cd alone significantly impaired both [Na(+)] and [Cl(-)] while AsV alone had a weak impact only on [Cl(-)]. The behavioural responses of G. pulex declined with increasing metal concentration suggesting a reallocation of energy from behavioural responses to maintenance functions. The interaction between AsV and Cd was considered as 'additive' for all the tested binary mixtures and temperatures (except for the lowest combination at 10 °C considered as "antagonistic"). In binary mixtures, the decrease in both ventilatory and locomotor activities and the decline in haemolymphatic [Cl(-)] were amplified when respectively compared to those observed with the same concentrations of AsV or Cd alone. However, the presence of AsV decreased the haemolymphatic [Na(+)] loss when G. pulex was exposed to the lowest Cd concentration. Finally, the observed physiological and behavioural effects (except ventilation) in G. pulex exposed to AsV and/or Cd were exacerbated under the highest temperature. The discussion encompasses both the toxicity

  13. Multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments with the amphipod Gammarus locusta: I. Biochemical endpoints.

    PubMed

    Neuparth, Teresa; Correia, Ana D; Costa, Filipe O; Lima, Gláucia; Costa, Maria Helena

    2005-07-01

    We report on biomarker responses conducted as part of a multi-level assessment of the chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments to the amphipod Gammarus locusta. A companion article accounts for organism and population-level effects. Five moderately contaminated sediments from two Portuguese estuaries, Sado and Tagus, were assessed. Three of them were muddy and two were sandy sediments. The objective was to assess sediments that were not acutely toxic. Three of the sediments met this criterion, the other two were diluted (50% and 75%) with clean sediment until acute toxicity was absent. Following 28-d exposures, the amphipods were analysed for whole-body metal bioaccumulation, metallothionein induction (MT), DNA strand breakage (SB) and lipid peroxidation (LP). Two of the muddy sediments did not cause chronic toxicity. These findings were consistent with responses at organism and population levels that showed higher growth rates and improvement of reproductive traits for amphipods exposed to these two sediments. Two other sediments, one muddy and one sandy, exhibited pronounced chronic toxicity, affecting SB, MT induction (in muddy sediment), survival and reproduction. Potential toxicants involved in these effects were identified. The last sandy sediment exhibited some loss of DNA integrity, however growth was also enhanced. Present results, together with the organism/population-level data, and also benthic communities information, were analysed under a weight-of-evidence approach. By providing evidence of exposure (or lack of it) to contaminants in sediments, the biomarkers here applied assisted in distinguishing toxicants' impacts in test organisms from the confounding influence of other geochemical features of the sediments.

  14. Effects of low-dosed imidacloprid pulses on the functional role of the caged amphipod Gammarus roeseli in stream mesocosms.

    PubMed

    Böttger, R; Feibicke, M; Schaller, J; Dudel, G

    2013-07-01

    Effects of two series of imidacloprid pulses on caged amphipods (Gammarus roeseli) and their shredder efficiency for litter decomposition were studied for 70 days as part of a comprehensive stream mesocosm experiment. The duration of each imidacloprid pulse of 12µgL(-1) was 12h. About 250mL cages with an initial stock of 10 adult gammarids together with different conditioned litter substrates were used. Beside alder leaves (Alnus glutinosa), straw (× Triticosecale) was also used in different trials and tested for its suitability to serve as litter substrate. Results from tracer and microprobe measurements approved the suitability of the test system under low-flow condition of 10cms(-1) in the surrounding stream water. Population development followed a logistic growth function with a carrying capacity of 200 Ind cage(-1) for alder and 161 for straw. In the course of the study, the F1 generation reached sexual maturity and F2 offspring appeared. Increased nitrogen contents of gammarid-free trials compared to stocked ones after 70 days indicated that biofilm on both substrates was an important food source for G. roeseli. However, increased shredding activity by gammarids was only detected for alder during the second pulse series. During the remaining time and also for straw, losses of coarse particular organic matter were quite constant and slow indicating the dominance of transport limited decomposition processes on the litter surfaces. No effect of imidacloprid pulses on population levels and litter decomposition could be detected. However, the number of brood carrying females was reduced in the treatments compared to the control groups in the last 3 weeks of the study. In conclusion, repeated low-level and short-term exposition may have adverse long-term effects on G. roeseli in the field with regard to both the population size and the functional role as key shredder.

  15. Temporal Community Structure in Two Gregarines (Rotundula gammari and Heliospora longissima) Co-Infecting the Amphipod Gammarus fasciatus.

    PubMed

    Grunberg, Rita L; Sukhdeo, Michael V K

    2017-02-01

    This study surveyed gregarine parasites that infect the amphipod, Gammarus fasciatus , to investigate temporal dynamics in infracommunity structure. We sampled a population of hosts for 2 yr from the north branch of the Raritan River in New Jersey. These hosts were infected with 2 direct life cycle gregarine parasites, Rotundula gammari and Heliospora longissima. Infections were separated temporally, with the prevalence of R. gammari peaking within the amphipod population in the fall (prevalence = 78% year 1 and 97% year 2) and H. longissima peaking in early spring (prevalence = 41% year 1 and 52% year 2). Increases in host population density did not significantly correlate with the abundance of these 2 parasites. However, H. longissima abundance was positively correlated with host body weight while R. gammari showed no significant relationship. The mean body mass of amphipods infected with H. longissima was 20.7 ± 1. 2 mg, and with R. gammari 8.1 ± 0.2 mg, which suggests a sized-based infection pattern. Mixed species infections were infrequent with an overall prevalence of 4.6%. When both gregarine species co-infected the same host, the R. gammari but not the H. longissima infrapopulation size was significantly lower when compared to single-species infections, suggesting asymmetric interactions. We conclude that the observed temporal patterns of infection by the 2 parasites are driven by a seasonal change in host demographics and size-dependent infections. We argue that specificity for host developmental stages may have arisen as a mechanism to avoid overlap between these gregarine species.

  16. Fish and land use influence Gammarus lacustris and Hyalella azteca (Amphipoda) densities in large wetlands across the upper Midwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anteau, M.J.; Afton, A.D.; Anteau, A.C.E.; Moser, E.B.

    2010-01-01

    Gammarus lacustris and Hyalella azteca (hereafter G. lacustris and H. azteca, respectively) are important components of secondary production in wetlands and shallow lakes of the upper Midwest, USA. Within the past 50 years, amphipod densities have decreased while occurrences of fish and intensity of agricultural land use have increased markedly across this landscape. We investigated influences of fish, sedimentation, and submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) on densities of G. lacustris and H. azteca in semipermanent and permanent wetlands and shallow lakes (n = 283) throughout seven eco-physiographic regions of Iowa, Minnesota, and North Dakota during 2004-2005. G. lacustris and H. azteca densities were positively correlated with densities of SAV (P<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively). Both species were negatively correlated with densities of large fish (non-Cyprinidae; P = 0.01 and P = 0.013, respectively) and with high densities of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas; P<0.001 and P = 0.033, respectively). H. azteca densities also were negatively correlated with densities of small fish (e.g., other minnows [Cyprinidae] and sticklebacks [Gasterosteidae]; P = 0.048) and common carp (Cyprinus spp.; P = 0.022). G. lacustris densities were negatively correlated with high levels of suspended solids (an index for sedimentation; P<0.001). H. azteca densities were positively correlated with the width of upland-vegetation buffers (P = 0.004). Our results indicate that sedimentation and fish reduce amphipod densities and may contribute to the current low densities of amphipods in the upper Midwest. Thus, removing/excluding fish, and providing a thick buffer of upland vegetation around wetlands may help restore amphipod densities and wetland and water quality within this landscape. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. (outside the USA) 2011.

  17. Fish and land use influence Gammarus lacustris and Hyalella azteca (Amphipoda) densities in large wetlands across the upper Midwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anteau, Michael J.; Afton, Alan D.; Anteau, Andrea C.E.; Moser, E. Barry

    2011-01-01

    Gammarus lacustrisK/i> and Ki>Hyalella azteca (hereafter G. lacustris and H. azteca, respectively) are important components of secondary production in wetlands and shallow lakes of the upper Midwest, USA. Within the past 50 years, amphipod densities have decreased while occurrences of fish and intensity of agricultural land use have increased markedly across this landscape. We investigated influences of fish, sedimentation, and submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) on densities of G. lacustris and H. azteca in semipermanent and permanent wetlands and shallow lakes (n = 283) throughout seven eco-physiographic regions of Iowa, Minnesota, and North Dakota during 2004–2005. G. lacustris and H. azteca densities were positively correlated with densities of SAV (P P P = 0.01 and P = 0.013, respectively) and with high densities of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas; P P = 0.033, respectively). H. azteca densities also were negatively correlated with densities of small fish (e.g., other minnows [Cyprinidae] and sticklebacks [Gasterosteidae]; P = 0.048) and common carp (Cyprinus spp.; P = 0.022). G. lacustris densities were negatively correlated with high levels of suspended solids (an index for sedimentation; P H. azteca densities were positively correlated with the width of upland-vegetation buffers (P = 0.004). Our results indicate that sedimentation and fish reduce amphipod densities and may contribute to the current low densities of amphipods in the upper Midwest. Thus, removing/excluding fish, and providing a thick buffer of upland vegetation around wetlands may help restore amphipod densities and wetland and water quality within this landscape.

  18. A comparison of beating parameters in larval and post-larval locomotor systems of the lobster Homarus gammarus (L.).

    PubMed

    Laverack, M S; Macmillan, D L; Neil, D M

    1976-03-18

    A study has been made of the interrelations between rhythmical exopodite beating in different larval stages and swimmeret beating in poast-larval stages of the lobster Homarus gammarus. Data on exopodite beat cycle durations have been used for statistical comparisons of exopodite performance within one larva, and also between different stages of larval development. Inter-exopodite comparisons reveal clear bilateral differences (table 1), although there is no consistently favoured relationship (tables 2 and 3). There are significant differences in cycle duration between the first three developmental stages, with a slight increase at the first moult, and a marked decrease at the second (table 4). However, within each stage the repeat frequency exhibits little change (table 5). Therefore it appears that changes in swimming behaviour occur discontinuously in development, and are associated with the larval moults. It is suggested that changes in beat frequency, and especially the faster beating in stage III, may represent responses to changed loading conditions (table 7). Measurements of swimmeret beating in post-larval lobsters have been analysed in terms of cycle durations, and inter- and intra-segmental phase relations. Swimmeret beating patterns are very regular (figure 1), but not restricted to a narrow range of frequencies (table 6a). Intersegmental phase lag remains constant around 0.2 (figure 3) independent of beat frequency (figure 4). Similarly the powerstroke/returnstroke ratio of approximately 0.5 (figure 5) shows no significant correlation with cycle duration (figure 6). Differences emerge in the performance of larval exopodites and post-larval swimmerets (table 6b), although the possibility cannot be excluded that the larval exopodite oscillator in some way influences the developing action of the post-larval swimmeret system.

  19. Safety of the molluscicide Zequanox (R) to nontarget macroinvertebrates Gammarus lacustris (Amphipoda: Gammaridae) and Hexagenia spp. (Ephemeroptera: Ephemeridae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, Diane L.; Luoma, James A.; Erickson, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Zequanox® is a commercial formulation of the killed bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens (strain CL145A), that was developed to control dreissenid mussels. In 2014, Zequanox became the second product registered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) for use in open water environments as a molluscicide. Previous nontarget studies demonstrated the safety and selectivity of P. fluorescens CL154A, but the database on the toxicity of the formulation (Zequanox) is limited for macroinvertebrate taxa and exposure conditions. We evaluated the safety of Zequanox to the amphipod Gammarus lacustris lacustris, and nymphs of the burrowing mayfly, Hexagenia spp. at the maximum approved concentration (100 mg/L active ingredient, A.I.) and exposure duration (8 h). Survival of animals was assessed after 8 h of exposure and again at 24 and 96 h post-exposure. Histopathology of the digestive tract of control and treated animals was compared at 96 h post-exposure. The results showed no significant effect of Zequanox on survival of either species. Survival of G. lacustris exceeded 85% in all concentrations at all three sampling time points. Survival of Hexagenia spp. ranged from 71% (control) to 91% at 8 h, 89–93% at 24 h post-exposure, and 70–73% at 96 h post-exposure across all treatments. We saw no evidence of pathology in the visceral organs of treated animals. Our results indicate that application of Zequanox at the maximum approved concentration and exposure duration did not cause significant mortality or treatment-related histopathological changes to G. lacustris and Hexagenia spp.

  20. Stage-Specific Changes in Physiological and Life-History Responses to Elevated Temperature and Pco2 during the Larval Development of the European Lobster Homarus gammarus (L.).

    PubMed

    Small, Daniel P; Calosi, Piero; Boothroyd, Dominic; Widdicombe, Steve; Spicer, John I

    2015-01-01

    An organism's physiological processes form the link between its life-history traits and the prevailing environmental conditions, especially in species with complex life cycles. Understanding how these processes respond to changing environmental conditions, thereby affecting organismal development, is critical if we are to predict the biological implications of current and future global climate change. However, much of our knowledge is derived from adults or single developmental stages. Consequently, we investigated the metabolic rate, organic content, carapace mineralization, growth, and survival across each larval stage of the European lobster Homarus gammarus, reared under current and predicted future ocean warming and acidification scenarios. Larvae exhibited stage-specific changes in the temperature sensitivity of their metabolic rate. Elevated Pco2 increased C∶N ratios and interacted with elevated temperature to affect carapace mineralization. These changes were linked to concomitant changes in survivorship and growth, from which it was concluded that bottlenecks were evident during H. gammarus larval development in stages I and IV, the transition phases between the embryonic and pelagic larval stages and between the larval and megalopa stages, respectively. We therefore suggest that natural changes in optimum temperature during ontogeny will be key to larvae survival in a future warmer ocean. The interactions of these natural changes with elevated temperature and Pco2 significantly alter physiological condition and body size of the last larval stage before the transition from a planktonic to a benthic life style. Thus, living and growing in warm, hypercapnic waters could compromise larval lobster growth, development, and recruitment.

  1. Effects of seawater alkalinity on calcium and acid-base regulation in juvenile European lobster (Homarus gammarus) during a moult cycle.

    PubMed

    Middlemiss, Karen L; Urbina, Mauricio A; Wilson, Rod W

    2016-03-01

    Fluxes of NH4(+) (acid) and HCO3(-) (base), and whole body calcium content were measured in European lobster (Homarus gammarus) during intermoult (megalopae stage), and during the first 24h for postmoult juveniles under control (~2000 μeq/L) and low seawater alkalinity (~830 μeq/L). Immediately after moulting, animals lost 45% of the total body calcium via the shed exoskeleton (exuvia), and only 11% was retained in the uncalcified body. At 24h postmoult, exoskeleton calcium increased to ~46% of the intermoult stage. Ammonia excretion was not affected by seawater alkalinity. After moulting, bicarbonate excretion was immediately reversed from excretion to uptake (~4-6 fold higher rates than intermoult) over the whole 24h postmoult period, peaking at 3-6h. These data suggest that exoskeleton calcification is not completed by 24h postmoult. Low seawater alkalinity reduced postmoult bicarbonate uptake by 29% on average. Net acid-base flux (equivalent to net base uptake) followed the same pattern as HCO3(-) fluxes, and was 22% lower in low alkalinity seawater over the whole 24h postmoult period. The common occurrence of low alkalinity in intensive aquaculture systems may slow postmoult calcification in juvenile H. gammarus, increasing the risk of mortalities through cannibalism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The proteasomes of two marine decapod crustaceans, European lobster (Homarus gammarus) and Edible crab (Cancer pagurus), are differently impaired by heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Götze, Sandra; Bose, Aneesh; Sokolova, Inna M; Abele, Doris; Saborowski, Reinhard

    2014-05-01

    The intracellular ubiquitin-proteasome system is a key regulator of cellular processes involved in the controlled degradation of short-living or malfunctioning proteins. Certain diseases and cellular dysfunctions are known to arise from the disruption of proteasome pathways. Trace metals are recognized stressors of the proteasome system in vertebrates and plants, but their effects on the proteasome of invertebrates are not well understood. Since marine invertebrates, and particularly benthic crustaceans, can be exposed to high metal levels, we studied the effects of in vitro exposure to Hg(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), and Cd(2+) on the activities of the proteasome from the claw muscles of lobsters (Homarus gammarus) and crabs (Cancer pagurus). The chymotrypsin like activity of the proteasome of these two species showed different sensitivity to metals. In lobsters the activity was significantly inhibited by all metals to a similar extent. In crabs the activities were severely suppressed only by Hg(2+) and Cu(2+) while Zn(2+) had only a moderate effect and Cd(2+) caused almost no inhibition of the crab proteasome. This indicates that the proteasomes of both species possess structural characteristics that determine different susceptibility to metals. Consequently, the proteasome-mediated protein degradation in crab C. pagurus may be less affected by metal pollution than that of the lobster H. gammarus.

  3. Influence of cooling rate on the ability of frozen-thawed sperm to bind to heterologous zona pellucida, as assessed by competitive in vitro binding assays in the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) and tigrina (Leopardus tigrinus).

    PubMed

    Baudi, D L K; Jewgenow, K; Pukazhenthi, B S; Spercoski, K M; Santos, A S; Reghelin, A L S; Candido, M V; Javorouski, M L; Müller, G; Morais, R N

    2008-01-15

    We evaluated the influence of two cooling rates (from 25 to 5 degrees C) on post-thaw function of frozen sperm in ocelots (Leopardus pardalis; n=3 males) and tigrinas (Leopardus tigrinus; n=4 males). Seven normospermic (>70% normal sperm) electroejaculates from each species were diluted with a 4% glycerol freezing medium, divided into two aliquots, and assigned to one of two cooling rates: fast or slow (0.7 or 0.16 degrees C/min, respectively). Sperm motility index (SMI) and percentage of sperm with an intact acrosome were assessed before freezing and after thawing, and the ability of sperm to bind to the zona pellucida of IVM domestic cat oocytes were assessed in a competitive in vitro sperm-binding assay. Regardless of the cooling rate, frozen-thawed sperm from both species exhibited a SMI of 50; approximately 20 and approximately 32% of post-thaw sperm had an intact acrosome in ocelots and tigrinas, respectively (P<0.05). The mean (+/-S.E.M.) number of sperm bound per oocyte was higher for fast-cooled (8.5+/-1.3) than slow-cooled (2.5+/-0.3; P<0.01) ocelot sperm. In contrast, more tigrina sperm bound to domestic cat oocytes when cooled slowly versus quickly (5.8+/-0.9 versus 2.7+/-0.4, P<0.05). In conclusion, cryopreservation decreased sperm function in both species, and the oocyte-binding assay was the most efficient method to detect functional differences in post-thaw sperm.

  4. Separate and combined effects of habitat-specific fish predation on the survival of invasive and native gammarids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotta, Jonne; Orav-Kotta, Helen; Herkül, Kristjan

    2010-10-01

    The North-American amphipod Gammarus tigrinus was observed for the first time in the northern Baltic Sea in 2003. The invasive amphipod has been particularly successful in some habitats (e.g. on pebbles) where it has become one of the most abundant gammarid species. We studied experimentally if the dominant fish Gasterosteus aculeatus preyed differentially on the exotic G. tigrinus and the native Gammarus salinus, if predation differed among habitats, and if one gammarid species facilitated predation on the other. The experiment demonstrated that (1) fish preyed more on the exotic G. tigrinus than the native G. salinus. (2) Predation did not differ among habitats. (3) Gammarus tigrinus facilitated the predation on G. salinus and this facilitation varied among habitats with significant effects on pebbles. Thus, the combined effect of habitat-specific fish predation and competition between gammarid amphipods is a possible explanation of the current range of G. tigrinus in the northern Baltic Sea. G. tigrinus seems to establish in habitats where it can significantly increase fish predation on the native gammarids.

  5. Additive effect of calcium depletion and low resource quality on Gammarus fossarum (Crustacea, Amphipoda) life history traits.

    PubMed

    Rollin, Marc; Coulaud, Romain; Danger, Michael; Sohm, Bénédicte; Flayac, Justine; Bec, Alexandre; Chaumot, Arnaud; Geffard, Olivier; Felten, Vincent

    2017-06-17

    Gammarus fossarum is an often-abundant crustacean detritivore that contributes importantly to leaf litter breakdown in oligotrophic, mainly heterotrophic, headwater streams. This species requires large amounts of Ca to moult, thus allowing growth and reproduction. Because resource quality is tightly coupled to the organism's growth and physiological status, we hypothesised that low Ca concentration [Ca] and low food resource quality (low phosphorus [P] and/or reduced highly unsaturated fatty acid [HUFA] contents) would interactively impair molecular responses (gene expression) and reproduction of G. fossarum. To investigate the effects of food resources quality, we experimentally manipulated the P content of sycamore leaves and also used diatoms because they contain high amounts of HUFAs. Three resource quality treatments were tested: low quality (LQ, unmanipulated leaves: low P content), high quality 1 (HQ1; P-manipulated leaves: high P content), and high quality 2 (unmanipulated leaves supplemented with a pellet containing diatoms: high P and HUFA content). Naturally, demineralised stream water was supplemented with CaSO4 to obtain three Ca concentrations (2, 3.5, and 10.5 mg Ca L(-1)). For 21 days, pairs of G. fossarum were individually exposed to one of the nine treatments (3 [Ca] × 3 resource qualities). At the individual level, strong and significant delays in moult stage were observed in gammarids exposed to lower [Ca] and to lower resource quality, with additive effects lengthening the duration of the reproductive cycle. Effects at the molecular level were investigated by measuring expression of 12 genes involved in energy production, translation, or Ca or P homeostasis. Expression of ATP synthase beta (higher in HQ2), calcified cuticle protein (higher in HQ1 and HQ2), and tropomyosin (higher in HQ2 compared to HQ1) was significantly affected by resource quality, and significant additive effects on Ca transporting ATPase expression were induced by [Ca

  6. Mortality and deformities in European lobster (Homarus gammarus) juveniles exposed to the anti-parasitic drug teflubenzuron.

    PubMed

    Samuelsen, Ole B; Lunestad, Bjørn T; Farestveit, Eva; Grefsrud, Ellen S; Hannisdal, Rita; Holmelid, Bjarte; Tjensvoll, Tore; Agnalt, Ann-Lisbeth

    2014-04-01

    This study describes experiments carried out to examine effects of the antiparasitic drug teflubenzuron, used in delousing farmed salmon, on a non-target species, the European lobster (Homarus gammarus). Juvenile lobsters were fed two doses of teflubenzuron, 10 and 20mg/kg successively for 7 days corresponding to a standard medication of the fish (10mg/kg day) and twice the standard dose (20mg/kg day). Monitoring lasted 3 months to include at least one moulting period for all individuals. Cumulative mortality was higher in all replicates given medicated feed compared with the control group. Mean cumulative mortality for each dosing was 41 ± 13% for 10mg/kg and 38 ± 8% for 20mg/kg, i.e. no difference. Drug residue was analysed in all juveniles that died, in addition to 12 juveniles at day 8 and the first 12 surviving lobsters. A decline in concentration of teflubenzuron from over 8,000 ng/g (day 5) to 14 ng/g (day 70) was observed in the juveniles that died during the experiment. Twelve individuals that died contained 82 ng/g or less whereas the mean concentration in the first 12 lobsters that survived moulting was 152 ng/g. Following a single oral administration, the half-life of teflubenzuron in lobster was estimated to 3.4 days and the initial concentration (C0) to 515 ng/g at time t0. At the end of the study a considerable number of juvenile lobsters were observed with deformities in various organs; carapace, walking legs, cheliped, tail fan, abdomen and antenna. The occurrence of observed deformities varied from 0 to 15% in treated replicates and will most likely affect ability to locate and consume food (antenna, claw and walking legs), respiration (carapace) and ability to move/swim (walking legs, tail fan and abdomen). In total, the mortality and senescent damages were close to 50% in all replicates. Juveniles that survived medication without deformities however, moulted and increased in size at each moult equally well as the unmedicated controls.

  7. Deformities in larvae and juvenile European lobster (Homarus gammarus) exposed to lower pH at two different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnalt, A.-L.; Grefsrud, E. S.; Farestveit, E.; Larsen, M.; Keulder, F.

    2013-05-01

    Trends of increasing temperatures and ocean acidification are expected to influence benthic marine resources, especially calcifying organisms. The European lobster (Homarus gammarus) is among those species at risk. A project was initiated in 2011 aiming to investigate long-term synergistic effects of temperature and projected increases in ocean acidification on the life cycle of lobster. Larvae were exposed to pCO2 levels of ambient water (water intake at 90 m depth, tentatively of 380 μatm pCO2), 727 and 1217 μatm pCO2, at temperatures 10 and 18 °C. Long-term exposure lasted until 5 months of age. Thereafter the surviving juveniles were transferred to ambient water at 14 °C. At 18 °C the development from Stage 1 to 4 lasted from 14 to 16 days, as predicted under normal pH values. Growth was very slow at 10 °C and resulted in only two larvae reaching Stage 4 in the ambient treatment. There were no significant differences in carapace length at the various larval stages between the different treatments, but there were differences in total length and dry weight at Stage 1 at 10 °C, Stage 2 at both temperatures, producing larvae slightly larger in size and lighter by dry weight in the exposed treatments. Stage 3 larvae raised in 18 °C and 1217 μatm pCO2 were also larger in size and heavier by dry weight compared with 727 μatm. Unfortunate circumstances precluded a full comparison across stages and treatment. Deformities were however observed in both larvae and juveniles. At 10 °C, about 20% of the larvae exposed to elevated pCO2were deformed, compared with 0% in larvae raised in pH above 8.0. At 18 °C and in high pCO2 treatment, 31.5% of the larvae were deformed. Occurrence of deformities after 5 months of exposure was 33 and 44% in juveniles raised in ambient and low pCO2, respectively, and 20% in juveniles exposed to high pCO2. Some of the deformities will possibly affect the ability to find food, sexual partner (walking legs, claw and antenna

  8. Multi-annual fluctuations in reconstructed historical time-series of a European lobster (Homarus gammarus) population disappear at increased exploitation levels.

    PubMed

    Sundelöf, Andreas; Bartolino, Valerio; Ulmestrand, Mats; Cardinale, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Through the history of ecology, fluctuations of populations have been a dominating topic, and endogenous causes of fluctuations and oscillations have been recognized and studied for more than 80 years. Here we analyzed an historical dataset, covering more than 130 years, of European lobster (Homarus gammarus) catches. The data shows periodic fluctuations, which are first dampened and then disappear over time. The disappearance of the periodicity coincided with a substantial increase in fishing effort and the oscillations have not reappeared in the time series. The shifting baseline syndrome has changed our perception of not only the status of the stock, but also the regulating pressures. We describe the transition of a naturally regulated lobster population into a heavily exploited fisheries controlled stock. This is shown by the incorporation of environmental and endogenous processes in generalized additive models, autocorrelation functions and periodicity analyses of time-series.

  9. Multi-Annual Fluctuations in Reconstructed Historical Time-Series of a European Lobster (Homarus gammarus) Population Disappear at Increased Exploitation Levels

    PubMed Central

    Sundelöf, Andreas; Bartolino, Valerio; Ulmestrand, Mats; Cardinale, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Through the history of ecology, fluctuations of populations have been a dominating topic, and endogenous causes of fluctuations and oscillations have been recognized and studied for more than 80 years. Here we analyzed an historical dataset, covering more than 130 years, of European lobster (Homarus gammarus) catches. The data shows periodic fluctuations, which are first dampened and then disappear over time. The disappearance of the periodicity coincided with a substantial increase in fishing effort and the oscillations have not reappeared in the time series. The shifting baseline syndrome has changed our perception of not only the status of the stock, but also the regulating pressures. We describe the transition of a naturally regulated lobster population into a heavily exploited fisheries controlled stock. This is shown by the incorporation of environmental and endogenous processes in generalized additive models, autocorrelation functions and periodicity analyses of time-series. PMID:23573187

  10. Effect of climate-related change in vegetation on leaf litter consumption and energy storage by Gammarus pulex from Continental or Mediterranean populations.

    PubMed

    Foucreau, Natacha; Piscart, Christophe; Puijalon, Sara; Hervant, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of global warming, it is important to characterise the potential changes occurring for some functional processes through the intra-specific study of key species. Changes in species distribution, particularly when key or engineer species are affected, should contribute to global changes in ecosystem functioning. In this study, we examined the potential consequences induced by global warming on ecosystem functioning in term of organic matter recycling. We compared consumption of leaf litter by some shredder populations (Gammarus pulex) between five tree species inhabiting continental (i.e., the northern region of the Rhône River Valley) and/or Mediterranean (i.e., the southern region of the Rhône River Valley) conditions. To consider any potential adaptation of the gammarid population to vegetation in the same climate conditions, three populations of the key shredder Gammarus pulex from the northern region and three from the southern region of the Rhône River Valley were used. We experimentally compared the effects of the geographical origin of both the gammarid populations and the leaf litter species on the shredding activity and the physiological state of animals (through body triglyceride content). This study demonstrated that leaf toughness is more important than geographical origin for determining shredder leaf litter consumption. The overall consumption rate of the gammarid populations from the southern region of Rhône Valley was much higher than that of the populations from the northern region, but no clear differences between the origins of the leaf litter (i.e., continental vs. Mediterranean) were observed. The northwards shift of G. pulex populations adapted to warmer conditions might significantly modify organic matter recycling in continental streams. As gammarid populations can demonstrate local adaptations to certain leaf species as a trophic resource, changes in riparian vegetation associated with climate change might locally

  11. Effect of Climate-Related Change in Vegetation on Leaf Litter Consumption and Energy Storage by Gammarus pulex from Continental or Mediterranean Populations

    PubMed Central

    Foucreau, Natacha; Piscart, Christophe; Puijalon, Sara; Hervant, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of global warming, it is important to characterise the potential changes occurring for some functional processes through the intra-specific study of key species. Changes in species distribution, particularly when key or engineer species are affected, should contribute to global changes in ecosystem functioning. In this study, we examined the potential consequences induced by global warming on ecosystem functioning in term of organic matter recycling. We compared consumption of leaf litter by some shredder populations (Gammarus pulex) between five tree species inhabiting continental (i.e., the northern region of the Rhône River Valley) and/or Mediterranean (i.e., the southern region of the Rhône River Valley) conditions. To consider any potential adaptation of the gammarid population to vegetation in the same climate conditions, three populations of the key shredder Gammarus pulex from the northern region and three from the southern region of the Rhône River Valley were used. We experimentally compared the effects of the geographical origin of both the gammarid populations and the leaf litter species on the shredding activity and the physiological state of animals (through body triglyceride content). This study demonstrated that leaf toughness is more important than geographical origin for determining shredder leaf litter consumption. The overall consumption rate of the gammarid populations from the southern region of Rhône Valley was much higher than that of the populations from the northern region, but no clear differences between the origins of the leaf litter (i.e., continental vs. Mediterranean) were observed. The northwards shift of G. pulex populations adapted to warmer conditions might significantly modify organic matter recycling in continental streams. As gammarid populations can demonstrate local adaptations to certain leaf species as a trophic resource, changes in riparian vegetation associated with climate change might locally

  12. Susceptibility of juvenile European lobster Homarus gammarus to shrimp products infected with high and low doses of white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Bateman, K S; Munro, J; Uglow, B; Small, H J; Stentiford, G D

    2012-08-27

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most important pathogen known to affect the sustainability and growth of the global penaeid shrimp farming industry. Although most commonly associated with penaeid shrimp farmed in warm waters, WSSV is also able to infect, cause disease in and kill a wide range of other decapod crustaceans, including lobsters, from temperate regions. In 2005, the European Union imported US$500 million worth of raw frozen or cooked frozen commodity products, much of which originated in regions positive for white spot disease (WSD). The presence of WSSV within the UK food market was verified by means of nested PCR performed on samples collected from a small-scale survey of supermarket commodity shrimp. Passage trials using inoculum derived from commodity shrimp from supermarkets and delivered by injection to specific pathogen-free Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei led to rapid mortality and pathognomonic signs of WSD in the shrimp, demonstrating that WSSV present within commodity shrimp was viable. We exposed a representative European decapod crustacean, the European lobster Homarus gammarus, to a single feeding of WSSV-positive, supermarket-derived commodity shrimp, and to positive control material (L. vannamei infected with a high dose of WSSV). These trials demonstrated that lobsters fed positive control (high dose) frozen raw products succumbed to WSD and displayed pathognomonic signs associated with the disease as determined by means of histology and transmission electron microscopy. Lobsters fed WSSV-positive, supermarket-derived commodity shrimp (low dose) did not succumb to WSD (no mortality or pathognomonic signs of WSD) but demonstrated a low level or latent infection via PCR. This study confirms susceptibility of H. gammarus to WSSV via single feedings of previously frozen raw shrimp products obtained directly from supermarkets.

  13. Deformities in larvae and juvenile European lobster (Homarus gammarus) exposed to lower pH at two different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnalt, A.-L.; Grefsrud, E. S.; Farestveit, E.; Larsen, M.; Keulder, F.

    2013-12-01

    The ongoing warming and acidification of the world's oceans are expected to influence the marine ecosystems, including benthic marine resources. Ocean acidification may especially have an impact on calcifying organisms, and the European lobster (Homarus gammarus) is among those species at risk. A project was initiated in 2011 aiming to investigate long-term effects of ocean acidification on the early life-cycle of lobster under two temperatures. Larvae were exposed to pCO2 levels of ambient water (water intake at 90 m depth), medium 750 (pH = 7.79) and high 1200 μatm pCO2 (pH = 7.62) at temperatures 10 and 18 °C. The water parameters in ambient water did not stay stable and were very low towards the end of the experiment in the larval phase at 10 °C,with pH between 7.83 and 7.90. At 18°, pH in ambient treatment was even lower, between 7.76 and 7.83, i.e. close to medium pCO2 treatment. Long-term exposure lasted 5 months. At 18 °C the development from stage 1 to 4 lasted 14 to 16 days, as predicted under optimal water conditions. Growth was very slow at 10 °C and resulted in three larvae reaching stage 4 in high pCO2 treatment only. There were no clear effects of pCO2 treatment, on either carapace length or dry weight. However, deformities were observed in both larvae and juveniles. The proportion of larvae with deformities increased with increasing pCO2 exposure, independent of temperature. In the medium treatment about 23% were deformed, and in the high treatment about 43% were deformed. None of the larvae exposed to water of pH >7.9 developed deformities. Curled carapace was the most common deformity found in larvae raised in medium pCO2 treatment, irrespective of temperature, but damages in the tail fan occurred in addition to a bent rostrum. Curled carapace was the only deformity found in high pCO2 treatment at both temperatures. Occurrence of deformities after five months of exposure was 33 and 44% in juveniles raised in ambient and low pCO2 levels

  14. Effects of water temperature and pH on toxicity of terbufos, trichlorfon, 4-nitrophenol and 2,4- dinitrophenol to the amphipod Gammarus pseudolimnaeus and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howe, G.E.; Marking, L.L.; Bills, T.D.; Rach, J.J.; Mayer, F.L.

    1994-01-01

    Acute toxicity tests were conducted to determine (a) the individual and interactive effects of water temperature (7, 12, 17 degree C), pH (6.5, 7.5, 8.5, 9.5), and time on the toxicity of terbufos, trichlorfon, 4- nitrophenol, and 2,4-dinitrophenol to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and the amphipod Gammarus pseudolimnaeus, and (b) the individual and interactive effects of water temperature and pH on chemical bioconcentration during acute tests with rainbow trout and Gammarus exposed to terbufos, 4-nitrophenol, and 2,4-dinitrophenol. The toxicity of all four chemicals was significantly affected by pH in all tests, except for Gammarus exposed to terbufos. The toxicity of terbufos to rainbow trout and Gammarus was less at pH 7.5 than at higher or lower pH. The toxicity of both nitrophenols decreased as pH increased, whereas the toxicity of trichlorfon increased with pH. The effect of pH on trichlorfon toxicity decreased with temperature. Temperature significantly affected the toxicity of all four chemicals to both species. Toxicity increased with temperature in all tests, except for rainbow trout exposed to nitrophenols; toxicity decreased as temperature increased for rainbow trout. Chemical bioconcentration was also significantly affected by temperature and pH and was directly related to toxicity in most tests. Significant interactive effects between toxicity-modifying factors were also frequently observed. Temperature and pH effects on chemical toxicity need to be considered in chemical hazard assessment to ensure adequate protection of aquatic organisms.

  15. Effects of water temperature and pH on toxicity of terbufos, trichlorfon, 4-nitrophenol and 2,4-dinitrophenol to the amphipod Gammarus pseudolimnaeus and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, G.E.; Marking, L.L.; Bills, T.D.; Rach, J.J. . National Fisheries Research Center); Mayer, F.L. Jr. . Environmental Research Lab.)

    1994-01-01

    Acute toxicity tests were conducted to determine (a) the individual and interactive effects of water temperature (7, 12, 17 C), pH (6.5, 7.5, 8.5, 9.5), and time on the toxicity of terbufos, trichlorfon, 4-nitrophenol, and 2,4-dinitrophenol to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and the amphipod Gammarus pseudolimnaeus, and (b) the individual and interactive effects of water temperature and pH on chemical bioconcentration during acute tests with rainbow trout and Gammarus exposed to terbufos, 4-nitrophenol, and 2,4-dinitrophenol. The toxicity of all four chemicals was significantly affected by pH in all tests, except for Gammarus exposed to terbufos. The toxicity of terbufos to rainbow trout and Gammarus was less at pH 7.5 than at higher or lower pH. The toxicity of both nitrophenols decreased as pH increased, whereas the toxicity of trichlorfon increased with pH. The effect of pH on trichlorfon toxicity decreased with temperature. Temperature significantly affected the toxicity of all four chemicals to both species. Toxicity increased with temperature in all tests, except for rainbow trout exposed to nitrophenols; toxicity decreased as temperature increased for rainbow trout. Chemical bioconcentration was also significantly affected by temperature and pH and was directly related to toxicity in most tests. Significant interactive effects between toxicity-modifying factors were also frequently observed. Temperature and pH effects on chemical toxicity need to be considered in chemical hazard assessment to ensure adequate protection of aquatic organisms.

  16. Invasive Macroinvertebrates in the Upper Mississippi River system: Recent Findings

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zoobenthos surveys of the great rivers of the Upper Mississippi River basin (Missouri, Upper Mississippi, and Ohio Rivers) in 2004-2006 revealed new invasions by marine and estuarine amphipods. The gammarid amphipods Echinogammarus ischnus and Gammarus tigrinus were discovered i...

  17. Invasive Macroinvertebrates in the Upper Mississippi River system: Recent Findings

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zoobenthos surveys of the great rivers of the Upper Mississippi River basin (Missouri, Upper Mississippi, and Ohio Rivers) in 2004-2006 revealed new invasions by marine and estuarine amphipods. The gammarid amphipods Echinogammarus ischnus and Gammarus tigrinus were discovered i...

  18. A new method for early assessment of effects of exposing two non-target crustacean species, Asellus aquaticus and Gammarus fossarum, to pesticides, a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Lukancic, Simon; Zibrat, Uros; Mezek, Tadej; Jerebic, Andreja; Simcic, Tatjana; Brancelj, Anton

    2010-05-01

    A reliable method is needed for assessing the condition of aquatic animals and their resistance to toxic pollutants. The physiological responses of two freshwater crustaceans, Asellus aquaticus and Gammarus fossarum, following in vitro exposure to two pesticides (atrazine and imidacloprid), were measured by a combination of electron transport system (ETS) activity and respiration (R). Short-term exposure concentrations were selected according to standard toxicity tests and ranged from 0.01 mg L(-1) to 10 mg L(-1). When pesticide concentration was greater than 1 mg l(- 1) (which is below the LC(50) [48 hours] determined for both species), A. aquaticus and G. fossarum responded to short-term exposure with elevated levels of R and/or lower levels of ETS activity. One hour exposure to concentrations of up to 10 mg L(-1) showed an effect in both test species. Laboratory tests confirmed that G. fossarum is more sensitive to short-term pesticide exposure than A. aquaticus. The combination of these two methods provides a useful and effective tool for assessing the general condition of aquatic animals. It also enables to determine toxic effects on freshwater biota of specific or combined pollutants. ETS/R ratio may be used as a quick predictor of effects on organisms exposed to pesticides and other stress factors such as changes in temperature, light, salinity, oxygen concentration and food.

  19. Toxicity effects of hazardous and noxious substances (HNS) to marine organisms: acute and chronic toxicity of p-xylene to the amphipod Gammarus locusta.

    PubMed

    Neuparth, T; Capela, R; Pereira, S P P; Moreira, S M; Santos, M M; Reis-Henriques, M A

    2014-01-01

    Despite the recent focus on hazardous and noxious substances (HNS) spills preparedness and responses, much remains to be done regarding the threat posed by HNS spills on marine biota. Among the identified priority HNS, p-xylene was selected to conduct ecotoxicological assays. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of the amphipod Gammarus locusta under acute and chronic exposure to p-xylene simulating conditions of a spill incident. In the acute exposure (96 h) the p-xylene LC50 was estimated. In the chronic bioassay (36 d), an integration of organism-level endpoints (survival, growth rate, and sex ratio) with biochemical markers indicative of oxidative stress including catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels was determined. The aim was to increase the xylene ecotoxicological database and better predict its impact in aquatic environments. p-Xylene induced several chronic toxicity effects in G. locusta. Significant alterations in antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation levels as well as growth rate and biased sex-ratio were observed. p-Xylene significantly affected the activities of CAT, SOD, and GST in G. locusta and produced oxidative damage by increasing levels of LPO in males. Further, impacts in key ecological endpoints, that is, growth and sex ratio, were noted that might be indicative of potential effects at the population level in a spill scenario. The present data may be useful to assist relevant bodies in preparedness and response to HNS spills.

  20. Biodegradable and Petroleum-Based Microplastics Do Not Differ in Their Ingestion and Excretion but in Their Biological Effects in a Freshwater Invertebrate Gammarus fossarum.

    PubMed

    Straub, Sandrine; Hirsch, Philipp E; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia

    2017-07-13

    Research on the uptake and effects of bioplastics by aquatic organisms is still in its infancy. Here, we aim to advance the field by comparing uptake and effects of microplastic particles (MPP) of a biodegradable bioMPP (polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB)) and petroleum-based MPP (polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)) in the freshwater amphipod Gammarus fossarum. Ingestion of both MPP in different particle sizes (32-250 µm) occurred after 24 h, with highest ingestion of particles in the range 32-63 µm and almost complete egestion after 64 h. A four-week effect-experiment showed a significant decrease of the assimilation efficiency in amphipods exposed to the petroleum-based MPP from week two onwards. The petroleum-based PMMA affected assimilation efficiency significantly in contrast to the biodegradable PHB, but overall differences in direct comparison of MPP types were small. Both MPP types led to a significantly lower wet weight gain relative to the control treatments. After four weeks, differences between both MPP types and silica, used as a natural particle control, were detected. In summary, these results suggest that both MPP types provoke digestive constraints on the amphipods, which go beyond those of natural non-palatable particles. This highlights the need for more detailed research comparing environmental effects of biodegradable and petroleum-based MPP and testing those against naturally occurring particle loads.

  1. Ecological modelling and toxicity data coupled to assess population recovery of marine amphipod Gammarus locusta: Application to disturbance by chronic exposure to aniline.

    PubMed

    de los Santos, Carmen B; Neuparth, Teresa; Torres, Tiago; Martins, Irene; Cunha, Isabel; Sheahan, Dave; McGowan, Tom; Santos, Miguel M

    2015-06-01

    A population agent-based model of marine amphipod Gammarus locusta was designed and implemented as a basis for ecological risk assessment of chemical pollutants impairing life-history traits at the individual level. We further used the model to assess the toxic effects of aniline (a priority hazardous and noxious substance, HNS) on amphipod populations using empirically-built dose-response functions derived from a chronic bioassay that we previously performed with this species. We observed a significant toxicant-induced mortality and adverse effects in reproductive performance (reduction of newborn production) in G. locusta at the individual level. Coupling the population model with the toxicological data from the chronic bioassay allowed the projection of the ecological costs associated with exposure to aniline that might occur in wild populations. Model simulations with different scenarios indicated that even low level prolonged exposure to the HNS aniline can have significant long-term impacts on G. locusta population abundance, until the impacted population returns to undisturbed levels. This approach may be a useful complement in ecotoxicological studies of chemical pollution to transfer individual-collected data to ecological-relevant levels.

  2. Multibiomarker assessment of cerium dioxide nanoparticle (nCeO2) sublethal effects on two freshwater invertebrates, Dreissena polymorpha and Gammarus roeseli.

    PubMed

    Garaud, M; Trapp, J; Devin, S; Cossu-Leguille, C; Pain-Devin, S; Felten, V; Giamberini, L

    2015-01-01

    Cerium nanoparticles (nCeO2) are widely used in everyday products, as fuel and paint additives. Meanwhile, very few studies on nCeO2 sublethal effects on aquatic organisms are available. We tried to fill this knowledge gap by investigating short-term effects of nCeO2 at environmentally realistic concentrations on two freshwater invertebrates; the amphipod Gammarus roeseli and the bivalve Dreissena polymorpha, using an integrated multibiomarker approach to detect early adverse effects of nCeO2 on organism biology. Differences in the behaviour of the organisms and of nanoparticles in the water column led to differential nCeO2 bioaccumulations, G. roeseli accumulating more cerium than D. polymorpha. Exposure to nCeO2 led to decreases in the size of the lysosomal system, catalase activity and lipoperoxidation in mussel digestive glands that could result from nCeO2 antioxidant properties, but also negatively impacted haemolymph ion concentrations. At the same time, no strong adverse effects of nCeO2 could be observed on G. roeseli. Further experiments will be necessary to confirm the absence of severe nCeO2 adverse effects in long-term environmentally realistic conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The mitogenome of Gammarus duebeni (Crustacea Amphipoda): A new gene order and non-neutral sequence evolution of tandem repeats in the control region.

    PubMed

    Krebes, Lukas; Bastrop, Ralf

    2012-06-01

    We determined the complete mitogenome sequence of Gammarus duebeni (Peracarida, Amphipoda). The mitogenome is circular and has a length of 15,651bp. The content corresponds to typical mitogenomes of metazoans. The gene order and transcriptional polarity of the protein-coding genes is identical to the pancrustacean ground pattern. Six tRNA genes are rearranged, making the gene order unique. Thus it will bring forward the understanding of mitogenome evolution within the Peracarida, for which much more derived gene orders are known. We postulate that the gene string trnA-trnS1 (AGN)-trnN-trnE-trnR constitutes an apomorphic character for the Amphipoda. In contrast to the relatively large genome size, we found two extremely truncated rRNA genes. The rrnL gene is the shortest (986bp) reported up until now for crustaceans. A six-time imperfect tandem repeat was observed within the control region. The inferred deterministic pattern of variation between the repeat units makes it likely, that functional constraints play an important role in the evolutionary dynamics and extant appearance of the repeat array. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Detailed surface morphology of the 'lobster louse' copepod, Nicothoë astaci, a haematophagous gill parasite of the European lobster, Homarus gammarus.

    PubMed

    Davies, Charlotte E; Thomas, Gethin R; Maffeis, Thierry G G; Wootton, Emma C; Penny, Mark W; Rowley, Andrew F

    2014-10-01

    The ectoparasitic copepod, Nicothoë astaci (the 'lobster louse'), infests the gills of the European lobster, Homarus gammarus. There have been limited studies on this haematophagous species; therefore knowledge of this parasite is rudimentary. The current study examines the surface morphology of this parasitic copepod, detached from the host, concentrating on adaptations of the suctorial mouthpart, the oral disc. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy revealed structural adaptations that facilitate attachment of these parasites to the gill filaments of their lobster host. The aperture of the feeding channel, through which host haemolymph is drawn, is only ca. 5μm in diameter. The edge of the oral disc is lined with numerous setae, whilst the surface of the disc is covered with large numbers of small (<1μm in diameter) teeth-like structures, which presumably pierce through, and grip, the cuticle lining of the host's gill. Overall, these structures are thought to provide a 'vacuum seal' to assist in pumping of blood, via peristalsis, into the alimentary canal of the copepod host.

  5. Mass spectrometry assay as an alternative to the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test for biomarker quantitation in ecotoxicology: application to vitellogenin in Crustacea (Gammarus fossarum).

    PubMed

    Simon, Romain; Jubeaux, Guillaume; Chaumot, Arnaud; Lemoine, Jérôme; Geffard, Olivier; Salvador, Arnaud

    2010-07-30

    Vitellogenin (Vg) is a widespread biomarker for measuring exposure to endocrine disruptors. Vg quantification is usually done by using the ELISA test (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Since this test is specific to a target protein, it can rarely be used with other species due to low cross-reactivity across species. Therefore alternative analytical methods have to be considered as the development of a specific and sensitive ELISA test for each new target is time-consuming and may prove unsuccessful. This paper focuses on the development of a quantitative assay by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) of vitelogenin in an invertebrate (Gammarus fossarum) for which no ELISA kit is available. The linearity of the method was within the concentration range 2.5-25,000pg/mL and the limit of detection was estimated at 0.75pg/mL of Vg. This method has been demonstrated to be an alternative to existing immunological methods for quantifying Vg in invertebrates due to its greater sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility (intra- and inter-assay below 15%). This assay was applied for Vg determination in female G. fossarum following exposure to a known endocrine disruptor, methyl farnesoate, in crustaceans. The availability of a quantitative G. fossarum LC-MS/MS assay should open the way for further studies to evaluate xenoestrogen effects in aquatic male G. fossarum.

  6. The effects of power station entrainment passage on three species of marine planktonic crustacean, Acartia tonsa (Copepoda), Crangon crangon (Decapoda) and Homarus gammarus (Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Bamber, Roger N; Seaby, Richard M H

    2004-05-01

    Experiments have been undertaken exposing larval common shrimp (Crangon crangon) and lobster (Homarus gammarus) and adult copepods (Acartia tonsa) to the key stresses of entrainment within power-station cooling-water systems. The apparatus has enabled the testing of mechanical, thermal, chlorine and realistic pressure effects both alone and in combination, the range of stressors spanning the standard conditions found within a temperate coastal direct-cooled power station. Mechanical stresses affected only lobster larvae, pressure changes affected only the Acartia adults. Residual chlorine caused significant mortality of Acartia and shrimp larvae, but had no effect on lobster larvae even at 1 ppm. The temperature increment significantly affected all three species, with a synergistic effect on chlorine sensitivity in the shrimp larvae, but only temperatures higher than would be experienced in a normally-operating power station affected the copepods. The majority of individuals of each species would survive passage through a power-station system under normal conditions. It is notable that, within the species tested, generalizations from the responses of one species to those of another are not valid.

  7. Biodegradable and Petroleum-Based Microplastics Do Not Differ in Their Ingestion and Excretion but in Their Biological Effects in a Freshwater Invertebrate Gammarus fossarum

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Sandrine; Hirsch, Philipp E.; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Research on the uptake and effects of bioplastics by aquatic organisms is still in its infancy. Here, we aim to advance the field by comparing uptake and effects of microplastic particles (MPP) of a biodegradable bioMPP (polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB)) and petroleum-based MPP (polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)) in the freshwater amphipod Gammarus fossarum. Ingestion of both MPP in different particle sizes (32–250 µm) occurred after 24 h, with highest ingestion of particles in the range 32–63 µm and almost complete egestion after 64 h. A four-week effect-experiment showed a significant decrease of the assimilation efficiency in amphipods exposed to the petroleum-based MPP from week two onwards. The petroleum-based PMMA affected assimilation efficiency significantly in contrast to the biodegradable PHB, but overall differences in direct comparison of MPP types were small. Both MPP types led to a significantly lower wet weight gain relative to the control treatments. After four weeks, differences between both MPP types and silica, used as a natural particle control, were detected. In summary, these results suggest that both MPP types provoke digestive constraints on the amphipods, which go beyond those of natural non-palatable particles. This highlights the need for more detailed research comparing environmental effects of biodegradable and petroleum-based MPP and testing those against naturally occurring particle loads. PMID:28703776

  8. Strategies of Gammarus pulex L. to cope with arsenic--Results from speciation analyses by IC-ICP-MS and XAS micro-mapping.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Jörg; Koch, Iris; Caumette, Guilhem; Nearing, Michelle; Reimer, Kenneth J; Planer-Friedrich, Britta

    2015-10-15

    The invertebrate shredder Gammarus pulex L. is a key species for aquatic carbon turnover via litter decomposition and can thrive in high-arsenic (As) environments. To understand their strategies for coping with increased As concentrations while fulfilling their ecosystem functions, we analyzed the As concentration and speciation in their aquatic habitat and in leaves with heterotrophic biofilms as their natural food source. We also followed the As distribution and speciation on the cuticle and within the body of G. pulex by X-ray absorption spectroscopic imaging. Half of the total As on G. pulex was found to be associated with the cuticle but was not taken up. Removing this externally bound As yielded only arsenate in the wash solution which reflects the speciation of the surrounding aquatic phase and shows that this As does not undergo any biotransformation. The major pathway into the organism is suggested to be incorporation via food intake, but only very low amounts of As were taken up or translocated from the gut system to other tissues. In one of the main food sources, leaves, 68% arsenate and 29% monomethylarsenate were found. After ingestion into the gut system, up to 23% of the more toxic arsenite was seen, but a substantial share was methylated to dimethylarsenate (46-56%). Little arsenate and arsenite were found in the adjacent tissues. Besides 76-80% mono- and di-methylarsenate, 10-21% of the As was complexed as As(III)-S species. G. pulex plays an important role in As cycling and our results indicate that As translocation from the gut to other tissues is minimized, but a transformation to other As-species occurred.

  9. Design of an electronically operated flow-through respirometer and its use to investigate the effects of copper on the respiration rate of the amphipod gammarus pulex (L.)

    SciTech Connect

    Kedwards, J.T.; Blockwell, S.J.; Tylor, E.J.; Pascoe, T.D.

    1996-12-31

    The use of oxygen consumption as a measure of metabolism has resulted in the development of many types of respirometer. These can be classified into three types. Firstly, there is the closed system in which oxygen concentration is measured at the beginning and end of the experiment and an organism`s respiratory rate calculated from the decrease in oxygen concentration and the volume of the vessel. Secondly, there is a system in which respired oxygen is replaced by oxygen from the surrounding air and the resultant change in air volume is measured gasometrically. A third approach, and the one employed in this study, utilises an open flow-through system in which water passes through a chamber containing an animal and the oxygen concentration is measured and compared to that of a reference chamber without an animal. The difference in oxygen concentration is then used to determine the respiration rate of the test animal. In open flow-through systems excretory products are washed away and water is not left stagnant as may occur in closed techniques. In addition, the open flow technique provides a constant oxygen concentration, avoids stress to animals with oxygen concentration-dependent metabolism and allows the simulation of low oxygen tension environments. Despite these obvious advantages the use of flow-through respirometers has been somewhat limited due to difficulties in calibration and complexity in construction and operation (Edwards and Learner 1960). The purpose of this investigation was to design a flow-through respirometer which is sufficiently sensitive to detect pollutant-induced respiratory changes in freshwater invertebrates and which permits automated continuous recording of the respiration of several animals maintained individually. In order to evaluate the system the effect of copper (prepared form cupric sulphate, CuSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O) on the respiration of the shrimp Gammarus pulex was studied. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Molecular characterisation of the Microsporidia of the amphipod Gammarus duebeni across its natural range revealed hidden diversity, wide-ranging prevalence and potential for co-evolution.

    PubMed

    Krebes, L; Blank, M; Frankowski, J; Bastrop, R

    2010-10-01

    Microsporidia comprise an unusual group of intracellular, eukaryotic parasites that exhibit ubiquitous distribution throughout the animal kingdom. We analysed the small subunit ribosomal gene (SSUrDNA) using PCR and sequencing and screened 894 Gammarus duebeni (Crustacea, Amphipoda) specimens from 35 European marine and freshwater populations. We discovered considerable hidden microsporidian diversity. Blast searches, sequence analysis and phylogenetic analysis revealed intraspecific sequence variants of known species Dictyocoela duebenum,Dictyocoela muelleri, Pleistophora mulleri and Nosema granulosis. For seven SSUrDNA sequences, we did not find corresponding GenBank entries; they likely represent new species, provisionally classified within the genus Microsporidium. Phylogenetic reconstructions revealed their position as polyphyletic, thereby lending support to the hypothesis of an early microsporidian radiation within this host group. Nevertheless, four of the presumptive novel species formed a discrete and well-supported subclade in the phylogenetic analysis. The respective host specimens were collected from disjunct freshwater sites in Wales, Ireland and Brittany (France) and may represent a new, G. duebeni-specific, microsporidian genus. At the population level, our screening showed that parasitism through Microsporidia is the rule rather than the exception in G. duebeni. We found Microsporidia in 91% of sampled G. duebeni populations. This finding may have considerable consequences for the interpretation of results from ecological, behavioural, physiological and evolutionary studies of the host, as parasitism can significantly influence these traits. Because the host G. duebeni has a complex phylogeography and evolutionary history, the studied host-parasite system may have potential as a model system for investigating processes of co-evolution. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Parallel reduction in expression, but no loss of functional constraint, in two opsin paralogs within cave populations of Gammarus minus (Crustacea: Amphipoda).

    PubMed

    Carlini, David B; Satish, Suma; Fong, Daniel W

    2013-04-23

    Gammarus minus, a freshwater amphipod living in the cave and surface streams in the eastern USA, is a premier candidate for studying the evolution of troglomorphic traits such as pigmentation loss, elongated appendages, and reduced eyes. In G. minus, multiple pairs of genetically related, physically proximate cave and surface populations exist which exhibit a high degree of intraspecific morphological divergence. The morphology, ecology, and genetic structure of these sister populations are well characterized, yet the genetic basis of their morphological divergence remains unknown. We used degenerate PCR primers designed to amplify opsin genes within the subphylum Crustacea and discovered two distinct opsin paralogs (average inter-paralog protein divergence ≈ 20%) in the genome of three independently derived pairs of G. minus cave and surface populations. Both opsin paralogs were found to be related to other crustacean middle wavelength sensitive opsins. Low levels of nucleotide sequence variation (< 1% within populations) were detected in both opsin genes, regardless of habitat, and dN/dS ratios did not indicate a relaxation of functional constraint in the cave populations with reduced or absent eyes. Maximum likelihood analyses using codon-based models also did not detect a relaxation of functional constraint in the cave lineages. We quantified expression level of both opsin genes and found that the expression of both paralogs was significantly reduced in all three cave populations relative to their sister surface populations. The concordantly lowered expression level of both opsin genes in cave populations of G. minus compared to sister surface populations, combined with evidence for persistent purifying selection in the cave populations, is consistent with an unspecified pleiotropic function of opsin proteins. Our results indicate that phototransduction proteins such as opsins may have retained their function in cave-adapted organisms because they may play a

  12. Multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments with the amphipod Gammarus locusta: II. Organism and population-level endpoints.

    PubMed

    Costa, Filipe O; Neuparth, Teresa; Correia, Ana D; Costa, Maria Helena

    2005-07-01

    This study aimed to test the performance of the amphipod Gammarus locusta (L.) in chronic sediment toxicity tests. It constitutes part of a multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments, integrating organism and population-level endpoints with biochemical markers responses. Here we account for organism and population-level effects, while biomarker responses were reported in a companion article. Five moderately contaminated sediments from Sado and Tagus estuaries were tested, comprising 3 muddy and 2 sandy sediments. These sediments either did not show acute toxicity or were diluted with control sediment as much as required to remove acute toxicity. Subsequent chronic tests consisted of 28-day exposures with survival, individual growth and reproductive traits as endpoints. Two of the muddy sediments induced higher growth rates in the amphipods, and improved reproductive traits. This was understood to be a consequence of the amount of organic matter in the sediment, which was nutritionally beneficial to the amphipods, while concurrently decreasing contaminant bioavailability. Biomarker responses did not reveal toxicant-induced stress in amphipods exposed to these sediments. One of the sandy sediments was acutely toxic at 50% dilution, but in contrast stimulated amphipod growth when diluted 75%. This was presumed to be an indication of a hormetic response. Finally the two remaining contaminated sediments showed pronounced chronic toxicity, affecting survival and reproduction. The sex ratio of survivors was highly biased towards females, and offspring production was severely impaired. The particulars of the responses of this amphipod were examined, as well as strengths versus limitations of the sediment test. This study illustrates the utility of this chronic test for toxicity assessment of contaminated estuarine sediments, with potential application all along Atlantic Europe.

  13. Caged Gammarus fossarum (Crustacea) as a robust tool for the characterization of bioavailable contamination levels in continental waters: towards the determination of threshold values.

    PubMed

    Besse, Jean-Philippe; Coquery, Marina; Lopes, Christelle; Chaumot, Arnaud; Budzinski, Hélène; Labadie, Pierre; Geffard, Olivier

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the suitability of an active biomonitoring approach, using the ecologically relevant species Gammarus fossarum, to assess trends of bioavailable contamination in continental waters. Gammarids were translocated into cages at 27 sites, in the Rhône-Alpes region (France) during early autumn 2009. Study sites were chosen to represent different physico-chemical characteristics and various anthropic pressures. Biotic factors such as sex, weight and food availability were controlled in order to provide robust and comparable results. After one week of exposure, concentrations of 11 metals/metalloids (Cd, Pb, Hg, Ni, Zn, Cr, Co, Cu, As, Se and Ag) and 38 hydrophobic organic substances including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorobiphenyles (PCBs), pentabromodiphenylethers (PBDEs) and organochlorine pesticides, were measured in gammarids. All metals except Ag, and 33 organic substances among 38 were quantified in G. fossarum, showing that this species is relevant for chemical biomonitoring. The control of biotic factors allowed a robust and direct inter-site comparison of the bioavailable contamination levels. Overall, our results show the interest and robustness of the proposed methodological approach for assessing trends of bioavailable contamination, notably for metals and hydrophobic organic contaminants, in continental waters. Furthermore, we built threshold values of bioavailable contamination in gammarids, above which measured concentrations are expected to reveal a bioavailable contamination at the sampling site. Two ways to define such values were investigated, a statistical approach and a model fit. Threshold values were determined for almost all the substances investigated in this study and similar values were generally derived from the two approaches. Then, levels of contaminants measured in G. fossarum at the 27 study sites were compared to the threshold values obtained using the model fit. These threshold values could serve as a

  14. The reaction of European lobster larvae (Homarus gammarus) to different quality food: effects of ontogenetic shifts and pre-feeding history.

    PubMed

    Schoo, Katherina L; Aberle, Nicole; Malzahn, Arne M; Schmalenbach, Isabel; Boersma, Maarten

    2014-02-01

    Young larval stages of many organisms represent bottlenecks in the life-history of many species. The high mortality commonly observed in, for example, decapod larvae has often been linked to poor nutrition, with most studies focussing on food quantity. Here, we focus instead on the effects of quality and have investigated its effects on the nutritional condition of lobster larvae. We established a tri-trophic food chain consisting of the cryptophyte Rhodomonas salina, the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa and larvae of the European lobster Homarus gammarus. In a set of experiments, we manipulated the C:N:P stoichiometry of the primary producers, and accordingly those of the primary consumer. In a first experiment, R. salina was grown under N- and P-limitation and the nutrient content of the algae was manipulated by addition of the limiting nutrient to create a food quality gradient. In a second experiment, the effect on lobster larvae of long- and short-term exposure to food of varying quality during ontogenetic development was investigated. The condition of the lobster larvae was negatively affected even by subtle N- and P-nutrient limitations of the algae. Furthermore, younger lobster larvae were more vulnerable to nutrient limitation than older ones, suggesting an ontogenetic shift in the capacity of lobster larvae to cope with low quality food. The results presented here might have substantial consequences for the survival of lobster larvae in the field, as, in the light of future climate change and re-oligotrophication of the North Sea, lobster larvae might face marked changes in temperature and nutrient conditions, thus significantly altering their condition and growth.

  15. A comparison of the structure of American (Homarus americanus) and European (Homarus gammarus) lobster cuticle with particular reference to shell disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Davies, Charlotte E; Whitten, Miranda M A; Kim, Anita; Wootton, Emma C; Maffeis, Thierry G G; Tlusty, Michael; Vogan, Claire L; Rowley, Andrew F

    2014-03-01

    The integument of arthropods is an important first-line defence against the invasion of parasites and pathogens. Once damaged, this can be subject to colonisation by microbial agents from the surrounding environment, which in crustaceans can lead to a condition termed shell disease syndrome. This condition has been reported in several crustacean species, including crabs and lobsters. The syndrome is a progressive condition where the outer cuticle becomes pitted and eroded, and in extreme cases is compromised, leaving animals susceptible to septicaemia. This study examined the susceptibility of juvenile American (Homarus americanus) and European (Homarus gammarus) lobsters to shell disease, as a result of mechanical damage. Scanning electron microscopy was used as a method to identify differences in the cuticle structure and consequences of mechanical damage. Claw regions were aseptically punctured, whilst carapaces were abraded using sterile sandpaper, to mimic natural damage. After a period of between 10 and 12 weeks, lobsters were sacrificed, fixed and stored for later examination. The carapace and claws of juvenile American lobsters were shown to be thinner and more vulnerable to abrasion damage than their European counterparts. In addition, the number and distribution of setal pits and pore canal openings also differed between the two species of lobster. Mechanical damage resulted in the formation of shell disease lesions on the claw and carapace of both lobster species. However, American lobsters, unlike their European counterparts, had extensive bacterial colonisation on the margins of these lesions. Overall, it is concluded that the cuticle of the American lobster is more susceptible to damage and resulting microbial colonisation. This may have implications for susceptibility of both species of lobster to shell disease syndrome.

  16. Parallel reduction in expression, but no loss of functional constraint, in two opsin paralogs within cave populations of Gammarus minus (Crustacea: Amphipoda)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gammarus minus, a freshwater amphipod living in the cave and surface streams in the eastern USA, is a premier candidate for studying the evolution of troglomorphic traits such as pigmentation loss, elongated appendages, and reduced eyes. In G. minus, multiple pairs of genetically related, physically proximate cave and surface populations exist which exhibit a high degree of intraspecific morphological divergence. The morphology, ecology, and genetic structure of these sister populations are well characterized, yet the genetic basis of their morphological divergence remains unknown. Results We used degenerate PCR primers designed to amplify opsin genes within the subphylum Crustacea and discovered two distinct opsin paralogs (average inter-paralog protein divergence ≈ 20%) in the genome of three independently derived pairs of G. minus cave and surface populations. Both opsin paralogs were found to be related to other crustacean middle wavelength sensitive opsins. Low levels of nucleotide sequence variation (< 1% within populations) were detected in both opsin genes, regardless of habitat, and dN/dS ratios did not indicate a relaxation of functional constraint in the cave populations with reduced or absent eyes. Maximum likelihood analyses using codon-based models also did not detect a relaxation of functional constraint in the cave lineages. We quantified expression level of both opsin genes and found that the expression of both paralogs was significantly reduced in all three cave populations relative to their sister surface populations. Conclusions The concordantly lowered expression level of both opsin genes in cave populations of G. minus compared to sister surface populations, combined with evidence for persistent purifying selection in the cave populations, is consistent with an unspecified pleiotropic function of opsin proteins. Our results indicate that phototransduction proteins such as opsins may have retained their function in cave

  17. Parasite-induced alteration of plastic response to predation threat: increased refuge use but lower food intake in Gammarus pulex infected with the acanothocephalan Pomphorhynchus laevis.

    PubMed

    Dianne, Lucile; Perrot-Minnot, Marie-Jeanne; Bauer, Alexandre; Guvenatam, Arnaud; Rigaud, Thierry

    2014-03-01

    Larvae of many trophically-transmitted parasites alter the behaviour of their intermediate host in ways that increase their probability of transmission to the next host in their life cycle. Before reaching a stage that is infective to the next host, parasite larvae may develop through several larval stages in the intermediate host that are not infective to the definitive host. Early predation at these stages results in parasite death, and it has recently been shown that non-infective larvae of some helminths decrease such risk by enhancing the anti-predator defences of the host, including decreased activity and increased sheltering. However, these behavioural changes may divert infected hosts from an optimal balance between survival and foraging (either seeking food or a mate). In this study, this hypothesis was tested using the intermediate host of the acanthocephalan parasite Pomphorhynchus laevis, the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex. We compared activity, refuge use, food foraging and food intake of hosts experimentally infected with the non-infective stage (acanthella), with that of uninfected gammarids. Behavioural assays were conducted in four situations varying in predation risk and in food accessibility. Acanthella-infected amphipods showed an increase in refuge use and a general reduction in activity and food intake. There was no effect of parasite intensity on these traits. Uninfected individuals showed plastic responses to water-borne cues from fish by adjusting refuge use, activity and food intake. They also foraged more when the food was placed outside the refuge. At the intra-individual level, refuge use and food intake were positively correlated in infected gammarids only. Overall, our findings suggest that uninfected gammarids exhibit risk-sensitive behaviour including increased food intake under predation risk, whereas gammarids infected with the non-infective larvae of P. laevis exhibit a lower motivation to feed, irrespective of predation risk

  18. The Indecisive Feminist: Study of Anne Sexton's Revisionist Fairy Tales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Nadia Fayidh

    2015-01-01

    Fairy tales to female writers are major resource for their abundant writings, but for the feminist poets since 1960s, they become essential subject matter to often deal with in their literary production. With the motivation to address the conventional tradition of patriarchal society, and re-address the stereotype females inhabiting these tales,…

  19. Effects of the acanthocephalan Polymorphus minutus and the microsporidian Dictyocoela duebenum on energy reserves and stress response of cadmium exposed Gammarus fossarum

    PubMed Central

    Nachev, Milen; Shih, Hsiu-Hui; Sures, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Amphipods are commonly parasitized by acanthocephalans and microsporidians and co-infections are found frequently. Both groups of parasites are known to have severe effects on their host. For example, microsporidians can modify host sex ratio and acanthocephalans can manipulate the behavior of the amphipod to promote transmission to the final host. These effects influence host metabolism in general and will also affect the ability of amphipods to cope with additional stressors such as environmental pollution, e.g., by toxic metals. Here we tested the effects of sub-lethal concentrations of cadmium on glycogen and lipid levels, as well as on the 70kDa heat shock protein (hsp70) response of field collected Gammarus fossarum, which were naturally infected with microsporidians and the acanthocephalan Polymorphus minutus. Infected and uninfected G. fossarum were exposed to a nominal Cd concentration of 4 µg/L, which resembled measured aqueous Cd concentration of 2.9 µg/L in reconstituted water for 7 d at 15 °C in parallel to an unexposed control. After exposure gammarids were snap frozen, weighed, sexed and tested for microsporidian infection by PCR. Only individuals containing the microsporidian Dictyocoela duebenum were used for the further biochemical and metal analyses. P. minutus infected amphipods were significantly smaller than their uninfected conspecifics. Mortality was insignificantly increased due to cadmium exposure, but not due to parasite infection. Microsporidian infection in combination with cadmium exposure led to increased glycogen levels in female gammarids. An increase of glycogen was also found due to interaction of acanthocephalan and microsporidian infection. Elevated lipid levels were observed in all groups infected with microsporidians, while acanthocephalans had the opposite effect. A positive correlation of lipid and glycogen levels was observed. The general stress response measured in form of hsp70 was significantly increased in

  20. Protein-chromophore interactions in alpha-crustacyanin, the major blue carotenoprotein from the carapace of the lobster, Homarus gammarus. A study by 13C magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Weesie, R J; Askin, D; Jansen, F J; de Groot, H J; Lugtenburg, J; Britton, G

    1995-03-27

    MAS (magic angle spinning) 13C NMR has been used to study protein-chromophore interactions in alpha-crustacyanin, the blue astaxanthin-binding carotenoprotein of the lobster, Homarus gammarus, reconstituted with astaxanthins labelled with 13C at the 14,14' or 15,15' positions. Two signals are seen for alpha-crustacyanin containing [14,14'-13C2]astaxanthin, shifted 6.9 and 4.0 ppm downfield from the 134.1 ppm signal of uncomplexed astaxanthin in the solid state. With alpha-crustacyanin containing [15,15'-13C2]astaxanthin, one essentially unshifted broad signal is seen. Hence binding to the protein causes a decrease in electronic charge density, providing the first experimental evidence that a charge redistribution mechanism contributes to the bathochromic shift of the astaxanthin in alpha-crustacyanin, in agreement with inferences based on resonance Raman data [Salares, et al. (1979) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 576, 176-191]. The splitting of the 14 and 14' signals provides evidence for asymmetric binding of each astaxanthin molecule by the protein.

  1. Invading predatory crustacean Dikerogammarus villosus eliminates both native and exotic species.

    PubMed Central

    Dick, J T; Platvoet, D

    2000-01-01

    As the tempo of biological invasions increases, explanations and predictions of their impacts become more crucial. Particularly with regard to biodiversity, we require elucidation of interspecific behavioural interactions among invaders and natives. In freshwaters in The Netherlands, we show that the invasive Ponto-Caspian crustacean amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus is rapidly eliminating Gammarus duebeni, a native European amphipod, and Gammarus tigrinus, until now a spectacularly successful invader from North America. In the laboratory, survival of single (unguarded) female G. duebeni was significantly lower when male D. villosus were free to roam as compared with isolated within microcosms. In addition, survival of paired (guarded) female G. duebeni was significantly lower when male D. villosus as compared with male G. duebeni were present. D. villosus killed and consumed both recently moulted and, unusually, intermoult victims. Survival of G. tigrinus was significantly lower when D. villosus were free to roam as compared with isolated within microcosms and, again, both moulted and intermoult victims were preyed upon. Male D. villosus were significantly more predatory than were females, while female G. tigrinus were significantly more often preyed upon than were males. Predation by D. villosus on both species occurred over a range of water conductivities, an environmental feature previously shown to promote amphipod coexistence. This predatory invader is predicted to reduce further the amphipod diversity in a range of freshwater habitats in Europe and North America. PMID:10874746

  2. Fungal propagules and DNA in feces of two detritus-feeding amphipods.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Kandikere Ramaiah; Beaton, Margaret; Bärlocher, Felix

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic shredders (leaf-eating invertebrates) preferentially ingest and digest leaves colonized by aquatic hyphomycetes (fungi). This activity destroys leaf-associated fungal biomass and detritial resources in streams. Fungal counter-adaptations may include the ability to survive passage through the invertebrate's digestive tract. When fecal pellets of Gammarus tigrinus and Hyalella azteca were incubated with sterile leaves, spores of nine (G. tigrinus) and seven (H. azteca) aquatic hyphomycete species were subsequently released from the leaves, indicating the presence of viable fungal structures in the feces. Extraction, amplification, and sequencing of DNA from feces revealed numerous fungal phylotypes, two of which could be assigned unequivocally to an aquatic hyphomycete. The estimated contributions of major fungal groups varied depending on whether 18S or ITS sequences were amplified and cloned. We conclude that a variable proportion of fungal DNA in the feces of detritivores may originate from aquatic hyphomycetes. Amplified DNA may be associated with metabolically active, dormant, or dead fungal cells.

  3. "[This] Book of Odd Tales/Which Transform the Brothers Grimm": Teaching Anne Sexton's "Transformations"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keely, Karen A.

    2008-01-01

    Folklorist Andrew Lang, in his Preface to his 1910 edited collection "The Lilac Fairy Book", celebrates the ongoing repetition and retelling of fairy tales, including both the cozy retelling by the family fireplace. In the century since Lang wrote these words, many authors have joined the ranks of Shakespeare and Homer in putting fairy tale…

  4. "[This] Book of Odd Tales/Which Transform the Brothers Grimm": Teaching Anne Sexton's "Transformations"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keely, Karen A.

    2008-01-01

    Folklorist Andrew Lang, in his Preface to his 1910 edited collection "The Lilac Fairy Book", celebrates the ongoing repetition and retelling of fairy tales, including both the cozy retelling by the family fireplace. In the century since Lang wrote these words, many authors have joined the ranks of Shakespeare and Homer in putting fairy tale…

  5. Transcriptional responses to teflubenzuron exposure in European lobster (Homarus gammarus).

    PubMed

    Olsvik, Pål A; Samuelsen, Ole B; Agnalt, Ann-Lisbeth; Lunestad, Bjørn T

    2015-10-01

    Increasing use of pharmaceutical drugs to delouse farmed salmon raises environmental concerns. This study describes an experiment carried out to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the antiparasitic drug teflubenzuron on a non-target species, the European lobster. Juvenile lobsters (10.3±0.9 mm carapace length) were fed two environmentally relevant doses of teflubenzuron, corresponding to 5 and 20% of a standard salmon medication (10 mg/kg day), termed low and high dose in this study. After 114 days of dietary exposure, whole-animal accumulation of teflubenzuron was determined. One claw from each animal was collected for transcriptional analysis. Overall, exposed animals showed low cumulative mortality. Six animals, two from the low dose treatment and four from the high dose, showed exoskeletal abnormalities (claw deformities or stiff walking legs). Residual levels of teflubenzuron in juvenile lobster were 2.7-fold higher in the high dose (282 ng/g) compared to the low dose treatment (103 ng/g). The transcriptional examination showed significant effects of teflubenzuron on 21 out of 39 studied genes. At the transcriptional level, environmentally relevant levels of the anti-salmon lice drug impacted genes linked to drug detoxification (cyp3a, cyp6a2, cyp302a, sult1b1, abcc4), cellular stress (hsp70, hsp90, chh), oxidative stress (cat, gpx3) and DNA damage (p53), as well as molting and exoskeleton regulation (chi3l1, ecr, jhl1, chs1, ctbs, gap65, jhel-ces1) in claw tissue (muscle and exoskeleton). In conclusion, teflubenzuron at sub-lethal levels can affect many molecular mechanisms in European lobster claws.

  6. Electrophoretic approach to the biochemical systematics of gammarids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulnheim, H.-P.; Scholl, A.

    1981-12-01

    By utilizing the techniques for electrophoretic separation of proteins by vertical starch gels, the biochemical systematics of 10 Gammaridae species obtained from marine, brackish and freshwater habitats was studied. They included Chaetogammarus marinus, Gammarus zaddachi, G. salinus, G. oceanicus, G. tigrinus, G. chevreuxi, G. locusta, G. duebeni duebeni, G. d. celticus, G. pulex pulex, and G. fossarum. For comparison of electrophoretic mobilities selected enzymes (phosphoglucose isomerase, glutamate oxalacetate transaminase, arginine phosphokinase, hexokinase, leucine amino peptidase, mannose 6-phosphate isomerase) were assayed. They were used as diagnostic characters in terms of electrophoretic identities or diversities of most frequent alleles at polymorphic gene loci. These criteria could be applied to estimate intrageneric enzymic variation and degrees of genetic relatedness between the crustacean amphipod species under consideration, thereby complementing traditional morphological classification.

  7. Effects of anthropogenic salinization on biological traits and community composition of stream macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Szöcs, Eduard; Coring, Eckhard; Bäthe, Jürgen; Schäfer, Ralf B

    2014-01-15

    Salinization of rivers resulting from industrial discharge or road-deicing can adversely affect macroinvertebrates. Trait-based approaches are a promising tool in ecological monitoring and may perform better than taxonomy-based approaches. However only little is known how and which biological traits are affected by salinization. We investigated the effects of anthropogenic salinization on macroinvertebrate communities and biological traits in the Werra River, Germany and compared the taxonomic and trait response. We found a change in macroinvertebrate community and trait composition. Communities at saline sites were characterized by the three exotic species Gammarus tigrinus, Apocorophium lacustre and Potamopyrgus antipodarum. The frequencies of trait modalities long life cycle duration, respiration by gill, ovoviviparity, shredder and multivoltinism were statistically significantly increased at saline sites. The trait-based ordination resulted in a higher explained variance than the taxonomy-based ordination, indicating a better performance of the trait-based approach, resulting in a better discrimination between saline and non-saline sites. Our results are in general agreement with other studies from Europe, indicating a trait convergence for saline streams, being dominated by the traits ovoviviparity and multivoltinism. Three further traits (respiration by gill, life cycle duration and shredders) responded strongly to salinization, but this may primarily be attributed to the dominance of a single invasive species, G. tigrinus, at the saline sites in the Werra River.

  8. Gregarines (Apicomplexa) and microsporidians (Microsporidia) of native and invasive gammarids (Amphipoda, Gammaroidea), occurring in Poland.

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, Mykola; Codreanu-Bălcescu, Doina; Grabowski, Michal; Konopacka, Alicja; Wita, Irena; Czaplińska, Urszula

    2009-01-01

    The goal of our study was to recognize microparasites of alien gammarids inhabiting Polish inland and coastal waters versus those infecting local species. Twenty two localities including the Vistula, Oder and Bug Rivers, Vistula Lagoon, Gosławskie Lake, littoral of the Baltic Sea, as well as small rivers draining directly to the sea were investigated. In total, over 5000 individuals of 14 species of gammarids were collected and analyzed using light and electron microscopy. The studies have revealed five named and seven unnamed species of gregarines (Apicomplexa, Gregarinidae) as well as three named and seven unnamed species of microsporidians (Microsporidia, Nosematidae, Thelohaniidae) infecting six native and four invasive gammarid host species. All the above microparasites were new to Poland. Four species of gregarines (Uradiophora ramosa, U. longissima, Cephaloidophora similis, C. mucronata) and four microsporidians (Nosema dikerogammari, N. pontogammari, Thelohania sp. 2, Thelohania sp. 5) were associated with hosts of Ponto-Caspian origins. Evidently, these microparasites were transported to the area through the range expansion of their invasive hosts. Gregarines Cephaloidophora sp. 1 and Uradiophora sp. 1 were registered only in North American Gammarus tigrinus. Uradiophoera ramosa infects Ponto-Caspian (P. robustoides, D. villosus) and North-Americah hosts (G. tigrinus).

  9. Interference competition among native and invader amphipods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Riel, Mariëlle C.; Healy, Evan P.; van der Velde, Gerard; bij de Vaate, Abraham

    2007-05-01

    Aquarium experiments were used to study indications of interference competition, such as substratum choice shifts, swimming activities and mortality of invasive and indigenous gammarids in each other's presence. The more recent invaders Gammarus tigrinus and Dikerogammarus villosus were more likely to prefer stone substratum, whereas the native Gammarus pulex and an earlier invader Gammarus roeseli were found more frequently in the water layer. Sand was the least likely substratum to be chosen by any of the species. G. pulex and G. roeseli did not alter their substratum preference in each other's presence. In the presence of D. villosus, G. pulex shifted towards smaller stones and increased its swimming activities, whereas D. villosus did not change its behaviour in the presence of G. pulex. These shifts may indicate interference competition, with D. villosus being the stronger competitor. The greatest shifts in substratum preference arose when one species had occupied a substratum before the other one was introduced, especially when D. villosus was already present before G. pulex was introduced, possibly indicating pre-emptive competition. Swimming activities of G. pulex increased in the presence of D. villosus, whereas D. villosus spent little time swimming. Mortality was comparable between the different experiments without any indication of predation. The effect of Intra Guild Predation (IGP) may not be reflected adequately by short-time experiments as moults occurred seldom during the experiments. Although no IGP was observed during our experiments, habitat shifts occurred, which may indicate that competitive interactions are apparent before IGP starts. Such shifts may serve to avoid intraguild competition.

  10. 77 FR 50207 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Project: I-5: Glendale-Hugo Paving/Sexton Climbing Lane...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Limitations on Claims for Judicial Review of Actions by FHWA, NMFS, USF... and damaged guardrail, and also replacing substandard median barrier. The project will also construct...- 4209]. 7. Wetlands and Water Resources: Clean Water Act (Section 404, Section 401, Section 319) ; Safe...

  11. Effects of phthalate esters on the locomotor activity of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex

    SciTech Connect

    Thuren, A. ); Woin, P. )

    1991-01-01

    Phthalates are of environmental concern owing to their large-scale annual production and to their ubiquitous use as additives in the manufacture of plastics. Among the phthalates, di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and dibutylphthalate (DBP) are the most commonly used compounds. Phthalates are lipophilic with a relatively low water solubility and show low acute toxicity to fish and selectively toxic to cladocerans. Little is known, however, about their effects on the behavior, reproductive success or the growth of organisms. In this investigation of locomotor activity of G. pulex was studied under phthalate stress. The aim of the study was to determine the effects of phthalates on overall locomotor activity of G. pulex and the impact of long term exposure on diel activity.

  12. Limited transfer of uranium to higher trophic levels by Gammarus pulex L. in contaminated environments.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Jörg; Brackhage, Carsten; Dudel, E Gert

    2009-09-01

    In contrast to the classification of most invertebrate shredders being sensitive to uranium, a G. pulex L. population with reproduction was found in a stream at a former uranium mining site with uranium concentrations of 150 microg l(-1) in water and up to 2000 mg kg(-1) DW(-1) (dry weight) in litter born organic sediments. The survival of G. pulex, collected from a site without uranium contamination, was tested in a laboratory microcosm experiment using synthetic uranium-contaminated water and uranium-contaminated but nutrient rich food, simulating physicochemical conditions of water from former uranium mining sites. The results reveal that there are no significant differences in survival rate between individuals exposed and those not exposed to uranium. The uptake of uranium by G. pulex in environments with concentrations in food of 1152 mg kg(-1) in DM (dry mass, organically bound) and in water of 63.9 microg L(-1) is very low (4.48(1.93-8.46) mg kg(-1) in DM). The accumulation of uranium in these invertebrates was verified to be via two pathways: body surface and food. A relevant amount of uranium adsorbs to the body surface where it can readily be desorbed.

  13. Significance of xenobiotic metabolism for bioaccumulation kinetics of organic chemicals in Gammarus pulex.

    PubMed

    Ashauer, Roman; Hintermeister, Anita; O'Connor, Isabel; Elumelu, Maline; Hollender, Juliane; Escher, Beate I

    2012-03-20

    Bioaccumulation and biotransformation are key toxicokinetic processes that modify toxicity of chemicals and sensitivity of organisms. Bioaccumulation kinetics vary greatly among organisms and chemicals; thus, we investigated the influence of biotransformation kinetics on bioaccumulation in a model aquatic invertebrate using fifteen (14)C-labeled organic xenobiotics from diverse chemical classes and physicochemical properties (1,2,3-trichlorobenzene, imidacloprid, 4,6-dinitro-o-cresol, ethylacrylate, malathion, chlorpyrifos, aldicarb, carbofuran, carbaryl, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, pentachlorophenol, 4-nitrobenzyl-chloride, 2,4-dichloroaniline, and sea-nine (4,5-dichloro-2-octyl-3-isothiazolone)). We detected and identified metabolites using HPLC with UV and radio-detection as well as high resolution mass spectrometry (LTQ-Orbitrap). Kinetics of uptake, biotransformation, and elimination of parent compounds and metabolites were modeled with a first-order one-compartment model. Bioaccumulation factors were calculated for parent compounds and metabolite enrichment factors for metabolites. Out of 19 detected metabolites, we identified seven by standards or accurate mass measurements and two via pathway analysis and analogies to other compounds. 1,2,3-Trichlorobenzene, imidacloprid, and 4,6-dinitro-o-cresol were not biotransformed. Dietary uptake contributed little to overall uptake. Differentiation between parent and metabolites increased accuracy of bioaccumulation parameters compared to total (14)C measurements. Biotransformation dominated toxicokinetics and strongly affected internal concentrations of parent compounds and metabolites. Many metabolites reached higher internal concentrations than their parents, characterized by large metabolite enrichment factors.

  14. Refining Notions through Converging Paradigms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Jean A.

    1994-01-01

    Responds to previous article by Sexton and Whiston (1994) on counseling relationship. Commends Sexton and Whiston's research review, but contends that, by adding interpersonal interaction as though it were a fourth and parallel component of counseling relationship (along with real, unreal, and working alliance components), Sexton and Whiston have…

  15. Contrasting patterns in genetic diversity following multiple invasions of fresh and brackish waters.

    PubMed

    Kelly, David W; Muirhead, James R; Heath, Daniel D; Macisaac, Hugh J

    2006-10-01

    Biological invasions may combine the genetic effects of population bottlenecks and selection and thus provide valuable insight into the role of such processes during novel environmental colonizations. However, these processes are also influenced by multiple invasions, the number of individuals introduced and the degree of similarity between source and receiving habitats. The amphipod Gammarus tigrinus provides a useful model to assess these factors, as its invasion history has involved major environmental transitions. This species is native to the northwest Atlantic Ocean, although it invaded both brackish and freshwater habitats in the British Isles after introduction more than 65 years ago. It has also spread to similar habitats in Western Europe and, most recently, to Eastern Europe, the Baltic Sea, and the Laurentian Great Lakes. To examine sources of invasion and patterns of genetic change, we sampled populations from 13 native estuaries and 19 invaded sites and sequenced 542 bp of the mitochondrial COI gene. Strong native phylogeographical structure allowed us to unambiguously identify three allopatrically evolved clades (2.3-3.1% divergent) in invading populations, indicative of multiple introductions. The most divergent clades occurred in the British Isles and mainland Europe and were sourced from the St Lawrence and Chesapeake/Delaware Bay estuaries. A third clade was found in the Great Lakes and sourced to the Hudson River estuary. Despite extensive sampling, G. tigrinus did not occur in freshwater at putative source sites. Some European populations showed reduced genetic diversity consistent with bottlenecks, although selection effects cannot be excluded. The habitat distribution of clades in Europe was congruent with the known invasion history of secondary spread from the British Isles. Differences in salinity tolerance among lineages were suggested by patterns of habitat colonization by different native COI clades. Populations consisting of admixtures

  16. Taxonomic relationship between two Gammarus species, G. nipponensis and G. sobaegensis (Amphipoda: Gammaridae), with description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Tomikawa, Ko; Soh, Ho Young; Kobayashi, Norio; Yamaguchi, Aika

    2014-10-20

    To assess the taxonomic relationship between G. nipponensis and G. sobaegensis, morphological features and molecular phylogenetic relationships using the nuclear 28S rRNA and the mitochondrial COI genes were examined. Detailed morphological observations revealed that G. nipponensis and G. sobaegensis were clearly distinguishable. In addition to the morphological differences, these two species were genetically diverged. In the course of this study, an undescribed species was found from Tsushima and Iki Islands and described here as G. mukudai. In the molecular phylogenetic analyses, monophyletic relationships of G. nipponensis, G. sobaegensis, and G. mukudai were shown but relationships among three species were unclear due to low statistical supports. Phylogeography of G. nipponensis, G. sobaegensis, and G. mukudai were discussed. 

  17. Bioaccumulation of Toxoplasma and Cryptosporidium by the crustacean Gammarus fossarum: involvement in biomonitoring survey and trophic transfer

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The protozoans Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum are public health priorities and their oocysts can persist in environment for long time. They are present in various watercourses as recreational, surface, drinking, river, and seawater and could interact with organisms. To evaluate the cap...

  18. The Counseling Relationship: What Is It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beutler, Larry E.; Sandowicz, Monica

    1994-01-01

    Responds to earlier article by Sexton and Whiston (1994) on counseling relationship. Commends Sexton and Whiston's decision to use Gelso and Carter's multidimensional model to guide research review. Asserts, however, that weaknesses exist in operations used to define real, unreal, and working alliance components. Questions both definitions of…

  19. The Counseling Relationship and Treatment Process and Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolden, Gregory G.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Responds to earlier article by Sexton and Whiston (1994) on counseling relationship. Points out problems with the social constructivist position discussed by Sexton and Whiston, and advocates for generic model of psychotherapy which posits multidimensional conceptualization of counseling relationship that encompasses both "real"…

  20. Model Program: Seymour High School, Indiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, Bob

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how Bob Sexton started changing the way technology was taught at Seymour High School more than 12 years ago. With the change came complaints and concerns from parents who said their children should be learning woodworking, not manufacturing. Through hard work and determination, Sexton proved the need for a new way of…

  1. Zur Ökophysiologie, Sexualität und Populationsgenetik litoraler Gammaridea — ein Überblick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulnheim, H.-P.

    1991-09-01

    Comparative investigations on the physiological capacities in the euryhaline amphipods Gammarus locusta, G. oceanicus, G. salinus, G. zaddachi and G. duebeni were reviewed. In order to assess the adaptations of these species to the abiotic conditions of their environment, the following criteria were examined: oxygen consumption in relation to ambient salinity and temperature levels, respiratory responses following osmotic stress, resistance capacities to oxygen deficiency, resistance to aerial exposure and the simultaneous presence of hydrogen sulphide. Covering the range from marine to typically brackish-water inhabitants, the 5 species show adaptive responses in the above-mentioned order. Respiration is less intensely modified by external factors, and oxygen consumption decreases. Accompanied by faster rates of acclimation to new steady states of performance, resistance capacities increase. The significance of the findings obtained is discussed in relation to the environmental requirements of the amphipods considered. Based on breeding experiments, the sex-determining systems reported thus far in Gammarus species are outlined. As demonstrated in G. duebeni, a more or less pronounced influence of external factors such as photoperiod may become effective. A preponderance of males was noted when offspring were raised under long-day photoperiods, whereas females prevailed under short-day conditions. In terms of the critical daylength, the light per day was estimated as being between 13 and 14 h (Elbe estuary population). Feminizing microporidians ( Octosporea effeminans, Thelohania herediteria), which are transovarially transmitted, can interfere with the system of sex determination and sex differentiation of the host. As reflected in various G. duebeni populations, they cause a maternally transferred sex-ratio condition by the production of all-female broods, thereby mimicking extrachromosomal inheritance. An increase of the salinity level to 25 30‰ results in a

  2. Mercury: Next-gen Data Analysis and Annotation Pipeline (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Sexton, David [Baylor

    2016-07-12

    David Sexton (Baylor) gives a talk titled "Mercury: Next-gen Data Analysis and Annotation Pipeline" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  3. High Blood Pressure and Cold Remedies: Which Are Safe?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feb. 25, 2016. Sexton DJ, et al. The common cold in adults: Treatment and prevention. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 25, 2016. Common cold: Protect yourself and others. National Institute of Allergy ...

  4. Mercury: Next-gen Data Analysis and Annotation Pipeline (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, David

    2012-06-01

    David Sexton (Baylor) gives a talk titled "Mercury: Next-gen Data Analysis and Annotation Pipeline" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  5. 78 FR 70319 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... Sexton Hotel, 203 E. Front St., Stuart, 13000924 Linn County Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church... Congregational Church, 540-544 Columbia Rd., Boston, 13000929 Walton and Roslin Halls, 702-708 & 710-726...

  6. 78 FR 20848 - Swap Dealers and Major Swap Participants; Clerical or Ministerial Employees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ..., ccummings@cftc.gov , or Barbara S. Gold, Associate Director, (202) 418-6700, bgold@cftc.gov , Division of... employees who are employed in a clerical or ministerial capacity. \\6\\ Letter from Thomas W. Sexton,...

  7. Eocene habitat shift from saline to freshwater promoted Tethyan amphipod diversification.

    PubMed

    Hou, Zhonge; Sket, Boris; Fiser, Cene; Li, Shuqiang

    2011-08-30

    Current theory predicts that a shift to a new habitat would increase the rate of diversification, while as lineages evolve into multiple species, intensified competition would decrease the rate of diversification. We used Holarctic amphipods of the genus Gammarus to test this hypothesis. We sequenced four genes (5,088 bp) for 289 samples representing 115 Gammarus species. A phylogenetic analysis showed that Gammarus originated from the Tethyan region with a saline ancestry in the Paleocene, and later colonized the freshwater habitat in the Middle Eocene. Ancestral range reconstruction and diversification mode analysis combined with paleogeological and paleoclimatic evidence suggested that the habitat shift from saline to freshwater led to an increased diversification rate. The saline lineage of Gammarus dispersed to both sides of the Atlantic at 55 million years ago (Ma), because of the few barriers between the Tethys and the Atlantic, and diversified throughout its evolutionary history with a constant diversification rate [0.04 species per million years (sp/My)]. The freshwater Gammarus, however, underwent a rapid diversification phase (0.11 sp/My) until the Middle Miocene, and lineages successively diversified across Eurasia via vicariance process likely driven by changes of the Tethys and landmass. In particular, the freshwater Gammarus lacustris and Gammarus balcanicus lineages had a relatively high diversification shift, corresponding to the regression of the Paratethys Sea and the continentalization of Eurasian lands during the Miocene period. Subsequently (14 Ma), the diversification rate of the freshwater Gammarus decreased to 0.05 and again to 0.01 sp/My. The genus Gammarus provides an excellent aquatic case supporting the hypothesis that ecological opportunities promote diversification.

  8. Connecting with the "Other" Side of Us: A Cooperative Inquiry by Self-Identified Minorities in a Teacher Preparation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower-Phipps, Laura; Homa, Thomas D.; Albaladejo, Cristina; Johnson, Arlette Mello; Cruz, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Minority teacher candidates' capacity to connect with diverse students in preK-12 settings is a driving force behind the demographic imperative to diversify the teaching professions (Achinstein, Ogawa, Sexton, & Freitas, 2010; Banks et al., 2005). Teacher candidates of color have great confidence in their abilities to relate to students of…

  9. Cornerstone: Foundational Models and Services for Integrated Battle Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    262-4240 william.a.sexton@baesystems.com David Lebling BAE Systems Technology Solutions 6 New England Executive Park Burlington, MA 01803 Phone...David Lebling BAE Systems Technology Solutions 6 New England Executive Park Burlington, MA 01803 Phone: 781-262-4226 david.lebling@baesystems.com William

  10. 75 FR 74748 - Senior Executive Service; Appointment of Members to the Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ...--Crystal Scott Alternate Vice-Chair--Director, Human Resources Center--Eugenio (Gene) Ochoa Sexton Rotating... expires on 09/30/11 ILAB Marcia M. Eugenio, Director, Office of Child Labor, Forced Labor Human Trafficking--appointment expires on 09/30/12 MSHA Maureen Walsh, Director, Administration and...

  11. Art and Migraine: Researching the Relationship between Artmaking and Pain Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Randy M.; Sexton-Radek, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    This research project extends a previous study (Vick & Sexton-Radek, 1999) in examining the relationship between artmaking and pain among 127 migraine sufferers. A basic overview of migraine symptoms and treatment is presented along with a discussion of concepts relating to "migraine art" in order to provide a context for this project. Surveys…

  12. Art and Migraine: Researching the Relationship between Artmaking and Pain Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Randy M.; Sexton-Radek, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    This research project extends a previous study (Vick & Sexton-Radek, 1999) in examining the relationship between artmaking and pain among 127 migraine sufferers. A basic overview of migraine symptoms and treatment is presented along with a discussion of concepts relating to "migraine art" in order to provide a context for this project. Surveys…

  13. Part Repairing Using A Hybrid Manufacturing System (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    in this paper is Direct Metal Deposition ( DMD ) process, which utilizes a high-powered laser to melt metal powder layer-by-layer on the substrate to...steam generator repair, Power Engineering, 1990. [10]Sexton, L., Lavin, S., Byrne, G., and Kennedy , A., Laser cladding of aerospace materials

  14. America's Other Youth: Growing up Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, David, Ed.; Heinsohn, Annie L., Ed.

    Contents of part one, Puerto Rican Youth, of this book, includes: excerpts from "Two blocks apart: Jan Gonzales and Peter Quinn," C. Mayerson; excerpts from "Up from Puerto Rico," E. Padilla; excerpt from "Spanish Harlem," P. Sexton; and "Poverty on the lower east side . . .," P. Montgomery. Contents of part two, Migrant Workers Youth, includes:…

  15. 78 FR 55292 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ..., Horace M., Training Center, Albright Ave. & Center Rd., Grand Canyon, 13000784 ARKANSAS Faulkner County... County Sexton, William K. and Nellie, House, 205 Mason Rd. (Marion Township), Howell, 13000797 Mason..., 13000800 Kessler, William and Margot, House, 1013 Cadieux Rd., Grosse Pointe Park, 13000801 NEW HAMPSHIRE...

  16. Editorial: Plant organ abscission: from models to crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The shedding of plant organs is a highly coordinated process essential for both vegetative and reproductive development (Addicott, 1982; Sexton and Roberts, 1982; Roberts et al., 2002; Leslie et al., 2007; Roberts and Gonzalez-Carranza, 2007; Estornell et al., 2013). Research with model plants, name...

  17. The Fate of Ineffective Teachers; Will It Be Different in Indiana?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olin, Harlod E.

    2013-01-01

    It has been widely publicized that approximately 98% of the teachers in the United States are rated as satisfactory (Weisberg, Sexton, Mulhern, & Keeling, 2009). This has led many Americans to think that there are very few ineffective teachers in the United States. But is this true? This study indicated that a majority of the principals in the…

  18. Emotional Self-Repair and Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David; Terry, Rina

    1994-01-01

    Notes that some scholars have argued that writing poetry was harmful for psychological health of Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton. Contends that their writing probably provided cathartic benefit for them and helped them gain cognitive distance from their inner conflicts. Argues that writing may have helped both poets survive longer than they might…

  19. Graphic Poetry: How to Help Students Get the Most out of Pictures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, River Ya-ling

    2013-01-01

    This paper attempts to give an account of some innovative work in paintings and modern poetry and to show how modern poets, such as Jane Flanders and Anne Sexton, the two American poets in particular, express and develop radically new conventions for their respective arts. Also elaborated are how such changes in artistic techniques are related to…

  20. Supervising Helpers Who Work with the Trauma of Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etherington, Kim

    2009-01-01

    This paper contributes to the ongoing discussion in this journal about counsellors' experiences of vicarious traumatisation (Sexton, 1999; Dunkley & Whelan, 2006a, b). It builds on my previous paper (Etherington, 2000a) that focused on the role of supervision in moderating the potential impact on helpers, and on the helping relationship, of…

  1. America's Other Youth: Growing up Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, David, Ed.; Heinsohn, Annie L., Ed.

    Contents of part one, Puerto Rican Youth, of this book, includes: excerpts from "Two blocks apart: Jan Gonzales and Peter Quinn," C. Mayerson; excerpts from "Up from Puerto Rico," E. Padilla; excerpt from "Spanish Harlem," P. Sexton; and "Poverty on the lower east side . . .," P. Montgomery. Contents of part two, Migrant Workers Youth, includes:…

  2. Connecting Right and Left Brain: Increasing Academic Performance of African American Students through the Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Doris McEwen

    An after-school fine arts program was developed at J. W. Sexton High School (Lansing, Michigan), based on the premise that participation in the fine arts, particularly by African Americans, would lead to higher grade point averages and a greater commitment to school life. A review of relevant literature revealed a number of reasons for low…

  3. Rhetorical and Communication Theory: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," January through June 1979 (Vol. 39 Nos. 7 through 12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 13 titles deal with the following topics: confessional rhetoric in the poetry of Anne Sexton, rhetorical criticism, the Hippocratic oath, messages communicated through team sports as a medium of social interaction, the silent…

  4. An Introduction to the Best Practices Section in the "Journal of Counseling & Development"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marotta, Sylvia A.; Watts, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    The authors present an introduction to the Best Practices section in the "Journal of Counseling & Development." The section, announced in the fall of 2003, updates counselors on the latest research evidence to support their counseling practices. Four invited experts in the counseling profession (D. Bubenzer, J. G. Garci, T. Sexton, & J. West)…

  5. Assessment Update: Progress, Trends, and Practices in Higher Education. Volume 24, Issue 5, September-October 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banta, Trudy W., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This issue of "Assessment Update" presents the following articles: (1) SLO-Based Grading Makes Assessment an Integral Part of Teaching (Nagy N. Bengiamin and Christina Leimer); (2) Editor's Notes: Assessing Assessment's ROI (Trudy W. Banta); (3) Assessment Plans: A Tool for Sanity (Shannon M. Sexton); and (4) Lessons from…

  6. Minorities in a Teacher Preparation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower-Phipps, Laura; Homa, Thomas D.; Albaladejo, Cristina; Johnson, Arlette Mello; Cruz, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    preK-12 settings is a driving force behind the demographic imperative to diversify the teaching professions (Achinstein, Ogawa, Sexton, & Freitas, 2010; Banks et al., 2005). Teacher candidates of color have great confidence in their abilities to relate to students…

  7. An Introduction to the Best Practices Section in the "Journal of Counseling & Development"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marotta, Sylvia A.; Watts, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    The authors present an introduction to the Best Practices section in the "Journal of Counseling & Development." The section, announced in the fall of 2003, updates counselors on the latest research evidence to support their counseling practices. Four invited experts in the counseling profession (D. Bubenzer, J. G. Garci, T. Sexton, & J. West)…

  8. Aiming for excellence.

    PubMed

    Snell, Janet

    Staff at Chase Farm mental health unit in north London have improved the service they provide by focusing on essential elements of care, particularly communication with patients. Director of nursing Mary Sexton put staff development at the heart of her transformation plan, ensuring they know what is expected from them and celebrating their achievements.

  9. Genetic Identification of Spirometra decipiens Plerocercoids in Terrestrial Snakes from Korea and China.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyeong-Kyu; Park, Hansol; Lee, Dongmin; Choe, Seongjun; Kim, Kyu-Heon; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Eom, Keeseon S

    2016-04-01

    Human sparganosis is a zoonotic disease caused by infection with larval forms (procercoid/plerocercoid) of Spirometra spp. The purpose of this study was to identify Spirometra spp. of infected snakes using a multiplex PCR assay and phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequence data from the spargana of terrestrial snakes obtained from Korea and China. A total of 283 snakes were obtained that included 4 species of Colubridae comprising Rhabdophis tigrinus tigrinus (n=150), Dinodon rufozonatum rufozonatum (n=64), Elaphe davidi (n=2), and Elaphe schrenkii (n=7), and 1 species of Viperidae, Agkistrodon saxatilis (n=60). The snakes were collected from the provinces of Chungbuk, Chungnam, and Gyeongbuk in Korea (n=161), and from China (n=122). The overall infection rate with spargana was 83% (235/283). The highest was recorded for D. rufozonatum rufozonatum (100%), followed by A. saxatilis (85%) and R. tigrinus tigrinus (80%), with a negative result for E. davidi (0%) and E. schrenkii (0%). The sequence identities between the spargana from snakes (n=50) and Spirometra erinaceieuropaei (KJ599680) or S. decipiens (KJ599679) control specimens were 90.8% and 99.2%, respectively. Pairwise genetic distances between spargana (n=50) and S. decipiens ranged from 0.0080 to 0.0107, while those between spargana and S. erinaceieuropaei ranged from 0.1070 to 0.1096. In this study, all of the 904 spargana analyzed were identified as S. decipiens either by a multiplex PCR assay (n=854) or mitochondrial cox1 sequence analysis (n=50).

  10. A new species of Diastatotropis Lacordaire (Coleoptera: Anthribidae) from Montagne d'Ambre National Park, northern Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Trýzna, Miloš; Baňař, Petr

    2017-01-20

    A new species, Diastatotropis perrinae Trýzna & Baňař sp. nov. (Anthribidae: Anthribinae: Cappadocini), from north Madagascar is described. Male genitalia are studied and illustrated and colour photographs are added. A comparison with the most similar known species, D. tigrinus Lacordaire, 1866, is provided.

  11. Resistor Susceptibility Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-01

    Woodruff, ATTN: Tech. Lib. 100K-26-W Grumman Aerosp. Corp. ATTN: J. Rogers , 533, Pt 35 ATTN: Tech. Lib. GTE Sylv. ATTN: Tech. Lib. Honeywell...ATTN: R. Hubbs, FB-46 ATTN: J. Bell, HA-10 ATTN: J. Sexton, CA-31 ATTN: Tech. Lib. Sperry Rand Gyro Mgt. Div. ATTN: Tech. Lib. Sperry Rand...Diamond Lab. ATTN: Lib. HQ USAF ATTN: XOOWD AFSC Tech. Lib. ATTN: DLCAW ATTN: XRP ! Sperry Rand Fit. Sys. Div. ATTN: Tech. Lib. ATTN: D

  12. Tumor Microenvironment Inflammation and Obesity in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    R , Sun L, Moul J , Lance R , Kusuda L, Sexton W, Soderdahl D, Donahue T , Foley J et al...prostatectomy and extended pelvic lymph node dissec- tion. Int J Urol 16:676–681 14. Cohen D, Mason K, Bedimo A, Scribner R , Basolo V, Farley T (2003...Laparoendosc Surg 11(4):438–442 27. Grubb R , Black A, Izmirlian G, Hickey T , Pinsky P, Mabie J , Riley T , Ragard L, Prorok P, Berg C et al (2009) Serum

  13. Tanker Avionics/Aircrew Complement Evaluation (TAACE). Phase 0. Analysis and Mockup. Volume I. Results.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    AIRCREW COMPLEMENT EVALUATION (TAACE) PHASE 0 - ANALYSIS AND MOCKUP C) VOLUME I: RESULTS !x The Bunker Ramo Corporation - Electronic Systems Division...data, is not to be re- garded by implication or otherwise as in any manner licensing the holder or any other person or corporation , or conveying any...adro Iftj William Ret randt - A./Sexton ( 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT.P E T. TASK Bunker Ramo, Corporation 4130 Linden Ave. 112 Dayton, Ohio 45432

  14. A Study on the Bionomics of Anopheles darlingi Root (Diptera: Culicidae) in Belize, Central America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    1960. Natural nidality of transmissible diseases with special reference to the landscape epidemiology of zooanthroponoses. Frederick K. Plous, Jr ...Richards, F.O., Jr ., R.Z. Flores, J.D. Sexton, R.F. Beach, D.L. Mount, C. Cordon- Rosales, M. Gatica and R.E. Klein. 1994. Effects of permethrin...later identified to species (Clark-Gil and Darsie 1983). An even distribution of larval sampling within enclosure traps was obtained by visually

  15. Molecular data reveal complex hybridization and a cryptic species of neotropical wild cat.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Tatiane C; Schneider, Alexsandra; de Oliveira, Tadeu G; Lehugeur, Livia M; Silveira, Leandro; Freitas, Thales R O; Eizirik, Eduardo

    2013-12-16

    Hybridization among animal species has recently become more recognized as an important phenomenon, especially in the context of recent radiations. Here we show that complex hybridization has led to contrasting patterns of genomic composition among closely related species of the Neotropical cat genus Leopardus. We show strong evidence of ancient hybridization and introgression between the pampas cat (L. colocolo) and northeastern populations of tigrina (L. tigrinus), leading to remarkable cytonuclear discordance in the latter. In contrast, southern tigrina populations show recent and continuing hybridization with Geoffroy's cat (L. geoffroyi), leading to extreme levels of interspecific admixture at their contact zone. Finally, we demonstrate that two seemingly continuous Brazilian tigrina populations show no evidence of ongoing gene flow between them, leading us to support their formal recognition as distinct species, namely L. tigrinus in the northeast and L. guttulus in the south. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic Identification of Spirometra decipiens Plerocercoids in Terrestrial Snakes from Korea and China

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyeong-Kyu; Park, Hansol; Lee, Dongmin; Choe, Seongjun; Kim, Kyu-Heon; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Eom, Keeseon S.

    2016-01-01

    Human sparganosis is a zoonotic disease caused by infection with larval forms (procercoid/plerocercoid) of Spirometra spp. The purpose of this study was to identify Spirometra spp. of infected snakes using a multiplex PCR assay and phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequence data from the spargana of terrestrial snakes obtained from Korea and China. A total of 283 snakes were obtained that included 4 species of Colubridae comprising Rhabdophis tigrinus tigrinus (n=150), Dinodon rufozonatum rufozonatum (n=64), Elaphe davidi (n=2), and Elaphe schrenkii (n=7), and 1 species of Viperidae, Agkistrodon saxatilis (n=60). The snakes were collected from the provinces of Chungbuk, Chungnam, and Gyeongbuk in Korea (n=161), and from China (n=122). The overall infection rate with spargana was 83% (235/283). The highest was recorded for D. rufozonatum rufozonatum (100%), followed by A. saxatilis (85%) and R. tigrinus tigrinus (80%), with a negative result for E. davidi (0%) and E. schrenkii (0%). The sequence identities between the spargana from snakes (n=50) and Spirometra erinaceieuropaei (KJ599680) or S. decipiens (KJ599679) control specimens were 90.8% and 99.2%, respectively. Pairwise genetic distances between spargana (n=50) and S. decipiens ranged from 0.0080 to 0.0107, while those between spargana and S. erinaceieuropaei ranged from 0.1070 to 0.1096. In this study, all of the 904 spargana analyzed were identified as S. decipiens either by a multiplex PCR assay (n=854) or mitochondrial cox1 sequence analysis (n=50). PMID:27180576

  17. Survey of feline leukemia virus and feline coronaviruses in captive neotropical wild felids from Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Ana M S; Brandão, Paulo E; de Moraes, Wanderlei; Cubas, Zalmir S; Santos, Leonilda C; Villarreal, Laura Y B; Robes, Rogério R; Coelho, Fabiana M; Resende, Mauricio; Santos, Renata C F; Oliveira, Rosangela C; Yamaguti, Mauricio; Marques, Lucas M; Neto, Renata L; Buzinhani, Melissa; Marques, Regina; Messick, Joanne B; Biondo, Alexander W; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2009-06-01

    A total of 57 captive neotropical felids (one Leopardus geoffroyi, 14 Leopardus pardalis, 17 Leopardus wiedii, 22 Leopardus tigrinus, and three Puma yagouaroundi) from the Itaipu Binacional Wildlife Research Center (Refúgio Bela Vista, Southern Brazil) were anesthetized for blood collection. Feces samples were available for 44 animals, including one L. geoffroyi, eight L. pardalis, 14 L. wiedii, 20 L. tigrinus, and one P. yagouaroundi. Total DNA and RNA were extracted from blood and feces, respectively, using commercial kits. Blood DNA samples were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) proviral DNA, whereas reverse transcriptase-PCR was run on fecal samples for detection of coronavirus RNA. None of the samples were positive for coronaviruses. A male L. pardalis and a female L. tigrinus were positive for FeLV proviral DNA, and identities of PCR products were confirmed by sequencing. This is the first evidence of FeLV proviral DNA in these species in Southern Brazil.

  18. Specific detection and localization of microsporidian parasites in invertebrate hosts by using in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Dubuffet, Aurore; Smith, Judith E; Solter, Leellen; Perotti, M Alejandra; Braig, Henk R; Dunn, Alison M

    2013-01-01

    We designed fluorescence in situ hybridization probes for two distinct microsporidian clades and demonstrated their application in detecting, respectively, Nosema/Vairimorpha and Dictyoceola species. We used them to study the vertical transmission of two microsporidia infecting the amphipod Gammarus duebeni.

  19. PHOTOACTIVATED TOXICITY IN AMPHIPODS COLLECTED FROM POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON-CONTAMINATED SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The risk of photo-activated PAH toxicity in contaminated aquatic systems has not been well characterized. To better indicate this potential, amphipods (Gammarus spp.) were collected from two PAH contaminated sites (Hog Island and USX), as well as a reference site (Chipmunk Cove)...

  20. Data Summary for Nitrocellulose.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    Gammarus fasciatus (scud), Asellus militaris ( sowbug ), Chironomus tentans (midge) - also were exposed to NC, suspended in water, at concentrations as...detection methods listed above, the last one is the most effective for detecting low levels of NC in the environment .2𔃽 It is a colorimetric method

  1. The enemy of my enemy is my friend: intraguild predation between invaders and natives facilitates coexistence with shared invasive prey

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, Calum; Dick, Jaimie T. A.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and predicting the outcomes of biological invasions is challenging where multiple invader and native species interact. We hypothesize that antagonistic interactions between invaders and natives could divert their impact on subsequent invasive species, thus facilitating coexistence. From field data, we found that, when existing together in freshwater sites, the native amphipod Gammarus duebeni celticus and a previous invader G. pulex appear to facilitate the establishment of a second invader, their shared prey Crangonyx pseudogracilis. Indeed, the latter species was rarely found at sites where each Gammarus species was present on its own. Experiments indicated that this may be the result of G. d. celticus and G. pulex engaging in more intraguild predation (IGP) than cannibalism; when the ‘enemy’ of either Gammarus species was present, that is, the other Gammarus species, C. pseudogracilis significantly more often escaped predation. Thus, the presence of mutual enemies and the stronger inter- than intraspecific interactions they engage in can facilitate other invaders. With some invasive species such as C. pseudogracilis having no known detrimental effects on native species, and indeed having some positive ecological effects, we also conclude that some invasions could promote biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. PMID:25122739

  2. Demonstrating That Habitat Structure Facilitates Coexistence of Prey & Predator: A Laboratory Investigation Using Goldfish & Invertebrates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Timothy W.; Embrey, Tracey R.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory investigation to demonstrate that habitat structure promotes increased organism abundance and species diversity by reducing predator effects on prey abundance. Investigates the effects of goldfish (Carassius auratus) predators on Gammarus sp. (an amphipod) and Daphnia magna (a cladoceran) prey in the absence and presence of a…

  3. The enemy of my enemy is my friend: intraguild predation between invaders and natives facilitates coexistence with shared invasive prey.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, Calum; Dick, Jaimie T A

    2014-08-01

    Understanding and predicting the outcomes of biological invasions is challenging where multiple invader and native species interact. We hypothesize that antagonistic interactions between invaders and natives could divert their impact on subsequent invasive species, thus facilitating coexistence. From field data, we found that, when existing together in freshwater sites, the native amphipod Gammarus duebeni celticus and a previous invader G. pulex appear to facilitate the establishment of a second invader, their shared prey Crangonyx pseudogracilis. Indeed, the latter species was rarely found at sites where each Gammarus species was present on its own. Experiments indicated that this may be the result of G. d. celticus and G. pulex engaging in more intraguild predation (IGP) than cannibalism; when the 'enemy' of either Gammarus species was present, that is, the other Gammarus species, C. pseudogracilis significantly more often escaped predation. Thus, the presence of mutual enemies and the stronger inter- than intraspecific interactions they engage in can facilitate other invaders. With some invasive species such as C. pseudogracilis having no known detrimental effects on native species, and indeed having some positive ecological effects, we also conclude that some invasions could promote biodiversity and ecosystem functioning.

  4. Demonstrating That Habitat Structure Facilitates Coexistence of Prey & Predator: A Laboratory Investigation Using Goldfish & Invertebrates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Timothy W.; Embrey, Tracey R.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory investigation to demonstrate that habitat structure promotes increased organism abundance and species diversity by reducing predator effects on prey abundance. Investigates the effects of goldfish (Carassius auratus) predators on Gammarus sp. (an amphipod) and Daphnia magna (a cladoceran) prey in the absence and presence of a…

  5. Occupational allergy to aquarium fish food: red midge larva, freshwater shrimp, and earthworm. A clinical and immunological study.

    PubMed

    Meseguer Arce, J; Villajos, I M Sánchez-Guerrero; Iraola, V; Carnés, J; Fernández Caldas, E

    2013-01-01

    Chironomids seem to be the main cause of occupational allergy to aquarium fish food. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of occupational sensitization to 3 different arthropod species used as components of aquarium fish food. The study sample comprised 8 workers from a fish food packing department. The control group comprised 40 atopic patients (20 of whom were allergic to mites). We performed prick tests with extracts of red midge larva (Chironomus thummi), freshwater shrimp (Gammarus species), earthworm (Tubifex species), and other arthropod species and a battery of common inhalant allergens. We measured peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E and performed a methacholine challenge test, nasal challenge test, and immunoblotting. Cross-reactivity analyses were completed using immunoblotting and CAP inhibition. Prick test results were positive to red midge larvae in 7 patients (87.5%), Gammarus in 5 (62.5%), Tubifex in 3 (37.5%), and mites in 6 (75%). In the mite-allergic controls, 30% had positive prick test results to red midge larvae. PEFR decreased > or = 20% during the packing process in all patients, and in 1 patient it indicated a dual asthmatic response. Methacholine challenge test results were positive in all participants. Nasal challenge tests were performed in 4 patients, and the results were positive. Specific IgE to red midge larvae was detected in 62.5%, Gammarus in 50%, and Tubifex in 16%. Bands of approximately 14-15 kDa and 31 kDa were observed in Gammarus and red midge larvae extracts. Cross-reactivity assays demonstrated that Gammarus totally inhibited red midge larvae, while Tubifex did so partially. Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus showed very low inhibitory capacity. Aquarium fish food arthropods are potent allergens with an elevated prevalence of sensitization and variable degree of crossreactivity. This is the first report of occupational allergy to Tubifex. More data are necessary to identify and

  6. Amphipod densities and indices of wetland quality across the upper-Midwest, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anteau, M.J.; Afton, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    Nutritional, behavioral, and diet data for lesser scaup (Aythya affinis [Eyton, 1838]) indicates that there has been a decrease in amphipod (Gammarus lacustris [G. O. Sars, 1863] and Hyalella azteca [Saussure, 1858]) density and wetland quality throughout the upper-Midwest, USA. Accordingly, we estimated densities of Gammarus and Hyalella in six eco-physiographic regions of Iowa, Minnesota, and North Dakota; 356 randomly selected semipermanent and permanent wetlands were sampled during springs 2004 and 2005. We also examined indices of wetland quality (e.g., turbidity, fish communities, aquatic vegetation) among regions in a random subset of these wetlands (n = 267). Gammarus and Hyalella were present in 19% and 54% of wetlands sampled, respectively. Gammarus and Hyalella densities in North Dakota were higher than those in Iowa and Minnesota. Although historical data are limited, our regional mean (1 to 12 m-3) amphipod densities (Gammarus + Hyalella) were markedly lower than any of the historical density estimates. Fish, important predators of amphipods, occurred in 31%-45% of wetlands in North Dakota, 84% of wetlands in the Red River Valley, and 74%-84% of wetlands in Iowa and Minnesota. Turbidity in wetlands of Minnesota Morainal (4.0 NTU geometric mean) and Red River Valley (6.1 NTU) regions appeared low relative to that of the rest of the upper-Midwest (13.2-17.5 NTU). We conclude that observed estimates of amphipods, fish, and turbidity are consistent with low wetland quality, which has resulted in lower food availability for various wildlife species, especially lesser scaup, which use these wetlands in the upper-Midwest. ?? 2008, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  7. Cytotoxicity of some edible mushrooms extracts over liver hepatocellular carcinoma cells in conjunction with their antioxidant and antibacterial properties

    PubMed Central

    Sadi, Gökhan; Emsen, Buğrahan; Kaya, Abdullah; Kocabaş, Aytaç; Çınar, Seval; Kartal, Deniz İrtem

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mushrooms have been valued for their nutritive content and as traditional medicines; several important medicinal properties of mushrooms have been recognized worldwide. Objective: The purpose of this study was to elucidate the cell growth inhibitory potential of four edible mushrooms; Coprinus comatus (O.F. Mull.) Pers. (Agaricaceae), Tricholoma fracticum (Britzelm.) Kreisel (Tricholomataceae), Rhizopogon luteolus Fr. and Nordholm (Rhizopogonaceae), Lentinus tigrinus (Bull.) Fr. (Polyporaceae) on hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells in conjunction with their antioxidant and antibacterial capacities. Materials and Methods: Five different extracts of edible mushrooms were obtained using water, methanol, acetone, n-hexane and chloroform as solvent systems for cytotoxic, antioxidant and antibacterial properties. Results: C. comatus showed substantial in vitro cytotoxic activity against HepG2 cell lines with all extracts especially with chloroform 50% inhibition (IC50 value of 0.086 mg/ml) and acetone (IC50 value of 0.420 mg/ml). Chloroform extract of C. comatus had maximum amount of β-carotene (25.94 μg/mg), total phenolic content (76.32 μg/mg) and lycopene (12.00 μg/mg), and n-hexane extract of L. tigrinus had maximum amount of flavonoid (3.67 μg/mg). While chloroform extract of C. comatus showed the highest 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) capturing activity (1.579 mg/ml), the best result for metal chelating activity was obtained from methanolic extract (0.842 mg/ml). Moreover, all tested mushrooms demonstrated antibacterial activity and n-hexane extract of L. tigrinus and acetone extracts of T. fracticum were the most active against tested microorganism. Conclusion: These results indicate that different extracts of investigated mushroom have considerable cytotoxic, antioxidant and antibacterial properties and may be utilized as a promising source of therapeutics. PMID:26109775

  8. Chemical defense of an Asian snake reflects local availability of toxic prey and hatchling diet

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, D A; Savitzky, A H; Burghardt, G M; Nguyen, C; Meinwald, J; Schroeder, F C; Mori, A

    2013-01-01

    Species that sequester toxins from prey for their own defense against predators may exhibit population-level variation in their chemical arsenal that reflects the availability of chemically defended prey in their habitat. Rhabdophis tigrinus is an Asian snake that possesses defensive glands in the skin of its neck (‘nuchal glands’), which typically contain toxic bufadienolide steroids that the snakes sequester from consumed toads. In this study, we compared the chemistry of the nuchal gland fluid of R. tigrinus from toad-rich and toad-free islands in Japan and determined the effect of diet on the nuchal gland constituents. Our findings demonstrate that captive-hatched juveniles from toad-rich Ishima Island that had not been fed toads possess defensive bufadienolides in their nuchal glands, presumably due to maternal provisioning of these sequestered compounds. Wild-caught juveniles from Ishima possess large quantities of bufadienolides, which could result from a combination of maternal provisioning and sequestration of these defensive compounds from consumed toads. Interestingly, juvenile females from Ishima possess larger quantities of bufadienolides than do juvenile males, whereas a small sample of field-collected snakes suggests that adult males contain larger quantities of bufadienolides than do adult females. Captive-born hatchlings from Kinkasan Island lack bufadienolides in their nuchal glands, reflecting the absence of toads on that island, but they can sequester bufadienolides by feeding on toads (Bufo japonicus) in captivity. The presence of large quantities of bufadienolides in the nuchal glands of R. tigrinus from Ishima may reduce the risk of predation by providing an effective chemical defense, whereas snakes on Kinkasan may experience increased predation due to the lack of defensive compounds in their nuchal glands. PMID:23853424

  9. Molecular detection of Cytauxzoon spp. in asymptomatic Brazilian wild captive felids.

    PubMed

    André, Marcos R; Adania, Cristina H; Machado, Rosangela Z; Allegretti, Silmara M; Felippe, Paulo A N; Silva, Ketty F; Nakaghi, Andréa C H; Dagnone, Ana S

    2009-01-01

    Cytauxzoon spp. DNA was detected for the first time in blood samples from asymptomatic Brazilian wild captive felids. In 2006, 72 EDTA blood samples from seven wild felids species: Puma concolor (puma), Leopardus pardalis (ocelot), Puma yagouaroundi (jaguarundi), Leopardus wiedii (margay), Leopardus tigrinus (little spotted cat), Oncifelis colocolo (pampas cat) and Panthera onca (jaguar) were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction to amplify the 18S rRNA gene segment in order to verify the presence of Cytauxzoon spp. DNA. Nine samples were positive: six ocelots, two pumas, and one jaguar. In Brazil, wild felids may be natural reservoirs for Cytauxzoon spp.

  10. Characterization of microsatellite markers in Homarus (Crustacea, Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Tam, Y K; Kornfield, I

    1996-09-01

    Three variable microsatellite loci have been isolated from the American lobster, Homarus americanus. In a population sample from the Gulf of Maine, the effective numbers of alleles (Ne) for the two most variable loci were 16.33 and 13.19, respectively. Reduced variability at all three loci was seen in the European lobster, H. gammarus, for which the maximum Ne was 4.00. The reduction in variability in H. gammarus is consistent with a bottleneck event. Inheritance analysis using H. americanus demonstrated segregation of codominant alleles and the absence of linkage. Null alleles were observed at two loci in inheritance studies. This study demonstrates that microsatellite loci should be useful in studying the population structure of clawed lobsters.

  11. Efficient removal of pollutants from olive washing wastewater in bubble-column bioreactor by Trametes versicolor.

    PubMed

    Cerrone, F; Barghini, P; Pesciaroli, C; Fenice, M

    2011-06-01

    The white-rot fungi Panus tigrinus, Funalia trogii and Trametes versicolor have been tested in shake flasks for the reduction of olive washing wastewater (OWW) pollutants and production of oxidases on OWW-based media. P. tigrinus was rejected for its scarce performance. F. trogii showed best production of laccase (27 000 Ug(-1)), while T. versicolor appeared a good pollutant degrader reducing colour, COD and phenols by 60, 72 and 87%, respectively. Only T. versicolor grew well in bubble-column bioreactor: its OWW depollution, in continuous process, led to colour, COD and phenols reduction by 65%, 73% and 89%, respectively. Optimal dilution rate was 0.225d(-1) (0.225 m(3) of effluent treated daily per m(3) of bioreactor). Thus, a small bioreactor (10 m(3)) could treat daily the amount of OWW produced by a standard olive washing machine (2m(3)d(-1)). For these reasons, this process could be proposed as a simple, efficient and low-cost OWW treatment.

  12. Phylogenetic Relationships of 3 Korean Neodiplostomum Species (Digenea: Neodiplostomidae) Based on Partial CO1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Pyo, Kyoung-Ho; Yi Lee, Jo Woon; Lee, Jin-Ju; Park, Yun-Kyu; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2014-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of the 3 Neodiplostomum spp. (Digenea: Neodiplostomidae) occurring in Korea (N. seoulense, N. leei, and N. boryongense) were analyzed using the partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) gene. The adult flukes were recovered from Sprague-Dawley rats (N. seoulense) and newborn chicks (N. leei and N. boryongense) experimentally infected with the neodiplostomula from the grass snake, Rhabdophis tigrinus tigrinus. The genomic DNA was amplified using specific primers, and the sequence of CO1 was obtained. According to the results, the pairwise similarity was 96.1% between N. boryongense and N. seoulense, but was 95.0% between N. boryongense and N. leei and 94.2% between N. leei and N. seoulense. The results demonstrated a closer phylogenetic relationship between N. seoulense and N. boryongense. This high relationship of N. seoulense and N. boryongense may be related to their similar morphologic features including the limited distribution of vitellaria and the presence of a genital cone. N. leei is distinct on the other hand with an extensive distribution of vitellaria and the absence of a genital cone. PMID:25031477

  13. Corticosteroid responses of snakes to toxins from toads (bufadienolides) and plants (cardenolides) reflect differences in dietary specializations.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Shabnam; French, Susannah S; Neuman-Lee, Lorin A; Durham, Susan L; Kojima, Yosuke; Mori, Akira; Brodie, Edmund D; Savitzky, Alan H

    2017-03-24

    Toads are chemically defended by cardiotonic steroids known as bufadienolides. Resistance to the acute effects of bufadienolides in snakes that prey on toads is conferred by target-site insensitivity of the toxin's target enzyme, the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Previous studies have focused largely on the molecular mechanisms of resistance but have not investigated the physiological mechanisms or consequences of exposure to the toxins. Adrenal enlargement in snakes often is associated with specialization on a diet of toads. These endocrine glands are partly composed of interrenal tissue, which produces the corticosteroids corticosterone and aldosterone. Corticosterone is the main hormone released in response to stress in reptiles, and aldosterone plays an important role in maintaining ion balance through upregulation of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. We tested the endocrine response of select species of snakes to acute cardiotonic steroid exposure by measuring circulating aldosterone and corticosterone concentrations. We found that Rhabdophis tigrinus, which specializes on a diet of toads, responds with lower corticosterone and higher aldosterone compared to other species that exhibit target-site resistance to the toxins but do not specialize on toads. We also found differences between sexes in R. tigrinus, with males generally responding with higher corticosterone and aldosterone than females. This study provides evidence of physiological adaptations, beyond target-site resistance, associated with tolerance of bufadienolides in a specialized toad-eating snake.

  14. Active foraging for toxic prey during gestation in a snake with maternal provisioning of sequestered chemical defences

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Yosuke; Mori, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Many animals sequester dietary defensive compounds and incorporate them into the offspring, which protects the young against predation. One possible but poorly investigated question is whether females of such species actively prey upon toxic diets. The snake Rhabdophis tigrinus sequesters defensive steroids from toads consumed as prey; it also feeds on other amphibians. Females produce chemically armed offspring in direct proportion to their own level of toad-derived toxins by provisioning the toxins to their eggs. Our field observations of movements and stomach contents of radio-tracked R. tigrinus showed that gravid snakes preyed upon toads by actively foraging in the habitat of toads, even though toads were a scarce resource and toad-searching may incur potential costs. Our Y-maze experiments demonstrated that gravid females were more likely to trail the chemical cues of toads than were males or non-gravid females. These results showed behavioural switching in females and active foraging for scarce, toxic prey during gestation. Because exploitation of toads by gravid females results in their offspring being more richly endowed with prey-derived toxins, active foraging for toxic prey is expected to be an adaptive antipredator trait, which may enhance chemical defence in offspring. PMID:25392472

  15. Thiacloprid affects trophic interaction between gammarids and mayflies.

    PubMed

    Englert, D; Bundschuh, M; Schulz, R

    2012-08-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides like thiacloprid enter agricultural surface waters, where they may affect predator-prey-interactions, which are of central importance for ecosystems as well as the functions these systems provide. The effects of field relevant thiacloprid concentrations on the leaf consumption of Gammarus fossarum (Amphipoda) were assessed over 96 h (n = 13-17) in conjunction with its predation on Baetis rhodani (Ephemeroptera) nymphs. The predation by Gammarus increased significantly at 0.50-1.00 μg/L. Simultaneously, its leaf consumption decreased with increasing thiacloprid concentration. As a consequence of the increased predation at 1.00 μg/L, gammarids' dry weight rose significantly by 15% compared to the control. At 4.00 μg/L, the reduced leaf consumption was not compensated by an increase in predation causing a significantly reduced dry weight of Gammarus (∼20%). These results may finally suggest that thiacloprid adversely affects trophic interactions, potentially translating into alterations in ecosystem functions, like leaf litter breakdown and aquatic-terrestrial subsidies.

  16. Macrofaunal involvement in the sublittoral decay of kelp debris: the detritivore community and species interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, A. P.; Moore, P. G.

    1984-01-01

    The fauna associated with sea-bed accumulations of decomposing Laminaria saccharina has been studied by year-round SCUBA diving at two sites in the Clyde Sea area. Seasonal changes in density of 64 species are reported. In the autumn, large quantities of kelp are detached by storms. This weed carries with it to the sea bed a large part of its normal fauna. Additional species settle onto the weed from the plankton whilst others migrate onto it from the surrounding sea bed. Peak densities of associated species were recorded in autumn. Litter bag experiments in situ showed that, except during the summer, weed is lost from sea-bed accumulations at a faster rate when macrofaunal animals are excluded. The macrofauna therefore inhibits decomposition. The relative importance of interactive cropping by three macrodetritivores, Psammechinus miliaris (Echinodermata), Platynereis dumerilii (Polychaeta) and Gammarus locusta (Amphipoda) was studied by in situ containment of different species combinations. The presence of Gammarus with Psammechinus resulted in less weed being lost than when Psammechinus was isolated. This is because Gammarus selectively crops rotting weed, retarding frond disintegration by microbes. Platynereis retards microbial colonization of frond tissues ruptured during its feeding by repeated cropping of the same region. Weed would decompose very rapidly were it not for macrofaunal cropping. Macroalgal decay thus differs profoundly from that of vascular plants.

  17. [Diversity and faunal analysis of crustaceans in Potatso National Park, Shangri-La, China].

    PubMed

    Shu, Shu-Sen; Chen, Fei-Zhou; Yang, Jun-Xing; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Xiao-Yong

    2013-06-01

    Potatso National Park was the first national park in mainland China, preceded by the earlier Bitahai Nature Reserve. Located in the northwest of Yunnan and on the southeast of Qinghai-Tibet plateau, Potatso is a typical low latitude and high elevation wetland nature reserve, with large areas of coniferous forest around alpine lakes and both wetland and water area ecosystems. In August, 2011, we undertook a survey of crustaceans in the park, sampling lakes, ponds, streams, and rivers throughout Potatso. We found a total of 29 species (including varieties) belonging to 24 genera and 11 families. Notable discoveries include Parartemiopsis sp, Arctodiaptomus parvispinus and Simocephalus congener, which are the first examples of these species to be recorded in China. Likewise, Gammarus bitaensis is a unique crustacean found only in Potatso National Park and Thermocyclops dumonti and Gammarus paucispinus are both endemic species to northwestern Yunnan. The overall faunal characteristics of crustaceans in the park also revealed several things about Potatso: (1) Cosmopolitan and Palaearctic elements reach 48.27% and 37.93%, clearly showing the Palaearctic element as the dominant fauna; (2) most of the crustacean, such as Arctodiaptomus parvispinus and Gammarus, are typical alpine types, confirming that Potatso has feature typical of alpine and plateau fauna; and (3) the proportion of endemic and rare crustacean species in Potatso National Park is approximately 10%, suggesting that the Potatso National Park in particular and the northwest of Yunnan in general have a unique geological and evolutionary history.

  18. Permanent Genetic Resources added to Molecular Ecology Resources Database 1 August 2009-30 September 2009.

    PubMed

    Abdoullaye, Doukary; Acevedo, I; Adebayo, Abisola A; Behrmann-Godel, Jasminca; Benjamin, R C; Bock, Dan G; Born, Céline; Brouat, Carine; Caccone, Adalgisa; Cao, Ling-Zhen; Casado-Amezúa, P; Catanéo, J; Correa-Ramirez, M M; Cristescu, Melania E; Dobigny, Gauthier; Egbosimba, Emmanuel E; Etchberger, Lianna K; Fan, Bin; Fields, Peter D; Forcioli, D; Furla, P; Garcia de Leon, F J; García-Jiménez, R; Gauthier, Philippe; Gergs, René; González, Clementina; Granjon, Laurent; Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, Carla; Havill, Nathan P; Helsen, P; Hether, Tyler D; Hoffman, Eric A; Hu, Xiangyang; Ingvarsson, Pär K; Ishizaki, S; Ji, Heyi; Ji, X S; Jimenez, M L; Kapil, R; Karban, R; Keller, Stephen R; Kubota, S; Li, Shuzhen; Li, Wansha; Lim, Douglas D; Lin, Haoran; Liu, Xiaochun; Luo, Yayan; Machordom, A; Martin, Andrew P; Matthysen, E; Mazzella, Maxwell N; McGeoch, Mélodie A; Meng, Zining; Nishizawa, M; O'Brien, Patricia; Ohara, M; Ornelas, Juan Francisco; Ortu, M F; Pedersen, Amy B; Preston, L; Ren, Qin; Rothhaupt, Karl-Otto; Sackett, Loren C; Sang, Qing; Sawyer, G M; Shiojiri, K; Taylor, Douglas R; Van Dongen, S; Van Vuuren, Bettine Jansen; Vandewoestijne, S; Wang, H; Wang, J T; Wang, L E; Xu, Xiang-Li; Yang, Guang; Yang, Yongping; Zeng, Y Q; Zhang, Qing-Wen; Zhang, Yongping; Zhao, Y; Zhou, Yan

    2010-01-01

    This article documents the addition of 238 microsatellite marker loci and 72 pairs of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) sequencing primers to the Molecular Ecology Resources Database. Loci were developed for the following species: Adelges tsugae, Artemisia tridentata, Astroides calycularis, Azorella selago, Botryllus schlosseri, Botrylloides violaceus, Cardiocrinum cordatum var. glehnii, Campylopterus curvipennis, Colocasia esculenta, Cynomys ludovicianus, Cynomys leucurus, Cynomys gunnisoni, Epinephelus coioides, Eunicella singularis, Gammarus pulex, Homoeosoma nebulella, Hyla squirella, Lateolabrax japonicus, Mastomys erythroleucus, Pararge aegeria, Pardosa sierra, Phoenicopterus ruber ruber and Silene latifolia. These loci were cross-tested on the following species: Adelges abietis, Adelges cooleyi, Adelges piceae, Pineus pini, Pineus strobi, Tubastrea micrantha, three other Tubastrea species, Botrylloides fuscus, Botrylloides simodensis, Campylopterus hemileucurus, Campylopterus rufus, Campylopterus largipennis, Campylopterus villaviscensio, Phaethornis longuemareus, Florisuga mellivora, Lampornis amethystinus, Amazilia cyanocephala, Archilochus colubris, Epinephelus lanceolatus, Epinephelus fuscoguttatus, Symbiodinium temperate-A clade, Gammarus fossarum, Gammarus roeselii, Dikerogammarus villosus and Limnomysis benedeni. This article also documents the addition of 72 sequencing primer pairs and 52 allele specific primers for Neophocaena phocaenoides. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Data for comparative proteomics of ovaries from five non-model, crustacean amphipods☆

    PubMed Central

    Trapp, Judith; Almunia, Christine; Gaillard, Jean-Charles; Pible, Olivier; Chaumot, Arnaud; Geffard, Olivier; Armengaud, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Ovaries were taken from five sexually mature amphipods: Gammarus fossarum, Gammarus pulex, Gammarus roeseli, Hyallela azteca and Parhyale hawaiensis. The soluble proteome extracted from individual pair of ovaries from five biological replicates was trypsin digested and the resulting peptides were analyzed by high resolution tandem mass spectrometry. The spectra were assigned with four protein sequence databases with different specificities: a RNAseq-derived G. fossarum database; a RNAseq-derived P. hawaiensis database; both originating from ovaries transcriptome; the Daphnia pulex database derived from whole-genome sequencing and the NCBInr database. The best interpretation was obtained for most animals with the specific RNA-seq protein database previously established by means of RNAseq carried out on G. fossarum. Proteins identified in the five amphipod species allow defining the core-proteome of female reproductive tissues of the Senticaudata suborder. The data accompanying the manuscript describing the database searches and comparative analysis Trapp et al., 2015 [1] have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD002253 (G. fossarum), PXD002254 (G. pulex), PXD002255 (G. roeseli), PXD002256 (H. Azteca), and PXD002257 (P. hawaiensis). PMID:26380837

  20. Outstanding conference paper award 2014 IEEE nuclear and space radiation effects conference

    DOE PAGES

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; ...

    2014-12-01

    The recipients of the 2014 NSREC Outstanding Conference Paper Award are Nathaniel A. Dodds, James R. Schwank, Marty R. Shaneyfelt, Paul E. Dodd, Barney L. Doyle, Michael Trinczek, Ewart W. Blackmore, Kenneth P. Rodbell, Michael S. Gordon, Robert A. Reed, Jonathan A. Pellish, Kenneth A. LaBel, Paul W. Marshall, Scot E. Swanson, Gyorgy Vizkelethy, Stuart Van Deusen, Frederick W. Sexton, and M. John Martinez, for their paper entitled "Hardness Assurance for Proton Direct Ionization-Induced SEEs Using a High-Energy Proton Beam." For older CMOS technologies, protons could only cause single-event effects (SEEs) through nuclear interactions. Numerous recent studies on 90 nmmore » and newer CMOS technologies have shown that protons can also cause SEEs through direct ionization. Furthermore, this paper develops and demonstrates an accurate and practical method for predicting the error rate caused by proton direct ionization (PDI).« less

  1. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Tulsa, Oklahoma, Roundtable Summary

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-14

    TULSA EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Tulsa, Oklahoma DOE Tribal Roundtable convened on April 14th, at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Policy and Programs and facilitated by Debra Drecksel, Senior Program Manager, Senior Facilitator, Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute) and Brian Manwaring, Program Manager, U.S. Institute. They were assisted by Lindsey Sexton, Program Associate, U.S. Institute.  Tribal leaders and representatives from multiple tribal communities attended the roundtable. David Conrad, Director of Tribal and Intergovernmental Affairs, DOE Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs represented DOE at the meeting.  

  2. Rapunzel Loves Merida: Melodramatic Expressions of Lesbian Girlhood and Teen Romance in Tangled, Brave, and Femslash.

    PubMed

    Kapurch, Katie

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the melodramatic expression of lesbian girlhood and teen romance in Disney's Tangled (2010) and Disney Pixar's Brave (2012), as well as "Meripunzel" femslash, fan-authored romantic pairings of the animations' female protagonists. First, Anne Sexton's poem, "Rapunzel," offers a literary precedent for exploring lesbian themes in the fairy tale. The next section shows how Tangled and Brave invoke the narrative conventions of the family melodrama. This generic association reveals the films' uses of rhetoric familiar to youth coming-out narratives, as well as other visual and aural coding suggestive of queer styles. The last section shows how Meripunzel femslash taps into the films' existing melodramatic narrative forms and visual aesthetics, rehearsing their coming-out rhetoric while addressing the pleasures of and problems facing lesbian teen romance. I conclude by problematizing the often conventional expressions of lesbian girlhood in femslash, ultimately arguing for their empowering potential, especially as they indicate revised definitions of "princess."

  3. Outstanding conference paper award 2014 IEEE nuclear and space radiation effects conference

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Dodd, Paul E.; Doyle, Barney Lee; Trinczek, Michael; Blackmore, Ewart W.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.; Reed, Robert A.; Pellish, Jonathan A.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Swanson, Scot E.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Van Deusen, Stuart B.; Sexton, Frederick W.; Martinez, Marino John

    2014-12-01

    The recipients of the 2014 NSREC Outstanding Conference Paper Award are Nathaniel A. Dodds, James R. Schwank, Marty R. Shaneyfelt, Paul E. Dodd, Barney L. Doyle, Michael Trinczek, Ewart W. Blackmore, Kenneth P. Rodbell, Michael S. Gordon, Robert A. Reed, Jonathan A. Pellish, Kenneth A. LaBel, Paul W. Marshall, Scot E. Swanson, Gyorgy Vizkelethy, Stuart Van Deusen, Frederick W. Sexton, and M. John Martinez, for their paper entitled "Hardness Assurance for Proton Direct Ionization-Induced SEEs Using a High-Energy Proton Beam." For older CMOS technologies, protons could only cause single-event effects (SEEs) through nuclear interactions. Numerous recent studies on 90 nm and newer CMOS technologies have shown that protons can also cause SEEs through direct ionization. Furthermore, this paper develops and demonstrates an accurate and practical method for predicting the error rate caused by proton direct ionization (PDI).

  4. KSC-99pp0437

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-26

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Discovery sits on Launch Pad 39B against a backdrop of blue sky and the blue-green Atlantic Ocean. At the top left is the 290-foot-high water tank that holds 300,000 gallons of water for the sound suppression system during liftoff. At the bottom, on the Rotating Service Structure, is photographer John Sexton, taking photos for a book. Liftoff of Discovery on mission STS-96 is targeted for May 20 at 9:32 a.m. EDT. STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-led experiment

  5. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Pala, California, Roundtable Summary

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-03-23

    The Pala, California, DOE Tribal Roundtable convened at 5:30 p.m., Wednesday, March 23, at the Pala Resort. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE Office of Indian Energy). Tracey LeBeau, Director of the DOE Office of Indian Energy and Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director-Policy of the DOE Office of Indian Energy, attended. Tribal leaders and representatives from five tribal communities also attended. There were thirteen participants. The meeting was facilitated by Debra Drecksel, Senior Program Manager, Senior Facilitator, Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute). She was assisted by Lindsey Sexton, Program Associate, U.S. Institute.   

  6. Efficiency of box-traps and leg-hold traps with several bait types for capturing small carnivores (mammalia) in a disturbed area of southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Michalski, Fernanda; Crawshaw, Peter G; Oliveira, Tadeu G de; Fabián, Marta E

    2007-03-01

    Capturing small carnivores is often necessary for obtaining key ecological data. We compared the efficiency of box and leg-hold traps, using live and dead bait, to capture six carnivore species (Herpailurus yagouaroundi (E. Geoffroyi, 1803), Leopardus tigrinus (Schreber, 1775), Nasua nasua (Linnaeus, 1766), Cerdocyon thous (Linnaeus, 1766), Eira barbara (Linnaeus, 1758), and Galictis cuja (Molina, 1782)). The use of leg-hold traps significantly increased the capture rate of carnivores (5.77%) and non-target species (non-carnivores, 11.54%). Dead bait significantly attracted more non-carnivores than carnivores and live bait was more efficient for capturing carnivores (2.56%) than non-carnivores (0.77%). Both box and leg-hold traps caused some minor injuries (swelling and claw loss). We provide recommendations for the ethical use of these trap and bait types.

  7. Extraintestinal migration of Centrorhynchus sp. (Acanthocephala: Centrorhynchidae) in experimentally infected rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang-Jin; Lee, Hye-Jung; Go, Jai-Hyang; Park, Yun-Kyu; Chai, Jong-Yil; Seo, Min

    2010-06-01

    Reptiles were known to serve as paratenic hosts for Centrorhynchus (Acanthocephala: Centrorhynchidae) in Korea, but the infection course in experimental animals was not elucidated yet. In this study, the tiger keelback snakes (Rhabdophis tigrinus) were collected and digested with artificial pepsin solution, and the larvae of Centrorhynchus were recovered from them. Then, the collected larvae were orally infected to rats for developmental observations. In rats, all the larvae were observed outside the intestine on day 3 post-infection (PI), including the mesentery and abdominal muscles. As for the development in rats, the ovary of Centrorhynchus sp. was observed at day 15 PI, and the cement glands were 3 in number. Based on the morphological characteristics, including the arrangement of proboscis hooks, these larvae proved to be a species of Centrorhynchus, and more studies were needed for species identification.

  8. Extraintestinal Migration of Centrorhynchus sp. (Acanthocephala: Centrorhynchidae) in Experimentally Infected Rats

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang-Jin; Lee, Hye-Jung; Go, Jai-Hyang; Park, Yun-Kyu; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2010-01-01

    Reptiles were known to serve as paratenic hosts for Centrorhynchus (Acanthocephala: Centrorhynchidae) in Korea, but the infection course in experimental animals was not elucidated yet. In this study, the tiger keelback snakes (Rhabdophis tigrinus) were collected and digested with artificial pepsin solution, and the larvae of Centrorhynchus were recovered from them. Then, the collected larvae were orally infected to rats for developmental observations. In rats, all the larvae were observed outside the intestine on day 3 post-infection (PI), including the mesentery and abdominal muscles. As for the development in rats, the ovary of Centrorhynchus sp. was observed at day 15 PI, and the cement glands were 3 in number. Based on the morphological characteristics, including the arrangement of proboscis hooks, these larvae proved to be a species of Centrorhynchus, and more studies were needed for species identification. PMID:20585530

  9. Plasma hormones in neotropical and domestic cats undergoing routine manipulations.

    PubMed

    Genaro, G; Moraes, W; Silva, J C R; Adania, C H; Franci, C R

    2007-04-01

    Many neotropical felines are threatened with extinction and information on their physiology is required to assist in conservation. Their reproduction in captivity is poor, particularly for the smaller species. Several factors may be responsible, but stress is probably the most important. We assayed cortisol, LH, FSH, prolactin, testosterone, estradiol, and progesterone in single blood samples obtained under sedation from seven neotropical species and, for comparison, in stressed and unstressed domestic cats. Cortisol was also assayed in serial blood samples obtained after ACTH administration in Leopardus tigrinus, L. wiedi and domestic cats. While, in general, the results were fairly consistent, there were some statistically significant differences between species that were large enough to be of practical importance.

  10. First evidence of feline herpesvirus, calicivirus, parvovirus, and Ehrlichia exposure in Brazilian free-ranging felids.

    PubMed

    Filoni, Claudia; Catão-Dias, José Luiz; Bay, Gert; Durigon, Edison Luiz; Jorge, Rodrigo Silva Pinto; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2006-04-01

    Serum samples from 18 pumas (Puma concolor), one ocelot (Leopardus pardalis), and two little spotted cats (Leopardus tigrinus) collected from free-ranging animals in Brazil between 1998 and 2004 were tested by indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) for antibodies to feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV 1), calicivirus (FCV), coronavirus (FCoV), parvo-virus (FPV), Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma pha-gocytophilum, and Bartonella henselae. Serum samples also were tested, by Western blot and ELISA, for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) specific antibodies and antigen, respectively, by Western blot for antibodies to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and by indirect ELISA for antibodies to puma lentivirus (PLV). Antibodies to FHV 1, FCV, FCoV, FPV, FeLV, FIV, PLV or related viruses, and to B. henselae were detected. Furthermore, high-titered antibodies to E. canis or a closely related agent were detected in a puma for the first time.

  11. Zoogeography of epigean freshwater Amphipoda (Crustacea) in Romania: fragmented distributions and wide altitudinal variability.

    PubMed

    Copilaș-Ciocianu, Denis; Grabowski, Michał; Pârvulescu, Lucian; Petrusek, Adam

    2014-12-08

    Inland epigean freshwater amphipods of Romania are diverse and abundant for this region has a favourable geographical position between the Balkans and the Black Sea. Excluding Ponto-Caspian species originating in brackish waters and freshwater subterranean taxa, there are 11 formally recognized epigean freshwater species recorded from this country. They belong to 3 genera, each representing a different family: Gammarus (Gammaridae, 8 species or species complexes), Niphargus (Niphargidae, 2 epigean species) and Synurella (Crangonyctidae, one species). Their large-scale distribution patterns nevertheless remain obscure due to insufficient data, consequently limiting biogeographical interpretations. We provide extensive new data with high resolution distribution maps, thus improving the knowledge of the ranges of these taxa. Gammarus species display substantial altitudinal variability and patchy, fragmented distribution patterns. They occur abundantly, particularly in springs and streams, from lowlands to sub-mountainous and mountainous regions. In the light of recent molecular research, we hypothesize that the complex geomorphological dynamics of the Carpathian region during the Late Tertiary probably contributed to their allopatric distribution pattern. Contrasting with Gammarus, the genera Niphargus and Synurella exhibit low altitudinal variability, broad ecological valences and overlapping distributions, being widespread throughout the lowlands. The current distribution of N. hrabei and N. valachicus seems to be linked to the extent of the Paratethys during the Early Pliocene or Pleistocene. We further discuss the taxonomic validity of two synonymized and one apparently undescribed taxon, and provide an updated pictorial identification key that includes all taxa and forms discussed in our study. The mosaic distribution of epigean freshwater amphipod species in Romania shows that this region is particularly suitable for phylo- and biogeographical analyses of this

  12. Antibiotics as a chemical stressor affecting an aquatic decomposer-detritivore system.

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, Mirco; Hahn, Torsten; Gessner, Mark O; Schulz, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that a variety of antibiotic residues may affect the integrity of streams located downstream from wastewater treatment plants. Aquatic communities comprising bacterial and fungal decomposers and invertebrate detritivores (shredders) play an important role in the decomposition of allochthonous leaf litter, which acts as a primary energy source for small running waters. The aim of the present study was to assess whether an antibiotic mixture consisting of sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, erythromycin-H2O, roxithromycin, and clarithromycin has an effect on such a decomposer-detritivore system. Leaf discs were exposed to these antibiotics (total concentration of 2 or 200 microg/L) for approximately 20 d before offering these discs and corresponding control discs to an amphipod shredder, Gammarus fossarum, in a food choice experiment. Gammarus preferred the leaf discs conditioned in the presence of the antibiotic mixture at 200 microg/L over the control discs (pair-wise t test; p = 0.006). A similar tendency, while not significant, was observed for leaves conditioned with antibiotics at a concentration of 2 microg/L. The number of bacteria associated with leaves did not differ between treatments at either antibiotic concentration (t test; p = 0.57). In contrast, fungal biomass (measured as ergosterol) was significantly higher in the 200 microg/L treatment (t test; p = 0.038), suggesting that the preference of Gammarus may be related to a shift in fungal communities. Overall these results indicate that mixtures of antibiotics may disrupt important ecosystem processes such as organic matter flow in stream ecosystems, although effects are likely to be weak at antibiotic concentrations typical of streams receiving wastewater treatment plant effluents.

  13. Short-term bioconcentration studies of Np in freshwater biota

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, T.M.; Klopfer, D.C.; Simmons, M.A. )

    1990-12-01

    Short-term laboratory exposures were conducted to determine the potential accumulation of Np in aquatic organisms. Concentration factors were highest in green algae. Daphnia magna, a filter-feeding crustacean, accumulated Np at levels one order of magnitude greater than the amphipod Gammarus sp., an omnivorous substrate feeder. Accumulation of Np in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was highest in carcass (generally greater than 78% of the total body burden) and lowest in fillets. Recommended concentration factors for Np, based on fresh weight, were 300 for green algae, 100 for filter-feeding invertebrates, for nonfilter-feeding invertebrates, 10 for whole fish, and one for fish flesh.

  14. Effects of iron in streams on gill morphology, oxygen consumption, and phytoplankton/benthic invertebrate distribution. Completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, E.C.; Hinton, D.E.; Werner, D.K.; Gerber, R.B.; Becker, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    The project covered many aspects of the influence of iron on aquatic organisms at a four-tier level: cellular, phytoplankton, invertebrate, and fish. One other section dealt with the statistical distribution of total iron in the waters of West Virginia. The iron content of the waters, along with manganese and conductivity, were associated with mucous cell structure changes in trout perch and bluntnose minnow. Higher iron levels were found to increase oxygen consumption rates in the amphipod Gammarus minus. Overall, about 30 percent of the time, the 1 mg/l regulatory limit was exceeded from water sampled throughout the state.

  15. Population studies on the Amphipoda of Mazoma Lagoon (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakiri, Maria; Nicolaidou, Artemis

    1987-12-01

    The life cycles of four amphipod species— Gammarus insensibilis, Dexamine spinosa, Microdeutopus gryllotalpa and Corophium insidiosum—were studied in the brackish-water lagoon Mazoma of the Amvrakikos Gulf, Ionian Sea. G. insensibilis has an annual life cycle with limited recruitment over the year and maximum reproductive activity in the winter months. D. spinosa exhibits continuous recruitment in the lagoon with a maximum in summer. Both species produce a single brood per female per yer. Continuous recruitment was observed during the summer months for M. gryllotalpa and C. insidiosum, and multiple breeding per female per year. Sex ratios varied considerably over the year, with a persisting preponderance of the females.

  16. Fish odour triggers conspecific attraction behaviour in an aquatic invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Kullmann, Harald; Thünken, Timo; Baldauf, Sebastian A; Bakker, Theo C M; Frommen, Joachim G

    2008-10-23

    Group living has evolved as an adaptation to predation in many animal species. In a multitude of vertebrates, the tendency to aggregate varies with the risk of predation, but experimental evidence for this is less well known in invertebrates. Here, we examine the tendency to aggregate in the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex in the absence and presence of predator fish odour. Without fish odour, the gammarids showed no significant tendency to aggregate. In contrast to this, in fish-conditioned water, they significantly preferred to stay close to conspecifics. Predation risk can, thus, influence gammarids social behaviour.

  17. Toxicity Studies of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) on European Amphipods.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Lázaro, Carlos; Marin, Arnaldo; Borredat, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT The effect of phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene in dimethyl sulfoxide on the amphipods Gammarus aequicauda, Gammarus locusta, and Corophium multisetosum was tested in a static exposure in sea water. The 48-h lethal concentration (LC(50)) of phenanthrene was 173.85 mug/L for G. aequicauda, 147.64 mug/L for G. locusta, and 215.20 mug/L for C. multisetosum. The 48-h LC(50) of fluoranthene was 49.99 mug/L for G. aequicauda, 42.71 mug/L for G. locusta, and 2.85 mug/L for C. multisetosum. The 48-h LC(50) of pyrene was 73.49 mug/L for G. aequicauda, 60.78 mug/L for G. locusta, and 25.29 mug/L for C. multisetosum. Together with their wide distribution along European coasts, the evidence of toxicity on the tested PAH compounds in these amphipods make these species appropriate candidates for evaluating oil-contaminated sediments in Europe.

  18. Conflict of interest between a nematode and a trematode in an amphipod host: Test of the "sabotage" hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Frédéric; Fauchier, Jerome; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    Microphallus papillorobustus is a manipulative trematode that induces strong behavioural alterations in the gamaridean amphipod Gammarus insensibilis, making the amphipod more vulnerable to predation by aquatic birds (definitive hosts). Conversely, the sympatric nematodeGammarinema gammari uses Gammarus insensibilis as a habitat and a source of nutrition. We investigated the conflict of interest between these two parasite species by studying the consequences of mixed infection on amphipod behaviour associated with the trematode. In the field, some amphipods infected by the trematode did not display the altered behaviour. These normal amphipods also had more nematodes, suggesting that the nematode overpowered the manipulation of the trematode, a strategy that would prolong the nematode's life. We hypothesize that sabotage of the trematode by the nematode would be an adaptive strategy for the nematode consistent with recent speculation about co-operation and conflict in manipulative parasites. A behavioural test conducted in the laboratory from naturally infected amphipods yielded the same result. However, exposing amphipods to nematodes did not negate or decrease the manipulation exerted by the trematode. Similarly, experimental elimination of nematodes from amphipods did not permit trematodes to manipulate behaviour. These experimental data do not support the hypothesis that the negative association between nematodes and manipulation by the trematode is a result of the "sabotage" hypothesis.

  19. The combined effects of water level reduction and an increase in ammonia concentration on organic matter processing by key freshwater shredders in alluvial wetlands.

    PubMed

    Dehedin, Arnaud; Maazouzi, Chafik; Puijalon, Sara; Marmonier, Pierre; Piscart, Christophe

    2013-03-01

    In a global change context, the intensity and the frequency of drastic low flow periods or drought events will most likely increase to a substantial extent over the coming decades, leading to a modification in the abiotic characteristics of wetlands. This change in environmental parameters may induce severe shifts in plant and animal communities and the functioning of ecosystems. In this study, we experimentally estimated the effect of drought and the accumulation of ammonia (NH3 ) on the feeding activities of three generalist macroinvertebrates (i.e. Gammarus pulex, Gammarus roeselii and Asellus aquaticus) on three types of organic matter: leaves of Berula erecta growing in submerged conditions, leaves of the same species growing in emerged conditions and dead leaves of Alnus glutinosa. We observed a modification in the biomechanical and stoichiometric characteristics of the plants as a result of the emersion of the aquatic plants. This shift produced a substantial decrease in organic matter recycling by invertebrates and in their associated physiological ability (i.e. the energy stores of the animals) to face conditions associated with environmental change. Moreover, the accumulation of NH3 amplified the negative effect of emersion. This snowball effect on invertebrates may profoundly modify the functioning of ecosystems, particularly in terms of organic matter production/degradation and carbon mineralization. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Multidimensionality in host manipulation mimicked by serotonin injection

    PubMed Central

    Perrot-Minnot, Marie-Jeanne; Sanchez-Thirion, Kevin; Cézilly, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Manipulative parasites often alter the phenotype of their hosts along multiple dimensions. ‘Multidimensionality’ in host manipulation could consist in the simultaneous alteration of several physiological pathways independently of one another, or proceed from the disruption of some key physiological parameter, followed by a cascade of effects. We compared multidimensionality in ‘host manipulation’ between two closely related amphipods, Gammarus fossarum and Gammarus pulex, naturally and experimentally infected with Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala), respectively. To that end, we calculated in each host–parasite association the effect size of the difference between infected and uninfected individuals for six different traits (activity, phototaxis, geotaxis, attraction to conspecifics, refuge use and metabolic rate). The effects sizes were highly correlated between host–parasite associations, providing evidence for a relatively constant ‘infection syndrome’. Using the same methodology, we compared the extent of phenotypic alterations induced by an experimental injection of serotonin (5-HT) in uninfected G. pulex to that induced by experimental or natural infection with P. laevis. We observed a significant correlation between effect sizes across the six traits, indicating that injection with 5-HT can faithfully mimic the ‘infection syndrome’. This is, to our knowledge, the first experimental evidence that multidimensionality in host manipulation can proceed, at least partly, from the disruption of some major physiological mechanism. PMID:25339729

  1. Do distantly related parasites rely on the same proximate factors to alter the behaviour of their hosts?

    PubMed Central

    Ponton, F; Lefevre, T; Lebarbenchon, C; Thomas, F; Loxdale, H.D; Marché, L; Renault, L; Perrot-Minnot, M.J; Biron, D.G

    2006-01-01

    Phylogenetically unrelated parasites often increase the chances of their transmission by inducing similar phenotypic changes in their hosts. However, it is not known whether these convergent strategies rely on the same biochemical precursors. In this paper, we explored such aspects by studying two gammarid species (Gammarus insensibilis and Gammarus pulex; Crustacea: Amphipoda: Gammaridae) serving as intermediate hosts in the life cycle of two distantly related parasites: the trematode, Microphallus papillorobustus and the acanthocephalan, Polymorphus minutus. Both these parasite species are known to manipulate the behaviour of their amphipod hosts, bringing them towards the water surface, where they are preferentially eaten by aquatic birds (definitive hosts). By studying and comparing the brains of infected G. insensibilis and G. pulex with proteomics tools, we have elucidated some of the proximate causes involved in the parasite-induced alterations of host behaviour for each system. Protein identifications suggest that altered physiological compartments in hosts can be similar (e.g. immunoneural connexions) or different (e.g. vision process), and hence specific to the host–parasite association considered. Moreover, proteins required to alter the same physiological compartment can be specific or conversely common in both systems, illustrating in the latter case a molecular convergence in the proximate mechanisms of manipulation. PMID:17015311

  2. Biological invasion and parasitism: invaders do not suffer from physiological alterations of the acanthocephalan Pomphorhynchus laevis.

    PubMed

    Cornet, S; Sorci, G; Moret, Y

    2010-01-01

    Biological invasions expose parasites to new invasive hosts in addition to their local hosts. However, local parasites are often less successful in infecting and exploiting their new hosts. This may have major consequences for the competitive ability of hosts, and finally on the fate of the parasite-host community. In Burgundy (Eastern France), the acanthocephalan parasite, Pomphorhynchus laevis, infects 2 amphipod species living in sympatry: the native Gammarus pulex and the invasive Gammarus roeseli. While P. laevis affects the behaviour and the immunity of G. pulex, G. roeseli seems unaffected by the infection. In this study, we examined in detail the ability of the parasite to affect the immune system and resource storage of both gammarid species. We found that the infection was associated with a general decrease of the prophenoloxidase activity, haemocyte density, resistance to an artificial bacterial infection and level of sugar reserves in G. pulex, but not in G. roeseli. These results demonstrate a differential ability of P. laevis to exploit its local and its invasive gammarid hosts. Potential mechanisms of these differential physiological alterations and their potential consequences on the coexistence of both gammarid species in sympatry are discussed.

  3. A test battery approach for ecotoxicological characterization of Mar Piccolo sediments in Taranto (Ionian Sea, Southern Italy).

    PubMed

    Narracci, M; Cavallo, R A; Acquaviva, M I; Prato, E; Biandolino, F

    2009-01-01

    The eco-toxicological approach is based on the determination of the toxic effects on organisms pertaining to various ecosystems and supplies information about the contaminants mixture bioavailability, in complex matrices as sediments. The use of a single species for a correct evaluation of the toxicity levels can be reductive, concerning the complexity of the ecosystem. In this work we have used species with various evolutionary levels and habitats; in particular, three different organisms: two amphipods species (Corophium insidiosum and Gammarus aequicauda) and one bacterium Vibrio fischeri. We have compared these organisms for the evaluation of sediments toxicity in four sites along the Ionian coast (Taranto, Italy); in particular, three sites in Mar Piccolo and one site in Mar Grande. The toxicity of sediments measured using Vibrio fischeri (Microtox Solid Phase Test protocol) has been compared with the mortality of the two amphipods. Both in polluted (Mar Piccolo sites) and in non-polluted environments (Mar Grande), the results of the three biological tests carried out converge into the evaluation of sediments quality monitored. In conclusion, these preliminary results show the potential use of Corophium insidiosum and Gammarus aequicauda as test species for a correct evaluation of sediments quality, together with Vibrio fischeri.

  4. Invisible face of boron pollution in fluvial ecosystem: the level in the tissues of sentinel and nectonic organisms.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Naime

    2013-10-01

    Turkey is the largest producer of borate products in the world. Among four largest boron mines in Turkey two of them are located in basins of Orhaneli and Emet Streams. In this study, boron levels in abiotic (water-sediment) and some biotic elements (sentinel organisms; Asellus aquaticus, Gammarus pulex, Chironomus tentans, Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri and nektonic organism; Squalius cii) of Orhaneli and Emet Streams were investigated and their ranks among the food chain were demonstrated. Since Orhaneli and Emet Streams confluence to form Mustafakemalpaşa Brook which feeds Uluabat Lake which is one of the most important Ramsar fields of the world, Boron levels in those two streams have importance in terms of both continuances of aquatic systems. Present study results have shown that boron levels in water of both streams are much higher (vary between 8.64 and 16.73 mg L(-1)) than not only Turkish Standard but also limits determined by WHO, US EPA, and NAS. Boron levels determined in sediments of two streams vary between 18.05 and 36.7 mg kg(-1). The highest boron level in the biotic elements was determined in liver of Squalius cii (34.64 mg kg(-1)), it is followed by Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri (2.84 mg kg(-1)), Chironomus tentans (2.11 mg kg(-1)), and Gammarus pulex (1.98 mg kg(-1)).

  5. Abundance, population structure and production of macro-invertebrate shredders in a Mediterranean brackish lagoon, Lake Ichkeul, Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagranda, Caterina; Dridi, Mohamed Sadok; Boudouresque, Charles François

    2006-02-01

    Abundance, population structure and production of the macro-invertebrates belonging to the functional feeding group of the shredders were studied in the Ichkeul wetland, northern Tunisia, from July 1993 to April 1994. Mean above-ground macrophyte biomass was at a maximum in September followed by a complete breakdown of the Potamogeton pectinatus L. meadow from October onward due to high salinity following an exceptionally dry winter. Only the meadow of Ruppia cirrhosa (Petagna) Grande at Tinja remained in place. Abundance of Gammarus aequicauda (Martynov 1931), Idotea chelipes (Pallas 1766) and Sphaeroma hookeri Leach 1814 was significantly related to the R. cirrhosa biomass. Gammarus aequicauda presented two recruitment periods in spring and autumn, and S. hookeri a third one in winter. The population of I. chelipes was renewed during winter by continued reproduction without any spring generation. Recruitment of all three species was not very successful during the study period. Life span of all three species was between 12 and 15 months. Despite their relatively low biomass and production rate, the shredders have a key function in processing macrophyte matter to different trophic levels through fragmentation and accelerating the decomposition of macrophyte biomass accumulated at the end of the growth season in the Ichkeul lagoon.

  6. Seasonal variations of the effect of temperature on lethal and sublethal toxicities of ammonia for three common freshwater shredders.

    PubMed

    Dehedin, Arnaud; Piscart, Christophe; Marmonier, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    In a context of global change, increases in temperature and in ammonia concentration should strongly affect the crustaceans of wetlands. We experimentally examined, at three different seasons (i.e. winter, spring, and summer), the effect of temperature (12, 18, and 24°C) on the lethal (survival rates) and sublethal (oxygen consumption) toxicity of unionized ammonia (NH(3)) on the amphipods Gammarus pulex and Gammarus roeselii and the isopod Asellus aquaticus. Our results demonstrate (1) a gradient of increasing tolerance and survival from G. roeselii to G. pulex and A. aquaticus, (2) an increasing toxicity of ammonia with temperature, and (3) a strong seasonal variation of the tolerance to ammonia, with a higher tolerance of individuals in winter than in summer. However, the sub-lethal effect of ammonia on the oxygen consumption rate was species dependant and changed according to temperature or season. Global change and resulting variations in crustacean densities will potentially affect the ecosystem functioning (e.g. organic matter recycling).

  7. Lotic community responses in the Lees Ferry reach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, T.; Rogers, R. S.; Ayers, A. D.; Persons, W. R.

    Responses of periphyton, aquatic macrophytes, benthic macroinvertebrates, and rainbow trout to the 1996 controlled flood were investigated in the Lees Ferry tailwater reach below Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River. Lotic biota differed spatially and temporally in abundance and distribution following recession of flood waters, and there was no evidence that the flood benefitted trout or lower trophic levels. The flood was associated with short-term changes in lower trophic levels, but benthic vegetation and macrofauna with low resistance were resilient. Adverse impacts of the flood on lower trophic levels were greater and more prolonged in depositional areas than on cobble bar habitat, but recovery occurred in both habitat types 4-8 months after the flood. The flood likely resulted in some downstream displacement of smaller fish but had no effects on catch rate or condition indices of trout. Percentage of young-of-the-year trout 8 months after the event indicates that the flood did not prevent successful spawning. The flood had little direct influence on diets of trout, but relative gut volume increased in the week after the event, remained high in summer, and composition changed seasonally. Amphipods (Gammarus lacustris), chironomids, and snails were predominant food items, and Gammarus generally were eaten more often and comprised greater relative volume in the diet than other macroinvertebrate taxa.

  8. Size-, surface- and crystalline structure composition-related effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles during their aquatic life cycle.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Frank; Rosenfeldt, Ricki R; Schneider, Sandra; Schulz, Ralf; Bundschuh, Mirco

    2014-09-15

    Nanoparticle toxicity depends amongst others on particle characteristics and nanoparticle behavior during their aquatic life cycle. Aquatic organisms may be exposed to nanoparticle agglomerates of varying size, while lager agglomerates after settling rather affect benthic organisms. In this context, the present study systematically examined the role of particle characteristics, i.e. crystalline structure composition (anatase as well as mixture of anatase-rutile), initial particle size (55-, 100-, and 140-nm) and surface area, in the toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2) to the pelagic filter feeder Daphnia magna (n = 4) and the benthic amphipod Gammarus fossarum (n = 30). Smaller initial particle sizes (i.e. 55-nm) and anatase based particles showed an approximately 90% lower Daphnia EC50-value compared to its respective counterpart. Most importantly, particle surface normalized EC50-values significantly differed for nanoparticles equal to or below 100 nm in size from 140-nm sized particles. Hence, these data suggest that the reactive initial surface area may explain the ecotoxicological potential of different particle size classes only if their size is smaller or around 100 nm. In contrast to Daphnia, Gammarus was not affected by nTiO2 concentrations of up to 5.00 mg/L, irrespective of their characteristics. This indicates fundamental differences in the toxicity of nTiO2 during its aquatic life cycle mediated by alterations in their characteristics over time.

  9. Identification of a putatively multixenobiotic resistance related Abcb1 transporter in amphipod species endemic to the highly pristine Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Pavlichenko, Vasiliy V; Protopopova, Marina V; Timofeyev, Maxim; Luckenbach, Till

    2015-04-01

    The fauna of Lake Baikal in Eastern Siberia, the largest freshwater body on Earth, is characterized by high degrees of biodiversity and endemism. Amphipods, a prominent taxon within the indigenous fauna, occur in an exceptionally high number of endemic species. Considering the specific water chemistry of Lake Baikal with extremely low levels of potentially toxic natural organic compounds, it seems conceivable that certain adaptions to adverse environmental factors are missing in endemic species, such as cellular defense mechanisms mitigating toxic effects of chemicals. The degree to which the endemic fauna is affected by the recently occurring anthropogenic water pollution of Lake Baikal may depend on the existence of such cellular defense mechanisms in those species. We here show that endemic amphipods express transcripts for Abcb1, a major component of the cellular multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) defense against toxic chemicals. Based on a partial abcb1 cDNA sequence from Gammarus lacustris, an amphipod species common across Northern Eurasia but only rarely found in Lake Baikal, respective homologous sequences were cloned from five amphipods endemic to Lake Baikal, Eulimnogammarus verrucosus, E. vittatus, E. cyaneus, E. marituji, and Gmelinoides fasciatus, confirming that abcb1 is transcribed in those species. The effects of thermal (25 °C) and chemical stress (1-2 mg L(-1) phenanthrene) in short-term exposures (up to 24 h) on transcript levels of abcb1 and heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), used as a proxy for cellular stress in the experiments, were exemplarily examined in E. verrucosus, E. cyaneus, and Gammarus lacustris. Whereas increases of abcb1 transcripts upon treatments occurred only in the Baikalian species E. verrucosus and E. cyaneus but not in Gammarus lacustris, changes of hsp70 transcript levels were seen in all three species. At least for species endemic to Lake Baikal, the data thus indicate that regulation of the identified amphipod abcb1 is

  10. Applying importance-performance analysis to patient safety culture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yii-Ching; Wu, Hsin-Hung; Hsieh, Wan-Lin; Weng, Shao-Jen; Hsieh, Liang-Po; Huang, Chih-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    The Sexton et al.'s (2006) safety attitudes questionnaire (SAQ) has been widely used to assess staff's attitudes towards patient safety in healthcare organizations. However, to date there have been few studies that discuss the perceptions of patient safety both from hospital staff and upper management. The purpose of this paper is to improve and to develop better strategies regarding patient safety in healthcare organizations. The Chinese version of SAQ based on the Taiwan Joint Commission on Hospital Accreditation is used to evaluate the perceptions of hospital staff. The current study then lies in applying importance-performance analysis technique to identify the major strengths and weaknesses of the safety culture. The results show that teamwork climate, safety climate, job satisfaction, stress recognition and working conditions are major strengths and should be maintained in order to provide a better patient safety culture. On the contrary, perceptions of management and hospital handoffs and transitions are important weaknesses and should be improved immediately. Research limitations/implications - The research is restricted in generalizability. The assessment of hospital staff in patient safety culture is physicians and registered nurses. It would be interesting to further evaluate other staff's (e.g. technicians, pharmacists and others) opinions regarding patient safety culture in the hospital. Few studies have clearly evaluated the perceptions of healthcare organization management regarding patient safety culture. Healthcare managers enable to take more effective actions to improve the level of patient safety by investigating key characteristics (either strengths or weaknesses) that healthcare organizations should focus on.

  11. A Polycomb Group Protein Is Retained at Specific Sites on Chromatin in Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Follmer, Nicole E.; Wani, Ajazul H.; Francis, Nicole J.

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of gene expression, including by Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins, may depend on heritable chromatin states, but how these states can be propagated through mitosis is unclear. Using immunofluorescence and biochemical fractionation, we find PcG proteins associated with mitotic chromosomes in Drosophila S2 cells. Genome-wide sequencing of chromatin immunoprecipitations (ChIP–SEQ) from mitotic cells indicates that Posterior Sex Combs (PSC) is not present at well-characterized PcG targets including Hox genes in mitosis, but does remain at a subset of interphase sites. Many of these persistent sites overlap with chromatin domain borders described by Sexton et al. (2012), which are genomic regions characterized by low levels of long range contacts. Persistent PSC binding sites flank both Hox gene clusters. We hypothesize that disruption of long-range chromatin contacts in mitosis contributes to PcG protein release from most sites, while persistent binding at sites with minimal long-range contacts may nucleate re-establishment of PcG binding and chromosome organization after mitosis. PMID:23284300

  12. The Power of Food Scale. A new measure of the psychological influence of the food environment.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Michael R; Butryn, Meghan L; Didie, Elizabeth R; Annunziato, Rachel A; Thomas, J Graham; Crerand, Canice E; Ochner, Christopher N; Coletta, Maria C; Bellace, Dara; Wallaert, Matthew; Halford, Jason

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes the psychometric evaluation of a new measure called the Power of Food Scale (PFS). The PFS assesses the psychological impact of living in food-abundant environments. It measures appetite for, rather than consumption of, palatable foods, at three levels of food proximity (food available, food present, and food tasted). Participants were 466 healthy college students. A confirmatory factor analysis replicated the three-factor solution found previously by Capelleri et al. [Capelleri, J. C., Bushmakin, A. G., Gerber, R. A., Leidy, N. K., Sexton, C., Karlsson, J., et al. (in press). Discovering the structure of the Power of Food Scale (PFS) in obese patients. International Journal of Obesity, 11, A165]. The PFS was found to have adequate internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The PFS and the Restraint Scale were regressed on four self-report measures of overeating. The PFS was independently related to all four whereas the Restraint Scale was independently related to two. Expert ratings of items suggested that the items are an acceptable reflection of the construct that the PFS is designed to capture. The PFS may be useful as a measure of the hedonic impact of food environments replete with highly palatable foods.

  13. Towards a portable, scalable, open source model of tree cover derived from Landsat spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, J. A.; Xu, Q.; Morrison, B. D.; Xu, Z.; Man, A.; Fredrickson, M. M.; Ramirez, C.; Li, B.

    2016-12-01

    Tree cover is a key parameter used in a variety of applications, including ecosystem and fire behavior modeling, wildlife management, and is the primary way by which a variety of biomes are classified. At large scales, quantification of tree cover can help elucidate changes in deforestation and forest recovery and understand the relationship between climate and forest distributions. To determine tree cover at large scales, remote sensing-based methods are required. There exist a variety of products at various scales and extents, including two global products, Hansen et al.'s treecover2000 product and Sexton et al.'s Landsat Vegetation Continuous Fields (VCF) product. While these products serve an important role, they are only available for a limited set of dates: treecover2000 is available for the year 2000, and Landsat VCF for 2000 and 2005. In this analysis, we created a single model of tree cover as a function of Landsat spectra that is both calibrated and validated using small footprint LiDAR estimates of tree cover, trained across multiple Landsat scenes. Our model was found to be accurate and portable across space and time largely due to using a large amount of LiDAR - Landsat pixel pairs across multiple Landsat scenes to capture both sensor and scene heterogeneity. We will be releasing the model itself, rather than time-limited products, to allow other users to apply the model to any reflectance-calibrated Landsat scene from any time period.

  14. Determination of the concentration and the average number of gold atoms in a gold nanoparticle by osmotic pressure.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Wang, Lixia; Chen, Dejun; Wang, Gongke

    2012-06-26

    For an ideal solution, an analytical expression for the macromolecule concentration, electrolyte concentration, and solution osmotic pressure is obtained on the basis of the van't Hoff equation and the Donnan equilibrium. The expression was further applied to a colloid solution of about 3 nm glutathione-stabilized gold nanoparticles. The concentration of the colloid solution and the average net ion charge number for each gold nanoparticle were determined with the measured osmotic pressure data. Meanwhile, the gold contents of the solutions were analyzed by means of atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and the results were combined with the determined concentration of gold nanoparticle colloids to determine that the average number of gold atoms per 3 nm gold nanoparticle is 479, which is 1/1.7 times the number of atoms in bulk metallic gold of the same size. The same proportion also occurred in the 2 nm 4-mercaptobenzoic acid monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles prepared by Ackerson et al., who utilized the quantitative high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscope to determine the average number of gold atoms per nanoparticle (Ackerson, C. J.; Jadzinsky, P. D.; Sexton J. Z.; Bushnell, D. A.; Kornberg, R. D. Synthesis and Bioconjugation of 2 and 3 nm-Diameter Gold Nanoparticles. Bioconjugate Chem. 2010, 21, 214-218).

  15. Accuracy Assessment of Landsat-Derived Continuous Fields of Tree Cover Products Using Airborne LIDAR Data in the Eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X. P.; Tang, H.

    2015-08-01

    Knowing the detailed error structure of a land cover map is crucial for area estimation. Facilitated by the opening of the Landsat archive, global land cover mapping at 30-m resolution has become possible in recent years. Two global Landsat-based continuous fields of tree cover maps have been generated by Sexton et al. (2013) and Hansen et al. (2013) but the accuracy of which have not been comprehensively evaluated. Here we used canopy cover derived from airborne small-footprint Lidar data as a reference to evaluate the accuracy of these two datasets as well as the National Land Cover Database 2001 canopy cover layer (Homer et al. 2004) in two entire counties in Maryland, United States. Our results showed that all three Landsat datasets captured well the spatial variations of tree cover in the study area with an r2 ranging between 0.54 and 0.58, a mean bias error ranging between -15% and 5% tree cover, and a root mean square error ranging between 27% and 29% tree cover. When the continuous tree cover maps were converted to binary forest/nonforest maps, all three products were proved to have an overall accuracy >= 80% but with significant differences in producer's accuracy and user's accuracy. Data users are thus suggested to beware of these accuracy patterns when selecting the most appropriate dataset for their specific applications.

  16. The effects of oil, dispersant, and emulsions on the survival and behavior of an estuarine teleost and an intertidal amphipod

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, R.G.; Trivelpiece, W.; Miller, D.S.

    1982-04-01

    Killfish (Fundulus heteroclitus) and amphipods (Gammarus oceanicus) were exposed seperately to either a No. 2 fuel oil, AP dispersant, or emulsions of the two in a static system. Both species exhibited a concentration-dependent response to all three treatments. However, emulsification of oil with dispersant clearly increased its lethal effect on killfish survival, but did not cause a differential change in behavioral parameters such as schooling, chafing, substrate nipping, activity, or depth preference. Killfish exposed to conditions of thermal or osmotic stress were more sensitive to the lethal effects of emulsions. In contrast, emulsions caused quantitative changes in amphipod activity and precopulatory behavior, but did not increase mortality beyond that caused by exposure to oil alone. Changes in salinity had little effect on amphipod sensitivity to emulsions, but decreasing temperature did result in increased survival.

  17. Microsporidia parasites disrupt the responses to cadmium exposure in a gammarid.

    PubMed

    Gismondi, Eric; Rigaud, Thierry; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Cossu-Leguille, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Microsporidia parasites are commonly found in amphipods, where they are often asymptomatic, vertically-transmitted and have several effects on host sexuality and behaviour. As amphipods are often used as models in ecotoxicological studies, we investigated the effect of microsporidian infections on energy reserves and defence capacities of Gammarus roeseli under cadmium stress. Only females were infected by two microsporidia parasites: Dictyocoela roeselum or Dictyocoela muelleri. In physiological conditions, microsporidia had no major effect on energy reserves and defence capacities of G. roeseli, while under cadmium exposure, energy reserves and antioxidant defence were weaker in infected females. Moreover, higher malondialdehyde levels detected in infected females revealed that they suffered more cellular damages. Our results suggest that microsporidia may affect gammarid fitness in stressful conditions, when parasitic stress cannot be compensated by the host. Consequently, microsporidia parasites should be a factor necessary to take into account in ecotoxicology studies involving amphipods.

  18. Feeding ecology of long-tailed ducks Clangula hyemalis wintering on the Nantucket Shoals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Timothy P.; Veit, Richard R.; Perry, Matthew C.

    2009-01-01

    A substantial proportion, perhaps 30%, of the North American breeding population of Long-tailed Ducks (Clangula hyemalis) winter in the vicinity of Nantucket Island, Massachusetts. These birds spend the night on Nantucket Sound and commute during daylight hours to the Nantucket Shoals, which extend about 65 km offshore from the southeastern corner of Nantucket. Strip transects done from a single-engine plane in 1997 and 1998 indicated that Long-tailed Ducks foraged over the shallower (<= 20 m depth) portions of the Nantucket Shoals, up to 70 km offshore. Diet analyses of ten birds collected in February 1999 and five in December 2006 showed that they fed principally (106.6 +/- 42.0 individuals per crop) on Gammarus annulatus, a pelagic amphipod that often forms large aggregations, and is consumed by several species of fish and marine mammals. Our findings emphasize the importance of conservation of the Nantucket Shoals and the prevention of oil spills or other potentially harmful accidents.

  19. Dietary supplementation with carotenoids improves immunity without increasing its cost in a crustacean.

    PubMed

    Babin, Aurélie; Biard, Clotilde; Moret, Yannick

    2010-08-01

    Costs of immunity include self-harming autoreactivity through the production of cytotoxic chemicals. While carotenoids stimulate immunity and reduce oxidative stress during immune activity in vertebrates, their involvement in invertebrate immunity is unclear. Recently, a positive correlation between immune defenses and concentration of carotenoids in the hemolymph was demonstrated in the crustacean Gammarus pulex, suggesting an important role of carotenoids in invertebrate immunity. We tested the causality of this relationship by using a dietary supplementation with carotenoids and measuring several immune parameters. We found that dietary carotenoids had a broad immunostimulating effect, enhancing phenoloxidase activity and resistance to a bacterial infection. When immune challenged, gammarids fed with carotenoids did not pay an additional survival cost because of autoreactivity, despite their intensified immune activity. Therefore, dietary carotenoids improved gammarids' immunity without inducing additional self-harming. This underlines the importance of carotenoids in both the regulation and the evolution of immunity in G. pulex.

  20. High titers of ecdysteroids are associated with the secretory process of embryonic envelopes in the european lobster.

    PubMed

    Goudeau, M; Lachaise, F; Carpentier, G; Goxe, B

    1990-01-01

    The newly laid egg of the lobster Homarus gammarus is surrounded by a vitelline coat. Just after fertilization, a new subjacent envelope (2), originating from the cortical reaction, is deposited beneath the vitelline coat. In the course of embryonic development, five new coatings (envelopes 3 to 7) are secreted successively from the ectodermal embryonic cells. These will remain until hatching, freeing the mysis larva in concentric order without exuviation. The concentration of both the two major ecdysteroids (ponasterone A and 20-hydroxyecdysone) and their respective precursors (25-deoxyecdysone and ecdysone) were determined as a function of the secretory phase for three embryonic envelopes (2, 3 and 6). We determined that the secretory processes proceed in the presence of high titers of 20-hydroxyecdysone during the onset of envelope secretion and of ponasterone A in the last phase of secretion.

  1. A review of crustacean sensitivity to high amplitude underwater noise: Data needs for effective risk assessment in relation to UK commercial species.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Nathan J; Firmin, Christopher J; Goldsmith, Denise; Faulkner, Rebecca C; Wood, Daniel T

    2016-07-15

    High amplitude anthropogenic noise is associated with adverse impacts among a variety of organisms but detailed species-specific knowledge is lacking in relation to effects upon crustaceans. Brown crab (Cancer pagurus), European lobster (Homarus gammarus) and Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) together represent the most valuable commercial fishery in the UK (Defra, 2014). Critical evaluation of literature reveals physiological sensitivity to underwater noise among N. norvegicus and closely related crustacean species, including juvenile stages. Current evidence supports physiological sensitivity to local, particle motion effects of sound production in particular. Derivation of correlative relationships between the introduction of high amplitude impulsive noise and crustacean distribution/abundance is hindered by the coarse resolution of available data at the present time. Future priorities for research are identified and argument for enhanced monitoring under current legislative frameworks outlined. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Is there a role for antioxidant carotenoids in limiting self-harming immune response in invertebrates?

    PubMed

    Cornet, Stéphane; Biard, Clotilde; Moret, Yannick

    2007-06-22

    Innate immunity relies on effectors, which produce cytotoxic molecules that have not only the advantage of killing pathogens but also the disadvantage of harming host tissues and organs. Although the role of dietary antioxidants in invertebrate immunity is still unknown, it has been shown in vertebrates that carotenoids scavenge cytotoxic radicals generated during the immune response. Carotenoids may consequently decrease the self-harming cost of immunity. A positive relationship between the levels of innate immune defence and circulating carotenoid might therefore be expected. Consistent with this hypothesis, we show that the maintenance and use of the prophenoloxidase system strongly correlate with carotenoid concentration in haemolymph within and among natural populations of the crustacean Gammarus pulex.

  3. A geothermal-linked biological oasis in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.

    PubMed

    Lovalvo, D; Clingenpeel, S R; McGinnis, S; Macur, R E; Varley, J D; Inskeep, W P; Glime, J; Nealson, K; McDermott, T R

    2010-09-01

    Hundreds of active and dormant geothermal vents have been located on the floor of Yellowstone Lake, although characterization of the associated biology (macro or micro) has been extremely limited. Herein, we describe an aquatic moss (Fontinalis) colony closely associated with vent emissions that considerably exceeded known temperature maxima for this plant. Vent waters were supersaturated with CO(2), likely accommodating a CO(2) compensation point that would be expected to be quite elevated under these conditions. The moss was colonized by metazoa, including the crustaceans Hyalella and Gammarus, a segmented worm in the Lumbriculidae family, and a flatworm specimen tentatively identified as Polycelis. The presence of these invertebrates suggest a highly localized food chain that derives from the presence of geothermal inputs and thus is analogous to the deep marine vents that support significant biodiversity.

  4. Invertebrates control metals and arsenic sequestration as ecosystem engineers.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Jörg; Weiske, Arndt; Mkandawire, Martin; Dudel, E Gert

    2010-03-01

    Organic sediments are known to be a significant sink of inorganic elements in polluted freshwater ecosystems. Hence, we investigated the role of invertebrate shredders (the freshwater shrimp Gammarus pulex L.) in metal and arsenic enrichment into organic partitions of sediments in a wetland stream at former uranium mining site. Metal and metalloid content in leaf litter increased significantly during decomposition, while at the same time the carbon content decreased. During decomposition, G. pulex as a ecosystem engineer facilitated significantly the enrichment of magnesium (250%), manganese (560%), cobalt (310%), copper (200%), zinc (43%), arsenic (670%), cadmium (100%) and lead (1340%) into small particle sizes. The enrichments occur under very high concentrations of dissolved organic carbon. Small particles have high surface area that results in high biofilm development. Further, the highest amounts of elements were observed in biofilms. Therefore, invertebrate shredder like G. pulex can enhance retention of large amounts of metal and arsenic in wetlands.

  5. Hexachlorobenzene uptake by fathead minnows and macroinvertebrates in recirculating sediment/water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schuytema, G.S.; Krawczyk, D.F.; Griffis, W.L.; Nebeker, A.V.; Robideaux, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), the worm, Lumbriculus variegatus, and the amphipods Hyalella azteca and Gammarus lacustris were exposed to hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in water with and without a bed of HCB-spiked sediment. Water HCB concentrations were maintained by recirculation through HCB-packed columns. Recirculating HCB-bound particulates and possibly eroded HCB particulates were an added source of HCB in addition to the sediment bed. Significant bioaccumulation of HCB in animal tissues was observed in water-only and water-sediment exposures. The presence of the HCB-spiked sediment did not result in a significant increase in the uptake of HCB by the organisms, but there was a substantial increase in sediment HCB levels over time. Higher tissue HCB levels in aquaria without sediment suggest that the sediment was a more efficient sink for HCB than the organisms.

  6. Utilization of both benthic macroinvertebrates and physicochemical parameters for evaluating water quality of the stream Cekerek (Tokat, Turkey).

    PubMed

    Duran, Mustafa; Suicmez, Menderes

    2007-04-01

    This study examines the applicability of five European biotic indices and the Gammarus:Asellus ratio (G:A), compared with the measurement of physicochemical parameters, in order to determine the water quality at ten sites along the Tokat part of Cekerek stream, in Anatolia, Turkey, during the period February 2002 to January 2003. The biological and chemical results are in good agreement with respect to the water quality. In particular, the G:A ratio was calculated to be high at the first three stations and this result was correlated with the ETBI and the Chandler scores. Consequently, the water quality of Cekerek stream was classified as class I for biological and physicochemical data, except for phosphate, ammonia nitrogen, nitrate and nitrite at the last seven stations. The high concentrations of these chemicals probably result from agricultural runoff and urban sewage. In total, 55 taxa of benthic macroinvertebrates were identified from the Cekerek stream during this study period.

  7. Biotransformation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics by ligninolytic fungi--Metabolites, enzymes and residual antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Čvančarová, Monika; Moeder, Monika; Filipová, Alena; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2015-10-01

    A group of white rot fungi (Irpex lacteus, Panus tigrinus, Dichomitus squalens, Trametes versicolor and Pleurotus ostreatus) was investigated for the biodegradation of norfloxacin (NOR), ofloxacin (OF) and ciprofloxacin (CIP). The selected fluoroquinolones were readily degraded almost completely by I. lacteus and T. versicolor within 10 and 14 d of incubation in liquid medium, respectively. The biodegradation products were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The analyses indicated that the fungi use similar mechanisms to degrade structurally related antibiotics. The piperazine ring of the molecules is preferably attacked via either substitution or/and decomposition. In addition to the degradation efficiency, attention was devoted to the residual antibiotic activities estimated using Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Only I. lacteus was able to remove the antibiotic activity during the course of the degradation of NOR and OF. The product-effect correlations evaluated by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) enabled elucidation of the participation of the individual metabolites in the residual antibacterial activity. Most of the metabolites correlated with the antibacterial activity, explaining the rather high residual activity remaining after the biodegradation. PCA of ligninolytic enzyme activities indicated that manganese peroxidase might participate in the degradation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Isolation of laccase gene-specific sequences from white rot and brown rot fungi by PCR

    SciTech Connect

    D`Souza, T.M.; Boominathan, K.; Reddy, C.A.

    1996-10-01

    Degenerate primers corresponding to the consensus sequences of the copper-binding regions in the N-terminal domains of known basidiomycete laccases were used to isolate laccase gene-specific sequences from strains representing nine genera of wood rot fungi. All except three gave the expected PCR product of about 200 bp. Computer searches of the databases identified the sequences of each of the PCR product of about 200 bp. Computer searches of the databases identified the sequence of each of the PCR products analyzed as a laccase gene sequence, suggesting the specificity of the primers. PCR products of the white rot fungi Ganoderma lucidum, Phlebia brevispora, and Trametes versicolor showed 65 to 74% nucleotide sequence similarity to each other; the similarity in deduced amino acid sequences was 83 to 91%. The PCR products of Lentinula edodes and Lentinus tigrinus, on the other hand, showed relatively low nucleotide and amino acid similarities (58 to 64 and 62 to 81%, respectively); however, these similarities were still much higher than when compared with the corresponding regions in the laccases of the ascomycete fungi Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa. A few of the white rot fungi, as well as Gloeophyllum trabeum, a brown rot fungus, gave a 144-bp PCR fragment which had a nucleotide sequence similarity of 60 to 71%. Demonstration of laccase activity in G. trabeum and several other brown rot fungi was of particular interest because these organisms were not previously shown to produce laccases. 36 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii from Brazilian wildlife revealed abundant new genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Vitaliano, S.N.; Soares, H.S.; Minervino, A.H.H.; Santos, A.L.Q.; Werther, K.; Marvulo, M.F.V.; Siqueira, D.B.; Pena, H.F.J.; Soares, R.M.; Su, C.; Gennari, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to isolate and genotype T. gondii from Brazilian wildlife. For this purpose, 226 samples were submitted to mice bioassay and screened by PCR based on 18S rRNA sequences. A total of 15 T. gondii isolates were obtained, including samples from four armadillos (three Dasypus novemcinctus, one Euphractus sexcinctus), three collared anteaters (Tamandua tetradactyla), three whited-lipped peccaries (Tayassu pecari), one spotted paca (Cuniculus paca), one oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus), one hoary fox (Pseudalopex vetulus), one lineated woodpecker (Dryocopus lineatus) and one maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus). DNA from the isolates, originated from mice bioassay, and from the tissues of the wild animal, designated as “primary samples”, were genotyped by PCR–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR/RFLP), using 12 genetic markers (SAG1, SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L258, PK1, CS3 and Apico). A total of 17 genotypes were identified, with 13 identified for the first time and four already reported in published literature. Results herein obtained corroborate previous studies in Brazil, confirming high diversity and revealing unique genotypes in this region. Given most of genotypes here identified are different from previous studies in domestic animals, future studies on T. gondii from wildlife is of interest to understand population genetics and structure of this parasite. PMID:25426424

  10. Toxicity profile of choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents for fungi and Cyprinus carpio fish.

    PubMed

    Juneidi, Ibrahim; Hayyan, Maan; Mohd Ali, Ozair

    2016-04-01

    An investigation on the toxicological assessment of 10 choline chloride (ChCl)-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) towards four fungi strains and Cyprinus carpio fish was conducted. ChCl was combined with materials from different chemical groups such as alcohols, sugars, acids and others to form DESs. The study was carried out on the individual DES components, their aqueous mixture before DES formation and their formed DESs. The agar disc diffusion method was followed to investigate their toxicity on four fungi strains selected as a model of eukaryotic microorganisms (Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Aspergillus niger, Lentinus tigrinus and Candida cylindracea). Among these DESs, ChCl:ZnCl2 exhibited the highest inhibition zone diameter towards the tested fungi growth in vitro, followed by the acidic group (malonic acid and p-toluenesulfonic acid). Another study was conducted to test the acute toxicity and determine the lethal concentration at 50 % (LC50) of the same DESs on C. carpio fish. The inhibition range and LC50 of DESs were found to be different from their individual components. DESs were found to be less toxic than their mixture or individual components. The LC50 of ChCl:MADES is much higher than that of ChCl:MAMix. Moreover, the DESs acidic group showed a lower inhibition zone on fungi growth. Thus, DESs should be considered as new components with different physicochemical properties and toxicological profiles, and not merely compositions of compounds.

  11. Niche partitioning and species coexistence in a Neotropical felid assemblage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bitetti, Mario S.; De Angelo, Carlos D.; Di Blanco, Yamil E.; Paviolo, Agustín

    2010-07-01

    Carnivores have been used as a model to understand the effects of competition in community structure. Behavioral mechanisms that facilitate species coexistence have been poorly explored and may explain the lack of community-wide morphological character displacement in some carnivore assemblages. We use the results of large-scale and intensive camera-trap surveys conducted in the Atlantic Forest of NE Argentina between 2003 and 2008 to describe the spatial patterns of detection and the daily pattern of records of the six wild cat species present in the region (jaguar Panthera onca, puma Puma concolor, ocelot Leopardus pardalis, jaguarundi Puma yagouaroundi, margay Leopardus wiedii, and oncilla Leopardus tigrinus). We use these patterns to generate hypotheses about behavioral differences that may facilitate species coexistence. The larger species were more frequently recorded in the better-protected areas, probably as a result of anthropogenic effects (poaching of cats and their prey). Competitive release from ocelots and jaguarundis may explain why the oncilla and the margay showed the opposite pattern. Morphologically similar species had the most contrasting activity patterns: the margay was exclusively nocturnal and the jaguarundi diurnal. The other species were cathemeral, but alternated their peaks of activity in relation to the relative order of their body weights. The contrasting temporal patterns observed and the ability of pumas and oncillas to adjust their activity patterns to local conditions may facilitate the coexistence of these cat species and explain the lack of character displacement in this assemblage.

  12. Serologic survey of brucellosis in captive neotropical wild carnivores in northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Filho, Edmilson F; Pinheiro, José W Junior; Souza, Marcília M A; Santana, Vânia L A; Silva, Jean C R; Mota, Rinaldo A; Sá, Fabricio B

    2012-06-01

    Abstract. This study reports the detection of antibodies against Brucella abortus and B. canis in wild neotropical carnivores kept in captivity in three zoos in northeastern Brazil. A total of 42 serum samples were examined, 17 from coatis (Nasua nasua), eight from crab-eating raccoons (Procyon cancrivorus), three from crab-eating foxes (Cerdocyon thous), three from hoary foxes (Lycalopex vetulus), two from little spotted cats (Leopardus tigrinus), five from tayras (Eira barbara), two from greater grisons (Galictis vittata), and two from neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis). The Rose-Bengal test and complement fixation test (CFT) were performed to detect anti-Brucella spp. antibodies, whereas the agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGID) was employed to detect anti-B. canis antibodies. The overall seroprevalence varied by species and by test; in addition, CFT and AGID seemed better able to detect antibodies against B. abortus and B. canis, respectively. This is the first study on the presence of anti-Brucella spp. antibodies in captive carnivores from Brazil, as well as the first report of antibodies to Brucella spp. in coatis, crab-eating raccoons, hoary foxes, little spotted cats, tayras, and greater grisons.

  13. Isolation and molecular characterization of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic degrading fungal isolates.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad Ishtiaq; Ahmed, Safia; Robson, Geoff; Javed, Imran; Ali, Naeem; Atiq, Naima; Hameed, Abdul

    2014-01-01

    The recalcitrant nature of polyvinyl chloride creates serious environmental concerns during manufacturing and waste disposal. The present study was aimed to isolate and screen different soil fungi having potential to biodegrade PVC films. After 10 months of soil burial experiment, it was observed that a number of fungal strains were flourishing on PVC films. On morphological as well as on 18rRNA gene sequence and phylogenetic basis they were identified as Phanerochaete chrysosporium PV1, Lentinus tigrinus PV2, Aspergillus niger PV3, and Aspergillus sydowii PV4. The biodegradation ability of these fungal isolates was further checked in shake flask experiments by taking thin films of PVC (C source) in mineral salt medium. A significant change in color and surface deterioration of PVC films was confirmed through visual observation and Scanning electron microscopy. During shake flask experiments, P. chrysosporium PV1 produced maximum biomass of about 2.57 mg ml(-1) followed by A. niger PV3. P. chrysosporium PV1 showed significant reduction (178,292 Da(-1)) in Molecular weight of the PVC film than control (200,000 Da(-1)) by gel permeation chromatography. Furthermore more Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance also revealed structural changes in the PVC. It was concluded that isolated fungal strains have significant potential for biodegradation of PVC plastics.

  14. Using detection dogs and genetic analyses of scat to expand knowledge and assist felid conservation in Misiones, Argentina.

    PubMed

    DeMatteo, Karen E; Rinas, Miguel A; Argüelles, Carina F; Holman, Bernardo E; Di Bitetti, Mario S; Davenport, Barbara; Parker, Patricia G; Eggert, Lori S

    2014-11-01

    Many carnivores require large ranges to meet their ecological and energetic needs; however, anthropogenic changes threaten species and their habitats. Camera traps have been used to effectively collect data on carnivores in a variety of habitat types; however, a single survey effort is typically limited to species that have similar body size, habitat use and movement patterns, and individual identification of animals is not always possible. We evaluated whether scat detection dogs could effectively survey for 4 wide-ranging felids that vary in these characteristics: jaguars (Panthera onca), pumas (Puma concolor), ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) and oncillas (Leopardus tigrinus). From June to October 2009 and May to August 2011, a detection dog-handler team detected 588 scats, from which 176 unique genotypes were detected. We assigned sex to 84.7% of the genotyped scats and identified 55 individuals multiple times. The effectiveness of these noninvasive techniques (detection dogs and genetic analyses of scat) not only opens the door for additional studies in areas that were previously difficult or impossible with standard survey techniques, but also provides conservationists with a set of tools that overcome some of the limitations associated with the use of camera traps alone.

  15. Medicinal and edible lignicolous fungi as natural sources of antioxidative and antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Karaman, M; Jovin, E; Malbasa, R; Matavuly, M; Popović, M

    2010-10-01

    The antioxidant activity of organic extracts of eight fungal species, Ganoderma lucidum, Ganoderma applanatum, Meripilus giganteus, Laetiporus sulphureus, Flammulina velutipes, Coriolus versicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus and Panus tigrinus, was evaluated for free radical (DPPH· and OH·) scavenging capacity and an effect on lipid peroxidation, and the antibacterial activity was tested by the agar well diffusion method. The highest DPPH· scavenging activity was found in the methanol extract of G. applanatum (12.5 μg/mL, 82.80%) and the chloroform extract of G. lucidum (510.2 μg/mL, 69.12%). The same extracts also showed the highest LP inhibition (91.83%, 85.09%) at 500 μg/mL, while the methanol extracts of G. applanatum and L. sulphureus showed the highest scavenging effect on OH· radicals (68.47%, 57.06%, respectively) at 400 μg/mL. A strong antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria was also manifested. The antioxidative potencies correlated generally with the total phenol content (0.19-9.98 mg/g). The HPLC determination showed that the majority of analysed species contained gallic and protocatechic acids. Consequently, these fungi are shown to be potential sources of antioxidative and antibacterial agents.

  16. Properties of Duvernoy's secretions from opisthoglyphous and aglyphous colubrid snakes.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, S A; Kardong, K V

    1994-10-01

    Relatively little attention has been given to the biological properties of Duvernoy's secretions produced by opisthoglyphous and some aglyphous colubrid snakes. A review is presented of literature pertaining to these secretions. Most detailed analyses of Duvernoy's secretions and their biological properties have been performed since the late 1970s. The dispholidines, Dispholidus typus and Thelotornis sp., and the natricines, Rhabdophis tigrinus and R. subminiata, have received the most attention due to the high toxicity of their secretions and their medical importance. These species produce secretions with variably strong prothrombin-activating activity, defibrinating activity, and hemorrhagic potential. Boigines, and natricines other than Rhabdophis, produce secretions of low to moderate toxicity and are variably hemorrhagic and proteolytic. Xenodontines and homalopsines similarly show hemorrhagic potential with low to moderate toxicity. Neurotoxic activity has been reported only from secretions of the boigines, Boiga blandingi and B. irregularis and the xenodontine, Heterodon platyrhinos. These species produce secretions containing postsynaptically acting components. Analyses of some of these secretions have shown that enzymes common to many ophidian venoms such as phospholipases A and L-amino acid oxidase are uncommon in the colubrid secretions studied. This may be due to few studies assaying for multiple enzyme activities and/or the unavailability of many secretion samples for study. Methods of secretion extraction, storage, and assay are discussed. Projected future research and the adaptive implications of Duvernoy's secretions are considered.

  17. Molecular detection of viral agents in free-ranging and captive neotropical felids in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Mariana M; Taniwaki, Sueli A; de Barros, Iracema N; Brandão, Paulo E; Catão-Dias, José L; Cavalcanti, Sandra; Cullen, Laury; Filoni, Claudia; Jácomo, Anah T de Almeida; Jorge, Rodrigo S P; Silva, Nairléia Dos Santos; Silveira, Leandro; Ferreira Neto, José S

    2017-09-01

    We describe molecular testing for felid alphaherpesvirus 1 (FHV-1), carnivore protoparvovirus 1 (CPPV-1), feline calicivirus (FCV), alphacoronavirus 1 (feline coronavirus [FCoV]), feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and canine distemper virus (CDV) in whole blood samples of 109 free-ranging and 68 captive neotropical felids from Brazil. Samples from 2 jaguars ( Panthera onca) and 1 oncilla ( Leopardus tigrinus) were positive for FHV-1; 2 jaguars, 1 puma ( Puma concolor), and 1 jaguarundi ( Herpairulus yagouaroundi) tested positive for CPPV-1; and 1 puma was positive for FIV. Based on comparison of 103 nucleotides of the UL24-UL25 gene, the FHV-1 sequences were 99-100% similar to the FHV-1 strain of domestic cats. Nucleotide sequences of CPPV-1 were closely related to sequences detected in other wild carnivores, comparing 294 nucleotides of the VP1 gene. The FIV nucleotide sequence detected in the free-ranging puma, based on comparison of 444 nucleotides of the pol gene, grouped with other lentiviruses described in pumas, and had 82.4% identity with a free-ranging puma from Yellowstone Park and 79.5% with a captive puma from Brazil. Our data document the circulation of FHV-1, CPPV-1, and FIV in neotropical felids in Brazil.

  18. Stable carbon isotope values document how a Late Holocene expansion in grasslands impacted vertebrates in northwestern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, B. E.; Samonds, K.

    2012-12-01

    Madagascar is home to some of the world's most distinctive plants and animals. Unfortunately, forest loss and habitat degradation has had a dramatic impact on both floral and faunal communities. Here we use carbon isotope values in radiocarbon-dated bones to examine how the vertebrate community at Anjohibe Cave, northwestern Madagascar, responded to a Late Holocene increase in C4 grass abundance. Our data demonstrate that major changes in the vegetation and animal community are recent phenomena at Anjohibe. Extinct lemurs and hippopotamuses were present until ca. 1500 years ago. These taxa relied exclusively on C3 resources. Locally extirpated fauna were present until 300 years ago. The majority of these species also relied on C3 resources. Their presence strongly suggests that the region surrounding the cave was more wooded than it is now, possibly as recently as 300 years ago. All introduced individuals are modern. Rats (Rattus sp.), shrews (Suncus murinus), and the giant frog Hoplobatrachus cf. tigrinus, have remarkably high carbon isotope values, implicating substantial ingestion of C4 foods. It is possible that grass abundance has increased dramatically in the past 100 years. Alternatively, opportunistically granivorous rats and shrews may selectively consume seeds from C4 grasses. In agreement with previous studies, stable isotope data reveal details of vegetation and faunal turnover in Northwestern Madagascar. Grasses have increased, forest dwelling species have vanished, and introduced taxa are exploiting a novel niche.

  19. Comparative assessment of bioremediation approaches to highly recalcitrant PAH degradation in a real industrial polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Lladó, S; Covino, S; Solanas, A M; Viñas, M; Petruccioli, M; D'annibale, A

    2013-03-15

    High recalcitrant characteristics and low bioavailability rates due to aging processes can hinder high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs) bioremediation in real industrial polluted soils. With the aim of reducing the residual fraction of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and (HMW-PAHs) in creosote-contaminated soil remaining after a 180-d treatment in a pilot-scale biopile, either biostimulation (BS) of indigenous microbial populations with a lignocellulosic substrate (LS) or fungal bioaugmentation with two strains of white-rot fungi (WRF) (i.e., Trametes versicolor and Lentinus tigrinus) were comparatively tested. The impact of bivalent manganese ions and two mobilizing agents (MAs) (i.e., Soybean Oil and Brij 30) on the degradation performances of biostimulated and bioaugmented microcosms was also compared. The results reveal soil colonization by both WRF strains was clearly hampered by an active native soil microbiota. In fact, a proper enhancement of native microbiota by means of LS amendment promoted the highest biodegradation of HMW-PAHs, even of those with five aromatic rings after 60 days of treatment, but HMW-PAH-degrading bacteria were specifically inhibited when non-ionic surfactant Brij 30 was amended. Effects of bioaugmentation and other additives such as non-ionic surfactants on the degrading capability of autochthonous soil microbiota should be evaluated in polluted soils before scaling up the remediation process at field scale.

  20. Genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii from Brazilian wildlife revealed abundant new genotypes.

    PubMed

    Vitaliano, S N; Soares, H S; Minervino, A H H; Santos, A L Q; Werther, K; Marvulo, M F V; Siqueira, D B; Pena, H F J; Soares, R M; Su, C; Gennari, S M

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to isolate and genotype T. gondii from Brazilian wildlife. For this purpose, 226 samples were submitted to mice bioassay and screened by PCR based on 18S rRNA sequences. A total of 15 T. gondii isolates were obtained, including samples from four armadillos (three Dasypus novemcinctus, one Euphractus sexcinctus), three collared anteaters (Tamandua tetradactyla), three whited-lipped peccaries (Tayassu pecari), one spotted paca (Cuniculus paca), one oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus), one hoary fox (Pseudalopex vetulus), one lineated woodpecker (Dryocopus lineatus) and one maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus). DNA from the isolates, originated from mice bioassay, and from the tissues of the wild animal, designated as "primary samples", were genotyped by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR/RFLP), using 12 genetic markers (SAG1, SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L258, PK1, CS3 and Apico). A total of 17 genotypes were identified, with 13 identified for the first time and four already reported in published literature. Results herein obtained corroborate previous studies in Brazil, confirming high diversity and revealing unique genotypes in this region. Given most of genotypes here identified are different from previous studies in domestic animals, future studies on T. gondii from wildlife is of interest to understand population genetics and structure of this parasite.

  1. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in captive mammals in three zoos in Mexico City, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Gayosso-Dominguez, Edgar Arturo; Villena, Isabelle; Dubey, J P

    2013-09-01

    Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii were determined in 167 mammals in three zoos in Mexico City, Mexico, using the modified agglutination test (MAT). Overall, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 89 (53.3%) of the 167 animals tested. Antibodies were found in 35 of 43 wild Felidae: 2 of 2 bobcats (Lynx rufus); 4 of 4 cougars (Puma concolor); 10 of 13 jaguars (Panthera onca); 5 of 5 leopards (Panthera pardus); 7 of 7 lions (Panthera leo); 2 of 3 tigers (Panthera tigris); 2 of 3 ocelots (Leopardus pardalis); 2 of 2 Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris sumatrae); lof 2 Jaguarundi (Herpailurus jagouaroundi); but not in 0 of 2 oncillas (Leopardus tigrinus). Such high seroprevalence in wild felids is of public health significance because of the potential of oocyst shedding. Four of 6 New World primates (2 of 2 Geoffroy's spider monkeys [Ateles geoffroyi], 1 of 3 Patas monkeys [Erythrocebus patas], and 1 of 1 white-headed capuchin [Cebus capucinus]) had high MAT titers of 3,200, suggesting recently acquired infection; these animals are highly susceptible to clinical toxoplasmosis. However, none of these animals were ill. Seropositivity to T. gondii was found for the first time in a number of species.

  2. Natural infection by endoparasites among free-living wild animals.

    PubMed

    Holsback, Luciane; Cardoso, Mauro José Lahm; Fagnani, Rafael; Patelli, Thaís Helena Constantino

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the frequency of occurrence and variety of intestinal parasites among free-living wild animals. Fecal samples from wild mammals and birds at rehabilitation centers in the states of Mato Grosso do Sul and São Paulo were analyzed by sedimentation and flotation-centrifugation methods. Parasite eggs, oocysts, cysts and/or trophozoites were found in 71% of the samples. Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts were detected in fecal samples from oncillas (Leopardus tigrinus) and scaly-headed parrots (Pionus maximiliani). Giardia cysts were identified in the feces of a gray brocket (Mazama gouazoubira). Among the most common parasites found, there were eggs from Toxocara cati, Toxascaris leonina and Ancylostoma tubaeforme, and from Cestoda. Several Enterobius sp. eggs were found in the feces of red howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus). It can be concluded from this study that despite the small number of samples, the diversity of parasites found was noteworthy. Additional information about parasite endofauna in wild animals is needed, since their presence might suggest that there could be proximity to and interactions with domestic animals and/or humans. In addition, further studies on parasites from free-living wild animals are of prime importance for understanding the intensity of anthropic changes in wild environments.

  3. Wolbachia Occurrence in Planthopper (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) Vectors of Cereal Viruses in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Mattio, M F; Argüello Caro, E B; Rodriguero, M S; Dumón, A D; Alemandri, V M; Truol, G

    2015-08-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) are the most important cereal crops for the Argentinean economy and are affected by several diseases. Different planthopper species transmit causal agents of some of those diseases, including Mal de Río Cuarto virus, barley yellow striate mosaic virus, and the recently proposed maize yellow striate virus. Many planthopper species are sap feeders and therefore are expected to host bacteria providing essential nutrients lacking in the diet. Previous studies have evidenced that some of these bacterial symbionts are involved in the virus transmission. Wolbachia is a group of obligate intracellular bacteria infecting numerous arthropod species and causing reproductive alterations in their hosts. These bacteria have been detected in planthopper species, considered rice pests in various regions of the world. To date, Wolbachia infection status of planthopper species of Argentina is unknown. Amplification by PCR and sequencing of 16S rDNA, wsp- and ftsZ-specific genes demonstrated Wolbachia infection in Caenodelphax teapae (Fowler), Delphacodes kuscheli Fennah, Pyrophagus tigrinus Remes Lenicov & Varela, Tagosodes orizicolus (Muir), and Toya propinqua (Fieber). This is the first report of Wolbachia in delphacid vectors of viruses affecting maize and wheat. An understanding of the bacterial diversity harbored by these insect vectors could lead to new options for future management of diseases of economically important crops in a developing country. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Intraguild predation may reinforce a species-environment gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacNeil, Calum; Dick, Jaimie T. A.

    2012-05-01

    Species-environment gradients are ubiquitous in nature, with studies often partially explaining the replacement of species along such gradients by autecological factors such as differential physiological tolerances. However, lacking direct evidence, the majority of studies only infer some form of inter-specific interaction, often competition, as reinforcing these gradients. There is usually the further implication that environmental factors mediate asymmetries in the interaction. Recognising the lack of explicit experimental considerations of how key inter-specific interactions are modified by the environment, we chose a study system where we were able to bring the species in question into the laboratory and conduct experiments to test hypotheses about gradient-induced asymmetries in an inter-specific interaction. To this end, we tested the hypothesis that a species-salinity gradient may be reinforced by changes in the asymmetry of intraguild predation between two species of amphipod crustaceans with wide salinity tolerances. River and estuary surveys showed that Gammarus duebeni and Gammarus zaddachi have overlapping distributions, with both surviving and reproducing in salinities ranging from freshwater to fully marine. However, the former species is relatively more abundant in low salinities and the latter in higher salinities. In the laboratory, survival of both species was high in all salinities and cannibalism occurred at low frequencies. However, intraguild predation by males on moulted females was asymmetric in favour of G. duebeni at low salinities, this asymmetry completely reversing to favour G. zaddachi at higher salinities. Thus, we provide evidence that this species-environment gradient occurs due to overlapping physiological tolerances and salinity-driven shifts in the asymmetry of a key inter-specific interaction, intraguild predation.

  5. Predicting invasive species impacts: a community module functional response approach reveals context dependencies.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Rachel A; Dick, Jaimie T A; Pritchard, Daniel W; Ennis, Marilyn; Hatcher, Melanie J; Dunn, Alison M

    2015-03-01

    Predatory functional responses play integral roles in predator-prey dynamics, and their assessment promises greater understanding and prediction of the predatory impacts of invasive species. Other interspecific interactions, however, such as parasitism and higher-order predation, have the potential to modify predator-prey interactions and thus the predictive capability of the comparative functional response approach. We used a four-species community module (higher-order predator; focal native or invasive predators; parasites of focal predators; native prey) to compare the predatory functional responses of native Gammarus duebeni celticus and invasive Gammarus pulex amphipods towards three invertebrate prey species (Asellus aquaticus, Simulium spp., Baetis rhodani), thus, quantifying the context dependencies of parasitism and a higher-order fish predator on these functional responses. Our functional response experiments demonstrated that the invasive amphipod had a higher predatory impact (lower handling time) on two of three prey species, which reflects patterns of impact observed in the field. The community module also revealed that parasitism had context-dependent influences, for one prey species, with the potential to further reduce the predatory impact of the invasive amphipod or increase the predatory impact of the native amphipod in the presence of a higher-order fish predator. Partial consumption of prey was similar for both predators and occurred increasingly in the order A. aquaticus, Simulium spp. and B. rhodani. This was associated with increasing prey densities, but showed no context dependencies with parasitism or higher-order fish predator. This study supports the applicability of comparative functional responses as a tool to predict and assess invasive species impacts incorporating multiple context dependencies.

  6. Native and Non-Native Plants Provide Similar Refuge to Invertebrate Prey, but Less than Artificial Plants

    PubMed Central

    Grutters, Bart M. C.; Pollux, Bart J. A.; Verberk, Wilco C. E. P.; Bakker, Elisabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    Non-native species introductions are widespread and can affect ecosystem functioning by altering the structure of food webs. Invading plants often modify habitat structure, which may affect the suitability of vegetation as refuge and could thus impact predator-prey dynamics. Yet little is known about how the replacement of native by non-native vegetation affects predator-prey dynamics. We hypothesize that plant refuge provisioning depends on (1) the plant’s native status, (2) plant structural complexity and morphology, (3) predator identity, and (4) prey identity, as well as that (5) structurally similar living and artificial plants provide similar refuge. We used aquatic communities as a model system and compared the refuge provided by plants to macroinvertebrates (Daphnia pulex, Gammarus pulex and damselfly larvae) in three short-term laboratory predation experiments. Plant refuge provisioning differed between plant species, but was generally similar for native (Myriophyllum spicatum, Ceratophyllum demersum, Potamogeton perfoliatus) and non-native plants (Vallisneria spiralis, Myriophyllum heterophyllum, Cabomba caroliniana). However, plant refuge provisioning to macroinvertebrate prey depended primarily on predator (mirror carp: Cyprinus carpio carpio and dragonfly larvae: Anax imperator) and prey identity, while the effects of plant structural complexity were only minor. Contrary to living plants, artificial plant analogues did improve prey survival, particularly with increasing structural complexity and shoot density. As such, plant rigidity, which was high for artificial plants and one of the living plant species evaluated in this study (Ceratophyllum demersum), may interact with structural complexity to play a key role in refuge provisioning to specific prey (Gammarus pulex). Our results demonstrate that replacement of native by structurally similar non-native vegetation is unlikely to greatly affect predator-prey dynamics. We propose that modification of

  7. Dietary habits of invasive Ponto-Caspian gobies in the Croatian part of the Danube River basin and their potential impact on benthic fish communities.

    PubMed

    Piria, Marina; Jakšić, Goran; Jakovlić, Ivan; Treer, Tomislav

    2016-01-01

    Invasive Ponto-Caspian (P-C(1)) gobies have recently caused dramatic changes in fish assemblage structures throughout the Danube basin. While their presence in the Croatian part of the basin has been noted and distribution studied, their dietary habits and impacts on native fish communities have, until now, been unknown. In 2011, 17 locations in the Sava River Basin were sampled for fish and 15 for benthic invertebrates. Fish population monitoring data, available for nine seasons (2003-2006 and 2010-2014) and 12 locations, were used to analyse the impacts of P-C gobies on benthic fish abundance. Gut content analysis indicates that the monkey goby Neogobius fluviatilis diet is very diverse, but dominated by Trichoptera, Chironomidae, Bivalvia and Odonata. The diet overlaps considerably with the round goby Neogobius melanostomus diet, although Gastropoda are dominant in the latter's diet. Small fish and Gammarus sp. dominate the bighead goby Ponticola kessleri diet. Comparison of gut content with the prey available in the environment indicates that monkey and round gobies exhibit preference for Trichoptera, Megaloptera and Coleoptera, and bighead goby for Trichoptera, Gammarus sp. and Pisces. P-C gobies in the Sava River are spreading upstream, towards the reaches with lower fish diversity. Analyses indicate potentially positive impacts of P-C gobies' presence on some fish populations: round and bighead goby on Balkan golden loach Sabanejewia balcanica and monkey goby on common carp Cyprinus carpio, crucian carp Carassius carassius, burbot Lota lota and Balkan loach Cobitis elongata. However, there are also indications that bighead and round goby could adversely impact the native chub Squalius cephalus and zingel Zingel zingel populations, respectively. As P-C gobies are still in the expansionary period of invasion and the ecosystem still adapting to new circumstances, continued monitoring of fish population dynamics in the Sava basin is needed to determine the

  8. Predicting invasive species impacts: a community module functional response approach reveals context dependencies

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Rachel A; Dick, Jaimie T A; Pritchard, Daniel W; Ennis, Marilyn; Hatcher, Melanie J; Dunn, Alison M

    2015-01-01

    Summary Predatory functional responses play integral roles in predator–prey dynamics, and their assessment promises greater understanding and prediction of the predatory impacts of invasive species. Other interspecific interactions, however, such as parasitism and higher-order predation, have the potential to modify predator–prey interactions and thus the predictive capability of the comparative functional response approach. We used a four-species community module (higher-order predator; focal native or invasive predators; parasites of focal predators; native prey) to compare the predatory functional responses of native Gammarus duebeni celticus and invasive Gammarus pulex amphipods towards three invertebrate prey species (Asellus aquaticus, Simulium spp., Baetis rhodani), thus, quantifying the context dependencies of parasitism and a higher-order fish predator on these functional responses. Our functional response experiments demonstrated that the invasive amphipod had a higher predatory impact (lower handling time) on two of three prey species, which reflects patterns of impact observed in the field. The community module also revealed that parasitism had context-dependent influences, for one prey species, with the potential to further reduce the predatory impact of the invasive amphipod or increase the predatory impact of the native amphipod in the presence of a higher-order fish predator. Partial consumption of prey was similar for both predators and occurred increasingly in the order A. aquaticus, Simulium spp. and B. rhodani. This was associated with increasing prey densities, but showed no context dependencies with parasitism or higher-order fish predator. This study supports the applicability of comparative functional responses as a tool to predict and assess invasive species impacts incorporating multiple context dependencies. PMID:25265905

  9. Size at the onset of maturity (SOM) revealed in length-weight relationships of brackish amphipods and isopods: An information theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Emanuela; Mancinelli, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    In amphipods and other small-sized crustaceans, allometric relationships are conventionally analysed by fitting the standard model Y = a·Xb (X and Y are, e.g., body length and weight, respectively) whose scaling exponent b is assumed to be constant. However, breakpoints in allometric relationships have long been documented in large-sized crustaceans, ultimately determined by ontogenetic, abrupt variations in the value of b. Here, the existence of breakpoints in length-weight relationships was investigated in four amphipod (i.e., Gammarus aequicauda, Gammarus insensibilis, Microdeutopus gryllotalpa, and Dexamine spinosa) and three isopod species (i.e., Lekanesphaera hookeri, Sphaeroma serratum, and Cymodoce truncata) from three Mediterranean lagoons. The power of two candidate linear models fitted to log10-transformed data - a simple model assuming a constant exponent b and a segmented model assuming b to vary after a breakpoint - was compared using a parsimonious selection strategy based on the Akaike information criterion. The segmented model with a breakpoint provided the most accurate fitting of length-weight data in the majority of the species analysed; non-conclusive results were obtained only for D. spinosa and C. truncata, of which a limited number of specimens was examined. Model parameters were consistent for amphipod and isopod species collected across the three different habitats; the generality of the results was further supported by a literature search confirming that the identified breakpoints corresponded with ontogenetic discontinuities related with sexual maturation in all the species investigated. In this study, segmented regression models were revealed to provide a statistically accurate and biologically meaningful description of length-weight relationships of common amphipod and isopod species. The methodological limitations of the approach are considered, while the practical implications for secondary production estimates are discussed.

  10. Chronic toxicity of nickel-spiked freshwater sediments: variation in toxicity among eight invertebrate taxa and eight sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, John M.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Ivey, Chris D.; Kunz, James L.; Kemble, Nile E.; Schlekat, Christian E.; Garman, Emily R.

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the chronic toxicity of Ni-spiked freshwater sediments to benthic invertebrates. A 2-step spiking procedure (spiking and sediment dilution) and a 2-stage equilibration period (10 wk anaerobic and 1 wk aerobic) were used to spike 8 freshwater sediments with wide ranges of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS; 0.94–38 µmol/g) and total organic carbon (TOC; 0.42–10%). Chronic sediment toxicity tests were conducted with 8 invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Gammarus pseudolimnaeus, Chironomus riparius, Chironomus dilutus, Hexagenia sp., Lumbriculus variegatus, Tubifex tubifex, and Lampsilis siliquoidea) in 2 spiked sediments. Nickel toxicity thresholds estimated from species-sensitivity distributions were 97 µg/g and 752 µg/g (total recoverable Ni; dry wt basis) for sediments with low and high concentrations of AVS and TOC, respectively. Sensitive species were tested with 6 additional sediments. The 20% effect concentrations (EC20s) for Hyalella and Gammarus, but not Hexagenia, were consistent with US Environmental Protection Agency benchmarks based on Ni in porewater and in simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) normalized to AVS and TOC. For Hexagenia, sediment EC20s increased at less than an equimolar basis with increased AVS, and toxicity occurred in several sediments with Ni concentrations in SEM less than AVS. The authors hypothesize that circulation of oxygenated water by Hexagenia led to oxidation of AVS in burrows, creating microenvironments with high Ni exposure. Despite these unexpected results, a strong relationship between Hexagenia EC20s and AVS could provide a basis for conservative site-specific sediment quality guidelines for Ni.

  11. Diets of Lesser Scaup during spring migration throughout the upper-Midwest are consistent with the spring condition hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anteau, M.J.; Afton, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    The spring condition hypothesis (SCH) states that the current decline of the North American scaup population (Lesser [Aythya affinis] and Greater Scaup [A. marila] combined) is due to a decline in quality or availability of scaup foods on wintering, spring migration, or breeding areas that has caused a reduction in female body condition and subsequent reproductive success. Our previous research indicated that forage quality in diets of Lesser Scaup (hereafter scaup) at two sites in Northwestern Minnesota was lower in springs 2000-2001 than that reported for springs 1986-1988, consistent with the SCH. Accordingly, we further tested the SCH at a landscape scale, by comparing amounts of amphipods in diets (index of forage quality) of scaup (N = 263) collected in springs 2003-2005 from seven eco-physiographic regions in Iowa, Minnesota, and North Dakota in relation to data from Northwestern Minnesota during springs 2000-2001. We found that aggregate percentages of Gammarus lacustris and Hyalella azteca (amphipods) in scaup diets during springs 2000-2001 in Northwest Minnesota were similar to those in the Iowa Prairie Pothole, Minnesota Morainal, Minnesota Glaciated Plains, Red River Valley, and Northwestern Minnesota in springs 2003-2005; however, scaup consumed relatively higher aggregate percentages of Gammarus lacustris and Hyalella azteca in North Dakota Missouri Coteau and North Dakota Glaciated Plains. Females in Iowa were over three times less likely to have consumed food than those in North Dakota, despite previous research indicating similar foraging rates among these regions. Mean mass of scaup diet samples throughout the upper-Midwest were 77 mg (49%) and 87 mg (52%) lower than those of historical studies in Minnesota and Manitoba, respectively. We conclude that there has been a decrease in forage quality for scaup in Iowa and Minnesota and a decrease in the amount of forage consumed throughout the upper-Midwest, consistent with the SCH.

  12. To bite, or not to bite? A quantitative comparison of foraging strategies among three brackish crustaceans feeding on leaf litters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancinelli, Giorgio

    2012-09-01

    A computerized image analysis technique was implemented to evaluate the damage done to leaf litters by macrophagous crustaceans characterized by different feeding strategies. In addition, a foraging strategy index (FSI) was tested to provide a quantitative estimation of both inter- and intra-specific, density-dependent changes in feeding strategies. Laboratory trials were run with the isopods Idotea baltica and Lekanesphaera hookeri and the amphipod Gammarus aequicauda. The effect of their feeding activities was tested on decaying leaves of Cymodocea nodosa and Phragmites australis. In addition, tests were run using three different abundances of each species to assess the occurrence of density-dependent shifts in feeding strategies. Independently from the leaf litter type, opposite foraging strategies characterized the isopods. Idotea baltica shredded the leaf blade heavily, whereas L. hookeri scraped the leaf surface removing the epidermis. Qualitative observations corresponded to consistent variations in FSI values, with Idotea showing the lowest and Lekanesphaera the highest FSI values. Leaves consumed by G. aequicauda, conversely, were characterized by both shredding and scraping damages, corresponding to intermediate FSI values compared to those measured for the isopods. Furthermore, negligible density-dependent changes in FSI values occurred for both isopods; Gammarus, in contrast, showed a significant shift in trophic strategies, with FSI values close to that observed for Lekanesphaera at high densities and to Idotea at low densities of conspecifics, respectively. The methodology and the FSI index herein presented provided an effective, quantitative assessment of species-specific differences in the feeding strategy of three ubiquitous components of Mediterranean detritivorous epifauna, for which only qualitative, phenomenological descriptions have been to date provided.

  13. Combined effects of drought and the fungicide tebuconazole on aquatic leaf litter decomposition.

    PubMed

    Pesce, Stéphane; Zoghlami, Olfa; Margoum, Christelle; Artigas, Joan; Chaumot, Arnaud; Foulquier, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    Loss of biodiversity and altered ecosystem functioning are driven by the cumulative effects of multiple natural and anthropogenic stressors affecting both quantity and quality of water resources. Here we performed a 40-day laboratory microcosm experiment to assess the individual and combined effects of drought and the model fungicide tebuconazole (TBZ) on leaf litter decomposition (LLD), a fundamental biogeochemical process in freshwater ecosystems. Starting out from a worst-case scenario perspective, leaf-associated microbial communities were exposed to severe drought conditions (four 5-day drought periods alternated with 4-day immersion periods) and/or a chronic exposure to TBZ (nominal concentration of 20μgL(-1)). We assessed the direct effects of drought and fungicide on the structure (biomass, diversity) and activity (extracellular enzymatic potential) of fungal and bacterial assemblages colonizing leaves. We also investigated indirect effects on the feeding rates of the amphipod Gammarus fossarum on leaves previously exposed to drought and/or TBZ contamination. Results indicate a stronger effect of drought stress than fungicide contamination under the experimental conditions applied. Indeed, the drought stress strongly impacted microbial community structure and activities, inhibiting the LLD process and leading to cascading effects on macroinvertebrate feeding. However, despite the lack of significant effect of TBZ applied alone, the effects of drought on microbial functions (i.e., decrease in LLD and in enzymatic activities) and on Gammarus feeding rates were more pronounced when drought and TBZ stresses were applied together. In a perspective of ecological risk assessment and ecosystem management for sustainability, these findings stress the need for deeper insight into how multiple stressors can affect the functioning of aquatic ecosystems and associated services.

  14. Changes in calcareous nannofossil assemblages during the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum in the central-western Tethys (Alano section, NE Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toffanin, Federica; Agnini, Claudia; Fornaciari, Eliana; Rio, Domenico; Giusberti, Luca; Luciani, Valeria; Spofforth, David J. A.; Palike, Heiko

    2010-05-01

    This study is focused on an oxygen and carbon isotope perturbation referred to as Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum. This event occurred at Chron C18r-C18n transition (ca. 40 Ma) lasting some 400-600 kyr and is interpreted as a significant temporary reversal in the middle-late Eocene long-term cooling trend (Bohaty and Zachos, 2003, Bohaty et al., 2009, Jovane et al., 2007, Sexton et al. 2006, Wade and Kroon, 2002). Our main goal is the shaping of the calcareous nannofossil assemblage before, during and after this transient episode of global warming. In fact, there is a general consensus that some nannofossil taxa are characterized by specific paleoecological affinities and thus would be utilized for palenviromental reconstructions. A high resolution sampling for micropaleontological analysis has been performed in Alano on-land section, located in NE Italy (Agnini et al., in press). Semi-quantitative and quantitative analyses on calcareous nannofossil assemblages have been carried out. Preliminary data show that the MECO interval seems to coincide with a significant shift in the relative abundance of calcareous nannofossil taxa, suggesting an intriguing relationship between biotic and abiotic signal (Spofforth et al., in press, Luciani et al, submitted). In particular, eutrophic/cold taxa, as for instance the reticulofenestrids, Cyclicargolithus and Coccolithus, increase in abundance during this warming phase, whereas oligotrophic/warm taxa, Sphenolithus and Zyghrablithus, decrease significantly showing peculiar anticovariant trends with respect to meso-eutrophic taxa. A marked increase in reworked, mainly Cretaceous, specimens is also observed during the MECO. The increase in eutrophic/cold taxa coupled with the decrease of oligotrophic/warm taxa is consistent with a transient enrichment in dissolved nutrients in warmer sea surface waters and suggests that enhanced nutrient availability could drive the make-up of the calcareous nannofossil assemblage. The increase in

  15. 2012 best practices for repositories collection, storage, retrieval, and distribution of biological materials for research international society for biological and environmental repositories.

    PubMed

    2012-04-01

    Third Edition [Formula: see text] [Box: see text] Printed with permission from the International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories (ISBER) © 2011 ISBER All Rights Reserved Editor-in-Chief Lori D. Campbell, PhD Associate Editors Fay Betsou, PhD Debra Leiolani Garcia, MPA Judith G. Giri, PhD Karen E. Pitt, PhD Rebecca S. Pugh, MS Katherine C. Sexton, MBA Amy P.N. Skubitz, PhD Stella B. Somiari, PhD Individual Contributors to the Third Edition Jonas Astrin, Susan Baker, Thomas J. Barr, Erica Benson, Mark Cada, Lori Campbell, Antonio Hugo Jose Froes Marques Campos, David Carpentieri, Omoshile Clement, Domenico Coppola, Yvonne De Souza, Paul Fearn, Kelly Feil, Debra Garcia, Judith Giri, William E. Grizzle, Kathleen Groover, Keith Harding, Edward Kaercher, Joseph Kessler, Sarah Loud, Hannah Maynor, Kevin McCluskey, Kevin Meagher, Cheryl Michels, Lisa Miranda, Judy Muller-Cohn, Rolf Muller, James O'Sullivan, Karen Pitt, Rebecca Pugh, Rivka Ravid, Katherine Sexton, Ricardo Luis A. Silva, Frank Simione, Amy Skubitz, Stella Somiari, Frans van der Horst, Gavin Welch, Andy Zaayenga 2012 Best Practices for Repositories: Collection, Storage, Retrieval and Distribution of Biological Materials for Research INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL REPOSITORIES (ISBER) INTRODUCTION T he availability of high quality biological and environmental specimens for research purposes requires the development of standardized methods for collection, long-term storage, retrieval and distribution of specimens that will enable their future use. Sharing successful strategies for accomplishing this goal is one of the driving forces for the International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories (ISBER). For more information about ISBER see www.isber.org . ISBER's Best Practices for Repositories (Best Practices) reflect the collective experience of its members and has received broad input from other repository professionals. Throughout this document

  16. Section Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groep, D. L.; Bonacorsi, D.

    2014-06-01

    1. Data Acquisition, Trigger and Controls Niko NeufeldCERNniko.neufeld@cern.ch Tassos BeliasDemokritosbelias@inp.demokritos.gr Andrew NormanFNALanorman@fnal.gov Vivian O'DellFNALodell@fnal.gov 2. Event Processing, Simulation and Analysis Rolf SeusterTRIUMFseuster@cern.ch Florian UhligGSIf.uhlig@gsi.de Lorenzo MonetaCERNLorenzo.Moneta@cern.ch Pete ElmerPrincetonpeter.elmer@cern.ch 3. Distributed Processing and Data Handling Nurcan OzturkU Texas Arlingtonnurcan@uta.edu Stefan RoiserCERNstefan.roiser@cern.ch Robert IllingworthFNAL Davide SalomoniINFN CNAFDavide.Salomoni@cnaf.infn.it Jeff TemplonNikheftemplon@nikhef.nl 4. Data Stores, Data Bases, and Storage Systems David LangeLLNLlange6@llnl.gov Wahid BhimjiU Edinburghwbhimji@staffmail.ed.ac.uk Dario BarberisGenovaDario.Barberis@cern.ch Patrick FuhrmannDESYpatrick.fuhrmann@desy.de Igor MandrichenkoFNALivm@fnal.gov Mark van de SandenSURF SARA sanden@sara.nl 5. Software Engineering, Parallelism & Multi-Core Solveig AlbrandLPSC/IN2P3solveig.albrand@lpsc.in2p3.fr Francesco GiacominiINFN CNAFfrancesco.giacomini@cnaf.infn.it Liz SextonFNALsexton@fnal.gov Benedikt HegnerCERNbenedikt.hegner@cern.ch Simon PattonLBNLSJPatton@lbl.gov Jim KowalkowskiFNAL jbk@fnal.gov 6. Facilities, Infrastructures, Networking and Collaborative Tools Maria GironeCERNMaria.Girone@cern.ch Ian CollierSTFC RALian.collier@stfc.ac.uk Burt HolzmanFNALburt@fnal.gov Brian Bockelman U Nebraskabbockelm@cse.unl.edu Alessandro de SalvoRoma 1Alessandro.DeSalvo@ROMA1.INFN.IT Helge MeinhardCERN Helge.Meinhard@cern.ch Ray PasetesFNAL rayp@fnal.gov Steven GoldfarbU Michigan Steven.Goldfarb@cern.ch

  17. Preliminary hydrogeologic framework of the Silurian and Devonian carbonate aquifer system in the Midwestern Basins and Arches Region of Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, and Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, G.D. )

    1992-01-01

    The aquifer and confining units have been identified; data on the thickness, extent, and structural configuration of these units have been collected; and thickness and structure-contour maps have been generated. Hydrologic information for the confining units and the aquifer also has been compiled. Where present, the confining unit that caps the carbonate aquifer consists of shales of Middle and Upper Devonian age and Lower Mississippian age, however, these units have been eroded from a large part of the study area. The regional carbonate aquifer consists of Silurian and Devonian limestones and dolomites. The rocks that comprise the aquifer in Indiana and northwestern Illinois are grouped into four major stratigraphic units: Brassfield and Sexton Creek Limestones or the Cataract Formation, the Salamonie Dolomite, the Salina Group, and the Detroit River and Traverse Formations or the Muscatatuck Group. In Ohio and southern Michigan the aquifer is grouped into ten stratigraphic units: Brassfield Limestone and Cataract Formation, the Dayton Limestone, the Rochester Shale equivalent, the Lockport Dolomite, the Salina Formation, the Hillsboro Sandstone, the Detroit River Group, the Columbus Limestone, the Delaware Limestone, and the Traverse Formation. The thickness of the carbonate aquifer increases from the contact with the outcropping Ordovician shales in the south-central part of the study area from the contact into the Appalachian Foreland Structural Basin from 0 ft at the contact to more than 700 ft at the eastern boundary of the study area, to more than 1,000 ft beneath Lake Erie and greater than 1,200 ft in southeastern Michigan. At the edge of the Michigan Intercontinental Structural Basin in western Ohio and eastern Indiana, the thickness ranges from 700 to 900 ft. and from 200 ft to 300 ft in south-central Indiana along the northeastern edge of the Illinois Intercontinental Structural Basin.

  18. Motorcycle accidents, rider behaviour, and psychological models.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Türker; Lajunen, Timo; Doğruyol, Burak; Yıldırım, Zümrüt; Çoymak, Ahmet

    2012-11-01

    The aims of the present study were to: (a) investigate the factor structure of the Motorcycle Rider Behaviour Questionnaire (MRBQ) [Elliott, M.A., Baughan, B.J., Sexton, B.F., 2007. Errors and violations in relation to motorcyclists' crash risk. Accident Analysis and Prevention 39, 491-499] in among Turkish riders, and (b) study the relationships between different types of rider behaviour and motorcyclists' active and passive accidents and offences, and (c) investigate the usefulness of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), Health Belief Model (HBM), and Locus of Control (T-LOC) in explaining rider behaviours. MRBQ was administered to a sample of motorcyclists (N=451). Principal components analysis yielded a 5-factor solution including traffic errors, control errors, speed violations, performance of stunts, and use of safety equipment. Annual mileage was related to higher number of active and passive accidents and offences whereas age was related to lower number of active and passive accidents. Stunts were the main predictors of active accidents and offences. Speeding violations predicted offences. Stunts and speeding violations were associated with the fate factor of the T-LOC, and with attitudes, subjective norms, and intention components of TPB, and cues to action and perceived severity components of the HBM. Use of safety equipment was related to the high level of perceived behavioural control and intention components of the TPB, the low score of perceived barriers component of the HBM, and the low fate factor of the T-LOC. While traffic errors were associated with the high score of perceived barriers and cues to action component of the HBM, control errors were related to the high score of vehicle and environment factor of the T-LOC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The biology and ecology of Necrodes littoralis, a species of forensic interest in Europe.

    PubMed

    Charabidze, Damien; Vincent, Benoît; Pasquerault, Thierry; Hedouin, Valéry

    2016-01-01

    Necrodes littoralis (Linnaeus, 1758) (Coleoptera: Silphidae), also known as the "shore sexton beetle," is a common silphid beetle that visits and breeds on large vertebrate cadavers. This study describes, for the first time, the involvement of N. littoralis on human corpses based on a large dataset of 154 French forensic cases. Various parameters regarding corpse location, decomposition stages, and entomofauna were extracted from each file. Compared to all of the forensic entomology cases analyzed between 1990 and 2013 (1028), N. littoralis was observed, on average, in one case out of eight; most of these cases occurred during spring and summer (73.5%). More than 90% of the cases were located outdoors, especially in woodlands, bushes, and fields. The decomposition stage of the corpse varied among cases, with more than 50% in the advanced decomposition stage, 36% in the early decomposition stage, and less than 10% in the fresh, mummified, or skeletonized stages. Regarding other necrophagous species sampled with N. littoralis, Calliphorid flies were found in 94% of the cases and Fanniidae/Muscidae in 65% of the cases. Chrysomya albiceps, a heliophilic species mostly located in the Mediterranean area, was present in 34% of the cases (only 20% in the whole dataset). The most common coleopteran species were Necrobia spp. (Coleoptera: Cleridae) and Creophilus maxillosus (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae); these beetles were observed in 27% of the cases. The over-representation of these species is likely due to similar requirements regarding the climate and decomposition stage. As N. littoralis is frequently observed and tends to become more common, we conclude that the developmental data for this species would be a precious tool for forensic entomologists in Europe.

  20. Artificial insemination and cryopreservation of semen from nondomestic birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Bakst, M.R.; Wishart, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    Studies of Al and cryopreservation of semen from nondomestic birds began because of the increased emphasis on conservation of avian species threatened with extinction. Over the years, aviculturists have developed techniques for Al and cryopreservation of semen obtained from a variety of birds ranging from passerines to Andean condors. Generally, for each new species, we develop a practical semen collection technique and then evaluate the semen. A commercial semen extender (Beltsville Poultry Semen Extender) is modified and used to dilute the semen and provide support for the sperm during the freezing process (the pH and osmolality of the extender is adjusted to reflect the pH and osmolality of the semen being frozen). We find that the freezing schedule developed by Sexton (1977), which utilizes dimethylsulfoxide (DMS0) as cryoprotectant, works well for many species. We cool the sample sequentially in an ethanol bath, in liquid nitrogen vapor, and lastly in liquid nitrogen. Although we have experimented with a variety of freezing protocols, we prefer a 15-min equilibration period in DMSO at 5 C. We begin the freezing process by cooling at -1 C/min from 5 to -20 C in the ethanol bath. The samples are transferred into a vapor tank at a location just above liquid nitrogen and frozen at -50 C/min to -80 C. To complete the freezing process, the samples are plunged into the liquid nitrogen in the bottom of the vapor tank. The samples remain in liquid nitrogen until they are thawed just before insemination. If necessary, the freezing equipment can be transported in a van to remote locations.

  1. Factors influencing teamwork and collaboration within a tertiary medical center.

    PubMed

    Chien, Shu Feng; Wan, Thomas Th; Chen, Yu-Chih

    2012-04-26

    To understand how work climate and related factors influence teamwork and collaboration in a large medical center. A survey of 3462 employees was conducted to generate responses to Sexton's Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) to assess perceptions of work environment via a series of five-point, Likert-scaled questions. Path analysis was performed, using teamwork (TW) and collaboration (CO) as endogenous variables. The exogenous variables are effective communication (EC), safety culture (SC), job satisfaction (JS), work pressure (PR), and work climate (WC). The measurement instruments for the variables or summated subscales are presented. Reliability of each sub-scale are calculated. Alpha Cronbach coefficients are relatively strong: TW (0.81), CO (0.76), EC (0.70), SC (0.83), JS (0.91), WP (0.85), and WC (0.78). Confirmatory factor analysis was performed for each of these constructs. Path analysis enables to identify statistically significant predictors of two endogenous variables, teamwork and intra-organizational collaboration. Significant amounts of variance in perceived teamwork (R(2) = 0.59) and in collaboration (R(2) = 0.75) are accounted for by the predictor variables. In the initial model, safety culture is the most important predictor of perceived teamwork, with a β weight of 0.51, and work climate is the most significant predictor of collaboration, with a β weight of 0.84. After eliminating statistically insignificant causal paths and allowing correlated predictors1, the revised model shows that work climate is the only predictor positively influencing both teamwork (β = 0.26) and collaboration (β = 0.88). A relatively weak positive (β = 0.14) but statistically significant relationship exists between teamwork and collaboration when the effects of other predictors are simultaneously controlled. Hospital executives who are interested in improving collaboration should assess the work climate to ensure that employees are operating in a setting conducive

  2. Insights into interactions between the alpha-helical region of the salmon calcitonin antagonists and the human calcitonin receptor using photoaffinity labeling.

    PubMed

    Pham, Vi; Dong, Maoqing; Wade, John D; Miller, Laurence J; Morton, Craig J; Ng, Hooi-Ling; Parker, Michael W; Sexton, Patrick M

    2005-08-05

    Fish-like calcitonins (CTs), such as salmon CT (sCT), are widely used clinically in the treatment of bone-related disorders; however, the molecular basis for CT binding to its receptor, a class II G protein-coupled receptor, is not well defined. In this study we have used photoaffinity labeling to identify proximity sites between CT and its receptor. Two analogues of the antagonist sCT(8-32) containing a single photolabile p-benzoyl-l-phenylalanine (Bpa) residue in position 8 or 19 were used. Both analogues retained high affinity for the CT receptor and potently inhibited agonist-induced cAMP production. The [Bpa(19)]sCT(8-32) analogue cross-linked to the receptor at or near the equivalent cross-linking site of the full-length peptide, within the fragment Cys(134)-Lys(141) (within the amino terminus of the receptor, adjacent to transmembrane 1) (Pham, V., Wade, J. D., Purdue, B. W., and Sexton, P. M. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 6720-6729). In contrast, proteolytic mapping and mutational analysis identified Met(49) as the cross-linking site for [Bpa(8)]sCT(8-32). This site differed from the previously identified cross-linking site of the agonist [Bpa(8)]human CT (Dong, M., Pinon, D. I., Cox, R. F., and Miller, L. J. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 31177-31182) and may provide evidence for conformational differences between interaction with active and inactive state receptors. Molecular modeling suggests that the difference in cross-linking between the two Bpa(8) analogues can be accounted for by a relatively small change in peptide orientation. The model was also consistent with cooperative interaction between the receptor amino terminus and the receptor core.

  3. Italian Dermestidae: notes on some species and an updated checklist (Coleoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Nardi, Gianluca; Háva, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Abstract An up-to-date checklist of the Italian Dermestidae is provided. The presence of 95 species in Italy is confirmed, while further 5 species (Dermestes (Dermestes) vorax Motschulsky, 1860, Thorictuspilosus Peyron, 1857, T. wasmanni Reitter, 1895, Attagenus (Attagenus) simonis Reitter, 1881 and Globicornis (G.) breviclavis (Reitter, 1878)) and 1 subspecies (A. (A.) tigrinus pulcher Faldermann, 1835) are excluded from the Italian fauna. Attagenus (Attagenus) calabricus Reitter, 1881 and A. (A.) lobatus Rosenhauer, 1856 are for the first time recorded from Abruzzi and Tuscany respectively; A. (A.) silvaticus Zhantiev, 1976 is recorded for the first time from mainland Italy (Apulia); Anthrenus (Anthrenus) angustefasciatus Ganglbauer, 1904 is new to northern Italy (Friuli-Venezia Giulia), central Italy (Tuscany), Apulia and Basilicata; A. (A.) munroi Hinton, 1943 is new to central Italy (Elba Island); A. (A.) delicatus Kiesenwetter, 1851 is for the first time recorded from Apulia; Globicornis (Globicornis) fasciata (Fairmaire & Brisout de Barneville, 1859) is new to southern Italy (Basilicata); G. (Hadrotoma) sulcata (C.N.F. Brisout de Barneville, 1866) is for the first time recorded from central Italy (Abruzzi), Campania and Sicily, whileTrogoderma inclusum LeConte, 1854 is new to Apulia. Seven species (Dermestes (Dermestes) peruvianus Laporte de Castelnau, 1840, D. (Dermestinus) carnivorus Fabricius, 1775, D. (Dermestinus) hankae Háva, 1999, D. (Dermestinus) intermedius intermedius Kalík, 1951, D. (Dermestinus) szekessyi Kalík, 1950, Anthrenus (Anthrenops) coloratus Reitter, 1881 and Trogodermaangustum (Solier, 1849)) recently recorded from Italy (without further details) are discussed. The lectotype and a paralectotype are designated forAttagenus (A.) calabricus Reitter, 1881 from Calabria. Attagenus pellio (Linnaeus, 1758) var. pilosissimus Roubal, 1932 is removed from synonymy with A. (A.) pellio and recognized as a valid species (stat. prom.); it is known

  4. Serologic survey for Leptospira spp. in captive neotropical felids in Foz do Iguaçu, Paraná, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ullmann, Leila Sabrina; Hoffmann, Juliano L; de Moraes, Wanderlei; Cubas, Zalmir S; dos Santos, Leonilda Correia; da Silva, Rodrigo Costa; Moreira, Nei; Guimaraes, Ana Marcia Sa; Camossi, Lucilene Granuzzio; Langoni, Helio; Biondo, Alexander W

    2012-06-01

    Leptospirosis is a bacterial zoonosis of worldwide distribution and is endemic in tropical countries, where rodents and other wild mammals are abundant and may act as reservoirs. Leptospirosis has become a concern in captive wild animals, due mostly to their exposure to contaminated urine or environment. Although domestic cats (Felis catus) have been reported refractory to leptospirosis, serology and disease in captive wild felids is still unclear. In this study 57 adult, clinically healthy felids, including 1 Geoffroy's cat (Leopardus geoffroyi), 3 jaguarundis (Puma yagouaroundi), 17 margays (Leopardus wiedii), 22 little spotted cats (Leopardus tigrinus), and 14 ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) kept in captivity at the Sanctuary at the Itaipu Binacional hydroelectric power plant (Bela Vista Biological Sanctuary), Foz do Iguacu City, Paraná State, Brazil, were serologically surveyed for the presence of antibodies against 28 serovars of Leptospira spp. by microagglutination test (MAT). Two animals (3.5%) were seropositive: one male ocelot to the serovar Cynopteri (titer 100) and one female margay to Autumnalis (100) and Butembo (200). The captive-born, 5-yr-old ocelot had been solitary housed in an individual cage. The approximately 21-yr-old wild-caught margay was also kept individually. None of the tested animals showed signs ofleptospirosis. During a study conducted 4 yr previously in the same facility, this particular margay also tested positive for the same two serovars, among others. The present study indicates that the felids tested for Leptospira spp. by MAT were exposed to serovars, but did not demonstrate clinical signs of disease. Comparison with a previous study suggests that serovar titers may vary over time and that leptospirosis dynamics remains unclear in wild felids.

  5. Measurement of thyroid hormones (thyroxine, T4; triiodothyronine, T3) in captive nondomestic felids.

    PubMed

    Rodini, Débora Cattaruzzi; Felippe, Erika Cristiane Gutierrez; Oliveira, Cláudio Alvarenga

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this research was to obtain basic values for the evaluation of thyroid function in nondomestic felids. Serum thyroid hormone concentrations (thyroxine, T4; triiodothyronine, T3) were measured by radioimmunoassay in 145 cats, representing nine species of captive nondomestic felids: jaguar (Panthera onca), n = 49; puma (Puma concolor), n = 10; ocelot (Leopardus pardalis), n = 22; oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus), n = 12; geoffroy (Oncifelis geoffroyi), n = 4; jaguarundi (Herpailurus yaguarondi), n = 8; margay (Leopardus wiedii), n = 7; lion (Panthera leo), n = 26; and tiger (Panthera tigris), n = 7. For each species, mean +/- SEM of T3 and T4, respectively, were as follows: jaguar, 0.56 +/- 0.03 and 9.7 +/- 0.8 ng/ml; puma, 0.67 +/- 0.04 and 11.2 +/- 1.2 ng/ml; ocelot, 0.48 +/- 0.03 and 13.8 +/- 1.5 ng/ml; oncilla, 0.43 +/- 0.03 and 10.0 +/- 1.6 ng/ml; geoffroy, 0.44 +/- 0.04 and 8.0 +/- 0.16 ng/ml; jaguarundi, 0.7 +/- 0.03 and 5.0 +/- 1.0 ng/ml; margay, 0.48 +/- 0.04 and 12.2 +/- 2.3 ng/ml; lion, 0.43 +/- 0.02 and 5.7 +/- 2.6 ng/ml; and tiger, 0.66 +/- 0.03 and 12.6 +/- 0.9 ng/ml. Within species, T3 and T4 concentrations did not differ (P > 0.05) between males and females.

  6. Serological survey of Toxoplasma gondii in captive Neotropical felids from Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ullmann, Leila Sabrina; da Silva, Rodrigo Costa; de Moraes, Wanderlei; Cubas, Zalmir Silvino; dos Santos, Leonilda Correia; Hoffmann, Juliano Leônidas; Moreira, Nei; Guimaraes, Ana Marcia Sa; Montaño, Patrícia; Langoni, Helio; Biondo, Alexander Welker

    2010-08-27

    Toxoplasma gondii is the causative intracellular protozoan of toxoplasmosis in human being and animals. Members of the Felidae family are considered the single definitive host for the infection; both wild and domestic cats are able to excrete oocysts in the environment. Wild cats maintained in captivity may serve as source of infection for other clinically susceptible animals in the same environment. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of T. gondii IgG antibodies in 57 neotropical felids (1 Leopardus geoffroyi; 3 Puma yagouaroundi; 17 Leopardus wiedii; 22 Leopardus tigrinus; and 14 Leopardus pardalis) kept at the Bela Vista Biological Sanctuary, Itaipu Binacional, Southern Brazil, by the modified agglutination test (MAT) using titer 16 as cut-off point. Seropositivity was observed in 38/57 (66.67%; 95% CI 53.66-77.51%) samples, with higher frequency in ocelots (71.43%). Wild-caught felids were three times more likely to be infected when compared to zoo-born animals (P

  7. The Influence of Allochthonous Leaf Detritus on the Occurrence of Crustacean Detritivores in the Soft-bottom Macrobenthos of the Po River Delta Area (northwestern Adriatic Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancinelli, G.; Rossi, L.

    2002-05-01

    Core samples were examined quarterly at two coastal sites (S1 and S2) and at an offshore station (S3) located in the Po River delta area (northwestern Adriatic Sea). Analyses focused on (i) occurrence of coarse detritus of allochthonous origin in the sedimentary matrix and (ii) the relative influence of macrodetritus enrichment and other environmental factors on the vagile macrofauna. Plant debris occurred in site S1 sediments only in summer and autumn; in contrast, fragments of the phanerogams Cymodocea nodosa and Zostera spp. were found in site S2 sediment throughout the sampling period. Sediments from the offshore site S3 were characterized by negligible plant material, even though in summer and autumn samples debris of continental origin was observed. Even though leaf detritus occurrence at site S2 was ∼5-fold higher compared to the other coastal site S1, it did not influence the total organic matter and its distribution among grain-size classes. Conversely, the specific organic content of dimensional fractions provided an effective assessment of detritus enrichment processes occurring at the two coastal sites. A group of brackish-originated crustaceans (i.e. the amphipods Gammarus insensibilis and G. aequicauda and the isopod Idotea baltica) was the main determinant of among-site multivariate differences in the vagile macrofauna; depositivorous ophiuroids accounted for the residual differences observed during the study period. The analysis of taxa abundance and individual body size indicated that in both site S1 and S3 macrodetritus advection to the benthic system corresponded with passive dispersal of brackish crustaceans, that provided a negligible contribution to the macrobenthic production. In contrast, in site S2 allochthonous inputs from marginal environments could have represented the key factor for the persistence of an authochthonous population of Gammarus insensibilis. The amphipod provided a considerable (19·4%) contribution to the total

  8. The effects of diet mixing on consumer fitness: macroalgae, epiphytes, and animal matter as food for marine amphipods.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Rivera, E; Hay, M E

    2000-05-01

    Herbivores are thought to achieve adequate nutrition by consuming numerous species of plants or by occasionally consuming animal tissue. Although active selection of diverse foods is common in nature, the relationship between diet mixing and consumer fitness is poorly understood, especially in marine environments. We studied the fitness-based consequences of dietary mixing in the sympatric amphipods Ampithoe marcuzzii, A. valida, Cymadusa compta, and Gammarus mucronatus by measuring survivorship, growth, and fecundity of these amphipods when they were offered single species of algae, a single animal food, a mixture of algal species, or a combination of algae and animal matter. For the more sedentary, tube-building amphipods A. marcuzzii, A. valida, and C. compta, fitness on mixed algal diets was matched by fitness on at least one of the monospecific algal diets, suggesting that they could benefit from preferential feeding on those algae in the field. The more mobile amphipod, G. mucronatus, survived and grew similarly on the mixed diets and on the filamentous brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus. However, its fecundity was significantly higher when feeding on the algal and animal mixture than on Ectocarpus alone. Additionally, for G. mucronatus, fitness on mixed algae, mixed algae plus animal matter, and animal matter alone was equivalent, although female growth (but not gonad production) was slightly lower on animal matter alone than on the mixed algae combined with animal food. Thus the more mobile amphipod, G. mucronatus, was the only species able to perform well on animal food alone. In contrast, A. valida and C. compta experienced large negative effects when limited to consuming animal matter alone. For these two species, combining algae and animal matter did not enhance fitness over combining only algae. Fitness effects of specific algal diets showed some general similarities, but also considerable variance among the amphipods. For example, E. siliculosus was

  9. Toxicity of five forest insecticides to cutthroat trout and two species of aquatic invertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodward, D.F.; Mauck, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    The Northern Rocky Mountain region has had scattered infestation of the western spruce budworm Christoneura occidentalis since the early 1900's (U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (USDA) 1976b). On the basis of aerial surveys in 1975, TUNNOCK et al. (1976), estimated that budworm defoliation occurred on 2,278,804 acres of six National Forests in Montana. Since the use of DDT was banned in 1972, there has been a need to develop alternative insecticides with the efficacy of DDT but without its environmental risk. These insecticides must be effective in controlling the budworm, but should not persist in the environment or be toxic to other organisms. The organophosphate and carbamate insecticides are relatively nonpersistent and generally present only a moderate hazard to fish when applied according to label recommendations. The USDA Forest Service has been investigating the effectiveness of these two classes of insecticides against the budworm, and the Columbia National Fisheries Research Laboratory of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been cooperating with the Forest Service conducted pilot control projects in eastern Montana in 1975 and 1976 to determine the efficacy and environmental impact of acephate, carbaryl, and trichlorfon in controlling the western budworm (USDA 1976 b). In 1975, a similar type project was carried out in Maine with aminocarb, fenitrothion, and trichlorfon (USDA 1976 a).Acephate, fenitrothion, and trichlorfon (organophosphate insecticides) and aminocarb and carbaryl (carbamate insecticides) were selected for toxicity tests against cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki), a stonefly (Pteronarcella badia), and a freshwater amphipod (Gammarus pseudolimnaeus) edemic in streams of the northern Rocky Mountains. Populations of cutthroat trout inhabit lakes and streams in the Rocky Mountains which include some of the most pristine habitat and fisheries in North America. Pteronarcella and Gammarus provide forage for cutthroat trout and feed on decaying

  10. The relation between invertebrate drift and two primary controls, discharge and benthic densities, in a large regulated river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, Theodore A.; Yackulic, Charles B.; Cross, Wyatt F.; Grams, Paul E.; Yard, Michael D.; Copp, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    1. Invertebrate drift is a fundamental process in streams and rivers. Studies from laboratory experiments and small streams have identified numerous extrinsic (e.g. discharge, light intensity, water quality) and intrinsic factors (invertebrate life stage, benthic density, behaviour) that govern invertebrate drift concentrations (# m−3), but the factors that govern invertebrate drift in larger rivers remain poorly understood. For example, while large increases or decreases in discharge can lead to large increases in invertebrate drift, the role of smaller, incremental changes in discharge is poorly described. In addition, while we might expect invertebrate drift concentrations to be proportional to benthic densities (# m−2), the benthic–drift relation has not been rigorously evaluated. 2. Here, we develop a framework for modelling invertebrate drift that is derived from sediment transport studies. We use this framework to guide the analysis of high-resolution data sets of benthic density and drift concentration for four important invertebrate taxa from the Colorado River downstream of Glen Canyon Dam (mean daily discharge 325 m3 s−1) that were collected over 18 months and include multiple observations within days. Ramping of regulated flows on this river segment provides an experimental treatment that is repeated daily and allowed us to describe the functional relations between invertebrate drift and two primary controls, discharge and benthic densities. 3. Twofold daily variation in discharge resulted in a >10-fold increase in drift concentrations of benthic invertebrates associated with pools and detritus (i.e. Gammarus lacustris and Potamopyrgus antipodarum). In contrast, drift concentrations of sessile blackfly larvae (Simuliium arcticum), which are associated with high-velocity cobble microhabitats, decreased by over 80% as discharge doubled. Drift concentrations of Chironomidae increased proportional to discharge. 4. Drift of all four taxa was

  11. A floodplain mesocosm study: Distribution, mobility, aging, and functioning of engineered silver nanoparticles at the aquatic-terrestrial interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metreveli, George; Kurtz, Sandra; Philippe, Allan; Tayyebi, Narjes; Seitz, Frank; Rosenfeldt, Ricki R.; Grün, Alexandra; Kumahor, Samuel K.; Baumann, Thomas; Bundschuh, Mirco; Lang, Friederike; Klitzke, Sondra; Manz, Werner; Schulz, Ralf; Vogel, Hans-Jörg; Schaumann, Gabriele E.

    2017-04-01

    With increasing use of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in different commercial products the risk for their release into the environment is continuously increased. The aging, distribution, mobility, biological availability, and ecotoxicological impact of ENPs in aquatic and terrestrial compartments will be influenced especially by the natural dynamics of meadow areas, which represent a sensible zone between these two compartments. In this study we present a newly developed floodplain stream mesocosm system linking aquatic and terrestrial aging of ENPs in one system. Using this system we investigated the distribution, mobility, and biological effects of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) at the aquatic-terrestrial interface. The mesocosm consists of a main channel, floodplain area, and transport columns simulating an aquatic compartment with river bed, aquatic-terrestrial transition zone, and terrestrial area, respectively. The system contained water sampled from the River Rhine, quartz sand as sediment phase and natural repacked soil from a Rhine floodplain. Every 3 weeks floodplain area was flooded for four days by increasing the water level in the main channel. The dispersions of Ag NPs were injected into the main channel as a pulse function with the pulse duration of 3 weeks and interval of 3 weeks between pulses. The biological effects of Ag NPs on the benthic organism Gammarus fossarum were evaluated in the bioassays during and between the Ag NP pulses. The total duration of the experiment was 33 weeks. The results of mesocosm experiments showed a fluctuating but successively increasing concentrations of total silver in the aqueous phase. At the end of the experiment 0.5% of the silver was still available in the aqueous phase mostly as nanoparticles. Although the major part of silver was immobilized in sediment and soil especially in their top layer, the feeding activity of Gammarus fossarum was not consistently affected. It is most likely due to the low

  12. Grazing preferences of marine isopods and amphipods on three prominent algal species of the Baltic Sea [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goecker, Margene E.; Kåll, Sara E.

    2003-12-01

    Preference tests were performed over a two-week period in September 2001 in which isopods ( Idotea baltica) and amphipods ( Gammarus oceanicus) were offered choices of three common species of algae from the Baltic Sea: Enteromorpha intestinalis, Cladophora spp., and Fucus vesiculosus. After a 48-hour starvation period, 20 individuals of each grazer species were placed in aquaria containing approximately 1.0 g of each algal species. Fifteen trials for each grazer species were run for 20 hours. We found that G. oceanicus ate significantly more Cladophora spp. and E. intestinalis than F. vesiculosus (p<0.001), with a preference order of: Cladophora spp.> E. intestinalis> F. vesiculosus. Similarly, I. baltica ate significantly more of both the filamentous green algae than F. vesiculosus (p<0.001), with a preference order of: E. intestinalis> Cladophora spp.> F. vesiculosus. Given the preference of isopods and amphipods for filamentous green algae, we might expect these algae to be maintained at low biomass levels. However, this is clearly not the case in the Baltic Sea. Nutrient enrichment (bottom-up effects) is the accepted dominant reason for the non-controlling impact of algal grazers, but other reasons may include cascading trophic effects resulting from the removal of large piscivorous fish (top-down effects).

  13. Heavy δ 15N in Intertidal Benthic Algae and Invertebrates in the Scheldt Estuary (The Netherlands): Effect of River Nitrogen Inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, P.; Stal, L. J.; Nieuwenhuize, J.

    2000-09-01

    The study investigated δ 15N in the intertidal benthic food webs from the middle Westerschelde Estuary and the middle Oosterschelde. Much heavier δ 15N values were observed for the main benthic primary producers and invertebrates in the Westerschelde Estuary. In the Oosterschelde, mean δ 15N values ranged from 1·4 to 7·3‰ for SOM and suspended POM, respectively, to 6·3 to 9·1‰ for Fucus vesiculosus and benthic diatoms, respectively. Mean δ 15N values in benthic invertebrates ranged from 9·7‰ for Gammarus locusta to 15·4‰ for Tubificoides sp. In the Westerschelde Estuary, mean δ 15N increased from 8·1 to 8·6‰ for suspended POM and SOM, respectively, to heavier δ 15N from 15·9 to 28·5‰ for F. vesiculosus and benthic diatoms, respectively. Mean δ 15N for intertidal invertebrates ranged from 18·1‰ for Lumbricillus sp. to 20·7‰ for Eulimnogammarus obtusatus. Higher enrichment in 15N in benthic primary producers and invertebrates from the Westerschelde Estuary are most likely due to the incorporation of 15N-enriched DIN carried by the Scheldt River by benthic algae and, then by benthic consumers. These results point to the fact that δ 15N in benthic estuarine food webs may respond directly to anthropogenic nitrogen inputs delivered into estuaries by rivers which drain highly urbanized areas.

  14. Effects of Fucus vesiculosus covering intertidal mussel beds in the Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, A.; Reise, K.

    1994-06-01

    The brown alga Fucus vesiculosus forma mytili (Nienburg) Nienhuis covered about 70% of mussel bed ( Mytilus edulis) surface area in the lower intertidal zone of Königshafen, a sheltered sandy bay near the island of Sylt in the North Sea. Mean biomass in dense patches was 584 g ash-free dry weight m-2 in summer. On experimental mussel beds, fucoid cover enhanced mud accumulation and decreased mussel density. The position of mussels underneath algal canopy was mainly endobenthic (87% of mussels with >1/3 of shell sunk into mud). In the absence of fucoids, mussels generated epibenthic garlands (81% of mussels with <1/3 of shell buried in mud). Mussel density underneath fucoid cover was 40 to 73% of mussel density without algae. On natural beds, barnacles (Balanidae), periwinkles ( Littorina littorea) and crabs (particularly juveniles of Carcinus maenas) were significantly less abundant in the presence of fucoids, presumably because most of the mussels were covered with sediment, whereas in the absence of fucoids, epibenthic mussel clumps provided substratum as well as interstitial hiding places. The endobenthic macrofauna showed little difference between covered and uncovered mussel beds. On the other hand, grazing herbivores — the flat periwinkle Littorina mariae, the isopod Jaera albifrons and the amphipods Gammarus spp. — were more abundant at equivalent sites with fucoid cover. The patchy growth of Fucus vesiculosus on mussel beds in the intertidal Wadden Sea affects mussels and their epibionts negatively, but supports various herbivores and increases overall benthic diversity.

  15. Eaten alive: cannibalism is enhanced by parasites.

    PubMed

    Bunke, Mandy; Alexander, Mhairi E; Dick, Jaimie T A; Hatcher, Melanie J; Paterson, Rachel; Dunn, Alison M

    2015-03-01

    Cannibalism is ubiquitous in nature and especially pervasive in consumers with stage-specific resource utilization in resource-limited environments. Cannibalism is thus influential in the structure and functioning of biological communities. Parasites are also pervasive in nature and, we hypothesize, might affect cannibalism since infection can alter host foraging behaviour. We investigated the effects of a common parasite, the microsporidian Pleistophora mulleri, on the cannibalism rate of its host, the freshwater amphipod Gammarus duebeni celticus. Parasitic infection increased the rate of cannibalism by adults towards uninfected juvenile conspecifics, as measured by adult functional responses, that is, the rate of resource uptake as a function of resource density. This may reflect the increased metabolic requirements of the host as driven by the parasite. Furthermore, when presented with a choice, uninfected adults preferred to cannibalize uninfected rather than infected juvenile conspecifics, probably reflecting selection pressure to avoid the risk of parasite acquisition. By contrast, infected adults were indiscriminate with respect to infection status of their victims, probably owing to metabolic costs of infection and the lack of risk as the cannibals were already infected. Thus parasitism, by enhancing cannibalism rates, may have previously unrecognized effects on stage structure and population dynamics for cannibalistic species and may also act as a selective pressure leading to changes in resource use.

  16. Polycyclic aromatic compound profiles from extracts of Dreissenid mussels and gammarid amphipods coexisting in Hamilton Harbor

    SciTech Connect

    Marvin, C.H.; McCarry, B.E.; Allan, L.; Bryant, D.W.

    1995-06-01

    Aggregates of dreissenid mussels were collected in Hamilton Harbour (western Lake Ontario) from a south shore site (Randle Reef) in an area characterized by coal tar-contaminated sediments, and from a site on the north shore exposed to particulates circulating in the harbour water column. Samples were separated into three components: dreissend mussels, gammarid amphipods (Gammarus fasciatus), and particulate material. The samples were freeze-dried, and extracted using ultrasonication in dichloromethane. The organic solvent extracts were subjected to an open-column alumina and Sephadex LH-20 gel column clean-up procedure, and characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The chromatographic profiles of all sample extracts were dominated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The concentrations of the individual compounds were normalized for contaminant profile comparison of the extracts of dreissenids, amphipods, and particulates associated with aggregates of dreissenid mussels. These profiles were also compared with extracts of coal tar-contaminated sediment from the Randle Reef area, and extracts of suspended particulates obtained from sediment traps. The similarities in the PAH profiles provide evidence of exposure to a common source of contaminants. These data also show that PAH associated with suspended particulates obtained from sediment traps. The similarities in the PAH profiles provide evidence of exposure to a common source of contaminants. These data also show that PAH associated with suspended particulates in Hamilton Harbour are being accumulated by dreissenid mussels and gammarid amphipods.

  17. Effects of municipal wastewater on aquatic ecosystem structure and function in the receiving stream.

    PubMed

    Englert, Dominic; Zubrod, Jochen P; Schulz, Ralf; Bundschuh, Mirco

    2013-06-01

    During recent years, increasing incidences of summer droughts - likely driven by climate change - reduced the dilution potential of low-order streams for secondary treated wastewater also in temperate Europe. Despite the potential risks to ecosystem integrity, there is a paucity of knowledge regarding the effects of different wastewater dilution potentials on ecosystem functions. The present study investigated the implications of secondary treated wastewater released into a third-order stream (Queich, southwest Germany) during a season with low dilution potential (summer; ~90% wastewater) as compared to a season with high dilution potential (winter; ~35% wastewater) in terms of leaf litter decomposition and macroinvertebrate communities. Adverse effects in macroinvertebrate mediated leaf mass loss (~65%), gammarids' feeding rate (~80%), leaf associated fungal biomass (>40%) and shifts in macroinvertebrate community structure were apparent up to 100 and 300 m (partially 500 m) downstream of the wastewater treatment plant effluent during winter and summer, respectively. In addition, a Gammarus fossarum laboratory feeding trial demonstrated the potential of powdered activated carbon to reduce the ecotoxicity of released wastewater. These results urge the development and evaluation of adequate management strategies, e.g. the application of advanced wastewater treatment technologies, to protect the integrity of freshwater ecosystems, which is required by the European Water Framework Directive - also considering decreasing dilution potential of streams as projected by climate change scenarios.

  18. Interspecific interactions between brown trout and slimy sculpin in stream enclosures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruetz, C. R.; Hurford, A.L.; Vondracek, B.

    2003-01-01

    We conducted a 30-d manipulative experiment in Valley Creek, Minnesota, to examine interspecific interactions between juvenile brown trout Salmo trutta and adult slimy sculpin Cottus cognatus. We measured the instantaneous growth of each species in the presence and absence of the other in 1-m2 enclosures. We tested single-species (three slimy sculpins/m2 or three brown trout/m2) and combined-species (three sculpins/m2 and three trout/m2) combinations in each of six riffles. We placed a clay tile in each enclosure to evaluate the effects of fish combinations on benthic macroinvertebrates. Growth of brown trout was unaffected by the presence of slimy sculpins (P = 0.647, power [to detect 50% increase in growth] = 0.92), whereas slimy sculpin growth was less in the presence of brown trout (P = 0.038). Densities of total benthic macroinvertebrates, Chironomidae, Trichoptera, and Physa did not differ among fish combinations (P > 0.3). However, densities of Gammarus pseudolimnaeus were significantly less in the presence of brown trout irrespective of the presence of slimy sculpins (P = 0.024), which could be a causal factor underlying the interaction between brown trout and slimy sculpins. We found asymmetrical competition between brown trout and slimy sculpins in stream enclosures, with brown trout being the superior competitor. Nevertheless, the size of enclosures may have biased our results, making it more likely to detect an effect of brown trout on slimy sculpins than vice versa.

  19. Novel membrane-associated prostaglandin E synthase-2 from crustacean arthropods.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kristella; Varvas, Külliki; Järving, Ivar; Samel, Nigulas

    2014-08-01

    Prostaglandins (PG) have been shown to play important physiological roles in insects and marine invertebrates, yet the knowledge of their biosynthetic pathways is often lacking. Recently, we described cyclooxygenases in two amphipod crustaceans, Gammarus sp. and Caprella sp. In the present study, we report the cloning and characterization of prostaglandin E synthases (PGES) from the same organisms. The amphipod membrane-bound PGES-2-type enzymes share about 40% of the amino acid sequence identity with human mPGES-2, contain a conserved Cys110-x-x-Cys113 motif and have very low heme-binding affinity. The recombinant enzymes purified in the absence of dithiothreitol specifically catalyze the isomerization of PGH2 into PGE2. The PGES activity is increased in the presence of reduced glutathione and inhibited with a sulfhydryl group inhibitor. We assume that the amphipod mPGES-2, unlike in their mammalian counterparts, is responsible for PGE2 synthesis, not only in vitro but also in vivo.

  20. Aerococcus viridans expression of Cpn60 is associated with virulence during infection of the American lobster, Homarus americanus Milne Edwards.

    PubMed

    Clark, K F; Greenwood, S J

    2011-11-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Aerococcus viridans var. homari is a well-documented causative agent of the lethal systemic disease gaffkemia in both the American lobster, Homarus americanus, and the European lobster, Homarus gammarus. Previous phenotypic characterization has been unsuccessful at differentiating avirulent from virulent strains without performing lethal animal infection trials. Recent genetic characterization of A. viridans strains through 16S rRNA sequencing and random amplification of polymorphic DNA fingerprinting has revealed the presence of two subtypes. However, subtype 1 contains both virulent and avirulent strains which are genetically identical. The purpose of this study was to determine the proteomic mediators of virulence in A. viridans. Quantitative proteomic mapping of these two strains has revealed 29 differentially expressed protein spots, seven of which are only expressed in the virulent strain and could act as virulence factors. One protein, chaperonin 60 (Cpn60), is uniquely expressed in the virulent strain and has been shown to act as a virulence factor in many other bacteria. The proteomic mapping strategy employed in this study is the first to show phenotypic differences between virulent and avirulent strains. Cpn60 expression represents a potentially useful tool for identifying the virulent strains of A. viridans in epidemiological studies.

  1. Comparison of Grazing Intensity & Diets of Native and Invasive Amphipods in Lake Erie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan, J. P.; Francouer, S. N.

    2005-05-01

    Echinogammarus ischnus, an invasive amphipod originating from the Ponto Caspian Basin, was first discovered in the Detroit River in 1995 and has migrated through the lower Great Lakes displacing the native amphipod, Gammarus fasciatus. Both amphipods seek food and refuge by inhabiting substrata encrusted with zebra mussels and/or filamentous macro-algae. The filamentous green alga Cladophora, along with its epiphytic communities, are an important food source and refuge from predators and physical stresses. We examined the gut content of both amphipod species to determine their preferred food in their natural habitats, and conducted a laboratory experiment to determine each amphipod's grazing effects on algal biomass. Gut analysis was completed by taking grab samples from 4 study sites located along the western shore of Lake Erie every two weeks July through September, 2004. Amphipods were separated by species and preserved in 90% alcohol for later dissection. Algal taxa from amphipod guts were identified and enumerated using brightfield microscopy. In the lab experiment, algal biomass prior to and after two weeks of amphipod grazing was determined using ash-free dry mass and chlorophyll-a. Preliminary results indicate that E. ischnus and G. fasciatus exert approximately equal grazing pressure on the Great Lakes food web.

  2. Drastic underestimation of amphipod biodiversity in the endangered Irano-Anatolian and Caucasus biodiversity hotspots.

    PubMed

    Katouzian, Ahmad-Reza; Sari, Alireza; Macher, Jan N; Weiss, Martina; Saboori, Alireza; Leese, Florian; Weigand, Alexander M

    2016-03-01

    Biodiversity hotspots are centers of biological diversity and particularly threatened by anthropogenic activities. Their true magnitude of species diversity and endemism, however, is still largely unknown as species diversity is traditionally assessed using morphological descriptions only, thereby ignoring cryptic species. This directly limits evidence-based monitoring and management strategies. Here we used molecular species delimitation methods to quantify cryptic diversity of the montane amphipods in the Irano-Anatolian and Caucasus biodiversity hotspots. Amphipods are ecosystem engineers in rivers and lakes. Species diversity was assessed by analysing two genetic markers (mitochondrial COI and nuclear 28S rDNA), compared with morphological assignments. Our results unambiguously demonstrate that species diversity and endemism is dramatically underestimated, with 42 genetically identified freshwater species in only five reported morphospecies. Over 90% of the newly recovered species cluster inside Gammarus komareki and G. lacustris; 69% of the recovered species comprise narrow range endemics. Amphipod biodiversity is drastically underestimated for the studied regions. Thus, the risk of biodiversity loss is significantly greater than currently inferred as most endangered species remain unrecognized and/or are only found locally. Integrative application of genetic assessments in monitoring programs will help to understand the true magnitude of biodiversity and accurately evaluate its threat status.

  3. Lobster and cod benefit from small-scale northern marine protected areas: inference from an empirical before-after control-impact study.

    PubMed

    Moland, Even; Olsen, Esben Moland; Knutsen, Halvor; Garrigou, Pauline; Espeland, Sigurd Heiberg; Kleiven, Alf Ring; André, Carl; Knutsen, Jan Atle

    2013-03-07

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are increasingly implemented as tools to conserve and manage fisheries and target species. Because there are opportunity costs to conservation, there is a need for science-based assessment of MPAs. Here, we present one of the northernmost documentations of MPA effects to date, demonstrated by a replicated before-after control-impact (BACI) approach. In 2006, MPAs were implemented along the Norwegian Skagerrak coast offering complete protection to shellfish and partial protection to fish. By 2010, European lobster (Homarus gammarus) catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) had increased by 245 per cent in MPAs, whereas CPUE in control areas had increased by 87 per cent. Mean size of lobsters increased by 13 per cent in MPAs, whereas increase in control areas was negligible. Furthermore, MPA-responses and population development in control areas varied significantly among regions. This illustrates the importance of a replicated BACI design for reaching robust conclusions and management decisions. Partial protection of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) was followed by an increase in population density and body size compared with control areas. By 2010, MPA cod were on average 5 cm longer than in any of the control areas. MPAs can be useful management tools in rebuilding and conserving portions of depleted lobster populations in northern temperate waters, and even for a mobile temperate fish species such as the Atlantic cod.

  4. The trophic position of the alien crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii (crustacea decapoda panopeidae) in the Taman Bay, Sea of Azov community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalota, A. K.; Kolyuchkina, G. A.; Tiunov, A. V.; Biriukova, S. V.; Spiridonov, V. A.

    2017-03-01

    This work concerns the trophic web positioning of the alien crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii and other common marine invertebrate species and fishes in the benthic ecosystem of the shallows of Taman Bay, Sea of Azov. The base of the trophic web in this system is composed of phytoplankton, macrophytes (algae and marine grasses), and reeds that use atmospheric carbon for photosynthesis. Analysis of the isotopic composition of nitrogen and carbon has shown that although marine grasses are dominating primary producers in the shallows of the bay, primary consumers (such as Cerastoderma glaucum, Porifera gen. sp., Gammarus aequicauda, Deshayesorchestia deshayesii and Idotea balthica) only partially use this organic source; instead, they use a combination of different sources of primary production. It has been shown that the food source of the alien crab is primarily of animal origin. In Taman Bay, R. harrisii is on the same trophic level as other carnivores/scavengers: benthic fishes Syngnathus nigrolineatus, Gobius spp. and native crab Pilumnus hirtellus and shrimp Palaemon adspersus.

  5. Community Interactions Modify the Effects of Pharmaceutical Exposure: A Microcosm Study on Responses to Propranolol in Baltic Sea Coastal Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Oskarsson, Hanna; Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin; Thorsén, Gunnar; Danielsson, Gabriela; Kumblad, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the uptake and effects of a common human pharmaceutical, propranolol, on the structure and function of a coastal Baltic Sea model community consisting of macroalga (Ceramium tenuicorne), mussels (Mytilus edulis trossulus), amphipods (Gammarus spp.), water and sediment. The most sensitive species, the mussel, was affected to the same extent as in previous single species studies, while the effects on the amphipod and alga were smaller or even positive compared to experiments performed in less complex test systems. The observed cascade of beneficial effects was a result of inter-specific species interactions that buffered for more severe effects. The poor condition of the mussel led to a feeding shift from alga to mussel by the amphipods. The better food quality, due to the dietary shift, counteracted the effects of the exposure. Less amphipod grazing, together with increased levels of nutrients in the water was favourable for the alga, despite the negative effects of propranolol. This microcosm study showed effects on organisms on different organizational levels as well as interactions among the different components resulting in indirect exposure effects of both functional and structural nature. The combination of both direct and indirect effects would not have been detected using simpler single- or even two-species study designs. The observed structural changes would in the natural environment have a long-term influence on ecosystem function, especially in a low-biodiversity ecosystem like the Baltic Sea. PMID:24713620

  6. Protection first then facilitation: a manipulative parasite modulates the vulnerability to predation of its intermediate host according to its own developmental stage.

    PubMed

    Dianne, Lucile; Perrot-Minnot, Marie-Jeanne; Bauer, Alexandre; Gaillard, Mickaël; Léger, Elsa; Rigaud, Thierry

    2011-09-01

    Many trophically transmitted parasites with complex life cycles manipulate their intermediate host behavior in ways facilitating their transmission to final host by predation. This facilitation generally results from lowering host's antipredatory defenses when the parasite is infective to the final host. However, a recent theoretical model predicts that an optimal parasitic strategy would be to protect the intermediate host from predation when noninfective, before switching to facilitation when the infective stage is reached. We tested this hypothesis in the fish acanthocephalan parasite Pomphorhynchus laevis using the amphipod Gammarus pulex as intermediate host. Gammarids parasitized by noninfective stage of P. laevis (acanthella) hid significantly more under refuges than uninfected ones. In addition, acanthella-infected gammarids were less predated upon by trout than uninfected ones. As predicted, a switch toward decreased antipredatory behavior of G. pulex and enhanced vulnerability to predation was found when P. laevis reached the stage infective to its final host. The parasites appear to be able to exploit plasticity in host antipredatory responses, and shift the host optimal response toward their own optimal balance. © 2011 The Author(s).

  7. Dietary effects on fatty acid composition in muscle tissue of juvenile European eel, Anguilla anguilla (L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigge, Enno; Malzahn, Arne M.; Zumholz, Karsten; Hanel, Reinhold

    2012-03-01

    The role of intracontinental migration patterns of European eel ( Anguilla anguilla) receives more and more recognition in both ecological studies of the European eel and possible management measures, but small-scale patterns proved to be challenging to study. We experimentally investigated the suitability of fatty acid trophic markers to elucidate the utilization of feeding habitats. Eight groups of juvenile European eels were fed on eight different diets in a freshwater recirculation system at 20°C for 56 days. Three groups were fed on freshwater diets ( Rutilus rutilus, Chironomidae larvae, and Gammarus pulex) and four groups were reared on diets of a marine origin ( Clupea harengus, Crangon crangon, Mysis spec., and Euphausia superba) and one on commercial pellets used in eel aquaculture. Fatty acid composition (FAC) of diets differed significantly with habitat. FAC of eel muscle tissue seemed to be rather insensitive to fatty acids supplied with diet, but the general pattern of lower n3:n6 and EPA:ARA ratios in freshwater prey organisms could be traced in the respective eels. Multivariate statistics of the fatty acid composition of the eels resulted in two distinct groups representing freshwater and marine treatments. Results further indicate the capability of selectively restraining certain fatty acids in eel, as e.g. the n3:n6 ratio in all treatments was <4, regardless of dietary n3:n6. In future studies on wild eel, these measures can be used to elucidate the utilization of feeding habitats of individual European eel.

  8. Effects of the veterinary pharmaceutical ivermectin in indoor aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Harry; Reichman, Erik P; van den Brink, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    The effects of the parasiticide ivermectin were assessed in plankton-dominated indoor microcosms. Ivermectin was applied once at concentrations of 30, 100, 300, 1000, 3000, and 10,000 ng/l. The half-life (dissipation time 50%; DT₅₀) of ivermectin in the water phase ranged from 1.1 to 8.3 days. The lowest NOEC(community) that could be derived on an isolated sampling from the microcosm study by means of multivariate techniques was 100 ng/l. The most sensitive species in the microcosm study were the cladocerans Ceriodaphnia sp. (no observed effect concentration, NOEC = 30 ng/l) and Chydorus sphaericus (NOEC = 100 ng/l). The amphipod Gammarus pulex was less sensitive to ivermectin, showing consistent statistically significant reductions at the 1000-ng/l treatment level. Copepoda taxa decreased directly after application of ivermectin in the highest treatment but had already recovered at day 20 posttreatment. Indirect effects (e.g., increase of rotifers, increased primary production) were observed at the highest treatment level starting only on day 13 of the exposure phase. Cladocera showed the highest sensitivity to ivermectin in both standard laboratory toxicity tests as well as in the microcosm study. This study demonstrates that simple plankton-dominated test systems for assessing the effects of ivermectin can produce results similar to those obtained with large complex outdoor systems.

  9. The effects of motorway runoff on freshwater ecosystems. 2: Identifying major toxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Maltby, L.; Boxall, A.B.A.; Forrow, D.M.; Calow, P.; Betton, C.I.

    1995-06-01

    Previous studies have provided prima facie evidence that runoff from the M1 motorway, UK, affects both the quality of the receiving water and the biota living there, in sites short distances from point sources-i.e., possible worst-case situations. Because discharges contain a wide variety of contaminants, both the identification of toxicants and the establishment of causal relationships between observed changes in water/sediment quality and biology are often difficult. In this particular case, the problem was addressed by conducting a series of toxicity tests using the benthic amphipod Gammarus pulex. The abundance of this species was greatly reduced downstream of the point where motorway runoff entered the stream. Stream water contaminated with motorway runoff was not toxic to G. pulex. However, exposure to contaminated sediments resulted in a slight reduction in survival over 14 d, and sediment manipulation experiments identified hydrocarbons, copper, and zinc as potential toxicants. Spiking experiments confirmed the importance of hydrocarbons, and fractionation studies indicated that most of the observed toxicity was due to the fraction containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Animals exposed to contaminated sediments and water spiked with sediment extract accumulated aromatic hydrocarbons in direct proportion to exposure concentrations.

  10. New ecotoxicological model to simulate survival of aquatic invertebrates after exposure to fluctuating and sequential pulses of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Ashauer, Roman; Boxall, Alistair B A; Brown, Colin D

    2007-02-15

    Aquatic nontarget organisms are exposed to fluctuating concentrations or sequential pulses of contaminants, so we need to predict effects resulting from such patterns of exposure. We present a process-based model, the Threshold Damage Model (TDM), that links exposure with effects and demonstrate how to simulate the survival of the aquatic invertebrate Gammarus pulex. Based on survival experiments of up to 28 days duration with three patterns of repeated exposure pulses and fluctuating concentrations of two pesticides with contrasting modes of action (pentachlorophenol and chlorpyrifos) we evaluate the new model and compare it to two approaches based on time-weighted averages. Two models, the Threshold Damage Model and the time-weighted averages fitted to pulses, are able to simulate the observed survival (mean errors 15% or less, r2 between 0.77 and 0.96). The models are discussed with respect to their theoretical base, data needs, and potential for extrapolation to different scenarios. The Threshold Damage Model is particularly useful because its parameters can be used to calculate recovery times, toxicokinetics are separated from toxicodynamics, and parameter values reflect the mode of action.

  11. Effects of intra- and interspecific competition on the sensitivity of aquatic macroinvertebrates to carbendazim.

    PubMed

    Del Arco, Ana Isabel; Parra, Gema; Rico, Andreu; Van den Brink, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    The Ecological Risk Assessment of pesticides and other potentially toxic chemicals is generally based on toxicity data obtained from single-species laboratory experiments. In the field, however, contaminant effects are ubiquitously co-occurring with ecological interactions such as species competition and predation, which might influence the sensitivity of the individuals exposed to toxicants. The present experimental study investigated how intra- and interspecific competition influence the response of sensitive aquatic organisms to a pesticide. For this, the effects of the fungicide carbendazim were assessed on the mortality and growth of the snail Bithynia tentaculata and the crustacean Gammarus pulex under different levels of intraspecific and interspecific competition for a food resource. Interspecific competition was created by adding individuals of Radix peregra and Asellus aquaticus, respectively. The interaction of competition and carbendazim exposure significantly influenced B. tentaculata growth, however, combined effects on survival and immobility were considered transient and were less easily demonstrated. Positive influence of competition on G. pulex survival was observed under low-medium carbendazim concentrations and under medium-high density pressures, being partly related to cannibalistic and predation compensatory mechanisms, enhanced under food limiting conditions. This study shows that intra- and interspecific competition pressure may influence the response of sensitive aquatic organisms in a more complex way (positive, non-significant and negative effects were observed) than just increasing the sensitivity of the studied species, as has generally been hypothesized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of sublethal copper exposure on two gammarid species: which is the best competitor?

    PubMed

    Sroda, Sophie; Cossu-Leguille, Carole

    2011-01-01

    Biomarker responses in organisms exposed to copper were examined by comparing two gammarid species, Gammarus roeseli and Dikerogammarus villosus, based on gender. G. roeseli specimens were exposed to 20 μg/L of copper for 6, 12, 24 and 48-h periods, while D. villosus were exposed to 20 and 30 μg/L of copper for 12, 48 and 72 h. Males and females of each species were exposed separately and biomarker measurements were performed for each species and gender. The selected biomarkers were antioxidant enzymes as total glutathione peroxidase (GPxtot), selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (SeGPx), and catalase activities. Malondialdehyde level (MDA) was measured as a biomarker of toxic effect. Energy reserves were evaluated by means of lipid, glycogen and protein levels. For both species and gender, antioxidant enzyme activities were weakly modified by copper exposure and differences were transient. MDA levels were increased in both species and genders in exposed animals compared to controls, when energy reserves were decreased. G. roeseli was more rapidly overwhelmed by copper toxicity while the first response of D. villosus was the mobilization of its energetic content. D. Villosus probably has specific physiological properties that enable it to cope with copper toxicity and thus become the best competitor.

  13. Conflict between parasites with different transmission strategies infecting an amphipod host

    PubMed Central

    Haine, Eleanor R; Boucansaud, Karelle; Rigaud, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    Competition between parasites within a host can influence the evolution of parasite virulence and host resistance, but few studies examine the effects of unrelated parasites with conflicting transmission strategies infecting the same host. Vertically transmitted (VT) parasites, transmitted from mother to offspring, are in conflict with virulent, horizontally transmitted (HT) parasites, because healthy hosts are necessary to maximize VT parasite fitness. Resolution of the conflict between these parasites should lead to the evolution of one of two strategies: avoidance, or sabotage of HT parasite virulence by the VT parasite. We investigated two co-infecting parasites in the amphipod host, Gammarus roeseli: VT microsporidia have little effect on host fitness, but acanthocephala modify host behaviour, increasing the probability that the amphipod is predated by the acanthocephalan's definitive host. We found evidence for sabotage: the behavioural manipulation induced by the Acanthocephala Polymorphus minutus was weaker in hosts also infected by the microsporidia Dictyocoela sp. (roeselum) compared to hosts infected by P. minutus alone. Such conflicts may explain a significant portion of the variation generally observed in behavioural measures, and since VT parasites are ubiquitous in invertebrates, often passing undetected, conflict via transmission may be of great importance in the study of host–parasite relationships. PMID:16271976

  14. Field evidence for non-host predator avoidance in a manipulated amphipod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Médoc, Vincent; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas

    2009-04-01

    Manipulative parasites are known to alter the spatial distribution of their intermediate hosts in a way that enables trophic transmission to definitive hosts. However, field data on the ecological implications of such changes are lacking. In particular, little is known about the spatial coexistence between infected prey and dead-end predators after a parasite-induced habitat shift. Here, we used an Amphipoda ( Gammarus roeseli)-Acanthocephala ( Polymorphus minutus) association to investigate how infection with a manipulative parasite affects the predation risk by non-hosts within the invertebrate community. First, we collected invertebrates by sampling various natural habitats and calculated the distribution amplitude of amphipods according to their infection status. Infection with P. minutus significantly reduced the habitat breadth in G. roeseli, parasitised individuals being mainly found in floating materials whereas uninfected ones were widespread throughout the sampled habitats. Second, to test if these changes also affect the risk for P. minutus to be ingested by non-hosts, we estimated the predation risk experienced by G. roeseli within the macro-invertebrate community. The habitat overlap between potential invertebrate predators and G. roeseli showed that the spatial probability of encounter was lower for P. minutus-infected amphipods than for uninfected conspecifics. For the first time, to our knowledge, a study used ecological tools to bring field evidence for the spatial avoidance of dead-end predators in a manipulated amphipod.

  15. Larval size in acanthocephalan parasites: Influence of intraspecific competition and effects on intermediate host behavioural changes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Parasites often face a trade-off between exploitation of host resources and transmission probabilities to the next host. In helminths, larval growth, a major component of adult parasite fitness, is linked to exploitation of intermediate host resources and is influenced by the presence of co-infecting conspecifics. In manipulative parasites, larval growth strategy could also interact with their ability to alter intermediate host phenotype and influence parasite transmission. Methods We used experimental infections of Gammarus pulex by Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala), to investigate larval size effects on host behavioural manipulation among different parasite sibships and various degrees of intra-host competition. Results Intra-host competition reduced mean P. laevis cystacanth size, but the largest cystacanth within a host always reached the same size. Therefore, all co-infecting parasites did not equally suffer from intraspecific competition. Under no intra-host competition (1 parasite per host), larval size was positively correlated with host phototaxis. At higher infection intensities, this relationship disappeared, possibly because of strong competition for host resources, and thus larval growth, and limited manipulative abilities of co-infecting larval acanthocephalans. Conclusions Our study indicates that behavioural manipulation is a condition-dependant phenomenon that needs the integration of parasite-related variables to be fully understood. PMID:22876882

  16. Enantiomer fractions of organic chlorinated pesticides in arctic marine ice fauna, zooplankton, and benthos.

    PubMed

    Borgå, Katrine; Bidleman, Terry F

    2005-05-15

    Stereoisomers of chiral chlorinated pesticides (alpha-HCH (HCH = hexachlorocyclohexane), trans- and cis-chlordane, MC5, o,p'-DDT) were quantified in arctic marine invertebrates (ice-associated amphipods Gammarus wilkitzkii, pelagic copepods Calanus hyperboreus, krill Thysanoessa inermis, and amphipods Themisto libellula, and benthic amphipods Paramphithoe hystrix). Enantiomer fractions (EFs) were calculated to investigate the influence of habitat, geographic area, and diet on selective bioaccumulation of the (-)- or (+)-enantiomer. Depletion of the (+)-alpha-HCH enantionmer increased from ice fauna to zooplankton to benthos, corresponding to previous reports of EF variations with depth. Chlordanes and o,p'-DDT also showed the strongest enantioselective bioaccumulation in benthic amphipods and less so in zooplankton and ice fauna, which had closer to racemic EFs. Neither diet nor geographic area explained EF differences among samples. Nonracemic EFs in benthos may be related to stereoselective biotransformation, but is most likely reflecting vertical distribution of EFs in the water column and sediments, as demonstrated earlier for alpha-HCH in the Canadian and European Arctic.

  17. Limiting immunopathology: Interaction between carotenoids and enzymatic antioxidant defences.

    PubMed

    Babin, A; Saciat, C; Teixeira, M; Troussard, J-P; Motreuil, S; Moreau, J; Moret, Y

    2015-04-01

    The release of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) during the inflammatory response generates damages to host tissues, referred to as immunopathology, and is an important factor in ecological immunology. The integrated antioxidant system, comprising endogenous antioxidant enzymes (e.g. superoxide dismutase SOD, and catalase CAT) and dietary antioxidants (e.g. carotenoids), helps to cope with immune-mediated oxidative stress. Crustaceans store large amounts of dietary carotenoids for yet unclear reasons. While being immunostimulants and antioxidants, the interaction of these pigments with antioxidant enzymes remains unclear. Here, we tested the interaction between dietary supplementation with carotenoids and immune challenge on immune defences and the activity of the antioxidant enzymes SOD and CAT, in the amphipod crustacean Gammarus pulex. Dietary supplementation increased the concentrations of circulating carotenoids and haemocytes in the haemolymph, while the immune response induced the consumption of circulating carotenoids and a drop of haemocyte density. Interestingly, supplemented gammarids exhibited down-regulated SOD activity but high CAT activity compared to control ones. Our study reveals specific interactions of dietary carotenoids with endogenous antioxidant enzymes, and further underlines the potential importance of carotenoids in the evolution of immunity and/or of antioxidant mechanisms in crustaceans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Temperature rise and parasitic infection interact to increase the impact of an invasive species.

    PubMed

    Laverty, Ciaran; Brenner, David; McIlwaine, Christopher; Lennon, Jack J; Dick, Jaimie T A; Lucy, Frances E; Christian, Keith A

    2017-04-01

    Invasive species often detrimentally impact native biota, e.g. through predation, but predicting such impacts is difficult due to multiple and perhaps interacting abiotic and biotic context dependencies. Higher mean and peak temperatures, together with parasites, might influence the impact of predatory invasive host species additively, synergistically or antagonistically. Here, we apply the comparative functional response methodology (relationship between resource consumption rate and resource supply) in one experiment and conduct a second scaled-up mesocosm experiment to assess any differential predatory impacts of the freshwater invasive amphipod Gammarus pulex, when uninfected and infected with the acanthocephalan Echinorhynchus truttae, at three temperatures representative of current and future climate. Individual G. pulex showed Type II predatory functional responses. In both experiments, infection was associated with higher maximum feeding rates, which also increased with increasing temperatures. Additionally, infection interacted with higher temperatures to synergistically elevate functional responses and feeding rates. Parasitic infection also generally increased Q10 values. We thus suggest that the differential metabolic responses of the host and parasite to increasing temperatures drives the synergy between infection and temperature, elevating feeding rates and thus enhancing the ecological impact of the invader.

  19. Photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide nanoparticles affect habitat selection of and food quality for a key species in the leaf litter decomposition process.

    PubMed

    Feckler, Alexander; Rosenfeldt, Ricki R; Seitz, Frank; Schulz, Ralf; Bundschuh, Mirco

    2015-01-01

    Interactions with environmental parameters may alter the ecotoxicity of nanoparticles. The present study therefore assessed the (in)direct effects of nanoparticulate titanium dioxide (nano-TiO(2)) towards Gammarus fossarum, considering nano-TiO(2)'s photocatalytic properties at ambient UV-intensities. Gammarids' habitat selection was investigated using its feeding preference on leaf discs either exposed to or protected from UV-irradiation in presence of nano-TiO(2) as proxy (n = 49). UV-irradiational one induced a significant preference for UV-protected habitats, which was more pronounced in simultaneous presence of nano-TiO(2). This behaviour may be mainly explained by the UV-induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by nano-TiO(2). Besides their direct toxicity, ROS may have lowered the leaf-quality in UV-exposed areas contributing (approximately 30%) to the observed behavioural pattern. Since the predicted no effect concentration of nano-TiO(2) in combination with UV irradiation falls below the predicted environmental concentration this study underpins the importance of considering environmental parameters during the risk assessment of nanoparticles.

  20. Ecotoxicological impact of the fungicide tebuconazole on an aquatic decomposer-detritivore system.

    PubMed

    Zubrod, Jochen P; Bundschuh, Mirco; Feckler, Alexander; Englert, Dominic; Schulz, Ralf

    2011-12-01

    Leaf litter breakdown is a fundamental process in aquatic ecosystems that is realized by microbial decomposers and invertebrate detritivores. Although this process may be adversely affected by fungicides, among other factors, no test design exists to assess combined effects on such decomposer-detritivore systems. Hence, the present study assessed effects of the model fungicide tebuconazole (65 µg/L) on the conditioning of leaf material (by characterizing the associated microbial community) as well as the combined effects (i.e., direct toxicity and food quality-related effects (=indirect)) on the energy processing of the leaf-shredding amphipod Gammarus fossarum using a five-week semistatic test design. Gammarids exposed to tebuconazole produced significantly less feces (≈ 20%), which in turn significantly increased their assimilation (≈ 30%). Moreover, a significantly reduced lipid content (≈ 20%) indicated lower physiological fitness. The conditioning process was altered as well, which was indicated by a significantly reduced fungal biomass (≈ 40%) and sporulation (≈ 30%) associated with the leaf material. These results suggest that tebuconazole affects both components of the investigated decomposer-detritivore system. However, adverse effects on the level of detritivores cannot be explicitly attributed to direct or indirect pathways. Nevertheless, as the endpoints assessed are directly related to leaf litter breakdown and associated energy transfer processes, the protectiveness of environmental risk assessment for this ecosystem function may be more realistically assessed in future studies by using this or comparable test designs.

  1. Experimental and mathematical modelling of the consumer influence on the productivity of algae in a model aquatic ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, T. I.; Galayda, Y. V.; Shirobokova, I. M.

    Based upon the experimental and theoretical results the possibility of increasing the microalgal productivity in the "producer - consumer" aquatic biotic cycle (Chlorella vulgaris - Paramecium caudatum) has been considered. The experiment was held on the device with spatially divided links, which consists of a fermenter for Chlorella cultivation (the "producer" link) and a fermenter for Paramecia growing (the "consumer" link). The direct relation between the reproduction of Paramecia at consuming Chlorella and emission of nitrogen in ammonium form, which is the most preferable for growing Chlorella, has been revealed. In the result of theoretical study of the model of the "producer - consumer" aquatic biotic cycle with spatially divided links the contribution of Paramecia to the nitrogen cycle has been proved. It was shown that simultaneously with the increase of concentration of nitrogen evolved in the process of Paramecia metabolism, the biomass of Chlorella increases as well. The possibility of increasing the productivity of agal growth in the presence of a predator in a different way (due to decrease of limitation on light) has been considered. A laboratory growth experiment revealed a positive effect of Gammarus presence on Ulva spp. growth, probably caused by removal of epiphytic diatoms from the Ulva spp. thalli.

  2. Parasite transfer from crustacean to fish hosts in the Lübeck Bight, SW Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zander, C. D.; Groenewold, S.; Strohbach, U.

    1994-03-01

    Four helminth parasites out of 19 species found in the Lübeck Bight, Baltic Sea, were chosen for investigations on the transfer from invertebrate to small-sized fish hosts: larvae of the tapeworms Schistocephalus sp. and Bothriocephalus sp. (Cestoda) living in planktonic copepods as primary hosts; Podocotyle atomon (Digenea) and Hysterothylacium sp. (Nematoda) were found in benthic crustaceans, especially Gammarus spp. These hosts were the prey of 3 gobiid fishes, Gobiusculus flavescens (feeding mainly on plankton), Pomatoschistus minutus (preferring benthos), and P. pictus (feeding more on plankton than benthos). Because the fishes selected smaller sizes of crustaceans, they ingested all stages of the copepods but only the smaller-sized groups of gammarids which were often less infested by parasites. In order to evaluate the probability for a fish to be parasitized by a helminth, an infestation potential index (IP) was calculated. Podocotyle atomon and Hysterothylacium sp. revealed an IP which was far lower in gobies than expected when the prevalences of the previous hosts were taken into consideration. The IP of tapeworm larvae was mainly influenced by the feeding pressure of the gobiid predators, which might change with developmental stage and season. It is concluded that parasite transfer to the next host decreases when sizes of prey and predator differ only moderately. This mechanism can reduce the numbers of parasites transferred to less suitable or wrong hosts.

  3. Role of cellular compartmentalization in the trophic transfer of mercury species in a freshwater plant-crustacean food chain.

    PubMed

    Beauvais-Flück, Rebecca; Chaumot, Arnaud; Gimbert, Frédéric; Quéau, Hervé; Geffard, Olivier; Slaveykova, Vera I; Cosio, Claudia

    2016-12-15

    Mercury (Hg) represents an important risk for human health through the food webs contamination. Macrophytes bioaccumulate Hg and play a role in Hg transfer to food webs in shallow aquatic ecosystems. Nevertheless, the compartmentalization of Hg within macrophytes, notably major accumulation in the cell wall and its impact on trophic transfer to primary consumers are overlooked. The present work focusses on the trophic transfer of inorganic Hg (IHg) and monomethyl-Hg (MMHg) from the intracellular and cell wall compartments of the macrophyte Elodea nuttallii - considered a good candidate for phytoremediation - to the crustacean Gammarus fossarum. The results demonstrated that Hg accumulated in both compartments was trophically bioavailable to gammarids. Besides IHg from both compartments were similarly transferred to G. fossarum, while for MMHg, uptake rates were ∼2.5-fold higher in G. fossarum fed with the cell wall vs the intracellular compartment. During the depuration phase, Hg concentrations in G. fossarum varied insignificantly suggesting that both IHg and MMHg were strongly bound to biological ligands in the crustacean. Our data imply that cell walls have to be considered as an important source of Hg to consumers in freshwater food webs when developing procedures for enhancing aquatic environment protection during phytoremediation programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Floating seaweed in the neustonic environment: A case study from Belgian coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandendriessche, Sofie; Vincx, Magda; Degraer, Steven

    2006-02-01

    Floating seaweeds form the most important natural component of all floating material found on the surface of oceans and seas. Notwithstanding the absence of natural rocky shores, ephemeral floating seaweed clumps are frequently encountered along the Belgian coast. From October 2002 to April 2003, seaweed samples and control samples (i.e. surface water samples from a seaweed-free area) were collected every other week. Multivariate analysis on neustonic macrofaunal abundances showed significant differences between seaweed and control samples in the fraction > 1 mm. Differences were less conspicuous in the 0.5-1 mm fraction. Seaweed samples were characterised by the presence of seaweed fauna e.g. Acari, Idotea baltica, Gammarus sp ., while control samples mainly contained Calanoida, Larvacea, Chaetognatha, and planktonic larvae of crustaceans and polychaetes. Seaweed samples (1 mm fraction) harboured considerably higher diversities (× 3), densities (× 18) and biomasses (× 49) compared to the surrounding water column (control samples). The impact of floating seaweeds on the neustonic environment was quantified by the calculation of the added values of seaweed samples considering biomass and density. These calculations resulted in mean added values of 311 ind m - 2 in density and 305 mg ADW m - 2 in biomass. The association degree per species was expressed as the mean percentage of individuals found in seaweed samples in proportion to the total density and biomass of that species (seaweed samples + control samples). Thirteen species showed an association percentage > 95%, and can therefore be considered members of the floating seaweed fauna.

  5. The effects of electrofishing on the invertebrates of a Lake District stream.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J M; Bagenal, T B

    1972-03-01

    The experiments were performed in Dale Park Beck, a stony stream in the English Lake District. Two operators electrofished the sampling area (length 20 m in April and July 1970, and 40 m in May 1971) three times (runs 1, 2, 3) in each experiment.Electrofishing caused a marked increase in the number of invertebrates drifting out of the sampling area, and nearly all taxa taken in the bottom samples were also found in the drift samples. The fish shocker was chiefly responsible for the increased drifting of Plecoptera, Ephemeroptera and Gammarus pulex, and these taxa were dislodged from the substratum more easily than Trichoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera and Polycelis felina. The increased drifting of the latter taxa was chiefly due to the disturbance of the substratum by the two operators.Most of the invertebrates drifting from the upstream end of the experimental section returned to the bottom within the sampling area. The invertebrate drift out of the sampling area came chiefly from the downstream end of the section, and was equivalent to a loss of only 5% from the total benthos in the sampling area (losses varied between <1 and 13% for individual taxa).

  6. Eaten alive: cannibalism is enhanced by parasites

    PubMed Central

    Bunke, Mandy; Alexander, Mhairi E.; Dick, Jaimie T. A.; Hatcher, Melanie J.; Paterson, Rachel; Dunn, Alison M.

    2015-01-01

    Cannibalism is ubiquitous in nature and especially pervasive in consumers with stage-specific resource utilization in resource-limited environments. Cannibalism is thus influential in the structure and functioning of biological communities. Parasites are also pervasive in nature and, we hypothesize, might affect cannibalism since infection can alter host foraging behaviour. We investigated the effects of a common parasite, the microsporidian Pleistophora mulleri, on the cannibalism rate of its host, the freshwater amphipod Gammarus duebeni celticus. Parasitic infection increased the rate of cannibalism by adults towards uninfected juvenile conspecifics, as measured by adult functional responses, that is, the rate of resource uptake as a function of resource density. This may reflect the increased metabolic requirements of the host as driven by the parasite. Furthermore, when presented with a choice, uninfected adults preferred to cannibalize uninfected rather than infected juvenile conspecifics, probably reflecting selection pressure to avoid the risk of parasite acquisition. By contrast, infected adults were indiscriminate with respect to infection status of their victims, probably owing to metabolic costs of infection and the lack of risk as the cannibals were already infected. Thus parasitism, by enhancing cannibalism rates, may have previously unrecognized effects on stage structure and population dynamics for cannibalistic species and may also act as a selective pressure leading to changes in resource use. PMID:26064614

  7. Modelling survival: exposure pattern, species sensitivity and uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashauer, Roman; Albert, Carlo; Augustine, Starrlight; Cedergreen, Nina; Charles, Sandrine; Ducrot, Virginie; Focks, Andreas; Gabsi, Faten; Gergs, André; Goussen, Benoit; Jager, Tjalling; Kramer, Nynke I.; Nyman, Anna-Maija; Poulsen, Veronique; Reichenberger, Stefan; Schäfer, Ralf B.; van den Brink, Paul J.; Veltman, Karin; Vogel, Sören; Zimmer, Elke I.; Preuss, Thomas G.

    2016-07-01

    The General Unified Threshold model for Survival (GUTS) integrates previously published toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic models and estimates survival with explicitly defined assumptions. Importantly, GUTS accounts for time-variable exposure to the stressor. We performed three studies to test the ability of GUTS to predict survival of aquatic organisms across different pesticide exposure patterns, time scales and species. Firstly, using synthetic data, we identified experimental data requirements which allow for the estimation of all parameters of the GUTS proper model. Secondly, we assessed how well GUTS, calibrated with short-term survival data of Gammarus pulex exposed to four pesticides, can forecast effects of longer-term pulsed exposures. Thirdly, we tested the ability of GUTS to estimate 14-day median effect concentrations of malathion for a range of species and use these estimates to build species sensitivity distributions for different exposure patterns. We find that GUTS adequately predicts survival across exposure patterns that vary over time. When toxicity is assessed for time-variable concentrations species may differ in their responses depending on the exposure profile. This can result in different species sensitivity rankings and safe levels. The interplay of exposure pattern and species sensitivity deserves systematic investigation in order to better understand how organisms respond to stress, including humans.

  8. Tracking living decapod larvae: mass staining of eggs with neutral red prior to hatching.

    PubMed

    Øresland, V; Horobin, R W

    2012-04-01

    Mass staining of decapod females carrying eggs, with subsequent identification of hatched larvae in the environment, is a research tool with great potential for field ecologists wishing to track the movements of larvae. For this to be achieved, however, numerous requirements must be met. These include adequate dye solubility, short staining time, dye penetration through different tissues, dye retention within the organism, absence of toxic and behavioral effects, low visibility to predators of stained larvae, no loss of staining owing to preservatives and low cost. The dye, neutral red, appears to meet most of these requirements. This dye was used in aliquots of 0.7 g/770 ml seawater applied to the females of Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) and European lobster (Homarus gammarus) for 10 min. This procedure stained lobster eggs and embryos so that hatched larvae could be distinguished easily by fluorescence microscopy from larvae that hatched from unstained eggs. Stained larvae that were preserved in 4% formaldehyde in seawater were still stained after 1 year. Larvae should not come in contact with ethanol, because it extracts the dye rapidly.

  9. Total Catch of a Red-Listed Marine Species Is an Order of Magnitude Higher than Official Data

    PubMed Central

    Kleiven, Alf Ring; Olsen, Esben Moland; Vølstad, Jon Helge

    2012-01-01

    Accurate information on total catch and effort is essential for successful fisheries management. Officially reported landings, however, may be underestimates of total catch in many fisheries. We investigated the fishery for the nationally red-listed European lobster (Homarus gammarus) in south-eastern Norway. Probability-based strip transect surveys were used to count buoys in the study area in combination with catch per unit effort data obtained independently from volunteer catch diaries, phone interviews, and questionnaires. We estimate that recreational catch accounts for 65% of total catch in the study area. Moreover, our results indicate that only a small proportion (24%) of lobsters landed commercially were sold through the legal market and documented. Total estimated lobster catch was nearly 14 times higher than reported officially. Our study highlights the need for adequate catch monitoring and data collection efforts in coastal areas, presents a clear warning to resource managers that illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fisheries in coastal areas should not be ignored, and shows the potential impact of recreational fisheries. PMID:22363583

  10. Thermal Preference Ranges Correlate with Stable Signals of Universal Stress Markers in Lake Baikal Endemic and Holarctic Amphipods

    PubMed Central

    Axenov-Gribanov, Denis; Bedulina, Daria; Shatilina, Zhanna; Jakob, Lena; Vereshchagina, Kseniya; Lubyaga, Yulia; Gurkov, Anton; Shchapova, Ekaterina; Luckenbach, Till; Lucassen, Magnus; Sartoris, Franz Josef; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Timofeyev, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is the most pervasive abiotic environmental factor for aquatic organisms. Fluctuations in temperature range lead to changes in metabolic performance. Here, we aimed to identify whether surpassing the thermal preference zones is correlated with shifts in universal cellular stress markers of protein integrity, responses to oxidative stress and lactate content, as indicators of anaerobic metabolism. Exposure of the Lake Baikal endemic amphipod species Eulimnogammarus verrucosus (Gerstfeldt, 1858), Ommatogammarus flavus (Dybowski, 1874) and of the Holarctic amphipod Gammarus lacustris Sars 1863 (Amphipoda, Crustacea) to increasing temperatures resulted in elevated heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and lactate content, elevated antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e., catalase and peroxidase), and reduced lactate dehydrogenase and glutathione S-transferase activities. Thus, the zone of stability (absence of any significant changes) of the studied molecular and biochemical markers correlated with the behaviorally preferred temperatures. We conclude that the thermal behavioral responses of the studied amphipods are directly related to metabolic processes at the cellular level. Thus, the determined thermal ranges may possibly correspond to the thermal optima. This relationship between species-specific behavioral reactions and stress response metabolism may have significant ecological consequences that result in a thermal zone-specific distribution (i.e., depths, feed spectrum, etc.) of species. As a consequence, by separating species with different temperature preferences, interspecific competition is reduced, which, in turn, increases a species’ Darwinian fitness in its environment. PMID:27706227

  11. Food quality affects secondary consumers even at low quantities: an experimental test with larval European lobster.

    PubMed

    Schoo, Katherina L; Aberle, Nicole; Malzahn, Arne M; Boersma, Maarten

    2012-01-01

    The issues of food quality and food quantity are crucial for trophic interactions. Although most research has focussed on the primary producer-herbivore link, recent studies have shown that quality effects at the bottom of the food web propagate to higher trophic levels. Negative effects of poor food quality have almost exclusively been demonstrated at higher food quantities. Whether these negative effects have the same impact at low food availability in situations where the majority if not all of the resources are channelled into routine metabolism, is under debate. In this study a tri-trophic food chain was designed, consisting of the algae Rhodomonas salina, the copepod Acartia tonsa and freshly hatched larvae of the European lobster Homarus gammarus. The lobster larvae were presented with food of two different qualities (C:P ratios) and four different quantities to investigate the combined effects of food quality and quantity. Our results show that the quality of food has an impact on the condition of lobster larvae even at very low food quantities. Food with a lower C:P content resulted in higher condition of the lobster larvae regardless of the quantity of food. These interacting effects of food quality and food quantity can have far reaching consequences for ecosystem productivity.

  12. Predatory Functional Response and Prey Choice Identify Predation Differences between Native/Invasive and Parasitised/Unparasitised Crayfish

    PubMed Central

    Haddaway, Neal R.; Wilcox, Ruth H.; Heptonstall, Rachael E. A.; Griffiths, Hannah M.; Mortimer, Robert J. G.; Christmas, Martin; Dunn, Alison M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Invasive predators may change the structure of invaded communities through predation and competition with native species. In Europe, the invasive signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus is excluding the native white clawed crayfish Austropotamobius pallipes. Methodology and Principal Findings This study compared the predatory functional responses and prey choice of native and invasive crayfish and measured impacts of parasitism on the predatory strength of the native species. Invasive crayfish showed a higher (>10%) prey (Gammarus pulex) intake rate than (size matched) natives, reflecting a shorter (16%) prey handling time. The native crayfish also showed greater selection for crustacean prey over molluscs and bloodworm, whereas the invasive species was a more generalist predator. A. pallipes parasitised by the microsporidian parasite Thelohania contejeani showed a 30% reduction in prey intake. We suggest that this results from parasite-induced muscle damage, and this is supported by a reduced (38%) attack rate and increased (30%) prey handling time. Conclusions and Significance Our results indicate that the per capita (i.e., functional response) difference between the species may contribute to success of the invader and extinction of the native species, as well as decreased biodiversity and biomass in invaded rivers. In addition, the reduced predatory strength of parasitized natives may impair their competitive abilities, facilitating exclusion by the invader. PMID:22359673

  13. Ecological effects of rubble-mound breakwater construction and channel dredging at West Harbor, Ohio (western Lake Erie)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manny, Bruce A.; Schloesser, Donald W.; Brown, Charles L.; French, John R. P.

    1985-01-01

    The investigation reported herein indicated that breakwater construction and associated channel dredging activities by the US Army Corps of Engineers in western Lake Erie at the entrance to West Harbor (Ohio) had no detectable adverse impacts on the distributions or abundances of macrozoobenthos and fishes. Rather, increases were noted in the number of fish eggs and larvae and in the density and biomass of periphyton and macrozoobenthos on and near the breakwaters. The area also served as a nursery ground for 20 species of fishes both during and after construction and dredging activities. Colonization of the breakwaters by periphyton, primarily a green alga (Cladophora glomerata), diatoms (Gomphonema parvulum), and a bluegreen alga (Oscillatoria tenuis), and by macrozoobenthos, primarily worms (Oligochaeta), amphipods (Gammarus spp.), and midge larvae (Chironomidae), was rapid and extensive, indicating that the breakwaters provided new, favorable habitat for primary and secondary producer organisms. Marked adverse changes in water quality, especially reduced dissolved oxygen concentrations (25 mg/l), occurred around the entrance to West Harbor in 1983 following cessation of construction and dredging activities. These water quality changes, however, could not be ascribed with certainty to construction and dredging activities at West Harbor. Construction of additional breakwaters in the study area at that time by the State of Ohio served to confound determination of the responsible causal factors.

  14. Thermal Preference Ranges Correlate with Stable Signals of Universal Stress Markers in Lake Baikal Endemic and Holarctic Amphipods.

    PubMed

    Axenov-Gribanov, Denis; Bedulina, Daria; Shatilina, Zhanna; Jakob, Lena; Vereshchagina, Kseniya; Lubyaga, Yulia; Gurkov, Anton; Shchapova, Ekaterina; Luckenbach, Till; Lucassen, Magnus; Sartoris, Franz Josef; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Timofeyev, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is the most pervasive abiotic environmental factor for aquatic organisms. Fluctuations in temperature range lead to changes in metabolic performance. Here, we aimed to identify whether surpassing the thermal preference zones is correlated with shifts in universal cellular stress markers of protein integrity, responses to oxidative stress and lactate content, as indicators of anaerobic metabolism. Exposure of the Lake Baikal endemic amphipod species Eulimnogammarus verrucosus (Gerstfeldt, 1858), Ommatogammarus flavus (Dybowski, 1874) and of the Holarctic amphipod Gammarus lacustris Sars 1863 (Amphipoda, Crustacea) to increasing temperatures resulted in elevated heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and lactate content, elevated antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e., catalase and peroxidase), and reduced lactate dehydrogenase and glutathione S-transferase activities. Thus, the zone of stability (absence of any significant changes) of the studied molecular and biochemical markers correlated with the behaviorally preferred temperatures. We conclude that the thermal behavioral responses of the studied amphipods are directly related to metabolic processes at the cellular level. Thus, the determined thermal ranges may possibly correspond to the thermal optima. This relationship between species-specific behavioral reactions and stress response metabolism may have significant ecological consequences that result in a thermal zone-specific distribution (i.e., depths, feed spectrum, etc.) of species. As a consequence, by separating species with different temperature preferences, interspecific competition is reduced, which, in turn, increases a species' Darwinian fitness in its environment.

  15. Modelling survival: exposure pattern, species sensitivity and uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Ashauer, Roman; Albert, Carlo; Augustine, Starrlight; Cedergreen, Nina; Charles, Sandrine; Ducrot, Virginie; Focks, Andreas; Gabsi, Faten; Gergs, André; Goussen, Benoit; Jager, Tjalling; Kramer, Nynke I.; Nyman, Anna-Maija; Poulsen, Veronique; Reichenberger, Stefan; Schäfer, Ralf B.; Van den Brink, Paul J.; Veltman, Karin; Vogel, Sören; Zimmer, Elke I.; Preuss, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    The General Unified Threshold model for Survival (GUTS) integrates previously published toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic models and estimates survival with explicitly defined assumptions. Importantly, GUTS accounts for time-variable exposure to the stressor. We performed three studies to test the ability of GUTS to predict survival of aquatic organisms across different pesticide exposure patterns, time scales and species. Firstly, using synthetic data, we identified experimental data requirements which allow for the estimation of all parameters of the GUTS proper model. Secondly, we assessed how well GUTS, calibrated with short-term survival data of Gammarus pulex exposed to four pesticides, can forecast effects of longer-term pulsed exposures. Thirdly, we tested the ability of GUTS to estimate 14-day median effect concentrations of malathion for a range of species and use these estimates to build species sensitivity distributions for different exposure patterns. We find that GUTS adequately predicts survival across exposure patterns that vary over time. When toxicity is assessed for time-variable concentrations species may differ in their responses depending on the exposure profile. This can result in different species sensitivity rankings and safe levels. The interplay of exposure pattern and species sensitivity deserves systematic investigation in order to better understand how organisms respond to stress, including humans. PMID:27381500

  16. Do male and female gammarids defend themselves differently during chemical stress?

    PubMed

    Gismondi, E; Cossu-Leguille, C; Beisel, J-N

    2013-09-15

    To investigate xenobiotic impacts on organism physiology, several studies involve biomarker assessment. However, most studies do not take into account the toxic effect on both males and females. Here, we have investigated the influence of gender on the detoxification response (reduced glutathione, metallothionein, γ-glutamylcystein ligase and carotenoid), energy reserves (protein, lipids and glycogen) and biomarker of toxic effects (malondialdehyde) in Gammarus roeseli exposed to cadmium. A principal component analysis revealed that G. roeseli males and females were differently impacted by cadmium. We observed lower malondialdehyde levels in females than in males, whatever the condition tested (i.e. control, 2 and 8 μg CdL(-1)), although the pattern of responses of control and exposures to 2 or 8 μgL(-1) was the same for both genders. Results could be linked to apparently more effective detoxification displayed by females than by males. Protein concentrations were unchanged in both genders, lipids contents were always significantly decreased and glycogen contents decreased only in females. This study supports the importance of taking into account the gender in ecotoxicological studies to have an overview of xenobiotics effects on a population.

  17. Comparative toxicokinetics of organic micropollutants in freshwater crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Junho; Kurth, Denise; Ashauer, Roman; Hollender, Juliane

    2013-08-06

    Exposure and depuration experiments for Gammarus pulex and Daphnia magna were conducted to quantitatively analyze biotransformation products (BTPs) of organic micropollutants (tramadol, irgarol, and terbutryn). Quantification for BTPs without available standards was performed using an estimation method based on physicochemical properties. Time-series of internal concentrations of micropollutants and BTPs were used to estimate the toxicokinetic rates describing uptake, elimination, and biotransformation processes. Bioaccumulation factors (BAF) for the parents and retention potential factors (RPF), representing the ratio of the internal amount of BTPs to the parent at steady state, were calculated. Nonlinear correlation of excretion rates with hydrophobicity indicates that BTPs with lower hydrophobicity are not always excreted faster than the parent compound. For irgarol, G.pulex showed comparable elimination, but greater uptake and BAF/RPF values than D.magna. Further, G. pulex had a whole set of secondary transformations that D. magna lacked. Tramadol was transformed more and faster than irgarol and there were large differences in toxicokinetic rates for the structurally similar compounds irgarol and terbutryn. Thus, predictability of toxicokinetics across species and compounds needs to consider biotransformation and may be more challenging than previously thought because we found large differences in closely related species and similar chemical structures.

  18. Metal accumulation by an epigean and a hypogean freshwater amphipod: Considerations for water quality assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Pienet, S.

    1999-12-01

    To evaluate their potential as biomonitors of surface and underground water quality, the accumulation of essential metals, zinc and copper, by two species of amphipod crustaceans, Gammarus fossarum (an epigean amphipod) and Niphargus rhenorhodanensis (a similar but blind and hypogean form) was investigated. These two species were exposed, under controlled laboratory conditions, to different metal concentrations for 12 days. Several concentrations of each of the two metals separately and one concentration of a mixture of both were tested. Percent mortality revealed that the hypogean species was more resistant than the epigean. During the 12 days of experiment, accumulation patterns differed between species and between metals. G. fossarum, but not N. rhenorhodanensis, accumulated zinc at exposures of up to 12 days and concentrations as great as 1,000 {micro}g/L. Zinc levels in tissue of G. fossarum were greater than in those of N. rhenorhodanensis. Epigean and hypogean amphipods did not clearly accumulate copper in exposures as great at 65 {micro}g/L. Possible reasons for the differences in zinc and copper accumulation between the two species are discussed. Finally, the suitability of the two species as biomonitors for surface and underground water is discussed.

  19. Predicting life-history adaptations to pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Maltby, L.

    1995-12-31

    Animals may adapt to pollutant stress so that individuals from polluted environments are less susceptible than those from unpolluted environments. In addition to such direct adaptations, animals may respond to pollutant stress by life-history modifications; so-called indirect adaptations. This paper will demonstrate how, by combining life-history theory and toxicological data, it is possible to predict stress-induced alterations in reproductive output and offspring size. Pollutant-induced alterations in age-specific survival in favor of adults and reductions in juvenile growth, conditions are predicted to select for reduced investment in reproduction and the allocation of this investment into fewer, larger offspring. Field observations on the freshwater crustaceans, Asellus aquaticus and Gammarus pulex, support these predictions. Females from metal-polluted sites had lower investment in reproduction and produced larger offspring than females of the same species from unpolluted sites. Moreover, interpopulation differences in reproductive biology persisted in laboratory cultures indicating that they had a genetic basis and were therefore due to adaptation rather than acclimation. The general applicability of this approach will be considered.

  20. Effects of the Veterinary Pharmaceutical Ivermectin in Indoor Aquatic Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Harry; Reichman, Erik P.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of the parasiticide ivermectin were assessed in plankton-dominated indoor microcosms. Ivermectin was applied once at concentrations of 30, 100, 300, 1000, 3000, and 10,000 ng/l. The half-life (dissipation time 50%; DT50) of ivermectin in the water phase ranged from 1.1 to 8.3 days. The lowest NOECcommunity that could be derived on an isolated sampling from the microcosm study by means of multivariate techniques was 100 ng/l. The most sensitive species in the microcosm study were the cladocerans Ceriodaphnia sp. (no observed effect concentration, NOEC = 30 ng/l) and Chydorus sphaericus (NOEC = 100 ng/l). The amphipod Gammarus pulex was less sensitive to ivermectin, showing consistent statistically significant reductions at the 1000-ng/l treatment level. Copepoda taxa decreased directly after application of ivermectin in the highest treatment but had already recovered at day 20 posttreatment. Indirect effects (e.g., increase of rotifers, increased primary production) were observed at the highest treatment level starting only on day 13 of the exposure phase. Cladocera showed the highest sensitivity to ivermectin in both standard laboratory toxicity tests as well as in the microcosm study. This study demonstrates that simple plankton-dominated test systems for assessing the effects of ivermectin can produce results similar to those obtained with large complex outdoor systems. PMID:20422169

  1. Influence of nearshore structure on growth and diets of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and white perch (Morone americana) in Mexico Bay, Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danehy, Robert J.; Ringler, Neil H.; Gannon, John E.

    1991-01-01

    The growth diets of 969 yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and white perch (Morone americana) caught at 3.3 and 7.0 m depths were compared between two cobble/rubble shoals and two featureless sand sites in Mexico Bay, eastern Lake Ontario during 1981. The growth rate of both species was significantly greater for individuals captured over the cobble/rubble shoals. Females of both species were faster growing than the males, although only significantly so in the white perch. The seasonal diet and breadth of diet (H′) of yellow perch and white perch were not substantially different with respect to substrate type. Diet overlap between substrate types was also equivalent for each species. Benthic invertebrates, primarilyGammarus spp., were the major prey of both species at all sites. Alewife eggs were the most important item for the white perch in mid-summer, and alewife juveniles were important to both species in the fall. Differences in growth patterns between cobble/rubble shoals and sand sites illustrate a subtle effect of habitat on these species.

  2. Bioenergetics of juveniles of red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii).

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Yurrita, P J; Montes, C

    2001-08-01

    Procambarus clarkii is an endemic North American crayfish species that was introduced into Spain in 1973 for aquacultural and fishing purposes. Although P. clarkii is a well-studied species for commercial production, there is a great gap in the knowledge of the bioenergetics of juveniles. The aims of this study were to quantify the elements of the energy flow for juveniles of P. clarkii when fed in the laboratory on four different diets. The diets used were: (1) trade commercial feed; (2) various dried algal species; (3) dried Gammarus pulex; and (4) an equal mixture of algal species and G. pulex. The best energetic balance was obtained with diet 3 (greatest energy directed to production P=57%; least energetic investment in respiration R=31%, excretion U=9%, but highest energy loss via faeces F=4%). The poorest energetic balance was observed with diet 4 (P=26.3%; R=55.5%; U=14.7%, but lower energy loss in faeces F=3.5%). The mean O:N relationship was 1.37+/-2.15, implying marked protein catabolism. The utility of studying the bioenergetics of juvenile P. clarkii in laboratory conditions results in the formulation of testable hypotheses about ecological facts and the provision of new insights into the management of their populations in natural environments.

  3. Infection with an acanthocephalan manipulates an amphipod's reaction to a fish predator's odours.

    PubMed

    Baldauf, Sebastian A; Thünken, Timo; Frommen, Joachim G; Bakker, Theo C M; Heupel, Oliver; Kullmann, Harald

    2007-01-01

    Many parasites with complex life cycles increase the chances of reaching a final host by adapting strategies to manipulate their intermediate host's appearance, condition or behaviour. The acanthocephalan parasite Pomphorhynchus laevis uses freshwater amphipods as intermediate hosts before reaching sexual maturity in predatory fish. We performed a series of choice experiments with infected and uninfected Gammarus pulex in order to distinguish between the effects of visual and olfactory predator cues on parasite-induced changes in host behaviour. When both visual and olfactory cues, as well as only olfactory cues were offered, infected and uninfected G. pulex showed significantly different preferences for the predator or the non-predator side. Uninfected individuals significantly avoided predator odours while infected individuals significantly preferred the side with predator odours. When only visual contact with a predator was allowed, infected and uninfected gammarids behaved similarly and had no significant preference. Thus, we believe we show for the first time that P. laevis increases its chance to reach a final host by olfactory-triggered manipulation of the anti-predator behaviour of its intermediate host.

  4. Predatory functional response and prey choice identify predation differences between native/invasive and parasitised/unparasitised crayfish.

    PubMed

    Haddaway, Neal R; Wilcox, Ruth H; Heptonstall, Rachael E A; Griffiths, Hannah M; Mortimer, Robert J G; Christmas, Martin; Dunn, Alison M

    2012-01-01

    Invasive predators may change the structure of invaded communities through predation and competition with native species. In Europe, the invasive signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus is excluding the native white clawed crayfish Austropotamobius pallipes. This study compared the predatory functional responses and prey choice of native and invasive crayfish and measured impacts of parasitism on the predatory strength of the native species. Invasive crayfish showed a higher (>10%) prey (Gammarus pulex) intake rate than (size matched) natives, reflecting a shorter (16%) prey handling time. The native crayfish also showed greater selection for crustacean prey over molluscs and bloodworm, whereas the invasive species was a more generalist predator. A. pallipes parasitised by the microsporidian parasite Thelohania contejeani showed a 30% reduction in prey intake. We suggest that this results from parasite-induced muscle damage, and this is supported by a reduced (38%) attack rate and increased (30%) prey handling time. Our results indicate that the per capita (i.e., functional response) difference between the species may contribute to success of the invader and extinction of the native species, as well as decreased biodiversity and biomass in invaded rivers. In addition, the reduced predatory strength of parasitized natives may impair their competitive abilities, facilitating exclusion by the invader.

  5. Impacts of pesticides and natural stressors on leaf litter decomposition in agricultural streams.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Jes Jesssen; Wiberg-Larsen, Peter; Baattrup-Pedersen, Annette; Monberg, Rikke Juul; Kronvang, Brian

    2012-02-01

    Agricultural pesticides are known to significantly impact the composition of communities in stream ecosystems. Moreover, agricultural streams are often characterised by loss of physical habitat diversity which may impose additional stress resulting from suboptimal environmental conditions. We surveyed pesticide contamination and rates of leaf litter decomposition in 14 1st and 2nd order Danish streams using litter bags with coarse and fine mesh sizes. Two sites differing in physical habitat complexity were sampled in each stream, and we used this approach to differentiate the effects of pesticides between sites with uniform (silt and sand) and more heterogeneous physical properties. Microbial litter decomposition was reduced by a factor two to four in agricultural streams compared to forested streams, and we found that the rate of microbial litter decomposition responded most strongly to pesticide toxicity for microorganisms and not to eutrophication. Moreover, the rate of microbial litter decomposition was generally 50% lower at sites with uniform physical habitats dominated by soft substrate compared to the sites with more heterogeneous physical habitats. The rate of macroinvertebrate shredding activity was governed by the density of shredders, and the density of shredders was not correlated to pesticide contamination mainly due to high abundances of the amphipod Gammarus pulex at all sites. Our study provides the first field based results on the importance of multiple stressors and their potential to increase the effect of agricultural pesticides on important ecosystem processes.

  6. Structural and functional effects of conventional and low pesticide input crop-protection programs on benthic macroinvertebrate communities in outdoor pond mesocosms.

    PubMed

    Auber, Arnaud; Roucaute, Marc; Togola, Anne; Caquet, Thierry

    2011-11-01

    The impacts of current and alternative wheat crop protection programs were compared in outdoor pond mesocosms in a 10-month long study. Realistic exposure scenarios were built based upon the results of modelling of drift, drainage and runoff of pesticides successively applied under two environmental situations characteristics of drained soils of northern France. Each situation was associated to two crop protection programs ("Conventional" and "Low-input") differing in the nature of pesticides used, number of treatments and application rate. Both programs induced significant direct negative effects on various invertebrate groups. Bifenthrin and cyprodynil were identified as the main responsible for these effects in conventional and low-input program, respectively. Indirect effects were also demonstrated especially following treatments with cyprodynil. Litter breakdown was significantly reduced in all treated mesocosms as the functional consequence of the decrease in the abundance of shredders (asellids, Gammarus pulex) illustrating the link between structural and functional effects of pesticides on macroinvertebrate communities. Recovery was observed for many taxa before the end of the study but not for the most sensitive non mobile taxa such as G. pulex. No influence of the agropedoclimatic situation on the effects was shown, suggesting than the main impacts were associated to inputs from drift. The results confirm that the proposed low-input program was less hazardous than the conventional program but the observed structural and functional impact of the low-input program suggest that further improvement of alternative crop protection programs is still needed.

  7. Field evidence for non-host predator avoidance in a manipulated amphipod.

    PubMed

    Médoc, Vincent; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas

    2009-04-01

    Manipulative parasites are known to alter the spatial distribution of their intermediate hosts in a way that enables trophic transmission to definitive hosts. However, field data on the ecological implications of such changes are lacking. In particular, little is known about the spatial coexistence between infected prey and dead-end predators after a parasite-induced habitat shift. Here, we used an Amphipoda (Gammarus roeseli)-Acanthocephala (Polymorphus minutus) association to investigate how infection with a manipulative parasite affects the predation risk by non-hosts within the invertebrate community. First, we collected invertebrates by sampling various natural habitats and calculated the distribution amplitude of amphipods according to their infection status. Infection with P. minutus significantly reduced the habitat breadth in G. roeseli, parasitised individuals being mainly found in floating materials whereas uninfected ones were widespread throughout the sampled habitats. Second, to test if these changes also affect the risk for P. minutus to be ingested by non-hosts, we estimated the predation risk experienced by G. roeseli within the macro-invertebrate community. The habitat overlap between potential invertebrate predators and G. roeseli showed that the spatial probability of encounter was lower for P. minutus-infected amphipods than for uninfected conspecifics. For the first time, to our knowledge, a study used ecological tools to bring field evidence for the spatial avoidance of dead-end predators in a manipulated amphipod.

  8. Endangered cave crustacean could be water quality indicator in Illinois Karst Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstrack, Randy

    Some of the rolling, rural countryside of southwestern Illinois has become just a 20-minute commute from the sprawling city of St. Louis, Missouri, across the Mississippi River, now that newly built roads have opened up the landscape. But as more houses rise in rapidly developing bedroom communities, increasing levels of coliform bacteria—probably originating from septic systems and livestock—are being found in the groundwater. Trace amounts of pesticides, including atrazine, also are present.These contaminants, in large enough quantities, can pollute groundwater and cause public health problems. They also appear to be responsible for the decreased habitat and population of a little-known cave-dwelling crustacean, the Illinois Cave Amphipod (Gammarus acherondytes), a tailless shrimp that can grow up to 20 mm in length and that swims in underground streams in cave dark zones. Decreased dissolved oxygen content in the streams, resulting from land development activities that can cause faster surface runoff, also may affect the amphipod.

  9. Parasite-induced changes in the diet of a freshwater amphipod: field and laboratory evidence.

    PubMed

    Médoc, V; Piscart, C; Maazouzi, C; Simon, L; Beisel, J-N

    2011-04-01

    Trophically transmitted parasites are likely to strongly influence food web-structure. The extent to which they change the trophic ecology of their host remains nevertheless poorly investigated and field evidence is lacking. This is particularly true for acanthocephalan parasites whose invertebrate hosts can prey on other invertebrates and contribute to leaf-litter breakdown. We used a multiple approach combining feeding experiments, neutral lipids and stable isotopes to investigate the trophic ecology of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus roeseli parasitized by the bird acanthocephalan Polymorphus minutus. Infected compared to uninfected amphipods consumed as many dead isopods, but fewer live isopods and less leaf material. Infection had no influence on the total concentration of neutral lipids. Contrary to what we expected based on laboratory findings, the nitrogen isotope signature, which allows for the estimation of consumer's trophic position, was not influenced by infection status. Conversely, the carbon isotope signature, which is used to identify food sources, changed with infection and suggested that the diet of infected G. roeseli includes less perilithon (i.e. fixed algae on rocks, stones) but more terrestrial inputs (e.g. leaf material) than that of uninfected conspecifics. This study shows evidence of changes in the trophic ecology of P. minutus-infected G. roeseli and we stress the need to complement feeding experiments with field data when investigating top-down effects of infection in an opportunistic feeder which adapts its diet to the available food sources.

  10. Effect of Macroinvertebrate Functional Diversity on Leaf Decomposition in a Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, E.; Hoefeijzers, B.; Franken, R.

    2005-05-01

    Biodiversity on earth is decreasing, yet still little is known of the effects of this loss on ecosystem functioning. The majority of studies dealing with species diversity and ecosystem functioning found a positive relationship. Different species may have similar functions in an ecosystem and can be clustered in functional groups. Based on their adaptations for food acquisition, macroinvertebrates are divided in different functional feeding groups. We performed a 12 days lasting laboratory experiment in which we studied the decomposition of poplar leaves under different combinations of three functional feeding groups (shredders, collector-filterers, grazers). As test-organisms were used: Gammarus pulex and Asellus aquaticus as shredders, Bythinia tentaculata and Planorbis planorbis as grazers, and Dreissena polymorpha and Hydropsyche angustipennis as collector-filterers. The results of our experiment show that all three functional groups alone contributed significantly to the decomposition of the poplar leaves, with the greatest decomposition rate by shredders. The contribution of the collector-filterers is due to leaf use for case building by H. angustipennis. Decomposition by shredders in combination with grazers or collectors or both grazers and collectors is not significantly different from decomposition by shredders alone. Therefore, there seems no relationship between functional feeding-group diversity and rate of decomposition.

  11. Habitat Complexity of Stream Leaf Packs: Effects on Benthic Macroinvertebrates and Leaf Litter Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruetz, C. R.; Vanhaitsma, D. L.; Breen, M. J.

    2005-05-01

    We investigated two attributes of leaf-pack complexity (i.e., leaf-pack mass and leaf surface area) on fish predation, colonization of benthic macroinvertebrates, and leaf breakdown rates in a coldwater Michigan stream. We manipulated three factors using a factorial design: fish (exclusion or control cage), leaf-pack mass (1, 3, or 5 g dry mass), and leaf surface area (<7, 7-10, or >10 cm leaf width). Acer leaves were fastened into leaf packs. Exclusion cages had mesh on all sides; control cages lacked mesh on two sides to provide access to fishes. Two replicate leaf packs were randomly collected after 25-31 d from two sections of the stream (n = 4). Common shredders were Gammarus, Pycnopsyche, and Lepidostoma. We did not detect a significant effect of fish predation on benthic macroinvertebrates or leaf breakdown (i.e., mass loss). Colonization of benthic macroinvertebrates appeared proportional to leaf-pack mass but was unaffected by the surface area of leaves. Leaf breakdown was more rapid among leaf packs with fewer leaves (i.e., leaves with large surface area and leaf packs with low mass) and greater numbers of shredders. We suspect that physical fragmentation is the primary mechanism for higher breakdown rates among leaf packs with fewer leaves.

  12. History Matters: Pre-Exposure to Wastewater Enhances Pesticide Toxicity in Invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Zubrod, Jochen P; Englert, Dominic; Lüderwald, Simon; Poganiuch, Sandra; Schulz, Ralf; Bundschuh, Mirco

    2017-08-15

    Disturbance regimes determine communities' structure and functioning. Nonetheless, little effort has been undertaken to understand interactions of press and pulse disturbances. In this context, leaf-shredding macroinvertebrates can be chronically exposed to wastewater treatment plant effluents (i.e., press disturbance) before experiencing pesticide exposure following agricultural runoff (i.e., pulse disturbance). It is assumed that wastewater pre-exposure alters animals' sensitivity to pesticides. To test this hypothesis, we exposed model-populations of the shredder Gammarus fossarum to wastewater at three field-relevant dilution levels (i.e., 0%, 50%, and 100%). After 2, 4, and 6 weeks, survival, leaf consumption, dry weight, and energy reserves were monitored. Additionally, animals were assessed for their sensitivity toward the neonicotinoid insecticide thiacloprid using their feeding rate as response variable. Both wastewater treatments reduced gammarids' survival, leaf consumption, dry weight, and energy reserves. Moreover, both wastewater pre-exposure scenarios increased animals' sensitivity toward thiacloprid by up to 2.5 times compared to the control. Our results thus demonstrate that press disturbance as posed by wastewater pre-exposure can enhance susceptibility of key players in ecosystem functioning to further (pulse) disturbances. Therefore, applying mitigation measures such as advanced treatment technologies seems sensible to support functional integrity in the multiple-stress situation.

  13. Food Quality Affects Secondary Consumers Even at Low Quantities: An Experimental Test with Larval European Lobster

    PubMed Central

    Schoo, Katherina L.; Aberle, Nicole; Malzahn, Arne M.; Boersma, Maarten

    2012-01-01

    The issues of food quality and food quantity are crucial for trophic interactions. Although most research has focussed on the primary producer – herbivore link, recent studies have shown that quality effects at the bottom of the food web propagate to higher trophic levels. Negative effects of poor food quality have almost exclusively been demonstrated at higher food quantities. Whether these negative effects have the same impact at low food availability in situations where the majority if not all of the resources are channelled into routine metabolism, is under debate. In this study a tri-trophic food chain was designed, consisting of the algae Rhodomonas salina, the copepod Acartia tonsa and freshly hatched larvae of the European lobster Homarus gammarus. The lobster larvae were presented with food of two different qualities (C∶P ratios) and four different quantities to investigate the combined effects of food quality and quantity. Our results show that the quality of food has an impact on the condition of lobster larvae even at very low food quantities. Food with a lower C∶P content resulted in higher condition of the lobster larvae regardless of the quantity of food. These interacting effects of food quality and food quantity can have far reaching consequences for ecosystem productivity. PMID:22442696

  14. Lobster and cod benefit from small-scale northern marine protected areas: inference from an empirical before–after control-impact study

    PubMed Central

    Moland, Even; Olsen, Esben Moland; Knutsen, Halvor; Garrigou, Pauline; Espeland, Sigurd Heiberg; Kleiven, Alf Ring; André, Carl; Knutsen, Jan Atle

    2013-01-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are increasingly implemented as tools to conserve and manage fisheries and target species. Because there are opportunity costs to conservation, there is a need for science-based assessment of MPAs. Here, we present one of the northernmost documentations of MPA effects to date, demonstrated by a replicated before–after control-impact (BACI) approach. In 2006, MPAs were implemented along the Norwegian Skagerrak coast offering complete protection to shellfish and partial protection to fish. By 2010, European lobster (Homarus gammarus) catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) had increased by 245 per cent in MPAs, whereas CPUE in control areas had increased by 87 per cent. Mean size of lobsters increased by 13 per cent in MPAs, whereas increase in control areas was negligible. Furthermore, MPA-responses and population development in control areas varied significantly among regions. This illustrates the importance of a replicated BACI design for reaching robust conclusions and management decisions. Partial protection of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) was followed by an increase in population density and body size compared with control areas. By 2010, MPA cod were on average 5 cm longer than in any of the control areas. MPAs can be useful management tools in rebuilding and conserving portions of depleted lobster populations in northern temperate waters, and even for a mobile temperate fish species such as the Atlantic cod. PMID:23303544

  15. Cuticles of European and American lobsters harbor diverse bacterial species and differ in disease susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Whitten, Miranda M A; Davies, Charlotte E; Kim, Anita; Tlusty, Michael; Wootton, Emma C; Chistoserdov, Andrei; Rowley, Andrew F

    2014-01-01

    Diseases of lobster shells have a significant impact on fishing industries but the risk of disease transmission between different lobster species has yet to be properly investigated. This study compared bacterial biofilm communities from American (Homarus americanus) and European lobsters (H. gammarus), to assess both healthy cuticle and diseased cuticle during lesion formation. Culture-independent molecular techniques revealed diversity in the bacterial communities of cuticle biofilms both within and between the two lobster species, and identified three bacterial genera associated with shell lesions plus two putative beneficial bacterial species (detected exclusively in healthy cuticle or healing damaged cuticle). In an experimental aquarium shared between American and European lobsters, heterospecific transmission of potentially pathogenic bacteria appeared to be very limited; however, the claws of European lobsters were more likely to develop lesions when reared in the presence of American lobsters. Aquarium biofilms were also examined but revealed no candidate pathogens for environmental transmission. Aquimarina sp. ‘homaria’ (a potential pathogen associated with a severe epizootic form of shell disease) was detected at a much higher prevalence among American than European lobsters, but its presence correlated more with exacerbation of existing lesions rather than with lesion initiation. PMID:24817518

  16. Disentangling the effects of local and regional factors on the thermal tolerance of freshwater crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Cottin, Delphine; Roussel, Damien; Foucreau, Natacha; Hervant, Frédéric; Piscart, Christophe

    2012-04-01

    In the global warming context, we compared the thermal tolerance of several populations of the crustacean Gammarus pulex (Amphipoda: Gammaridae) along a latitudinal thermal gradient in the Rhône Valley. To disentangle the effect of regional (North vs. South) and local (site-specific) factors, the ecophysiological responses of populations were investigated at two levels of biological organisation: whole organism level considering body size [critical thermal maximum (CTmax), mean speed of locomotion (MS), time mobile (TM)] and organelle function level [mitochondrial respiratory control ratios (RCRs)]. CTmax and RCRs, but not MS and TM, revealed a significantly higher thermal tolerance in southern populations compared to northern ones. Nevertheless, temperatures ≥ 30°C were deleterious for all populations, suggesting that populations located in the warmer limit of the species distribution will be more threatened by climate change as they live closer to their upper thermal limits. The strong differences observed between populations indicate that the species-level thermal tolerance used in predictive models may not be informative enough to study the impact of global warming on species distributions. This work also reveals that an appropriate choice of indicators is essential to study the consequences of global warming since the response of organisms at the whole body level can be influenced by local conditions.

  17. Benthic fauna of Blagopoluchiya Bay (Novaya Zemlya Archipelago, Kara Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalov, A. A.; Vedenin, A. A.; Simakov, M. I.

    2016-09-01

    The benthic fauna was studied in the Blagopoluchiya Bay (Kara Sea, Novaya Zemlya Archipelago) during an expedition of the R/V Professor Shtokman in autumn 2013. The inner basin of the bay, with depths of around 150 m, is separated from the outer slope of Novaya Zemlya by a shoal 30 m in depth. Six macrobenthic communities were described at nine stations (25 bottom grab samples) taken along a transect from the inner part of the bay to the outer part of the slope. The depths, position on the transect axis and sediment types were the major factors influencing the distribution of the communities. The benthic abundance and biomass in the inner and outer parts of the bay did not differ significantly. The diversity of macrobenthic organisms (α-diversity as the number of species in the sample and β-diversity as the rate of increase in species number in the area) was lower in the inner part of the bay. The intertidal zone (littoral) has been described. The littoral fauna was very poor; it comprised only the amphipods Gammarus setosus inhabiting the near-surface area.

  18. Does temporal variation of mercury levels in Arctic seabirds reflect changes in global environmental contamination, or a modification of Arctic marine food web functioning?

    PubMed

    Fort, Jérôme; Grémillet, David; Traisnel, Gwendoline; Amélineau, Françoise; Bustamante, Paco

    2016-04-01

    Studying long-term trends of contaminants in Arctic biota is essential to better understand impacts of anthropogenic activities and climate change on the exposure of sensitive species and marine ecosystems. We concurrently measured temporal changes (2006-2014) in mercury (Hg) contamination of little auks (Alle alle; the most abundant Arctic seabird) and in their major zooplankton prey species (Calanoid copepods, Themisto libellula, Gammarus spp.). We found an increasing contamination of the food-chain in East Greenland during summer over the last decade. More specifically, bird contamination (determined by body feather analyses) has increased at a rate of 3.4% per year. Conversely, bird exposure to Hg during winter in the northwest Atlantic (determined by head feather analyses) decreased over the study period (at a rate of 1.5% per year), although winter concentrations remained consistently higher than during summer. By combining mercury levels measured in birds and zooplankton to isotopic analyses, our results demonstrate that inter-annual variations of Hg levels in little auks reflect changes in food-chain contamination, rather than a reorganization of the food web and a modification of seabird trophic ecology. They therefore underline the value of little auks, and Arctic seabirds in general, as bio-indicators of long-term changes in environmental contamination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Multiple stress response of lowland stream benthic macroinvertebrates depends on habitat type.

    PubMed

    Graeber, Daniel; Jensen, Tinna M; Rasmussen, Jes J; Riis, Tenna; Wiberg-Larsen, Peter; Baattrup-Pedersen, Annette

    2017-12-01

    Worldwide, lowland stream ecosystems are exposed to multiple anthropogenic stress due to the combination of water scarcity, eutrophication, and fine sedimentation. The understanding of the effects of such multiple stress on stream benthic macroinvertebrates has been growing in recent years. However, the interdependence of multiple stress and stream habitat characteristics has received little attention, although single stressor studies indicate that habitat characteristics may be decisive in shaping the macroinvertebrate response. We conducted an experiment in large outdoor flumes to assess the effects of low flow, fine sedimentation, and nutrient enrichment on the structure of the benthic macroinvertebrate community in riffle and run habitats of lowland streams. For most taxa, we found a negative effect of low flow on macroinvertebrate abundance in the riffle habitat, an effect which was mitigated by fine sedimentation for overall community composition and the dominant shredder species (Gammarus pulex) and by nutrient enrichment for the dominant grazer species (Baetis rhodani). In contrast, fine sediment in combination with low flow rapidly affected macroinvertebrate composition in the run habitat, with decreasing abundances of many species. We conclude that the effects of typical multiple stressor scenarios on lowland stream benthic macroinvertebrates are highly dependent on habitat conditions and that high habitat diversity needs to be given priority by stream managers to maximize the resilience of stream macroinvertebrate communities to multiple stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Interaction between stress induced by competition, predation and an insecticide on the response of aquatic invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Van den Brink, Paul J; Klein, Sylvan L; Rico, Andreu

    2017-03-10

    This study investigated effects of species interactions like competition and (intraguild) predation on the sensitivity of aquatic organisms to the insecticide chlorpyrifos. In the first experiment, combined effects of chlorpyrifos and different levels of intra- and inter-specific interaction were assessed on Gammarus pulex survival using Asellus aquaticus as an interacting species. Intra- and inter-specific interactions increased the time to extinction of G. pulex up to a factor of two, most likely due to the cannibalistic nature of G. pulex and its intraguild predation on A. aquaticus under stress conditions. In the second experiment, combined effects of chlorpyrifos and intra- and inter-specific interaction were assessed on Daphnia pulex abundance using Brachionus calyciflorus as a competing species and Chaoborus sp. larvae as a predator. Intra- and inter-specific interaction significantly affected the D. pulex population structure, but they did not influence the total population size. Predation decimated D. pulex abundance, however, interacting effects of predation and chlorpyrifos exposure were found to be less noticeable at high exposure concentrations due to the reduced predatory efficiency of Chaoborus sp. larvae. This study shows species interactions do not always increase the vulnerability of aquatic populations to chemical stress and that some interactions (e.g. cannibalism and intraguild predation) or reduced predator grazing pressure can alleviate competition and predation stress on population-level insecticide effects under food limiting conditions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Allergenicity and allergens of amphipods found in nori (dried laver).

    PubMed

    Motoyama, Kanna; Hamada, Yuki; Nagashima, Yuji; Shiomi, Kazuo

    2007-09-01

    Gammaridean and caprellid amphipods, crustaceans of the order Amphipoda, inhabit laver culture platforms and, hence, are occasionally found in nori (dried laver) sheets. Amphipods mixed in nori may cause allergic reactions in sensitized patients, as is the case with other crustaceans, such as shrimp and crab, members of the order Decapoda. In this study, dried samples of amphipods (unidentified) found in nori and fresh samples of gammaridean amphipod (Gammarus sp., not accurately identified) and caprellid amphipod (Caprella equilibra) were examined for allergenicity and allergens using two species of decapods (black tiger prawn and spiny lobster) as references. When analyzed by ELISA, sera from crustacean-allergic patients reacted to extracts from amphipod samples, although less potently than to the extracts from decapods. In IgE-immunoblotting, a 37-kDa protein was found to be the major allergen in amphipods. Based on the molecular mass and the cross-reactivity with decapod tropomyosin evidenced by inhibition ELISA and inhibition immunoblotting, the 37-kDa protein was identified as amphipod tropomyosin.

  2. Effect of sulfate concentration on acute toxicity of selenite and selenate to invertebrates and fish. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, D.O.; McCauley, D.J.; McCool, P.; Winkler, N.; DeGraeve, M.

    1998-12-01

    The effect of sulfate concentration on the acute toxicity of selenite (Se IV) and selenate (Se VI) to freshwater organisms was evaluated using toxicity test data generated from this study and toxicity data obtained from the open literature. The acute toxicity of Se IV and Se VI to fathead minnows and two amphipod species, Gammarus pseudolimnaeus and Hyalella azteca, were determined in four different sulfate concentrations. The newly generated toxicity data combined with the data obtained from the literature were evaluated using analysis of covariance to determine if there was a significant relationship between acute toxicity and sulfate concentration. The analysis of the Se IV data indicated that there was not a significant relationship between the acute toxicity of Se IV and sulfate concentration. A significant relationship was found between the acute toxicity of Se VI to freshwater organisms and sulfate concentration. Statistically significant slopes describing the relationship between Se VI toxicity and sulfate concentration were determined for individual species and for the combined data. A sulfate-based equation was constructed using the pooled slope to modify the criterion maximum concentration (CMC) for selenate: CMC = e{sup [0.4259(ln[sulfate]) + 4.6305]}.

  3. Effect of submersed aquatic macrophytes on resource partitioning in yearling rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris) and pumpkinseeds (Lepomis gibbosus) in Lake St. Clair

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    French, John R. P.

    1988-01-01

    Yearling rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris), pumpkinseeds (Lepomis gibbosus), macroinvertebrates, and submersed aquatic plants were sampled at 2- or 3-week intervals from June to October 1979 in a shallow, heavily vegetated embayment in Lake St. Clair to determine whether seasonal changes in plant canopy and plant taxonomic composition affected resource partitioning in these two fish species. In both species, numbers of prey and gut volumes increased with increasing plant canopy until the plant canopy reached a seasonal maximum in mid-summer. Rock bass consumed fewer, larger prey than pumpkinseeds while large Caenidae-Trichoptera-Coenagrionidae, the prey group most preferred by rock bass, was available. Pumpkinseeds ate smaller amphipods, gastropods, and chironomid-lepidopterans that were more abundant numerically than Caenidae-Trichoptera-Coenagrionidae. After mid-summer, the plant canopy declined slowly to one-half of the maximum value, but built-up densities ofHyalella azteca, gastropods, and chironomid-lepidopterans kept availability of prey high throughout late summer. Rock bass shifted to Gammarus, gastropods, and chironomid-lepidopterans as large Caenidae-Trichoptera-Coenagrionidae became scarce. Pumpkinseeds ate more prey in the late season and displayed no prey preference. Their gut volumes peaked in September. Apparently, increasing combined canopy of bushy plants and Heteranthera dubia hindered the foraging of rock bass more than that of pumpkinseeds and caused resource partitioning in the two species.

  4. Potential for parasite-induced biases in aquatic invertebrate population studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Justin D.L.; Mushet, David M.; Stockwell, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies highlight the need to include estimates of detection/capture probability in population studies. This need is particularly important in studies where detection and/or capture probability is influenced by parasite-induced behavioral alterations. We assessed potential biases associated with sampling a population of the amphipod Gammarus lacustris in the presence of Polymorphus spp. acanthocephalan parasites shown to increase positive phototaxis in their amphipod hosts. We trapped G. lacustris at two water depths (benthic and surface) and compared number of captures and number of parasitized individuals at each depth. While we captured the greatest number of G. lacustris individuals in benthic traps, parasitized individuals were captured most often in surface traps. These results reflect the phototaxic movement of infected individuals from benthic locations to sunlit surface waters. We then explored the influence of varying infection rates on a simulated population held at a constant level of abundance. Simulations resulted in increasingly biased abundance estimates as infection rates increased. Our results highlight the need to consider parasite-induced biases when quantifying detection and/or capture probability in studies of aquatic invertebrate populations.

  5. Drastic underestimation of amphipod biodiversity in the endangered Irano-Anatolian and Caucasus biodiversity hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Katouzian, Ahmad-Reza; Sari, Alireza; Macher, Jan N.; Weiss, Martina; Saboori, Alireza; Leese, Florian; Weigand, Alexander M.

    2016-01-01

    Biodiversity hotspots are centers of biological diversity and particularly threatened by anthropogenic activities. Their true magnitude of species diversity and endemism, however, is still largely unknown as species diversity is traditionally assessed using morphological descriptions only, thereby ignoring cryptic species. This directly limits evidence-based monitoring and management strategies. Here we used molecular species delimitation methods to quantify cryptic diversity of the montane amphipods in the Irano-Anatolian and Caucasus biodiversity hotspots. Amphipods are ecosystem engineers in rivers and lakes. Species diversity was assessed by analysing two genetic markers (mitochondrial COI and nuclear 28S rDNA), compared with morphological assignments. Our results unambiguously demonstrate that species diversity and endemism is dramatically underestimated, with 42 genetically identified freshwater species in only five reported morphospecies. Over 90% of the newly recovered species cluster inside Gammarus komareki and G. lacustris; 69% of the recovered species comprise narrow range endemics. Amphipod biodiversity is drastically underestimated for the studied regions. Thus, the risk of biodiversity loss is significantly greater than currently inferred as most endangered species remain unrecognized and/or are only found locally. Integrative application of genetic assessments in monitoring programs will help to understand the true magnitude of biodiversity and accurately evaluate its threat status. PMID:26928527

  6. Artificial light and nocturnal activity in gammarids

    PubMed Central

    Hölker, Franz; Heller, Stefan; Berghahn, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Artificial light is gaining attention as a potential stressor to aquatic ecosystems. Artificial lights located near streams increase light levels experienced by stream invertebrates and we hypothesized light would depress night drift rates. We also hypothesized that the effect of light on drift rates would decrease over time as the invertebrates acclimated to the new light level over the course of one month’s exposure. These hypotheses were tested by placing Gammarus spp. in eight, 75 m × 1 m artificial flumes. One flume was exposed to strong (416 lx) artificial light at night. This strong light created a gradient between 4.19 and 0.04 lx over the neighboring six artificial flumes, while a control flume was completely covered with black plastic at night. Night-time light measurements taken in the Berlin area confirm that half the flumes were at light levels experienced by urban aquatic invertebrates. Surprisingly, no light treatment affected gammarid drift rates. In contrast, physical activity measurements of in situ individually caged G. roeseli showed they increased short-term activity levels in nights of complete darkness and decreased activity levels in brightly lit flumes. Both nocturnal and diurnal drift increased, and day drift rates were unexpectadly higher than nocturnal drift. PMID:24688857

  7. Artificial light and nocturnal activity in gammarids.

    PubMed

    Perkin, Elizabeth K; Hölker, Franz; Heller, Stefan; Berghahn, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Artificial light is gaining attention as a potential stressor to aquatic ecosystems. Artificial lights located near streams increase light levels experienced by stream invertebrates and we hypothesized light would depress night drift rates. We also hypothesized that the effect of light on drift rates would decrease over time as the invertebrates acclimated to the new light level over the course of one month's exposure. These hypotheses were tested by placing Gammarus spp. in eight, 75 m × 1 m artificial flumes. One flume was exposed to strong (416 lx) artificial light at night. This strong light created a gradient between 4.19 and 0.04 lx over the neighboring six artificial flumes, while a control flume was completely covered with black plastic at night. Night-time light measurements taken in the Berlin area confirm that half the flumes were at light levels experienced by urban aquatic invertebrates. Surprisingly, no light treatment affected gammarid drift rates. In contrast, physical activity measurements of in situ individually caged G. roeseli showed they increased short-term activity levels in nights of complete darkness and decreased activity levels in brightly lit flumes. Both nocturnal and diurnal drift increased, and day drift rates were unexpectadly higher than nocturnal drift.

  8. Hydrodynamic control of mesozooplankton abundance and biomass in northern Svalbard waters (79-81°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blachowiak-Samolyk, Katarzyna; Søreide, Janne E.; Kwasniewski, Slawek; Sundfjord, Arild; Hop, Haakon; Falk-Petersen, Stig; Nøst Hegseth, Else

    2008-10-01

    The spatial variation in mesozooplankton biomass, abundance and species composition in relation to oceanography was studied in different climatic regimes (warm Atlantic vs. cold Arctic) in northern Svalbard waters. Relationships between the zooplankton community and various environmental factors (salinity, temperature, sampling depth, bottom depth, sea-ice concentrations, algal biomass and bloom stage) were established using multivariate statistics. Our study demonstrated that variability in the physical environment around Svalbard had measurable effect on the pelagic ecosystem. Differences in bottom depth and temperature-salinity best explained more than 40% of the horizontal variability in mesozooplankton biomass (DM m -2) after adjusting for seasonal variability. Salinity and temperature also explained much (21% and 15%, respectively) of the variability in mesozooplankton vertical distribution (ind. m -3) in August. Algal bloom stage, chlorophyll- a biomass, and depth stratum accounted for additional 17% of the overall variability structuring vertical zooplankton distribution. Three main zooplankton communities were identified, including Atlantic species Fritillaria borealis, Oithona atlantica, Calanus finmarchicus, Themisto abyssorum and Aglantha digitale; Arctic species Calanus glacialis, Gammarus wilkitzkii, Mertensia ovum and Sagitta elegans; and deeper-water inhabitants Paraeuchaeta spp., Spinocalanus spp., Aetideopsis minor, Mormonilla minor, Scolecithricella minor, Gaetanus ( Gaidius) tenuispinus, Ostracoda, Scaphocalanus brevicornis and Triconia borealis. Zooplankton biomasses in Atlantic- and Arctic-dominated water masses were similar, but biological "hot-spots" were associated with Arctic communities.

  9. Development of chemically mediated prey-search response in postlarval lobsters (Homarus americanus) through feeding experience.

    PubMed

    Daniel, P C; Bayer, R C

    1987-05-01

    Postlarval lobsters were fed live amphipods (Gammarus oceanicus), soft clam spat (Mya arenaria), or frozen brine shrimp (Artemia salina) for five weeks in order to determine by behavioral bioassay if chemically mediated prey-search behavior is established by feeding experience. Chemosensory responses of predatorily naive lobsters to live clam and amphipod metabolites were low and erratic. After five weeks, amphipod-fed lobsters had developed strong responses towards amphipod metabolites but not clam metabolites. In contrast, clam-fed lobsters did not develop responses to either prey. Chemical fractionation of amphipod metabolites indicated that attractants were confined to the same fraction as for prey extracts, i.e., polar, low-molecular-weight compounds. Survival (80-90%) was similar for each diet group; growth was greatest for amphipod-fed lobsters (100%), followed by clam-fed lobsters (72%) and brine shrimp-fed lobsters (18%); and feeding rates increased for amphipod-fed lobsters and decreased for clam-fed lobsters. Coloration of lobsters indicated that only amphipod diet provided desirable pigments. Differences in ingestive conditioning results between clamfed and amphipod-fed lobsters may have been related to (1) clam metabolites being qualitatively or quantitatively less attractive than amphipod metabolites or (2) differences in the predisposition of lobsters to show ingestive conditioning to different prey and their associated metabolites as a function of quality of prey as a diet.

  10. Toxic Mixtures in Time-The Sequence Makes the Poison.

    PubMed

    Ashauer, Roman; O'Connor, Isabel; Escher, Beate I

    2017-03-07

    "The dose makes the poison". This principle assumes that once a chemical is cleared out of the organism (toxicokinetic recovery), it no longer has any effect. However, it overlooks the other process of re-establishing homeostasis, toxicodynamic recovery, which can be fast or slow depending on the chemical. Therefore, when organisms are exposed to two toxicants in sequence, the toxicity can differ if their order is reversed. We test this hypothesis with the freshwater crustacean Gammarus pulex and four toxicants that act on different targets (diazinon, propiconazole, 4,6-dinitro-o-cresol, 4-nitrobenzyl chloride). We found clearly different toxicity when the exposure order of two toxicants was reversed, while maintaining the same dose. Slow toxicodynamic recovery caused carry-over toxicity in subsequent exposures, thereby resulting in a sequence effect-but only when toxicodynamic recovery was slow relative to the interval between exposures. This suggests that carry-over toxicity is a useful proxy for organism fitness and that risk assessment methods should be revised as they currently could underestimate risk. We provide the first evidence that carry-over toxicity occurs among chemicals acting on different targets and when exposure is several days apart. It is therefore not only the dose that makes the poison but also the exposure sequence.

  11. Using single-species toxicity tests, community-level responses, and toxicity identification evaluations to investigate effluent impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Maltby, L.; Clayton, S.A.; Yu, H.; McLoughlin, N.; Wood, R.M.; Yin, D.

    2000-01-01

    Whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests are increasingly used to monitor compliance of consented discharges, but few studies have related toxicity measured using WET tests to receiving water impacts. Here the authors adopt a four-stage procedure to investigate the toxicity and biological impact of a point source discharge and to identify the major toxicants. In stage 1, standard WET tests were employed to determine the toxicity of the effluent. This was then followed by an assessment of receiving water toxicity using in situ deployment of indigenous (Gammarus pulex) and standard (Daphnia magna) test species. The third stage involved the use of biological survey techniques to assess the impact of the discharge on the structure and functioning of the benthic macroinvertebrate community. In stage 4, toxicity identification evaluations (TIE) were used to identify toxic components in the effluent. Receiving-water toxicity and ecological impact detected downstream of the discharge were consistent with the results of WET tests performed on the effluent. Downstream of the discharge, there was a reduction in D. magna survival, in G. pulex survival and feeding rate, in detritus processing, and in biotic indices based on macroinvertebrate community structure. The TIE studies suggested that chlorine was the principal toxicant in the effluent.

  12. Toxicity tests based on predator-prey and competitive interactions between freshwater macroinvertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, E.J.; Blockwell, S.J.; Pascoe, D.

    1994-12-31

    Simple multi-species toxicity tests based on the predation of Daphnia magna Straus by Hydra oligactis (Pallas) and competition between Gammarus pulex (L.) and Asellus aquaticus (L.) were used to determine the effects of three reference chemicals. Criteria examined included functional responses; time to first captures; handling times (predator/prey systems) and co-existence and growth. The tests which proved most practicable and sensitive (lowest observed effects 0.1, 21, and 80 {micro}g/l for lindane, copper and 3,4 dichloroaniline, respectively) were: (1) predator-prey tests: determining changes in the size-structure of predated D. magna populations and (2) competition tests: measuring the feeding rate of G. pulex competing with A. aquaticus, using a bioassay based on the time-response analysis of the consumption of Artemia salina eggs. The concentration of a chemical which affected particular response criteria was fond to depend on the test system employed. Results of the tests indicated that effects were often not dose-related and that a given criterion could be variously affected by different test concentrations. The complex pattern of responses may be explained in terms of the differential sensitivity of the interacting species and perhaps subtle alteration in strategies. The sensitivity of the bioassay endpoints is compared to those of a range of single species tests, and their value for predicting the impact pollutants may have upon natural freshwater ecosystems is discussed.

  13. Biotransformation pathways of biocides and pharmaceuticals in freshwater crustaceans based on structure elucidation of metabolites using high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Junho; Kurth, Denise; Hollender, Juliane

    2013-03-18

    So far, there is limited information on biotransformation mechanisms and products of polar contaminants in freshwater crustaceans. In the present study, metabolites of biocides and pharmaceuticals formed in Gammarus pulex and Daphnia magna were identified using liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry. Different confidence levels were assigned to the identification of metabolites without reference standards using a framework based on the background evidence used for structure elucidation. Twenty-five metabolites were tentatively identified for irgarol, terbutryn, tramadol, and venlafaxine in G. pulex (21 via oxidation and 4 via conjugation reactions) and 11 metabolites in D. magna (7 via oxidation and 4 via conjugation reactions), while no evidence of metabolites for clarithromycin and valsartan was found. Of the 360 metabolites predicted for the four parent compounds using pathway prediction systems and expert knowledge, 23 products were true positives, while 2 identified metabolites were unexpected products. Observed oxidative reactions included N- and O-demethylation, hydroxylation, and N-oxidation. Glutathione conjugation of selected biocides followed by subsequent reactions forming cysteine conjugates was described for the first time in freshwater invertebrates.

  14. Effects of the ``Amoco Cadiz '' oil spill on an eelgrass community at roscoff (france) with special reference to the mobile benthic fauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Hartog, C.; Jacobs, R. P. W. M.

    1980-03-01

    In October 1977 an investigation was initiated of the qualitative and quantitative composition of the fauna of the eelgrass ( Zostera marina) beds at Roscoff. Samples were taken in 2 seagrass beds at different tidal levels in order to follow numerical changes in the course of the year. In March 1978 the area of study was struck by the oil slick of the tanker “Amoco Cadiz ”. For this reason sampling has been continued at the same frequency. The tabulated results show clearly that the oil slick had a profound but selective influence on the various animal groups; some of them disappeared while others were apparently unaffected. Rapid recovery of some species has taken place, but re-establishment of other species, particularly the filter feeders has not been observed. The very diverse amphipod fauna has disappeared, and has been replaced by a population of Pherusa fucicola and Gammarus locusta; the latter was absent in the year before the oil disaster took place.

  15. Keeping an Eye on the Prize

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A U

    2007-02-06

    Setting performance goals is part of the business plan for almost every company. The same is true in the world of supercomputers. Ten years ago, the Department of Energy (DOE) launched the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) to help ensure the safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile without nuclear testing. ASCI, which is now called the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program and is managed by DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), set an initial 10-year goal to obtain computers that could process up to 100 trillion floating-point operations per second (teraflops). Many computer experts thought the goal was overly ambitious, but the program's results have proved them wrong. Last November, a Livermore-IBM team received the 2005 Gordon Bell Prize for achieving more than 100 teraflops while modeling the pressure-induced solidification of molten metal. The prestigious prize, which is named for a founding father of supercomputing, is awarded each year at the Supercomputing Conference to innovators who advance high-performance computing. Recipients for the 2005 prize included six Livermore scientists--physicists Fred Streitz, James Glosli, and Mehul Patel and computer scientists Bor Chan, Robert Yates, and Bronis de Supinski--as well as IBM researchers James Sexton and John Gunnels. This team produced the first atomic-scale model of metal solidification from the liquid phase with results that were independent of system size. The record-setting calculation used Livermore's domain decomposition molecular-dynamics (ddcMD) code running on BlueGene/L, a supercomputer developed by IBM in partnership with the ASC Program. BlueGene/L reached 280.6 teraflops on the Linpack benchmark, the industry standard used to measure computing speed. As a result, it ranks first on the list of Top500 Supercomputer Sites released in November 2005. To evaluate the performance of nuclear weapons systems, scientists must understand how

  16. Astronomically paced middle Eocene deepwater circulation in the western North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahlenkamp, Maximilian; Niezgodzki, Igor; De Vleeschouwer, David; Bickert, Torsten; Harper, Dustin; Lohmann, Gerrit; Pälike, Heiko; Zachos, James C.

    2017-04-01

    observed in the data from IODP Site U1410. Davies, R., Cartwright, J., Pike, J., and Line, C., 2001, Early Oligocene initiation of North Atlantic deep water formation: Nature, v. 410, no. 6831, p. 917-920. Stoker, M. S., Praeg, D., Hjelstuen, B. O., Laberg, J. S., Nielsen, T., and Shannon, P. M., 2005, Neogene stratigraphy and the sedimentary and oceanographic development of the NW European Atlantic margin: Marine and Petroleum Geology, v. 22, no. 9, p. 977-1005. Hohbein, M. W., Sexton, P. F., and Cartwright, J. A., 2012, Onset of North Atlantic Deep Water production coincident with inception of the Cenozoic global cooling trend: Geology, v. 40, no. 3, p. 255-258.

  17. The Southwest UK Burns Network (SWUK) experience of electronic cigarette explosions and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Arnaout, A; Khashaba, H; Dobbs, T; Dewi, F; Pope-Jones, S; Sack, A; Estela, C; Nguyen, D

    2017-06-01

    Since the introduction of e-cigarettes to the UK market in 2007 their popularity amongst young adults has significantly increased. These lithium-ion powered devices remain unregulated by the Standards Agency and as a result burns centres across the world have seen an increasing number of patients presenting with significant burns, resulting from poor quality batteries that appear to be liable to explode when over-heated, over-charged or incorrectly stored. Retrospective and perspective review of all e-cigarette related burns presenting to the Southwest Burns Network; South Wales Burns Centre (Morriston Hospital) or to Bristol burns centre (Southmead Hospital) between Oct 15-July 16, followed by a review of available literature performed and eligible papers identified using PRISMA 2009 Checklist. South Wales Burns Centre (Morriston Hospital) (N=5), Bristol burns centre (Southmead Hospital) (N=7). 92% of injuries were seen in male patients with a mean age of 34.58 (±12.7). The mean TSBA sustained 2.54% of mixed depth, most common anatomical area is the thigh 83% (n=10) with a mean 23.1(±5) days to heal with conservative management. The literature search yielded 3 case series (Colaianni et al., 2016; Kumetz et al., 2016; Nicoll et al., 2016) [8,9,12] and 4 case reports (Jablow and Sexton, 2015; Harrison and Hicklin, 2016; Walsh et al., 2016; Shastry and Langdorf, 2016) [6,7,10,11]. We compare our findings with the published studies. The import and sale of e-cigarettes remains unrestricted. This increases the risk of devices being available in the UK market that do not meet the British Standard Specification, potentially increasing their risk of causing fire and exploding. Consumers should be made aware of this risk, and advised of adequate charging and storage procedures. In case lithium ion compounds leak following a breach in the battery, first aid with mineral oil use is advocated to avoid a further chemical reaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All

  18. The Pleistocene Eastern Equatorial Pacific: Insights from a New Carnegie Platform Stratigraphic Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwizd, S.; Lea, D. W.

    2016-12-01

    Renewed interest in a classic Eastern Equatorial Pacific paleoceanographic site at 3° 35.85' S, 83° 57.79' W, previous site of cores V19-29 and TR163-31, prompted a re-coring in 2009 using the recently developed CDH giant piston coring system on cruise KNR195-5. Giant piston core CDH-36 (3225 m depth, 42.61 m length) nearly triples the length of previous cores at this site. When spliced together with companion multicore MC-34A (0.36 m length), these two cores generate continuous stratigraphy throughout most of the middle Pleistocene, and include recognized stratigraphic tie points ash layer "L" (Ninkovich and Shackleton, 1975) and the extinction of pink G. ruber. A new age model utilizing Bayesian analysis of 17 N. dutertrei radiocarbon dates in MC-34A and the top 3.4 m of CDH-36, and alignment of a new CDH-36 δ18O record with the LR04 benthic stack (Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005), demonstrates that this new "Carnegie Platform" (CP) record extends from 0 to 720 ka (MIS 18), tripling the timescale of previous studies, with an average sedimentation rate of 7 cm/kyr. The CP C. wuellerstorfi δ18O and δ13C records reveal strong consistencies in timing and extent of glacial and interglacial episodes with previously studied regional records. Coarse fraction percentage (%CF) ([coarse fraction/bulk dry sample] * 100) is also evaluated throughout the CP core in order to qualitatively assess dissolution cycles. The CP %CF dataset primarily records Pleistocene dissolution cycles, yet exhibits variability representative of potential local bathymetric and hydrographic effects. The timing of %CF cyclicity is consistent with processes which affect basin-wide calcium carbonate dissolution cycles, including changes in terrestrial carbon input to the oceans and changes in water mass ventilation (Shackleton, 1977; Toggweiler et al., 2006; Sexton and Barker, 2012). Establishing the stratigraphy of the CP record provides the first step towards a more thorough and extended analysis of

  19. Photochemically Altered Air Pollution Mixtures and Contractile Parameters in Isolated Murine Hearts before and after Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh-Kastrinsky, Rachel; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Sexton, Kenneth G.; Jania, Corey M.; Zavala, Jose; Tilley, Stephen L.; Jaspers, Ilona; Gilmour, M. Ian; Devlin, Robert B.; Cascio, Wayne E.

    2013-01-01

    Intosh-Kastrinsky R, Diaz-Sanchez D, Sexton KG, Jania CM, Zavala J, Tilley SL, Jaspers I, Gilmour MI, Devlin RB, Cascio WE, Tong H. 2013. Photochemically altered air pollution mixtures and contractile parameters in isolated murine hearts before and after ischemia. Environ Health Perspect 121:1344–1348; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306609 PMID:24148996

  20. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.

    1999-07-01

    This issue marks the end of an era for The Astrophysical Journal and for astronomical publishing. Helmut Abt is retiring as Editor-in-Chief after serving for 28 years, a period that saw enormous growth in the Journal and its transformation to the forefront of electronic scientific publishing. In February the ApJ office celebrated the receipt of manuscript number 40,000 under Helmut's tenure, a milestone that testifies to his impact on all of our careers. Although the names at the top of the masthead are changing, the rest of the ApJ team remains nearly unchanged, so the editorial transition should be barely noticeable. Much of the editorial work of the Journal will continue to be performed by our capable staff of Scientific Editors. I am also very fortunate to inherit Helmut's outstanding support staff in Tucson, ably headed by Janice Sexton. Our publications staff in Chicago, led by Julie Steffen, and our electronic publications staff, led by Evan Owens, are unmatched in their dedication and energy, and I have already begun working with them on further improvements to the Journal. And Helmut Abt will continue to serve the Journal over the coming months, overseeing the manuscripts that are still under review and editing the special centennial issue that will appear at the end of this year. In the coming months we will introduce several new features, most of them initiated under Helmut Abt's leadership. These will include an upgraded ApJ homepage, web tools for authors and referees, updated documentation and author instructions, and an attractive new version of the on-line journal itself. Over the longer term we are developing plans for streamlining the publication timescale and for expanding our capabilities for publishing and archiving electronic data. However my overriding priority, always, will be to uphold the Journal's reputation for scientific accuracy, impact, and integrity. I close with a personal note of thanks to Helmut Abt for his patient tutoring over

  1. Air toxics and asthma: impacts and end points.

    PubMed

    Eschenbacher, W L; Holian, A; Campion, R J

    1995-09-01

    The National Urban Air Toxics Research Center (NUATRC) hosted a medical/scientific workshop focused on possible asthma/air toxics relationships, with the results of the NUATRC's first research contract with the University of Cincinnati as the point of discussion. The workshop was held at the Texas Medical Center on 4 February 1994 and featured presentations by distinguished academic, government, and industry scientists. This one-day session explored the impact of various environmental factors, including air toxics, on asthma incidence and exacerbation; an emphasis was placed on future research directions to be pursued in the asthma/air toxics area. A key research presentation on the association of air toxics and asthma, based on the study sponsored by NUATRC, was given by Dr. George Leikauf of the University of Cincinnati Medical Center. Additional presentations were made by H. A. Boushey, Jr., Cardiovascular Research Institute/University of California at San Francisco, who spoke on of the Basic Mechanisms of Asthma; K. Sexton, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, who spoke on hazardous air pollutants: science/policy interface; and D. V. Bates, Department of Health Care and Epidemiology at the University of British Columbia, who spoke on asthma epidemiology. H. Koren, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and M. Yeung, of the Respiratory Division/University of British Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital, discussed occupational health impacts on asthma. Doyle Pendleton, Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, reviewed air quality measurements in Texas. The information presented at the workshop suggested a possible association of asthma exacerbations with ozone and particulate matter (PM10); however, direct relationships between worsening asthma and air toxic ambient levels were not established. Possible respiratory health effects associated with air toxics will require considerably more investigation, especially in the area of human exposure assessment

  2. Ticks (Acari: Ixodida) on wild carnivores in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Labruna, Marcelo B; Jorge, Rodrigo S P; Sana, Dênis A; Jácomo, Anah Tereza A; Kashivakura, Cyntia K; Furtado, Mariana M; Ferro, Claudia; Perez, Samuel A; Silveira, Leandro; Santos, Tarcísio S; Marques, Samuel R; Morato, Ronaldo G; Nava, Alessandra; Adania, Cristina H; Teixeira, Rodrigo H F; Gomes, Albério A B; Conforti, Valéria A; Azevedo, Fernando C C; Prada, Cristiana S; Silva, Jean C R; Batista, Adriana F; Marvulo, Maria Fernanda V; Morato, Rose L G; Alho, Cleber J R; Pinter, Adriano; Ferreira, Patrícia M; Ferreira, Fernado; Barros-Battesti, Darci M

    2005-01-01

    The present study reports field data of ticks infesting wild carnivores captured from July 1998 to September 2004 in Brazil. Additional data were obtained from one tick collection and from previous published data of ticks on carnivores in Brazil. During field work, a total of 3437 ticks were collected from 89 Cerdocyon thous (crab-eating fox), 58 Chrysocyon brachyurus (maned wolf), 30 Puma concolor (puma), 26 Panthera onca (jaguar), 12 Procyon cancrivorus (crab-eating raccoon), 4 Speothos venaticus (bush dog), 6 Pseudalopex vetulus (hoary fox), 6 Nasua nasua (coati), 6 Leopardus pardalis (ocelot), 2 Leopardus tigrinus (oncilla), 1 Leopardus wiedii (margay), 1 Herpailurus yagouaroundi (jaguarundi), 1 Oncifelis colocolo (pampas cat), 1 Eira barbara (tayara), 1 Galictis vittata (grison), 1 Lontra longicaudis (neotropical otter), and 1 Potus flavus (kinkajou). Data obtained from the Acari Collection IBSP included a total of 381 tick specimens collected on 13 C. thous, 8 C. brachyurus, 3 P. concolor, 10 P. onca, 3 P. cancrivorus, 4 N. nasua, 1 L. pardalis, 1 L. wiedii, 4 H. yagouaroundi, 1 Galictis cuja (lesser grison), and 1 L. longicaudis. The only tick-infested carnivore species previously reported in Brazil, for which we do not present any field data are Pseudalopex gymnocercus (pampas fox), Conepatus chinga (Molina's hog-nosed skunk), and Conepatus semistriatus (striped hog-nosed skunk). We report the first tick records in Brazil on two Felidae species (O. colocolo, H. yagouaroundi), two Canidae species (P. vetulus, S. venaticus), one Procyonidae species (P. flavus) and one Mustelidae (E. barbara). Tick infestation remains unreported for 5 of the 26 Carnivora species native in Brazil: Oncifelis geoffroyi (Geoffroy's cat), Atelocynus microtis (short-eared dog), Pteronura brasiliensis (giant otter), Mustela africana (Amazon weasel), and Bassaricyon gabbii (olingo). Our field data comprise 16 tick species represented by the genera Amblyomma (12 species), Ixodes (1

  3. Toxoplasma gondii in free-ranging wild small felids from Brazil: molecular detection and genotypic characterization.

    PubMed

    Cañón-Franco, W A; Araújo, F A P; López-Orozco, N; Jardim, M M A; Keid, L B; Dalla-Rosa, C; Cabral, A D; Pena, H F J; Gennari, S M

    2013-11-08

    Brazil harbors the largest number of wild Neotropical felid species, with ten of the twelve species recorded in the American continent. Although these animals are considered to be definitive hosts for Toxoplasma gondii, there are few descriptions of the parasite in these species. Here, we performed a molecular detection of T. gondii by amplification of the marker ITS-1 from tissue samples obtained from 90 free-ranging wild small Neotropical felids from Rio Grande do Sul - Brazil. Of the sampled animals, 34.4% (n=31) were positive including the species Puma yagouaroundi - jaguarondi (9/22), Leopardus geoffroyi - Geoffroy's cat (6/22), Leopardus tigrinus - oncilla (8/28), Leopardus wiedii - margay (6/10), Leopardus pardalis - ocelot (1/1) and Leopardus colocolo - Pampas cat (1/7). Toxoplasma DNA was detected with a frequency of 14.6% (63/433) in primary samples of tongue (16/56), brain (8/43), skeletal muscle (15/83), heart (7/63), diaphragm (3/56), vitreous humor (2/44), eye muscle (6/44) and eyeball (6/44). Multilocus PCR-RFLP genotyping of eleven small Neotropical felids using the molecular markers SAG1, 5'3'SAG2, alt. SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, Apico and CS3 allowed the partial characterization of eight genotypes. We fully characterized two new genotypes that have not been described previously in Brazil (Lw#31Tn from L. wiedii and Py#21Sm from P. yagouaroundi) and one genotype Py#56Br from P. yagouaroundi that has been described previously in isolates from cats, dogs and capybaras from São Paulo state. This study constitutes the first detection and genotypic characterization of T. gondii in free-ranging felids in Brazil, demonstrating the occurrence of the parasite in wild populations and suggesting its potential transmissibility to humans and other domestic and wild animals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Using niche-modelling and species-specific cost analyses to determine a multispecies corridor in a fragmented landscape

    PubMed Central

    Zurano, Juan Pablo; Selleski, Nicole; Schneider, Rosio G.

    2017-01-01

    Misiones, Argentina, contains the largest remaining tract of Upper Paraná Atlantic Forest ecoregion; however, ~50% of native forest is unprotected and located in a mosaic of plantations, agriculture, and pastures. Existing protected areas are becoming increasingly isolated due to ongoing habitat modification. These factors, combined with lower than expected regional carnivore densities, emphasize the need to understand the effect of fragmentation on animal movement and connectivity between protected areas. Using detection dogs and genetic analyses of scat, we collected data on jaguars (Panthera onca), pumas (Puma concolor), ocelots (Leopardus pardalis), oncillas (Leopardus tigrinus), and bush dogs (Speothos venaticus) across habitats that varied in vegetation, disturbance, human proximity, and protective status. With MaxEnt we evaluated habitat use, habitat suitability, and potential species richness for the five carnivores across northern-central Misiones, Argentina. Through a multifaceted cost analysis that included unique requirements of each carnivore and varying degrees of overlap among them, we determined the optimal location for primary/secondary corridors that would link the northern-central zones of the Green Corridor in Misiones and identified areas within these corridors needing priority management. A secondary analysis, comparing these multispecies corridors with the jaguar’s unique requirements, demonstrated that this multispecies approach balanced the preferences of all five species and effectively captured areas required by this highly restricted and endangered carnivore. We emphasize the potential importance of expanding beyond a single umbrella or focal species when developing biological corridors that aim to capture the varied ecological requirements of coexisting species and ecological processes across the landscape. Detection dogs and genetic analyses of scat allow data on multiple species to be collected efficiently across multiple habitat

  5. Using niche-modelling and species-specific cost analyses to determine a multispecies corridor in a fragmented landscape.

    PubMed

    DeMatteo, Karen E; Rinas, Miguel A; Zurano, Juan Pablo; Selleski, Nicole; Schneider, Rosio G; Argüelles, Carina F

    2017-01-01

    Misiones, Argentina, contains the largest remaining tract of Upper Paraná Atlantic Forest ecoregion; however, ~50% of native forest is unprotected and located in a mosaic of plantations, agriculture, and pastures. Existing protected areas are becoming increasingly isolated due to ongoing habitat modification. These factors, combined with lower than expected regional carnivore densities, emphasize the need to understand the effect of fragmentation on animal movement and connectivity between protected areas. Using detection dogs and genetic analyses of scat, we collected data on jaguars (Panthera onca), pumas (Puma concolor), ocelots (Leopardus pardalis), oncillas (Leopardus tigrinus), and bush dogs (Speothos venaticus) across habitats that varied in vegetation, disturbance, human proximity, and protective status. With MaxEnt we evaluated habitat use, habitat suitability, and potential species richness for the five carnivores across northern-central Misiones, Argentina. Through a multifaceted cost analysis that included unique requirements of each carnivore and varying degrees of overlap among them, we determined the optimal location for primary/secondary corridors that would link the northern-central zones of the Green Corridor in Misiones and identified areas within these corridors needing priority management. A secondary analysis, comparing these multispecies corridors with the jaguar's unique requirements, demonstrated that this multispecies approach balanced the preferences of all five species and effectively captured areas required by this highly restricted and endangered carnivore. We emphasize the potential importance of expanding beyond a single umbrella or focal species when developing biological corridors that aim to capture the varied ecological requirements of coexisting species and ecological processes across the landscape. Detection dogs and genetic analyses of scat allow data on multiple species to be collected efficiently across multiple habitat

  6. Risk factors associated with sero-positivity to Toxoplasma gondii in captive neotropical felids from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ramos Silva, Jean Carlos; Marvulo, Maria Fernanda Vianna; Dias, Ricardo Augusto; Ferreira, Fernando; Amaku, Marcos; Adania, Cristina Harumi; Ferreira Neto, José Soares

    2007-03-17

    From September 1995 to February 2001, blood samples were collected from 865 neotropical felids belonging to 8 different species. These animals were housed in 86 institutions located in 78 cities of 20 Brazilian states. Our goal was to identify the risk factors associated with sero-positivity to Toxoplasma gondii in captive neotropical felids from Brazil. All serum samples were tested by the modified agglutination test (MAT), using formalin-fixed whole tachyzoites and mercaptoethanol. For each animal an individual questionnaire was filled with questions about tattoo number, felid species, age, sex, origin, number of animals in the group, introduction of new animals in the group, time in the institution, eating meat previously frozen for a period <7 days in the last 6 months, eating meat of run-over or euthanized animals in the last 6 months, predation of rodents or birds in the last 6 months and presence of domestic cats near the enclosures in the last 6 months. The total sero-prevalence was 55% (95% CI: 52%, 57%). We estimated a prevalence of 46% (95% CI: 40%, 54%) for jaguarundi (Puma yagouaroundi); 58% (95% CI: 53%, 63%) for ocelot (Leopardus pardalis); 50% (95% CI: 45%, 56%) for oncilla (L. tigrinus); 54% (95% CI: 46%, 62%) for margay (L. wiedii); 12% (95% CI: 4%, 31%) for Pampas-cat (L. colocolo); 83% (95% CI: 65%, 93%) for Geoffroy's-cat (L. geoffroyi); 64% (95% CI: 50%, 68%) for jaguar (Panthera onca) and 48% (95% CI: 42%, 54%) for puma (Puma concolor). Multiple logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between the variables in the questionnaire and sero-positivity to T. gondii. We concluded that the independent risk factors for toxoplasmosis were: age >3 years (OR=4.75 [2.75; 8.2]), eating meat previously frozen for a period <7 days (OR=2.23 [1.24; 4.01]), and consumption of animals that were run-over or euthanized (OR=1.64; [1.14; 2.37]).

  7. Stochastic Parametrisations and Regime Behaviour of Atmospheric Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Hannah; Moroz, Irene; Palmer, Tim

    2013-04-01

    -18, Shinfield Park, Reading, 1996. ECMWF. E. N. Lorenz. Regimes in simple systems. J. Atmos. Sci., 63(8):2056-2073, 2006. T. N Palmer. A nonlinear dynamical perspective on model error: A proposal for non-local stochastic-dynamic parametrisation in weather and climate prediction models. Q. J. Roy. Meteor. Soc., 127(572):279-304, 2001. T. N. Palmer, R. Buizza, F. Doblas-Reyes, T. Jung, M. Leutbecher, G. J. Shutts, M. Steinheimer, and A. Weisheimer. Stochastic parametrization and model uncertainty. Technical Report 598, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, 2009. J. Rougier, D. M. H. Sexton, J. M. Murphy, and D. Stainforth. Analyzing the climate sensitivity of the HadSM3 climate model using ensembles from different but related experiments. J. Climate, 22:3540-3557, 2009. S. Solomon, D. Qin, M. Manning, Z. Chen, M. Marquis, K. B. Averyt, Tignor M., and H. L. Miller. Climate models and their evaluation. In Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA, 2007. Cambridge University Press. D. A Stainforth, T. Aina, C. Christensen, M. Collins, N. Faull, D. J. Frame, J. A. Kettleborough, S. Knight, A. Martin, J. M. Murphy, C. Piani, D. Sexton, L. A. Smith, R. A Spicer, A. J. Thorpe, and M. R Allen. Uncertainty in predictions of the climate response to rising levels of greenhouse gases. Nature, 433(7024):403-406, 2005.

  8. Chemical activity and distribution of emerging pollutants: Insights from a multi-compartment analysis of a freshwater system.

    PubMed

    Inostroza, Pedro A; Massei, Riccardo; Wild, Romy; Krauss, Martin; Brack, Werner

    2017-08-12

    Emerging pollutants are ubiquitous in the aquatic system and may pose risks to aquatic ecosystems. The quantification and prediction of environmental partitioning of these chemicals in aquatic systems between water, sediment and biota is an important step in the comprehensive assessment of their sources and final fates in the environment. In this multi-compartment field study, we applied equilibrium partitioning theory and chemical activity estimates to investigate the predictability of concentrations in Gammarus pulex as a model invertebrate from water and sediment in a typical small central European river. Furthermore, KOW-based and LSER approaches were assessed for the calculation of sediment organic carbon-, lipid-, and protein-water partitioning coefficients and activity ratios between the different compartments. Gammarid-water activity ratios close to unity have been observed for many chemicals, while sediment-water and sediment-biota chemical activity ratios exceeded unity by up to six orders of magnitudes. Causes may be: disequilibrium due to slow desorption kinetics and/or an underestimation of partition coefficients due to the presence of strongly adsorbing phases in the sediments. Water concentrations, particularly when using LSER for prediction of partition coefficients were good predictors of internal concentrations in gammarids for most emerging pollutants. Some hydrophilic chemicals such as the neonicotinoid imidacloprid tend to accumulate more in G. pulex than expected from equilibrium partitioning. This conclusion holds both for KOW as well as for LSER-based predictions and suggests previously unidentified mechanisms of bio-accumulation which may include binding to specific protein structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Trophic relationships on a fucoid shore in south-western Iceland as revealed by stable isotope analyses, laboratory experiments, field observations and gut analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinarsdóttir, M. B.; Ingólfsson, A.; Ólafsson, E.

    2009-04-01

    Rocky shores in the North Atlantic are known for their zonation patterns of both algae and animals, which can be expected to greatly affect food availability to consumers at different height levels on the shore. We tested the hypothesis that consumers would feed on the most abundant suitable food source in their surroundings. In total 36 species/taxa of common primary producers and consumers were sampled for stable isotope analyses from a sheltered fucoid shore at Hvassahraun in south-western Iceland. A selection of these species was also collected seasonally and from different height levels. Feeding experiments, field observations and gut analyses were also conducted. Our results were in good overall agreement with pre-existing knowledge of trophic relationships in the rocky intertidal. Consumers often appeared to be assimilating carbon and nitrogen from the most common diet in their immediate surroundings. The predator Nucella lapillus was thus feeding on different prey at different height levels in accordance with different densities of prey species. When tested in the laboratory, individuals taken from low on the shore would ignore the gastropod Littorina obtusata, uncommon at that height level, even when starved, while individuals from mid-shore readily ate the gastropod. This indicated that some kind of learned behaviour was involved. There were, however, important exceptions, most noteworthy the relatively small contribution to herbivores, both slow moving (the gastropod L. obtusata) and fast moving (the isopod Idotea granulosa and the amphipod Gammarus obtusatus) of the dominant alga at this site, Ascophyllum nodosum. The recent colonizer Fucus serratus seemed to be favoured. Selective feeding was indicated both by isotope signatures as well as by results of feeding experiments. Seasonal migrations of both slow and fast moving species could partly explain patterns observed.

  10. Influence of salinity regime on the food-web structure and feeding ecology of fish species from Mediterranean coastal lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Patricia; Vergara, Carolina; Caiola, Nuno; Ibáñez, Carles

    2014-02-01

    Dual δ15N and δ13C analyses and estimates of biomass were used to characterize the food webs of valuable fish species in three coastal lagoons of the Ebro Delta subjected to contrasting salinity regimes (polyhaline in the Tancada lagoon, mesohaline in the Encanyissada and oligohaline in the Clot lagoon). The δ13C signatures of the entire food-web including primary producers, sediment organic matter and consumers showed the most enriched values in the Tancada lagoon (from approx. -4.8‰ in sediments to -19.7‰ in fish) and the most depleted ones in the Clot lagoon (from approx. -11.4‰ in sediments to -25.4‰ in fish), consistent with dominant contributions from marine and continental sources, respectively. For δ15N, particularly high values were detected in the submersed vegetation (11.3 ± 0.3‰) together with more enriched sediment values at lower salinities (by approx. 2.5‰), suggesting that historical loadings of agricultural fertilizers are still retained by the systems and transmitted across trophic levels. Negative relationships between δ15N and salinity were also observed for the amphipod Gammarus aequicauda and the isopod Sphaeroma hookeri, suggesting some consumption of accumulated and resuspended detrital material. In contrast, δ15N signatures of fish showed lower values and inconsistent patterns, possibly because most species have a seasonal use of the lagoons. The biomass of fish species did not show a clear effect of the salinity regime (except for the mosquitofish Gambusia holbrookii), but results for mixing models suggest a diet shift from higher contribution of zooplankton size fractions in the Encanyissada (from 57 to 73%) to macrofauna at the other lagoons (from 40 to 67%). We suggest that alterations in salinity might modify the trophic dynamics of the systems from benthic to planktonic pathways, without large-scale differences in δ15N of fish suggestive of similar trophic levels.

  11. Predicting toxicity in marine sediment in Taranto Gulf (Ionian Sea, Southern Italy) using Sediment Quality Guidelines and a battery bioassay.

    PubMed

    Annicchiarico, Cristina; Biandolino, Francesca; Cardellicchio, Nicola; Di Leo, Antonella; Giandomenico, Santina; Prato, Ermelinda

    2007-03-01

    The goal of this study was to assess coastal marine pollution in the Mar Piccolo and Taranto Gulf (Ionian Sea, Southern Italy) by combining chemical and toxicological data in order to compare and integrate both approaches. Pollutants levels, traditionally, have limited ability to predict adverse effects on living resources. Moreover, in order to provide information on the ecological impact of sediment contamination on aquatic biota Numerical Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs) and sediment toxicity bioassays were carefully recommended. In this study ERL (effect range low)/ERM (effect range medium value) and TEL (threshold effect level)/PEL (probable effect level) guidelines have been used. Bioassays were performed with two species of amphipods Gammarus aequicauda and Corophium insidiosum, one species of isopod Idotea baltica and bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis larvae. The TEL/PEL analysis suggested that, especially for stations 1 and 2, sediments in Mar Piccolo should contain acutely toxic concentrations of metals. In particular Hg content, in station 1, was about 17 times PEL value. 96 h LC(50) and 48 h EC(50) values were estimated for cadmium, copper and mercury in these species using the static acute toxicity test. M. galloprovincialis larvae was more sensitive than other species to all the reference toxicants tested (EC(50) determined for cadmium copper and mercury were of 0.59, 0.11 and 0.01 mg/l respectively). Significant differences in sensitivity of species tested to all reference toxicants (ANOVA p < 0.001) were recorded. Bioassays with these species allowed to estimated sediment toxicity from the different studied sites. On the basis of results obtained a good agreement was reported between chemical data and response of the biological endpoints tested.

  12. Impaired ecosystem process despite little effects on populations: modeling combined effects of warming and toxicants.

    PubMed

    Galic, Nika; Grimm, Volker; Forbes, Valery E

    2017-08-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are exposed to many stressors, including toxic chemicals and global warming, which can impair, separately or in combination, important processes in organisms and hence higher levels of organization. Investigating combined effects of warming and toxicants has been a topic of little research, but neglecting their combined effects may seriously misguide management efforts. To explore how toxic chemicals and warming, alone and in combination, propagate across levels of biological organization, including a key ecosystem process, we developed an individual-based model (IBM) of a freshwater amphipod detritivore, Gammarus pseudolimnaeus, feeding on leaf litter. In this IBM, life history emerges from the individuals' energy budgets. We quantified, in different warming scenarios (+1-+4 °C), the effects of hypothetical toxicants on suborganismal processes, including feeding, somatic and maturity maintenance, growth, and reproduction. Warming reduced mean adult body sizes and population abundance and biomass, but only in the warmest scenarios. Leaf litter processing, a key contributor to ecosystem functioning and service delivery in streams, was consistently enhanced by warming, through strengthened interaction between the detritivorous consumer and its resource. Toxicant effects on feeding and maintenance resulted in initially small adverse effects on consumers, but ultimately led to population extinction and loss of ecosystem process. Warming in combination with toxicants had little effect at the individual and population levels, but ecosystem process was impaired in the warmer scenarios. Our results suggest that exposure to the same amount of toxicants can disproportionately compromise ecosystem processing depending on global warming scenarios; for example, reducing organismal feeding rates by 50% will reduce resource processing by 50% in current temperature conditions, but by up to 200% with warming of 4 °C. Our study has implications for

  13. Potential effects of recurrent low oxygen conditions on the Illinois Cave amphipod

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panno, S.V.; Hackley, Keith C.; Kelly, W.R.; Hwang, H.-H.; Wilhelm, F.M.; Taylor, S.J.; Stiff, B.J.

    2006-01-01

    The caves of Illinois' sinkhole plain are the sole habitat of the Illinois Cave amphipod (Gammarus acherondytes), a federally endangered species. The sinkhole plain is a hydrologically-connected sequence of karstified limestone that constitutes an extensive karst aquifer which serves as an important source of potable water for area residents. During this investigation, we examined the ground-water quality in caves within two ground-water basins: 1) Illinois Caverns, where the amphipod is now present after previously reported to have been extirpated from the lower reaches, and 2) Stemler Cave, where the amphipod is reported to have been extirpated. The chemical composition of cave streams in Illinois Caverns and Stemler Cave were compared to determine which parameters, if any, could have contributed to the loss of G. acherondytes from Stemler Cave. Stream water in Stemler Cave contained higher concentrations of organic carbon, potassium, silica, chloride, fluoride, sulfate, iron and manganese than Illinois Caverns. Perhaps most importantly, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in Stemler Cave were, during periods of low flow, substantially lower than in Illinois Caverns. Based on land use, there are probably at least eight times more private septic systems in the Stemler Cave ground-water basin than in the Illinois Caverns ground-water basin. Low DO concentrations were likely the result of microbial breakdown of soil organic matter and wastewater treatment system effluent, and the oxidation of pyrite in bedrock. The near-hypoxic DO in Stemler Cave that occurred during low-flow conditions, and, we speculate, a limited range of G. acherondytes within the Stemler Cave ground-water basin due to a metabolic advantage of the stygophilic aquatic invertebrates over the stygobitic G. acherodytes, resulted in the apparent loss of G. acherondytes from Stemler Cave.

  14. The Role of Seagrass Traits in Mediating Zostera noltei Vulnerability to Mesograzers.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Crego, Begoña; Arteaga, Pedro; Tomas, Fiona; Santos, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how intra-specific differences in plant traits mediate vulnerability to herbivores of relevant habitat-forming plants is vital to attain a better knowledge on the drivers of the structure and functioning of ecosystems. Such studies, however, are rare in seagrass-mesograzer systems despite the increasingly recognized relevance of mesograzers as seagrass consumers. We investigated the role and potential trade-offs of multiple leaf traits in mediating the vulnerability of the seagrass Zostera noltei to different mesograzer species, the amphipod Gammarus insensibilis and the isopod Idotea chelipes. We worked with plants from two different meadows for which contrasting chemical and structural traits were expected based on previous information. We found that plants with high vulnerability to mesograzers (i.e. those preferred and subjected to higher rates of leaf area loss) had not only higher nitrogen content and lower C:N, fibre, and phenolics, but also tender and thinner leaves. No trade-offs between chemical and structural traits of the seagrass were detected, as they were positively correlated. When leaf physical structure was removed using agar-reconstituted food, amphipod preference towards high-susceptibility plants disappeared; thus indicating that structural rather than chemical traits mediated the feeding preference. Removal of plant structure reduced the size of isopod preference to less than half, indicating a stronger contribution of structural traits (> 50%) but combined with chemical/nutritional traits in mediating the preference. We then hypothesized that the high environmental nutrient levels recorded in the meadow exhibiting high susceptibility modulate the differences observed between meadows in seagrass traits. To test this hypothesis, we exposed low-vulnerability shoots to eutrophic nutrient levels in a 6-week enrichment experiment. Nutrient enrichment increased Z. noltei nitrogen content and lowered C:N, fibre, and phenolics, but had

  15. The Application of DNA Barcodes for the Identification of Marine Crustaceans from the North Sea and Adjacent Regions

    PubMed Central

    Raupach, Michael J.; Barco, Andrea; Steinke, Dirk; Beermann, Jan; Laakmann, Silke; Mohrbeck, Inga; Neumann, Hermann; Kihara, Terue C.; Pointner, Karin; Radulovici, Adriana; Segelken-Voigt, Alexandra; Wesse, Christina; Knebelsberger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    During the last years DNA barcoding has become a popular method of choice for molecular specimen identification. Here we present a comprehensive DNA barcode library of various crustacean taxa found in the North Sea, one of the most extensively studied marine regions of the world. Our data set includes 1,332 barcodes covering 205 species, including taxa of the Amphipoda, Copepoda, Decapoda, Isopoda, Thecostraca, and others. This dataset represents the most extensive DNA barcode library of the Crustacea in terms of species number to date. By using the Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD), unique BINs were identified for 198 (96.6%) of the analyzed species. Six species were characterized by two BINs (2.9%), and three BINs were found for the amphipod species Gammarus salinus Spooner, 1947 (0.4%). Intraspecific distances with values higher than 2.2% were revealed for 13 species (6.3%). Exceptionally high distances of up to 14.87% between two distinct but monophyletic clusters were found for the parasitic copepod Caligus elongatus Nordmann, 1832, supporting the results of previous studies that indicated the existence of an overlooked sea louse species. In contrast to these high distances, haplotype-sharing was observed for two decapod spider crab species, Macropodia parva Van Noort & Adema, 1985 and Macropodia rostrata (Linnaeus, 1761), underlining the need for a taxonomic revision of both species. Summarizing the results, our study confirms the application of DNA barcodes as highly effective identification system for the analyzed marine crustaceans of the North Sea and represents an important milestone for modern biodiversity assessment studies using barcode sequences. PMID:26417993

  16. Interactions among zebra mussel shells, invertebrate prey, and Eurasian ruffe or yellow perch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolar, C.S.; Fullerton, A.H.; Martin, K.M.; Lamberti, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    The exotic zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, is established in all of the Laurentian Great Lakes and may affect benthivorous fishes by increasing the complexity of benthic substrates and changing energy flow patterns within the food web. Native yellow perch, Perca flavescens, and the nonindigenous Eurasian ruffe, Gymnocephalus cernuus, are benthivores that may compete for limited food resources. As ruffe spread to areas with more dense zebra mussel populations, the zone of interaction among zebra mussels, yellow perch, and ruffe will increase and intensify. In the laboratory, the effect of zebra mussel shells on the ability of these fishes to forage on amphipods (Gammarus pseudolimnaeus) and chironomids (Chironomus plumosus) was examined in light and darkness. In 12 h, ruffe consumed more amphipods than did similar-sized yellow perch, particularly in darkness on bare cobble, and in light within zebra mussels. Amphipods decreased activity more in the presence of ruffe than yellow perch. More amphipods were found in zebra mussel shells than in bare cobble, whether or not fish were present. In darkness, when ruffe consumed more amphipods on bare cobble, amphipods became more associated with zebra mussel shells. Although ruffe consumed more amphipods than yellow perch, perch consumed more chironomids than ruffe on bare cobble. The presence of zebra mussel shells altered the relative consumption of invertebrates in some substrate-light combinations. Experiments such as these help to improve understanding of the direct and indirect effects of predation between and among native and nonindigenous species that may exert structuring forces on the nearshore communities of the Great Lakes currently or in the future.

  17. The Role of Seagrass Traits in Mediating Zostera noltei Vulnerability to Mesograzers

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Crego, Begoña; Arteaga, Pedro; Tomas, Fiona; Santos, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how intra-specific differences in plant traits mediate vulnerability to herbivores of relevant habitat-forming plants is vital to attain a better knowledge on the drivers of the structure and functioning of ecosystems. Such studies, however, are rare in seagrass-mesograzer systems despite the increasingly recognized relevance of mesograzers as seagrass consumers. We investigated the role and potential trade-offs of multiple leaf traits in mediating the vulnerability of the seagrass Zostera noltei to different mesograzer species, the amphipod Gammarus insensibilis and the isopod Idotea chelipes. We worked with plants from two different meadows for which contrasting chemical and structural traits were expected based on previous information. We found that plants with high vulnerability to mesograzers (i.e. those preferred and subjected to higher rates of leaf area loss) had not only higher nitrogen content and lower C:N, fibre, and phenolics, but also tender and thinner leaves. No trade-offs between chemical and structural traits of the seagrass were detected, as they were positively correlated. When leaf physical structure was removed using agar-reconstituted food, amphipod preference towards high-susceptibility plants disappeared; thus indicating that structural rather than chemical traits mediated the feeding preference. Removal of plant structure reduced the size of isopod preference to less than half, indicating a stronger contribution of structural traits (> 50%) but combined with chemical/nutritional traits in mediating the preference. We then hypothesized that the high environmental nutrient levels recorded in the meadow exhibiting high susceptibility modulate the differences observed between meadows in seagrass traits. To test this hypothesis, we exposed low-vulnerability shoots to eutrophic nutrient levels in a 6-week enrichment experiment. Nutrient enrichment increased Z. noltei nitrogen content and lowered C:N, fibre, and phenolics, but had

  18. Comparison of whole animal costs of protein synthesis among polar and temperate populations of the same species of gammarid amphipod.

    PubMed

    Rastrick, S P S; Whiteley, N M

    2017-03-02

    Protein synthesis can account for a substantial proportion of metabolic rate. Energetic costs of protein synthesis, should in theory, be the same in marine invertebrates from a range of thermal habitats, and yet direct measurements using inhibitors produce widely differing values, especially in the cold. The present study aimed to remove any potential confounding interspecific effects by determining costs of protein synthesis in two latitudinally separated populations of the same species (amphipod, Gammarus oceanicus) living in two different thermal regimes; polar vs cold-temperate. Costs of protein synthesis were determined in summer acclimatised G. oceanicus from Svalbard (79°N) at 5°C and from Scotland (58°N) at 13°C. Amphipods were injected with the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide (CHX), at 9mmoll(-1) in crab saline to give a tissue concentration of 0.05mgCHXg(-1)FW and left for 60min before the injection of [(3)H] phenylalanine. After incubation for 120min (180min in total from initial injection), both whole-animal rates of oxygen uptake and absolute rates of protein synthesis were significantly reduced in CHX-treated amphipods vs controls injected with saline. Both populations exhibited similar costs of protein synthesis of ~7μmolO2mg(-1)protein which is close to the estimated theoretical minimum for peptide bond formation, and similar to the values obtained in cell-free systems. The study demonstrates that in G. oceanicus, costs of protein synthesis rates were not elevated in the cold but were fixed among polar and cold-temperate populations.

  19. Multi-residue analysis of emerging pollutants in benthic invertebrates by modified micro-quick-easy-cheap-efficient-rugged-safe extraction and nanoliquid chromatography-nanospray-tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Berlioz-Barbier, Alexandra; Buleté, Audrey; Faburé, Juliette; Garric, Jeanne; Cren-Olivé, Cécile; Vulliet, Emmanuelle

    2014-11-07

    Aquatic ecosystems are continuously contaminated by agricultural and industrial sources. Although the consequences of this pollution are gradually becoming visible, their potential impacts on aquatic ecosystems are poorly known, particularly regarding the risk of bioaccumulation in different trophic levels. To establish a causality relationship between bioaccumulation and disease, experiments on biotic matrices must be performed. In this context, a multi-residue method for the analysis of 35 emerging pollutants in three benthic invertebrates (Potamopyrgus antipodarum, Gammarus fossarum, and Chironomus riparius) has been developed. Because the variation in response of each individual must be taken into account in ecotoxicological studies, the entire analytical chain was miniaturised, thereby reducing the required sample size to a minimum of one individual and scaling the method accordingly. A new extraction strategy based on a modified, optimised and miniaturised "QuEChERS" approach is reported. The procedure involves salting out liquid-liquid extraction of approximately 10-20mg of matrix followed by nano-liquid chromatography-nano electospray ionisation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The validated analytical procedure exhibited recoveries between 40 and 98% for all the target compounds and enabled the determination of pollutants on an individual scale in the ng g(-1) concentration. The method was subsequently applied to determine the levels of target analytes in several encaged organisms which were exposed upstream and downstream of an effluent discharge. The results highlighted a bioaccumulation of certain targeted emerging pollutants in three freshwater invertebrates, as well as inter-species differences. 18 out of 35 compounds were detected and eight were quantified. The highest concentrations were measured for ibuprofen in G. fossarum, reaching up to 105 ng g(-1). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The legacy of a vanished sea: a high level of diversification within a European freshwater amphipod species complex driven by 15 My of Paratethys regression.

    PubMed

    Mamos, Tomasz; Wattier, Remi; Burzyński, Artur; Grabowski, Michał

    2016-02-01

    The formation of continental Europe in the Neogene was due to the regression of the Tethys Ocean and of the Paratethys Sea. The dynamic geology of the area and repetitious transitions between marine and freshwater conditions presented opportunities for the colonization of newly emerging hydrological networks and diversification of aquatic biota. Implementing mitochondrial and nuclear markers in conjunction with a large-scale sampling strategy, we investigated the impact of this spatiotemporal framework on the evolutionary history of a freshwater crustacean morphospecies. The Gammarus balcanicus species complex is widely distributed in the area previously occupied by the Paratethys Sea. Our results revealed its high diversification and polyphyly in relation to a number of other morphospecies. The distribution of the studied amphipod is generally characterized by very high local endemism and divergence. The Bayesian time-calibrated reconstruction of phylogeny and geographical distribution of ancestral nodes indicates that this species complex started to diversify in the Early Miocene in the central Balkans, partially in the shallow epicontinental sea. It is possible that there were several episodes of inland water colonization by local brackish water lineages. Subsequent diversification within clades and spread to new areas could have been induced by Alpine orogeny in the Miocene/Pliocene and, finally, by Pleistocene glaciations. The present distribution of clades, in many cases, still reflects Miocene palaeogeography of the area. Our results point out that investigations of the historical aspect of cryptic diversity in other taxa may help in a general understanding of the origins of freshwater invertebrate fauna of Europe. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Hidden Biodiversity in an Ecologically Important Freshwater Amphipod: Differences in Genetic Structure between Two Cryptic Species

    PubMed Central

    Westram, Anja Marie; Jokela, Jukka; Keller, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Cryptic species, i.e. species that are morphologically hard to distinguish, have been detected repeatedly in various taxa and ecosystems. In order to evaluate the importance of this finding, we have to know in how far cryptic species differ in various aspects of their biology. The amphipod Gammarus fossarum is a key invertebrate in freshwater streams and contains several cryptic species. We examined the population genetic structure, genetic diversity and demographic history of two of them (type A and type B) using microsatellite markers and asked whether they show significant differences. We present results of population genetic analyses based on a total of 37 populations from the headwaters of two major European drainages, Rhine and Rhone. We found that, in both species, genetic diversity was geographically structured among and within drainages. For type A in the Rhine and type B in the Rhone, we detected significant patterns of isolation by distance. The increase of genetic differentiation with geographical distance, however, was much higher in type A than in type B. This result indicates substantial interspecific differences in population history and/or the extent of current gene flow between populations. In the Rhine, type B does not show evidence of isolation by distance, and population differentiation is relatively low across hundreds of kilometres. The majority of these populations also show signatures of recent bottlenecks. These patterns are consistent with a recent expansion of type B into the Rhine drainage. In summary, our results suggest considerable and previously unrecognized interspecific differences in the genetic structure of these cryptic keystone species. PMID:23967060

  2. Hidden biodiversity in an ecologically important freshwater amphipod: differences in genetic structure between two cryptic species.

    PubMed

    Westram, Anja Marie; Jokela, Jukka; Keller, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Cryptic species, i.e. species that are morphologically hard to distinguish, have been detected repeatedly in various taxa and ecosystems. In order to evaluate the importance of this finding, we have to know in how far cryptic species differ in various aspects of their biology. The amphipod Gammarus fossarum is a key invertebrate in freshwater streams and contains several cryptic species. We examined the population genetic structure, genetic diversity and demographic history of two of them (type A and type B) using microsatellite markers and asked whether they show significant differences. We present results of population genetic analyses based on a total of 37 populations from the headwaters of two major European drainages, Rhine and Rhone. We found that, in both species, genetic diversity was geographically structured among and within drainages. For type A in the Rhine and type B in the Rhone, we detected significant patterns of isolation by distance. The increase of genetic differentiation with geographical distance, however, was much higher in type A than in type B. This result indicates substantial interspecific differences in population history and/or the extent of current gene flow between populations. In the Rhine, type B does not show evidence of isolation by distance, and population differentiation is relatively low across hundreds of kilometres. The majority of these populations also show signatures of recent bottlenecks. These patterns are consistent with a recent expansion of type B into the Rhine drainage. In summary, our results suggest considerable and previously unrecognized interspecific differences in the genetic structure of these cryptic keystone species.

  3. Carotenoid-based colour of acanthocephalan cystacanths plays no role in host manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Kaldonski, Nicolas; Perrot-Minnot, Marie-Jeanne; Dodet, Raphaël; Martinaud, Guillaume; Cézilly, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Manipulation by parasites is a catchy concept that has been applied to a large range of phenotypic alterations brought about by parasites in their hosts. It has, for instance, been suggested that the carotenoid-based colour of acanthocephalan cystacanths is adaptive through increasing the conspicuousness of infected intermediate hosts and, hence, their vulnerability to appropriate final hosts such as fish predators. We revisited the evidence in favour of adaptive coloration of acanthocephalan parasites in relation to increased trophic transmission using the crustacean amphipod Gammarus pulex and two species of acanthocephalans, Pomphorhynchus laevis and Polymorphus minutus. Both species show carotenoid-based colorations, but rely, respectively, on freshwater fish and aquatic bird species as final hosts. In addition, the two parasites differ in the type of behavioural alteration brought to their common intermediate host. Pomphorhynchus laevis reverses negative phototaxis in G. pulex, whereas P. minutus reverses positive geotaxis. In aquaria, trout showed selective predation for P. laevis-infected gammarids, whereas P. minutus-infected ones did not differ from uninfected controls in their vulnerability to predation. We tested for an effect of parasite coloration on increased trophic transmission by painting a yellow–orange spot on the cuticle of uninfected gammarids and by masking the yellow–orange spot of infected individuals with inconspicuous brown paint. To enhance realism, match of colour between painted mimics and true parasite was carefully checked using a spectrometer. We found no evidence for a role of parasite coloration in the increased vulnerability of gammarids to predation by trout. Painted mimics did not differ from control uninfected gammarids in their vulnerability to predation by trout. In addition, covering the place through which the parasite was visible did not reduce the vulnerability of infected gammarids to predation by trout. We discuss

  4. Ecology of ontogenetic body-mass scaling of gill surface area in a freshwater crustacean.

    PubMed

    Glazier, Douglas S; Paul, David A

    2017-06-01

    Several studies have documented ecological effects on intraspecific and interspecific body-size scaling of metabolic rate. However, little is known about how various ecological factors may affect the scaling of respiratory structures supporting oxygen uptake for metabolism. To our knowledge, our study is the first to provide evidence for ecological effects on the scaling of a respiratory structure among conspecific populations of any animal. We compared the body-mass scaling of gill surface area (SA) among eight spring-dwelling populations of the amphipod crustacean Gammarus minus Although gill SA scaling was not related to water temperature, conductivity or G. minus population density, it was significantly related to predation regime (and secondarily to pH). Body-mass scaling slopes for gill SA were significantly lower in four populations inhabiting springs with fish predators than for four populations in springs without fish (based on comparing means of the population slopes, or slopes calculated from pooled raw data for each comparison group). As a result, gill SA was proportionately smaller in adult amphipods from springs with versus without fish. This scaling difference paralleled similar differences in the scaling exponents for the rates of growth and resting metabolic rate. We hypothesized that gill SA scaling is shallower in fish-containing versus fishless spring populations of G. minus because of effects of size-selective predation on size-specific growth and activity that in turn affect the scaling of oxygen demand and concomitantly the gill capacity (SA) for oxygen uptake. Although influential theory claims that metabolic scaling is constrained by internal body design, our study builds on previous work to show that the scaling of both metabolism and the respiratory structures supporting it may be ecologically sensitive and evolutionarily malleable. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Quantification of emerging micropollutants in an amphipod crustacean by nanoliquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry using multiple reaction monitoring cubed mode.

    PubMed

    Sordet, Martin; Berlioz-Barbier, Alexandra; Buleté, Audrey; Garric, Jeanne; Vulliet, Emmanuelle

    2016-07-22

    An innovative analytical method has been developed to quantify the bioaccumulation in an amphipod crustacean (Gammarus fossarum) of three micropollutants regarded as anthropic-pollution markers: carbamazepine, oxazepam, and testosterone. A liquid-liquid extraction assisted by salts, known as QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe) was miniaturised and optimised, so it could be adapted to the low mass samples (approximatively 5mg dry weight). For this same reason and in order to obtain good sensitivity, ultra-trace analyses were carried out by means of nanoliquid chromatography. A preconcentration system by on-column trapping was optimised to increase the injection volume. In order to improve both sensitivity and selectivity, the multiple reaction monitoring cubed mode analyses (MRM(3)) were carried out, validated and compared to the classic MRM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that MRM(3) is coupled to nanoliquid chromatography for the analysis and detection of organic micropollutants <300Da. The optimised extraction method exhibited recoveries superior to 80%. The limits of quantification of the target compounds were 0.3, 0.7 and 4.7ng/g (wet weight) for oxazepam, carbamazepine and testosterone, respectively and the limits of detection were 0.1, 0.3 and 2.2ng/g (wet weight), respectively. The intra- and inter-day precisions were inferior to 7.7% and 10.9%, respectively, for the three levels of concentration tested. The analytical strategy developed allowed to obtain limits of quantification lower than 1ng/g (wet weight) and to establish the kinetic bioconcentration of contaminants within G. fossarum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Metal/metalloid accumulation/remobilization during aquatic litter decomposition in freshwater: a review.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Jörg; Brackhage, Carsten; Mkandawire, Martin; Dudel, E Gert

    2011-11-01

    The focus of this article is to combine two main areas of research activities in freshwater ecosystems: the effect of inorganic pollutants on freshwater ecosystems and litter decomposition as a fundamental ecological process in streams. The decomposition of plant litter in aquatic systems as a main energy source in running water ecosystems proceeds in three distinct temporal stages of leaching, conditioning and fragmentation. During these stages metals and metalloids may be fixed by litter, its decay products and the associated organisms. The global-scale problem of contaminated freshwater ecosystems by metals and metalloids has led to many investigations on the acute and chronic toxicity of these elements to plants and animals as well as the impact on animal activity under laboratory conditions. Where sorption properties and accumulation/remobilization potential of metals in sediments and attached microorganisms are quite well understood, the combination of both research areas concerning the impact of higher trophic levels on the modification of sediment sorption conditions and the influence of metal/metalloid pollution on decomposition of plant litter mediated by decomposer community, as well as the effect of high metal load during litter decay on organism health under field conditions, has still to be elucidated. So far it was found that microbes and invertebrate shredder (species of the genera Gammarus and Asellus) have a significant influence on metal fixation on litter. Not many studies focus on the impact of other functional groups affecting litter decay (e.g. grazer and collectors) or other main processes in freshwater ecosystems like bioturbation (e.g. Tubifex, Chironomus) on metal fixation/release.

  7. Response of invertebrates from the hyporheic zone of chalk rivers to eutrophication and land use.

    PubMed

    Pacioglu, Octavian; Moldovan, Oana Teodora

    2016-03-01

    Whereas the response of lotic benthic macroinvertebrates to different environmental stressors is a widespread practice nowadays in assessing the water and habitat quality, the use of hyporheic zone invertebrates is still in its infancy. In this study, classification and regression trees analysis were employed in order to assess the ecological requirements and the potential as bioindicators for the hyporheic zone invertebrates inhabiting four lowland chalk rivers (south England) with contrasting eutrophication levels (based on surface nitrate concentrations) and magnitude of land use (based on percentage of fine sediments load and median interstitial space). Samples of fauna, water and sediment were sampled twice, during low (summer) and high (winter) groundwater level, at depths of 20 and 35 cm. Certain groups of invertebrates (Glossosomatidae and Psychomyiidae caddisflies, and riffle beetles) proved to be good indicators of rural catchments, moderately eutrophic and with high fine sediment load. A diverse community dominated by microcrustaceans (copepods and ostracods) were found as good indicators of highly eutrophic urban streams, with moderate-high fine sediment load. However, the use of other taxonomic groups (e.g. chironomids, oligochaetes, nematodes, water mites and the amphipod Gammarus pulex), very widespread in the hyporheic zone of all sampled rivers, is of limited use because of their high tolerance to the analysed stressors. We recommend the use of certain taxonomic groups (comprising both meiofauna and macroinvertebrates) dwelling in the chalk hyporheic zone as indicators of eutrophication and colmation and, along with routine benthic sampling protocols, for a more comprehensive water and habitat quality assessment of chalk rivers.

  8. Studying the movement behavior of benthic macroinvertebrates with automated video tracking

    PubMed Central

    Augusiak, Jacqueline; Van den Brink, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying and understanding movement is critical for a wide range of questions in basic and applied ecology. Movement ecology is also fostered by technological advances that allow automated tracking for a wide range of animal species. However, for aquatic macroinvertebrates, such detailed methods do not yet exist. We developed a video tracking method for two different species of benthic macroinvertebrates, the crawling isopod Asellus aquaticus and the swimming fresh water amphipod Gammarus pulex. We tested the effects of different light sources and marking techniques on their movement behavior to establish the possibilities and limitations of the experimental protocol and to ensure that the basic handling of test specimens would not bias conclusions drawn from movement path analyses. To demonstrate the versatility of our method, we studied the influence of varying population densities on different movement parameters related to resting behavior, directionality, and step lengths. We found that our method allows studying species with different modes of dispersal and under different conditions. For example, we found that gammarids spend more time moving at higher population densities, while asellids rest more under similar conditions. At the same time, in response to higher densities, gammarids mostly decreased average step lengths, whereas asellids did not. Gammarids, however, were also more sensitive to general handling and marking than asellids. Our protocol for marking and video tracking can be easily adopted for other species of aquatic macroinvertebrates or testing conditions, for example, presence or absence of food sources, shelter, or predator cues. Nevertheless, limitations with regard to the marking protocol, material, and a species’ physical build need to be considered and tested before a wider application, particularly for swimming species. Data obtained with this approach can deepen the understanding of population dynamics on larger spatial scales

  9. Allelopathic potential and ecotoxicity evaluation of gallic and nonanoic acids to prevent cyanobacterial growth in lentic systems: A preliminary mesocosm study.

    PubMed

    Techer, Didier; Fontaine, Pascal; Personne, Aline; Viot, Sandrine; Thomas, Marielle

    2016-03-15

    The increase in anthropogenic nutrient loading affecting many freshwater ecosystems combined with global warming may lead to cyanobacterial blooms on an increasingly frequent basis. Among the various physicochemical and biological methods which have been proposed to rapidly control blue-green algae growth, the use of plant-derived substances such as allelochemicals has gained great interest as an environment-friendly approach. The primary aim of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of gallic and nonanoic acid application to preemptively inhibit cyanobacterial growth in lentic hydrosystems. In order to address the process feasibility under realistic exposure scenarios, thirteen outdoor freshwater mesocosms (unit volume: 3m(3)) were designed, each containing phytoplankton (including local blue-green algae species) and various non-target organisms from higher trophic levels (Physa, Lymnaea, Gammarus, and Scardinius erythrophthalmus). After an 8-week mesocosm stabilization period, a full factorial design based on the presence/absence of gallic acid (GA) and nonanoic acid (NA) (including a control group) was implemented into the exposure tanks. Regular monitoring of major phytoplankton taxa was conducted during a 28-day experiment using an on-line fluorometer. The main results suggested that gallic acid was more efficient than nonanoic acid at limiting cyanobacterial growth at concentrations as low as 1 mg L(-1). Successive gallic acid applications (at 1, 2 and 4 mg L(-1)) at the early stages of cyanobacterial growth did not allow the complete elimination of blue-green algae from the mesocosms. However, the specificity of the allelopathic effect of gallic acid towards cyanobacteria was compatible with the maintenance of a primary productivity in the treated tanks as indicated by the photoautotrophic growth of other algal taxa. Finally, no biomarker induction signal could be reported in non-target species. Further gallic acid application trials in lentic systems such

  10. Assessing effects of the fungicide tebuconazole to heterotrophic microbes in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Mauricio R; Kosol, Sujitra; Smidt, Hauke; Buijse, Laura; Van den Brink, Paul J; Van Wijngaarden, René P A; Brock, Theo C M; Maltby, Lorraine

    2014-08-15

    Aquatic ecological risk assessment of fungicides in Europe under Regulation 1107/2009/EC does not currently assess risk to non-target bacteria and fungi. Rather, regulatory acceptable concentrations based on ecotoxicological data obtained from studies with fish, invertebrates and primary producers (including algae) are assumed to be protective to all other aquatic organisms. Here we explore the validity of this assumption by investigating the effects of a fungicide (tebuconazole) applied at its "non-microbial" HC5 concentration (the concentration that is hazardous to 5% of the tested taxa) and derived from acute single species toxicity tests on fish, invertebrates and primary producers (including algae) on the community structure and functioning of heterotrophic microbes (bacteria and aquatic fungi) in a semi-field study, using novel molecular techniques. In our study, a treatment-related effect of tebuconazole (238 μg/L) on either fungal biomass associated with leaf material or leaf decomposition or the composition of the fungal community associated with sediment could not be demonstrated. Moreover, treatment-related effects on bacterial communities associated with sediment and leaf material were not detected. However, tebuconazole exposure did significantly reduce conidia production and altered fungal community composition associated with leaf material. An effect on a higher trophic level was observed when Gammarus pulex were fed tebuconazole-exposed leaves, which caused a significant decrease in their feeding rate. Therefore, tebuconazole may affect aquatic fungi and fungally mediated processes even when applied at its "non-microbial" HC5 concentration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Coupling geochemical and biological approaches to assess the availability of cadmium in freshwater sediment.

    PubMed

    Dabrin, Aymeric; Durand, Cyrielle L; Garric, Jeanne; Geffard, Olivier; Ferrari, Benoit J D; Coquery, Marina

    2012-05-01

    Sediments are considered as a sink for metals, and the assessment of metal bioavailability for benthic organisms represents a great challenge. Diffusive Gradient in Thin films (DGT), developed to measure labile metals in aquatic media, have more recently been applied to sediment. Nevertheless, few studies have determined the relation between measurements from DGT and bioaccumulation in different benthic organisms. The aim of our work was to determine if labile metal measured by DGT in sediment is representative of bioavailable metal for benthic organisms. We focused our work on Cd and chose to use the diversity of ecological traits from different organisms to better understand the measurement given by DGT. We exposed simultaneously DGT and 3 macroinvertebrates species (the chironomid, Chironomus riparius; the amphipod, Gammarus fossarum; the mudsnail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum) to a natural sediment Cd-spiked at environmental relevant concentrations. The nature of sediment-bound Cd was also determined by means of sequential extractions in order to better interpret DGT measurements. Cadmium concentrations were determined in DGT and in the 3 organisms after one week of exposure. Results provided by DGT indicated that Cd was poorly released from particulate phase to pore water, suggesting that Cd measured by DGT was representative of the pore water labile fraction. Sequential extractions showed that the percentage of Cd bound to carbonate fraction increased simultaneously with Cd-spiking level; hence, this Cd fraction was poorly reactive to supply DGT demand. Cadmium accumulation rates were similar between DGT measurements and P. antipodarum, suggesting that labile Cd in pore waters was representative of bioavailable Cd for this species. Cadmium accumulation rates in C. riparius were higher than in DGT, demonstrating that C. riparius can mobilize Cd bound to carbonate phase. G. fossarum showed the lowest Cd accumulation rates, suggesting that they were mainly exposed

  12. (Cryptic) sex in the microsporidian Nosema granulosis--evidence from parasite rDNA and host mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Krebes, Lukas; Zeidler, Lisza; Frankowski, Jens; Bastrop, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Microsporidia are single-celled, intracellular eukaryotes that parasitise a wide range of animals. The Nosema/Vairimorpha group includes some putative asexual species, and asexuality is proposed to have originated multiple times from sexual ancestors. Here, we studied the variation in the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of 14 isolates of the presumed apomictic and vertically transmitted Nosema granulosis to evaluate its sexual status. The analysed DNA fragment contained a part of the small-subunit ribosomal gene (SSU) and the entire intergenic spacer (IGS). The mitochondrial cox1 gene of the host Gammarus duebeni (Crustacea) was analysed to temporally calibrate the system and to test the expectation of cophylogeny of host and parasite genealogies. Genetic variability of the SSU gene was very low within and between the isolates. In contrast, intraisolate (within a single host) variability of the IGS felt in two categories, because 12 isolates possess a very high IGS genetic diversity and two isolates were almost invariable in the IGS. This difference suggests variable models of rDNA evolution involving birth-and-death and unexpectedly concerted evolution. An alternative explanation could be a likewise unattended mixed infection of host individuals by more than one parasite strain. Despite considerable genetic divergence between associated host mitochondrial haplotypes, some N. granulosis 'IGS populations' seem not to belong to different gene pools; the relevant tests failed to show significant differences between populations. A set of recombinant IGS sequences made our data incompatible with the model of a solely maternally inherited, asexual species. In line with recent reports, our study supports the hypothesis that some assumed apomictic Microsporidia did not entirely abstain from the evolutionary advantages of sex. In addition, the presented data indicate that horizontal transmission may occur occasionally. This transmission mode could be a survival strategy of N

  13. Responses of trophic structure and zooplankton community to salinity and temperature in Tibetan lakes: Implication for the effect of climate warming.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiuqi; Xu, Lei; Hou, Juzhi; Liu, Zhengwen; Jeppesen, Erik; Han, Bo-Ping

    2017-11-01

    Warming has pronounced effects on lake ecosystems, either directly by increased temperatures or indirectly by a change in salinity. We investigated the current status of zooplankton communities and trophic structure in 45 Tibetan lakes along a 2300 m altitude and a 76 g/l salinity gradient. Freshwater to hyposaline lakes mainly had three trophic levels: phytoplankton, small zooplankton and fish/Gammarus, while mesosaline to hypersaline lakes only had two: phytoplankton and large zooplankton. Zooplankton species richness declined significantly with salinity, but did not relate with temperature. Furthermore, the decline in species richness with salinity in lakes with two trophic levels was much less abrupt than in lakes with three trophic levels. The structural variation of the zooplankton community depended on the length of the food chain, and was significantly explained by salinity as the critical environmental variable. The zooplankton community shifted from dominance of copepods and small cladoceran species in the lakes with low salinity and three trophic levels to large saline filter-feeding phyllopod species in those lakes with high salinity and two trophic levels. The zooplankton to phytoplankton biomass ratio was positively related with temperature in two-trophic-level systems and vice versa in three-trophic-level systems. As the Tibetan Plateau is warming about three times faster than the global average, our results imply that warming could have a considerable impact on the structure and function of Tibetan lake ecosystems, either via indirect effects of salinization/desalinization on species richness, composition and trophic structure or through direct effects of water temperature on trophic interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Meta-ecosystems and biological energy transport from ocean to coast: the ecological importance of herring migration.

    PubMed

    Varpe, Oystein; Fiksen, Oyvind; Slotte, Aril

    2005-12-01

    Ecosystems are not closed, but receive resource subsidies from other ecosystems. Energy, material and organisms are moved between systems by physical vectors, but migrating animals also transport resources between systems. We report on large scale energy transport from ocean to coast by a migrating fish population, the Norwegian spring-spawning (NSS) herring Clupea harengus. We observe a rapid body mass increase during parts of the annual, oceanic feeding migration and we use a bioenergetics model to quantify energy consumption. The model predicts strong seasonal variation in food consumption with a marked peak in late May to July. The copepod Calanus finmarchicus is the most important prey and 23 x 10(6) tones (wet weight) of C. finmarchicus is consumed annually. The annual consumption-biomass ratio is 5.2. During the feeding migration 17% of consumed energy is converted to body mass. The biomass transported to the coast and left as reproductive output is estimated from gonad weight and is about 1.3 x 10(6) tones for the current population. This transport is to our knowledge the world's largest flux of energy caused by a single population. We demonstrate marked temporal variation in transport during the last century and discuss the effects of NSS herring in the ocean, as a major consumer, and at the coast, where eggs and larvae are important for coastal predators. In particular, we suggest that the rapid decline of lobster Homarus gammarus landings in Western Norway during the 1960s was related to the collapse of NSS herring. We also discuss spatial variation in energy transport caused by changed migration patterns. Both climate and fisheries probably triggered historical changes in the migration patterns of NSS herring. New migration routes emerge at the level of individuals, which in turn determines where resources are gathered and delivered, and therefore, how meta-ecosystems function.

  15. Specificity in Mesograzer-Induced Defences in Seagrasses

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Crego, Begoña; Arteaga, Pedro; Ueber, Alexandra; Engelen, Aschwin H.; Santos, Rui; Molis, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Grazing-induced plant defences that reduce palatability to herbivores are widespread in terrestrial plants and seaweeds, but they have not yet been reported in seagrasses. We investigated the ability of two seagrass species to induce defences in response to direct grazing by three associated mesograzers. Specifically, we conducted feeding-assayed induction experiments to examine how mesograzer-specific grazing impact affects seagrass induction of defences within the context of the optimal defence theory. We found that the amphipod Gammarus insensibilis and the isopod Idotea chelipes exerted a low-intensity grazing on older blades of the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa, which reflects a weak grazing impact that may explain the lack of inducible defences. The isopod Synischia hectica exerted the strongest grazing impact on C. nodosa via high-intensity feeding on young blades with a higher fitness value. This isopod grazing induced defences in C. nodosa as indicated by a consistently lower consumption of blades previously grazed for 5, 12 and 16 days. The lower consumption was maintained when offered tissues with no plant structure (agar-reconstituted food), but showing a reduced size of the previous grazing effect. This indicates that structural traits act in combination with chemical traits to reduce seagrass palatability to the isopod. Increase in total phenolics but not in C:N ratio and total nitrogen of grazed C. nodosa suggests chemical defences rather than a modified nutritional quality as primarily induced chemical traits. We detected no induction of defences in Zostera noltei, which showed the ability to replace moderate losses of young biomass to mesograzers via compensatory growth. Our study provides the first experimental evidence of induction of defences against meso-herbivory that reduce further consumption in seagrasses. It also emphasizes the relevance of grazer identity in determining the level of grazing impact triggering resistance and compensatory

  16. The Application of DNA Barcodes for the Identification of Marine Crustaceans from the North Sea and Adjacent Regions.

    PubMed

    Raupach, Michael J; Barco, Andrea; Steinke, Dirk; Beermann, Jan; Laakmann, Silke; Mohrbeck, Inga; Neumann, Hermann; Kihara, Terue C; Pointner, Karin; Radulovici, Adriana; Segelken-Voigt, Alexandra; Wesse, Christina; Knebelsberger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    During the last years DNA barcoding has become a popular method of choice for molecular specimen identification. Here we present a comprehensive DNA barcode library of various crustacean taxa found in the North Sea, one of the most extensively studied marine regions of the world. Our data set includes 1,332 barcodes covering 205 species, including taxa of the Amphipoda, Copepoda, Decapoda, Isopoda, Thecostraca, and others. This dataset represents the most extensive DNA barcode library of the Crustacea in terms of species number to date. By using the Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD), unique BINs were identified for 198 (96.6%) of the analyzed species. Six species were characterized by two BINs (2.9%), and three BINs were found for the amphipod species Gammarus salinus Spooner, 1947 (0.4%). Intraspecific distances with values higher than 2.2% were revealed for 13 species (6.3%). Exceptionally high distances of up to 14.87% between two distinct but monophyletic clusters were found for the parasitic copepod Caligus elongatus Nordmann, 1832, supporting the results of previous studies that indicated the existence of an overlooked sea louse species. In contrast to these high distances, haplotype-sharing was observed for two decapod spider crab species, Macropodia parva Van Noort & Adema, 1985 and Macropodia rostrata (Linnaeus, 1761), underlining the need for a taxonomic revision of both species. Summarizing the results, our study confirms the application of DNA barcodes as highly effective identification system for the analyzed marine crustaceans of the North Sea and represents an important milestone for modern biodiversity assessment studies using barcode sequences.

  17. Miniature circulatory systems: A new exposure system for ecotoxicological effect assessments in riverine organisms.

    PubMed

    Feiner, Mona; Beggel, Sebastian; Geist, Juergen

    2016-11-01

    Long-term effect assessments in ecotoxicological investigations are important, yet there is a lack of suitable exposure systems for these experiments that can be used for riverine species. A cost-efficient miniature circulatory system was developed that was evaluated for its applicability in long-term exposures in 2 stream-dwelling species: brown trout (Salmo trutta) and an amphipod (Gammarus roeseli). In an egg-to-fry exposure of S. trutta, the toxicity of 2 reverse osmosis concentrates was investigated as examples. Control hatching rate of yolk sac fry was 75 ± 7% and thus complies with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development validity criterion (≥66%). The reverse osmosis concentrates did not impair the hatching rate in any tested concentration. In G. roeseli, mortality rates remained below 20% during a 21-d cultivation, fulfilling the common validity criterion in ecotoxicological testing. Mortality was significantly lower when the species was fed with conditioned alder leaves instead of an artificial shrimp food. Finally, a toxicity test on G. roeseli using copper as the test substance revealed median lethal concentration (LC50) values of 156 μg/L after 96 h and 99 μg/L after 264 h, which is in line with literature findings using other accepted exposure units. In conclusion, the miniature circulatory system provides a novel and cost-efficient exposure system for long-term investigations on riverine species that may also be applicable for other species of fishes and macroinvertebrates. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2827-2833. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  18. Variability in ecosystem structure and functioning in a low order stream: Implications of land use and season.

    PubMed

    Englert, Dominic; Zubrod, Jochen P; Schulz, Ralf; Bundschuh, Mirco

    2015-12-15

    Human activity can degrade the habitat quality for aquatic communities, which ultimately impacts the functions these communities provide. Disentangling the complex interaction between environmental and anthropogenic parameters as well as their alteration both along the stream channel, over the seasons, and finally their impact in the aquatic ecosystem represents a fundamental challenge for environmental scientists. Therefore, the present study investigates the implications of successive land uses (i.e., vineyard, urban area, highway and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP)) on structural and functional endpoints related to the ecosystem process of leaf litter breakdown during a winter and summer season in a five km stretch of a second-order stream in southern Germany. This sequence of the different land uses caused, among others, a downstream decline of the ecological status from "high" to "bad" judged based on the SPEARpesticides index together with significant shifts in the macroinvertebrate community composition, which coincided with substantial impairments (up to 100%) in the macroinvertebrate-mediated leaf decomposition. These effects, seem to be mainly driven by alterations in water quality rather than morphological modifications of the stream's habitat since the key shredder Gammarus was not in direct contact with the local habitat during in situ bioassays but showed similar response patterns than the other endpoints. While the relative effect size for most endpoints deviated considerably (sometimes above 2-fold) among seasons, the general response pattern pointed to reductions in energy supply for local and downstream communities. Although the present study focused on a single low-order stream with the main purpose of describing the impact of different land uses on various levels of biological organization, which limits the direct transferability and thus applicability of results to other stream ecosystems, the findings point to the need to develop adequate

  19. Effects of elevated CO2 on litter chemistry and subsequent invertebrate detritivore feeding responses.

    PubMed

    Dray, Matthew W; Crowther, Thomas W; Thomas, Stephen M; A'Bear, A Donald; Godbold, Douglas L; Ormerod, Steve J; Hartley, Susan E; Jones, T Hefin

    2014-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 can change foliar tissue chemistry. This alters leaf litter palatability to macroinvertebrate detritivores with consequences for decomposition, nutrient turnover, and food-web structure. Currently there is no consensus on the link between CO2 enrichment, litter chemistry, and macroinvertebrate-mediated leaf decomposition. To identify any unifying mechanisms, we presented eight invertebrate species from aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems with litter from Alnus glutinosa (common alder) or Betula pendula (silver birch) trees propagated under ambient (380 ppm) or elevated (ambient +200 ppm) CO2 concentrations. Alder litter was largely unaffected by CO2 enrichment, but birch litter from leaves grown under elevated CO2 had reduced nitrogen concentrations and greater C/N ratios. Invertebrates were provided individually with either (i) two litter discs, one of each CO2 treatment ('choice'), or (ii) one litter disc of each CO2 treatment alone ('no-choice'). Consumption was recorded. Only Odontocerum albicorne showed a feeding preference in the choice test, consuming more ambient- than elevated-CO2 birch litter. Species' responses to alder were highly idiosyncratic in the no-choice test: Gammarus pulex and O. albicorne consumed more elevated-CO2 than ambient-CO2 litter, indicating compensatory feeding, while Oniscus asellus consumed more of the ambient-CO2 litter. No species responded to CO2 treatment when fed birch litter. Overall, these results show how elevated atmospheric CO2 can alter litter chemistry, affecting invertebrate feeding behaviour in species-specific ways. The data highlight the need for greater species-level information when predicting changes to detrital processing-a key ecosystem function-under atmospheric change.

  20. Fungal composition on leaves explains pollutant-mediated indirect effects on amphipod feeding.

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, Mirco; Zubrod, Jochen P; Kosol, Sujitra; Maltby, Lorraine; Stang, Christoph; Duester, Lars; Schulz, Ralf

    2011-07-01

    The energy stored in coarse particulate organic matter, e.g. leaf litter, is released to aquatic ecosystems by breakdown processes involving microorganisms and leaf shredding invertebrates. The palatability of leaves and thus the feeding of shredders on leaf material are highly influenced by microorganisms. However, implications in the colonization of leaves by microorganisms (=conditioning) caused by chemical stressors are rarely studied. Our laboratory experiments, therefore, investigated for the first time effects of a fungicide on the conditioning process of leaf material by means of food-choice experiments using Gammarus fossarum (Crustacea: Amphipoda). Additionally, microbial analyses were conducted to facilitate the mechanistic understanding of the observed behavior. Gammarids significantly preferred control leaf discs over those conditioned in presence of the fungicide tebuconazole at concentrations of 50 and 500 μg/L. Besides the decrease of fungal biomass with increasing fungicide concentration, also the leaf associated fungal community composition showed that species preferred by gammarids, such as Alatospora acumunata, Clavariopsis aquatica, or Flagellospora curvula, were more frequent in the control. Tetracladium marchalianum, however, which is rejected by gammarids, was abundant in all treatments suggesting an increasing importance of this species for the lower leaf palatability--as other more palatable fungal species were almost absent--in the fungicide treatments. Hence, the food-choice behavior of G. fossarum seems to be a suitable indicator for alterations in leaf associated microbial communities, especially fungal species composition, caused by chemical stressors. Finally, this or similar test systems may be a reasonable supplement to the environmental risk assessment of chemicals in order to achieve its protection goals, as on the one hand, indirect